WorldWideScience

Sample records for experimental ischemic stroke

  1. Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Ischemic stroke is the most common type. It is usually ... are at risk for having a more serious stroke. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness ...

  2. Ischemic Strokes (Clots)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Month Infographic Stroke Hero F.A.S.T. Quiz Ischemic Strokes (Clots) Updated:Apr 26,2017 Ischemic stroke ... stroke. Let's Talk Numbers Updated Guidelines for Acute Ischemic Strokes Infographic : Attacking Brain Clots to Save Lives ...

  3. Targeting neutrophils in ischemic stroke: translational insights from experimental studies

    OpenAIRE

    Jickling, Glen C; Liu, DaZhi; Ander, Bradley P; Stamova, Boryana; Zhan, Xinhua; Sharp, Frank R

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils have key roles in ischemic brain injury, thrombosis, and atherosclerosis. As such, neutrophils are of great interest as targets to treat and prevent ischemic stroke. After stroke, neutrophils respond rapidly promoting blood–brain barrier disruption, cerebral edema, and brain injury. A surge of neutrophil-derived reactive oxygen species, proteases, and cytokines are released as neutrophils interact with cerebral endothelium. Neutrophils also are linked to the major processes that c...

  4. Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Giving Fundraise Planned Giving Corporate Giving Cause Marketing Join your team, your way! The Stroke Challenge team is a great way to get active ... to Expect at the Hospital Key Questions to Ask Learn More About Stroke ...

  5. Therapeutic targets and limits of minocycline neuroprotection in experimental ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaneko Yuji

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Minocycline, a second-generation tetracycline with anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties, has been shown to promote therapeutic benefits in experimental stroke. However, equally compelling evidence demonstrates that the drug exerts variable and even detrimental effects in many neurological disease models. Assessment of the mechanism underlying minocycline neuroprotection should clarify the drug's clinical value in acute stroke setting. Results Here, we demonstrate that minocycline attenuates both in vitro (oxygen glucose deprivation and in vivo (middle cerebral artery occlusion experimentally induced ischemic deficits by direct inhibition of apoptotic-like neuronal cell death involving the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2/cytochrome c pathway. Such anti-apoptotic effect of minocycline is seen in neurons, but not apparent in astrocytes. Our data further indicate that the neuroprotection is dose-dependent, in that only low dose minocycline inhibits neuronal cell death cascades at the acute stroke phase, whereas the high dose exacerbates the ischemic injury. Conclusion The present study advises our community to proceed with caution to use the minimally invasive intravenous delivery of low dose minocycline in order to afford neuroprotection that is safe for stroke.

  6. No influence of dabigatran anticoagulation on hemorrhagic transformation in an experimental model of ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand Bohmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dabigatran etexilate (DE is a new oral direct thrombin inhibitor. Clinical trials point towards a favourable risk-to-benefit profile of DE compared to warfarin. In this study, we evaluated whether hemorrhagic transformation (HT occurs after experimental stroke under DE treatment as we have shown for warfarin. METHODS: 44 male C57BL/6 mice were pretreated orally with 37.5 mg/kg DE, 75 mg/kg DE or saline and diluted thrombin time (dTT and DE plasma concentrations were monitored. Ischemic stroke was induced by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO for 1 h or 3 h. We assessed functional outcome and HT blood volume 24 h and 72 h after tMCAO. RESULTS: After 1 h tMCAO, HT blood volume did not differ significantly between mice pretreated with DE 37.5 mg/kg and controls (1.5±0.5 µl vs. 1.8±0.5 µl, p>0.05. After 3 h tMCAO, DE-anticoagulated mice did also not show an increase in HT, neither at the dose of 37.5 mg/kg equivalent to anticoagulant treatment in the therapeutic range (1.3±0.9 µl vs. control 2.3±0.5 µl, p>0.05 nor at 75 mg/kg, clearly representing supratherapeutic anticoagulation (1.8±0.8 µl, p>0.05. Furthermore, no significant increase in HT under continued anticoagulation with DE 75 mg/kg could be found at 72 h after tMCAO for 1 h (1.7±0.9 µl vs. control 1.6±0.4 µl, p>0.05. CONCLUSION: Our experimental data suggest that DE does not significantly increase hemorrhagic transformation after transient focal cerebral ischemia in mice. From a translational viewpoint, this indicates that a continuation of DE anticoagulation in case of an ischemic stroke might be safe, but clearly, clinical data on this question are warranted.

  7. Successfully Climbing the “STAIRs”: Surmounting Failed Translation of Experimental Ischemic Stroke Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Kahle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable (STAIR provided initial (in 1999 and updated (in 2009 recommendations with the goal of improving preclinical stroke therapy assessment and to increase the translational potential of experimental stroke treatments. It is important for preclinical stroke researchers to frequently consider and revisit these concepts, especially since promising experimental stroke treatments continue to fail in human clinical trials. Therefore, this paper will focus on considerations for several key aspects of preclinical stroke studies including the selection and execution of the animal stroke model, drug/experimental treatment administration, and outcome measures to improve experimental validity and translation potential. Specific points of interest discussed include the incorporation of human comorbid conditions and drugs, the benefits of defining a proposed mechanism of action, replication of results using multiple methods, using clinically relevant routes of administration and treatment time windows, and performing and reporting good experimental methods to reduce bias such as, as suggested by the updated STAIR recommendations, sample size calculations, randomization, allocation concealment, blinding, and appropriate inclusion/exclusion criteria. It is our hope that reviewing and revisiting these considerations will benefit researchers in their investigations of stroke therapies and increase the likelihood of translational success in the battle against stroke.

  8. Therapeutic outcomes of transplantation of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells in experimental ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki eTajiri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating preclinical evidence suggests the use of amnion as a source of stem cells for investigations of basic science concepts related to developmental cell biology, but also for stem cells’ therapeutic applications in treating human disorders. We previously reported isolation of viable rat amniotic fluid-derived stem (AFS cells. Subsequently, we recently reported the therapeutic benefits of intravenous transplantation of AFS cells in a rodent model of ischemic stroke. Parallel lines of investiagtions have provided safety and efficacy of stem cell therapy for treating stroke and other neurological disorders. This review article highlights characterization of AFS cells’ phenotype and their transplant-mediated functional effects, the need for investigations of mechanisms underlying AFS cells’ therapeutic benefits and discusses lab-to-clinic translational gating items in an effort to optimize the clinical application of cell transplantation for stroke.

  9. Acupuncture for neurogenesis in experimental ischemic stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lin; Zhang, Xiao-guang; Zhong, Linda L D; Chen, Zi-xian; Li, Yan; Zheng, Guo-qing; Bian, Zhao-xiang

    2016-01-20

    Acupuncture has been used for patients with stroke and post-stroke rehabilitation for thousands of years. Previous studies reported that acupuncture enhanced stroke recovery through neurogenesis. Hence, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis for preclinical studies to assess the current evidence for acupuncture effect on neurogenesis in treating ischaemic stroke. Studies were obtained from six databases, including PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP information database, and Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, Ultimately, 34 studies containing 1617 animals were identified. Neurogenesis markers of Brdu, Nestin, PSA-NCAM, NeuN and GFAP were selected as major outcomes. The pooled results of 15 studies marked with Brdu showed significant effects of acupuncture for improving proliferation when compared with control groups (P acupuncture for increasing proliferation when compared with control groups (P acupuncture for enhancing migration when compared with control groups (P acupuncture for stimulating differentiation when compared with control groups (P acupuncture is a prospective therapy targeting neurogenesis for ischemic stroke.

  10. Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; De Keyser, J.; Luijckx, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    In the last decennium, thrombolytic therapy has changed the management of acute ischemic stroke. Randomized clinical studies have demonstrated that intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator improves functional outcomes. Recently the time window for intravenous thrombolysis has been

  11. Physiologically based model of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Vincent; Chabaud, Sylvie; Girard, Pascal; Cucherat, Michel; Hommel, Marc; Boissel, Jean Pierre

    2002-08-01

    In the treatment of acute ischemic stroke most of the clinical trials have failed, contrasting with promising results in the preclinical stages. This continuing discrepancy suggests some misconceptions in the understanding of acute ischemic stroke. One possible method for identifying the shortcomings of present-day approaches is to integrate all the available knowledge into a single mathematical model and to subject that model to challenges via simulations with available experimental data. As a first stage, then, the authors developed a simplified model, defining the structure and the different parameters that represent the phenomena that occur during the hyperacute phase of ischemic stroke. First, the different critical points of the evolution of ischemic stroke, based on the available evidence on the pathophysiology of stroke, were identified. Those key steps were then related to the quantitative data obtained by magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography scan. These two techniques allow the measurement of diverse key markers of cerebral metabolism: cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen extraction factor, cerebral metabolism rate of oxygen, and the apparent diffusion coefficient of water, among others. Those markers were organized together through mathematical equations, and changed over time in order to describe the evolution of an acute ischemic stroke. At each time during the evolution of stroke those parameters are summarized in a parameter called survival delay. This parameter made possible the definition of three different states for tissues-functional, infarcted, salvageable-as end point. Once the model was designed, simulations were performed to explore its internal validity. Simulation results were consistent with the reality of acute ischemic stroke and did not reveal any major drawbacks in the use of the model. The more rapid the decrease in CBF, the larger is the final infarcted area. The model also allowed for the characterization of two

  12. Intravenously Infused F3.Olig2 Improves Memory Deficits via Restoring Myelination in the Aged Hippocampus Following Experimental Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich Na; Cho, Jeong Hwi; Kim, In Hye; Park, Joon Ha; Lee, Jae Chul; Tae, Hyun Jin; Lee, Yun Lyul; Lee, Jaesuk; Byun, Kyunghee; Jeong, Goo-Bo; Lee, Bonghee; Kim, Seung U; Kim, Young-Myeong; Won, Moo-Ho; Choi, Soo Young

    2016-12-13

    Oligodendrocytes play a crucial role in creating the myelin sheath that is an important component in neural transmission. In an animal model of transient cerebral ischemia, application of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) has not yet been reported. In this study, the effects of F3.Olig2 transplantation on memory and cognitive dysfunction were investigated in the aged gerbil in which ischemic stroke was induced. To investigate the possible mechanisms underlying repair, changes in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP), oligodendrocyte-specific protein (OSP), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were examined. Experimental ischemic stroke was induced by occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries in aged gerbils. Gerbils (n=31 per group) were randomly divided into three groups: (1) vehicle sham group, (2) vehicle ischemia group, and (3) F3.Olig2 ischemia group. After 1, 3, and 7 days of ischemiareperfusion (I-R), saline or F3.Olig2 cells (1106 cells in 100 l) were injected into the gerbils intravenously. The gerbils were sacrificed 10 days after I-R for identification of grafted F3.Olig2 cells, and 15 and 30 days after I-R for tissue analysis after conducting passive avoidance and novel object recognition test. Injected F3.Olig2 cells and MBP, OSP, and BDNF were detected by specific antibodies using immunohistochemistry and/or Western blots. Memory and cognition were significantly increased in the F3.Olig2 ischemia group compared with the vehicle ischemia group. In the F3.Olig2 ischemia group, the neurons were not protected from ischemic damage; however, MBP, OSP, and BDNF expressions were significantly increased. Our results show that injection of F3.Olig2 cells significantly improved impaired memory and cognition, which might be related to increased MBP expression via increasing OSP and BDNF expression in the aged gerbil hippocampus following transient cerebral ischemia.

  13. Low-level light emitting diode (LED) therapy suppresses inflammasome-mediated brain damage in experimental ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae In; Lee, Sae-Won; Kim, Nam Gyun; Park, Kyoung-Jun; Choi, Byung Tae; Shin, Yong-Il; Shin, Hwa Kyoung

    2017-11-01

    Use of photostimulation including low-level light emitting diode (LED) therapy has broadened greatly in recent years because it is compact, portable, and easy to use. Here, the effects of photostimulation by LED (610 nm) therapy on ischemic brain damage was investigated in mice in which treatment started after a stroke in a clinically relevant setting. The mice underwent LED therapy (20 min) twice a day for 3 days, commencing at 4 hours post-ischemia. LED therapy group generated a significantly smaller infarct size and improvements in neurological function based on neurologic test score. LED therapy profoundly reduced neuroinflammatory responses including neutrophil infiltration and microglia activation in the ischemic cortex. LED therapy also decreased cell death and attenuated the NLRP3 inflammasome, in accordance with down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 in the ischemic brain. Moreover, the mice with post-ischemic LED therapy showed suppressed TLR-2 levels, MAPK signaling and NF-kB activation. These findings suggest that by suppressing the inflammasome, LED therapy can attenuate neuroinflammatory responses and tissue damage following ischemic stroke. Therapeutic interventions targeting the inflammasome via photostimulation with LED may be a novel approach to ameliorate brain injury following ischemic stroke. Effect of post-ischemic low-level light emitting diode therapy (LED-T) on infarct reduction was mediated by inflammasome suppression. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. [Ischemic stroke in young women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekker, M.S.; Wermer, M.J.; Riksen, N.P.; Klijn, C.J.; Leeuw, F.E. de

    2016-01-01

    - In virtually all age groups, the incidence of ischemic stroke is higher in men. However, in women aged between 25-49 years the prevalence is higher than in men. Female-specific risk factors and disorders may explain this peak.- Pregnancy and the post-partum period are associated with physiological

  15. Ischemic Stroke and Neuroprotection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . E‑mail: ikenna.onwuekwe@unn. edu.ng. Introduction. Stroke or cerebrovascular accident is defined as an acute focal or global neurological deficit lasting longer than 24 h or leading to death and which is of no aetiology other than vascular.[1].

  16. Changes of resting cerebral activities in subacute ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to detect the difference in resting cerebral activities between ischemic stroke patients and healthy participants, define the abnormal site, and provide new evidence for pathological mechanisms, clinical diagnosis, prognosis prediction and efficacy evaluation of ischemic stroke. At present, the majority of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies focus on the motor dysfunction and the acute stage of ischemic stroke. This study recruited 15 right-handed ischemic stroke patients at subacute stage (15 days to 11.5 weeks and 15 age-matched healthy participants. A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan was performed on each subject to detect cerebral activity. Regional homogeneity analysis was used to investigate the difference in cerebral activities between ischemic stroke patients and healthy participants. The results showed that the ischemic stroke patients had lower regional homogeneity in anterior cingulate and left cerebrum and higher regional homogeneity in cerebellum, left precuneus and left frontal lobe, compared with healthy participants. The experimental findings demonstrate that the areas in which regional homogeneity was different between ischemic stroke patients and healthy participants are in the cerebellum, left precuneus, left triangle inferior frontal gyrus, left inferior temporal gyrus and anterior cingulate. These locations, related to the motor, sensory and emotion areas, are likely potential targets for the neural regeneration of subacute ischemic stroke patients.

  17. [Migraine and ischemic stroke: possible pathogenic relation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimi, Rocco

    2012-09-01

    Migraine, especially migraine with aura, is an established risk factor for ischemic lesions of the brain. This disorder affects about 15% of people in developed countries and is three times more common in women than in men. The risk of ischemic stroke appears to be higher in migraine with aura than in migraine without aura. An association between migraine and ischemic stroke has been observed for many years but exact mechanisms by which migraine can lead to stroke are currently still under investigation. A significant association between migraine and ischemic stroke has been demonstrated in population and case-control studies. The observation that stroke may occur during migraine attacks prompts to speculation that migraine may directly cause an ischemic event (migrainous infarct). Alternatively, as stroke occurs more frequently during the interictal phase of migraine, an indirect relation between the two diseases might exist. Both ischemic stroke and migraine with aura might be consequences of many underlying vascular disorders. Meta-analysis also demonstrates that subjects with migraine are at higher risk of showing white matter abnormalities on Magnetic Resonance images. Ultimately, it will be important to determine whether migraine with aura is a modifiable risk factor for ischemic stroke and if preventive medications for migraine or antiplatelet therapy might reduce the risk of ischemic stroke in patients with migraine with aura. In the present paper, I will review epidemiological studies, discuss potential mechanisms of migraine-induced stroke and comorbid ischemic stroke.

  18. Ischemic stroke and incomplete infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Javier; Lassen, N A; Weiller, C

    1996-01-01

    The concept of selective vulnerability or selective loss o f individual neurons, with survival of glial and vascular elements as one of the consequences of a systemic ischemic-hypoxic insult (eg, transient cardiac arrest or severe hypotension), has been recognized for decades. In contrast, select......, selective neuronal death as one of the lesions that may develop in the brain after occluding an intracranial artery is an idea not readily acknowledged in the current medical literature dealing with human stroke....

  19. Myeloperoxidase Inhibition Increases Neurogenesis after Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, HyeonJu; Wei, Ying; Lee, Ji Yong; Wu, Yue; Zheng, Yi; Moskowitz, Michael A; Chen, John W

    2016-11-01

    The relationship between inflammation and neurogenesis in stroke is currently not well understood. Focal ischemia enhances cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the neurogenic regions, including the subventricular zone (SVZ), dentate gyrus, as well as the non-neurogenic striatum, and cortex in the ischemic hemisphere. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a potent oxidizing enzyme secreted during inflammation by activated leukocytes, and its enzymatic activity is highly elevated after stroke. In this study, we investigated whether the inhibition of MPO activity by a specific irreversible inhibitor, 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide (ABAH) (MPO(-/-) mice) can increase neurogenesis after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice. ABAH administration increased the number of proliferating bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells expressing markers for neural stems cells, astrocytes, neuroprogenitor cells (Nestin), and neuroblasts (doublecortin) in the ischemic SVZ, anterior SVZ, striatum, and cortex. MPO inhibition also increased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (Ser133), acetylated H3, and NeuN to promote neurogenesis in the ischemic SVZ. ABAH treatment also increased chemokine CXC receptor 4 expression in the ischemic SVZ. MPO-deficient mice treated with vehicle or ABAH both showed similar effects on the number of BrdU(+) cells in the ischemic hemisphere, demonstrating that ABAH is specific to MPO. Taken together, our results underscore a detrimental role of MPO activity to postischemia neurogenesis and that a strategy to inhibit MPO activity can increase cell proliferation and improve neurogenesis after ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  20. Pulmonary Embolism in Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswaradass, Prasanna Venkatesan; Dey, Sadanand; Singh, Dilip; Hill, Michael D

    2018-01-28

    Silent pulmonary embolism (PE) may be associated with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). We identified 10 patients from 3,132 unique patients (3,431 CT scans). We retrospectively examined CT angiogram of patients with AIS to determine the frequency of concurrent PE in AIS. The period prevalence of PE was 0.32. Seven patients had concurrent PE, whereas three had PE diagnosed 2 days after their AIS presentation. We suspected paradoxical embolism via patent foramen ovale as the cause of stroke in three patients and thrombophilia in four patients. Seven patients had poor outcome including four deaths. CT angiogram stroke protocol images from aortic arch to vertex allows visualization of upper pulmonary arteries and PE detection in AIS.

  1. Hyperglycemia, Acute Ischemic Stroke and Thrombolytic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Askiel; Fagan, Susan C.; Ergul, Adviye

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of disability and is considered now the 4th leading cause of death. Many clinical trials have shown that stroke patients with acute elevation in blood glucose at onset of stroke suffer worse functional outcomes, longer in-hospital stay and higher mortality rates. The only therapeutic hope for these patients is the rapid restoration of blood flow to the ischemic tissue through intravenous administration of the only currently proven effective therapy, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). However, even this option is associated with the increased risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. Nonetheless, the underlying mechanisms through which hyperglycemia (HG) and tPA worsen the neurovascular injury after stroke are not fully understood. Accordingly, this review summarizes the latest updates and recommendations about the management of HG and co-administration of tPA in a clinical setting while focusing more on the various experimental models studying: 1. the effect of HG on stroke outcomes; 2. the potential mechanisms involved in worsening the neurovasular injury; 3. the different therapeutic strategies employed to ameliorate the injury, and finally; 4. the interaction between HG and tPA. Developing therapeutic strategies to reduce the hemorrhage risk with tPA in hyperglycemic setting is of great clinical importance. This can best be achieved by conducting robust preclinical studies evaluating the interaction between tPA and other therapeutics in order to develop potential therapeutic strategies with high translational impact. PMID:24619488

  2. Fibrinogen gene variation and ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jood, K; Danielson, J; Ladenvall, C; Blomstrand, C; Jern, C

    2008-06-01

    Plasma fibrinogen level and fibrin clot structure are heritable traits that may be of importance in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke. To investigate associations between variation in the fibrinogen gamma (FGG), alpha (FGA) and beta (FGB) genes, fibrinogen level, and ischemic stroke. The Sahlgrenska Academy Study on Ischemic Stroke comprises 600 cases and 600 matched population controls. Stroke subtypes were defined according to TOAST criteria. Plasma fibrinogen level was measured by an automated clot-rate assay. Eight tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected to capture genetic variation in the FGA, FGG, and FGB genes. Plasma fibrinogen was independently associated with overall ischemic stroke and all subtypes, both in the acute stage (P FGG and FGA genes. FGB haplotypes were associated with fibrinogen level (P FGG/FGA haplotypes showed independent association to ischemic stroke but not to fibrinogen level. In an additive model with the most common FGG/FGA haplotype (A1) as reference, the adjusted odds ratios of ischemic stroke were 1.4 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.1-1.8], P FGG/FGA haplotypes, respectively. FGG/FGA haplotypes show association to ischemic stroke. This association is independent of fibrinogen level, thus suggesting that the association between ischemic stroke and variation at the FGG/FGA genes is mediated by qualitative rather than quantitative effects on fibrin(ogen).

  3. Swallowing disorders after ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Camargo Remesso

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate occurrences of swallowing disorders after ischemic stroke. METHOD: This was a retrospective study on 596 medical files. The inclusion criterion was that the patients needed to have been hospitalized with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke; the exclusion criteria were the presence of associated cardiac problems and hospital stay already more than 14 days. RESULTS: 50.5% were men and 49.5% women; mean age 65.3 years (SD=±11.7 (p<0.001. Among the risk factors, 79.4% had hypertension, 36.7% had diabetes (p<0.001 and 42.7% were smokers. 13.3% of the patients died. Swallowing disorders occurred in 19.6%, among whom 91.5% had mild difficulty and 8.5% had severe difficulty. 87.1% had spontaneous recovery after a mean of 2.4 months. A lesion in the brainstem region occurred in 6.8% (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Swallowing disorders occurred in almost 20% of the population and most of the difficulty in swallowing found was mild. The predictors for swallowing disorders were older age, diabetes mellitus and lesions in the brainstem region.

  4. Rapamycin attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction via activation of mitophagy in experimental ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qiang [Department of Neurology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233 (China); Department of Neurology, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200011 (China); Zhang, Ting [Department of Neurology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233 (China); Wang, Jixian [Department of Neurology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Med-X Research Institute and School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Zhang, Zhijun [Med-X Research Institute and School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Zhai, Yu [Department of Neurology, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200011 (China); Yang, Guo-Yuan, E-mail: gyyang0626@gmail.com [Department of Neurology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Med-X Research Institute and School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Sun, Xiaojiang, E-mail: sunxj19@gmail.com [Department of Neurology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233 (China)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Rapamycin enhances mitophagy via increasing p62 translocation to the mitochondria. • Rapamycin attenuates brain ischemic damage and improves mitochondrial function. • The protection of rapamycin to mitochondrial is linked to enhanced mitophagy. - Abstract: Rapamycin has been demonstrated to exhibit neuroprotective functions via the activation of autophagy in a cerebral ischemia model. However, the involvement of mitophagy in this process and its contribution to the protection of mitochondrial function remains unknown. The present study explored the characteristics of mitophagy after cerebral ischemia and the effect of rapamycin on mitochondrial function. Male Sprague–Dawley rats underwent transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Neurological deficits scores; infarct volumes; mitophagy morphology; and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and mitochondrial membrane potentials (Δψm) were examined. The expression of LC3, Beclin-1 and p62 in the mitochondrial fraction combined with transmission electronic microscopy were used to explore mitophagic activity after ischemia. We also blocked autophagosome formation using 3-methyladenine (3-MA) to check the linkage between the mitochondrial protective effect of rapamycin and enhanced mitophagy. We observed that rapamycin significantly enhanced mitophagy, as evidenced by the increase in LC3-II and Beclin-1 expression in the mitochondria and p62 translocation to the mitochondria. Rapamycin reduced infarct volume, improved neurological outcomes and inhibited mitochondrial dysfunction compared with the control animals (p < 0.05). However, these protective effects were reversed by 3-methyladenine treatment after rapamycin. The present study indicates that rapamycin treatment attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction following cerebral ischemia, which is linked to enhanced mitophagy.

  5. Atrial fibrillation in patients with ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Sandra Kruchov; Frost, Lars; Eagle, Kim A

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation is a major risk factor for ischemic stroke. However, the prognostic impact of atrial fibrillation among patients with stroke is not fully clarified. We compared patient characteristics, including severity of stroke and comorbidity, quality of in-hospital care and o...

  6. Diagnostic value of plasma signal peptide-Cub-Egf domain-containing protein-1 (SCUBE-1) in an experimental model of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkmen, Suha; Eryigit, Umut; Karaca, Yunus; Mentese, Ahmet; Sumer, Uzun Aysegul; Yulug, Esin; Aksut, Nurhak; Gazioglu, Sibel; Gunduz, Abdulkadir

    2015-02-01

    This study was intended to examine possible diagnostic value of plasma Signal Peptide-Cub-Egf domain-containing protein-1 (SCUBE1) levels in an experimental model of acute ischemic stroke. Twenty-four female Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Blood and brain tissue specimens were collected immediately following artery ligation (control; Group 1), 1h after ligation (Group 2), 2 h after ligation (Group 3) and 6h after ligation (Group 4). SCUBE1 levels were investigated in the serum specimens. The brain samples were examined histopathologically. Correlation analysis was performed between the values. Median SCUBE1 values were 1.75 ng/ml in the control group, 3.80 ng/ml, 3.71 ng/ml and 4.19 ng/ml in the groups 2, 3 and 4, respectively (n=6 for each, P=0.004, for each group compared to control values). Histopathological analysis revealed median atrophic neuron percentages of 16% (in group 1), 42%, 55% and 76% in group 2, 3 and 4 respectively (n=6 for each, P=0.004, for each group compared to control group). A higly significant correlation was determined between SCUBE-1 levels and percentage of atrophic neurons (r=0.744 P=0.000). In this experimental model of acute ischemic stroke plasma SCUBE1 levels rose from the 1st hour of induced stroke and remained high up to 6th hour tested. Results of this experimental study has a potential to become the basis for a clinical study to confirm whether SCUBE1 can be used as a biomarker in the early diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Ischemic Stroke Genetics Study (ISGS Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rich Stephen S

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular basis for the genetic risk of ischemic stroke is likely to be multigenic and influenced by environmental factors. Several small case-control studies have suggested associations between ischemic stroke and polymorphisms of genes that code for coagulation cascade proteins and platelet receptors. Our aim is to investigate potential associations between hemostatic gene polymorphisms and ischemic stroke, with particular emphasis on detailed characterization of the phenotype. Methods/Design The Ischemic Stroke Genetic Study is a prospective, multicenter genetic association study in adults with recent first-ever ischemic stroke confirmed with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Patients are evaluated at academic medical centers in the United States and compared with sex- and age-matched controls. Stroke subtypes are determined by central blinded adjudication using standardized, validated mechanistic and syndromic classification systems. The panel of genes to be tested for polymorphisms includes β-fibrinogen and platelet glycoprotein Ia, Iba, and IIb/IIIa. Immortalized cell lines are created to allow for time- and cost-efficient testing of additional candidate genes in the future. Discussion The study is designed to minimize survival bias and to allow for exploring associations between specific polymorphisms and individual subtypes of ischemic stroke. The data set will also permit the study of genetic determinants of stroke outcome. Having cell lines will permit testing of future candidate risk factor genes.

  8. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and symptomatic ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum-Jacobsen, Peter; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Schnohr, Peter

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that low plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D are associated with increased risk of symptomatic ischemic stroke in the general population. METHODS: We measured plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D in 10,170 individuals from the general population, the Copenhagen...... City Heart Study. During 21 years of follow-up, 1,256 and 164 persons developed ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, respectively. In a meta-analysis of ischemic stroke, we included 10 studies, 58,384 participants, and 2,644 events. RESULTS: Stepwise decreasing plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations...... were associated with stepwise increasing risk of ischemic stroke both as a function of seasonally adjusted percentile categories and as a function of clinical categories of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (p for trend ≤ 2 × 10(-3) ). In a Cox regression model comparing individuals with plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D...

  9. Stroke subtypes and factors associated with ischemic stroke in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Better understanding and controlling factors associated will improve the prevention of the disease. This study reviews records of patients with ischemic stroke in Central Africa. Material and methods: Patients of Bantu ethnicity with clinical ...

  10. Ischemic Stroke and Neuroprotection | Onwuekwe | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in both developed and developing countries of the world. Greater understanding of the pathophysiology of neuronal damage in ischemic stroke has generated interest in neuroprotection as a management strategy. This paper aims to review the current concept and place of ...

  11. The Neuroprotective Effect of Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) Hydro-alcoholic Extract on Cerebral Ischemic Tolerance in Experimental Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedemadi, Parisa; Rahnema, Mehdi; Bigdeli, Mohammad Reza; Oryan, Shahrebano; Rafati, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    The prevention of BBB breakdown and the subsequent vasogenic edema are important parts of the medical management of ischemic stroke. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ischemic tolerance effect of Rosmarinus officinalis leaf hydro-alcoholic extract (RHE). Five groups of animals were designed: sham (underwent surgery without MCAO) and MCAO groups, the MCAO groups were pretreated orally by gavages with RHE (50, 75, and 100 mg/Kg/day), daily for 30 days. Two hours after the last dose, serum lipid levels were determined and then the rats were subjected to 60 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by 24 h of reperfusion. Subsequently, brain infarct size, brain edema and Evans Blue dye extravasations were measured and neurological deficits were scored. Dietary RHE could significantly reduce cortical and sub-cortical infarct volumes (211.55 ± 24.88 mm3 vs. 40.59 ± 10.04 mm3 vs. 29.96 ± 12.19 mm3vs. 6.58 ± 3.2 mm3), neurologic deficit scores, cerebral edema (82.34 ± 0.42% vs. 79.92 ± 0.49% vs. 79.45 ± 0.26% vs. 79.30 ± 0.19%), blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability (7.73 ± 0.4 μg/g tissue vs. 4.1 ± 0.23 μg/g tissue vs. 3.58 ± 0.3 μg/g tissue vs. 3.38 ± 0.25 μg/g tissue) in doses of 50, 75 and 100 mg/Kg/day as compared with the control group in the transient model of focal cerebral ischemia. Although pretreatment with RHE plays an important role in the generation of tolerance against cerebral I/R injury, further studies are needed to clarify the mechanism of the ischemic tolerance. PMID:28243285

  12. Etiologic Ischemic Stroke Phenotypes in the NINDS Stroke Genetics Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, Hakan; Arsava, Ethem Murat; Andsberg, Gunnar; Benner, Thomas; Brown, Robert D.; Chapman, Sherita N.; Cole, John W.; Delavaran, Hossein; Dichgans, Martin; Engström, Gunnar; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Grewal, Raji P.; Gwinn, Katrina; Jern, Christina; Jimenez-Conde, Jordi; Jood, Katarina; Katsnelson, Michael; Kissela, Brett; Kittner, Steven J.; Kleindorfer, Dawn O.; Labovitz, Daniel L.; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Lee, Jin-Moo; Lehm, Manuel; Lemmens, Robin; Levi, Chris; Li, Linxin; Lindgren, Arne; Markus, Hugh S.; McArdle, Patrick F.; Melander, Olle; Norrving, Bo; Peddareddygari, Leema Reddy; Pedersén, Annie; Pera, Joanna; Rannikmäe, Kristiina; Rexrode, Kathryn M.; Rhodes, David; Rich, Stephen S.; Roquer, Jaume; Rosand, Jonathan; Rothwell, Peter M.; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schürks, Markus; Seiler, Stephan; Sharma, Pankaj; Slowik, Agnieszka; Sudlow, Cathie; Thijs, Vincent; Woodfield, Rebecca; Worrall, Bradford B.; Meschia, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose NINDS Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN) is an international consortium of ischemic stroke studies that aims to generate high quality phenotype data to identify the genetic basis of etiologic stroke subtypes. This analysis characterizes the etiopathogenetic basis of ischemic stroke and reliability of stroke classification in the consortium. Methods Fifty-two trained and certified adjudicators determined both phenotypic (abnormal test findings categorized in major etiologic groups without weighting towards the most likely cause) and causative ischemic stroke subtypes in 16,954 subjects with imaging-confirmed ischemic stroke from 12 US studies and 11 studies from 8 European countries using the web-based Causative Classification of Stroke System. Classification reliability was assessed with blinded re-adjudication of 1509 randomly selected cases. Results The distribution of etiologic categories varied by study, age, sex, and race (p<0.001 for each). Overall, only 40% to 54% of cases with a given major ischemic stroke etiology (phenotypic subtype) were classified into the same final causative category with high confidence. There was good agreement for both causative (kappa 0.72, 95%CI:0.69-0.75) and phenotypic classifications (kappa 0.73, 95%CI:0.70-0.75). Conclusions This study demonstrates that etiologic subtypes can be determined with good reliability in studies that include investigators with different expertise and background, institutions with different stroke evaluation protocols and geographic location, and patient populations with different epidemiological characteristics. The discordance between phenotypic and causative stroke subtypes highlights the fact that the presence of an abnormality in a stroke patient does not necessarily mean that it is the cause of stroke. PMID:25378430

  13. Genetic variation in WRN and ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Werner syndrome, a premature genetic aging syndrome, shares many clinical features reminiscent of normal physiological aging, and ischemic vascular disease is a frequent cause of death. We tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in the WRN gene was associated with risk of ischemic...... for ischemic cerebrovascular disease (P=0.06). In meta-analyses including 59,190 individuals in 5 studies, the hazard ratio for ischemic stroke for C1367R TT homozygotes versus CC/CT was 1.14 (1.04-1.25; P=0.008). CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that common genetic variation in WRN is associated...

  14. Anticoagulant Therapy In Ischemic Stroke Or TIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Mehrvar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the leading cause of disability and the third leading cause of death  . Anticoagulants   have been used to treat patients with acute ischemic stroke for many years. Despite their widespread use, the usefulness of emergency anticoagulation is a subject of debate. Disagreements exist about the best agent to administer, the route of administration, the use of a bolus dose to start treatment, the level of anticoagulation required, and the duration of treatment. There are 2 types of anticoagulants: Parenteral and oral. Heparin is an anticoagulant that used parenteral. Oral anticoagulants are including Warfarin and new anticoagulants such as Dabigatrn,Rivaroxaban ,Apixaban and other newer drugs. In patients with noncardioembolic  ischemic stroke or TIA antiplatelet agents are treatment of choice and preferred to anticoagulants. In cardioembolic  ischemic stroke or TIA with high risk of reembolization  anticoagulants  are considered as preferred treatment.  Warfarin, apixaban10mg/d ,Rivaroxaban20mg/d, and dabigatran 150 mg/d are all indicated for the prevention of recurrent stroke in patients with nonvalvular AF, whether paroxysmal or permanent.Also anticoagulant therapy is recommended for ischemic stroke or TIA patients in the setting of acute MI, atrial or ventricular thrombosis or dilated and restricted cardiomyopathy. Some valvular heart diseases are other indication for anticoagulant therapy in ischemic stroke or TIA patients. Ischemic  Stroke or TIA in patients with Cerebral vein thrombosis and  known hypercoagulable state specially anti phospholipid antibody syndrome are other indications for anticoagulant treatment.

  15. Stroke bricks - spatial brain regions to assess ischemic stroke localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszek, Bogdan; Jóźwiak, Rafał; Sobieszczuk, Ewa; Przelaskowski, Artur; Skadorwa, Tymon

    2017-03-29

    Computer-aided analysis of non-contrast CT (NCCT) images for rapid diagnosis of ischemic stroke is based on the augmented visualization of evolving ischemic lesions. Computerized support of NCCT often leads to overinterpretation of ischemic areas, thus it is of great interest to provide neurologically verified regions in order to improve accuracy of subsequent radiological assessment. We propose Stroke Bricks (StBr) as an arbitrary spatial division of brain tissue into the regions associated with specific clinical symptoms of ischemic stroke. Neurological stroke deficit is formally translated into respective areas of possible ischemic lesions. StBr were designed according to formalized mapping of neurological symptoms and were attributed to the uniquely defined areas of impaired blood supply. StBr concept may be useful for an integrated radiological CT-based assessment of suspected stroke cases or can be included into computer-aided tools to optimize the evaluation of stroke site and its extent. These data in turn are appropriable for further diagnosis, predicting the therapeutic outcome as well as for patients' qualification for an appropriate form of reperfusion therapy. The usefulness of Stroke Bricks was illustrated in the case studies.

  16. Thrombophilia And Arterial Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Abrishamizadeh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke (IS is a common cause of morbidity and mortality with significant socioeconomic impact especially when it affects young patients. Compared to the older adults, the incidence, risk factors, and etiology are distinctly different in younger IS. Hypercoagulable states are relatively more commonly detected in younger IS patients. Thrombophilic states are disorders of hemostatic mechanisms that result in a predisposition to thrombosis .Thrombophilia is an established cause of venous thrombosis. Therefore, it is tempting to assume that these disorders might have a similar relationship with arterial thrombosis. Despite this fact that 1-4 % of ischemic strokes are attributed to Thrombophillia, this   alone rarely causes arterial occlusions .Even in individuals with a positive thrombophilia screen and arterial thrombosis, the former might not be the primary etiological factor. Thrombophilic   disorders can be broadly divided into inherited or acquired conditions. Inherited thrombophilic states include deficiencies of natural anticoagulants such as protein C, protein S, and antithrombin III (AT III deficiency, polymorphisms causing resistance to activated protein C(Factor V Leiden mutation, and disturbance in the clotting balance (prothrombin gene 20210G/A variant. Of all the inherited  thrombophilic disorders, Factor V Leiden mutation is perhaps the commonest cause. On the contrary, acquired thrombophilic disorders are more common and include conditions such as the antiphospholipid syndrome, associated with lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies. The more useful and practical approach of ordering various diagnostic tests for the uncommon thrombophilic states tests should be determined by a detailed clinical history, physical examination, imaging studies and evaluating whether an underlying hypercoagulable state appears more likely. The laboratory thrombophilia   screening should be comprehensive and avoid missing the

  17. Stroke subtypes and factors associated with ischemic stroke in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    plegia, aphasia) with CT scan confirmation of ischemic stroke. The study was conducted at two radiology de- partments of a public and a private hospital in the ur- .... In a recent study carry out in 2012, Song et al.24 found similar proportion in race distribution of LACI and non. LACI stroke using magnetic resonance imaging ...

  18. Citicoline for ischemic stroke: ICTUS trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Anatolyevich Parfenov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives data available in the literature on the use of citicoline in an experimental model of ischemic stroke (IS and in randomized multicenter placebo-controlled trials. It analyzes the results of the ICTUS trial in which 2298 patients with IS who received randomly citicoline or placebo for 24 hours after the onset of symptoms (I000 mg intravenously every I2 hours during the first 3 days, then orally as one 500-mg tablet every 12 hours during 6 weeks. The results of the trial confirmed the safety of citicoline used in IS, but failed to show its significant advantage over placebo in reducing the degree of disability (global improvement 90 days later. However, to pool the results of the ICTUS trial with those of other randomized multicenter placebo-controlled studies demonstrates a significant decrease in the degree of disability in IS patients treated with citicoline.

  19. Guidelines for acute ischemic stroke treatment: part II: stroke treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Cristina Ouriques Martins

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The second part of these Guidelines covers the topics of antiplatelet, anticoagulant, and statin therapy in acute ischemic stroke, reperfusion therapy, and classification of Stroke Centers. Information on the classes and levels of evidence used in this guideline is provided in Part I. A translated version of the Guidelines is available from the Brazilian Stroke Society website (www.sbdcv.com.br.

  20. [Nonfasting triglycerides and risk of ischemic stroke--secondary publication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiberg, J.J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Jensen, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    The role of triglycerides in the risk of ischemic stroke remains controversial. We tested the hypothesis that increased levels of nonfasting triglycerides are associated with ischemic stroke in the general population. Men with a nonfasting triglyceride level 5 mmol/l had a multivariable, adjusted...... hazard ratio for ischemic stroke of 2.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.3-4.8) compared with men with a nonfasting triglyceride level triglycerides is associated with risk of ischemic stroke Udgivelsesdato...

  1. Inflammatory mechanisms in ischemic stroke: therapeutic approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirchgessner Annette

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute ischemic stroke is the third leading cause of death in industrialized countries and the most frequent cause of permanent disability in adults worldwide. Despite advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia, therapeutic options remain limited. Only recombinant tissue-plasminogen activator (rt-PA for thrombolysis is currently approved for use in the treatment of this devastating disease. However, its use is limited by its short therapeutic window (three hours, complications derived essentially from the risk of hemorrhage, and the potential damage from reperfusion/ischemic injury. Two important pathophysiological mechanisms involved during ischemic stroke are oxidative stress and inflammation. Brain tissue is not well equipped with antioxidant defenses, so reactive oxygen species and other free radicals/oxidants, released by inflammatory cells, threaten tissue viability in the vicinity of the ischemic core. This review will discuss the molecular aspects of oxidative stress and inflammation in ischemic stroke and potential therapeutic strategies that target neuroinflammation and the innate immune system. Currently, little is known about endogenous counterregulatory immune mechanisms. However, recent studies showing that regulatory T cells are major cerebroprotective immunomodulators after stroke suggest that targeting the endogenous adaptive immune response may offer novel promising neuroprotectant therapies.

  2. Aspirin resistant patients with recent ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Navas-Alcántara, M S; Fernández-Moreno, M C

    2014-04-01

    Some patients with a recent ischemic stroke who are being treated with aspirin as an antiaggregant suffer a new ischemic stroke. These patients (15-25%) have been called unresponsive to aspirin or aspirin resistant. The aspirin-resistant patients have a four-time greater risk of suffering a stroke. Furthermore, these strokes are generally more severe, with increased infarct volume and greater risk of recurrence. There is currently no ideal laboratory test to detect the resistance to the antiaggregant effect of aspirin. The study of resistance to aspirin would only be indicated in selected cases. In these patients, one should first rule out any "pseudo-resistance" to aspirin (lack of compliance, concomitant treatments that interfere with the action of the aspirin). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Periprocedural management of acute ischemic stroke intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlov, Nicholas; Nien, Yih Lin; Zaidat, Osama O; Nguyen, Thanh N

    2012-09-25

    Periprocedural medical management is an important aspect in optimizing the outcome of patients who undergo endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke. Blood pressure, fluid hydration, and antithrombotics are some of the elements that need to be tailored carefully to the patient according to the patency of his or her cerebral vasculature, the extent of his or her infarct, and the potential for hemorrhagic transformation. This article reviews the medical care of acute stroke patients before and after endovascular therapy.

  4. Left atrial catheter ablation and ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeusler, Karl Georg; Kirchhof, Paulus; Endres, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Left atrial catheter ablation (LACA) has become an established therapy to abolish drug-refractory symptomatic paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation. Restoring sinus rhythm by LACA may help to prevent atrial fibrillation-related strokes, but presently there is no evidence from randomized clinical trials to support this notion. This review summarizes the current knowledge and uncertainties regarding LACA and procedure-related ischemic stroke. In fact, most patients who undergo LACA have a rather low annual stroke risk even when left untreated, whereas LACA imposes a risk of procedure-related stroke of ≈0.5% to 1%. In addition, LACA may cause cerebral microemboli, resulting in ischemic lesions. These cerebral lesions, detectable by high-resolution MRI, could contribute to neuropsychological deficits and cognitive dysfunction. Furthermore, recurrent atrial fibrillaton episodes can be detected up to years after LACA and might cause ischemic strokes, especially in those patients in whom therapeutic anticoagulation was discontinued. Further prospective multicenter trials are needed to identify procedure-dependent risk factors for stroke and to optimize postprocedural anticoagulation management.

  5. Ischemic Stroke Penumbra and Extracorporeal Ozone Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasser, G.

    2013-01-01

    The course of events in ischemic strokes is normally seen from a point in which the penumbra is already in place. Since there is no known treatment for edema reduction, mainstream medicine focuses on re-opening the occluded vessel. Here we show that reducing the penumbra saves neuronal units from undergoing apoptosis. PMID:23859279

  6. Ischemic Stroke during Pregnancy and Puerperium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Del Zotto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke during pregnancy and puerperium represents a rare occurrence but it could be a serious and stressful event for mothers, infants, and also families. Whenever it does occur, many concerns arise about the safety of the mother and the fetus in relation to common diagnostic tests and therapies leading to a more conservative approach. The physiological adaptations in the cardiovascular system and in the coagulability that accompany the pregnant state, which are more significant around delivery and in the postpartum period, likely contribute to increasing the risk of an ischemic stroke. Most of the causes of an ischemic stroke in the young may also occur in pregnant patients. Despite this, there are specific conditions related to pregnancy which may be considered when assessing this particular group of patients such as pre-eclampsia-eclampsia, choriocarcinoma, peripartum cardiomiopathy, amniotic fluid embolization, and postpartum cerebral angiopathy. This article will consider several questions related to pregnancy-associated ischemic stroke, dwelling on epidemiological and specific etiological aspects, diagnostic issue concerning the use of neuroimaging, and the related potential risks to the embryo and fetus. Therapeutic issues surrounding the use of anticoagulant and antiplatelets agents will be discussed along with the few available reports regarding the use of thrombolytic therapy during pregnancy.

  7. hyperfibrinogenemia and ischemic stroke in young adul

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Imran Imran

    2014-11-07

    Nov 7, 2014 ... Abstract Background: Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) А148C/T which is located in b- fibrinogen gene (FGB) promoter has correlation with fibrinogen levels; however, the association of SNP А148C/T and ischemic stroke in young adult patients is contradictory. Aim: To determine the association of ...

  8. Obstructive sleep apnea in ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliye Tosun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in patients with ischemic stroke and to evaluate the effectiveness of nasal continuous positive airway pressure treatment. METHODS: Overnight polysomnography was performed by a computerized system in 19 subjects with ischemic stroke. Patients with an apnea-hypopnea index > 5 were considered to have obstructive sleep apnea. The appropriate level of continuous positive airway pressure for each patient was determined during an all-night continuous positive airway pressure determination study. Attended continuous positive airway pressure titration was performed with a continuous positive airway pressure auto-titrating device. RESULTS: Obstructive sleep apnea prevalence among patients with ischemic stroke was 73.7%. The minimum SaO2 was significantly lower, and the percent of total sleep time in the wake stage and stage 1 sleep was significantly longer in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. In two patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea, we observed a decrease in the apnea-hypopnea index, an increase in mean wake time, mean SaO2, and minimum SaO2, and alterations in sleep structures with continuous positive airway pressure treatment. CONCLUSION: As the diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea is of particular importance in secondary stroke prevention, we suggest that the clinical assessment of obstructive sleep apnea be part of the evaluation of stroke patients in rehabilitation units, and early treatment should be started.

  9. Ischemic stroke: carotid and vertebral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilela, P.; Goulao, A. [Hospital Garcia de Orta, Servico de Neurorradiologia, Almada (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    Ischemic strokes may have distinct aetiologies, including several different intrinsic arterial pathological disorders. The diagnosis and understanding of these arterial diseases is critical for the correct management of stroke as different treatment approaches are undertaken according to the aetiology. Atherosclerosis is by far the most common arterial disease among adults, and other pathological processes include arterial dissection, small vessel disease, inflammatory and non-inflammatory vasculopathy and vasomotor disorders. In children, there are several vasculopathies responsible for vaso-occlusive disease such as sickle-cell anemia, acute regressive angiopathy and Moya-Moya disease, neurofibromatosis, dissections, vasculitis associated with intracranial and systemic infections. An overview of the major carotid and vertebral pathological diseases responsible for ischemic stroke in adults and children, highlighting the accuracy of the different imaging modalities for its diagnosis and the imaging appearance of these diseases, is given. (orig.)

  10. Mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ye Zhang, Hong Deng, Chao Pan, Yang Hu, Qian Wu, Na Liu, Zhouping Tang Department of Neurology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Stroke is a clinical disease with high incidence, high disability rate, and high mortality. But effective and safe therapy for stroke remains limited. Adult mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs perform a variety of therapeutic functions. MSC delivery improves neurological outcomes in ischemic stroke models via neurorestorative and neuroprotective effects such as angiogenic effects, promoting endogenous proliferation, and reducing apoptosis and inflammation. MSC secretome also showed powerful therapeutic effects as a cell-based therapy in animal experiments. Several clinical trials on MSC implantation via different routes have now been completed in patients with stroke. Although challenges such as immunogenicity of allo-MSCs and large-scale production strategies need to be overcome, MSCs can be considered as a promising potential therapy for ischemic stroke. Keywords: mesenchymal stromal cell, stroke, therapy, transplantation, exosomes

  11. Antithrombotic and Thrombolytic Therapy for Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansberg, Maarten G.; O’Donnell, Martin J.; Khatri, Pooja; Lang, Eddy S.; Nguyen-Huynh, Mai N.; Schwartz, Neil E.; Sonnenberg, Frank A.; Schulman, Sam; Vandvik, Per Olav; Spencer, Frederick A.; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This article provides recommendations on the use of antithrombotic therapy in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Methods: We generated treatment recommendations (Grade 1) and suggestions (Grade 2) based on high (A), moderate (B), and low (C) quality evidence. Results: In patients with acute ischemic stroke, we recommend IV recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) if treatment can be initiated within 3 h (Grade 1A) or 4.5 h (Grade 2C) of symptom onset; we suggest intraarterial r-tPA in patients ineligible for IV tPA if treatment can be initiated within 6 h (Grade 2C); we suggest against the use of mechanical thrombectomy (Grade 2C) although carefully selected patients may choose this intervention; and we recommend early aspirin therapy at a dose of 160 to 325 mg (Grade 1A). In patients with acute stroke and restricted mobility, we suggest the use of prophylactic-dose heparin or intermittent pneumatic compression devices (Grade 2B) and suggest against the use of elastic compression stockings (Grade 2B). In patients with a history of noncardioembolic ischemic stroke or TIA, we recommend long-term treatment with aspirin (75-100 mg once daily), clopidogrel (75 mg once daily), aspirin/extended release dipyridamole (25 mg/200 mg bid), or cilostazol (100 mg bid) over no antiplatelet therapy (Grade 1A), oral anticoagulants (Grade 1B), the combination of clopidogrel plus aspirin (Grade 1B), or triflusal (Grade 2B). Of the recommended antiplatelet regimens, we suggest clopidogrel or aspirin/extended-release dipyridamole over aspirin (Grade 2B) or cilostazol (Grade 2C). In patients with a history of stroke or TIA and atrial fibrillation we recommend oral anticoagulation over no antithrombotic therapy, aspirin, and combination therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel (Grade 1B). Conclusions: These recommendations can help clinicians make evidence-based treatment decisions with their patients who have had strokes. PMID:22315273

  12. Ischemic stroke related to anabolic abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamarina, Rodrigo Daniel; Besocke, Ana Gabriela; Romano, Lucas Martin; Ioli, Pablo Leonardo; Gonorazky, Sergio Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) abuse increased in recent years, and it is associated with numerous adverse effects. Few reports on ischemic stroke related to anabolic steroid abuse have been published. We report a case of a 26-year-old male amateur athlete who suffered a posterior territory ischemic stroke. No abnormalities were found in angiography and echocardiography studies, neither in hemostatic profile. His only significant risk factor was nonmedical use of stanozolol, an anabolic steroid. Anabolic steroids are capable of increasing vascular tone, arterial tension, and platelet aggregation; therefore, they are prone to produce atherothrombotic phenomena. Because of young people's widespread use of anabolic steroids, physicians should be aware of this kind of complication.

  13. Hospital costs of ischemic stroke and TIA in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buisman, Leander R.; Tan, Siok Swan; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Redekop, William K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives:There have been no ischemic stroke costing studies since major improvements were implemented in stroke care. We therefore determined hospital resource use and costs of ischemic stroke and TIA in the Netherlands for 2012.Methods:We conducted a retrospective cost analysis using individual

  14. Neutrophil extracellular traps in ischemic stroke thrombi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laridan, Elodie; Denorme, Frederik; Desender, Linda; François, Olivier; Andersson, Tommy; Deckmyn, Hans; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen; De Meyer, Simon F

    2017-08-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been shown to promote thrombus formation. Little is known about the exact composition of thrombi that cause ischemic stroke. In particular, no information is yet available on the presence of NETs in cerebral occlusions. Such information is, however, essential to improve current thrombolytic therapy with tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA). This study aimed at investigating the presence of neutrophils and more specifically NETs in ischemic stroke thrombi. Sixty-eight thrombi retrieved from ischemic stroke patients undergoing endovascular treatment were characterized by immunostaining using neutrophil markers (CD66b and neutrophil elastase) and NET markers (citrullinated histone H3 [H3Cit] and extracellular DNA). Neutrophils and NETs were quantified. In addition, extracellular DNA was targeted by performing ex vivo lysis of retrieved thrombi with DNase 1 and t-PA. Neutrophils were detected extensively throughout all thrombi. H3Cit, a hallmark of NETs, was observed in almost all thrombi. H3Cit-positive area varied up to 13.45% of total thrombus area. Colocalization of H3Cit with extracellular DNA released from neutrophils confirmed the specific presence of NETs. H3Cit was more abundant in thrombi of cardioembolic origin compared to other etiologies. Older thrombi contained significantly more neutrophils and H3Cit compared to fresh thrombi. Interestingly, ex vivo lysis of patient thrombi was more successful when adding DNase 1 to standard t-PA. Neutrophils and NETs form important constituents of cerebral thrombi. Targeting of NETs with DNase 1 might have prothrombolytic potential in treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Ann Neurol 2017;82:223-232. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  15. Rising statin use and effect on ischemic stroke outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haymore Joseph

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statins (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors have neuroprotective effects in experimental stroke models and are commonly prescribed in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to determine if patients taking statins before hospital admission for stroke had an improved clinical outcome. Methods This was an observational study of 436 patients admitted to the National Institutes of Health Suburban Hospital Stroke Program between July 2000 and December 2002. Self-reported risk factors for stroke were obtained on admission. Stroke severity was determined by the admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score. Good outcome was defined as a Rankin score Results There were 436 patients with a final diagnosis of ischemic stroke; statin data were available for 433 of them. A total of 95/433 (22% of patients were taking a statin when they were admitted, rising from 16% in 2000 to 26% in 2002. Fifty-one percent of patients taking statins had a good outcome compared to 38% of patients not taking statins (p = 0.03. After adjustment for confounding factors, statin pretreatment was associated with a 2.9 odds (95% CI: 1.2–6.7 of a good outcome at the time of hospital discharge. Conclusions The proportion of patients taking statins when they are admitted with stroke is rising rapidly. Statin pretreatment was significantly associated with an improved functional outcome at discharge. This finding could support the early initiation of statin therapy after stroke.

  16. [Ischemic stroke related to spontaneous].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benamer, H; Bouzid, M A; Dufay, A; Akodad, M; Russel, S; Halna du Fretay, X; Haziza, F

    2017-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease in women is a particularly complex pathology especially in the youngest population. The clinical presentation of acute coronary syndromes is sometimes misleading and does not necessarily point to the potential presence of cardiac disease given the frequent absence of cardiovascular risks. Such complexity results in delayed diagnosis, which worsens the outcome of myocardial infarction and generates complications related to the absence of coronary revascularization. We report the case of a patient who suffered an (undiagnosed) apical myocardial infarction that went undetected and was complicated by a voluminous intraventricular thrombus with embolus migration in the cerebral circulation resulting in an ischemic accident. The combination of these two pathologies make their therapeutic management particularly difficult. As widely reported in the literature, the outcome of myocardial infarction in women is poorer than in their male counterparts for a number of reasons. We can assume that in the youngest patients, another physiopathological mechanism is often involved, namely, the occurrence of hematoma and spontaneous coronary dissection. Diagnosis is often difficult even with coronary angiography diagnosis. As shown in the case reported here, initial examination results, if not thoroughly analyzed, may be erroneously interpreted as normal. It is also likely that the presence of hematoma or coronary wall dissection without any plaque rupture may negatively influence the outcome owing to the implementation of inappropriate treatments. In conclusion, in patients presenting with an ischemic cerebral accident, meticulous cardiac examination must be performed even in young women with no cardiovascular risk factors given that the occurrence of hematoma or coronary dissection may contribute to the formation of mural thrombi in the setting of myocardial infarction. Cardiac MRI seems to be particularly effective in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction

  17. Green space and mortality following ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilker, Elissa H; Wu, Chih-Da; McNeely, Eileen; Mostofsky, Elizabeth; Spengler, John; Wellenius, Gregory A; Mittleman, Murray A

    2014-08-01

    Residential proximity to green space has been associated with physical and mental health benefits, but whether green space is associated with post-stroke survival has not been studied. Patients ≥ 21 years of age admitted to the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) between 1999 and 2008 with acute ischemic stroke were identified. Demographics, presenting symptoms, medical history and imaging results were abstracted from medical records at the time of hospitalization for stroke onset. Addresses were linked to average Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, distance to roadways with more than 10,000 cars/day, and US census block group. Deaths were identified through June 2012 using the Social Security Death Index. There were 929 deaths among 1645 patients with complete data (median follow up: 5 years). In multivariable Cox models adjusted for indicators of medical history, demographic and socioeconomic factors, the hazard ratio for patients living in locations in the highest quartile of green space compared to the lowest quartile was 0.78 (95% Confidence Interval: 0.63-0.97) (p-trend = 0.009). This association remained statistically significant after adjustment for residential proximity to a high traffic road. Residential proximity to green space is associated with higher survival rates after ischemic stroke in multivariable adjusted models. Further work is necessary to elucidate the underlying mechanisms for this association, and to better understand the exposure-response relationships and susceptibility factors that may contribute to higher mortality in low green space areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nonfasting triglycerides, cholesterol, and ischemic stroke in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Current guidelines on stroke prevention have recommendations on desirable cholesterol levels, but not on nonfasting triglycerides. We compared stepwise increasing levels of nonfasting triglycerides and cholesterol for their association with risk of ischemic stroke in the general population....

  19. Defining minor symptoms in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strambo, Davide; Zambon, Alberto A; Roveri, Luisa; Giacalone, Giacomo; Di Maggio, Giovanni; Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; La Gioia, Sara; Galantucci, Sebastiano; Comi, Giancarlo; Sessa, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Thrombolysis is often withheld from acute ischemic stroke patients presenting with mild symptoms; however, up to 40% of these patients end up with a poor outcome when left untreated. Since there is lack of consensus on the definition of minor symptoms, we aimed at addressing this issue by looking for features that would better predict functional outcomes at 3 months. Among all acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to our Stroke Unit (n = 1,229), we selected a cohort of patients who arrived within 24 hours from symptoms onset, with baseline NIHSS ≤6, not treated with thrombolysis (n = 304). Epidemiological data, comorbidities, radiological features and clinical presentation (NIHSS items) were collected to identify predictors of outcome. Our cohort was tested against minor stroke definitions selected from the literature and a newly proposed one. Three months after stroke onset, 97 patients (31.9%) had mRS ≥ 2. Independent predictors of poor outcome were age (OR 0.97 [95% CI 0.95-9.99]) and baseline NIHSS score (OR 0.79 [95% CI 0.67-0.94]), while cardioembolic aetiology was negatively associated (OR 3.29 [95% CI 1.51-7.14]). Items of NIHSS associated with poor outcome were impairment of right motor arm (OR 0.49 [95% CI 0.27-0.91]) or the involvement of any of the motor items (OR 0.69 [95% CI 0.48-0.99]). The definition of minor stroke as NIHSS ≤3 and the new proposed definition had the highest sensitivity and accuracy and were independent predictors of outcome. Our study confirmed that in spite of a low NIHSS score, one third of patients had poor outcome. As already described, age and NIHSS score remained independent predictors of poor outcome even in mild stroke. Also, motor impairment appeared a major determinant of poor outcome. The new proposed definition of minor stroke featured the NIHSS score and the NIHSS items that better predicted functional outcome. Awareness that even minor stroke can yield to poor outcome should sensitize patients to arrive early

  20. Pathophysiology and Biomarkers in Acute Ischemic Stroke – A Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stroke is one of the major causes of death and disability, including ischemic stroke, which accounts for 85 - 87 % of cases. Currently, there are few treatment options available for minimizing tissue death following a stroke. Emerging data suggest that biomarkers may help improve current clinical outcome of stroke. As such ...

  1. Ginsenoside Rd and ischemic stroke; a short review of literatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Fazel Nabavi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Panax ginseng is a well-known economic medical plant that is widely used in Chinese traditional medicine. This species contains a unique class of natural products—ginsenosides. Recent clinical and experimental studies have presented numerous lines of evidence on the promising role of ginsenosides on different diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and certain types of cancer. Nowadays, most of the attention has focused on ginsenoside Rd as a neuroprotective agent to attenuate ischemic stroke damages. Some of the evidence showed that ginsenoside Rd ameliorates ischemic stroke-induced damages through the suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation. Ginsenoside Rd can prolong neural cells' survival through the upregulation of the endogenous antioxidant system, phosphoinositide-3-kinase/AKT and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 pathways, preservation of mitochondrial membrane potential, suppression of the nuclear factor-kappa B, transient receptor potential melastatin, acid sensing ion channels 1a, poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1, protein tyrosine kinase activation, as well as reduction of cytochrome c-releasing and apoptosis-inducing factor. In the current work, we review the available reports on the promising role of ginsenoside Rd on ischemic stroke. We also discuss its chemistry, source, and the molecular mechanism underlying this effect.

  2. Ginsenoside Rd and ischemic stroke; a short review of literatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Sureda, Antoni; Habtemariam, Solomon; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-10-01

    Panax ginseng is a well-known economic medical plant that is widely used in Chinese traditional medicine. This species contains a unique class of natural products-ginsenosides. Recent clinical and experimental studies have presented numerous lines of evidence on the promising role of ginsenosides on different diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and certain types of cancer. Nowadays, most of the attention has focused on ginsenoside Rd as a neuroprotective agent to attenuate ischemic stroke damages. Some of the evidence showed that ginsenoside Rd ameliorates ischemic stroke-induced damages through the suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation. Ginsenoside Rd can prolong neural cells' survival through the upregulation of the endogenous antioxidant system, phosphoinositide-3-kinase/AKT and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 pathways, preservation of mitochondrial membrane potential, suppression of the nuclear factor-kappa B, transient receptor potential melastatin, acid sensing ion channels 1a, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, protein tyrosine kinase activation, as well as reduction of cytochrome c-releasing and apoptosis-inducing factor. In the current work, we review the available reports on the promising role of ginsenoside Rd on ischemic stroke. We also discuss its chemistry, source, and the molecular mechanism underlying this effect.

  3. A Mobitz type II atrioventricular block in multicentric ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalafat, Utku Murat; Akman, Canan; Karaboga, Turker; Ocak, Tarik

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac and cerebrovascular illnesses are major causes of mortality and morbidity. Thromboembolisms, which are the result of cardiac arrhythmia, are important causes of ischemic stroke. In this study, we present a rare case of multicentric ischemic stroke induced by Mobitz type II atrioventricular block. PMID:28154620

  4. Trans fat, aspirin, and ischemic stroke in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaemsiri, Sirin; Sen, Souvik; Tinker, Lesley; Rosamond, Wayne; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; He, Ka

    2012-11-01

    To examine the associations between dietary fat intake and ischemic stroke among postmenopausal women. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 87,025 generally healthy postmenopausal women (age, 50-79 years) enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study. Repeated and validated dietary assessments were done using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of ischemic stroke based on quintiles of the cumulative average of fat intake. We documented 1,049 incident cases of ischemic stroke over 663,041 person-years of follow-up. Women in the highest quintile of trans fat intake had a significantly higher incidence of ischemic stroke (HR, 1.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-1.79; p-trend = 0.048) compared with women in the lowest quintile, while controlling for multiple covariates. The observed association was modified by aspirin use (p-interaction = 0.02). The HR was 1.66 (95% CI, 1.21-2.36; p-trend fat and ischemic stroke or any ischemic stroke subtypes. In this large cohort of postmenopausal women, higher intake of trans fat was associated with incident ischemic stroke independent of major lifestyle/dietary factors. Aspirin use may attenuate the potential adverse effect of trans fat intake on ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  5. Intra‐arterial treatment for acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhemer, O.A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis deals with current issues in the field of acute ischemic stroke. The main objective has been to proof the effectiveness and safety of intra-arterial treatment in patients with acute ischemic stroke. MR CLEAN was the first study to proof the safety and effectiveness of intra-arterial

  6. Multiple Silent Lacunes Are Associated with Recurrent Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren Due; Skjøth, Flemming; Yavarian, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    ackground: Silent lacunes are a common finding on brain imaging in ischemic stroke patients, but the prognostic significance of these lesions is uncertain. We aimed at investigating the association of silent lacunes and the risk of ischemic stroke recurrence, death, and cardiovascular events...... in a cohort of patients with incident ischemic stroke and no atrial fibrillation (AF). Methods: We included 786 patients (mean age 59.5 (SD 14.0); 42.9% females) in a registry-based, observational cohort study on patients with first-ever ischemic stroke. On brain MRI we assessed the number of silent lacunes...... further adjusted for white matter hyperintensities. Patients were followed up until death or recurrence of ischemic stroke. Results: In 81 (10.3%) patients, a single silent lacune was present, and in 87 (11.1%) patients, multiple silent lacunes were present. Patients with at least one silent lacune were...

  7. Silent stroke in patients with transient ischemic attack or minor ischemic stroke. The Dutch TIA Trial Study Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herderscheê, D.; Hijdra, A.; Algra, A.; Koudstaal, P. J.; Kappelle, L. J.; van Gijn, J.

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We studied silent stroke (i.e., infarcts on computed tomographic scan not related to later symptoms) in patients after transient ischemic attack or minor ischemic stroke. METHODS: Ours is a cross-sectional study of 2,329 patients who were randomized in a secondary prevention

  8. Perinatal arterial ischemic stroke: presentation, risk factors, evaluation, and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Laura L; Rivkin, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    Perinatal arterial ischemic stroke is as common as large vessel arterial ischemic stroke in adults and leads to significant morbidity. Perinatal arterial ischemic stroke is the most common identifiable cause of cerebral palsy and can lead to cognitive and behavioral difficulties that are amortized over a lifetime. The literature on perinatal arterial ischemic stroke was reviewed and analyzed. Risk factors for perinatal arterial ischemic stroke include those that are maternal, neonatal, and placental. The most common clinical signs at presentation are seizures and hemiparesis. Evaluation should begin with thorough history acquisition and physical examination followed by magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, with consideration of magnetic resonance angiography of the head and neck, echocardiogram, and thrombophilia evaluation. Treatment beginning early to include physical, speech, and occupational therapies including constraint-induced movement therapy and close cognitive and developmental follow-up may be beneficial. Future treatments may include transcranial magnetic stimulation, hypothermia, and erythropoietin. Perinatal arterial ischemic stroke comprises a group of arterial ischemic injuries that can occur in the prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal periods in term and preterm infants with different types of perinatal arterial ischemic stroke having different clinical presentations, risk factors, and long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Plasma Magnesium and the Risk of Ischemic Stroke among Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarolo-Anthony, Sally N.; Jiménez, Monik C.; Chiuve, Stephanie E.; Spiegelman, Donna; Willett, Walter C.; Rexrode, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Lower plasma magnesium levels may be associated with higher blood pressure and endothelial dysfunction, but sparse prospective data are available for stroke. Methods Among 32,826 participants in the Nurses’ Health Study who provided blood samples in 1989–1990, incident ischemic strokes were identified and confirmed by medical records through 2006. We conducted a nested case-control analysis of 459 cases, matched 1:1 to controls on age, race/ethnicity, smoking status, date of blood draw, fasting status, menopausal status and hormone use. We used conditional logistic regression models to estimate the multivariable adjusted association of plasma magnesium and the risk of ischemic stroke and ischemic stroke subtypes. Results Median magnesium levels did not differ between ischemic stroke cases and controls (median=0.86 mmol/l for both; p-value=0.14). Conditional on matching factors, women in the lowest magnesium quintile had a relative risk (RR) of 1.34 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.86–2.10, p trend=0.13) for total ischemic stroke, compared to women in the highest quintile. Additional adjustment for risk factors and confounders did not substantially alter the risk estimates for total ischemic stroke. Women with magnesium levels magnesium levels ≥0.82 mmol/l. No significant effect modification was observed by age, body mass index, hypertension or diabetes. Conclusions Lower plasma magnesium levels may contribute to higher risk of ischemic stroke among women. PMID:25116874

  10. Characteristics of Misclassified CT Perfusion Ischemic Core in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuskens, R.R.; Borst, J.; Lucas, M.; Boers, A.M.; Berkhemer, O.A.; Roos, Y.B.; Walderveen, M.A. van; Jenniskens, S.F.M.; Zwam, W.H. van; Dippel, D.W.; Majoie, C.B.; Marquering, H.A.; et al.,

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CT perfusion (CTP) is used to estimate the extent of ischemic core and penumbra in patients with acute ischemic stroke. CTP reliability, however, is limited. This study aims to identify regions misclassified as ischemic core on CTP, using infarct on follow-up noncontrast CT. We aim to

  11. Characteristics of misclassified ct perfusion ischemic core in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.R.E.G. Geuskens (Ralph R.E.G.); J. Borst (Jordi); M. Lucas (Marit); A.M. Boers; O.A. Berkhemer (Olvert); B.W.E.M. Roos Yvo; M.A. van Walderveen (M.); S. Jenniskens (Sjoerd); W.H. van Zwam (Wim); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); C.B. Majoie (Charles); H. Marquering (Henk)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground CT perfusion (CTP) is used to estimate the extent of ischemic core and penumbra in patients with acute ischemic stroke. CTP reliability, however, is limited. This study aims to identify regions misclassified as ischemic core on CTP, using infarct on follow-up noncontrast CT.

  12. Characteristics of Misclassified CT Perfusion Ischemic Core in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuskens, Ralph R. E. G.; Borst, Jordi; Lucas, Marit; Boers, A. M. Merel; Berkhemer, Olvert A.; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.; van Walderveen, Marianne A. A.; Jenniskens, Sjoerd F. M.; van Zwam, Wim H.; Dippel, Diederik W. J.; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Marquering, Henk A.

    2015-01-01

    CT perfusion (CTP) is used to estimate the extent of ischemic core and penumbra in patients with acute ischemic stroke. CTP reliability, however, is limited. This study aims to identify regions misclassified as ischemic core on CTP, using infarct on follow-up noncontrast CT. We aim to assess

  13. Cardiac Complications in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Lewandowski

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To characterize cardiac complications in acute ischemic stroke (AIS patients admitted from an urban emergency department (ED. Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study evaluating AIS patients admitted from the ED within 24 hours of symptom onset who also had an echocardiogram performed within 72 hours of admission. Results: Two hundred AIS patients were identified with an overall in-hospital mortality rate of 8% (n¼ 16. In our cohort, 57 (28.5% of 200 had an ejection fraction less than 50%, 35 (20.4% of 171 had ischemic changes on electrocardiogram (ECG, 18 (10.5% of 171 presented in active atrial fibrillation, 21 (13.0% of 161 had serum troponin elevation, and 2 (1.1% of 184 survivors had potentially lethal arrhythmias on telemetry monitoring. Subgroup analysis revealed higher in-hospital mortality rates among those with systolic dysfunction (15.8% versus 4.9%; P ¼ 0.0180, troponin elevation (38.1% versus 3.4%; P , 0.0001, atrial fibrillation on ECG (33.3% versus 3.8%; P ¼ 0.0003, and ischemic changes on ECG (17.1% versus 6.1%; P ¼ 0.0398 compared with those without. Conclusion: A proportion of AIS patients may have cardiac complications. Systolic dysfunction, troponin elevation, atrial fibrillation, or ischemic changes on ECG may be associated with higher inhospital mortality rates. These findings support the adjunctive role of cardiac-monitoring strategies in the acute presentation of AIS. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:414–420.

  14. Quantitative Measurement of Physical Activity in Acute Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømmen, Anna Maria; Christensen, Thomas; Jensen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to quantitatively measure and describe the amount and pattern of physical activity in patients within the first week after acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack using accelerometers. METHODS: A total of 100 patients with acute is...... ischemic stroke. The method offers a low cost and noninvasive tool for future clinical interventional physiotherapeutic and early mobilization studies. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01560520....

  15. Changes in risk factor profile after ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornnes, Nete

    Background and aims. Adherence to preventive medication and to a healthy life style reduces stroke survivors’ risk of recurrent stroke. We investigated risk factor management in patients admitted to 3 Copenhagen hospitals with ischemic stroke (IS) Methods. 320 patients with acute IS were followed...

  16. Correlation study on cystatin C and ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Rong-bo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the relationship between serum cystatin C (Cys C and patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods The clinical and laboratory data of 115 patients with acute ischemic stroke and 110 controls were recorded and analyzed. Results The serum Cys C levels of patients in ischemic stroke group [(1.15 ± 0.34 mg/L] were higher than that of the control group [(0.99 ± 0.25 mg/L]. The difference between two groups was significant after correction of age and cardiovascular risk factors (t = ? 3.889, P = 0.000. It was found that age, Cys C, homocysteine (Hcy, type 2 diabetes mellitus [hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, fructosamine (FRU], smoking, alcohol consumption, hypertension and intima-media thickness (IMT were risk factors for ischemic stroke on univariate Logistic regression analysis. The difference of serum Cys C level between the patients and controls was significant (P = 0.000, but through covariance analysis, after adjusted other risk factors, it was not significant (P = 0.875. Conclusion The serum Cys C levels of patients in ischemic stroke group is higher than the control group. It can be used as an indicator in the acute phase of ischemic stroke. The elevation of serum Cys C is a risk factor for ischemic stroke, but not an independent risk factor.

  17. Therapeutic interventions for prevention of recurrent ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, Howard S

    2008-06-01

    Patients who suffer ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) are at increased risk for subsequent cerebrovascular events. Secondary prevention is essential to reduce risks of recurrence and should include lifestyle modification to improve cardiovascular health, along with strict control of blood pressure, glucose, and lipids. Recurrent stroke in ischemic stroke patients is likely to be the same subtype as the initial stroke, and treatment should be unique to the stroke subtype and patient risk factors. This article presents an overview of the recommendations for the secondary prevention of ischemic stroke or TIA and a review of the evidence supporting the role of antiplatelet therapy in managing the risk of recurrent noncardioembolic stroke. Although anticoagulants are recommended preventive treatment for cardioembolic stroke, they can increase the patient's risk of bleeding complications and are not recommended for all subtypes of ischemic stroke. The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association guidelines recommend 3 antiplatelet regimens for the secondary prevention of noncardioembolic ischemic stroke: aspirin (ASA), clopidogrel, and combined ASA + extended-release (ER) dipyridamole (DP). ASA + ER-DP is recommended over ASA alone. Several studies have established the effectiveness of these 3 antiplatelet regimens as first-line options in the secondary prevention of noncardioembolic ischemic stroke. Clopidogrel monotherapy is a reasonable alternative for patients who cannot tolerate ASA. ASA + ER-DP has been shown to be more effective than ASA alone and does not increase the risk of bleeding. Effective secondary prevention must also address modifiable risk factors, such as obesity, smoking, and excessive alcohol consumption.

  18. Therapeutically Targeting Neuroinflammation and Microglia after Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjeon Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke, and recent studies posit that inflammation acts as a double-edged sword, not only detrimentally augmenting secondary injury, but also potentially promoting recovery. An initial event of inflammation in ischemic stroke is the activation of microglia, leading to production of both pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators acting through multiple receptor signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the role of microglial mediators in acute ischemic stroke and elaborate on preclinical and clinical studies focused on microglia in stroke models. Understanding how microglia can lead to both pro- and anti-inflammatory responses may be essential to implement therapeutic strategies using immunomodulatory interventions in ischemic stroke.

  19. The effects of citicoline on acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Early reopening of the occluded artery is, thus, important in ischemic stroke, and it has been calculated that 2 million neurons die every minute in an ischemic stroke if no effective therapy is given; therefore, "Time is Brain." In massive hemispheric infarction and edema, surgical decompression...... lowers the risk of death or severe disability defined as a modified Rankin Scale score greater than 4 in selected patients. The majority, around 80%-85% of all ischemic stroke victims, does not fulfill the criteria for revascularization therapy, and also for these patients, there is no effective acute......,000 patients with various neurologic disorders, including acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The conclusion is that citicoline is safe to use and may have a beneficial effect in AIS patients and most beneficial in less severe stroke in older patients not treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator...

  20. [Recurrent ischemic strokes revealing Lyme meningovascularitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparsa, L; Blanc, F; Lauer, V; Cretin, B; Marescaux, C; Wolff, V

    2009-03-01

    Infectious vascularitis is an unusual cause of ischemic stroke (IS). We report a case of Lyme meningovascularitis complicated with multiple IS. A 64-year-old man, without any cardiovascular risk factor, was admitted for a right hemiparesia with a left thalamic hypodensity on the initial cerebral CT scan. No cause for this presumed IS could be identified. Later, the patient developed cognitive impairment and a bilateral cerebellar syndrome. Multiple infarcts and multiple intracranial stenosis were seen on cerebral MRI with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Cerebrospinal fluid tests showed meningitis and positive Lyme serology with an intrathecal specific anti-Borrelia antibody index. Antibiotic treatment was followed by good biological and partial clinicoradiological outcome. The diagnosis of Lyme neuroborreliosis should be entertained as a possible cause of IS in highly endemic zones.

  1. Correlation Analysis of Sleep Quality and Youth Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Shunqing Zhang; Cheng Chang; Juan Zhang; Bo Song; Hui Fang; YuMing Xu

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To study risk factors related to ischemic stroke (IS) in youth and the influence of sleep quality on youth ischemic stroke incidence. Methods. 223 patients aged 18 to 45 years who were admitted to Puyang People’s Hospital from June 2011 to February 2013 with a first-ever ischemic stroke were selected as the research cases. 158 young people with a normal physical examination were selected as the control group. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire was used to analy...

  2. Spreading depolarizations occur in human ischemic stroke with high incidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohmen, C.; Sakowitz, O.W.; Fabricius, M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Cortical spreading depression (CSD) and periinfarct depolarization (PID) have been shown in various experimental models of stroke to cause secondary neuronal damage and infarct expansion. For decades it has been questioned whether CSD or PID occur in human ischemic stroke. Here, we...... potential change spreading between adjacent channels was accompanied by transient depression of ECoG activity. In PID, a slow potential change spread between neighboring channels despite already established suppression of ECoG activity. Most CSDs and PIDs appeared repetitively in clusters. CSD or PID...... was observed in all but two patients. In these two patients, the electrode strip had been placed over infarcted tissue, and accordingly, no local ECoG or recurrent transient depolarization activity occurred throughout the observation period. Interpretation: CSD and PID occurred spontaneously with high...

  3. The Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy John

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family history and twins studies suggest an inherited component to ischemic stroke risk. Candidate gene association studies have been performed but have limited capacity to identify novel risk factor genes. The Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS aims to conduct a genome-wide scan in sibling pairs concordant or discordant for ischemic stroke to identify novel genetic risk factors through linkage analysis. Methods Screening at multiple clinical centers identifies patients (probands with radiographically confirmed ischemic stroke and a family history of at least 1 living full sibling with stroke. After giving informed consent, without violating privacy among other family members, the proband invites siblings concordant and discordant for stroke to participate. Siblings then contact the study coordinating center. The diagnosis of ischemic stroke in potentially concordant siblings is confirmed by systematic centralized review of medical records. The stroke-free status of potentially discordant siblings is confirmed by validated structured telephone interview. Blood samples for DNA analysis are taken from concordant sibling pairs and, if applicable, from 1 discordant sibling. Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines are created, and a scan of the human genome is planned. Discussion Conducting adequately powered genomics studies of stroke in humans is challenging because of the heterogeneity of the stroke phenotype and the difficulty of obtaining DNA samples from clinically well-characterized members of a cohort of stroke pedigrees. The multicentered design of this study is intended to efficiently assemble a cohort of ischemic stroke pedigrees without invoking community consent or using cold-calling of pedigree members.

  4. Basic and clinical research advances in ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-yuan MA

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the most common cerebrovascular disease worldwide, which seriously affects life quality of survivals and results in huge economic burden of families and society. In terms of clinical treatment for ischemic stroke, apart from thrombolytic therapy with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA, the occurrence and successful application of endovascular thrombectomy in patients of ischemic stroke is a major breakthrough. Meanwhile, many novel clinical drugs for ischemic stroke therapy have entered into clinical trials. Most of basic and clinical researches have showed promising results in ischemic stroke therapy. This review mainly summarizes the progress of research during the period of Twelfth Five-Year Plan for National Economic and Social Development on treatment of ischemic stroke, including omics technologies, gene therapy, microRNA (miRNA interference and stem cell therapy. Stem cell therapy has shown great potential since many clinical trials have been completed or are ongoing. The development and mutual transformation of basic and clinical research will provide valuable and comprehensive information for the precise treatment of ischemic stroke.

  5. Prediction of Recurrent Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack After Noncardiogenic Posterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changqing; Wang, Yilong; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Liping; Wang, ChunXue; Pu, Yuehua; Zou, Xinying; Pan, Yuesong; Wong, Ka Sing; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-07-01

    Posterior circulation ischemic stroke (IS) is generally considered an illness with a poor prognosis. However, there are no effective rating scales to predict recurrent stroke following it. Therefore, our aim was to identify clinical or radiological measures that could assist in predicting recurrent cerebral ischemic episodes. We prospectively enrolled 723 noncardiogenic posterior circulation IS patients with onset of symptoms Stroke risk factors, admission symptoms and signs, topographical distribution and responsible cerebral artery of acute infarcts, and any recurrent IS or transient ischemic attack (TIA) within 1 year were assessed. Cox regression was used to identify risk factors associated with recurrent IS or TIA within the year after posterior circulation IS. A total of 40 patients (5.5%) had recurrent IS or TIA within 1 year of posterior circulation IS. Multivariate Cox regression identified chief complaint with dysphagia (hazard ratio [HR], 4.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.69-10.2; P =0.002), repeated TIAs within 3 months before the stroke (HR, 15.4; 95% CI, 5.55-42.5; P <0.0001), responsible artery stenosis ≥70% (HR, 7.91; 95% CI, 1.00-62.6; P =0.05), multisector infarcts (HR, 5.38; 95% CI, 1.25-23.3; P =0.02), and not on antithrombotics treatment at discharge (HR, 3.06; 95% CI, 1.09-8.58; P =0.03) as independent predictors of recurrent IS or TIA. Some posterior circulation IS patients are at higher risk for recurrent IS or TIA. Urgent assessment and preventive treatment should be offered to these patients as soon as possible. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Racial Differences by Ischemic Stroke Subtype: A Comprehensive Diagnostic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previous studies have suggested that black populations have more small-vessel and fewer cardioembolic strokes. We sought to analyze racial differences in ischemic stroke subtype employing a comprehensive diagnostic workup with magnetic resonance-imaging-(MRI- based evaluation including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI. Methods. 350 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to an urban hospital with standardized comprehensive diagnostic evaluations were retrospectively analyzed. Ischemic stroke subtype was determined by three Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST classification systems. Results. We found similar proportions of cardioembolic and lacunar strokes in the black and white cohort. The only subtype category with a significant difference by race was “stroke of other etiology,” more common in whites. Black stroke patients were more likely to have an incomplete evaluation, but this did not reach significance. Conclusions. We found similar proportions by race of cardioembolic and lacunar strokes when employing a full diagnostic evaluation including DWI MRI. The relatively high rate of cardioembolism may have been underappreciated in black stroke patients when employing a CT approach to stroke subtype diagnosis. Further research is required to better understand the racial differences in frequency of “stroke of other etiology” and explore disparities in the extent of diagnostic evaluations.

  7. Hyperglycemia in acute ischemic stroke: pathophysiology and clinical management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, Nyika D.; Biessels, Geert Jan; DeVries, J. Hans; Roos, Yvo B.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with acute ischemic stroke frequently test positive for hyperglycemia, which is associated with a poor clinical outcome. This association between poor glycemic control and an unfavorable prognosis is particularly evident in patients with persistent hyperglycemia, patients without a known

  8. Fibrinogen gamma' in ischemic stroke: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Elim Y L; Uitte de Willige, Shirley; Vos, Hans L; Leebeek, Frank W G; Dippel, Diederik W J; Bertina, Rogier M; de Maat, Moniek P M

    2008-03-01

    To determine the contribution of fibrinogen gamma' levels and FGG haplotypes to ischemic stroke. Associations between fibrinogen gamma' levels, fibrinogen gamma'/total fibrinogen ratio, and FGG haplotypes with the risk of ischemic stroke were determined in 124 cases and 125 controls. Fibrinogen gamma'/total fibrinogen ratio was higher in patients than in controls during the acute phase of the stroke and lower in the convalescent phase 3 months after the stroke. FGG haplotype 3 (H3) was associated with a reduced risk of ischemic stroke (odds ratio 0.60; 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.94), but not with the fibrinogen gamma'/total fibrinogen ratio. In contrast, FGG-H2 was associated with a decreased fibrinogen gamma'/total fibrinogen ratio, but not with risk of stroke. Fibrinogen gamma'/total fibrinogen ratio is associated with ischemic stroke, especially in the acute phase of the disease. In addition, FGG-H3 haplotype appears to be protective against ischemic stroke.

  9. A Mobitz type II atrioventricular block in multicentric ischemic stroke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Mobitz type II atrioventricular block in multicentric ischemic stroke. Utku Murat Kalafat, Canan Akman, Turker Karaboga, Tarik Ocak. Abstract. Cardiac and cerebrovascular illnesses are major causes of mortality and morbidity. Thromboembolisms, which are the result of cardiac arrhythmia, are important causes of ischemic ...

  10. Takayasu Arteritis Presenting with Ischemic Stroke: Two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergane Memmodova

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Takayasu arteritis is a rare vasculitic disease characterized with inflamation of vessels. It commonly results stenosis and dilatations of aort and aortic branches. Ischemic Cerebrovascular Disease is one of the major complications of Takayasu arteritis. In this report we concluded two Takayasu arteritis cases in the light of current data whom presented with ischemic stroke clinical symptoms.

  11. Complications of hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke : a CT perfusion evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dankbaar, J.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314079408

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis the use of CT-perfusion (CTP) imaging in the evaluation of the most severe complications of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)) and ischemic stroke was explored. These complications are delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after SAH and damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) after ischemic

  12. Fish Consumption and Ischemic stroke in Southern Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wennberg Maria

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between fish intake and stroke incidence has been inconsistent in previous Swedish studies. Here, we report the risk of stroke and fish intake in a cohort from southern Sweden. Findings Data were obtained from an already available population based case-control study where the cases were defined as incident first-time ischemic stroke patients. Complete data on all relevant variables were obtained for 2722 controls and 2469 cases. The data were analyzed with logistic regression analysis. Stroke risk decreased with fat fish intake ([greater than or equal to] 1/week versus Conclusions The results suggest fat fish intake to decrease ischemic stroke risk and lean fish intake to increase women's stroke risk. The inconsistent relationship between fish intake and stroke risk reported in previous studies is further stressed by the results of this study.

  13. Relationship between Estradiol and Antioxidant Enzymes Activity of Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Sheikh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Some evidence suggests the neuroprotection of estrogen provided by the antioxidant activity of this compound. The main objective of this study was to determine the level of estradiol and its correlation with the activity of antioxidant enzymes, total antioxidant status and ferritin from ischemic stroke subjects. The study population consisted of 30 patients with acute ischemic stroke and 30 controls. There was no significant difference between estradiol in stroke and control group. The activity of superoxide dismutase and level of ferritin was higher in stroke compared with control group (<.05, <.001, resp.. There was no significant correlation between estradiol and glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, catalase, total antioxidant status, and ferritin in stroke and control groups. We observed inverse correlation between estradiol with superoxide dismutase in males of stroke patients (=−0.54, =.029. Our results supported that endogenous estradiol of elderly men and women of stroke or control group has no antioxidant activity.

  14. Periodontal Disease, Regular Dental Care Use, and Incident Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Souvik; Giamberardino, Lauren D; Moss, Kevin; Morelli, Thiago; Rosamond, Wayne D; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Beck, James; Offenbacher, Steven

    2018-02-01

    Periodontal disease is independently associated with cardiovascular disease. Identification of periodontal disease as a risk factor for incident ischemic stroke raises the possibility that regular dental care utilization may reduce the stroke risk. In the ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) study, pattern of dental visits were classified as regular or episodic dental care users. In the ancillary dental ARIC study, selected subjects from ARIC underwent fullmouth periodontal measurements collected at 6 sites per tooth and classified into 7 periodontal profile classes (PPCs). In the ARIC study 10 362 stroke-free participants, 584 participants had incident ischemic strokes over a 15-year period. In the dental ARIC study, 6736 dentate subjects were assessed for periodontal disease status using PPC with a total of 299 incident ischemic strokes over the 15-year period. The 7 levels of PPC showed a trend toward an increased stroke risk (χ 2 trend P periodontal disease). Periodontal disease was significantly associated with cardioembolic (hazard ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-5.6) and thrombotic (hazard ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.8) stroke subtypes. Regular dental care utilization was associated with lower adjusted stroke risk (hazard ratio, 0.77; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-0.94). We confirm an independent association between periodontal disease and incident stroke risk, particularly cardioembolic and thrombotic stroke subtype. Further, we report that regular dental care utilization may lower this risk for stroke. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Knowledge of ischemic stroke among a Mexico City population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góngora-Rivera, Fernando; Gutiérrez-Jiménez, Eugenio; Zenteno, Marco Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of risk factors (RF) and warning signs of stroke by the general population is fundamental to implement efficient preventive measures and provide timely treatment. The objective of this study was to assess this knowledge in a sample population of Mexico City. Personal interview was conducted in a multifamily building complex in Mexico City. The questionnaire included sociodemographic and comorbidity factors. Knowledge was determinated according to the number of correct answers. Chi-square and Wilcoxon rank tests were performed and significant variables were included in a multivariate logistic regression model using level of knowledge as the dependent variable. A total of 330 subjects were interviewed. Of the respondents, 66.7% named one RF associated with ischemic stroke, whereas only 12.1% identified 3 or more; one warning sign was identified by 36.7% and only 2.1% identified 3 or more. The factors associated with knowledge of RF were history of hypertension, educational level, and family history of ischemic stroke. Educational level and a family history of stroke were also associated with knowledge of warning signs. A Family history of ischemic stroke was the most important way to receive information about RF and warning signs of ischemic stroke. The study shows the need for informing the public about prevention and early detection of ischemic stroke.

  16. Pathophysiology and Risk of Atrial Fibrillation Detected after Ischemic Stroke (PARADISE): A Translational, Integrated, and Transdisciplinary Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, Maryse; Cerasuolo, Joshua O; Thorburn, Victoria; Fridman, Sebastian; Alsubaie, Rasha; Lopes, Renato D; Cipriano, Lauren E; Salamone, Paula; Melling, C W James; Khan, Ali R; Sedeño, Lucas; Fang, Jiming; Drangova, Maria; Montero-Odasso, Manuel; Mandzia, Jennifer; Khaw, Alexander V; Racosta, Juan M; Paturel, Justin; Samoilov, Lucy; Stirling, Devin; Balint, Brittany; Jaremek, Victoria; Koschinsky, Marlys L; Boffa, Michael B; Summers, Kelly; Ibañez, Agustín; Mrkobrada, Marko; Saposnik, Gustavo; Kimpinski, Kurt; Whitehead, Shawn N; Sposato, Luciano A

    2018-03-01

    It has been hypothesized that ischemic stroke can cause atrial fibrillation. By elucidating the mechanisms of neurogenically mediated paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, novel therapeutic strategies could be developed to prevent atrial fibrillation occurrence and perpetuation after stroke. This could result in fewer recurrent strokes and deaths, a reduction or delay in dementia onset, and in the lessening of the functional, structural, and metabolic consequences of atrial fibrillation on the heart. The Pathophysiology and Risk of Atrial Fibrillation Detected after Ischemic Stroke (PARADISE) study is an investigator-driven, translational, integrated, and transdisciplinary initiative. It comprises 3 complementary research streams that focus on atrial fibrillation detected after stroke: experimental, clinical, and epidemiological. The experimental stream will assess pre- and poststroke electrocardiographic, autonomic, anatomic (brain and heart pathology), and inflammatory trajectories in an animal model of selective insular cortex ischemic stroke. The clinical stream will prospectively investigate autonomic, inflammatory, and neurocognitive changes among patients diagnosed with atrial fibrillation detected after stroke by employing comprehensive and validated instruments. The epidemiological stream will focus on the demographics, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of atrial fibrillation detected after stroke at the population level by means of the Ontario Stroke Registry, a prospective clinical database that comprises over 23,000 patients with ischemic stroke. PARADISE is a translational research initiative comprising experimental, clinical, and epidemiological research aimed at characterizing clinical features, the pathophysiology, and outcomes of neurogenic atrial fibrillation detected after stroke. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Global DNA methylation of ischemic stroke subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Soriano-Tárraga

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke (IS, a heterogeneous multifactorial disorder, is among the leading causes of mortality and long-term disability in the western world. Epidemiological data provides evidence for a genetic component to the disease, but its epigenetic involvement is still largely unknown. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, change over time and may be associated with aging processes and with modulation of the risk of various pathologies, such as cardiovascular disease and stroke. We analyzed 2 independent cohorts of IS patients. Global DNA methylation was measured by luminometric methylation assay (LUMA of DNA blood samples. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to assess the methylation differences between the 3 most common IS subtypes, large-artery atherosclerosis (LAA, small-artery disease (SAD, and cardio-aortic embolism (CE. A total of 485 IS patients from 2 independent hospital cohorts (n = 281 and n = 204 were included, distributed across 3 IS subtypes: LAA (78/281, 59/204, SAD (97/281, 53/204, and CE (106/281, 89/204. In univariate analyses, no statistical differences in LUMA levels were observed between the 3 etiologies in either cohort. Multivariate analysis, adjusted by age, sex, hyperlipidemia, and smoking habit, confirmed the lack of differences in methylation levels between the analyzed IS subtypes in both cohorts. Despite differences in pathogenesis, our results showed no global methylation differences between LAA, SAD, and CE subtypes of IS. Further work is required to establish whether the epigenetic mechanism of methylation might play a role in this complex disease.

  18. Ketogenic Diet Provides Neuroprotective Effects against Ischemic Stroke Neuronal Damages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheida Shaafi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in the world. Many mechanisms contribute in cell death in ischemic stroke. Ketogenic diet which has been successfully used in the drug-resistant epilepsy has been shown to be effective in many other neurologic disorders. The mechanisms underlying of its effects are not well studied, but it seems that its neuroprotective ability is mediated at least through alleviation of excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis events. On the basis of these mechanisms, it is postulated that ketogenic diet could provide benefits to treatment of cerebral ischemic injuries.

  19. Paradoxical centrally increased diffusivity in perinatal arterial ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stence, Nicholas V.; Mirsky, David M.; Deoni, Sean C.L. [University of Colorado Anschutz School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); Armstrong-Wells, Jennifer [University of Colorado Anschutz School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics (Neurology) and OB/GYN, Aurora, CO (United States); University of Colorado Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Restricted diffusion on acute MRI is the diagnostic standard for perinatal arterial ischemic stroke. In a subset of children with perinatal arterial ischemic stroke, primarily those with large infarct volumes, we noted a core of centrally increased diffusivity with a periphery of restricted diffusion. Given the paradoxical diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) appearance observed in some children with perinatal arterial ischemic stroke, we sought to determine its significance and hypothesized that: (1) centrally increased diffusivity is associated with larger infarcts in perinatal arterial ischemic stroke and (2) this tissue is irreversibly injured (infarcted). We reviewed all perinatal arterial ischemic stroke cases in a prospective cohort study from Aug. 1, 2000, to Jan. 1, 2012. Infarct volumes were measured by drawing regions of interest around the periphery of the area of restricted diffusion on DWI. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare means between groups. Of 25 eligible cases, centrally increased diffusivity was seen in 4 (16%). Cases with centrally increased diffusivity had larger average infarct volumes (mean 117,182 mm{sup 3} vs. 36,995 mm{sup 3}; P = 0.008), higher average apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in the infarct core (1,679 x 10{sup -6} mm{sup 2}/s vs. 611 x 10{sup -6} mm{sup 2}/s, P < 0.0001), and higher ADC ratio (1.2 vs. 0.5, P < 0.0001). At last clinical follow-up, children with perinatal arterial ischemic stroke and centrally increased diffusivity were more often treated for ongoing seizures (75% vs. 0%; P < 0.001) than those without. Centrally increased diffusivity was associated with larger stroke volume and the involved tissue was confirmed to be infarcted on follow-up imaging. Radiologists should be aware of this unusual appearance of perinatal arterial ischemic stroke in order to avoid underestimating infarct volume or making an incorrect early diagnosis. (orig.)

  20. [Neuroprotective and antiamnesic effects of GK-2h dipeptide HNGF mimetic on a model of experimental ischemic stroke of brain cortex prefrontal areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudasheva, T A; Romanova, G A; Shakova, F M; Kotel'nikova, S O; Barskov, I V; Stel'mashuk, E V; Seredenin, S B

    2012-01-01

    Neuroprotective and antiamnesic effects of human nerve growth factor (HNGF) synthetic dipeptide mimetic bis-(N-monosuccinyl-glycyl-lysine)hexamethylenediamide (GK-2h) has been studied on a model of bilateral photochemically induced focal ischemical brain injury in prefrontal cortex of rats. It is established that a single intraperitoneal injection of GK-2h (0.1 mg/kg) 1 h or 4 h after operation, followed by injections on the 2nd, 4th and 8th days after operation, results (on the 9th day) in reduction of the cortical infarction volume by 47 or 65%, and leads to restoration of the passive avoidance reflex (acquired before experimental ischemic insult) by 42 and 60%, respectively. It is concluded that GK-2h possesses significant neuroprotective properties.

  1. Ischemic stroke subtype is associated with outcome in thrombolyzed patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, Marie Louise; Simonsen, C Z; Svendsen, M L

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The impact of ischemic stroke subtype on clinical outcome in patients treated with intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) is sparsely examined. We studied the association between stroke subtype and clinical outcome in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-evaluated patients...

  2. Cortical modulation of cardiac autonomic activity in ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Victor; Matei, Daniela; Cuciureanu, Dan; Corciova, Calin; Ignat, Bogdan; Popescu, Cristian Dinu

    2016-12-01

    The cardiovascular system is regulated by the autonomic nervous system, under cortical modulation. Stroke can induce cardiac autonomic imbalance, therefore, causing secondary cardiovascular complications. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is a simple method to appraise the autonomic nervous function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cardiac autonomic activity in patients that suffered an ischemic stroke in middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. Using Biopac Acquisition System, we monitored ECG in rest condition and during Ewing's tests. From these measurements, HRV parameters (using time and frequency domain analysis) were determined in 20 right MCA and 20 left MCA ischemic stroke patients, in the first 6 months after the acute event. Data were compared with 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. All the patients were right handed. In ischemic stroke patients, HRV parameters were significantly modified compared to controls (p < 0.05) and we found asymmetric responses to different stimulation autonomic tests between right and left hemisphere. Parameters illustrating the parasympathetic predominance in time domain (RMSSD) and frequency domain (HF) analysis were higher in left hemisphere stroke compared to right hemisphere stroke patients (p < 0.01) in resting state. From Ewing's battery test, patients with left hemisphere ischemic stroke showed predominance of parasympathetic activity to deep breathing (p < 0.01), while HRV parameters in right hemisphere ischemic stroke patients described a reduced cardiac parasympathetic innervation (p < 0.01). Cardiac autonomic imbalance occurs more often after right hemisphere ischemic stroke. HRV study may highlight cardiac dysfunctions that increase the risk of cardiovascular complications and portends a poor long-term outcome.

  3. Hypertensive patients using thiazide diuretics as primary stroke prevention make better functional outcome after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hong-Mo; Lin, Wei Chun; Wang, Cheng-Hsien; Lin, Leng-Chieh

    2014-10-01

    Thiazides have been used for the control of blood pressure and primary prevention of ischemic stroke. No previous studies have assessed the influence of thiazides on functional prognosis after ischemic stroke. Demographics, prestroke conditions, poststroke National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, and clinical and laboratory parameters were prospectively registered in 216 Taiwanese patients. One hundred forty patients who completed follow-up 3 months after experiencing ischemic stroke were assessed with the modified Rankin scale as functional prognoses. Twenty-one patients used thiazide to control hypertension before experiencing ischemic stroke. No differences of stroke subtypes and comorbidities before stroke were observed between the 2 groups. The emergency department National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was lesser among thiazide users (4 [2-7] versus 6 [4-16], P = .02). Among 140 patients who completed follow-up in 90 days, thiazide users had more favorable functional status (modified Rankin scale ≤2: 42.4% versus 26.9%, P = .02, odds ratio 3.34, 95%, confidence interval .130-.862). Hypertensive patients treated with thiazides long term had a lesser severity of stroke and better functional outcomes after ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A rating system for prompt clinical diagnosis of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera, J O; Wacher, N H; Laredo, F; López, A; Martínez, V; González, J; Lifshitz, A; Feinstein, A R

    2000-01-01

    When a CT scan is not available, an early accurate clinical diagnosis of ischemic stroke is essential to initiate prompt therapy. Our objective was to construct a clinical index that is easy to use when stroke patients are first evaluated at the hospital, to identify those who probably are experiencing an acute ischemic episode. The study was conducted at a university-affiliated medical referral center and two community general hospitals in Mexico. Clinical records were reviewed for 801 patients with sudden onset of a focal or global neurologic dysfunction, presumably of vascular origin lasting more than 24 h. Eligibility criteria for this study were admission to the hospital within the first 24 h after symptomatic onset, CT scan diagnosis between 24 and 72 h, and age >45 years. Ischemic stroke included cases of arterial brain infarction, while nonischemic stroke included subarachnoid or intraparenchymatous hemorrhage, mass lesion, venous infarction, and in cases without a CT scan evidence that could explain the clinical manifestations. Data excerpted for analysis were age, sex, history of diabetes mellitus or previous stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA), time of onset of symptoms, presence of headache, vomiting, neck stiffness, hemiplegia, leukocytosis or atrial fibrillation, diastolic blood pressure, and Glasgow coma scale (GCS) rating. Two multivariable analyses were used: 1) step-wise multiple logistic regression (SMLR), and 2) conjunctive consolidation (CC). After appropriate exclusions, the study proceeded with 83 ischemic and 42 nonischemic stroke patients. With SMLR, six variables were selected as predictive for ischemic stroke, including neck stiffness, diastolic blood pressure, previous history of stroke/TIA, hemiplegia, GCS, and atrial fibrillation. An appropriate sum of weighted ratings had a positive predictive value (PPV) of 100% for ischemic stroke. With consolidated categories, the PPV was 97% when patients had the following: no neck stiffness

  5. Factoring in Factor VIII With Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, James E; Samai, Alyana; Albright, Karen C; Boehme, Amelia K; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2015-10-01

    There is growing research interest into the etiologies of cryptogenic stroke, in particular as it relates to hypercoagulable states. An elevation in serum levels of the procoagulant factor VIII is recognized as one such culprit of occult cerebral infarctions. It is the objective of the present review to summarize the molecular role of factor VIII in thrombogenesis and its clinical use in the diagnosis and prognosis of acute ischemic stroke. We also discuss the utility of screening for serum factor VIII levels among patients at risk for, or those who have experienced, ischemic stroke. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Pharmaceutical Sponsorship Bias Influences Thrombolytic Literature in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P Radecki

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The efficacy of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke remains controversial in Emergency Medicine and has not been fully endorsed by either the American College of Emergency Physicians or the American Academy of emergency medicine. A growing recognition exists of the influence of pharmaceutical sponsorship on the reported findings of published clinical trials. Sponsorship bias has been suggested as a potential criticism of the literature and guidelines favoring thrombolytic therapy. Objective: The objective of this study is to review the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke and document the presence or absence of pharmaceutical sponsorship. Methods: A publication-citation analysis was performed to identify the most frequently cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke. Identified articles were reviewed for disclosures of pharmaceutical funding. Results: Of the 20 most-cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute stroke, 17 (85% disclosed pharmaceutical sponsorship. These disclosures range from general sponsorship to direct employment of authors by pharmaceutical companies. Conclusion: An overwhelming predominance of the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke is susceptible to sponsorship bias. This potential bias may provide a basis for physician concern regarding the efficacy and safety of thrombolytic therapy. Further, large, independent, placebo-controlled studies may be required to guide therapy and professional guidelines definitively for acute ischemic stroke. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:435–441.

  7. Anticoagulation in acute ischemic stroke: A systematic search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayara L. Froio

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Stroke is one of the most important diseases worldwide. Several clinical scenarios demand full dose of anticoagulants primary to stroke etiology or to the treatment of comorbidity. However, controversy exists over many issues regarding anticoagulation treatment in stroke such as time for initiation, efficacy according to stroke etiology, the ideal dose of anticoagulants, and whether novel anticoagulants should be used. Method: Computerized search for clinical trials and randomized controlled clinical trials was done to the present date at Medline, Scielo, Embase, PsychInfo, and Cochrane Library using MeSH terms and the keywords stroke, ischemic stroke, anticoagulation, anticoagulants, heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, warfarin, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban. The PRISMA statement was used to evaluate clinical trials. Results: Fourteen clinical trials were selected based on inclusion criteria. No evidence was found supporting the early use of heparin, heparinoids or low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH early after stroke. No consistent evidence for the use of warfarin and the newer oral anticoagulants were found. Argatroban was the only anticoagulant with significant positive results early after large-artery ischemic stroke. Conclusion: The ideal time for initiating anticoagulation remains undefined, requiring further investigation. Early anticoagulation for ischemic stroke is not recommended, with few exceptions, such as that of argatroban.

  8. Parvovirus B19 Infection in Children With Arterial Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Heather J; Luna, Jorge M; Wintermark, Max; Hills, Nancy K; Tokarz, Rafal; Li, Ying; Glaser, Carol; DeVeber, Gabrielle A; Lipkin, W Ian; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2017-10-01

    Case-control studies suggest that acute infection transiently increases the risk of childhood arterial ischemic stroke. We hypothesized that an unbiased pathogen discovery approach utilizing MassTag-polymerase chain reaction would identify pathogens in the blood of childhood arterial ischemic stroke cases. The multicenter international VIPS study (Vascular Effects of Infection in Pediatric Stroke) enrolled arterial ischemic stroke cases, and stroke-free controls, aged 29 days through 18 years. Parental interview included questions on recent infections. In this pilot study, we used MassTag-polymerase chain reaction to test the plasma of the first 161 cases and 34 controls enrolled for a panel of 28 common bacterial and viral pathogens. Pathogen DNA was detected in no controls and 14 cases (8.7%): parvovirus B19 (n=10), herpesvirus 6 (n=2), adenovirus (n=1), and rhinovirus 6C (n=1). Parvovirus B19 infection was confirmed by serologies in all 10; infection was subclinical in 8. Four cases with parvovirus B19 had underlying congenital heart disease, whereas another 5 had a distinct arteriopathy involving a long-segment stenosis of the distal internal carotid and proximal middle cerebral arteries. Using MassTag-polymerase chain reaction, we detected parvovirus B19-a virus known to infect erythrocytes and endothelial cells-in some cases of childhood arterial ischemic stroke. This approach can generate new, testable hypotheses about childhood stroke pathogenesis. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Community Level Disadvantage and the Likelihood of First Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadette Boden-Albala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Residing in “disadvantaged” communities may increase morbidity and mortality independent of individual social resources and biological factors. This study evaluates the impact of population-level disadvantage on incident ischemic stroke likelihood in a multiethnic urban population. Methods. A population based case-control study was conducted in an ethnically diverse community of New York. First ischemic stroke cases and community controls were enrolled and a stroke risk assessment performed. Data regarding population level economic indicators for each census tract was assembled using geocoding. Census variables were also grouped together to define a broader measure of collective disadvantage. We evaluated the likelihood of stroke for population-level variables controlling for individual social (education, social isolation, and insurance and vascular risk factors. Results. We age-, sex-, and race-ethnicity-matched 687 incident ischemic stroke cases to 1153 community controls. The mean age was 69 years: 60% women; 22% white, 28% black, and 50% Hispanic. After adjustment, the index of community level disadvantage (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.7–2.1 was associated with increased stroke likelihood overall and among all three race-ethnic groups. Conclusion. Social inequalities measured by census tract data including indices of community disadvantage confer a significant likelihood of ischemic stroke independent of conventional risk factors.

  10. Predictors and Outcomes of Dysphagia Screening After Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joundi, Raed A; Martino, Rosemary; Saposnik, Gustavo; Giannakeas, Vasily; Fang, Jiming; Kapral, Moira K

    2017-04-01

    Guidelines advocate screening all acute stroke patients for dysphagia. However, limited data are available regarding how many and which patients are screened and how failing a swallowing screen affects patient outcomes. We sought to evaluate predictors of receiving dysphagia screening after acute ischemic stroke and outcomes after failing a screening test. We used the Ontario Stroke Registry from April 1, 2010, to March 31, 2013, to identify patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke and determine predictors of documented dysphagia screening and outcomes after failing the screening test, including pneumonia, disability, and death. Among 7171 patients, 6677 patients were eligible to receive dysphagia screening within 72 hours, yet 1280 (19.2%) patients did not undergo documented screening. Patients with mild strokes were significantly less likely than those with more severe strokes to have documented screening (adjusted odds ratio, 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.41-0.64). Failing dysphagia screening was associated with poor outcomes, including pneumonia (adjusted odds ratio, 4.71; 95% CI, 3.43-6.47), severe disability (adjusted odds ratio, 5.19; 95% CI, 4.48-6.02), discharge to long-term care (adjusted odds ratio, 2.79; 95% CI, 2.11-3.79), and 1-year mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.42; 95% CI, 2.09-2.80). Associations were maintained in patients with mild strokes. One in 5 patients with acute ischemic stroke did not have documented dysphagia screening, and patients with mild strokes were substantially less likely to have documented screening. Failing dysphagia screening was associated with poor outcomes, including in patients with mild strokes, highlighting the importance of dysphagia screening for all patients with acute ischemic stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Transthoracic echocardiography in Thai patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriyapong, Tapawas; Dharmasaroja, Pompatr A; Muengtaweepongsa, Sombat; Piyayotai, Dilok; Hutayanon, Pisit

    2012-01-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is routinely performed to look for the cardiac sources of emboli in many Western stroke centers. Due to a limitation of resources in Thailand, echocardiography is done in only some patients with acute ischemic stroke. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the need for cardiac investigations, especially TTE, in Thai patients with acute ischemic stroke. Two-hundred and seven patients with acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), who had TTE results during August 2006 to November 2008, were studied. Patients were divided into 2 groups by the risk of cardioembolism: low- versus high-risk groups. All echocardiography results were reviewed and classified by the need for management change following the echocardiography. Abnormal TTE results indicating a need for change in management were found in 4% (4/102) and 18% (18/105) in low- and high- risk patients, respectively The results of ECG alone led to change in management in 17% (36 patients). Atrial fibrillation was the most common cause of cardioembolism, which was found in 35 patients (17%). Because of limited resources in Thailand, ECG should be routinely performed on all ischemic stroke patients and TTE in patients with high risk for cardioembolism. However larger studies are still needed to clarify the benefits of echocardiography in low-risk patients.

  12. Mortality study for a decade: ischemic stroke in the elderly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier J. García Zacarías

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular diseases are among the top three causes of death in Cuba and the world, about 80 % of these patients belong to Ischemic Stroke. The objective of this paper is to describe the clinical and developmental profile of patients who died of Ischemic Stroke. A descriptive, prospective research, cross- sectional study was made, the sample included all deaths from ischemic stroke at the University Hospital "Camilo Cienfuegos" Sancti Spiritus, between January 1st, 2001 and December 31, 2010, and persons over 60 years of age with necropsy performed. Atherothrombotic stroke was the most frequent category, the highest mortality rates were observed in persons over 80 years of age and in females, hypertension, ischemic heart disease and transient ischemic attack were the main significant medical history; most patients were admitted in the stroke unit and died in Middle Progressive Care, cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension and hypostatic bronchopne umonia were complications and specific main causes of most frequent death. Value of cerebral edema and hypostatic bronchopneumonia as clinical complications and causes of death in patients investigated is confirmed.

  13. A Clinical Survey Efficacy Of Frankincense In Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Jivad

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background &Aims: Ischemic stroke is the most common cause of stroke ,and paralysis and movement disorders are the most symptoms of stroke. Therefore, it is important to find a method for improving the disorders. This study aimed to examine the clinical efficacy of frankincense in patients with the acute ischemic stroke. Methods: In this clinical trial, 60 patients with ischemic stroke were randomly allocated into the treatment and control groups (n=30. In the treatment group, in addition to routine treatment of stroke, four capsules containing 500 mg powdered frankincense was given daily  , but in the control group, was performed only the treatment of stroke (no frankincense. The treatment lasted for 1 month. The NIHSS scale (for assessment of speech and muscle strength at the beginning,  the seventh day and end of the study for each patient was completed. Statistical analysis was performed using independent t-test, chi-square, mann withney in SPSS software. Results: Results showed that only improvement of muscle strength in patients left limb increased significantly in stage II in the treatment group than the control group. Conclusion: Adding frankincense to treatment of patients with stroke can be effective on improvement muscle strength in patients with muscle weakness and non-dominant side in acute neurological disorders. While that is not effective on improving muscle strength of the right limb or speech.

  14. Nutrition for brain recovery after ischemic stroke: an added value to rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilani, Roberto; Sessarego, Paolo; Iadarola, Paolo; Barbieri, Annalisa; Boschi, Federica

    2011-06-01

    In patients who undergo rehabilitation after ischemic stroke, nutrition strategies are adopted to provide tube-fed individuals with adequate nutrition and/or to avoid the body wasting responsible for poor functional outcome and prolonged stay in the hospital. Investigations have documented that nutrition interventions can enhance the recovery of neurocognitive function in individuals with ischemic stroke. Experimental studies have shown that protein synthesis is suppressed in the ischemic penumbra. In clinical studies on rehabilitation patients designed to study the effects of counteracting or limiting this reduction of protein synthesis by providing protein supplementation, patients receiving such supplementation had enhanced recovery of neurocognitive function. Cellular damage in cerebral ischemia is also partly caused by oxidative damage secondary to free radical formation and lipid peroxidation. Increased oxidative stress negatively affects a patient's life and functional prognosis. Some studies have documented that nutrition supplementation with B-group vitamins may mitigate oxidative damage after acute ischemic stroke. Experimental investigations have also shown that cerebral ischemia changes synaptic zinc release and that acute ischemia increases zinc release, aggravating neuronal injury. In clinical practice, patients with ischemic stroke were found to have a lower than recommended dietary intake of zinc. Patients in whom daily zinc intake was normalized had better recovery of neurological deficits than subjects given a placebo. The aim of this review is to highlight those brain metabolic alterations susceptible to nutrition correction in clinical practice. The mechanisms underlying the relationship between cerebral ischemia and nutrition metabolic conditions are discussed.

  15. Atrial Fibrillation Genetic Risk and Ischemic Stroke Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubitz, Steven A; Parsons, Owen E; Anderson, Christopher D; Benjamin, Emelia J; Malik, Rainer; Weng, Lu-Chen; Dichgans, Martin; Sudlow, Cathie L; Rothwell, Peter M; Rosand, Jonathan; Ellinor, Patrick T; Markus, Hugh S; Traylor, Matthew

    2017-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a leading cause of cardioembolic stroke, but the relationship between AF and noncardioembolic stroke subtypes are unclear. Because AF may be unrecognized, and because AF has a substantial genetic basis, we assessed for predisposition to AF across ischemic stroke subtypes. We examined associations between AF genetic risk and Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment stroke subtypes in 2374 ambulatory individuals with ischemic stroke and 5175 without from the Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium 2 using logistic regression. We calculated AF genetic risk scores using single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with AF in a previous independent analysis across a range of preselected significance thresholds. There were 460 (19.4%) individuals with cardioembolic stroke, 498 (21.0%) with large vessel, 474 (20.0%) with small vessel, and 814 (32.3%) individuals with strokes of undetermined cause. Most AF genetic risk scores were associated with stroke, with the strongest association ( P =6×10 - 4 ) attributed to scores of 944 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (each associated with AF at P stroke were enriched in the cardioembolic stroke subset (strongest P =1.2×10 - 9 , 944 single-nucleotide polymorphism score). In contrast, AF genetic risk was not significantly associated with noncardioembolic stroke subtypes. Comprehensive AF genetic risk scores were specific for cardioembolic stroke. Incomplete workups and subtype misclassification may have limited the power to detect associations with strokes of undetermined pathogenesis. Future studies are warranted to determine whether AF genetic risk is a useful biomarker to enhance clinical discrimination of stroke pathogeneses. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Air Pollution Is Associated With Ischemic Stroke via Cardiogenic Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jong-Won; Bang, Oh Young; Ahn, Kangmo; Park, Sang-Soon; Park, Tai Hwan; Kim, Jae Guk; Ko, Youngchai; Lee, SooJoo; Lee, Kyung Bok; Lee, Jun; Kang, Kyusik; Park, Jong-Moo; Cho, Yong-Jin; Hong, Keun-Sik; Nah, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Cha, Jae-Kwan; Ryu, Wi-Sun; Kim, Dong-Eog; Kim, Joon-Tae; Choi, Jay Chol; Oh, Mi-Sun; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Byung-Chul; Lee, Ji Sung; Lee, Juneyoung; Park, Hong-Kyun; Kim, Beom Joon; Han, Moon-Ku; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assessed the impact of short-term exposure to air pollution on ischemic stroke subtype, while focusing on stroke caused via cardioembolism. From a nationwide, multicenter, prospective, stroke registry database, 13 535 patients with acute ischemic stroke hospitalized to 12 participating centers were enrolled in this study. Data on the hourly concentrations of particulate matter air pollution surveillance stations. The average values of these air pollutants over the 7 days before stroke onset from nearest air quality monitoring station in each patient were used to determine association with stroke subtype. The primary outcome was stroke subtype, including large artery atherosclerosis, small-vessel occlusion, cardioembolism, and stroke of other or undetermined cause. Particulate matter air pollution. Our findings suggest that the short-term exposure to air pollutants is associated with cardioembolic stroke, and greater care should be taken for those susceptible to cerebral embolism during peak pollution periods. Public and environmental health policies to reduce air pollution could help slow down global increasing trends of cardioembolic stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Intravenous thrombolysis plus hypothermia for acute treatment of ischemic stroke (ICTuS-L): final results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hemmen, Thomas M; Raman, Rema; Guluma, Kama Z; Meyer, Brett C; Gomes, Joao A; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Wijman, Christine A; Rapp, Karen S; Grotta, James C; Lyden, Patrick D

    2010-01-01

    .... Intravenous Thrombolysis Plus Hypothermia for Acute Treatment of Ischemic Stroke (ICTuS-L) was a randomized, multicenter trial of hypothermia and intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in patients treated within 6 hours after ischemic stroke...

  18. Acute Ischemic Stroke and Acute on Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Ahsan Aftab

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is due to either local thrombus formation or emboli that occlude a cerebral artery, together with chronic kidney disease represent major mortality and morbidity. Here wer present a case of 53 years old Malay man, admitted to a hospital in Malaysia complaining of sudden onset of weakness on right sided upper and lower limb associated with slurred speech. Patient was also suffering from uncontrolled hypertension, hyperlipidemia, chronic kidney disease stage 4, and diabetes mellitus(un controlled. He was diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke with cranial nerve 7 palsy (with right hemiparesis, acute on chronic kidney disease precipitated by dehydration and ACE inhibitor, and hyperkalemia. Patients with ischemic disease and chronic kidney disaese require constant monitering and carefull selected pharmacotherapy. Patient was placed under observation and was prescribed multiple pharamacotherpay to stabalise detoriating condition. Keywords: ischemic disease; chronic kidney disease; uncontrolled hypertension. | PubMed

  19. Pathogenic ischemic stroke phenotypes in the NINDS-stroke genetics network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, Hakan; Arsava, Ethem Murat; Andsberg, Gunnar; Benner, Thomas; Brown, Robert D; Chapman, Sherita N; Cole, John W; Delavaran, Hossein; Dichgans, Martin; Engström, Gunnar; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Grewal, Raji P; Gwinn, Katrina; Jern, Christina; Jimenez-Conde, Jordi; Jood, Katarina; Katsnelson, Michael; Kissela, Brett; Kittner, Steven J; Kleindorfer, Dawn O; Labovitz, Daniel L; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Lee, Jin-Moo; Lehm, Manuel; Lemmens, Robin; Levi, Chris; Li, Linxin; Lindgren, Arne; Markus, Hugh S; McArdle, Patrick F; Melander, Olle; Norrving, Bo; Peddareddygari, Leema Reddy; Pedersén, Annie; Pera, Joanna; Rannikmäe, Kristiina; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Rhodes, David; Rich, Stephen S; Roquer, Jaume; Rosand, Jonathan; Rothwell, Peter M; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schürks, Markus; Seiler, Stephan; Sharma, Pankaj; Slowik, Agnieszka; Sudlow, Cathie; Thijs, Vincent; Woodfield, Rebecca; Worrall, Bradford B; Meschia, James F

    2014-12-01

    NINDS (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke)-SiGN (Stroke Genetics Network) is an international consortium of ischemic stroke studies that aims to generate high-quality phenotype data to identify the genetic basis of pathogenic stroke subtypes. This analysis characterizes the etiopathogenetic basis of ischemic stroke and reliability of stroke classification in the consortium. Fifty-two trained and certified adjudicators determined both phenotypic (abnormal test findings categorized in major pathogenic groups without weighting toward the most likely cause) and causative ischemic stroke subtypes in 16 954 subjects with imaging-confirmed ischemic stroke from 12 US studies and 11 studies from 8 European countries using the web-based Causative Classification of Stroke System. Classification reliability was assessed with blinded readjudication of 1509 randomly selected cases. The distribution of pathogenic categories varied by study, age, sex, and race (P<0.001 for each). Overall, only 40% to 54% of cases with a given major ischemic stroke pathogenesis (phenotypic subtype) were classified into the same final causative category with high confidence. There was good agreement for both causative (κ 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.69-0.75) and phenotypic classifications (κ 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.70-0.75). This study demonstrates that pathogenic subtypes can be determined with good reliability in studies that include investigators with different expertise and background, institutions with different stroke evaluation protocols and geographic location, and patient populations with different epidemiological characteristics. The discordance between phenotypic and causative stroke subtypes highlights the fact that the presence of an abnormality in a patient with stroke does not necessarily mean that it is the cause of stroke. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Adolescent ischemic stroke associated with anabolic steroid and cannabis abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Scheich, Tarik; Weber, Artur-Aron; Klee, Dirk; Schweiger, Daniel; Mayatepek, Ertan; Karenfort, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We report on a 16-year-old body builder who suffered from an acute ischemic stroke. In the urine, cannabis metabolites as well as metabolites of the oral androgenic-anabolic steroid methandrostenolone were detected, both known to be associated with stroke events. This report highlights the role of cannabis and steroid abuse that induce strokes in the absence of arteriopathy, cardioembolism or thrombophilia. Owing to new upcoming socio-behavioral aspects of late childhood and early adolescent life, this formally rare abuse of cannabis and/or anabolic steroids as well as their associations with strokes becomes more current than ever.

  1. Detection of atrial fibrillation after ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kishore, Amit; Vail, Andy; Majid, Arshad; Dawson, Jesse; Lees, Kennedy R; Tyrrell, Pippa J; Smith, Craig J

    2014-01-01

    .... We therefore undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the frequency of newly detected AF using noninvasive or invasive cardiac monitoring after ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack...

  2. Association between acute statin therapy, survival, and improved functional outcome after ischemic stroke: the North Dublin Population Stroke Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-04-01

    Statins improve infarct volume and neurological outcome in animal stroke models. We investigated the relationship between statin therapy and ischemic stroke outcome in the North Dublin Population Stroke Study.

  3. D-dimer levels and stroke progression in patients with acute ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, L-H; Sandset, E C; Sandset, P M

    2011-01-01

    Krarup L-H, Sandset EC, Sandset PM, Berge E. D-dimer levels and stroke progression in patients with acute ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation. Acta Neurol Scand: 2011: 124: 40-44. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Background -  Patients with acute ischemic stroke and atrial fibrillation...... progression was defined as a ≥3-point worsening on the Scandinavian Stroke Scale during the first 48 h after randomization. Blood samples were analyzed for D-dimer, prothrombin fragment 1 + 2, soluble fibrin monomer, and C-reactive protein. Results -  A total of 382 patients were included in the analyses...

  4. Clues to occult cancer in patients with ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk Jae Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that hidden malignancy could be detected in patients with cryptogenic stroke without active cancer when they showed the distinctive characteristics of cancer-related stroke. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Among 2,562 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke, patients with cryptogenic stroke were analyzed and categorized into two groups according to the presence of active cancer: cryptogenic stroke with active cancer (cancer-related stroke, CA-stroke group and without active cancer (CR-stroke group. Patients with active lung cancer without stroke were also recruited for comparison purposes (CA-control. Clinical factors, lesion patterns on diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI, and laboratory findings were analyzed among groups. A total of 348 patients with cryptogenic stroke were enrolled in this study. Among them, 71 (20.4% patients had active cancer at the time of stroke. The D-dimer levels were significantly higher in patients with CA-stroke than those with CR-stroke or CA-control (both p<0.001. Regarding lesion patterns, patients with CA-stroke mostly had multiple lesions in multiple vascular territories, while more than 80% of patients with CR-stroke had single/multiple lesions in a single vascular territory (P<0.001. D-dimer levels (OR 1.11 per 1 µg/mL increase; 95% CI 1.06-1.15; P<0.001 and DWI lesion patterns (OR 7.13; 95% CI 3.42-14.87; P<0.001 were independently associated with CA-stroke. Workup for hidden malignancy was performed during hospitalization in 10 patients who showed elevated D-dimer levels and multiple infarcts involving multiple vascular territories but had no known cancer, and it revealed hidden malignancies in all the patients. CONCLUSION: Patients with CA-stroke have distinctive D-dimer levels and lesion patterns. These characteristics can serve as clues to occult cancer in patients with cryptogenic stroke.

  5. Report of ischemic stroke mimicking isolated ulnar nerve paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çetin Kürşad Akpınar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The cortical motor hand area is the precentral gyrus. Small cortical infarcts of this area can caused isolated hand weakness. Weakness can consist of either all fingers or ulnar-sided fingers. A 71-year-old man admitted to the emergency department with sudden weakness of the right fourth and fifth fingers Diffusion-weighted brain imaging of a magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed acute infarction of right precentral gyrus. Cardioembolus is the determined ischemic stroke subtype. This report presented a case of ischemic stroke mimicking isolated ulnar nerve paralysis.

  6. Different Perfusion Patterns in a Patient with Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudilosso, Salvatore; Laredo, Carlos; Urra, Xabier; Chamorro, Ángel

    2017-05-01

    A 29-year-old male patient with aphasia and mild weakness of the right arm arrived at the emergency room 4 hours after symptom onset. The computed tomography perfusion showed a typical delay in the time-based maps in the left occipital lobe and another hyperperfused area in the left frontal lobe. The follow-up magnetic resonance imaging confirmed cortical ischemic lesions in both areas. This case shows that besides hypoperfusion, hyperperfusion can also be found in the first stages of acute stroke, and it is highly suggestive of established ischemic lesions. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A STUDY ON INTRACRANIAL STENOSIS IN ACUTE ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerrin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Acute ischemic stroke is very common cause of significant morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The causes of acute ischemic stroke could be intracranial or extra cranial. Prevention of the acute episode could be decreased by surgically treating ex tra - cranial vascular disease but the prevention of intracranial cause is only medical. Various risk factors are also associated with development of ischemic stroke. However, the association between these and the pattern of vascular involvement is not clear . AIM: The aim of the study was to 1. Identify the location of the vessel involved in different cases of ischemic stroke 2. To study the various risk factors associated with the development of ischemic stroke. MATERIALS AND METHOD S: This was a prospective study conducted between the years 2010 and 2012. All adult patients with acute ischemic stroke which was confirmed by MRI and less than two weeks duration were included in the study. Parameters recorded were presence of pre - existing comorbid conditions, n eurological examination findings, Cardiovascular system examination findings, Blood pressures, blood sugar levels and pattern of vascular involvement. This was assessed using MR angiography or four vessel Doppler. Statistical analysis was done using the SP SS software. RESULTS: Two hundred patients were enrolled in the study. Pure extracranial stenosis was present in 21.5%, extracranial with intracranial stenosis in 34%, and pure intracranial stenosis in 44.5%, which was predominant and resembled other Indi an studies. 15.5% of patients had significant carotid stenosis based on Doppler study and were suitable candidates for carotid endarterectomy. Middle cerebral artery was commonly involved (55%. Hypertension (63.5%, diabetes mellitus (48%, alcoholism (20 .5% and smoking (18.5% were the common risk factors. Prevalence of these risk factors was more in those with intracranial stenosis in our study, elevated total

  8. European Stroke Organisation (ESO) guidelines for the management of temperature in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntaios, George; Dziedzic, Tomasz; Michel, Patrik; Papavasileiou, Vasileios; Petersson, Jesper; Staykov, Dimitre; Thomas, Brenda; Steiner, Thorsten

    2015-08-01

    Hyperthermia is a frequent complication in patients with acute ischemic stroke. On the other hand, therapeutically induced hypothermia has shown promising potential in animal models of focal cerebral ischemia. This Guideline Document presents the European Stroke Organisation guidelines for the management of temperature in patients with acute ischemic stroke. A multidisciplinary group identified related questions and developed its recommendations based on evidence from randomized controlled trials elaborating the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. This Guideline Document was reviewed within the European Stroke Organisation and externally and was approved by the European Stroke Organisation Guidelines Committee and the European Stroke Organisation Executive Committee. We found low-quality evidence, and therefore, we cannot make any recommendation for treating hyperthermia as a means to improve functional outcome and/or survival in patients with acute ischemic stroke and hyperthermia; moderate evidence to suggest against routine prevention of hyperthermia with antipyretics as a means to improve functional outcome and/or survival in patients with acute ischemic stroke and normothermia; very low-quality evidence to suggest against routine induction of hypothermia as a means to improve functional outcome and/or survival in patients with acute ischemic stroke. The currently available data about the management of temperature in patients with acute ischemic stroke are limited, and the strengths of the recommendations are therefore weak. We call for new randomized controlled trials as well as recruitment of eligible patients to ongoing randomized controlled trials to allow for better-informed recommendations in the future. © 2015 World Stroke Organization.

  9. PHARMACOECONOMIC EFFECTIVENESS OF NAFTIDROFURYL IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Bogolepova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study objective is to conduct a pharmacoeconomic analysis of naftidrofuryl effectiveness in patients with ischemic stroke.Materials and methods. The work is based on the results of clinical studies of effectiveness, tolerability, and safety of naftidrofuryl in patients who suffered an ischemic stroke. The study design included data on 1000 patients of 45 and older with first-time acute cerebrovascular disease of ischemic type.Results. Direct medical costs for the chosen patient cohort per the Standard of stroke treatment current at the time of the study were 730 575 189 rubles, in case of naftidrofuryl inclusion they were 476 467 620 rubles. Cost minimization is 254 107 569 rubles. Indirect nonmedical costs associated with temporary incapacity for work for treatment per the Standard of stroke treatment were 124 156 950 rubles, and 64 559 180 rubles for naftidrofuryl use which demonstrates the drug’s economic benefit. Budget impact analysis has shown that the possible savings constitute 7.59 %.Conclusion. Inclusion of naftidrofuryl into treatment of patients with ischemic stroke is justified as it decreases duration of rehabilitation. This leads to a positive economic effect expressed as decreased direct and non-direct medical costs.

  10. Clopidogrel and ischemic stroke outcomes by smoking status: Smoker's paradox?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Yuan; Song, Haiqing; Hou, Chengbei; Cao, Qingyu; Dong, Kai; Huang, Xiaoqin; Feng, Wuwei; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Wang, Moli; Ji, Xunming

    2017-02-15

    Active smokers with myocardial infarction were shown to have enhanced benefit with clopidogrel compared with aspirin. Whether this "paradox" exists in ischemic stroke patients is unknown. We aimed to investigate whether smoking status has a differential impact on the efficacy of clopidogrel vs. aspirin in patients with non-cardioembolic strokes. This single-center study retrospectively assessed 1792 non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke patients discharged from January 2013 to October 2014, and followed for 12months. Patients were categorized as current-smokers and never-smokers. Primary outcome was a composite of secondary ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction and all-cause death. Secondary outcome was secondary ischemic stroke. 1066 patients were current-smokers and 726 were never-smokers. Compared with never-smokers, current-smokers had significantly higher rates of ischemic stroke (4.3% vs. 1.2%; adjusted OR: 3.60, 95%CI: 1.50-8.64, p=0.004). Regarding the primary outcome, among smokers, rates showed a lower trend in clopidogrel vs. aspirin groups (3.7% vs. 6.4%; adjusted OR 0.57, 95%CI: 0.31-1.07, p=0.08), but no difference among never-smokers (2.1% vs. 1.0%; adjusted OR: 1.67, 95%CI: 0.47-5.89, p=0.42). Similarly, among smokers, trending lower rates for recurrent ischemic stroke were observed in clopidogrel vs. aspirin group (3.1% vs. 5.0%; adjusted OR: 0.60, 95%CI: 0.31-1.18, p=0.14); but no difference between the two groups among never-smokers (1.7% vs. 1.0%; adjusted OR 1.36, 95%CI: 0.36-5.52, p=0.65). Smoking is a major risk factor for recurrent stroke in our retrospective non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke cohort. Active-smokers trend toward better cardiovascular outcomes when on clopidogrel. This finding needs to be confirmed in a prospective cohort. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Migraine and risk of perioperative ischemic stroke and hospital readmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timm, Fanny P; Houle, Timothy T; Grabitz, Stephanie D

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether patients with migraine are at increased risk of perioperative ischemic stroke and whether this may lead to an increased hospital readmission rate. DESIGN: Prospective hospital registry study. SETTING: Massachusetts General Hospital and two satellite campuses between...... January 2007 and August 2014. PARTICIPANTS: 124 558 surgical patients (mean age 52.6 years; 54.5% women). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was perioperative ischemic stroke occurring within 30 days after surgery in patients with and without migraine and migraine aura. The secondary outcome...... was hospital readmission within 30 days of surgery. Exploratory outcomes included post-discharge stroke and strata of neuroanatomical stroke location. RESULTS: 10 179 (8.2%) patients had any migraine diagnosis, of whom 1278 (12.6%) had migraine with aura and 8901 (87.4%) had migraine without aura. 771 (0...

  12. Hemorrhagic transformation in ischemic stroke and its treatment during thrombolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Paciaroni

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Haemorrhagic transformation (HT of brain infarction or hemorrhagic infarction is a complication of acute ischemic stroke, especially in cardioembolic stroke, and represents the most feared complication of thrombolysis. HT is a multifocal secondary bleeding into brain infarcts with innumerable foci of capillary and venular extravasation either remaining as discrete petechiae or emerging to form confluent purpura. HT is evidenced as a parenchymal area of increased density within an area of low attenuation in a typical vascular distribution on non-contrasted CT scans and is subdivided into two major categories on the basis of standardised definition: haemorrhagic infarct (HI and parenchymal haematoma (PH. PH has been associated to poor outcome in ischemic stroke patients. Thus, its prevention, early detection and adequate treatment represent key points in the management of acute stroke.

  13. Intravenous xenotransplantation of human placental mesenchymal stem cells to rats: comparative analysis of homing in rat brain in two models of experimental ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodenko, I V; Yarygin, K N; Gubsky, L V; Konieva, A A; Tairova, R T; Povarova, O V; Kholodenko, R V; Burunova, V V; Yarygin, V N; Skvortsova, V I

    2012-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells from human placenta obtained after term natural delivery were cultured and labeled with vital dye Dil of magnetic fluorescing microparticles. The labeled cells were transplanted intravenously to rats with occlusion of the median cerebral artery. Penetration of cells through the brain-blood barrier and their distribution in the brain of experimental animals were studied on serial cryostat sections. Two models of cerebral artery occlusion associated with different traumatic consequences were used. The efficiency of crossing the blood-brain barrier by transplanted cells, the number of mesenchymal cells attaining the ischemic focus and neurogenic zones, and the time of death of transplanted cells largely depended on the degree and nature of injury to the central nervous system, which should be taken into account when planning the experiments for evaluation of the effects of cell therapy on the models of neurological diseases and in clinical studies in the field of regenerative neurology.

  14. Role of homocysteine in the ischemic stroke nad development of ischemic tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Lehotsky

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Homocysteine (Hcy is a toxic, sulfur-containing intermediate of methionine metabolism. Hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcy, as a consequence of impaired Hcy metabolism or defects in crucial co-factors that participate in its recycling, is assumed as an independent human stroke risk factor. Neural cells are sensitive to prolonged hHcy treatment, because Hcy cannot be metabolized either by the transsulfuration pathway or by the folate/vitamin B12 independent remethylation pathway. Its detrimental effect after ischemia-induced damage includes accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and posttranslational modifications of proteins via homocysteinylation and thiolation. Ischemic preconditioning (IPC is an adaptive response of the CNS to sub-lethal ischemia, which elevates tissues tolerance to subsequent ischemia. The main focus of this review is on the recent data on homocysteine metabolism and mechanisms of its neurotoxicity. In this context, the review documents an increased oxidative stress and functional modification of enzymes involved in redox balance in experimentally induced hyperhomocysteinemia. It also gives an interpretation whether hyperhomocysteinemia alone or in combination with IPC affects the ischemia-induced neurodegenerative changes as well as intracellular signalling. Studies document that hHcy alone significantly increased Fluoro-Jade C- and TUNEL-positive cell neurodegeneration in the rat hippocampus as well as in the cortex. IPC, even if combined with hHcy, could still preserve the neuronal tissue from the lethal ischemic effects. This review also describes the changes in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK protein pathways following ischemic injury and IPC. These studies provide evidence for the interplay and tight integration between ERK and p38 MAPK signalling mechanisms in response to the hHcy and also in association of hHcy with ischemia/IPC challenge in the rat brain. Further investigations of the protective factors

  15. Spontaneous Low Frequency Oscillations in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillip, Dorte; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    2014-01-01

    patients admitted to the stroke unit with symptoms of ischemic stroke. 11/29 patients received thrombolytic therapy. NIRS examination was conducted 2 days (median time) from stroke onset. NIRS optodes were placed on each side of the head with a 3 cm source-detector distance. Using transfer function.......09-0.11 Hz range are affected by changes in cerebral autoregulation (CA), which is altered following stroke. We examined oxyHb LFOs at bed-side as a marker of CA in the subacute phase in stroke patients with or without recombinant tissue plasminogen activator thrombolytic therapy. Methods: We recruited 29...... analysis, inter-hemispheric phase shift and amplitude ratio of the oxyHb oscillations in the 0.09-0.11 Hz range were assessed. Results: The correlation between NIHSS scores at admission and oxyHb parameters revealed a significant positive correlation between stroke severity at admission and inter...

  16. THE IMPACT OF COMORBIDITY ON COGNITIVE PARAMETERS AFTER ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirena Valkova

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of our study is to examine the impact of comorbidity on cognitive parameters after the first ever ischemic stroke.Material and methods: We examined 112 patients (aged 46 to 84 (66.67± 5.96, 69 males and 43 females with first ever ischemic stroke. For cognitive assessment we used Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, 10 word test (for short term memory and delayed recall, Isaack’s test for verbal fluency (VF, Geriatric depression scale (GDS, Hamilton depression scale (HDS, Blessed dementia information memory concentration test (revised, BDIMCT, Benton Visual Retention test (A,E; BVRT – number of corrects and number of errors and Wiskonsin Card Sorting Test (number of errors, WCST. The patients were examined on two step model. At acute stage, after collecting medical history, somatic and neurological examinations, MMSE, 10 words test and HDS were applied. At subacute stroke stage (90±5 days after first stroke symptoms, all cognitive tests were used. „STATGRAPHICS Plus 5.0 (free version” was used for statistical analysis.Results: Chronic ischemic heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are the most important additional risk factors for cognitive decline. Thyroid pathology, renal failure and anemia are independently associated with poststroke depression.Conclusions: On the basis of these data we can conclude that vascular risk factors are independently associated with cognitive and emotional changes after stroke and their effects should be assessed and taken into account for subsequent treatment of stroke survivors.

  17. Thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke: where and when?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Micieli

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The therapy of acute ischemic stroke remains an open challenge for the clinicians and is closely connected to the ready acknowledgment of symptoms, to the promptness of the instrumental diagnosis and consequently to the rapidity of the pharmacological intervention. Although several studies have validated the effectiveness and the safety profileof the intravenous fibrinolytic treatment, the number of patients who benefit of such therapeutic opportunity is still too little. This data is partially due to the delay within patients arrive to the hospital and to the doubts of the physicians on the possible collateral effects, but it is also related to logistic and organizational-managerial problematic of the patient with acute stroke.These last ones mainly derive from the deficiency on the national territory of dedicated structures (Stroke Unit, from the absence of operative connections between the 118-service and the Stroke Unit, from the delay of the neurologist calling in the emergency room that does not allow an adapted diagnostic evaluation of the ischemic event. The spread of the intravenous fibrinolysis must therefore necessarily pass through the creation of participation protocols between hospitals with stroke unit and primary aid, and between department of emergency/ urgency and staff of the stroke unit also previewing the creation of professional figures like those of the urgency neurologist that could have the full right of the management and the treatment of cerebral ischemic pathology.

  18. Hypertension and experimental stroke therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Collins, Victoria E; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Macleod, Malcolm R; Howells, David W

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is an established target for long-term stroke prevention but procedures for management of hypertension in acute stroke are less certain. Here, we analyze basic science data to examine the impact of hypertension on candidate stroke therapies and of anti-hypertensive treatments on stroke outcome. Methods: Data were pooled from 3,288 acute ischemic stroke experiments (47,899 animals) testing the effect of therapies on infarct size (published 1978–2010). Data were combined using meta-analysis and meta-regression, partitioned on the basis of hypertension, stroke model, and therapy. Results: Hypertensive animals were used in 10% of experiments testing 502 therapies. Hypertension was associated with lower treatment efficacy, especially in larger infarcts. Overall, anti-hypertensives did not provide greater benefit than other drugs, although benefits were evident in hypertensive animals even when given after stroke onset. Fifty-eight therapies were tested in both normotensive and hypertensive animals: some demonstrated superior efficacy in hypertensive animals (hypothermia) while others worked better in normotensive animals (tissue plasminogen activator, anesthetic agents). Discussion: Hypertension has a significant effect on the efficacy of candidate stroke drugs: standard basic science testing may overestimate the efficacy which could be reasonably expected from certain therapies and for hypertensive patients with large or temporary occlusions. PMID:23736641

  19. Transient central diabetes insipidus following ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukrishnan Jayaraman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Central Diabetes Insipidus (CDI following ischemic infarction of the brain has been described as a rare presentation. Posterior pituitary ischemia has also been postulated as a possible cause of idiopathic CDI. We encountered a young male with bilateral extensive ischemic infarction sustained at high altitude, who had transient polyuria due to central diabetes insipidus, requiring desmopressin therapy. DI completely resolved during the course of his neurological recovery.

  20. Ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack after head and neck radiotherapy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Chris; Henderson, Robert D; O'Sullivan, John D; Read, Stephen J

    2011-09-01

    Cerebrovascular disease can complicate head and neck radiotherapy and result in transient ischemic attack and ischemic stroke. Although the incidence of radiation vasculopathy is predicted to rise with improvements in median cancer survival, the pathogenesis, natural history, and management of the disease are ill defined. We examined studies on the epidemiology, imaging, pathogenesis, and management of medium- and large-artery intra- and extra-cranial disease after head and neck radiotherapy. Controlled prospective trials and larger retrospective trials from the last 30 years were prioritized. The relative risk of transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke is at least doubled by head and neck radiotherapy. Chronic radiation vasculopathy affecting medium and large intra- and extra-cranial arteries is characterized by increasing rates of hemodynamically significant stenosis with time from radiotherapy. Disease expression is the likely consequence of the combined radiation insult to the intima-media (accelerating atherosclerosis) and to the adventitia (injuring the vasa vasorum). Optimal medical treatment is not established. Carotid endarterectomy is confounded by the need to operate across scarred tissue planes, whereas carotid stenting procedures have resulted in high restenosis rates. Head and neck radiotherapy significantly increases the risk of transient ischemic attack and ischemic stroke. Evidence-based guidelines for the management of asymptomatic and symptomatic (medium- and large-artery) radiation vasculopathy are lacking. Long-term prospective studies remain a priority, as the incidence of the problem is anticipated to rise with improvements in postradiotherapy patient survival.

  1. Patients living in impoverished areas have more severe ischemic strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleindorfer, Dawn; Lindsell, Christopher; Alwell, Kathleen A; Moomaw, Charles J; Woo, Daniel; Flaherty, Matthew L; Khatri, Pooja; Adeoye, Opeolu; Ferioli, Simona; Kissela, Brett M

    2012-08-01

    Initial stroke severity is one of the strongest predictors of eventual stroke outcome. However, predictors of initial stroke severity have not been well-described within a population. We hypothesized that poorer patients would have a higher initial stroke severity on presentation to medical attention. We identified all cases of hospital-ascertained ischemic stroke occurring in 2005 within a biracial population of 1.3 million. "Community" socioecomic status was determined for each patient based on the percentage below poverty in the census tract in which the patient resided. Linear regression was used to model the effect of socioeconomic status on stroke severity. Models were adjusted for race, gender, age, prestroke disability, and history of medical comorbidities. There were 1895 ischemic stroke events detected in 2005 included in this analysis; 22% were black, 52% were female, and the mean age was 71 years (range, 19-104). The median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was 3 (range, 0-40). The poorest community socioeconomic status was associated with a significantly increased initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale by 1.5 points (95% confidence interval, 0.5-2.6; P<0.001) compared with the richest category in the univariate analysis, which increased to 2.2 points after adjustment for demographics and comorbidities. We found that increasing community poverty was associated with worse stroke severity at presentation, independent of other known factors associated with stroke outcomes. Socioeconomic status may impact stroke severity via medication compliance, access to care, and cultural factors, or may be a proxy measure for undiagnosed disease states.

  2. Acute MRI Changes in Progressive Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalowska, Elizabeth; Rostrup, Egill; Rosenbaum, S

    2008-01-01

    aimed to assess if acute MRI findings could be used for the prediction of stroke in progression (SIP). Methods: Prospectively 41 patients, 13 with lacunar infarcts and 28 with territorial infarcts, were admitted to an acute stroke unit within 24 h of stroke onset (median 11 h, range 3- 22). Diffusion...... the modified Rankin Scale, Barthel Index and SSS score. Patients with and without SIP were compared using both clinical and MRI data obtained on admission, on day 7 and after 3 months. Results: Fifteen patients (37%) developed SIP. Increased DWI lesion volume on day 7 in all strokes was associated with SIP...

  3. Acute MRI changes in progressive ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalowska, E.; Rostrup, E.; Rosenbaum, S.

    2008-01-01

    aimed to assess if acute MRI findings could be used for the prediction of stroke in progression (SIP). METHODS: Prospectively 41 patients, 13 with lacunar infarcts and 28 with territorial infarcts, were admitted to an acute stroke unit within 24 h of stroke onset (median 11 h, range 3- 22). Diffusion...... the modified Rankin Scale, Barthel Index and SSS score. Patients with and without SIP were compared using both clinical and MRI data obtained on admission, on day 7 and after 3 months. RESULTS: Fifteen patients (37%) developed SIP. Increased DWI lesion volume on day 7 in all strokes was associated with SIP...

  4. HOME CARE HOLISTIC ON THE CHANGE OF ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION FOR THE PATIENT WITH STROKE ISCHEMIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luluk Widarti

    2017-04-01

    study was to examine the effect of home care holistic nursing on the change of anxiety and depression for the patient with stroke ischemic. Method: An experimental research with quasy experimental specifically nonrandomized pre-post test control group design was applied in this study. The study was conducted in Surabaya by selecting ischemic stroke patients after being hospitalized at "A-Seruni was, Medic IRNA, Dr. Soetomo hospital". A sample of size 40 patients was divided equally into two groups, control and treatment groups. The treatment and control groups respectively received holistic home care and home care. The depression and anxiety level were measured by using questionnaires technique. The data were analyzed by using Levene's test for homogeneity of variance, and t-test. Result: The result showed that there were significantly different between both groups for psychological response such as anxiety with p-value = 0.000, depression with p = 0.000. Discussion: It was concluded that holistic home care could improve the psychological responses by decreasing anxiety and depression level in ischemic stroke patients. It is recommended to make standard operational procedure of holistic home care that can be implemented by all health personnel who take care ischemic stroke patients.

  5. Characterization of Hospitalized Ischemic Stroke Patients in Palestine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pearson Chi-square and independent t test were used in the univariate analysis. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality rates among the patients. Statistical testing and graphics were carried out using SPSS 15. Results: We identified 153 ischemic stroke ...

  6. Separate prediction of intracerebral hemorrhage and ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.S. Ferket (Bart); B.J.H. van Kempen (Bob); R.G. Wieberdink (Renske); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); A. Hofman (Albert); E. Shahar (Eyal); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); W.D. Rosamond (Wayne); J.R. Kizer (Jorge); R.A. Kronmal (Richard); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); W.T. Longstreth Jr. (W.); T.H. Mosley (Thomas); A.R. Folsom (Aaron); M.G.M. Hunink (Myriam); M.A. Ikram (Arfan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To develop and validate 10-year cumulative incidence functions of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and ischemic stroke (IS). Methods: We used data on 27,493 participants from 3 population-based cohort studies: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, median age 54 years,

  7. Leukoaraiosis and ventricular enlargement in patients with ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijdra, A.; Verbeeten, B.

    1991-01-01

    We studied the relationship between ventricular size and nonspecific periventricular lucency on computed tomograms (leukoaraiosis) in 192 patients with ischemic stroke. Leukoaraiosis did not occur in 21 patients less than 50 years of age; ventricular size could not be measured in an additional 29.

  8. Classifiers for Ischemic Stroke Lesion Segmentation: A Comparison Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Oskar; Schröder, Christoph; Forkert, Nils Daniel; Martinetz, Thomas; Handels, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic stroke, triggered by an obstruction in the cerebral blood supply, leads to infarction of the affected brain tissue. An accurate and reproducible automatic segmentation is of high interest, since the lesion volume is an important end-point for clinical trials. However, various factors, such as the high variance in lesion shape, location and appearance, render it a difficult task. In this article, nine classification methods (e.g. Generalized Linear Models, Random Decision Forests and Convolutional Neural Networks) are evaluated and compared with each other using 37 multiparametric MRI datasets of ischemic stroke patients in the sub-acute phase in terms of their accuracy and reliability for ischemic stroke lesion segmentation. Within this context, a multi-spectral classification approach is compared against mono-spectral classification performance using only FLAIR MRI datasets and two sets of expert segmentations are used for inter-observer agreement evaluation. The results of this study reveal that high-level machine learning methods lead to significantly better segmentation results compared to the rather simple classification methods, pointing towards a difficult non-linear problem. The overall best segmentation results were achieved by a Random Decision Forest and a Convolutional Neural Networks classification approach, even outperforming all previously published results. However, none of the methods tested in this work are capable of achieving results in the range of the human observer agreement and the automatic ischemic stroke lesion segmentation remains a complicated problem that needs to be explored in more detail to improve the segmentation results.

  9. Treatment and partial recovery of ischemic stroke hemiplegy through acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gonçalves Nordon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We present the case of a patient with hemiplegy and dysphonia due to an ischemic stroke in the pons who was treated through classical systemic and scalpean acupuncture and electroacupuncture, presenting considerable improvement in speaking, walking and moving her right arm after three months of treatment.

  10. Update on the Role of Cannabinoid Receptors after Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano S. A. Capettini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids are considered as key mediators in the pathophysiology of inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis. In particular, they have been shown to reduce the ischemic injury after acute cardiovascular events, such as acute myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. These protective and anti-inflammatory properties on peripheral tissues and circulating inflammatory have been demonstrated to involve their binding with both selective cannabinoid type 1 (CB1 and type 2 (CB2 transmembrane receptors. On the other hands, the recent discoveries of novel different classes of cannabinoids and receptors have increased the complexity of this system in atherosclerosis. Although only preliminary data have been reported on the activities of novel cannabinoid receptors, several studies have already investigated the role of CB1 and CB2 receptors in ischemic stroke. While CB1 receptor activation has been shown to directly reduce atherosclerotic plaque inflammation, controversial data have been shown on neurotransmission and neuroprotection after stroke. Given its potent anti-inflammatory activities on circulating leukocytes, the CB2 activation has been proven to produce protective effects against acute poststroke inflammation. In this paper, we will update evidence on different cannabinoid-triggered avenues to reduce inflammation and neuronal injury in acute ischemic stroke.

  11. Glibenclamide for the Treatment of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Caffes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are associated with severe functional disability and high mortality. Except for recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, therapies targeting the underlying pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS ischemia and hemorrhage are strikingly lacking. Sur1-regulated channels play essential roles in necrotic cell death and cerebral edema following ischemic insults, and in neuroinflammation after hemorrhagic injuries. Inhibiting endothelial, neuronal, astrocytic and oligodendroglial sulfonylurea receptor 1–transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (Sur1–Trpm4 channels and, in some cases, microglial KATP (Sur1–Kir6.2 channels, with glibenclamide is protective in a variety of contexts. Robust preclinical studies have shown that glibenclamide and other sulfonylurea agents reduce infarct volumes, edema and hemorrhagic conversion, and improve outcomes in rodent models of ischemic stroke. Retrospective studies suggest that diabetic patients on sulfonylurea drugs at stroke presentation fare better if they continue on drug. Additional laboratory investigations have implicated Sur1 in the pathophysiology of hemorrhagic CNS insults. In clinically relevant models of subarachnoid hemorrhage, glibenclamide reduces adverse neuroinflammatory and behavioral outcomes. Here, we provide an overview of the preclinical studies of glibenclamide therapy for CNS ischemia and hemorrhage, discuss the available data from clinical investigations, and conclude with promising preclinical results that suggest glibenclamide may be an effective therapeutic option for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

  12. Thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke by tenecteplase in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mean time to the first medical contact after the onset of symptoms was 3h 30 min. One patient presented a capsulo-lenticular hematoma of 5 mm3 in the same side of the ischemic stroke. Conclusion: Tenecteplase is a more interesting thrombolytic than alteplase, it seems to be more suitable for thrombolysis in our center ...

  13. The ABCD(2) Score is Highly Predictive of Stroke in Minor Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandehari, Kavian; Ahmadi, Fahimeh; Ebrahimzadeh, Saeed; Shariatinezhad, Keyvan; Ghandehari, Kosar

    2012-06-01

    Stroke risk prediction scores have been designed to stratify risk of recurrent cerebrovascular events in transient ischemic attack (TIA) and minor ischemic stroke (MIS) patients. Consecutive TIA or MIS patients referred to Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad were enrolled in a prospective cohort study during 2010-2011. Only TIA or MIS patients presenting within 24 h from the onset of symptoms were recruited. MIS was considered as ischemic stroke with NIHSS ABCD(2) scoring system for recurrent stroke or TIA was quantified by the area under the cure (AUC) using the c statistics. Three hundred ninety-three TIA patients (238 males, 155 females) and 118 MIS patients (77 males, 41 females) were enrolled in the study. One hundred seventeen strokes (23.2%), 99 TIA (19.6%), and 11 vascular death (2.2%) occurred within 3 months postevent in the whole of our 511 patients with minor ischemic events. The ABCD(2) score had a weak predictive value for 3 months and 3 days recurrent stroke in our TIA patients (AUC = 0.599, AUC = 0.591), but a high predictive value for 3 months and 3 days recurrent stroke in our MIS patients (AUC = 0.727, AUC = 0.728), respectively. The ABCD(2) score is highly predictive of short-term recurrent stroke in MIS patients but not TIA cases, despite its creation for TIA cohorts.

  14. Prescription of secondary preventive drugs after ischemic stroke : Results from the Malaysian National Stroke Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hwong, Wen Yea; Abdul Aziz, Zariah; Sidek, Norsima Nazifah; Bots, Michiel L.; Selvarajah, Sharmini; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Sivasampu, Sheamini; Vaartjes, Ilonca

    2017-01-01

    Background: Evaluation of secondary stroke prevention in low and middle-income countries remains limited. This study assessed the prescription of secondary preventive drugs among ischemic stroke patients upon hospital discharge in Malaysia and identified factors related to the prescribing decisions.

  15. Intermittent fasting attenuates inflammasome activity in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fann, David Yang-Wei; Santro, Tomislav; Manzanero, Silvia; Widiapradja, Alexander; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Lee, Seung-Yoon; Chunduri, Prasad; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Stranahan, Alexis M; Mattson, Mark P; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2014-07-01

    Recent findings have revealed a novel inflammatory mechanism that contributes to tissue injury in cerebral ischemia mediated by multi-protein complexes termed inflammasomes. Intermittent fasting (IF) can decrease the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the periphery and brain. Here we investigated the impact of IF (16h of food deprivation daily) for 4months on NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasome activities following cerebral ischemia. Ischemic stroke was induced in C57BL/6J mice by middle cerebral artery occlusion, followed by reperfusion (I/R). IF decreased the activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, the expression of NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasome proteins, and both IL-1β and IL-18 in the ischemic brain tissue. These findings demonstrate that IF can attenuate the inflammatory response and tissue damage following ischemic stroke by a mechanism involving suppression of NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasome activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Admitting acute ischemic stroke patients to a stroke care monitoring unit versus a conventional stroke unit : a randomized pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sulter, Geert; Elting, Jan Willem; Langedijk, Marc; Maurits, Natasha M; De Keyser, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Pathophysiological considerations and observational studies indicate that elevated body temperature, hypoxia, hypotension, and cardiac arrhythmias in the acute phase of ischemic stroke may aggravate brain damage and worsen outcome. METHODS: Both units were organized with the

  17. Severe ischemic stroke: too severe for thrombolysis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Fink, John N.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty years after the introduction of IV thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA), only a small proportion of stroke patients are treated with rtPA.(1) The strict inclusion and exclusion criteria in the stroke guidelines, based on criteria used in the rtPA trials, partially

  18. Acute ischemic stroke prognostication, comparison between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ossama Y. Mansour

    2014-11-20

    Nov 20, 2014 ... Abstract Background: Stroke is the second most common cause of death worldwide and a fre- quent cause of adult disability in developed countries. No single outcome measure can describe or predict all dimensions of recovery and disability after acute stroke. Several scales have proven reliability and ...

  19. Bone Fracture Pre-Ischemic Stroke Exacerbates Ischemic Cerebral Injury in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is a devastating complication of bone fracture. Bone fracture shortly after stroke enhances stroke injury by augmenting inflammation. We hypothesize that bone fracture shortly before ischemic stroke also exacerbates ischemic cerebral injury. Tibia fracture was performed 6 or 24 hours before permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO on C57BL/6J mice or Ccr2RFP/+Cx3cr1GFP/+ mice that have the RFP gene knocked into one allele of Ccr2 gene and GFP gene knocked into one allele of Cx3cr1 gene. Behavior was tested 3 days after pMCAO. Infarct volume, the number of CD68+ cells, apoptotic neurons, bone marrow-derived macrophages (RFP+, and microgila (GFP+ in the peri-infarct region were quantified. Compared to mice subjected to pMCAO only, bone fracture 6 or 24 hours before pMCAO increased behavioral deficits, the infarct volume, and the number of CD68+ cells and apoptotic neurons in the peri-infarct area. Both bone marrow-derived macrophages (CCR2+ and microglia (CX3CR1+ increased in the peri-infarct regions of mice subjected to bone fracture before pMCAO compared to stroke-only mice. The mice subjected to bone fracture 6 hours before pMCAO had more severe injury than mice that had bone fracture 24 hours before pMCAO. Our data showed that bone fracture shortly before stroke also increases neuroinflammation and exacerbates ischemic cerebral injury. Our findings suggest that inhibition of neuroinflammation or management of stroke risk factors before major bone surgery would be beneficial for patients who are likely to suffer from stroke.

  20. Curcumin Protects against Ischemic Stroke by Titrating Microglia/Macrophage Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongjian Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the most common type of cerebrovascular disease and is a leading cause of disability and death. Ischemic stroke accounts for approximately 80% of all strokes. The remaining 20% of strokes are hemorrhagic in nature. To date, therapeutic options for acute ischemic stroke are very limited. Recent research suggests that shifting microglial phenotype from the pro-inflammatory M1 state toward the anti-inflammatory and tissue-reparative M2 phenotype may be an effective therapeutic strategy for ischemic stroke. The dietary phytochemical curcumin has shown promise in experimental stroke models, but its effects on microglial polarization and long-term recovery after stroke are unknown. Here we address these gaps by subjecting mice to distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (dMCAO and administering curcumin intraperitoneally (150 mg/kg immediately after ischemia and 24 h later. Histological studies revealed that curcumin post-treatment significantly reduced cerebral ischemic damage 3 days after dMCAO. Sensorimotor functions—as measured by the adhesive removal test and modified Garcia scores—were superior in curcumin-treated mice at 3, 5, 7 and 10 days after stroke. RT-PCR measurements revealed an elevation of M2 microglia/macrophage phenotypic markers and a reduction in M1 markers in curcumin-treated brains 3 days after dMCAO. Immunofluorescent staining further showed that curcumin treatment significantly increased the number of CD206+Iba1+ M2 microglia/macrophages and reduced the number of CD16+Iba1+ M1 cells 10 days after stroke. In vitro studies using the BV2 microglial cell line confirmed that curcumin inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS and interferon-γ (IFN-γ-induced M1 polarization. Curcumin treatment concentration-dependently reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12p70, in the absence of any toxic effect on microglial cell survival. In conclusion, we demonstrate that curcumin has a

  1. [Incidence of aphasia in patients experiencing an ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Mc, Francisca; Lavados G, Pablo; Olavarría I, Verónica

    2017-02-01

    Sequelae after a stroke are common and may lead to disability. Aphasia - defined as an acquired language disturbance - can cause important limitations in quality of life. To describe the epidemiological features of patients who had an aphasia after a first episode of ischemic stroke and their functional outcome at six months. Review of a database of a population study on the incidence, 30-day case fatality rate, and prognosis of stroke performed in a northern Chilean city between 2000 and 2002. Aphasia was diagnosed in 28 of 142 patients in whom the disorder was sought (20%). The projected incidence rate in the city where the study was carried out is 7.06 per 100,000 inhabitants. The mean age of these 28 patients was 66 ± 20 years and 53% were women. The main risk factor for stroke was hypertension in 62%. The etiology of stroke was undetermined in 64% of these patients. Partial anterior circulation infarction was the most common stroke location in 61%. Twenty percent of patients with a first episode of ischemic stroke have aphasia.

  2. Characteristics of Misclassified CT Perfusion Ischemic Core in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph R E G Geuskens

    Full Text Available CT perfusion (CTP is used to estimate the extent of ischemic core and penumbra in patients with acute ischemic stroke. CTP reliability, however, is limited. This study aims to identify regions misclassified as ischemic core on CTP, using infarct on follow-up noncontrast CT. We aim to assess differences in volumetric and perfusion characteristics in these regions compared to areas that ended up as infarct on follow-up.This study included 35 patients with >100 mm brain coverage CTP. CTP processing was performed using Philips software (IntelliSpace 7.0. Final infarct was automatically segmented on follow-up noncontrast CT and used as reference. CTP and follow-up noncontrast CT image data were registered. This allowed classification of ischemic lesion agreement (core on CTP: rMTT≥145%, aCBV<2.0 ml/100g and infarct on follow-up noncontrast CT and misclassified ischemic core (core on CTP, not identified on follow-up noncontrast CT regions. False discovery ratio (FDR, defined as misclassified ischemic core volume divided by total CTP ischemic core volume, was calculated. Absolute and relative CTP parameters (CBV, CBF, and MTT were calculated for both misclassified CTP ischemic core and ischemic lesion agreement regions and compared using paired rank-sum tests.Median total CTP ischemic core volume was 49.7ml (IQR:29.9ml-132ml; median misclassified ischemic core volume was 30.4ml (IQR:20.9ml-77.0ml. Median FDR between patients was 62% (IQR:49%-80%. Median relative mean transit time was 243% (IQR:198%-289% and 342% (IQR:249%-432% for misclassified and ischemic lesion agreement regions, respectively. Median absolute cerebral blood volume was 1.59 (IQR:1.43-1.79 ml/100g (P<0.01 and 1.38 (IQR:1.15-1.49 ml/100g (P<0.01 for misclassified ischemic core and ischemic lesion agreement, respectively. All CTP parameter values differed significantly.For all patients a considerable region of the CTP ischemic core is misclassified. CTP parameters significantly

  3. Correlation analysis of sleep quality and youth ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shunqing; Chang, Cheng; Zhang, Juan; Song, Bo; Fang, Hui; Xu, YuMing

    2014-01-01

    To study risk factors related to ischemic stroke (IS) in youth and the influence of sleep quality on youth ischemic stroke incidence. 223 patients aged 18 to 45 years who were admitted to Puyang People's Hospital from June 2011 to February 2013 with a first-ever ischemic stroke were selected as the research cases. 158 young people with a normal physical examination were selected as the control group. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire was used to analyse the correlation between sleep quality and youth IS incidence. The U.S. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and modified Rankin Scale (MRS) scores were used to assess cases' state of illness and prognosis three months after IS. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the association of these risk factors with youth IS incidence, from highest to lowest, was hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, smoking history, high homocysteine, the quality of sleep, family history of stroke, and alcoholism. Poor sleep quality ranked fifth among all risk factors and was positively correlated with poor prognosis for youth IS patients. The results of this study showed that sleep quality is an important factor in the pathogenesis and prognosis of youth IS.

  4. Correlation Analysis of Sleep Quality and Youth Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunqing Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study risk factors related to ischemic stroke (IS in youth and the influence of sleep quality on youth ischemic stroke incidence. Methods. 223 patients aged 18 to 45 years who were admitted to Puyang People’s Hospital from June 2011 to February 2013 with a first-ever ischemic stroke were selected as the research cases. 158 young people with a normal physical examination were selected as the control group. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI questionnaire was used to analyse the correlation between sleep quality and youth IS incidence. The US National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS and modified Rankin Scale (MRS scores were used to assess cases’ state of illness and prognosis three months after IS. Results. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the association of these risk factors with youth IS incidence, from highest to lowest, was hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, smoking history, high homocysteine, the quality of sleep, family history of stroke, and alcoholism. Poor sleep quality ranked fifth among all risk factors and was positively correlated with poor prognosis for youth IS patients. Conclusion. The results of this study showed that sleep quality is an important factor in the pathogenesis and prognosis of youth IS.

  5. Potential of Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany E. Marei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is one of the major health problems worldwide. The only FDA approved anti-thrombotic drug for acute ischemic stroke is the tissue plasminogen activator. Several studies have been devoted to assessing the therapeutic potential of different types of stem cells such as neural stem cells (NSCs, mesenchymal stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived NSCs as treatments for ischemic stroke. The results of these studies are intriguing but many of them have presented conflicting results. Additionally, the mechanism(s by which engrafted stem/progenitor cells exert their actions are to a large extent unknown. In this review, we will provide a synopsis of different preclinical and clinical studies related to the use of stem cell-based stroke therapy, and explore possible beneficial/detrimental outcomes associated with the use of different types of stem cells. Due to limited/short time window implemented in most of the recorded clinical trials about the use of stem cells as potential therapeutic intervention for stroke, further clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of the intervention in a longer time window after cellular engraftments are still needed.

  6. Risk factors for perioperative ischemic stroke in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Augusto Cray da Costa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective:The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for ischemic stroke in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.Methods:From January 2010 to December 2012, 519 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery were analyzed prospectively. The sample was divided into two groups: patients with stroke per and postoperative were allocated in Group GS (n=22 and the other patients in the group CCONTROL (n=497. The following variables were compared between the groups: gender, age, carotid stenosis > 70%, diabetes on insulin, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, peripheral arteriopathy, unstable angina, kidney function, left ventricular function, acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary arterial hypertension, use of cardiopulmonary bypass. Ischemic stroke was defined as symptoms lasting over 24 hours associated with changes in brain computed tomography scan. The variables were compared using Fisher’s exact test, Chi square, Student’s t-test and logistic regression.Results:Stroke occurred in 4.2% of patients and the risk factors statistically significant were: carotid stenosis of 70% or more (P=0.03; OR 5.07; IC 95%: 1.35 to 19.02, diabetes on insulin (P=0.04; OR 2.61; IC 95%: 1.10 to 6.21 and peripheral arteriopathy (P=0.03; OR 2.61; 95% CI: 1.08 to 6.28.Conclusion:Risk factors for ischemic stroke were carotid stenosis of 70% or more, diabetes on insulin and peripheral arteriopathy.

  7. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations as risk factors for ischemic stroke in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, A.; Nordestgaard, B. G.; Benn, M.

    2017-01-01

    Essentials FLG mutations cause atopic dermatitis, previously found to be associated with ischemic stroke. Association between FLG mutations and ischemic stroke was examined in 97 174 Danish individuals. FLG mutations were associated with increased ischemic stroke risk in the general population....... The association was most pronounced in younger individuals, and in current and former smokers. Summary: Background Heritability studies have shown a considerable genetic component to ischemic stroke risk; however, much is unknown as to which genes are responsible. Also, previous studies have found an association...... between atopic dermatitis and increased ischemic stroke risk. Objective To test the hypothesis that FLG loss-of-function mutations, known to be associated with atopic dermatitis, were also associated with ischemic stroke. Methods A total of 97 174 individuals, with 3597 cases of ischemic stroke, from...

  8. Serum Copeptin Predicts Severity and Recurrent Stroke in Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wan-Zhong; Wang, Xiao-Bo; Li, Huan-Ting; Dong, Mei; Ji, Xiang

    2017-10-01

    Several studies investigated the prognostic role of copeptin in stroke. The aim of this study is to assess copeptin levels in serum, and investigate their associations with risk of recurrent stroke in a 1-year follow-up study in patients with ischemic stroke. In this post hoc analysis, serum levels of copeptin and NIH stroke scale (NIHSS) were measured at the time of admission in a cohort of 316 patients with ischemic stroke. The end point was stroke recurrence after 1-year follow-up. We used logistic regression model to assess the relationship between copeptin levels and risk recurrent stroke. Logistic regression analysis considering traditional risk factors showed a relationship between serum copeptin levels and moderate-to-high clinical severity when serum copeptin was used as a continuous variable (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.03-1.09). In the follow-up, 54 patients (17.1%) had a stroke recurrence. The stroke recurrence events distribution across the copeptin quartiles ranged between 5.1% (first quartile) to 23.1% (fourth quartile). In multivariate models comparing the third (OR = 2.78; 95% CI 1.85-3.53) and fourth quartiles (OR = 4.00; 95% CI 2.86-6.50) against the first quartile of the copeptin, levels of copeptin were associated with stroke recurrence events. A higher serum copeptin level is a predictor of both severity at admission and stroke recurrence at 1-year in stroke patients.

  9. Highly sensitive troponin T in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J K; Ueland, T; Aukrust, P

    2012-01-01

    in decedents than in survivors. After adjustment for stroke severity, C-reactive protein, age, NT-proBNP and prior heart and/or renal failure, hsTnT levels were not a significant predictor of long-term all-cause or cardiovascular mortality. Conclusion: Elevated levels of hsTnT are frequently present......Background: Newly developed troponin assays have superior diagnostic and prognostic performance in acute coronary syndrome (ACS), when compared to conventional troponin assays; however, highly sensitive troponin has not been evaluated in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods: Highly...... sensitive troponin T (hsTnT) was measured daily during the first 4 days in 193 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke without overt ACS or atrial fibrillation. The patients were previously tested normal with a fourth-generation TnT assay. The patients were followed for 47 months, with all...

  10. Anticoagulant treatment in patients with atrial fibrillation and ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner-Frandsen, Nicole; Dammann Andersen, Andreas; Ashournia, Hamoun

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac dysrhythmia, with a lifetime risk of 25%, and it is a well-known independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Over the last 15 years, efforts have been made to initiate relevant treatment in patients with AF. A retrospective study....... RESULTS: A total of 4134 patients were included in the study. Overall, the yearly proportion of patients with known AF varied between 9% and 18%. No significant change was observed (P = .511). The proportion of patients with known AF treated with anticoagulants at the time of the stroke and the proportion...... was observed. An explanation could be an increase in the prevalence of AF in the general population, leaving the proportion of patients admitted with ischemic stroke unchanged. Other risk factors have been sought reduced as well with the implementation of national guidelines regarding hypertension...

  11. Cotard and Capgras syndrome after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottile, Fabrizio; Bonanno, Lilla; Finzi, Giuseppina; Ascenti, Giorgio; Marino, Silvia; Bramanti, Placido; Corallo, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Capgras and Cotard are delusional misidentification syndromes characterized by delusions about oneself, others, places, and objects. To date, there are few cases of comorbidity of both syndromes. We describe a case of aphasic stroke patient affected by cerebral ischemia localized in right temporoparietal region. The patient showed a typical clinical picture of delusional disorder attributable, through psychological assessment, to comorbidity of both Capgras and Cotard syndromes. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sex differences in neuroinflammation and neuroprotection in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spychala, Monica S; Honarpisheh, Pedram; McCullough, Louise D

    2017-01-02

    Stroke is not only a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide it also disproportionally affects women. There are currently over 500,000 more women stroke survivors in the US than men, and elderly women bear the brunt of stroke-related disability. Stroke has dropped to the fifth leading cause of death in men, but remains the third in women. This review discusses sex differences in common stroke risk factors, the efficacy of stroke prevention therapies, acute treatment responses, and post-stroke recovery in clinical populations. Women have an increased lifetime risk of stroke compared to men, largely due to a steep increase in stroke incidence in older postmenopausal women, yet most basic science studies continue to only evaluate young male animals. Women also have an increased lifetime prevalence of many common stroke risk factors, including hypertension and atrial fibrillation, as well as abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome. None of these age-related risk factors have been well modeled in the laboratory. Evidence from the bench has implicated genetic and epigenetic factors, differential activation of cell-death programs, cell-cell signaling pathways, and systemic immune responses as contributors to sex differences in ischemic stroke. The most recent basic scientific findings have been summarized in this review, with an emphasis on factors that differ between males and females that are pertinent to stroke outcomes. Identification and understanding of the underlying biological factors that contribute to sex differences will be critical to the development of translational targets to improve the treatment of women after stroke. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The Interplay between Stroke Severity, Antiplatelet Use, and Aspirin Resistance in Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agayeva, Nergiz; Topcuoglu, Mehmet Akif; Arsava, Ethem Murat

    2016-02-01

    The issue of whether prior antiplatelet use favorably affects stroke severity is currently unresolved. In this study, we evaluated the effect of antiplatelet use on clinical stroke severity and ischemic lesion volume, and assessed the confounding effect of laboratory-defined aspirin resistance on this relationship. Admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, ischemic lesion volumes on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and in vitro aspirin resistance, in addition to other pertinent stroke features, were determined in a series of ischemic stroke patients. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to compare clinical and imaging markers of stroke severity among patients with and without prior antiplatelet use, taking into consideration the presence or absence of aspirin resistance. Antiplatelet users experienced more severe strokes, per NIHSS score, in comparison to antiplatelet-naive patients (P = .007). No significant difference was observed with respect to admission DWI lesion volume. When analyses were repeated after adjustment for stroke subtype and other confounders, no association was observed between antiplatelet use and stroke severity. On the other hand, NIHSS scores were significantly higher in aspirin-unresponsive patients than in both aspirin responders (P = .049) and aspirin nonusers (P = .005). We were unable to demonstrate a substantial positive influence of prestroke antiplatelet usage on stroke severity. Although the presence of more severe strokes among patients with laboratory resistance suggests a protective influence of aspirin sensitivity on stroke severity, the hypothesis could not be validated as no difference was observed among aspirin-naive and aspirin-sensitive patients with respect to admission NIHSS score or DWI lesion volume. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Smoking Cessation Intervention After Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack. A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner Frandsen, Nicole; Sørensen, Margit; Hyldahl, Tanja Kirstine

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Smoking cessation is widely recommended for secondary stroke prevention. However, little is known about the efficacy of smoking cessation intervention after stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). METHODS: Ninety-four smokers under age 76, admitted with ischemic stroke or TIA were...... randomized to minimal smoking cessation intervention or intensive smoking cessation intervention. All patients attended a 30-min individual counseling by the study nurse. Patients randomized to intensive smoking cessation intervention also participated in a 5-session outpatient smoking cessation program...... by an authorized smoking cessation instructor, a 30-min outpatient visit after 6 weeks, and 5 telephone counseling sessions by the study nurse. Free samples of nicotine replacement therapy were offered as part of the intensive smoking cessation program. Smoking cessation rates at 6 months were determined by self...

  15. Neuroanatomical correlates of severe cardiac arrhythmias in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Frank; Kallmünzer, Bernd; Gutjahr, Isabell; Breuer, Lorenz; Winder, Klemens; Kaschka, Iris; Kloska, Stephan; Doerfler, Arnd; Hilz, Max-Josef; Schwab, Stefan; Köhrmann, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Neurocardiological interactions can cause severe cardiac arrhythmias in patients with acute ischemic stroke. The relationship between the lesion location in the brain and the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias is still discussed controversially. The aim of the present study was to correlate the lesion location with the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Cardiac arrhythmias were systematically assessed in patients with acute ischemic stroke during the first 72 h after admission to a monitored stroke unit. Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) was used to correlate the lesion location with the occurrence of clinically relevant severe arrhythmias. Overall 150 patients, 56 with right-hemispheric and 94 patients with a left-hemispheric lesion, were eligible to be included in the VLSM study. Severe cardiac arrhythmias were present in 49 of these 150 patients (32.7%). We found a significant association (FDR correction, q cardiac arrhythmias. Because left- and right-hemispheric lesions were analyzed separately, the significant findings rely on the 56 patients with right-hemispheric lesions. The data indicate that these areas are involved in central autonomic processing and that right-hemispheric lesions located to these areas are associated with an elevated risk for severe cardiac arrhythmias.

  16. Crossed cerebellar diaschisis in ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meneghetti, G; Vorstrup, S; Mickey, B

    1984-01-01

    Seventy measurements of CBF were performed in 12 stroke patients by 133Xe inhalation and a rapidly rotating single photon emission computerized tomograph. CBF was measured every other day during the acute phase and at 2- and 6-month follow-up visits. A persistent contralateral cerebellar blood flow...... depression was evident in five patients with severe hemispheric low flow areas, which correlated with large, hypodense lesions on the computerized tomographic scan. In a sixth patient with a small, deep infarct, a transient crossed cerebellar low flow was observed, while the clinical symptoms persisted....... It is concluded from this serial study that crossed cerebellar diaschisis is a common finding in completed stroke. It is probably caused by disconnection of the corticopontine pathways, a disconnection that tends to persist. The phenomenon is in fact less variable than the stroke-related CBF changes...

  17. Exercise promotes axon regeneration of newborn striatonigral and corticonigral projection neurons in rats after ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Wan Zhang

    Full Text Available Newborn striatal neurons induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO can form functional projections targeting into the substantia nigra, which should be very important for the recovery of motor function. Exercise training post-stroke improves motor recovery in clinic patients and increases striatal neurogenesis in experimental animals. This study aimed to investigate the effects of exercise on axon regeneration of newborn projection neurons in adult rat brains following ischemic stroke. Rats were subjected to a transient MCAO to induce focal cerebral ischemic injury, followed by 30 minutes of exercise training daily from 5 to 28 days after MCAO. Motor function was tested using the rotarod test. We used fluorogold (FG nigral injection to trace striatonigral and corticonigral projection neurons, and green fluorescent protein (GFP-targeting retroviral vectors combined with FG double labeling (GFP(+ -FG(+ to detect newborn projection neurons. The results showed that exercise improved the recovery of motor function of rats after MCAO. Meanwhile, exercise also increased the levels of BDNF and VEGF, and reduced Nogo-A in ischemic brain. On this condition, we further found that exercise significantly increased the number of GFP(+ -FG(+ neurons in the striatum and frontal and parietal cortex ipsilateral to MCAO, suggesting an increase of newborn striatonigral and corticonigral projection neurons by exercise post-stroke. In addition, we found that exercise also increased NeuN(+ and FG(+ cells in the striatum and frontal and parietal cortex, the ischemic territory, and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH immunopositive staining cells in the substantia nigra, a region remote from the ischemic territory. Our results provide the first evidence that exercise can effectively enhance the capacity for regeneration of newborn projection neurons in ischemic injured mammalian brains while improving motor function. Our results provide a very important cellular mechanism

  18. Risk of ischemic stroke after atrial fibrillation diagnosis: A national sample cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Kyoung Son

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is a major risk factor for ischemic stroke and associated with a 5-fold higher risk of stroke. In this retrospective cohort study, the incidence of and risk factors for ischemic stroke in patients with AF were identified. All patients (≥30 years old without previous stroke who were diagnosed with AF in 2007-2013 were selected from the National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort. To identify factors that influenced ischemic stroke risk, Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was conducted. During a mean follow-up duration of 3.2 years, 1022 (9.6% patients were diagnosed with ischemic stroke. The overall incidence rate of ischemic stroke was 30.8/1000 person-years. Of all the ischemic stroke that occurred during the follow-up period, 61.0% occurred within 1-year after AF diagnosis. Of the patients with CHA2DS2-VASc score of ≥2, only 13.6% were receiving warfarin therapy within 30 days after AF diagnosis. Relative to no antithrombotic therapy, warfarin treatment for >90 days before the index event (ischemic stroke in stroke patients and death/study end in non-stroke patients associated with decreased ischemic stroke risk (Hazard Ratio = 0.41, 95%confidence intervals = 0.32-0.53. Heart failure, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus associated with greater ischemic stroke risk. AF patients in Korea had a higher ischemic stroke incidence rate than patients in other countries and ischemic stroke commonly occurred at early phase after AF diagnosis. Long-term (>90 days continuous warfarin treatment may be beneficial for AF patients. However, warfarin treatment rates were very low. To prevent stroke, programs that actively detect AF and provide anticoagulation therapy are needed.

  19. The prevention of ischemic stroke with antithrombotic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Perko

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Current antithrombotic drugs reduce the risk of stroke, heart attack and death from vascular causes by 25 % in patients with cerebral ischemic events resulting from disease of small or large cerebral arteries. In the primary prevention, Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA reduces the risk of stroke by 19 % in women but not in men. In patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation the risk of stroke treating with ASA is reduced by 20 %. Oral anticoagulants significantly reducestroke risk due to nonvalvular atrial fibrillation by 65–70 % compared with placebo and by 40 % compared with ASA alone. At the same time they cause more major bleedings. Recently studied new antiplatelet drugs and anticoagulants might alter the current course of stroke prevention treatment. Research is also needed on the benefits and risks of combination antiplatelets and anticoagulants in patients with non valvular atrial fibrillation in combination with arterial cerebral disease.

  20. Effect of pre-stroke use of ACE inhibitors on ischemic stroke severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caplan Louis

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent trials suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI are effective in prevention of ischemic stroke, as measured by reduced stroke incidence. We aimed to compare stroke severity between stroke patients who were taking ACEI before their stroke onset and those who were not, to examine the effects of pretreatment with ACEI on ischemic stroke severity. Methods We retrospectively studied 126 consecutive patients presenting within 24 hours of ischemic stroke onset, as confirmed by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI. We calculated the NIHSS score at presentation, as the primary measure of clinical stroke severity, and categorized stroke severity as mild (NIHSS [less than or equal to] 7, moderate (NIHSS 8–13 or severe (NIHSS [greater than or equal to] 14. We analyzed demographic data, risk-factor profile, blood pressure (BP and medications on admissions, and determined stroke mechanism according to TOAST criteria. We also measured the volumes of admission diffusion- and perfusion-weighted (DWI /PWI magnetic resonance imaging lesions, as a secondary measure of ischemic tissue volume. We compared these variables among patients on ACEI and those who were not. Results Thirty- three patients (26% were on ACE-inhibitors. The overall median baseline NIHSS score was 5.5 (range 2–21 among ACEI-treated patients vs. 9 (range 1–36 in non-ACEI patients (p = 0.036. Patients on ACEI prior to their stroke had more mild and less severe strokes, and smaller DWI and PWI lesion volumes compared to non-ACEI treated patients. However, none of these differences were significant. Predictably, a higher percentage of patients on ACEI had a history of heart failure (p = 0.03. Age, time-to-imaging or neurological evaluation, risk-factor profile, concomitant therapy with lipid lowering, other antihypertensives or antithrombotic agents, or admission BP were comparable between the two groups. Conclusion Our results

  1. Critical care management of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Peter J D

    2004-04-01

    To review and examine the efficacy of recently described medical and surgical interventions after acute ischaemic stroke using data from well conducted, clinical trials and systematic reviews. This review will consider recently published or updated articles. As therapeutic options evolve, including thrombolysis and anti-platelet therapy, prevention of secondary insults, becomes increasingly important during periods of acute cerebral ischaemia in order to prevent worsening of the neurological injury. As in other acute medical conditions, urgent management of patients with acute ischaemic stroke should begin with the assessment and treatment of the airway, breathing, circulation, temperature, and blood glucose control. It is estimated that there will be 8.5 million patients with acute ischaemic stroke in the European Union and the USA over the next decade, and of these, about one and a half million will die within six months of stroke onset. Of those who survive, about one third will depend on other people for help with their activities of daily living. Future treatment strategies are likely to involve agents that re-canalise vessels and minimise further neuronal damage.

  2. The Association Between Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection and Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Chlamydia pneumoniae has been linked with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases; however, data on stroke and cerebrovascular accidents are sparse. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the association between C. pneumoniae infection and ischemic stroke. Patients and Methods In a case-control study, 141 patients, admitted with ischemic stroke, were compared with gender and age-matched control subjects (n = 141. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit, the presence of C. pneumoniae IgG and IgA in the patients’ sera was determined. The data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 15 and were compared between the two groups using T-test and chi square test. Results The mean ages of the case and control groups were 68.97 ± 12.29 and 66.95 ± 6.68 years old, respectively. The difference between these two groups was not statistically significant (P = 0.102. The seroprevalence of C. pneumoniae-specific IgG were 78.7% in the patients with stroke and 52.5% in the control group. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.0001. The seroprevalence of C. pneumoniae-specific IgA were 41.1% in the stroke and 15.6% in the control group. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.0001. Conclusions The results supported the hypothesis that serological evidence of C. pneumoniae infection may be associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke and cerebrovascular accident.

  3. An approach of patients with ischemic stroke to primary and secondary stroke prevention in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacki, Przemysław; Porebska, Agata; Bajer-Czajkowska, Anna; Zywica, Adrian; Koziarska, Dorota; Podbielski, Jarosław

    2007-01-01

    The stroke mortality rate in the Polish population is significantly higher than the average stroke mortality in Western Europe. It may prove a poor "initial" health condition of the Polish population which is afflicted with many life-threatening diseases which are at the same time the major risk factors for both: first ever and recurrent stroke. The aim of our study was to evaluate what is an attitude of Polish people with first-ever or recurrent stroke to keeping under control the most important risk factors for ischemic stroke. 1282 consecutive patients with ischemic stroke were examined and categorized as individuals with first ever (group I - 980 patients) and recurrent stroke (group II - 302 patients). The data on the patients' previous history of stroke and vascular modifiable risk factors diagnosed before the onset of stroke: arterial hypertension (AH), type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), ischemic heart disease (IHD), atrial fibrillation (AF), cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption were determined. The treatment with antiplatelet agents or oral anticoagulants was also taken into account. More than one-third ofpatients, irrespective of group admitted that they had treated AH unsystematically or not treated at all. Based on initial blood pressure, it may be suspected, that also individuals declaring systematic AH treatment, did not do it effectively. It also concerned the type 2 DM - glycemic control remained unsatisfactory within the period preceding first-ever and recurrent stroke. After first stroke, the patients haven't changed their habits considering tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption. The anticoagulants were used relatively seldom in relation to recommendations in both group of patients. The main risk factors for ischemic stroke are poorly controlled by Polish patients before first ever stroke. After the first cerebrovascular event they usually don't change their habits, which lead to recurrent stroke. In Poland the educational strategies regarding

  4. The Effects of Various Weather Conditions as a Potential Ischemic Stroke Trigger in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Kristy L; Silver, Gena M

    2017-11-16

    Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States, and is the leading cause of serious, long-term disability worldwide. There are at least 795,000 new or recurrent strokes each year, and approximately 85% of all stroke occurrences are ischemic. Unfortunately, companion animals are also at risk for ischemic stroke. Although the exact incidence of ischemic stroke in companion animals is unknown, some studies, and the veterinary information network (VIN), report that approximately 3% of neurological case referrals are due to a stroke. There is a long list of predisposing factors associated with the risk of ischemic stroke in both humans and canines; however, these factors do not explain why a stroke happens at a particular time on a particular day. Our understanding of these potential stroke "triggers" is limited, and the effect of transient environmental exposures may be one such "trigger". The present study investigated the extent to which the natural occurrence of canine ischemic stroke was related to the weather conditions in the time-period immediately preceding the onset of stroke. The results of the present study demonstrated that the change in weather conditions could be a potential stroke trigger, with the strokes evaluated occurring after periods of rapid, large fluctuations in weather conditions. There are currently no epidemiological data on the seasonal variability of ischemic stroke in dogs, and determining whether canine stroke parallels human stroke would further validate the use of companion dogs as an appropriate naturally occurring model.

  5. Blunt Traumatic Extracranial Cerebrovascular Injury and Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Foreman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ischemic stroke occurs in a significant subset of patients with blunt traumatic cerebrovascular injury (TCVI. The patients are victims of motor vehicle crashes, assaults or other high-energy collisions, and suffer ischemic stroke due to injury to the extracranial carotid or vertebral arteries. Summary: An increasing number of patients with TCVI are being identified, largely because of the expanding use of computed tomography angiography for screening patients with blunt trauma. Patients with TCVI are particularly challenging to manage because they often suffer polytrauma, that is, numerous additional injuries including orthopedic, chest, abdominal, and head injuries. Presently, there is no consensus about optimal management. Key Messages: Most literature about TCVI and stroke has been published in trauma, general surgery, and neurosurgery journals; because of this, and because these patients are managed primarily by trauma surgeons, patients with stroke due to TCVI have been essentially hidden from view of neurologists. This review is intended to bring this clinical entity to the attention of clinicians and investigators with specific expertise in neurology and stroke.

  6. Anxiety and depressive symptoms in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuletić, Vladimira; Sapina, Lidija; Lozert, Marija; Lezaić, Zeljka; Morović, Sandra

    2012-06-01

    Inadequate attention is being paid to the anxiety and depressive symptoms in acute stroke, although these problems are known to influence the patients' neurological outcome. The aim of our study was to assess the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms in the acute stage of ischemic stroke and to identify the factors associated with such problems. Anxiety and depressive symptoms were evaluated using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in 40 patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted during a period of one month. Statistical analyses were performed by the SigmaStat (Version 2.0) software. Study results showed 55% of study patients to suffer from depressive symptoms and 40% from both anxiety symptoms and depressive symptoms. There was a correlation of depressive symptoms (HADS-D score) with MMSE (p symptoms (HADS-A score) with MMSE (p symptoms were more frequent in the acute stage ofischemic stroke. Study patients had a high prevalence of both groups of symptoms. Therefore, attention should be paid to the anxiety and depressive symptoms in stroke units and try to relieve the patients' emotional stress and personal suffering, which could improve their neurological outcome.

  7. Distribution territories and causative mechanisms of ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovira, A.; Grive, E.; Alvarez-Sabin, J. [Unidad de Resonancia Magnetica, Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-03-01

    Ischemic stroke prognosis, risk of recurrence, clinical assessment, and treatment decisions are influenced by stroke subtype (anatomic distribution and causative mechanism of infarction). Stroke subtype diagnosis is better achieved in the early phase of acute ischemia with the use of multimodal MR imaging. The pattern of brain lesions as shown by brain MR imaging can be classified according to a modified Oxfordshire method, based on the anatomic distribution of the infarcts into six groups: (1) total anterior circulation infarcts, (2) partial anterior circulation infarcts, (3) posterior circulation infarcts, (4) watershed infarcts, (5) centrum ovale infarcts, and (6) lacunar infarcts. The subtype of stroke according to its causative mechanism is based on the TOAST method, which classifies stroke into five major etiologic groups: (1) large-vessel atherosclerotic disease, (2) small-vessel atherosclerotic disease, (3) cardioembolic source, (4) other determined etiologies, and (5) undetermined or multiple possible etiologies. The different MR imaging patterns of acute ischemic brain lesions visualized using diffusion-weighted imaging and the pattern of vessel involvement demonstrated with MR angiography are essential factors that can suggest the most likely causative mechanism of infarction. This information may have an impact on decisions regarding therapy and the performance of additional diagnostic tests. (orig.)

  8. Clinical Correlates, Ethnic Differences, and Prognostic Implications of Perivascular Spaces in Transient Ischemic Attack and Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kui-Kai; Li, Linxin; Lovelock, Caroline E; Zamboni, Giovanna; Chan, Tsz-Tai; Chiang, Man-Fung; Lo, Kin-Ting; Küker, Wilhelm; Mak, Henry Ka-Fung; Rothwell, Peter M

    2017-06-01

    Perivascular spaces (PVSs) are considered markers of small vessel disease. However, their long-term prognostic implications in transient ischemic attack/ischemic stroke patients are unknown. Ethnic differences in PVS prevalence are also unknown. Two independent prospective studies were conducted, 1 comprising predominantly whites with transient ischemic attack/ischemic stroke (OXVASC [Oxford Vascular] study) and 1 comprising predominantly Chinese with ischemic stroke (University of Hong Kong). Clinical and imaging correlates, prognostic implications for stroke and death, and ethnic differences in basal ganglia (BG) and centrum semiovale (CS) PVSs were studied with adjustment for age, sex, vascular risk factors, and scanner strength. Whites with transient ischemic attack/ischemic stroke (n=1028) had a higher prevalence of both BG and CS-PVSs compared with Chinese (n=974; >20 BG-PVSs: 22.4% versus 7.1%; >20 CS-PVSs: 45.8% versus 10.4%; P stroke (adjusted hazard ratio compared with 20 PVSs: HR, 1.82; 1.18-2.80; P =0.011) but not intracerebral hemorrhage ( P =0.10) or all-cause mortality ( P =0.16). CS-PVSs were not associated with recurrent stroke ( P =0.57) or mortality ( P =0.072). Prognostic associations were similar in both cohorts. Over and above ethnic differences in frequency of PVSs in transient ischemic attack/ischemic stroke patients, BG and CS-PVSs had similar risk factors, but although >20 BG-PVSs were associated with an increased risk of recurrent ischemic stroke, CS-PVSs were not. © 2017 The Authors.

  9. Intensive treadmill training in the acute phase after ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømmen, Anna Maria; Christensen, Thomas; Jensen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to (a) assess the feasibility of intensive treadmill training in patients with acute ischemic stroke, (b) test whether physical activity of the legs during training increases with time, and (c) evaluate to what extent training sessions contribute toward the overall physical...... activity of these patients. Twenty hospitalized patients with acute ischemic stroke trained on a treadmill twice daily for 30 min for 5 days and on day 30. Physical activity was measured as activity counts (AC) from accelerometers. A total of 196 of 224 initiated training sessions were completed. Training...... started 41.5±14 h after symptom onset. Only nonserious adverse events occurred in 14.7% of the sessions. An intensity of at least 50% of the individual heart rate reserve was obtained in 31% of training sessions. There was a significant increase in AC/min in the legs during training sessions...

  10. CURRENT REPERFUSION THERAPY POSSIBILITIES IN MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION AND ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Konstantinova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke remain to be of the greatest medical and social importance because of their high prevalence, disability, and mortality rates. Intractable thrombotic occlusion of the respective artery leads to the formation of an ischemic lesion focus in the tissue of the heart or brain. Emergency reperfusion serves to decrease a necrotic focus, makes its formation reversible, and reduces patient death rates. The paper considers main reperfusion therapy lines: medical (with thrombolytic drugs and mechanical (with primary interventions one and their combination in treating patients with acute myocardial and cerebral ischemia. Each reperfusion procedure is discussed in view of its advantages, disadvantages, available guidelines, and possibilities of real clinical practice. Tenecteplase is assessed in terms of its efficacy, safety, and capacities for bolus administration, which allows its use at any hospital and at the pre-hospital stage. Prehospital thrombolysis permits reperfusion therapy to bring much closer to the patient and therefore aids in reducing time to reperfusion and in salvaging as much the myocardial volume as possible. The rapidest recovery of myocardial and cerebral perfusion results in a decreased necrotic area and both improved immediate and late prognosis. The results of randomized clinical trials studying the possibilities of the medical and mechanical methods to restore blood flow are analyzed in the context of evidence-based medicine. The reason why despite the available contraindications, limited efficiency, and the risk of hemorrhagic complications, thrombolytic therapy remains the method of choice for prehospital reperfusion, an alternative to primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI if it cannot be carried out in patients with myocardial infarction at the stated time, and the only treatment ischemic stroke treatment that has proven its efficiency and safety in clinical trials is under

  11. Silent ischemic lesions in young adults with first stroke are associated with recurrent stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, Laura C; Tollard, Éléonore; Dubuc, Véronique; Lanthier, Sylvain; Deschaintre, Yan; Chagnon, Miguel; Poppe, Alexandre Y

    2012-09-18

    To determine the association between silent ischemic lesions (SILs) on baseline brain MRI and recurrent stroke in young adults with first-ever ischemic stroke. This was a single-center retrospective study of adult patients aged 18-50 years with first-ever ischemic stroke investigated by brain MRI between 2002 and 2009. Silent brain infarcts (SBIs) were defined as focal T2 hyperintensities ≥ 3 mm without corresponding focal symptoms, and leukoaraiosis was defined as focal, multifocal, or confluent hyperintensities on T2-weighted sequences. The primary outcome was recurrent stroke. A forward stepwise Cox regression model was used to determine whether SILs were independently associated with recurrent stroke. A total of 271 eligible patients were identified in the database: 89 did not undergo MRI imaging and 12 patients had inadequate follow-up, leaving a study population of 170 patients. MRI demonstrated SILs in 48 of 170 (28.2) patients. No patients had isolated leukoaraiosis. Hypertension (p = 0.049), migraine with aura (p = 0.02), and cardiovascular disease (p = 0.04) were associated with SIL. Mean follow-up duration was 25 ± 7 months. Among patients with SILs, 11 of 48 (23%) had a recurrent stroke vs 8 of 122 (6.5%) patients without SIL (p = 0.003). After multivariate Cox regression, SILs remained independently associated with recurrent stroke (hazard ratio [HR] 3.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-8.6, p = 0.02), as did the combination of SBIs and leukoaraiosis (HR 7.3, 95% CI 2.3-22.9, p = 0.003). In adults ≤ 50 years old with first-ever ischemic stroke, SILs are common and independently predict recurrent stroke.

  12. Association between Stroke Center Hospitalization for Acute Ischemic Stroke and Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Ying; Holloway, Robert G.; Chan, Paul S.; Noyes, Katia; Shah, Manish N.; Ting, Henry H.; Chappel, Andre R.; Peterson, Eric D.; Friedman, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Context Although stroke centers are widely accepted and supported, little is known about their impact on patient outcomes. Objective To examine the association between admission to stroke centers for an acute ischemic stroke and mortality. Design, Setting, and Participants Observational study using data from the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System. We compared mortality for patients admitted with acute ischemic stroke (n=30,947) between 2005 and 2006 at designated stroke centers and non-designated hospitals using differential distance to hospitals as an instrumental variable to adjust for potential pre-hospital selection bias. Patients were followed for mortality for 1 year after the index hospitalization through 2007. To assess whether our findings were specific to stroke, we also compared mortality for patients admitted with gastrointestinal hemorrhage (n=39,409) or acute myocardial infarction (n=40,024) at designated stroke centers and non-designated hospitals. Main Outcome Measure Thirty-day all-cause mortality. Results Among 30,947 patients with acute ischemic stroke, 15,297 (49.4%) were admitted to designated stroke centers. Using the instrumental variable analysis, admission to designated stroke centers was associated with greater use of thrombolytic therapy (4.8% vs. 1.7%; adjusted difference 2.2%, 95% CI, 1.6% to 2.8%; P<0.001) and lower 30-day all-cause mortality (10.1% vs. 12.5%; adjusted mortality difference: −2.5%, 95% CI, −3.6% to −1.4%; P<0.001). Differences in mortality also were observed at all time points, including at 1-day, 7-day, and 1-year follow-up. Moreover, the outcome differences were specific to stroke, as stroke centers and non-stroke centers had similar 30-day all-cause mortality rates among those with acute myocardial infarction (adjusted mortality difference: +0.3%, 95% CI, −0.5% to 1.0%; P=0.50) and/or gastrointestinal hemorrhage (adjusted mortality difference: +0.1%, 95% CI, −0.9% to 1.1%; P=0

  13. Classifiers for Ischemic Stroke Lesion Segmentation: A Comparison Study

    OpenAIRE

    Oskar Maier; Christoph Schröder; Nils Daniel Forkert; Thomas Martinetz; Heinz Handels

    2015-01-01

    Motivation Ischemic stroke, triggered by an obstruction in the cerebral blood supply, leads to infarction of the affected brain tissue. An accurate and reproducible automatic segmentation is of high interest, since the lesion volume is an important end-point for clinical trials. However, various factors, such as the high variance in lesion shape, location and appearance, render it a difficult task. Methods In this article, nine classification methods (e.g. Generalized Linear Models, Random De...

  14. Classifiers for Ischemic Stroke Lesion Segmentation: A Comparison Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oskar Maier

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke, triggered by an obstruction in the cerebral blood supply, leads to infarction of the affected brain tissue. An accurate and reproducible automatic segmentation is of high interest, since the lesion volume is an important end-point for clinical trials. However, various factors, such as the high variance in lesion shape, location and appearance, render it a difficult task.In this article, nine classification methods (e.g. Generalized Linear Models, Random Decision Forests and Convolutional Neural Networks are evaluated and compared with each other using 37 multiparametric MRI datasets of ischemic stroke patients in the sub-acute phase in terms of their accuracy and reliability for ischemic stroke lesion segmentation. Within this context, a multi-spectral classification approach is compared against mono-spectral classification performance using only FLAIR MRI datasets and two sets of expert segmentations are used for inter-observer agreement evaluation.The results of this study reveal that high-level machine learning methods lead to significantly better segmentation results compared to the rather simple classification methods, pointing towards a difficult non-linear problem. The overall best segmentation results were achieved by a Random Decision Forest and a Convolutional Neural Networks classification approach, even outperforming all previously published results. However, none of the methods tested in this work are capable of achieving results in the range of the human observer agreement and the automatic ischemic stroke lesion segmentation remains a complicated problem that needs to be explored in more detail to improve the segmentation results.

  15. Acute ischemic stroke--from symptom recognition to thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, M W; Kurz, K D; Farbu, E

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of stroke has changed in the recent years from rehabilitation to an emergency approach. We review existing data from symptom recognition to thrombolysis and identify challenges in the different phases of patient treatment. Implementation of treatment in dedicated stroke units with a multidisciplinary team exclusively treating stroke patients has led to significant reduction of stroke morbidity and mortality. Yet, first the introduction of treatment with intravenous rtPA (IVT) has led to the 'time is brain' concept where stroke is conceived as an emergency. As neuronal death in stroke is time dependent, all effort should be laid on immediate symptom recognition, rapid transport to the nearest hospital with a stroke treatment facility and diagnosis and treatment as soon as possible. The main cause of prehospital delay is that patients do not recognize that they suffered a stroke or out of other reasons do not call the Emergency Medical Services immediately. Educational stroke awareness campaigns may have an impact in increasing the number of patients eligible for rtPA treatment and can decrease the prehospital times if they are directed both to the public and to the medical divisions treating stroke. Stroke transport times can be shortened by the use of helicopter and a stroke mobile--an ambulance equipped with a CT scanner--may be helpful to decrease time from onset to treatment start in the future. Yet, IVT has several limitations such as a narrow time window and a weak effect in ischemic strokes caused by large vessel occlusions. In these cases, interventional procedures and the concept of bridging therapy, a combined approach of IVT and intraarterial thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy, might improve recanalization rates and patient outcome. As neuronal death in stroke patients occurs in a time-dependent fashion, all effort should be made to decrease time from symptom onset to treatment start with rtPA: major challenges are stroke

  16. ROCK as a therapeutic target for ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladojevic, Nikola; Yu, Brian; Liao, James K

    2017-12-01

    Stroke is a major cause of disability and the fifth leading cause of death. Currently, the only approved acute medical treatment of ischemic stroke is tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), but its effectiveness is greatly predicated upon early administration of the drug. There is, therefore, an urgent need to find new therapeutic options for acute stroke. Areas covered: In this review, we summarize the role of Rho-associated coiled-coil containing kinase (ROCK) and its potential as a therapeutic target in stroke pathophysiology. ROCK is a major regulator of cell contractility, motility, and proliferation. Many of these ROCK-mediated processes in endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes, astrocytes, glia, neurons, leukocytes, and platelets are important in stroke pathophysiology, and the inhibition of such processes could improve stroke outcome. Expert commentary: ROCK is a potential therapeutic target for cardiovascular disease and ROCK inhibitors have already been approved for human use in Japan and China for the treatment of acute stroke. Further studies are needed to determine the role of ROCK isoforms in the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia and whether there are further therapeutic benefits with selective ROCK inhibitors.

  17. Guidelines for prevention of stroke in patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack: a statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Council on Stroke: co-sponsored by the Council on Cardiovascular Radiology and Intervention: the American Academy of Neurology affirms the value of this guideline

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sacco, Ralph L; Adams, Robert; Albers, Greg; Alberts, Mark J; Benavente, Oscar; Furie, Karen; Goldstein, Larry B; Gorelick, Philip; Halperin, Jonathan; Harbaugh, Robert; Johnston, S Claiborne; Katzan, Irene; Kelly-Hayes, Margaret; Kenton, Edgar J; Marks, Michael; Schwamm, Lee H; Tomsick, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this new statement is to provide comprehensive and timely evidence-based recommendations on the prevention of ischemic stroke among survivors of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack...

  18. The role of sleep in recovery following ischemic stroke: A review of human and animal data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone B. Duss

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite advancements in understanding the pathophysiology of stroke and the state of the art in acute management of afflicted patients as well as in subsequent neurorehabilitation training, stroke remains the most common neurological cause of long-term disability in adulthood. To enhance stroke patients’ independence and well-being it is necessary, therefore, to consider and develop new therapeutic strategies and approaches. We postulate that sleep might play a pivotal role in neurorehabilitation following stroke. Over the last two decades compelling evidence for a major function of sleep in neuroplasticity and neural network reorganization underlying learning and memory has evolved. Training and learning of new motor skills and knowledge can modulate the characteristics of subsequent sleep, which additionally can improve memory performance. While healthy sleep appears to support neuroplasticity resulting in improved learning and memory, disturbed sleep following stroke in animals and humans can impair stroke outcome. In addition, sleep disorders such as sleep disordered breathing, insomnia, and restless legs syndrome are frequent in stroke patients and associated with worse recovery outcomes. Studies investigating the evolution of post-stroke sleep changes suggest that these changes might also reflect neural network reorganization underlying functional recovery. Experimental and clinical studies provide evidence that pharmacological sleep promotion in rodents and treatment of sleep disorders in humans improves functional outcome following stroke. Taken together, there is accumulating evidence that sleep represents a “plasticity state” in the process of recovery following ischemic stroke. However, to test the key role of sleep and sleep disorders for stroke recovery and to better understand the underlying molecular mechanisms, experimental research and large-scale prospective studies in humans are necessary. The effects of hospital

  19. Vascular remodeling after ischemic stroke: mechanisms and therapeutic potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jialing; Wang, Yongting; Akamatsu, Yosuke; Lee, Chih Cheng; Stetler, R Anne; Lawton, Michael T.; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The brain vasculature has been increasingly recognized as a key player that directs brain development, regulates homeostasis, and contributes to pathological processes. Following ischemic stroke, the reduction of blood flow elicits a cascade of changes and leads to vascular remodeling. However, the temporal profile of vascular changes after stroke is not well understood. Growing evidence suggests that the early phase of cerebral blood volume (CBV) increase is likely due to the improvement in collateral flow, also known as arteriogenesis, whereas the late phase of CBV increase is attributed to the surge of angiogenesis. Arteriogenesis is triggered by shear fluid stress followed by activation of endothelium and inflammatory processes, while angiogenesis induces a number of pro-angiogenic factors and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The status of collaterals in acute stroke has been shown to have several prognostic implications, while the causal relationship between angiogenesis and improved functional recovery has yet to be established in patients. A number of interventions aimed at enhancing cerebral blood flow including increasing collateral recruitment are under clinical investigation. Transplantation of EPCs to improve angiogenesis is also underway. Knowledge in the underlying physiological mechanisms for improved arteriogenesis and angiogenesis shall lead to more effective therapies for ischemic stroke. PMID:24291532

  20. Copeptin Levels in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke and Stroke Mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Matthias; Ebinger, Martin; Kunz, Alexander; Rozanski, Michal; Waldschmidt, Carolin; Weber, Joachim E; Winter, Benjamin; Koch, Peter M; Nolte, Christian H; Hertel, Sabine; Ziera, Tim; Audebert, Heinrich J

    2015-09-01

    Copeptin levels are increased in patients diagnosed with stroke and other vascular diseases. Copeptin elevation is associated with adverse outcome, predicts re-events in patients with transient ischemic attack and is used in ruling-out acute myocardial infarction. We evaluated whether copeptin can also be used as a diagnostic marker in the prehospital stroke setting. We prospectively examined patients with suspected stroke on the Stroke Emergency Mobile-an ambulance that is equipped with computed tomography and point-of-care laboratory. A blood sample was taken from patients immediately after arrival. We analyzed copeptin levels in patients with final hospital-based diagnosis of stroke or stroke mimics as well as in vascular or nonvascular patients. In addition, we examined the associations of symptom onset with copeptin levels and the prognostic value of copeptin in patients with stroke. Blood samples of 561 patients were analyzed. No significant differences were seen neither between cerebrovascular (n=383) and other neurological (stroke mimic; n=90) patients (P=0.15) nor between vascular (n=391) and nonvascular patients (n=170; P=0.57). We could not detect a relationship between copeptin levels and time from onset to blood draw. Three-month survival status was available in 159 patients with ischemic stroke. Copeptin levels in nonsurviving patients (n=8: median [interquartile range], 27.4 [20.2-54.7] pmol/L) were significantly higher than in surviving patients (n=151: median [interquartile range], 11.7 [5.2-30.9] pmol/L; P=0.024). In the prehospital setting, copeptin is neither appropriate to discriminate between stroke and stroke mimic patients nor between vascular and nonvascular patients. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01382862. The Pre-Hospital Acute Neurological Therapy and Optimization of Medical Care in Stroke Patients study (PHANTOM-S) was registered (NCT01382862). This sub-study was observational and not registered separately

  1. Remote post-conditioning reduces hypoxic damage early after experimental stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasseldam, Henrik; Hansen-Schwartz, Jacob; Munkholm, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Given that reliable markers for early ischemic brain damage are lacking, we set out to test whether pimonidazole can be used as a reliable tool in the quantification of hypoxic insults, at early time points following experimental stroke....

  2. The role of monocytes in ischemic stroke pathobiology: New avenues to explore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman eElAli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke accounts for the majority of stroke cases and constitutes a major cause of death and disability in the industrialized world. Inflammation has been reported to constitute a major component of ischemic stroke pathobiology. In the acute phase of ischemic stroke, microglia, the resident macrophages of the brain, are activated, followed by several infiltration waves of different circulating immune cells into the brain. Among these circulating immune cells, monocytes have been shown to play a particularly important role. Following their infiltration, monocytes differentiate into potent phagocytic cells, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs in the ischemic brain. Initially, the presence of these cells was considered as marker of an exacerbated inflammatory response that contributes to brain damage. However, the recent reports are suggesting a more complex and multiphasic roles of these cells in ischemic stroke pathobiology. Monocytes constitute a heterogeneous group of cells, which comprises two major subsets in rodent and three major subsets in human. In both species, two equivalent subsets exist, the pro-inflammatory subset and the anti-inflammatory subset. Recent data have demonstrated that ischemic stroke differentially regulate monocyte subsets, which directly affect ischemic stroke pathobiology and may have direct implications in ischemic stroke therapies. Here we review the recent findings that addressed the role of different monocyte subsets in ischemic stroke pathobiology, and the implications on therapies.

  3. Positive effects of intermittent fasting in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fann, David Yang-Wei; Ng, Gavin Yong Quan; Poh, Luting; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2017-03-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF) is a dietary protocol where energy restriction is induced by alternate periods of ad libitum feeding and fasting. Prophylactic intermittent fasting has been shown to extend lifespan and attenuate the progress and severity of age-related diseases such as cardiovascular (e.g. stroke and myocardial infarction), neurodegenerative (e.g. Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease) and cancerous diseases in animal models. Stroke is the second leading cause of death, and lifestyle risk factors such as obesity and physical inactivity have been associated with elevated risks of stroke in humans. Recent studies have shown that prophylactic IF may mitigate tissue damage and neurological deficit following ischemic stroke by a mechanism(s) involving suppression of excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death pathways in animal stroke models. This review summarizes data supporting the potential hormesis mechanisms of prophylactic IF in animal models, and with a focus on findings from animal studies of prophylactic IF in stroke in our laboratory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. RECAST (Remote Ischemic Conditioning After Stroke Trial): A Pilot Randomized Placebo Controlled Phase II Trial in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Timothy J; Hedstrom, Amanda; O'Sullivan, Saoirse; Donnelly, Richard; Barrett, David A; Sarmad, Sarir; Sprigg, Nikola; Bath, Philip M

    2017-05-01

    Repeated episodes of limb ischemia and reperfusion (remote ischemic conditioning [RIC]) may improve outcome after acute stroke. We performed a pilot blinded placebo-controlled trial in patients with acute ischemic stroke, randomized 1:1 to receive 4 cycles of RIC within 24 hours of ictus. The primary outcome was tolerability and feasibility. Secondary outcomes included safety, clinical efficacy (day 90), putative biomarkers (pre- and post-intervention, day 4), and exploratory hemodynamic measures. Twenty-six patients (13 RIC and 13 sham) were recruited 15.8 hours (SD 6.2) post-onset, age 76.2 years (SD 10.5), blood pressure 159/83 mm Hg (SD 25/11), and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score 5 (interquartile range, 3.75-9.25). RIC was well tolerated with 49 out of 52 cycles completed in full. Three patients experienced vascular events in the sham group: 2 ischemic strokes and 2 myocardial infarcts versus none in the RIC group ( P =0.076, log-rank test). Compared with sham, there was a significant decrease in day 90 NIHSS score in the RIC group, median NIHSS score 1 (interquartile range, 0.5-5) versus 3 (interquartile range, 2-9.5; P =0.04); RIC augmented plasma HSP27 (heat shock protein 27; P stroke is well tolerated and appears safe and feasible. RIC may improve neurological outcome, and protective mechanisms may be mediated through HSP27. A larger trial is warranted. URL: http://www.isrctn.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN86672015. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Copeptin as a biomarker for prediction of prognosis of acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qian; Tian, Yunfan; Peng, Hao; Li, Hongmei

    2017-05-01

    This meta-analysis aimed to investigate the predictive effect of copeptin as a biomarker for the prognosis of acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack. Electronic databases including PubMed, Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science and Cochrane Central were searched for studies assessing the association of copeptin level on admission with prognosis of acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack. The Newcastle-Ottawa Quality assessment scale for cohort study was used to evaluate quality. A total of 1976 acute ischemic stroke patients from 6 studies were included, and 59% of patients were male. Patients with poor outcomes and nonsurvivors had a higher copeptin level at admission (PCopeptin combined with an admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score significantly improved the discriminatory accuracy of functional outcome and mortality compared with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale alone. Elevation in plasma copeptin level carried a higher risk of all-cause mortality (odds ratio=4.16; 95% CI: 2.77-6.25) and poor functional outcome (odds ratio=2.56; 95% CI: 1.97-3.32) after acute ischemic stroke. In addition, copeptin improved the prognostic value of the ABCD2 (age, blood pressure, clinical features of transient ischemic attack, duration of symptoms and presence of diabetes mellitus) score for a recurrent cerebrovascular event in transient ischemic attack. Copeptin seems to be a promising independent biomarker for predicting the functional outcome and all-cause mortality within 3 months or 1 year after acute ischemic stroke, and it could also be a powerful tool for early risk stratification for patients with transient ischemic attack.

  6. Clinical predictors of hemorrhagic transformation in non lacunar ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia R. Balian

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic transformation is a complex phenomenon where brain tissue bleeds, which could be associated or not to an increase in the neurological deficit after the acute ischemic stroke. The aim of our study was to evaluate clinical predictors of hemorrhagic transformation in patients with non-lacunar ischemic stroke. We performed a prospective analysis of the clinical records and images of patients with non-lacunar ischemic stroke. Demographics, vascular risk factors, previous medications and the information of the event in patients with and without hemorrhagic transformation were here compared. We included in this study 747 patients with non-lacunar stroke, the mean age was 77 ± 11 years and 61% were females. In the univariate analysis, the age, a history of hypertension, atrial fibrillation, chronic kidney disease and the previous use of oral anticoagulation resulted statistically significant. In the multivariate analysis of logistic regression adjusted by age and vascular risk factors: the age > 80 years (OR 3.6, CI 95% 1.8-7.6, the pulse pressure > 60 mmHg at admission (OR 5.3, CI 95% 3.2-9.1, the chronic kidney disease (OR 3, CI 95% 2.5-3.8 and the presence of previous atrial fibrillation (OR 3.5, CI 95% 2.1-6.1 were associated with and increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation. The predictors of hemorrhagic transformation in our cohort showed a relationship with severe vascular illness. The identification of these patients could influence therapeutic decisions that could increase the risk of hemorrhagic transformation

  7. Validation of the Essen Stroke Risk Score in different subtypes of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Yongjun; Li, William A; Yan, Aoshuang; Wang, Yilong

    2017-06-01

    Predictive scores are important tools for stratifying patients based on their risk of future vascular events and for selecting preventive therapies. The aim of this study is to validate the Essen Stroke Risk Score (ESRS) for stratifying stroke recurrence in different subtypes of non-atrial fibrillation ischemic stroke in a large Chinese cohort. Data were derived from the Blood pressure and clinical Outcome in Stroke Survivors registry, which includes a cohort of 2204 stroke patients. All patients were further classified according to the TOAST (Trial of Org 10 172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) criteria. We stratified one-year cumulative rates for stroke and composite vascular events using the ESRS. The predictive power of the ESRS was assessed using the area under the receiver-operator curves (AUC). Among 1699 patients included in the study, the AUC of ESRS was 0.58 (95% CI: 0.52-0.64) for recurrent stroke, whereas 0.59 (95% CI: 0.53-0.64) for composite vascular events at 1 year. In patients with large-artery atherosclerosis (LAA) subtype of stroke, the AUC of ESRS was both 0.61 (95% CI: 0.54-0.68) for recurrent stroke and composite vascular events. However, no significant AUC was observed in patients with small-artery occlusion subtype of stroke. In patients with LAA subtype of non-atrial fibrillation stroke, the ESRS has moderate accuracy in stratifying the risk of both recurrent strokes and major vascular events within the first year. However, the ESRS couldn't accurately stratify the risk of recurrent strokes in patients with small-artery atherosclerosis subtype of non-atrial fibrillation stroke.

  8. Self-perceived psychological stress and ischemic stroke: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blomstrand Christian

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing body of evidence suggests that psychological stress contributes to coronary artery disease. However, associations between stress and stroke are less clear. In this study, we investigated the possible association between ischemic stroke and self-perceived psychological stress, as measured by a single-item questionnaire, previously reported to be associated with myocardial infarction. Methods In the Sahlgrenska Academy Study on Ischemic Stroke (SAHLSIS, 600 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke (aged 18 to 69 years and 600 age-matched and sex-matched population controls were recruited. Ischemic stroke subtype was determined according to Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST criteria. Self-perceived psychological stress preceding stroke was assessed retrospectively using a single-item questionnaire. Results Permanent self-perceived psychological stress during the last year or longer was independently associated with overall ischemic stroke (multivariate adjusted odds ratio (OR 3.49, 95% confidence interval (CI 2.06 to 5.93. Analyses by stroke subtype showed that this association was present for large vessel disease (OR 3.91, 95% CI 1.58 to 9.67, small vessel disease (OR 3.20, 95% CI 1.64 to 6.24, and cryptogenic stroke (OR 4.03, 95% CI 2.34 to 6.95, but not for cardioembolic stroke (OR 1.48, 95% CI 0.64 to 3.39. Conclusion In this case-control study, we found an independent association between self-perceived psychological stress and ischemic stroke. A novel finding was that this association differed by ischemic stroke subtype. Our results emphasize the need for further prospective studies addressing the potential role for psychological stress as a risk factor for ischemic stroke. In such studies ischemic stroke subtypes should be taken into consideration.

  9. Childhood Stature and Growth in Relation to First Ischemic Stroke or Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjærde, Line Klingen; Truelsen, Thomas Clement; Baker, Jennifer Lyn

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Attained height, an indicator of genetic potential and childhood growth environment, is inversely associated with stroke, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. We investigated whether childhood height and growth are associated with ischemic stroke (IS) and intracerebra...

  10. Cognitive aftermath of ischemic stroke : a longitudinal community-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, Marleen Juliana Josephina

    2004-01-01

    Stroke is a catastrophic event with a wide variety of possible long-term consequences for patients and their partners. The present study investigated cognitive functioning after ischemic stroke and the impact of changes in cognition on daily life.

  11. Association between pneumonia in acute stroke stage and 3-year mortality in patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi-Jing; Weng, Wei-Chieh; Su, Feng-Chieh; Peng, Tsung-I; Chien, Yu-Yi; Wu, Chia-Lun; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Wei, Yi-Chia; Lin, Shun-Wen; Zhu, Jun-Xiao; Huang, Wen-Yi

    2016-11-01

    The influence of pneumonia in acute stroke stage on the clinical presentation and long-term outcomes of patients with acute ischemic stroke is still controversial. We investigate the influence of pneumonia in acute stroke stage on the 3-year outcomes of patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke. Nine-hundred and thirty-four patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke were enrolled and had been followed for 3years. Patients were divided into two groups according to whether pneumonia occurred during acute stroke stage or not. Clinical presentations, risk factors for stroke, laboratory data, co-morbidities, and outcomes were recorded. The result showed that a total of 100 patients (10.7%) had pneumonia in acute stroke stage. The prevalence of older age, atrial fibrillation was significantly higher in patients with pneumonia in acute stroke stage. Total anterior circulation syndrome and posterior circulation syndrome occurred more frequently among patients with pneumonia in acute stroke stage (Ppneumonia in acute stroke stage is a significant predictor of 3-year mortality (hazard ratio=6.39, 95% confidence interval=4.03-10.11, Ppneumonia during the acute stroke stage is associated with increased risk of 3-year mortality. Interventions to prevent pneumonia in acute stroke stage might improve ischemic stroke outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Therapeutic Potential of Non-Psychotropic Cannabidiol in Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiro Fujiwara

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis contains the psychoactive component delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC, and the non-psychoactive components cannabidiol (CBD, cannabinol, and cannabigerol. It is well-known that delta9-THC and other cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists are neuroprotective during global and focal ischemic injury. Additionally, delta9-THC also mediates psychological effects through the activation of the CB1 receptor in the central nervous system. In addition to the CB1 receptor agonists, cannabis also contains therapeutically active components which are CB1 receptor independent. Of the CB1 receptor-independent cannabis, the most important is CBD. In the past five years, an increasing number of publications have focused on the discovery of the anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and neuroprotective effects of CBD. In particular, CBD exerts positive pharmacological effects in ischemic stroke and other chronic diseases, including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and rheumatoid arthritis. The cerebroprotective action of CBD is CB1 receptor-independent, long-lasting, and has potent anti-oxidant activity. Importantly, CBD use does not lead to tolerance. In this review, we will discuss the therapeutic possibility of CBD as a cerebroprotective agent, highlighting recent pharmacological advances, novel mechanisms, and therapeutic time window of CBD in ischemic stroke.

  13. Clinical and neurophysiological peculiarities in patients with ischemic supratentorial stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kuznietsov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work – optimization of diagnostic and prognostic arrangements in patients with ischemic supratentorial stroke in acute period by revealing of pathoneurophysiological peculiarities of realization of clinical pattern and stroke acute period outcome on the basis of clinical neurophysiological comparisons depending on the subtypes of stroke according to The Oxfordshire Community Stroke Classification. Material and methods: Clinical and computed electroencephalography investigations of 118 patients (mean age 67,9±0,8 in acute period of ischemic supratentorial stroke (firstly appeared was made. Depending on clinical subtype of the stroke that was detected during admission according to The Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification (OCSP all patients were devided into 3 groups: 1st – 50 patients with total anterior circulation infarct (TACI-subtype, 2nd – 38 patients with partial anterior circulation infarct (PACI and 3rd – 30 patients with lacunar infarct (LACI. Clinical examination included Rankin scale graduation and NIHSS detection. Separately for intact and affected hemisphere value of absolute (mcv2 and relative (% spectrum rhythm activity (RSRA of δ- (0,5-4 Hertz, θ- (4-8 Hertz, α- (8-13 Hertz, β- (13-35 Hertz range, and θlo- (4-6 Hertz, θhi- (6-8 Hertz, αlo- (8-10 Hertz, αhi - (10-13 Hertz, βlo- (13-25 Hertz та βhi- (25-35 Hertz subranges were evaluated. Results: The level of RSRA in δ- and θ-range in affected hemisphere exceeded the same parameters in patients with stroke PACI-subtype and LACI-subtype in 2,3 and 3,0 times respectively (p<0,01. The same time RSRA in α-, β-ranges, αlo-, αhi-, βlo-subranges in comparison with PACI-subtype was lower in 2,4; 2,1; 2,5; 2,4 and 1,6 times respectively (p<0,01; in comparison with LACI-subtype – in 3,4; 1,7; 3,3; 1,5 and 1,9 times respectively (p<0,01. Spectral structure of intact hemisphere EEG-pattern in patients with TACI-subtype of ischemic

  14. Specific features of reperfusion therapy for vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Anisimov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke in the vertebrobasilar system (VBS is characterized by the high rates of death and disability; reperfusion therapy in patients with a lesion focus in the VBS is safe and effective beyond the 4.5-hour therapeutic window. Actively developed current methods for the endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke enable one to increase recanalization rates and hence to improve the degree of functional recovery in this group of patients. Considering that there are no significant differences in the outcomes of systemic and selective thrombolytic therapy in patients with occlusion of the basilar arteries, the urgent problem is to increase the time from the onset of the disease to reperfusion therapy, therefore combined reperfusion therapy may be an optimal option. This approach would make it possible to initiate the therapy in a shorter period of time and to use the advantages of both reperfusion techniques. Intravenous thrombolysis as the rapidest and technically simplest method may be performed in the first step of therapy in the clinics unequipped with an X-ray surgical service, with the patient being further transported to a specialized endovascular center if the intravenous injection of a thrombolytic agent has no effect. Taking into account the fact that reperfusion therapy may be performed in patients with vertebrobasilar stroke in the wider therapeutic window, a similar organizational chart with multistep therapy for this disease might become the treatment of choice.

  15. Population-based effectiveness and safety of different antiplatelet regimens as secondary prevention for ischemic stroke/Transient ischemic attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorsyahdy, Alfi; De Boer, Anthonius; Deneer, Vera H.M.; Ten Berg, Jurrien M.; Souverein, Patrick C.; Klungel, Olaf H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different antiplatelet regimens are used for secondary prevention after ischemic stroke (IS)/transient ischemic attack (TIA), but studies on the relative effectiveness and safety of each regimen in daily practice are lacking. Objectives: To assess the relative effectiveness and safety of

  16. Prevalence of electrocardiographic ST-T changes during acute ischemic stroke in patients without known ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper K; Bak, Søren; Flemming Høilund-Carlsen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated characteristics and prevalence of ST-segment depression and/or T-wave inversion in the resting electrocardiogram of 244 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke, but without ischemic heart disease. The prevalence of ST-T changes ranged from 13% to 16% and this is what to expect...

  17. Sex differences and the role of IL-10 in ischemic stroke recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Sarah E; Roy-O'Reilly, Meaghan; Friedler, Brett; Staff, Ilene; Fortunato, Gilbert; McCullough, Louise D

    2015-01-01

    Females experience poorer recovery after ischemic stroke compared to males, even after controlling for age and stroke severity. IL-10 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine produced by T regulatory cells and Th2 CD4(+) helper T cells. In ischemic stroke, an excessive IL-10 response contributes to post-stroke immunosuppression, which worsens outcomes. However, it is unknown if sex differences exist in IL-10 levels after ischemic stroke. In this study, we found that higher levels of IL-10 were associated with poor acute and long-term outcomes after ischemic stroke in female patients but not in males. After controlling for confounders, IL-10 was not an independent predictor of functional outcomes. This suggests that higher serum IL-10 levels may reflect factors that interact with sex such as age and stroke severity.

  18. Timing of blood pressure lowering in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcel, Cheryl; Anderson, Craig S

    2015-08-01

    Whether there are any benefits without harm from early lowering of blood pressure (BP) in the setting of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) has been a longstanding controversy in medicine. Whilst most studies have consistently shown associations between elevated BP, particularly systolic BP, and poor outcome, some also report that very low BP (systolic <130 mmHg) and large reductions in systolic BP are associated with poor outcomes in AIS. However, despite these associations, the observed U- or J-shaped relationship between BP and outcome in these patients may not be causally related. Patients with more severe strokes may have a more prominent autonomic response and later lower BP as their condition worsens, often pre-terminally. Fortunately, substantial progress has been made in recent years with new evidence arising from well-conducted randomized trials. This review outlines new evidence and recommendations for clinical practice over BP management in AIS.

  19. Mitral annular calcification and incident ischemic stroke in treated hypertensive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Marco, Marina; Gerdts, Eva; Casalnuovo, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Background Fibro-calcification of the mitral annulus (MAC) has been associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke in general populations. This study was performed to assess whether MAC predicts incidence of ischemic stroke in treated hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LV...

  20. Strongly increased levels of fibrinogen elastase degradation products in patients with ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lau, L.M.L. de; Cheung, E.Y.L.; Kluft, C.; Leebeek, F.W.G.; Meijer, P.; Laterveer, R.; Dippel, D.W.J.; Maat, M.P.M.de

    2008-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is associated with leucocyte activation. Activated leucocytes release elastase, an enzyme that can degrade fibrinogen. Fibrinogen elastase degradation products (FgEDP) may serve as a specific marker of elastase proteolytic activity. In a case-control study of 111 ischemic stroke

  1. Increasing Incidence of Hospitalization for Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack in Young Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibæk, Maiken; Dehlendorff, Christian; Jørgensen, Henrik S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have reported increasing incidence of ischemic stroke in adults younger than 50 to 55 years. Information on temporal trends of other stroke subtypes and transient ischemic attack (TIA) is sparse. The aim of this study was to investigate temporal trends of the incidence...

  2. Fibrinogen γ′ in ischemic stroke: A case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.Y.L. Cheung (Elim); S.U. de Willige; H.L. Vos (Hans); F.W.G. Leebeek (Frank); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); R.M. Bertina (Rogier); M.P.M. de Maat (Moniek)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND AND PURPOSE - To determine the contribution of fibrinogen γ′ levels and FGG haplotypes to ischemic stroke. METHODS - Associations between fibrinogen γ′ levels, fibrinogen γ′/total fibrinogen ratio, and FGG haplotypes with the risk of ischemic stroke were determined in 124

  3. Hormonal contraceptives and risk of ischemic stroke in women with migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sacco, Simona; Merki-Feld, Gabriele S; Ægidius, Karen Lehrmann

    2017-01-01

    Several data indicate that migraine, especially migraine with aura, is associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke and other vascular events. Of concern is whether the risk of ischemic stroke in migraineurs is magnified by the use of hormonal contraceptives. As migraine prevalence is hig...

  4. Whole Grain Consumption and Risk of Ischemic Stroke: Results From 2 Prospective Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Juan; Liu, Gang; Willett, Walter C; Hu, Frank B; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Sun, Qi

    2017-12-01

    Higher intake of whole grains may exert cardiometabolic benefits, although findings on stroke risk are inconclusive. The potentially differential effects of individual whole grain foods on ischemic stroke have not been examined. We analyzed whole grain consumption in relation to ischemic stroke among 71 750 women from the Nurses' Health Study and 42 823 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study who were free of cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and cancer at baseline (1984 and 1986, respectively) through 2010 using a Cox proportional hazards model. Validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires were used to assess consumption of whole grain intake, including whole grain cold breakfast cereal, dark bread, oatmeal, brown rice, popcorn, bran, and germ. Self-reported incident cases of ischemic stroke were confirmed through medical record review. During 2 820 128 person-years of follow-up in the 2 cohorts, 2458 cases of ischemic stroke were identified and confirmed. Intake of total whole grains was not associated with risk of ischemic stroke after adjustment for covariates: the pooled hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) comparing extreme intake levels was 1.04 (0.91-1.19). However, intake of whole grain cold breakfast cereal and total bran was inversely associated with ischemic stroke after multivariate adjustment: the pooled hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 0.88 (0.80-0.96; Ptrend=0.008) and 0.89 (0.79-1.00; Ptrend=0.004), respectively. Other whole grain foods were not associated with a lower risk of ischemic stroke. Although overall consumption of whole grains was not associated with lower risk of ischemic stroke, greater consumption of whole grain cold breakfast cereal and bran was significantly associated with a lower risk of ischemic stroke. More studies are needed to replicate these associations between individual whole grain foods and risk of ischemic stroke among other populations. © 2017 American Heart

  5. Essential hypertension, cerebral white matter pathology and ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, C

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most-frequent causes of death and the first cause of disability worldwide. Different mechanisms are related to the pathogenesis of stroke, involving multiple biological systems, which are often inter-connected. Besides age, hypertension is the most important risk factor for stroke and may also predispose to the development of more subtle cerebral damage based on arteriolar narrowing or pathological microvascular changes. Age and high blood pressure are responsible for silent structural and functional cerebral changes leading to white matter lesions and cognitive impairment. The clinical significance and pathological substrate of white matter lesions are not fully understood. Hypertensive patients have more white matter lesions, which are an important prognostic factor for the development of stroke, cognitive impairment, dementia and death, than normotensive people. Over the past 10 years, strong evidence has emerged that cerebral white matter lesions in hypertensive patients should be considered a silent early marker of brain damage. The mechanisms that would explain all these relationships remain to be elucidated, but available data suggest that arteriosclerosis of the penetrating brain vessels is the main factor in the pathogenesis of ischemic white matter lesions.

  6. Statins in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Keun-Sik; Lee, Ji Sung

    2015-09-01

    Statins have pleiotropic effects of potential neuroprotection. However, because of lack of large randomized clinical trials, current guidelines do not provide specific recommendations on statin initiation in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The current study aims to systematically review the statin effect in AIS. From literature review, we identified articles exploring prestroke and immediate post-stroke statin effect on imaging surrogate markers, initial stroke severity, functional outcome, and short-term mortality in human AIS. We summarized descriptive overview. In addition, for subjects with available data from publications, we conducted meta-analysis to provide pooled estimates. In total, we identified 70 relevant articles including 6 meta-analyses. Surrogate imaging marker studies suggested that statin might enhance collaterals and reperfusion. Our updated meta-analysis indicated that prestroke statin use was associated with milder initial stroke severity (odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval], 1.24 [1.05-1.48]; P=0.013), good functional outcome (1.50 [1.29-1.75]; Ptransformation (1.63 [1.04-2.56]; P=0.035). The current study findings support the use of statin in AIS. However, the findings were mostly driven by observational studies at risk of bias, and thereby large randomized clinical trials would provide confirmatory evidence.

  7. A Validation of the Essen Stroke Risk Score in Outpatients with Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pan; Liu, Yi; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Anxin; Zheng, Huaguang; Zhao, Xingquan; Yan, Aoshuang; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about the predictive accuracy of the Essen Stroke Risk Score (ESRS) for Chinese stroke outpatients. Our goal was to perform an external validation of the ESRS using a large multicenter cohort of outpatients with ischemic stroke (IS). We estimated the 1-year cumulative event rates for both recurrent stroke and combined vascular events for patients in different ESRS categories using data from a prospective cohort of 3316 outpatients with IS admitted to 18 hospitals in China. In addition, we evaluated the predictive accuracy of the ESRS for both recurrent stroke and combined vascular events using C statistic. In the nonatrial fibrillation IS outpatients, the cumulative 1-year event rate was 2.47% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.97%-3.06%) for recurrent stroke and 4.32% (95% CI, 3.65%-5.06%) for combined vascular events. The event rates were significantly higher in patients in higher ESRS categories. The ESRS had a predictive accuracy of .63 (.57-.69) for recurrent stroke and .63 (.58-.68) for combined vascular events. Among the Chinese outpatients with IS, the ESRS was able to stratify the risk of both recurrent stroke and combined vascular events equally well. A prediction model suitable for Chinese IS populations is needed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Recurrent juvenile ischemic stroke caused by bow hunter's stroke revealed by carotid duplex ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekawa, Hidehiro; Suzuki, Keisuke; Nishihira, Takahito; Iwasaki, Akio; Hoshiyama, Eisei; Okamura, Madoka; Numao, Ayaka; Suzuki, Shiho; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-07-01

    Bow hunter's stroke (BHS) is a rare cause of vertebrobasilar insufficiency due to rotational vertebral artery (VA) occlusion associated with head turning. We report a juvenile patient presenting with recurrent ischemic stroke caused by BHS, which was revealed by carotid duplex ultrasonography. Carotid duplex ultrasonography performed in the neutral position showed normal findings. However, disappearance of end-diastolic blood flow of contralateral VAs was observed with head rotation. Digital subtraction angiography confirmed occlusion at C1/2 levels in the VA contralateral to the head rotation, bilaterally. Importantly, our patient did not recognize the association of head rotation and previous episodes of stroke. We suggest that BHS should be considered in patients with cryptogenic stroke occurring in the vertebrobasilar artery territory.

  9. The Prognostic Values of Leukocyte Rho Kinase Activity in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-I. Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. It has been reported that leukocyte ROCK activity is elevated in patients after ischemic stroke, but it is unclear whether leukocyte ROCK activity is associated with clinical outcomes following acute stroke events. The objective of this study is to investigate if leukocyte ROCK activity can predict the outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Materials and Methods. We enrolled 110 patients of acute ischemic stroke and measured the leukocyte ROCK activity and plasma level of inflammatory cytokines to correlate the clinical outcomes of these patients. Results. The leukocyte ROCK activity at 48 hours after admission in acute ischemic stroke patients was higher as compared to a risk-matched population. The leukocyte ROCK activity significantly correlated with National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS difference between admission and 90 days after stroke event. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates showed lower stroke-free survival during follow-up period in patients with high leukocyte ROCK activity or plasma hsCRP level. Leukocyte ROCK activity independently predicted the recurrent stroke in patients with atherosclerotic stroke. Conclusions. This study shows elevated leukocyte ROCK activity in patients with ischemic stroke as compared to risk-matched subjects and is an independent predictor for recurrent stroke.

  10. Differences in Acute Ischemic Stroke Quality of Care and Outcomes by Primary Stroke Center Certification Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Shumei; Cox, Margueritte; Patel, Puja; Smith, Eric E; Reeves, Mathew J; Saver, Jeffrey L; Bhatt, Deepak L; Xian, Ying; Schwamm, Lee H; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2017-02-01

    Primary stroke center (PSC) certification was established to identify hospitals providing evidence-based care for stroke patients. The numbers of PSCs certified by Joint Commission (JC), Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program, Det Norske Veritas, and State-based agencies have significantly increased in the past decade. This study aimed to evaluate whether PSCs certified by different organizations have similar quality of care and in-hospital outcomes. The study population consisted of acute ischemic stroke patients who were admitted to PSCs participating in Get With The Guidelines-Stroke between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2012. Measures of care quality and outcomes were compared among the 4 different PSC certifications. A total of 477 297 acute ischemic stroke admissions were identified from 977 certified PSCs (73.8% JC, 3.7% Det Norske Veritas, 1.2% Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program, and 21.3% State-based). Composite care quality was generally similar among the 4 groups of hospitals, although State-based PSCs underperformed JC PSCs in a few key measures, including intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator use. The rates of tissue-type plasminogen activator use were higher in JC and Det Norske Veritas (9.0% and 9.8%) and lower in State and Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program certified hospitals (7.1% and 5.9%) (Pcertification, acute ischemic stroke quality of care and outcomes may differ according to which organization provided certification. These findings may have important implications for further improving systems of care. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Update on Inflammatory Biomarkers and Treatments in Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Bonaventura

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available After an acute ischemic stroke (AIS, inflammatory processes are able to concomitantly induce both beneficial and detrimental effects. In this narrative review, we updated evidence on the inflammatory pathways and mediators that are investigated as promising therapeutic targets. We searched for papers on PubMed and MEDLINE up to August 2016. The terms searched alone or in combination were: ischemic stroke, inflammation, oxidative stress, ischemia reperfusion, innate immunity, adaptive immunity, autoimmunity. Inflammation in AIS is characterized by a storm of cytokines, chemokines, and Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs released by several cells contributing to exacerbate the tissue injury both in the acute and reparative phases. Interestingly, many biomarkers have been studied, but none of these reflected the complexity of systemic immune response. Reperfusion therapies showed a good efficacy in the recovery after an AIS. New therapies appear promising both in pre-clinical and clinical studies, but still need more detailed studies to be translated in the ordinary clinical practice. In spite of clinical progresses, no beneficial long-term interventions targeting inflammation are currently available. Our knowledge about cells, biomarkers, and inflammatory markers is growing and is hoped to better evaluate the impact of new treatments, such as monoclonal antibodies and cell-based therapies.

  12. Self-reported stroke symptoms without a prior diagnosis of stroke or transient ischemic attack: a powerful new risk factor for stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleindorfer, Dawn; Judd, Suzanne; Howard, Virginia J; McClure, Leslie; Safford, Monika M; Cushman, Mary; Rhodes, David; Howard, George

    2011-11-01

    Previously in the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort, we found 18% of the stroke/transient ischemic attack-free study population reported ≥1 stroke symptom at baseline. We sought to evaluate the additional impact of these stroke symptoms on risk for subsequent stroke. REGARDS recruited 30,239 US blacks and whites, aged 45+ years in 2003 to 2007 who are being followed every 6 months for events. All stroke events are physician-verified; those with prior diagnosed stroke or transient ischemic attack are excluded from this analysis. At baseline, participants were asked 6 questions regarding stroke symptoms. Measured stroke risk factors were components of the Framingham Stroke Risk Score. After excluding those with prior stroke or missing data, there were 24,412 participants in this analysis with a median follow-up of 4.4 years. Participants were 39% black, 55% female, and had median age of 64 years. There were 381 physician-verified stroke events. The Framingham Stroke Risk Score explained 72.0% of stroke risk; individual components explained between 0.2% (left ventricular hypertrophy) and 5.7% (age+race) of stroke risk. After adjustment for Framingham Stroke Risk Score factors, stroke symptoms were significantly related to stroke risk: for each stroke symptom reported, the risk of stroke increased by 21% per symptom. Among participants without self-reported stroke or transient ischemic attack, prior stroke symptoms are highly predictive of future stroke events. Compared with Framingham Stroke Risk Score factors, the impact of stroke symptom on the prediction of future stroke was almost as large as the impact of smoking and hypertension and larger than the impact of diabetes and heart disease.

  13. Total antioxidant capacity of the diet is associated with lower risk of ischemic stroke in a large Italian cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rio, Daniele; Agnoli, Claudia; Pellegrini, Nicoletta; Krogh, Vittorio; Brighenti, Furio; Mazzeo, Teresa; Masala, Giovanna; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Berrino, Franco; Sieri, Sabina; Tumino, Rosario; Rollo, Patrizia Concetta; Gallo, Valentina; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Mattiello, Amalia; Chiodini, Paolo; Panico, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Experimental studies suggest that oxidative stress and systemic inflammation are involved in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke. Consuming a diet with a high total antioxidant capacity (TAC) has been related to reduced inflammation and increased circulating antioxidants in cross-sectional and randomized intervention studies. This study investigates the relation between dietary TAC and risk of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in 41,620 men and women not previously diagnosed with stroke or myocardial infarction, representing the Italian segment of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Controlling for potential confounders, a diet rich in TAC was associated with a reduction in HR for all types of stroke, but this association was only marginally significant (P-trend = 0.054). When only ischemic stroke cases were considered, data suggest a stronger inverse association with dietary TAC, with HR = 0.41 (95% CI = 0.23-0.74). Regarding single antioxidants, data from subanalyses on stroke types suggest that vitamin C is significantly associated with a decreased risk of ischemic stroke [HR = 0.58 (95% CI = 0.34-0.99)], whereas vitamin E was associated with increased HR of hemorrhagic stroke in the highest tertile of intake [HR = 2.94 (95% CI = 1.13-7.62)]. In conclusion, our findings suggest that antioxidants may play a role in reducing the risk of cerebral infarction but not hemorrhagic stroke. However, a high intake of vitamin E could be positively associated to the risk of brain hemorrhagic events; therefore, more focused investigations about this observation are needed.

  14. The neuroprotective effect of electro-acupuncture against ischemic stroke in animal model: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Rui; Zhang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that electro-acupuncture can exert neuroprotection in animal experiments. However, the exact mechanism of electro-acupuncture against ischemic stroke is not very clear. Literature retrieval was performed in four databases (OVID, PUBMED, EMBASE, and ISI Web of Science), from respective inception to July 2013. Series of studies have demonstrated that electro-acupuncture might be a promising method in reducing brain damage after stroke and induce brain ischemic tolerance before stroke through the promotion of angiogenesis, alleviation of the inflammatory response, regulation of the blood brain barrier (BBB), inhibition of apoptosis, and so on. Through these mechanisms, electro-acupuncture may reduce the neural damages associated with stroke. An awareness of the benefits of acupuncture might lead more patients into accepting acupuncture therapy for the management of patients with ischemic stroke and patients with high risk of ischemic stroke.

  15. Relation between reperfusion and hemorrhagic transformation in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsch, Alexander D. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Rijnstate Hospital, Department of Radiology, Arnhem (Netherlands); Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Niesten, Joris M.; Seeters, Tom van; Schaaf, Irene C. van der; Velthuis, Birgitta K. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Graaf, Yolanda van der [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kappelle, L.J. [University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Utrecht Stroke Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Collaboration: DUST investigators

    2015-12-15

    Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV-rtPA) is given in acute ischemic stroke patients to achieve reperfusion. Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) is a serious complication of IV-rtPA treatment and related to blood-brain barrier (BBB) injury. It is unclear whether HT occurs secondary to reperfusion in combination with ischemic BBB injury or is caused by the negative effect of IV-rtPA on BBB integrity. The aim of this study was to establish the association between reperfusion and the occurrence of HT. From the DUST study, patients were selected with admission and follow-up non-contrast CT (NCCT) and CT perfusion (CTP) imaging, and a perfusion deficit in the middle cerebral artery territory on admission. Reperfusion was categorized qualitatively as reperfusion or no-reperfusion by visual comparison of admission and follow-up CTP. Occurrence of HT was assessed on follow-up NCCT. The association between reperfusion and occurrence of HT on follow-up was estimated by calculating odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) with additional stratification for IV-rtPA treatment. Inclusion criteria were met in 299 patients. There was no significant association between reperfusion and HT (OR 1.2 95%CI 0.5-3.1). In patients treated with IV-rtPA (n = 203), the OR was 1.3 (95%CI 0.4-4.0), and in patients not treated with IV-rtPA (n = 96), the OR was 0.8 (95%CI 0.1-4.5). HT occurred in 14 % of the IV-rtPA patients and in 7 % of patients without IV-rtPA (95%CI of difference -1 to 14 %). Our results suggest that the increased risk of HT after acute ischemic stroke treatment is not dependent on the reperfusion status. (orig.)

  16. Stroke severity may predict causes of readmission within one year in patients with first ischemic stroke event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Cheng-Yang; Lin, Huey-Juan; Hu, Ya-Han; Sung, Sheng-Feng

    2017-01-15

    Readmissions after stroke are costly. Risk assessment using information available upon admission could identify high-risk patients for potential interventions to reduce readmissions. Baseline stroke severity has been suspected to be a factor in readmission; however, the exact nature of the impact has not been adequately understood. Hospitalized adult patients with first-ever ischemic stroke were identified from a nationwide administrative database. Stroke severity was assessed using a validated claims-based stroke severity index. Cox proportional hazards models were used to investigate the relationship between stroke severity and first readmission within one year. Of the 10,877 patients, 4295 (39.5%) were readmitted in one year. The cumulative risk of readmission was 34.1%, 44.7%, and 62.9% in patients with mild, moderate, and severe stroke, respectively. Patients with greater stroke severity had a significantly higher adjusted risk of first readmission for infection, metabolic disorders, neurological sequelae, and pulmonary diseases, whereas those with lesser stroke severity were prone to first readmission due to accidents. Stroke severity did not affect the risk of first readmission for recurrent stroke/transient ischemic attack, other cardiovascular events, malignancy, ulcers/upper gastrointestinal bleeding, kidney diseases, and others. Stroke severity in patients with first-ever ischemic stroke not only predicts readmission but also relates to the cause of readmission. Our results might provide important information for tailoring discharge planning to prevent readmissions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. NADPH Oxidase-Related Pathophysiology in Experimental Models of Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Several experimental studies have indicated that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidases (Nox exert detrimental effects on ischemic brain tissue; Nox-knockout mice generally exhibit resistance to damage due to experimental stroke following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO. Furthermore, our previous MCAO study indicated that infarct size and blood-brain barrier breakdown are enhanced in mice with pericyte-specific overexpression of Nox4, relative to levels observed in controls. However, it remains unclear whether Nox affects the stroke outcome directly by increasing oxidative stress at the site of ischemia, or indirectly by modifying physiological variables such as blood pressure or cerebral blood flow (CBF. Because of technical problems in the measurement of physiological variables and CBF, it is often difficult to address this issue in mouse models due to their small body size; in our previous study, we examined the effects of Nox activity on focal ischemic injury in a novel congenic rat strain: stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats with loss-of-function in Nox. In this review, we summarize the current literature regarding the role of Nox in focal ischemic injury and discuss critical issues that should be considered when investigating Nox-related pathophysiology in animal models of stroke.

  18. Smoking cessation intervention after ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. A randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner Frandsen, Nicole; Sørensen, Margit; Hyldahl, Tanja Kirstine; Henriksen, Rikke Mitzi; Bak, Søren

    2012-04-01

    Smoking cessation is widely recommended for secondary stroke prevention. However, little is known about the efficacy of smoking cessation intervention after stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Ninety-four smokers under age 76, admitted with ischemic stroke or TIA were randomized to minimal smoking cessation intervention or intensive smoking cessation intervention. All patients attended a 30-min individual counseling by the study nurse. Patients randomized to intensive smoking cessation intervention also participated in a 5-session outpatient smoking cessation program by an authorized smoking cessation instructor, a 30-min outpatient visit after 6 weeks, and 5 telephone counseling sessions by the study nurse. Free samples of nicotine replacement therapy were offered as part of the intensive smoking cessation program. Smoking cessation rates at 6 months were determined by self-report and verified by measurement of exhaled carbon monoxide (CO). Fewer patients than expected were recruited, which renders this report a pilot study. The 6-month self-reported smoking cessation rate was 37.8% in the minimal intervention group and 42.9% in the intensive intervention group. Smoking cessation rates verified by exhaled CO levels in the minimal intervention group and the intensive intervention group were 28.9% and 32.7%, respectively. No difference was found between the two groups (χ(2) = 0.16, p = .69). Overall smoking cessation rates were moderate and comparable to the results from other studies. Intensive smoking cessation intervention was not superior to short smoking cessation intervention. Thus, other factors than intensity of smoking cessation intervention might influence the smoking cessation rates after stroke or TIA.

  19. Risk Factors and Neurologic Outcomes in Childhood Arterial Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taner Sezer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to describe clinical characteristics, treatment modalities and outcomes of children with arterial ischemic stroke (AIS. Material and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 102 children (62 girls and 40 boys with AIS admitted at our hospital between 2009 and 2015. Age at stroke, sex, medical history, family history, clinical findings upon admission, history of seizure, and radiological findings were recorded. Cardiac assessment, hematological and immunological tests, metabolic screening were all performed in the patients. Results: In 25 children stroke occured as a complication of cardiac disease, 12 had transient cerebral arteriopathy, 11 had Down’s syndrome, 9 had thalassemia, 7 had moyamoya disease, 6 had MTHFR mutation, 4 had homozygote for factor V Leiden, 3 had protein C deficiency, 1 had sickle cell disease, and in 24 children no underlying cause could be found. Multiple risk factors were found in 16 children and recurrent stroke was observed in 4 patients. Hemiplegia was the commonest initial clinical presentation (88.2% followed by seizure (66.6% and decreased level of consciousness (54.9%. The avarage length of follow-up was 32.1±5.4 months. The outcome in all 102 stroke patients was as follows: asymptomatic 57.8%; persistent neurologic deficit or epilepsy 40.2%; and death 2%. Conclusion: Our study showed an underlying cause for AIS in 76.5% of the patients; 42.2% of the patients either died or had motor and/or cognitive sequelae and recurrence occured despite prophylactic aspirin treatment in 4 patients. [J Contemp Med 2017; 7(3.000: 278-283

  20. MAFB prevents excess inflammation after ischemic stroke by accelerating clearance of damage signals through MSR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shichita, Takashi; Ito, Minako; Morita, Rimpei; Komai, Kyoko; Noguchi, Yoshiko; Ooboshi, Hiroaki; Koshida, Ryusuke; Takahashi, Satoru; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2017-06-01

    Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) trigger sterile inflammation after tissue injury, but the mechanisms underlying the resolution of inflammation remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that common DAMPs, such as high-mobility-group box 1 (HMGB1), peroxiredoxins (PRXs), and S100A8 and S100A9, were internalized through the class A scavenger receptors MSR1 and MARCO in vitro. In ischemic murine brain, DAMP internalization was largely mediated by MSR1. An elevation of MSR1 levels in infiltrating myeloid cells observed 3 d after experimental stroke was dependent on the transcription factor Mafb. Combined deficiency for Msr1 and Marco, or for Mafb alone, in infiltrating myeloid cells caused impaired clearance of DAMPs, more severe inflammation, and exacerbated neuronal injury in a murine model of ischemic stroke. The retinoic acid receptor (RAR) agonist Am80 increased the expression of Mafb, thereby enhancing MSR1 expression. Am80 exhibited therapeutic efficacy when administered, even at 24 h after the onset of experimental stroke. Our findings uncover cellular mechanisms contributing to DAMP clearance in resolution of the sterile inflammation triggered by tissue injury.

  1. Can the FAST and ROSIER adult stroke recognition tools be applied to confirmed childhood arterial ischemic stroke?

    OpenAIRE

    Babl Franz E; Yock-Corrales Adriana; Mosley Ian T; Mackay Mark T

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Stroke recognition tools have been shown to improve diagnostic accuracy in adults. Development of a similar tool in children is needed to reduce lag time to diagnosis. A critical first step is to determine whether adult stoke scales can be applied in childhood stroke. Our objective was to assess the applicability of adult stroke scales in childhood arterial ischemic stroke (AIS) Methods Children aged 1 month to < 18 years with radiologically confirmed acute AIS who present...

  2. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin d deficiency in ischemic stroke and subtypes in Indian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Jaydip Ray; Mridula, K Rukmini; Alladi, Suvarna; Anamika, A; Umamahesh, M; Balaraju, Banda; Swath, A; Bandaru, Vcs Srinivasarao

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common across all age groups and may contribute to cardiovascular diseases. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency causing ischemic stroke has been documented in recent reports. To investigate the association of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency with ischemic stroke and subtypes. We recruited 250 consecutive ischemic stroke patients and 250 age and sex matched controls attending the Department of Neurology, at Yashoda hospital, Hyderabad, India, from January 2011 to December 2012. All ischemic stroke patients underwent stroke subtyping. We measured 25-hydroxyvitamin D by chemiluminescence test, serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in cases and controls. Out of 250 stroke patients, 190 (76%) were men and mean age was 58.4±11.1 years (age range-26-89 years). 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency was observed in 122 (48.8%) stroke patients and 79 (31.6%) controls (P=0.001). Among stroke patients, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency was found in 54.9% (50/91) of patients with large artery atherosclerosis, 54% (20/37) in cardioembolic stroke, 44.4% (20/45) in small artery diseases, 42.8% (15/35) in stroke of other determined etiology and 40.4% (17/42) in stroke of un-determined etiology. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed an independent association of 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency with ischemic stroke (odds ratio: 1.6; 95% CI 1.2-2.8). The association was strongest with large artery atherosclerosis (odds ratio: 2.4; 95% CI 1.6-3.5) and cardioembolic stroke (odds ratio: 2.0; 95% CI 1.0-3.2). We found that 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency had an independent association with ischemic stroke. The association was established in large artery arthrosclerosis and cardioembolic stroke.

  3. Standard medical management in secondary prevention of ischemic stroke in China (SMART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bin; Zhu, Yicheng; Cui, Liying; Ni, Jun; Xu, Weihai; Zhou, Lixin; Yao, Ming; Chen, Lin; Wang, Jianming; Wang, Yongjun; Pu, Chuanqiang

    2011-10-01

    Although guidelines for secondary ischemic stroke have been developed, there is a gap between guidelines and clinic practice. This study will investigate the current status of secondary ischemic stroke prevention in China, and implement a standard medical program in ischemic stroke and/or transient ischemic attack patients, and to examine the feasibility and efficacy of the program. This is a multicentre, parallel, randomized, open label, controlled trial to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a recommended guideline based program (SMART) in secondary stroke prevention. Forty-eight sites across Mainland China will participate in the trial. The number of enrolled patients in the study will be 4074. Primary outcome includes the proportion of patients adherent to eligible measures recommend by the SMART program, which is derived from current prevention guidelines for ischemic stroke, and the proportion of the patients achieving the treatment target. Secondary outcomes include new onset ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, acute coronary syndrome and all causes of death. The study has been registered on Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00664846); to date, 3380 patients have been enrolled. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2011 World Stroke Organization.

  4. The Effects of Air Pollution on Ischemic Stroke Admission Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimohammadi, Hossein; Fakhri, Sara; Derakhshanfar, Hojjat; Hosseini-Zijoud, Seyed-Mostafa; Safari, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the relationship between the level of air pollutants and the rate of ischemic stroke (IS) admissions to hospitals. In this retrospective cross-sectional study, stroke admissions (January-March 2012 and 2013) to an emergency department and air pollution and meteorological data were gathered. The relationship between air pollutant levels and hospital admission rates were evaluated using the generalize additive model. In all 379 patients with IS were referred to the hospital (52.5% male; mean age 68.2±13.3 years). Both transient (p<0.001) and long-term (p<0.001) rises in CO level increases the risk of IS. Increased weekly (p<0.001) and monthly (p<0.001) average O3 levels amplifies this risk, while a transient increase in NO2 (p<0.001) and SO2 (p<0.001) levels has the same effect. Long-term changes in PM10 (p<0.001) and PM2.5 (p<0.001) also increase the risk of IS. The findings showed that the level of air pollutants directly correlates with the number of stroke admissions to the emergency department. PMID:26866000

  5. Anthropometric evaluation in diabetic patients with ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holanda Maurus Marques de Almeida

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Strokes are one of the most common causes of mortality and long term severe disability. Risk factors for stroke include: age, gender, diabetes mellitus (DM, hypertension, and many others. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate obesity and hypertension in patients affected by acute ischemic stroke. METHOD: We compared the anthropometric variables between type II diabetic patients and non-diabetic patients. We evaluated a total of 60 patients, divided into two groups: 34 non-diabetic patients and a group of 26 type II diabetic subjects. RESULTS: The predominance of obesity, as well as hypertension, was very high among the studied groups, presenting no differences among the waist-hip ratio (WHR values of the study group compared to the ones of the control group. CONCLUSION: The predominance of obesity was very high among the studied groups and there was prevalence the android type obesity. There was no significative difference in the anthropometric evaluation by the measurement of WHR and the waist in the groups.

  6. Early outcome in acute ischemic stroke is not influenced by the prophylactic use of low-dose aspirin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeKeyser, J; Herroelen, L; DeKlippel, N

    Aspirin reduces the occurrence of ischemic strokes. In some prophylactic trials it was suggested that aspirin might also lessen stroke severity, and hence improve outcome in patients sustaining an ischemic stroke. We examined stroke severity (by using the Mathew scale) and early outcome (Barthel

  7. Emergency Department Healthcare Providers’ Knowledge of Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Lamba

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability in the United States. Nationally, only 3-8% of patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke (AIS who are eligible for thrombolysis currently receive recombinant tissue plasminogen factor (r-TPA. Lack of knowledge and familiarity with thrombolytics in stroke therapy are major impediments. We investigated the baseline stroke management concepts and knowledge of AIS therapy in Emergency Department (ED healthcare providers and then assessed the impact of a brief educational intervention. Method: An anonymous 14-item (11 multiple choice and 3 open-ended questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of 58 healthcare providers in the ED of a Level-1, tertiary care, academic, urban hospital. The survey was collected and a 15-minute lecture was provided to the group. A post-test was administered immediately and six months after the intervention. Data collected were analyzed with chi-square, analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis analysis using SAS 9.1.3. Results: Of the 58 respondents 77% (45/58 identified r-TPA as the thrombolytic agent, but only 56% (33/58 knew the therapeutic window and 29% (17/58 knew the “Door-to-CT” time. Sixty-two percent (36/58 of the respondents reported unfamiliarity with the National Institute of Health’s Stroke Scale and the eligibility criteria of r-TPA. Median score pre-education was 5/14 which improved to 11/14 (CI 8-12, p<0.0001 and six months later was 8/14 (best score was 12, p<0.0001. Only 8% (5/58 of the respondents expressed a special interest in stroke. Conclusion: Few medical personnel express a special interest in stroke and many misunderstand basic management concepts as well as eligibility criteria for thrombolysis in AIS. A brief targeted intervention improves knowledge and familiarizes ED healthcare providers about the use of r-TPA in AIS. Improvement in knowledge was demonstrated on testing immediately and at six month follow-up.

  8. Shared genetic contribution to ischemic stroke and Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib‐Samii, Poneh; Harold, Denise; Dichgans, Martin; Williams, Julie; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Markus, Hugh S.; Fornage, Myriam; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Sharma, Pankaj; Bis, Joshua C; Psaty, Bruce M; Seshadri, Sudha; Nalls, Mike A; Devan, William J; Boncoraglio, Giorgio; Malik, Rainer; Mitchell, Braxton D; Kittner, Steven J; Ikram, M Arfan; Clarke, Robert; Rosand, Jonathan; Meschia, James F; Sudlow, Cathie; Rothwell, Peter M; Levi, Christopher; Bevan, Steve; Kilarski, Laura L; Walters, Matthew; Thijs, Vincent; Slowik, Agnieszka; Lindgren, Arne; de Bakker, Paul I W; Lambert, Jean‐Charles; Ibrahim‐Verbaas, Carla A; Harold, Denise; Naj, Adam C; Sims, Rebecca; Bellenguez, Céline; Jun, Gyungah; DeStefano, Anita L; Bis, Joshua C; Beecham, Gary W; Grenier‐Boley, Benjamin; Russo, Giancarlo; Thornton‐Wells, Tricia A; Jones, Nicola; Smith, Albert V; Chouraki, Vincent; Thomas, Charlene; Ikram, M Arfan; Zelenika, Diana; Vardarajan, Badri N; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Lin, Chiao‐Feng; Gerrish, Amy; Schmidt, Helena; Kunkle, Brian; Dunstan, Melanie L; Ruiz, Agustin; Bihoreau, Marie‐Thçrèse; Choi, Seung‐Hoan; Reitz, Christiane; Pasquier, Florence; Hollingworth, Paul; Ramirez, Alfredo; Hanon, Olivier; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Campion, Dominique; Crane, Paul K; Baldwin, Clinton; Becker, Tim; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Cruchaga, Carlos; Craig, David; Amin, Najaf; Berr, Claudine; Lopez, Oscar L; De Jager, Philip L; Deramecourt, Vincent; Johnston, Janet A; Evans, Denis; Lovestone, Simon; Letenneur, Luc; Morón, Francisco J; Rubinsztein, David C; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Sleegers, Kristel; Goate, Alison M; Fiçvet, Nathalie; Huentelman, Matthew J; Gill, Michael; Brown, Kristelle; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Keller, Lina; Barberger‐Gateau, Pascale; McGuinness, Bernadette; Larson, Eric B; Green, Robert; Myers, Amanda J; Dufouil, Carole; Todd, Stephen; Wallon, David; Love, Seth; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Gallacher, John; St George‐Hyslop, Peter; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleo, Alberto; Bayer, Anthony; Tsuang, Debby W; Yu, Lei; Tsolaki, Magda; Bossù, Paola; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Proitsi, Petroula; Collinge, John; Sorbi, Sandro; Sanchez‐Garcia, Florentino; Fox, Nick C; Hardy, John; Deniz Naranjo, Maria Candida; Bosco, Paolo; Clarke, Robert; Brayne, Carol; Galimberti, Daniela; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Matthews, Fiona; Moebus, Susanne; Mecocci, Patrizia; Del Zompo, Maria; Maier, Wolfgang; Hampel, Harald; Pilotto, Alberto; Bullido, Maria; Panza, Francesco; Caffarra, Paolo; Nacmias, Benedetta; Gilbert, John R; Mayhaus, Manuel; Lannfelt, Lars; Hakonarson, Hakon; Pichler, Sabrina; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Ingelsson, Martin; Beekly, Duane; Alvarez, Victoria; Zou, Fanggeng; Valladares, Otto; Younkin, Steven G; Coto, Eliecer; Hamilton‐Nelson, Kara L; Gu, Wei; Razquin, Cristina; Pastor, Pau; Mateo, Ignacio; Owen, Michael J; Faber, Kelley M; Jonsson, Palmi V; Combarros, Onofre; O'Donovan, Michael C; Cantwell, Laura B; Soininen, Hilkka; Blacker, Deborah; Mead, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H; Bennett, David A; Harris, Tamara B; Fratiglioni, Laura; Holmes, Clive; de Bruijn, Renee F A G; Passmore, Peter; Montine, Thomas J; Bettens, Karolien; Rotter, Jerome I; Brice, Alexis; Morgan, Kevin; Foroud, Tatiana M; Kukull, Walter A; Hannequin, Didier; Powell, John F; Nalls, Michael A; Ritchie, Karen; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Kauwe, John S K; Boerwinkle, Eric; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Boada, Mercè; Hiltunen, Mikko; Martin, Eden R; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rujescu, Dan; Wang, Li‐San; Dartigues, Jean‐François; Mayeux, Richard; Tzourio, Christophe; Hofman, Albert; Nöthen, Markus M; Graff, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M; Jones, Lesley; Haines, Jonathan L; Holmans, Peter A; Lathrop, Mark; Pericak‐Vance, Margaret A; Launer, Lenore J; Farrer, Lindsay A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Moskvina, Valentina; Seshadri, Sudha; Williams, Julie; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Amouyel, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective Increasing evidence suggests epidemiological and pathological links between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and ischemic stroke (IS). We investigated the evidence that shared genetic factors underpin the two diseases. Methods Using genome‐wide association study (GWAS) data from METASTROKE + (15,916 IS cases and 68,826 controls) and the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project (IGAP; 17,008 AD cases and 37,154 controls), we evaluated known associations with AD and IS. On the subset of data for which we could obtain compatible genotype‐level data (4,610 IS cases, 1,281 AD cases, and 14,320 controls), we estimated the genome‐wide genetic correlation (rG) between AD and IS, and the three subtypes (cardioembolic, small vessel, and large vessel), using genome‐wide single‐nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. We then performed a meta‐analysis and pathway analysis in the combined AD and small vessel stroke data sets to identify the SNPs and molecular pathways through which disease risk may be conferred. Results We found evidence of a shared genetic contribution between AD and small vessel stroke (rG [standard error] = 0.37 [0.17]; p = 0.011). Conversely, there was no evidence to support shared genetic factors in AD and IS overall or with the other stroke subtypes. Of the known GWAS associations with IS or AD, none reached significance for association with the other trait (or stroke subtypes). A meta‐analysis of AD IGAP and METASTROKE + small vessel stroke GWAS data highlighted a region (ATP5H/KCTD2/ICT1) associated with both diseases (p = 1.8 × 10−8). A pathway analysis identified four associated pathways involving cholesterol transport and immune response. Interpretation Our findings indicate shared genetic susceptibility to AD and small vessel stroke and highlight potential causal pathways and loci. Ann Neurol 2016;79:739–747 PMID:26913989

  9. Intracranial stents in the endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Acosta, F; Jiménez Gómez, E; Bravo Rey, I; Bravo Rodríguez, F A; Ochoa Sepúlveda, J J; Oteros Fernández, R

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intracranial stenting as a rescue therapy after failed mechanical thrombectomy in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We retrospectively studied 42 patients treated with intracranial stenting after failed mechanical thrombectomy between December 2008 and January 2016. We compared outcomes before and after the incorporation of stentrievers. We assessed the degree of recanalization in the carotid and basilar territories (modified TIMI score), prognostic factors, and outcome (modified Rankin Score at 3 months). Safety was evaluated in function of the appearance of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (SICH). Median NIHSS was 17 in patients with carotid territory strokes and 26 in those with vertebrobasilar territory strokes. Median time from onset of symptoms to treatment was 225minutes in carotid territory strokes and 390minutes in vertebrobasilar territory strokes. A total of 10 patients underwent intravenous fibrinolytic therapy before treatment with stentrievers. Two patients developed SICH; both had undergone intravenous fibrinolytic therapy (p=0.0523). Recanalization was effective in 30 (71.4%) in the entire series: in 7 (50%) of 14 patients treated before the incorporation of stentrievers and in 23 (82.1%) of 28 treated after the incorporation of stentrievers (p=0.0666). Outcome at 3 months was good in 2 (14.3%) patients in the earlier group and in 14 (50%) patients in the later group (p=0.042). We found significant associations between recanalization and outcome (p=0.0415) and between shorter time to treatment and outcome (p=0.002). Outcome was good in 14 (48.3%) of the 29 patients with carotid territory strokes and in 2 (15.4%) of the 13 patients with vertebrobasilar territory strokes (p=0.078). Intracranial stenting is the rescue treatment when the usual treatment fails. Stentrievers must be used to eliminate the clot burden before stenting. In our study, antiplatelet treatment did not seem to increase the risk of SICH

  10. Angiogenesis in Ischemic Stroke and Angiogenic Effects of Chinese Herbal Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai-Wang Seto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of the major causes of death and adult disability worldwide. The underlying pathophysiology of stroke is highly complicated, consisting of impairments of multiple signalling pathways, and numerous pathological processes such as acidosis, glutamate excitotoxicity, calcium overload, cerebral inflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS generation. The current treatment for ischemic stroke is limited to thromolytics such as recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA. tPA has a very narrow therapeutic window, making it suitable to only a minority of stroke patients. Hence, there is great urgency to develop new therapies that can protect brain tissue from ischemic damage. Recent studies have shown that new vessel formation after stroke not only replenishes blood flow to the ischemic area of the brain, but also promotes neurogenesis and improves neurological functions in both animal models and patients. Therefore, drugs that can promote angiogenesis after ischemic stroke can provide therapeutic benefits in stroke management. In this regard, Chinese herbal medicine (CHM has a long history in treating stroke and the associated diseases. A number of studies have demonstrated the pro-angiogenic effects of various Chinese herbs and herbal formulations in both in vitro and in vivo settings. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of the current knowledge on angiogenesis in the context of ischemic stroke and discuss the potential use of CHM in stroke management through modulation of angiogenesis.

  11. Angiogenesis in Ischemic Stroke and Angiogenic Effects of Chinese Herbal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Sai-Wang; Chang, Dennis; Jenkins, Anita; Bensoussan, Alan; Kiat, Hosen

    2016-06-06

    Stroke is one of the major causes of death and adult disability worldwide. The underlying pathophysiology of stroke is highly complicated, consisting of impairments of multiple signalling pathways, and numerous pathological processes such as acidosis, glutamate excitotoxicity, calcium overload, cerebral inflammation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The current treatment for ischemic stroke is limited to thromolytics such as recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). tPA has a very narrow therapeutic window, making it suitable to only a minority of stroke patients. Hence, there is great urgency to develop new therapies that can protect brain tissue from ischemic damage. Recent studies have shown that new vessel formation after stroke not only replenishes blood flow to the ischemic area of the brain, but also promotes neurogenesis and improves neurological functions in both animal models and patients. Therefore, drugs that can promote angiogenesis after ischemic stroke can provide therapeutic benefits in stroke management. In this regard, Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has a long history in treating stroke and the associated diseases. A number of studies have demonstrated the pro-angiogenic effects of various Chinese herbs and herbal formulations in both in vitro and in vivo settings. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of the current knowledge on angiogenesis in the context of ischemic stroke and discuss the potential use of CHM in stroke management through modulation of angiogenesis.

  12. Self-report of stroke, transient ischemic attack, or stroke symptoms and risk of future stroke in the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Suzanne E; Kleindorfer, Dawn O; McClure, Leslie A; Rhodes, J David; Howard, George; Cushman, Mary; Howard, Virginia J

    2013-01-01

    History of stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) are documented risk factors for subsequent stroke and all-cause mortality. Recent reports suggest increased risk among those reporting stroke symptoms absent stroke or TIA. However, the relative magnitude of increased stroke risk has not been described across the symptomatic spectrum: (1) asymptomatic, (2) stroke symptoms (SS) only, (3) TIA, (4) distant stroke (DS), and (5) recent stroke (RS). Between 2003 and 2007, the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study enrolled 30 239 black and white Americans ≥45 years of age. DS and RS were defined as self-report of physician diagnosis of stroke >5 or stroke symptoms absent TIA/stroke diagnosis. Kaplan-Meier and proportional hazards analysis were used to contrast stroke risk differences. Over 5.0±1.72 years of follow-up, 737 strokes were validated. Compared with asymptomatic persons, those with SS, TIA, DS, and RS all had increased risk of future stroke. After adjustment for age, race, sex, income, education, alcohol intake, current smoking, and a history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, and dyslipidemia, there was 1.20-fold (not statistically significant) increased stroke risk for SS (95% CI, 0.96-1.51), 1.73-fold for TIA (95% CI, 1.27-2.36), 2.23-fold for DS (95% CI, 1.61- 3.09), and 2.85-fold for RS (95% CI, 2.16-3.76). Results suggest a spectrum of risk from stroke symptoms to TIA, DS, and RS, and imply a need for establishing these categories in health screenings to manage risk for future stroke, reinforcing the clinical importance of stroke history including the presence of stroke symptoms.

  13. Analysis of risk factors and risk assessment for ischemic stroke recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-ying LONG

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To screen the risk factors for recurrence of ischemic stroke and to assess the risk of recurrence. Methods Essen Stroke Risk Score (ESRS was used to evaluate the risk of recurrence in 176 patients with ischemic stroke (96 cases of first onset and 80 cases of recurrence. Univariate and multivariate stepwise Logistic regression analysis was used to screen risk factors for recurrence of ischemic stroke.  Results There were significant differences between first onset group and recurrence group on age, the proportion of > 75 years old, hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, peripheral angiopathy, transient ischemic attack (TIA or ischemic stroke, drinking and ESRS score (P < 0.05, for all. First onset group included one case of ESRS 0 (1.04%, 8 cases of 1 (8.33%, 39 cases of 2 (40.63%, 44 cases of 3 (45.83%, 4 cases of 4 (4.17%. Recurrence group included 2 cases of ESRS 3 (2.50%, 20 cases of 4 (25% , 37 cases of 5 (46.25% , 18 cases of 6 (22.50% , 3 cases of 7 (3.75% . There was significant difference between 2 groups (Z = -11.376, P = 0.000. Logistic regression analysis showed ESRS > 3 score was independent risk factor for recurrence of ischemic stroke (OR = 31.324, 95%CI: 3.934-249.430; P = 0.001.  Conclusions ESRS > 3 score is the independent risk factor for recurrence of ischemic stroke. It is important to strengthen risk assessment of recurrence of ischemic stroke. To screen and control risk factors is the key to secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.07.011

  14. Incidence and predictors of epilepsy after pediatric arterial ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beslow, Lauren A.; Abend, Nicholas S.; Uohara, Michael; Jastrzab, Laura; Licht, Daniel J.; Ichord, Rebecca N.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the cumulative incidence and clinical predictors of remote symptomatic seizures and epilepsy after pediatric arterial ischemic stroke (AIS). Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 218 participants with neonatal AIS (NAIS), presumed perinatal AIS (PPAIS), and childhood AIS (CAIS) from a single-center prospective consecutive cohort enrolled from 2006 to 2014. Medical records were reviewed for timing, semiology, and treatment of acute symptomatic seizures, remote symptomatic seizures (RSS), and epilepsy. Cumulative incidence of RSS and epilepsy were assessed using survival analysis. Results: Acute symptomatic seizures occurred in 94% of NAIS (n = 70/74) and 17% of CAIS (n = 18/105). Younger children were more likely to present with seizures at stroke ictus, and acute symptomatic seizures were predictive of later RSS and epilepsy in CAIS. Median follow-up for the entire cohort was 34 months, interquartile range 44.9 months (16.3–61.2). Estimated cumulative incidence of RSS at 2 years was 19% in NAIS, 24% in PPAIS, and 7% in CAIS. Estimated cumulative incidence of epilepsy at 2 years was 11% in NAIS, 19% in PPAIS, and 7% in CAIS. The median time to these outcomes was <2 years in all stroke subtypes. Among participants developing epilepsy (n = 34), seizures were often well-controlled at last follow-up with median Engel class of ≤2 (<1 seizure/month). Conclusions: RSS and epilepsy are important neurologic sequelae of pediatric AIS. Children with perinatal stroke and CAIS with acute symptomatic seizures are at increased risk of these outcomes. These cohorts need further study to identify biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets for epileptogenesis. PMID:28087825

  15. Cerebral microbleeds are common in ischemic stroke but rare in TIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werring, D J; Coward, L J; Losseff, N A; Jäger, H R; Brown, M M

    2005-12-27

    In patients with stroke, gradient-echo MRI commonly detects microbleeds, indicating small artery disease with increased risk of macroscopic intracranial bleeding. Antithrombotic treatments are frequently prescribed after TIA and stroke, but there have been no previous studies of microbleeds in TIA. Because microbleeds may predict the hemorrhagic risk of antithrombotic treatments, we studied the prevalence of microbleeds, risk factors, and pathophysiologic mechanisms in patients with ischemic stroke and TIA. One hundred twenty-nine consecutive patients with ischemic stroke or TIA were studied with MRI including T2, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, and gradient-echo MRI sequences. Blinded observers counted microbleeds and graded white matter T2 hyperintensities throughout the brain. TIA patients with previous ischemic stroke were excluded. Sixty-seven percent of patients had ischemic stroke; 33% had TIA. Microbleeds were found in 23% of ischemic stroke patients but only 2% of TIA patients (p hypertensive (81 vs 59%; p = 0.04) and had more severe MRI white matter disease on T2 MRI (p = 0.003). Microbleeds are common in ischemic stroke but rare in TIA, an observation not explained by differences in vascular risk factors or severity of white matter disease seen on T2 MRI. This finding has implications for the safety of antithrombotic therapy and clinical trial design in the two groups. Microbleeds may also be a new marker for severe microvascular pathology with increased risk of permanent cerebral infarction.

  16. Mediterranean Diet in patients with acute ischemic stroke: Relationships between Mediterranean Diet score, diagnostic subtype, and stroke severity index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Casuccio, Alessandra; Buttà, Carmelo; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Della Corte, Vittoriano; Arnao, Valentina; Clemente, Giuseppe; Maida, Carlo; Simonetta, Irene; Miceli, Giuseppe; Lucifora, Benedetto; Cirrincione, Anna; Di Bona, Danilo; Corpora, Francesca; Maugeri, Rosario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Pinto, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Adherence to a Mediterranean Diet appears to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease, as well as the risk of death due to cardiovascular disease. No study has addressed the association between diagnostic subtype of stroke and its severity and adherence to a Mediterranean Diet in subjects with acute ischemic stroke. To evaluate the association between Mediterranean Diet adherence, TOAST subtype, and stroke severity by means of a retrospective study. The type of acute ischemic stroke was classified according to the TOAST criteria. All patients admitted to our ward with acute ischemic stroke completed a 137-item validated food-frequency questionnaire adapted to the Sicilian population. A scale indicating the degree of adherence to the traditional Mediterranean Diet was used (Me-Di score: range 0-9). 198 subjects with acute ischemic stroke and 100 control subjects without stroke. Stroke subjects had a lower mean Mediterranean Diet score compared to 100 controls without stroke. We observed a significant positive correlation between Me-Di score and SSS score, whereas we observed a negative relationship between Me-Di score and NIHSS and Rankin scores. Subjects with atherosclerotic (LAAS) stroke subtype had a lower mean Me-Di score compared to subjects with other subtypes. Multinomial logistic regression analysis in a simple model showed a negative relationship between MeDi score and LAAS subtype vs. lacunar subtype (and LAAS vs. cardio-embolic subtype). Patients with lower adherence to a Mediterranean Diet are more likely to have an atherosclerotic (LAAS) stroke, a worse clinical presentation of ischemic stroke at admission and a higher Rankin score at discharge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Platelets Proteomic Profiles of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozge Cevik

    Full Text Available Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of stroke and antiplatelet agents exist for its treatment and prevention. Through the use of LC-MS based protein expression profiling, platelets from stroke patients were analyzed and then correlated with the proteomic analyses results in the context of this disease. This study was based on patients who post ischemic stroke were admitted to hospital and had venous blood drawn within 24 hrs of the incidence. Label-free protein expression analyses of the platelets' tryptic digest was performed in triplicate on a UPLC-ESI-qTOF-MS/MS system and ProteinLynx Global Server (v2.5, Waters was used for tandem mass data extraction. The peptide sequences were searched against the reviewed homo sapiens database (www.uniprot.org and the quantitation of protein variation was achieved through Progenesis LC-MS software (V4.0, Nonlinear Dynamics. These Label-free differential proteomics analysis of platelets ensured that 500 proteins were identified and 83 of these proteins were found to be statistically significant. The differentially expressed proteins are involved in various processes such as inflammatory response, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development and function and nucleic acid metabolism. The expressions of myeloperoxidase, arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase and histidine-rich glycoprotein are involved in cellular metabolic processes, crk-like protein and ras homolog gene family member A involved in cell signaling with vitronectin, thrombospondin 1, Integrin alpha 2b, and integrin beta 3 involved in cell adhesion. Apolipoprotein H, immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 1 and immunoglobulin heavy constant gamma 3 are involved in structural, apolipoprotein A-I, and alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor is involved in transport, complement component 3 and clusterin is involved in immunity proteins as has been discussed. Our data provides

  18. [Ischemic stroke in childhood. A complication of tonsillectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matilla Álvarez, A; García Serrano, E; González de la Huebra Labrador, T; Morales Martín, A C; Yusta Martín, G; Vaquero Roncero, L M

    2016-02-01

    Tonsillectomy is one of the most frequently performed otorhinolaryngological procedures on children. The postoperative complications are classified into primary or intermediate, which generally appear within 24h, and as secondary or delayed, after 48 h. We present the case of an ischemic stroke after performing a tonsillectomy on a 3 year-old boy, which was diagnosed in the immediate postoperative period. Using brain echo-doppler and angio-CT, an intraluminal clot was observed in the left internal carotid artery, probably as a result of direct vessel injury during arterial ligature for hemostasis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Substitution of Linoleic Acid for Other Macronutrients and the Risk of Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venø, Stine K; Schmidt, Erik B; Jakobsen, Marianne U; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren; Bach, Flemming W; Overvad, Kim

    2017-10-25

    Ischemic stroke is a major health problem worldwide, but the influence of dietary factors on stroke risk is not well known. This study aimed to investigate the risk of ischemic stroke and its subtypes with a higher intake from linoleic acid and a concomitant lower intake from saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, or glycemic carbohydrates. In the Danish prospective Diet, Cancer, and Health Study of 57 053 participants aged 50 to 64 years at baseline, information on diet was collected using a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Information on ischemic stroke was obtained from the Danish National Patient Register, and cases were all validated and subclassified according to the TOAST (Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) classification. Substitution of linoleic acid for saturated fatty acid, monounsaturated fatty acid, or glycemic carbohydrates was investigated in relation to the risk of ischemic stroke and subtypes. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate the associations with ischemic stroke adjusting for appropriate confounders. During 13.5 years of follow-up 1879 participants developed ischemic stroke. A slightly lower risk of ischemic stroke was found with a 5% higher intake of linoleic acid and a concomitant lower intake of saturated fatty acid (hazard ratio, 0.98; 95% confidence interval, 0.83-1.16), monounsaturated fatty acid (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-1.02), and glycemic carbohydrates (hazard ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.78-1.09), although not statistically significant. Similar patterns of association were found for large-artery atherosclerosis and small-vessel occlusions. This study suggests that replacing saturated fatty acid, glycemic carbohydrate, or monounsaturated fatty acid with linoleic acid may be associated with a lower risk of ischemic stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. One-Year Outcomes After Minor Stroke or High-Risk Transient Ischemic Attack: Korean Multicenter Stroke Registry Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hong-Kyun; Kim, Beom Joon; Han, Moon-Ku; Park, Jong-Moo; Kang, Kyusik; Lee, Soo Joo; Kim, Jae Guk; Cha, Jae-Kwan; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Nah, Hyun-Wook; Park, Tai Hwan; Park, Sang-Soon; Lee, Kyung Bok; Lee, Jun; Hong, Keun-Sik; Cho, Yong-Jin; Lee, Byung-Chul; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Oh, Mi-Sun; Kim, Joon-Tae; Choi, Kang-Ho; Kim, Dong-Eog; Ryu, Wi-Sun; Choi, Jay Chol; Johansson, Saga; Lee, Su Jin; Lee, Won Hee; Lee, Ji Sung; Lee, Juneyoung; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2017-11-01

    Patients with minor ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack are at high risk of recurrent stroke and vascular events, which are potentially disabling or fatal. This study aimed to evaluate contemporary subsequent vascular event risk after minor ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack in Korea. Patients with minor ischemic stroke or high-risk transient ischemic attack admitted within 7 days of symptom onset were identified from a Korean multicenter stroke registry database. We estimated 3-month and 1-year event rates of the primary outcome (composite of stroke recurrence, myocardial infarction, or all-cause death), stroke recurrence, a major vascular event (composite of stroke recurrence, myocardial infarction, or vascular death), and all-cause death and explored differences in clinical characteristics and event rates according to antithrombotic strategies at discharge. Of 9506 patients enrolled in this study, 93.8% underwent angiographic assessment and 72.7% underwent cardiac evaluations; 25.1% had symptomatic stenosis or occlusion of intracranial arteries. At discharge, 95.2% of patients received antithrombotics (antiplatelet polytherapy, 37.1%; anticoagulation, 15.3%) and 86.2% received statins. The 3-month cumulative event rate was 5.9% for the primary outcome, 4.3% for stroke recurrence, 4.6% for a major vascular event, and 2.0% for all-cause death. Corresponding values at 1 year were 9.3%, 6.1%, 6.7%, and 4.1%, respectively. Patients receiving nonaspirin antithrombotic strategies or no antithrombotic agent had higher baseline risk profiles and at least 1.5× higher event rates for clinical event outcomes than those with aspirin monotherapy. Contemporary secondary stroke prevention strategies based on thorough diagnostic evaluation may contribute to the low subsequent vascular event rates observed in real-world clinical practice in Korea. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. [NDT-Bobath method used in the rehabilitation of patients with a history of ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimkiewicz, Paulina; Kubsik, Anna; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the third leading cause of death and disability in human. The vitally important problem after ischemic stroke is hemiparesis of the body. The most common methods used in improving the mobility of patients after ischemic stroke is a Bobath-NDT (Neuro-Developmental Treatment - Bobath), which initiated the Berta and Karel Bobath for children with cerebral palsy. It is a method designed to neurophysiological recovery of these vital functions that the patient was lost due to illness, and wants it back.

  2. Endovascular Intervention for Acute Ischemic Stroke in Light of Recent Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Alkhalili

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three recently published trials, MR RESCUE, IMS III, and SYNTHESIS Expansion, evaluating the efficacy and safety of endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke have generated concerns about the future of endovascular approach. However, the tremendous evolution that imaging and endovascular treatment modalities have undergone over the past several years has raised doubts about the validity of these trials. In this paper, we review the role of endovascular treatment strategies in acute ischemic stroke and discuss the limitations and shortcomings that prevent generalization of the findings of recent trials. We also provide our experience in endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

  3. Different medical data mining approaches based prediction of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Ahmet Kadir; Colak, Cemil; Sarihan, Mehmet Ediz

    2016-07-01

    Medical data mining (also called knowledge discovery process in medicine) processes for extracting patterns from large datasets. In the current study, we intend to assess different medical data mining approaches to predict ischemic stroke. The collected dataset from Turgut Ozal Medical Centre, Inonu University, Malatya, Turkey, comprised the medical records of 80 patients and 112 healthy individuals with 17 predictors and a target variable. As data mining approaches, support vector machine (SVM), stochastic gradient boosting (SGB) and penalized logistic regression (PLR) were employed. 10-fold cross validation resampling method was utilized, and model performance evaluation metrics were accuracy, area under ROC curve (AUC), sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value. The grid search method was used for optimizing tuning parameters of the models. The accuracy values with 95% CI were 0.9789 (0.9470-0.9942) for SVM, 0.9737 (0.9397-0.9914) for SGB and 0.8947 (0.8421-0.9345) for PLR. The AUC values with 95% CI were 0.9783 (0.9569-0.9997) for SVM, 0.9757 (0.9543-0.9970) for SGB and 0.8953 (0.8510-0.9396) for PLR. The results of the current study demonstrated that the SVM produced the best predictive performance compared to the other models according to the majority of evaluation metrics. SVM and SGB models explained in the current study could yield remarkable predictive performance in the classification of ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Low dose CT perfusion in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Amanda; Symons, Sean; Jakubovic, Raphael; Zhang, Liying; Aviv, Richard I. [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); So, Aaron; Lee, Ting-Yim [Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    The purpose of this investigation is to determine if CT perfusion (CTP) measurements at low doses (LD = 20 or 50 mAs) are similar to those obtained at regular doses (RD = 100 mAs), with and without the addition of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). A single-center, prospective study was performed in patients with acute ischemic stroke (n = 37; 54 % male; age = 74 ± 15 years). Two CTP scans were performed on each subject: one at 100 mAs (RD) and one at either 50 or 20 mAs (LD). CTP parameters were compared between the RD and LD scans in regions of ischemia, infarction, and normal tissue. Differences were determined using a within-subjects ANOVA (p < 0.05) followed by a paired t test post hoc analysis (p < 0.01). At 50 mAs, there was no significant difference between cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), or time to maximum enhancement (Tmax) values for the RD and LD scans in the ischemic, infarcted, or normal contralateral regions (p < 0.05). At 20 mAs, there were significant differences between the RD and LD scans for all parameters in the ischemic and normal tissue regions (p > 0.05). CTP-derived CBF and CBV are not different at 50 mAs compared to 100 mAs, even without the addition of ASIR. Current CTP protocols can be modified to reduce the effective dose by 50 % without altering CTP measurements. (orig.)

  5. Anosognosia in patients with acute hemispheric ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Grigoryeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the frequency of anosognosia (a deficit of self-awareness, its anatomic correlates associated with other neuropsychological and neurological disorders in acute hemispheric ischemic stroke (IS.Patients and methods 150 patients (83 men and 67 women; mean age, 63.0±9.3 years with acute hemispheric IS were examined. All the patients underwent neurological, neuroimaging, and neuropsychological (by the procedure described by A.R. Luria examinations. neuropsychological investigations. Anosognosia was diagnosed using the Dysexecutive Questionnaire (DEX and the authors' procedure involving a scale to measure impaired self-rating of motor abilities and a scale to measure impaired self-rating of cognitive abilities in everyday life.Results and discussion. In the acute period of hemispheric IS, reduced self-awareness of motor and cognitive abilities was noted in 14% of the patients and unawareness of only cognitive abilities was recorded in 15%. Patients with anosognosia and cognitive dysfunction (ACD and those with anosognosia and motor dysfunction (AMD had right-sided hemispheric IS more frequently (76% while this was not found in patients with isolated ACD. The development of anosognosia for paralysis and paresis was favored by the large sizes of an ischemic focus that involved a few lobes in the posterior regions of the brain although no lesions were found in the anosognosia-specific anatomical regions. ACD and AMD proved to be associated with unilateral spatial and tactile neglect and obvious regulatory dysfunction. 

  6. Predictors of Stroke Events in Patients with Transient Ischemic Attack Attributable to Intracranial Stenotic Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Toshiyuki; Ohara, Tomoyuki; Minematsu, Kazuo; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2018-02-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to identify the predictors of subsequent ischemic stroke events in patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) attributable to intracranial arterial occlusive lesions. Methods The study population included 82 patients (55 men; mean age, 69.3±12.1 years) with TIA caused by intracranial arterial occlusive lesions who were admitted to our stroke care unit within 48 h of the onset of a TIA between April 2008 and November 2015. TIA was diagnosed if focal neurological symptoms ascribable to a vascular etiology lasted less than 24 h, irrespective of the presence of ischemic insults on imaging. The primary endpoint was an ischemic stroke event within 90 days of the onset of a TIA. Results The 90-day risk of ischemic stroke after the onset of a TIA was 14.6% [95% confidence interval (CI): 8.6-23.9%]. Cox proportional hazards multivariate analyses revealed that diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) positivity [hazard ratio (HR), 8.73; 95%CI, 2.20-41.59; p=0.002], prior ischemic stroke (HR, 4.03; 95%CI, 1.07-15.99; p=0.040), and a high serum level of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) on admission (HR, 1.15; 95%CI, 1.05-1.26; p=0.002, for every +10 U/L) were significant independent predictors of ischemic stroke within 90 days after the onset of a TIA. Conclusion Our results suggested that patients with a TIA attributable to intracranial artery disease who showed DWI lesions, prior ischemic stroke, or high serum levels of ALP on admission were at high risk of subsequent ischemic stroke events.

  7. The fate of medications evaluated for ischemic stroke pharmacotherapy over the period 1995–2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a brain damage caused by a loss of blood supply to a portion of the brain, which requires prompt and effective treatment. The current pharmacotherapy for ischemic stroke primarily relies on thrombolysis using recombinant tissue plasminogen activators (rt-PAs to breakdown blood clots. Neuroprotective agents that inhibit excitatory neurotransmitters are also used to treat ischemic stroke but have failed to translate into clinical benefits. This poses a major challenge in biomedical research to understand what causes the progressive brain cell death after stroke and how to develop an effective pharmacotherapy for stroke. This brief review analyzes the fate of about 430 potentially useful stroke medications over the period 1995–2015 and describes in detail those that successfully reached the market. Hopefully, the information from this analysis will shed light on how future stroke research can improve stroke drug discovery.

  8. Costs and outcomes of noncardioembolic ischemic stroke in a managed care population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Engel-Nitz

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Nicole M Engel-Nitz1, Stephen D Sander2, Carolyn Harley3, Gabriel Gomez Rey1, Hemal Shah21Health Economic and Outcomes Research, i3 Innovus, Eden Prairie, MN, USA; 2Health Economic and Outcomes Research, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Ridgefield, CT, USA; 3Health Economic and Outcomes Research, i3 Innovus, Palo Alto, CA, USAPurpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes and incremental health care costs of ischemic stroke in a US managed care population.Patients and methods: A retrospective cohort analysis was done on patients (aged 18+ years hospitalized with noncardioembolic ischemic stroke from January 1, 2002, through ­December 31, 2003, identified from commercial health plan administrative claims. New or recurrent stroke was based on history in the previous 12 months, with index date defined as first date of ­indication of stroke. A control group without stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA was matched (1:3 on age, sex, and geographic region, with an index date defined as the first ­medical claim during the patient identification period. Patients with atrial fibrillation or mitral value abnormalities were excluded. Ischemic stroke and control cohorts were compared on 4-year clinical outcomes and 1-year costs.Results: Of 2180 ischemic stroke patients, 1808 (82.9% had new stroke and 372 (17.1% had a recurrent stroke. Stroke patients had higher unadjusted rates of additional stroke, TIA, and fatal outcomes compared with the 6540 matched controls. Recurrent stroke patients had higher rates of adverse clinical outcomes compared with new stroke patients; costs attributed to recurrent stroke were also higher. Stroke patients were 2.4 times more likely to be hospitalized in follow-up compared with controls (hazard ratio [HR] 2.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.2, 2.6. Occurrence of stroke following discharge was 21 times more likely among patients with index stroke compared with controls (HR 21.0, 95% CI: 16.1, 27.3. Stroke was

  9. Long-Term Antiplatelet Mono- and Dual Therapies After Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack: Network Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wuxiang; Zheng, Fanfan; Zhong, Baoliang; Song, Xiaoyu

    2015-08-24

    The latest guidelines do not make clear recommendations on the selection of antiplatelet therapies for long-term secondary prevention of stroke. We aimed to integrate the available evidence to create hierarchies of the comparative efficacy and safety of long-term antiplatelet therapies after ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. We performed a network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to compare 11 antiplatelet therapies in patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. In December 2014, we searched Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library database for trials. The search identified 24 randomized controlled trials including a total of 85 667 patients with antiplatelet treatments for at least 1 year. Cilostazol significantly reduced stroke recurrence in comparison with aspirin (odds ratio 0.66, 95% credible interval 0.44 to 0.92) and dipyridamole (odds ratio 0.57, 95% credible interval 0.34 to 0.95), respectively. Cilostazol also significantly reduced intracranial hemorrhage compared with aspirin, clopidogrel, terutroban, ticlopidine, aspirin plus clopidogrel, and aspirin plus dipyridamole. Aspirin plus clopidogrel could not significantly reduce stroke recurrence compared with monotherapies but caused significantly more major bleeding than all monotherapies except terutroban. The pooled estimates did not change materially in the sensitivity analyses of the primary efficacy outcome. Long-term monotherapy was a better choice than long-term dual therapy, and cilostazol had the best risk-benefit profile for long-term secondary prevention after stroke or transient ischemic attack. More randomized controlled trials in non-East Asian patients are needed to determine whether long-term use of cilostazol is the best option for the prevention of recurrent stroke. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  10. Ischemic stroke subtypes and migraine with visual aura in the ARIC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androulakis, X Michelle; Kodumuri, Nishanth; Giamberardino, Lauren D; Rosamond, Wayne D; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Yim, Eunsil; Sen, Souvik

    2016-12-13

    To investigate the association among migraine, ischemic stroke, and stroke subtypes in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. In this ongoing, prospective, longitudinal community-based cohort study, participants were given an interview ascertaining migraine history in 1993-1995, and were followed for all vascular events, including stroke. All stroke events over the subsequent 20 years were adjudicated and classified into stroke subtypes by standard definitions. Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for stroke risk factors were used to study the relationship between migraine and ischemic stroke, overall, as well as stroke subtypes (cardioembolic, lacunar, or thrombotic). We identified 1,622 migraineurs among 12,758 participants. Mean age of the study population at the 3rd clinical visit was 59 years. When compared to nonheadache participants, there was a significant association between migraine with visual aura and ischemic stroke (hazard ratio [HR] 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-2.6, p = 0.008). Migraine without visual aura was not significantly associated with ischemic stroke (HR 1.2, CI 1.0-1.8, p = 0.28) when compared to nonheadache participants. Among the 3 subtypes of ischemic stroke evaluated, migraine with visual aura was significantly associated only with cardioembolic stroke (HR 3.7, 95% CI 1.6-8.7, p = 0.003). In participants with migraine with visual aura in late middle age, increased risk of cardioembolic stroke was observed. Migraine with visual aura was linked to increased stroke risk, while migraine without visual aura was not, over the period of 20 years. These results are specific to older migraineurs. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Reversed Robin Hood syndrome in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Andrei V; Sharma, Vijay K; Lao, Annabelle Y; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Malkoff, Marc D; Alexandrov, Anne W

    2007-11-01

    Recurrent hemodynamic and neurological changes with persisting arterial occlusions may be attributable to cerebral blood flow steal from ischemic to nonaffected brain. Transcranial Doppler monitoring with voluntary breath-holding and serial NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores were obtained in patients with acute middle cerebral artery or internal carotid artery occlusions. The steal phenomenon was detected as transient, spontaneous, or vasodilatory stimuli-induced velocity reductions in affected arteries at the time of velocity increase in normal vessels. The steal magnitude (%) was calculated as [(MFVm-MFVb)/MFVb]x100, where m=minimum and b=baseline mean flow velocities (MFV) during the 15- to 30-second period of a total 30 second of breath-holding. Six patients had steal phenomenon on transcranial Doppler (53 to 73 years, NIHSS 4 to 15 points). Steal magnitude ranged from -15.0% to -43.2%. All patients also had recurrent neurological worsening (>2 points increase in NIHSS scores) at stable blood pressure. In 3 of 5 patients receiving noninvasive ventilatory correction for snoring/sleep apnea, no further velocity or NIHSS score changes were noted. Our descriptive study suggests possibility to detect and quantify the cerebral steal phenomenon in real-time. If the steal is confirmed as the cause of neurological worsening, reversed Robin Hood syndrome may identify a target group for testing blood pressure augmentation and noninvasive ventilatory correction in stroke patients.

  12. Correlation between clot density and recanalization success or stroke etiology in acute ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagani, Manoj; Kallmes, David F; Brinjikji, Waleed

    2017-06-01

    Background Predicting recanalization success for patients undergoing endovascular treatment for acute ischemic stroke is of significant interest. Studies have previously correlated the success of recanalization with the density of the clot. We evaluated clot density and its relationship to revascularization success and stroke etiology. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of 118 patients undergoing intra-arterial therapy for acute ischemic stroke. Mean and maximum thrombus density was measured by drawing a circular region of interest on an axial slice of a non-contrast computed tomography scan. T-tests were used to compare clot density to recanalization success or to stroke etiology, namely large artery atherosclerosis and cardioembolism. Recanalization success was compared in four device groups: aspiration, stent retriever, aspiration and stent retriever, and all other. Results There was no significant difference in the mean clot density in patients with successful ( n = 80) versus unsuccessful recanalization ( n = 38, 50.1 ± 7.4 Hounsfield unit (HU) vs. 53 ± 12.7 HU; P = 0.17). Comparing the large artery thromboembolism ( n = 35) to the cardioembolic etiology group ( n = 56), there was no significant difference in mean clot density (51.5 ± 7.7 HU vs. 49.7 ± 8.5 HU; P = 0.31). A subgroup analysis of middle cerebral artery occlusions ( n = 65) showed similar, non-statistically significant differences between groups. There was no difference in the rate of recanalization success in patients with a mean clot density greater than 50 HU or less than 50 HU in each of the four device groups. Conclusions There was no relationship between clot density and revascularization success or stroke etiology in our study. More research is needed to determine if clot density can predict recanalization rates or indicate etiology.

  13. Nonfocal Symptoms in Patients with Transient Ischemic Attack or Ischemic Stroke: Occurrence, Clinical Determinants, and Association with Cardiac History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plas, Gerben J J; Booij, Heleen A; Brouwers, Paul J A M; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein; Koudstaal, Peter J; Dippel, Diederik W J; den Hertog, Heleen M

    2016-01-01

    Transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) accompanied by nonfocal symptoms are associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events, in particular cardiac events. Reported frequencies of TIAs accompanied by nonfocal symptoms range from 18 to 53%. We assessed the occurrence of nonfocal symptoms in patients with TIA or minor ischemic stroke in a neurological outpatient clinic in terms of clinical determinants, cardiac history, and atrial fibrillation (AF). We included 1,265 consecutive patients with TIA or minor stroke who visited the outpatient clinic. During these visits, we systematically asked for nonfocal symptoms. Nonfocal symptoms included decreased consciousness, amnesia, positive visual phenomena, non-rotatory dizziness, and paresthesias. Relative risks for the presence of nonfocal symptoms in relation to clinical determinants, AF, and cardiac history were calculated. In 243 (19%) of 1,265 patients, TIA or minor ischemic stroke was accompanied by one or more nonfocal symptoms. Non-rotatory dizziness, paresthesia, and amnesia were the most common nonfocal symptoms. In patients with an event of the posterior circulation or obesity, the qualifying TIA or minor stroke was more frequently accompanied by nonfocal symptoms, and in patients with significant carotid stenosis, nonfocal symptoms occurred less frequently. AF was related only with amnesia. Nonfocal symptoms are present in one out of 5 patients with TIA or ischemic stroke, in particular when located in the posterior circulation. A cardiac history or AF was not directly related to nonfocal symptoms. A heterogeneous etiology is suggested. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Diagnostic and prognostic role of resistin and copeptin in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovic, Edi; Mrdjen, Anamarija; Harapin, Mladen; Tesija Kuna, Andrea; Simundic, Ana-Maria

    2017-12-01

    Our aim was to evaluate (i) whether there is a difference in the concentration of resistin and copeptin between acute ischemic stroke patients and stroke-free controls; and (ii) if there is any prognostic value of resistin and copeptin in predicting stroke infarct volume, stroke severity, and outcome. Our case-control study has recruited 112 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted within 24 h after the stroke onset. We have also included 63 age and gender matched stroke-free controls. Resistin and copeptin levels were measured by a commercial ELISA kits. Stroke severity was assessed according to the modified National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (mNIHSS) and the degree of disability was assessed using Barthel index (BI). Stroke infarct volume was determined by the volumetric estimation. Resistin concentrations were significantly higher in patients (3.2 mg/L; IQR: 1.9-6.4) than in stroke-free controls (2.5 mg/L; IQR: 1.4-5.2; p = 0.024) whereas the concentration of copeptin did not differ between patients and controls. Copeptin concentrations were significantly higher in patients with poor functional outcome (Barthel index copeptin and BI score (ρ = -0.309, p = 0.020). Resistin, but not copeptin levels are higher in acute ischemic stroke patients early after the stroke onset, than in age and gender matched stroke-free controls. Moreover, higher copeptin concentrations are predictive of poor short term functional outcome after ischemic stroke. If confirmed in larger prospective studies, resistin and copeptin could improve clinical diagnosis of stroke and effective management of patient recovery.

  15. Autonomic symptoms in hypertensive patients with post-acute minor ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idiaquez, Juan; Farias, Hector; Torres, Francisco; Vega, Jorge; Low, David A

    2015-12-01

    Most studies regarding autonomic dysfunction in ischemic stroke are limited to heart rate and blood pressure changes during the acute phase. However, there are few data on quantitative assessment of autonomic symptoms. We sought to assess autonomic symptoms in hypertensive ischemic stroke patients. In 100 hypertensive patients (45 with symptomatic ischemic stroke (6 months after stroke onset) and 55 without stroke), we assessed autonomic symptoms using the Scale for Outcomes in Parkinson disease-Autonomic (SCOPA-AUT). The age (mean ± standard deviation) for the stroke group was 66 ± 12 and 63 ± 15 for the without stroke group (P=0.8). Orthostatic hypotension occurred in 3.6% of the stroke group and 4.4% in the group without stroke. The total SCOPA-AUT score was higher in the stroke group compared with the group without stroke (P=0.001). Domain scores for gastrointestinal (P=0.001), urinary (P=0.005) and cardiovascular (P=0.001) were higher in the stroke group. No differences were found when comparing the total SCOPA-AUT scores for stroke subtypes (P=0.168) and for lateralization (P=0.6). SCOPA AUT scores were correlated with depression scores (P=0.001) but not with stroke severity (P=0.2). Autonomic symptoms, especially, gastrointestinal, urinary and cardiovascular function, were significantly increased in hypertensive patients with minor ischemic stroke. Symptoms were associated with depression but not with the characteristic of the stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Ischemic Stroke Following Multiple Traumas in a Child: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Pei-Jung; Chang, Yu-Tang; Lai, Chiou-Lian

    2006-01-01

    Stroke is an uncommon disorder in children but an increasingly recognized cause of disability. Acute stroke may be attributable to trauma, but this topic is seldom discussed. In limited reports, most ischemic strokes following trauma were detected after a considerable delay. Early recognition of stroke following trauma might reduce secondary neurologic complications. We report a case of posterior cerebral artery area infarct following multiple traumas in a child. A comprehensive etiologic sur...

  17. Biomarkers and mortality after transient ischemic attack and minor ischemic stroke: population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greisenegger, Stefan; Segal, Helen C; Burgess, Annette I; Poole, Debbie L; Mehta, Ziyah; Rothwell, Peter M

    2015-03-01

    Premature death after transient ischemic attack or stroke is more often because of heart disease or cancer than stroke. Previous studies found blood biomarkers not usefully predictive of nonfatal stroke but possibly of all-cause death. This association might be explained by potentially treatable occult cardiac disease or cancer. We therefore aimed to validate the association of a panel of biomarkers with all-cause death, particularly cardiac death and cancer death, despite the absence of associations with risk of nonfatal vascular events. Fifteen biomarkers were measured in 929 consecutive patients in a population-based study (Oxford Vascular Study), recruited from 2002 and followed up to 2013. Associations were determined by Cox regression. Model discrimination was assessed by c-statistic and the integrated discrimination improvement. During 5560 patient-years of follow-up, none of the biomarkers predicted risk of nonfatal vascular events. However, soluble tumor necrosis factor α receptor-1, von Willebrand factor, heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein, and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide were independently predictive of all-cause death (n=361; adjusted hazard ratio per SD, 95% confidence interval: heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein: 1.31, 1.12-1.56, P=0.002; N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide: 1.34, 1.11-1.62, P=0.002; soluble tumor necrosis factor α receptor-1: 1.45, 1.26-1.66, P=0.02; von Willebrand factor: 1.19, 1.04-1.36, P=0.01). The independent contribution of the four biomarkers taken together added prognostic information and improved model discrimination (integrated discrimination improvement=0.028, P=0.0001). N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide was most predictive of vascular death (adjusted hazard ratio=1.80, 95% confidence interval, 1.34-2.41, Pheart-type fatty-acid-binding protein predicted cancer deaths (1.64, 1.26-2.12, P=0.0002). Associations were strongest in patients without known prior cardiac disease or cancer

  18. Thrombectomy within 8 hours after symptom onset in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovin, Tudor G; Chamorro, Angel; Cobo, Erik; de Miquel, María A; Molina, Carlos A; Rovira, Alex; San Román, Luis; Serena, Joaquín; Abilleira, Sonia; Ribó, Marc; Millán, Mònica; Urra, Xabier; Cardona, Pere; López-Cancio, Elena; Tomasello, Alejandro; Castaño, Carlos; Blasco, Jordi; Aja, Lucía; Dorado, Laura; Quesada, Helena; Rubiera, Marta; Hernandez-Pérez, María; Goyal, Mayank; Demchuk, Andrew M; von Kummer, Rüdiger; Gallofré, Miquel; Dávalos, Antoni

    2015-06-11

    We aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of thrombectomy for the treatment of stroke in a trial embedded within a population-based stroke reperfusion registry. During a 2-year period at four centers in Catalonia, Spain, we randomly assigned 206 patients who could be treated within 8 hours after the onset of symptoms of acute ischemic stroke to receive either medical therapy (including intravenous alteplase when eligible) and endovascular therapy with the Solitaire stent retriever (thrombectomy group) or medical therapy alone (control group). All patients had confirmed proximal anterior circulation occlusion and the absence of a large infarct on neuroimaging. In all study patients, the use of alteplase either did not achieve revascularization or was contraindicated. The primary outcome was the severity of global disability at 90 days, as measured on the modified Rankin scale (ranging from 0 [no symptoms] to 6 [death]). Although the maximum planned sample size was 690, enrollment was halted early because of loss of equipoise after positive results for thrombectomy were reported from other similar trials. Thrombectomy reduced the severity of disability over the range of the modified Rankin scale (adjusted odds ratio for improvement of 1 point, 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05 to 2.8) and led to higher rates of functional independence (a score of 0 to 2) at 90 days (43.7% vs. 28.2%; adjusted odds ratio, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.1 to 4.0). At 90 days, the rates of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage were 1.9% in both the thrombectomy group and the control group (P=1.00), and rates of death were 18.4% and 15.5%, respectively (P=0.60). Registry data indicated that only eight patients who met the eligibility criteria were treated outside the trial at participating hospitals. Among patients with anterior circulation stroke who could be treated within 8 hours after symptom onset, stent retriever thrombectomy reduced the severity of post-stroke disability and increased the

  19. Autologous Intravenous Mononuclear Stem Cell Therapy in Chronic Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhasin A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The regenerative potential of brain has led to emerging therapies that can cure clinico-motor deficits after neurological diseases. Bone marrow mononuclear cell therapy is a great hope to mankind as these cells are feasible, multipotent and aid in neurofunctional gains in Stroke patients. Aims: This study evaluates safety, feasibility and efficacy of autologous mononuclear (MNC stem cell transplantation in patients with chronic ischemic stroke (CIS using clinical scores and functional imaging (fMRI and DTI. Design: Non randomised controlled observational study Study: Twenty four (n=24 CIS patients were recruited with the inclusion criteria as: 3 months–2years of stroke onset, hand muscle power (MRC grade at least 2; Brunnstrom stage of recovery: II-IV; NIHSS of 4-15, comprehendible. Fugl Meyer, modified Barthel Index (mBI and functional imaging parameters were used for assessment at baseline, 8 weeks and at 24 weeks. Twelve patients were administered with mean 54.6 million cells intravenously followed by 8 weeks of physiotherapy. Twelve patients served as controls. All patients were followed up at 24 weeks. Outcomes: The laboratory and radiological outcome measures were within normal limits in MNC group. Only mBI showed statistically significant improvement at 24 weeks (p<0.05 whereas the mean FM, MRC, Ashworth tone scores in the MNC group were high as compared to control group. There was an increased number of cluster activation of Brodmann areas BA 4, BA 6 post stem cell infusion compared to controls indicating neural plasticity. Cell therapy is safe and feasible which may facilitate restoration of function in CIS.

  20. Frequency and significance of troponin T elevation in acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper K.; Kristensen, Søren R.; Bak, Søren

    2007-01-01

    for a mean of 19 +/- 7 months, with all-cause mortality as the clinical end point. Elevated levels of TnT (>0.03 micro g/L) and creatine kinase-MB (> or =10 micro g/L) were observed in 10% and 9% of patients, respectively. Patients with elevated TnT had higher frequencies of heart and/or renal failure...... myocardial infarctions. According to univariate and multivariate analyses, elevation of TnT was significantly associated with mortality. In conclusion, elevated levels of TnT are rare in patients presenting with ischemic stroke but without overt ischemic heart disease. Heart and renal failure rather than......Elevated levels of troponin have been reported in patients with acute ischemic stroke. In this prospective study, the prevalence and characteristics of troponin elevation were examined in 244 patients with acute ischemic stroke but without overt ischemic heart disease. Troponin T (TnT) and creatine...

  1. Inducible pluripotent stem cells for the treatment of ischemic stroke: current status and problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu; Wan, Shu; Zhan, Ren-ya

    2012-01-01

    Despite dramatic advancements in medical and surgical care, effective clinical therapies for ischemic stroke are limited. Stem-cell transplantation has emerged as a potential therapeutic approach for cell replacement in ischemic brain injuries. Inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have become an alternative cell source for transplantation. They possess efficient capacities for neural differentiation without ethical and immune-rejection concerns. Substantial function of iPSCs in pre-clinical models of ischemic brain injury has been observed. However, several problems remain regarding the treatment of ischemic stroke with iPSCs: tumorigenicity, poor iPSC derivation methods, and undefined delivery variables. With the development of iPSC research, safer and more effective strategies will be achieved for highly effective and tumor-free cell treatment of ischemic stroke.

  2. Stroke and Drug Delivery--In Vitro Models of the Ischemic Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornabene, Erica; Brodin, Birger

    2016-01-01

    and Drug Administration-approved tissue plasminogen activator for treatment of acute ischemic stroke being the most prominent example. A large number of potential drug candidates for treatment of ischemic brain tissue have been developed and subsequently failed in clinical trials. A deeper understanding......Stroke is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Both cerebral hypoperfusion and focal cerebral infarcts are caused by a reduction of blood flow to the brain, leading to stroke and subsequent brain damage. At present, only few medical treatments of stroke are available, with the Food...... of permeation pathways across the barrier in ischemic and postischemic brain endothelium is important for development of new medical treatments. The blood-brain barrier, that is, the endothelial monolayer lining the brain capillaries, changes properties during an ischemic event. In vitro models of the blood-brain...

  3. Thrombus Permeability Is Associated With Improved Functional Outcome and Recanalization in Patients With Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, E.M.; Marquering, H.A.; Blanken, M.D. den; Berkhemer, O.A.; Boers, A.M.; Yoo, A.J.; Beenen, L.F.; Treurniet, K.M.; Wismans, C.; Noort, K. van; Lingsma, H.F.; Dippel, D.W.; Lugt, A. van der; Zwam, W.H. van; Roos, Y.B.; Oostenbrugge, R.J. van; Niessen, W.J.; Majoie, C.B.; Heijden, E.H.F.M. van der; Dijk, E.J. van; Vries, J. de; Jenniskens, S.F.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Preclinical studies showed that thrombi can be permeable and may, therefore, allow for residual blood flow in occluded arteries of patients having acute ischemic stroke. This perviousness may increase tissue oxygenation, improve thrombus dissolution, and augment

  4. Thrombus Permeability Is Associated With Improved Functional Outcome and Recanalization in Patients With Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, Emilie M. M.; Marquering, Henk A.; den Blanken, Mark D.; Berkhemer, Olvert A.; Boers, Anna M. M.; Yoo, Albert J.; Beenen, Ludo F.; Treurniet, Kilian M.; Wismans, Carrie; van Noort, Kim; Lingsma, Hester F.; Dippel, Diederik W. J.; van der Lugt, Aad; van Zwam, Wim H.; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Majoie, Charles B.; Vroomen, P.C.

    Background and Purpose- Preclinical studies showed that thrombi can be permeable and may, therefore, allow for residual blood flow in occluded arteries of patients having acute ischemic stroke. This perviousness may increase tissue oxygenation, improve thrombus dissolution, and augment

  5. A study of effects and safety of dual antiplatelet therapy on non-cardiac ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei LIANG

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular disease is the primary cause of disease leading to death in China, of them about 80% cases are due to ischemic stroke. In treatment and secondary prevention of non-cardiac ischemic stroke, the efficacy of aspirin has been extensively verified by clinical studies, and the clinical application of aspirin has been recommended by national guidelines, but its net benefit is still not ideal. It still remains as a controversial problem whether on top of the use of aspirin, a short-term supplement of clopidogrel might result in a better efficacy in the prevention and treatment of non-cardiac ischemic stroke. In present paper, the authors have summarized the efficacy and safety of dual antiplatelet therapy on non-cardiac ischemic stroke by reviewing the guidelines published worldwide in recent years as well as the result of classical clinical trials. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.02.18

  6. Dual Antiplatelet Therapy of Clopidogrel and Aspirin in Secondary Prevention of Ischemic Stroke: Evidence and Indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ya; Cheng, Xin; Dong, Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays the dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) becomes more widely used in patients with ischemic stroke. Nevertheless, controversies exist for indications of DAPT. In view of evidence-based medicine analysis, patients with high-risk transient ischemic attack and minor stroke, severe symptomatic intracranial artery stenosis, symptomatic intracranial and extracranial artery stenosis causing artery-to-artery embolism, ischemic stroke attributed to aortic arch plaques, high-risk atrial fibrillation not suitable for oral anticoagulants, intracranial and extracranial stent implantation, and ischemic stroke with acute coronary syndrome may gain great benefit from DAPT of clopidogrel and aspirin. In clinical practice, individualized antiplatelet therapy strategies should be taken by weighing risks of ischemia and hemorrhage. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Influence of Kinesitherapy on Gait in Patients with Ischemic Stroke in the Chronic Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danche Vasileva

    2015-10-01

    CONCLUSION: The applied specialized kinesitherapeutic methodology continued later as exercise program at home, which significantly improved gait cadence and speed of movement in patients with ischemic stroke in the chronic period and is with a supportive prolonged exposure.

  8. Relationship between asian dust and ischemic stroke: a time-stratified case-crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamouchi, Masahiro; Ueda, Kayo; Ago, Tetsuro; Nitta, Hiroshi; Kitazono, Takanari

    2012-11-01

    Particulate matter is increasingly recognized as a cause of human diseases, including cardiovascular diseases. However, the association between Asian dust (AD), a windblown sand dust originating from mineral soil in the deserts of China and Mongolia, and the incidence of cardiovascular diseases is unclear. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether AD is associated with the incidence of ischemic stroke. This study investigated the onset time of 7429 consecutive patients with ischemic stroke who were admitted to seven stroke centers in Fukuoka, Japan, between June 1999 and March 2010. Meteorologic variables and air pollutants, including AD and suspended particulate matters, were investigated during the identical period. A time-stratified case-crossover study was conducted to assess the association between AD and stroke incidence using a conditional logistic regression analysis. Although AD was not significantly associated with the overall incidence of ischemic stroke, there was a relationship specific to the stroke subtypes. AD was significantly associated with the incidence of atherothrombotic brain infarction after adjusting for expected confounders, including meteorologic variables and other air pollutants. No association was detected in other types of ischemic stroke. These data suggest that AD does not increase the overall incidence of ischemic stroke, but it is specifically associated with the risk of atherothrombotic brain infarction.

  9. Mechanisms of Acupuncture Therapy in Ischemic Stroke Rehabilitation: A Literature Review of Basic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Lina M; Huang, Shiang-Suo; MacDonald, Iona; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Lee, Yu-Chen; Chen, Yi-Hung

    2017-10-28

    Acupuncture is recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) as an alternative and complementary strategy for stroke treatment and for improving stroke care. Clinical trial and meta-analysis findings have demonstrated the efficacy of acupuncture in improving balance function, reducing spasticity, and increasing muscle strength and general well-being post-stroke. The mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of acupuncture in stroke rehabilitation remain unclear. The aim of this study was to conduct a literature review, summarize the current known mechanisms in ischemic stroke rehabilitation through acupuncture and electroacupuncture (EA) therapy, and to detail the frequently used acupoints implicated in these effects. The evidence in this review indicates that five major different mechanisms are involved in the beneficial effects of acupuncture/EA on ischemic stroke rehabilitation: (1) Promotion of neurogenesis and cell proliferation in the central nervous system (CNS); (2) Regulation of cerebral blood flow in the ischemic area; (3) Anti-apoptosis in the ischemic area; (4) Regulation of neurochemicals; and, (5) Improvement of impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory after stroke. The most frequently used acupoints in basic studies include Baihui (GV20), Zusanli (ST36), Quchi (LI11), Shuigou (GV26), Dazhui (GV14), and Hegu (LI4). Our findings show that acupuncture exerts a beneficial effect on ischemic stroke through modulation of different mechanisms originating in the CNS.

  10. Risk of stroke and cardiovascular events after ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack in patients with type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome: secondary analysis of the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callahan, Alfred; Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B

    2011-01-01

    To perform a secondary analysis of the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial, which tested the effect of treatment with atorvastatin in reducing stroke in subjects with a recent stroke or transient ischemic attack, to explore the effects of treatment in su...

  11. Abnormal P-Wave Axis and Ischemic Stroke: The ARIC Study (Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Ankit; Norby, Faye L; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Koene, Ryan J; Rooney, Mary R; O'Neal, Wesley T; Alonso, Alvaro; Chen, Lin Y

    2017-08-01

    Abnormal P-wave axis (aPWA) has been linked to incident atrial fibrillation and mortality; however, the relationship between aPWA and stroke has not been reported. We hypothesized that aPWA is associated with ischemic stroke independent of atrial fibrillation and other stroke risk factors and tested our hypothesis in the ARIC study (Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities), a community-based prospective cohort study. We included 15 102 participants (aged 54.2±5.7 years; 55.2% women; 26.5% blacks) who attended the baseline examination (1987-1989) and without prevalent stroke. We defined aPWA as any value outside 0 to 75° using 12-lead ECGs obtained during study visits. Each case of incident ischemic stroke was classified in accordance with criteria from the National Survey of Stroke by a computer algorithm and adjudicated by physician review. Multivariable Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association of aPWA with stroke. During a mean follow-up of 20.2 years, there were 657 incident ischemic stroke cases. aPWA was independently associated with a 1.50-fold (95% confidence interval, 1.22-1.85) increased risk of ischemic stroke in the multivariable model that included atrial fibrillation. When subtyped, aPWA was associated with a 2.04-fold (95% confidence interval, 1.42-2.95) increased risk of cardioembolic stroke and a 1.32-fold (95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.71) increased risk of thrombotic stroke. aPWA is independently associated with ischemic stroke. This association seems to be stronger for cardioembolic strokes. Collectively, our findings suggest that alterations in atrial electric activation may predispose to cardiac thromboembolism independent of atrial fibrillation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. A COMPAR A TIVE STUDY OF SELECTIVE INDICATOR PROFILES IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC STROKE AND HEMORRHAGIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanaswamy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Urban India, stroke accounts for 1% mortality in all hospital admissions. The pathogenic role of increased plasma fibrinogen level in causing stroke has been recently reinforced. It was therefore of interest to measure plasma fibrinogen level in patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and to compare it with lipid profile. Also to sell if fibrinogen levels increase if patient has hypertension, diabetes, smoking and alcohol intake. METHODS: The study was conducted in Victoria Hospital and Bowring & Lady Curzon Hospital attached to Bangalore medical college and Research Institute. Study included 30 patients of Ischemic stroke, 20 patients of Hemorrhagic stroke and 50 age and sex matched controls. Plasma Fibrinogen level s and lipid profile were analyzed in cases and controls. Duration of the study was 2 years. RESULTS: Most common age group in our study was 61 - 70 years. Males (62% were more than females (38%. 16 patients were Diabetics (32% and 21 were Hypertensives (42%. 40% of patients had elevated total cholesterol, 20% had elevated Triglycerides, 26% had high LDL value, 36% had Low HDL levels, 32% had high VLDL value. Mean fibrinogen levels are significantly raised in cases (411.50+111.56 mg/dl compared to controls (313.76+71.24 mg/dl. Among patients with Ischemic stroke, mean fibrinogen level was 439.63+106.93 mg/dl and in hemorrhagic stroke mean level was 370.1+105.83 mg/dl. In Correlation of levels of lipid profile with levels of fibrinogen in Ischemic stroke cases, Pearson correlation showed moderate correlation for Fibrinogen vs T chol, small correlation for Fibrinogen vs TGL, Fibrinogen vs LDL and Fibrinogen vs VLDL and negative correlation for Fibrinogen vs HDL in cases and statistically significant difference for Fibrinogen vs T chol. In Hemorrhagic stroke cases, Pearson correlation showed negative correlation for Fibrinogen vs T chol, Fibrinogen vs TGL and Fibrinogen vs HDL, and trivial correlation for Fibrinogen

  13. Sex differences in ischemic stroke sensitivity are influenced by gonadal hormones, not by sex chromosome complement

    OpenAIRE

    Manwani, Bharti; Bentivegna, Kathryn; Benashski, Sharon E; Venna, Venugopal Reddy; Xu, Yan; Arnold, Arthur P; McCullough, Louise D

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown sex differences in ischemic stroke. The four core genotype (FCG) mouse model, in which the testes determining gene, Sry, has been moved from Y chromosome to an autosome, was used to dissociate the effects of sex hormones from sex chromosome in ischemic stroke outcome. Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in gonad intact FCG mice revealed that gonadal males (XXM and XYM) had significantly higher infarct volumes as compared with gonadal females (XXF and XYF)....

  14. Physiotherapeutic Procedure for Patient after Ischemic Cerebrovascular Accident (Stroke) in The Pons

    OpenAIRE

    Alrasheed, Abdulaziz Abdullah A

    2017-01-01

    Title of thesis: Physiotherapeutic Procedure for Patient after Ischemic Cerebrovascular Accident (Stroke) in The Pons. Author: Abdulaziz Abdullah Alrasheed. Work placement: Oblastní Nemocnice Kladno Summary: In the thesis, I will be covering a case study diagnosed with ischemic cerebrovascular accident (stroke) in the pons. It will be divided into 2 parts ( General - Practical) The general part explains the anatomical, biomechanical ,physiological and neurophysiological point view of the brai...

  15. Genetic Variant of Kalirin Gene Is Associated with Ischemic Stroke in a Chinese Han Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ischemic stroke is a complex disorder resulting from the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Previous studies showed that kalirin gene variations were associated with cardiovascular disease. However, the association between this gene and ischemic stroke was unknown. We performed this study to confirm if kalirin gene variation was associated with ischemic stroke. Methods. We enrolled 385 ischemic stroke patients and 362 controls from China. Three SNPs of kalirin gene were genotyped by means of ligase detection reaction-PCR method. Data was processed with SPSS and SHEsis platform. Results. SNP rs7620580 (dominant model: OR = 1.590, p = 0.002 and adjusted OR = 1.662, p = 0.014; additive model: OR = 1.490, p = 0.002 and adjusted OR = 1.636, p = 0.005; recessive model: OR = 2.686, p = 0.039 and SNP rs1708303 (dominant model: OR = 1.523, p = 0.007 and adjusted OR = 1.604, p = 0.028; additive model: OR = 1.438, p = 0.01 and adjusted OR = 1.476, p = 0.039 were associated with ischemic stroke. The GG genotype and G allele of SNP rs7620580 were associated with a risk for ischemic stroke with an adjusted OR of 3.195 and an OR of 1.446, respectively. Haplotype analysis revealed that A–T–G,G-T-A, and A-T-A haplotypes were associated with ischemic stroke. Conclusions. Our results provide evidence that kalirin gene variations were associated with ischemic stroke in the Chinese Han population.

  16. Neonatal seizures triple the risk of a remote seizure after perinatal ischemic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, CK; Glass, HC; Sidney, S; Smith, SE; Fullerton, HJ

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 American Academy of Neurology. To determine incidence rates and risk factors of remote seizure after perinatal arterial ischemic stroke. Methods: We retrospectively identified a population-based cohort of children with perinatal arterial ischemic stroke (presenting acutely or in a delayed fashion) from a large Northern Californian integrated health care system. We determined incidence and predictors of a remote seizure (unprovoked seizure after neonatal period, defined as 28 days of li...

  17. Giant left atrial myxoma causing acute ischemic stroke in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ise, Hayato; Ishikawa, Natsuya; Nakanishi, Sentaro; Kamiya, Hiroyuki

    2018-01-12

    Ischemic stroke is uncommon in pediatric populations and is sometimes caused by cardiac myxoma. In such cases, neurological deficits initially present in ischemic stroke due to emboli or thrombi of the myxoma. Echocardiography is helpful to diagnose myxoma in a timely manner and allows urgent surgical resection of the myxoma. We report a successful case of myxoma in a 7-year-old boy who initially presented with left-sided hemiparesis.

  18. Association of IL8 and IL10 gene allelic variants with ischemic stroke risk and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucherenko A. M.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Evaluating a role of IL8 gene –781 C/T, and IL10 gene –592C/A polymorphisms as genetic markers of ischemic stroke risk. Methods. A case group consisted of 183 patients with ischemic stroke, which were treated in the Brain Vascular Pathology unit of SI «Institute of Gerontology of NAMS of Ukraine». A control group included 88 healthy individuals older than 65 years without any history of ischemic stroke. Genotyping was performed using PCR followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Results. Significantly (P < 0,05 higher frequency of IL8 –781T allele carriers in the case group (81,6 % comparing to the control (70,1% was revealed. –781T allele carriers have nearly 2-fold increased ischemic stroke development risk (OR = 1.886; 95 % CI: 1.041–3.417. Significantly (P < 0,05 higher frequency of IL10 gene –592C allele carriers was observed in the patients with ischemic stroke (98,2% comparing to the control (90,7 %. The ischemic stroke development risk in such individuals is 5-fold increased (OR = 5.71; 95 % CI: 1.48–22.11. It was revealed that –592C allele homozygotes with ischemic stroke have more than 2-fold higher improvement (according to the Rankin scale chances during the first fortnight of treatment (OR = 2,76; 95 % CI: 1,26–6,07. Conclusions. On the basis of the obtained significant differences, IL8 gene –781T and IL10 gene –592C variants may be considered the factors of ischemic stroke hereditary susceptibility. Besides, IL10 gene –592CC genotype is a genetic marker of the patients state positive dynamics during first two weeks of treatment.

  19. Renal dysfunction and chronic kidney disease in ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Derek; McCarthy, Christine; Akijian, Layan; Callaly, Elizabeth; Ní Chróinín, Danielle; Horgan, Gillian; Kyne, Lorraine; Duggan, Joseph; Dolan, Eamon; O' Rourke, Killian; Williams, David; Murphy, Sean; O'Meara, Yvonne; Kelly, Peter J

    2017-10-01

    Background and purpose The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) chronic kidney disease (CKD)) in ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) is unknown, as estimates have been based on single-point estimates of renal function. Studies investigating the effect of renal dysfunction (eGFR < 60 mL/min per 1.73 m 2 , renal dysfunction) on post-stroke outcomes are limited to hospitalized cohorts and have provided conflicting results. Methods We investigated rates, determinants and outcomes of renal dysfunction in ischemic stroke and TIA in the North Dublin Population Stroke Study. We also investigate the persistence of renal dysfunction in 90-day survivors to determine the prevalence of CKD. Ascertainment included hot and cold pursuit using multiple overlapping sources. Survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox proportional hazards modeling. Results In 547 patients (ischemic stroke in 76.4%, TIA in 23.6%), the mean eGFR at presentation was 63.7 mL/min/1.73 m 2 (SD 22.1). Renal dysfunction was observed in 44.6% (244/547). Among 90-day survivors, 31.2% (139/446) met criteria for CKD. After adjusting for age and stroke severity, eGFR < 45 mL/min/1.73 m 2 (hazard ratio 2.53, p = 0.01) independently predicted 28-day fatality but not at two years. Poor post-stroke functional outcome (Modified Rankin Scale 3-5) at two years was more common in those with renal dysfunction (52.5% vs. 20.6%, p < 0.001). After adjusting for age, stroke severity and pre-stroke disability, renal dysfunction (OR 2.17, p = 0.04) predicted poor functional outcome. Conclusion Renal dysfunction and CKD are common in ischemic stroke and TIA. Renal dysfunction is associated with considerable post-stroke morbidity and mortality. Further studies are needed to investigate if modifiable mechanisms underlie these associations.

  20. Increased serum neuron specific enolase concentrations in patients with hyperglycemic cortical ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elting, JW; De Keyser, J; Sulter, G.

    1998-01-01

    A detrimental effect of hyperglycemia in ischemic brain has been demonstrated in laboratory experiments and it has been found that hyperglycemia in ischemic stroke is a predictor of poor outcome. We determined serum neuron specific enolase (NSE) concentrations in 41 consecutive patients with a

  1. Incorporating Stroke Severity Into Hospital Measures of 30-Day Mortality After Ischemic Stroke Hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jennifer; Wang, Yongfei; Qin, Li; Schwamm, Lee H; Fonarow, Gregg C; Cormier, Nicole; Dorsey, Karen; McNamara, Robert L; Suter, Lisa G; Krumholz, Harlan M; Bernheim, Susannah M

    2017-11-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services publicly reports a hospital-level stroke mortality measure that lacks stroke severity risk adjustment. Our objective was to describe novel measures of stroke mortality suitable for public reporting that incorporate stroke severity into risk adjustment. We linked data from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Get With The Guidelines-Stroke registry with Medicare fee-for-service claims data to develop the measures. We used logistic regression for variable selection in risk model development. We developed 3 risk-standardized mortality models for patients with acute ischemic stroke, all of which include the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score: one that includes other risk variables derived only from claims data (claims model); one that includes other risk variables derived from claims and clinical variables that could be obtained from electronic health record data (hybrid model); and one that includes other risk variables that could be derived only from electronic health record data (electronic health record model). The cohort used to develop and validate the risk models consisted of 188 975 hospital admissions at 1511 hospitals. The claims, hybrid, and electronic health record risk models included 20, 21, and 9 risk-adjustment variables, respectively; the C statistics were 0.81, 0.82, and 0.79, respectively (as compared with the current publicly reported model C statistic of 0.75); the risk-standardized mortality rates ranged from 10.7% to 19.0%, 10.7% to 19.1%, and 10.8% to 20.3%, respectively; the median risk-standardized mortality rate was 14.5% for all measures; and the odds of mortality for a high-mortality hospital (+1 SD) were 1.51, 1.52, and 1.52 times those for a low-mortality hospital (-1 SD), respectively. We developed 3 quality measures that demonstrate better discrimination than the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' existing stroke mortality measure, adjust for

  2. Corneal Confocal Microscopy Detects Corneal Nerve Damage in Patients Admitted With Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Adnan; Akhtar, Naveed; Kamran, Saadat; Ponirakis, Georgios; Petropoulos, Ioannis N; Tunio, Nahel A; Dargham, Soha R; Imam, Yahia; Sartaj, Faheem; Parray, Aijaz; Bourke, Paula; Khan, Rabia; Santos, Mark; Joseph, Sujatha; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Malik, Rayaz A

    2017-11-01

    Corneal confocal microscopy can identify corneal nerve damage in patients with peripheral and central neurodegeneration. However, the use of corneal confocal microscopy in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is unknown. One hundred thirty patients (57 without diabetes mellitus [normal glucose tolerance], 32 with impaired glucose tolerance, and 41 with type 2 diabetes mellitus) admitted with acute ischemic stroke, and 28 age-matched healthy control participants underwent corneal confocal microscopy to quantify corneal nerve fiber density, corneal nerve branch density, and corneal nerve fiber length. There was a significant reduction in corneal nerve fiber density, corneal nerve branch density, and corneal nerve fiber length in stroke patients with normal glucose tolerance ( P stroke. Corneal confocal microscopy is a rapid noninvasive ophthalmic imaging technique that identifies corneal nerve fiber loss in patients with acute ischemic stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Cardiac myxoma causing acute ischemic stroke in a pediatric patient and a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Jennifer; Leszczyszyn, David; Mathew, Don

    2014-05-01

    Ischemic stroke in the pediatric population is a rare occurrence, and its possible causes span a wide differential that includes atrial myxomas. Myxomas are friable cardiac tumors that produce "showers" of emboli resulting in transient neurological deficits, cutaneous eruptions, and ophthalmologic deficits. We present an 11-year-old boy with a months-long history of an intermittent spotted "rash" who presented with acute ischemic stroke caused by a left atrial myxoma. We also review clinical features in all 16 other cases of cardiac myxoma causing pediatric stroke reported in the literature. Our case, along with the review of the literature, highlights the fact that myxomas often initially present as stroke with acute hemiplegia and transient cutaneous eruptions due to fragmentation of the tumor. Cardiac myxoma should be considered in any child presenting with ischemic stroke, and transient skin findings may provide an important diagnostic clue prior to onset of neurological symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Normobaric oxygen therapy in acute ischemic stroke: A pilot study in Indian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Clinical and radiological assessment of effects of normobaric high-flow oxygen therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS. Materials and Methods: Patients with anterior circulation ischemic strokes presenting within 12 h of onset, ineligible for intravenous thrombolysis, an National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score of >4, a mean transit time (MTT lesion larger than diffusion-weighted image (DWI (perfusiondiffusion mismatch, and an evidence of cortical hypoperfusion on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were included into the trial. Active chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, requirement of >3/L min oxygen delivery to maintain SaO2 > 95%, rapidly improving neurological deficits, pregnancy, contraindications to MRI, or unstable medical conditions were excluded. The experimental group received humidified oxygen at flow rates of 10 L/min for 12 h. The NIHSS, modified Rankin Score (mRS, Barthel Index (BI were measured at 0, 1, 7 day of admission and at 3 months follow-up. MRI with DWI/PWI was performed at admission, 24 h later and at 3 months follow-up. Results: Of 40 patients (mean age = 55.8 years ± 13.2 (range, 26-82, 20 patients were randomized to normobaric oxygen (NBO. The mean NIHSS in NBO and control groups were 14.25 and 12.7 at admission which decreased to 11.6 and 9.5 on the seventh day, and 9.4 and 9.05 at 3 months, respectively. The mean mRS (3.7/3.7 and BI (58.2/53.9 in NBO and control groups improved to 2/2.2 and 73.05/73.8 at the end of 3 months, respectively. Conclusions: NBO did not improve the clinical scores of stroke outcome in Indian patients with AIS.

  5. A biochemical marker panel in MRI-proven hyperacute ischemic stroke-a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knauer Carolin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computer tomography (CT is still the fastest and most robust technique to rule out ICH in acute stroke. However CT-sensitivity for detection of ischemic stroke in the hyperacute phase is still relatively low. Moreover the validity of pure clinical judgment is diminished by several stroke imitating diseases (mimics. The "Triage® Stroke Panel", a biochemical multimarker assay, detects Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP, D-Dimers (DD, Matrix-Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, and S100B protein and promptly generates a Multimarkerindex of these values (MMX. This index has been licensed for diagnostic purposes as it might increase the validity of the clinical diagnosis to differentiate between stroke imitating diseases and true ischemic strokes. Our aim was to prove whether the panel is a reliable indicating device for the diagnosis of ischemic stroke in a time window of 6 h to fasten the pre- and intrahospital pathway to fibrinolysis. Methods We investigated all consecutive patients admitted to our stroke unit during a time period of 5 months. Only patients with clinical investigation, blood sample collection and MRI within six hours from symptom onset were included. Values of biochemical markers were analyzed according to the results of diffusion weighted MR-imaging. In addition MMX-values in ischemic strokes were correlated with the TOAST-criteria. For statistical analysis the SAS Analyst software was used. Correlation coefficients were analyzed and comparison tests for two or more groups were performed. Statistical significance was assumed in case of p Results In total 174 patients were included into this study (n = 100 strokes, n = 49 mimics, n = 25 transitoric ischemic attacks. In patients with ischemic strokes the mean NIHSS was 7.6 ± 6.2, while the mean DWI-lesion volume was 20.6 ml (range 186.9 to 4.2 ml. According to the MMX or the individual markers there was no statistically significant difference between the group of ischemic

  6. Cardiac Arrest in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Incidence, Predisposing Factors, and Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joundi, Raed A; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Nikneshan, Davar; Tu, Jack V; Fang, Jiming; Holloway, Robert; Saposnik, Gustavo

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac arrest is a devastating complication of acute ischemic stroke, but little is known about its incidence and characteristics. We studied a large ischemic stroke inpatient population and compared patients with and without cardiac arrest. We studied consecutive patients from the Ontario Stroke Registry who had an ischemic stroke between July 2003 and June 2008 at 11 tertiary care stroke centers in Ontario. Multivariable analyses were used to determine independent predictors of cardiac arrest and associated outcomes. Adjusted survival curves were computed, and hazard ratios for mortality at 30 days and 1 year were determined for cardiac arrest and other major outcomes. Among the 9019 patients with acute ischemic stroke, 352 had cardiac arrest, for an overall incidence of 3.9%. In a sensitivity analysis with palliative patients removed, the incidence of cardiac arrest was 2.5%. Independent predictors of cardiac arrest were as follows: older age, greater stroke severity, preadmission dependence, and a history of diabetes, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. Systemic complications associated with cardiac arrest were as follows: myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, sepsis, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and pneumonia. Patients with cardiac arrest had higher disability at discharge, and a markedly increased 30-day mortality of 82.1% compared with 9.3% without cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest had a high incidence and was associated with poor outcomes after ischemic stroke, including multiple medical complications and very high mortality. Predictors of cardiac arrest identified in this study could help risk stratify ischemic stroke patients for cardiac investigations and prolonged cardiac monitoring. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Relationship of Preexisting Cardiovascular Comorbidities to Newly Diagnosed Atrial Fibrillation After Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, Arnaud; Clementy, Nicolas; Bodin, Alexandre; Angoulvant, Denis; Babuty, Dominique; Lip, Gregory Y H; Fauchier, Laurent

    2017-10-01

    There remains uncertainty as whether newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation (AF) after ischemic stroke reflects underlying heart disease and represents an increased risk of cardioembolic stroke, or whether it is triggered by neurogenic mechanisms. We aimed to determine whether cardiovascular comorbidities in patients with new AF after ischemic stroke differ from patients with previous known AF or without AF. This French longitudinal cohort study was based on the database covering hospital care from 2009 to 2012 for the entire population. Of 336 291 patients with ischemic stroke, 240 459 (71.5%) had no AF and 95 832 (28.5%) had previously known AF at baseline. Patients without previous AF had a mean CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score of 4.98±1.63 SD. During a mean follow-up of 7.9±11.5 months, 14 095 (5.9%) of these patients had incident AF, representing an annual incidence of AF after ischemic stroke of 8.9 per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval, 8.8-9.0). New AF patients had higher CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score, more likely comorbidities, and more frequent history of previous transient ischemic attack than patients with previous known AF or without AF. Preexisting cardiovascular comorbidities underlie AF newly diagnosed after stroke. Consequently, these high-risk patients should be closely monitored for incident AF to facilitate an earlier diagnosis of AF and avoid stroke with appropriate thromboprophylaxis. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Delayed treatment with a novel neurotrophic compound reduces behavioral deficits in rabbit ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapchak, Paul A; Schubert, David R; Maher, Pamela A

    2011-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a major risk for morbidity and mortality in our aging population. Currently only one drug, the thrombolytic tissue plasminogen activator, is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat stroke. Therefore, there is a need to develop new drugs that promote neuronal survival following stroke. We have synthesized a novel neuroprotective molecule called CNB-001 (a pyrazole derivative of curcumin) that has neurotrophic activity, enhances memory, and blocks cell death in multiple toxicity assays related to ischemic stroke. In this study, we tested the efficacy of CNB-001 in a rigorous rabbit ischemic stroke model and determined the molecular basis of its in vivo activity. CNB-001 has substantial beneficial properties in an in vitro ischemia assay and improves the behavioral outcome of rabbit ischemic stroke even when administered 1 h after the insult, a therapeutic window in this model comparable to tissue plasminogen activator. In addition, we elucidated the protein kinase pathways involved in neuroprotection. CNB-001 maintains the calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase signaling pathways associated with neurotrophic growth factors that are critical for the maintenance of neuronal function. On the basis of its in vivo efficacy and novel mode of action, we conclude that CNB-001 has a great potential for the treatment of ischemic stroke as well as other CNS pathologies.

  9. Molecular basis of impaired glycogen metabolism during ischemic stroke and hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammed Iqbal; Roulston, Carli Lorraine; Stapleton, David Ian

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the combinatorial effect of many pathological processes including the loss of energy supplies, excessive intracellular calcium accumulation, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses. The brain's ability to maintain energy demand through this process involves metabolism of glycogen, which is critical for release of stored glucose. However, regulation of glycogen metabolism in ischemic stroke remains unknown. In the present study, we investigate the role and regulation of glycogen metabolizing enzymes and their effects on the fate of glycogen during ischemic stroke. Ischemic stroke was induced in rats by peri-vascular application of the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 and forebrains were collected at 1, 3, 6 and 24 hours post-stroke. Glycogen levels and the expression and activity of enzymes involved in glycogen metabolism were analyzed. We found elevated glycogen levels in the ipsilateral hemispheres compared with contralateral hemispheres at 6 and 24 hours (25% and 39% increase respectively; PGlycogen synthase activity and glycogen branching enzyme expression were found to be similar between the ipsilateral, contralateral, and sham control hemispheres. In contrast, the rate-limiting enzyme for glycogen breakdown, glycogen phosphorylase, had 58% lower activity (Pglycogen debranching enzyme expression 24 hours post-stroke was 77% (Pglycogen phosphorylase activity and increased glycogen accumulation but did not alter glycogen synthase activity. Furthermore, elevated glycogen levels provided metabolic support to astrocytes during hypoxia. Our study has identified that glycogen breakdown is impaired during ischemic stroke, the molecular basis of which includes reduced glycogen debranching enzyme expression level together with reduced glycogen phosphorylase and PKA activity.

  10. The health loss from ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage: evidence from the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadilhac, Dominique A; Dewey, Helen M; Vos, Theo; Carter, Rob; Thrift, Amanda G

    2010-05-14

    People suffering different types of stroke have differing demographic characteristics and survival. However, current estimates of disease burden are based on the same underlying assumptions irrespective of stroke type. We hypothesized that average Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) lost from stroke would be different for ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We used 1 and 5-year data collected from patients with first-ever stroke participating in the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS). We calculated case fatality rates, health-adjusted life expectancy, and quality-of-life (QoL) weights specific to each age and gender category. Lifetime 'health loss' for first-ever ischemic stroke and ICH surviving 28-days for the 2004 Australian population cohort was then estimated. Multivariable uncertainty analyses and sensitivity analyses (SA) were used to assess the impact of varying input parameters e.g. case fatality and QoL weights. Paired QoL data at 1 and 5 years were available for 237 NEMESIS participants. Extrapolating NEMESIS rates, 31,539 first-ever strokes were expected for Australia in 2004. Average discounted (3%) QALYs lost per first-ever stroke were estimated to be 5.09 (SD 0.20; SA 5.49) for ischemic stroke (n = 27,660) and 6.17 (SD 0.26; SA 6.45) for ICH (n = 4,291; p < 0.001). QALYs lost also differed according to gender for both subtypes (ischemic stroke: males 4.69 SD 0.38, females 5.51 SD 0.46; ICH: males 5.82 SD 0.67, females 6.50 SD 0.40). People with ICH incurred greater loss of health over a lifetime than people with ischemic stroke. This is explained by greater stroke related case fatality at a younger age, but longer life expectancy with disability after the first 12 months for people with ICH. Thus, studies of disease burden in stroke should account for these differences between subtype and gender. Otherwise, in countries where ICH is more common, health loss for stroke may be underestimated. Similar to other studies

  11. Mechanical thrombectomy with snare in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Alejandro; Mayol, Antonio [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Seville (Spain); Martinez, Eva; Gonzalez-Marcos, Jose R.; Gil-Peralta, Alberto [Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocio, Department of Neurology, Seville (Spain)

    2007-04-15

    We evaluated the efficacy and safety of thrombus extraction using a microsnare in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). This was a prospective, observational, cohort study in which consecutive patients with AIS (<6 hours of ischemia for anterior circulation and <24 hours for posterior circulation) who had been previously excluded from intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) thrombolysis were included and followed-up for 3 months. Mechanical embolectomy with a microsnare of 2-4 mm was undertaken as the first treatment. Low-dose intraarterial thrombolysis or angioplasty was used if needed. TIMI grade and modified Rankin stroke scale (mRSS) score were used to evaluate vessel recanalization and clinical efficacy, respectively. Nine patients (mean age 55 years, range 17-69 years) were included. Their basal mean NIHSS score was 16 (range 12-24). In seven out of the nine patients (77.8%) the clot was removed, giving a TIMI grade of 3 in four patients and TIMI grade 2 in three patients. Occlusion sites were: middle cerebral artery (four), basilar artery (two) and anterior cerebral artery plus middle cerebral artery (one). The mean time for recanalization from the start of the procedure was 50 min (range 50-75 min). At 3 months, the mRSS score was 0 in two patients and 3-4 in three patients (two patients died). According to our results, the microsnare is a safe procedure for mechanical thrombectomy with a good recanalization rate. Further studies are required to determine the role of the microsnare in the treatment of AIS. (orig.)

  12. Gut dysbiosis is associated with metabolism and systemic inflammation in patients with ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Yamashiro

    Full Text Available The role of metabolic diseases in ischemic stroke has become a primary concern in both research and clinical practice. Increasing evidence suggests that dysbiosis is associated with metabolic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the gut microbiota, as well as concentrations of organic acids, the major products of dietary fiber fermentation by the gut microbiota, are altered in patients with ischemic stroke, and to examine the association between these changes and host metabolism and inflammation. We analyzed the composition of the fecal gut microbiota and the concentrations of fecal organic acids in 41 ischemic stroke patients and 40 control subjects via 16S and 23S rRNA-targeted quantitative reverse transcription (qRT-PCR and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses, respectively. Multivariable linear regression analysis was subsequently performed to evaluate the relationships between ischemic stroke and bacterial counts and organic acid concentrations. Correlations between bioclinical markers and bacterial counts and organic acids concentrations were also evaluated. Although only the bacterial counts of Lactobacillus ruminis were significantly higher in stroke patients compared to controls, multivariable analysis showed that ischemic stroke was independently associated with increased bacterial counts of Atopobium cluster and Lactobacillus ruminis, and decreased numbers of Lactobacillus sakei subgroup, independent of age, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. Changes in the prevalence of Lactobacillus ruminis were positively correlated with serum interleukin-6 levels. In addition, ischemic stroke was associated with decreased and increased concentrations of acetic acid and valeric acid, respectively. Meanwhile, changes in acetic acid concentrations were negatively correlated with the levels of glycated hemoglobin and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, whereas changes in valeric acid concentrations were positively

  13. Sex Differences in Caspase Activation after Experimental Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fudong; Li, Zhong; Li, Jun; Siegel, Chad; Yuan, Rongwen; McCullough, Louise D.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Over the past five years, experimental data has emerged that ischemia-induced cell death pathways may differ in males and females. Cell death in males is triggered by Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). We have previously shown that interference with this pathway benefits males but not females after an experimental stroke. In contrast caspase activation may be the major pathway activated after ischemic injury in females. The aim of this study is to examine whether sex differences exist in caspase activation in adult mice after stroke and to determine if interference with stroke-induced caspase activation preferentially protects females. Methods Focal stroke was induced by reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO; 90 minutes) in young and aging C57BL6 mice of both sexes. The pan-caspase inhibitor, quinoline-Val-Asp(Ome)-CH2-O-phenoxy (Q-VD-OPh) was administered at reperfusion. Histological outcomes was assessed 48 hours after MCAO. Separate cohorts were utilized for protein analysis of key cell death proteins including caspase-3, caspase-8, cytochrome C and Apoptosis Inducing Factor (AIF). Results Drug-treated female mice had significantly decreased infarct volumes and improved neurological deficits after stroke compared to vehicle-treated mice. Q-VD-OPh administration had no effect in male mice. The expression of cytochrome C and nuclear caspase-8 levels were increased in females after stroke. Conclusions Female mice had an early release of cytochrome C and enhanced caspase activation after MCAO. Caspase inhibition benefited females but not males. Sex differences exist in both the response to ischemic injury and the efficacy of neuroprotective agents. PMID:19265047

  14. Feasibility and Diagnostic Value of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging After Acute Ischemic Stroke of Undetermined Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeusler, Karl Georg; Wollboldt, Christian; Bentheim, Laura Zu; Herm, Juliane; Jäger, Sebastian; Kunze, Claudia; Eberle, Holger-Carsten; Deluigi, Claudia Christina; Bruder, Oliver; Malsch, Carolin; Heuschmann, Peter U; Endres, Matthias; Audebert, Heinrich J; Morguet, Andreas J; Jensen, Christoph; Fiebach, Jochen B

    2017-05-01

    Etiology of acute ischemic stroke remains undetermined (cryptogenic) in about 25% of patients after state-of-the-art diagnostic work-up. One-hundred and three patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-proven acute ischemic stroke of undetermined origin were prospectively enrolled and underwent 3-T cardiac MRI and magnetic resonance angiography of the aortic arch in addition to state-of-the-art diagnostic work-up, including transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). We analyzed the feasibility, diagnostic accuracy, and added value of cardiovascular MRI (cvMRI) compared with TEE for detecting sources of stroke. Overall, 102 (99.0%) ischemic stroke patients (median 63 years [interquartile range, 53-72], 24% female, median NIHSS (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale) score on admission 2 [interquartile range, 1-4]) underwent cvMRI and TEE in hospital; 89 (86.4%) patients completed the cvMRI examination. In 93 cryptogenic stroke patients, a high-risk embolic source was found in 9 (8.7%) patients by cvMRI and in 11 (11.8%) patients by echocardiography, respectively. cvMRI and echocardiography findings were consistent in 80 (86.0%) patients, resulting in a degree of agreement of κ=0.24. In 82 patients with cryptogenic stroke according to routine work-up, including TEE, cvMRI identified stroke etiology in additional 5 (6.1%) patients. Late gadolinium enhancement consistent with previous myocardial infarction was found in 13 (14.6%) out of 89 stroke patients completing cvMRI. Only 2 of these 13 patients had known coronary artery disease. Our study demonstrated that cvMRI was feasible in the vast majority of included patients with acute ischemic stroke. The diagnostic information of cvMRI seems to be complementary to TEE but is not replacing echocardiography after acute ischemic stroke. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01917955. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Electrocardiographic monitoring for detecting atrial fibrillation after ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussault, Charles; Toeg, Hadi; Nathan, Meena; Wang, Zhi Jian; Roux, Jean-Francois; Secemsky, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a major cause of stroke. Although standard investigations after an event include electrocardiographic monitoring, the optimal duration to detect AF is unclear. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine whether the duration of electrocardiographic monitoring after an ischemic event is related to the detection of AF. Prospective studies that reported the proportion of new AF diagnosed using electrocardiographic monitoring for > 12 hours in patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack were analyzed. Studies were excluded if the stroke was hemorrhagic or AF was previously diagnosed. A total of 31 articles met inclusion criteria. Longer duration of monitoring was associated with an increased detection of AF when examining monitoring time as a continuous variable (P Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Ethnicity and thrombolysis in ischemic stroke: a hospital based study in Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coutinho, J.M.; Klaver, E.C.; Roos, Y.B.; Stam, J.; Nederkoorn, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ethnic differences have been reported with regard to several medical therapies. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between ethnicity and thrombolysis in stroke patients. Retrospective single-centre study. Patients admitted with an ischemic stroke between 2003 and 2008 were

  17. When void matters: Imaging, detection, quantification, and analysis of thrombi in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, E.M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the most common cause of disability and the third most common cause of death worldwide. However, despite improvements in imaging techniques and treatments, there is a large group of patients that do not recover with currently available therapies. Ischemic stroke, which accounts for 80% of

  18. Automatic detection of ischemic stroke based on scaling exponent electroencephalogram using extreme learning machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhi, H. A.; Wijaya, S. K.; Prawito; Badri, C.; Rezal, M.

    2017-03-01

    Stroke is one of cerebrovascular diseases caused by the obstruction of blood flow to the brain. Stroke becomes the leading cause of death in Indonesia and the second in the world. Stroke also causes of the disability. Ischemic stroke accounts for most of all stroke cases. Obstruction of blood flow can cause tissue damage which results the electrical changes in the brain that can be observed through the electroencephalogram (EEG). In this study, we presented the results of automatic detection of ischemic stroke and normal subjects based on the scaling exponent EEG obtained through detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) using extreme learning machine (ELM) as the classifier. The signal processing was performed with 18 channels of EEG in the range of 0-30 Hz. Scaling exponents of the subjects were used as the input for ELM to classify the ischemic stroke. The performance of detection was observed by the value of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. The result showed, performance of the proposed method to classify the ischemic stroke was 84 % for accuracy, 82 % for sensitivity and 87 % for specificity with 120 hidden neurons and sine as the activation function of ELM.

  19. Vagus Nerve Stimulation in Ischemic Stroke: Old Wine in a New Bottle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Y Cai

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS is currently FDA-approved for treatment of both medically refractory partial-onset seizures and severe, recurrent refractory depression which have failed to respond to medical interventions. Because of its ability to regulate mechanisms well-studied in neuroscience, such as norepinephrine and serotonin release, the vagus nerve may play an important role in regulating cerebral blood flow, edema, inflammation, glutamate excitotoxicity, and neurotrophic processes. There is strong evidence that these same processes are important in stroke pathophysiology. We reviewed the literature for the role of VNS in improving ischemic stroke outcomes by performing a systematic search for publications in Medline (1966-2014 with keywords vagus nerve stimulation AND stroke in subject headings and key words with no language restrictions. Of the 73 publications retrieved, we identified 7 studies from 3 different research groups that met our final inclusion criteria of research studies addressing the role of vagus nerve stimulation in ischemic stroke. Results from these studies suggest that VNS has promising efficacy in reducing stroke volume and attenuating neurological deficits in ischemic stroke models. Given the lack of success in Phase III trials for stroke neuroprotection, it is important to develop new therapies targeting different neuroprotective pathways. Further studies of the possible role of VNS, through normally physiologically active mechanisms, in ischemic stroke therapeutics should be conducted in both animal models and clinical studies. In addition, recent advent of a non-invasive, transcutaneous VNS could provide the potential for easier clinical translation.

  20. Prevalence and Prognostic Significance of Runs of Premature Atrial Complexes in Ischemic Stroke Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg Vinther, Kristina; Tveskov, Claus; Möller, Sören

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Runs of premature atrial complexes (PACs) are common in stroke patients and perceived to be clinically insignificant, but their prognostic significance is unclear. This study investigated the association between runs of PACs in ischemic stroke patients and the risk...

  1. Current Canadian And American Experiences In The Treatment Of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Dolati

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke remains one of the main public health issues worldwide. It is the third leading cause of death in the United States, with more than 200,000 people dying from strokes each year. Approximately 80% of all acute ischemic strokes are due to intracranial artery occlusion, most commonly thromboembolic clot occlusion. Revascularization of occluded territories is the cornerstone of acute ischemic stroke and Thrombolysis for ischemic stroke has been systematically studied in large randomized trials only since the 1990s. To date, thrombolytic therapy for ischemic stroke has been investigated in 21 randomized controlled clinical trials enrolling more than 7,000 patients. The advent of modern imaging and endovascular tools and technology has revolutionized treatment of stroke. In this talk, I will review current clinical trials published in The NEJM (ESCAPE, MR Clean, EXTENDED IA, …. regarding superiority of the endovascular treatments, especially, the stent retrievers, over Iv tPA. I will also go over all endovascular techniques used in the endovascular treatment of acute stroke using my Canadian and American experiences.

  2. Current Canadian And American Experiences In The Treatment Of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Dolati

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stroke remains one of the main public health issues worldwide. It is the third leading cause of death in the United States, with more than 200,000 people dying from strokes each year. Approximately 80% of all acute ischemic strokes are due to intracranial artery occlusion, most commonly thromboembolic clot occlusion. Revascularization of occluded territories is the cornerstone of acute ischemic stroke and Thrombolysis for ischemic stroke has been systematically studied in large randomized trials only since the 1990s. To date, thrombolytic therapy for ischemic stroke has been investigated in 21 randomized controlled clinical trials enrolling more than 7,000 patients. The advent of modern imaging and endovascular tools and technologyhas revolutionized treatment of stroke. In this talk, I will review current clinical trials published in The NEJM (ESCAPE, MR Clean, EXTENDED IA, …. regarding superiority of the endovascular treatments, especially, the stent retrievers, over Iv tPA. I will also go over all endovascular techniques used in the endovascular treatment of acute stroke using my Canadian and American experiences.

  3. A comprehensive association analysis of homocysteine metabolic pathway genes in Singaporean Chinese with ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Qi Low

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effect of genetic factors, apart from 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR polymorphisms, on elevated plasma homocysteine levels and increasing ischemic stroke risk have not been fully elucidated. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of 25 genes involved in homocysteine metabolism to investigate association of common variants within these genes with ischemic stroke risk. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study was done in two stages. In the initial study, SNP and haplotype-based association analyses were performed using 147 tagging Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in 360 stroke patients and 354 non-stroke controls of Singaporean Chinese ethnicity. Joint association analysis of significant SNPs was then performed to assess the cumulative effect of these variants on ischemic stroke risk. In the replication study, 8 SNPs were selected for validation in an independent set of 420 matched case-control pairs of Singaporean Chinese ethnicity. SNP analysis from the initial study suggested 3 risk variants in the MTRR, SHMT1 and TCN2 genes which were moderately associated with ischemic stroke risk, independent of known stroke risk factors. Although the replication study failed to support single-SNP associations observed in the initial study, joint association analysis of the 3 variants in combined initial and replication samples revealed a trend of elevated risk with an increased number of risk alleles (Joint P(trend = 1.2×10(-6. CONCLUSIONS: Our study did not find direct evidence of associations between any single polymorphisms of homocysteine metabolic pathway genes and ischemic stroke, but suggests that the cumulative effect of several small to moderate risk variants from genes involved in homocysteine metabolism may jointly confer a significant impact on ischemic stroke risk.

  4. Ischemic stroke management in West Scotland: a chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpillat, Patrice; Dorey, Julie; Guilhaume-Goulant, Chantal; Dabbous, Firas; Aballéa, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Little information is available about the long-term management of ischemic stroke (IS) in West Scotland. In this study we aim to describe the management of IS at onset, admission, and during follow-up among patients who survived an IS event. General practitioners (GPs) (n=20) were randomly selected to recruit IS patients and extract data about patient characteristics, hospitalizations, discharge, and ambulatory care from GP databases, hospital letters, and direct contact with patients and their relatives. Descriptive analyses were conducted. One hundred and one patients were included, with a mean age of 65.6±13.4. About half of the patients contacted their GPs at the time of onset (45.4%). Cardiovascular history was prevalent in 29.7% of cases, and 14% of all cases were recurrences. Of the patients, 89 (88%) were hospitalized with mean length of stay (LOS) 11.8 days. Treatment was administered on average within 12.9 hours of admission and 23.6% of the admitted patients received thrombolytic treatment. During the 1-year follow-up period, 33.6% of patients were rehospitalized and the mean LOS was 15.1±29.5 days. Further, patients on average sought nursing care (10.9%), physical therapy (45.5%), occupational therapy (27.7%), speech therapy (12.9%), and professional caregivers (12%). The health-care resource utilization of IS patients is a major driver of economic burden.

  5. [Impact of warning against procrastination of thrombolysis in ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre-Moreno, J F; Arnáiz-Urrutia, C; del Saz-Saucedo, P; Fernández-Pérez, M D; Vatz, K A; Feria-Vilar, I; Montiel-Navarro, L; Pineda-Martínez, A; Creus-Fernández, C; Ortega-Moreno, A

    Fibrinolysis in stroke should be carried out as soon as possible, but delays occur for various reasons. In the first 17 ischemic infarcts treated in our center we confirmed a tendency to exhaust the therapeutic window. We look now at whether warnings against this tendency, without other logistical or organizational modifications, have had an impact on delays. Neurologists were encouraged to avoid procrastination. When we reached 51 treated patients, we compared features and delay times between the first 17 (February, 2002 to June, 2004) and the 17 most recent cases (October, 2005 to April, 2006). Non-parametric tests were used (significant if p procrastination appear to be important in terms of shortening the delays. The time used for clinical-radiologic evaluation (arrival through CT)--about which there had been no action taken--had not been modified, but the time employed in the decision to treat (CT-treatment) and the 'door-to-needle' time had decreased appreciably. This effective compensatory reduction permitted treatment of late-arriving patients, such that although the overall time from onset to treatment apparently was not modified, the actual treatment rate increased.

  6. A mathematical model of inflammation during ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dronne Marie-Aimée

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we propose a model to describe the inflammatory process which occurs during ischemic stroke. First, an introduction to some basic concepts about the biological phenomenon is given. Then, a detailed derivation of the model and the numerical scheme used are presented. Finally, the studies of the model robustness and sensitivity are showed and some numerical results on the time and space evolution of the process are presented and discussed. Dans cet article, nous nous attachons à modéliser le processus inflammatoire lors d’un accident vasculaire cérébral ischémique. Tout d’abord, nous expliquons brièvement les bases biologiques de ce phénomène. Puis, nous décrivons les équations et les schémas numériques retenus pour le modéliser et l’implémenter. Nous présentons ensuite des études de robustesse et de sensibilité et montrons et discutons les premiers résultats de simulation obtenus.

  7. Ischemic conditioning-induced endogenous brain protection: Applications Pre-, Per- or Post-Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuechun; Reis, Cesar; Applegate, Richard; Stier, Gary; Martin, Robert; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    In the area of brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases, a plethora of experimental and clinical evidence strongly indicates the promise of therapeutically exploiting the endogenous adaptive system at various levels like triggers, mediators and the end-effectors to stimulate and mobilize intrinsic protective capacities against brain injuries. It is believed that ischemic pre- or post-conditioning are actually the strongest known interventions to stimulate the innate neuroprotective mechanism to prevent or reverse neurodegenerative diseases including stoke and traumatic brain injury. Recently, studies showed the effectiveness of ischemic per-conditioning in some organs. Therefore the term ischemic conditioning, including all interventions applied pre-, per- and post- ischemia, which spans therapeutic windows in 3 time periods, has recently been broadly accepted by scientific communities. In addition, it is extensively acknowledged that ischemia-mediated protection not only affects the neurons but also all the components of the neurovascular network (consisting of neurons, glial cells, vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, smooth muscle cells, and venule/veins). The concept of cerebroprotection has been widely used in place of neuroprotection. Intensive studies on the cellular signaling pathways involved in ischemic conditioning have improved the mechanistic understanding of tolerance to cerebral ischemia. This has added impetus to exploration for potential pharmacologic mimetics, which could possibly induce and maximize inherent protective capacities. However, most of these studies were performed in rodents, and the efficacy of these mimetics remains to be evaluated in human patients. Several classical signaling pathways involving apoptosis, inflammation, or oxidation have been elaborated in the past decades. Newly characterized mechanisms are emerging with the advances in biotechnology and conceptual renewal. In this review we are going to focus on those

  8. The Acute STroke Registry and Analysis of Lausanne (ASTRAL): design and baseline analysis of an ischemic stroke registry including acute multimodal imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michel, Patrik; Odier, Céline; Rutgers, Matthieu; Reichhart, Marc; Maeder, Philippe; Meuli, Reto; Wintermark, Max; Maghraoui, Ali; Faouzi, Mohamed; Croquelois, Alexandre; Ntaios, George

    2010-01-01

    .... The Acute STroke Registry and Analysis of Lausanne (ASTRAL) prospectively collects epidemiological, clinical, laboratory and multimodal brain imaging data of acute ischemic stroke patients in the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV...

  9. Is there a consistent association between coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke caused by intracranial atherosclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforto, Adriana B; Leite, Claudia da Costa; Nomura, Cesar H; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson; Santos, Raul D

    2013-05-01

    Coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke are frequent coexistent conditions that share risk factors and pose major burdens to global health. Even though a clear relation has been established between extracranial internal carotid artery atherosclerosis and symptomatic or asymptomatic coronary heart disease, there is a gap in knowledge about the association between intracranial atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Intracranial atherosclerosis is associated with high risks of stroke recurrence and vascular death. More research and clinical trials are needed to answer whether early diagnosis of asymptomatic coronary heart disease and aggressive treatment can decrease the risk of vascular death in patients with ischemic stroke caused by intracranial atherosclerosis.

  10. Is there a consistent association between coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke caused by intracranial atherosclerosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana B. Conforto

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke are frequent coexistent conditions that share risk factors and pose major burdens to global health. Even though a clear relation has been established between extracranial internal carotid artery atherosclerosis and symptomatic or asymptomatic coronary heart disease, there is a gap in knowledge about the association between intracranial atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Intracranial atherosclerosis is associated with high risks of stroke recurrence and vascular death. More research and clinical trials are needed to answer whether early diagnosis of asymptomatic coronary heart disease and aggressive treatment can decrease the risk of vascular death in patients with ischemic stroke caused by intracranial atherosclerosis.

  11. Research progress of endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke: Chinese scholars' reports published abroad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji LIU

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Stroke has become the leading common cause of disability and the second most common cause of death in China. Endovascular treatment emerged in recent years as a promising treatment method with a higher recanalization rate and better functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by large vessel occlusion. This paper selected 4 high-quality retrospective studies by Chinese scholars regarding endovascular treatment in patients with acute ischemic stroke, which were published in foreign journals during past 3 years, and focused on study methods and results. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.11.003

  12. Painless Legs and Moving Toes as an Initial Presentation of Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Mi Oh

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Painless legs and moving toes is an unusual syndrome, which has not previously been reported as an initial presentation of ischemic stroke. We encountered a 78-year-old woman who developed dysarthria and involuntary movement of her left toes that was clinically regarded as painless legs and moving toes. These symptoms appeared abruptly and simultaneously as the initial symptoms of stroke, and improved gradually with conservative management by intravenous hydration for a month. We suggest that, in our case, a cortical brain lesion caused by ischemic stroke might be associated with the development of painless legs and moving toes.

  13. Low Dose of Apelin-36 Attenuates ER Stress-Associated Apoptosis in Rats with Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Qiu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury-induced cellular apoptosis contributes to neuronal death in ischemic stroke, while endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS and subsequently triggered unfolded protein response (UPR are the major mechanisms of cerebral I/R injury-induced apoptosis. A number of studies indicated that apelin-13 protects neurons from I/R injury-induced apoptosis. Apelin-36, the longest isoform of apelin, has stronger affinity to apelin receptor than apelin-13 does. However, the role of apelin-36 in ischemic stroke is less studied. In addition, preventive administration of apelin was applied in most studies, which could not precisely reflect its therapeutic potential in ischemic stroke. Here, we first reported that low dose of apelin-36, other than apelin-13, administrated after ischemic stroke significantly reduced infarct volume in rats. Moreover, apelin-36 attenuated cerebral I/R injury-induced apoptosis and caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, apelin-36 suppressed I/R injury-induced CHOP and GRP78 elevation, indicating that apelin-36 inhibited ERS/UPR activation. Our study first demonstrated that post-stroke administration of low-dose apelin-36 could attenuate cerebral I/R injury-induced infarct and apoptosis, which is associated with the inhibition of cerebral I/R injury-induced ERS/UPR activation. Our data support the therapeutic potential of apelin-36 in ischemic stroke although further investigation is needed.

  14. Serum C-Reactive Protein Level as a Biomarker for Differentiation of Ischemic from Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Roudbary

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular accidents rank first in the frequency and importance among all neurological disease. Although a number of studies had shown increased level of the high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP in patients with ischemic stroke, the association of increased hs-CRP with various type of stroke especially the assessment hs-CRP level in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke have not been investigated. In the present study, we assessed the concentration of hs-CRP in patients with documented ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in the first 24 hours of the onset of symptoms. Thirty-two patients with Ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke were evaluated at neurology department of Poursina Hospital. The presence of baseline vascular risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, and smoking, was determined. The blood samples were then collected and routine hematology and biochemistry tests were done. hs-CRP levels were determined using a highly sensitive immunonephelometric method. In this cross sectional study, the age of patient varied from 45-85 years (Mean 70.9  9.4. Serum level of hs-CRP in Ischemic patients were 18.92  11.28 and in hemorrhagic group was 2.65  1.7. This relationship was statistically significant (P<0.0001. It might be concluded that hs-CRP might be considered as a usefully adjunct method for the initial diagnosis of the type of stroke.

  15. Dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin after ischemic stroke: A review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kyle A; Miyares, Marta A; Dietrich, Eric

    2015-10-01

    The safety and efficacy of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with aspirin and clopidogrel in the setting of secondary stroke prevention are reviewed. Antiplatelet therapy has been shown to reduce the risk of numerous vascular events, especially in the setting of secondary prevention. DAPT with aspirin and another antiplatelet agent such as clopidogrel, prasugrel, or ticagrelor has become the main stay of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) management. The underlying pathophysiologies of ACS, ischemic stroke, and transient ischemic attack (TIA) are similar. In the setting of ACS, DAPT has clearly been shown to improve outcomes over single antiplatelet therapy for up to 12 months after the ischemic event. However, the role for DAPT in the setting of ischemic stroke and TIA is less clear. The MATCH, CHARISMA, and SPS3 studies demonstrated that DAPT was associated with increased bleeding compared with single antiplatelet therapy without an appreciable reduction in ischemic events. Early initiation of DAPT proved beneficial in reducing future ischemic events in the FASTER and CHANCE trials; however, these trials did not provide enough evidence to recommend the routine use of DAPT in secondary stroke prevention, and current guidelines recommend against such therapy. DAPT with aspirin and clopidogrel appears to be effective only for patients with minor stroke or TIA when started within 24 hours of the ischemic event and continued for a maximum of 21 days. Currently available evidence does not substantiate the widespread use of long-term aspirin with clopidogrel for the secondary prevention of ischemic stroke or TIA. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Population-based study of ischemic stroke risk after trauma in children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christine K; Hills, Nancy K; Vinson, David R; Numis, Adam L; Dicker, Rochelle A; Sidney, Stephen; Fullerton, Heather J

    2017-12-05

    To quantify the incidence, timing, and risk of ischemic stroke after trauma in a population-based young cohort. We electronically identified trauma patients (trauma and 3 controls per case. A physician panel reviewed medical records, confirmed cases, and adjudicated whether the stroke was related to trauma. We calculated the 4-week stroke incidence and estimated stroke odds ratios (OR) by injury location using logistic regression. From 1,308,009 trauma encounters, we confirmed 52 trauma-related ischemic strokes. The 4-week stroke incidence was 4.0 per 100,000 encounters (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.0-5.2). Trauma was multisystem in 26 (50%). In 19 (37%), the stroke occurred on the day of trauma, and all occurred within 15 days. In 7/28 cases with cerebrovascular angiography at the time of trauma, no abnormalities were detected. In unadjusted analyses, head, neck, chest, back, and abdominal injuries increased stroke risk. Only head (OR 4.1, CI 1.1-14.9) and neck (OR 5.6, CI 1.03-30.9) injuries remained associated with stroke after adjusting for demographics and trauma severity markers (multisystem trauma, motor vehicle collision, arrival by ambulance, intubation). Stroke risk is elevated for 2 weeks after trauma. Onset is frequently delayed, providing an opportunity for stroke prevention during this period. However, in one-quarter of stroke cases with cerebrovascular angiography at the time of trauma, no vascular abnormality was detected. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  17. A Sporadic Case of Fabry Disease Involving Repeated Fever, Psychiatric Symptoms, Headache, and Ischemic Stroke in an Adult Japanese Woman

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sawada, Jun; Katayama, Takayuki; Kano, Kohei; Asanome, Asuka; Takahashi, Kae; Saito, Tsukasa; Chinda, Junko; Nakagawa, Naoki; Sato, Nobuyuki; Kimura, Takashi; Yahara, Osamu; Momosaki, Ken; Nakamura, Kimitoshi; Hasebe, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Fabry disease can cause various neurological manifestations. We describe the case of a Japanese woman with Fabry disease who presented with ischemic stroke, aseptic meningitis, and psychiatric symptoms...

  18. The Number of Stenotic Intracranial Arteries Is Independently Associated with Ischemic Stroke Severity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodan Wei

    Full Text Available The severity of ischemic stroke symptoms varies among patients and is a critical determinant of patient outcome. To date, the association between the number of stenotic intracranial arteries and stroke severity remains unclear.We aimed to investigate the association between the number of stenotic major intracranial arteries (NSMIA and ischemic stroke severity, as well as the degree of stenosis and common stroke risk factors.We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with digital subtraction angiography (DSA-confirmed ischemic stroke. Clinical stroke severity was measured using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS. The number of stenotic vessels was counted from the internal carotid arteries and vertebral arteries, bilaterally.Eighty three patients were recruited from a single center and included in the study. NSMIA was significantly correlated with stroke severity (Pearson Correlation Coefficient = 0.485, P < 0.001, but not with the degree of stenosis (Pearson Correlation Coefficient = 0.01, P = 0.90. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that NSMIA was significantly associated with the NIHSS score after adjusting for stroke risk factors. The adjusted odds ratio (per lateral was 2.092 (95% CI, 0.865 to 3.308, P = 0.001. The degree of stenosis was also significantly associated with the NIHSS score after adjusting for common risk factors. The odds ratio (per 10% was 0.712 (95% CI, 0.202 to 1.223, P = 0.007.The number of stenotic intracranial major arteries is associated with the severity of ischemic stroke independent of the degree of stenosis and other stroke risk factors. To the best of our knowledge, this has not been previosuly studied in great detail using DSA. Our data highlight the importance of examining all major arteries in stroke patients.

  19. Correlations of ANP genetic polymorphisms and serum levels with ischemic stroke risk: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, De-Guang; Zhang, Dong-Yong; Wang, Zhan-Fu; Ding, Da-Ling; Wang, Jun; Wang, Yun-Jie

    2014-05-01

    This meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the correlations between atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) genetic polymorphism and its serum ANP levels with the risk of ischemic stroke. The PubMed, CISCOM, CINAHL, Web of Science, Google Scholar, EBSCO, Cochrane Library, and CBM databases were searched for relevant articles published before October 1st, 2013 without language restrictions. Meta-analysis was conducted using the STATA 12.0 software. Crude odds ratios (ORs) or standardized mean difference (SMD) with their 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated. Twelve case-control studies that met all inclusion criteria were included in this meta-analysis. A total of 1285 patients with ischemic stroke and 1088 healthy control subjects were involved in this meta-analysis. Three common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (1837 G/A, 2238 T/C, and 664 G/A) in the ANP gene were assessed. Our meta-analysis results revealed that ANP 2238 T/C polymorphism might increase the risk of ischemic stroke (C allele vs. T allele: OR=2.26, 95% CI: 1.59-3.23, pANP 1837 G/A and 664 G/A polymorphisms with ischemic stroke risk (all p>0.05). Furthermore, ischemic stroke patients had higher levels of serum ANP than those of healthy control subjects (SMD=3.12, 95% CI: 1.16-5.07, p=0.002). Our study revealed no publication bias in this meta-analysis (all p>0.05). Our findings indicate that ANP genetic polymorphism and serum ANP levels may contribute to the development of ischemic stroke. Thus, the ANP genetic polymorphism and serum ANP levels could be potential biomarkers for early detection of ischemic stroke.

  20. Association of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism with ischemic stroke in the Eastern Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Q-Q; Lu, J; Sun, H; Zhang, J-S

    2015-04-27

    The association between the MTHFR genetic polymorphism and ischemic stroke has been reported by a number of investigators. However, the results have been controversial and conflicting. The aim of this study was to explore the association between the MTHFR variants C677T and A1298C and the risk of ischemic stroke in an Eastern Chinese Han population. A total of 199 patients with ischemic stroke and 241 controls were recruited. Genotyping of the MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms was carried out using the Taqman 7900HT Sequence Detection System. The overall estimates (odds ratio: OR) for the allele (C) and genotype (AC+CC) of the A1298C polymorphism were 1.57 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.16-2.10], and 2.36 (95%CI = 1.39-4.00), respectively, establishing significant association of the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism with ischemic stroke. In contrast, there were no statistically significant differences compared to controls between MTHFR C677T polymorphic variants in the association ischemic stroke risk. Furthermore, haplotype-based analysis demonstrated that compared with the C-677-A-1298 haplotype, the C-677-C-1298 and T-677-C-1298 haplotypes showed significant increased risk of ischemic stroke (OR = 1.56; 95%CI = 1.07- 2.2; P = 0.02; OR = 1.76; 95%CI = 1.17-2.65; P A1298C polymorphism and the haplotypes C-677-C-1298 and T-677-C-1298 in MTHFR might modulate the risk of ischemic stroke in the Eastern Chinese Han population.

  1. Gender differences in presenting signs and symptoms of acute ischemic stroke: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerath, Nivedita U; Reddy, Chandan; Freeman, W David; Jerath, Aarti U; Brown, Robert D

    2011-10-01

    There are few population-based data regarding gender differences in signs and symptoms of acute ischemic stroke, and previously reported data have been inconsistent and conflicting. The goal of this study was to address the gender differences of the presenting signs and symptoms of acute ischemic stroke in a population-based study. All patients with first ischemic stroke occurring between 1985 and 1989 were identified; subjects were residents of Rochester, Minnesota. Signs and symptoms were collected via review of comprehensive medical records. Differences were identified using the Pearson χ(2) test. A total of 449 cases of first ischemic stroke were identified; 268 (60%) were women. Symptoms at ischemic stroke presentation differed between men and women. Women more commonly presented with generalized weakness (P = 0.005) and mental status change (P = 0.0001). Men more commonly presented with paresthesia (P = 0.003), ataxia (P = 0.006), and double vision (P = 0.005). Signs at ischemic stroke presentation differed between men and women. Men more commonly presented with nystagmus (P = 0.002) on examination. Significant trends were that women more commonly presented with fatigue (P = 0.02), disorientation (P = 0.04), and fever (P = 0.02), whereas men more commonly presented with sensory abnormalities (P = 0.02). There were gender differences in signs and symptoms at presentation of ischemic stroke in these study patients. In addition to selected focal symptoms, women more commonly presented with diffuse symptoms of generalized weakness, fatigue, disorientation, and mental status change. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Association between Factor V Gene Polymorphism and Risk of Ischemic Stroke: An Updated Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhazzani, Adel Ali; Kumar, Amit; Selim, Magdy

    2018-02-22

    Ischemic stroke is a complex, multifactorial, and polygenic disease. Reports on relationship between Factor V G1691A single nucleotide gene polymorphism and ischemic stroke have revealed inconsistent results. We conducted an updated meta-analysis to determine the role of Factor V single nucleotide gene polymorphism in ischemic stroke. We searched the literature using academic electronic databases that is, PubMed, Trip Data Base, EBSCO, and Google Scholar, last search up to September 2017. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated from fixed or random effects models whichever applicable using software STATA version 13 (StataCorp LP, College Station, TX). Forty case-control studies met the inclusion criteria, which included 6860 cases and 18,025 controls. Altogether, 19 studies in young adults (age  40). Four studies did not report the mean age at recruitment. Significant association between Factor V G1691A gene polymorphism and risk of ischemic stroke were observed under dominant model (OR 1.40; 95% CI: 1.22 to 1.62, P value V gene polymorphism and risk of ischemic stroke in cases with onset at young age (OR 1.84; 95% CI: 1.47 to 2.30), but was not statistical significant in cases at old age (>40 years). Factor V G1691A single nucleotide gene polymorphism was associated with risk of ischemic stroke mainly in young adults. Further research with adequately powered prospective studies in homogenous subjects are required to determine the nature of association in young stroke. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Top-100 Highest-Cited Original Articles in Ischemic Stroke: A Bibliometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Konark; Saeed, Omar; Goyal, Nitin; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Tsivgoulis, Georgios

    2017-12-30

    The total number of citations of a research article can be used to determine its impact on the scientific community. We aimed to identify the top-100 articles published on ischemic stroke and evaluate their characteristics. Based on the database of Journal Citation Reports, 934 journals were selected that published original ischemic stroke articles. We used Web of Science citation search tool to identify top-100 citation classics, i.e., articles with more than 400 citations, in the field of ischemic stroke. All original articles were evaluated for publication year, journal category, journal and its impact factor, number of total and annual citations, research topic, publishing country, and institutional affiliation. The top-100 citation classics in ischemic stroke were published from 1970 to 2015, with the decade of 1990-1999 contributing 47 articles of historical significance. Median of total citations and annual citations in our analysis were 625.0 (interquartile range [IQR] 851.3-494.5) and 35.7 (IQR 79.9-25.9), respectively. The majority of the articles originated from the United States (n = 57), focused over the medical management (n = 26), and were published in the New England Journal of Medicine or Stroke (n = 25 each) journals. The median impact factor for the journals that published top-100 ischemic stroke citation classics was 9.11 (IQR 21.49-6.11). Our list of top-100 citation classics specific to ischemic stroke provide a detailed insight into academic achievements, historical perspective and serves as a guide for the scientific progress in stroke. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Association Between Dehydration and Short-Term Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swerdel, Joel N; Janevic, Teresa M; Kostis, William J; Faiz, Ambarina; Cosgrove, Nora M; Kostis, John B

    2017-04-01

    Previous cross-sectional studies have demonstrated a higher incidence of dehydration in patients admitted for stroke suggesting a possible association. However, the temporality of the association has not been well established. We examined whether dehydration increases the risk of ischemic stroke in patients with a recent hospitalization for atrial fibrillation (AF). Data was from 1994 to 2012 from the Myocardial Infarction Data Acquisition System (MIDAS), a repository of in-patient records New Jersey hospitals, for AF hospitalizations (n = 1,282,787). Estimates for the association between AF hospitalization with/without dehydration and ischemic stroke within 30 days post-AF discharge were determined using log-linear multivariable modeling adjusting for socio-demographic factors and comorbid conditions. Within 10 days of discharge for AF, patients 18-80 years old (YO) with comorbid dehydration had a 60 % higher risk of ischemic stroke compared to AF patients without comorbid dehydration (adjusted risk ratio (ARR) 1.60, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.28-2.00). Eighteen- to 80-YO patients had a 34 % higher risk of ischemic stroke in days 11-20 post-AF discharge (ARR 1.34, 95 % CI 1.04, 1.74). There was no difference in the risk of stroke in 18-80-YO patients with or without prior dehydration during days 21-30 post-AF discharge. We also found no difference in the risk of ischemic stroke during any time period in patients over 80 YO. Dehydration may be a significant risk factor for ischemic stroke in patients 18-80 YO with AF.

  5. Treatment with intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke is associated with reduced bed day use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Thorkild; Schmitz, Marie Louise; Simonsen, Claus Z.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) on neurological outcome in acute ischemic stroke. It is uncertain whether the improved neurological outcome also translates into less morbidity and lower need for hospi......Introduction: Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) on neurological outcome in acute ischemic stroke. It is uncertain whether the improved neurological outcome also translates into less morbidity and lower need...... for hospital admissions during follow-up. Methods: We conducted a register-based nationwide propensity score-matched follow-up study among ischemic stroke patients in Denmark (2004-2011). IV-tPA-treated patients were propensity-score matched with IV-tPA eligible but non-treated ischemic stroke patients from...... stroke centers not offering tPA. The adjusted Hazard ratio (HR) for first readmission was estimated by multivariable Cox regression among patients who survived the initial stroke admission. Total all-cause bed day use in the first year after stroke admission was determined for patients with a potential...

  6. Recrudescence of Symptoms of Remote Ischemic Stroke After a Cerebral Angiogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falatko, Stephanie R; Schmalz, Philip G R; Harrigan, Mark

    2017-05-01

    Ischemic stroke recrudescence, or reappearance of previously resolved symptoms of ischemic stroke, may occur after physiologic stress. Although generally thought to be uncommon, this syndrome may account for a significant proportion of stroke mimics. A 67-year-old man was admitted with a Hunt and Hess grade 2 spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage. He underwent digital subtraction cerebral angiography as part of imaging evaluation. About 30 minutes after the procedure, he developed dysarthria, right facial droop, and right pronator drift. The patient and family denied a history of similar symptoms or previous ischemic stroke. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a remote left lacunar infarction. The symptoms resolved after 24 hours and were attributed to recrudescence of the patient's previous lacunar infarction. The physiological stress of the subarachnoid hemorrhage combined with the cerebral angiogram likely triggered the event. Recrudescence of symptoms of a previous stroke may be initiated by subarachnoid hemorrhage and/or a cerebral angiogram. The possibility of ischemic stroke recrudescence should be kept in mind as a possible stroke mimic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Vagus Nerve Stimulation in Ischemic Stroke: Old Wine in a New Bottle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Peter Y.; Bodhit, Aakash; Derequito, Roselle; Ansari, Saeed; Abukhalil, Fawzi; Thenkabail, Spandana; Ganji, Sarah; Saravanapavan, Pradeepan; Shekar, Chandana C.; Bidari, Sharatchandra; Waters, Michael F.; Hedna, Vishnumurthy Shushrutha

    2014-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is currently Food and Drug Administration-approved for treatment of both medically refractory partial-onset seizures and severe, recurrent refractory depression, which has failed to respond to medical interventions. Because of its ability to regulate mechanisms well-studied in neuroscience, such as norepinephrine and serotonin release, the vagus nerve may play an important role in regulating cerebral blood flow, edema, inflammation, glutamate excitotoxicity, and neurotrophic processes. There is strong evidence that these same processes are important in stroke pathophysiology. We reviewed the literature for the role of VNS in improving ischemic stroke outcomes by performing a systematic search for publications in Medline (1966–2014) with keywords “VNS AND stroke” in subject headings and key words with no language restrictions. Of the 73 publications retrieved, we identified 7 studies from 3 different research groups that met our final inclusion criteria of research studies addressing the role of VNS in ischemic stroke. Results from these studies suggest that VNS has promising efficacy in reducing stroke volume and attenuating neurological deficits in ischemic stroke models. Given the lack of success in Phase III trials for stroke neuroprotection, it is important to develop new therapies targeting different neuroprotective pathways. Further studies of the possible role of VNS, through normally physiologically active mechanisms, in ischemic stroke therapeutics should be conducted in both animal models and clinical studies. In addition, recent advent of a non-invasive, transcutaneous VNS could provide the potential for easier clinical translation. PMID:25009531

  8. Randomized Controlled Trial of Early Versus Delayed Statin Therapy in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke: ASSORT Trial (Administration of Statin on Acute Ischemic Stroke Patient).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shinichi; Uchida, Kazutaka; Daimon, Takashi; Takashima, Ryuzo; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Morimoto, Takeshi

    2017-11-01

    Several studies suggested that statins during hospitalization were associated with better disability outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke, but only 1 small randomized trial is available. We conducted a multicenter, open-label, randomized controlled trial in patients with acute ischemic strokes in 11 hospitals in Japan. Patients with acute ischemic stroke and dyslipidemia randomly received statins within 24 hours after admission in the early group or on the seventh day in the delayed group, in a 1:1 ratio. Statins were administered for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was patient disability assessed by modified Rankin Scale at 90 days. A total of 257 patients were randomized and analyzed (early 131, delayed 126). At 90 days, modified Rankin Scale score distribution did not differ between groups ( P =0.68), and the adjusted common odds ratio of the early statin group was 0.84 (95% confidence interval, 0.53-1.3; P =0.46) compared with the delayed statin group. There were 3 deaths at 90 days (2 in the early group, 1 in the delayed group) because of malignancy. Ischemic stroke recurred in 9 patients (6.9%) in the early group and 5 patients (4.0%) in the delayed group. The safety profile was similar between groups. Our randomized trial involving patients with acute ischemic stroke and dyslipidemia did not show any superiority of early statin therapy within 24 hours of admission compared with delayed statin therapy 7 days after admission to alleviate the degree of disability at 90 days after onset. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02549846. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Post-stroke depression as a predictor of caregivers burden of acute ischemic stroke patients in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Dong-Mei; Huang, Ling-Ling; Dou, Jin; Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Pei-Xi

    2017-08-29

    Our aim was to explore the independent attribution of Post-stroke depression (PSD) to caregiver burden of acute ischemic stroke patients. A cross-sectional survey was performed with 271 acute ischemic stroke patients in the Huai-He Hospital and First People's Hospital of Kaifeng City in China. PSD was assessed by Self-rating Depressive Scale, and caregiver burden was assessed by Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview. Clustered logistic regression was applied to identify the impact of PSD on caregiver burden. As results, female patients, normal muscle strength and PSD were associated with caregiver burden. PSD correlated with an independent influence of 17.2% on the risk of caregiver burden, The independent influence of PSD on caregiver burden was smaller than that of social-demographics of caregivers and clinical factors of stroke patients This study suggests that PSD may have a modest influence on caregiver burden.

  10. Mobile game-based virtual reality rehabilitation program for upper limb dysfunction after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon-Hee; Ku, Jeonghun; Lim, Hyunmi; Kim, Yeo Hyung; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2016-05-02

    Virtual reality (VR) has the potential to provide intensive, repetitive, and task-oriented training, and game-based therapy can enhance patients' motivation and enjoyment. The objective of the present study was to develop a mobile game-based upper extremity VR program for patients who have experienced stroke, and to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of the program. This randomized, double-blind, controlled trial included 24 patients with ischemic stroke. The intervention group (n = 12) received 30 min of conventional occupational therapy (OT) and 30 min of the mobile upper extremity rehabilitation program using a smartphone and a tablet PC (MoU-Rehab). The controls (n = 12) received conventional OT alone for 1 h per day. Rehabilitation consisted of 10 sessions of therapy, 5 days per week, for 2 weeks. The outcome measures (Fugl-Meyer Assessment of the upper extremity [FMA-UE], Brunnström stage [B-stage] for the arm and the hand, manual muscle testing [MMT], modified Barthel index [MBI], EuroQol-5 Dimension [EQ-5D], and Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]) were assessed at the beginning and end of treatment, and at 1 month. User satisfaction was evaluated by a questionnaire. A greater improvement in the FMA-UE, B-stage, and MMT was found after treatment with the MoU-Rehab than with conventional therapy. The extent of improvements in the MBI, EQ-5D, and BDI was not significantly different between the two groups. Patients in the experimental group completed the 2-weeks treatment without adverse effects, and they were generally satisfied with MoU-Rehab. This mobile game-based VR rehabilitation program appears to be feasible and effective for promoting upper limb recovery after ischemic stroke.

  11. Long-Term Risk of Dementia among Survivors of Ischemic or Hemorrhagic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corraini, Priscila; Henderson, Victor; Ording, Anne Gulbech

    2017-01-01

    type did not change during follow-up and was not altered appreciably by age, sex, or preexisting diagnoses of vascular conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Stroke increases dementia risk. Survivors of intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage are at particularly high long-term risk of poststroke......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Stroke is a risk factor for dementia, but the risk of dementia after different stroke types is poorly understood. We examined the long-term risk of dementia among survivors of any first-time stroke and of first-time ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid...... ratios of dementia up to 30 years after stroke. RESULTS: The 30-year absolute risk of dementia among stroke survivors was 11.5% (95% confidence interval, 11.2%-11.7%). Compared with the general population, the hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) for dementia among stroke survivors was 1.80 (1...

  12. The health loss from ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage: evidence from the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewey Helen M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People suffering different types of stroke have differing demographic characteristics and survival. However, current estimates of disease burden are based on the same underlying assumptions irrespective of stroke type. We hypothesized that average Quality Adjusted Life Years (QALYs lost from stroke would be different for ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH. Methods We used 1 and 5-year data collected from patients with first-ever stroke participating in the North East Melbourne Stroke Incidence Study (NEMESIS. We calculated case fatality rates, health-adjusted life expectancy, and quality-of-life (QoL weights specific to each age and gender category. Lifetime 'health loss' for first-ever ischemic stroke and ICH surviving 28-days for the 2004 Australian population cohort was then estimated. Multivariable uncertainty analyses and sensitivity analyses (SA were used to assess the impact of varying input parameters e.g. case fatality and QoL weights. Results Paired QoL data at 1 and 5 years were available for 237 NEMESIS participants. Extrapolating NEMESIS rates, 31,539 first-ever strokes were expected for Australia in 2004. Average discounted (3% QALYs lost per first-ever stroke were estimated to be 5.09 (SD 0.20; SA 5.49 for ischemic stroke (n = 27,660 and 6.17 (SD 0.26; SA 6.45 for ICH (n = 4,291; p Discussion People with ICH incurred greater loss of health over a lifetime than people with ischemic stroke. This is explained by greater stroke related case fatality at a younger age, but longer life expectancy with disability after the first 12 months for people with ICH. Thus, studies of disease burden in stroke should account for these differences between subtype and gender. Otherwise, in countries where ICH is more common, health loss for stroke may be underestimated. Similar to other studies of this type, the generalisability of the results may be limited. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses were used to provide

  13. Outcome of acute ischemic stroke after intra-arterial thrombolysis: A study from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Jaydip Ray; Kumar, Randhir; Umamahesh, Matapathi; Mridula, Kandadai Rukmini; Alladi, Suvarnal; Bandaru, Srinivasarao

    2016-10-07

    Background: Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is the currently standard treatment of acute ischemic stroke within 4.5 hours of the onset of stroke. Recent studies have looked at the benefits of administration of intra-arterial (IA) rt-PA within 8 hours onset of symptoms. Our objective was to assess the outcome of stroke after administration of IA rt-PA in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods: We recruited 10 consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients with onset of stroke from 4.5 hours to 6.5 hours. The present study was conducted at Yashoda Hospital, Hyderabad, India, between January 2008 and December 2013. All patients underwent stroke subtyping and were administered rt-PA. We measured the thrombolysis in cerebral infarction (TICI) score after thrombolysis and functional outcomes at time of admission, after 24 hours, 30, 60, and 90 days. A good outcome was defined as modified Rankin Scale (mRS) ≤ 2 after 90 days. Results: Out of 10 patients 9 were men, mean age 56.3 ± 1.8 years and age range from 35-68 years. On stroke subtyping, 6 (60%) patients had large artery atherosclerosis, 3 (30%) had a stroke of indeterminate etiology and 1 (10%) had a stroke of other etiologies. Mean time of recanalization was 6.2 ± 0.5 hours, 7 (70%) patients showed major neurological improvement with a mRS score of ≤ 2 at 90 days and one patient was lost to follow-up. Conclusion: Our study established good outcome at 90 days after administration of IA thrombolysis rt-PA in acute ischemic stroke.

  14. Association of dimethylarginines and mediators of inflammation after acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shufen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA are accompanied by endothelial dysfunction and predict adverse outcome after ischemic stroke. Via induction of oxidative stress, dimethylarginines are possibly linked to the inflammatory cascade after stroke that is known to considerably contribute to secondary progression of brain injury. We sought to investigate the association between dimethylarginines and inflammatory mediators in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods Plasma levels of ADMA and SDMA were measured in prospectively collected blood samples of 58 patients with acute ischemic stroke. Blood samples were taken at 6 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, 3 days and 7 days after onset of symptoms. Analyses of ADMA and SDMA were done by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6, C-reactive protein (CRP and S100B as markers of inflammation and brain damage were determined by commercially available immunometric assays. Patient data were compared with control data from 32 age-adjusted healthy volunteers. Baseline stroke severity was evaluated by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS (NIHSS 0 to 1: mild stroke; NIHSS 2 to 8: moderate stroke; NIHSS ≥9: severe stroke. Results Plasma ADMA and SDMA levels significantly correlated with blood levels of inflammatory mediators up to day 7 after stroke. On multiple stepwise linear regression analysis ADMA correlated with TIMP-1 at 6 hours, 24 hours, 3 days and 7 days, MMP-9 at 12 hours and IL-6 at 7 days (P P Conclusions The levels of the vasoactive compound ADMA as well as levels of its structural isomer SDMA are associated with levels of inflammatory mediators after acute ischemic stroke. Further studies need to elucidate the cause and effect relationship

  15. Antecedent Aspirin Use Is Associated with Less Severe Symptoms on Admission for Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Sarah; Cloonan, Lisa; Kanakis, Allison S; Fitzpatrick, Kaitlin M; Shideler, Kelsey I; Perilla, Adriana S; Furie, Karen L; Rost, Natalia S

    2016-10-01

    Aspirin is known to reduce stroke risk; however, its role in reducing severity of ischemic syndrome is not clear. We sought to investigate the relationship between antecedent aspirin use and stroke severity in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke (AIS). We retrospectively analyzed a prospectively collected database of consecutive AIS patients presenting to our center. Clinical characteristics (including antecedent aspirin use), imaging findings, and laboratory data were assessed in association with presenting stroke severity, as measured by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Logistic regression models were used to determine univariate and multivariate predictors of baseline NIHSS. Of the 610 AIS patients with admission brain magnetic resonance imaging available for volumetric analysis of acute infarct size, 241 (39.5%) used aspirin prior to stroke onset. Antecedent aspirin use (P = .0005), history of atrial fibrillation (P stroke subtype (P stroke severity in univariate analysis. Antecedent aspirin use (P stroke severity, even after accounting for acute infarct volume. While the underlying biology of this apparent protective relationship requires further study, patients at high risk of stroke may benefit from routine aspirin use. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of Antihypertensive Drugs and Ischemic Stroke Severity - Is There a Role for Angiotensin-II?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwong, Wen Yea; Bots, Michiel L; Selvarajah, Sharmini; Abdul Aziz, Zariah; Sidek, Norsima Nazifah; Spiering, Wilko; Kappelle, L Jaap; Vaartjes, Ilonca

    2016-01-01

    The increase in angiotensin II (Ang II) formation by selected antihypertensive drugs is said to exhibit neuroprotective properties, but this translation into improvement in clinical outcomes has been inconclusive. We undertook a study to investigate the relationship between types of antihypertensive drugs used prior to a stroke event and ischemic stroke severity. We hypothesized that use of antihypertensive drugs that increase Ang II formation (Ang II increasers) would reduce ischemic stroke severity when compared to antihypertensive drugs that suppress Ang II formation (Ang II suppressors). From the Malaysian National Neurology Registry, we included hypertensive patients with first ischemic stroke who presented within 48 hours from ictus. Antihypertensive drugs were divided into Ang II increasers (angiotensin-I receptor blockers (ARBs), calcium channel blockers (CCBs) and diuretics) and Ang II suppressors (angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and beta blockers). We evaluated stroke severity during admission with the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). We performed a multivariable logistic regression with the score being dichotomized at 15. Scores of less than 15 were categorized as less severe stroke. A total of 710 patients were included. ACEIs was the most commonly prescribed antihypertensive drug in patients using Ang II suppressors (74%) and CCBs, in patients prescribed with Ang II increasers at 77%. There was no significant difference in the severity of ischemic stroke between patients who were using Ang II increasers in comparison to patients with Ang II suppressors (OR: 1.32, 95%CI: 0.83-2.10, p = 0.24). In our study, we found that use of antihypertensive drugs that increase Ang II formation was not associated with less severe ischemic stroke as compared to use of antihypertensive drugs that suppress Ang II formation.

  17. Risk of Ischemic Stroke after Intracranial Hemorrhage in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Lerario

    Full Text Available We aimed to estimate the risk of ischemic stroke after intracranial hemorrhage in patients with atrial fibrillation.Using discharge data from all nonfederal acute care hospitals and emergency departments in California, Florida, and New York from 2005 to 2012, we identified patients at the time of a first-recorded encounter with a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation. Ischemic stroke and intracranial hemorrhage were identified using validated diagnosis codes. Kaplan-Meier survival statistics and Cox proportional hazard analyses were used to evaluate cumulative rates of ischemic stroke and the relationship between incident intracranial hemorrhage and subsequent stroke.Among 2,084,735 patients with atrial fibrillation, 50,468 (2.4% developed intracranial hemorrhage and 89,594 (4.3% developed ischemic stroke during a mean follow-up period of 3.2 years. The 1-year cumulative rate of stroke was 8.1% (95% CI, 7.5-8.7% after intracerebral hemorrhage, 3.9% (95% CI, 3.5-4.3% after subdural hemorrhage, and 2.0% (95% CI, 2.0-2.1% in those without intracranial hemorrhage. After adjustment for the CHA2DS2-VASc score, stroke risk was elevated after both intracerebral hemorrhage (hazard ratio [HR], 2.8; 95% CI, 2.6-2.9 and subdural hemorrhage (HR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.5-1.7. Cumulative 1-year rates of stroke ranged from 0.9% in those with subdural hemorrhage and a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 0, to 33.3% in those with intracerebral hemorrhage and a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 9.In a large, heterogeneous cohort, patients with atrial fibrillation faced a substantially heightened risk of ischemic stroke after intracranial hemorrhage. The risk was most marked in those with intracerebral hemorrhage and high CHA2DS2-VASc scores.

  18. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with acute ischemic stroke is associated with more severe stroke and worse outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeldyem, Sabry M; Goda, Tarek; Khodeir, Samy A; Abou Saif, Sabry; Abd-Elsalam, Sherief

    There is a paucity of data regarding the association between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and acute ischemic stroke. Stroke is largely preventable, so that knowledge of risk factors is essential to achieve reductions in the stroke rate and resulting disease burden. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic value of NAFLD on stroke severity and outcome. We prospectively studied 200 patients who were admitted with acute ischemic stroke between September 2013 and August 2015. Demographic and vascular risk factors were detailed for all subjects. The severity of stroke was assessed with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at admission. NAFLD was defined as serum alanine aminotransferase and/or aspartate aminotransferase levels above the upper limit of normal in the absence of other causes of elevated aminotransferase levels. The outcome was assessed with the modified Rankin scale score at discharge. NAFLD was found in 42.5% of the study population. The prevalence of diabetes was significantly higher among patients with NAFLD than those without NAFLD (P = .001). Waist circumference was significantly higher among patients with NAFLD than those without NAFLD (P < .05). Patients with NAFLD had significantly higher glucose, Triglycerides, Low density lipoprotein, serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase than those without NAFLD (P < .05 for each comparison). National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at admission and modified Rankin scale score at discharge were significantly higher in patients with NAFLD than those without NAFLD (P < .05 for each comparison). NAFLD was found in 42.5% of acute ischemic stroke patients. NAFLD might be associated with more severe stroke and worse outcome. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Gait improvement after treadmill training in ischemic stroke survivors: A critical review of functional MRI studies ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Xiang; Huang, Dongfeng; O’Young, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Stroke survivors often present with abnormal gait, movement training can improve the walking performance post-stroke, and functional MRI can objectively evaluate the brain functions before and after movement training. This paper analyzes the functional MRI changes in patients with ischemic stroke after treadmill training with voluntary and passive ankle dorsiflexion. Functional MRI showed that there are some changes in some regions of patients with ischemic stroke including primary sensorimot...

  20. Safety and Tolerability of Desmoteplase Within 3 to 9 Hours After Symptoms Onset in Japanese Patients With Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mori, Etsuro; Minematsu, Kazuo; Nakagawara, Jyoji

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study investigated the safety and tolerability of desmoteplase administered within 3 to 9 hours after stroke symptoms onset in Japanese patients with acute ischemic stroke. METHODS: Patients were randomized to treatment with either desmoteplase or placebo in a 2:1 rat...... tolerated in Japanese patients with acute ischemic stroke when administered 3 to 9 hours after stroke symptoms onset. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01104467....

  1. Determinants of fatigue after first-ever ischemic stroke during acute phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Shan Wang

    Full Text Available Fatigue after stroke is common and has a negative impact on rehabilitation and survival. However, its pathogenesis and contributing factors remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify factors influencing the occurrence of fatigue after first-ever ischemic stroke in acute phase.We examined 265 consecutive patients with first-ever ischemic stroke during acute phase (within 2 weeks in two tertiary stroke care hospitals in Henan, China. We documented patients' demographic and clinical characteristics through face-to-face interviews using structured questionnaires and reviews of medical records. Post-stroke fatigue was defined as a score of ≥4 using the Fatigue Severity Scale. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine post-stroke fatigue in relation to socio-demographic, lifestyle, clinical characteristics and family function.About 40% first-ever ischemic stroke patients experienced post-stroke fatigue in acute phase. Post-stroke fatigue was associated with lack of exercise before stroke (adjusted odds ratio 4.01, 95% CI 1.95-8.24, family dysfunction (2.63, 1.20-5.80, depression (2.39, 1.02-5.58, the presence of pre-stroke fatigue (4.89, 2.13-11.21, use of sedative medications (4.14, 1.58-10.88, coronary heart disease (3.38, 1.46-7.79 and more severe Modified Rankin Scale (2.55, 1.65-3.95.The causes of post-stroke fatigue are multifaceted. More physical exercise, improving family function, reducing depression and appropriate use of sedative medications may be helpful in preventing post-stroke fatigue.

  2. Detection of Early Ischemic Changes in Noncontrast CT Head Improved with "Stroke Windows".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainali, Shraddha; Wahba, Mervat; Elijovich, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Noncontrast head CT (NCCT) is the standard radiologic test for patients presenting with acute stroke. Early ischemic changes (EIC) are often overlooked on initial NCCT. We determine the sensitivity and specificity of improved EIC detection by a standardized method of image evaluation (Stroke Windows). Methods. We performed a retrospective chart review to identify patients with acute ischemic stroke who had NCCT at presentation. EIC was defined by the presence of hyperdense MCA/basilar artery sign; sulcal effacement; basal ganglia/subcortical hypodensity; and loss of cortical gray-white differentiation. NCCT was reviewed with standard window settings and with specialized Stroke Windows. Results. Fifty patients (42% females, 58% males) with a mean NIHSS of 13.4 were identified. EIC was detected in 9 patients with standard windows, while EIC was detected using Stroke Windows in 35 patients (18% versus 70%; P Windows (14% and 36%; P Windows (6% and 46%; P Windows significantly improved detection of EIC.

  3. Vascular Pathology in the Extracranial Vertebral Arteries in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, L; Nygård, A; Ovesen, C

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Vascular pathology in the extracranial vertebral arteries remains among the possible causes in cryptogenic stroke. However, the diagnosis is challenged by the great variety in the anatomy of the vertebral arteries, clinical symptoms and difficulties in the radiological assessments....... METHOD: The analysis was based on 657 consecutive patients with symptoms of acute stroke and a final diagnosis of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. On admission, a noncontrast CT cerebrum and CTA were performed. A senior consultant neuroradiologist, blinded to clinical data, reviewed all CTA...... (2.8%) with pathological findings had an unknown cause of stroke, likely posterior symptoms and no clinical stroke symptoms from the anterior circuit. Of these, 3 cases were kinked arteries (0.5%) and 15 cases (2.3%) were possible dissections. CONCLUSION: We found that in approximately 3...

  4. Comparing associations of different metabolic syndrome definitions with ischemic stroke in Chinese elderly population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Li, Yan-Xun; Hu, Zhi-Hao; Jiang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Shu-Juan; Wang, Xiao-Feng

    2018-01-01

    Studies have showed the associations between different definitions of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and risk of ischemic stroke were inconsistent. In this study, we compared associations of different MetS definitions with ischemic stroke in Chinese elderly population. A total of 1713 individuals aged 70-84years from Rugao Longevity and Ageing Study were analyzed. The MetS was defined by four different criteria: Chinese Adult Dyslipidemia Prevention Guide, International Diabetes Federation (IDF), Updated ATPIII (Updated ATPIII) by American heart association/American heart, lung and blood institute (AHA/NHLBI), and Joint Interim Statement(JIS) recommended by IDF and the American heart association/American national institutes of health/American heart, lung and blood institute (AHA/NIH/NHLBI). Prevalence of MetS in the whole population was 24.0% (Chinese guide), 32.5% (IDF), 38.8% (Updated ATPIII) and 24.0% (JIS) and in stroke population was 27.1% (Chinese guide), 41.1% (IDF), 48.8% (Updated ATPIII) and 27.1% (JIS), respectively. The agreement between definitions was highest in Updated ATPIII vs. IDF (kappa=0.863). It showed that only definitions of IDF (OR 1.55, 95%CI 1.04-2.31, p=0.031) and Updated ATPIII (OR 1.64, 95%CI 1.11-2.42, p=0.013) were independently associated with risk of ischemic stroke in multivariable logistic regression analysis. The risk of ischemic stroke increased with the increasing of numbers of Mets components in Updated ATPIII (pguide, IDF and JIS for screening high-risk individuals of ischemic stroke, and the additive effects of Mets components might play a greater role than its composition alone in ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Can the FAST and ROSIER adult stroke recognition tools be applied to confirmed childhood arterial ischemic stroke?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babl Franz E

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke recognition tools have been shown to improve diagnostic accuracy in adults. Development of a similar tool in children is needed to reduce lag time to diagnosis. A critical first step is to determine whether adult stoke scales can be applied in childhood stroke. Our objective was to assess the applicability of adult stroke scales in childhood arterial ischemic stroke (AIS Methods Children aged 1 month to Results 47 children with AIS were identified. 34 had anterior, 12 had posterior and 1 child had anterior and posterior circulation infarcts. Median age was 9 years and 51% were male. Median time from symptom onset to ED presentation was 21 hours but one third of children presented within 6 hours. The most common presenting stroke symptoms were arm (63%, face (62%, leg weakness (57%, speech disturbance (46% and headache (46%. The most common signs were arm (61%, face (70% or leg weakness (57% and dysarthria (34%. 36 (78% of children had at least one positive variable on FAST and 38 (81% had a positive score of ≥1 on the ROSIER scale. Positive scores were less likely in children with posterior circulation stroke. Conclusion The presenting features of pediatric stroke appear similar to adult strokes. Two adult stroke recognition tools have fair to good sensitivity in radiologically confirmed childhood AIS but require further development and modification. Specificity of the tools also needs to be determined in a prospective cohort of children with stroke and non-stroke brain attacks.

  6. Endovascular therapy is effective and safe for patients with severe ischemic stroke : Pooled analysis of interventional management of Stroke III and multicenter randomized clinical trial of endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke in the Netherlands data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Broderick (Joseph P.); O.A. Berkhemer (Olvert); Palesch, Y.Y. (Yuko Y.); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); Foster, L.D. (Lydia D.); Y.B.W.E.M. Roos (Yvo); A. van der Lugt (Aad); T.A. Tomsick (Thomas A.); C.B. Majoie (Charles); W.H. van Zwam (Wim); A.M. Demchuk (Andrew); R.J. van Oostenbrugge (Robert Jan); P. Khatri (Pooja); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); M. Hill (Michael); B. Roozenbeek (Bob); E. Jauch (Edward); T.G. Jovin (Tudor G.); Yan, B. (Bernard); R. von Kummer (Ruediger); C. Molina; M. Goyal (Mayank); W.J. Schonewille (W.); Mazighi, M. (Mikael); S.T. Engelter (Stefan); Anderson, C.S. (Craig S.); Spilker, J. (Judith); Carrozzella, J. (Janice); Ryckborst, K.J. (Karla J.); Janis, L.S. (L. Scott); Simpson, K.N. (Kit N.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground and Purpose - We assessed the effect of endovascular treatment in acute ischemic stroke patients with severe neurological deficit (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, ≥20) after a prespecified analysis plan. Methods - The pooled analysis of the Interventional

  7. Endovascular therapy is effective and safe for patients with severe ischemic stroke : Pooled analysis of interventional management of Stroke III and multicenter randomized clinical trial of endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke in the Netherlands data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broderick, Joseph P.; Berkhemer, Olvert A.; Palesch, Yuko Y.; Dippel, Diederik W J; Foster, Lydia D.; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.; van der Lugt, Aad; Tomsick, Thomas A.; Majoie, Charles B L M; van Zwam, Wim H; Demchuk, Andrew M.; Oostenbrugge, Robert J.; Khatri, Pooja; Lingsma, Hester F.; Hill, Michael D.; Roozenbeek, Bob; Jauch, Edward C.; Jovin, Tudor G.; Yan, Bernard; Von Kummer, Rüdiger; Molina, Carlos A.; Goyal, Mayank; Schonewille, Wouter J.; Mazighi, Mikael; Engelter, Stefan T.; Anderson, Craig S.; Spilker, Judith; Carrozzella, Janice; Ryckborst, Karla J.; Janis, L. Scott; Simpson, Kit N.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose - We assessed the effect of endovascular treatment in acute ischemic stroke patients with severe neurological deficit (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, ≥20) after a prespecified analysis plan. Methods - The pooled analysis of the Interventional Management of

  8. Patterns of Acute Ischemic Strokes After Carotid Endarterectomy and Therapeutic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lareyre, Fabien; Raffort, Juliette; Weill, Caroline; Marsé, Claire; Suissa, Laurent; Chikande, Julien; Hassen-Khodja, Réda; Jean-Baptiste, Elixène

    2017-10-01

    Acute ischemic strokes following surgical treatment of carotid stenosis lead to substantial disability and mortality, and vascular mechanisms underlying their development are not fully elucidated. The goal of this study was to analyze the topographic patterns of acute ischemic stroke following carotid endarterectomy (CEA) on diffusion-weighted and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Data were retrospectively collected from consecutive patients who underwent CEA and developed postoperative acute ischemic stroke. Based on the MRI data sets, the lesion patterns of acute stoke were characterized. Morphology of the circle of Willis, the 3-D time-of-flight (3D-TOF) of the cerebral arteries, and status of the carotid circulation were also analyzed in order to determine the vascular mechanisms involved in stroke development. Between January 2008 and May 2015, 821 patients were treated surgically for a symptomatic or asymptomatic carotid stenosis at the University Hospital of Nice. Nineteen (2.3%) patients had an acute ischemic stroke after surgery. Among them, 11 (57.9%) patients had a territorial infarction and 8 (42.1%) patients had an internal watershed infarction, cortical watershed infarction, or mixed border zone infarction. According to imaging data sets, embolic mechanism of stroke was reported for 12 (63.2%) patients, hemodynamic mechanism for 2 (10.5%) patients, and mixed mechanism for 5 (26.3%) patients. An asymmetry on 3D-TOF was observed in 60% and 50% of patients with hemodynamic and mixed stroke and in 25% of patients with embolic stroke. The latter 2 patients with embolic stroke underwent successful mechanical thrombectomy using stent-retriever devices. In this cohort, embolic mechanism leading to postoperative stroke was more frequently observed than hemodynamic mechanism. Immediate characterization of the cerebral lesion by postoperative brain MRI is of utmost importance because it may rapidly identify patients eligible for treatments

  9. Demethylation of Circulating Estrogen Receptor Alpha Gene in Cerebral Ischemic Stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Fen Lin

    Full Text Available Estrogen is involved in neuron plasticity and can promote neuronal survival in stroke. Its actions are mostly exerted via estrogen receptor alpha (ERα. Previous animal studies have shown that ERα is upregulated by DNA demethylation following ischemic injury. This study investigated the methylation levels in the ERα promoter in the peripheral blood of ischemic stroke patients.The study included 201 ischemic stroke patients, and 217 age- and sex-comparable healthy controls. The quantitative methylation level in the 14 CpG sites of the ERα promoter was measured by pyrosequencing in each participant. Multivariate regression model was used to adjust for stroke traditional risk factors. Stroke subtypes and sex-specific analysis were also conducted.The results demonstrated that the stroke cases had a lower ERα methylation level than controls in all 14 CpG sites, and site 13 and site 14 had significant adjusted p-values of 0.035 and 0.026, respectively. Stroke subtypes analysis showed that large-artery atherosclerosis and cardio-embolic subtypes had significantly lower methylation levels than the healthy controls at CpG site 5, site 9, site 12, site 13 and site 14 with adjusted p = 0.039, 0.009, 0.025, 0.046 and 0.027 respectively. However, the methylation level for the patients with small vessel subtype was not significant. We combined the methylation data from the above five sites for further sex-specific analysis. The results showed that the significant association only existed in women (adjusted p = 0.011, but not in men (adjusted p = 0.300.Female stroke cases have lower ERα methylation levels than those in the controls, especially in large-artery and cardio-embolic stroke subtypes. The study implies that women suffering from ischemic stroke of specific subtype may undergo different protective mechanisms to reduce the brain injury.

  10. Dysphagia in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke: Early Dysphagia Screening May Reduce Stroke-Related Pneumonia and Improve Stroke Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khaled, Mohamed; Matthis, Christine; Binder, Andreas; Mudter, Jonas; Schattschneider, Joern; Pulkowski, Ulrich; Strohmaier, Tim; Niehoff, Torsten; Zybur, Roland; Eggers, Juergen; Valdueza, Jose M; Royl, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is associated with poor outcome in stroke patients. Studies investigating the association of dysphagia and early dysphagia screening (EDS) with outcomes in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) are rare. The aims of our study are to investigate the association of dysphagia and EDS within 24 h with stroke-related pneumonia and outcomes. Over a 4.5-year period (starting November 2007), all consecutive AIS patients from 15 hospitals in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, were prospectively evaluated. The primary outcomes were stroke-related pneumonia during hospitalization, mortality, and disability measured on the modified Rankin Scale ≥2-5, in which 2 indicates an independence/slight disability to 5 severe disability. Of 12,276 patients (mean age 73 ± 13; 49% women), 9,164 patients (74%) underwent dysphagia screening; of these patients, 55, 39, 4.7, and 1.5% of patients had been screened for dysphagia within 3, 3 to 72 h following admission. Patients who underwent dysphagia screening were likely to be older, more affected on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, and to have higher rates of neurological symptoms and risk factors than patients who were not screened. A total of 3,083 patients (25.1%; 95% CI 24.4-25.8) had dysphagia. The frequency of dysphagia was higher in patients who had undergone dysphagia screening than in those who had not (30 vs. 11.1%; p dysphagia had a higher rate of pneumonia than those without dysphagia (29.7 vs. 3.7%; p dysphagia was associated with increased risk of stroke-related pneumonia (OR 3.4; 95% CI 2.8-4.2; p dysphagia was independently correlated with an increase in mortality (OR 3.2; 95% CI 2.4-4.2; p Dysphagia exposes stroke patients to a higher risk of pneumonia, disability, and death, whereas an EDS seems to be associated with reduced risk of stroke-related pneumonia and disability. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in experimental and clinical stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-wei Zhai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke, which is defined as a neurologic deficit caused by sudden impaired blood supply, has been considered as a common cause of death and disability for decades. The World Health Organization has declared that almost every 5 seconds a new stroke occurs, placing immense socioeconomic burdens. However, the effective and available treatment strategies are still limited. Additionally, the most effective therapy, such as thrombolysis and stenting for ischemic stroke, generally requires a narrow therapeutic time window after the event. A large majority of patients cannot be admitted to hospital and receive these effective treatments for reperfusion timely. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT has been frequently applied and investigated in stroke since 1960s. Numerous basic and clinical studies have shown the beneficial efficacy for neurological outcome after stroke, and meanwhile many underlying mechanisms associated with neuroprotection have been illustrated, such as cerebral oxygenation promotion and metabolic improvement, blood-brain barrier protection, anti-inflammation and cerebral edema, intracranial pressure modulation, decreased oxidative-stress and apoptosis, increased vascular and neural regeneration. However, HBOT in human stroke is still not sufficiently evidence-based, due to the insufficient randomized double-blind controlled clinical studies. To date, there are no uniform criteria for the dose and session duration of HBOT in different strokes. Furthermore, the additional effect of HBOT combined with drugs and other treatment strategies are being investigated recently. Therefore, more experimental and clinical research is imperative to identify the mechanisms more clearly and to explore the best protocol of HBOT in stroke treatment.

  12. Evaluation of transesophageal echocardiography in detecting cardiac sources of emboli in ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toodeji, Mohammad Amin; Izadi, Sadegh; Shariat, Abdolhamid; Nikoo, Mohamad Hosin

    2015-01-01

    Embolus is one of the causes of ischemic stroke that can be due to cardiac sources such as valvular heart diseases and atrial fibrillation and atheroma of the aorta. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is superior in identifying potential cardiac sources of emboli. Due to insufficient data on TEE findings in ischemic stroke in Iran, the present study was done to evaluate TEE in detecting cardiac sources of emboli. The main aim of this study was to describe the cardiogenic sources of emboli using TEE in the ischemic stroke patients. This is a cross-sectional study conducted during a 13-month period from January 2012 to February 2013 in Shiraz Nemazee teaching hospital. Patients admitted with stroke diagnosis were included; but hemorrhagic stroke cases were excluded. 229 patients with ischemic stroke diagnosis were included and underwent TEE. Causes of cardiac emboli were detected in 65 cases (40.7%) and categorized to high-risk (29.7%) and potential risk (11%). High risk cardiac sources included atrial fibrillation (8.7%), mitral valve disease (MS or MI) 11 cases (4.75%), aortic valve disease (AS or AI) 8 (3.5%), prosthetic valve 3 (1.35%), dilated cardiomyopathy 45 (19.65%) and congestive heart failure with ejection fraction valvular heart diseases.

  13. Diagnosing Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation in Patients With Ischemic Strokes and Transient Ischemic Attacks Using Echocardiographic Measurements of Left Atrium Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Kristoffer Grundtvig; Christensen, Hanne Krarup; Høst, Nis

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-five to 35 percentage of stroke cases are cryptogenic, and it has been demonstrated that paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) is the causal agent in up to 25% of these incidents. The purpose of this study was to investigate if left atrial (LA) parameters have value for diagnosing paroxysmal...... AF in patients with ischemic stroke (IS) and transient ischemic attack (TIA). We retrospectively analyzed 219 patients who after acute IS or TIA underwent a transthoracic echocardiographic examination. Patients were designated as patients with paroxysmal AF if they had one or more reported incidents...... of AF before or after their echocardiographic examination. Patients in the paroxysmal AF group were significantly older and had higher CHA2DS2-VASc score than patients without paroxysmal AF (p

  14. miR-455 inhibits neuronal cell death by targeting TRAF3 in cerebral ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao ST

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Shengtao Yao,* Bo Tang,* Gang Li, Ruiming Fan, Fang Cao Department of Cerebrovascular Disease, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical College, Zunyi, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of brain disease, with high morbidity, disability, and mortality. MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been identified as vital gene regulators in various types of human diseases. Accumulating evidence has suggested that aberrant expression of miRNAs play critical roles in the pathologies of ischemic stroke. Yet, the precise mechanism by which miRNAs control cerebral ischemic stroke remains unclear. In the present study, we explored whether miR-455 suppresses neuronal death by targeting TRAF3 in cerebral ischemic stroke. The expression levels of miR-455 and TRAF3 were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. The role of miR-455 in cell death caused by oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD was assessed using Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8 assay. The influence of miR-455 on infarct volume was evaluated in mouse brain after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO. Bioinformatics softwares and luciferase analysis were used to find and confirm the targets of miR-455. The results showed that the expression levels of miR-455 significantly decreased in primary neuronal cells subjected to OGD and mouse brain subjected to MCAO. In addition, forced expression of miR-455 inhibited neuronal death and weakened ischemic brain infarction in focal ischemia-stroked mice. Furthermore, TRAF3 was proved to be a direct target of miR-455, and miR-455 could negatively suppress TRAF3 expression. Biological function analysis showed that TRAF3 silencing displayed the neuroprotective effect in ischemic stroke and could enhance miR-455-induced positive impact on ischemic injury both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, miR-455 played a vital role in protecting neuronal

  15. Preventive antibacterial therapy in acute ischemic stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Harms

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pneumonia is a major risk factor of death after acute stroke. In a mouse model, preventive antibacterial therapy with moxifloxacin not only prevents the development of post-stroke infections, it also reduces mortality, and improves neurological outcome significantly. In this study we investigate whether this approach is effective in stroke patients. METHODS: Preventive ANtibacterial THERapy in acute Ischemic Stroke (PANTHERIS is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 80 patients with severe, non-lacunar, ischemic stroke (NIHSS>11 in the middle cerebral artery (MCA territory. Patients received either intravenous moxifloxacin (400 mg daily or placebo for 5 days starting within 36 hours after stroke onset. Primary endpoint was infection within 11 days. Secondary endpoints included neurological outcome, survival, development of stroke-induced immunodepression, and induction of bacterial resistance. FINDINGS: On intention-to treat analysis (79 patients, the infection rate at day 11 in the moxifloxacin treated group was 15.4% compared to 32.5% in the placebo treated group (p = 0.114. On per protocol analysis (n = 66, moxifloxacin significantly reduced infection rate from 41.9% to 17.1% (p = 0.032. Stroke associated infections were associated with a lower survival rate. In this study, neurological outcome and survival were not significantly influenced by treatment with moxifloxacin. Frequency of fluoroquinolone resistance in both treatment groups did not differ. On logistic regression analysis, treatment arm as well as the interaction between treatment arm and monocytic HLA-DR expression (a marker for immunodepression at day 1 after stroke onset was independently and highly predictive for post-stroke infections. INTERPRETATION: PANTHERIS suggests that preventive administration of moxifloxacin is superior in reducing infections after severe non-lacunar ischemic stroke compared to placebo. In addition, the results emphasize

  16. In-hospital direct cost of acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioldasis, G; Talelli, P; Chroni, E; Daouli, J; Papapetropoulos, T; Ellul, J

    2008-10-01

    The geographic inequity and the wide variation in the patterns of care of stroke found across Europe together with the lack of health economics evaluation in Greece led to this prospective study, aiming to provide data on in-hospital direct cost of patients with an acute stroke in Greece, and to identify independent prognostic factors. Demographic and clinical data were recorded on 429 consecutive patients with an acute ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke admitted to a tertiary care hospital in Greece during a period of 18 months. The costs incurred were estimated using the official financial charts listing in euro (euro), the real expenditure of all hospital departments. The direct in-hospital cost for all stroke cases was 1,551,445euro for a total of 4674 days (331.9euro per day in-hospital). The mean in-hospital cost per stroke patient was 3624.9euro (+/-2695.4). Hemorrhagic strokes were significantly more expensive than the ischemic strokes [mean 5305.4 (+/-4204.8)euro and 3214.5 (+/-1976.2)euro, respectively) and lacunar strokes the least expensive among ischemic stroke subtypes. The length of stay was highly correlated with in-hospital total cost. Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that admission ward, stroke severity on admission, stroke type and status discharge were independent predictors of cost. Purchasers in our health services should differentiate in their cost estimates and pricing schemes between types of cerebrovascular events. Future studies should focus on modifiable factors related, not only with stroke characteristics, but also with operational policies of hospitals, that may influence length of stay.

  17. Effect of body mass index and abdominal girth index on location and etiology of ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-yu HAO

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the influence of body mass index (BMI and abdominal girth index (AGI on the location and etiology of ischemic stroke in order to determine whether they can predict the etiology and pathogenesis of ischemic stroke. Methods A total of 185 patients with acute ischemic stroke and 155 cases of normal controls matched in sex, age and past medical history were enrolled in this study. Their height and weight were measured to calculate BMI, and abdominal circumference was measured to calculate AGI. Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project (OCSP and TOAST classification were carried out. Results BMI of overweight (BMI 24.00-27.90 kg/m2 subgroup (t = 2.060, P = 0.000 and obesity (BMI ≥ 28 kg/m2 subgroup (t = 2.315, P = 0.000 in patients with ischemic stroke was significantly higher than that in control group. AGI of abnomaly (AGI > 1 cm/kg subgroup in patients with ischemic stroke was significantly higher than that in control group (t = 1.021, P = 0.000. Based on OCSP classification, 185 patients with ischemic stroke were classified into 10 (5.41% of total anterior circulation infarct (TACI, 81 (43.78% of partial anterior circulation infarct (PACI, 56 (30.27% of lacunar infarct (LACI and 38 (20.54% of posterior circulation infarct (POCI. Only the PACI ratio among different BMI subgroups had statistical significance (H = 7.041, P = 0.011. PACI ratio in BMI 24.00-27.90 kg/m2 subgroup was significantly higher than that in BMI 1 cm/kg subgroup was significantly higher (χ2 = 11.461, P = 0.001, while SOE ratio was significantly lower ( χ2 = 4.558, P = 0.033 than that in AGI ≤ 1 cm/kg subgroup. Conclusions BMI and AGI can influence the location and etiology of ischemic stroke, which can be used to predict the etiology and pathogenesis of ischemic stroke. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.11.011

  18. Bronchiectasis and increased risk of ischemic stroke: a nationwide population-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen YF

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Yung-Fu Chen,1–3,* Hsuan-Hung Lin,4,* Chih-Sheng Lin,5 Battsetseg Turbat,1 Kuo-An Wang,4,6 Wei-Sheng Chung1,3,7 1Department of Healthcare Administration, 2Department of Dental Technology and Materials Science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, 3Department of Health Services Administration, China Medical University, Taichung, 4Department of Management Information Systems, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China; 5Department of Radiology, BenQ Medical Center, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 6Department of Industrial Education and Technology, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua, 7Department of Internal Medicine, Taichung Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Bronchiectasis is characterized by permanent dilatation of the bronchial tree caused by recurrent airway infection and inflammation. The association of atherosclerosis and inflammation is well established. However, studies on the relationship between bronchiectasis and stroke are scant. Objective: We conducted a population-based cohort study to investigate the incidence and risk of ischemic stroke in patients with bronchiectasis. Methods: Data of 1,295 patients newly diagnosed as bronchiectasis between 2000 and 2008 were retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 6,475 controls without bronchiectasis at a ratio of 5:1 were randomly selected from the general population based on frequency-matched age and sex to the patients. All participants were followed up to the date of ischemic stroke development, censoring, or the end of 2010. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to identify the risk of ischemic stroke in patients with bronchiectasis compared with those without bronchiectasis. Results: The patients with bronchiectasis exhibited a higher incidence

  19. The NINDS Stroke Genetics Network: a genome-wide association study of ischemic stroke and its subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulit, Sara L.; McArdle, Patrick F.; Wong, Quenna; Malik, Rainer; Gwinn, Katrina; Achterberg, Sefanja; Algra, Ale; Amouyel, Philippe; Anderson, Christopher D.; Arnett, Donna K.; Arsava, Ethem Murat; Attia, John; Ay, Hakan; Bartz, Traci M.; Battey, Thomas; Benavente, Oscar R.; Bevan, Steve; Biffi, Alessandro; Bis, Joshua C.; Blanton, Susan H.; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B.; Brown, Robert D.; Burgess, Annette I.; Carrera, Caty; Chapman Smith, Sherita N.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chauhan, Ganesh; Chen, Wei-Min; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Chong, Michael; Cloonan, Lisa K.; Cole, John W.; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Cruchaga, Carlos; Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Dave, Tushar; Dawson, Jesse; Debette, Stéphanie; Delavaran, Hossein; Dell, Cameron A.; Dichgans, Martin; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Dong, Chuanhui; Duggan, David J.; Engström, Gunnar; Evans, Michele K.; Pallejà, Xavier Estivill; Faul, Jessica D.; Fernández-Cadenas, Israel; Fornage, Myriam; Frossard, Philippe M.; Furie, Karen; Gamble, Dale M.; Gieger, Christian; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; González, Hector M.; Goris, An; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Grewal, Raji P.; Grittner, Ulrike; Gustafsson, Stefan; Han, Buhm; Hankey, Graeme J.; Heitsch, Laura; Higgins, Peter; Hochberg, Marc C.; Holliday, Elizabeth; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Horenstein, Richard B.; Howard, George; Ikram, M. Arfan; Ilinca, Andreea; Ingelsson, Erik; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Jern, Christina; Conde, Jordi Jiménez; Johnson, Julie A.; Jood, Katarina; Kahn, Muhammad S.; Kaplan, Robert; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Keene, Keith L.; Kissela, Brett M.; Kleindorfer, Dawn O.; Koblar, Simon; Labovitz, Daniel; Launer, Lenore J.; Laurie, Cathy C.; Laurie, Cecelia A.; Lee, Cue Hyunkyu; Lee, Jin-Moo; Lehm, Manuel; Lemmens, Robin; Levi, Christopher; Leys, Didier; Lindgren, Arne; Longstreth, W. T.; Maguire, Jane; Manichaikul, Ani; Markus, Hugh S.; McClure, Leslie A.; McDonough, Caitrin W.; Meisinger, Christa; Melander, Olle; Meschia, James F.; Mola-Caminal, Marina; Montaner, Joan; Mosley, Thomas H.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nalls, Mike A.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; O’Donnell, Martin; Ois, Ángel; Papanicolaou, George J.; Paré, Guillaume; Peddareddygari, Leema Reddy; Pedersén, Annie; Pera, Joanna; Peters, Annette; Poole, Deborah; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rabionet, Raquel; Raffeld, Miriam R.; Rannikmäe, Kristiina; Rasheed, Asif; Redfors, Petra; Reiner, Alex P.; Rexrode, Kathryn; Ribasés, Marta; Rich, Stephen S.; Robberecht, Wim; Rodriguez-Campello, Ana; Rolfs, Arndt; Roquer, Jaume; Rose, Lynda M.; Rosenbaum, Daniel; Rost, Natalia S.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Rundek, Tatjana; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Sale, Michèle M.; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sánchez-Mora, Cristina; Schmidt, Carsten Oliver; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schürks, Markus; Scott, Rodney; Segal, Helen C.; Seiler, Stephan; Seshadri, Sudha; Sharma, Pankaj; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Silver, Brian; Slowik, Agnieszka; Smith, Jennifer A.; Söderholm, Martin; Soriano, Carolina; Sparks, Mary J.; Stanne, Tara; Stefansson, Kari; Stine, O. Colin; Strauch, Konstantin; Sturm, Jonathan; Sudlow, Cathie LM; Tajuddin, Salman M.; Talbert, Robert L.; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Thijs, Vincent; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteindottir, Unnur; Tiedt, Steffen; Traylor, Matthew; Trompet, Stella; Valant, Valerie; Waldenberger, Melanie; Walters, Matthew; Wang, Liyong; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Weir, David R.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Williams, Stephen R.; Wloch-Kopec, Dorota; Woo, Daniel; Woodfield, Rebecca; Wu, Ona; Xu, Huichun; Zonderman, Alan B.; Worrall, Bradford B.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Kittner, Steven J.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Rosand, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction The discovery of disease-associated loci through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) is the leading approach to the identification of novel biological pathways for human disease. To date, GWAS have had been limited by relatively small sample sizes and yielded relatively few loci associated with ischemic stroke The National Institute of Neurological Disorders Stroke Genetics Network (NINDS-SiGN) is an international consortium that has taken a systematic approach to phenotyping and produced the largest ischemic stroke GWAS to date. Methods In order to identify genetic loci associated with ischemic stroke, we performed a two-stage genome-wide association study. The first stage consisted of 16,851 cases with state-of-the-art phenotyping and 32,473 stroke-free controls. Cases were aged 16 to 104 years, recruited between 1989 and 2012, and subtyped by centrally trained and certified investigators using the web-based protocol, Causative Classification of Stroke (CCS). We constructed case-control strata by identify samples genotyped on (nearly) identical arrays and of similar genetic ancestral background. Data was cleaned and imputed using dense imputation reference panels generated from whole-genome sequence data. Genome-wide testing was performed within each stratum for each available phenotype, and summary level results were combined using inverse variance-weighted fixed effects meta-analysis. The second stage consisted of in silico look-ups of 1,372 SNPs in 20,941 cases and 364,736 stroke-free controls, with cases previously subtyped using the TOAST classification system according to local standards. The two stages were then jointly analyzed in a final meta-analysis. Findings We identified a novel locus at 1p13.2 near TSPAN2 associated with large artery atherosclerosis (LAA)-related stroke (stage I OR for the G allele at rs12122341 = 1·21, p = 4.50 × 10−8; stage II OR = 1·19, p = 1·30 × 10−9). We also confirmed four loci robustly

  20. Endovascular Hypothermia in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Pilot Study of Selective Intra-Arterial Cold Saline Infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Liu, Liqiang; Zhang, Hongqi; Geng, Xiaokun; Jiao, Liqun; Li, Guilin; Coutinho, Jonathan M; Ding, Yuchuan; Liebeskind, David S; Ji, Xunming

    2016-07-01

    We conducted a pilot feasibility and safety study of selective brain cooling with intra-arterial infusion of cold saline combined with endovascular reperfusion for acute ischemic stroke. Patients with large-vessel occlusion within 8 hours after symptom onset were enrolled. All patients received intra-arterial recanalization combined with infusion of cold isotonic saline (4°C) in the ischemic territory through the angiographic catheter. Twenty-six patients underwent the procedure, which was technically successful in all. The temperature of ischemic cerebral tissue was decreased by at least 2°C during infusion of the cold solution, and systemic temperature was mildly reduced (maximum 0.3°C). No obvious complications related to intra-arterial hypothermia were observed. Selective brain cooling by intra-arterial infusion of cold saline combined with endovascular recanalization therapy in acute ischemic stroke seems feasible and safe. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Ischemic Stroke Following Multiple Traumas in a Child: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Jung Lin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is an uncommon disorder in children but an increasingly recognized cause of disability. Acute stroke may be attributable to trauma, but this topic is seldom discussed. In limited reports, most ischemic strokes following trauma were detected after a considerable delay. Early recognition of stroke following trauma might reduce secondary neurologic complications. We report a case of posterior cerebral artery area infarct following multiple traumas in a child. A comprehensive etiologic survey was undertaken and discussed. Although the definite pathogenesis is still unclear, adequate, individualized, and uncomplicated management can significantly affect the outcome.

  2. Deep vein thrombosis after ischemic stroke: rationale for a therapeutic trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornstein, N.M.; Norris, J.W.

    1988-11-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the legs occurs in 23% to 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke, and pulmonary embolism accounts for about 5% of deaths. New heparinoid substances, lacking the hazards of more established anticoagulants, raise the question of DVT prophylaxis for these patients. Two hundred fifty consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients were evaluated for the presence of DVT of the legs in a feasibility study for a trial of low-molecular-weight heparin prophylaxis. Forty-nine patients were found suitable for the study, of whom 11 (22.5%) developed DVT. All patients underwent clinical examination, I-125 fibrinogen leg scanning, and impedance plethysmography. Five patients were sufficiently alert and without serious neurologic deficits to justify DVT prophylaxis. Recent advances in noninvasive diagnostic techniques to detect DVT early and the development of relatively safe heparinoid compounds increase the need for a prophylactic study in patients with ischemic stroke.

  3. Association of AHSG gene polymorphisms with ischemic stroke in a Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shanshan; He, Zhiyi; Zhao, Jie; Li, Lei; Yuan, Liying; Dai, Yingjie; Qiu, Jing

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have shown associations of fetuin-A (alpha2-Heremans-Schmid glycoprotein, AHSG) with various disorders, including insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and atherosclerosis. In this study, genotype and allele frequencies of the rs4918 SNP in the AHSG gene were examined in 380 patients with ischemic stroke and 350 healthy controls from a Northern Han Chinese population via the PCR-RFLP technique. Frequencies of the GG genotype and the G allele in AHSG (rs4918) were significantly higher in patients with ischemic stroke or atherosclerotic cerebral infarction than those in the control group (P AHSG gene are associated with a risk for ischemic stroke in a Northern Han Chinese population.

  4. Arterial spin-labeled perfusion imaging to predict mismatch in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niibo, Takeya; Ohta, Hajime; Yonenaga, Kazuma; Ikushima, Ichiro; Miyata, Shirou; Takeshima, Hideo

    2013-09-01

    We assigned a threshold to arterial spin-labeling (ASL) perfusion-weighted images (PWI) from patients with acute ischemic stroke and compared them with dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion images to examine whether mismatch can be determined. Pseudocontinuous ASL was combined with dynamic susceptibility contrast PWI in 23 patients with acute ischemic stroke. Scans were obtained within 24 hours of symptom onset. PWI volumes were defined by ASL cerebral blood flow (10 s) that show a strong association with cerebral blood flow PWI and the baseline diffusion-weighted imaging lesion, respectively, and the final infarct volume were assessed. The lesion volumes defined by MTT>10 s and ASL10 s and ASLPWI lesions defined by ASL10 s. In acute ischemic stroke, PWI lesions based on ASL threshold of 10 s.

  5. Guidelines for the early management of patients with acute ischemic stroke: a guideline for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Edward C; Saver, Jeffrey L; Adams, Harold P; Bruno, Askiel; Connors, J J Buddy; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Khatri, Pooja; McMullan, Paul W; Qureshi, Adnan I; Rosenfield, Kenneth; Scott, Phillip A; Summers, Debbie R; Wang, David Z; Wintermark, Max; Yonas, Howard

    2013-03-01

    The authors present an overview of the current evidence and management recommendations for evaluation and treatment of adults with acute ischemic stroke. The intended audiences are prehospital care providers, physicians, allied health professionals, and hospital administrators responsible for the care of acute ischemic stroke patients within the first 48 hours from stroke onset. These guidelines supersede the prior 2007 guidelines and 2009 updates. Members of the writing committee were appointed by the American Stroke Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee, representing various areas of medical expertise. Strict adherence to the American Heart Association conflict of interest policy was maintained throughout the consensus process. Panel members were assigned topics relevant to their areas of expertise, reviewed the stroke literature with emphasis on publications since the prior guidelines, and drafted recommendations in accordance with the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Level of Evidence grading algorithm. The goal of these guidelines is to limit the morbidity and mortality associated with stroke. The guidelines support the overarching concept of stroke systems of care and detail aspects of stroke care from patient recognition; emergency medical services activation, transport, and triage; through the initial hours in the emergency department and stroke unit. The guideline discusses early stroke evaluation and general medical care, as well as ischemic stroke, specific interventions such as reperfusion strategies, and general physiological optimization for cerebral resuscitation. Because many of the recommendations are based on limited data, additional research on treatment of acute ischemic stroke remains urgently needed.

  6. The association between socioeconomic status and disability after stroke: findings from the Adherence eValuation After Ischemic stroke Longitudinal (AVAIL) registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettger, Janet Prvu; Zhao, Xin; Bushnell, Cheryl; Zimmer, Louise; Pan, Wenqin; Williams, Linda S; Peterson, Eric D

    2014-03-26

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability among adults in the United States. The association of patients' pre-event socioeconomic status (SES) with post-stroke disability is not well understood. We examined the association of three indicators of SES--educational attainment, working status, and perceived adequacy of household income--with disability 3-months following an acute ischemic stroke. We conducted retrospective analyses of a prospective cohort of 1965 ischemic stroke patients who survived to 3 months in the Adherence eValuation After Ischemic stroke--Longitudinal (AVAIL) study. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the relationship of level of education, pre-stroke work status, and perceived adequacy of household income with disability (defined as a modified Rankin Scale of 3-5 indicating activities of daily living limitations or constant care required). Overall, 58% of AVAIL stroke patients had a high school or less education, 61% were not working, and 27% perceived their household income as inadequate prior to their stroke. Thirty five percent of patients were disabled at 3-months. After adjusting for demographic and clinical factors, stroke survivors who were unemployed or homemakers, disabled and not-working, retired, less educated, or reported to have inadequate income prior to their stroke had a significantly higher odds of post-stroke disability. In this cohort of stroke survivors, socioeconomic status was associated with disability following acute ischemic stroke. The results may have implications for public health and health service interventions targeting stroke survivors at risk of poor outcomes.

  7. Ischemic stroke in a young man with MTHFR A1298C and ACE I/D polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedat Çilingir

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Mutations in several candidate genes involving angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene have been found to be associated with ischemic stroke. This report describes the case of a 29 year-old man who presented with sudden onset left hemiparesis and hemihipoestesia. Magnetic resonance imaging investigations showed acute ischemic infarct in the right parietal region. Mutation analysis revealed homozygout MTHFR A1298C and ACE I/D polymorphisms and laboratory invastigations showed mild hyperhomocysteinemia. No other risk factor was detected for ischemic stroke etiology.

  8. Association between ischemic stroke and carbon monoxide poisoning: A population-based retrospective cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Wei; Chen, Wei-Kung; Hung, Dong-Zong; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Li; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-04-01

    The long-term consequence of cardiovascular health has not been evaluated for patients with carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. This study evaluated the risk of ischemic stroke using population-based data. We identified 8705 inpatients with CO intoxication diagnosed from 2000 to 2011 from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The control cohort consisted of 34,820 persons randomly identified from patients without exposure frequency matched by age, sex, and the year of hospitalization. Incidence and hazard ratio (HR) of ischemic stroke were evaluated by sociodemographic factors and comorbidities by the end of 2011. The incidence of ischemic stroke revealed a significant increase in the CO-poisoning cohort over the follow-up period (pincidence of ischemic stroke was near 2.5-fold greater in the CO-poisoned cohort than in controls (5.49 versus 2.02 per 1000 person-years), with an adjusted HR of 2.60 (95% confidence interval (CI)=2.15-3.15). The adjusted HR for those without comorbidities was slightly higher (2.76, 95% CI=2.13-3.58). The age-specific CO-poisoning to non-CO-poisoning relative risk was greatest in the youngest group (20-34years) (adjusted HR=6.45; 95% CI=3.30-12.6). CO poisoning is associated with a long-term risk of increased incident ischemic stroke. Further study on the mechanism of ischemic stroke for CO poisoning affects is needed. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Risk of ischemic stroke during the initiation period of α-blocker therapy among older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chao-Lun; Kuo, Raymond Nien-Chen; Chen, Ho-Min; Chen, Ming-Fong; Chan, K Arnold; Lai, Mei-Shu

    2016-03-01

    Alpha-blockers are notorious for their first-dose effect of acute hypotension during the early initiation period. Because acute cerebral hypoperfusion may precipitate an episode of ischemic stroke, we aimed to provide a quantitative estimate of the risk of ischemic stroke during the early initiation period of α-blocker therapy, using a self-controlled case series design. We identified all men aged 50 years or more as of 2007 who were incident users of α-blockers and had a diagnosis of ischemic stroke during the 2007-2009 study period using claims data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance claims database. The first day on which the α-blocker was prescribed was the index date. We partitioned different risk periods according to their relationship to the index date (pre-exposure risk periods 1 and 2 = ≤ 21 d and 22-60 d before index date, respectively; post-exposure risk periods 1 and 2 = ≤ 21 d and 22-60 d after index date, respectively); the remainder of the study period was defined as the unexposed period. We estimated the incidence rate ratio (IRR) of ischemic stroke in each risk period relative to the unexposed period using a conditional Poisson regression model. A total of 7502 men were included. Compared with the risk in the unexposed period, the risk of ischemic stroke was increased in post-exposure risk period 1 among all patients in the study population (adjusted IRR 1.40, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22-1.61) and among patients without concomitant prescriptions for other antihypertensive agents (adjusted IRR 2.11, 95% CI 1.73-2.57). Alpha-blocker therapy was associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke during the early initiation period, especially among patients who were not taking other antihypertensive agents. © 2016 Canadian Medical Association or its licensors.

  10. Processes and outcomes of ischemic stroke care: the influence of hospital level of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Yu-Chi; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chang, Guann-Ming; Chung, Kuo-Piao

    2015-08-01

    Processes of stroke care play an increasingly important role in comparing hospital performance. The relationship between processes of care and outcomes for stroke is unclear. Moreover, in terms of stroke care regionalization, little information is available with regard to the relationships among hospital level of care, processes and outcomes of stroke care. We used nationwide population-based data to examine the relationship between processes of care and mortality and the relationships among hospital level of care, processes and mortality for ischemic stroke. Cross-sectional study. General acute care hospitals throughout Taiwan. A total of 31 274 ischemic stroke patients admitted in 2010 through Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. Processes of care and 30-day mortality. Multilevel models were used after adjustment for patient and hospital characteristics to test the relationship between processes of care and 30-day mortality and the relationships among hospital level of care, processes and 30-day mortality. The use of thrombolytic therapy, antithrombotic therapy, statin treatment and rehabilitation assessment was associated with lower mortality. Hospital level of care was associated with the use of thrombolytic therapy, antithrombotic therapy, statin treatment and rehabilitation assessment, and mortality. These processes of care were mediators of the relationship between hospital level of care and mortality. Outcomes among patients with ischemic stroke can be improved by thrombolytic therapy, antithrombotic therapy, statin treatment and rehabilitation assessment. Among patients with ischemic stroke, admission to designated stroke center hospitals may be associated with lower mortality through better processes of care. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  11. Ginsenoside Rd Is Efficacious Against Acute Ischemic Stroke by Suppressing Microglial Proteasome-Mediated Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangyun; Xia, Feng; Zhang, Yunxia; Zhang, Xiao; Cao, Yuhong; Wang, Ling; Liu, Xuedong; Zhao, Gang; Shi, Ming

    2016-05-01

    A great deal of attention has been paid to neuroprotective therapies for cerebral ischemic stroke. Our two recent clinical trials showed that ginsenoside Rd (Rd), a kind of monomeric compound extracted from Chinese herbs, Panax ginseng and Panax notoginseng, was safe and efficacious for the treatment of ischemic stroke. In this study, we conducted a pooled analysis of the data from 199 patients with acute ischemic stroke in the first trial and 390 in the second to reanalyze the efficacy and safety of Rd. Moreover, animal stroke models were carried out to explore the possible molecular mechanisms underlying Rd neuroprotection. The pooled analysis showed that compared with placebo group, Rd could improve patients' disability as assessed by modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score on day 90 post-stroke and reduce neurologic deficits on day 15 or day 90 post-stroke as assessed by NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and Barthel Index (BI) scores. For neuroprotective mechanisms, administration of Rd 4 h after stroke could inhibit ischemia-induced microglial activation, decrease the expression levels of various proinflammatory cytokines, and suppress nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells inhibitor, alpha (IκBα) phosphorylation and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) nuclear translocation. An in vitro proteasome activity assay revealed a significant inhibitory effect of Rd on proteasome activity in microglia. Interestingly, Rd was showed to have less side effects than glucocorticoid. Therefore, our study demonstrated that Rd could safely improve the outcome of patients with ischemic stroke, and this therapeutic effect may result from its capability of suppressing microglial proteasome activity and sequential inflammation.

  12. Dysphagia and Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Acute, First-Ever, Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losurdo, Anna; Brunetti, Valerio; Broccolini, Aldobrando; Caliandro, Pietro; Frisullo, Giovanni; Morosetti, Roberta; Pilato, Fabio; Profice, Paolo; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Sacchetti, Maria Luisa; Testani, Elisa; Vollono, Catello; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2018-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and dysphagia are common in acute stroke and are both associated with increased risk of complications and worse prognosis. The aims of the present study were (1) to evaluate the prevalence of OSA and dysphagia in patients with acute, first-ever, ischemic stroke; (2) to investigate their clinical correlates; and (3) to verify if these conditions are associated in acute ischemic stroke. We enrolled a cohort of 140 consecutive patients with acute-onset (<48 hours), first-ever ischemic stroke. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging scans confirmed the diagnosis. Neurological deficit was measured using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) by examiners trained and certified in the use of this scale. Patients underwent a clinical evaluation of dysphagia (Gugging Swallowing Screen) and a cardiorespiratory sleep study to evaluate the presence of OSA. There are 72 patients (51.4%) with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA+), and there are 81 patients (57.8%) with dysphagia (Dys+). OSA+ patients were significantly older (P = .046) and had greater body mass index (BMI) (P = .002), neck circumference (P = .001), presence of diabetes (P = .013), and hypertension (P < .001). Dys+ patients had greater NIHSS (P < .001), lower Alberta Stroke Programme Early CT Score (P < .001), with greater BMI (P = .030). The association of OSA and dysphagia was greater than that expected based on the prevalence of each condition in acute stroke (P < .001). OSA and dysphagia are associated in first-ever, acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A clinical study on cognitive impairment in post-ischemic stroke patients with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Chen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the relation between metabolic syndrome (MetS and cognitive impairment after ischemic stroke. Methods Ninety-four cases of first ischemic stroke patients were divided into stroke without MetS group (n = 54 and stroke with MetS group (n = 40 according to the diagnostic criteria for MetS defined by Metabolic Syndrome Researching Group of Chinese Diabetes Society. All patients underwent Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, Clock Drawing Test (CDT, animal Verbal Fluency Test (aVFT, Trial Making Test-A (TMT-A at 2 weeks and 3 months after stroke to evaluate mental state such as verbal learning memory, and executive, attentional and visuospatial abilities. The incidence and development of cognitive impairment were also assessed. Results At 2 weeks and 3 months after stroke, the incidence of cognitive impairment were 24.47% (23/94 and 22.34% (21/94, respectively, and in the cognitive impairment patients the incidence of non-dementia were 21.28% (20/94 and 19.15% (18/94, while the incidence of dementia were 3.19% (3/94 and 3.19% (3/94, respectively. The incidence of cognitive impairment was higher in the stroke patients with MetS than the stroke patients without MetS, 37.50% (15/40 vs 14.81% (8/54 (Z = 2.500, P = 0.012 at 2 weeks after stroke and 35.00% (14/40 vs 12.96% (7/54 (Z = 2.513, P = 0.012 at 3 months after stroke. In the scores of MMSE, delay recall and CDT of the stroke patients with MetS were all lower than those without MetS at 2 weeks after stroke and at 3 months after stroke (P < 0.05, for all. The stroke patients with MetS had more cognition deterioration than the stroke patients without MetS at 3 months after stroke, the difference was significant (Z = 2.134, P = 0.033. Conclusion MetS can increase the incidence of cognitive impairment, especially non-dementia cognitive impairment in post ischemic stroke. Executive dysfunction and hypomnesis are often seen. The development of cognitive impairment in stroke patients

  14. DYNAMIC FOLLOW UP OF APHASIC DISORDERS IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC STROKE IN ACUTE STAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Peychinska

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic follow up of aphasic disorders in patients with acute ischemic stroke is of great importance because of its prognostic value for their future recovery. The purpose of that clinical study is to compare the type of aphasia with the CT data about the infarction localization and to evaluate the prospective aphasia recovery. In the clinical study were included 37 patients with ischemic stroke and aphasia, theated in II-nd Neurology Clinic, Medical University Pleven. The diagnosis ischemic stroke was confirmed by clinical and CT investigations. Partial and full recovery of sensory aphasia was registered in all the patients with total aphasia, while motor aphasia showed little tendency of reduction in acute ischemic stroke. Aphasic disorders were more severe in cases with ischemic infarctions localized in the specific anatomical regions responsible for the speech function. The dynamic follow up of aphasic disorders has prognostic value for the speech recovery. Better prognosis show sensory and amnestic aphasia. Lesion localization also influences the prognosis.

  15. Patent foramen ovale and the risk of ischemic stroke in a multiethnic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Tullio, Marco R; Sacco, Ralph L; Sciacca, Robert R; Jin, Zhezhen; Homma, Shunichi

    2007-02-20

    We sought to assess the risk of ischemic stroke from a patent foramen ovale (PFO) in the multiethnic prospective cohort of northern Manhattan. Patent foramen ovale has been associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke, mainly in case-control studies. The actual PFO-related stroke risk in the general population is unclear. The presence of PFO was assessed at baseline by using transthoracic 2-dimensional echocardiography with contrast injection in 1,100 stroke-free subjects older than 39 years of age (mean age 68.7 +/- 10.0 years) from the Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS). The presence of atrial septal aneurysm (ASA) also was recorded. Subjects were followed annually for outcomes. We assessed PFO/ASA-related stroke risk after adjusting for established stroke risk factors. We detected PFO in 164 subjects (14.9%); ASA was present in 27 subjects (2.5%) and associated with PFO in 19 subjects. During a mean follow-up of 79.7 +/- 28.0 months, an ischemic stroke occurred in 68 subjects (6.2%). After adjustment for demographics and risk factors, PFO was not found to be significantly associated with stroke (hazard ratio 1.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87 to 3.09). The same trend was observed in all age, gender, and race-ethnic subgroups. The coexistence of PFO and ASA did not increase the stroke risk (adjusted hazard ratio 1.25, 95% CI 0.17 to 9.24). Isolated ASA was associated with elevated stroke incidence (2 of 8, or 25%; adjusted hazard ratio 3.66, 95% CI 0.88 to 15.30). Patent foramen ovale, alone or together with ASA, was not associated with an increased stroke risk in this multiethnic cohort. The independent role of ASA needs further assessment in appositely designed and powered studies.

  16. Endovascular Treatment In Acute Ischemic Stroke: What Has Changed Over The Last One Year?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesna Bektaş

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the absence of sufficent data from randomised controlled trials, endovascular treatment has always been considered as a therapeutic option in the setting of acute ischemic stroke. Our knowledge regarding in this field has dramatically expanded over the last three years. Following the initial dissapointing and negative trials, the subsequent positive results observed in a series of studies has consolidated the role of endovascular treatment in patients with acute ischemic stroke. In this review we will comment on the recent developments in the field of endovascular treatment and discuss the messages that underlie the controversial findings observed in these trials.

  17. Differentiating the effects of characteristics of PM pollution on mortality from ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hualiang; Tao, Jun; Du, Yaodong; Liu, Tao; Qian, Zhengmin; Tian, Linwei; Di, Qian; Zeng, Weilin; Xiao, Jianpeng; Guo, Lingchuan; Li, Xing; Xu, Yanjun; Ma, Wenjun

    2016-03-01

    Though increasing evidence supports significant association between particulate matter (PM) air pollution and stroke, it remains unclear what characteristics, such as particle size and chemical constituents, are responsible for this association. A time-series model with quasi-Poisson function was applied to assess the association of PM pollution with different particle sizes and chemical constituents with mortalities from ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in Guangzhou, China, we controlled for potential confounding factors in the model, such as temporal trends, day of the week, public holidays, meteorological factors and influenza epidemic. We found significant association between stroke mortality and various PM fractions, such as PM10, PM2.5 and PM1, with generally larger magnitudes for smaller particles. For the PM2.5 chemical constituents, we found that organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), sulfate, nitrate and ammonium were significantly associated with stroke mortality. The analysis for specific types of stroke suggested that it was hemorrhagic stroke, rather than ischemic stroke, that was significantly associated with PM pollution. Our study shows that various PM pollution fractions are associated with stroke mortality, and constituents primarily from combustion and secondary aerosols might be the harmful components of PM2.5 in Guangzhou, and this study suggests that PM pollution is more relevant to hemorrhagic stroke in the study area, however, more studies are warranted due to the underlying limitations of this study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. [Characteristics of ischemic stroke in children in the years 1968-1998 and 2010-2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witek, Izabela; Kroczka, Sławomir; Kaciński, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic strokes in children are rare. The etiology and risk factors for ischemic stroke in children and adolescence differ from those typical in adults. Clinical symptoms depend on the location, extent of damage of the central nervous system and age. The aim of the study was to compare the clinical picture of ischemic stroke in children at two periods. The study included children who had a stroke: 32 children (group I) in the years 1968-1998 and 27 children (group II) in 2010-2015. In each case medical history, physical and neurological examination, laboratory tests and neuroimaging were taken. To determine the location of ischemia in children The Oxford Community Stroke Project classification was used. To determine the score of hemiparesis the Ashworth scale was used. Pregnancy, delivery, neonatal period and neurological history in the majority of children enrolled to the study, was unbounded. Etiology of stroke in first group was found in 20 children. Diagnosis of ischemic stroke was made on the basis of angiography in 13 children, while the remaining 19 based on head CT. TACI were found in 11 children, while PACI had 21 children. In the Ashworth scale I score of paralysis was observed in 14 children; 2 score in 5 children. 3 score had 11 children and 2 children 4 score of paralysis. In the second group, the etiology of stroke was found in 6 children. Ischemic stroke in all children was diagnosed based on CT scans. Additionaly, 24 children had MRI, 4 children had CT angiography and in 5 children MRA. TACI was diagnosed in 3 children, in the next 21 children PACI and POCI in other 3 children. The Ashworth Scale score 1 paralysis were observed in 8 children and score 2 at 16. 2 children had paresis score 3, in 1 paralysis had score 4. No child in group I and II, had hemorrhagic stroke. In the pharmacological treatment of the acute phase of stroke steroidotherapy and diuretics were used, in children with infection antibiotic therapy was introduced. Antithrombotic

  19. Validation of algorithms to identify stroke risk factors in patients with acute ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, or intracerebral hemorrhage in an administrative claims database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Sheng-Feng; Hsieh, Cheng-Yang; Lin, Huey-Juan; Chen, Yu-Wei; Yang, Yea-Huei Kao; Li, Chung-Yi

    2016-07-15

    Stroke patients have a high risk for recurrence, which is positively correlated with the number of risk factors. The assessment of risk factors is essential in both stroke outcomes research and the surveillance of stroke burden. However, methods for assessment of risk factors using claims data are not well developed. We enrolled 6469 patients with acute ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, or intracerebral hemorrhage from hospital-based stroke registries, which were linked with Taiwan's National Health Insurance (NHI) claims database. We developed algorithms using diagnosis codes and prescription data to identify stroke risk factors including hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, atrial fibrillation (AF), and coronary artery disease (CAD) in the claims database using registry data as reference standard. We estimated the kappa statistics to quantify the agreement of information on the risk factors between claims and registry data. The prevalence of risk factors in the registries was hypertension 77.0%, diabetes 39.1%, hyperlipidemia 55.6%, AF 10.1%, and CAD 10.9%. The highest kappa statistics were 0.552 (95% confidence interval 0.528-0.577) for hypertension, 0.861 (0.836-0.885) for diabetes, 0.572 (0.549-0.596) for hyperlipidemia, 0.687 (0.663-0.712) for AF, and 0.480 (0.455-0.504) for CAD. Algorithms based on diagnosis codes alone could achieve moderate to high agreement in identifying the selected risk factors, whereas prescription data helped improve identification of hyperlipidemia. We tested various claims-based algorithms to ascertain important risk factors in stroke patients. These validated algorithms are useful for assessing stroke risk factors in future studies using Taiwan's NHI claims data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. P-Wave Indices and Risk of Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinli; Tse, Gary; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis; Letsas, Konstantinos P; Ali-Hasan-Al-Saegh, Sadeq; Kamel, Hooman; Li, Guangping; Lip, Gregory Y H; Liu, Tong

    2017-08-01

    Atrial cardiomyopathy is associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke. P-wave terminal force in lead V1, P-wave duration, and maximum P-wave area are electrocardiographic parameters that have been used to assess left atrial abnormalities related to developing atrial fibrillation. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to examine their values for predicting ischemic stroke risk. PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched until December 2016 for studies that evaluated the association between P-wave indices and stroke risk. Both fixed- and random-effects models were used to calculate the overall effect estimates. Ten studies examining P-wave terminal force in lead V1, P-wave duration, and maximum P-wave area were included. P-wave terminal force in lead V1 was found to be an independent predictor of stroke as both a continuous variable (odds ratio [OR] per 1 SD change, 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-1.25; PP=0.01). P-wave duration was a significant predictor of incident ischemic stroke when analyzed as a categorical variable (OR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.37-2.52; PP=0.15). Maximum P-wave area also predicted the risk of incident ischemic stroke (OR per 1 SD change, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.04-1.17). P-wave terminal force in lead V1, P-wave duration, and maximum P-wave area are useful electrocardiographic markers that can be used to stratify the risk of incident ischemic stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Vinpocetine in Atherosclerosis and Ischemic Stroke: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linjie Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Immune responses play an important role in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and ischemic stroke. Atherosclerosis is a common condition that increases the risk of stroke. Hyperlipidemia damages endothelial cells, thus initiating chemokine pathways and the release of inflammatory cytokines—this represents the first step in the inflammatory response to atherosclerosis. Blocking blood flow in the brain leads to ischemic stroke, and deprives neurons of oxygen and energy. Damaged neurons release danger-associated molecular patterns, which promote the activation of innate immune cells and the release of inflammatory cytokines. The nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells κB (NF-κB pathway plays a key role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and ischemic stroke. Vinpocetine is believed to be a potent anti-inflammatory agent and has been used to treat cerebrovascular disorders. Vinpocetine improves neuronal plasticity and reduces the release of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines from endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, macrophages, and microglia, by inhibiting the inhibitor of the NF-κB pathway. This review clarifies the anti-inflammatory role of vinpocetine in atherosclerosis and ischemic stroke.

  2. Serum Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 and Cognitive Impairment After Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chongke; Bu, Xiaoqing; Xu, Tan; Guo, Libing; Wang, Xuemei; Zhang, Jintao; Cui, Yong; Li, Dong; Zhang, Jianhui; Ju, Zhong; Chen, Chung-Shiuan; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Yonghong; He, Jiang

    2018-01-06

    The impact of serum matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) on cognitive impairment after ischemic stroke is unclear. We aimed to investigate the association between serum MMP-9 in the short-term acute phase of ischemic stroke and cognitive impairment at 3 months. Our study was based on a subsample from the CATIS (China Antihypertensive Trial in Acute Ischemic Stroke); a total of 558 patients with serum MMP-9 levels from 7 of 26 participating sites of the trial were included in this analysis. Cognitive impairment severity was categorized as severe, mild, or none (Mini-Mental State Examination score, impairment was defined as a score of impairment and 153 (27.4%) had severe cognitive impairment at 3 months. After adjustment for age, National Institutes of Health stroke score, education, and other covariates, the odds ratio for the highest quartile of serum MMP-9 compared with the lowest quartile was 3.20 (95% confidence interval, 1.87-5.49) for cognitive impairment. Multiple-adjusted spline regression model showed a linear association between MMP-9 levels and cognitive impairment ( P impairment was defined by Montreal Cognitive Assessment score. Increased serum MMP-9 levels in the short-term phase of ischemic stroke were associated with 3-month cognitive impairment, independently of established risk factors. © 2018 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  3. Cardioembolism and Involvement of the Insular Cortex in Patients with Ischemic Stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihoon Kang

    Full Text Available To evaluate whether topographical characteristics of insular involvement in ischemic stroke are associated with cardioembolism.A consecutive series of patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke within 7 days of symptom onset were identified. Based on diffusion-weighted imaging, we included those who had ischemic lesions in the middle cerebral artery (MCA territory. Each patient was assigned to one of two groups based on the presence or absence of insular involvement. The primary outcome was the frequency of cardioembolism, which was compared based on insular involvement. Of 1,311 patients with ischemic stroke in the MCA territory, 112 had insular involvement (8.5%. The frequency of cardioembolism in patients with insular involvement (52.7% was significantly higher than that in patients without insular involvement (30.4%, P < 0.001. Although insular involvement was associated with a severe baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (13 vs. 4, it did not independently affect the 3-month functional outcome.In cases of stroke in the MCA territory, involvement of the insular cortex may be associated with a risk of cardioembolism.

  4. Genetic polymorphism of ITGA2 C807T can increase the risk of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guangliang; Xi, Yujing; Yao, Li; Su, Li; Yan, Yan; Li, Minzhi; Gu, Lian

    2014-11-01

    The role of genetic variants in the pathogenesis of stroke has not been fully elucidated. Several studies have been examined the association of the Integrin alpha2 (ITGA2) gene-C807T (rs1126643) polymorphism with ischemic stroke susceptibility. However, the results of these studies are inconsistent. In order to explore this association more deeply, we performed a meta-analysis. We collected case-control studies concerning the relationship between the C807T polymorphism and ischemic stroke, and odd ratios (OR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to describe the relationships. Inconsistency index (I(2)) and Cochran's Q statistic were used to check heterogeneity. Publication bias was tested by funnel plots and Egger's test. Fifteen studies with 2242 cases and 2408 controls were included. Our meta-analysis results indicated an association between the C807T polymorphism and the risk of ischemic stroke in the overall population, Asians and the subgroup of hospital-based people. However, statistically association was not observed for Caucasians and non-hospitalized individuals. The ITGA2 gene C807T polymorphism may be a susceptible predictor of the risk of ischemic stroke. More data are needed to elucidate the relationship further.

  5. Combined effects of socioeconomic position, smoking, and hypertension on risk of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Helene; Osler, Merete; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Combined effects of socioeconomic position and well-established risk factors on stroke incidence have not been formally investigated. METHODS: In a pooled cohort study of 68 643 men and women aged 30 to 70 years in Denmark, we examined the combined effect and interaction...... between socioeconomic position (ie, education), smoking, and hypertension on ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke incidence by the use of the additive hazards model. RESULTS: During 14 years of follow-up, 3613 ischemic strokes and 776 hemorrhagic strokes were observed. Current smoking and hypertension were......, particularly among men: 134 (95% confidence interval, 49-219) extra cases per 100 000 person-years because of interaction, adjusted for age, cohort study, and birth cohort. There was no clear evidence of interaction between low education and hypertension. The combined effect of current smoking and hypertension...

  6. Intravenous thrombolysis in a patient with left atrial myxoma with acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Baburao Kulkarni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT is an accepted therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke presenting within 3-4.5 hours of symptom onset. Selection of the patient for thrombolysis depends on the careful assessment for the risk of post thrombolysis symptomatic haemorrhage (6.2-8.9% which may be fatal. Atrial myxomas which are the commonest tumors of the heart are associated with stroke due to tumor/clot embolism. There are very few case reports of IVT and its outcome in patients with atrial myxoma with stroke. Some have reported successful thrombolysis, while others have reported intracerebral bleeding. In this report we describe our experience of IVT in atrial myxoma patient with ischemic stroke and review the relevant literature.

  7. Temporal Trends in Mortality from Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke in Mexico, 1980-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Copytzy; Campuzano-Rincón, Julio César; Calleja-Castillo, Juan Manuel; Hernández-Álvarez, Anaid; Parra, María Del Socorro; Moreno-Macias, Hortensia; Hernández-Girón, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Over the past decades, the decline in mortality from stroke has been more pronounced in high-income countries than in low- and middle-income countries. We evaluated changes in temporal stroke mortality trends in Mexico according to sex and type of stroke. We assessed stroke mortality from Mexico's National Health Information System for the period from 1980 to 2012. We analyzed age-adjusted mortality rates by sex, type of stroke, and age group. The annual percentage change and the average annual percentage change (AAPC) in the slopes of the age-adjusted mortality trends were determined using joinpoint regression models. The age-adjusted mortality rates due to stroke decreased between 1980 and 2012, from 44.55 to 33.47 per 100,000 inhabitants, and the AAPC (95% confidence interval [CI]) was -.9 (-1.0 to -.7). The AAPC for females was -1.1 (-1.5 to -.7) and that for males was -.7 (-.9 to -.6). People older than 65 years showed the highest mortality throughout the period. Between 1980 and 2012, the AAPC (95% CI) for ischemic stroke was -3.8 (-4.8 to -2.8) and was -.5 (-.8 to -.2) for hemorrhagic stroke. For the same period, the AAPC for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) was -.7 (-1.6 to .2) and that for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was 1.6 (.4-2.8). The age-adjusted mortality rates of all strokes combined, ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and ICH, decreased between 1980 and 2012 in Mexico. However, the increase in SAH mortality makes it necessary to explore the risk factors and clinical management of this type of stroke. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of the European and Japanese guidelines for the management of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Rolf; Nagayama, Masao; Toyoda, Kazunori; Steiner, Thorsten; Hennerici, Michael G; Shinohara, Yukito

    2013-01-01

    Different aspects of acute stroke management and strategies for stroke prevention derive from two viewpoints: specific traditional and historical backgrounds and evidence-based medicine from modern randomized controlled trials (RCTs), meta-analysis and authorized clinical practice guidelines (GLs). Regarding stroke, GLs have been published by national and international organizations in different languages, most frequently in English. Cerebrovascular Diseases published the European GLs for the management of ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attacks in 2003, with an update in 2008. At about the same time (in 2004), the first Japanese GLs for the management of stroke appeared in Japanese. The first English version of the updated Japanese GLs was published only in 2011 and included differently approved drugs and drug dosages as compared with other American or European countries. Since 2011, the authors have met repeatedly and have compared the latest versions of published European and Japanese GLs for ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. Many aspects have only been addressed in one but left out in the other GLs, which consequently founded the basis for the comparison. Classification of evidence levels and recommendation grades defined by the individual committees differed between both original GLs. Aspects of major importance were surprisingly similar and hence did not need extensive interpretation. Other aspects of ischemic stroke management differed significantly, e.g. the dosage of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator approved in Japan is lower (0.6 mg/kg) than in Europe (0.9 mg/kg), which derived from different practices in cardiovascular treatment prior to the design of acute ischemic stroke RCTs. Furthermore, comedication with neuroprotective agents (edaravone), intravenous anticoagulants (argatroban) or antiplatelet agents within 1-2 days after stroke onset is recommended in Japan but not in Europe. For cardioembolic stroke prevention, a major difference

  9. Is there a consistent association between coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke caused by intracranial atherosclerosis?

    OpenAIRE

    Conforto, Adriana B.; Claudia da Costa Leite; Cesar H. Nomura; Edson Bor-Seng-Shu; Santos, Raul D

    2013-01-01

    Coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke are frequent coexistent conditions that share risk factors and pose major burdens to global health. Even though a clear relation has been established between extracranial internal carotid artery atherosclerosis and symptomatic or asymptomatic coronary heart disease, there is a gap in knowledge about the association between intracranial atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Intracranial atherosclerosis is associated with high risks of stroke rec...

  10. Use of APACHE II and SAPS II to predict mortality for hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Byeong Hoo; Park, Sang Kyu; Jang, Dong Kyu; Jang, Kyoung Sool; Kim, Jong Tae; Han, Yong Min

    2015-01-01

    We studied the applicability of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II) in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with acute stroke and compared the results with the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). We also conducted a comparative study of accuracy for predicting hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke mortality. Between January 2011 and December 2012, ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke patients admitted to the ICU were included in the study. APACHE II and SAPS II-predicted mortalities were compared using a calibration curve, the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and the results were compared with the GCS and NIHSS. Overall 498 patients were included in this study. The observed mortality was 26.3%, whereas APACHE II and SAPS II-predicted mortalities were 35.12% and 35.34%, respectively. The mean GCS and NIHSS scores were 9.43 and 21.63, respectively. The calibration curve was close to the line of perfect prediction. The ROC curve showed a slightly better prediction of mortality for APACHE II in hemorrhagic stroke patients and SAPS II in ischemic stroke patients. The GCS and NIHSS were inferior in predicting mortality in both patient groups. Although both the APACHE II and SAPS II systems can be used to measure performance in the neurosurgical ICU setting, the accuracy of APACHE II in hemorrhagic stroke patients and SAPS II in ischemic stroke patients was superior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Association of ischemic stroke to coronary artery disease using computed tomography coronary angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Møller; Medina, Hector; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and cerebrovascular disease share similar risk factor profiles, data on whether IS can be considered a "CAD equivalent" are limited. We aimed to determine whether ischemic stroke is an independent predictor of CAD by using cardiac...... increase odds of having coronary artery plaque (odds ratio [OR] 4.9, P4 segments of plaque than 0-4 segments as compared to patients without stroke (OR 18.3, P...

  12. Cognitive alterations in motor imagery process after left hemispheric ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Motor imagery training is a promising rehabilitation strategy for stroke patients. However, few studies had focused on the neural mechanisms in time course of its cognitive process. This study investigated the cognitive alterations after left hemispheric ischemic stroke during motor imagery task. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eleven patients with ischemic stroke in left hemisphere and eleven age-matched control subjects participated in mental rotation task (MRT of hand pictures. Behavior performance, event-related potential (ERP and event-related (desynchronization (ERD/ERS in beta band were analyzed to investigate the cortical activation. We found that: (1 The response time increased with orientation angles in both groups, called "angle effect", however, stoke patients' responses were impaired with significantly longer response time and lower accuracy rate; (2 In early visual perceptual cognitive process, stroke patients showed hypo-activations in frontal and central brain areas in aspects of both P200 and ERD; (3 During mental rotation process, P300 amplitude in control subjects decreased while angle increased, called "amplitude modulation effect", which was not observed in stroke patients. Spatially, patients showed significant lateralization of P300 with activation only in contralesional (right parietal cortex while control subjects showed P300 in both parietal lobes. Stroke patients also showed an overall cortical hypo-activation of ERD during this sub-stage; (4 In the response sub-stage, control subjects showed higher ERD values with more activated cortical areas particularly in the right hemisphere while angle increased, named "angle effect", which was not observed in stroke patients. In addition, stroke patients showed significant lower ERD for affected hand (right response than that for unaffected hand. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Cortical activation was altered differently in each cognitive sub-stage of motor imagery after

  13. Acute Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack Treated with Aspirin or Ticagrelor and Patient Outcomes (SOCRATES) trial: rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, S Claiborne; Amarenco, Pierre; Albers, Gregory W; Denison, Hans; Easton, J Donald; Held, Peter; Jonasson, Jenny; Minematsu, Kazuo; Molina, Carlos A; Wong, Lawrence K S

    2015-12-01

    The risk of recurrent ischemia is high in the acute period after ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack. Aspirin is recommended by guidelines for this indication, but more intensive antiplatelet therapy may be justified. We aim to evaluate whether ticagrelor, a potent antiplatelet agent that blocks the P2Y12 receptor without requiring metabolic activation, reduces the risk of major vascular events compared with aspirin when randomization occurs within 24 h after symptom onset of a nonsevere ischemic stroke or high-risk transient ischemic attack. Acute Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack Treated with Aspirin or Ticagrelor and Patient Outcomes (SOCRATES) is a randomized, double-blind, event-driven trial and will include an estimated 13,600 participants randomized in 33 countries worldwide to collect 844 primary events. The primary endpoint is the composite of stroke (ischemic or hemorrhagic), myocardial infarction, and death. Time to the first primary endpoint will be compared in the treatment groups during 90-day follow-up, with major hemorrhage serving as the primary safety endpoint. Participants will be followed for an additional 30 days after the randomized treatment period. The SOCRATES trial fulfills an important clinical need by evaluating a potent antiplatelet agent as a superior alternative to current standard of care in patients presenting acutely with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. © 2015 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Stroke Organization.

  14. Causes of Death Data in the Global Burden of Disease Estimates for Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truelsen, Thomas; Krarup, Lars-Henrik; Iversen, Helle K

    2015-01-01

    on the International Classification of Diseases and the pathology behind each code by checking multiple causes of death and literature review. RESULTS: Unspecified stroke and primary and secondary hypertension are leading contributing 'GCs' to stroke mortality estimates for hemorrhagic stroke (HS) and ischemic stroke...... mortality estimates. METHODS: All available mortality data were compiled and non-specific cause codes were redistributed based on literature review and statistical methods. Ill-defined codes were redistributed to their specific cause of disease by age, sex, country and year. The reassignment was done based......' with marked regional differences. Future advancements in stroke certification, data collections and statistical analyses may improve the estimation of the global stroke burden....

  15. Genetic polymorphisms associated with lipid metabolism involved in the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamires Flauzino

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The stroke is a complex, multifactorial, and polygenic disorder that results from the interaction between the individual genetic components and environmental factors. Previous studies have established hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, elevated body mass index, disturbances of coagulation and increasing age as predictors of stroke risk factors. The stroke is a more crippling than deadly disease that requires long-term institutionalization, as it decreases the quality of life of patients, resulting in higher costs to social and economic levels. It thus becomes increasingly important to emphasize the Preventive Medicine strategies. Dyslipidemia has been associated with pathophysiology of ischemic stroke and genetic polymorphisms that occur in the metabolic pathway, such as lipids metabolism, has been one of the hereditary factors related to ischemic stroke. The identification of the genetic component in the cause of dyslipidemia has been intensively investigated in recent years. Among the several genetic polymorphisms, the gene of the low-density lipoprotein receptor has been the object of many studies in the population worldwide. Data on lipid profile and study of polymorphisms of genes encoding structural proteins and enzymes related to lipid metabolism may reveal the prevalence of dyslipidemia in a population, enabling a targeted intervention for the control and prevention of atherosclerotic diseases such as ischemic stroke.

  16. Down-Regulation of Lncrna MALAT1 Attenuates Neuronal Cell Death Through Suppressing Beclin1-Dependent Autophagy by Regulating Mir-30a in Cerebral Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Guo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: LncRNA metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1 was reported to be highly expressed in an in vitro mimic of ischemic stroke conditions. However, the exact biological role of MALAT1 and its underlying mechanism in ischemic stroke remain to be elucidated. Methods: The roles of MALAT1 and miR-30a on cell death and infarct volume and autophagy were evaluated in experimental ischemic stroke. The relationships between miR-30a and MALAT1, Beclin1 were confirmed by luciferase reporter assay. The autophagy inhibitor 3-methyadenine (3-MA was used to examine the impact of autophagy on ischemic injury. Results: We found that MALAT1, along with the levels of conversion from autophagy-related protein microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-I (LC3-I to LC3-phosphatidylethanolamine conjugate (LC3-II, as well as Beclin1 were up-regulated and miR-30a was down-regulated in cerebral cortex neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD and mouse brain cortex after middle cerebral artery occlusion-reperfusion (MCAO. Down-regulation of MALAT1 suppressed ischemic injury and autophagy in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, MALAT1 may serve as a molecular sponge for miR-30a and negatively regulate its expression. In addition, MALAT1 overturned the inhibitory effect of miR-30a on ischemic injury and autophagy in vitro and in vivo, which might be involved in the derepression of Beclin1, a direct target of miR-30a. Mechanistic analyses further revealed that autophagy inhibitor 3-methyadenine (3-MA markedly suppressed OGD-induced neuronal cell death and MCAO-induced ischemic brain infarction. Conclusion: Taken together, our study first revealed that down-regulation of MALAT1 attenuated neuronal cell death through suppressing Beclin1-dependent autophagy by regulating miR-30a expression in cerebral ischemic stroke. Besides, our study demonstrated a novel lncRNA-miRNA-mRNA regulatory network that is MALAT1-miR-30a-Beclin1 in ischemic

  17. Women's interpretation of and cognitive and behavioral responses to the symptoms of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, Claudia C

    2014-10-01

    Delay seeking medical assistance for acute ischemic stroke remains a barrier to the provision of optimal care, including the administration of tissue plasminogen activator. Although women report greater knowledge of stroke symptoms and stroke risk factors than men, earlier hospital arrival in women has not been consistently reported. The purposes of this study were to examine women's interpretation of stroke symptoms and compare cognitive and behavioral responses between women who arrived at the hospital within 3 hours of symptom onset and women who arrived after 3 hours. More than half of the participants arrived at the hospital greater than 3 hours after first noticing symptoms. Most women did not recognize the cause of symptoms. Knowledge about a treatment of stroke was limited, and a minority of the women knew they were at risk for stroke despite having known risk factors. Maladaptive responses to symptoms were reported more frequently by women with hospital arrival greater than 3 hours after symptom onset than by women with earlier arrival. Efforts are needed to reduce maladaptive responses to stroke onset that may contribute to delay seeking medical assistance for the symptoms of acute ischemic stroke.

  18. The Influence of Resistance Exercise Training on the Levels of Anxiety in Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe José Aidar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this pilot study was to analyze the effect of a strength training program on indicators of trait and state anxiety in patients with ischemic stroke. The subjects were divided into two groups: experimental group (EG consisting of 11 subjects aged years and a control group (CG with 13 subjects aged years. EG underwent 12 weeks of strength training, with a frequency of three times a week. For data collection, a State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI was used. Significant differences were found between pre- and posttest in EG for trait anxiety ( pretest posttest and state anxiety ( pretest posttest with no differences in CG for trait anxiety ( pretest posttest and state anxiety ( pretest posttest. In the evaluation between the groups, significant differences were found for all indicators of trait anxiety ( EG; CG and state anxiety ( EG; CG. This pilot study indicates that strength training may provide an improvement in trait and state anxiety more than one year after stroke.

  19. Correlation between Nerve Growth Factor (NGF with Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF in Ischemic Stroke Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Widodo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a family of polypeptides that play critical role during neuronal development, appear to mediate protective role on neurorepair in ischemic stroke. Naturally in adult brain neurorepair process consist of: angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and neuronal plasticity, it can also be stimulated by endogenous neurorepair. In this study we observed correlation between NGF and BDNF ischemic stroke patient’s onset: 7-30 and over 30 days. Methods: This is cross sectional study on 46 subjects aged 38 – 74 years old with ischemic stroke from The Indonesian Central Hospital of Army Gatot Subroto Jakarta. Diagnosis of ischemic stroke was made using clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI by neurologist. Subjects were divided into 2 groups based on stroke onset: 7 – 30 days (Group A: 19 subjects and > 30 days (Group B: 27 Subjects. Serum NGF levels were measured with ELISA method and BDNF levels were measured using multiplex method with Luminex Magpix. Results: Levels of NGF and BDNF were significantly different between onset group A and B (NGF p= 0.022, and BDNF p=0.008, with mean levels NGF in group A higher than group B, indicating that BDNF levels is lower in group A than group B. There was no significant correlation between NGF and BDNF levels in all groups. Conclusion: The variations in neurotrophic factor levels reflect an endogenous attempt at neuroprotection against biochemical and molecular changes after ischemic stroke. NGF represents an early marker of brain injury while BDNF recovery is most prominent during the first 14 days after onsite but continuous for more than 30 days. There is no significant correlation between NGF and BDNF in each group.  

  20. New standardized nursing cooperation workflow to reduce stroke thrombolysis delays in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Y

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Yan Zhou,1 Zhuojun Xu,2 Jiali Liao,1 Fangming Feng,1 Lai Men,3 Li Xu,2 Yanan He,2 Gang Li2 1Nursing Department, Shanghai East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 2Department of Neurology, Shanghai East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Paddington Dental Practice, London, UK Objective: We assessed the effectiveness of a new standardized nursing cooperation workflow in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS to reduce stroke thrombolysis delays.Patients and methods: AIS patients receiving conventional thrombolysis treatment from March to September 2015 were included in the control group, referred to as T0. The intervention group, referred to as T1 group, consisted of AIS patients receiving a new standardized nursing cooperation workflow for intravenous thrombolysis (IVT at the emergency department of Shanghai East Hospital (Shanghai, People’s Republic of China from October 2015 to March 2016. Information was collected on the following therapeutic techniques used: application or not of thrombolysis, computed tomography (CT time, and door-to-needle (DTN time. A nursing coordinator who helped patients fulfill the medical examinations and diagnosis was appointed to T1 group. In addition, a nurse was sent immediately from the stroke unit to the emergency department to aid the thrombolysis treatment.Results: The average value of the door-to-CT initiation time was 38.67±5.21 min in the T0 group, whereas it was 14.39±4.35 min in the T1 group; the average values of CT completion-to-needle time were 55.06±4.82 and 30.26±3.66 min; the average values of DTN time were 100.43±6.05 and 55.68±3.62 min, respectively; thrombolysis time was improved from 12.8% (88/689 in the T0 group to 32.5% (231/712 in the T1 group (all P<0.01. In addition, the new standardized nursing cooperation workflow decreased the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS scores at 24 h (P<0

  1. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate: Can be a prognostic marker in acute ischemic stroke?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selim Selçuk Çomoğlu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR values and the severity of neurological findings on admission, short- term prognosis, risk factors and etiology of the patients with acute ischemic stroke. MATERIAL and METHODS: One hundred and fifty-eight consecutive patients who admitted to the hospital within 24 hours of stroke onset were retrospectively analyzed. National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS and modified Rankin Scale (mRS scores on admission and mRS scores at discharge, brain imaging findings, stroke etiology and risk factors of the patients were recorded. Patients were classified into three groups according to ESR values on admission and compared in terms of severity of clinical symptoms on admission, short-term prognosis, risk factors and etiology of stroke. RESULTS: A total 158 patients with acute ischemic stroke including 89 women and 69 men were enrolled in the study. Patients with ESR≤10 mm/h were included in group 1 (n=49, ESR levels between 11-25 mm/h were included in group 2 (n=69 and ESR≥26 mm/h were included in group 3 (n=40. No significant difference was determined between the groups in terms of NIHSS and mRS scores on admission and mRS scores at discharge and etiology of stroke. While coronary artery disease was found more frequently in group 1 and 2 than group 3 (p=0.018, valvular heart disease was more frequently in group 2 than group 1 (p=0.037. CONCLUSION: The results of our study revealed that ESR levels on admission do not reflect the severity of stroke and can not be accepted as a useful predictor of short-term prognosis in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

  2. Albuminuria predicts early neurological deterioration in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamaru, Takuya; Suda, Satoshi; Muraga, Kanako; Okubo, Seiji; Watanabe, Yoko; Tsuruoka, Syuichi; Kimura, Kazumi

    2017-01-15

    Reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and albuminuria have been independently associated with an increased risk of stroke and unfavorable long-term outcomes. However, the association between GFR, albuminuria, and early neurological deterioration (END) in patients with ischemic stroke has not been well studied to date. We therefore investigated the ability of estimated GFR (eGFR) and albuminuria to predict END in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We retrospectively enrolled 294 patients that were admitted to our stroke center with acute ischemic stroke between January 2011 and September 2012. General blood and urine examinations, including eGFR and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR) measurements, were performed on admission. Kidney dysfunction was defined by a low eGFR value (albuminuria (≥30mg/g creatinine). END was defined as a ≥2-point increase in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score within 7days after admission. Kidney dysfunction was diagnosed in 200 of the 294 patients (68.0%). END was observed in 60 patients (20.4%). Age, blood glucose level on admission, UACR on admission, and NIHSS score on admission were significantly associated with END, while no relationship between eGFR on admission and END was identified. A multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that END was positively associated with high UACR (≥39.6mg/g creatinine) and a high NIHSS score (≥6 points). Our data suggest that high UACR on admission may predict END in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Larger prospective studies are required to validate the correlation between albuminuria and END. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Dietary habits in patients with ischemic stroke: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rodríguez-Campello

    Full Text Available Diet appears to have some role in stroke development. The objective of our study was to describe the dietary habits in patients admitted with acute ischemic stroke and compare selected dietary components with healthy controls. Adherence to healthy diet behaviors was also assessed.A case-control study of consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted to the Neurology Department of Hospital del Mar from 2007 to 2010. Patients were matched by age and sex with control subjects. A previously validated nutritional survey was administered to patients and controls. Demographic data, vascular risk factors, caloric intake and dietary nutrients were evaluated. Intention to follow a healthy diet was also assessed in both groups.A total of 300 acute ischemic stroke patients and 300 controls with evaluation of dietary habits. No differences were observed in vascular risk factors, except smoking habit, diabetes and ischemic heart disease. Stroke patients reported a higher caloric intake: 2444.8(1736.8-3244.5 vs 2208.7(1753.1-2860.7 Kcal, p = 0.001. After adjusting for energy intake, patients had higher intake of proteins (p<0.001; OR 1.02, total cholesterol (p = 0.001; OR 1.04, and breaded foods (p = 0.001; OR 1.94 and lower consumption of probiotic yogurt (p = 0.002; OR 0.88. Compared to patients, control participants indicated greater intention to eat vegetables (p = 0.002; OR 1.5 and whole foods (p = 0.000; OR 2.4 and reduce their intake of salt (p = 0.002; OR 1.7, fat (p = 0.000; OR 3.7 and sweets (p = 0.004; OR 1.7 than patients.We observed different dietary patterns between stroke patients and controls. Stroke patients have a higher caloric intake and are less concerned about maintaining healthy nutritional habits.

  4. Different Antiplatelet Strategies in Patients With New Ischemic Stroke While Taking Aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joon-Tae; Park, Man-Seok; Choi, Kang-Ho; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Beom Joon; Han, Moon-Ku; Park, Tai Hwan; Park, Sang-Soon; Lee, Kyung Bok; Lee, Byung-Chul; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Oh, Mi Sun; Cha, Jae Kwan; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Nah, Hyun-Wook; Lee, Jun; Lee, Soo Joo; Ko, Young-Chai; Kim, Jae Guk; Park, Jong-Moo; Kang, Kyusik; Cho, Yong-Jin; Hong, Keun-Sik; Choi, Jay Chol; Kim, Dong-Eog; Ryu, Wi-Sun; Shin, Dong-Ick; Yeo, Min-Ju; Kim, Wook-Joo; Lee, Juneyoung; Lee, Ji Sung; Saver, Jeffrey L; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Selecting among different antiplatelet strategies when patients experience a new ischemic stroke while taking aspirin is a common clinical challenge, currently addressed by a paucity of data. This study is an analysis of a prospective multicenter stroke registry database from 14 hospitals in South Korea. Patients with acute noncardioembolic stroke, who were taking aspirin for prevention of ischemic events at the time of onset of stroke, were enrolled. Study subjects were divided into 3 groups according to the subsequent antiplatelet therapy strategy pursued; maintaining aspirin monotherapy (MA group), switching aspirin to nonaspirin antiplatelet agents (SA group), and adding another antiplatelet agent to aspirin (AA group). The primary study end point was the composite of stroke (ischemic and hemorrhagic), myocardial infarction, and vascular death up to 1 year after stroke onset. A total of 1172 patients were analyzed for this study. Antiplatelet strategies pursued in study patients were MA group in 212 (18.1%), SA group in 246 (21.0%), and AA group in 714 (60.9%). The Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that, compared with the MA group, there was a reduction in the composite vascular event primary end point in the SA group (hazard ratio, 0.50; 95% confidence interval, 0.27-0.92; P=0.03) and in the AA group (hazard ratio, 0.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.24-0.66; Paspirin, switching to or adding alternative antiplatelet agents may be better in preventing subsequent vascular events in patients who experienced a new ischemic stroke while taking aspirin. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Homocysteine and carotid intima-media thickness in ischemic stroke patients are not correlated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Ntaios

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available George Ntaios1, Christos Savopoulos1, Apostolos Hatzitolios1, Ippoliti Ekonomou2, Evangelos Destanis2, Ioannis Chryssogonidis2, Anastasia Chatzinikolaou3, Ifigenia Pidonia3, Dimitrios Karamitsos11First Propedeutic Department of Internal Medicine; 2Department of Radiology; 3Department of Biochemistry, AHEPA Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, GreeceIntroduction: Hyperhomocysteinemia has been linked to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality by numerous authors. Whether this association is causal or not remains uncertain. The aim of the study was to investigate the association of hyperhomocysteinemia with the degree of carotid atherosclerosis in stroke patients.Methods: We studied 97 Greek patients in our stroke unit who were hospitalized as a result of ischemic stroke between March 2006 and May 2007. The patients were divided into two groups: the first (52 patients included stroke patients with serum levels of homocysteine below 15 µmol/L, but in the second group (45 patients serum homocysteine exceeded this value. We measured carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT in all patients and correlated it with serum homocysteine.Results: The mean homocysteine concentration was 11.5 µmol/L in the first group and 21.5 µmol/L in the second group. Carotid IMT was 1.012 mm in the first group, and 1.015 mm in the second group, an insignificant difference. On the contrary, serum folate concentration was 21.3 nmol/L in the first group compared with 16.7 nmol/L in the second group (p < 0.001. VitB12 was 401 pmol/L in the first group and 340 pmol/L in the second group, a statistically significant difference (p < 0.001.Conclusions: Serum levels of homocysteine were not correlated with cIMT in ischemic stroke patients. Both folate and vitB12 were decreased in hyperhomocysteinemic ischemic stroke patients.Keywords: homocysteine, carotid intima-media thickness, ischemic stroke

  6. Pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, and ischemic stroke in lung cancer patients : results from a longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Herk-Sukel, Myrthe P. P.; Shantakumar, Sumitra; Penning-Van Beest, Fernie J. A.; Kamphuisen, Pieter W.; Majoor, Christof J.; Overbeek, Lucy I. H.; Herings, Ron M. C.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: In this cohort study, the rates of pulmonary embolism (PE), myocardial infarction (MI), and ischemic stroke (IS) before and after lung cancer (LC) diagnosis were compared to cancer-free controls. METHODS: Patients with LC during 2000-2007 were selected from PALGA, the Dutch Pathology

  7. Visualization of damaged brain tissue after ischemic stroke with cobalt-55 positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H M; Pruim, J; vd Vliet, A M; Paans, A M; Hew, J M; Franssen, E J; de Jong, B M; Kosterink, J G; Haaxma, R; Korf, J

    UNLABELLED: In animal experiments, the radionuclide 55Co2+ has been shown to accumulate in degenerating cerebral tissue similar to Ca2+. METHODS: The potential role of 55Co2+ for in vivo brain PET imaging was investigated in four patients after ischemic stroke. RESULTS: PET showed uptake of 55Co2+

  8. Timing-Invariant Imaging of Collateral Vessels in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, E.J.; Vonken, E.J.; Seeters, T. van; Dankbaar, J.W.; Schaaf, I.C. van der; Kappelle, L.J.; Ginneken, B. van; Velthuis, B.K.; Prokop, M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although collateral vessels have been shown to be an important prognostic factor in acute ischemic stroke, patients with lack of collaterals on standard imaging techniques may still have good clinical outcome. We postulate that in these cases collateral vessels are present

  9. Chronic hyperglycemia is related to poor functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luitse, Merel Ja; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Kappelle, L Jaap; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Biessels, Geert Jan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute hyperglycemia is associated with poor functional outcome after ischemic stroke, but the association between chronic antecedent hyperglycemia and outcome is unclear. AIM: We assessed the association between chronic hyperglycemia, measured by hemoglobin A1c, and functional outcome in

  10. Saturated Fat Consumption and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease and Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nettleton, Joyce A.; Brouwer, Ingeborg A.; Geleijnse, Marianne; Hornstra, G.

    2017-01-01

    At a workshop to update the science linking saturated fatty acid (SAFA) consumption with the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and ischemic stroke, invited participants presented data on the consumption and bioavailability of SAFA and their functions in the body and food technology.

  11. Safety of antiplatelet therapy prior to intravenous thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Koch, Marcus W; Koopman, Karen; Vroomen, Patrick C A J; De Keyser, Jacques; Luijckx, Gert-Jan

    Background: There is some uncertainty whether prior use of antiplatelet (AP) drugs increases the risk of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH) and influences functional outcome in patients with ischemic stroke treated with intravenous thrombolysis. Objective: To assess whether prior use of AP

  12. Endovascular Hypothermia in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Pilot Study of Selective Intra-Arterial Cold Saline Infusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Jian; Liu, Liqiang; Zhang, Hongqi; Geng, Xiaokun; Jiao, Liqun; Li, Guilin; Coutinho, Jonathan M.; Ding, Yuchuan; Liebeskind, David S.; Ji, Xunming

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a pilot feasibility and safety study of selective brain cooling with intra-arterial infusion of cold saline combined with endovascular reperfusion for acute ischemic stroke. Patients with large-vessel occlusion within 8 hours after symptom onset were enrolled. All patients received

  13. Temporal profile of body temperature in acute ischemic stroke: Relation to infarct size and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Geurts (Marjolein); Scheijmans, F.E.V. (Féline E.V.); T. van Seeters (Tom); G.J. Biessels; L.J. Kappelle (Jaap); B.K. Velthuis (Birgitta K.); H.B. van der Worp (Bart); C.B. Majoie (Charles); Y.B.W.E.M. Roos (Yvo); L.E.M. Duijm (Lucien); K. Keizer (Koos); A. van der Lugt (Aad); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); Greve, D. (Droogh-de); H.P. Bienfait; M.A. van Walderveen (M.); M.J.H. Wermer (Marieke); G.J. Lycklama à Nijeholt (Geert); J. Boiten (Jelis); A. Duyndam (Anita); V.I.H. Kwa; F.J. Meijer (F.); E.J. van Dijk (Ewoud); A.M. Kesselring (Anouk); J. Hofmeijer; J.A. Vos (Jan Albert); W.J. Schonewille (Wouter); W.J. van Rooij (W.); P.L.M. de Kort (Paul); C.C. Pleiter (C.); S.L.M. Bakker (Stef); Bot, J.; M.C. Visser (Marieke); B.K. Velthuis (Birgitta); I.C. van der Schaaf (Irene); J.W. Dankbaar (Jan); W.P. Mali (Willem); van Seeters, T.; A.D. Horsch (Alexander D.); J.M. Niesten (Joris); G.J. Biessels (Geert Jan); L.J. Kappelle (Jaap); J.S.K. Luitse; Y. van der Graaf (Yolanda)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: High body temperatures after ischemic stroke have been associated with larger infarct size, but the temporal profile of this relation is unknown. We assess the relation between temporal profile of body temperature and infarct size and functional outcome in patients with acute

  14. Regional brain structural abnormality in ischemic stroke patients: a voxel-based morphometry study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study used regional homogeneity analysis and found that activity in some brain areas of patients with ischemic stroke changed significantly. In the current study, we examined structural changes in these brain regions by taking structural magnetic resonance imaging scans of 11 ischemic stroke patients and 15 healthy participants, and analyzing the data using voxel-based morphometry. Compared with healthy participants, patients exhibited higher gray matter density in the left inferior occipital gyrus and right anterior white matter tract. In contrast, gray matter density in the right cerebellum, left precentral gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus, and left middle temporal gyrus was less in ischemic stroke patients. The changes of gray matter density in the middle frontal gyrus were negatively associated with the clinical rating scales of the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment (r = -0.609, P = 0.047 and the left middle temporal gyrus was negatively correlated with the clinical rating scales of the nervous functional deficiency scale (r = -0.737, P = 0.010. Our findings can objectively identify the functional abnormality in some brain regions of ischemic stroke patients.

  15. Increased risk of stroke and transient ischemic attack in 5-year survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, M.L. De; Dorresteijn, L.D.A.; Veer, M.B. van 't; Krol, A.D.; Pal, H.J. van der; Kappelle, A.C.; Boogerd, W.; Aleman, B.M.; Leeuwen, F.E. van

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Information on clinically verified stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) following Hodgkin lymphoma is scarce. We quantified the long-term risk of cerebrovascular disease associated with the use of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma and explored potential

  16. miRNA Expression Profiles in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Blood of Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sofie Sølvsten; Nygaard, Ann-Britt; Nielsen, Ming-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the study were (1) to determine whether miRNAs (microRNAs) can be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood of patients with ischemic stroke and (2) to compare these miRNA profiles with corresponding profiles from other neurological patients to address whether the miRNA prof...

  17. Association between oxidized low-density lipoprotein and cognitive impairment in patients with ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, A; Liu, J; Meng, X; Li, J; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Su, Z; Zhang, N; Dai, L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y

    2018-01-01

    The association between oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and cognitive impairment is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the potential association between oxLDL and cognitive impairment among patients with acute ischemic stroke. We measured the levels of oxLDL and recorded the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score in patients with acute ischemic stroke who were recruited from the Study of Oxidative Stress in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke. Cognitive impairment was defined as an MMSE score of impairment was assessed by multivariate logistic or linear regression analysis. Other clinical variables of interest were also studied. A total of 3726 patients [1287 (34.54%) female] were included in this study, with a mean age of 63.62 ± 11.96 years. After adjusting for potential confounders in our logistic regression model, each SD increase in oxLDL was associated with a 26% increase in the prevalence of cognitive impairment (odds radio, 1.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.39; P impairment (all interactions, P > 0.05). Elevated levels of oxLDL were associated with a higher prevalence of cognitive impairment in patients with ischemic stroke. © 2017 EAN.

  18. Long Course Hyperbaric Oxygen Stimulates Neurogenesis and Attenuates Inflammation after Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Sheng Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have provided evidence with regard to the neuroprotection benefits of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy in cases of stroke, and HBO also promotes bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs proliferation and mobilization. This study investigates the influence of HBO therapy on the migration of BMSCs, neurogenesis, gliosis, and inflammation after stroke. Rats that sustained transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO were treated with HBO three weeks or two days. The results were examined using a behavior test (modified neurological severity score, mNSS and immunostaining to evaluate the effects of HBO therapy on migration of BMSCs, neurogenesis, and gliosis, and expression of neurotrophic factors was also evaluated. There was a lower mNSS score in the three-week HBO group when compared with the two-day HBO group. Mobilization of BMSCs to an ischemic area was more improved in long course HBO treatments, suggesting the duration of therapy is crucial for promoting the homing of BMSCs to ischemic brain by HBO therapies. HBO also can stimulate expression of trophic factors and improve neurogenesis and gliosis. These effects may help in neuronal repair after ischemic stroke, and increasing the course of HBO therapy might enhance therapeutic effects on ischemic stroke.

  19. Timing of the effect of acetaminophen on body temperature in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dippel, DWJ; van Breda, EJ; van der Worp, H. Bart; van Gemert, HMA; Kappelle, LJ; Algra, A; Koudstaal, PJ

    2003-01-01

    The authors assessed the time of onset of the hypothermic effect of acetaminophen in 102 patients with acute ischemic stroke. These patients were randomized to treatment with either 1000 mg of acetaminophen (n=52) or placebo (n=50), given six times daily. Treatment with high-dose acetaminophen

  20. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to ischemic stroke: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pingping; Qin, Chao

    2014-02-10

    Associations between 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene C677T polymorphism and ischemic stroke have been reported (Ariyaratnam et al., 2007; Banerjee et al., 2007; Casas et al., 2004), but the results of these studies are inconsistent. To investigate the possible associations between the MTHFR gene polymorphism and ischemic stroke, we performed a meta-analysis. Nineteen case-control studies associated with MTHFR gene C667T involving 2223 cases and 2936 controls were included. Heterogeneity among studies was evaluated with I(2) and Egger's test and an inverted funnel plot was used to assess publication bias. Odds ratio (OR) was observed to identify the associations. Statistically significant association with ischemic stroke was identified for allele T polymorphism of MTHFR [fixed-effects OR=1.28, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.17-1.40, PMTHFR (fixed-effects OR=1.13, 95% CI: 1.01-127, P=0.04) and genotype TT of MTHFR (fixed-effects OR=1.43, 95% CI: 1.20-1.70, PMTHFR C667T genetic polymorphism was significantly associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke. © 2013.

  1. Thrombolysis with alteplase 3 to 4.5 hours after acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hacke, Werner; Kaste, Markku; Bluhmki, Erich; Brozman, Miroslav; Dávalos, Antoni; Guidetti, Donata; Larrue, Vincent; Lees, Kennedy R.; Medeghri, Zakaria; Machnig, Thomas; Schneider, Dietmar; von Kummer, Rüdiger; Wahlgren, Nils; Toni, Danilo; Hacke, W.; Dávalos, A.; Kaste, M.; von Kummer, R.; Larrue, V.; Toni, D.; Wahlgren, N.; Lees, K. R.; Heiss, W. D.; Lesaffre, E.; Orgogozo, J. M.; Bastianello, S.; Wardlaw, J. M.; Peyrieux, J.-C.; Sauce, C.; Medeghri, Z.; Mazenc, R.; Machnig, T.; Bluhmki, E.; Aichner, F.; Alf, C.; Baumhackl, U.; Brainin, M.; Eggers, C.; Gruber, F.; Ladurner, G.; Niederkorn, K.; Noistering, G.; Willeit, J.; Vanhooren, G.; Blecic, S.; Bruneel, B.; Caekebeke, J.; Laloux, P.; Simons, P. J.; Thijs, V.; Bar, M.; Dvorakova, H.; Vaclavik, D.; Boysen, G.; Andersen, G.; Iversen, H. K.; Traberg-Kristensen, B.; Marttila, R.; Sivenius, J.; Trouillas, P.; Amarenco, P.; Bouillat, J.; Ducrocq, X.; Giroud, M.; Jaillard, A.; Larrieu, J.-M.; Leys, D.; Magne, C.; Mahagne, M.-H.; Milhaud, D.; Sablot, D.; Saudeau, D.; Busse, O.; Berrouschot, J.; Faiss, J. H.; Glahn, J.; Görtler, M.; Grau, A.; Grond, M.; Haberl, R.; Hamann, G.; Hennerici, M.; Koch, H.; Krauseneck, P.; Marx, J.; Meves, S.; Meyding-Lamadé, U.; Ringleb, P.; Schneider, D.; Schwarz, A.; Sobesky, J.; Urban, P.; Karageorgiou, K.; Komnos, A.; Csányi, A.; Csiba, L.; Valikovics, A.; Agnelli, G.; Billo, G.; Bovi, P.; Comi, G.; Gigli, G.; Guidetti, D.; Inzitari, D.; Marcello, N.; Marini, C.; Orlandi, G.; Pratesi, M.; Rasura, M.; Semplicini, A.; Serrati, C.; Tassinari, T.; Brouwers, P. J. A. M.; Stam, J.; Naess, H.; Indredavik, B.; Kloster, R.; Czlonkowska, A.; Kuczyńska-Zardzewialy, A.; Nyka, W.; Opala, G.; Romanowicz, S.; Cunha, L.; Correia, C.; Cruz, V.; Pinho e Melo, T.; Brozman, M.; Dvorak, M.; Garay, R.; Krastev, G.; Kurca, E.; Alvarez-Sabin, J.; Chamorro, A.; del Mar Freijo Guerrero, M.; Herrero, J. A. E.; Gil-Peralta, A.; Leira, R.; Martí-Vilalta, J. L.; Masjuan Vallejo, J.; Millán, M.; Molina, C.; Mostacero, E.; Segura, T.; Serena, J.; Vivancos Mora, J.; Danielsson, E.; Cederin, B.; von Zweigberg, A. N.; Wahlgren, N.-G.; Welin, L.; Lyrer, P.; Bogousslavsky, J.; Hungerbühler, H.-J.; Weder, B.; Ford, G. A.; Jenkinson, D.; MacLeod, M. J.; MacWalter, R. S.; Markus, H. S.; Muir, K. W.; Sharma, A. K.; Walters, M. R.; Warburton, E. A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase is the only approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke, but its efficacy and safety when administered more than 3 hours after the onset of symptoms have not been established. We tested the efficacy and safety of alteplase administered between 3

  2. Thrombolysis with alteplase 3 to 4.5 hours after acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hacke, Werner; Kaste, Markku; Bluhmki, Erich

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase is the only approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke, but its efficacy and safety when administered more than 3 hours after the onset of symptoms have not been established. We tested the efficacy and safety of alteplase administered between ...

  3. The Effect of Sleep Disordered Breathing on the Outcome of Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Johannes; Clark, Alice J; Rod, Naja Hulvej

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective was to systematically review the literature on how sleep disordered breathing (SDB) affects recurrence and death among stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients. A secondary objective was to evaluate how treatment of SDB with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP...

  4. Silent intracerebral microhemorrhages in patients with ischemic stroke. Amsterdam Vascular Medicine Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwa, V. I.; Franke, C. L.; Verbeeten, B.; Stam, J.

    1998-01-01

    We compared the frequencies of signs of old intracerebral hemorrhages on brain magnetic resonance imaging scans in 66 patients with ischemic stroke, 69 with myocardial infarction, and 86 with peripheral arterial disease (a total of 221 patients). Magnetic resonance imaging scans were independently

  5. (148C/T), hyperfibrinogenemia and ischemic stroke in young adult

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association of β-fibrinogen promoter gene polymorphism (148C/T), hyperfibrinogenemia and ischemic stroke in young adult patients. ... Physical and neurological examinations, brain computed tomography, plasma fibrinogen levels and blood biochemistry tests were assessed within seven days after the onset of symptoms.

  6. Soluble CXCL16 and long-term outcome in acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ueland, T; Smedbakken, L M; Hallén, J

    2012-01-01

    CXCL16 is a chemokine involved in atherosclerosis by promoting inflammation, lipid accumulation and matrix degradation. The level of circulating CXCL16 has been proposed as a predictor of long-term mortality in acute coronary syndromes. We studied plasma CXCL16 in acute ischemic stroke and examin...

  7. Cerebral blood flow in acute and chronic ischemic stroke using xenon-133 inhalation tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorstrup, S; Paulson, O B; Lassen, N A

    1986-01-01

    Serial measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) were performed in 12 patients with acute symptoms of ischemic cerebrovascular disease. CBF was measured by xenon-133 inhalation and single photon emission computer tomography. Six patients had severe strokes and large infarcts on the CT scan...

  8. Impact of Stroke Center Certification on Mortality After Ischemic Stroke: The Medicare Cohort From 2009 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Shumei; Schold, Jesse D; Uchino, Ken

    2017-09-01

    An increasing number of hospitals have been certified as primary stroke centers (PSCs). It remains unknown whether the action toward PSC certification has improved the outcome of stroke care. This study aimed to understand whether PSC certification reduced stroke mortality. We examined Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries aged ≥65 years who were hospitalized between 2009 and 2013 for ischemic stroke. Hospitals were classified into 3 groups: new PSCs, the hospitals that received initial PSC certification between 2009 and 2013 (n=634); existing PSCs, the PSCs certified before 2009 (n=785); and non-SCs, the hospitals that have never been certified as PSCs (n=2640). Multivariate logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards model was used to compare the mortality among the 3 groups. Existing PSCs were significantly larger than new PSCs as reflected by total number of beds and annual stroke admission ( P stroke certification may reduce stroke mortality and overcome the disadvantage of being smaller hospitals. Further study of other outcome measures will be useful to improve stroke system of care. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Nonfasting Triglycerides and Risk of Ischemic Stroke in the General Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiberg, J.J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Jensen, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Context The role of triglycerides in the risk of ischemic stroke remains controversial. Recently, a strong association was found between elevated levels of nonfasting triglycerides, which indicate the presence of remnant lipoproteins, and increased risk of ischemic heart disease. Objective To test...... the hypothesis that increased levels of nonfasting triglycerides are associated with ischemic stroke in the general population. Design, Setting, and Participants The Copenhagen City Heart Study, a prospective, Danish population - based cohort study initiated in 1976, with follow- up through July 2007....... Participants were 13 956 men and women aged 20 through 93 years. A cross- sectional study included 9637 individuals attending the 1991- 1994 examination of the prospective study. Main Outcome Measures Prospective study: baseline levels of nonfasting triglycerides, other risk factors at baseline and at follow...

  10. Association of the Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in microRNAs 130b, 200b, and 495 with Ischemic Stroke Susceptibility and Post-Stroke Mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinkwon Kim

    Full Text Available The microRNA (miRNA is a small non-coding RNA molecule that modulates gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Platelets have a crucial role in both hemostasis and thrombosis, a condition that can occlude a cerebral artery and cause ischemic stroke. miR-130b, miR-200b, and miR-495 are potential genetic modulators involving platelet production and activation. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in these miRNAs might potentially contribute to the susceptibility to ischemic stroke and post-stroke mortality. This study included 523 ischemic stroke patients and 400 control subjects. We investigated the association of three miRNA SNPs (miR-130bT>C, miR-200bT>C, and miR-495A>C with ischemic stroke prevalence and post-stroke mortality. In the multivariate logistic regression, there was no statistically significant difference in the distribution of miR-130bT>C, miR-200bT>C, or miR-495A>C between the ischemic stroke and control groups. In the subgroup analysis based on ischemic stroke subtype, the miR-200b CC genotype was less frequently found in the large-artery atherosclerosis stroke subtype compared with controls (TT+CT vs CC; adjusted odds ratio for CC, 0.506; 95% confidence interval, 0.265-0.965. During a mean follow-up period of 4.80 ± 2.11 years after stroke onset, there were 106 all-cause deaths among the 523 stroke patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis did not find a significant association between post-stroke mortality and three miRNA SNPs. Our findings suggest that the functional SNP of miR-200b might be responsible for the susceptibility to large-artery atherosclerotic stroke.

  11. Statins and the Risk of Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Patients With Previous Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; Goldstein, Larry B; Cea Soriano, Lucía

    2017-01-01

    of preadmission statin use with the risk of ICH in patients with a history of IS or TIA in a population-based cohort. METHODS: The Health Improvement Network primary care database in the United Kingdom was used to identify new users of low-dose aspirin and a matched comparison. Both cohorts were followed......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although there is no overall association between statin use and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), whether there is an increased risk among those with a history of ischemic stroke (IS) or transient ischemic attack (TIA) remains controversial. We evaluated the relationship...... to identify incident cases of ICH, with validation by manual review of patient records and linkage to hospitalization data. In a nested case-control study, we compared the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for ICH based on statin use in the subgroup of individuals with history...

  12. Cross-sectional analysis of cognitive impairment and relative factors after acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU Yu-ying

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Acute ischemic stroke may decline cognitive function and induce vascular dementia (VaD. In early identification of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI, active searching for relevant factors, effective and timely treatment can reduce or even prevent further decline of cognitive function. The purpose of this study is to investigate the cognitive impairment after acute ischemic stroke and its associated factors. Methods A total of 314 cases of acute ischemic stroke patients were recruited in this study. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA was used to evaluate the degree of cognitive impairment. The American National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS was used to evaluate the extent of neurological deficit. The Barthel Index (BI was used to evaluate activities of daily living. Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD was used to evaluate the patients' mental or emotional state. Results Based on the examination results, post-stroke cognitive impairment (PSCI group were less educated ( P = 0.000 with lower BI score ( P = 0.008, higher HAMD score and higher NIHSS score ( P = 0.000, for all, and elevated serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, P = 0.002 and glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c levels (P = 0.005 than those in post-stroke no cognitive impairment (PSNCI group. In PSCI group, the concentration of serum hs-CRP and HbA1c, NIHSS and HAMD scores were negatively correlated with the MoCA rating (P < 0.05, for all; whereas, BI score was positively correlated with the MoCA rating (P < 0.05. The subjects in PSCI group had more cortical ischemic vascular disease (CIVD and left hemisphere ischemic vascular disease (LHIVD than subjects in PSNCI group ( P < 0.05. Logistic regression analysis indicated that lower education, history of diabetes, higher HAMD score, higher serum hs-CRP and HbA1c levels were independent risk factors for PSCI. Conclusion Cognitive impairment after acute ischemic stroke may be closely related to

  13. Upregulated Serum MiR-146b Serves as a Biomarker for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhen Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Stroke is a major cerebrovascular disease threatening human health and life with high morbidity, disability and mortality. It is aimed to find effective biomarkers for the early diagnosis on stroke. Methods: The expressions of 17 previously reported stroke-associated miRNAs were measured using quantitative RT-PCR and the expressions of plasma high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP and serum interleukin 6 (IL-6, the pro-inflammation markers in brain injury, were examined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 128 acute ischemic stroke (AIS patients and control group. Results: Serum miR-146b expression was significantly increased within 24 hours after stroke onset in patients compared with control group. In addition, the upregulation of serum miR-146b was strong positively correlated with plasma hs-CRP, infarct volume and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS score, and moderate positively correlated with serum IL-6 of patients. Importantly, the combination of plasma hs-CRP and serum miR-146b gained a better sensitivity/specificity for prediction of AIS (AUC from 0.782 to 0.863. Conclusion: Our preliminary findings suggested that upregulated serum miR-146b in acute ischemic stroke might be a potential biomarker for AIS evaluation.

  14. The Role of Citicoline in Neuroprotection and Neurorepair in Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo C. Román

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Advances in acute stroke therapy resulting from thrombolytic treatment, endovascular procedures, and stroke units have improved significantly stroke survival and prognosis; however, for the large majority of patients lacking access to advanced therapies stroke mortality and residual morbidity remain high and many patients become incapacitated by motor and cognitive deficits, with loss of independence in activities of daily living. Therefore, over the past several years, research has been directed to limit the brain lesions produced by acute ischemia (neuroprotection and to increase the recovery, plasticity and neuroregenerative processes that complement rehabilitation and enhance the possibility of recovery and return to normal functions (neurorepair. Citicoline has therapeutic effects at several stages of the ischemic cascade in