WorldWideScience

Sample records for experimental nuclear structure

  1. Nuclear Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargano, Angela

    2003-04-01

    An account of recent studies in the field of theoretical nuclear structure is reported. These studies concern essentially research activities performed under the Italian project "Fisica Teorica del Nucleo e dei Sistemi a Molti Corpi". Special attention is addressed to results obtained during the last two years as regards the development of new many-body techniques as well as the interpretation of new experimental aspects of nuclear structure.

  2. Nuclear structure theory

    CERN Document Server

    Irvine, J M

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear Structure Theory provides a guide to nuclear structure theory. The book is comprised of 23 chapters that are organized into four parts; each part covers an aspect of nuclear structure theory. In the first part, the text discusses the experimentally observed phenomena, which nuclear structure theories need to look into and detail the information that supports those theories. The second part of the book deals with the phenomenological nucleon-nucleon potentials derived from phase shift analysis of nucleon-nucleon scattering. Part III talks about the phenomenological parameters used to de

  3. Nuclear symmetry energy: An experimental overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The nuclear symmetry energy is a fundamental quantity important for study- ing the structure of systems as diverse as the atomic nucleus and the neutron star. Con- siderable efforts are being made to experimentally extract the symmetry energy and its dependence on nuclear density and temperature. In this article ...

  4. Nuclear symmetry energy: An experimental overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The nuclear symmetry energy is a fundamental quantity important for studying the structure of systems as diverse as the atomic nucleus and the neutron star. Considerable efforts are being made to experimentally extract the symmetry energy and its dependence on nuclear density and temperature. In this article, the ...

  5. Nuclear test experimental science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struble, G.L.; Middleton, C.; Bucciarelli, G.; Carter, J.; Cherniak, J.; Donohue, M.L.; Kirvel, R.D.; MacGregor, P.; Reid, S. (eds.)

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory under the following topics: prompt diagnostics; experimental modeling, design, and analysis; detector development; streak-camera data systems; weapons supporting research.

  6. Experimental techniques in nuclear and particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Tavernier, Stefaan

    2009-01-01

    The book is based on a course in nuclear and particle physics that the author has taught over many years to physics students, students in nuclear engineering and students in biomedical engineering. It provides the basic understanding that any student or researcher using such instruments and techniques should have about the subject. After an introduction to the structure of matter at the subatomic scale, it covers the experimental aspects of nuclear and particle physics. Ideally complementing a theoretically-oriented textbook on nuclear physics and/or particle physics, it introduces the reader to the different techniques used in nuclear and particle physics to accelerate particles and to measurement techniques (detectors) in nuclear and particle physics. The main subjects treated are: interactions of subatomic particles in matter; particle accelerators; basics of different types of detectors; and nuclear electronics. The book will be of interest to undergraduates, graduates and researchers in both particle and...

  7. Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuli, Jagdish K.

    2004-10-01

    The Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) is a leading resource for the experimental nuclear data. It is maintained and distributed by the National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The file is mainly contributed to by an international network of evaluators under the auspice of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The ENSDF is updated, generally by mass number, i.e., evaluating together all isobars for a given mass number. If, however, experimental activity in an isobaric chain is limited to a particular nuclide then only that nuclide is updated. The evaluations are published in the journal Nuclear Data Sheets, a publication of Elsevier. This presentation will briefly review this and other databases and dissemination services of the US and international network, and reflect on how the network resources can help scientists in both the basic as well as the applied fields.

  8. Nuclear Structure Data for the Present Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglin, Coral M.

    2005-05-01

    The US Nuclear Data Program maintains and provides easy and free access to several comprehensive databases that assist scientists to sift through and assess the vast quantity of published nuclear structure and decay data. These databases are an invaluable asset for nuclear-science experimentalists and theorists alike, and the recommended values provided for nuclear properties such as decay modes, level energies and lifetimes, and radiation properties can also be of great importance to specialists in other fields such as medicine, geophysics, and reactor design. The Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) contains experimental nuclear structure data for all known nuclides, evaluated by the US nuclear data program evaluators in collaboration with a number of international data groups; the Nuclear Science Reference (NSR) database provides complementary bibliographic information; the Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data Listing (XUNDL) exists to enable rapid access to experimental nuclear-structure data compiled from the most recent publications (primarily in high-spin physics). This paper presents an overview of the nuclear structure and decay data available through these databases, with emphasis on recent and forthcoming additions to and presentations of the available material.

  9. Nuclear structure database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, R.B.; Browne, E.

    1980-06-01

    A nuclear structure database has been created from the Table of Isotopes level-scheme file. This database contains evaluated data (through 1977) on level and deexcitation properties for all known isotopes from radioactive decay and nuclear reaction studies. The data are organized in simple array formats to enable rapid searches for specific level or decay information. Examples of the use of this database to study the properties of first excited J/sup ..pi../ = 2/sup +/ states in even-even nuclei and Weisskopf enhancements of delayed ..gamma..-ray transitions are shown. 6 figures, 3 tables.

  10. Nuclear Structure Data Evaluation and the US Nuclear Data Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmer, Richard G.

    2001-10-01

    The United States Nuclear Data Program and the Nuclear Structure and Decay Data network of the International Atomic Energy Agency work in collaboration to provide recommended nuclear structure and decay data for use in basic and applied research. Data are evaluted for nuclear levels and for various types of radiation. In addition, an extensive bibliographic database of nuclear structure, reaction, and decay data references is maintained. The databases maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory include the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), the Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data Library (XUNDL), and the Nuclear Sciences References (NSR). These data are all available via the Internet and some are available in hard-copy. Although the data in the ENSDF database for a particular nucleus has often not been updated in the last few fears, XUNDL provides compiled experimental data from papers with a delay of only about one month. Also, the NSR bibliographic database is current for the many journals that are monitored regularly.

  11. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-04-01

    This is the final report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington on work supported in part by US Department of Energy contract DE-AC06-81ER40048. It contains chapters on giant dipole resonances in excited nuclei, nucleus-nucleus reactions, astrophysics, polarization in nuclear reactions, fundamental symmetries and interactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), ultra-relativistic heavy ions, medium energy reactions, work by external users, instrumentation, accelerators and ion sources, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, a Ph. D. degree granted in the 1990-1991 academic year, and publications. Refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Investigations of Nuclear Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarantites, Demetrios [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Reviol, W. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The proposal addresses studies of nuclear structure at low-energies and development of instrumentation for that purpose. The structure studies deal with features of neutron-rich nuclei with unexplored shapes (football- or pear-shaped nuclei). The regions of interest are: neutron rich nuclei like 132-138Sn, or 48-54Ca, and the Zr, Mo, and Ru isotopes. The tools used can be grouped as follows: either Gammasphere or Gretina multi-gamma detector arrays and auxiliary detectors (Microball, Neutron Shell, and the newly completed Phoswich Wall).The neutron-rich nuclei are accessed by radioactive-beam binary reactions or by 252Cf spontaneous fission. The experiments with heavy radioactive beams aim at exciting the beam nuclei by pick-up or transfer a neutron or a proton from a light target like 13C, 9Be, 11B or 14N .For these binary-reaction studies the Phoswich Wall detector system is essential. It is based on four multi-anode photomultiplier tubes on which CsI and thin fast-timing plastic scintillators are attached. Their signals are digitized with a high density microchip system.

  13. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adkins, Harold E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Under current U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulation, it is not sufficient for used nuclear fuel (UNF) to simply maintain its integrity during the storage period, it must maintain its integrity in such a way that it can withstand the physical forces of handling and transportation associated with restaging the fuel and moving it to treatment or recycling facilities, or a geologic repository. Hence it is necessary to understand the performance characteristics of aged UNF cladding and ancillary components under loadings stemming from transport initiatives. Researchers would like to demonstrate that enough information, including experimental support and modeling and simulation capabilities, exists to establish a preliminary determination of UNF structural performance under normal conditions of transport (NCT). This research, development and demonstration (RD&D) plan describes a methodology, including development and use of analytical models, to evaluate loading and associated mechanical responses of UNF rods and key structural components. This methodology will be used to provide a preliminary assessment of the performance characteristics of UNF cladding and ancillary components under rail-related NCT loading. The methodology couples modeling and simulation and experimental efforts currently under way within the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC). The methodology will involve limited uncertainty quantification in the form of sensitivity evaluations focused around available fuel and ancillary fuel structure properties exclusively. The work includes collecting information via literature review, soliciting input/guidance from subject matter experts, performing computational analyses, planning experimental measurement and possible execution (depending on timing), and preparing a variety of supporting documents that will feed into and provide the basis for future initiatives. The methodology demonstration will focus on structural performance evaluation of

  14. Experimental physics 4. Nuclear, particle and astrophysics. 5. ed.; Experimentalphysik 4. Kern-, Teilchen- und Astrophysik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demtroeder, Wolfgang

    2017-09-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Structure of atomic nuclei, unstable nuclei and radioactivity, experimental techniques in nuclear and high-energy physics, nuclear forces and nuclear models, nuclear reactions, physics of elementary particles, applications of nuclear and high-energy physics, foundations of experimental astronomy and astrophysics, our solar system, birth, life, and death of stars, the development and present structure of the universe. (HSI)

  15. Symmetries in nuclear structure

    CERN Document Server

    Allaart, K; Dieperink, A

    1983-01-01

    The 1982 summer school on nuclear physics, organized by the Nuclear Physics Division of the Netherlands' Physical Society, was the fifth in a series that started in 1963. The number of students attending has always been about one hundred, coming from about thirty countries. The theme of this year's school was symmetry in nuclear physics. This book covers the material presented by the enthusi­ astic speakers, who were invited to lecture on this subject. We think they have succeeded in presenting us with clear and thorough introductory talks at graduate or higher level. The time schedule of the school and the location allowed the participants to make many informal contacts during many social activities, ranging from billiards to surf board sailing. We hope and expect that the combination of a relaxed atmosphere during part of the time and hard work during most of the time, has furthered the interest in, and understanding of, nuclear physics. The organization of the summer school was made possible by substantia...

  16. EMC effect and nuclear structure functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atashbar Tehrani, S. [Physics Department, Persian Gulf University, Boushehr, Iran and Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, P.O.Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: Atashbar@ipm.ir; Mirjalili, A. [Physics Department, Yazd University, Yazd, Iran and Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, P.O.Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: Mirjalili@ipm.ir; Khorramian, Ali N. [Physics Department, Semnan University, Semnan, Iran and Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics, P.O.Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: Alinaghi.Khorramian@cern.ch

    2007-02-15

    We analyze experimental data of nuclear structure function ratios F{sub 2}{sup A}/F{sub 2}{sup D} for obtaining optimum parton distribution functions (PDFs) in nuclei. Then, uncertainties of the nuclear PDFs are estimated by the Hessian method. Parametrization of nuclear parton distribution is investigated in the leading order of {alpha}{sub s}. The parton distribution are provided at Q{sup 2}=1GeV{sup 2} with a number of parameters, which are determined by a {chi}{sup 2} analysis of the data on nuclear structure function. From the analysis, we propose parton distributions at Q{sup 2}=1GeV{sup 2} for nuclei from deuteron to heavy ones with a mass number A{approx}208.

  17. Experimental Seminar on Nuclear Energy for Teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    `Experimental Seminar on Nuclear Energy for Teachers` was conducted and sponsored by the Science and Technology Agency. And in order to understand nuclear energy properly through lectures and experiments with good results inclass, the seminar carried out for teachers of high schools and junior high schools by the Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC), Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in 1990 FY to 1997 FY. In this report, details of the seminars in the above period are described and No.1 to 17 of Communication Letters of Experimental Seminar on Nuclear Energy` started at 1992 FY are described also. These letters were prepared for attendant follow-up program. And programs of recent seminars, future`s seminars, impressions and comments from attendants, reports from actual classes and others are described in these letters and they are very useful for educational classes on nuclear energy by other teachers. Therefore contents of the letters are listed and easy to refer. A part of this educational task was transferred to the Radiation Application Development Association in 1997 FY and other parts were transferred in 1998 FY. (author)

  18. Nuclear Quadrupole Moments and Nuclear Shell Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townes, C. H.; Foley, H. M.; Low, W.

    1950-06-23

    Describes a simple model, based on nuclear shell considerations, which leads to the proper behavior of known nuclear quadrupole moments, although predictions of the magnitudes of some quadrupole moments are seriously in error.

  19. Nuclear Chemistry, Science (Experimental): 5316.62.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Russell R.

    This nuclear chemistry module includes topics on atomic structure, instability of the nucleus, detection strengths and the uses of radioactive particles. Laboratory work stresses proper use of equipment and safe handling of radioactive materials. Students with a strong mathematics background may consider this course as advanced work in chemistry.…

  20. Nuclear Structure at the Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarewicz, W.

    1998-01-12

    One of the frontiers of today�s nuclear science is the �journey to the limits� of atomic charge and nuclear mass, of neutron-to-proton ratio, and of angular momentum. The tour to the limits is not only a quest for new, exciting phenomena, but the new data are expected, as well, to bring qualitatively new information about the fundamental properties of the nucleonic many-body system, the nature of the nuclear interaction, and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this series of lectures, current developments in nuclear structure at the limits are discussed from a theoretical perspective, mainly concentrating on medium-mass and heavy nuclei.

  1. Nuclear structure of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkman, Sergio; Pascoalino, Bruno dos Santos; Nardelli, Sheila C

    2011-01-01

    The presence of nucleus in living organisms characterizes the Eukaryote domain. The nucleus compartmentalizes the genetic material surrounded by a double membrane called nuclear envelope. The nucleus has been observed since the advent of the light microscope, and sub-compartments such as nucleoli, diverse nuclear bodies and condensed chromosomes have been later recognized, being part of highly organized and dynamic structure. The significance and function of such organization has increased with the understanding of transcription, replication, DNA repair, recombination processes. It is now recognized as consequence of adding complexity and regulation in more complex eukaryotic cells. Here we provide a description of the actual stage of knowledge of the nuclear structure of Trypanosoma cruzi. As an early divergent eukaryote, it presents unique and/or reduced events of DNA replication, transcription and repair as well as RNA processing and transport to the cytosol. Nevertheless, it shows peculiar structure changes accordingly to the cell cycle and stage of differentiation. T. cruzi proliferates only as epimastigote and amastigote stages, and when these forms differentiate in trypomastigote forms, their cell cycle is arrested. This arrested stage is capable of invading mammalian cells and of surviving harsh conditions, such as the gut of the insect vector and mammalian macrophages. Transcription and replication decrease during transformation in trypomastigotes implicating large alterations in the nuclear structure. Recent evidences also suggest that T. cruzi nucleus respond to oxidative and nutritional stresses. Due to the phylogenetic proximity with other well-known trypanosomes, such as Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major, they are expected to have similar nuclear organization, although differences are noticed due to distinct life cycles, cellular organizations and the specific adaptations for surviving in different host environments. Therefore, the general

  2. Nuclear Structure and Decay Data: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondev, Filip G.; International Nuclear Structure; Decay Data Network

    2006-03-01

    The nuclear structure databases provide physicists around the world with a useful collection of reliable and well documented datasets. The Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) database, produced by the International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network (NSDD) under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), contains evaluated experimental information for all known nuclei. The bibliographical database Nuclear Science References (NSR) provides references to published data in the field of Nuclear Physics. The Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data List (XUNDL) provides a method for rapid access to formatted (compiled) data from recently published articles. Detailed information regarding these databases, as well as other products and services, can be found at the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) and IAEA web portals.

  3. Progress on nuclear modifications of structure functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumano S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report progress on nuclear structure functions, especially on their nuclear modifications and a new tensor structure function for the deuteron. To understand nuclear structure functions is an important step toward describing nuclei and QCD matters from low to high densities and from low to high energies in terms of fundamental quark and gluon degrees of freedom beyond conventional hadron and nuclear physics. It is also practically important for understanding new phenomena in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. Furthermore, since systematic errors of current neutrinooscillation experiments are dominated by uncertainties of neutrino-nucleus interactions, such studies are valuable for finding new physics beyond current framework. Next, a new tensor-polarized structure function b1 is discussed for the deuteron. There was a measurement by HERMES; however, its data are inconsistent with the conventional convolution estimate based on the standard deuteron model with D-state admixture. This fact suggests that a new hadronic phenomenon should exist in the tensor-polarized deuteron at high energies, and it will be experimentally investigated at JLab from the end of 2010’s.

  4. Nuclear structure with coherent states

    CERN Document Server

    Raduta, Apolodor Aristotel

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the essential features of a large variety of nuclear structure properties, both collective and microscopic in nature. Most of results are given in an analytical form thus giving deep insight into the relevant phenomena. Using coherent states as variational states, which allows a description in the classical phase space, or provides the generating function for a boson basis, is an efficient tool to account, in a realistic fashion, for many complex properties. A detailed comparison with all existing nuclear structure models provides readers with a proper framework and, at the same time, demonstrates the prospects for new developments. The topics addressed are very much of current concern in the field. The book will appeal to practicing researchers and, due to its self-contained account, can also be successfully read and used by new graduate students.

  5. Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmer, Richard G.

    1998-10-01

    Earlier this year, the U. S. Nuclear Data Program was reorganized; it now consists of a Coordinating Committee and three working groups. The Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Working Group consists of the persons at several U. S. laboratories and McMaster University who prepare the evaluated experimental structure and decay data that make up the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), which is maintain at the National Nuclear Data Center. This Working Group is responsible for coordinating the work of the evaluators and approving improvements in the ENSDF format and data evaluation methodology. In this period of decreasing manpower, the Working Group helps set priorities for future work. While working to maintain the quality and currency of ENSDF, there is a need to be responsive to research ares of high current interest, such as data for astrophysics and high-spin levels. In support of astrophysics, the status of the decay data for atoms of interest is being determined and modifications of the ENSDF format will allow inclusion of data for the decay of ionized atoms. A compilation of published and unpublished data for high-spin levels is being created at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by D. Radford. The ENSDF evaluators may be able to make use of this compilation to improve the currency of ENSDF in this research area. For the case of super-deformed bands, a special publication of these data already exists and it is up-dated annually.

  6. Electromagnetic studies of nucleon and nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heisenberg, J.H.; Calarco, J.R.; Hersman, F.W.; Dawson, J.F.

    1993-06-01

    Important objectives of the group are the study of subatomic structure through experimental measurements and the interpretation of the data through modeling. The common theme that unifies the studies of strong interactions and hadronic systems is the effort to determine the electromagnetic response as completely as possible. The general approach is coincidence detection of exclusive final states and determination of the dependence on the spin variables using polarized beams and targets and outgoing nucleon polarimetry. Direct reaction and giant resonance studies of electron quasi-elastic scattering on {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O are reported, as well as work on nuclear structure models and instrumentation development.

  7. Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File and Related Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuli, Jagdish K.

    2005-05-01

    The Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) is a leading resource for experimental nuclear data. It is maintained and distributed by the National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The file is mainly contributed to by an international network of evaluators under the auspice of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The ENSDF is updated, generally by mass number, i.e., evaluating together all isobars for a given mass number. If, however, experimental activity in an isobaric chain is limited to a particular nuclide, then only that nuclide is updated. The evaluations are published in the Journal of Nuclear Data Sheets, Academic Press, a division of Elsevier.

  8. Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeflinski, Z.; Kirejczyk, M.; Popkiewicz, M. [eds.

    1998-08-01

    In the presented report the research activities of Nuclear Physics Division (NPD) of the Institute of Experimental Physics (Warsaw University) in year 1997 are described. The report is divided into three parts: Reaction Mechanisms and Nuclear Structure, Experimental Methods and Instrumentation and the third one contain the lists of personnel, seminars held at the Nuclear Physics Division and published papers. A summary of the (NPD) activities are briefly presented in ``Preface`` written by NDP director prof. K. Siwek-Wilczynska

  9. Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University Annual Report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeflinski, Z.; Popkiewicz, M. [eds.

    1997-12-31

    In the presented report the research activities of Nuclear Physics Division (NPD) of the Institute of Experimental Physics (Warsaw University) in year 1996 are described. The report is divided into three parts: Reaction mechanisms and nuclear structure; Experimental methods and instrumentation and the third part contains the list of personnel, seminars held at the Nuclear Physics Division and published papers. A summary of the (NPD) activities are briefly presented in ``Preface`` by NPD director prof. Ch. Droste.

  10. Nuclear Physics Division - Inst. of Experimental Physics - Warsaw University - Annual Report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirejczyk, M.; Szeflinski, Z. [eds.

    1999-08-01

    In the presented report the research activities of Nuclear Physics Division (NPD) of the Warsaw University Institute of Experimental Physics in year of 1998 are described. The report is divided into three parts: Reaction Mechanisms and Nuclear Structure, Experimental Methods and Instrumentation and the third one contains the lists of personnel, seminars held at the Nuclear Physics Division and list of published papers. A summary of the (NPD) activities are briefly presented in ``Preface`` written by NDP director prof. K. Siwek-Wilczynska

  11. Analysis of statistical model properties from discrete nuclear structure data

    OpenAIRE

    Firestone Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental M1, E1, and E2 photon strengths have been compiled from experimental data in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) and the Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF). Over 20,000 Weisskopf reduced transition probabilities were recovered from the ENSDF and EGAF databases. These transition strengths have been analyzed for their dependence on transition energies, initial and final level energies, spin/parity dependence, and nuclear deformation. ENSDF BE1W values were fou...

  12. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. Hadrons in nuclear matter; the structure of hadrons; relativistic nuclear physics and heavy ion dynamics and related processes. The section on hadrons in nuclear matter groups together research items which are aimed at exploring ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. A very interesting result has been the finding that QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate, which characterizes spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of the late QCD vacuum, decreases in nuclear matter and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon`s mass. The section on the structure of hadrons contains progress reports on our research aimed at understanding the structure of the nucleon. Widely different approaches are being studied, e.g., lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. A major goal of this type of research is to develop appropriate links between nuclear physics and QCD. The section on relativistic nuclear physics represents our continuing interest in developing an appropriate relativistic framework for nuclear dynamics. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a similar decrease of the nucleon`s mass in the nuclear medium as has been found from QCD sum rules. Work in progress extends previous successes in elastic scattering to inelastic scattering of protons by nuclei. The section on heavy ion dynamics and related processes reports on research into the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} problem and heavy ion dynamics.

  13. Theoretical studies in nuclear reactions and nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    Research in the Maryland Nuclear Theory Group focusses on problems in four basic areas of current relevance. Hadrons in nuclear matter; the structure of hadrons; relativistic nuclear physics and heavy ion dynamics and related processes. The section on hadrons in nuclear matter groups together research items which are aimed at exploring ways in which the properties of nucleons and the mesons which play a role in the nuclear force are modified in the nuclear medium. A very interesting result has been the finding that QCD sum rules supply a new insight into the decrease of the nucleon's mass in the nuclear medium. The quark condensate, which characterizes spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking of the late QCD vacuum, decreases in nuclear matter and this is responsible for the decrease of the nucleon's mass. The section on the structure of hadrons contains progress reports on our research aimed at understanding the structure of the nucleon. Widely different approaches are being studied, e.g., lattice gauge calculations, QCD sum rules, quark-meson models with confinement and other hedgehog models. A major goal of this type of research is to develop appropriate links between nuclear physics and QCD. The section on relativistic nuclear physics represents our continuing interest in developing an appropriate relativistic framework for nuclear dynamics. A Lorentz-invariant description of the nuclear force suggests a similar decrease of the nucleon's mass in the nuclear medium as has been found from QCD sum rules. Work in progress extends previous successes in elastic scattering to inelastic scattering of protons by nuclei. The section on heavy ion dynamics and related processes reports on research into the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} problem and heavy ion dynamics.

  14. Nuclear Criticality Experimental Research Center (NCERC) Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goda, Joetta Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Grove, Travis Justin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hayes, David Kirk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, William L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sanchez, Rene Gerardo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-03

    The mission of the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) is to conduct experiments and training with critical assemblies and fissionable material at or near criticality in order to explore reactivity phenomena, and to operate the assemblies in the regions from subcritical through delayed critical. One critical assembly, Godiva-IV, is designed to operate above prompt critical. The Nuclear Criticality Experimental Research Center (NCERC) is our nation’s only general-purpose critical experiments facility and is only one of a few that remain operational throughout the world. This presentation discusses the history of NCERC, the general activities that makeup work at NCERC, and the various government programs and missions that NCERC supports. Recent activities at NCERC will be reviewed, with a focus on demonstrating how NCERC meets national security mission goals using engineering fundamentals. In particular, there will be a focus on engineering theory and design and applications of engineering fundamentals at NCERC. NCERC activities that relate to engineering education will also be examined.

  15. Antiprotons for Nuclear Structure Research

    CERN Document Server

    Lenske, H

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of antiprotons with nuclei is investigated in a model using the free space pN T-matrix and nuclear densities from HFB calculations. Elastic scattering and annihilation reactions are used as probes for nuclear sizes of exotic nuclei. The annihilation cross sections are related to the nuclear root-mean-square radii by a scaling law. By detecting a pion ejected from the annihilation zone in coincidence with the final A-1 system the the annihilation process can be localized spatially and used to to extract specific information on the nuclear wave function.

  16. Steel plates and concrete filled composite shear walls related nuclear structural engineering: Experimental study for out-of-plane cyclic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaohu [The College of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Li, Xiaojun, E-mail: beerli@vip.sina.com [The College of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Institute of Geophysics, China Earthquake Administration, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Based on the program of CAP1400 nuclear structural engineering, the out-of-plane seismic behavior of steel plate and concrete infill composite shear walls (SCW) was investigated. 6 1/5 scaled specimens were conducted which consist of 5 SCW specimens and 1 reinforced concrete (RC) specimen. The specimens were tested under out-of-plane cyclic loading. The effect of the thickness of steel plate, vertical load and the strength grade of concrete on the out-of-plane seismic behavior of SCW were analyzed. The results show that the thickness of steel plate and vertical load have great influence on the ultimate bearing capacity and lateral stiffness, however, the influence of the strength grade of concrete was little within a certain range. SCW is presented to have a better ultimate capacity and lateral stiffness but have worse ductility in failure stage than that of RC. Based on the experiment, the cracking load of concrete infill SCW was analyzed in theory. The modified calculation formula of the cracking load was made, the calculated results showed good agreement with the test results. The formula can be used as the practical design for the design of cracking loads.

  17. Structure of the subsaturated nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Toshiki; Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Chiba, Satoshi; Iwamoto, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Niita, Koji; Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro

    1998-07-01

    Quantum molecular dynamics is applied to study the ground state and excited state properties of nuclear matter at subsaturation densities. The structure of nuclear matter at subsaturation density shows some exotic shapes with variation of the density. However, the structure in our result is rather irregular compared to those of previous works due to the existence of local minimum configurations. (author)

  18. QCD Structure of Nuclear Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados, Carlos [Florida Intl Univ., Miami, FL (United States)

    2011-05-25

    This dissertation investigated selected processes involving baryons and nuclei in hard scattering reactions. Through these processes, this work explored the constituent structure of baryons and the mechanisms through which the interactions between these constituents ultimately control the selected reactions. First, hard nucleon-nucleon elastic scattering was studied considering the quark exchange (QE) between the nucleons to be the dominant mechanism of interaction in the constituent picture. It was found that an angular asymmetry exhibited by proton-neutron (pn) elastic scattering data is explained within this framework if a quark-diquark picture dominates the nucleon's structure instead of a more traditional SU(6) model. The latter yields an asymmetry around 90 deg center of mass scattering with a sign opposite to what is experimentally observed. The second process is the hard breakup by a photon of a nucleon-nucleon system in light nuclei. Proton-proton (pp) and pn breakup in 3He, and double Δ-isobars production in deuteron breakup were analyzed in the hard rescattering model (HRM), which in conjunction with the QE mechanism provides a QCD description of the reaction. Cross sections for both channels in 3He photodisintegration were computed without the need of a fitting parameter. The results presented here for pp breakup show excellent agreement with recent experimental data. In double Δ-isobars production in deuteron breakup, HRM angular distributions for the two double Δ channels were compared to the pn channel and to each other. An important prediction from this study is that the Δ++ Δ- channel consistently dominates Δ+Δ0, which is in contrast with models that unlike the HRM consider a double Δ system in the initial state of the interaction. For such models both channels should have the same strength.

  19. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Annual report 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-04-01

    This is the April 1989 annual report of the Nuclear Physics Labortaory of the University of Washington. It contains chapters on astrophysics, giant resonances, heavy ion induced reactions, fundamental symmetries, polarization in nuclear reactions, medium energy reactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), research by outside users, Van de Graaff and ion sources, computer systems, instrumentation, and the Laboratory`s booster linac work. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, Ph.D. degrees granted in the 1988-1989 academic year, and publications. Refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Annual report 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-05-01

    This is the May 1988 annual report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington. It contains chapters on astrophysics, giant resonances, heavy ion induced reactions, fundamental symmetries, polarization in nuclear reactions, medium energy reactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), research by outside users, Van de Graaff and ion sources, the Laboratory`s booster linac project work, instrumentation, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, Ph.D. degrees granted in the 1987-88 academic year, and publications. Refs., 27 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Nuclear Structure of 186Re

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-24

    known nuclides plotted with their proton number Z versus neutron number N . The black squares in the central valley of the chart represent the stable...can also occur when the nucleus is stretched or compressed along a direction perpendicular to the axis of nuclear symmetry , resulting in axial...equipotential surfaces in deformed nuclei, with the axis of nuclear symmetry identified as the z axis. The spherical shape has = 0, while the oblate

  2. TUNL Nuclear Structure Data Evaluation on A = 2-20 Nuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Thinh; Kelley, John; Sheu, Grace

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear data represents measured or evaluated probabilities of various physical interactions involving the nuclei of atoms. The nuclear data group at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) compiles, evaluates and disseminates nuclear structure data relevant to light nuclei in the mass region of A = 2 - 20. Our activities primarily involve surveying literature articles and producing recommended values for inclusion into various United States Nuclear Data Program databases, such as Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data List (XUNDL) and Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). We have projects related to analyzing beta-decay lifetimes, compiling structure data from recently published articles, and producing full nuclear structure data evaluations of nuclides based on all existing literature. The nuclear data disseminated is used for theoretical model development of nuclear physics and for applications involving radiation and nuclear power technologies. This work is supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation Grant No. NSF-PHY-1461204 and Duke/TUNL.

  3. Nuclear structure studies at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy, carried out at the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics in the recent past, using heavy-ion projectiles from the pelletron accelerator centres in the country and multi-detector arrays have yielded significant data on the structure of a large number of nuclei spanning different mass ...

  4. Electromagnetic studies of nuclear structure and reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hersman, F.W.; Dawson, J.F.; Heisenberg, J.H.; Calarco, J.R.

    1990-06-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: giant resonance studies; deep inelastic scattering studies; high resolution nuclear structure work; and relativistic RPA; and field theory in the Schroedinger Representation.

  5. Optical spectroscopy by Hantaro Nagaoka Pioneer nuclear structure study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamura, Takashi T.

    2000-08-01

    Hantaro Nagaoka is a Japanese physicist who made an experimental pioneer work on optical spectroscopy for nuclear structure studies in 1920s. Today much attention should be paid to this work rather than to his famous atomic model that died away long time ago along with Thomson's model.

  6. Optical spectroscopy by Hantaro Nagaoka - Pioneer nuclear structure study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inamura, Takashi T. [Warsaw University, Heavy Ion Laboratory (Poland)], E-mail: inamura@slcj.uw.edu.pl

    2000-08-15

    Hantaro Nagaoka is a Japanese physicist who made an experimental pioneer work on optical spectroscopy for nuclear structure studies in 1920s. Today much attention should be paid to this work rather than to his famous atomic model that died away long time ago along with Thomson's model.

  7. Nuclear Test-Experimental Science: Annual report, fiscal year 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struble, G.L.; Donohue, M.L.; Bucciarelli, G.; Hymer, J.D.; Kirvel, R.D.; Middleton, C.; Prono, J.; Reid, S.; Strack, B. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    Fiscal year 1988 has been a significant, rewarding, and exciting period for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's nuclear testing program. It was significant in that the Laboratory's new director chose to focus strongly on the program's activities and to commit to a revitalized emphasis on testing and the experimental science that underlies it. It was rewarding in that revolutionary new measurement techniques were fielded on recent important and highly complicated underground nuclear tests with truly incredible results. And it was exciting in that the sophisticated and fundamental problems of weapons science that are now being addressed experimentally are yielding new challenges and understanding in ways that stimulate and reward the brightest and best of scientists. During FY88 the program was reorganized to emphasize our commitment to experimental science. The name of the program was changed to reflect this commitment, becoming the Nuclear Test-Experimental Science (NTES) Program.

  8. Dynamic testing of nuclear power plant structures: an evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, H.J.

    1980-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) evaluated the applications of system identification techniques to the dynamic testing of nuclear power plant structures and subsystems. These experimental techniques involve exciting a structure and measuring, digitizing, and processing the time-history motions that result. The data can be compared to parameters calculated using finite element or other models of the test systems to validate the model and to verify the seismic analysis. This report summarizes work in three main areas: (1) analytical qualification of a set of computer programs developed at LLL to extract model parameters from the time histories; (2) examination of the feasibility of safely exciting nuclear power plant structures and accurately recording the resulting time-history motions; (3) study of how the model parameters that are extracted from the data be used best to evaluate structural integrity and analyze nuclear power plants.

  9. Progress of experimental research on nuclear safety in NPIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Houjun; Zan, Yuanfeng; Peng, Chuanxin; Xi, Zhao; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Ying; He, Yanqiu; Huang, Yanping [Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu (China)

    2016-05-15

    Two kinds of Generation III commercial nuclear power plants have been developed in CNNC (China National Nuclear Corporation), one is a small modular reactor ACP100 having an equivalent electric power 100 MW, and the other is HPR1000 (once named ACP1000) having an equivalent electric power 1 000 MW. Both NPPs widely adopted the design philosophy of advanced passive safety systems and considered the lessons from Fukushima Daichi nuclear accident. As the backbone of the R and D of ACP100 and HPR1000, NPIC (Nuclear power Institute of China) has finished the engineering verification test of main safety systems, including passive residual heat removal experiments, reactor cavity injection experiments, hydrogen combustion experiments, and passive autocatalytic recombiner experiments. Above experimental work conducted in NPIC and further research plan of nuclear safety are introduced in this paper.

  10. VI European Summer School on Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The European Summer School on Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics has reached the sixth edition, marking the tenth year's anniversary. The spirit of the school is to provide a very important occasion for a deep education of young researchers about the main topics of experimental nuclear astrophysics. Moreover, it should be regarded as a forum for the discussion of the last-decade research activity. Lectures are focused on various aspects of primordial and stellar nucleosynthesis, including novel experimental approaches and detectors, indirect methods and radioactive ion beams. Moreover, in order to give a wide educational offer, some lectures cover complementary subjects of nuclear astrophysics such as gamma ray astronomy, neutron-induced reactions, short-lived radionuclides, weak interaction and cutting-edge facilities used to investigate nuclear reactions of interest for astrophysics. Large room is also given to young researcher oral contributions. Traditionally, particular attention is devoted to the participation of students from less-favoured countries, especially from the southern coast of the Mediterranean Sea. The school is organised by the Catania Nuclear Astrophysics research group with the collaboration of Dipartimento di Fisica e Astromomia - Università di Catania and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare.

  11. Theoretical nuclear structure. Progress report for 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarewicz, W.; Strayer, M.R.

    1997-12-31

    This research effort is directed toward theoretical support and guidance for the fields of radioactive ion beam physics, gamma-ray spectroscopy, and the interface between nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. The authors report substantial progress in all these areas. One measure of progress is publications and invited material. The research described here has led to more than 25 papers that are published, accepted, or submitted to refereed journals, and to 25 invited presentations at conferences and workshops.

  12. A porous medium approach for the fluid structure interaction modelling of a water pressurized nuclear reactor core fuel assemblies: simulation and experimentation; Une approche milieu poreux pour la modeisation de l'interaction fluide-structure des assemblages combustibles dans un coeur de reacteur a eau pressurisee: simulation et experimentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricciardi, G.

    2008-10-15

    The designing of a pressurized water reactor core subjected to seismic loading, is a major concern of the nuclear industry. We propose, in this PhD report, to establish the global behaviour equations of the core, in term of a porous medium. Local equations of fluid and structure are space averaged on a control volume, thus we define an equivalent fluid and an equivalent structure, of which unknowns are defined on the whole space. The non-linear fuel assemblies behaviour is modelled by a visco-elastic constitutive law. The fluid-structure coupling is accounted for by a body force, the expression of that force is based on empirical formula of fluid forces acting on a tube subject to an axial flow. The resulting equations are solved using a finite element method. A validation of the model, on three experimental device, is proposed. The first one presents two fuel assemblies subjected to axial flow. One of the two fuel assemblies is deviated from its position of equilibrium and released, while the other is at rest. The second one presents a six assemblies row, immersed in water, placed on a shaking table that can simulate seismic loading. Finally, the last one presents nine fuel assemblies network, arranged in a three by three, subject to an axial flow. The displacement of the central fuel assembly is imposed. The simulations are in agreement with the experiments, the model reproduces the influence of the flow of fluid on the dynamics and coupling of the fuel assemblies. (author)

  13. Methods and benefits of experimental seismic evaluation of nuclear power plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    This study reviews experimental techniques, instrumentation requirements, safety considerations, and benefits of performing vibration tests on nuclear power plant containments and internal components. The emphasis is on testing to improve seismic structural models. Techniques for identification of resonant frequencies, damping, and mode shapes, are discussed. The benefits of testing with regard to increased damping and more accurate computer models are oulined. A test plan, schedule and budget are presented for a typical PWR nuclear power plant.

  14. Nuclear Structure Research at Richmond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beausang, Cornelius W. [Univ. of Richmond, VA (United States)

    2015-04-30

    The goals for the final year were; (1) to continue ongoing efforts to develop and enhance GRETINA and work towards GRETA; (2) to investigate the structure of non-yrast states in shape transitional Sm and Gd nuclei; (3) to investigate the structure of selected light Cd nuclei; (4) to exploit the surrogate reaction technique to extract (n,f) cross sections for actinide nuclei, particularly the first measurement of the 236Pu and 237Pu(n,f) cross sections.

  15. Nuclear structure of $^{231}$Ac

    CERN Document Server

    Boutami, R; Mach, H; Kurcewicz, W; Fraile, L M; Gulda, K; Aas, A J; García-Raffi, L M; Løvhøiden, G; Martínez, T; Rubio, B; Taín, J L; Tengblad, O

    2008-01-01

    The low-energy structure of 231Ac has been investigated by means of gamma ray spectroscopy following the beta-decay of 231Ra. Multipolarities of 28 transitions have been established by measuring conversion electrons with a mini-orange electron spectrometer. The decay scheme of 231Ra --> 231Ac has been constructed for the first time. The Advanced Time Delayed beta-gamma-gamma(t) method has been used to measure the half-lives of five levels. The moderately fast B(E1) transition rates derived suggest that the octupole effects, albeit weak, are still present in this exotic nucleus.

  16. Nuclear structure of Ra at high spin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    However, nuclear structure at high spin and excitation energies (∼ 6 MeV) would require a coupling of excited 1p–1h with 208Pb core. The coupling between single- particle orbitals and collective vibrations of core complicates the simple shell model picture. With increasing neutron number, Ra isotopes show an abrupt ...

  17. Nuclear Physics Division Institute of Experimental Physics Warsaw University annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osuch, S. [ed.

    1995-12-31

    In the presented Annual Report the activities of the Nuclear Physics Division of the Institute of Experimental Physics of the Warsaw University in 1994 are described. The report consist of three sections: (i) Reaction Mechanism and Nuclear Structure (12 articles); (ii) Experimental Methods and Instrumentation (2 articles); (iii) Other Research (1 article). Additionally the list of seminars held at the NPD, personnel list and list of published papers is also given. In the first, leading article of the report written by head of NPD prof. Ch. Droste the general description of the Department activity is presented.

  18. Correlation between muonic levels and nuclear structure in muonic atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, J.M., E-mail: dongjm07@lzu.edu.cn [Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University and Institute of Modern Physics of CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(18), Beijing 102413 (China); Zuo, W., E-mail: zuowei@impcas.ac.cn [Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University and Institute of Modern Physics of CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, H.F. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Scheid, W. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Justus-Liebig-University, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Gu, J.Z., E-mail: gujianzhong2000@yahoo.com.cn [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(18), Beijing 102413 (China); Wang, Y.Z. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(18), Beijing 102413 (China)

    2011-10-25

    A method that deals with the nucleons and the muon unitedly is employed to investigate the muonic lead, with which the correlation between the muon and nucleus can be studied distinctly. A 'kink' appears in the muonic isotope shift at a neutron magic number where the nuclear shell structure plays a key role. This behavior may have very important implications for the experimentally probing the shell structure of the nuclei far away from the {beta}-stable line. We investigate the variations of the nuclear structure due to the interaction with the muon in the muonic atom and find that the nuclear structure remains basically unaltered. Therefore, the muon is a clean and reliable probe for studying the nuclear structure. In addition, a correction that the muon-induced slight change in the proton density distribution in turn shifts the muonic levels is investigated. This correction to muonic level is as important as the Lamb shift and high order vacuum polarization correction, but is larger than anomalous magnetic moment and electron shielding correction.

  19. New Directions in Nuclear Structure Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchell, D. F.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Dunford, C.; Tuli, J.

    2003-04-01

    Since the 1970's, the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) at Brookhaven National Lab has maintained and disseminated a variety of widely-used databases containing evaluated nuclear structure and decay data, as well as indexed bibliographic information. These include ENSDF, NuDat, NSR, and the Nuclear Wallet Cards. Over the last few years, the NNDC has been involved in an effort to migrate existing databases to a more modern, relational format. The end result of this migration will be more flexible access and more efficient administration of the data. Ongoing tasks include the development of object-oriented interfaces and XML formats for data exchange. In this talk, several of the new databases and interfaces will be discussed.

  20. Investigation of Nuclear Partonic Structure. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Henry J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Engelage, J. M.

    2016-08-30

    Our research program had two primary goals during the period of this grant, to search for new and rare particles produced in high-energy nuclear collisions and to understand the internal structure of nuclear matter. We have developed electronics to pursue these goals at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) experiment and the AnDY experiment. Our results include discovery of the anti-hyper-triton, anti- 3Λ-barH, which opened a new branch on the chart of the nuclides, and the anti-alpha, anti- 4He, the heaviest form of anti-matter yet seen, as well as uncovering hints of gluon saturation in cold nuclear matter and observation of jets in polarized proton-proton collisions that will be used to probe orbital motion inside protons.

  1. Seismic analysis of nuclear power plant structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Primary structures for nuclear power plants are designed to resist expected earthquakes of the site. Two intensities are referred to as Operating Basis Earthquake and Design Basis Earthquake. These structures are required to accommodate these seismic loadings without loss of their functional integrity. Thus, no plastic yield is allowed. The application of NASTRAN in analyzing some of these seismic induced structural dynamic problems is described. NASTRAN, with some modifications, can be used to analyze most structures that are subjected to seismic loads. A brief review of the formulation of seismic-induced structural dynamics is also presented. Two typical structural problems were selected to illustrate the application of the various methods of seismic structural analysis by the NASTRAN system.

  2. Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluation: Status and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondev, F. G.; Browne, E.; Ouellet, C.; Pritychenko, B.; Reich, C.; Sonzogni, A.; Tandel, S.; Tuli, J. K.; Cameron, J.; Chen, A.; Singh, B.; Kelley, J.; Kwan, E.; Baglin, C.; Basunia, M. S.; Firestone, R. B.; Nica, N.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Smith, M. S.

    2009-10-01

    Reliable nuclear structure data represent the fundamental building blocks of nuclear structure physics and astrophysics research, and are also of vital importance in a large number of applications. Members of the Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Working Group of the U.S. Nuclear Data Program, in collaboration with scientists from Japan and other countries within the International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network (under the auspices of IAEA), are involved in compilation, evaluation, and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data for all known nuclei. The network's principal effort is devoted to the timely revision of information in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) library, which is the only comprehensive nuclear structure and decay data database that is updated continuously. This presentation will briefly review recent achievements of the network, present on-going activities, and reflect on ideas for future projects and challenges in the field of nuclear structure and decay data evaluation.

  3. 15th National Conference on Nuclear Structure in China

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ning; Zhou, Shan-Gui; Nuclear Structure in China 2014; NSC2014

    2016-01-01

    This volume is a collection of the contributions to the 15th National Conference on Nuclear Structure in China (NSC2014), held on October 25-28, 2014 in Guilin, China and hosted by Guangxi Normal University. It provides an important updated resource in the nuclear physics literature for researchers and graduate students studying nuclear structure and related topics. Recent progress made in the study of nuclear spectroscopy of high-spin states, nuclear mass and half-life, nuclear astrophysics, super-heavy nuclei, unstable nuclei, density functional theory, neutron star and symmetry energy, nuclear matter, and nuclear shell model are covered.

  4. A New Light Weight Structural Material for Nuclear Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiei, Afsaneh [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-01-14

    Ci 60Co, 1.8mCi 137Cs, 13.5mCi 241Am, and 5.0mCi 133Ba were used for gamma-ray attenuation analysis. The evaluations of neutron transmission measurements were conducted at the Neutron Powder Diffractometer beam facility at North Carolina State University. The experimental results were verified theoretically through XCOM and Monte Carlo Z-particle Transport Code (MCNP). A mechanical investigation was performed by means of quasi-static compressive testing. Thermal characterizations were carried out through effective thermal conductivity and thermal expansion analyses in terms of high temperature guarded-comparative-longitudinal heat flow technique and thermomechanical analyzer (TMA), respectively. The experimental results were compared with analytical results obtained from, respectively, Brailsford and Major’s model and modified Turner’s model for verification. Flame test was performed in accordance with United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) standard. CMF sample and a 304L stainless steel control sample were subjected to a fully engulfing fire with an average flame temperature of 800°C for a period of 30 minutes. Finite Element Analysis was conducted to secure the credibility of the experimental results. This research indicates the potential of utilizing the light-weight close-cell CMFs and open-cell Al foam with fillers as shielding material replacing current heavy structures with additional advantage of high-energy absorption and excellent thermal characteristics.

  5. Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluation: Challenges and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondev, F. G.; Tuli, J. K.

    2003-10-01

    The expression ``Nuclear Structure and Decay Data'' refers to complex nuclear level schemes and tables of numerical values, which quantify fundamental properties of nuclear structure, such as level energies, quantum numbers and state lifetimes, as well as various decay modes and associated radiation. These data are not only at the core of basic nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics research, but they are also relevant for many applied technologies, including nuclear energy production, reactor design and safety, medical diagnostic and radiotherapy, health physics, environmental research and monitoring, safeguards, material analysis, etc. The mission of the Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Working Group of the US DOE funded Nuclear Data Program is to evaluate, compile, maintain, and disseminate nuclear structure and decay data for all known nuclei (more than 2900!). The network's principal effort is devoted to the timely revision of information in the ENSDF (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File) database. However, in recent years, special attention has been given to topical evaluations of properties of particular interest to the nuclear structure community, such as log ft values, α- and proton decay properties, super-deformed and magnetic dipole collective structures, nuclear moments, and nuclear isomers (under development). This presentation will briefly review recent achievements of the network, present on-going activities, and reflect on ideas for future projects and challenges in the field of nuclear structure and decay data evaluation.

  6. Structural Biology of Nuclear Auxin Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesh, Dhurvas Chandrasekaran; Calderón Villalobos, Luz Irina; Abel, Steffen

    2016-04-01

    Auxin coordinates plant development largely via hierarchical control of gene expression. During the past decades, the study of early auxin genes paired with the power of Arabidopsis genetics have unraveled key nuclear components and molecular interactions that perceive the hormone and activate primary response genes. Recent research in the realm of structural biology allowed unprecedented insight into: (i) the recognition of auxin-responsive DNA elements by auxin transcription factors; (ii) the inactivation of those auxin response factors by early auxin-inducible repressors; and (iii) the activation of target genes by auxin-triggered repressor degradation. The biophysical studies reviewed here provide an impetus for elucidating the molecular determinants of the intricate interactions between core components of the nuclear auxin response module. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Equation of state of dense nuclear matter and neutron star structure from nuclear chiral interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombaci, Ignazio; Logoteta, Domenico

    2018-02-01

    Aims: We report a new microscopic equation of state (EOS) of dense symmetric nuclear matter, pure neutron matter, and asymmetric and β-stable nuclear matter at zero temperature using recent realistic two-body and three-body nuclear interactions derived in the framework of chiral perturbation theory (ChPT) and including the Δ(1232) isobar intermediate state. This EOS is provided in tabular form and in parametrized form ready for use in numerical general relativity simulations of binary neutron star merging. Here we use our new EOS for β-stable nuclear matter to compute various structural properties of non-rotating neutron stars. Methods: The EOS is derived using the Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone quantum many-body theory in the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation. Neutron star properties are next computed solving numerically the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov structure equations. Results: Our EOS models are able to reproduce the empirical saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter, the symmetry energy Esym, and its slope parameter L at the empirical saturation density n0. In addition, our EOS models are compatible with experimental data from collisions between heavy nuclei at energies ranging from a few tens of MeV up to several hundreds of MeV per nucleon. These experiments provide a selective test for constraining the nuclear EOS up to 4n0. Our EOS models are consistent with present measured neutron star masses and particularly with the mass M = 2.01 ± 0.04 M⊙ of the neutron stars in PSR J0348+0432.

  8. Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Containment Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, H.L.; Naus, D.J.; Norris, W.E.

    1998-12-01

    Safety-related nuclear power plant (NPP) structures are designed to withstand loadings from a number of low-probability external and interval events, such as earthquakes, tornadoes, and loss-of-coolant accidents. Loadings incurred during normal plant operation therefore generally are not significant enough to cause appreciable degradation. However, these structures are susceptible to aging by various processes depending on the operating environment and service conditions. The effects of these processes may accumulate within these structures over time to cause failure under design conditions, or lead to costly repair. In the late 1980s and early 1990s several occurrences of degradation of NPP structures were discovered at various facilities (e.g., corrosion of pressure boundary components, freeze- thaw damage of concrete, and larger than anticipated loss of prestressing force). Despite these degradation occurrences and a trend for an increasing rate of occurrence, in-service inspection of the safety-related structures continued to be performed in a somewhat cursory manner. Starting in 1991, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) published the first of several new requirements to help ensure that adequate in-service inspection of these structures is performed. Current regulatory in-service inspection requirements are reviewed and a summary of degradation experience presented. Nondestructive examination techniques commonly used to inspect the NPP steel and concrete structures to identify and quantify the amount of damage present are reviewed. Finally, areas where nondestructive evaluation techniques require development (i.e., inaccessible portions of the containment pressure boundary, and thick heavily reinforced concrete sections are discussed.

  9. Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University annual report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osuch, S. [ed.

    1996-12-31

    In the presented Annual Report the activities of Nuclear Physics Division (NPD) of Warsaw University in 1995 are described. The report consists of three sections: (i) Reaction Mechanism and Nuclear Structure (11 articles); (ii) Instrumentation and Experimental Methods (9 articles); (iii) Other Research (1 article). Additionally the list of seminars held at the NPD, personnel list and list of published papers are also given. The first, leading article in the report written by head of NPD prof. Ch. Droste the general description of the Department activity is presented.

  10. Chiral nucleon-nucleon forces in nuclear structure calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coraggio L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Realistic nuclear potentials, derived within chiral perturbation theory, are a major breakthrough in modern nuclear structure theory, since they provide a direct link between nuclear physics and its underlying theory, namely the QCD. As a matter of fact, chiral potentials are tailored on the low-energy regime of nuclear structure physics, and chiral perturbation theory provides on the same footing two-nucleon forces as well as many-body ones. This feature fits well with modern advances in ab-initio methods and realistic shell-model. Here, we will review recent nuclear structure calculations, based on realistic chiral potentials, for both finite nuclei and infinite nuclear matter.

  11. Nuclear matrix – structure, function and pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Wasąg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear matrix (NM, or nuclear skeleton, is the non-chromatin, ribonucleoproteinaceous framework that is resistant to high ionic strength buffers, nonionic detergents, and nucleolytic enzymes. The NM fulfills a structural role in eukaryotic cells and is responsible for maintaining the shape of the nucleus and the spatial organization of chromatin. Moreover, the NM participates in several cellular processes, such as DNA replication/repair, gene expression, RNA transport, cell signaling and differentiation, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and carcinogenesis. Short nucleotide sequences called scaffold/matrix attachment regions (S/MAR anchor the chromatin loops to the NM proteins (NMP. The NMP composition is dynamic and depends on the cell type and differentiation stage or metabolic activity. Alterations in the NMP composition affect anchoring of the S/MARs and thus alter gene expression.This review aims to systematize information about the skeletal structure of the nucleus, with particular emphasis on the organization of the NM and its role in selected cellular processes. We also discuss several diseases that are caused by aberrant NM structure or dysfunction of individual NM elements.

  12. Relative degradation of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA: an experimental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foran, David R

    2006-07-01

    Single copy nuclear loci often cannot be amplified from degraded remains, necessitating the analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The success in analyzing mtDNA is generally thought to result from its higher copy number in the cell; however, other factors, such as cellular location or molecular features, may be equally or more important in the superior preservation of mtDNA. To explore and compare mtDNA and nuclear DNA degradation, mouse tissues (muscle, liver, and brain) were allowed to degrade at different temperatures, and the relative degradation of a mitochondrial gene, a single copy nuclear gene, and a multi-copy nuclear gene was assayed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The tissues were also homogenized, allowing the three loci to degrade in the same cellular environment. Gene copy number and cellular location both influence DNA recovery. In some instances, multi-copy loci could be recovered when the single copy locus could not; however, the pattern of relative DNA degradation changed between whole and homogenized tissues. The overall results indicate that DNA degradation is influenced by multiple factors-including cellular location, chromatin structure, and transcriptional activity-factors that could be used to exploit loci for more robust forensic analysis from degraded biological material.

  13. Nuclear structure functions at a future electron-ion collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenauer, E. C.; Fazio, S.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Paukkunen, H.; Zurita, P.

    2017-12-01

    The quantitative knowledge of heavy nuclei's partonic structure is currently limited to rather large values of momentum fraction x —robust experimental constraints below x ˜10-2 at low resolution scale Q2 are particularly scarce. This is in sharp contrast to the free proton's structure which has been probed in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) measurements down to x ˜10-5 at perturbative resolution scales. The construction of an electron-ion collider (EIC) with a possibility to operate with a wide variety of nuclei, will allow one to explore the low-x region in much greater detail. In the present paper we simulate the extraction of the nuclear structure functions from measurements of inclusive and charm reduced cross sections at an EIC. The potential constraints are studied by analyzing simulated data directly in a next-to-leading order global fit of nuclear Parton Distribution Functions based on the recent EPPS16 analysis. A special emphasis is placed on studying the impact an EIC would have on extracting the nuclear gluon parton distribution function, the partonic component most prone to nonlinear effects at low Q2. In comparison to the current knowledge, we find that the gluon parton distribution function can be measured at an EIC with significantly reduced uncertainties.

  14. From nuclear structure to neutron stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandolfi Stefano

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in quantum Monte Carlo with modern nucleon-nucleon interactions have enabled the successful description of properties of light nuclei and neutronrich matter. As a demonstration, we show that the agreement between theoretical calculations of the charge form factor of 12C and the experimental data is excellent. Applying similar methods to isospin-asymmetric systems allows one to describe neutrons confined in an external potential and homogeneous neutron-rich matter. Of particular interest is the nuclear symmetry energy, the energy cost of creating an isospin asymmetry. Combining these advances with recent observations of neutron star masses and radii gives insight into the equation of state of neutron-rich matter near and above the saturation density. In particular, neutron star radius measurements constrain the derivative of the symmetry energy.

  15. Development of structural steels for nuclear application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jun Hwa; Chi, S. H.; Ryu, W. S.; Lee, B. S.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, J. H.; Oh, Y. J.; Byun, T. S.; Yoon, J. H.; Park, D. K.; Oh, J. M.; Cho, H. D.; Kim, H.; Kim, H. D.; Kang, S. S.; Kim, J. W.; Ahn, S. B.

    1997-08-01

    To established the bases of nuclear structural material technologies, this study was focused on the localization and improvement of nuclear structural steels, the production of material property data, and technology developments for integrity evaluation. The important test and analysis technologies for material integrity assessment were developed, and the materials properties of the pressure vessel steels were evaluated systematically on the basis of those technologies, they are microstructural characteristics, tensile and indentation deformation properties, impact properties, and static and dynamic fracture toughness, fatigue and corrosion fatigue etc. Irradiation tests in the research reactors were prepared or completed to obtain the mechanical properties of irradiated materials. The improvement of low alloy steel was also attempted through the comparative study on the manufacturing processes, computer assisted alloy and process design, and application of the inter critical heat treatment. On the other hand, type 304 stainless steels for reactor internals were developed and tested successfully. High strength type 316LN stainless steels for reactor internals were developed and the microstructural characteristics, corrosion resistance, mechanical properties at high temperatures, low cycle fatigue property etc. were tested and analyzed in the view point of the effect of nitrogen. Type 347 stainless steels with high corrosion resistance and toughness for pipings and tubes and low-activated Cr-Mn steels were also developed and their basic properties were evaluated. Finally, the martensitic stainless steels for turbine blade were developed and tests. (author). 242 refs., 100 tabs., 304 figs.

  16. Update on nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, Oscar Javier, E-mail: javierh@triumf.ca; Dinur, Nir Nevo; Ji, Chen; Bacca, Sonia [TRIUMF (Canada); Barnea, Nir [The Hebrew University, Racah Institute of Physics (Israel)

    2016-12-15

    We present calculations of the nuclear structure corrections to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms, using state-of-the-art nuclear potentials. We outline updated results on finite nucleon size contributions.

  17. Experimental study and nuclear model calculations of {sup 3}He-induced nuclear reactions on zinc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Abyad, M.; Mohamed, Gehan Y. [Nuclear Research Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Physics Department (Cyclotron Facility), Cairo (Egypt); Ditroi, F.; Takacs, S.; Tarkanyi, F. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Institute for Nuclear Research, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2017-05-15

    Excitation functions of {sup 3}He-induced nuclear reactions on natural zinc were measured using the standard stacked-foil technique and high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. From their threshold energies up to 27 MeV, the cross-sections for {sup nat}Zn ({sup 3}He,xn) {sup 69}Ge, {sup nat}Zn({sup 3}He,xnp) {sup 66,67,68}Ga, and {sup nat}Zn({sup 3}He,x){sup 62,65}Zn reactions were measured. The nuclear model codes TALYS-1.6, EMPIRE-3.2 and ALICE-IPPE were used to describe the formation of these products. The present data were compared with the theoretical results and with the available experimental data. Integral yields for some important radioisotopes were determined. (orig.)

  18. Experimental study and nuclear model calculations of 3He-induced nuclear reactions on zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abyad, M.; Mohamed, Gehan Y.; Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.; Tárkányi, F.

    2017-05-01

    Excitation functions of 3He -induced nuclear reactions on natural zinc were measured using the standard stacked-foil technique and high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. From their threshold energies up to 27MeV, the cross-sections for natZn (3He, xn) 69Ge, natZn(3He, xnp) 66,67,68Ga, and natZn(3He, x)62,65Zn reactions were measured. The nuclear model codes TALYS-1.6, EMPIRE-3.2 and ALICE-IPPE were used to describe the formation of these products. The present data were compared with the theoretical results and with the available experimental data. Integral yields for some important radioisotopes were determined.

  19. Update on the U.S. Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluation Program*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglin, Coral M.

    2000-04-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Data Program (USNDP) maintains and provides easy access to several large databases to assist scientists to sift through and assess the vast quantity of published nuclear structure and decay data. The Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) presents evaluated experimental nuclear data; the Nuclear Structure Reference (NSR) database provides bibliographic information; an Experimental Unevaluated Data Listing (XUNDL)has also recently been established to provide rapid access to data from the most recent publications (primarily in high-spin physics). In addition to the ongoing revision of data in ENSDF, information from the latest evaluations for A=21-44 by Endt[1] and evaluated data for recently-discovered heavy elements (up to Z=118) are currently being incorporated into ENSDF. An overview of nuclear structure and decay data available through the USNDP will be presented, with emphasis on recent and forthcoming additions to the material available. Feedback concerning the extent to which users' nuclear structure and decay data needs are being met by this data program will be welcomed. 1. P.M. Endt, Nucl. Phys. A521, 1 (1998). *On behalf of the U.S. Nuclear Data Program

  20. The TRIUMF nuclear structure program and TIGRESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, P E; Andreyev, A; E.Austin, R A; Ball, G C; Bandyopadhyay, D; Becker, J A; Boston, A; Boston, H; Charkrawarthy, R S; Churchman, R; Cline, D; Cooper, R J; Cross, D; Dashdorj, D; Demand, G A; Dimmock, M R; Drake, T; Finlay, P; Gagnon, K; Gallant, A T; Green, K L; Grint, A N; Grinyer, G F; Hackman, G; Harkness, L J; Hayes, A B; Kanungo, R; Kulp, W D; Leach, K G; Lee, G; Leslie, J R; Maharaj, R; Martin, J P; Mattoon, C; Mills, W J; Morton, A C; Nelson, L; Newman, O; Nolan, P J; Padilla-Rodal, E; Pearson, C J; Phillips, A A; Porter-Peden, M; Ressler, J J; Ruiz, C; Sarazin, F; Schumaker, M A; Scraggs, D P; Strange, M T; Subramanian, M; Svensson, C E; Waddington, J C; Wan, J; Whitebeck, A; Williams, S J; Wood, J L; Wong, J C; Wu, C Y; Zganjar, E F

    2006-08-30

    The Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) facility located at the TRIUMF laboratory in Vancouver, Canada, is one of the world's most advanced ISOL-type radioactive ion beam facilities. An extensive {gamma}-ray spectroscopy program at ISAC is centered around two major research facilities: (1) the 8{pi} {gamma}-ray spectrometer for {beta}-delayed {gamma}-ray spectroscopy experiments with the low-energy beams from ISAC-I, and (2) the next-generation TRIUMF-ISAC Gamma-Ray Escape Suppressed Spectrometer (TIGRESS) for in-beam experiments with the accelerated radioactive ion beams. An overview of these facilities and recent results from the diverse program of nuclear structure and fundamental interaction studies they support is presented.

  1. Investigations of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions induced by complex projectiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarantites, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: nuclear structure; fusion reactions near and below the barrier; incomplete fusion and fragmentation reactions; and instrumentation and analysis. (LSP).

  2. Tensegrity structures - Computational and experimental tensegrity mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Detlef; Lim, Yi Chung; Long, David S.

    2017-07-01

    The present paper deals with tensegrity structures. We review the definition of tensegrity structures, and describe both experimental and computational form finding methods. Also described are the numerical methods for the simulation of prestress induced stiffness, and the static and dynamic structural analyses. Furthermore, we present laboratory models and measurement methods for identifying the realized geometry and prestress state. Finally, computationally and experimentally obtained geometries and prestress states are compared, a representative realization of a real world tensegrity tower is shown and the modeling of biological cells as tensegrity structures is adressed.

  3. Nuclear Cartography: Patterns in Binding Energies and Subatomic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, E. C.; Shelley, M.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear masses and binding energies are some of the first nuclear properties met in high school physics, and can be used to introduce radioactive decays, fusion, and fission. With relatively little extension, they can also illustrate fundamental concepts in nuclear physics, such as shell structure and pairing, and to discuss how the elements…

  4. Establishment and Analysis of Nuclear Structure Data DB for Nuclear Safety Regulation Technique Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Ouk; Yoo, Jae Kwon; Gil, Choong; Cho, Young Sik; Kim, Hyung Il; Kim, Jong Woon; Kwon, Duk Hee; Lee, Jong Hwa

    2013-10-15

    The contents of the project consisting of four research fields carried out are: Ο Installation of DB with nuclear structure/decay datasets - Setup a computer system for production of nuclear structure/decay data in ENSDF format - Production of nuclear structure/decay data in ENSDF format({sup 211}, {sup 215}Po, {sup 136}Cs) and setup a data converting system from ENSDF format to ENDF-6 format. Ο Computer simulation of nuclear decay and burnup using the ENSDF DB - Calculation of decay heats of the several radioactive nuclides with Geant4 - Burnup calculation with full decay chain using Monte Carlo method Ο Comparison and analysis of nuclear structure/decay and fission product yields data. - Acquisitions and Analyses of decay and fission yields data in ENDF-6 format - Research for theoretical evaluation method of fission product yields data. Ο Analysis of SCALE(ORIGEN-s, -ARP) libraries - Analysis of ORIGEN library structure of nuclear decay/yields data. - Methodological studies to improve nuclear decay/yield ORIGEN libraries by use of nuclear structure/yield data in ENDF-6 format. The results of this project will be a basis to establish the nuclear decay and fission yield data DB in Korea. Additionally, new decay and yield data can be immediately served for the users to utilize those data for nuclear research and/or development.

  5. The Influence of Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Structure in Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, K. E.

    2017-11-01

    Nuclear reactions play an important role for the energy production and the nucleosynthesis in stars. New facilities, able to accelerate radioactive nuclei or high-intensity stable beams have allowed us to measure in the laboratory reactions involving short-lived nuclei or processes with very small cross sections, which are crucial for stellar nucleosynthesis. I will discuss some of the recent experiments studying fusion and transfer reactions with radioactive beams which play a critical role in various quiescent and explosive stellar environments.

  6. Experimental study of the nucleon spin structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litmaath, M.F.

    1996-05-07

    After introducing the theoretical framework, which includes DIS, the Quark Parton Model (QPM) and QCD, we describe the implementation of the experiment. The SMC uses a beam of 190 GeV naturally polarized muons, scattering off nucleons in a large cryogenic target containing protons or deuterons that are polarized through Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP). The target material is located in two cells in a row, with opposite polarizations. Every 5 hours the polarizations of both cells are reversed. The target polarization is measured by an NMR system. The polarization of the beam is measured in a polarimeter, located downstream of the main experimental setup. (orig.).

  7. Nuclear structure at high spin using multidetector gamma array and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-05

    Apr 5, 2014 ... Keywords. Hyperpure germanium; multiplicity detector, charged particle detector; nuclear structure; -ray spectroscopy; empirical shell model. Abstract. A multidetector gamma array (GDA), for studying nuclear structure was built with ancillary devices namely gamma multiplicity filter and charged particle ...

  8. Nuclear Structure References (NSR) file. [Mostly information for input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewbank, W.B.

    1978-08-01

    The use of the Nuclear Structure References file by the Nuclear Data Project at ORNL is described. Much of the report concerns format information of interest only to those preparing input to the system or otherwise needing detailed knowledge of its internal structure. 17 figures. (RWR)

  9. Structural integrity of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, John F.

    2013-09-01

    The paper starts from concerns expressed by Sir Alan Cottrell, in the early 1970s, related to the safety of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) proposed at that time for the next phase of electrical power generation. It proceeds to describe the design and operation of nuclear generation plant and gives details of the manufacture of PWR reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). Attention is paid to stress-relief cracking and under-clad cracking, experienced with early RPVs, explaining the mechanisms for these forms of cracking and the means taken to avoid them. Particular note is made of the contribution of non-destructive inspection to structural integrity. Factors affecting brittle fracture in RPV steels are described: in particular, effects of neutron irradiation. The use of fracture mechanics to assess defect tolerance is explained, together with the failure assessment diagram embodied in the R6 procedure. There is discussion of the Master Curve and how it incorporates effects of irradiation on fracture toughness. Dangers associated with extrapolation of data to low probabilities are illustrated. The treatment of fatigue-crack growth is described, in the context of transients that may be experienced in the operation of PWR plant. Detailed attention is paid to the thermal shock associated with a large loss-of-coolant accident. The final section reviews the arguments advanced to justify 'Incredibility of Failure' and how these are incorporated in assessments of the integrity of existing plant and proposed 'new build' PWR pressure vessels.

  10. Nuclear cartography: patterns in binding energies and subatomic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, E. C.; Shelley, M.

    2017-11-01

    Nuclear masses and binding energies are some of the first nuclear properties met in high school physics, and can be used to introduce radioactive decays, fusion, and fission. With relatively little extension, they can also illustrate fundamental concepts in nuclear physics, such as shell structure and pairing, and to discuss how the elements around us were formed in stars. One way of visualising these nuclear properties is through the nuclide chart, which maps all nuclides as a function of their proton and neutron numbers. Here we use the nuclide chart to illustrate various aspects of nuclear physics, and present 3D visualisations of it produced as part of the binding blocks project.

  11. Experimental facility for testing nuclear instruments for planetary landing missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovin, Dmitry; Mitrofanov, Igor; Litvak, Maxim; Kozyrev, Alexander; Sanin, Anton; Vostrukhin, Andrey

    2017-04-01

    The experimental facility for testing and calibration of nuclear planetology instruments has been built in the frame of JINR and Space Research Institute (Moscow) cooperation. The Martian soil model from silicate glass with dimensions 3.82 x 3.21 m and total weight near 30 tons has been assembled in the facility. The glass material was chosen for imitation of dry Martian regolith. The heterogeneous model has been proposed and developed to achieve the most possible similarity with Martian soil in part of the average elemental composition by adding layers of necessary materials, such as iron, aluminum, and chlorine. The presence of subsurface water ice is simulated by adding layers of polyethylene at different depths inside glass model assembly. Neutron generator was used as a neutron source to induce characteristic gamma rays for testing active neutron and gamma spectrometers to define elements composition of the model. The instrumentation was able to detect gamma lines attributed to H, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Cl, K, Ca and Fe. The identified elements compose up to 95 wt % of total mass of the planetary soil model. This results will be used for designing scientific instruments to performing experiments of active neutron and gamma ray spectroscopy on the surface of the planets during Russian and international missions Luna-Glob, Luna-Resource and ExoMars-2020.

  12. Numerical and experimental investigations of water hammers in nuclear industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Messahel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In nuclear and petroleum industries, supply pipes are often exposed to high pressure loading which can cause to the structure high strains, plasticity and even, in the worst scenario, failure. Fast Hydraulic Transient phenomena such as Water Hammers (WHs are of this type. It generates a pressure wave that propagates in the pipe causing high stress. Such phenomena are of the order of few msecs and numerical simulation can offer a better understanding and an accurate evaluation of the dynamic complex phenomenon including fluid-structure interaction, multi-phase flow, cavitation … For the last decades, the modeling of phase change taking into account the cavitation effects has been at the centre of many industrial applications (chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, … and has a direct impact on the industry as it might cause damages to the installation (pumps, propellers, control valves, …. In this paper, numerical simulation using FSI algorithm and One-Fluid Cavitation models ("Cut-Off" and "HEM (Homogeneous Equilibrium Model Phase-Change" introduced by Saurel et al. [1] of WHs including cavitation effects is presented.

  13. Experimental and computational study of thaumasite structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholtzová, Eva, E-mail: Eva.Scholtzova@savba.sk [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 845 36 Bratislava (Slovakia); Kucková, Lenka; Kožíšek, Jozef [Department of Physical Chemistry, Institute of Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics, Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Radlinského 9, 812 37 Bratislava (Slovakia); Pálková, Helena [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 845 36 Bratislava (Slovakia); Tunega, Daniel [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 845 36 Bratislava (Slovakia); Institute for Soil Science, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Peter-Jordanstrasse 82, A-1190 Wien (Austria)

    2014-05-01

    The structure of thaumasite has been studied experimentally by means of a single crystal X-ray diffraction and FTIR methods, and theoretically using density functional theory (DFT) method. Very good agreement was achieved between calculated and experimental structural parameters. In addition, calculations offered the refinement of the positions of the hydrogen atoms. The detailed analysis of the hydrogen bonds existing in the thaumasite structure has been performed. Several types of hydrogen bonds have been classified. The water molecules coordinating Ca{sup 2+} cation act as proton donors in moderate O-H···O hydrogen bonds formed with CO₃⁻²and SO₄⁻² anions. The multiple O-H···O hydrogen bonds exist among water molecules themselves. Finally, relatively weak hydrogen bonds form water molecules with the OH groups from the coordination sphere of the Si(OH)₆⁻² anion. Further, calculated vibrational spectrum allowed complete assignment of all vibrational modes which are not available from the experimental spectrum that has a complex structure with overlapped bands, especially below 1500 cm⁻¹. Highlights: • The thaumasite structure was studied experimentally and using DFT method. • We used DFT method for the refinement of the positions of hydrogen atoms. • A detailed analysis of the hydrogen bonds was done. • A complete assignment of all bands to particular types of vibrations was done.

  14. Relativistic density functional for nuclear structure

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book aims to provide a detailed introduction to the state-of-the-art covariant density functional theory, which follows the Lorentz invariance from the very beginning and is able to describe nuclear many-body quantum systems microscopically and self-consistently. Covariant density functional theory was introduced in nuclear physics in the 1970s and has since been developed and used to describe the diversity of nuclear properties and phenomena with great success. In order to provide an advanced and updated textbook of covariant density functional theory for graduate students and nuclear physics researchers, this book summarizes the enormous amount of material that has accumulated in the field of covariant density functional theory over the last few decades as well as the latest developments in this area. Moreover, the book contains enough details for readers to follow the formalism and theoretical results, and provides exhaustive references to explore the research literature.

  15. Identifying Understudied Nuclear Reactions by Text-mining the EXFOR Experimental Nuclear Reaction Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirdt, J.A. [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, St. Joseph' s College, Patchogue, NY 11772 (United States); Brown, D.A., E-mail: dbrown@bnl.gov [National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The EXFOR library contains the largest collection of experimental nuclear reaction data available as well as the data's bibliographic information and experimental details. We text-mined the REACTION and MONITOR fields of the ENTRYs in the EXFOR library in order to identify understudied reactions and quantities. Using the results of the text-mining, we created an undirected graph from the EXFOR datasets with each graph node representing a single reaction and quantity and graph links representing the various types of connections between these reactions and quantities. This graph is an abstract representation of the connections in EXFOR, similar to graphs of social networks, authorship networks, etc. We use various graph theoretical tools to identify important yet understudied reactions and quantities in EXFOR. Although we identified a few cross sections relevant for shielding applications and isotope production, mostly we identified charged particle fluence monitor cross sections. As a side effect of this work, we learn that our abstract graph is typical of other real-world graphs.

  16. Identifying Understudied Nuclear Reactions by Text-mining the EXFOR Experimental Nuclear Reaction Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirdt, J. A.; Brown, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    The EXFOR library contains the largest collection of experimental nuclear reaction data available as well as the data's bibliographic information and experimental details. We text-mined the REACTION and MONITOR fields of the ENTRYs in the EXFOR library in order to identify understudied reactions and quantities. Using the results of the text-mining, we created an undirected graph from the EXFOR datasets with each graph node representing a single reaction and quantity and graph links representing the various types of connections between these reactions and quantities. This graph is an abstract representation of the connections in EXFOR, similar to graphs of social networks, authorship networks, etc. We use various graph theoretical tools to identify important yet understudied reactions and quantities in EXFOR. Although we identified a few cross sections relevant for shielding applications and isotope production, mostly we identified charged particle fluence monitor cross sections. As a side effect of this work, we learn that our abstract graph is typical of other real-world graphs.

  17. Preliminary Results on the Experimental Investigation of the Structure Functions of Bound Nucleons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodek, Arie [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    We present preliminary results on an experimental study of the nuclear modification of the longitudinal ($\\sigma_L$) and transverse ($\\sigma_T$) structure functions of nucleons bound in nuclear targets. The origin of these modifications (commonly referred as as the EMC effect) is not fully understood. Our measurements of R= $\\sigma_L / \\sigma_T$ for nuclei ($R_A$) and for deuterium ($R_D$) indicate that nuclear modifications of the structure functions of bound nucleons are different for the longitudinal and transverse structure functions, and that contrary to expectation from several theoretical models, $R_A< R_D$.

  18. Experimental examination of ternary fission in nuclear track emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamatkulov, K. Z.; Ambrožová, I.; Artemenkov, D. A.; Bradnova, V.; Firu, E.; Haiduc, M.; Kakona, M.; Kattabekov, R. R.; Marey, A.; Neagu, A.; Ploc, O.; Rusakova, V. V.; Stanoeva, R.; Turek, K.; Zaitsev, A. A.; Zarubin, P. I.; Zarubina, I. G.

    2017-11-01

    Activities performed in preparation for the search for ternary fission of heavy nuclei and the analysis of fragment angular correlations with nuclear track emulsion and an automated microscope are detailed. Surface irradiation of nuclear emulsion by a Cf source was initiated. Planar events containing nothing but fragment triples were found and studied.

  19. Nuclear Effects in Extraction of Polarized Structure Functions of the Neutron at Large x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheswari, Dhiraj; Sargsian, Misak

    2017-09-01

    Currently there are active experimental efforts to extract the deep inelastic polarized structure functions of neutron from experiments in which polarized electron scatters off the polarized deuteron or 3He target. Special emphasize in these experiments is given to the large Bjorken x region where predictions of different QCD models largely diverge. The extraction of the neutron structure functions at large Bjorken x from nuclear DIS data is very sensitive to nuclear effects due to the correspondence of the large x region to the large internal momenta of bound nucleon in the nucleus. To account for these nuclear effects, we developed a theoretical approach for calculation of nuclear DIS scattering based on light-front approximation which allows to account for the relativistic effects of bound nucleon motion in the self consistent way. We present the model and the extraction of the polarized neutron DIS structure functions from the existing deuteron and 3He data. Supported by US Department of Energy Grant.

  20. Nuclear Structures Surrounding Internal Lamin Invaginations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Legartová, Soňa; Stixová, Lenka; Laur, O.; Kozubek, Stanislav; Sehnalová, Petra; Bártová, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 3 (2014), s. 476-487 ISSN 0730-2312 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD11020 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : LAMINS * NUCLEAR PORES * CHROMATIN Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.263, year: 2014

  1. Review of nuclear data improvement needs for nuclear radiation measurement techniques used at the CEA experimental reactor facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Destouches Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The constant improvement of the neutron and gamma calculation codes used in experimental nuclear reactors goes hand in hand with that of the associated nuclear data libraries. The validation of these calculation schemes always requires the confrontation with integral experiments performed in experimental reactors to be completed. Nuclear data of interest, straight as cross sections, or elaborated ones such as reactivity, are always derived from a reaction rate measurement which is the only measurable parameter in a nuclear sensor. So, in order to derive physical parameters from the electric signal of the sensor, one needs specific nuclear data libraries. This paper presents successively the main features of the measurement techniques used in the CEA experimental reactor facilities for the on-line and offline neutron/gamma flux characterizations: reactor dosimetry, neutron flux measurements with miniature fission chambers and Self Power Neutron Detector (SPND and gamma flux measurements with chamber ionization and TLD. For each technique, the nuclear data necessary for their interpretation will be presented, the main identified needs for improvement identified and an analysis of their impact on the quality of the measurement. Finally, a synthesis of the study will be done.

  2. Stress Management and Nuclear Anxiety: A Structured Group Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisio, Thomas A.; Crisan, Pamela

    1984-01-01

    Describes a structured workshop in which group members explore their fears of nuclear holocaust and the effects this fear has had on their lives. By using logotherapy ideals, the participants create a renewed sense of purpose and hope. (Author)

  3. Nuclear structure notes on element 115 decay chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, D.; Sarmiento, L. G.; Forsberg, U.

    2015-10-01

    Hitherto collected data on more than hundred α-decay chains stemming from element 115 are combined to probe some aspects of the underlying nuclear structure of the heaviest atomic nuclei yet created in the laboratory.

  4. Nuclear Structure Notes on Element 115 Decay Chains

    OpenAIRE

    Rudolph, Dirk; Sarmiento, Luis; Forsberg, Ulrika

    2015-01-01

    Hitherto collected data on more than hundred α-decay chains stemming from element 115 are combined to probe some aspects of the underlying nuclear structure of the heaviest atomic nuclei yet created in the laboratory.

  5. Determination of Structures of Proteins in Solution using Nuclear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 8. Determination of Structures of Proteins in Solution using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Siddhartha P Sarma. Research News Volume 8 Issue 8 August 2003 pp 86-99 ...

  6. PREFACE: 11th International Spring Seminar on Nuclear Physics: Shell Model and Nuclear Structure - achievements of the past two decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The 11th International Seminar on Nuclear Physics was held in Ischia from May 12 to May 16, 2014. This Seminar was dedicated to Aldo Covello, who has been the promoter of this series of meetings, which started in Sorrento in 1986 and continued with meetings held every two or three years in the Naples area. Aldo's idea was to offer to a group of researchers, actively working in selected fields of Nuclear Physics, the opportunity to confront their points of view in a lively and informal way. The choice for the period of the year, Spring, as well as the sites chosen reflected this intent. The first meeting was of a purely theoretical nature, but it was immediately clear that the scope of these conferences needed to be enlarged calling into play the experimental community. Then, starting from the second meeting, all the following ones have been characterized by fruitful discussion between theoretical and experimental researchers on current achievements and future developments of nuclear structure. This may be read, in fact, as one of the motivating factors for Aldo's election as Fellow of the American Physical Society in 2008 "... for his outstanding contributions to the international nuclear physics community by providing, for over two decades, a venue for theorists and experimentalists to share their latest ideas." The present meeting, organized by Aldo's former students and with the benefit of his suggestions, has maintained this tradition. The title "Shell model and nuclear structure: achievements of the past two decades" recalls that of the 2nd International Spring Seminar "Shell Model and Nuclear Structure: where do we stand?". The main aim of this 11th Seminar was, in fact, to discuss the changes of the past two decades on our view of nuclei in terms of shell structure as well as the perspectives of the shell model, which has been one of the key points in Aldo's research. This point is well accounted by the Opening Speech of Igal Talmi, one of the fathers of the

  7. Nuclear Structure Studies of Exotic Nuclei with Radioactive Ion Beams A Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winger, Jeff Allen [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2016-04-21

    Beta-decay spectroscopy provides important information on nuclear structure and properties needed to understand topics as widely varied as fundamental nuclear astrophysics to applied nuclear reactor design. However, there are significant limitations of our knowledge due to an inability to experimentally measure everything. Therefore, it is often necessary to rely on theoretical calculations which need to be vetted with experimental results. The focus of this report will be results from experimental research performed by the Principal Investigator (PI) and his research group at Mississippi State University in which the group played the lead role in proposing, implementing, performing and analyzing the experiment. This research was carried out at both the National Superconduction Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University and the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The primary emphasis of the research was the use of \\bdec spectroscopy as a tool to understand the evolution of nuclear structure in neutron-rich nuclei which could then be applied to improve theory and to increase the overall knowledge of nuclear structure.

  8. Nuclear microscopy of sperm cell elemental structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bench, G.S.; Balhorn, R.; Friz, A.M.; Freeman, S.P.H.T.

    1994-09-28

    Theories suggest there is a link between protamine concentrations in individual sperm and male fertility. Previously, biochemical analyses have used pooled samples containing millions of sperm to determine protamine concentrations. These methods have not been able to determine what percentage of morphologically normal sperm are biochemically defective and potentially infertile. Nuclear microscopy has been utilized to measure elemental profiles at the single sperm level. By measuring the amount of phosphorus and sulfur, the total DNA and protamine content in individual sperm from fertile bull and mouse semen have been determined. These values agree with results obtained from other biochemical analyses. Nuclear microscopy shows promise for measuring elemental profiles in the chromatin of individual sperm. The technique may be able to resolve theories regarding the importance of protamines to male fertility and identify biochemical defects responsible for certain types of male infertility.

  9. Report on aging of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1996-03-01

    The Structural Aging Program provides the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments of nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures. The program was organized under four task areas: Program Management, Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technology, and Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. Under these tasks, over 90 papers and reports were prepared addressing pertinent aspects associated with aging management of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures. Contained in this report is a summary of program results in the form of information related to longevity of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, a Structural Materials Information Center presenting data and information on the time variation of concrete materials under the influence of environmental stressors and aging factors, in-service inspection and condition assessments techniques, repair materials and methods, evaluation of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current and future condition assessments. Recommendations for future activities are also provided. 308 refs., 61 figs., 50 tabs.

  10. Experimental Studies of Light-Ion Nuclear Reactions Using Low-Energy RI Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Abe, K.; Shimuzu, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Hashimoto, T.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Rapisarda, G. G.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Romano, S.; Kubono, S.; Iwasa, N.; Teranishi, T.; Kawabata, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, T.; Coc, A.; de Sereville, N.; Hammache, F.; Kiss, G.; Bishop, S.

    CRIB (CNS Radio-Isotope Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator of Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), the University of Tokyo. Studies on nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure, and other interests have been performed using the RI beams at CRIB, forming international collaborations. A striking method to study astrophyiscal reactions involving radioactive nuclei is the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Several astrophysical alpha-induced reactions have been be studied with that method at CRIB. A recent example is on the α resonant scattering with a radioactive 7Be beam. This study is related to the astrophysical 7Be(α , γ ) reactions, important at hot p-p chain and ν p-process in supernovae. There have been measurements based on several indirect methods, such as the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) and Trojan horse method (THM). The first THM measurement using an RI beam has been performed at CRIB, to study the 18F(p, α )15O reaction at astrophysical energies via the three body reaction 2H(18F, α 15O)n. The 18F(p, α )15O reaction rate is crucial to understand the 511-keV γ -ray production in nova explosion phenomena, and we successfully evaluated the reaction cross section at novae temperature and below experimentally for the first time.

  11. Mean field approach to nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarewicz, W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-01

    Several examples of mean-field calculations, relevant to the recent and planned low-spin experimental works, are presented. The perspectives for future studies (mainly related to spectroscopy of exotic nuclei) are reviewd.

  12. Nuclear structure at particle drip lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobaczewski, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Warsaw Univ. (Poland); Hamamoto, I. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Lund Inst. of Tech. (Sweden); Nazarewicz, W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Warsaw Univ. (Poland)]|[Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics; Sheikh, J.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research, Bombay (India)

    1993-12-31

    Several examples of mean-field calculations, relevant to the recent and planned low-spin experimental works, are presented. The perspectives for future studies (mainly related to spectroscopy of exotic nuclei) are reviewed.

  13. Nuclear structure and Indian Clover array

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    -UD pelletron at TIFR has been presented. The experimental facilities developed for these studies are described. Some of the interesting results obtained for mass 70 to 80 nuclei are presented. The development of a recoil mass spectrometer ...

  14. Nuclear structures: Twinning and modulation in crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petříček, Václav; Dušek, Michal

    2017-10-01

    Crystal structure analysis is a standard technique routinely applied to single crystals as well as powders. However the process is not so straightforward if the crystal sample is affected by twinning or if the structure is modulated. In such cases the standard procedures are not directly applicable. The main purpose of this contribution is to show how to solve and refine such difficult structures. While for twinned structures the basic property of crystal - translation symmetry in three dimensional space-remains valid, for modulated crystals a special superspace theory must be exploited in order to describe the atomic structure with crystallographic methods generalized for superspace.

  15. Experimental and computational investigation of flow of pebbles in a pebble bed nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khane, Vaibhav B.

    The Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) is a 4th generation nuclear reactor which is conceptually similar to moving bed reactors used in the chemical and petrochemical industries. In a PBR core, nuclear fuel in the form of pebbles moves slowly under the influence of gravity. Due to the dynamic nature of the core, a thorough understanding about slow and dense granular flow of pebbles is required from both a reactor safety and performance evaluation point of view. In this dissertation, a new integrated experimental and computational study of granular flow in a PBR has been performed. Continuous pebble re-circulation experimental set-up, mimicking flow of pebbles in a PBR, is designed and developed. Experimental investigation of the flow of pebbles in a mimicked test reactor was carried out for the first time using non-invasive radioactive particle tracking (RPT) and residence time distribution (RTD) techniques to measure the pebble trajectory, velocity, overall/zonal residence times, flow patterns etc. The tracer trajectory length and overall/zonal residence time is found to increase with change in pebble's initial seeding position from the center towards the wall of the test reactor. Overall and zonal average velocities of pebbles are found to decrease from the center towards the wall. Discrete element method (DEM) based simulations of test reactor geometry were also carried out using commercial code EDEM(TM) and simulation results were validated using the obtained benchmark experimental data. In addition, EDEM(TM) based parametric sensitivity study of interaction properties was carried out which suggests that static friction characteristics play an important role from a packed/pebble beds structural characterization point of view. To make the RPT technique viable for practical applications and to enhance its accuracy, a novel and dynamic technique for RPT calibration was designed and developed. Preliminary feasibility results suggest that it can be implemented as a non

  16. Few-Body Problems in Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, H.O.U.

    2013-01-01

    The 3α-reaction is one of the key reactions in nuclear astrophysics. Since it is a three-body reaction direct measurement is impossible, and therefore the reaction rate must be estimated theoretically. In this contribution I will discuss uncertainties in this reaction rate both at very low...

  17. Structuring Cooperative Nuclear RIsk Reduction Initiatives with China.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, Larry [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Reinhardt, Jason Christian [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Hecker, Siegfried [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The Stanford Center for International Security and Cooperation engaged several Chinese nuclear organizations in cooperative research that focused on responses to radiological and nuclear terrorism. The objective was to identify joint research initiatives to reduce the global dangers of such threats and to pursue initial technical collaborations in several high priority areas. Initiatives were identified in three primary research areas: 1) detection and interdiction of smuggled nuclear materials; 2) nuclear forensics; and 3) radiological (“dirty bomb”) threats and countermeasures. Initial work emphasized the application of systems and risk analysis tools, which proved effective in structuring the collaborations. The extensive engagements between national security nuclear experts in China and the U.S. during the research strengthened professional relationships between these important communities.

  18. Accelerating Full Configuration Interaction Calculations for Nuclear Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chao; Sternberg, Philip; Maris, Pieter; Ng, Esmond; Sosonkina, Masha; Le, Hung Viet; Vary, James; Yang, Chao

    2008-04-14

    One of the emerging computational approaches in nuclear physics is the full configuration interaction (FCI) method for solving the many-body nuclear Hamiltonian in a sufficiently large single-particle basis space to obtain exact answers - either directly or by extrapolation. The lowest eigenvalues and correspondingeigenvectors for very large, sparse and unstructured nuclear Hamiltonian matrices are obtained and used to evaluate additional experimental quantities. These matrices pose a significant challenge to the design and implementation of efficient and scalable algorithms for obtaining solutions on massively parallel computer systems. In this paper, we describe the computational strategies employed in a state-of-the-art FCI code MFDn (Many Fermion Dynamics - nuclear) as well as techniques we recently developed to enhance the computational efficiency of MFDn. We will demonstrate the current capability of MFDn and report the latest performance improvement we have achieved. We will also outline our future research directions.

  19. Structural integrity of materials in nuclear service: a bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heddleson, F.A.

    1977-06-07

    This report contains 679 abstracts from the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) computer file dated 1973 through 1976 covering material properties with respect to structural integrity. All materials important to the nuclear industry (except concrete) are covered for mechanical properties, chemical properties, corrosion, fracture or failure, radiation damage, creep, cracking, and swelling. Keyword, author, and permuted-title indexes are included for the convenience of the user.

  20. Review of nuclear physics experimental data for space radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W; Miller, Jack

    2012-11-01

    The available nuclear fragmentation data relevant to space radiation studies are reviewed. It is found that there are serious gaps in the data. Helium data are missing in the intervals 280 MeV n-3 GeV n and >15 GeV n. Carbon data are missing >15 GeV n. Iron projectile data are missing at all energies except in the interval 280 MeV n-3 GeV n.

  1. Experimental study for quantative aging evaluation of epoxy liner in BWR nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, H. S. [KEPRI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Y. C.; Kim, N. Y. [Korea Univ. of Educational Technology, Chonnon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this study is an experimental approach to quantitatively evaluate the aging status of epoxy coating onto containment structure in BWR nuclear power plant. Based on accelerated aging experiment for 64 days, adhesion test was performed to evaluate an physical bonding. To compare with adhesion data, both impedance data by UT and data by thermal gravimetric analysis were obtained during experiment. At almost 50% of adhesion force decrease, it was identified that aging phenamena of epoxy such as pine hole, blistering was discovered. Coating to establish aging status of epoxy, relations among three kinds of different data were analyze. By compatibility of these data, physical aging situation of as-built epoxy coating was figured out. The possibility to develop new methodology of time-dependent aging status on epoxy coating was identified.

  2. Radiation Damage in Nuclear Fuel for Advanced Burner Reactors: Modeling and Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Niels Gronbech; Asta, Mark; Ozolins, Nigel Browning' Vidvuds; de Walle, Axel van; Wolverton, Christopher

    2011-12-29

    The consortium has completed its existence and we are here highlighting work and accomplishments. As outlined in the proposal, the objective of the work was to advance the theoretical understanding of advanced nuclear fuel materials (oxides) toward a comprehensive modeling strategy that incorporates the different relevant scales involved in radiation damage in oxide fuels. Approaching this we set out to investigate and develop a set of directions: 1) Fission fragment and ion trajectory studies through advanced molecular dynamics methods that allow for statistical multi-scale simulations. This work also includes an investigation of appropriate interatomic force fields useful for the energetic multi-scale phenomena of high energy collisions; 2) Studies of defect and gas bubble formation through electronic structure and Monte Carlo simulations; and 3) an experimental component for the characterization of materials such that comparisons can be obtained between theory and experiment.

  3. Experimental Study of the Nuclear Rotational Motion with Statistical Analysis Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Leoni, S; Frattini, S; Montingelli, G; Vigezzi, E; Døssing, T; Herskind, B; Matsuo, M

    1999-01-01

    The gamma-decay of excited rotating nuclei in the high level density region a few MeV above the yrast line has been studied through a statistical analysis of the fluctuation of counts in gamma-gamma coincident spectra. In particular, making use of the covariance technique between spectra gated by different intrinsic configurations, one can measure how the cascades feeding into different selected bands are similar. The aim is to learn about the transition between order to chaos in the nuclear many-body system, in terms of the validity of selection rules associated with the quantum numbers of the intrinsic structure. Experimental results on the nucleus sup 1 sup 6 sup 4 Yb are presented and compared to model predictions based on cranked shell model calculations including a two-body residual interaction.

  4. Analysis of statistical model properties from discrete nuclear structure data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firestone, Richard B.

    2012-02-01

    Experimental M1, E1, and E2 photon strengths have been compiled from experimental data in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) and the Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF). Over 20,000 Weisskopf reduced transition probabilities were recovered from the ENSDF and EGAF databases. These transition strengths have been analyzed for their dependence on transition energies, initial and final level energies, spin/parity dependence, and nuclear deformation. ENSDF BE1W values were found to increase exponentially with energy, possibly consistent with the Axel-Brink hypothesis, although considerable excess strength observed for transitions between 4-8 MeV. No similar energy dependence was observed in EGAF or ARC data. BM1W average values were nearly constant at all energies above 1 MeV with substantial excess strength below 1 MeV and between 4-8 MeV. BE2W values decreased exponentially by a factor of 1000 from 0 to 16 MeV. The distribution of ENSDF transition probabilities for all multipolarities could be described by a lognormal statistical distribution. BE1W, BM1W, and BE2W strengths all increased substantially for initial transition level energies between 4-8 MeV possibly due to dominance of spin-flip and Pygmy resonance transitions at those excitations. Analysis of the average resonance capture data indicated no transition probability dependence on final level spins or energies between 0-3 MeV. The comparison of favored to unfavored transition probabilities for odd-A or odd-Z targets indicated only partial support for the expected branching intensity ratios with many unfavored transitions having nearly the same strength as favored ones. Average resonance capture BE2W transition strengths generally increased with greater deformation. Analysis of ARC data suggest that there is a large E2 admixture in M1 transitions with the mixing ratio δ ≈ 1.0. The ENSDF reduced transition strengths were considerably stronger than those derived from capture gamma ray

  5. Analysis of statistical model properties from discrete nuclear structure data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firestone Richard B.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimental M1, E1, and E2 photon strengths have been compiled from experimental data in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF and the Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF. Over 20,000 Weisskopf reduced transition probabilities were recovered from the ENSDF and EGAF databases. These transition strengths have been analyzed for their dependence on transition energies, initial and final level energies, spin/parity dependence, and nuclear deformation. ENSDF BE1W values were found to increase exponentially with energy, possibly consistent with the Axel-Brink hypothesis, although considerable excess strength observed for transitions between 4-8 MeV. No similar energy dependence was observed in EGAF or ARC data. BM1W average values were nearly constant at all energies above 1 MeV with substantial excess strength below 1 MeV and between 4-8 MeV. BE2W values decreased exponentially by a factor of 1000 from 0 to 16 MeV. The distribution of ENSDF transition probabilities for all multipolarities could be described by a lognormal statistical distribution. BE1W, BM1W, and BE2W strengths all increased substantially for initial transition level energies between 4-8 MeV possibly due to dominance of spin-flip and Pygmy resonance transitions at those excitations. Analysis of the average resonance capture data indicated no transition probability dependence on final level spins or energies between 0-3 MeV. The comparison of favored to unfavored transition probabilities for odd-A or odd-Z targets indicated only partial support for the expected branching intensity ratios with many unfavored transitions having nearly the same strength as favored ones. Average resonance capture BE2W transition strengths generally increased with greater deformation. Analysis of ARC data suggest that there is a large E2 admixture in M1 transitions with the mixing ratio δ ≈ 1.0. The ENSDF reduced transition strengths were considerably stronger than those derived from

  6. Cross-checking of Large Evaluated and Experimental Nuclear Reaction Databases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeydina, O. [Société de Calcul Mathématique, Paris (France); Koning, A.J. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Petten (Netherlands); Soppera, N. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank, Issy-les-Moulineaux (France); Raffanel, D. [Société de Calcul Mathématique, Paris (France); Bossant, M. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank, Issy-les-Moulineaux (France); Dupont, E., E-mail: data@oecd-nea.org [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank, Issy-les-Moulineaux (France); Beauzamy, B. [Société de Calcul Mathématique, Paris (France)

    2014-06-15

    Automated methods are presented for the verification of large experimental and evaluated nuclear reaction databases (e.g. EXFOR, JEFF, TENDL). These methods allow an assessment of the overall consistency of the data and detect aberrant values in both evaluated and experimental databases.

  7. Cross-checking of Large Evaluated and Experimental Nuclear Reaction Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeydina, O.; Koning, A. J.; Soppera, N.; Raffanel, D.; Bossant, M.; Dupont, E.; Beauzamy, B.

    2014-06-01

    Automated methods are presented for the verification of large experimental and evaluated nuclear reaction databases (e.g. EXFOR, JEFF, TENDL). These methods allow an assessment of the overall consistency of the data and detect aberrant values in both evaluated and experimental databases.

  8. Nuclear Structure of the Heaviest Elements – Investigated at SHIP-GSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heßberger Fritz Peter

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The quest for the heaviest nuclei that can exist is a basic topic in natural science as their stability is characterized by a delicate interplay of short range nuclear forces acting between the nucleons (protons and neutrons and long-range Coulomb forces acting solely between charged particles, i.e. the protons. As the stability of a nucleus is strongly correlated to its structure, understanding the nuclear structure of heaviest nuclei is presently a main challenge of experimental and theoretical investigations concerning the field of Superheavy Elements. At the velocity filter SHIP at GSI Darmstadt an extensive program on nuclear structure investigations has been started about a decade ago. The project covered both as well systematic investigations of single particle levels in odd-mass isotopes populated by α-decay as investigation of two- or fourquasi-particle states forming K isomers and was supplemented by direct mass measurements at SHIPTRAP and investigation of spontaneous fission properties. Recent experimental studies allowed to extend the systematics of low lying levels in N = 151 and N = 153 up to 255Rf and 259Sg, investigation of possible relations between nuclear structure and fission properties of odd-mass nuclei and investigation of shell strengths at N = 152 and towards N = 162.

  9. FFTF reload core nuclear design for increased experimental capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothrock, R.B.; Nelson, J.V.; Dobbin, K.D.; Bennett, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    In anticipation of continued growth in the FTR experimental irradiations program, the enrichments for the next batches of reload driver fuel to be manufactured have been increased to provide a substantially enlarged experimental reactivity allowance. The enrichments for these fuel assemblies, termed ''Cores 3 and 4,'' were selected to meet the following objectives and constraints: (1) maintain a reactor power capability of 400 MW (based on an evaluation of driver fuel centerline melting probability at 15 percent overpower); (2) provide a peak neutron flux of nominally 7 x 10/sup 15/ n/cm/sup 2/-sec, with a minimum acceptable value of 95 percent of this (i.e., 6.65 x 10/sup 15/ n/cm/sup 2/-sec); and (3) provide the maximum experimental reactivity allowance that is consistent with the above constraints.

  10. High Temperature Steam Corrosion of Cladding for Nuclear Applications: Experimental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, Kevin M; Garnier, John E; Sergey Rashkeev; Michael V. Glazoff; George W. Griffith; Shannong M. Bragg-Sitton

    2013-01-01

    Stability of cladding materials under off-normal conditions is an important issue for the safe operation of light water nuclear reactors. Metals, ceramics, and metal/ceramic composites are being investigated as substitutes for traditional zirconium-based cladding. To support down-selection of these advanced materials and designs, a test apparatus was constructed to study the onset and evolution of cladding oxidation, and deformation behavior of cladding materials, under loss-of-coolant accident scenarios. Preliminary oxidation tests were conducted in dry oxygen and in saturated steam/air environments at 1000OC. Tube samples of Zr-702, Zr-702 reinforced with 1 ply of a ß-SiC CMC overbraid, and sintered a-SiC were tested. Samples were induction heated by coupling to a molybdenum susceptor inside the tubes. The deformation behavior of He-pressurized tubes of Zr-702 and SiC CMC-reinforced Zr-702, heated to rupture, was also examined.

  11. Nuclear structure of {sup 231}Ac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutami, R. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 113 bis, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Borge, M.J.G. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 113 bis, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: borge@iem.cfmac.csic.es; Mach, H. [Department of Radiation Sciences, ISV, Uppsala University, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Kurcewicz, W. [Department of Physics, University of Warsaw, Pl-00 681 Warsaw (Poland); Fraile, L.M. [Departamento Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); ISOLDE, PH Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Gulda, K. [Department of Physics, University of Warsaw, Pl-00 681 Warsaw (Poland); Aas, A.J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, PO Box 1033, Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Garcia-Raffi, L.M. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC - Universidad de Valencia, Apdo. 22805, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Lovhoiden, G. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, PO Box 1048, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Martinez, T.; Rubio, B.; Tain, J.L. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC - Universidad de Valencia, Apdo. 22805, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Tengblad, O. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 113 bis, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); ISOLDE, PH Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2008-10-15

    The low-energy structure of {sup 231}Ac has been investigated by means of {gamma} ray spectroscopy following the {beta}{sup -} decay of {sup 231}Ra. Multipolarities of 28 transitions have been established by measuring conversion electrons with a MINI-ORANGE electron spectrometer. The decay scheme of {sup 231}Ra {yields}{sup 231}Ac has been constructed for the first time. The Advanced Time Delayed {beta}{gamma}{gamma}(t) method has been used to measure the half-lives of five levels. The moderately fast B(E1) transition rates derived suggest that the octupole effects, albeit weak, are still present in this exotic nucleus.

  12. Nuclear magnetic and quadrupole moments for nuclear structure research on exotic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Neyens, G

    2003-01-01

    One of the key issues in current nuclear physics research is to investigate the properties of so-called 'exotic nuclei' and of 'exotic nuclear structures'. Exotic nuclei are nuclei with a proton-to-neutron ratio that is very different from the proton-to-neutron ratio in stable nuclei (a technical term related to this ratio is the 'isospin'). We define exotic nuclear structures as excitation modes of nuclei that have a very different structure than the structure (or shape) of the nuclear ground state. By putting the nucleons in a nucleus to extreme conditions of isospin and excitation energy one can investigate details of one of the four basic forces in nature: the strong force which binds the nucleons together to form a bound nucleus. While the basic properties of the strong nucleon-nucleon interaction are known from investigating the properties of nuclei near the 'valley of stability', recent developments in the study of exotic nuclei have demonstrated that specific properties of the strong interaction, such...

  13. Nuclear fission: a review of experimental advances and phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreyev, A. N.; Nishio, K.; Schmidt, K.-H.

    2018-01-01

    In the last two decades, through technological, experimental and theoretical advances, the situation in experimental fission studies has changed dramatically. With the use of advanced production and detection techniques both much more detailed and precise information can now be obtained for the traditional regions of fission research and, crucially, new regions of nuclei have become routinely accessible for fission studies. This work first of all reviews the recent developments in experimental fission techniques, in particular the resurgence of transfer-induced fission reactions with light and heavy ions, the emerging use of inverse-kinematic approaches, both at Coulomb and relativistic energies, and of fission studies with radioactive beams. The emphasis on the fission-fragment mass and charge distributions will be made in this work, though some of the other fission observables, such as prompt neutron and γ-ray emission will also be reviewed. A particular attention will be given to the low-energy fission in the so far scarcely explored nuclei in the very neutron-deficient lead region. They recently became the focus for several complementary experimental studies, such as β-delayed fission with radioactive beams at ISOLDE(CERN), Coulex-induced fission of relativistic secondary beams at FRS(GSI), and several prompt fusion–fission studies. The synergy of these approaches allows a unique insight in the new region of asymmetric fission around {\\hspace{0pt}}180 Hg, recently discovered at ISOLDE. Recent extensive theoretical efforts in this region will also be outlined. The unprecedented high-quality data for fission fragments, completely identified in Z and A, by means of reactions in inverse kinematics at FRS(GSI) and VAMOS(GANIL) will be also reviewed. These experiments explored an extended range of mercury-to-californium elements, spanning from the neutron-deficient to neutron-rich nuclides, and covering both asymmetric, symmetric and transitional fission regions

  14. Detailed requirements for a next generation nuclear data structure.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-07-05

    This document attempts to compile the requirements for the top-levels of a hierarchical arrangement of nuclear data such as found in the ENDF format. This set of requirements will be used to guide the development of a new data structure to replace the legacy ENDF format.

  15. Structure of nuclear transition matrix elements for neutrinoless ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The structure of nuclear transition matrix elements (NTMEs) required for the study of neutrinoless double- decay within light Majorana neutrino mass mechanism is disassembled in the PHFB model. The NTMEs are calculated using a set of HFB intrinsic wave functions, the reliability of which has been previously ...

  16. Structure of nuclear transition matrix elements for neutrinoless ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The structure of nuclear transition matrix elements (NTMEs) required for the study of neutrinoless double-β decay within light Majorana neutrino mass mechanism is disassembled in the PHFB model. The NTMEs are calculated using a set of HFB intrinsic wave functions, the reliability of which has been previously ...

  17. Nuclear shapes: from earliest ideas to multiple shape coexisting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyde, K.; Wood, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    The concept of the atomic nucleus being characterized by an intrinsic property such as shape came as a result of high precision hyperfine studies in the field of atomic physics, which indicated a non-spherical nuclear charge distribution. Herein, we describe the various steps taken through ingenious experimentation and bold theoretical suggestions that mapped the way for later work in the early 50s by Aage Bohr, Ben Mottelson and James Rainwater. We lay out a long and winding road that marked, in the period of 50s to 70s, the way shell-model and collective-model concepts were reconciled. A rapid increase in both accelerator and detection methods (70s towards the early 2000s) opened new vistas into nuclear shapes, and their coexistence, in various regions of the nuclear mass table. Next, we outline a possible unified view of nuclear shapes: emphasizing decisive steps taken as well as questions remaining, next to the theoretical efforts that could result in an emerging understanding of nuclear shapes, building on the nucleus considered as a strongly interacting system of nucleons as the microscopic starting point.

  18. Nuclear structure of light Ca and heavy Cr isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buerger, A.

    2007-07-01

    -energy Coulomb excitation of radioactive beams. Prior to this experiment, the assumption of a sub-shell closure was based only on systematics of excitation energies of the first 2{sup +} states in Cr, Ti, and Ca isotopes. The small B(E2) value for {sup 56}Cr is in agreement with these indications. Further evidence for a N=32 shell gap has meanwhile been found in the development of B(E2) values in Ti isotopes and the evolution of E(4{sup +})/E(2{sup +}) ratios for Cr and Ti. While the experimental evidence has firmly established a sub-shell closure at N=32, calculations are, at present, not able to reproduce the behavior of the B(E2) values, whereas the evolution of excitation energies is well described. Both results touch the limits of present nuclear structure models: in the Cr isotopes, the B(E2) evolution cannot yet be reproduced, and in the Ca isotopes, a consistent picture of mirror energy differences as well as a successful calculation of cross sections are missing. As a result of this work, new experimental data are available for future improvements of such calculations. (orig.)

  19. Summary Report of the Workshop on The Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semkova, V. [IAEA Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Pritychenko, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The Workshop on the Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database (EXFOR) was held at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 6 to 10 October 2014. The workshop was organized to discuss various aspects of the EXFOR compilation process including compilation rules, different techniques for nuclear reaction data measurements, software developments, etc. A summary of the presentations and discussions that took place during the workshop is reported here.

  20. Introduction of Nuclear Instrumentations and Radiation Measurements in Experimental Fast Reactor 「JOYO」

    OpenAIRE

    大戸 敏弘; 鈴木 惣十

    1992-01-01

    This report introduces the nuclear instrumentation system and major R&D (research and development) activities using radiation measurement techniques in Experimental Fast Reactor "JOYO". In the introduction of the nuclear instrumentation system, following items are described; (1)system function (2)roles as a reactor plant equipment (3)specifications and charactelistics of neutron detectors, (4)construction and layout of the system. For reactor dosimetry at various irradiation tests and surveil...

  1. EXFOR – a global experimental nuclear reaction data repository: Status and new developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semkova Valentina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC have collaborated since the 1960s on the worldwide collection, compilation and dissemination of experimental nuclear reaction data. New publications are systematically complied, and all agreed data assembled and incorporated within the EXFOR database. Recent upgrades to achieve greater completeness of the contents are described, along with reviews and adjustments of the compilation rules for specific types of data.

  2. Crystal Structure of the Herpesvirus Nuclear Egress Complex Provides Insights into Inner Nuclear Membrane Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzviya Zeev-Ben-Mordehai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is typically mediated through nuclear pore complexes, herpesvirus capsids exit the nucleus via a unique vesicular pathway. Together, the conserved herpesvirus proteins pUL31 and pUL34 form the heterodimeric nuclear egress complex (NEC, which, in turn, mediates the formation of tight-fitting membrane vesicles around capsids at the inner nuclear membrane. Here, we present the crystal structure of the pseudorabies virus NEC. The structure revealed that a zinc finger motif in pUL31 and an extensive interaction network between the two proteins stabilize the complex. Comprehensive mutational analyses, characterized both in situ and in vitro, indicated that the interaction network is not redundant but rather complementary. Fitting of the NEC crystal structure into the recently determined cryoEM-derived hexagonal lattice, formed in situ by pUL31 and pUL34, provided details on the molecular basis of NEC coat formation and inner nuclear membrane remodeling.

  3. Experimental aspects of quarkonia production and suppression in cold and hot nuclear matter

    CERN Document Server

    Frawley, A D

    2015-01-01

    When heavy Quarkonia are formed in collisions between between nuclei, their production cross section is modified relative to that in p+p collisions. The physical effects that cause this modification fall into two categories. Hot matter effects are due to the large energy density generated in the nuclear collision, which disrupts the formation of the quarkonium state. Cold nuclear matter effects are due to the fact that the quarkonium state is created in a nuclear target. I will review experimental aspects of quarkonia production due to both hot and cold matter effects.

  4. Archival and Dissemination of the U.S. and Canadian Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data (EXFOR Project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritychenko, Boris; Hlavac, Stanislav; Schwerer, Otto; Zerkin, Viktor

    2017-09-01

    The Exchange Format (EXFOR) or experimental nuclear reaction database and the associated Web interface provide access to the wealth of low- and intermediate-energy nuclear reaction physics data. This resource includes numerical data sets and bibliographical information for more than 22,000 experiments since the beginning of nuclear science. Analysis of the experimental data sets, recovery and archiving will be discussed. Examples of the recent developments of the data renormalization, uploads and inverse reaction calculations for nuclear science and technology applications will be presented. The EXFOR database, updated monthly, provides an essential support for nuclear data evaluation, application development and research activities. It is publicly available at the National Nuclear Data Center website http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/exfor and the International Atomic Energy Agency mirror site http://www-nds.iaea.org/exfor. This work was sponsored in part by the Office of Nuclear Physics, Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with Brookha ven Science Associates, LLC.

  5. Microscopic description of nuclear structure; La structure nucleaire decrite par les theories microscopiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girod, M.; Berger, J.F.; Peru, S.; Dancer, H. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)

    2002-07-01

    After briefly recalling the formalism of the mean field approach with an effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, the theoretical framework of the nuclear structure studies performed at CEA-DAM, applications of this theory to various nuclear systems: shape and spin isomeric states, neutron and proton rich nuclei, superheavy and hyper-heavy nuclei, and to the fission process are presented. (authors)

  6. Nuclear structure studies for the astrophysical r-process

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeiffer, B; Thielemann, F K; Walters, W B

    2001-01-01

    The production of the heaviest elements in nature occurs via the r-process, i.e. a combination of rapid neutron captures, the inverse photodisintegrations, and slower beta sup - -decays, beta-delayed processes as well as fission and possibly interactions with intense neutrino fluxes. A correct understanding and modeling requires the knowledge of nuclear properties far from stability and a detailed prescription of the astrophysical environment. Experiments at radioactive ion beam facilities have played a pioneering role in exploring the characteristics of nuclear structure in terms of masses and beta-decay properties. Initial examinations paid attention to highly unstable nuclei with magic neutron numbers and their beta-decay properties, related to the location and height of r-process peaks, while recent activities focus on the evolution of shell effects at large distances from the valley of stability. We show in site-independent applications the effect of both types of nuclear properties on r-process abundanc...

  7. Establishment of Experimental Equipment for Training of Professionals in the Nuclear Radiation Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, S. K.; Seo, K. W.; Joo, Y. C.; Kim, I. C.; Woo, C. K.; Yoo, B. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    The main purpose of this project is to establish experimental equipment for training of professionals and students in the field of radiation measurement, and settle the foundation for the advanced education system and program. The priority for the experimental equipment had been deduced by reviewing of the Nuclear Training and Education Center of KAERI and other country's training courses. Equipment for training of radiation professionals are High-Purity Germanium spectroscopic systems, alpha analyzers, and hand-held gamma/neutron inspector systems. For the basic experiments, electric personal dosimeters and a reader, radiation survey meters, and various alpha, beta and gamma radiation isotopes have been equipped. Some old or disused equipment and devices were disposed and re-arranged, and a new experiment lab had been settled for gamma spectroscopy. Along with the preparation of equipment, 14 experimental modules have been selected for practical and essential experiments training to professionals from industries, universities and research organizations. Among the modules, 7 important experiment notes had been prepared in Korea and also in English. As a consequence, these advanced radiation experimental setting would be a basis to cooperate with IAEA or other countries for international training courses. These activities would be a foundation for our contribution to the international nuclear society and for improving our nuclear competitiveness. The experimental equipment and application notes developed in this study will be used also by other training institutes and educational organizations through introducing and encouraging to use them to the nuclear society.

  8. Experimental Validation of an Integrated Controls-Structures Design Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghami, Peiman G.; Gupta, Sandeep; Elliot, Kenny B.; Walz, Joseph E.

    1996-01-01

    The first experimental validation of an integrated controls-structures design methodology for a class of large order, flexible space structures is described. Integrated redesign of the controls-structures-interaction evolutionary model, a laboratory testbed at NASA Langley, was described earlier. The redesigned structure was fabricated, assembled in the laboratory, and experimentally tested against the original structure. Experimental results indicate that the structure redesigned using the integrated design methodology requires significantly less average control power than the nominal structure with control-optimized designs, while maintaining the required line-of-sight pointing performance. Thus, the superiority of the integrated design methodology over the conventional design approach is experimentally demonstrated. Furthermore, amenability of the integrated design structure to other control strategies is evaluated, both analytically and experimentally. Using Linear-Quadratic-Guassian optimal dissipative controllers, it is observed that the redesigned structure leads to significantly improved performance with alternate controllers as well.

  9. Nuclear Structure Studies at ISOLDE and their Impact on the Astrophysical r-Process

    CERN Document Server

    Kratz, K L; Thielemann, F K; Walters, W B

    2001-01-01

    The focus of the present review is the production of the heaviest elements in nature via the r-process. A correct understanding and modeling requires the knowledge of nuclear properties far from stability and a detailed prescription of the astrophysical environment. Experiments at CERN/ISOLDE have played a pioneering role in exploring the characteristics of nuclear structure in terms of masses and beta-decay properties. Initial examinations paid attention to far unstable nuclei with magic neutron numbers related to r-process peaks, while present activities are centered on the evolution of shell effects with the distance from the valley of stability. We first show in site-independent applications the effect of both types of nuclear properties on r-process abundances. Then, we explore the results of calculations related to two different `realistic' astrophysical sites, (i) the supernova neutrino wind and (ii) neutron star mergers. We close with a list of remaining theoretical and experimental challenges needed ...

  10. Nuclear structure in cold rearrangement processes in fission and fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armbruster, P.

    1998-11-01

    In fission and fusion of heavy nuclei large numbers of nucleons are rearranged at a scale of excitation energy very small compared to the binding energy of the nuclei. The energies involved are less than 40 MeV at nuclear temperatures below 1.5 MeV. The shapes of the configurations in the rearrangement of a binary system into a monosystem in fusion, or vice versa in fission, change their elongations by as much as 8 fm, the radius of the monosystem. The dynamics of the reactions macroscopically described by a potential energy surface, inertia parameters, dissipation, and a collision energy is strongly modified by the nuclear structure of the participating nuclei. Experiments showing nuclear structure effects in fusion and fission of the heaviest nuclei are reviewed. The reaction kinematics and the multitude of isotopes involved are investigated by detector techniques and by recoil spectrometers. The advancement of the latter allows to find very small reaction branches in the range of 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -10}. The experiments reveal nuclear structure effects in all stages of the rearrangement processes. These are discussed pointing to analogies in fusion and fission on the microscopic scale, notwithstanding that both processes macroscopically are irreversible. Heavy clusters, as 132Sn, 208Pb, nuclei with closed shell configurations N=82,126, Z=50,82 survive in large parts of the nuclear rearrangement. They determine the asymmetry in the mass distribution of low energy fission, and they allow to synthesise superheavy elements, until now up to element 112. Experiments on the cold rearrangement in fission and fusion are presented. Here, in the range of excitation energies below 12 MeV the phenomena are observed most convincingly. (orig.)

  11. Basic Nuclear Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington, DC.

    Basic concepts of nuclear structures, radiation, nuclear reactions, and health physics are presented in this text, prepared for naval officers. Applications to the area of nuclear power are described in connection with pressurized water reactors, experimental boiling water reactors, homogeneous reactor experiments, and experimental breeder…

  12. EVALUATED NUCLEAR STRUCTURE DATA FILE -- A MANUAL FOR PREPARATION OF DATA SETS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TULI, J.K.

    2001-02-01

    This manual describes the organization and structure of the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). This computer-based file is maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the international Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network. For every mass number (presently, A {le} 293), the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) contains evaluated structure information. For masses A {ge} 44, this information is published in the Nuclear Data Sheets; for A < 44, ENSDF is based on compilations published in the journal Nuclear Physics. The information in ENSDF is updated by mass chain or by nuclide with a varying cycle time dependent on the availability of new information.

  13. Evaluated nuclear structure data file: A manual for preparation of data sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuli, J.K.

    1987-04-01

    This manual describes the organization and structure of the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). This computer-based file is maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the international Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network. For every mass number (presently, Aless than or equal to263), the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) contains evaluated structure information. For masses Agreater than or equal to45, this information is documented in the Nuclear Data Sheets; for A<45, ENSDF is based on compilations published in the journal Nuclear Physics. The information in ENSDF is updated by mass chains with a present cycle time of approximately six years.

  14. Numerical and Experimental Calibration of a Calorimetric Sample Cell Dedicated to Nuclear Heating Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, J.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Lyoussi, A.; Merroun, O.; Carette, M.; Janulyte, A.; Zerega, Y.; Andre, J.; Bignan, G.; Chauvin, J.-P.; Fourmentel, D.; Gonnier, C.; Guimbal, P.; Malo, J.-Y.; Villard, J.-F.

    2012-12-01

    Online nuclear measurements inside experimental channels of material testing reactors (MTRs) are needed for experimental works (to design mock-ups) and for numerical works (input data) in order to better understanding complex phenomena occurring during the accelerated ageing of materials and the irradiation of nuclear fuels. In this paper, we focus only on one kind of measurements: nuclear heating performed by means of a radiometric calorimeter. The aims of numerical and experimental works are firstly to optimize the sensor response: in particular the sensitivity for new energy deposit ranges (new lower nuclear heating level in the reflector), and then to miniaturize and adapt this sensor for irradiation conditions in the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR). A calorimeter, developed previously by the CEA, is studied. It corresponds to a graphite differential calorimeter. It is used with a nonadiabatic mode called heat flow mode too. Experimental calibration of the sample cell is presented. In that case, energy deposit is simulated by Joule effect and the sample cell is inserted into a bath at a regulated temperature and controlled flow. The response of the sensor is discussed versus electrical power imposed for two flow rates. Numerical works show the influence of the gas conductivity and of specific dimensions on the cell sensitivity.

  15. Microscopic Nuclear Structure and Reaction Calculations in the FMD Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, T.; Feldmeier, H.; Langanke, K.

    We present here a first application of the Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD) approach to low-energy nuclear reactions, namely the $^3$He($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^7$Be radiative capture reaction. We divide the Hilbert space into an external region where the system is described as $^3$He and $^4$He clusters interacting only via the Coulomb interaction and an internal region where the nuclear interaction will polarize the clusters. Polarized configurations are obtained by a variation after parity and angular momentum projection procedure with respect to the parameters of all single particle states. A constraint on the radius of the intrinsic many-body state is employed to obtain polarized clusters at desired distances. The boundary conditions for bound and scattering states are implemented using the Bloch operator. The FMD calculations reproduce the correct energy for the centroid of the $3/2^-$ and $1/2^-$ bound states in $^7$Be. The charge radius of the ground state is in good agreement with recent experimental results. The FMD calculations also describe well the experimental phase shift data in the $1/2^+$, $3/2^+$ and $5/2^+$ channels that are important for the capture reaction at low energies. Using the bound and scattering many-body wave functions we calculate the radiative capture cross section. The calculated $S$ factor agrees very well, both in absolute normalization and energy dependence, with the recent experimental data from the Weizmann, LUNA, Seattle and ERNA experiments.

  16. Feasibility Study on The Modulization of Structure and System Facility for Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K.S. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2002-07-01

    This final report is a results of Study on applicable to SC(Steel Concrete) structure for NPPS and experimentation of SC wall-Support joint carried out by KEPRI from 2001.7.1 to 2000.3.27. The major objectives is to study on application of SC structure and behavior of SC wall-support joint. This result is applicable to plan a main project for ''Development of Modular Construction System in the Nuclear Power Plant''. (author). 45 refs., 19 figs., 23 tabs.

  17. Research in nondestructive evaluation techniques for nuclear reactor concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Dwight; Smith, Cyrus

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of the Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting longterm environmental degradation behavior of material in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess the performance of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) essential to safe and sustained nuclear power plant operations. The understanding of aging-related phenomena and their impacts on SSCs is expected to be a significant issue for any nuclear power plant planning for long-term operations (i.e. service beyond the initial license renewal period). Management of those phenomena and their impacts during long-term operations can be better enable by improved methods and techniques for detection, monitoring, and prediction of SSC degradation. The MAaD Pathway R&D Roadmap for Concrete, "Light Water Reactor Sustainability Nondestructive Evaluation for Concrete Research and Development Roadmap", focused initial research efforts on understanding the recent concrete issues at nuclear power plants and identifying the availability of concrete samples for NDE techniques evaluation and testing. [1] An overview of the research performed by ORNL in these two areas is presented here.

  18. Experimental Study on Surrogate Nuclear Fuel Rods under Reversed Cyclic Bending

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong [ORNL; Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) rods under reversed cyclic bending or bending fatigue must be understood to evaluate their vibration integrity in a transportation environment. This is especially important for high-burnup fuels (>45 GWd/MTU), which have the potential for increased structural damage. It has been demonstrated that the bending fatigue of SNF rods can be effectively studied using surrogate rods. In this investigation, surrogate rods made of stainless steel (SS) 304 cladding and aluminum oxide pellets were tested under load or moment control at a variety of amplitude levels at 5 Hz using the Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The behavior of the rods was further characterized using flexural rigidity and hysteresis data, and fractography was performed on the failed rods. The proposed surrogate rods captured many of the characteristics of deformation and failure mode observed in SNF, including the linear-to-nonlinear deformation transition and large residual curvature in static tests, PPI and PCMI failure mechanisms, and large variation in the initial structural condition. Rod degradation was measured and characterized by measuring the flexural rigidity; the degradation of the rigidity depended on both the moment amplitude applied and the initial structural condition of the rods. It was also shown that a cracking initiation site can be located on the internal surface or the external surface of cladding. Finally, fatigue damage to the bending rods can be described in terms of flexural rigidity, and the fatigue life of rods can be predicted once damage model parameters are properly evaluated. The developed experimental approach, test protocol, and analysis method can be used to study the vibration integrity of SNF rods in the future.

  19. Superallowed Beta Decay: the Role of Nuclear Structure in Standard-Model Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, J. C.; Towner, I. S.

    2009-03-01

    Measurements on superallowed 0+ rightarrow 0+ nuclear beta transitions currently provide the most demanding test of the Conserved Vector Current (CVC) hypothesis and the most precise value for the up-down element, Vud, of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix. Both are sensitive probes for physics beyond the Standard Model. Analysis of the experimental results depends on small radiative and isospin-symmetry-breaking corrections, some of which depend on the specific structure of the parent and daughter nuclei involved. These calculated corrections affect the precision of the results, and experiments are currently focused on reducing their uncertainties. Although nuclear structure only contributes to rather small corrections, it plays a crucial role in these fundamental tests.

  20. Training Course of Experimental Chemistry in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Solid State and Solution Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju hyeong; Park, Kwangheon; Kim, Tae hoon; Park, Hyoung gyu; Kim, Jisu [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Song, Hyuk jin [Dongguk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chan ki; Kang, Do kyu; Jeong, Hyeon jun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this experimental study program in Tohoku University, basic experiments were done by the participants. First one is the hydrogen reduction experiment of the mixture of UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}. Second one is to observe microscopic structure of solid solution of UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} using SEM/EDX and XRD system, simulated fuel debris. Third one is milking process of {sup 239}Np from {sup 243}Am by solvent extraction using Tri-n-Octylamine (TOA). Last one is solvent extraction in PUREX by the simulated mixed aqueous solution of U, {sup 85}Sr and {sup 239}Np which is represented minor actinide elements included in the spent nuclear fuel. Uranium is separated from aqueous phase to organic phase during solvent extraction procedure using TBP and dodecane. Also, neptunium can be extracted to organic phase as nitric acid concentration change. The extraction behavior of neptunium is different by oxidation state in aqueous phase. The behavior of neptunium is represented as a combined form of these oxidation states in experiment. Therefore, because the oxidation states of neptunium can be controlled by controlling the concentration of nitric acid, the extractability of neptunium can be controlled.

  1. CCDC 1416891: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : Methyl-triphenyl-germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Bernatowicz, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  2. CCDC 1408042: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : 6,13-dimesitylpentacene

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Xueliang

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  3. Non-intrusive Experimental Study on Nuclear Fuel Assembly Response to Seismic Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichselbaum, Noah A.

    Experimental measurements of nuclear fuel bundle response to seismic loads have primarily been focused on the response of the structure. Forcing methods have included use of shake tables, however, the majority of work has used hydraulic actuators rigidly connected to a single spacer grid to force the fuel bundle. Structural measurements utilize such instruments as linear variable displacement transducers (LVDT) that are mounted on the structure. From these measurements it has been shown that fuel bundles in prototypical conditions, with an axial flow of 6 m/s, behave markedly different from fuel bundles in still water when there is external forcing on the core from an earthquake. It has also been shown that the structure and fluid are fully coupled. Thus more recently attention has been focused on fluid measurements in the bypass region around fuel bundles with external forcing with laser doppler velocimetry (LDV), which is a point wise fluid velocity measurement technique. This work describes a unique facility that has garnered a large experimental database of fully coupled fluid and structure measurements with time resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) and digital image correlation (DIC) within a full height 6x6 fuel bundle exposed to seismic forcing on a large 6 degree of freedom shake table. A refractive index matched (RIM) vertical liquid tunnel is mounted on the shake table and houses the fuel bundle which is based on the geometry of a prototypical fuel bundle in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). PIV is obtained with high spatial resolution by rigidly mounting all optical equipment to the test section on the shake table, where the laser light is delivered through high power multi-mode step index fiber optics from a high powered Nd:YLF laser located 10 meters away from the test section. High temporal resolution for the PIV measurements is obtained with state of the art high speed CMOS cameras that record straight to hard drive allowing for increased

  4. Nuclear hormone receptor co-repressors: Structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Peter J.; Fairall, Louise; Schwabe, John W.R.

    2012-01-01

    Co-repressor proteins, such as SMRT and NCoR, mediate the repressive activity of unliganded nuclear receptors and other transcription factors. They appear to act as intrinsically disordered “hub proteins” that integrate the activities of a range of transcription factors with a number of histone modifying enzymes. Although these co-repressor proteins are challenging targets for structural studies due to their largely unstructured character, a number of structures have recently been determined of co-repressor interaction regions in complex with their interacting partners. These have yielded considerable insight into the mechanism of assembly of these complexes, the structural basis for the specificity of the interactions and also open opportunities for targeting these interactions therapeutically. PMID:21925568

  5. Seismic margin analysis technique for nuclear power plant structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Moon; Choi, In Kil

    2001-04-01

    In general, the Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (SPRA) and the Seismic Margin Assessment(SAM) are used for the evaluation of realistic seismic capacity of nuclear power plant structures. Seismic PRA is a systematic process to evaluate the seismic safety of nuclear power plant. In our country, SPRA has been used to perform the probabilistic safety assessment for the earthquake event. SMA is a simple and cost effective manner to quantify the seismic margin of individual structural elements. This study was performed to improve the reliability of SMA results and to confirm the assessment procedure. To achieve this goal, review for the current status of the techniques and procedures was performed. Two methodologies, CDFM (Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin) sponsored by NRC and FA (Fragility Analysis) sponsored by EPRI, were developed for the seismic margin review of NPP structures. FA method was originally developed for Seismic PRA. CDFM approach is more amenable to use by experienced design engineers including utility staff design engineers. In this study, detailed review on the procedures of CDFM and FA methodology was performed.

  6. Experimental observation of localized structures in medium size VCSELs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averlant, Etienne; Tlidi, Mustapha; Thienpont, Hugo; Ackemann, Thorsten; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2014-01-13

    We report experimental evidence of spontaneous formation of localized structures in a 80 μm diameter Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSEL) biased above the lasing threshold and under optical injection. Such localized structures are bistable with the injected beam power and the VCSEL current. We experimentally investigate the formation of localized structures for different detunings between the injected beam and the VCSEL, and different injection beam waists.

  7. Health and Safety Considerations Associated with Sodium-Cooled Experimental Nuclear Fuel Dismantlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvo, Alan E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Between the mid-1970s and the mid-1980s Sandia National Laboratory constructed eleven experimental assemblies to simulate debris beds formed in a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. All but one of the assemblies were irradiated. The experimental assemblies were transferred to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in 2007 and 2008 for storage, dismantlement, recovery of the uranium for reuse in the nuclear fuel cycle, and disposal of unneeded materials. This paper addresses the effort to dismantle the assemblies down to the primary containment vessel and repackage them for temporary storage until such time as equipment necessary for sodium separation is in place.

  8. Epigenetic stochasticity, nuclear structure and cancer: the implications for medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize an evolution of thinking about the epigenetic basis of human cancer, from the earliest studies of altered DNA methylation in cancer to the modern comprehensive epigenomic era. Converging data from epigenetic studies of primary cancers and from experimental studies of chromatin in development and epithelial–mesenchymal transition suggest a role for epigenetic stochasticity as a driving force of cancer, with Darwinian selection of tumour cells at the expense of the host. This increased epigenetic stochasticity appears to be mediated by large-scale changes in DNA methylation and chromatin in domains associated with the nuclear lamina. The implications for diagnosis include the potential to identify stochastically disrupted progenitor cells years before cancer develops, and to target drugs to epigenetic drivers of gene expression instability rather than to mean effects per se. PMID:24635672

  9. Structural analysis of strained quantum dots using nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekhovich, E A; Kavokin, K V; Puebla, J; Krysa, A B; Hopkinson, M; Andreev, A D; Sanchez, A M; Beanland, R; Skolnick, M S; Tartakovskii, A I

    2012-10-01

    Strained semiconductor nanostructures can be used to make single-photon sources, detectors and photovoltaic devices, and could potentially be used to create quantum logic devices. The development of such applications requires techniques capable of nanoscale structural analysis, but the microscopy methods typically used to analyse these materials are destructive. NMR techniques can provide non-invasive structural analysis, but have been restricted to strain-free semiconductor nanostructures because of the significant strain-induced quadrupole broadening of the NMR spectra. Here, we show that optically detected NMR spectroscopy can be used to analyse individual strained quantum dots. Our approach uses continuous-wave broadband radiofrequency excitation with a specially designed spectral pattern and can probe individual strained nanostructures containing only 1 × 10(5) quadrupole nuclear spins. With this technique, we are able to measure the strain distribution and chemical composition of quantum dots in the volume occupied by the single confined electron. The approach could also be used to address problems in quantum information processing such as the precise control of nuclear spins in the presence of strong quadrupole effects.

  10. ROR nuclear receptors: structures, related diseases, and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Luo, Xiao-yu; Wu, Dong-hai; Xu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-regulated transcription factors that regulate metabolism, development and immunity. The NR superfamily is one of the major classes of drug targets for human diseases. Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor (ROR) α, β and γ belong to the NR superfamily, and these receptors are still considered as 'orphan' receptors because the identification of their endogenous ligands has been controversial. Recent studies have demonstrated that these receptors are regulated by synthetic ligands, thus emerge as important drug targets for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, etc. Studying the structural basis and ligand development of RORs will pave the way for a better understanding of the roles of these receptors in human diseases. Here, we review the structural basis, disease relevance, strategies for ligand identification, and current status of development of therapeutic ligands for RORs.

  11. Hydroxyapatites: Key Structural Questions and Answers from Dynamic Nuclear Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, César; Aussenac, Fabien; Bonhomme-Coury, Laure; Osaka, Akiyoshi; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Babonneau, Florence; Coelho-Diogo, Cristina; Bonhomme, Christian

    2017-10-03

    We demonstrate that NMR/DNP (Dynamic Nuclear Polarization) allows an unprecedented description of carbonate substituted hydroxyapatite (CHAp). Key structural questions related to order/disorder and clustering of carbonates are tackled using distance sensitive DNP experiments using 13 C- 13 C recoupling. Such experiments are easily implemented due to unprecedented DNP gain (orders of magnitude). DNP is efficiently mediated by quasi one-dimensional spin diffusion through the hydroxyl columns present in the CHAp structure (thought of as "highways" for spin diffusion). For spherical nanoparticles and ϕ dynamics and line shape resolution). Finally, all 2D DNP experiments can be interpreted in terms of domains exhibiting well identified types of substitution: local order and carbonate clustering are clearly favored.

  12. A study of nuclear structure for 244Cm, 241Am, 238Pu, 210Po, 147Pm, 137Cs, 90Sr and 63Ni nuclei used in nuclear battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artun, Ozan

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we intend to extend the nuclear data of 244Cm, 241Am, 238Pu, 210Po, 147Pm, 137Cs, 90Sr and 63Ni nuclei used in nuclear battery technology, because, these nuclei are quite important for space investigations in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) and for microelectronic technologies in betavoltaic batteries. Therefore, the nuclear structure properties of nuclei such as separation energies, neutron skin thicknesses, proton, charge and neutron density distributions as a function of radius, the root mean square (rms) proton, charge and neutron radii, binding energies per particle, have been investigated by Hartree-Fock with eight different Skyrme forces. The obtained results have been compared with the experimental data in literature and relativistic mean field theory (RMFT) results.

  13. Alterations in nuclear structure promote lupus autoimmunity in a mouse model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singh, Namrata; Johnstone, Duncan B; Martin, Kayla A; Tempera, Italo; Kaplan, Mariana J; Denny, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    ... the nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor (LBR), consistent with their Pelger-Huet-like nuclear morphology, we used a novel mouse model system to test the hypothesis that a disruption in the structure of the nucleus itself also contributes...

  14. Evaluated nuclear structure data file. a manual for preparation of data sets

    CERN Document Server

    Tuli, J K

    2001-01-01

    This manual describes the organization and structure of the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). This computer-based file is maintained by the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the international Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network. For every mass number (presently, A = 44, this information is published in the Nuclear Data Sheets; for A < 44, ENSDF is based on compilations published in the journal Nuclear Physics. The information in ENSDF is updated by mass chain or by nuclide with a varying cycle time dependent on the availability of new information.

  15. Diabetic polyneuropathy, sensory neurons, nuclear structure and spliceosome alterations: a role for CWC22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Chandrasekhar, Ambika; Cheng, Chu; Martinez, Jose A; Ng, Hilarie; de la Hoz, Cristiane; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2017-03-01

    Unique deficits in the function of adult sensory neurons as part of their early neurodegeneration might account for progressive polyneuropathy during chronic diabetes mellitus. Here, we provide structural and functional evidence for aberrant pre-mRNA splicing in a chronic type 1 model of experimental diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). Cajal bodies (CBs), unique nuclear substructures involved in RNA splicing, increased in number in diabetic sensory neurons, but their expected colocalization with survival motor neuron (SMN) proteins was reduced - a mislocalization described in motor neurons of spinal muscular atrophy. Small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs), also participants in the spliceosome, had abnormal multiple nuclear foci unassociated with CBs, and their associated snRNAs were reduced. CWC22, a key spliceosome protein, was aberrantly upregulated in diabetic dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and impaired neuronal function. CWC22 attenuated sensory neuron plasticity, with knockdown in vitro enhancing their neurite outgrowth. Further, axonal delivery of CWC22 siRNA unilaterally to locally knock down the aberrant protein in diabetic nerves improved aspects of sensory function in diabetic mice. Collectively, our findings identify subtle but significant alterations in spliceosome structure and function, including dysregulated CBs and CWC22 overexpression, in diabetic sensory neurons that offer new ideas regarding diabetic sensory neurodegeneration in polyneuropathy. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Diabetic polyneuropathy, sensory neurons, nuclear structure and spliceosome alterations: a role for CWC22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Kobayashi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Unique deficits in the function of adult sensory neurons as part of their early neurodegeneration might account for progressive polyneuropathy during chronic diabetes mellitus. Here, we provide structural and functional evidence for aberrant pre-mRNA splicing in a chronic type 1 model of experimental diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN. Cajal bodies (CBs, unique nuclear substructures involved in RNA splicing, increased in number in diabetic sensory neurons, but their expected colocalization with survival motor neuron (SMN proteins was reduced – a mislocalization described in motor neurons of spinal muscular atrophy. Small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs, also participants in the spliceosome, had abnormal multiple nuclear foci unassociated with CBs, and their associated snRNAs were reduced. CWC22, a key spliceosome protein, was aberrantly upregulated in diabetic dorsal root ganglia (DRG, and impaired neuronal function. CWC22 attenuated sensory neuron plasticity, with knockdown in vitro enhancing their neurite outgrowth. Further, axonal delivery of CWC22 siRNA unilaterally to locally knock down the aberrant protein in diabetic nerves improved aspects of sensory function in diabetic mice. Collectively, our findings identify subtle but significant alterations in spliceosome structure and function, including dysregulated CBs and CWC22 overexpression, in diabetic sensory neurons that offer new ideas regarding diabetic sensory neurodegeneration in polyneuropathy.

  17. Ab Initio Nuclear Structure and Reaction Calculations for Rare Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draayer, Jerry P. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2014-09-28

    We have developed a novel ab initio symmetry-adapted no-core shell model (SA-NCSM), which has opened the intermediate-mass region for ab initio investigations, thereby providing an opportunity for first-principle symmetry-guided applications to nuclear structure and reactions for nuclear isotopes from the lightest p-shell systems to intermediate-mass nuclei. This includes short-lived proton-rich nuclei on the path of X-ray burst nucleosynthesis and rare neutron-rich isotopes to be produced by the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). We have provided ab initio descriptions of high accuracy for low-lying (including collectivity-driven) states of isotopes of Li, He, Be, C, O, Ne, Mg, Al, and Si, and studied related strong- and weak-interaction driven reactions that are important, in astrophysics, for further understanding stellar evolution, X-ray bursts and triggering of s, p, and rp processes, and in applied physics, for electron and neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments as well as for fusion ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  18. Nonlocalized clustering: a new concept in nuclear cluster structure physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Funaki, Y; Horiuchi, H; Ren, Zhongzhou; Röpke, G; Schuck, P; Tohsaki, A; Xu, Chang; Yamada, T

    2013-06-28

    We investigate the α+^{16}O cluster structure in the inversion-doublet band (Kπ=0(1)±}) states of 20Ne with an angular-momentum-projected version of the Tohsaki-Horiuchi-Schuck-Röpke (THSR) wave function, which was successful "in its original form" for the description of, e.g., the famous Hoyle state. In contrast with the traditional view on clusters as localized objects, especially in inversion doublets, we find that these single THSR wave functions, which are based on the concept of nonlocalized clustering, can well describe the Kπ=0(1)- band and the Kπ=0(1)+ band. For instance, they have 99.98% and 99.87% squared overlaps for 1- and 3- states (99.29%, 98.79%, and 97.75% for 0+, 2+, and 4+ states), respectively, with the corresponding exact solution of the α+16O resonating group method. These astounding results shed a completely new light on the physics of low energy nuclear cluster states in nuclei: The clusters are nonlocalized and move around in the whole nuclear volume, only avoiding mutual overlap due to the Pauli blocking effect.

  19. Experimental studies of keV energy neutron-induced reactions relevant to astrophysics and nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shima, T.; Kii, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Okazaki, F.; Kobayashi, T.; Baba, T.; Nagai, Y. [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Faculty of Science; Igashira, M.

    1997-03-01

    Nuclear reactions induced by keV energy neutrons provide a plenty of informations for studies of both astrophysics and nuclear physics. In this paper we will show our experimental studies of neutron- induced reactions of light nuclei in the keV energy region by means of a pulsed keV neutron beam and high-sensitivity detectors. Also we will discuss astrophysical and nuclear-physical consequences by using the obtained results. (author)

  20. High-throughput computational and experimental techniques in structural genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Mark R; Fiser, Andras; Sali, Andrej; Pieper, Ursula; Eswar, Narayanan; Xu, Guiping; Fajardo, J Eduardo; Radhakannan, Thirumuruhan; Marinkovic, Nebojsa

    2004-10-01

    Structural genomics has as its goal the provision of structural information for all possible ORF sequences through a combination of experimental and computational approaches. The access to genome sequences and cloning resources from an ever-widening array of organisms is driving high-throughput structural studies by the New York Structural Genomics Research Consortium. In this report, we outline the progress of the Consortium in establishing its pipeline for structural genomics, and some of the experimental and bioinformatics efforts leading to structural annotation of proteins. The Consortium has established a pipeline for structural biology studies, automated modeling of ORF sequences using solved (template) structures, and a novel high-throughput approach (metallomics) to examining the metal binding to purified protein targets. The Consortium has so far produced 493 purified proteins from >1077 expression vectors. A total of 95 have resulted in crystal structures, and 81 are deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Comparative modeling of these structures has generated >40,000 structural models. We also initiated a high-throughput metal analysis of the purified proteins; this has determined that 10%-15% of the targets contain a stoichiometric structural or catalytic transition metal atom. The progress of the structural genomics centers in the U.S. and around the world suggests that the goal of providing useful structural information on most all ORF domains will be realized. This projected resource will provide structural biology information important to understanding the function of most proteins of the cell.

  1. Nuclear structure with unitarily transformed two-body plus phenomenological three-body interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, Anneke

    2011-02-02

    The importance of three-nucleon forces for a variety of nuclear structure phenomena is apparent in various investigations. This thesis provides a first step towards the inclusion of realistic three-nucleon forces by studying simple phenomenological threebody interactions. The Unitary Correlation Operator Method (UCOM) and the Similarity Renormalization Group (SRG) provide two different approaches to derive soft phase-shift equivalent nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions via unitary transformations. Although their motivations are quite different the NN interactions obtained with the two methods exhibit some similarities. The application of the UCOM- or SRG-transformed Argonne V18 potential in the Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation and including the second-order energy corrections emerging from many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) reveals that the systematics of experimental ground-state energies can be reproduced by some of the interactions considering a series of closed-shell nuclei across the whole nuclear chart. However, charge radii are systematically underestimated, especially for intermediate and heavy nuclei. This discrepancy to experimental data is expected to result from neglected three-nucleon interactions. As first ansatz for a three-nucleon force, we consider a finite-range three-body interaction of Gaussian shape. Its influence on ground-state energies and charge radii is discussed in detail on the basis of HF plus MBPT calculations and shows a significant improvement in the description of experimental data. As the handling of the Gaussian three-body interaction is time-extensive, we show that it can be replaced by a regularized three-body contact interaction exhibiting a very similar behavior. An extensive study characterizes its properties in detail and confirms the improvements with respect to nuclear properties. To take into account information of an exact numerical solution of the nuclear eigenvalue problem, the No-Core Shell Model is applied to

  2. Extending the lifespan of nuclear power plant structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Ellingwood, B. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (US)

    1995-04-01

    By the end of this decade, 63 of the 111 commercial nuclear power plants in the United States will be more than 20 years old, with some nearing the end of their 40-year operating license term. Faced with the prospect of having to replace lost generating capacity from other sources and substantial shutdown and decommissioning costs, many utilities are expected to apply to continue the service of their plants past the initial licensing period. In support of such applications, evidence should be provided that the capacity of the safety-related systems and structures to mitigate potential extreme events has not deteriorated unacceptably due to either aging or environmental stressor effects during the previous service history.

  3. Nuclear Structure of N $\\simeq$ 56 Krypton Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    In view of the strong overlap in subject matter, the proposals IP-39 and 40 were considered together by the ISOLDE-Committee, and a combined investigation was suggested to be presented to the PSCC.\\\\ \\\\ First results on $\\beta$-decay properties of very neutron-rich Br isotopes (Z=35) indicate a rather smooth onset of deformation already below N=60 and the existence of a deformed N=56 subshell gap. This behaviour is in contrast to earlier observations of a sudden onset of strong deformations at N=60 for $ \\% Z ge $ 37 nuclei. \\\\ \\\\ We propose to study at CERN-ISOLDE nuclear structure properties of N=55 - 57 Kr isotopes from $\\beta$-decay of $^9

  4. Nuclear Structure Functions at Low-$x$ in a Holographic Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Agozzino, L; Colangelo, P

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear effects in deep inelastic scattering at low$-x$ are phenomenologically described changing the typical dynamical and/or kinematical scales characterizing the free nucleon case. In a holographic approach, this rescaling is an analytical property of the computed structure function $F_2(x,Q^2)$. This function is given by the sum of a conformal term and of a contribution due to quark confinement, depending on IR hard-wall parameter $z_0$ and on the mean square distances, related to a parameter $Q^\\prime$, among quarks and gluons in the target. The holographic structure function per nucleon in a nucleus $A$ is evaluated showing that a rescaling of the typical nucleon size, $z_0$ and $Q^\\prime$, due to nuclear binding, can be reabsorbed in a $Q^2$-rescaling scheme. The difference between neutron and proton structure functions and the effects of the longitudinal structure functions can also be taken into account. The obtained theoretical results favourably compare with the experimental data.

  5. DFT and experimental studies on structure and spectroscopic parameters of 3,6-diiodo-9-ethyl-9H-carbazole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radula-Janik, Klaudia; Kupka, Teobald; Ejsmont, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The first report on crystal and molecular structure of 3,6-diiodo-9-ethyl-9H-carbazole is presented. Experimental room-temperature X-ray and 13C chemical shift studies were supported by advanced theoretical calculations using density functional theory (DFT). The 13C nuclear magnetic shieldings were...

  6. Methods of experimental settlement of contradicting data in evaluated nuclear data libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Libman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The latest versions of the evaluated nuclear data libraries (ENDLs have contradictions concerning data about neutron cross sections. To resolve this contradiction we propose the method of experimental verification. This method is based on using of the filtered neutron beams and following measurement of appropriate samples. The basic idea of the method is to modify the suited filtered neutron beam so that the differences between the neutron cross sections in accordance with different ENDLs become measurable. Demonstration of the method is given by the example of cerium, which according to the latest versions of four ENDLs has significantly different total neutron cross section.

  7. The identification of experimentally induced appendicitis using in vitro nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, D O; Clarke, J R; Settle, R G; Sachdeva, A K; Wheeler, J E; Trerotola, S O; Wolf, G L; Rombeau, J L

    1985-07-01

    Appendicitis was induced in six New Zealand white rabbits. The appendices from these animals had significantly higher spin-lattice relaxation times, T1, as determined in vitro by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) (10 controls vs 6 experimentals, 413 +/- 23 vs 455 +/- 41, X +/- SD, P less than (0.02). T1 correlated significantly with the water content of the appendiceal tissue (P less than 0.001). These findings suggest that in vivo NMR imaging techniques weighted on T1 might be able to identify human appendicitis noninvasively by detecting localized edema.

  8. Impact of structural aging on seismic risk assessment of reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellingwood, B.; Song, J. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1996-03-01

    The Structural Aging Program is addressing the potential for degradation of concrete structural components and systems in nuclear power plants over time due to aging and aggressive environmental stressors. Structures are passive under normal operating conditions but play a key role in mitigating design-basis events, particularly those arising from external challenges such as earthquakes, extreme winds, fires and floods. Structures are plant-specific and unique, often are difficult to inspect, and are virtually impossible to replace. The importance of structural failures in accident mitigation is amplified because such failures may lead to common-cause failures of other components. Structural condition assessment and service life prediction must focus on a few critical components and systems within the plant. Components and systems that are dominant contributors to risk and that require particular attention can be identified through the mathematical formalism of a probabilistic risk assessment, or PRA. To illustrate, the role of structural degradation due to aging on plant risk is examined through the framework of a Level 1 seismic PRA of a nuclear power plant. Plausible mechanisms of structural degradation are found to increase the core damage probability by approximately a factor of two.

  9. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B P; Saini, G S S

    2016-02-15

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Nuclear matrix and structural and functional compartmentalization of the eucaryotic cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razin, S V; Borunova, V V; Iarovaia, O V; Vassetzky, Y S

    2014-07-01

    Becoming popular at the end of the 20th century, the concept of the nuclear matrix implies the existence of a nuclear skeleton that organizes functional elements in the cell nucleus. This review presents a critical analysis of the results obtained in the study of nuclear matrix in the light of current views on the organization of the cell nucleus. Numerous studies of nuclear matrix have failed to provide evidence of the existence of such a structure. Moreover, the existence of a filamentous structure that supports the nuclear compartmentalization appears to be unnecessary, since this function is performed by the folded genome itself.

  11. Experimental realization of single-shot nonadiabatic holonomic gates in nuclear spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hang; Liu, Yang; Long, GuiLu

    2017-08-01

    Nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation has received increasing attention due to its robustness against control errors. However, all the previous schemes have to use at least two sequentially implemented gates to realize a general one-qubit gate. Based on two recent reports, we construct two Hamiltonians and experimentally realized nonadiabatic holonomic gates by a single-shot implementation in a two-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system. Two noncommuting one-qubit holonomic gates, rotating along ˆx and ˆz axes respectively, are implemented by evolving a work qubit and an ancillary qubit nonadiabatically following a quantum circuit designed. Using a sequence compiler developed for NMR quantum information processor, we optimize the whole pulse sequence, minimizing the total error of the implementation. Finally, all the nonadiabatic holonomic gates reach high unattenuated experimental fidelities over 98%.

  12. Nuclear structure of 76Se from inelastic neutron scattering measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sharmistha

    2017-09-01

    The low-lying, low-spin levels of 76Se were studied with the (n,n' γ) reaction. Gamma-ray excitation function measurements were performed at incident neutron energies from 2.0 to 3.5 MeV, and γ-ray angular distributions were measured at neutron energies of 2.4, 3.0 and 3.7 MeV. From these measurements, level spins, level lifetimes, γ-ray intensities, and multipole mixing ratios were determined. Interpreting the nuclear structure of the stable Se nuclei is challenging, with shape transitions, shape coexistence, and triaxiality in evidence. The low-lying structure of 76Se appears to be the most vibrational of the Se isotopes, with a two-phonon (0+, 2+, 4+) triplet of collective states. In addition to these clearly collective excitations, we have identified and characterized a 4+ ->2+ ->0+ cascade of two E 2 transitions built on the first excited 0+ state at 1122 keV. The picture for 76Se thus differs from 72Se and 74Se, and indicates that the configuration mixing of this coexisting band is less than exhibited in the other Se nuclei. Comparison of the low-lying level schemes of 76Ge and 76Se, the double-beta decay daughter, shows a marked difference. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1606890.

  13. Nuclear containment structure subjected to commercial and fighter aircraft crash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadique, M.R., E-mail: rehan.sadique@gmail.com; Iqbal, M.A., E-mail: iqbalfce@iitr.ernet.in; Bhargava, P., E-mail: bhpdpfce@iitr.ernet.in

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Nuclear containment response has been studied against aircraft crash. • Concrete damaged plasticity and Johnson–Cook elasto-viscoplastic models were employed. • Boeing 747-400 and Boeing 767-400 aircrafts caused global failure of containment. • Airbus A320 and Boeing 707-320 aircrafts caused local damage. • Tension damage of concrete was found more prominent compared to compression damage. -- Abstract: The response of a boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear containment vessel has been studied against commercial and fighter aircraft crash using a nonlinear finite element code ABAQUS. The aircrafts employed were Boeing 747-400, Boeing 767-400, Airbus A-320, Boeing 707-320 and Phantom F4. The containment was modeled as a three-dimensional deformable reinforced concrete structure while the loading of aircraft was assigned using the respective reaction–time curve. The location of strike was considered near the junction of dome and cylinder, and the angle of incidence, normal to the containment surface. The material behavior of the concrete was incorporated using the damaged plasticity model while that of the reinforcement, the Johnson–Cook elasto-viscoplastic model. The containment could not sustain the impact of Boeing 747-400 and Boeing 767-400 aircrafts and suffered rupture of concrete around the impact region leading to global failure. On the other hand, the maximum local deformation at the point of impact was found to be 0.998 m, 0.099 m, 0.092 m, 0.089 m, and 0.074 m against Boeing 747-400, Phantom F4, Boeing 767, Boeing 707-320 and Airbus A-320 aircrafts respectively. The results of the present study were compared with those of the previous analytical and numerical investigations with respect to the maximum deformation and overall behavior of the containment.

  14. Structural and isospin effects on balance energy and transition energy via different nuclear charge radii parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeeta; Kaur, Varinderjit

    2017-10-01

    The structural and isospin effects have been studied through isospin dependent and independent nuclear charge radii parameterizations on the collective flow within the framework of Isospin-dependent Quantum Molecular Dynamics (IQMD) model. The calculations have been carried out by using two approaches: (i) for the reaction series having fixed N / Z ratio and (ii) for the isobaric reaction series with different N / Z ratio. Our results indicate that there is a considerable effect of radii parameterizations on the excitation function of reduced flow (∂v1/∂Yred) and elliptical flow (v2). Both balance energy (Ebal) and transition energy (Etrans) are enhanced with increase in radii of reacting nuclei and found to follow a power law with nuclear charge radii. The exponent τ values show that the elliptical flow is more sensitive towards different nuclear charge radii as compared to reduced flow. Moreover, we observe that our theoretical calculation of Ebal and Etrans are in agreement with the experimental data provided by GSI, INDRA and FOPI collaborations.

  15. Experimental evidence of independence of nuclear de-channeling length on the particle charge sign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagli, E.; Guidi, V.; Mazzolari, A.; Bandiera, L.; Germogli, G.; Sytov, A.I. [Universita di Ferrara, Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra (Italy); INFN Sezione di Ferrara (Italy); De Salvador, D. [Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Padua (Italy); INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy); Berra, A.; Prest, M. [Universita dell' Insubria, Como (Italy); INFN Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Vallazza, E. [INFN Sezione di Trieste (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    Under coherent interactions, particles undergo correlated collisions with the crystal lattice and their motion result in confinement in the fields of atomic planes, i.e. particle channeling. Other than coherently interacting with the lattice, particles also suffer incoherent interactions with individual nuclei and may leave their bounded motion, i.e., they de-channel. The latter is the main limiting factor for applications of coherent interactions in crystal-assisted particle steering. We experimentally investigated the nature of de-channeling of 120 GeV/c e{sup -} and e{sup +} in a bent silicon crystal at H4-SPS external line at CERN. We found that while channeling efficiency differs significantly for e{sup -} (2 ± 2%) and e{sup +} (54 ± 2%), their nuclear de-channeling length is comparable, (0.6 ± 0.1) mm for e{sup -} and (0.7 ± 0.3) mm for e{sup +}. The experimental proof of the equality of the nuclear de-channeling length for positrons and electrons is interpreted in terms of similar dynamics undergone by the channeled particles in the field of nuclei irrespective of their charge. (orig.)

  16. Demonstrating Structural Adequacy of Nuclear Power Plant Containment Structures for Beyond Design-Basis Pressure Loadings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braverman, J.I.; Morante, R.

    2010-07-18

    ABSTRACT Demonstrating the structural integrity of U.S. nuclear power plant (NPP) containment structures, for beyond design-basis internal pressure loadings, is necessary to satisfy Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements and performance goals. This paper discusses methods for demonstrating the structural adequacy of the containment for beyond design-basis pressure loadings. Three distinct evaluations are addressed: (1) estimating the ultimate pressure capacity of the containment structure (10 CFR 50 and US NRC Standard Review Plan, Section 3.8) ; (2) demonstrating the structural adequacy of the containment subjected to pressure loadings associated with combustible gas generation (10 CFR 52 and 10 CFR 50); and (3) demonstrating the containment structural integrity for severe accidents (10 CFR 52 as well as SECY 90-016, SECY 93-087, and related NRC staff requirements memoranda (SRMs)). The paper describes the technical basis for specific aspects of the methods presented. It also presents examples of past issues identified in licensing activities related to these evaluations.

  17. Approaches and Software for Multi-Objective Optimization of Nuclear Power Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei A. Andrianov

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The work presents the approaches and software developed for multi-objective optimization of nuclear power structures: the modules for energy planning package MESSAGE intended for modeling purposes of developing nuclear power systems and multi-objective evaluation of its effectiveness and an integrated approach based on the method of system dynamics and parameter space investigation, allowing the problem of optimizing a nuclear power system structure in multi-objective formulation to be solved. Some results of implementation of these tools for multi-objective optimization of nuclear power structures are shown.

  18. Mass measurements of exotic ions in the heavy mass region for nuclear structure studies at ISOLTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgmann, Christopher

    2012-11-07

    The mass is a unique fingerprint of each nucleus as it reflects the sum of all interactions within it. Comparing experimental mass values with theoretical calculations provides an important benchmark of how well the role of these interactions is already understood. By investigating differences of experimental binding energies, such as two-neutron separation energies (S{sub 2n}), valuable indications for nuclear-structure studies are provided. The present thesis contributes to these studies providing new high-precision mass measurements especially in the heavy-mass region. Here, nuclear theory is heavily challenged due to the large number of nucleons. The data have been obtained at the Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP located at the radioactive-ion-beam facility Isolde at CERN. For the determination of the masses, the time-of-flight ion-cyclotron-resonance technique has been applied. While the new mass data for {sup 122-124}Ag continue existing trends in the S{sub 2n} energies, the new mass values for {sup 207,208}Fr render them more precisely. In the case of the mass values for {sup 184,186,190,193-195}Tl a new interesting odd-even effect has been revealed. The comparison of the measured mass values with theoretical models furthermore demonstrates significant problems in reproducing the strength of the pairing correctly. This is of special interest for the discussion about shape coexistence in the region around the doubly-magic {sup 208}Pb.

  19. Superallowed Beta Decay Studies at TRIUMF --- Nuclear Structure and Fundamental Symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zganjar, E. F.; Achtzehn, T.; Albers, D.; Andreoiu, C.; Andreyev, A. N.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Behr, J. A.; Biosvert, G. C.; Bricault, P.; Bishop, S.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Churchman, R.; Cross, D.; Cunningham, E.; D'Auria, J. M.; Dombsky, M.; Finlay, P.; Garrett, P. E.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hackman, G.; Hanemaayer, V.; Hardy, J. C.; Hodgson, D. F.; Hyland, B.; Iacob, V.; Klages, P.; Koopmans, K. A.; Kulp, W. D.; Lassen, J.; Lavoie, J. P.; Leslie, J. R.; Linder, T.; MacDonald, J. A.; Mak, H.-B.; Melconian, D.; Morton, A. C.; Ormand, W. E.; Osborne, C. J.; Pearson, C. J.; Pearson, M. R.; Phillips, A. A.; Piechaczek, A.; Ressler, J.; Sarazin, F.; Savard, G.; Schumaker, M. A.; Scraggs, H. C.; Svensson, C. E.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Towner, I. S.; Waddington, J. C.; Walker, P. M.; Wendt, K.; Wood, J. L.

    2007-04-01

    Precision measurement of the beta -decay half-life, Q-value, and branching ratio between nuclear analog states of Jpi = 0+ and T=1 can provide critical and fundamental tests of the Standard Model's description of electroweak interactions. A program has been initiated at TRIUMF-ISAC to measure the ft values of these superallowed beta transitions. Two Tz = 0, A > 60 cases, 74Rb and 62Ga, are presented. These are particularly relevant because they can provide critical tests of the calculated nuclear structure and isospin-symmetry breaking corrections that are predicted to be larger for heavier nuclei, and because they demonstrate the advance in the experimental precision on ft at TRIUMF-ISAC from 0.26% for 74Rb in 2002 to 0.05% for 62Ga in 2006. The high precision world data on experimental ft and corrected Ft values are discussed and shown to be consistent with CVC at the 10-4 level, yielding an average Ft = 3073.70(74) s. This Ft leads to Vud = 0.9737(4) for the up-down element of the Standard Model's CKM matrix. With this value and the Particle Data Group's 2006 values for Vus and Vub, the unitarity condition for the CKM matrix is met. Additional measurements and calculations are needed, however, to reduce the uncertainties in that evaluation. That objective is the focus of the continuing program on superallowed-beta decay at TRIUMF-ISAC.

  20. Mass measurements of exotic Ions in the heavy mass region for nuclear structure studies at ISOLTRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Borgmann, Christopher

    The mass is a unique fingerprint of each nucleus as it reflects the sum of all interactions within it. Comparing experimental mass values with theoretical calculations provides an important benchmark of how well the role of these interactions is already understood. By investigating differences of experimental binding energies, such as two-neutron separation energies (S$_{2n}$), valuable indications for nuclear-structure studies are provided. The present thesis contributes to these studies providing new high-precision mass measurements especially in the heavy-mass region. Here, nuclear theory is heavily challenged due to the large number of nucleons. The data have been obtained at the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP located at the radioactive-ion-beam facility ISOLDE at CERN. For the determination of the masses, the time-of-flight ion-cyclotron-resonance technique has been applied. While the new mass data for $^{122−124}$Ag continue existing trends in the S$_{2n}$ energies, the new mass values for $...

  1. The 3D structure of the hadrons: recents results and experimental program at Jefferson Lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muñoz Camacho C.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD at large distances still remains one of the main outstanding problems of nuclear physics. Studying the internal structure of hadrons provides a way to probe QCD in the non-perturbative domain and can help us unravel the internal structure of the most elementary blocks of matter. Jefferson Lab (JLab has already delivered results on how elementary quarks and gluons create nucleon structure and properties. The upgrade of JLab to 12 GeV will allow the full exploration of the valence-quark structure of nucleons and the extraction of real threedimensional pictures. I will present recent results and review the future experimental program at JLab.

  2. Experimental and numerical characterization of wind-induced pressure coefficients on nuclear buildings and chimney exhausts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricciardi, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.ricciardi@irsn.fr; Gélain, Thomas; Soares, Sandrine

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Experiments on scale models of nuclear buildings and chimney exhausts were performed. • Pressure coefficient fields on buildings are shown for various wind directions. • Evolution of pressure coefficient vs U/W ratio is given for various chimney exhausts. • RANS simulations using SST k–ω turbulence model were performed on most studied cases. • A good agreement is overall observed, with Root Mean Square Deviation lower than 0.15. - Abstract: Wind creates pressure effects on different surfaces of buildings according to their exposure to the wind, in particular at external communications. In nuclear facilities, these effects can change contamination transfers inside the building and can even lead to contamination release into the environment, especially in damaged (ventilation stopped) or accidental situations. The diversity of geometries of facilities requires the use of a validated code for predicting pressure coefficients, which characterize the wind effect on the building walls and the interaction between the wind and chimney exhaust. The first aim of a research program launched by the French Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), was therefore to acquire experimental data of the mean pressure coefficients for different geometries of buildings and chimneys through wind tunnel tests and then to validate a CFD code (ANSYS CFX) from these experimental results. The simulations were performed using a steady RANS approach and a two-equation SST k–ω turbulence model. After a mesh sensitivity study for one configuration of building and chimney, a comparison was carried out between the numerical and experimental values for other studied configurations. This comparison was generally satisfactory, averaged over all measurement points, with values of Root Mean Square Deviations lower than 0.15 for most cases.

  3. The shell model. Towards a unified description of nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poves, Alfredo [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma Cantoblanco, 28049 - Madrid (Spain); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    In this series of lectures we present the foundations of the spherical shell model that we treat as an approximation to the exact solution of the full secular problem. We introduce the notions of valence space, effective interaction and effective operator. We analyse the structure of the realistic effective interactions, identifying their monopole part with the spherical mean field. The multipole Hamiltonian is shown to have a universal (simple) form that includes pairing (isovector and isoscalar), quadrupole, octupole, deca-pole, and ({sigma}{center_dot}{tau})({sigma}{center_dot}{tau}). We describe the methods of resolution of the secular problem, in particular the Lanczos method. The model is applied to the description of nuclear deformation and its relationship with the deformed mean field theories is studied. We propose a new symmetry, `quasi`-SU3, to understand deformation in the spherical basis. Finally, we discuss the domain of nuclei very far from the valley of {beta} stability, addressing the vanishing of some magic closures that can be explained in terms of intruder states. (author) 53 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Experimental study on beam for composite CES structural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Tomoya

    2017-10-01

    Development study on Concrete Encase Steel (CES) composite structure system has been continuously conducted toward the practical use. CES structure is composed of steel and fiber reinforced concrete. In previous study, it was found that CES structure has good seismic performance from experimental study of columns, beam - column joints, shear walls and a two story two span frame. However, as fundamental study on CES beam could be lacking, it is necessary to understand the structural performance of CES beam. In this study, static loading tests of CES beams were conducted with experimental valuable of steel size, the presence or absence of slab and thickness of slab. And restoring characteristics, failure behavior, deformation behavior, and strength evaluation method of CES beam were investigated. As the results, it was found that CES beam showed stable hysteresis behavior. Furthermore it was found that the flexural strength of the CES beam could be evaluated by superposition strength theory.

  5. Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators; Summary Report of an IAEA Technical Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abriola, D.; Tuli, J.

    2009-03-23

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the 18th meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, 23 to 27 March 2009. This meeting was attended by 22 scientists from 14 Member States, plus IAEA staff, concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, recommendations/conclusions, data centre reports, and various proposals considered, modified and agreed by the participants are contained within this document. The International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluators holds biennial meetings under the auspices of the IAEA, and consists of evaluation groups and data service centres in several countries. This network has the objective of providing up-to-date nuclear structure and decay data for all known nuclides by evaluating all existing experimental data. Data resulting from this international evaluation collaboration is included in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) and published in the journals Nuclear Physics A and Nuclear Data Sheets (NDS).

  6. Nuclear Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Savage, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Lattice QCD is making good progress toward calculating the structure and properties of light nuclei and the forces between nucleons. These calculations will ultimately refine the nuclear forces, particularly in the three- and four-nucleon sector and the short-distance interactions of nucleons with electroweak currents, and allow for a reduction of uncertainties in nuclear many-body calculations of nuclei and their reactions. After highlighting their importance, particularly to the Nuclear Physics and High-Energy Physics experimental programs, I discuss the progress that has been made toward achieving these goals and the challenges that remain.

  7. Improved estimates of the nuclear structure corrections in μD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, O.J., E-mail: javierh@triumf.ca [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Ji, C., E-mail: jichen@triumf.ca [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Bacca, S., E-mail: bacca@triumf.ca [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Nevo Dinur, N., E-mail: nir.nevo@mail.huji.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 9190401 (Israel); Barnea, N., E-mail: nir@phys.huji.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 9190401 (Israel)

    2014-09-07

    We calculate the nuclear structure corrections to the Lamb shift in muonic deuterium by using state-of-the-art nucleon–nucleon potentials derived from chiral effective field theory. Our calculations complement previous theoretical work obtained from phenomenological potentials and the zero range approximation. The study of the chiral convergence order-by-order and the dependence on cutoff variations allows us to improve the estimates on the nuclear structure corrections and the theoretical uncertainty coming from nuclear potentials. This will enter the determination of the nuclear radius from ongoing muonic deuterium experiments at PSI.

  8. An Eclectic Journey Through Experimental Nuclear Physics, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Nuclear Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, E B

    2004-12-07

    In this paper, I illustrate how the ability to rapidly access the broad range of nuclear data has facilitated my research in fields from searches for double beta decay, to measurements of astrophysical reaction rates, to issues in homeland security. In doing this, I hope to persuade even the skeptics that for the benefit of the broad scientific community, it is imperative that the outstanding work of the nuclear data community continue.

  9. Experimental implementation of quantum information processing by Zeeman-perturbed nuclear quadrupole resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, João; Rivera-Ascona, Christian; Polli, Roberson S.; Oliveira-Silva, Rodrigo; Vidoto, Edson L. G.; Andreeta, José P.; Bonagamba, Tito J.

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been widely used in the context of quantum information processing (QIP). However, despite the great similarities between NMR and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), no experimental implementation for QIP using NQR has been reported. We describe the implementation of basic quantum gates and their applications on the creation and manipulation of pseudopure states using linearly polarized radiofrequency pulses under static magnetic field perturbation. The NQR quantum operations were implemented using a single-crystal sample of and observing nuclei, which possess spin 3/2 and give rise to a two-qubit system. The results are very promising and indicate that NQR can be successfully used for performing fundamental experiments in QIP. One advantage of NQR in comparison with NMR is that the main interaction is internal to the sample, which makes the system more compact, lowering its cost and making it easier to be miniaturized to solid-state devices. Furthermore, as an example, the study of squeezed spin states could receive relevant contributions from NQR.

  10. A new experimental scheme for nuclear γ -resonance time-domain interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaletti, F.; Chumakov, A. I.; Rüffer, R.; Monaco, G.

    2017-10-01

    Time-domain interferometry (TDI) based on nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation by Mössbauer nuclei is a promising technique to study slow dynamics at the interatomic length scale. In order to improve the efficiency of this technique, a new TDI scheme is developed involving the use of a nuclear absorber with a two-line energy spectrum combined with a single-line spectrum. Different from other TDI setups, the issue of external vibrations is much reduced since the two absorbers are at rest and no velocity transducer is used. This allows measuring beating patterns with satisfying statistical accuracy and contrast up to 350 ns. We report here the characterization of the experimental setup necessary for the implementation of this new scheme. The model required for the description of the beating pattern produced by a three-line spectrum system is also discussed in detail. Finally, we report some results for the dynamics of the prototypical glass-former ortho-terphenyl to demonstrate the possibilities offered by this new scheme.

  11. Experimental determination of activation cross section of alpha-induced nuclear reactions on natPt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Shubin, Yu. N.; Kovalev, S.

    2006-10-01

    Alpha-particle induced nuclear reactions that result in the generation of several Hg (mass numbers 192, 193m, 193g, 195m, 195g, 197m, 197g, 199m) and Au (mass numbers 194, 195m, 195g, 196n, 196g, 198m, 198g, 199, 200m) radionuclides were investigated. The stacked-foil activation technique on natural platinum targets was used. Excitation functions are reported for Eα from threshold up to 37 MeV. Cross sections are reported for the first time for reactions of the type natPt(α, xn) ∗Hg ( x = 1-5) and natPd(α,p xn) ∗Au ( x = 1-5). The experimental results are compared with literature values and with model calculations performed with the ALICE-IPPE code. Use of the data for possible applications in comparison with our earlier results for proton and deuteron induced reactions is discussed.

  12. Computational tools for experimental determination and theoretical prediction of protein structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Donoghue, S.; Rost, B.

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. The authors intend to review the state of the art in the experimental determination of protein 3D structure (focus on nuclear magnetic resonance), and in the theoretical prediction of protein function and of protein structure in 1D, 2D and 3D from sequence. All the atomic resolution structures determined so far have been derived from either X-ray crystallography (the majority so far) or Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy (becoming increasingly more important). The authors briefly describe the physical methods behind both of these techniques; the major computational methods involved will be covered in some detail. They highlight parallels and differences between the methods, and also the current limitations. Special emphasis will be given to techniques which have application to ab initio structure prediction. Large scale sequencing techniques increase the gap between the number of known proteins sequences and that of known protein structures. They describe the scope and principles of methods that contribute successfully to closing that gap. Emphasis will be given on the specification of adequate testing procedures to validate such methods.

  13. A new method of evaluating tight gas sands pore structure from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Liang; Mao, Zhi-qiang; Xie, Xiu-hong

    2016-04-01

    Tight gas sands always display such characteristics of ultra-low porosity, permeability, high irreducible water, low resistivity contrast, complicated pore structure and strong heterogeneity, these make that the conventional methods are invalid. Many effective gas bearing formations are considered as dry zones or water saturated layers, and cannot be identified and exploited. To improve tight gas sands evaluation, the best method is quantitative characterizing rock pore structure. The mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves are advantageous in predicting formation pore structure. However, the MICP experimental measurements are limited due to the environment and economy factors, this leads formation pore structure cannot be consecutively evaluated. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs are considered to be promising in evaluating rock pore structure. Generally, to consecutively quantitatively evaluate tight gas sands pore structure, the best method is constructing pseudo Pc curves from NMR logs. In this paper, based on the analysis of lab experimental results for 20 core samples, which were drilled from tight gas sandstone reservoirs of Sichuan basin, and simultaneously applied for lab MICP and NMR measurements, the relationships of piecewise power function between nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) transverse relaxation T2 time and pore-throat radius Rc are established. A novel method, which is used to transform NMR reverse cumulative curve as pseudo capillary pressure (Pc) curve is proposed, and the corresponding model is established based on formation classification. By using this model, formation pseudo Pc curves can be consecutively synthesized. The pore throat radius distribution, and pore structure evaluation parameters, such as the average pore throat radius (Rm), the threshold pressure (Pd), the maximum pore throat radius (Rmax) and so on, can also be precisely extracted. After this method is extended into field applications, several tight gas

  14. Nuclear structure effects in quasifission – understanding the formation of the heaviest elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinde D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quasifission is an important process suppressing the fusion of two heavy nuclei in reactions used to create superheavy elements. Quasifission results in rapid separation of the dinuclear system initially formed at contact. Achieving reliable a priori prediction of quasifission probabilities is a very diffcult problem. Through measurements with projectiles from C to Ni, the Australian National University’s Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility and CUBE spectrometer have been used to map out mass-angle distributions (MAD - the fission mass-ratio as a function of centre-of-mass angle. These provide information on quasifission dynamics in the least modeldependent way. Average quasifission time-scales have been extracted, and compared with TDHF calculations of the collisions, with good agreement being found. With the baseline information from the survey of experimental MAD, strong influences of the nuclear structure of the projectile and target nuclei can be clearly determined.

  15. Scale-up considerations relevant to experimental studies of nuclear waste-package behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, D.G.; Peters, R.D.

    1986-04-01

    Results from a study that investigated whether testing large-scale nuclear waste-package assemblages was technically warranted are reported. It was recognized that the majority of the investigations for predicting waste-package performance to date have relied primarily on laboratory-scale experimentation. However, methods for the successful extrapolation of the results from such experiments, both geometrically and over time, to actual repository conditions have not been well defined. Because a well-developed scaling technology exists in the chemical-engineering discipline, it was presupposed that much of this technology could be applicable to the prediction of waste-package performance. A review of existing literature documented numerous examples where a consideration of scaling technology was important. It was concluded that much of the existing scale-up technology is applicable to the prediction of waste-package performance for both size and time extrapolations and that conducting scale-up studies may be technically merited. However, the applicability for investigating the complex chemical interactions needs further development. It was recognized that the complexity of the system, and the long time periods involved, renders a completely theoretical approach to performance prediction almost hopeless. However, a theoretical and experimental study was defined for investigating heat and fluid flow. It was concluded that conducting scale-up modeling and experimentation for waste-package performance predictions is possible using existing technology. A sequential series of scaling studies, both theoretical and experimental, will be required to formulate size and time extrapolations of waste-package performance.

  16. Nonobservable nature of the nuclear shell structure: Meaning, illustrations, and consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguet, T.; Hergert, H.; Holt, J. D.; Somà, V.

    2015-09-01

    transformations is broken owing to the omission of induced many-body interactions beyond three-body operators and to the nonexact treatment of the many-body Schrödinger equation. The impact of this breaking is first characterized by quantifying the artificial running of observables over a (necessarily) finite interval of λ values. Then the genuine running of ESPEs is characterized and shown to be convincingly larger than the one of observables (which would be zero in an exact calculation). Conclusions: The nonobservable nature of the nuclear shell structure, i.e., the fact that it constitutes an intrinsically theoretical object with no counterpart in the empirical world, must be recognized and assimilated. Indeed, the shell structure cannot be determined uniquely from experimental data and cannot be talked about in an absolute sense as it depends on the nonobservable resolution scale employed in the theoretical calculation. It is only at the price of fixing arbitrarily (but conveniently) such a scale that one can establish correlations between observables and the shell structure. To some extent, fixing the resolution scale provides ESPEs (and spectroscopic factors) with a quasi-observable character. Eventually, practitioners can refer to nuclear shells and spectroscopic factors in their analyses of nuclear phenomena if, and only if, they use consistent structure and reaction theoretical schemes based on a fixed resolution scale they have agreed on prior to performing their analysis and comparisons.

  17. Structure and Activities of Nuclear Medicine in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgazzar, Abdelhamid H; Owunwanne, Azuwuike; Alenezi, Saud

    2016-07-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine in Kuwait began in 1965 as a clinic for treating thyroid diseases. The practice developed gradually and until 1981 when the Faculty of Medicine established the Division of Nuclear Medicine in the Department of Radiology, which later became a separate department responsible for establishing and managing the practice in all hospitals of Kuwait. In 1987, a nuclear medicine residency program was begun and it is administered by Kuwait Institute for Medical Specializations originally as a 4-year but currently as a 5-year program. Currently there are 11 departments in the ministry of health hospitals staffed by 49 qualified attending physicians, mostly the diplomats of the Kuwait Institute for Medical Specializations nuclear medicine residency program, 4 academic physicians, 2 radiopharmacists, 2 physicists, and 130 technologists. These departments are equipped with 33 dual-head gamma cameras, 10 SPET/CT, 5 PET/CT, 2 cyclotrons, 1 breast-specific gamma imaging, 1 positron-emitting mammography, 10 thyroid uptake units, 8 technegas machines, 7 PET infusion systems, and 8 treadmills. Activities of nuclear medicine in Kuwait include education and training, clinical service, and research. Education includes nuclear medicine technology program in the Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, the 5-year residency program, medical school teaching distributed among different modules of the integrated curriculum with 14 didactic lecture, and other teaching sessions in nuclear medicine MSc program, which run concurrently with the first part of the residency program. The team of Nuclear Medicine in Kuwait has been active in research and has published more than 300 paper, 11 review articles, 12 book chapters, and 17 books in addition to 36 grants and 2 patents. A PhD program approved by Kuwait University Council would begin in 2016. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nuclear structure features of very heavy and superheavy nuclei—tracing quantum mechanics towards the ‘island of stability’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, D.; Theisen, Ch

    2017-08-01

    The quantum-mechanic nature of nuclear matter is at the origin of the vision of a region of enhanced stability at the upper right end of the chart of nuclei, the so-called ‘island of stability’. Since the 1960s in the early second half of the last century, various models predict closed shells for proton numbers 114-126 and neutron numbers such as 172 or 184. Being stabilized by quantum-mechanic effects only, those extremely heavy man-made nuclear species are an ideal laboratory to study the origin of the strong nuclear interaction which is the driving force for matter properties in many fields ranging from microscopic scales like hadronic systems to cosmic scales in stellar environments like neutron stars. Since the 1950s, experiments on the synthesis of new elements and isotopes have also revealed various exciting nuclear structure features. The contribution of Bohr, Mottelson and Rainwater with, in particular, the development of the unified model played an essential role in this context. Although not anticipated in the region of the heaviest nuclei, many phenomena were subsequently discovered like the interplay of collective features manifesting themselves e.g. in nuclear deformation, ranging from spherical to prolate and oblate shapes with the possible occurrence of triaxial symmetries, and single particle states and their excitation into quasiparticle configurations. The continuous development of modern experimental techniques employing advanced detection set-ups was essential to reveal these exciting nuclear structure aspects in the actinide and transactinide regions since the production cross-section becomes extremely small with increasing mass and charge. Further technological progress, in particular, high intensity stable ion beam accelerator facilities presently under construction, as well as potentially in the farther future radioactive neutron rich ion beams provide a high discovery potential for the basic understanding of nuclear matter.

  19. [Structure and function of nuclear matrix associated regions (S/MARs)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, I P; Akopov, S B; Nikolaev, L G

    2004-01-01

    Modern concepts on the chromatin loop-domain organization and the role of the DNA regions specifically binding the nuclear matrix (nuclear scaffold, or S/MARs) in its formation, maintenance, and regulation are discussed. Some S/MAR structural features, properties of binding the nuclear matrix, and probable mechanisms of their involvement in regulation of gene activity are considered. The English version of the paper: Russian Journal of Bioorganic Chemistry, 2004, vol. 30, no. 1; see also http://www.maik.ru.

  20. Nuclear Structure and Dynamics in the Quasi-Continuum of ²⁴⁰Pu

    OpenAIRE

    Zeiser, Fabio Balthasar

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear level densities and γ-ray strength functions are essential quantities in various fields of basic and applied research involving nuclear matter. From microscopic calculations and structure research to nuclear reactor models and astrophysical applications a good knowledge of these parameters determines fundamental properties of the systems. This study analyses the level density and strength function of ²⁴⁰Pu below the particle separation threshold with the Oslo Method. The results are u...

  1. Understanding the proton radius puzzle: Nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present calculations of nuclear structure effects to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms. We adopt a modern ab-initio approach by combining state-of-the-art nuclear potentials with the hyperspherical harmonics method. Our calculations are instrumental to the determination of nuclear charge radii in the Lamb shift measurements, which will shed light on the proton radius puzzle.

  2. Structural safety analysis based on seismic service conditions for butterfly valves in a nuclear power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang-Uk; Ahn, Dae-Gyun; Lee, Myeong-Gon; Lee, Kwon-Hee; Han, Seung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The structural integrity of valves that are used to control cooling waters in the primary coolant loop that prevents boiling within the reactor in a nuclear power plant must be capable of withstanding earthquakes or other dangerous situations. In this study, numerical analyses using a finite element method, that is, static and dynamic analyses according to the rigid or flexible characteristics of the dynamic properties of a 200A butterfly valve, were performed according to the KEPIC MFA. An experimental vibration test was also carried out in order to verify the results from the modal analysis, in which a validated finite element model was obtained via a model-updating method that considers changes in the in situ experimental data. By using a validated finite element model, the equivalent static load under SSE conditions stipulated by the KEPIC MFA gave a stress of 135 MPa that occurred at the connections of the stem and body. A larger stress of 183 MPa was induced when we used a CQC method with a design response spectrum that uses 2% damping ratio. These values were lower than the allowable strength of the materials used for manufacturing the butterfly valve, and, therefore, its structural safety met the KEPIC MFA requirements.

  3. The experimental facility for investigation of MHD heat transfer in perspective coolants in nuclear energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batenin, B. M.; Belyaev, I. A.; Birukov, D. A.; Frick, P. G.; Nikitina, I. S.; Manchkha, S. P.; Pyatnitskaya, N. Yu; Razuvanov, N. G.; Sviridov, E. V.; Sviridov, V. G.

    2017-11-01

    Paper presents the current results of work conducted by a joint research group of MPEI–JIHT RAS for experimental study of liquid metals heat transfer. The team of specialists of MPEI–JIHT RAS put into operation a new mercury MHD facility RK-3. The main components of this stand are: a unique electromagnet, created by specialists of the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP), and a sealed liquid-metal circuit. The facility will be explored lifting and standpipe flow of liquid metal in a transverse magnetic field in channels of different forms. For the experiments on the study of heat transfer and hydrodynamics of flows for measuring characteristics such as temperature, speed, pulse characteristics, probe method is used. Presents the first experimental results obtained for a pipe in a transverse magnetic field. During the experiments with various flow parameters data was obtained and processed with constructing temperature fields, dimensionless wall temperature distributions and heat transfer coefficients along the perimeter of the work area. Modes with low frequency pulsations of temperature were discovered. The boundaries where low frequency temperature fluctuations occur were defined in a circular tube.

  4. SQUIDs vs. Faraday coils for ultlra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance: experimental and simulation comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlashov, Andrei N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Espy, Michelle A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kraus, Robert H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sayukov, Igor M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schultz, Larry J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbaitis, Algis V [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volegov, Petr L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wurden, Caroline J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods are widely used in medicine, chemistry and industry. One application area is magnetic resonance imaging or MRI. Recently it has become possible to perform NMR and MRI in ultra-low field (ULF) regime that requires measurement field strengths only of the order of 1 Gauss. These techniques exploit the advantages offered by superconducting quantum interference devices or SQUIDs. Our group at LANL has built SQUID based MRI systems for brain imaging and for liquid explosives detection at airports security checkpoints. The requirement for liquid helium cooling limits potential applications of ULF MRI for liquid identification and security purposes. Our experimental comparative investigation shows that room temperature inductive magnetometers provide enough sensitivity in the 3-10 kHz range and can be used for fast liquid explosives detection based on ULF NMR/MRI technique. We describe an experimental and computer simulation comparison of the world's first multichannel SQUID based and Faraday coils based instruments that are capable of performing ULF MRI for liquids identification.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion pore imaging: Experimental phase detection by double diffusion encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demberg, Kerstin; Laun, Frederik Bernd; Windschuh, Johannes; Umathum, Reiner; Bachert, Peter; Kuder, Tristan Anselm

    2017-02-01

    Diffusion pore imaging is an extension of diffusion-weighted nuclear magnetic resonance imaging enabling the direct measurement of the shape of arbitrarily formed, closed pores by probing diffusion restrictions using the motion of spin-bearing particles. Examples of such pores comprise cells in biological tissue or oil containing cavities in porous rocks. All pores contained in the measurement volume contribute to one reconstructed image, which reduces the problem of vanishing signal at increasing resolution present in conventional magnetic resonance imaging. It has been previously experimentally demonstrated that pore imaging using a combination of a long and a narrow magnetic field gradient pulse is feasible. In this work, an experimental verification is presented showing that pores can be imaged using short gradient pulses only. Experiments were carried out using hyperpolarized xenon gas in well-defined pores. The phase required for pore image reconstruction was retrieved from double diffusion encoded (DDE) measurements, while the magnitude could either be obtained from DDE signals or classical diffusion measurements with single encoding. The occurring image artifacts caused by restrictions of the gradient system, insufficient diffusion time, and by the phase reconstruction approach were investigated. Employing short gradient pulses only is advantageous compared to the initial long-narrow approach due to a more flexible sequence design when omitting the long gradient and due to faster convergence to the diffusion long-time limit, which may enable application to larger pores.

  6. Experimental realization of Shor's quantum factoring algorithm using nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersypen, L M; Steffen, M; Breyta, G; Yannoni, C S; Sherwood, M H; Chuang, I L

    The number of steps any classical computer requires in order to find the prime factors of an l-digit integer N increases exponentially with l, at least using algorithms known at present. Factoring large integers is therefore conjectured to be intractable classically, an observation underlying the security of widely used cryptographic codes. Quantum computers, however, could factor integers in only polynomial time, using Shor's quantum factoring algorithm. Although important for the study of quantum computers, experimental demonstration of this algorithm has proved elusive. Here we report an implementation of the simplest instance of Shor's algorithm: factorization of N = 15 (whose prime factors are 3 and 5). We use seven spin-1/2 nuclei in a molecule as quantum bits, which can be manipulated with room temperature liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. This method of using nuclei to store quantum information is in principle scalable to systems containing many quantum bits, but such scalability is not implied by the present work. The significance of our work lies in the demonstration of experimental and theoretical techniques for precise control and modelling of complex quantum computers. In particular, we present a simple, parameter-free but predictive model of decoherence effects in our system.

  7. Experimental study to explore the $\\rm ^8Be$ induced nuclear reaction via the Trojan Horse Method

    CERN Document Server

    Qun-Gang, Wen; Shu-Hua, Zhou; Irgaziev, Bakhadir; Yuan-Yong, Fu; Spitaleri, Claudio; La Cognata, Marco; Jing, Zhou; Qiu-Ying, Meng; Lamia, Livio; Lattuada, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    To explore a possible indirect method for $\\rm ^8Be$ induced astrophysical reactions, the $\\rm ^9Be=({}^8Be+\\it n)$ cluster structure was studied via the Trojan Horse Method. It is the first time to study a super short life nucleus $\\rm ^8Be$ via the Trojan Horse Method, and it is the first time to make a valid test for $l=1$ Trojan-horse nucleus. The $\\rm ^9Be$ nucleus is assumed to have a ($\\rm {}^8Be+\\it n$) cluster structure and used as the Trojan-horse nucleus. The $\\rm ^8Be$ nucleus acts as a participant, while the neutron is a spectator to the virtual $\\rm ^8Be +{\\it d}\\rightarrow \\alpha + {}^6Li$ reaction via a suitable 3-body reaction $\\rm ^9Be +{\\it d}\\rightarrow \\alpha + {}^6Li +\\it n$. The experimental neutron momentum distribution inside $\\rm ^9Be$ was reconstructed. The agreement between experimental and theoretical momentum distribution indicates that there should be a ($\\rm {}^8Be+\\it n$) cluster structure inside $\\rm ^9Be$. Therefor the experimental study of $\\rm ^8Be$ induced reactions, for ...

  8. Models, simulation, and experimental issues in structural mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Maceri, Franco; Vairo, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    The reader aware in Structural Mechanics will find in this book a source of fruitful knowledge and effective tools useful for imagining, creating, and promoting novel and challenging developments. It addresses a wide range of topics, such as mechanics and geotechnics, vibration and damping, damage and friction, experimental methods, and advanced structural materials. It also discusses analytical, experimental and numerical findings, focusing on theoretical and practical issues, and leading to innovations in the field. Collecting some of the latest results from the Lagrange Laboratory, a European scientific research group, mainly consisting of Italian and French engineers, mechanicians and mathematicians, the book presents the most recent example of the long-term scientific cooperation between well-established French and Italian Mechanics, Mathematics and Engineering Schools. .

  9. Nuclear structure investigations of 84Sr and 86Sr using γ-ray spectroscopic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckwitz, H.; Petkov, P.; Thomas, T.; Ahn, T.; Blazhev, A.; Cooper, N.; Fransen, C.; Hinton, M.; Ilie, G.; Jolie, J.; Werner, V.

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the low-spin structure of 84Sr and 86Sr, two fusion-evaporation experiments using the (p,2n) reaction have been performed. The data have been evaluated in terms of γ-ray spectroscopy, i.e. the level scheme was built up, branching intensities were determined, nuclear state spin and parity assignments were made after γγ angular correlation analyses. The previously known level scheme information was extended. In addition, lifetimes were determined by means of the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method (DSAM). In 86Sr, a new method for lifetime determinations, the Spectral Difference Method (SDM), was applied for the first time. In cases where all necessary input variables were known, reduced transition strengths were calculated with Monte Carlo simulated probability density functions. It is stressed that linear error propagation for the calculated errors of reduced transition strengths is not universally applicable. As both nuclei lie in the vicinity of the N=50 neutron shell closure and on a possible proton subshell closure of the 2p3/2 orbital at Z=38, Nuclear Shell Model calculations for 84Sr, 86Sr, and 88Sr have been performed in the truncated (2p3/2, 1f5/2, 2p1/2, 1g9/2) model space for protons and neutrons with the empirical JUN45 residual interaction. The comparison between experimental results and theoretical predictions show a large degree of consistency.

  10. Experimental observation of subharmonic gap structures in long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahn, M.A.; Manscher, Martin; Mygind, Jesper

    1999-01-01

    The subharmonic gap structure (SGS) in long-overlap Nb-AlOx-Nb Josephson tunnel junctions has been investigated. The experimental results show peaks in the differential conductance at both odd and even integer fractions of the gap voltage, VG Furthermore, the conductance peaks at V-G/2 has been...... observed to split into two peaks with different characteristics. At high magnetic fields, the I-V characteristics approach a single curve, while retaining the SGS conductance peaks. The gap structure and the SGS show the same temperature dependence. The SGS can be explained by a Josephson self...

  11. Cardiac nuclear receptors: architects of mitochondrial structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Rick B; Kelly, Daniel P

    2017-04-03

    The adult heart is uniquely designed and equipped to provide a continuous supply of energy in the form of ATP to support persistent contractile function. This high-capacity energy transduction system is the result of a remarkable surge in mitochondrial biogenesis and maturation during the fetal-to-adult transition in cardiac development. Substantial evidence indicates that nuclear receptor signaling is integral to dynamic changes in the cardiac mitochondrial phenotype in response to developmental cues, in response to diverse postnatal physiologic conditions, and in disease states such as heart failure. A subset of cardiac-enriched nuclear receptors serve to match mitochondrial fuel preferences and capacity for ATP production with changing energy demands of the heart. In this Review, we describe the role of specific nuclear receptors and their coregulators in the dynamic control of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism in the normal and diseased heart.

  12. Chaotic features of nuclear structure and dynamics: selected topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelevinsky, Vladimir; Volya, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Quantum chaos has become an important element of our knowledge about physics of complex systems. In typical mesoscopic systems of interacting particles the dynamics invariably become chaotic when the level density, growing by combinatorial reasons, leads to the increasing probability of mixing simple mean-field (particle-hole) configurations. The resulting stationary states have exceedingly complicated structures that are comparable to those in random matrix theory. We discuss the main properties of mesoscopic quantum chaos and show that it can serve as a justification for application of statistical mechanics to mesoscopic systems. We show that quantum chaos becomes a powerful instrument for experimental, theoretical and computational work. The generalization to open systems and effects in the continuum are discussed with the help of the effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian; it is shown how to formulate this approach for numerous problems of quantum signal transmission. The artificially introduced randomness can also be helpful for a deeper understanding of physics. We indicate the problems that require more investigation so as to be understood further.

  13. Mining the structural genomics pipeline: identification of protein properties that affect high-throughput experimental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Chern-Sing; Lan, Ning; Douglas, Shawn M; Wu, Baolin; Echols, Nathaniel; Smith, Andrew; Milburn, Duncan; Montelione, Gaetano T; Zhao, Hongyu; Gerstein, Mark

    2004-02-06

    Structural genomics projects represent major undertakings that will change our understanding of proteins. They generate unique datasets that, for the first time, present a standardized view of proteins in terms of their physical and chemical properties. By analyzing these datasets here, we are able to discover correlations between a protein's characteristics and its progress through each stage of the structural genomics pipeline, from cloning, expression, purification, and ultimately to structural determination. First, we use tree-based analyses (decision trees and random forest algorithms) to discover the most significant protein features that influence a protein's amenability to high-throughput experimentation. Based on this, we identify potential bottlenecks in various stages of the structural genomics process through specialized "pipeline schematics". We find that the properties of a protein that are most significant are: (i.) whether it is conserved across many organisms; (ii). the percentage composition of charged residues; (iii). the occurrence of hydrophobic patches; (iv). the number of binding partners it has; and (v). its length. Conversely, a number of other properties that might have been thought to be important, such as nuclear localization signals, are not significant. Thus, using our tree-based analyses, we are able to identify combinations of features that best differentiate the small group of proteins for which a structure has been determined from all the currently selected targets. This information may prove useful in optimizing high-throughput experimentation. Further information is available from http://mining.nesg.org/.

  14. Nuclear analysis of structural damage and nuclear heating on enhanced K-DEMO divertor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Im, K.; Kwon, S.; Kim, J.; Kim, D.; Woo, M.; Shin, C.

    2017-12-01

    This paper addresses nuclear analysis on the Korean fusion demonstration reactor (K-DEMO) divertor to estimate the overall trend of nuclear heating values and displacement damages. The K-DEMO divertor model was created and converted by the CAD (Pro-Engineer™) and Monte Carlo automatic modeling programs as a 22.5° sector of the tokamak. The Monte Carlo neutron photon transport and ADVANTG codes were used in this calculation with the FENDL-2.1 nuclear data library. The calculation results indicate that the highest values appeared on the upper outboard target (OT) area, which means the OT is exposed to the highest radiation conditions among the three plasma-facing parts (inboard, central and outboard) in the divertor. Especially, much lower nuclear heating values and displacement damages are indicated on the lower part of the OT area than others. These are important results contributing to thermal-hydraulic and thermo-mechanical analyses on the divertor and also it is expected that the copper alloy materials may be partially used as a heat sink only at the lower part of the OT instead of the reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel due to copper alloy’s high thermal conductivity.

  15. Nuclear hormone receptor architecture - form and dynamics: The 2009 FASEB Summer Conference on Dynamic Structure of the Nuclear Hormone Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Iain J; Nardulli, Ann M

    2009-12-31

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) represent a large and diverse family of ligand-activated transcription factors involved in regulating development, metabolic homeostasis, salt balance and reproductive health. The ligands for these receptors are typically small hydrophobic molecules such as steroid hormones, thyroid hormone, vitamin D3 and fatty acid derivatives. The first NHR structural information appeared approximately 20 years ago with the solution and crystal structures of the DNA binding domains and was followed by the structure of the agonist and antagonist bound ligand binding domains of different NHR members. Interestingly, in addition to these defined structural features, it has become clear that NHRs also possess significant structural plasticity. Thus, the dynamic structure of the NHRs was the topic of a recent stimulating and informative FASEB Summer Research Conference held in Vermont.

  16. Experimental measurement of structural power flow on an aircraft fuselage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental technique is used to measure structural intensity through an aircraft fuselage with an excitation load applied near one of the wing attachment locations. The fuselage is a relatively large structure, requiring a large number of measurement locations to analyze the whole of the structure. For the measurement of structural intensity, multiple point measurements are necessary at every location of interest. A tradeoff is therefore required between the number of measurement transducers, the mounting of these transducers, and the accuracy of the measurements. Using four transducers mounted on a bakelite platform, structural intensity vectors are measured at locations distributed throughout the fuselage. To minimize the errors associated with using the four transducer technique, the measurement locations are selected to be away from bulkheads and stiffeners. Furthermore, to eliminate phase errors between the four transducer measurements, two sets of data are collected for each position, with the orientation of the platform with the four transducers rotated by 180 degrees and an average taken between the two sets of data. The results of these measurements together with a discussion of the suitability of the approach for measuring structural intensity on a real structure are presented.

  17. Nuclear structure studies of neutron-rich heavy nuclei by mass measurements of francium and radium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbusch, Marco [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, Institut fuer Physik, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Collaboration: ISOLTRAP-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    The mass is a unique property of an atomic nucleus reflecting its binding energy and thus the sum of all interactions at work. Precise measurements of nuclear masses especially of short-lived exotic nuclides provide important input for nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, tests of the Standard Model, and weak interaction studies. The Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at the on-line isotope separator ISOLDE/CERN has been set up for precision mass measurements and continuously improved for accessing more exotic nuclides. The mass uncertainty is typically δm / m=10{sup -8} and the accessible half-life has been reduced to about 50 ms. In this contribution, the results of a measurement campaign of neutron-rich francium and radium isotopes will be presented, i.e. the masses of the isotopic chain of {sup 224-233}Fr and {sup 233,234}Ra, one of the most neutron-rich ensemble obtainable at ISOL facilities. The mass {sup 234}Ra denotes the heaviest mass ever measured with ISOLTRAP. Experimental data in the neutron-rich, heavy mass region is of great interest for studies of structural evolution far from stability, especially because the knowledge from nuclear mass models is scarce. The impact of the new data on the physics in this mass region as well as recent technical developments of ISOLTRAP are discussed.

  18. An introduction to using the FORTRAN programs provided with Computational Nuclear Physics 1 Nuclear Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boytos, Matthew A.; Norbury, John W.

    1992-01-01

    The authors of this paper have provided a set of ready-to-run FORTRAN programs that should be useful in the field of theoretical nuclear physics. The purpose of this document is to provide a simple synopsis of the programs and their use. A separate section is devoted to each program set and includes: abstract; files; compiling, linking, and running; obtaining results; and a tutorial.

  19. Nuclear spectrin-like proteins are structural actin-binding proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Munive, Clara; Moreno Díaz de la Espina, Susana

    2011-03-01

    Although actin is a relevant component of the plant nucleus, only three nuclear ABPs (actin-binding proteins) have been identified in plants to date: cofilin, profilin and nuclear myosin I. Although plants lack orthologues of the main structural nuclear ABPs in animals, such as lamins, lamin-associated proteins and nesprins, their genome does contain sequences with spectrin repeats and N-terminal calponin homology domains for actin binding that might be distant relatives of spectrin. We investigated here whether spectrin-like proteins could act as structural nuclear ABPs in plants. We have investigated the presence of spectrins in Allium cepa meristematic nuclei by Western blotting, confocal and electron microscopy, using antibodies against α- and β-spectrin chains that cross-react in plant nuclei. Their role as nuclear ABPs was analysed by co-immunoprecipitation and IF (immunofluorescence) co-localization and their association with the nuclear matrix was investigated by sequential extraction of nuclei with non-ionic detergent, and in low- and high-salt buffers after nuclease digestion. Our results demonstrate the existence of several spectrin-like proteins in the nucleus of onion cells that have different intranuclear distributions in asynchronous meristematic populations and associate with the nuclear matrix. These nuclear proteins co-immunoprecipitate and co-localize with actin. These results reveal that the plant nucleus contains spectrin-like proteins that are structural nuclear components and function as ABPs. Their intranuclear distribution suggests that plant nuclear spectrin-like proteins could be involved in multiple nuclear functions.

  20. Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricard-McCutchan, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dimitriou, P. [Intl Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna (Austria); Nichols, A. L. [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-01

    The 21st meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators was convened at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, from 20 to 24 April 2015 under the auspices of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. This meeting was attended by 36 scientists from 15 Member States, plus IAEA staff, concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, data centre reports, various proposals considered, and actions agreed by the participants, as well as recommendations/conclusions are presented within this document.

  1. Applications of a global nuclear-structure model to studies of the heaviest elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    We present some new results on heavy-element nuclear-structure properties calculated on the basis of the finite-range droplet model and folded-Yukawa single-particle potential. Specifically, we discuss calculations of nuclear ground-state masses and microscopic corrections, {alpha}-decay properties, {beta}-decay properties, fission potential-energy surfaces, and spontaneous-fission half-lives. These results, obtained in a global nuclear-structure approach, are particularly reliable for describing the stability properties of the heaviest elements.

  2. The present and future of nuclear structure with hadronic probes

    CERN Document Server

    Tanner, N W

    1974-01-01

    The author discusses the scattering of medium energy pions by nuclei in anticipation of an increase in intensity of about three orders of magnitude from the meson factories. It is shown that pion scattering at around 200 MeV is not likely to vary revealing except in two respects:- (i) the scattering problems itself, and (ii) simple spectroscopy of double charge exchange, which reactions allow the study of the energy states of strange nuclear species such as /sup 5 /Be and /sup 18/C. Nuclear properties will be more easily extracted from low energy (50 MeV) pion scattering and, in the case of high momentum properties, from high energy (2 GeV) scattering. (18 refs).

  3. Theoretical nuclear structure and astrophysics. Progress report for 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidry, M.W.; Nazarewicz, W.; Strayer, M.R.

    1996-12-31

    This research effort is directed toward theoretical support and guidance for the fields of radioactive ion beam physics, gamma ray spectroscopy, computational and nuclear astrophysics, and the interface between these disciplines. The authors report substantial progress in all those areas. One measure of progress is publications and invited material. The research described here has led to more than 43 papers that are published, accepted, or submitted to refereed journals, and to 15 invited presentations at conferences and workshops.

  4. Experimental Verification of the Structural Glass Beam-Columns Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pešek, Ondřej; Melcher, Jindřich; Balázs, Ivan

    2017-10-01

    This paper deals with experimental research of axially and laterally loaded members made of structural (laminated) glass. The purpose of the research is the evaluation of buckling strength and actual behaviour of the beam-columns due to absence of standards for design of glass load-bearing structures. The experimental research follows the previous one focusing on measuring of initial geometrical imperfections of glass members, testing of glass beams and columns. Within the frame of the research 9 specimens were tested. All of them were of the same geometry (length 2000 mm, width 200 mm and thickness 16 mm) but different composition – laminated double glass made of annealed glass or fully tempered glass panes bonded together by PVB or EVASAFE foil. Specimens were at first loaded by axial force and then by constantly increasing bending moment up to failure. During testing lateral deflections, vertical deflection and normal stresses at mid-span were measured. A maximum load achieved during testing has been adopted as flexural-lateral-torsional buckling strength. The results of experiments were statistically evaluated according to the European standard for design of structures EN 1990, appendix D. There are significant differences between specimens made of annealed glass or fully tempered glass. Differences between specimens loaded by axial forces 1 kN and 2 kN are negligible. The next step was to determine the design strength by calculation procedure based on buckling curves approach intended for design of steel columns and develop interaction criterion for glass beams-columns.

  5. Ghrelin ameliorates intestinal barrier dysfunction in experimental colitis by inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian; Zhang, Lin; Dai, Weiqi; Mao, Yuqing; Li, Sainan; Wang, Jingjie; Li, Huanqing; Guo, Chuanyong; Fan, Xiaoming

    2015-02-27

    This study aimed to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of ghrelin on intestinal barrier dysfunction in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Acute colitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by administering 2.5% DSS. Saline or 25, 125, 250 μg/kg ghrelin was administrated intraperitoneally (IP) to mice 1 day before colitis induction and on days 4, 5, and 6 after DSS administration. IP injection of a ghrelin receptor antagonist, [D-lys(3)]-GHRP-6, was performed immediately prior to ghrelin injection. Ghrelin (125 or 250 μg/kg) could reduce the disease activity index, histological score, and myeloperoxidase activities in experimental colitis, and also prevented shortening of the colon. Ghrelin could prevent the reduction of transepithelial electrical resistance and tight junction expression, and bolstered tight junction structural integrity and regulated cytokine secretion. Ultimately, ghrelin inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitory κB-α, myosin light chain kinase, and phosphorylated myosin light chain 2 activation. Ghrelin prevented the breakdown of intestinal barrier function in DSS-induced colitis. The protective effects of ghrelin on intestinal barrier function were mediated by its receptor GHSR-1a. The inhibition of NF-κB activation might be part of the mechanism underlying the effects of ghrelin that protect against barrier dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. THE AIMS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE INTERNATIONAL NETWORK OF NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND DECAY DATA EVALUATORS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NICHOLS,A.L.; TULI, J.K.

    2007-04-22

    International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluators consists of a number of evaluation groups and data service centers in several countries that appreciate the merits of working together to maintain and ensure the quality and comprehensive content of the ENSDF database (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File). Biennial meetings of the network are held under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to assign evaluation responsibilities, monitor progress, discuss improvements and emerging difficulties, and agree on actions to be undertaken by individual members. The evaluated data and bibliographic details are made available to users via various media, such as the journals ''Nuclear Physics A'' and ''Nuclear Data Sheets'', the World Wide Web, on CD-ROM, wall charts of the nuclides and ''Nuclear Wallet Cards''. While the ENSDF master database is maintained by the US National Nuclear Data Center at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, these data are also available from other nuclear data centers including the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy, in cooperation with the IAEA, organizes workshops on NSDD at regular intervals. The primary aims of these particular workshops are to provide hands-on training in the data evaluation processes, and to encourage new evaluators to participate in NSDD activities. The technical contents of these NSDD workshops are described, along with the rationale for the inclusion of various topics.

  7. Experimental demonstration of dielectric structure based two beam acceleration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gai, W.; Conde, M. E.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Schoessow, P.; Sun, X.; Zou, P.

    2000-11-28

    We report on the experimental results of the dielectric based two beam accelerator (step-up transformer). By using a single high charge beam, we have generated and extracted a high power RF pulse from a 7.8 GHz primary dielectric structure and then subsequently transferred to a second accelerating structure with higher dielectric constant and smaller transverse dimensions. We have measured the energy change of a second (witness) beam passing through the acceleration stage. The measured gradient is >4 times the deceleration gradient. The detailed experiment of set-up and results of the measurements are dimmed. Future plans for the development of a 100 MeV demonstration accelerator based on this technique is presented.

  8. Ghrelin ameliorates intestinal barrier dysfunction in experimental colitis by inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jian; Zhang, Lin [Department of Gastroenterology, Jinshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Dai, Weiqi [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People' s Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Mao, Yuqing [Department of Gastroenterology, Jinshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Sainan [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People' s Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Wang, Jingjie; Li, Huanqing [Department of Gastroenterology, Jinshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Guo, Chuanyong [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People' s Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Fan, Xiaoming, E-mail: xiaomingfan57@sina.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Jinshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-02-27

    Aim: This study aimed to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of ghrelin on intestinal barrier dysfunction in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Methods and results: Acute colitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by administering 2.5% DSS. Saline or 25, 125, 250 μg/kg ghrelin was administrated intraperitoneally (IP) to mice 1 day before colitis induction and on days 4, 5, and 6 after DSS administration. IP injection of a ghrelin receptor antagonist, [D-lys{sup 3}]-GHRP-6, was performed immediately prior to ghrelin injection. Ghrelin (125 or 250 μg/kg) could reduce the disease activity index, histological score, and myeloperoxidase activities in experimental colitis, and also prevented shortening of the colon. Ghrelin could prevent the reduction of transepithelial electrical resistance and tight junction expression, and bolstered tight junction structural integrity and regulated cytokine secretion. Ultimately, ghrelin inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitory κB-α, myosin light chain kinase, and phosphorylated myosin light chain 2 activation. Conclusions: Ghrelin prevented the breakdown of intestinal barrier function in DSS-induced colitis. The protective effects of ghrelin on intestinal barrier function were mediated by its receptor GHSR-1a. The inhibition of NF-κB activation might be part of the mechanism underlying the effects of ghrelin that protect against barrier dysfunction. - Highlights: • Ghrelin ameliorates intestinal barrier dysfunction in experimental colitis. • The effect of ghrelin is mediated by GHSR-1a. • Inhibition of NF-κB activation.

  9. Structural Aging Program to evaluate continued performance of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This report discusses the Structural Aging (SAG) Program which is being conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the United States Nuclear Regulatory commission (USNRC). The SAG Program is addressing the aging management of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants for the purpose of providing improved technical bases for their continued service. The program is organized into three technical tasks: Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technologies, and Quantitative Methodology for continued Service Determinations. Objectives and a summary of recent accomplishments under each of these tasks are presented.

  10. A study on nuclear properties of Zr, Nb, and Ta nuclei used as structural material in fusion reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahan Halide

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusion has a practically limitless fuel supply and is attractive as an energy source. The main goal of fusion research is to construct and operate an energy generating system. Fusion researches also contains fusion structural materials used fusion reactors. Material issues are very important for development of fusion reactors. Therefore, a wide range of fusion structural materials have been considered for fusion energy applications. Zirconium (Zr, Niobium (Nb and Tantalum (Ta containing alloys are important structural materials for fusion reactors and many other fields. Naturally Zr includes the 90Zr (%51.5, 91Zr (%11.2, 92Zr (%17.1, 94Zr (%17.4, 96Zr (%2.80 isotopes and 93Nb and 181Ta include the 93Nb (%100 and 181Ta (%99.98, respectively. In this study, the charge, mass, proton and neutron densities and the root-mean-square (rms charge radii, rms nuclear mass radii, rms nuclear proton, and neutron radii have been calculated for 87-102Zr, 93Nb, 181Ta target nuclei isotopes by using the Hartree–Fock method with an effective Skyrme force with SKM*. The calculated results have been compared with those of the compiled experimental taken from Atomic Data and Nuclear Data Tables and theoretical values of other studies.

  11. The density matrix renormalization group and nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittel, S.; Thakur, B. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Sandulescu, N. [Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, 76900 Bucharest (Romania)

    2007-12-15

    We briefly review the Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) method and its potential use in large-scale nuclear shell-model calculations. We propose the use of angular-momentum-conserving variant of the method (the JDMRG) and report the first test results of such an approach for the nucleus {sup 48}Cr The positive results of these calculations have motivated us to search for an even more efficient means of implementing the DMRG strategy and the status of these efforts is also described. (Author)

  12. New density-independent interactions for nuclear structure calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennaceur K.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a new two-body finite-range and momentum-dependent but density-independent effective interaction, which can be interpreted as a regularized zerorange force. We show that no three-body or density-dependent terms are needed for a correct description of saturation properties in infinite matter, that is, on the level of lowenergy density functional, the physical three-body effects can be efficiently absorbed in effective two-body terms. The new interaction gives a satisfying equation of state of nuclear matter and opens up extremely interesting perspectives for the mean-field and beyond-mean-field descriptions of atomic nuclei.

  13. Nuclear Structure and Galactic γ-Ray Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görres, J

    2000-01-01

    The observation of galactic γ lines following the decay of radioactive nuclei provides a direct link between nuclear physics experiments in earth-based laboratories and astrophysical observations with space-based observatories. Two examples are presented to illustrate this interplay: the measurement of the lifetime of (44)Ti to allow an improved determination of the (44)Ti mass of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A from the observed γ ray activity and the measurements of excited states in (24)Si to determine the reaction rate of (23)Al(p, γ)(24)Si which might be important for a reduced production of (22)Na in novae.

  14. 2nd International Symposium "Atomic Cluster Collisions : Structure and Dynamics from the Nuclear to the Biological Scale"

    CERN Document Server

    Solov'yov, Andrey; ISACC 2007; Latest advances in atomic cluster collisions

    2008-01-01

    This book presents a 'snapshot' of the most recent and significant advances in the field of cluster physics. It is a comprehensive review based on contributions by the participants of the 2nd International Symposium on Atomic Cluster Collisions (ISACC 2007) held in July 19-23, 2007 at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany. The purpose of the Symposium is to promote the growth and exchange of scientific information on the structure and properties of nuclear, atomic, molecular, biological and complex cluster systems studied by means of photonic, electronic, heavy particle and atomic collisions. Particular attention is devoted to dynamic phenomena, many-body effects taking place in cluster systems of a different nature - these include problems of fusion and fission, fragmentation, collective electron excitations, phase transitions, etc.Both the experimental and theoretical aspects of cluster physics, uniquely placed between nuclear physics on the one hand and atomic, molecular and solid state physics on the other, are discuss...

  15. A stochastic method for asphaltene structure formulation from experimental data: avoidance of implausible structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De León, Jennifer; Velásquez, Ana M; Hoyos, Bibian A

    2017-04-12

    This work presents a stochastic procedure designed to formulate a discrete set of molecular structures that, as a whole, adjust properly to experimental asphaltene data. This algorithm incorporates the pentane effect concept and Clar's sextet rule to the formulation process. The set of viable structures was constructed based on probability distribution functions obtained from experimental information and an isomer database containing all plausible configurations for a given number of rings, avoiding high-energy structures. This procedure was applied to a collection of experimental data from the literature. Ten sets, consisting of 5000 structures each, were obtained. Each set was then optimized. For the most accurate representation, four molecules were sufficient to properly reproduce the experimental input. The asphaltene system obtained is consistent with the reported molecular weight, number of aromatic rings and heteroatom content. Molecular dynamic simulations showed that the asphaltene representation adequately reproduced asphaltene aggregation behavior in toluene and n-heptane. In toluene, a single three-molecule aggregate was observed, and the majority of asphaltene molecules remained in a monomeric state. In n-heptane, aggregates containing up to four molecules were observed; both porous and compact aggregates were found. The asphaltene molecular representation obtained, which allows researchers to avoid inappropriate torsions in the molecule, is able to reproduce interplanar distances between aromatic cores of 4 Å or less for the aggregation state, as supported by experimental results.

  16. Uncertainty Quantification in Experimental Structural Dynamics Identification of Composite Material Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luczak, Marcin; Peeters, Bart; Kahsin, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Aerospace and wind energy structures are extensively using components made of composite materials. Since these structures are subjected to dynamic environments with time-varying loading conditions, it is important to model their dynamic behavior and validate these models by means of vibration...... for uncertainty evaluation in experimentally estimated models. Investigated structures are plates, fuselage panels and helicopter main rotor blades as they represent different complexity levels ranging from coupon, through sub-component up to fully assembled structures made of composite materials. To evaluate...

  17. Structural and functional adaptations of the mammalian nuclear envelope to meet the meiotic requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Jana; Jahn, Daniel; Alsheimer, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies in the past years provided definite evidence that the nuclear envelope is much more than just a simple barrier. It rather constitutes a multifunctional platform combining structural and dynamic features to fulfill many fundamental functions such as chromatin organization, regulation of transcription, signaling, but also structural duties like maintaining general nuclear architecture and shape. One additional and, without doubt, highly impressive aspect is the recently identified key function of selected nuclear envelope components in driving meiotic chromosome dynamics, which in turn is essential for accurate recombination and segregation of the homologous chromosomes. Here, we summarize the recent work identifying new key players in meiotic telomere attachment and movement and discuss the latest advances in our understanding of the actual function of the meiotic nuclear envelope.

  18. A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of Secondary and Tertiary Structure in Yeast tRNAPhe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robillard, G.T.; Tarr, C.E.; Vosman, F.; Reid, B.R.

    1977-01-01

    We present experimental evidence which confirms recently proposed ring current prediction methods for assigning hydrogen-bond proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra from tRNA. The evidence is a series of temperature-dependent studies on yeast tRNAPhe monitoring both the high- and low-field

  19. Nuclear radiative recoil corrections to the hyperfine structure of S-states in muonic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustov, R. N.; Martynenko, A. P.; Martynenko, F. A.; Sorokin, V. V.

    2017-09-01

    Nuclear radiative recoil corrections of order α( Zα)5 to the hyperfine splitting of S-states in muonic hydrogen are calculated on the basis of quasipotential method in quantum electrodynamics. The calculation is performed in the infrared safe Fried-Yennie gauge. Modern experimental data on the proton form factors are used.

  20. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of the telomere repeat sequence in hamster sperm nuclear structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lara, J; Wydner, K L; Hyland, K M; Ward, W S

    1993-11-01

    The flat, hooked-shaped architecture of the hamster sperm nucleus makes this an excellent model for in situ hybridization studies of the three dimensional structure of the genome. We have examined the structure of the telomere repeat sequence (TTAGGG)n with respect to the various nuclear structures present in hamster spermatozoa, using fluorescent in situ hybridization. In fully condensed, mature sperm nuclei, the telomere sequences appeared as discrete spots of various sizes interspersed throughout the volume of the nuclei. While the pattern of these signals was non-random, it varied significantly in different nuclei. These discrete telomere foci were seen to gradually lengthen into linear, beaded signals as sperm nuclei were decondensed, in vitro, and were not associated with the nuclear annulus. We also examined the relationship of telomeres to the sperm nuclear matrix, a residual nuclear structure that retains the original size and shape of the nucleus. In these structures the DNA extends beyond the perimeter of the nucleus to form a halo around it, representing the arrangement of the chromosomal DNA into loop domains attached at their bases to the nuclear matrix. Telomere signals in these structures were also linear and equal in length to those of the decondensed nuclei, and each signal represented part of a single DNA loop domain. The telomeres were attached at one end to the nuclear matrix and extended into the halo. Sperm nuclear matrices treated with Eco RI retained the telomere signals. These data support sperm DNA packaging models in which DNA is coiled into discrete foci, rather than spread out linearly along the length of the sperm nucleus.

  1. Nuclear dependence of structure functions in the shadowing region of deep inelastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, E.L.; Qiu, Jianwei

    1988-07-27

    A discussion of nuclear shadowing in deep inelastic lepton scattering is presented. We show that the parton recombination model suggests that shadowing should begin to occur at larger values of Bjorken x as A increases. This expectation as well as that of weak dependence on Q/sup 2/, and the trend of the x dependence of the shadowing phenomenon are consistent with recent data. Shadowing at small x is combined with nuclear bound state effects, responsible for nuclear dependence at larger x, to provide description of the A dependence of the structure function for the entire range of x. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Structural Dynamics Experimental Activities in Ultra-Lightweight and Inflatable Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Lassiter, John O.; Ross, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports recently completed structural dynamics experimental activities with new ultra-lightweight and inflatable space structures (a.k.a., "Gossamer" spacecraft) at NASA Langley Research Center, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Nine aspects of this work are covered: 1) inflated, rigidized tubes, 2) active control experiments, 3) photogrammetry, 4) laser vibrometry, 5) modal tests of inflatable structures, 6) in-vacuum modal tests, 7) tensioned membranes, 8) deployment tests, and 9) flight experiment support. Structural dynamics will play a major role in the design and eventually in-space deployment and performance of Gossamer spacecraft. Experimental research and development such as this is required to validate new analysis methods. The activities discussed in the paper are pathfinder accomplishments. conducted on unique components and prototypes of future spacecraft systems.

  3. Experimental study on mechanical properties of aircraft honeycomb sandwich structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talebi Mazraehshahi H.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical behaviour of sandwich panels under different conditions have been exprimentally studied in this research to increase the knowledge of aircraft sandwich panel structures and facilitate design criteria for aircraft structures. Tests were concentrated on the honeycomb sandwich structures under different loads including flexural, insert shear, flat wise tension and compression loads. Furthermore, effect of core density and face material on mechanical behavior of different samples were investigated and compared with analytical and FEM method. Effects of skin thickness on strength of honycomb sandwhich panels under shear pull out and moments have also been considerd in this study. According to this investigation, insert strength and flexural test under different load conditions is strongly affected by face thickness, but compression and tearoff (falt wise tensile properties of a sandwich panel depends on core material. The study concludes that the correlation between experimental results and the analytical predictions will enable the designer to predict the mechanical behaviour and strength of a sandwich beam; however, applied formula may lead engineers to unreliable results for shear modulus.

  4. Experimental evaluation of the structural behaviour of adobe masonry structural elements

    OpenAIRE

    H. Varum; Costa, A; Pereira, H; Almeida, J; Rodrigues, H.; D. Silveira

    2007-01-01

    Rehabilitation and strengthening of existing adobe masonry constructions have been neglected during the last decades. In Aveiro, Portugal, many adobe buildings present an important level of structural damage and, in many cases, are even near to ruin, having the majority a high vulnerability to seismic actions. To face the lack of information concerning the mechanical properties and structural behaviour of adobe elements, it was developed an experimental campaign. The composition and mechanica...

  5. Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Structures - Overview of Methods and Related Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2009-05-01

    The objectives of this limited study were to provide an overview of the methods that are available for inspection of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete and metallic structures, and to provide an assessment of the status of methods that address inspection of thick, heavily-reinforced concrete and inaccessible areas of the containment metallic pressure boundary. In meeting these objectives a general description of nuclear power plant safety-related structures was provided as well as identification of potential degradation factors, testing and inspection requirements, and operating experience; methods for inspection of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures and containment metallic pressure boundaries were identified and described; and applications of nondestructive evaluation methods specifically related to inspection of thick-section reinforced concrete structures and inaccessible portions of containment metallic pressure boundaries were summarized. Recommendations are provided on utilization of test article(s) to further advance nondestructive evaluation methods related to thick-section, heavily-reinforced concrete and inaccessible portions of the metallic pressure boundary representative of nuclear power plant containments. Conduct of a workshop to provide an update on applications and needed developments for nondestructive evaluation of nuclear power plant structures would also be of benefit.

  6. Experimental Study on Desalination System Using the Waste Heat of Nuclear Power Plants and Solar Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaswneh, Khalid; Jeong, Yong Hoon [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study a new desalination system using the waste heat of nuclear power plant or solar energy system is under consideration. An experiment study will performed to evaluate the performance of the system. In this paper, the experimental design of the system and steady-state and transient analysis, using MATLAB and MARS code respectively, will be presented. A new desalination system using the waste heat from nuclear power plants or solar energy was proposed and the design of an experimental facility to evaluate the system's performance was presented. The analytical steady-state analysis using MATLAB and transient MARS calculations have been performed. An Experiment will be performed to verify the model. Moreover a feasibility study for the proposed design and a comparison with the conventional desalination system will be performed.

  7. Shamir secret sharing scheme with dynamic access structure (SSSDAS). Case study on nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiyagarajan, P.; Thandra, Prasanth Kumar; Rajan, J.; Satyamurthy, S.A.V. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam (India). Computer Div.; Aghila, G. [National Institute of Technology, Karaikal (India). Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering

    2015-05-15

    In recent years, due to the sophistication offered by the Internet, strategic organizations like nuclear power plants are linked to the outside world communication through the Internet. The entry of outside world communication into strategic organization (nuclear power plant) increases the hacker's attempts to crack its security and to trace any information which is being sent among the top level officials. Information security system in nuclear power plant is very crucial as even small loophole in the security system will lead to a major disaster. Recent cyber attacks in nuclear power plant provoked information security professionals to look deeply into the information security aspects of strategic organizations (nuclear power plant). In these lines, Shamir secret sharing scheme with dynamic access structure (SSSDAS) is proposed in the paper which provides enhanced security by providing dynamic access structure for each node in different hierarchies. The SSSDAS algorithm can be applied to any strategic organizations with hierarchical structures. In this paper the possible scenarios where SSSDAS algorithm can be applied to nuclear power plant is explained as a case study. The proposed SSSDAS scheme identifies the wrong shares, if any, used for reconstruction of the secret. The SSSDAS scheme also address the three major security parameters namely confidentiality, authentication and integrity.

  8. NUCLEAR HEATING IN LIF DOSEMETERS IN A FUSION NEUTRON FIELD, TRIAL OF DIRECT COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTAL AND SIMULATED RESULTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorecki, Wladyslaw; Obryk, Barbara

    2017-09-29

    The results of nuclear heating measured by means of thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD-LiF) in a Cu block irradiated by 14 MeV neutrons are presented. The integral Cu experiment relevant for verification of copper nuclear data at neutron energies characteristic for fusion facilities was performed in the ENEA FNG Laboratory at Frascati. Five types of TLDs were used: highly photon sensitive LiF:Mg,Cu,P (MCP-N), 7LiF:Mg,Cu,P (MCP-7) and standard, lower sensitivity LiF:Mg,Ti (MTS-N), 7LiF:Mg,Ti (MTS-7) and 6LiF:Mg,Ti (MTS-6). Calibration of the detectors was performed with gamma rays in terms of air-kerma (10 mGy of 137Cs air-kerma). Nuclear heating in the Cu block was also calculated with the use of MCNP transport code Nuclear heating in Cu and air in TLD's positions was calculated as well. The nuclear heating contribution from all simulated by MCNP6 code particles including protons, deuterons, alphas tritons and heavier ions produced by the neutron interactions were calculated. A trial of the direct comparison between experimental results and results of simulation was performed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Experimental and simulated study of a composite structure metamaterial absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengyong; Ai, Xiaochuan; Wu, Ronghua; Chen, Jiajun

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, a high performance metamaterial absorber is designed and experimental studied. Measured results indicate that a perfect absorption band and a short-wavelength absorption peak are achieved in the near-infrared spectrum. Current strength distributions reveal that the absorption band is excited by the cavity resonance. And electric field distributions show that the short-wavelength absorption peak is excited by the horizontal coupled of localized surface plasmon (LSP) modes near hole edges. On the one hand, the absorption property of the measured metamaterial absorber can be enhanced through optimizing the structural parameters (a, w, and H). On the other hand, the absorption property is sensitive to the change of refractive index of environmental medias. A sensing scheme is proposed for refractive index detecting based on the figure of merit (FOM) value. Measured results indicate that the proposed sensing scheme can achieve high FOM value with different environmental medias (water, glucose solution).

  10. Perfluoroalkyl Acids Shift Microbial Community Structure Across Experimental Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathers, T. S.; Sharp, J.

    2016-12-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are contaminants of emerging concern that have increasingly been found in groundwater and drinking water systems. Previously, we demonstrated that PFAAs significantly alter the abundance of specific microbial clades in batch reductive dechlorinating systems, resulting in decreased chlorinated solvent attenuation capabilities. To further understand the impacts of PFAA exposure on subsurface microbial processes and PFAA transport, we investigated changes in microbial community structure as a function of PFAA presence in flow-through columns simulating aquifer transport. Phylogenetic analysis using high throughput, next generation sequencing performed after exposure to 250 pore volumes of source zone concentrations of PFAAs (10 mg/L each of 11 analytes including PFOS and PFOA) resulted in patterns that mirrored those observed in batch systems, demonstrating a conservation of community dynamics across experimental scales. Of the nine clades observed in both batch and flow-through systems, six were similarly impacted as a function of PFAA exposure, regardless of the experimental differences in transport and redox state. Specifically, the presence of PFAAs enhanced the relative abundance of Archaea, Bacteroidetes (phylum), and the family Veillonellaceae in both systems. Repressed clades include the genus Sedimentibacter, Ruminococcaceae (family), and the Anaerolineales, which contains Dehalococcoides, a genus known for its ability to fully dechlorinate TCE. As PFAAs are often co-located with TCE and BTEX, changes in microbial community structure can result in hindered bioremediation of these co-contaminants. Consideration of community shifts and corresponding changes in behavior, such as repressed reductive dechlorination or increased biofilm formation, will aid in the development of conceptual site models that account for co-contaminant bioremediation potential and PFAA transport.

  11. Investigating the effects of stress on the pore structures of nuclear grade graphites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Joshua E.L., E-mail: joshua.taylor@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Hall, Graham N., E-mail: graham.n.hall@manchester.ac.uk; Mummery, Paul M., E-mail: paul.m.mummery@manchester.ac.uk

    2016-03-15

    Graphite is used as a moderating material and as a structural component in a number of current generation nuclear reactors. During reactor operation stresses develop in the graphite components, causing them to deform. It is important to understand how the microstructure of graphite affects the material's response to these stresses. A series of experiments were performed to investigate how the pore structures of Pile Grade A and Gilsocarbon graphites respond to loading stresses. A compression rig was used to simulate the build-up of operational stresses in graphite components, and a confocal laser microscope was used to study variation of a number of important pore properties. Values of elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio were calculated and compared to existing literature to confirm the validity of the experimental techniques. Mean pore areas were observed to decrease linearly with increasing applied load, mean pore eccentricity increased linearly, and a small amount of clockwise pore rotation was observed. The response to build-up of stresses was dependent on the orientation of the pores and basal planes and the shapes of the pores with respect to the loading axis. It was proposed that pore closure and pore reorientation were competing processes. Pore separation was quantified using ‘nearest neighbour’ and Voronoi techniques, and non-pore regions were found to shrink linearly with increasing applied load. - Highlights: • Effects of stress on pore structures of Gilsocarbon and PGA graphites were studied. • Application of a compressive load was used to generate stresses in graphite. • Inverse linear relationship between stress and pore area was observed. • Mean pore eccentricity increased, clockwise pore rotation observed. • Separation of pores quantified using Voronoi and ‘nearest-neighbour’ methods.

  12. Experimental results from pressure testing a 1:6-scale nuclear power plant containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horschel, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the testing of a 1:6-scale, reinforced-concrete containment building at Sandia National Laboratories, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scale-model, Light Water Reactor (LWR) containment building was designed and built to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., and was instrumented with over 1200 transducers to prepare for the test. The containment model was tested to failure to determine its response to static internal overpressurization. As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s program on containment integrity, the test results will be used to assess the capability of analytical methods to predict the performance of containments under severe-accident loads. The scaled dimensions of the cylindrical wall and hemispherical dome were typical of a full-size containment. Other typical features included in the heavily reinforced model were equipment hatches, personnel air locks, several small piping penetrations, and a ihin steel liner that was attached to the concrete by headed studs. In addition to the transducers attached to the model, an acoustic detection system and several video and still cameras were used during testing to gather data and to aid in the conduct of the test. The model and its instrumentation are briefly discussed, and is followed by the testing procedures and measured response of the containment model. A summary discussion is included to aid in understanding the significance of the test as it applies to real world reinforced concrete containment structures. The data gathered during SIT and overpressure testing are included as an appendix.

  13. Dynamical self-consistent description of exotic structures in nuclear matter at subnuclear densities

    CERN Document Server

    de la Mota, Virginia; Figerou, Sébastien

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the occurrence of exotic structures in nuclear matter at subnuclear densities within the framework of the dywan model. This approach, developed ab initio for the description of nuclear collisions, is a microscopic dynamical approach in which the numerical treatment makes use of wavelet representation techniques. Before tackling the effects of multi-particle correlations on the overall dynamics, we focused the present work on the study of cold matter within a pure mean field description. Starting from inhomogeneous initial conditions provided by an arrangement of nuclei located on an initial crystalline lattice, the exotic structures result from the dynamical self-consistent evolution. The nuclear system can freely self-organize, it can modify or even break the lattice structure and the initial symmetries of matter distribution. This approach goes beyond the Wigner-Seitz approximation and no assumption of final shapes of matter is made. In this framework, different effects, as the sensitivity of...

  14. Relation between molecular electronic structure and nuclear spin-induced circular dichroism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Štěpánek, Petr; Coriani, Sonia; Sundholm, Dage

    2017-01-01

    The recently theoretically described nuclear spin-induced circular dichroism (NSCD) is a promising method for the optical detection of nuclear magnetization. NSCD involves both optical excitations of the molecule and hyperfine interactions and, thus, it offers a means to realize a spectroscopy...... with the spatial distribution of the excited states and couplings between them, reflecting changes in molecular structure and conformation. This constitutes a marked difference to the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift, which only reflects the local molecular structure in the ground electronic state...... are discussed. The results underline NSCD spectroscopy as a plausible tool with a power for the identification of not only different molecules, but their specific structures as well....

  15. Decay study of neutron-deficient La isotopes for atomic masses and nuclear structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osa, Akihiko; Koizumi, Mitsuo; Sekine, Toshiaki [Department of Materials Science, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Takasaki, Gunma (JP)] [and others

    2000-06-01

    We report the decay spectroscopic studies with the TIARA-ISOL connected to an AVF cyclotron at the Takasaki site of JAERI between 1994 and 1998 under the Universities-JAERI Collaborative Research Project. Decay spectroscopic studies have been carried out for neutron-deficient La-Ce-Pr isotopes in the mass 120-130 region, which were prepared by on-line mass-separation following the fusion-evaporation reactions {sup 92,nat}Mo({sup 36}Ar, 3pxn). The {sup 125}Pr isotope was newly identified with a half-life of 3.3(7) s and its decay scheme was presented. The assignment of the 135.8 keV {gamma}-ray to the decay of {sup 125}Pr was supported by its coincidence with Ce X-rays and {beta}{sup +} rays. Low-spin states in {sup 124,} {sup 126,} {sup 128,} {sup 130}Ba fed by the {beta}{sup +}/EC decay of their La parents were investigated by means of the {gamma}-{gamma} angular correlation measurement. Q{sub EC}-values/atomic masses of neutron-deficient {sup 124-130}La were determined by {beta}{sup +}-ray maximum energy measurement. Half-lives of the first 2{sup +} state in {sup 122,} {sup 124,} {sup 126}Ba were measured using a {beta}-{gamma} delayed coincidence method. The experimental results obtained for the nuclear structure of the Ba isotopes are discussed in comparison with theory. (author)

  16. Experimental investigation on light propagation through apple tissue structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askoura, Mohamed Lamine; Piron, Vianney; Vaudelle, Fabrice; L'Huillier, Jean-Pierre; Madieta, Emmanuel; Mehinagic, Emira

    2015-07-01

    The interaction of light with biological materials, such as fruits and vegetables, is a complex process which involves both absorption, and scattering events at different scales. Measuring the optical properties of a fruit allows understanding the physical and chemical characteristics. In this paper, an optical bench based on the use of a continuous laser source and a CCD camera was developed to study the light diffusion inside apple tissue structures. The method refers to the well-known steady-state spatially resolved method. First, the optoelectronics system was tested with a tissue phantom in order to show the optimal sensing range required to obtain the best estimated optical properties. Second, experimental results were obtained using peeled and unpeeled apples as interrogated tissues. The data were confronted with a diffusion model in order to extract the optical properties at two wavelengths of 633, and 852 nm. To better understand the effect of the apple tissue structures, investigations into the propagation of light through a half cut apple were also performed.

  17. Numerical and experimental study of bistable plates for morphing structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicassio, F.; Scarselli, G.; Avanzini, G.; Del Core, G.

    2017-04-01

    This study is concerned with the activation energy threshold of bistable composite plates in order to tailor a bistable system for specific aeronautical applications. The aim is to explore potential configurations of the bistable plates and their dynamic behavior for designing novel morphing structure suitable for aerodynamic surfaces and, as a possible further application, for power harvesters. Bistable laminates have two stable mechanical shapes that can withstand aerodynamic loads without additional constraint forces or locking mechanisms. This kind of structures, when properly loaded, snap-through from one stable configuration to another, causing large strains that can also be used for power harvesting scopes. The transition between the stable states of the composite laminate can be triggered, in principle, simply by aerodynamic loads (pilot, disturbance or passive inputs) without the need of servo-activated control systems. Both numerical simulations based on Finite Element models and experimental testing based on different activating forcing spectra are used to validate this concept. The results show that dynamic activation of bistable plates depend on different parameters that need to be carefully managed for their use as aircraft passive wing flaps.

  18. Nuclear structure in odd-odd nucleus [sup 138]Pr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzutto, M.A.; Cybulska, E.W.; Vanin, V.R.; Oliveira, J.R.B.; Emediato, L.G.R.; Ribas, R.V.; Seale, W.A.; Rao, M.N.; Medina, N.H.; Botelho, S.; Acquadro, J.C.; Lima, C.L. (Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Lab. Pelletron)

    1992-12-01

    With the view of extending the systematics of odd-odd Pr nuclei toward the N=82 closed shell, high-spin states in [sup 138]Pr nucleus have been investigated with the [sup 128]Te([sup 14]N, 4n[gamma]) reaction. Configurations and spin assignments are suggested for three of the observed band-structures. (orig.).

  19. Nuclear structure at high spin using multidetector gamma array and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-05

    Apr 5, 2014 ... the scattering chamber in a honey comb structure arrangement, mounted at a distance of. 4 cm from the target. It covered ∼35% of the total solid angle at the target (figure 2) and each BGO detector covered nearly equal solid angle. This BGO array [11] was used as total energy and/or gamma multiplicity ...

  20. Simulation and experimentation of PSCAR chemistry for complex structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcasi, Michael; Nagahara, Seiji; Shiraishi, Gosuke; Iseki, Tomohiro; Minekawa, Yukie; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Nakagawa, Hisashi; Naruoka, Takehiko; Nagai, Tomoki; Oshima, Akihiro; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2017-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL, λ = 13.5 nm) continues to be one of the most important candidates for future technology nodes. For the insertion of EUV lithography into device mass production, higher sensitivity of EUV resists is helpful for better cost of ownership of the EUV tool and light source. However, obtaining low sensitivity (S), high resolution (R), and low line edge roughness (L) simultaneously is very difficult. Many previous experiments by lithographers proved the existence of this "RLS trade-off"1-2. This paper furthers the work related to Photosensitized Chemically Amplified ResistTM (PSCAR)TM**, a chemistry which is trying to break the "RLS tradeoff" relationship. This chemistry was introduced as a new chemically amplified lithographic concept and is accomplished in an in-line track tool with secondary exposure module connected to EUV exposure tool. PSCAR is a modified CAR which contains a photosensitizer precursor (PP) in addition to other standard CAR components such as a protected polymer, a photo acid generator (PAG) and a quencher. In the PSCAR process, an improved chemical gradient can be realized by dual acid quenching steps with the help of increased quencher concentration. The addition of the PP, as well as other material optimization, offers more degrees of freedom for getting high sensitivity and low LER, but also makes the system more complicated. Thus coupling simulation and experimentation is the most rational approach to optimizing the overall process and for understanding complicated 2-D structures. In this paper, we will provide additional background into the simulation of PSCAR chemistry, explore the effects of PSCAR chemistry on chemical contrast of complex structures (e.g. T structures, slot contacts, I/D bias for L/S), and explore the sensitivity enhancement levels capable while improving or maintaining lithographic performance. Finally, we will explore modifications of PSCAR chemistry on performance.

  1. Track structure based modelling of light ion radiation effects on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Elke; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Dingfelder, Michael; Friedland, Werner; Kundrat, Pavel; Baiocco, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    and SRIM calculations. Preliminary studies regarding the biological endpoints DSB (cluster) and chromosomal aberrations have been performed for selected light ions up to neon. Validation with experimental data as well as further calculations are underway and final results will be presented at the meeting. Mitochondrial alterations have been implicated in radiation-induced cardiovascular effects. To extend the applicability of PARTRAC biophysical tool towards effects on mitochondria, the nuclear DNA and chromatin as the primary target of radiation has been complemented by a model of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to mimic a coronary cell with thousand mitochondria contained in the cytoplasm. Induced mtDNA damage (SSB, DSB) has been scored for 60Co photons and 5 MeV alpha-particle irradiation, assuming alternative radical scavenging capacities within the mitochondria. While direct radiation effects in mtDNA are identical to nuclear DNA, indirect effects in mtDNA are in general larger due to lower scavenging and the lack of DNA-protecting histones. These simulations complement the scarce experimental data on radiation-induced mtDNA damage and help elucidate the relative roles of initial mtDNA versus nuclear DNA damage and of pathways that amplify their respective effects. Ongoing and planned developments of PARTRAC include coupling with a radiation transport code and track-structure based calculations of cell killing for RBE studies on macroscopic scales within a mixed ion field. [1] Friedland, Dingfelder et al. (2011): "Track structures, DNA targets and radiation effects in the biophysical Monte Carlo simulation code PARTRAC", Mutat. Res. 711, 28-40 [2] Friedland et al. (2013): "Track structure based modelling of chromosome aberrations after photon and alpha-particle irradiation", Mutat. Res. 756, 213-223 [3] Schmid, Friedland et al. (2015): "Sub-micrometer 20 MeV protons or 45 MeV lithium spot irradiation enhances yields of dicentric chromosomes due to clustering of DNA

  2. Structural control and health monitoring of building structures with unknown ground excitations: Experimental investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jia; Xu, You-Lin; Zhan, Sheng; Huang, Qin

    2017-03-01

    When health monitoring system and vibration control system both are required for a building structure, it will be beneficial and cost-effective to integrate these two systems together for creating a smart building structure. Recently, on the basis of extended Kalman filter (EKF), a time-domain integrated approach was proposed for the identification of structural parameters of the controlled buildings with unknown ground excitations. The identified physical parameters and structural state vectors were then utilized to determine the control force for vibration suppression. In this paper, the possibility of establishing such a smart building structure with the function of simultaneous damage detection and vibration suppression was explored experimentally. A five-story shear building structure equipped with three magneto-rheological (MR) dampers was built. Four additional columns were added to the building model, and several damage scenarios were then simulated by symmetrically cutting off these columns in certain stories. Two sets of earthquakes, i.e. Kobe earthquake and Northridge earthquake, were considered as seismic input and assumed to be unknown during the tests. The structural parameters and the unknown ground excitations were identified during the tests by using the proposed identification method with the measured control forces. Based on the identified structural parameters and system states, a switching control law was employed to adjust the current applied to the MR dampers for the purpose of vibration attenuation. The experimental results show that the presented approach is capable of satisfactorily identifying structural damages and unknown excitations on one hand and significantly mitigating the structural vibration on the other hand.

  3. The Legnaro National Laboratories and the SPES facility: nuclear structure and reactions today and tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, Giacomo; Fiorentini, Gianni

    2016-11-01

    There is a very long tradition of studying nuclear structure and reactions at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL) of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Italian Institute of Nuclear Physics). The wide expertise acquired in building and running large germanium arrays has made the laboratories one of the most advanced research centers in γ-ray spectroscopy. The ’gamma group’ has been deeply involved in all the national and international developments of the last 20 years and is currently one of the major contributors to the AGATA project, the first (together with its American counterpart GRETINA) γ-detector array based on γ-ray tracking. This line of research is expected to be strongly boosted by the coming into operation of the SPES radioactive ion beam project, currently under construction at LNL. In this report, written on the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the Nobel prize awarded to Aage Bohr, Ben R Mottelson and Leo Rainwater and particularly focused on the physics of nuclear structure, we intend to summarize the different lines of research that have guided nuclear structure and reaction research at LNL in the last decades. The results achieved have paved the way for the present SPES facility, a new laboratories infrastructure producing and accelerating radioactive ion beams of fission fragments and other isotopes.

  4. Chromatin insulator bodies are nuclear structures that form in response to osmotic stress and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoborg, Todd; Rickels, Ryan; Barrios, Josh; Labrador, Mariano

    2013-07-22

    Chromatin insulators assist in the formation of higher-order chromatin structures by mediating long-range contacts between distant genomic sites. It has been suggested that insulators accomplish this task by forming dense nuclear foci termed insulator bodies that result from the coalescence of multiple protein-bound insulators. However, these structures remain poorly understood, particularly the mechanisms triggering body formation and their role in nuclear function. In this paper, we show that insulator proteins undergo a dramatic and dynamic spatial reorganization into insulator bodies during osmostress and cell death in a high osmolarity glycerol-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-independent manner, leading to a large reduction in DNA-bound insulator proteins that rapidly repopulate chromatin as the bodies disassemble upon return to isotonicity. These bodies occupy distinct nuclear territories and contain a defined structural arrangement of insulator proteins. Our findings suggest insulator bodies are novel nuclear stress foci that can be used as a proxy to monitor the chromatin-bound state of insulator proteins and provide new insights into the effects of osmostress on nuclear and genome organization.

  5. Chromatin insulator bodies are nuclear structures that form in response to osmotic stress and cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoborg, Todd; Rickels, Ryan; Barrios, Josh

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin insulators assist in the formation of higher-order chromatin structures by mediating long-range contacts between distant genomic sites. It has been suggested that insulators accomplish this task by forming dense nuclear foci termed insulator bodies that result from the coalescence of multiple protein-bound insulators. However, these structures remain poorly understood, particularly the mechanisms triggering body formation and their role in nuclear function. In this paper, we show that insulator proteins undergo a dramatic and dynamic spatial reorganization into insulator bodies during osmostress and cell death in a high osmolarity glycerol–p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase–independent manner, leading to a large reduction in DNA-bound insulator proteins that rapidly repopulate chromatin as the bodies disassemble upon return to isotonicity. These bodies occupy distinct nuclear territories and contain a defined structural arrangement of insulator proteins. Our findings suggest insulator bodies are novel nuclear stress foci that can be used as a proxy to monitor the chromatin-bound state of insulator proteins and provide new insights into the effects of osmostress on nuclear and genome organization. PMID:23878275

  6. Technology development on the assessment of structural integrity of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Moon; Choun, Y. S.; Choi, I. K. and others

    1999-04-01

    Nuclear power plants in Korea show drop off in their performance and safety margin as the age of plants increase. The reevaluation of Kori-1 Unit on its performance and safety for life extension is expected in the near future. However, technologies and information related are insufficient to quantitatively estimate them. The final goal of this study is to develop the basic testing and evaluation techniques related with structural integrity of important nuclear equipment and structures. A part of the study includes development of equipment qualification technique. To ensure the structural integrity of structures, systems, and equipment in nuclear power plants, the following 5 research tasks were performed in the first year. - Analysis of dynamic characteristics of reactor internals - Analysis of engineering characteristics of instrumental earthquakes recorded in Korea - Analysis of ultimate pressure capacity and failure mode of containments building - Development of advanced NDE techniques using ultrasonic resonance scattering - Development of equipment qualification technique against vibration aging. These technologies developed in this study can be used to ensure the structural safety of operational nuclear power plants, and for the long-term life management. (author)

  7. Theoretical and experimental study of the dark signal in CMOS image sensors affected by neutron radiation from a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuanyuan; Wang, Zujun; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Liu, Minbo; Ma, Wuying; Sheng, Jiangkun; Dong, Guantao; Jin, Junshan

    2017-12-01

    The CMOS image sensors (CISs) are irradiated with neutron from a nuclear reactor. The dark signal in CISs affected by neutron radiation is studied theoretically and experimentally. The Primary knock-on atoms (PKA) energy spectra for 1 MeV incident neutrons are simulated by Geant4. And the theoretical models for the mean dark signal, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU) and dark signal distribution versus neutron fluence are established. The results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental outputs. Finally, the dark signal in the CISs under the different neutron fluence conditions is estimated. This study provides the theoretical and experimental evidence for the displacement damage effects on the dark signal CISs.

  8. Nuclear structure studies of rare francium isotopes using Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS)

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084441

    It was known for many years that nuclei possessing certain numbers of protons (Z) and neutrons (N), called the magic numbers (8,20,28,50,82,126...), exhibit characteristic behavior and are in general more stable than their neighboring isotopes. As the capabilities of producing isotopes with more extreme values of Z and N increased, it was realized that those spherical nuclei only represent a small fraction of the total number of isotopes and that most isotopes are deformed. In order to study exotic isotopes and their deformation, it was necessary to develop new experimental techniques that would be powerful enough to be able to cope with very small production yields, but precise enough to measure the nuclear properties (such as radii and moments) with relatively small uncertainties. One technique that can measure nuclear properties of scarcely produced isotopes is in-source resonant ionization, but this technique does not allow for sufficient precision to deduce nuclear quadrupole moments. Furthermore, this t...

  9. Nuclear Shell Structure and Beta Decay I. Odd A Nuclei II. Even A Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, M.G.; Moszkowski, S.A.; Nordheim, L.W.

    1951-05-01

    In Part I a systematics is given of all transitions for odd A nuclei for which sufficiently reliable data are available. The allowed or forbidden characters of the transitions are correlated with the positions of the initial and final odd nucleon groups in the nuclear shell scheme. The nuclear shells show definite characteristics with respect to parity of the ground states. The latter is the same as the one obtained from known spins and magnetic moments in a one-particle interpretation. In Part II a systematics of the beta transitions of even-A nuclei is given. An interpretation of the character of the transitions in terms of nuclear shell structure is achieved on the hypothesis that the odd nucleon groups have the same structure as in odd-A nuclei, together with a simple coupling rule between the neutron and proton groups in odd-odd nuclei.

  10. Experimental investigation and theoretical calculation for 3He induced nuclear reactions on vanadium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, B. M.; Al-Abyad, M.; Seddik, U.; El-Kameesy, S. U.; Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.; Tárkányi, F.

    2016-04-01

    Using stacked-foil activation technique and gamma-ray spectrometry, excitation functions for 3He induced nuclear reactions on natV were measured. Cross-sections for natV(3He, xn)52m,gMn and natV(3He, pxn)51Cr nuclear reactions were measured up to 27 MeV utilizing the MGC-20E cyclotron of ATOMKI. The measurements establish for the first time consistent excitation curves. Comparisons with results for values derived from different theoretical codes were included. Integral yield were calculated.

  11. Experimental investigation and theoretical calculation for {sup 3}He induced nuclear reactions on vanadium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, B.M. [Physics Department (Cyclotron Facility), Nuclear Research Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo 13759 (Egypt); Al-Abyad, M., E-mail: alabyad_m@yahoo.com [Physics Department (Cyclotron Facility), Nuclear Research Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo 13759 (Egypt); Seddik, U. [Physics Department (Cyclotron Facility), Nuclear Research Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo 13759 (Egypt); El-Kameesy, S.U. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.; Tárkányi, F. [Institute for Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen H4026 (Hungary)

    2016-04-15

    Using stacked-foil activation technique and gamma-ray spectrometry, excitation functions for {sup 3}He induced nuclear reactions on {sup nat}V were measured. Cross-sections for {sup nat}V({sup 3}He, xn){sup 52m,g}Mn and {sup nat}V({sup 3}He, pxn){sup 51}Cr nuclear reactions were measured up to 27 MeV utilizing the MGC-20E cyclotron of ATOMKI. The measurements establish for the first time consistent excitation curves. Comparisons with results for values derived from different theoretical codes were included. Integral yield were calculated.

  12. Experimental diabetes induces structural, inflammatory and vascular changes of Achilles tendons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo R de Oliveira

    Full Text Available This study aims to demonstrate how the state of chronic hyperglycemia from experimental Diabetes Mellitus can influence the homeostatic imbalance of tendons and, consequently, lead to the characteristics of tendinopathy. Twenty animals were randomly divided into two experimental groups: control group, consisting of healthy rats and diabetic group constituted by rats induced to Diabetes Mellitus I. After twenty-four days of the induction of Diabetes type I, the Achilles tendon were removed for morphological evaluation, cellularity, number and cross-sectional area of blood vessel, immunohistochemistry for Collagen type I, VEGF and NF-κB nuclear localization sequence (NLS and nitrate and nitrite level. The Achilles tendon thickness (µm/100g of diabetic animals was significantly increased and, similarly, an increase was observed in the density of fibrocytes and mast cells in the tendons of the diabetic group. The average number of blood vessels per field, in peritendinous tissue, was statistically higher in the diabetic group 3.39 (2.98 vessels/field when compared to the control group 0.89 (1.68 vessels/field p = 0.001 and in the intratendinous region, it was observed that blood vessels were extremely rare in the control group 0.035 (0.18 vessels/field and were often present in the tendons of the diabetic group 0.89 (0.99 vessels/field. The immunohistochemistry analysis identified higher density of type 1 collagen and increased expression of VEGF as well as increased immunostaining for NFκB p50 NLS in the nucleus in Achilles tendon of the diabetic group when compared to the control group. Higher levels of nitrite/nitrate were observed in the experimental group induced to diabetes. We conclude that experimental DM induces notable structural, inflammatory and vascular changes in the Achilles tendon which are compatible with the process of chronic tendinopathy.

  13. Experimental study of acoustical characteristics of honeycomb sandwich structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Portia Renee

    Loss factor measurements were performed on sandwich panels to determine the effects of different skin and core materials on the acoustical properties. Results revealed inserting a viscoelastic material in the core's mid-plane resulted in the highest loss factor. Panels constructed with carbon-fiber skins exhibited larger loss factors than glass-fiber skins. Panels designed to achieve subsonic wave speed did not show a significant increase in loss factor above the coincidence frequency. The para-aramid core had a larger loss factor value than the meta-aramid core. Acoustic absorption coefficients were measured for honeycomb sandwiches designed to incorporate multiple sound-absorbing devices, including Helmholtz resonators and porous absorbers. The structures consisted of conventional honeycomb cores filled with closed-cell polyurethane foams of various densities and covered with perforated composite facesheets. Honeycomb cores filled with higher density foam resulted in higher absorption coefficients over the frequency range of 50 -- 1250 Hz. However, this trend was not observed at frequencies greater than 1250 Hz, where the honeycomb filled with the highest density foam yielded the lowest absorption coefficient among samples with foam-filled cores. The energy-recycling semi-active vibration suppression method (ERSA) was employed to determine the relationship between vibration suppression and acoustic damping for a honeycomb sandwich panel. Results indicated the ERSA method simultaneously reduced the sound transmitted through the panel and the panel vibration. The largest reduction in sound transmitted through the panel was 14.3% when the vibrations of the panel were reduced by 7.3%. The influence of different design parameters, such as core density, core material, and cell size on wave speeds of honeycomb sandwich structures was experimentally analyzed. Bending and shear wave speeds were measured and related to the transmission loss performance for various material

  14. Glutamate Metabolism in Brain Structures in Experimental Hemorrhagic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Jakovlev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To study glutamate metabolism characteristics in phylogenetically different parts of the mammalian brain in experimentally induced hemorrhagic shock (HS in cats.Material and methods. Experiments were performed on 76 cats. HS was induced by intermittent bloodletting from femoral artery at a rate of 10ml/kg•10 minutes, with the average volume of 24±0.8 ml/kg. The bloodletting was discontinued after arterial pressure (BP drop to 60.0±1.5 mmHg. We studied ammonia, glutamate (Gt, and α-ketoglutarate (α-KG levels and glutaminase (GS and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDG activity in specimens harvested from phylogenetically different parts of the brain (cortex, limbic system, diencephalon, and medulla oblongata.Results. In intact animals, the peak GDG activity was found in the medulla oblongata (phylogenetically the oldest part of the brain and the peak GS activity was registered in the sensorimotor cortex (phylogenetically the youngest part of the brain; the glutaminase activity did not depend on the phylogenetic age of brain structures.In the case of HS, Gt metabolism changes began in the sensorimotor cortex manifested by decreased GS activity, which progresses by the 70th minute of the post%hemorrhagic period (PHP accompanied by delayed increase in the GDG and glutaminase activity, as well as Gt accumulation. In the limbic system and diencephalon the Gt metabolism was changing (impaired glutamine synthesis, stimuled Gt synthesis with glutamine desamidization and α%KG amination when developed by the 70th minute of the PHP. Similarly to sensorimotor cortex, changes were associated with Gt accumulation. During the agony, α%KG deficiency developed in all parts of the brain as a result of its increased contribution to Gt synthesis. At the same period of time, in the sensorimotor cortex, limbic system and diencephalon the Gt synthesis from glutamine was stimulated, however, the Gt contribution tothe formation of glutamine was decreased. The

  15. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Structures, Systems, and Components Safety Classification White Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pete Jordan

    2010-09-01

    This white paper outlines the relevant regulatory policy and guidance for a risk-informed approach for establishing the safety classification of Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant and sets forth certain facts for review and discussion in order facilitate an effective submittal leading to an NGNP Combined Operating License application under 10 CFR 52.

  16. The determination of the in situ structure by nuclear spin contrast variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuhrmann, H.B. [GKSS Forschungszentrum, Geesthacht (Germany); Nierhaus, K.H. [Max-Planch-Institut fuer Molekulare Genetik, Berlin (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    Polarized neutron scattering from polarized nuclear spins in hydrogenous substances opens a new way of contrast variation. The enhanced contrast due to proton spin polarization was used for the in situ structure determination of tRNA of the functional complex of the E.coli ribosome.

  17. Developing a Computerized Aging Management System for Concrete Structures in Finnish Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Neshawy, F.; Piironen, J.; Sistonen, E.; Vesikari, E.; Tuomisto, M.; Hradil, P.; Ferreira, M.

    2013-07-01

    Finland has four nuclear reactors units in two power plants. The first unit started operation in 1977 and in the early 1980's all four units were in use. During the last few years the aging management of the Nuclear Power Plant's (NPP) concrete structures has grown an important issue because the existing structures are reaching the end of their licensed operating lifetime (about 40 years). Therefore the nuclear power companies are developing aging management systems to avoid premature degradation of NPP facilities and to be able to extend their operating lifetime. This paper is about the development of a computerized ageing management system for the nuclear power plants concrete structures. The computerized ageing management system is built upon central database and implementation applications. It will assist the personnel of power companies to implement the aging management activities at different phases of the lifetime of a power plant. It will provide systematic methods for planning, surveillance, inspection, monitoring, condition assessment, maintenance and repair of structures.

  18. Chromatin organization at the nuclear periphery as revealed by image analysis of structured illumination microscopy data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fišerová, Jindřiška; Efenberková, Michaela; Sieger, T.; Maninová, Miloslava; Uhlířová, Jana; Hozák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 130, č. 12 (2017), s. 2066-2077 ISSN 0021-9533 R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ15-08835Y; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Structured illumination * Image analysis * Chromation * Nucleus * Histone modification * Nuclear pore complexes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.431, year: 2016

  19. Proceedings of the 1st conference on nuclear structure data evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, R.B.; Shirley, V.S.; Dairiki, J.M. (eds.)

    1982-04-01

    The 1st Conference on Nuclear Structure Data Evaluation was organized by the Isotopes Project of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in order to encourage the open discussion of the scientific aspects of ENSDF production and usage. Summaries of the roundtable discussion sessions, abstracts of the presented papers, and additional contributed papers are contained in these Proceedings.

  20. Students' Assessment of Interactive Distance Experimentation in Nuclear Reactor Physics Laboratory Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkawi, Salaheddin; Al-Araidah, Omar

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory experiments develop students' skills in dealing with laboratory instruments and physical processes with the objective of reinforcing the understanding of the investigated subject. In nuclear engineering, where research reactors play a vital role in the practical education of students, the high cost and long construction time of research…

  1. Experiments at the Frontiers of Nuclear Physics: the Experimental Program of the Super-Frs Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidenberger, C.; Äystö, J.; Behr, K.-H.; Benlliure, J.; Bracco, A.; Egelhof, P.; Fomichev, A.; Galès, S.; Geissel, H.; Grahn, T.; Grigorenko, L.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hayano, R.; Heinz, S.; Itahashi, K.; Jokinen, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kanungo, R.; Lenske, H.; Muenzenberg, G.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C.; Ong, H. J.; Pfützner, M.; Prochazka, A.; Pietri, S.; Plaß, W. R.; Purushothaman, S.; Saito, T.; Simon, H.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Toki, H.; Trache, L.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.; Winkler, M.; Zamfir, V.

    2015-06-01

    The superconducting fragment separator (Super-FRS) will be one of the main scientific instruments of the future FAIR facility. This versatile high-resolution spectrometer allows for a variety of exciting experiments in atomic, nuclear and hadron physics. Future directions are presented in this contribution.

  2. Experimental Observations of Nuclear Activity in Deuterated Materials Subjected to a Low-Energy Photon Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Benyo, Theresa L.; Pines, Vladimir; Pines, Marianna; Forsley, Lawrence P.; Westmeyer, Paul A.; Chait, Arnon; Becks, Michael D.; Martin, Richard E.; Hendricks, Robert C.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Exposure of highly deuterated materials to a low-energy (nom. 2 MeV) photon beam resulted in nuclear activity of both the parent metals of hafnium and erbium and a witness material (molybdenum) mixed with the reactants. Gamma spectral analysis of all deuterated materials, ErD2.8+C36D74+Mo and HfD2+C36D74+Mo, showed that nuclear processes had occurred as shown by unique gamma signatures. For the deuterated erbium specimens, posttest gamma spectra showed evidence of radioisotopes of erbium ((163)Er and (171)Er) and of molybdenum ((99)Mo and (101)Mo) and by beta decay, technetium (99mTc and 101Tc). For the deuterated hafnium specimens, posttest gamma spectra showed evidence of radioisotopes of hafnium (180mHf and 181Hf) and molybdenum ((99)Mo and (101)Mo), and by beta decay, technetium ((99m)Tc and (101)Tc). In contrast, when either the hydrogenated or non-gas-loaded erbium or hafnium materials were exposed to the gamma flux, the gamma spectra revealed no new isotopes. Neutron activation materials showed evidence of thermal and epithermal neutrons. CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors showed evidence of fast neutrons with energies between 1.4 and 2.5 MeV and several instances of triple tracks, indicating (is) greater than 10 MeV neutrons. Further study is required to determine the mechanism causing the nuclear activity.

  3. Cladding Effects on Structural Integrity of Nuclear Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattari-Far, Iradi; Andersson, Magnus [lnspecta Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-06-15

    measurement of different clad components. Measurement of cladding residual stresses in a decommissioned reactor pressure vessel head, which was exposed to service conditions (pressure test, temperature, neutron irradiation, etc.), and the results from the cladding in a cut-out-piece, which did not experience any service or test pressure, basically showed similar profiles. Considering the low scatter and the reproducible data, the hole-drilling technique is recommended in measurement of the peak of the cladding residual stresses. The profile and magnitude of the cladding residual stresses depend mainly upon cladding composition, cladding thickness, clad component geometry and clad component temperature. The peak of the cladding residual stresses is actually about 2-3 mm under the surface of the clad layer, and values in the range of 150 and 500 MPa are reported. Fracture assessments on different clad components at different loading conditions reveal that fracture assessments based on LEFM and ASME Kk curve lead to unrealistic conservative results, and the cladding residual stresses are of importance for surface crack behaviour, especially under cold loads. The NESC projects have shown that the Master Curve methodology can give good predictions of the conducted experiments. It is reasonable to assume a peak value of cladding residual stresses in the whole clad layer to be equal to the yield strength of the cladding material (around 300 MPa) at room temperature. Providing that the clad component has received PWHT, it can be assumed no residual stresses in the underlying base material. For the nuclear pressure vessel, it is also reasonable to assume that the cladding stress free temperature is at the operation temperature of the vessel (around 300 deg C). It has been shown that the cladding residual stresses have negligible influence on subclad crack behaviour in clad components (receiving PWHT). It has also been shown that the crack growth for subclad cracks would be towards the

  4. Structural disorder within Henipavirus nucleoprotein and phosphoprotein: from predictions to experimental assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny Habchi

    Full Text Available Henipaviruses are newly emerged viruses within the Paramyxoviridae family. Their negative-strand RNA genome is packaged by the nucleoprotein (N within alpha-helical nucleocapsid that recruits the polymerase complex made of the L protein and the phosphoprotein (P. To date structural data on Henipaviruses are scarce, and their N and P proteins have never been characterized so far. Using both computational and experimental approaches we herein show that Henipaviruses N and P proteins possess large intrinsically disordered regions. By combining several disorder prediction methods, we show that the N-terminal domain of P (PNT and the C-terminal domain of N (NTAIL are both mostly disordered, although they contain short order-prone segments. We then report the cloning, the bacterial expression, purification and characterization of Henipavirus PNT and NTAIL domains. By combining gel filtration, dynamic light scattering, circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance, we show that both NTAIL and PNT belong to the premolten globule sub-family within the class of intrinsically disordered proteins. This study is the first reported experimental characterization of Henipavirus P and N proteins. The evidence that their respective N-terminal and C-terminal domains are highly disordered under native conditions is expected to be invaluable for future structural studies by helping to delineate N and P protein domains amenable to crystallization. In addition, following previous hints establishing a relationship between structural disorder and protein interactivity, the present results suggest that Henipavirus PNT and NTAIL domains could be involved in manifold protein-protein interactions.

  5. Study of the nuclear structure of {sup 155}Eu; Estudo da estrutura nuclear do {sup 155}Eu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genezini, Frederico Antonio

    2004-07-01

    The {sup 155}Eu nuclide was investigated by the directional angular correlation technique following the {beta} decay of {sup 155}Sm. The angular correlation measurements were carried out using a setup with 4 Ge detectors and a multi parametric data acquisition system. To perform the data analysis a new methodology was developed . The multipole mixing ratios of twenty sixty {gamma}- transitions were determined. Seven of them agreed with the results of earlier angular correlation studies and nineteen obtained for the first time confirmed the multipolarity suggested in earlier electron capture studies. Besides, the spin of the level at 1106.83 keV as well as the parity of the level at 1301.41 keV have also been suggested. The nuclear structure of {sup 155}Eu was discussed successfully in terms of the single particle model using a deformed Woods-Saxon potential plus residual pairing interaction permitting the description of the rotational quasi-proton band heads. (author)

  6. Large-Scale Computations Leading to a First-Principles Approach to Nuclear Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormand, W E; Navratil, P

    2003-08-18

    We report on large-scale applications of the ab initio, no-core shell model with the primary goal of achieving an accurate description of nuclear structure from the fundamental inter-nucleon interactions. In particular, we show that realistic two-nucleon interactions are inadequate to describe the low-lying structure of {sup 10}B, and that realistic three-nucleon interactions are essential.

  7. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance studies of molecular structure in liquids and liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rucker, S.P.

    1991-07-01

    Magnetic couplings between protons, such as through-space dipole couplings, and scalar J-couplings depend sensitively on the structure of the molecule. Two dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance experiments provide a powerful tool for measuring these couplings, correlating them to specific pairs of protons within the molecule, and calculating the structure. This work discusses the development of NMR methods for examining two such classes of problems -- determination of the secondary structure of flexible molecules in anisotropic solutions, and primary structure of large biomolecules in aqueous solutions. 201 refs., 84 figs., 19 tabs.

  8. Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis of Isolated Nuclear Power Plants in Frequency Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguang Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One important aspect of applying seismic isolation to Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs is that the complex interactions of flexible soil, flexible isolators, and stiff structures require careful investigation. In this paper, a NPP model was used to investigate the effects of SSI and the effects of changing soil and isolator properties on seismic response of an isolated NPP. The following aspects are considered in the study: horizontal excitation and vertical excitation; linear and equivalent-linear models of the isolators; scaling of the shear modulus of the soil profile model; and scaling of the horizontal equivalent stiffness of the isolators. It was found that Pseudospectral Acceleration (PSA in the nuclear structure at the frequencies near the natural frequency of the structure increase with elevation, and the difference between the in-structure response spectral acceleration with and without SSI effects is concentrated at the frequencies near the natural frequencies of the superstructure. It is also found that the linear SSI analysis underestimates the in-structure response of the nuclear structures compared to the equivalent-linear SSI analyses, and the soil profile properties directly affect the effectiveness of the isolation system.

  9. Structural characterization by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of ozonized triolein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Díaz, Maritza

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study ozonized triolein with 739 mmolequiv/ kg peroxide index is characterized by NMR.The triolein and ozonized triolein show very similar 1H NMR spectra except for the resonances at δ 9.74 ppm, which correspond to aldehydic protons and δ 5.14 ppm (ozonides methylic protons. Other new signal assignments are based on the connectivities provided by the proton scalar coupling constants δ 2.41 ppm (methylenic group allylic to aldehydic protons and ozonides methynic protons and δ 1.67 ppm (methylenic protons in position with respect to ozonides methylic protons. From the 13C and 1H-13C spectrum of the ozonized triolein, the presence of ozonides was confirmed by the signals δ 104.2 and 104.3 ppm, respectively. Other new signals in δ 43.9 ppm confirm the presence of methylenic carbon ozonides. From the structural elucidation of ozonated triglycerides, relevant chemical information about ozonated vegetable oil can be found .En el presente estudio ha sido caracterizada por RMN la trioleina ozonizada con índice de peróxidos de 739 mmolequiv/ kg. La trioleina y la trioleina ozonizada muestran espectros muy similares exceptuando los valores de las resonancias δ 9,74 ppm de los protones aldehídicos, y δ 5,14 ppm (protones metínicos de los ozónidos. Otras nuevas asignaciones fueron basadas en las conectividades obtenidas por las constantes de acoplamiento escalar como δ 2,41 ppm (grupo metilénico alilico a los protones aldehídicos y protones metínicos de los ozónidos y δ 1,67 ppm (protones metilénicos en posición βcon respecto a los protones metínicos de los ozónidos. En los espectros 13C y 1H-13C de la trioleina ozonizada la presencia de ozónidos fue atribuida, respectivamente, por las señales δ 104,2 y δ 104,3 ppm. Una nueva señal en δ 43,9 ppm confirma la presencia de carbono metilénico de ozónidos. Estos resultados indican que la elucidación estructural de triglicéridos ozonizados, ofrece información qu

  10. Negative heat capacity in the critical region of nuclear fragmentation: an experimental evidence of the liquid-gas phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, M.; Gulminelli, F.; Chomaz, P.; Bruno, M.; Cannata, F.; Bougault, R.; Gramegna, F.; Iori, I.; Le Neindre, N.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Moroni, A.; Vannini, G.

    2000-02-01

    An experimental indication of negative heat capacity in excited nuclear systems is inferred from the event by event study of energy fluctuations in Au quasi-projectile sources formed in Au+Au collisions at 35 A.MeV. Equilibrated events are selected and the excited source configuration is reconstructed through a calorimetric analysis of its de-excitation products. Fragment partitions show signs of a critical behavior at about 4.5 A.MeV excitation energy. Around this value the heat capacity shows a negative branch providing a direct evidence of a first order liquid gas phase transition.

  11. Experimental investigation and nuclear model calculations on proton-induced reactions on highly enriched 114Cd at low energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, S A; Elmaghraby, E K; Asfour, F I

    2006-12-01

    The excitation functions of both Cd(p,n)(114m)In114 and Cd(p,2n)(113m)In114 reactions were evaluated experimentally by the stacked-foil technique on highly enriched (114)Cd isotope. Two stacks were irradiated by proton beam with energies 14.7 and 18MeV on the MGC-20 cyclotron at Nuclear Research Center, AEA, Egypt. The present results support the previous measurements. The theoretical interpretations of the measured excitation functions were done by EMPIRE-II (v2.18 Mondovi) code. Compatibility with predictions of hybrid Monte Carlo simulation (HMS) pre-equilibrium mechanism was obtained.

  12. Experimental evidences of95 mTc production in a nuclear reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I M; Robles, A; Mendoza, P; Airas, R M; Montoya, E H

    2018-02-02

    95 m Tc has been identified as by-product in some solutions of 99 m Tc obtained by irradiation of molybdenum trioxide in a reactor neutron flux. The characterization was carried out using both measurements by gamma spectrometry and half-life determination. The possible ways that lead to the 95 m Tc production in a nuclear reactor are discussed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Crystal structure of rice importin-α and structural basis of its interaction with plant-specific nuclear localization signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiung-Wen; Couñago, Rafael Lemos Miguez; Williams, Simon J; Bodén, Mikael; Kobe, Boštjan

    2012-12-01

    In the classical nucleocytoplasmic import pathway, nuclear localization signals (NLSs) in cargo proteins are recognized by the import receptor importin-α. Importin-α has two separate NLS binding sites (the major and the minor site), both of which recognize positively charged amino acid clusters in NLSs. Little is known about the molecular basis of the unique features of the classical nuclear import pathway in plants. We determined the crystal structure of rice (Oryza sativa) importin-α1a at 2-Å resolution. The structure reveals that the autoinhibitory mechanism mediated by the importin-β binding domain of importin-α operates in plants, with NLS-mimicking sequences binding to both minor and major NLS binding sites. Consistent with yeast and mammalian proteins, rice importin-α binds the prototypical NLS from simian virus 40 large T-antigen preferentially at the major NLS binding site. We show that two NLSs, previously described as plant specific, bind to and are functional with plant, mammalian, and yeast importin-α proteins but interact with rice importin-α more strongly. The crystal structures of their complexes with rice importin-α show that they bind to the minor NLS binding site. By contrast, the crystal structures of their complexes with mouse (Mus musculus) importin-α show preferential binding to the major NLS binding site. Our results reveal the molecular basis of a number of features of the classical nuclear transport pathway specific to plants.

  14. Online Monitoring of Concrete Structures in Nuclear Power Plants: Interim Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cai, Guowei [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The existing fleet of nuclear power plants in the United States have initial operating licenses of 40 years, and many of these plants have applied for and received license extensions. As plant structures, systems, and components age, their useful life—considering both structural integrity and performance—is reduced as a result of deterioration of the materials. Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code-based design margins of safety. Structural health monitoring is required to produce actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. The online monitoring of concrete structures project conducted under the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Technologies Pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory is seeking to develop and demonstrate capabilities for concrete structures health monitoring. Through this research project, several national laboratories and Vanderbilt University propose to develop a framework of research activities for the health monitoring of nuclear power plant concrete structures that includes the integration of four elements—damage modeling, monitoring, data analytics, and uncertainty quantification. This report briefly discusses activities in this project during October-December, 2014. The most significant activity during this period was the organizing of a two-day workshop on research needs in online monitoring of concrete structures, hosted by Vanderbilt University in November 2014. Thirty invitees from academia, industry and government participated in the workshop. The presentations and discussions at the workshop surveyed current activities related to concrete structures deterioration modeling and monitoring, and identified the challenges, knowledge gaps, and opportunities for advancing the state of the art; these

  15. Seismic resistance design of nuclear power plant building structures in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitano, Takehito [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    Japan is one of the countries where earthquakes occur most frequently in the world and has incurred a lot of disasters in the past. Therefore, the seismic resistance design of a nuclear power plant plays a very important role in Japan. This report describes the general method of seismic resistance design of a nuclear power plant giving examples of PWR and BWR type reactor buildings in Japan. Nuclear facilities are classified into three seismic classes and is designed according to the corresponding seismic class in Japan. Concerning reactor buildings, the short-term allowable stress design is applied for the S1 seismic load and it is confirmed that the structures have a safety margin against the S2 seismic load. (J.P.N.)

  16. TANGRA - an experimental setup for basic and applied nuclear research by means of 14.1 MeV neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruskov, Ivan; Kopatch, Yury; Bystritsky, Vyacheslav; Skoy, Vadim; Shvetsov, Valery; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Oberstedt, Stephan; Noy, Roberto Capote; Grozdanov, Dimitar; Zontikov, Artem; Rogov, Yury; Zamyatin, Nikolay; Sapozhnikov, Mikhail; Slepnev, Vyacheslav; Bogolyubov, Evgeny; Sadovsky, Andrey; Barmakov, Yury; Ryzhkov, Valentin; Yurkov, Dimitry; Valković, Vladivoj; Obhođaš, Jasmina; Aliyev, Fuad

    2017-09-01

    For investigation of the basic characteristics of 14.1 MeV neutron induced nuclear reactions on a number of important isotopes for nuclear science and engineering, a new experimental setup TANGRA has been constructed at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna. For testing its performance, the angular distribution of γ-rays (and neutrons) from the inelastic scattering of 14.1 MeV neutrons on high-purity carbon was measured and the angular anisotropy of γ-rays from the reaction 12C(n, n'γ)12C was determined. This reaction is important from fundamental (differential cross-sections) and practical (non-destructive elemental analysis of materials containing carbon) point of view. The preliminary results for the anisotropy of the γ-ray emission from the inelastic scattering of 14.1- MeV neutrons on carbon are compared with already published literature data. A detailed data analysis for determining the correlations between inelastic scattered neutron and γ-ray emission will be published elsewhere.

  17. Modelling the local atomic structure of molybdenum in nuclear waste glasses with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos; Sushko, Peter V; Duffy, Dorothy M

    2016-09-21

    The nature of chemical bonding of molybdenum in high level nuclear waste glasses has been elucidated by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Two compositions, (SiO 2 ) 57.5 -(B 2 O 3 ) 10 -(Na 2 O) 15 -(CaO) 15 -(MoO 3 ) 2.5 and (SiO 2 ) 57.3 -(B 2 O 3 ) 20 -(Na 2 O) 6.8 -(Li 2 O) 13.4 -(MoO 3 ) 2.5 , were considered in order to investigate the effect of ionic and covalent components on the glass structure and the formation of the crystallisation precursors (Na 2 MoO 4 and CaMoO 4 ). The coordination environments of Mo cations and the corresponding bond lengths calculated from our model are in excellent agreement with experimental observations. The analysis of the first coordination shell reveals two different types of molybdenum host matrix bonds in the lithium sodium borosilicate glass. Based on the structural data and the bond valence model, we demonstrate that the Mo cation can be found in a redox state and the molybdate tetrahedron can be connected with the borosilicate network in a way that inhibits the formation of crystalline molybdates. These results significantly extend our understanding of bonding in Mo-containing nuclear waste glasses and demonstrate that tailoring the glass composition to specific heavy metal constituents can facilitate incorporation of heavy metals at high concentrations.

  18. Rotational spectra, nuclear quadrupole hyperfine tensors, and conformational structures of the mustard gas simulent 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubergen, M. J.; Lesarri, A.; Suenram, R. D.; Samuels, A. C.; Jensen, J. O.; Ellzy, M. W.; Lochner, J. M.

    2005-10-01

    Rotational spectra have been recorded for both the 35Cl and 37Cl isotopic forms of two structural conformations of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES). The rotational constants of the 35Cl and 37Cl isotopomers were used to identify the conformational isomers. A total of 236 hyperfine transitions have been assigned for 47 rotational transitions of the 35Cl isotope of a GGT conformer, and 146 hyperfine have been assigned for 37 rotational transitions of the 37Cl isotopomer. For the second conformer, a total of 128 (110) hyperfine and 30 (28) rotational transitions have also been assigned to the 35Cl ( 37Cl) isotopes of a TGT conformation. The extensive hyperfine splitting data, measured to high resolution with a compact Fourier transform microwave spectrometer, were used to determine both the diagonal and off-diagonal elements of the 35Cl and 37Cl nuclear quadrupole coupling tensors in the inertial tensor principal axis system. The experimental rotational constant data, as well as the 35Cl and 37Cl nuclear quadrupole coupling tensors, were compared to the results from 27 optimized ab initio (HF/6-311++G ∗∗ and MP2/6-311++G ∗∗) model structures.

  19. Conformational, electronic, and spectroscopic characterization of isophthalic acid (monomer and dimer structures) experimentally and by DFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardak, F.; Karaca, C.; Bilgili, S.; Atac, A.; Mavis, T.; Asiri, A. M.; Karabacak, M.; Kose, E.

    2016-08-01

    Isophthalic acid (C6H4(CO2H)2) is a noteworthy organic compound widely used in coating and synthesis of resins and the production of commercially important polymers such as drink plastic bottles. The effects of isophthalic acid (IPA) on human health, toxicology, and biodegradability are the main focus of many researchers. Because structural and spectroscopic investigation of molecules provides a deep understanding of interactional behaviors of compounds, this study stands for exploring those features. Therefore, the spectroscopic, structural, electronic, and thermodynamical properties of IPA were thoroughly studied in this work experimentally using UV-Vis, 1H and 13C NMR, FT-IR, FT-Raman and theoretically via DFT and TD-DFT calculations. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum in water was taken in the region 200-400 nm. The NMR chemical shifts (1H and 13C) were recorded in DMSO solution. The infrared and Raman spectra of the solid IPA were recorded in the range of 4000-400 cm- 1 and 3500-50 cm- 1, respectively. DFT and TD-DFT calculations were performed at the level of B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) in determination of geometrical structure, electronic structure analysis and normal mode. The 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were estimated by using the gauge-invariant atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method was used to determine the total energy distribution (TED) to assign the vibrational modes accurately. Weak interactions such as hydrogen bonding and Van der Walls were analyzed via reduced density gradient (RDG) analysis in monomeric and dimeric forms. Furthermore, the excitation energies, density of state (DOS) diagram, thermodynamical properties, molecular electro-static potential (MEP), and nonlinear optical (NLO) properties were obtained.

  20. Nuclear effects in atomic transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Pálffy, Adriana

    2011-01-01

    Atomic electrons are sensitive to the properties of the nucleus they are bound to, such as nuclear mass, charge distribution, spin, magnetization distribution, or even excited level scheme. These nuclear parameters are reflected in the atomic transition energies. A very precise determination of atomic spectra may thus reveal information about the nucleus, otherwise hardly accessible via nuclear physics experiments. This work reviews theoretical and experimental aspects of the nuclear effects that can be identified in atomic structure data. An introduction to the theory of isotope shifts and hyperfine splitting of atomic spectra is given, together with an overview of the typical experimental techniques used in high-precision atomic spectroscopy. More exotic effects at the borderline between atomic and nuclear physics, such as parity violation in atomic transitions due to the weak interaction, or nuclear polarization and nuclear excitation by electron capture, are also addressed.

  1. Development of Structural Health Monitoring System for pipes in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, H. S.; Choi, Y. C.; Shin, S. H.; Youn, D. B.; Park, J. H.

    2010-01-15

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) has becoming an important issue in the maintenance of various structures such as large steel plates, vessels, and pipes in nuclear power plants. There are important factors to be considered in developing an SHM system. With consideration of these factors, we have developed a computerized multi-channel ultrasonic system that can handle array transducers and generate a high-power pulse for online SHM of the plates and pipes. The proposed system is compact but has all the necessary functions for SHM of important structure such as pipes and plates in a NPP

  2. Tensioned metastable fluids and nanoscale interactions with external stimuli-Theoretical-cum-experimental assessments and nuclear engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi [Purdue University, W. Lafayette, IN 47907-1290 (United States)], E-mail: rusi@purdue.edu; Lapinskas, J.; Xu, Y. [Purdue University, W. Lafayette, IN 47907-1290 (United States)

    2008-07-15

    The field of tensioned (sub-zero pressure) metastability of organic and inorganic fluids and their responses to external stimuli is under study at Purdue University. Unique properties related to energy storage and sub-nano scale response to external stimuli have been found that give rise to the capability for causing localized supercritical states leading to fluid boiling by visible light photons and other fundamental particles over eight orders of magnitude in the energy range (i.e., from the sub -eV to MeV range). A theoretical model is developed for predicting limits of tension metastability and validated against experimental data. Resonant acoustics and centrifugal force-based systems are described for attaining as-desired tension metastable states along with triggering mechanisms for nano-to-macroscale energy storage-cum-release. Finite-element modeling and simulation framework for design of such systems with experimental benchmarking are described. Technological impacts on diverse fields such as nuclear material detection, physics-based spectroscopy, monitoring of power levels in nuclear systems, general cavitation physics of fluids, acoustically driven thermonuclear fusion, and super compression states attainment are discussed.

  3. 3rd International Conference on High-energy Physics and Nuclear Structure

    CERN Document Server

    High energy physics and nuclear structure

    1970-01-01

    In preparing the program for this Conference, the third in the series, it soon became evident that it was not possible to in­ clude in a conference of reasonable duration all the topics that might be subsumed under the broad title, "High Energy Physics and Nuclear Structure. " From their initiation, in 1963, it has been as much the aim of these Conferences to provide some bridges between the steadily separating domains of particle and nuclear physics, as to explore thoroughly the borderline territory between the two -­ the sort of no-man's-land that lies unclaimed, or claimed by both sides. The past few years have witnessed the rapid development of many new routes connecting the two major areas of 'elementary par­ ticles' and 'nuclear structure', and these now spread over a great expanse of physics, logically perhaps including the whole of both subjects. (As recently as 1954, an International Conference on 'Nuclear and Meson Physics' did, in fact, embrace both fields!) Since it is not now possibl...

  4. Experimental investigations of 3 mm aperture PPLN structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolker, D.; Pronyushkina, A.; Boyko, A.; Kostyukova, N.; Trashkeev, S.; Nuyshkov, B.; Shur, V.

    2017-01-01

    We are reporting about investigation of domestic 3 mm aperture periodically polled lithium niobate (PPLN) structures for cascaded mid-IR OPO. Wide aperture periodically poled MgO-doped lithium niobate (LiNbO3) structures at multigrating, fan-out and multi fan-out configuration were prepared at “Labfer LTD”. Laser source based on such structures can be used for special applications. Four different PPLN structures were investigated and effective aperture for effective pumping was defined.

  5. Transfer-induced fission in inverse kinematics: Impact on experimental and evaluated nuclear data bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farget, F.; Schmidt, K.H.; Clement, E.; Delaune, O.; Derkx, X.; Dijon, A.; Golabek, C.; Lemasson, A.; Roger, T.; Schmitt, C. [CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, GANIL, Caen (France); Caamano, M.; Ramos, D.; Benlliure, J.; Cortina, D.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Paradela, C. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Rodriguez-Tajes, C. [CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, GANIL, Caen (France); Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Audouin, L. [Universite Paris-Sud 11, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay (France); Casarejos, E. [Universidade de Vigo, Vigo (Spain); Dore, D.; Salsac, M.D. [Centre de Saclay, CEA, Irfu, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gaudefroy, L. [CEA DAM Ile-de-France, BP 12, Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Heinz, A. [Chalmers Tekniska Hoegskola, Fundamental Fysik, Goeteborg (Sweden); Jurado, B. [Universite Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797 CNRS/IN2P3, Gradignan (France)

    2015-12-15

    Inverse kinematics is a new tool to study nuclear fission. Its main advantage is the possibility to measure with an unmatched resolution the atomic number of fission fragments, leading to new observables in the properties of fission-fragment distributions. In addition to the resolution improvement, the study of fission based on nuclear collisions in inverse kinematics beneficiates from a larger view with respect to the neutron-induced fission, as in a single experiment the number of fissioning systems and the excitation energy range are widden. With the use of spectrometers, mass and kinetic-energy distributions may now be investigated as a function of the proton and neutron number sharing. The production of fissioning nuclei in transfer reactions allows studying the isotopic yields of fission fragments as a function of the excitation energy. The higher excitation energy resulting in the fusion reaction leading to the compound nucleus {sup 250}Cf at an excitation energy of 45MeV is also presented. With the use of inverse kinematics, the charge polarisation of fragments at scission is now revealed with high precision, and it is shown that it cannot be neglected, even at higher excitation energies. In addition, the kinematical properties of the fragments inform on the deformation configuration at scission. (orig.)

  6. Synaptic activity induces dramatic changes in the geometry of the cell nucleus: interplay between nuclear structure, histone H3 phosphorylation, and nuclear calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Malte; Queisser, Gillian; Eder, Anja; Wiegert, J Simon; Bengtson, C Peter; Hellwig, Andrea; Wittum, Gabriel; Bading, Hilmar

    2009-11-25

    Synaptic activity initiates many adaptive responses in neurons. Here we report a novel form of structural plasticity in dissociated hippocampal cultures and slice preparations. Using a recently developed algorithm for three-dimensional image reconstruction and quantitative measurements of cell organelles, we found that many nuclei from hippocampal neurons are highly infolded and form unequally sized nuclear compartments. Nuclear infoldings are dynamic structures, which can radically transform the geometry of the nucleus in response to neuronal activity. Action potential bursting causing synaptic NMDA receptor activation dramatically increases the number of infolded nuclei via a process that requires the ERK-MAP kinase pathway and new protein synthesis. In contrast, death-signaling pathways triggered by extrasynaptic NMDA receptors cause a rapid loss of nuclear infoldings. Compared with near-spherical nuclei, infolded nuclei have a larger surface and increased nuclear pore complex immunoreactivity. Nuclear calcium signals evoked by cytosolic calcium transients are larger in small nuclear compartments than in the large compartments of the same nucleus; moreover, small compartments are more efficient in temporally resolving calcium signals induced by trains of action potentials in the theta frequency range (5 Hz). Synaptic activity-induced phosphorylation of histone H3 on serine 10 was more robust in neurons with infolded nuclei compared with neurons with near-spherical nuclei, suggesting a functional link between nuclear geometry and transcriptional regulation. The translation of synaptic activity-induced signaling events into changes in nuclear geometry facilitates the relay of calcium signals to the nucleus, may lead to the formation of nuclear signaling microdomains, and could enhance signal-regulated transcription.

  7. Summary Report of a Specialized Workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Alan L. [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Dimitrious, P. [IAEA Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Kondev, F. G. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ricard-McCutchan, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-04-27

    A three-day specialised workshop on Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluations was organised and held at the headquarters of the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria, from 27 to 29 April 2015. This workshop covered a wide range of important topics and issues addressed when evaluating and maintaining the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). The primary aim was to improve evaluators’ abilities to identify and understand the most appropriate evaluation processes to adopt in the formulation of individual ENSDF data sets. Participants assessed and reviewed existing policies, procedures and codes, and round-table discussions included the debate and resolution of specific difficulties experienced by ENSDF evaluators (i.e., all workshop participants). The contents of this report constitute a record of this workshop, based on the presentations and subsequent discussions.

  8. Finite nuclear fragmenting systems:. An experimental evidence of a first order liquid gas phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, M.; Gulminelli, F.; Chomaz, Ph.; Bruno, M.; Cannata, F.; Le Neindre, N.; Bougault, R.; Fiandri, M. L.; Fuschini, E.; Gramegna, F.; Iori, I.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Moroni, A.; Vannini, G.; Verondini, E.

    2001-11-01

    An experimental observation of negative heat capacity is inferred from the event by event study of partial energy fluctuations in Quasi-Projectile sources, formed in Au + Au peripheral collisions at 35 A.MeV. Between about 2.5 and 5 A.MeV excitation energy, the system undergoes a first order phase transition.

  9. Status of experimental data of proton-induced reactions for intermediate-energy nuclear data evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Yukinobu; Kawano, Toshihiko [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Yamano, Naoki; Fukahori, Tokio

    1998-11-01

    The present status of experimental data of proton-induced reactions is reviewed, with particular attention to total reaction cross section, elastic and inelastic scattering cross section, double-differential particle production cross section, isotope production cross section, and activation cross section. (author)

  10. Transfer reactions in nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardayan, D. W.

    2016-08-01

    To a high degree many aspects of the large-scale behavior of objects in the Universe are governed by the underlying nuclear physics. In fact the shell structure of nuclear physics is directly imprinted into the chemical abundances of the elements. The tranquility of the night sky is a direct result of the relatively slow rate of nuclear reactions that control and determines a star’s fate. Understanding the nuclear structure and reaction rates between nuclei is vital to understanding our Universe. Nuclear-transfer reactions make accessible a wealth of knowledge from which we can extract much of the required nuclear physics information. A review of transfer reactions for nuclear astrophysics is presented with an emphasis on the experimental challenges and opportunities for future development.

  11. Genetic Diversity and Structure of Lolium Species Surveyed on Nuclear Simple Sequence Repeat and Cytoplasmic Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Cai

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available To assess the genetic diversity and population structure of Lolium species, we used 32 nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR markers and 7 cytoplasmic gene markers to analyze a total of 357 individuals from 162 accessions of 9 Lolium species. This survey revealed a high level of polymorphism, with an average number of alleles per locus of 23.59 and 5.29 and an average PIC-value of 0.83 and 0.54 for nuclear SSR markers and cytoplasmic gene markers, respectively. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA revealed that 16.27 and 16.53% of the total variation was due to differences among species, with the remaining 56.35 and 83.47% due to differences within species and 27.39 and 0% due to differences within individuals in 32 nuclear SSR markers set and 6 chloroplast gene markers set, respectively. The 32 nuclear SSR markers detected three subpopulations among 357 individuals, whereas the 6 chloroplast gene markers revealed three subpopulations among 160 accessions in the STRUCTURE analysis. In the clustering analysis, the three inbred species clustered into a single group, whereas the outbreeding species were clearly divided, especially according to nuclear SSR markers. In addition, almost all Lolium multiflorum populations were clustered into group C4, which could be further divided into three subgroups, whereas Lolium perenne populations primarily clustered into two groups (C2 and C3, with a few lines that instead grouped with L. multiflorum (C4 or Lolium rigidum (C6. Together, these results will useful for the use of Lolium germplasm for improvement and increase the effectiveness of ryegrass breeding.

  12. Research on a laser ultrasound method for testing the quality of a nuclear radiation protection structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kuanshuang; Zhou, Zhenggan; Ma, Liyin

    2017-02-01

    Laser ultrasonics has been investigated for inspecting the quality of a nuclear radiation protection structure. A possibility is proposed to improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of a laser ultrasonic inspection system. Then, a nuclear radiation protection structure composed of an AISI 1045 steel sheet connected with a lead alloy sheet by using an epoxy resin adhesive was manufactured with simulated defects. A non-contact laser ultrasonic inspection system, where the measured signals were filtered using a wavelet threshold de-noising method, was established to conduct a series of experiments. The proposed signal processing method can significantly improve the SNR of measured laser ultrasound signals on a rough solid surface. Compared with the SNR of original ultrasonic signals measured in transmission and reflection, the SNR of processed transmitted and reflected signals is improved by 13.8 and 16.6 dB, respectively. Moreover, laser ultrasonic C-scans based on the transmission and pulse-echo method can detect the simulated de-bonding defects, and the relative deviation between the measured sizes and design values is below 9%. Therefore, the laser ultrasonic method combined with effective signal processing can achieve the quantitative characterization of de-bonding defects in nuclear radiation protection structures.

  13. (Nuclear theory). [Research in nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haxton, W.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in nuclear physics. Topics covered in this paper are: symmetry principles; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure; quark-gluon plasma; quantum chromodynamics; symmetry breaking; nuclear deformation; and cold fusion. (LSP)

  14. High-throughput automated platform for nuclear magnetic resonance-based structural proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinarov, Dmitriy A; Markley, John L

    2005-01-01

    The development of new systems and strategies capable of synthesizing any desired soluble, labeled protein or protein fragment on a preparative scale is one of the most important tasks in biotechnology today. The Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (WI, USA), in co-operation with Ehime University (Matsuyama, Japan) and CellFree Sciences Co., Ltd, has developed an automated platform for nuclear magnetic resonance-based structural proteomics that employs wheat germ extracts for cell-free production of labeled protein. The platform utilizes a single construct for all targets without any redesign of the DNA or RNA. Therefore, it offers advantages over commercial cell-free methods utilizing Escherichia coli extracts that require multiple constructs or redesign of the open reading frame. The protein production and labeling protocol is no more costly than E. coli cell-based approaches, is robust and scalable for high-throughput applications. This protocol has been used in the authors center to screen eukaryotic open reading frames from the Arabidopsis thaliana and human genomes and for the determination of nuclear magnetic resonance structures. With the recent addition of the GeneDecoder 1000 (CellFree Sciences Co., Ltd) robotic system, the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics is able to carry out as many as 384 small-scale (50 microl) screening reactions per week. Furthermore, the Protemist (CellFree Sciences Co., Ltd) robotic system enables the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics to carry out 16 production-scale (4 ml) reactions per week. Utilization of this automated platform technology to screen targets for expression and solubility and to produce stable isotope-labeled samples for nuclear magnetic resonance structure determinations is discussed.

  15. Creating New Structures for Marketing Firms: An Experimental Conjoint Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalogeras, N.; Lans, van der I.A.C.M.; Pennings, J.M.E.; Dijk, van G.

    2004-01-01

    ABSTRACT As market conditions change rapidly in the 21st century, questions are arising concerning the suitable organizational structures and processes to meet the challenges that these conditions pose. This paper introduces a new model to structure marketing co-operatives (MCs), which is based on

  16. Animal Structures and Functions, Science (Experimental): 5314.13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Barbara A.

    This unit of instruction was designed to introduce the student to the relationship between structure and function in the animal kingdom, with emphasis given to: (1) the evolution of physiological systems in the major animal phyla, (2) the complementarity of structure and function, and (3) the concept of homeostasis. The booklet lists the relevant…

  17. Alterations in nuclear structure promote lupus autoimmunity in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namrata Singh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the development of autoantibodies that recognize components of the cell nucleus. The vast majority of lupus research has focused on either the contributions of immune cell dysfunction or the genetics of the disease. Because granulocytes isolated from human SLE patients had alterations in neutrophil nuclear morphology that resembled the Pelger–Huet anomaly, and had prominent mis-splicing of mRNA encoding the nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor (LBR, consistent with their Pelger–Huet-like nuclear morphology, we used a novel mouse model system to test the hypothesis that a disruption in the structure of the nucleus itself also contributes to the development of lupus autoimmunity. The lupus-prone mouse strain New Zealand White (NZW was crossed with c57Bl/6 mice harboring a heterozygous autosomal dominant mutation in Lbr (B6.Lbric/+, and the (NZW×B6.LbricF1 offspring were evaluated for induction of lupus autoimmunity. Only female (NZW×B6.LbricF1 mice developed lupus autoimmunity, which included splenomegaly, kidney damage and autoantibodies. Kidney damage was accompanied by immune complex deposition, and perivascular and tubule infiltration of mononuclear cells. The titers of anti-chromatin antibodies exceeded those of aged female MRL-Faslpr mice, and were predominantly of the IgG2 subclasses. The anti-nuclear antibody staining profile of female (NZW×B6.LbricF1 sera was complex, and consisted of an anti-nuclear membrane reactivity that colocalized with the A-type lamina, in combination with a homogeneous pattern that was related to the recognition of histones with covalent modifications that are associated with gene activation. An anti-neutrophil IgM recognizing calreticulin, but not myeloperoxidase (MPO or proteinase 3 (PR3, was also identified. Thus, alterations in nuclear structure contribute to lupus autoimmunity when expressed in the context of a lupus

  18. Alterations in nuclear structure promote lupus autoimmunity in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namrata; Johnstone, Duncan B; Martin, Kayla A; Tempera, Italo; Kaplan, Mariana J; Denny, Michael F

    2016-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the development of autoantibodies that recognize components of the cell nucleus. The vast majority of lupus research has focused on either the contributions of immune cell dysfunction or the genetics of the disease. Because granulocytes isolated from human SLE patients had alterations in neutrophil nuclear morphology that resembled the Pelger-Huet anomaly, and had prominent mis-splicing of mRNA encoding the nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor (LBR), consistent with their Pelger-Huet-like nuclear morphology, we used a novel mouse model system to test the hypothesis that a disruption in the structure of the nucleus itself also contributes to the development of lupus autoimmunity. The lupus-prone mouse strain New Zealand White (NZW) was crossed with c57Bl/6 mice harboring a heterozygous autosomal dominant mutation in Lbr (B6.Lbr(ic/+)), and the (NZW×B6.Lbr(ic))F1 offspring were evaluated for induction of lupus autoimmunity. Only female (NZW×B6.Lbr(ic))F1 mice developed lupus autoimmunity, which included splenomegaly, kidney damage and autoantibodies. Kidney damage was accompanied by immune complex deposition, and perivascular and tubule infiltration of mononuclear cells. The titers of anti-chromatin antibodies exceeded those of aged female MRL-Fas(lpr) mice, and were predominantly of the IgG2 subclasses. The anti-nuclear antibody staining profile of female (NZW×B6.Lbr(ic))F1 sera was complex, and consisted of an anti-nuclear membrane reactivity that colocalized with the A-type lamina, in combination with a homogeneous pattern that was related to the recognition of histones with covalent modifications that are associated with gene activation. An anti-neutrophil IgM recognizing calreticulin, but not myeloperoxidase (MPO) or proteinase 3 (PR3), was also identified. Thus, alterations in nuclear structure contribute to lupus autoimmunity when expressed in the context of a lupus

  19. Characterization of structural defects in nuclear graphite IG-110 and NBG-18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Guiqiu, E-mail: guiqiuzheng@gmail.com [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Xu, Peng [Westinghouse Electric Company, Columbia, SC 29209 (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Allen, Todd [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Nuclear graphite IG-110 and NBG-18 were examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) to understand the structure and microstructure of nuclear graphite. The lattice parameter (a), degree of graphitization (g{sup ¯}), crystallite size parallel and perpendicular to c-direction (L{sub c} and L{sub ⊥}), anisotropy (B), as well as in-plane crystallite size (L{sub a}) were calculated and compared based on XRD patterns and Raman spectra. Results indicate that IG-110 has a larger crystallite size and higher degree of graphitization, but lower anisotropy than NBG-18. These differences are attributed to the properties of coke source and manufacturing processes. Additionally, the shape of the pores and crystallized filler particles, the interface between binders and fillers, Mrozowski cracks and nano-cracks, and the defects of disclination were observed and characterized from SEM and HR-TEM images. The similarities and differences in microstructure between IG-110 and NBG-18 are discussed. The results in this work provide useful information to guide selection of nuclear graphite for the design of next generation nuclear plants (NGNP)

  20. Characterization of structural defects in nuclear graphite IG-110 and NBG-18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guiqiu Zheng; Peng Xu; Kumar Sridharan; Todd Allen

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear graphite IG-110 and NBG-18 were examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) to understand the structure and microstructure of nuclear graphite. The lattice parameter (a), degree of graphitization ( ), crystallite size parallel and perpendicular to c-direction (Lc and L ), anisotropy (B), as well as in-plane crystallite size (La) were calculated and compared based on XRD patterns and Raman spectra. Results indicate that IG-110 has a larger crystallite size and higher degree of graphitization, but lower anisotropy than NBG-18. These differences are attributed to the properties of coke source and manufacturing processes. Additionally, the shape of the pores and crystallized filler particles, the interface between binders and fillers, Mrozowski cracks and nano-cracks, and the defects of disclination were observed and characterized from SEM and HR-TEM images. The similarities and differences in microstructure between IG-110 and NBG-18 are discussed. The results in this work provide useful information to guide selection of nuclear graphite for the design of next generation nuclear plants (NGNP).

  1. Ataxin-1 with an expanded glutamine tract alters nuclear matrix-associated structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skinner, P J; Koshy, B T; Cummings, C J

    1997-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is one of several neurodegenerative disorders caused by an expansion of a polyglutamine tract. It is characterized by ataxia, progressive motor deterioration, and loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. To understand the pathogenesis of SCA1, we examined.......5 microm across, whereas the expanded ataxin-1 localizes to a single approximately 2-microm structure, before the onset of ataxia. Mutant ataxin-1 localizes to a single nuclear structure in affected neurons of SCA1 patients. Similarly, COS-1 cells transfected with wild-type or mutant ataxin-1 show...

  2. Nuclear structure for the crust of neutron stars and exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goegelein, Peter

    2007-07-01

    In this work the Skyrme Hartree-Fock and Relativistic Hartree--Fock approaches have been considered to describe the structure of nuclear systems ranging from finite nuclei, structures in the crust of neutron stars to homogeneous matter. Effects of pairing correlations and finite temperature are also taken into account. The numerical procedure in the cubic box is described for the Skyrme Hartree-Fock as well as the relativistic Hartree-Fock approach. And finally, results for the crust of neutron stars and exotic nuclei are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  3. A four-scale homogenization analysis of creep of a nuclear containment structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, A.B. [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Échelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, F-77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France); EDF R and D – Département MMC Site des Renardières – Avenue des Renardières - Ecuelles, 77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France); Department of Applied Informatics in Construction, National University of Civil Engineering, 55 Giai Phong Road, Hai Ba Trung District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Yvonnet, J., E-mail: julien.yvonnet@univ-paris-est.fr [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Échelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, F-77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France); He, Q.-C. [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Échelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, F-77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France); Toulemonde, C.; Sanahuja, J. [EDF R and D – Département MMC Site des Renardières – Avenue des Renardières - Ecuelles, 77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France)

    2013-12-15

    A four-scale approach is proposed to predict the creep behavior of a concrete structure. The behavior of concrete is modeled through a numerical multiscale methodology, by successively homogenizing the viscoelastic behavior at different scales, starting from the cement paste. The homogenization is carried out by numerically constructing an effective relaxation tensor at each scale. In this framework, the impact of modifying the microstructural parameters can be directly observed on the structure response, like the interaction of the creep of concrete with the prestressing tendons network, and the effects of an internal pressure which might occur during a nuclear accident.

  4. Experimental and theoretical studies on concrete structures with special-shaped shear walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Jianxin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of concept design and staggered shear panels structure,this paper puts forward a new reinforced concrete high rise biuding structure with special-shaped shear walls and presents an experimental study of the seismic performance of the new special-shaped shear walls structure under low reversed cyclic loading using MTS electro hydraulic servo system.Compared with experimental results,a finite element analysis on this special-shaped shear wall structure,which considers the nonlinearity of concrete structure,is found suitable.It shows that the experimental results fairly confirms to the calculated values,which indicates that this new structure has advantages as good architecture function,big effective space,high overall lateral stiffness,fine ductility,advanced seismic behavior,etc..That is,the close r agreement between the theoretical and experimental results indicates the proposed shear wall structure has wide applications.

  5. CCDC 713130: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : bis(2,5-Dihydrobenzylammonium) hexachloro-osmium(iv)

    KAUST Repository

    Reiner, T.

    2011-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  6. CCDC 1515632: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : hexakis(dimethyl sulfoxide)-manganese(ii) tetraiodide

    KAUST Repository

    Haque, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  7. CCDC 721712: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : (N-(2-Aminoethyl)-4-methylbenzenesulfonamidato)-(phenylalaninato)-ruthenium dimethylsulfoxide solvate

    KAUST Repository

    Reiner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  8. CCDC 844302: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : N-1-Naphthyl-P,P-diphenylphosphinoselenoic amide

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Masri, H.T.

    2012-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  9. CCDC 887968: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : Dichloro-bis(tricyclohexylphosphine)-(3-phenylindenylidene)-ruthenium tetrahydrofuran solvate

    KAUST Repository

    Urbina-Blanco, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  10. CCDC 713129: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : (eta^6^-Benzylammonium)-dichloro-(dimethylsulfoxide-S)-ruthenium(ii) chloride

    KAUST Repository

    Reiner, T.

    2011-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  11. CCDC 1477679: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : (1,3-dimesitylimidazolidin-2-ylidene)-trimethyl-indium

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Melissa M.

    2017-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  12. CCDC 1427126: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : bis(1,10-Phenanthroline)-copper pentafluoropropanoate

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yangjie

    2016-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  13. CCDC 1427127: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : bis(1,10-Phenanthroline)-copper heptafluorobutanoate benzene solvate

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yangjie

    2016-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  14. CCDC 870534: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : Dichloro-trimethyl-tantalum(v)

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yin

    2013-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  15. CCDC 1482638: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : trimethylammonium trichloro-tin(iv)

    KAUST Repository

    Dang, Yangyang

    2016-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  16. CCDC 1475929: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : trimethylammonium tribromo-tin(iv)

    KAUST Repository

    Dang, Yangyang

    2016-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  17. CCDC 1475930: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : trimethylammonium trichloro-tin(iv)

    KAUST Repository

    Dang, Yangyang

    2016-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  18. CCDC 1475931: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : trimethylammonium trichloro-tin(iv)

    KAUST Repository

    Dang, Yangyang

    2016-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  19. CCDC 721713: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : Dichloro-(ethyl phenylalaninate)-tris(pyridine)-ruthenium(ii)

    KAUST Repository

    Reiner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  20. CCDC 1420580: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : catena-[(mu-4,4'-sulfonyldibenzoato)-calcium acetylene

    KAUST Repository

    Plonka, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  1. CCDC 1420581: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : catena-[(mu-4,4'-sulfonyldibenzoato)-calcium ethylene

    KAUST Repository

    Plonka, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  2. CCDC 1420582: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : catena-[(mu-4,4'-sulfonyldibenzoato)-calcium ethane

    KAUST Repository

    Plonka, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  3. CCDC 1024814: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : 1,3-Dimesitylimidazolidine-2-selenone

    KAUST Repository

    Vummaleti, Sai V. C.

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  4. CCDC 1011330: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : 1,3,6,8-tetrakis(4-fluorophenyl)pyrene

    KAUST Repository

    El-Assaad, Tarek H.

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  5. CCDC 1477678: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : (1,3-dimesitylimidazolidin-2-ylidene)-trimethyl-gallium

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Melissa M.

    2017-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  6. CCDC 1015953: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : 1,3,6,8-tetrakis(4-phenoxyphenyl)pyrene

    KAUST Repository

    El-Assaad, Tarek H.

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  7. CCDC 1010350: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : dichloro-(methylenebis(di-t-butylphosphine))-palladium(ii)

    KAUST Repository

    Roesle, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  8. CCDC 1446070: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : tris(Pentafluorophenyl)-(triethylsilyl formate)-boron

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  9. CCDC 933273: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : Chloro-(1-cyclododecyl-3-mesitylimidazol-2-ylidene)-gold

    KAUST Repository

    Queval, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  10. CCDC 1429311: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : N-(5-Bromoquinolin-8-yl)benzamide

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  11. CCDC 1419731: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : dodecakis(mu-2-phenylethanethiolato)-hexa-nickel dichloromethane solvate

    KAUST Repository

    Joya, Khurram S.

    2016-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  12. CCDC 844303: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : 1,1,3,3-Tetraphenyldiphosphoxane 1,3-disulfide

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Masri, H.T.

    2012-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  13. CCDC 930139: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : Chloro-(1-cyclododecyl-3-mesitylimidazol-2-ylidene)-silver

    KAUST Repository

    Queval, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  14. CCDC 951636: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : bis(tetra-n-butylammonium) trichloro-(nitrosyl)-(oxalato)-ruthenium

    KAUST Repository

    Kuhn, Paul-Steffen

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  15. CCDC 1048729: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : bis(2-(hydroxyimino)-3-phenylpropanoato)-tin(ii)

    KAUST Repository

    Khanderi, Jayaprakash

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  16. CCDC 1059905: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : 7,13-dimesitylindeno[1,2-b]thioxanthene

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Xueliang

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  17. CCDC 1048727: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : bis(2-(hydroxyimino)propanoato)-tin(ii)

    KAUST Repository

    Khanderi, Jayaprakash

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  18. CCDC 963856: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : catena-[bis(mu2-2-methylimidazole)-zinc

    KAUST Repository

    Shekhah, Osama

    2014-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  19. CCDC 1048728: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : ammonium tris(2-(methoxyimino)propanoato)-tin(ii) dihydrate

    KAUST Repository

    Khanderi, Jayaprakash

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  20. CCDC 1446069: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : tris(Pentafluorophenyl)-(triethylsilyl formate)-aluminium

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  1. CCDC 1436717: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : 2-bromo-4,5-diiodo-1,3-thiazole

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Qinqin

    2016-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  2. CCDC 1436716: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : 5-fluoro-4-iodo-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Qinqin

    2016-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  3. Analytical and Experimental Random Vibration of Nonlinear Aeroelastic Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-28

    dinamics . Sijthoff- Hilton, H H. and Feigen. M. Minimum weight analysis based on structural Noordhoff Co, Netherlands. reliability. J Aerospace Sc, 27...AEROELASTIC STRUCTURES January 28, 1987 ELECT Tpp. AIM" 0OV 7PTCE OF 9r(’TF1CP RESCH JAMi) NOTI-CE OF wIM 1 T AL TO D .TAC’ ..hirte;h-tz’ l rer)t ’(V...freedom aeroelastic structural model in the neighborhood of combination internal resonance condition. The Fokker:Planck equation approach is used to

  4. Methodology for reliability based condition assessment. Application to concrete structures in nuclear plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Y.; Ellingwood, B. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (US). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1993-08-01

    Structures in nuclear power plants may be exposed to aggressive environmental effects that cause their strength to decrease over an extended period of service. A major concern in evaluating the continued service for such structures is to ensure that in their current condition they are able to withstand future extreme load events during the intended service life with a level of reliability sufficient for public safety. This report describes a methodology to facilitate quantitative assessments of current and future structural reliability and performance of structures in nuclear power plants. This methodology takes into account the nature of past and future loads, and randomness in strength and in degradation resulting from environmental factors. An adaptive Monte Carlo simulation procedure is used to evaluate time-dependent system reliability. The time-dependent reliability is sensitive to the time-varying load characteristics and to the choice of initial strength and strength degradation models but not to correlation in component strengths within a system. Inspection/maintenance strategies are identified that minimize the expected future costs of keeping the failure probability of a structure at or below an established target failure probability during its anticipated service period.

  5. A study in the reliability analysis method for nuclear power plant structures (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Byung Hwan; Choi, Seong Cheol; Shin, Ho Sang; Yang, In Hwan; Kim, Yi Sung; Yu, Young; Kim, Se Hun [Seoul, Nationl Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-15

    Nuclear power plant structures may be exposed to aggressive environmental effects that may cause their strength and stiffness to decrease over their service life. Although the physics of these damage mechanisms are reasonably well understood and quantitative evaluation of their effects on time-dependent structural behavior is possible in some instances, such evaluations are generally very difficult and remain novel. The assessment of existing steel containment in nuclear power plants for continued service must provide quantitative evidence that they are able to withstand future extreme loads during a service period with an acceptable level of reliability. Rational methodologies to perform the reliability assessment can be developed from mechanistic models of structural deterioration, using time-dependent structural reliability analysis to take loading and strength uncertainties into account. The final goal of this study is to develop the analysis method for the reliability of containment structures. The cause and mechanism of corrosion is first clarified and the reliability assessment method has been established. By introducing the equivalent normal distribution, the procedure of reliability analysis which can determine the failure probabilities has been established. The influence of design variables to reliability and the relation between the reliability and service life will be continued second year research.

  6. Experimental investigation and modelling of tritium washout by precipitation in the area of the nuclear power plant of Paks, Hungary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koello, Z., E-mail: kolloz42@gmail.co [Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies, Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Bem ter 18/c, Debrecen 4026 (Hungary); Palcsu, L.; Major, Z.; Papp, L.; Molnar, M. [Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies, Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Bem ter 18/c, Debrecen 4026 (Hungary); Ranga, T.; Dombovari, P.; Manga, L. [Department of Radiation Protection, Nuclear Power Plant of Paks, Paks (Hungary)

    2011-01-15

    Tritium occurs in nature in trace amounts, but its concentration is changing due to natural and artificial sources. Studies focusing on natural tritium have to take into account the effect of artificial sources. Also, the impact of tritium is an important issue in environmental protection, e.g. in connection with the emissions from nuclear power plants. The present work focuses on the rain washout of tritium emitted from the Paks nuclear power plant in Hungary. Rainwater collectors were placed around the plant and after a period of precipitation, rainwater was collected and analysed for tritium content. Samples were analysed using low-level liquid scintillation counting, with some also subject to the more accurate {sup 3}He ingrowth method. The results clearly show the trace of the tritium plume emitted from the plant; however, values are only about one order of magnitude higher than environmental background levels. A washout model was devised to estimate the distribution of tritium around the plant. The model gives slightly higher concentrations than those measured in the field, but in general the agreement is satisfactory. The modelled values demonstrate that the effect of the plant on rainwater tritium levels is negligible over a distance of some kilometres. - Research highlights: {yields}The rainwater around a nuclear power plant was collected with a special rainwater collector {yields}The rainwater after a rain event was analysed for tritium with LSC and with the helium ingrowth method. {yields}The trace of the tritium plume is clearly detectable in the rainwater. {yields}The agreement between a reversible washout model and experimental data is satisfactory. {yields}According to the model the tritium plume is hardly detectable over some kilometers from the plant

  7. Different experimental approaches in modelling cataractogenesis: An overview of selenite-induced nuclear cataract in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyselova, Zuzana

    2010-03-01

    Cataract, the opacification of eye lens, is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. At present, the only remedy is surgical removal of the cataractous lens and substitution with a lens made of synthetic polymers. However, besides significant costs of operation and possible complications, an artificial lens just does not have the overall optical qualities of a normal one. Hence it remains a significant public health problem, and biochemical solutions or pharmacological interventions that will maintain the transparency of the lens are highly required. Naturally, there is a persistent demand for suitable biological models. The ocular lens would appear to be an ideal organ for maintaining culture conditions because of lacking blood vessels and nerves. The lens in vivo obtains its nutrients and eliminates waste products via diffusion with the surrounding fluids. Lens opacification observed in vivo can be mimicked in vitro by addition of the cataractogenic agent sodium selenite (Na(2)SeO(3)) to the culture medium. Moreover, since an overdose of sodium selenite induces also cataract in young rats, it became an extremely rapid and convenient model of nuclear cataract in vivo. The main focus of this review will be on selenium (Se) and its salt sodium selenite, their toxicological characteristics and safety data in relevance of modelling cataractogenesis, either under in vivo or in vitro conditions. The studies revealing the mechanisms of lens opacification induced by selenite are highlighted, the representatives from screening for potential anti-cataract agents are listed.

  8. Random walk versus discrete master equation for nuclear heavy ions: Theoretical and experimental distinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, B.; Blin, A. H.; Dworzecka, M.; Griffin, J. J.

    1984-08-01

    The correspondence between a random walk process, comprising discrete steps on the integer values of ( N, Z) and the Markovian discrete master equation which it uniquely specifies is reviewed. Differences between the random walk distribution calculated at integral values of the step count q and that of its Markovian master equation at corresponding values of the (continuous) time parameter ( are studied for a certain soluble two-dimensional example. The mean values of N and Z calculated from the random walk and Markovian master equation agree precisely. The second and higher moments which are also linear in the distribution function agree in leading order. But in this case, the N, Z correlation width vanishes identically for the master equation, and is finite in general for the random walk, while the widths of the distributions (which are bilinear in the distribution function) may differ even in leading order. The relevance of these differences to data measured against some independent variable (e.g. total kinetic energy loss in a heavyion collision), which is in fact uniquely related neither to q nor to t, is discussed. Since both random walk and master equations are currently used to analyze the phenomenology of nuclear heavy-ion collisions, the fact that they offer different predictions, and that depending upon the physical circumstances either (or neither) may be the correct description, recommends the development of a more rational basis for choosing between them.

  9. Development of a seismic damage assessment program for nuclear power plant structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Hyun Moo; Cho, Ho Hyun; Cho, Yang Hui [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2000-12-15

    Some of nuclear power plants operating currently in Korea have been passed about 20 years after construction. Moreover, in the case of KORI I the service year is over 20 years, so their abilities are different from initial abilities. Also, earthquake outbreak increase, our country is not safe area for earthquake. Therefore, need is to guarantee the safety of these power plant structures against seismic accident, to decide to maintain them operational and to obtain data relative to maintenance/repair. Such objectives can be reached by damage assessment using inelastic seismic analysis considering aging degradation. It appears to be more important particularly for the structure enclosing the nuclear reactor that must absolutely protect against any radioactive leakage. Actually, the tendency of the technical world, led by the OECD/NEA, BNL in the United States, CEA in France and IAEA, is to develop researches or programs to assess the seismic safety considering aging degradation of operating nuclear power plants. Regard to the above-mentioned international technical trend, a technology to establish inelastic seismic analysis considering aging degradation so as to assess damage level and seismic safety margin appears to be necessary. Damage assessment and prediction system to grasp in real-time the actual seismic resistance capacity and damage level by 3-dimensional graphic representations are also required.

  10. Optically-based Sensor System for Critical Nuclear Facilities Post-Event Seismic Structural Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallen, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Petrone, Floriana [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Buckle, Ian [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Wu, Suiwen [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Coates, Jason [California State Univ., Chico, CA (United States)

    2017-09-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has ownership and operational responsibility for a large enterprise of nuclear facilities that provide essential functions to DOE missions ranging from national security to discovery science and energy research. These facilities support a number of DOE programs and offices including the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Science, and Office of Environmental Management. With many unique and “one of a kind” functions, these facilities represent a tremendous national investment, and assuring their safety and integrity is fundamental to the success of a breadth of DOE programs. Many DOE critical facilities are located in regions with significant natural phenomenon hazards including major earthquakes and DOE has been a leader in developing standards for the seismic analysis of nuclear facilities. Attaining and sustaining excellence in nuclear facility design and management must be a core competency of the DOE. An important part of nuclear facility management is the ability to monitor facilities and rapidly assess the response and integrity of the facilities after any major upset event. Experience in the western U.S. has shown that understanding facility integrity after a major earthquake is a significant challenge which, lacking key data, can require extensive effort and significant time. In the work described in the attached report, a transformational approach to earthquake monitoring of facilities is described and demonstrated. An entirely new type of optically-based sensor that can directly and accurately measure the earthquake-induced deformations of a critical facility has been developed and tested. This report summarizes large-scale shake table testing of the sensor concept on a representative steel frame building structure, and provides quantitative data on the accuracy of the sensor measurements.

  11. The hyperfine structure in the rotational spectra of D2(17)O and HD(17)O: Confirmation of the absolute nuclear magnetic shielding scale for oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Cazzoli, Gabriele; Harding, Michael E; Vázquez, Juana; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-03-28

    Guided by theoretical predictions, the hyperfine structures of the rotational spectra of mono- and bideuterated-water containing (17)O have been experimentally investigated. To reach sub-Doppler resolution, required to resolve the hyperfine structure due to deuterium quadrupole coupling as well as to spin-rotation (SR) and dipolar spin-spin couplings, the Lamb-dip technique has been employed. The experimental investigation and in particular, the spectral analysis have been supported by high-level quantum-chemical computations employing coupled-cluster techniques and, for the first time, a complete experimental determination of the hyperfine parameters involved was possible. The experimentally determined (17)O spin-rotation constants of D2 (17)O and HD(17)O were used to derive the paramagnetic part of the corresponding nuclear magnetic shielding constants. Together with the computed diamagnetic contributions as well as the vibrational and temperature corrections, the latter constants have been employed to confirm the oxygen nuclear magnetic shielding scale, recently established on the basis of spin-rotation data for H2 (17)O [Puzzarini et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 234304 (2009)].

  12. Theoretical nuclear structure and astrophysics. Progress report for 1993--1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidry, M.W.; Nazarewicz, W.; Strayer, M.R.

    1995-12-31

    This research effort is directed toward theoretical support and guidance for the developing fields of radioactive ion beam (RIB) physics, computational and nuclear astrophysics, and the interface between these disciplines. The authors are concerned both with the application of existing technologies and concepts to guide the initial RIB program, and the development of new ideas and new technologies to influence the longer-term future of nuclear structure physics and astrophysics. The authors report substantial progress in both areas. One measure of progress is publications and invited material. The research described here has led to more than 70 papers that are published, accepted, or submitted to refereed journals, and to 46 invited presentations at conferences and workshops.

  13. Linking empowering leadership to safety participation in nuclear power plants: a structural equation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Córcoles, Mario; Schöbel, Markus; Gracia, Francisco J; Tomás, Inés; Peiró, José M

    2012-07-01

    Safety participation is of paramount importance in guaranteeing the safe running of nuclear power plants. The present study examined the effects of empowering leadership on safety participation. Based on a sample of 495 employees from two Spanish nuclear power plants, structural equation modeling showed that empowering leadership has a significant relationship with safety participation, which is mediated by collaborative team learning. In addition, the results revealed that the relationship between empowering leadership and collaborative learning is partially mediated by the promotion of dialogue and open communication. The implications of these findings for safety research and their practical applications are outlined. An empowering leadership style enhances workers' safety performance, particularly safety participation behaviors. Safety participation is recommended to detect possible rule inconsistencies or misunderstood procedures and make workers aware of critical safety information and issues. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Nuclear medium modification of the F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) structure function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajjad Athar, M., E-mail: sajathar@gmail.co [Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202 002 (India); Ruiz Simo, I.; Vicente Vacas, M.J. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia - CSIC, 46100 Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain)

    2011-05-01

    We study the nuclear effects in the electromagnetic structure function F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) in the deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering process by taking into account Fermi motion, binding, pion and rho meson cloud contributions. Calculations have been done in a local density approximation using relativistic nuclear spectral functions which include nucleon correlations. The ratios R{sub F}{sub 2}{sup A}(x,Q{sup 2})=(2F{sub 2}{sup A}(x,Q{sup 2}))/(AF{sub 2}{sup D}(x,Q{sup 2})) are obtained and compared with recent JLab results for light nuclei with special attention to the slope of the x distributions. This magnitude shows a non-trivial A dependence and it is insensitive to possible normalization uncertainties. The results have also been compared with some of the older experiments using intermediate mass nuclei.

  15. Theoretical temperature model with experimental validation for CLIC Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2126138; Vamvakas, Alex; Alme, Johan

    Micron level stability of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) components is one of the main requirements to meet the luminosity goal for the future $48 \\,km$ long underground linear accelerator. The radio frequency (RF) power used for beam acceleration causes heat generation within the aligned structures, resulting in mechanical movements and structural deformations. A dedicated control of the air- and water- cooling system in the tunnel is therefore crucial to improve alignment accuracy. This thesis investigates the thermo-mechanical behavior of the CLIC Accelerating Structure (AS). In CLIC, the AS must be aligned to a precision of $10\\,\\mu m$. The thesis shows that a relatively simple theoretical model can be used within reasonable accuracy to predict the temperature response of an AS as a function of the applied RF power. During failure scenarios or maintenance interventions, the RF power is turned off resulting in no heat dissipation and decrease in the overall temperature of the components. The theoretica...

  16. A Bayesian experimental design approach to structural health monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Flynn, Eric [UCSD; Todd, Michael [UCSD

    2010-01-01

    Optimal system design for SHM involves two primarily challenges. The first is the derivation of a proper performance function for a given system design. The second is the development of an efficient optimization algorithm for choosing a design that maximizes, or nearly maximizes the performance function. In this paper we will outline how an SHM practitioner can construct the proper performance function by casting the entire design problem into a framework of Bayesian experimental design. The approach demonstrates how the design problem necessarily ties together all steps of the SHM process.

  17. Potentially of using vertical and three dimensional isolation systems in nuclear structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Zhiuang [Research Institute of Structural Engineering and Disaster Reduction, Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Wong, Jenna [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley (United States); Mahin, Stephen [University of California, Berkeley (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Although the horizontal component of an earthquake response can be significantly reduced through the use of conventional seismic isolators, the vertical component of excitation is still transmitted directly into the structure. Records from instrumented structures, and some recent tests and analyses have actually seen increases in vertical responses in base isolated structures under the combined effects of horizontal and vertical ground motions. This issue becomes a great concern to facilities such as a Nuclear Power Plants (NPP), with specialized equipment and machinery that is not only expensive, but critical to safe operation. As such, there is considerable interest worldwide in vertical and three-dimensional (3D) isolation systems. This paper examines several vertical and 3D isolation systems that have been proposed and their potential application to modern nuclear facilities. In particular, a series of case study analyses of a modern NPP model are performed to examine the benefits and challenges associated with 3D isolation compared with horizontal isolation. It was found that compared with the general horizontal isolators, isolators that have vertical frequencies of no more than 3 Hz can effectively reduce the vertical in-structure responses for the studied NPP model. Among the studied cases, the case that has a vertical isolation frequency of 3 Hz is the one that can keep the horizontal period of the isolators as the first period while having the most flexible vertical isolator properties. When the vertical frequency of isolators reduces to 1 Hz, the rocking effect is obvious and rocking restraining devices are necessary.

  18. Developing a structural health monitoring system for nuclear dry cask storage canister

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoyi; Lin, Bin; Bao, Jingjing; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Knight, Travis; Lam, Poh-Sang; Yu, Lingyu

    2015-03-01

    Interim storage of spent nuclear fuel from reactor sites has gained additional importance and urgency for resolving waste-management-related technical issues. In total, there are over 1482 dry cask storage system (DCSS) in use at US plants, storing 57,807 fuel assemblies. Nondestructive material condition monitoring is in urgent need and must be integrated into the fuel cycle to quantify the "state of health", and more importantly, to guarantee the safe operation of radioactive waste storage systems (RWSS) during their extended usage period. A state-of-the-art nuclear structural health monitoring (N-SHM) system based on in-situ sensing technologies that monitor material degradation and aging for nuclear spent fuel DCSS and similar structures is being developed. The N-SHM technology uses permanently installed low-profile piezoelectric wafer sensors to perform long-term health monitoring by strategically using a combined impedance (EMIS), acoustic emission (AE), and guided ultrasonic wave (GUW) approach, called "multimode sensing", which is conducted by the same network of installed sensors activated in a variety of ways. The system will detect AE events resulting from crack (case for study in this project) and evaluate the damage evolution; when significant AE is detected, the sensor network will switch to the GUW mode to perform damage localization, and quantification as well as probe "hot spots" that are prone to damage for material degradation evaluation using EMIS approach. The N-SHM is expected to eventually provide a systematic methodology for assessing and monitoring nuclear waste storage systems without incurring human radiation exposure.

  19. Experimental rovibrational constants and equilibrium structure of phosphorus trifluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najib, Hamid

    2014-11-01

    Thanks to recent high-resolution Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and pure rotational (RF/CM/MMW) measurements, several experimental values of the rotation-vibration parameters of the oblate molecule PF3 have been extracted, contributing thus to the knowledge of the molecular potential of phosphorus trifluoride. The data used are those of the fundamental, overtone and combination bands studied in the 300-1500 cm-1 range. The new values are in good agreement with ones determined at low resolution, but significantly more accurate. The agreement is excellent with the available values determined by ab initio HF-SCF calculations employing the TZP/TZ2P triple-zeta basis. From the recent experimental rovibrational interaction constants αC and αB, new accurate equilibrium rotational constants Ce and Be have been derived for the symmetric top molecule PF3, which were used to derive the equilibrium geometry of this molecule: re(F-P) = 1.560986 (43) Å; θe(FPF) = 97.566657 (64)°.

  20. EEG Analysis during complex diagnostic tasks in Nuclear Power Plants - Simulator-based Experimental Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Jun Su; Seong, Poong Hyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    In literature, there are a lot of studies based on EEG signals during cognitive activities of human-beings but most of them dealt with simple cognitive activities such as transforming letters into Morse code, subtraction, reading, semantic memory search, visual search, memorizing a set of words and so on. In this work, EEG signals were analyzed during complex diagnostic tasks in NPP simulator-based environment. Investigated are the theta, alpha, beta, and gamma band EEG powers during the diagnostic tasks. The experimental design and procedure are represented in section 2 and the results are shown in section 3. Finally some considerations are discussed and the direction for the further work is proposed in section 4.

  1. Nuclear Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  2. Structure and conformational plasticity of the U6 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montemayor, Eric J.; Didychuk, Allison L.; Liao, Honghong; Hu, Panzhou; Brow, David A.; Butcher, Samuel E. (UW)

    2017-01-01

    U6 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) is a key component of the active site of the spliceosome, a large ribonucleoprotein complex that catalyzes the splicing of precursor messenger RNA. Prior to its incorporation into the spliceosome, U6 is bound by the protein Prp24, which facilitates unwinding of the U6 internal stem-loop (ISL) so that it can pair with U4 snRNA. A previously reported crystal structure of the `core' of the U6 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) contained an ISL-stabilized A62G mutant of U6 bound to all four RNA-recognition motif (RRM) domains of Prp24 [Montemayoret al.(2014),Nature Struct. Mol. Biol.21, 544–551]. The structure revealed a novel topology containing interlocked rings of protein and RNA that was not predicted by prior biochemical and genetic data. Here, the crystal structure of the U6 snRNP core with a wild-type ISL is reported. This complex crystallized in a new space group, apparently owing in part to the presence of an intramolecular cross-link in RRM1 that was not observed in the previously reported U6-A62G structure. The structure exhibits the same protein–RNA interface and maintains the unique interlocked topology. However, the orientation of the wild-type ISL is altered relative to the A62G mutant structure, suggesting inherent structural dynamics that may facilitate its pairing with U4. Consistent with their similar architectures in the crystalline state, the wild-type and A62G variants of U6 exhibit similar Prp24-binding affinities and electrophoretic mobilities when analyzed by gel-shift assay.

  3. The nuclear higher-order structure defined by the set of topological relationships between DNA and the nuclear matrix is species-specific in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Santiago, Evangelina; Pardo, Juan Pablo; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando; Aranda-Anzaldo, Armando

    2017-01-15

    During the interphase the nuclear DNA of metazoan cells is organized in supercoiled loops anchored to constituents of a nuclear substructure or compartment known as the nuclear matrix. The stable interactions between DNA and the nuclear matrix (NM) correspond to a set of topological relationships that define a nuclear higher-order structure (NHOS). Current evidence suggests that the NHOS is cell-type-specific. Biophysical evidence and theoretical models suggest that thermodynamic and structural constraints drive the actualization of DNA-NM interactions. However, if the topological relationships between DNA and the NM were the subject of any biological constraint with functional significance then they must be adaptive and thus be positively selected by natural selection and they should be reasonably conserved, at least within closely related species. We carried out a coarse-grained, comparative evaluation of the DNA-NM topological relationships in primary hepatocytes from two closely related mammals: rat and mouse, by determining the relative position to the NM of a limited set of target sequences corresponding to highly-conserved genomic regions that also represent a sample of distinct chromosome territories within the interphase nucleus. Our results indicate that the pattern of topological relationships between DNA and the NM is not conserved between the hepatocytes of the two closely related species, suggesting that the NHOS, like the karyotype, is species-specific. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A new experimental study of the 12Be cluster structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Z. H.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We have carried out a new experiment with 12Be secondary beam at 29MeV/u. The molecular resonant states were reconstructed from 4He-8He and 6He-6He decaying channels. These states agree well with previously reported results by Freer et al., and therefore support the highly disputed clustering structure of 12Be. Cross sections for these two breakup channels were also deduced.

  5. Structures and Materials Experimental Facilities and Capabilities Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Lucas G. (Compiler); Kurtz-Husch, Jeanette D. (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Center of Excellent for Structures and Materials at Langley Research Center is responsible for conducting research and developing useable technology in the areas of advanced materials and processing technologies, durability, damage tolerance, structural concepts, advanced sensors, intelligent systems, aircraft ground operations, reliability, prediction tools, performance validation, aeroelastic response, and structural dynamics behavior for aerospace vehicles. Supporting the research activities is a complementary set of facilities and capabilities documented in this report. Because of the volume of information, the information collected was restricted in most cases to one page. Specific questions from potential customers or partners should be directed to the points of contacts provided with the various capabilities. Grouping of the equipment is by location as opposed to function. Geographical information of the various buildings housing the equipment is also provided. Since this is the first time that such an inventory is ever collected at Langley it is by no means complete. It is estimated that over 90 percent of the equipment capabilities at hand are included but equipment is continuously being updated and will be reported in the future.

  6. Nuclear physics today

    CERN Document Server

    Galès, Sydney

    1999-01-01

    This brief review explores the future perspectives of nuclear physics at the dawn of the next millennium, a century after the great discoveries of H. Becquerel, Marie and Pierre Curie. Nuclear physics plays an important role in the understanding of the formation of matter in the universe. Today, fundamental research is moving towards new frontiers. Challenging physics issues like the quest for the quark-gluon plasma, the structure and the dynamics of hadrons, the properties of nuclei under extreme conditions of spin, mass, temperature and/or far off stability are the main research avenues for the future. The methods and the tools developed both experimentally and theoretically to probe and understand the nucleus at the microscopic level have a broad spectrum of applications both in other fields of sciences and in our society. Specific examples related to nuclear medicine and nuclear energy will illustrate the possible impact of the applications of Nuclear Physics to our everyday life.

  7. Fundamentals of nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Takigawa, Noboru

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces the current understanding of the fundamentals of nuclear physics by referring to key experimental data and by providing a theoretical understanding of principal nuclear properties. It primarily covers the structure of nuclei at low excitation in detail. It also examines nuclear forces and decay properties. In addition to fundamentals, the book treats several new research areas such as non-relativistic as well as relativistic Hartree–Fock calculations, the synthesis of super-heavy elements, the quantum chromodynamics phase diagram, and nucleosynthesis in stars, to convey to readers the flavor of current research frontiers in nuclear physics. The authors explain semi-classical arguments and derivation of its formulae. In these ways an intuitive understanding of complex nuclear phenomena is provided. The book is aimed at graduate school students as well as junior and senior undergraduate students and postdoctoral fellows. It is also useful for researchers to update their knowledge of diver...

  8. Fission product iodine release and retention in nuclear reactor accidents— experimental programme at PSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchertseifer, H.; Cripps, R.; Guentay, S.; Jaeckel, B.

    2003-01-01

    Iodine radionuclides constitute one of the most important fission products of uranium and plutonium. If the volatile forms would be released into the environment during a severe accident, a potential health hazard would then ensue. Understanding its behaviour is an important prerequisite for planning appropriate mitigation measures. Improved and extensive knowledge of the main iodine species and their reactions important for the release and retention processes in the reactor containment is thus mandatory. The aim of PSI's radiolytical studies is to improve the current thermodynamic and kinetic databases and the models for iodine used in severe accident computer codes. Formation of sparingly soluble silver iodide (AgI) in a PWR containment sump can substantially reduce volatile iodine fraction in the containment atmosphere. However, the effectiveness is dependent on its radiation stability. The direct radiolytic decomposition of AgI and the effect of impurities on iodine volatilisation were experimentally determined at PSI using a remote-controlled and automated high activity 188W/Re generator (40 GBq/ml). Low molecular weight organic iodides are difficult to be retained in engineered safety systems. Investigation of radiolytic decomposition of methyl iodide in aqueous solutions, combined with an on-line analysis of iodine species is currently under investigation at PSI.

  9. Unified description of structure and reactions: implementing the nuclear field theory program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broglia, R. A.; Bortignon, P. F.; Barranco, F.; Vigezzi, E.; Idini, A.; Potel, G.

    2016-06-01

    The modern theory of the atomic nucleus results from the merging of the liquid drop model of Niels Bohr and Fritz Kalckar, and of the shell model of Marie Goeppert Meyer and Hans Jensen. The first model contributed the concepts of collective excitations. The second, those of independent-particle motion. The unification of these apparently contradictory views in terms of the particle-vibration and particle-rotation couplings carried out by Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson has allowed for an ever more complete, accurate and detailed description of nuclear structure. Nuclear field theory (NFT), developed by the Copenhagen-Buenos Aires collaboration, provided a powerful quantal embodiment of this unification. Reactions are not only at the basis of quantum mechanics (statistical interpretation, Max Born), but also the specific tools to probe the atomic nucleus. It is then natural that NFT is being extended to deal with processes which involve the continuum in an intrinsic fashion, so as to be able to treat them on an equal footing with those associated with bound states (structure). As a result, spectroscopic studies of transfer to continuum states could eventually make use of the NFT rules, properly extended to take care of recoil effects. In the present contribution we review the implementation of the NFT program of structure and reactions, setting special emphasis on open problems and outstanding predictions.

  10. Assessment of modular construction for safety-related structures at advanced nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braverman, J.; Morante, R.; Hofmayer, C.

    1997-03-01

    Modular construction techniques have been successfully used in a number of industries, both domestically and internationally. Recently, the use of structural modules has been proposed for advanced nuclear power plants. The objective in utilizing modular construction is to reduce the construction schedule, reduce construction costs, and improve the quality of construction. This report documents the results of a program which evaluated the proposed use of modular construction for safety-related structures in advanced nuclear power plant designs. The program included review of current modular construction technology, development of licensing review criteria for modular construction, and initial validation of currently available analytical techniques applied to concrete-filled steel structural modules. The program was conducted in three phases. The objective of the first phase was to identify the technical issues and the need for further study in order to support NRC licensing review activities. The two key findings were the need for supplementary review criteria to augment the Standard Review Plan and the need for verified design/analysis methodology for unique types of modules, such as the concrete-filled steel module. In the second phase of this program, Modular Construction Review Criteria were developed to provide guidance for licensing reviews. In the third phase, an analysis effort was conducted to determine if currently available finite element analysis techniques can be used to predict the response of concrete-filled steel modules.

  11. Computational and experimental approaches to the molecular structure of the HCl adduct of Me3PO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orthaber, Andreas; Belaj, Ferdinand; Pietschnig, Rudolf

    2010-08-01

    The reaction of anhydrous HCl(g) with trimethyl phosphane oxide yields trimethylhydroxy phosphonium chloride. A crystal structure analysis showed that the prevalent mesomeric structure in the solid state is the phosphonium chloride ion pair. Ab initio calculations in the gas phase cannot reproduce these findings, whereas higher correlated methods (CISD) and solvation models predict the experimental structure correctly.

  12. CHANGE IN DEFORMATION PROPERTIES MODELING OF CONCRETE IN PROTECTIVE STRUCTURES OF NUCLEAR REACTOR BY IONIZING RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. K. Agakhanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The necessity of studying the effect impact of elementary particles impact on the strength and deformation materials properties used in protective constructions nuclear reactors and reactor technology has been stipulated. A nuclear reactor pressure vessel from prestressed concrete, combining the functions of biological protection is to be considered. The neutron flux problem distribution in the pressure vessel of a nuclear reactor has been solved. The solution is made in axisymmetric with the finite element method using a flat triangular finite element. Computing has been conducted in Matlab package. The comparison with the results has been obtained using the finite difference method, as well as the graphs of changes under the influence of radiation exposure and the elastic modulus of concrete radiation deformations have been constructed. The proposed method allows to simulate changes in the deformation properties of concrete under the influence of neutron irradiation. Results of the study can be used in the calculation of stress-strain state of structures, taking into account indirect heterogeneity caused by the physical fields influence.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance T 2 spectrum: multifractal characteristics and pore structure evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jian-Ping; He, Xu; Geng, Bin; Hu, Qin-Hong; Feng, Chun-Zhen; Kou, Xiao-Pan; Li, Xing-Wen

    2017-06-01

    Pore structure characteristics are important to oil and gas exploration in complex low-permeability reservoirs. Using multifractal theory and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), we studied the pore structure of low-permeability sandstone rocks from the 4th Member (ES4) of the Shahejie Formation in the south slope of the Dongying Sag. We used the existing pore structure data from petrophysics, core slices, and mercury injection tests to classify the pore structure into three categories and five subcategories. Then, the T 2 spectra of samples with different pore structures were interpolated, and the one- and three-dimensional fractal dimensions and the multifractal spectrum were obtained. Parameters α (intensity of singularity) and f (α) (density of distribution) were extracted from the multifractal spectra. The differences in the three fractal dimensions suggest that the pore structure types correlate with α and f (α). The results calculated based on the multifractal spectrum is consistent with that of the core slices and mercury injection. Finally, the proposed method was applied to an actual logging profile to evaluate the pore structure of low-permeability sandstone reservoirs.

  14. Isotopic and structural signature of experimentally irradiated organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Boris; Roskosz, Mathieu; Remusat, Laurent; Leroux, Hugues; Vezin, Hervé; Depecker, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    The effects of electron irradiation on the structure and the D/H signature of a synthetic analogue of extraterrestrial insoluble organic matter (IOM) were studied. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was chosen because it contains both aliphatic and aromatic functional groups. A 900 nm-thick film was irradiated with electrons within the energy range 4-300 keV, for different run durations. Temperature influence was also tested. Irradiated residues were structurally and isotopically characterized by infrared spectroscopy (IR), electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). With increasing energy deposition, spectroscopic results indicate (i) a gradual amorphization with chain scissions, (ii) an increase of CH2/CH3 and (iii) the formation of quinones. The EPR study shows that mono- and biradicals (organic species with one or several unpaired valence electrons) are also formed during irradiation. As these structural modifications occur, the δD (initially at -33‰ relative to SMOW) decreases first during a transient step and then stabilizes at ∼+300‰. There is a strong correlation between the changes recorded by the different methods and the electron dose. Deposited energy appears to be the key parameter to induce these modifications. In this respect a low-energy electron irradiation causes more damages than high energy ones. Based on our data and considering the current solar electron flux, the irradiation at moderate energy (1-10 keV) can produce significant D-enrichments of the IOM in a timescale compatible with the evolution of a typical protoplanetary disk.

  15. Study of special challenges for NDT-methods on nuclear structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maack, Stefan; Wiggenhauser, Herbert [BAM Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung, Berlin (Germany); Thunell, Bjoern [Scanscot Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2015-07-01

    The special design of buildings, constructed for nuclear power plants is a particular challenge for the nondestructive testing in the building industry. In particular the major component thicknesses, the degree of reinforcement and surface coating systems make the application of NDT methods difficult. The studies first steps were undertaken to determine to which extent established applications of these techniques are useable in the field of infrastructure buildings. Methods have been evaluated that are already state of the art. So for example the ground penetrating radar was used for locating metallic mounting parts. Furthermore, the low-lying internal structure of the containment was investigated with the ultrasonic method.

  16. Molecular Structure Laboratory. Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FTNMR) Spectrometer and Ancillary Instrumentation at SUNY Geneseo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, David K [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Geneseo, NY (United States)

    2015-12-31

    An Agilent 400-MR nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer and ancillary equipment were purchased, which are being used for molecular structure elucidation.  The instrumentation is housed in a pre-existing facility designed specifically for its use. This instrument package is being used to expand the research and educational efforts of the faculty and students at SUNY-Geneseo and is made available to neighboring educational institutions and business concerns.  Funds were also used for training of College personnel, maintenance of the instrumentation, and installation of the equipment.

  17. Time to Come in from the Cold (War): Nuclear Force Structure for an Uncertain World

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wallace R Turnbull

    2015-01-01

      The US nuclear deterrent is at a turning point. Seven decades have passed since a nuclear weapon was used, and many noted leaders have called for the abolition of nuclear weapons altogether -- a "Global Zero...

  18. Cyanobacteria Affect Fitness and Genetic Structure of Experimental Daphnia Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drugă, Bogdan; Turko, Patrick; Spaak, Piet; Pomati, Francesco

    2016-04-05

    Zooplankton communities can be strongly affected by cyanobacterial blooms, especially species of genus Daphnia, which are key-species in lake ecosystems. Here, we explored the effect of microcystin/nonmicrocystin (MC/non-MC) producing cyanobacteria in the diet of experimental Daphnia galeata populations composed of eight genotypes. We used D. galeata clones hatched from ephippia 10 to 60 years old, which were first tested in monocultures, and then exposed for 10 weeks as mixed populations to three food treatments consisting of green algae combined with cyanobacteria able/unable of producing MC. We measured the expression of nine genes potentially involved in Daphnia acclimation to cyanobacteria: six protease genes, one ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene, and two rRNA genes, and then we tracked the dynamics of the genotypes in mixed populations. The expression pattern of one protease and the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme genes was positively correlated with the increased fitness of competing clones in the presence of cyanobacteria, suggesting physiological plasticity. The genotype dynamics in mixed populations was only partially related to the growth rates of clones in monocultures and varied strongly with the food. Our results revealed strong intraspecific differences in the tolerance of D. galeata clones to MC/non-MC-producing cyanobacteria in their diet, suggesting microevolutionary effects.

  19. Experimental evidence for a shell structure of the proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levintov, I.I.

    1983-11-01

    Spin effects in nucleon-nucleon scattering are explained by the interaction of Fock configurations of the type (qqQQ-barq), having the structure of p shells. The number of nucleon p shells is N = n/sub f/ -1 (n/sub f/ is the number of flavors). The strong spin effect in p/sub arrow-up/p/sub arrow-up/ scattering for p/sup 2//sub perpendicular/ > or approx. =4 (GeV/c)/sup 2/ (the Argonne effect) is explained by the presence of the configuration (qqcc-barq) in the proton. An analogous effect in the region p/sup 2//sub perpendicular/ > or approx. =100 (GeV/c)/sup 2/, due to the configuration (qqbb-barq), is predicted. In scattering of unpolarized hadrons by a polarized proton target for constant theta/sub cms/ and variation of s (i.e., p/sup 2//sub perpendicular/), it is predicted that there are structures in the asymmetry in the region p/sup 2//sub perpendicular/ approx.4m/sup 2//sub Q/ (Q = c, b, ...).

  20. Structure of a herpesvirus nuclear egress complex subunit reveals an interaction groove that is essential for viral replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Kendra E.; Sharma, Mayuri; Mansueto, My Sam; Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Filman, David J.; Hogle, James M.; Wagner, Gerhard; Coen, Donald M.; Arthanari, Haribabu

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses require a nuclear egress complex (NEC) for efficient transit of nucleocapsids from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. The NEC orchestrates multiple steps during herpesvirus nuclear egress, including disruption of nuclear lamina and particle budding through the inner nuclear membrane. In the important human pathogen human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), this complex consists of nuclear membrane protein UL50, and nucleoplasmic protein UL53, which is recruited to the nuclear membrane through its interaction with UL50. Here, we present an NMR-determined solution-state structure of the murine CMV homolog of UL50 (M50; residues 1–168) with a strikingly intricate protein fold that is matched by no other known protein folds in its entirety. Using NMR methods, we mapped the interaction of M50 with a highly conserved UL53-derived peptide, corresponding to a segment that is required for heterodimerization. The UL53 peptide binding site mapped onto an M50 surface groove, which harbors a large cavity. Point mutations of UL50 residues corresponding to surface residues in the characterized M50 heterodimerization interface substantially decreased UL50–UL53 binding in vitro, eliminated UL50–UL53 colocalization, prevented disruption of nuclear lamina, and halted productive virus replication in HCMV-infected cells. Our results provide detailed structural information on a key protein–protein interaction involved in nuclear egress and suggest that NEC subunit interactions can be an attractive drug target. PMID:26150520

  1. Energetic electron processes fluorescence effects for structured nanoparticles X-ray analysis and nuclear medicine applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taborda, A.; Desbrée, A. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-HOM/SDI/LEDI, BP-17, 31, Avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Carvalho, A. [IEQUALTECS, Lda, Rua Dr. Francisco Sá Carneiro, 36, 2500-065 S. Gregório CLD (Portugal); Chaves, P.C. [C" 2TN, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, EN10 km 139.7, 2685-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Reis, M.A., E-mail: mareis@ctn.tecnico.ulisboa.pt [IEQUALTECS, Lda, Rua Dr. Francisco Sá Carneiro, 36, 2500-065 S. Gregório CLD (Portugal); C" 2TN, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, EN10 km 139.7, 2685-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal)

    2016-08-15

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are widely used as contrast agents for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and can be modified for improved imaging or to become tissue-specific or even protein-specific. The knowledge of their detailed elemental composition characterisation and potential use in nuclear medicine applications, is, therefore, an important issue. X-ray fluorescence techniques such as particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) or X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), can be used for elemental characterisation even in problematic situations where very little sample volume is available. Still, the fluorescence coefficient of Fe is such that, during the decay of the inner-shell ionised atomic structure, keV Auger electrons are produced in excess to X-rays. Since cross-sections for ionisation induced by keV electrons, for low atomic number atoms, are of the order of 10{sup 3} barn, care should be taken to account for possible fluorescence effects caused by Auger electrons, which may lead to the wrong quantification of elements having atomic number lower than the atomic number of Fe. Furthermore, the same electron processes will occur in iron oxide nanoparticles containing {sup 57}Co, which may be used for nuclear medicine therapy purposes. In the present work, simple approximation algorithms are proposed for the quantitative description of radiative and non-radiative processes associated with Auger electrons cascades. The effects on analytical processes and nuclear medicine applications are quantified for the case of iron oxide nanoparticles, by calculating both electron fluorescence emissions and energy deposition on cell tissues where the nanoparticles may be embedded.

  2. Transfer of elements relevant to nuclear fuel cycle from soil to boreal plants and animals in experimental meso- and microcosms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuovinen, Tiina S., E-mail: tiina.tuovinen@uef.fi [Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Kasurinen, Anne; Häikiö, Elina [Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Tervahauta, Arja [Department of Biology, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box FI-70211, Kuopio (Finland); Makkonen, Sari; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka [Department of Environmental Science, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FI-70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2016-01-01

    Uranium (U), cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), thorium (Th) and zinc (Zn) occur naturally in soil but their radioactive isotopes can also be released into the environment during the nuclear fuel cycle. The transfer of these elements was studied in three different trophic levels in experimental mesocosms containing downy birch (Betula pubescens), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana) and Scandinavian small-reed (Calamagrostis purpurea ssp. Phragmitoides) as producers, snails (Arianta arbostorum) as herbivores, and earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) as decomposers. To determine more precisely whether the element uptake of snails is mainly via their food (birch leaves) or both via soil and food, a separate microcosm experiment was also performed. The element uptake of snails did not generally depend on the presence of soil, indicating that the main uptake route was food, except for U, where soil contact was important for uptake when soil U concentration was high. Transfer of elements from soil to plants was not linear, i.e. it was not correctly described by constant concentration ratios (CR) commonly applied in radioecological modeling. Similar nonlinear transfer was found for the invertebrate animals included in this study: elements other than U were taken up more efficiently when element concentration in soil or food was low. - Highlights: • We studied transfer of elements in boreal food chain using meso- and microcosms. • Elements related to nuclear fuel cycle and mining were examined. • Higher uptake at lower soil concentrations was observed for primary producers. • Snails took up elements mainly from food but for U also soil was an element source. • Non-linear transfer of essential elements was observed for herbivore and decomposer.

  3. Nuclear spectroscopic studies. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, C.R.; Guidry, M.W.; Riedinger, L.L.; Sorensen, S.P.

    1994-02-18

    The Nuclear Physics group at UTK is involved in heavy-ion physics including both nuclear structure and reaction mechanisms. During the last year experimental work has been in 3 broad areas: structure of nuclei at high angular momentum, structure of nuclei far from stability, and ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics. Results in these areas are described in this document under: properties of high-spin states, study of low-energy levels of nuclei far from stability, and high-energy heavy-ion physics (PHENIX, etc.). Another important component of the work is theoretical interpretation of experimental results (Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research).

  4. Effects of experimental hypothyroidism on myelin sheath structural organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Andréa A; Nazário, José C; Pereira, Mário J S; Azevedo, Neide L; Barradas, Penha C

    2004-03-01

    A previous study using the 2'3'cyclic nucleotide 3'phosphodiesterase (CNPase), an oligodendroglial marker that also stain ensheathed fibers, showed a decrease in the number of immunoreactive fibers and a change in the pattern of CNPase immunoreactivity (CNPase+) in hypothyroid animals. CNPase+ fibers, in mature hypothyroid animals, showed a continuous pattern of staining in contrast with a discontinuous one in controls. As CNPase, in adult animals, can be found only in regions in which oligodendrocyte cytoplasm remains as internal, external and paranodal loops, it was suggested that the reduction of thyroid hormone levels leads to a failure in myelin compaction. Previous data showed a higher frequency of some abnormalities in myelin sheath as multiple cytoplasmic loops and redundant myelin profiles in mutant animals that present a failure in myelin compaction. The increase in the frequency of these abnormalities (multiple internal and external loops and redundant myelin) indicates a failure in the interrelations between the axons and the oligodendroglial processes. To verify if the thyroid hormone deficiency during CNS development disturbs these interrelations, we evaluated the frequency of the morphological abnormalities (multiple internal and external loops and redundant myelin) in myelin sheath of corpus callosum (cc) in experimental hypothyroidism. Randomic fields were kept by electron microscopy and the analysis of the frequency of morphological abnormalities showed a significant difference in hypothyroid animals at 60-day-old (PND60), with no significant differences at 90-day-old (PND90) animals. The frequency of multiple internal loops is higher in hypothyroid animals at PND60 that indicates a disturbance in the wrapping by the oligodendroglial process. These findings showed that thyroid hormone might modulate the axon-oligodendroglial relationships that are important for the adequate temporal sequence of events that occur during myelinogenesis, with

  5. Wave-Structure Interactions on Point Absorbers - an experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Morten Møller

    We are facing a significant challenge when it comes to securing the energy needed to sustain our standard of living in the future. With the increasing global temperature and the climbing levels of carbon dioxide in our atmo- sphere we need to reduce the consumption of fossil fuels. The renewable...... of a wave energy device by determin- ing the loads on the device. The loads plays a key part in optimizing the power extraction, reducing the structural cost, and increasing the survivabil- ity. Experiments are carried out in small and large scale and compared to simulations and empirical functions. The WEC...... technologies will play a key role in achieving this. The renewable energy sec- tor consists of a wide range of technologies yet the source with the highest energy density is still untapped. The extraction of energy from the ocean has shown to be costly and difficult. This thesis deals with the development...

  6. The Monotonicity Puzzle: An Experimental Investigation of Incentive Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannette Brosig

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-monotone incentive structures, which - according to theory - are able to induce optimal behavior, are often regarded as empirically less relevant for labor relationships. We compare the performance of a theoretically optimal non-monotone contract with a monotone one under controlled laboratory conditions. Implementing some features relevant to real-world employment relationships, our paper demonstrates that, in fact, the frequency of income-maximizing decisions made by agents is higher under the monotone contract. Although this observed behavior does not change the superiority of the non-monotone contract for principals, they do not choose this contract type in a significant way. This is what we call the monotonicity puzzle. Detailed investigations of decisions provide a clue for solving the puzzle and a possible explanation for the popularity of monotone contracts.

  7. Experimental study of aerosol deposition in pulsating balloon structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, G; Fadl, A; Barek, T; Zhang, Z; Major, J

    2009-02-01

    In this study, aerosol depositions within pulsating balloon structures are investigated. Cyclical motion of expansion and contraction of the balloon models are controlled by varying the surrounding vacuum pressures inside the air chamber. Balloons of various configurations are used to induce the air flows as well as to collect the deposited particles. The non-uniform distribution patterns of particle deposition inside the models are measured by fluorescence spectrophotometer. Different airflow rates are investigated. The objective of this study is to qualitatively investigate the phenomena of enhanced particle local deposition in pockets with moving wall conditions. It has been observed in the experiments that a particle deposition "hot spot" exists at the entrance of balloon model for almost all flow rates covered in the study and the moving boundary flow enhances the aerosol deposition significantly.

  8. Use of reward-penalty structures in human experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, A. C.; Allen, R. W.; Schwartz, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    The use of motivational techniques in human performance research is reviewed and an example study employing a reward-penalty structure to simulate the motivations inherent in a real-world situation is presented. Driver behavior in a decision-making driving scenario was studied. The task involved control of an instrumented car on a cooperative test course. Subjects were penalized monetarily for tickets and accidents and rewarded for saving driving time. Two groups were assigned different ticket penalties. The group with the highest penalties tended to drive more conservatively. However, the average total payoff to each group was the same, as the conservative drivers traded off slower driving times with lower ticket penalties.

  9. A new tool for the search of nuclides with properties suitable for nuclear solid state physics based on the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data Files

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagl, M.A., E-mail: matthias@nagl.eu [II. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August-Universität, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Barbosa, M.B. [IFIMUP and IN-Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Departamento de Física e Astronomia da Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); CERN-EP, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Vetter, U. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August-Universität, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Correia, J.G. [CERN-EP, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); ITN, IST, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Centro de Física Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Professor Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Hofsäss, H.C. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August-Universität, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2013-10-21

    A software tool for the displaying of nuclear decay schemes, the calculation of angular γ emission anisotropies, and the automated search for appropriate decay cascade properties based on the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data Files (ENSDF) was created and published for free download. After a short introduction of this tool, candidate nuclides for time differential perturbed γ–γ angular correlation (TDPAC) measurements are presented. These candidates are grouped according to their parent nuclides’ half-life periods in groups for online, on-site, and off-site measurements. For all candidates angular correlation coefficients (also called anisotropy values) were computed and are shown alongside magnetic and quadrupole moments from the ENSDF database and other sources. An extension of the presented software for the search of nuclides for Mössbauer spectroscopy, Nuclear Resonant Scattering, and other methods is easily possible.

  10. A new tool for the search of nuclides with properties suitable for nuclear solid state physics based on the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data Files

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagl, M. A.; Barbosa, M. B.; Vetter, U.; Correia, J. G.; Hofsäss, H. C.

    2013-10-01

    A software tool for the displaying of nuclear decay schemes, the calculation of angular γ emission anisotropies, and the automated search for appropriate decay cascade properties based on the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data Files (ENSDF) was created and published for free download. After a short introduction of this tool, candidate nuclides for time differential perturbed γ-γ angular correlation (TDPAC) measurements are presented. These candidates are grouped according to their parent nuclides’ half-life periods in groups for online, on-site, and off-site measurements. For all candidates angular correlation coefficients (also called anisotropy values) were computed and are shown alongside magnetic and quadrupole moments from the ENSDF database and other sources. An extension of the presented software for the search of nuclides for Mössbauer spectroscopy, Nuclear Resonant Scattering, and other methods is easily possible.

  11. Investigations into the Structure and Dynamics of Chalcogenide Glasses using High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaseman, Derrick Charles

    Chalcogenide glasses constitute an important class of materials that are sulfides, selenides or tellurides of group IV and/or V elements, namely Ge, As, P and Si with minor concentrations of other elements such as Ga, Sb, In. Because of their infrared transparency that can be tuned by changing chemistry and can be actively altered by exposure to band gap irradiation, chalcogenide glasses find use in passive and active optical devices for applications in the areas of photonics, remote sensing and memory technology. Therefore, it is important to establish predictive models of structure-property relationships for these materials for optimization of their physical properties for various applications. Structural elucidation of chalcogenide glasses is experimentally challenging and in order to make predictive structural models, structural units at both short and intermediate -range length scales must be identified and quantified. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an element-specific structural probe that is uniquely suited for this task, but resolution and sensitivity issues have severely limited the applications of such techniques in the past. The recent development of multi-dimensional solid-state NMR techniques, such as Phase Adjusted Spinning Sidebands (PASS) and Magic Angle Turning (MAT) can potentially alleviate such issues. In this study novel two-dimensional, high-resolution 77Se and 125Te MATPASS NMR spectroscopic techniques are utilized to elucidate quantitatively the compositional evolution of the short- and intermediate- range atomic structure in three binary chalcogenide glass-forming systems, namely: GexSe100-x, AsxSe100-x , and AsxTe100-x. The spectroscopic results provide unambiguous site speciation and quantification for short- and intermediate-range structural motifs present in these glasses. In turn, for all systems, robust structural models and the corresponding structure-property relationships are successfully established as a function

  12. Experimental Evaluation of the Training Structure of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Anne R.; Carr, James E.; LeBlanc, Linda A.

    2012-01-01

    The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is a picture-based alternative communication method that is widely accepted and utilized with individuals with disabilities. Although prior studies have examined the clinical efficacy of PECS, none have experimentally evaluated its manualized training structure. We experimentally evaluated the…

  13. Computed Tomography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance to study the internal structure and measure weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zornoza-Indart, A.; Lopez-Arce, P.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2012-04-01

    Outdoor stone heritage is prone to decay due to its direct exposure to weathering agents such us thermal shock caused by isolation processes, salt crystallization phenomena, atmospheric pollutants effects on stone surfaces, freezing and thawing cycles or biodeterioration o decay provoked by biogenic activity. These damages use to affect the surface of the objects or elements causing de-cohesions (flaking, spallings, grain disintegration), material loss or color changes, but also use to affect the internal structure of the objects, although they are not visible, causing internal pressures, fissures and fractures, mineral transformations or inner biodeterioration compromising objects conservation. For this reason, the study of the internal structure of the objects is necessary to establish its weathering and conservation state, to determine its restoration needs and achieve its conservation. Moreover, in cultural heritage where the originality of the objects and their historical or artistic values are so important the use of non-destructive techniques result necessary for their study without causing any damage by sampling. In this work X ray Computed Tomography (CT) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) are used to analyze rock samples (dolostones used in historical buildings from Central Spain and Madrid both in the city and in the province) subjected to different artificial accelerated ageing tests (thermal shock, salt crystallization, freezing and thawing cycles and marine aerosol) to simulate the most common outdoor heritage deterioration scenarios. The changes in the internal structure and pore system modifications are studied with these non-destructive techniques. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (both imaging and relaxometry) experiments were performed in stone specimens to observe and to quantify the location and distribution of water inside the objects, been able to analyze pore size and location. X ray Computed Tomography was used for visualizing and locating

  14. Synthesis of the Novel MAX Phases for the Future Nuclear Fuel Cladding and Structural Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Seung Hyeok [Kyunghee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Taehee; Lee, Taegyu; Ryu, H. J. [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    With these properties, the MAX phases are expected to be used for the Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) cladding and oxidation/corrosion resistance materials. Especially, the MAX phase can be used for the Gen-IV, SFR and HTGR, component materials which have to possess the thermal and corrosion resistance. The zirconium has been used to the nuclear industry for fuel cladding because of the small thermal neutron cross-section. Zr-based MAX phase was discovered by group Lapauw et al. They observed the Zr{sub 2}AlC and Zr{sub 3}AlC{sub 2} with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and backscattered electron detector. Fabrication of the Zr-containing MAX phase was investigated for nuclear fuel cladding and structural materials applications. A MAX phase with the Zr{sub 3}AlC{sub 2} structure was synthesized by spark plasma sintering of a powder mixture targeting (Zr{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.5}){sub 4}AlC{sub 3}. The formation of MAX phases was confirmed by XRD and EDS of sintered samples. In the future work, the electron probe micro analyzer (EPMA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are required to certain analyze the elements composition and formation of the MAX phase.

  15. Numerical analysis of nuclear power plant structure subjected to aircraft crash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Reza; Alinejad, Majid; Mahdavi, Mir Omid; Sepanloo, Kamran

    2017-12-01

    An aircraft crashing into a nuclear containment may induce a series of disasters related to containment capacity, including local penetration and perforation of the containment, intensive vibrations, and fire ignited after jet fuel leakage. In this study, structural safety of a reinforced concrete containment vessel (RCCV) has been studied against the direct hit of Airbus A320, Boeing 707-320 and Phantom F4 aircrafts. ABAQUS/explicit finite element code has been used to carry out the three-dimensional numerical simulations. The impact locations identified on the nuclear containment structure are mid height of containment, center of the cylindrical portion, junction of dome and cylinder, and over the cylindrical portion close to the foundation level. The loading of the aircraft has been assigned through the corresponding reaction-time response curve. The concrete damaged plasticity model was predicted to simulate the behavior of concrete while the behavior of steel reinforcement was incorporated using elastoplastic material model. Dynamic loading conditions were considered using dynamic increase factor. The mid height of containment and center of cylindrical portion have been found to experience most severe deformation against each aircraft crash. It has also been found that compression damage in concrete is not critical at none of the impact locations.

  16. Nuclear reactor fuel structure containing uranium alloy wires embedded in a metallic matrix plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travelli, A.

    1985-10-25

    A flat or curved plate structure, to be used as fuel in a nuclear reactor, comprises elongated fissionable wires or strips embedded in a metallic continuous non-fissionable matrix plate. The wires or strips are made predominantly of a malleable uranium alloy, such as uranium silicide, uranium gallide or uranium germanide. The matrix plate is made predominantly of aluminum or an aluminum alloy. The wires or strips are located in a single row at the midsurface of the plate, parallel with one another and with the length dimension of the plate. The wires or strips are separated from each other, and from the surface of the plate, by sufficient thicknesses of matrix material, to provide structural integrity and effective fission product retention, under neutron irradiation. This construction makes it safely feasible to provide a high uranium density, so that the uranium enrichment with uranium 235 may be reduced below about 20%, to deter the reprocessing of the uranium for use in nuclear weapons.

  17. Primer on Durability of Nuclear Power Plant Reinforced Concrete Structures - A Review of Pertinent Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a primer on the environmental effects that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant concrete structures. As concrete ages, changes in its properties will occur as a result of continuing microstructural changes (i.e., slow hydration, crystallization of amorphous constituents, and reactions between cement paste and aggregates), as well as environmental influences. These changes do not have to be detrimental to the point that concrete will not be able to meet its performance requirements. Concrete, however, can suffer undesirable changes with time because of improper specifications, a violation of specifications, or adverse performance of its cement paste matrix or aggregate constituents under either physical or chemical attack. Contained in this report is a discussion on concrete durability and the relationship between durability and performance, a review of the historical perspective related to concrete and longevity, a description of the basic materials that comprise reinforced concrete, and information on the environmental factors that can affect the performance of nuclear power plant concrete structures. Commentary is provided on the importance of an aging management program.

  18. Numerical analysis of nuclear power plant structure subjected to aircraft crash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Reza; Alinejad, Majid; Mahdavi, Mir Omid; Sepanloo, Kamran

    2017-10-01

    An aircraft crashing into a nuclear containment may induce a series of disasters related to containment capacity, including local penetration and perforation of the containment, intensive vibrations, and fire ignited after jet fuel leakage. In this study, structural safety of a reinforced concrete containment vessel (RCCV) has been studied against the direct hit of Airbus A320, Boeing 707-320 and Phantom F4 aircrafts. ABAQUS/explicit finite element code has been used to carry out the three-dimensional numerical simulations. The impact locations identified on the nuclear containment structure are mid height of containment, center of the cylindrical portion, junction of dome and cylinder, and over the cylindrical portion close to the foundation level. The loading of the aircraft has been assigned through the corresponding reaction-time response curve. The concrete damaged plasticity model was predicted to simulate the behavior of concrete while the behavior of steel reinforcement was incorporated using elastoplastic material model. Dynamic loading conditions were considered using dynamic increase factor. The mid height of containment and center of cylindrical portion have been found to experience most severe deformation against each aircraft crash. It has also been found that compression damage in concrete is not critical at none of the impact locations.

  19. Natively Unfolded FG Repeats Stabilize the Structure of the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onischenko, Evgeny; Tang, Jeffrey H; Andersen, Kasper R; Knockenhauer, Kevin E; Vallotton, Pascal; Derrer, Carina P; Kralt, Annemarie; Mugler, Christopher F; Chan, Leon Y; Schwartz, Thomas U; Weis, Karsten

    2017-11-02

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are ∼100 MDa transport channels assembled from multiple copies of ∼30 nucleoporins (Nups). One-third of these Nups contain phenylalanine-glycine (FG)-rich repeats, forming a diffusion barrier, which is selectively permeable for nuclear transport receptors that interact with these repeats. Here, we identify an additional function of FG repeats in the structure and biogenesis of the yeast NPC. We demonstrate that GLFG-containing FG repeats directly bind to multiple scaffold Nups in vitro and act as NPC-targeting determinants in vivo. Furthermore, we show that the GLFG repeats of Nup116 function in a redundant manner with Nup188, a nonessential scaffold Nup, to stabilize critical interactions within the NPC scaffold needed for late steps of NPC assembly. Our results reveal a previously unanticipated structural role for natively unfolded GLFG repeats as Velcro to link NPC subcomplexes and thus add a new layer of connections to current models of the NPC architecture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The multi-layered structure of Dps with a novel di-nuclear ferroxidase center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Bin; Tibbelin, Gudrun; Kajino, Tsutomu; Asami, Osamu; Ladenstein, Rudolf

    2003-06-06

    The crystallization of cellular components represents a unique survival strategy for bacterial cells under stressed conditions. A highly ordered, layered structure is often formed in such a process, which may involve one or more than one type of bio-macromolecules. The main advantage of biocrystallization has been attributed to the fact that it is a physical process and thus is independent of energy consumption. Dps is a protein that crystallizes to form a multi-layered structure in starved cells in order to protect DNA against oxidative damage and other detrimental factors. The multi-layered crystal structure of a Dps protein from Bacillus brevis has been revealed for the first time at atomic resolution in the absence of DNA. Inspection of the structure provides the first direct evidence for the existence of a di-nuclear ferroxidase center, which possesses unique features among all the di-iron proteins identified so far. It constitutes the structural basis for the ferroxidase activity of Dps in the crystalline state as well as in solution. This finding proves that the enzymatic process of detoxification of metal ions, which may cause severe oxidative damage to DNA, is the other important aspect of the defense mechanism performed by Dps. In the multi-layered structure, Dps dodecamers are organized in a highly ordered manner. They adopt the classic form of hexagonal packing in each layer of the structure. Such arrangement results in reinforced structural features that would facilitate the attraction and absorption of metal ions from the environment. The highly ordered layered structure may provide an ideal basis for the accommodation of DNA between the layers so that it can be isolated and protected from harmful factors under stress conditions.

  1. Experimental Studies of Premixed Flame Structure and Propagation Characteristics in Compressible Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-14

    low speed flows have focused on premixed flame kernel interactions with isotropic turbulence in shear-free ducts and fan -stirred chambers.7-8,9,10 In...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0181 Experimental Studies of Premixed Flame Structure and Propagation Suresh Menon GEORGIA TECH RESEARCH CORPORATION Final Report...Experimental Studies of Premixed Flame Structure and Propagation Characteristics in Compressible Flow Brad Ochs, Dan Fries, Tom Slais and Nathan Grady Co

  2. Development of an automated fracture assessment system for nuclear structures (appendix 1/1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkola, Timo P. J.; Raiko, Heikki

    1992-10-01

    A program system for fracture assessment of nuclear power plant structures was developed. The system consists of a program for engineering analysis and an automated finite element program system for accurate analysis with solid three dimensional models. The VTTSIF (Technical Research Center of Finland Stress Intensity Factor) program for engineering fracture assessment applies either the weight function method or superposition method in calculating the stress intensity factor. The fatigue crack growth analysis is based on the Paris equation. The generation of a three dimensional finite element model of a cracked structure is automated by the ACR (automatic finite element model generation for part through cracks) program. The finite element analyses are created with commercial programs. The virtual crack extension method is used for fracture parameter evaluation by the VTTVIRT postprocessor program (program for J-integral evaluation using virtual crack extension method). The test cases demonstrated that the accuracy of the system is satisfactory.

  3. Understanding the genetic structure of Symplocos laurina Wall. populations using nuclear gene markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banu, Sofia; Bhagwat, R M; Kadoo, N Y; Lagu, M D; Gupta, V S

    2010-02-01

    To characterize the genetic diversity of present populations of Symplocos laurina, which grow in the montane forests in India, we analyzed the DNA sequences of a nuclear gene. Using the 881 bp sequence of cytosolic Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, we detected 24 haplotypes among 195 individuals sampled from 14 populations. Two dominant haplotypes were distributed over the entire range of this species in India and several private haplotypes were found. Low genetic diversity within population, high differentiation, number of population specific haplotypes and deviation from neutral evolution characterized the present populations of S. laurina. An analysis of molecular variance indicated the presence of geographic structure within the haplotype distribution. The occurrence of S. laurina preglaciation in India is the most parsimonious explanation for the current geographic structure observed. The populations are presumably ancient and might have spread across its extant distribution range in India through a recent range expansion event.

  4. Structure and biochemical characterization of proliferating cellular nuclear antigen from a parasitic protozoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardona-Felix, Cesar S.; Lara-Gonzalez, Samuel; Brieba, Luis G. (LNLS)

    2012-02-08

    Proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a toroidal-shaped protein that is involved in cell-cycle control, DNA replication and DNA repair. Parasitic protozoa are early-diverged eukaryotes that are responsible for neglected diseases. In this work, a PCNA from a parasitic protozoon was identified, cloned and biochemically characterized and its crystal structure was determined. Structural and biochemical studies demonstrate that PCNA from Entamoeba histolytica assembles as a homotrimer that is able to interact with and stimulate the activity of a PCNA-interacting peptide-motif protein from E. histolytica, EhDNAligI. The data indicate a conservation of the biochemical mechanisms of PCNA-mediated interactions between metazoa, yeast and parasitic protozoa.

  5. Experimental Detection and Quantification of Structural Nonlinearity Using Homogeneity and Hilbert Transform Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Knud Abildgaard; Thomsen, Jon Juel; Tcherniak, Dmitri

    2010-01-01

    exists. The present study suggests a framework for the detection of structural nonlinearities. Two methods for detection are compared, the homogeneity method and a Hilbert transform based method. Based on these two methods, a nonlinearity index is suggested. Through simulations and laboratory experiments......All real structures are inherently nonlinear. Whether a structure exhibits linear or nonlinear behavior, depends mainly on the excitation level. So far no unequivocal framework for experimental detection, localization, and characterization of structural nonlinearities from dynamic measurements...

  6. Crystal structure of the shrimp proliferating cell nuclear antigen: structural complementarity with WSSV DNA polymerase PIP-box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Miranda, Jesus S; Lopez-Zavala, Alonso A; Arvizu-Flores, Aldo A; Garcia-Orozco, Karina D; Stojanoff, Vivian; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Brieba, Luis G; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication requires processivity factors that allow replicative DNA polymerases to extend long stretches of DNA. Some DNA viruses encode their own replicative DNA polymerase, such as the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) that infects decapod crustaceans but still require host replication accessory factors. We have determined by X-ray diffraction the three-dimensional structure of the Pacific white leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (LvPCNA). This protein is a member of the sliding clamp family of proteins, that binds DNA replication and DNA repair proteins through a motif called PIP-box (PCNA-Interacting Protein). The crystal structure of LvPCNA was refined to a resolution of 3 Å, and allowed us to determine the trimeric protein assembly and details of the interactions between PCNA and the DNA. To address the possible interaction between LvPCNA and the viral DNA polymerase, we docked a theoretical model of a PIP-box peptide from the WSSV DNA polymerase within LvPCNA crystal structure. The theoretical model depicts a feasible model of interaction between both proteins. The crystal structure of shrimp PCNA allows us to further understand the mechanisms of DNA replication processivity factors in non-model systems.

  7. Crystal structure of the shrimp proliferating cell nuclear antigen: structural complementarity with WSSV DNA polymerase PIP-box.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus S Carrasco-Miranda

    Full Text Available DNA replication requires processivity factors that allow replicative DNA polymerases to extend long stretches of DNA. Some DNA viruses encode their own replicative DNA polymerase, such as the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV that infects decapod crustaceans but still require host replication accessory factors. We have determined by X-ray diffraction the three-dimensional structure of the Pacific white leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (LvPCNA. This protein is a member of the sliding clamp family of proteins, that binds DNA replication and DNA repair proteins through a motif called PIP-box (PCNA-Interacting Protein. The crystal structure of LvPCNA was refined to a resolution of 3 Å, and allowed us to determine the trimeric protein assembly and details of the interactions between PCNA and the DNA. To address the possible interaction between LvPCNA and the viral DNA polymerase, we docked a theoretical model of a PIP-box peptide from the WSSV DNA polymerase within LvPCNA crystal structure. The theoretical model depicts a feasible model of interaction between both proteins. The crystal structure of shrimp PCNA allows us to further understand the mechanisms of DNA replication processivity factors in non-model systems.

  8. Potentiality of Using Vertical and Three-Dimensional Isolation Systems in Nuclear Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguang Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the horizontal component of an earthquake response can be significantly reduced through the use of conventional seismic isolators, the vertical component of excitation is still transmitted directly into the structure. Records from instrumented structures, and some recent tests and analyses have actually seen increases in vertical responses in base isolated structures under the combined effects of horizontal and vertical ground motions. This issue becomes a great concern to facilities such as a Nuclear Power Plants (NPP, with specialized equipment and machinery that is not only expensive, but critical to safe operation. As such, there is considerable interest worldwide in vertical and three-dimensional (3D isolation systems. This paper examines several vertical and 3D isolation systems that have been proposed and their potential application to modern nuclear facilities. In particular, a series of case study analyses of a modern NPP model are performed to examine the benefits and challenges associated with 3D isolation compared with horizontal isolation. It was found that compared with the general horizontal isolators, isolators that have vertical frequencies of no more than 3 Hz can effectively reduce the vertical in-structure responses for the studied NPP model. Among the studied cases, the case that has a vertical isolation frequency of 3 Hz is the one that can keep the horizontal period of the isolators as the first period while having the most flexible vertical isolator properties. When the vertical frequency of isolators reduces to 1 Hz, the rocking effect is obvious and rocking restraining devices are necessary.

  9. Numerical simulation and experimental study on Resonant Acoustic Chambers-For novel, high-efficiency nuclear particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jing; Archambault, Brian [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Xu, Yiban [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA, 16066 (United States); Taleyarkhan, Rusi P., E-mail: rusi@purdue.ed [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Acoustic-structural-electromagnetic coupled models have been successfully set up for Resonant Acoustic Chambers (RACs). RACs have important applications in several areas such as radiation detection, sonoluminescence and sonofusion. The goal of this undertaking was able to simulate transient acoustically driven metastable states and structural responses so that the designs of RACs can be optimized for advanced applications. The simulation predictions have been benchmarked with experimental data in two designs of RACs, Open Chamber System (OCS) and Closed Chamber System (CCS). A framework was developed for benchmarking and validating the predicted resonant frequency and oscillatory pressure mapping profiles with and without scattering centers. Experiments were conducted with and without external neutron-induced cavitation bubble clusters. Comparison of measurements versus experimental data demonstrated the applicability of the modeling-cum-simulation framework. Studies have provided insights into the significant and complex influences of fluid-structure-electromagnetic coupling and on the influence of scattering center inclusions on the system's acoustic responses. The framework appears reasonable for design of advanced, high-powered RACs; however, significant technical challenges remain with respect to capturing the overall system performance upon evolution and transport of transient bubble clusters.

  10. Equilibration of experimentally determined protein structures for molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Emily B; Vanvliet, Krystyn J

    2006-12-01

    Preceding molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecular interactions, the molecule of interest is often equilibrated with respect to an initial configuration. This so-called equilibration stage is required because the input structure is typically not within the equilibrium phase space of the simulation conditions, particularly in systems as complex as proteins, which can lead to artifactual trajectories of protein dynamics. The time at which nonequilibrium effects from the initial configuration are minimized-what we will call the equilibration time-marks the beginning of equilibrium phase-space exploration. Note that the identification of this time does not imply exploration of the entire equilibrium phase space. We have found that current equilibration methodologies contain ambiguities that lead to uncertainty in determining the end of the equilibration stage of the trajectory. This results in equilibration times that are either too long, resulting in wasted computational resources, or too short, resulting in the simulation of molecular trajectories that do not accurately represent the physical system. We outline and demonstrate a protocol for identifying the equilibration time that is based on the physical model of Normal Mode Analysis. We attain the computational efficiency required of large-protein simulations via a stretched exponential approximation that enables an analytically tractable and physically meaningful form of the root-mean-square deviation of atoms comprising the protein. We find that the fitting parameters (which correspond to physical properties of the protein) fluctuate initially but then stabilize for increased simulation time, independently of the simulation duration or sampling frequency. We define the end of the equilibration stage--and thus the equilibration time--as the point in the simulation when these parameters attain constant values. Compared to existing methods, our approach provides the objective identification of the time at

  11. Structures of peptide families by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and distance geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pease, J.H.

    1989-12-01

    The three dimensional structures of several small peptides were determined using a combination of {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and distance geometry calculations. These techniques were found to be particularly helpful for analyzing structural differences between related peptides since all of the peptides' {sup 1}H NMR spectra are very similar. The structures of peptides from two separate classes are presented. Peptides in the first class are related to apamin, an 18 amino acid peptide toxin from honey bee venom. The {sup 1}H NMR assignments and secondary structure determination of apamin were done previously. Quantitative NMR measurements and distance geometry calculations were done to calculate apamin's three dimensional structure. Peptides in the second class are 48 amino acid toxins from the sea anemone Radianthus paumotensis. The {sup 1}H NMR assignments of toxin II were done previously. The {sup 1}H NMR assignments of toxin III and the distance geometry calculations for both peptides are presented.

  12. On the importance of nuclear quantum motions in near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy of molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Craig P.; Uejio, Janel S.; Saykally, Richard J.; Prendergast, David

    2009-02-26

    We report the effects of sampling nuclear quantum motion with path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) on calculations of the nitrogen K-edge spectra of two isolated organic molecules. S-triazine, a prototypical aromatic molecule occupying primarily its vibrational ground state at room temperature, exhibits substantially improved spectral agreement when nuclear quantum effects are included via PIMD, as compared to the spectra obtained from either a single fixed-nuclei based calculation or from a series of configurations extracted from a classical molecular dynamics trajectory. Nuclear quantum dynamics can accurately explain the intrinsic broadening of certain features. Glycine, the simplest amino acid, is problematic due to large spectral variations associated with multiple energetically accessible conformations at the experimental temperature. This work highlights the sensitivity of NEXAFS to quantum nuclear motions in molecules, and the necessity of accurately sampling such quantum motion when simulating their NEXAFS spectra.

  13. Zirconium and Yttrium (p, d) Surrogate Nuclear Reactions: Measurement and determination of gamma-ray probabilities: Experimental Physics Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, J. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hughes, R. O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Escher, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Scielzo, N. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Casperson, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ressler, J. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Saastamoinen, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ota, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ross, T. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McCleskey, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McCleskey, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Austin, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rapisarda, G. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-21

    This technical report documents the surrogate reaction method and experimental results used to determine the desired neutron induced cross sections of 87Y(n,g) and the known 90Zr(n,g) cross section. This experiment was performed at the STARLiTeR apparatus located at Texas A&M Cyclotron Institute using the K150 Cyclotron which produced a 28.56 MeV proton beam. The proton beam impinged on Y and Zr targets to produce the nuclear reactions 89Y(p,d)88Y and 92Zr(p,d)91Zr. Both particle singles data and particle-gamma ray coincident data were measured during the experiment. This data was used to determine the γ-ray probability as a function of energy for these reactions. The results for the γ-ray probabilities as a function of energy for both these nuclei are documented here. For completeness, extensive tabulated and graphical results are provided in the appendices.

  14. Publication of nuclear magnetic resonance experimental data with semantic web technology and the application thereof to biomedical research of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokochi, Masashi; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Ulrich, Eldon L; Kinjo, Akira R; Iwata, Takeshi; Ioannidis, Yannis E; Livny, Miron; Markley, John L; Nakamura, Haruki; Kojima, Chojiro; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2016-05-05

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic data for biological macromolecules archived at the BioMagResBank (BMRB) provide a rich resource of biophysical information at atomic resolution. The NMR data archived in NMR-STAR ASCII format have been implemented in a relational database. However, it is still fairly difficult for users to retrieve data from the NMR-STAR files or the relational database in association with data from other biological databases. To enhance the interoperability of the BMRB database, we present a full conversion of BMRB entries to two standard structured data formats, XML and RDF, as common open representations of the NMR-STAR data. Moreover, a SPARQL endpoint has been deployed. The described case study demonstrates that a simple query of the SPARQL endpoints of the BMRB, UniProt, and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), can be used in NMR and structure-based analysis of proteins combined with information of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and their phenotypes. We have developed BMRB/XML and BMRB/RDF and demonstrate their use in performing a federated SPARQL query linking the BMRB to other databases through standard semantic web technologies. This will facilitate data exchange across diverse information resources.

  15. Computational and experimental study of probability of galloping and torsional divergence at span structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedosova Anastasia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers study of aeroeslatic stability of span structure using computational and experimental modelling of aerodynamics by wind-tunnel tests and numerical simulation at software package ANSYS CFX. Wind-tunnel test were conducted to to determine steady state wind load coefficients for zero wind attack angle. Using numerical simulation aerodynamic coefficients were obtained for different wind attack angles from −5 to 5 degree with verification to experimental data at zero wind attack angle. Using this approach of combination the accuracy of experimental studies and the convenience of numerical simulation the problems of forecasting phenomena such as galloping and torsion torsional divergence at span structures were solved.

  16. A Neutron Diffraction Study of the Nuclear and Magnetic Structure of MnNb2O6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Oliver Vindex; Lebech, Bente; Krebs Larsen, F.

    1976-01-01

    A neutron diffraction study was made of the nuclear and the magnetic structure of MnNb2O6 single crystals. The thirteen nuclear parameters (space group Pbcn) were determined from 304 reflections at room temperature. The antiferromagnetic structure (Neel temperature=4.4K), determined at 1.2K......, is a superposition of G- and A-type structures of the form 0.90 Gx+0.34 Gy+0.28 Az. The corresponding magnetic space group is P2'1/c....

  17. Structural determination of importin alpha in complex with beak and feather disease virus capsid nuclear localization signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Edward I. [Charles Sturt University, School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (NSW Department of Primary Industries and Charles Sturt University), Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); Dombrovski, Andrew K. [Charles Sturt University, School of Biomedical Sciences, Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); Swarbrick, Crystall M.D. [Charles Sturt University, School of Biomedical Sciences, Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (NSW Department of Primary Industries and Charles Sturt University), Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); Raidal, Shane R. [Charles Sturt University, School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (NSW Department of Primary Industries and Charles Sturt University), Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); Forwood, Jade K., E-mail: jforwood@csu.edu.au [Charles Sturt University, School of Biomedical Sciences, Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia); EH Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (NSW Department of Primary Industries and Charles Sturt University), Boorooma St., Wagga Wagga, New South Wales 2678 (Australia)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Circovirus capsid proteins contain large nuclear localization signals (NLS). •A method of nuclear import has not been elucidated. •Beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) capsid NLS was crystallized with importin α. •The structure showed BFDV NLS binding to the major site of importin α. •Result shows implications for mechanism of nuclear transport for all circoviruses. -- Abstract: Circoviruses represent a rapidly increasing genus of viruses that infect a variety of vertebrates. Replication requires shuttling viral molecules into the host cell nucleus, a process facilitated by capsid-associated protein (Cap). Whilst a nuclear localization signal (NLS) has been shown to mediate nuclear translocation, the mode of nuclear transport remains to be elucidated. To better understand this process, beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) Cap NLS was crystallized with nuclear import receptor importin-α (Impα). Diffraction yielded structural data to 2.9 Å resolution, and the binding site on both Impα and BFDV Cap NLS were well resolved. The binding mechanism for the major site is likely conserved across circoviruses as supported by the similarity of NLSs in circovirus Caps. This finding illuminates a crucial step for infection of host cells by this viral family, and provides a platform for rational drug design against the binding interface.

  18. Genetic structure of Populus hybrid zone along the Irtysh River provides insight into plastid-nuclear incompatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yan-Fei; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Duan, Ai-Guo; Abuduhamiti, Bawerjan

    2016-01-01

    In plants, the maintenance of species integrity despite hybridization has often been explained by the co-adaption of nuclear gene complexes. However, the interaction between plastid and nuclear sub-genomes has been underestimated. Here, we analyzed the genetic structure of a Populus alba and P. tremula hybrid zone along the Irtysh River system in the Altai region, northwest China, using both nuclear microsatellites and plastid DNA sequences. We found high interspecific differentiation, although the hybrid P. × canescens was prevalent. Bayesian inference classified most hybrids into F1, followed by a few back-crosses to P. alba, and fewer F2 hybrids and back-crosses to P. tremula, indicating a few introgressions but preference toward P. alba. When plastid haplotypes in parental species were distinct, P. × canescens carried the haplotypes of both parents, but showed significant linkage between intraspecific haplotype and nuclear genotypes at several microsatellite loci. Selection, rather than migration and assortative mating, might have contributed to such plastid-nuclear disequilibria. By removing later-generated hybrids carrying interspecific combinations of haplotype and nuclear genotypes, plastid-nuclear incompatibility has greatly limited the gene exchange between P. alba and P. tremula via backcrossing with hybrids, demonstrating a significant association between plastid haplotype and the proportion of nuclear admixture. PMID:27306416

  19. Mutations causing Greenberg dysplasia but not Pelger anomaly uncouple enzymatic from structural functions of a nuclear membrane protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Clayton, P; Fischer, B; Mann, A.; Mansour, S.; Rossier, E; Van der Veen, M.; C. Lang; Baasanjav, S.; Kieslich, M.; Brossuleit, K.; Gravemann, S; Schnipper, N.; Karbasyian, M.; Demuth, I.; Zwerger, M.

    2010-01-01

    The lamin B receptor (LBR) is an inner nuclear membrane protein with a structural function interacting with chromatin and lamins, and an enzymatic function as a sterol reductase. Heterozygous LBR mutations cause nuclear hyposegmentation in neutrophils (Pelger anomaly), while homozygous mutations cause prenatal death with skeletal defects and abnormal sterol metabolism (Greenberg dysplasia). It has remained unclear whether the lethality in Greenberg dysplasia is due to cholesterol defects or a...

  20. Nuclear spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ajzenberg-Selove, Fay

    1960-01-01

    Nuclear Spectroscopy, Part B focuses on the ways in which experimental data may be analyzed to furnish information about nuclear parameters and nuclear models in terms of which the data are interpreted.This book discusses the elastic and inelastic potential scattering amplitudes, role of beta decay in nuclear physics, and general selection rules for electromagnetic transitions. The nuclear shell model, fundamental coupling procedure, vibrational spectra, and empirical determination of the complex potential are also covered. This publication is suitable for graduate students preparing for exper

  1. A NEW METHOD FOR EXTRACTING SPIN-DEPENDENT NEUTRON STRUCTURE FUNCTIONS FROM NUCLEAR DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Y.F.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2009-01-01

    High-energy electrons are currently the best probes of the internal structure of nucleons (protons and neutrons). By collecting data on electrons scattering off light nuclei, such as deuterium and helium, one can extract structure functions (SFs), which encode information about the quarks that make up the nucleon. Spin-dependent SFs, which depend on the relative polarization of the electron beam and the target nucleus, encode quark spins. Proton SFs can be measured directly from electron-proton scattering, but those of the neutron must be extracted from proton data and deuterium or helium-3 data because free neutron targets do not exist. At present, there is no reliable method for accurately determining spin-dependent neutron SFs in the low-momentum-transfer regime, where nucleon resonances are prominent and the functions are not smooth. The focus of this study was to develop a new method for extracting spin-dependent neutron SFs from nuclear data. An approximate convolution formula for nuclear SFs reduces the problem to an integral equation, for which a recursive solution method was designed. The method was then applied to recent data from proton and deuterium scattering experiments to perform a preliminary extraction of spin-dependent neutron SFs in the resonance region. The extraction method was found to reliably converge for arbitrary test functions, and the validity of the extraction from data was verifi ed using a Bjorken integral, which relates integrals of SFs to a known quantity. This new information on neutron structure could be used to assess quark-hadron duality for the neutron, which requires detailed knowledge of SFs in all kinematic regimes.

  2. Methods of experimental physics

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Dudley

    1962-01-01

    Methods of Experimental Physics, Volume 3: Molecular Physics focuses on molecular theory, spectroscopy, resonance, molecular beams, and electric and thermodynamic properties. The manuscript first considers the origins of molecular theory, molecular physics, and molecular spectroscopy, as well as microwave spectroscopy, electronic spectra, and Raman effect. The text then ponders on diffraction methods of molecular structure determination and resonance studies. Topics include techniques of electron, neutron, and x-ray diffraction and nuclear magnetic, nuclear quadropole, and electron spin reson

  3. The nuclear activity and central structure of the elliptical galaxy NGC 5322

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dullo, Bililign T.; Knapen, Johan H.; Williams, David R. A.; Beswick, Robert J.; Bendo, George; Baldi, Ranieri D.; Argo, Megan; McHardy, Ian M.; Muxlow, Tom; Westcott, J.

    2018-01-01

    We have analysed a new high-resolution e-MERLIN 1.5 GHz radio continuum map together with HST and SDSS imaging of NGC 5322, an elliptical galaxy hosting radio jets, aiming to understand the galaxy's central structure and its connection to the nuclear activity. We decomposed the composite HST + SDSS surface brightness profile of the galaxy into an inner stellar disc, a spheroid, and an outer stellar halo. Past works showed that this embedded disc counter-rotates rapidly with respect to the spheroid. The HST images reveal an edge-on nuclear dust disc across the centre, aligned along the major-axis of the galaxy and nearly perpendicular to the radio jets. After careful masking of this dust disc, we find a central stellar mass deficit Mdef in the spheroid, scoured by SMBH binaries with final mass MBH such that Mdef/MBH ˜ 1.3 - 3.4. We propose a three-phase formation scenario for NGC 5322 where a few (2 - 7) `dry' major mergers involving SMBHs built the spheroid with a depleted core. The cannibalism of a gas-rich satellite subsequently creates the faint counter-rotating disc and funnels gaseous material directly onto the AGN, powering the radio core with a brightness temperature of TB, core ˜ 4.5 × 107 K and the low-power radio jets (Pjets ˜ 7.04 × 1020 W Hz-1) which extend ˜1.6 kpc. The outer halo can later grow via minor mergers and the accretion of tidal debris. The low-luminosity AGN/jet-driven feedback may have quenched the late-time nuclear star formation promptly, which could otherwise have replenished the depleted core.

  4. RATU2. The Finnish research programme on the structural integrity of nuclear power plants. Interim report 1995 - April 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solin, J.; Sarkimo, M.; Asikainen, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Materials and Structural Integrity] [eds.

    1997-06-01

    The projects within the Finnish public funded research programme on the structural integrity of nuclear power plants (RATU2) are briefly introduced and the scientific and technical results obtained during the first two years, 1995-April 1997, are summarised in this report. The RATU2 programme was started in 1995 and will be continued until 1998. In 1996 this programme represented 6 % of the nuclear energy R and D in Finland. The research programme is mainly publicly funded and supplies impartial expertise for the regulation of nuclear energy. It also plays an important role in the education of new experts, technology transfer and international exchange of scientific results. The programme is organised into five research projects on the following topics: Material degradation in the reactor environment, Reliability of nondestructive inspections of nuclear power plants, Structural analyses for nuclear power plant components, Maintenance strategies and dependability, and Fire safety. The ageing of the structures and components in the Finnish nuclear power plants is one of the main issues to be considered when safety and economic operation of the plants is evaluated. At the same time, ways are being sought to extend the lifetime of components. The first half of the RATU2 research programme has already brought significant scientific findings and useful applications for ensuring the reliability of NPP components. New technology has been transferred to domestic use through active participation to international co-operation. On the other hand, international acceptance of the results has provided valuable feedback and benchmarking. (orig.). 112 refs.

  5. Electronic structure of copper phthalocyanine : An experimental and theoretical study of occupied and unoccupied levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evangelista, Fabrizio; Carravetta, Vincenzo; Stefani, Giovanni; Jansik, Branislav; Alagia, Michele; Stranges, Stefano; Ruocco, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of the electronic structure of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecule is presented. We performed x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and photoabsorption [x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES)] gas phase experiments and we compared the results with

  6. Nuclear structure study of two-neutron halo nucleus 19B in microscopic cluster model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Fitri Hakeem M.; Lee, Chun Hao; Radiman, Shahidan; Khoo, Kok Siong

    2017-04-01

    The structure nucleus 19B is investigated in the Microscopic Cluster Model, using three-body model 17B+n+n. This model is used to investigate neutron halo features such as binding energy of neutron valence, root-mean-square (rms) of radius and core deformation. All the features are studied in configuration-T and -Y. In this study, theoretical framework is used in the MATLAB software to run the computational calculations. The results are compared with the experimental data.

  7. Crystal structure of an archaeal DNA sliding clamp: proliferating cell nuclear antigen from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumiya, S; Ishino, Y; Morikawa, K

    2001-01-01

    The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is now recognized as one of the key proteins in DNA metabolic events because of its direct interactions with many proteins involved in important cellular processes. We have determined the crystal structure of PCNA from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus (pfuPCNA), at 2.1 A resolution. pfuPCNA forms a toroidal, ring-shaped structure consisting of homotrimeric molecules, which is also observed in the PCNA crystals from human and yeast. The overall structure of pfuPCNA is highly conserved with other PCNA proteins, as well as with the bacterial ss clamp and the bacteriophage gp45. This result shows that the three-dimensional structure of the sliding clamp is conserved in the three domains of life. pfuPCNA has two remarkable features compared with the human and yeast PCNA molecules: it has more ion pairs and fewer intermolecular main chain hydrogen bonds. The former may contribute to the thermal stability of pfuPCNA, and the latter may be the cause of the stimulatory effect of pfuPCNA on the DNA synthesizing activity of P. furiosus DNA polymerases in the absence of the clamp loader replication factor C in vitro.

  8. Jacking mechanism for upper internals structure of a liquid metal nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, James E.; Wineman, Arthur L.

    1984-01-01

    A jacking mechanism for raising the upper internals structure of a liquid metal nuclear reactor which jacking mechanism uses a system of gears and drive shafts to transmit force from a single motor to four mechanically synchronized ball jacks to raise and lower support columns which support the upper internals structure. The support columns have a pin structure which rides up and down in a slot in a housing fixed to the reactor head. The pin has two locking plates which can be rotated around the pin to bring bolt holes through the locking plates into alignment with a set of bolt holes in the housing, there being a set of such housing bolt holes corresponding to both a raised and a lowered position of the support column. When the locking plate is so aligned, a surface of the locking plate mates with a surface in the housing such that the support column is then supported by the locking plate and not by the ball jacks. Since the locking plates are to be installed and bolted to the housing during periods of reactor operation, the ball jacks need not be sized to react the large forces which occur or potentially could occur on the upper internals structure of the reactor during operation. The locking plates react these loads. The ball jacks, used only during refueling, can be smaller, which enable conventionally available equipment to fulfill the precision requirements for the task within available space.

  9. Nuclear receptor engineering based on novel structure activity relationships revealed by farnesyl pyrophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyanka, Ritu; Das, Sharmistha; Samuels, Herbert H; Cardozo, Timothy

    2010-11-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) comprise the second largest protein family targeted by currently available drugs, acting via specific ligand interactions within the ligand binding domain (LBD). Recently, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) was shown to be a unique promiscuous NR ligand, activating a subset of NR family members and inhibiting wound healing in skin. The current study aimed at visualizing the unique basis of FPP interaction with multiple receptors in order to identify general structure-activity relationships that operate across the NR family. Docking of FPP to the 3D structures of the LBDs of a diverse set of NRs consistently revealed an electrostatic FPP pyrophosphate contact with an NR arginine conserved in the NR family, a hydrophobic farnesyl contact with NR helix-12 and a ligand binding pocket volume between 300 and 430 Å(3) as the minimal requirements for FPP activation of any NR. Lack of any of these structural features appears to render a given NR resistant to FPP activation. We used these structure-activity relationships to rationally design and successfully engineer several mutant human estrogen receptors that retain responsiveness to estradiol but no longer respond to FPP.

  10. Nuclear structure beyond the neutron drip line: The lowest energy states in 9He via their T=5/2 isobaric analogs in 9Li

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Uberseder

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The level structure of the very neutron rich and unbound 9He nucleus has been the subject of significant experimental and theoretical study. Many recent works have claimed that the two lowest energy 9He states exist with spins Jπ=1/2+ and Jπ=1/2− and widths on the order of 100–200 keV. These findings cannot be reconciled with our contemporary understanding of nuclear structure. The present work is the first high-resolution study with low statistical uncertainty of the relevant excitation energy range in the 8He+n system, performed via a search for the T=5/2 isobaric analog states in 9Li populated through 8He+p elastic scattering. The present data show no indication of any narrow structures. Instead, we find evidence for a broad Jπ=1/2+ state in 9He located approximately 3 MeV above the neutron decay threshold.

  11. Experimental investigation on single-phase pressure losses in nuclear debris beds: Identification of flow regimes and effective diameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clavier, R., E-mail: remi.clavier@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) – PSN-RES/SEREX/LE2M, Cadarache bât. 327, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Chikhi, N., E-mail: nourdine.chikhi@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) – PSN-RES/SEREX/LE2M, Cadarache bât. 327, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Fichot, F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) – PSN-RES/SAG/LEPC, Cadarache bât. 700, 13115 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Quintard, M. [Université de Toulouse – INPT – UPS – Institut de Mécanique des Fluides de Toulouse (IMFT), Allée Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS – IMFT, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Single-phase pressure drops versus flow rates in particle beds are measured. • Conditions are representative of the reflooding of a nuclear fuel debris bed. • Darcy, weak inertial, strong inertial and weak turbulent regimes are observed. • A Darcy–Forchheimer law is found to be a good approximation in this domain. • A predictive correlation is derived from new experimental data. - Abstract: During a severe nuclear power plant accident, the degradation of the reactor core can lead to the formation of debris beds. The main accident management procedure consists in injecting water inside the reactor vessel. Nevertheless, large uncertainties remain regarding the coolability of such debris beds. Motivated by the reduction of these uncertainties, experiments have been conducted on the CALIDE facility in order to investigate single-phase pressure losses in representative debris beds. In this paper, these results are presented and analyzed in order to identify a simple single-phase flow pressure loss correlation for debris-bed-like particle beds in reflooding conditions, which cover Darcean to Weakly Turbulent flow regimes. The first part of this work is dedicated to study macro-scale pressure losses generated by debris-bed-like particle beds, i.e., high sphericity (>80%) particle beds with relatively small size dispersion (from 1 mm to 10 mm). A Darcy–Forchheimer law, involving the sum of a linear term and a quadratic deviation, with respect to filtration velocity, has been found to be relevant to describe this behavior in Darcy, Strong Inertial and Weak Turbulent regimes. It has also been observed that, in a restricted domain (Re = 15 to Re = 30) between Darcy and Weak Inertial regimes, deviation is better described by a cubic term, which corresponds to the so-called Weak Inertial regime. The second part of this work aims at identifying expressions for coefficients of linear and quadratic terms in Darcy–Forchheimer law, in order to obtain a

  12. Safety apparatus for nuclear reactor to prevent structural damage from overheating by core debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, J.D.; Cassulo, J.C.; Pedersen, D.R.; Baker, L. Jr.

    The invention teaches safety apparatus that can be included in a nuclear reactor, either when newly fabricated or as a retrofit add-on, that will minimize proliferation of structural damage to the reactor in the event the reactor is experiencing an overheating malfunction whereby radioactive nuclear debris might break away from and can be discharged from the reactor core. The invention provides a porous bed of sublayer on the lower surface of the reactor containment vessel so that the debris falls on and piles up on the bed. Vapor release elements upstand from the bed in some laterally spaced array. Thus should the high heat flux of the debris interior vaporize the coolant at that location, the vaporized coolant can be vented downwardly to and laterally through the bed to the vapor release elements and in turn via the release elements upwardly through the debris. This minimizes the pressure buildup in the debris and allows for continuing infiltration of the liquid coolant into the debris interior.

  13. Deciphering the Structure and Function of Nuclear Pores Using Single-Molecule Fluorescence Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Siegfried M; Grünwald, David

    2016-05-22

    Due to its central role in macromolecular trafficking and nucleocytoplasmic information transfer, the nuclear pore complex (NPC) has been studied in great detail using a wide spectrum of methods. Consequently, many aspects of its architecture, general function, and role in the life cycle of a cell are well understood. Over the last decade, fluorescence microscopy methods have enabled the real-time visualization of single molecules interacting with and transiting through the NPC, allowing novel questions to be examined with nanometer precision. While initial single-molecule studies focused primarily on import pathways using permeabilized cells, it has recently proven feasible to investigate the export of mRNAs in living cells. Single-molecule assays can address questions that are difficult or impossible to answer by other means, yet the complexity of nucleocytoplasmic transport requires that interpretation be based on a firm genetic, biochemical, and structural foundation. Moreover, conceptually simple single-molecule experiments remain technically challenging, particularly with regard to signal intensity, signal-to-noise ratio, and the analysis of noise, stochasticity, and precision. We discuss nuclear transport issues recently addressed by single-molecule microscopy, evaluate the limits of existing assays and data, and identify open questions for future studies. We expect that single-molecule fluorescence approaches will continue to be applied to outstanding nucleocytoplasmic transport questions, and that the approaches developed for NPC studies are extendable to additional complex systems and pathways within cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Di-nucleon structures in homogeneous nuclear matter based on two- and three-nucleon interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arellano, Hugo F. [University of Chile, Department of Physics - FCFM, Santiago (Chile); CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); Isaule, Felipe [University of Chile, Department of Physics - FCFM, Santiago (Chile); Rios, Arnau [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    We investigate homogeneous nuclear matter within the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (BHF) approach in the limits of isospin-symmetric nuclear matter (SNM) as well as pure neutron matter at zero temperature. The study is based on realistic representations of the internucleon interaction as given by Argonne v{sub 18}, Paris, Nijmegen I and II potentials, in addition to chiral N{sup 3}LO interactions, including three-nucleon forces up to N{sup 2}LO. Particular attention is paid to the presence of di-nucleon bound states structures in {sup 1}S{sub 0} and {sup 3}SD{sub 1} channels, whose explicit account becomes crucial for the stability of self-consistent solutions at low densities. A characterization of these solutions and associated bound states is discussed. We confirm that coexisting BHF single-particle solutions in SNM, at Fermi momenta in the range 0.13-0.3 fm{sup -1}, is a robust feature under the choice of realistic internucleon potentials. (orig.)

  15. FY2017 Final Report: Power of the People: A technical ethical and experimental examination of the use of crowdsourcing to support international nuclear safeguards verification.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastelum, Zoe Nellie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sentz, Kari [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Swanson, Meili Claire [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rinaudo, Cristina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Recent advances in information technology have led to an expansion of crowdsourcing activities that utilize the “power of the people” harnessed via online games, communities of interest, and other platforms to collect, analyze, verify, and provide technological solutions for challenges from a multitude of domains. To related this surge in popularity, the research team developed a taxonomy of crowdsourcing activities as they relate to international nuclear safeguards, evaluated the potential legal and ethical issues surrounding the use of crowdsourcing to support safeguards, and proposed experimental designs to test the capabilities and prospect for the use of crowdsourcing to support nuclear safeguards verification.

  16. Overview of activities in the U.S. related to continued service of nuclear power plant concrete structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naus D.J.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Safety-related nuclear power plant concrete structures are described and commentary on continued service assessments of these structures is provided. In-service inspection and testing requirements in the U.S. are summarized. The license renewal process in the U.S. is outlined and its current status noted. A summary of operating experience related to U.S. nuclear power plant concrete structures is presented. Several candidate areas are identified where additional research would be of benefit to aging management of NPP concrete structures. Finally current ORNL activities related to aging-management of concrete structures are outlined: development of operating experience database, application of structural reliability theory, and compilation of elevated temperature concrete material property data and information.

  17. Stability of Complex Biomolecular Structures: Vander Waals, Hydrogen Bond Cooperativity, and Nuclear Quantum Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Mariana; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    Biomolecules are complex systems stabilized by a delicate balance of weak interactions, making it important to assess all energetic contributions in an accurate manner. However, it is a priori unclear which contributions make more of an impact. Here, we examine stacked polyglutamine (polyQ) strands, a peptide repeat often found in amyloid aggregates. We investigate the role of hydrogen bond (HB) cooperativity, van der Waals (vdW) dispersion interactions, and quantum contributions to free energies, including anharmonicities through density functional theory and ab initio path integral simulations. Of these various factors, we find that the largest impact on structural stabilization comes from vdW interactions. HB cooperativity is the second largest contribution as the size of the stacked chain grows. Competing nuclear quantum effects make the net quantum contribution small but very sensitive to anharmonicities, vdW, and the number of HBs. Our results suggest that a reliable treatment of these systems can only ...

  18. Surface Binding of TOTAPOL Assists Structural Investigations of Amyloid Fibrils by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Madhu; Franks, Trent W; Saeidpour, Siavash; Schubeis, Tobias; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Ritter, Christiane; van Rossum, Barth-Jan

    2016-07-15

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR can enhance sensitivity but often comes at the price of a substantial loss of resolution. Two major factors affect spectral quality: low-temperature heterogeneous line broadening and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) effects. Investigations by NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and EPR revealed a new substantial affinity of TOTAPOL to amyloid surfaces, very similar to that shown by the fluorescent dye thioflavin-T (ThT). As a consequence, DNP spectra with remarkably good resolution and still reasonable enhancement could be obtained at very low TOTAPOL concentrations, typically 400 times lower than commonly employed. These spectra yielded several long-range constraints that were difficult to obtain without DNP. Our findings open up new strategies for structural studies with DNP NMR spectroscopy on amyloids that can bind the biradical with affinity similar to that shown towards ThT. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Regulation of HIV-1 latency by chromatin structure and nuclear architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusic, Marina; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-02-13

    Current antiretroviral therapies fail to cure HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type 1) infection because HIV-1 persists as a transcriptionally inactive provirus in resting memory CD4(+) T cells. Multiple molecular events are known to regulate HIV-1 gene expression, yet the mechanisms governing the establishment and maintenance of latency remain incompletely understood. Here we summarize different molecular aspects of viral latency, from its establishment in resting CD4(+) T cells to the mechanisms involved in the reactivation of latent viral reservoirs. We focus on the relevance of chromatin structure and nuclear architecture in determining the transcriptional fate of integrated HIV-1 genomes, in light of recent findings indicating that proximity to specific subnuclear neighborhoods regulates HIV-1 gene expression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of the membrane-coating Nup84 complex: paradigm for the nuclear pore complex structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debler, Erik W; Hsia, Kuo-Chiang; Nagy, Vivien; Seo, Hyuk-Soo; Hoelz, André

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) function as selective gates for nucleocytoplasmic transport. Although the NPC was discovered more than half a century ago, our knowledge of NPC components in atomic detail has exploded only over the past few years. Recent structural, biochemical, and in vivo studies of NPC components, in particular the membrane-coating heptameric Nup84 complex, have shed light onto the NPC architecture as well as onto its dynamic nature. Striking similarities were revealed between the components of the NPC and of coat protein complexes in the endocytic and secretory pathways, supporting their common evolutionary origin in a progenitor protocoatomer. Here, we summarize these findings and discuss emerging concepts that underlie the molecular architecture and the dynamics of the NPC. We conclude that the uncovered principles are not limited to the NPC, but are likely to extend to other macromolecular assemblies.

  1. A sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance study of structural and organisational changes in the cell

    CERN Document Server

    Tunnah, S K

    2000-01-01

    Increasing importance is being placed on understanding the role of membrane lipids in many different areas of biochemistry. It is of interest to determine what interactions may occur between membrane lipids and drug species. Furthermore, an increasing body of evidence suggests that membrane lipids are involved in the pathology of numerous diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, cancer and HIV. Clearly, the more information available on the mechanisms involved in diseases, the greater the potential for identifying a cure or even a prevention. sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the alterations in membrane lipid organisation and structure in intact, viable cultured cells. Changes in the sup 1 H NMR spectra and the spin-lattice relaxation measurements of the human K562 and the rat FRTL-5 cell lines were observed on the addition of the fatty acid species: triolein, evening primrose oil, arachidonic acid and ITF 1779. Results indicate that the membrane lipids are reorganised to a...

  2. A study of thermal, structural and shielding safety analysis for dry storage of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, S. H. [Kyungpook Nationl Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-15

    As a replaced method for MRS, the dry storage has been intensively developed by the advanced countries of nuclear power technology. Currently, the domestic technology for the dry storage is also under development. In the present study, the developed technical standards for USNRC and its operation are summarized. Futhermore, the SAR for VECTRA's NUHOMES satisfied with DOE and NRC's requirements is inversely analyzed and combined with both USNRC's regulatory guide and LLNL's SARS. In the safety analysis of a dry storage, the principal design criteria which identifies the structural and mechanical safety criteria is investigated. Based on the design criteria, hypothetical accident analysis as well as off-normal operation analysis are investigated.

  3. Structure and dynamics of [3.3]paracyclophane as studied by nuclear magnetic resonance and density functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodziuk, Helena; Szymański, Sławomir; Jaźwiński, Jarosław; Marchwiany, Maciej E; Hopf, Henning

    2010-09-30

    Strained cyclophanes with small (-CH(2)-)(n) bridges connecting two benzene rings are interesting objects of basic research, mostly because of the nonplanarity of the rings and of interference of π-electrons of the latter. For title [3.3]paracyclophane, in solutions occurring in two interconverting cis and trans conformers, the published nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data are incomplete and involve its partially deuterated isotopomers. In this paper, variable-temperature NMR studies of its perprotio isotopomer combined with DFT quantum chemical calculations provide a complete characterization of the solution structure, NMR parameters, and interconversion of the cis and trans isomers of the title compound. Using advanced methods of spectral analysis, total quantitative interpretation of its proton NMR spectra in both the static and dynamic regimes is conducted. In particular, not only the geminal but also all of the vicinal J(HH) values for the bridge protons are determined, and for the first time, complete Arrhenius data for the interconversion process are reported. The experimental proton and carbon chemical shifts and the (n)J(HH), (1)J(CH), and (1)J(CC) coupling constants are satisfactorily reproduced theoretically by the values obtained from the density functional theory calculations.

  4. Structures and Nuclear Quadrupole Coupling Tensors of a Series of Chlorine-Containing Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikkumbura, Asela S.; Webster, Erica R.; Dorris, Rachel E.; Peebles, Rebecca A.; Peebles, Sean A.; Seifert, Nathan A.; Pate, Brooks

    2016-06-01

    Rotational spectra for gauche-1,2-dichloroethane (12DCE), gauche-1-chloro-2-fluoroethane (1C2FE) and both anti- and gauche-2,3-dichloropropene (23DCP) have been observed using chirped-pulse Fourier-transform microwave (FTMW) spectroscopy in the 6-18 GHz region. Although the anti conformers for all three species are predicted to be more stable than the gauche forms, they are nonpolar (12DCE) or nearly nonpolar (predicted dipole components for anti-1C2FE: μ_a = 0.11 D, μ_b = 0.02 D and for anti-23DCP: μ_a = 0.25 D, μ_b = 0.02 D); nevertheless, it was also possible to observe and assign the spectrum of anti-23DCP. Assignments of parent spectra and 37Cl and 13C substituted isotopologues utilized predictions at the MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) level and Pickett's SPCAT/SPFIT programs. For the weak anti-23DCP spectra, additional measurements also utilized a resonant-cavity FTMW spectrometer. Full chlorine nuclear quadrupole coupling tensors for gauche-12DCE and both anti- and gauche-23DCP have been diagonalized to allow comparison of coupling constants. Kraitchman's equations were used to determine r_s coordinates of isotopically substituted atoms and r_0 structures were also deduced for gauche conformers of 12DCE and 1C2FE. Structural details and chlorine nuclear quadrupole coupling constants of all three molecules will be compared, and effects of differing halogen substitution and carbon chain length on molecular properties will be evaluated.

  5. Input/Output of ab-initio nuclear structure calculations for improved performance and portability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laghave, Nikhil [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Many modern scientific applications rely on highly computation intensive calculations. However, most applications do not concentrate as much on the role that input/output operations can play for improved performance and portability. Parallelizing input/output operations of large files can significantly improve the performance of parallel applications where sequential I/O is a bottleneck. A proper choice of I/O library also offers a scope for making input/output operations portable across different architectures. Thus, use of parallel I/O libraries for organizing I/O of large data files offers great scope in improving performance and portability of applications. In particular, sequential I/O has been identified as a bottleneck for the highly scalable MFDn (Many Fermion Dynamics for nuclear structure) code performing ab-initio nuclear structure calculations. We develop interfaces and parallel I/O procedures to use a well-known parallel I/O library in MFDn. As a result, we gain efficient I/O of large datasets along with their portability and ease of use in the down-stream processing. Even situations where the amount of data to be written is not huge, proper use of input/output operations can boost the performance of scientific applications. Application checkpointing offers enormous performance improvement and flexibility by doing a negligible amount of I/O to disk. Checkpointing saves and resumes application state in such a manner that in most cases the application is unaware that there has been an interruption to its execution. This helps in saving large amount of work that has been previously done and continue application execution. This small amount of I/O provides substantial time saving by offering restart/resume capability to applications. The need for checkpointing in optimization code NEWUOA has been identified and checkpoint/restart capability has been implemented in NEWUOA by using simple file I/O.

  6. x- and xi-scaling of the Nuclear Structure Function at Large x

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Arrington; C. S. Armstrong; T. Averett; O. K. Baker; L. de Bever; C. W. Bochna; W. Boeglin; B. Bray; R. D. Carlini; G. Collins; C. Cothran; D. Crabb; D. Day; J. A. Dunne; D. Dutta; R. Ent; B. W. Filippone; A. Honegger; E. W. Hughes; J. Jensen; J. Jourdan; C. E. Keppel; D. M. Koltenuk; R. Lindgren; A. Lung; D. J Mack; J. McCarthy; R. D. McKeown; D. Meekins; J. H. Mitchell; H. G. Mkrtchyan; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; T. Petitjean; O. Rondon; I. Sick; C. Smith; B. Terburg; W. F. Vulcan; S. A. Wood; C. Yan; J. Zhao; B. Zihlmann

    2001-07-01

    Inclusive electron scattering data are presented for {sup 2}H and Fe targets at an incident electron energy of 4.045 GeV for a range of momentum transfers from Q{sup 2} = 1 to 7 (GeV/c){sup 2}. Data were taken at Jefferson Laboratory for low values of energy loss, corresponding to values of Bjorken x greater than or near 1. The structure functions do not show scaling in x in this range, where inelastic scattering is not expected to dominate the cross section. The data do show scaling, however, in the Nachtmann variable {xi}. This scaling may be the result of Bloom Gilman duality in the nucleon structure function combined with the Fermi motion of the nucleons in the nucleus. The resulting extension of scaling to larger values of {xi} opens up the possibility of accessing nuclear structure functions in the high-x region at lower values of Q{sup 2} than previously believed.

  7. Nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate direct containment heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutu, Narinder K.; Ginsberg, Theodore; Klages, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A light water nuclear reactor melt-retention structure to mitigate the extent of direct containment heating of the reactor containment building. The structure includes a retention chamber for retaining molten core material away from the upper regions of the reactor containment building when a severe accident causes the bottom of the pressure vessel of the reactor to fail and discharge such molten material under high pressure through the reactor cavity into the retention chamber. In combination with the melt-retention chamber there is provided a passageway that includes molten core droplet deflector vanes and has gas vent means in its upper surface, which means are operable to deflect molten core droplets into the retention chamber while allowing high pressure steam and gases to be vented into the upper regions of the containment building. A plurality of platforms are mounted within the passageway and the melt-retention structure to direct the flow of molten core material and help retain it within the melt-retention chamber. In addition, ribs are mounted at spaced positions on the floor of the melt-retention chamber, and grid means are positioned at the entrance side of the retention chamber. The grid means develop gas back pressure that helps separate the molten core droplets from discharged high pressure steam and gases, thereby forcing the steam and gases to vent into the upper regions of the reactor containment building.

  8. Structured information analysis for human reliability analysis of emergency tasks in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Won Dea; Kim, Jae Whan; Park, Jin Kyun; Ha, Jae Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    More than twenty HRA (Human Reliability Analysis) methodologies have been developed and used for the safety analysis in nuclear field during the past two decades. However, no methodology appears to have universally been accepted, as various limitations have been raised for more widely used ones. One of the most important limitations of conventional HRA is insufficient analysis of the task structure and problem space. To resolve this problem, we suggest SIA (Structured Information Analysis) for HRA. The proposed SIA consists of three parts. The first part is the scenario analysis that investigates the contextual information related to the given task on the basis of selected scenarios. The second is the goals-means analysis to define the relations between the cognitive goal and task steps. The third is the cognitive function analysis module that identifies the cognitive patterns and information flows involved in the task. Through the three-part analysis, systematic investigation is made possible from the macroscopic information on the tasks to the microscopic information on the specific cognitive processes. It is expected that analysts can attain a structured set of information that helps to predict the types and possibility of human error in the given task. 48 refs., 12 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  9. Assessment of structural changes of human teeth by low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qingwen; Chen, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    A technique of low-field pulsed proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation is described for assessment of age-related structural changes (dentin and pulp) of human teeth in vitro. The technique involves spin-spin relaxation measurement and inversion spin-spin spectral analysis methods. The spin-spin relaxation decay curve is converted into a T2 distribution spectrum by a sum of single exponential decays. The NMR spectra from the extracted dentin-portion-only and dental pulp-cells-only were compared with the whole extracted teeth spectra, for the dentin and pulp peak assignments. While dentin and pulp are highly significant parameters in determining tooth quality, variations in these parameters with age can be used as an effective tool for estimating tooth quality. Here we propose an NMR calibration method—the ratio of the amount of dentin to the amount of pulp obtained from NMR T2 distribution spectra can be used for measuring the age-related structural changes in teeth while eliminating any variations in size of teeth. Eight teeth (third molars) extracted from humans, aged among 17-67 years old, were tested in this study. It is found that the intensity ratio of dentin to pulp sensitively changes from 0.48 to 3.2 approaching a linear growth with age. This indicates that age-related structural changes in human teeth can be detected using the low-field NMR technique.

  10. Database structure and file layout of Nuclear Power Plant Database. Database for design information on Light Water Reactors in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Izumi, Fumio

    1995-12-01

    The Nuclear Power Plant Database (PPD) has been developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) to provide plant design information on domestic Light Water Reactors (LWRs) to be used for nuclear safety research and so forth. This database can run on the main frame computer in the JAERI Tokai Establishment. The PPD contains the information on the plant design concepts, the numbers, capacities, materials, structures and types of equipment and components, etc, based on the safety analysis reports of the domestic LWRs. This report describes the details of the PPD focusing on the database structure and layout of data files so that the users can utilize it efficiently. (author).

  11. Experimental effects of dynamics and thermodynamics in nuclear reactions on the symmetry energy as seen by the CHIMERA 4 π detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Filippo, E.; Pagano, A. [INFN, Catania (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    Heavy-ion collisions have been widely used in the last decade to constrain the parameterizations of the symmetry energy term of the nuclear equation of state (EOS) for asymmetric nuclear matter as a function of baryonic density. In the Fermi energy domain one is faced with variations of the density within a narrow range of values around the saturation density ρ{sub 0}=0.16 fm{sup -3} down towards sub-saturation densities. The experimental observables which are sensitive to the symmetry energy are constructed starting from the detected light particles, clusters and heavy fragments that, in heavy-ion collisions, are generally produced by different emission mechanisms at different stages and time scales of the reaction. In this review the effects of dynamics and thermodynamics on the symmetry energy in nuclear reactions are discussed and characterized using an overview of the data taken so far with the CHIMERA multi detector array. (orig.)

  12. Particle Shape Effect on Macroscopic Behaviour of Underground Structures: Numerical and Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szarf Krzysztof

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical performance of underground flexible structures such as buried pipes or culverts made of plastics depend not only on the properties of the structure, but also on the material surrounding it. Flexible drains can deflect by 30% with the joints staying tight, or even invert. Large deformations of the structure are difficult to model in the framework of Finite Element Method, but straightforward in Discrete Element Methods. Moreover, Discrete Element approach is able to provide information about the grain-grain and grain-structure interactions at the microscale. This paper presents numerical and experimental investigations of flexible buried pipe behaviour with focus placed on load transfer above the buried structure. Numerical modeling was able to reproduce the experimental results. Load repartition was observed, being affected by a number of factors such as particle shape, pipe friction and pipe stiffness.

  13. Comparison of various structural damage tracking techniques based on experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hongwei; Yang, Jann N.; Zhou, Li

    2008-03-01

    Damage identification of structures is an important task of a health monitoring system. The ability to detect damages on-line or almost on-line will ensure the reliability and safety of structures. Analysis methodologies for structural damage identification based on measured vibration data have received considerable attention, including the least-square estimation (LSE), extended Kalman filter (EKF), etc. Recently, new analysis methods, referred to as the sequential non-linear least-square estimation (SNLSE) and quadratic sum-squares error (QSSE), have been proposed for the damage tracking of structures. In this paper, these newly proposed analysis methods will be compared with the LSE and EKF approaches, in terms of accuracy, convergence and efficiency, for damage identification of structures based on experimental data. A series of experimental tests using a small-scale 3-story building model have been conducted. In these experimental tests, white noise excitations were applied to the model, and different damage scenarios were simulated and tested. Here, the capability of the adaptive LSE, EKF, SNLSE and QSSE approaches in tracking the structural damage are demonstrated using experimental data. The tracking results for the stiffness of all stories, based on each approach, are compared with the stiffness predicted by the finite-element method. The advantages and drawbacks for each damage tracking approach will be evaluated in terms of the accuracy, efficiency and practicality.

  14. Nuclear networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Burke, Brian

    2017-07-04

    Nuclear lamins are intermediate filament proteins that represent important structural components of metazoan nuclear envelopes (NEs). By combining proteomics and superresolution microscopy, we recently reported that both A- and B-type nuclear lamins form spatially distinct filament networks at the nuclear periphery of mouse fibroblasts. In particular, A-type lamins exhibit differential association with nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Our studies reveal that the nuclear lamina network in mammalian somatic cells is less ordered and more complex than that of amphibian oocytes, the only other system in which the lamina has been visualized at high resolution. In addition, the NPC component Tpr likely links NPCs to the A-type lamin network, an association that appears to be regulated by C-terminal modification of various A-type lamin isoforms. Many questions remain, however, concerning the structure and assembly of lamin filaments, as well as with their mode of association with other nuclear components such as peripheral chromatin.

  15. Experimental investigations and simplified seismic analysis of the structural system JUBHome BASE

    OpenAIRE

    Stermecki, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The experimental investigations of the structural system JUBHome BASE are presented in the first part of the thesis. JUBHome BASE is a foundation assembly which consists of hydro isolation, thermal isolation (EPS) and reinforced concrete foundation slab. The main objective of the experimental investigations, which were performed at the Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering, was to determine the shear resistance of the JUBHome BASE system and the shear resistance of the cont...

  16. Experimental evidence of large complete bandgaps in zig-zag lattice structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Lin; Zhao, Sheng-Dong; Wang, Yue-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, experimental evidence of large complete bandgaps in a kind of light-weighted zig-zag lattice structure (ZLS) is presented. Ultrasonic experiments are conducted on the stainless steel slab designed with ZLS to detect the complete bandgaps. Also, the numerical simulations of the experiments by the finite element method are carried out. For comparison, we conduct the same experiments and numerical simulations on the stainless steel slab with straight lattice structure (SLS). Good agreement is obtained between the experimental and numerical results. The complete bandgaps of ZLS are successfully tested and no complete bandgap is found in SLS. The band structures and vibration modes of both ZLS and SLS are calculated via the finite element method to understand the experimental data. The effects of the geometry parameters of ZLS on the complete bandgaps are discussed in detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of integrated D/B system for the safety-related structures in nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, M. S.; Song, Y. C. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. S.; Choi, W. S. [Korea Institute of Construction Technology, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    The integrated D/B system is developed for digitalizing the history of the safety-related structures of nuclear power plant. It have 5 database which are consist of Generals, Structural and Design, Materials, Construction, Aging and repair information D/B. For efficient operation of the system, we are to set up the outline of the system, find out data field for target structures, and develop utilities. Utilities will be the aging and repair data management program, the close examination management program, the data search engine with various options which help users to find the information quickly, and the data management program restoring, updating and exchanging input data. Development of the integrated D/B system of the safety-related structures will contribute to management of the structures of nuclear power plant with advanced technology.

  18. Mutations causing Greenberg dysplasia but not Pelger anomaly uncouple enzymatic from structural functions of a nuclear membrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Peter; Fischer, Björn; Mann, Anuska; Mansour, Sahar; Rossier, Eva; Veen, Markus; Lang, Christine; Baasanjav, Sevjidmaa; Kieslich, Moritz; Brossuleit, Katja; Gravemann, Sophia; Schnipper, Nele; Karbasyian, Mohsen; Demuth, Ilja; Zwerger, Monika; Vaya, Amparo; Utermann, Gerd; Mundlos, Stefan; Stricker, Sigmar; Sperling, Karl; Hoffmann, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    The lamin B receptor (LBR) is an inner nuclear membrane protein with a structural function interacting with chromatin and lamins, and an enzymatic function as a sterol reductase. Heterozygous LBR mutations cause nuclear hyposegmentation in neutrophils (Pelger anomaly), while homozygous mutations cause prenatal death with skeletal defects and abnormal sterol metabolism (Greenberg dysplasia). It has remained unclear whether the lethality in Greenberg dysplasia is due to cholesterol defects or altered nuclear morphology.To answer this question we characterized two LBR missense mutations and showed that they cause Greenberg dysplasia. Both mutations affect residues that are evolutionary conserved among sterol reductases. In contrast to wildtype LBR, both mutations failed to rescue C14 sterol reductase deficient yeast, indicating an enzymatic defect. We found no Pelger anomaly in the carrier parent excluding marked effects on nuclear structure. We studied Lbr in mouse embryos and demonstrate expression in skin and the developing skeletal system consistent with sites of histological changes in Greenberg dysplasia. Unexpectedly we found in disease-relevant cell types not only nuclear but also cytoplasmatic LBR localization. The cytoplasmatic LBR staining co-localized with ER-markers and is thus consistent with the sites of endogeneous sterol synthesis. We conclude that LBR missense mutations can abolish sterol reductase activity, causing lethal Greenberg dysplasia but not Pelger anomaly. The findings separate the metabolic from the structural function and indicate that the sterol reductase activity is essential for human intrauterine development.

  19. Oocytes as an experimental system to analyze the ultrastructure of endogenous and ectopically expressed nuclear envelope components by field-emission scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stick, Reimer; Goldberg, Martin W

    2010-05-01

    Xenopus oocytes provide a powerful model system for studying the structure and function of the nuclear envelope and its components. Firstly, the nuclear envelope is easily isolated by hand under gentle conditions that have little effect on its structural organization. They can then be prepared for several types of electron microscopy (EM) including field-emission scanning EM (feSEM) (described here) and cryo-EM. They can be immuno-gold labeled to determine the localization of individual proteins. There is also enough material to analyze biochemically. Secondly, they possess an efficient transcription and translation system so that proteins of interest can be ectopically expressed by injection of either mRNA into the cytoplasm or plasmids into the nucleus. Such proteins can be tagged and mutated. They are post-translationally modified and usually incorporate into the correct compartment. We describe here methods developed to analyze the structural organization of the nuclear envelope by feSEM including the structural organization of ectopically expressed nuclear envelope proteins.

  20. Vaccinia virus G8R protein: a structural ortholog of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Da Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Eukaryotic DNA replication involves the synthesis of both a DNA leading and lagging strand, the latter requiring several additional proteins including flap endonuclease (FEN-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA in order to remove RNA primers used in the synthesis of Okazaki fragments. Poxviruses are complex viruses (dsDNA genomes that infect eukaryotes, but surprisingly little is known about the process of DNA replication. Given our previous results that the vaccinia virus (VACV G5R protein may be structurally similar to a FEN-1-like protein and a recent finding that poxviruses encode a primase function, we undertook a series of in silico analyses to identify whether VACV also encodes a PCNA-like protein. RESULTS: An InterProScan of all VACV proteins using the JIPS software package was used to identify any PCNA-like proteins. The VACV G8R protein was identified as the only vaccinia protein that contained a PCNA-like sliding clamp motif. The VACV G8R protein plays a role in poxvirus late transcription and is known to interact with several other poxvirus proteins including itself. The secondary and tertiary structure of the VACV G8R protein was predicted and compared to the secondary and tertiary structure of both human and yeast PCNA proteins, and a high degree of similarity between all three proteins was noted. CONCLUSIONS: The structure of the VACV G8R protein is predicted to closely resemble the eukaryotic PCNA protein; it possesses several other features including a conserved ubiquitylation and SUMOylation site that suggest that, like its counterpart in T4 bacteriophage (gp45, it may function as a sliding clamp ushering transcription factors to RNA polymerase during late transcription.