WorldWideScience

Sample records for experimental evidence indicating

  1. Ingratiation: Experimental Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Robin, Stéphane; Rusinowska, Agnieszka; Villeval, Marie Claire

    2014-01-01

    We investigate experimentally ingratiatory behavior expressed by opinion conformity. Both individuals' performance at a task and their opinions on various topics can be observed before unequal payoffs are assigned by a second mover. In some treatments, first movers can change their opinion after learning that held by the second mover. We find evidence of high ingratiation indices, as opinion conformity is rewarded. However, second movers reward conformity less when it is common knowledge that...

  2. Indicators of Evidence for Bioequivalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Morgenthaler

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Some equivalence tests are based on two one-sided tests, where in many applications the test statistics are approximately normal. We define and find evidence for equivalence in Z-tests and then one- and two-sample binomial tests as well as for t-tests. Multivariate equivalence tests are typically based on statistics with non-central chi-squared or non-central F distributions in which the non-centrality parameter λ is a measure of heterogeneity of several groups. Classical tests of the null λ ≥ λ 0 versus the equivalence alternative λ < λ 0 are available, but simple formulae for power functions are not. In these tests, the equivalence limit λ 0 is typically chosen by context. We provide extensions of classical variance stabilizing transformations for the non-central chi-squared and F distributions that are easy to implement and which lead to indicators of evidence for equivalence. Approximate power functions are also obtained via simple expressions for the expected evidence in these equivalence tests.

  3. Facial expressions and speech acts: experimental evidences on the role of the upper face as an illocutionary force indicating device in language comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domaneschi, Filippo; Passarelli, Marcello; Chiorri, Carlo

    2017-08-01

    Language scientists have broadly addressed the problem of explaining how language users recognize the kind of speech act performed by a speaker uttering a sentence in a particular context. They have done so by investigating the role played by the illocutionary force indicating devices (IFIDs), i.e., all linguistic elements that indicate the illocutionary force of an utterance. The present work takes a first step in the direction of an experimental investigation of non-verbal IFIDs because it investigates the role played by facial expressions and, in particular, of upper-face action units (AUs) in the comprehension of three basic types of illocutionary force: assertions, questions, and orders. The results from a pilot experiment on production and two comprehension experiments showed that (1) certain upper-face AUs seem to constitute non-verbal signals that contribute to the understanding of the illocutionary force of questions and orders; (2) assertions are not expected to be marked by any upper-face AU; (3) some upper-face AUs can be associated, with different degrees of compatibility, with both questions and orders.

  4. Ingratiation and Favoritism: Experimental Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Robin, Stéphane; Rusinowska, Agnieszka; Villeval, Marie Claire

    2012-01-01

    URL des Documents de travail : http://centredeconomiesorbonne.univ-paris1.fr/documents-de-travail-du-ces/; Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 2012.32 - ISSN : 1955-611X; We provide experimental evidence of worker's ingratiation by opinion conformity and of managers' discrimination in favor of workers with whom they share similar opinions. In our Baseline, managers can observe both workers' performance at a task and opinions before assigning unequal payoffs. In the Ingrat...

  5. Experimental Evidence on Transfer Pricing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Quoc H.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We use incentivized economics experiments to test both the point predictions and comparative static predictions of optimal transfer pricing models, comparing behavior under varying conditions, including wholly versus partially-owned subsidiaries and different tariff and tax rates. As predicted, we find that transfer prices are responsive to relative tax and tariff rates as well as ownership proportions. Additionally, we examine convergence and learning in this setting. While individuals do not choose optimal transfer prices, their choices converge to optimal levels with experience. This paper thus makes two important contributions. First, by comparing behavior with theoretical predictions it provides evidence of whether (and when individuals set transfer prices optimally. Second, by comparing behavior under conditions of full and partial ownership it provides evidence on the impact of policy interventions (like regulating ownership proportions by MNEs on tax revenues.

  6. Income Aspirations and Cooperation : Experimental Evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalton, P.S.

    2010-01-01

    This article is the first attempt to study the empirical link between income aspirations and cooperation in a one shot public good game. By combining experimental with survey data, we find evidence that the more frustrated people are with their income, the lower is their propensity to cooperate with

  7. Microorganisms as Analytical Indicators. Experimental Methods and Techniques,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    development of methods of biological indication of chemicals. Representatives of the most varied groups of saprophytic microorganisms are currently used as...AD-A120 295 ARMY MEDICAL BIOENGINEERING, RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT -- ETC F/6 6/13 MICROORGANISMS AS ANALYTICAL INDICATORS. EXPERIMENTAL METHODS A-ETC...block number) L-.! A wide range of substances in envirormental and other materials can be monitored through use of various microorganisms as indicators

  8. SEGA mode locking, first experimental indications of operation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenbeuving, Ruud; Lee, Christopher James; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2012-01-01

    We present an alternative scheme for laser mode-locking and discuss its first experimental indications of operation. In this scheme, a large set of spatially separated gain (SEGA) media generate single-frequency continuous-wave (CW) light beams arranged as an approximately equidistant spectral

  9. Experimental evidence of electromagnetic pollution of ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronenko, Vira; Korepanov, Valery; Dudkin, Denis

    multiple low orbiting satellites have confirmed a significant increase in their intensity over the populated areas of Europe and Asia. Recently, there are many experimental evidences of the existence of power line harmonic radiation (PLHR) in the ionosphere. Their spectra consist of succession of 50 (60) Hz harmonics which is accompanied by a set of lines separated by 50 (60) or 100 (120) Hz - the central frequency of which is shifted to high frequency. These lines cover rather wide band - according to the available experimental data, their central frequencies are observed from ~1.5 - 3 kHz up to 15 kHz, and recently the main mains frequencies are also observed. The examples of power line harmonic radiation, which were detected by “Sich-1M”, “Chibis-M” and “Demeter” satellites, have been presented and discussed. The available experimental data, as well as theoretical estimations, allow us with a high degree of certainty to say that the permanent satellite monitoring of the ionospheric and magnetospheric anthropogenic EM perturbations is necessary for: a) objective assessment and prediction of the space weather conditions; b) evaluation of the daily or seasonal changes in the level of energy consumption; c) construction of a map for estimation of near space EM pollution. This study is partially supported by SSAU contract N 4-03/13.

  10. Experimental evidence of the Frenkel line in supercritical neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescher, C.; Fomin, Yu. D.; Prakapenka, V. B.; Stefanski, J.; Trachenko, K.; Brazhkin, V. V.

    2017-04-01

    Recent research suggests that the supercritical state consists of liquidlike and gaslike states where particle dynamics and key system properties are qualitatively different. We report experimental evidence of the structural crossover in supercritical neon at pressure and temperature conditions significantly exceeding the critical point values: 250 Pc and 6.6 Tc . The experimental results show a crossover of the medium-range order structure evidenced by the change of the structure factor with pressure. We also observe the crossover of the short-range order structure indicated by changes in the coordination number. The relative width of the crossover is fairly narrow and is smaller than 10-12% in pressure and temperature. By comparing our experimental results with molecular dynamics simulations, we suggest that the observed crossover can be attributed to the Frenkel line and discuss the relationship between the structural crossover and qualitative changes of dynamical and thermodynamic properties of supercritical matter.

  11. Experimental Evidence on Valuation with Multiple Priors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiu, J.; Weitzel, G.U.

    2016-01-01

    Popular models for decision making under ambiguity assume that people use not one but multiple priors. This paper is a first attempt to experimentally elicit the min and the max of multiple priors directly. In an ambiguous scenario we measure a participant’s single prior, her min and max of multiple

  12. Experimental evidence of infrared scintillation in crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Belogurov, S; Carugno, Giovanni; Conti, E; Iannuzzi, D; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa

    2000-01-01

    We present experimental results on infrared emission induced by protons in some solid-state samples. Infrared scintillation occurs in many crystals, with different yield values and time-response behaviours. A rough measurement of the emission wavelength of CsI(Tl) is also reported.

  13. Endogenous Timing in Duopoly : Experimental Evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonseca, M.A.; Müller, W.; Normann, H.T.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we experimentally investigate the extended game with observable delay of Hamilton and Slutsky (Games Econ.Beh., 1990).Firms bindingly announce a production period (one out of two periods) and then they produce in the announced sequence.Theory predicts simultaneous production in period

  14. Experimental evidence for Wigner's tunneling time

    CERN Document Server

    Camus, Nicolas; Fechner, Lutz; Klaiber, Michael; Laux, Martin; Mi, Yonghao; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z; Pfeifer, Thomas; Keitel, Christoph H; Moshammer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Tunneling of a particle through a potential barrier remains one of the most remarkable quantum phenomena. Owing to advances in laser technology, electric fields comparable to those electrons experience in atoms are readily generated and open opportunities to dynamically investigate the process of electron tunneling through the potential barrier formed by the superposition of both laser and atomic fields. Attosecond-time and angstrom-space resolution of the strong laser-field technique allow to address fundamental questions related to tunneling, which are still open and debated: Which time is spent under the barrier and what momentum is picked up by the particle in the meantime? In this combined experimental and theoretical study we demonstrate that for strong-field ionization the leading quantum mechanical Wigner treatment for the time resolved description of tunneling is valid. We achieve a high sensitivity on the tunneling barrier and unambiguously isolate its effects by performing a differential study of t...

  15. Experimental evidence for circular inference in schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardri, Renaud; Duverne, Sandrine; Litvinova, Alexandra S.; Denève, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a complex mental disorder that may result in some combination of hallucinations, delusions and disorganized thinking. Here SCZ patients and healthy controls (CTLs) report their level of confidence on a forced-choice task that manipulated the strength of sensory evidence and prior information. Neither group's responses can be explained by simple Bayesian inference. Rather, individual responses are best captured by a model with different degrees of circular inference. Circular inference refers to a corruption of sensory data by prior information and vice versa, leading us to `see what we expect' (through descending loops), to `expect what we see' (through ascending loops) or both. Ascending loops are stronger for SCZ than CTLs and correlate with the severity of positive symptoms. Descending loops correlate with the severity of negative symptoms. Both loops correlate with disorganized symptoms. The findings suggest that circular inference might mediate the clinical manifestations of SCZ.

  16. Time discounting and pain anticipation. Experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brañas Garza, Pablo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with pain anticipation experienced before medical procedures. our experimental results show that individuals with lower time discount factors are more prone to suffer pain in advance. We provide a framework to rationalize the connection between pain anticipation and impatience. in this set up, more impatient subjects, who only value very near events, mainly take into account the present negative effects of medical procedures (the costs, whereas more patient individuals have a net positive valuation of medical events, given that they are able to value both the cost incurred now and all the benefits to be accrued in the future.

    Este artículo trata de la anticipación del dolor experimentada antes de los procedimientos médicos. nuestros resultados experimentales muestran que los individuos con factor de descuento temporal más bajo son más proclives a sufrir dolor por adelantado. el artículo proporciona un marco en el que racionalizar la relación existente entre impaciencia y anticipación del dolor. en este marco, los sujetos más impacientes, que evalúan sólo los eventos muy próximos en el tiempo, focalizan su atención principalmente en los efectos negativos de los procedimientos médicos (sólo los costes, mientras que los individuos más pacientes tienen una valoración neta positiva de los actos médicos puesto que valoran tanto el coste en el que se incurre en el presente como los beneficios que se obtendrán en el futuro.

  17. Experimental evidence of pollination in marine flowers by invertebrate fauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tussenbroek, Brigitta I.; Villamil, Nora; Márquez-Guzmán, Judith; Wong, Ricardo; Monroy-Velázquez, L. Verónica; Solis-Weiss, Vivianne

    2016-01-01

    Pollen transport by water-flow (hydrophily) is a typical, and almost exclusive, adaptation of plants to life in the marine environment. It is thought that, unlike terrestrial environments, animals are not involved in pollination in the sea. The male flowers of the tropical marine angiosperm Thalassia testudinum open-up and release pollen in mucilage at night when invertebrate fauna is active. Here we present experimental evidence that, in the absence of water-flow, these invertebrates visit the flowers, carry and transfer mucilage mass with embedded pollen from the male flowers to the stigmas of the female flowers. Pollen tubes are formed on the stigmas, indicating that pollination is successful. Thus, T. testudinum has mixed abiotic–biotic pollination. We propose a zoobenthophilous pollination syndrome (pollen transfer in the benthic zone by invertebrate animals) which shares many characteristics with hydrophily, but flowers are expected to open-up during the night. PMID:27680661

  18. Female rose bitterling prefer MHC-dissimilar males: experimental evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Reichard

    Full Text Available The role of genetic benefits in female mate choice remains a controversial aspect of sexual selection theory. In contrast to "good allele" models of sexual selection, "compatible allele" models of mate choice predict that females prefer mates with alleles complementary to their own rather than conferring additive effects. While correlative results suggest complementary genetic effects to be plausible, direct experimental evidence is scarce. A previous study on the Chinese rose bitterling (Rhodeus ocellatus demonstrated a positive correlation between female mate choice, offspring growth and survival, and the functional dissimilarity between the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC alleles of males and females. Here we directly tested whether females used cues associated with MHC genes to select genetically compatible males in an experimental framework. By sequentially pairing females with MHC similar and dissimilar males, based on a priori known MHC profiles, we showed that females discriminated between similar and dissimilar males and deposited significantly more eggs with MHC dissimilar males. Notably, the degree of dissimilarity was an important factor for female decision to mate, possibly indicating a potential threshold value of dissimilarity for decision making, or of an indirect effect of the MHC.

  19. Evidence-based practice: a quality indicator analysis of peer-tutoring in adapted physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalef, Laura; Reid, Greg; Macdonald, Cathy

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of the research was to conduct a quality indicator analysis of studies investigating peer-tutoring for students with a disability in adapted physical education. An electronic search was conducted among English journals published from 1960 to November 2012. Databases included ERIC, PsycINFO, and SPORTDiscus. Fifteen research studies employing group-experimental (Gersten et al., 2005) or single-subject designs (Horner et al., 2005) met inclusion criteria. Each study was assessed for the presence and clarity of quality indicators. Group designs met an average of 62.5% essential and 69% desirable indicators. An average of 80% of indicators was present for single-subject designs. Results suggest claims of peer-tutoring being an evidence-based practice are premature. Recommendations for clarifying and applying the quality indicators are offered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Experimental evidence of vibrational resonance in a multistable system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizhevsky, V. N.

    2014-06-01

    Experimental evidence of vibrational resonance in a multistable vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) is reported. The VCSEL is characterized by a coexistence of four polarization states and driven by low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) periodic signals. In these conditions a series of resonances on the low frequency depending on the HF amplitude is observed. The location of resonances in a parameter space (dc current, amplitude of HF signal) is experimentally studied. For a fixed value of the dc current an evolution of the resonance curves with an increase of the LF amplitude is experimentally investigated.

  1. Single-Subject Experimental Design for Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byiers, Breanne J.; Reichle, Joe; Symons, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Single-subject experimental designs (SSEDs) represent an important tool in the development and implementation of evidence-based practice in communication sciences and disorders. The purpose of this article is to review the strategies and tactics of SSEDs and their application in speech-language pathology research. Method: The authors…

  2. Development and Experimental Application of International Affairs Indicators. Volume A

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-01

    sections of the report. The technical research staff is as follows: Don R. Harris. Project Director and Principal Investigator Herbert L. Calhoun James...OF ISSUE INDICATORS James Moore Michael Maxfield Barbai.^ Hughes Don Krysakowski ! WASHING ION. DC. OF M( KS: IMS NOKIH KOK ■ MVI K DRIVE ARI...TABLE 15 Prediction Date State Pattern Transition April 23 S8: F->D May 28 Sl: n~*T June 25 S8: F->D July 16 S8: IHH August 13 S4: IHD The

  3. Pediatric head trauma: the evidence regarding indications for emergent neuroimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuppermann, Nathan [UC Davis Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Departments of Emergency Medicine and Pediatrics, Davis, CA (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of childhood death and disability worldwide. In the United States, childhood head trauma results in approximately 3,000 deaths, 50,000 hospitalizations, and 650,000 emergency department (ED) visits annually. Children presenting to the ED with seemingly minor head trauma account for approximately one-half of children with documented TBIs. Despite the frequency and importance of childhood minor head trauma, there exists no highly accurate, reliable and validated clinical scoring system or prediction rule for assessing risk of TBI among those with minor head trauma. At the same time, use of CT scanning in these children in recent years has increased substantially. The major benefit of CT scanning is early identification (and treatment) of TBIs that might otherwise be missed and result in increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Unnecessary CT imaging, however, exposes the child needlessly to the risk of radiation-induced malignancies. What constitutes appropriate criteria for obtaining CT scans in children after minor blunt head trauma remains controversial. Current evidence to guide clinicians in this regard is limited; however, large studies performed in multi-center research networks have recently been conducted. These studies should provide the foundation of evidence to guide CT decisions by clinicians, help identify TBIs in a timely fashion, and reduce unnecessary radiation exposure. (orig.)

  4. Experimental evidence of three-wave coupling on plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidalgo, C.; Sanchez, E.; Estrada, T.; Branas, B.; Ritz, C.P. (Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain)); Uckan, T.; Harris, J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37931 (United States)); Wootton, A.J. (Fusion Research Center, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States))

    1993-11-08

    Experimental evidence of the nonlinear nature of the broadband edge fluctuations has been obtained in edge turbulence in the Advanced Toroidal Facility torsatron. Whereas little nonlinear wave interaction is found in the scrape-off layer region, three-wave coupling is enhanced in the plasma edge region ([ital r][lt][ital a][sub shear]). The degree of three-wave coupling strongly depends on the plasma conditions; it decreases in the temperature range ([ital T][sub [ital e

  5. Experimental evidence for mixed reality states in an interreality system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gintautas, Vadas; Hübler, Alfred W

    2007-05-01

    We present experimental data on the limiting behavior of an interreality system comprising a virtual horizontally driven pendulum coupled to its real-world counterpart, where the interaction time scale is much shorter than the time scale of the dynamical system. We present experimental evidence that, if the physical parameters of the simplified virtual system match those of the real system within a certain tolerance, there is a transition from an uncorrelated dual reality state to a mixed reality state of the system in which the motion of the two pendula is highly correlated. The region in parameter space for stable solutions has an Arnold tongue structure for both the experimental data and a numerical simulation. As virtual systems better approximate real ones, even weak coupling in other interreality systems may produce sudden changes to mixed reality states.

  6. Experimental evidence of conformal invariance in soap film turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Thalabard, S; Artana, G; Mininni, P D; Pouquet, A

    2010-01-01

    We present experimental evidence of statistical conformal invariance in isocontours of fluid thickness in experiments of two-dimensional turbulence using soap films. A Schlieren technique is used to visualize regions of the flow with constant film thickness, and association of isocontours with Schramm-L\\"owner evolution (SLE) is used to identify conformal invariance. In experiments where an inverse energy cascade develops, statistical evidence is consistent with such an association. The diffusivity of the associated one-dimensional Brownian process is close to 8/3, a value previously identified in isocontours of vorticity in high-resolution numerical simulations of two-dimensional turbulence (D. Bernard et al., Nature Phys. 2, 124, 2006). In experiments where the inverse energy cascade is not sufficiently developed, no statistical evidence of conformal invariance is found.

  7. Prescribing amiodarone: an evidence-based review of clinical indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassallo, Patricia; Trohman, Richard G

    2007-09-19

    Although amiodarone is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration only for refractory ventricular arrhythmias, it is one of the most frequently prescribed antiarrhythmic medications in the United States. To evaluate and synthesize evidence regarding optimal use of amiodarone for various arrhythmias. Systematic search of MEDLINE to identify peer-reviewed clinical trials, randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, and other studies with clinical pertinence. The search was limited to human-participant, English-language reports published between 1970 and 2007. Amiodarone was searched using the terms adverse effects, atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, congestive heart failure, electrical storm, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, surgery, ventricular arrhythmia, ventricular fibrillation, and Wolff-Parkinson-White. Bibliographies of identified articles and guidelines from official societies were reviewed for additional references. Ninety-two identified studies met inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Amiodarone may have clinical value in patients with left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure as first-line treatment for atrial fibrillation, though other agents are available. Amiodarone is useful in acute management of sustained ventricular tachyarrythmias, regardless of hemodynamic stability. The only role for prophylactic amiodarone is in the perioperative period of cardiac surgery. Amiodarone may be effective as an adjunct to implantable cardioverter-defibrillator therapy to reduce number of shocks. However, amiodarone has a number of serious adverse effects, including corneal microdeposits (>90%), optic neuropathy/neuritis (Amiodarone should be used with close follow-up in patients who are likely to derive the most benefit, namely those with atrial fibrillation and left ventricular dysfunction, those with acute sustained ventricular arrhythmias, those about to undergo cardiac surgery, and those with

  8. Experimental evidence for herbivore limitation of the treeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed, James D M; Austrheim, Gunnar; Hester, Alison J; Mysterud, Atle

    2010-11-01

    The treeline ecotone divides forest from open alpine or arctic vegetation states. Treelines are generally perceived to be temperature limited. The role of herbivores in limiting the treeline is more controversial, as experimental evidence from relevant large scales is lacking. Here we quantify the impact of different experimentally controlled herbivore densities on the recruitment and survival of birch Betula pubescens tortuosa along an altitudinal gradient in the mountains of southern Norway. After eight years of summer grazing in large-scale enclosures at densities of 0, 25, and 80 sheep/km2, birch recruited within the whole altitudinal range of ungrazed enclosures, but recruitment was rarer in enclosures with low-density sheep and was largely limited to within the treeline in enclosures with high-density sheep. In contrast, the distribution of saplings (birch older than the experiment) did not differ between grazing treatments, suggesting that grazing sheep primarily limit the establishment of new tree recruits rather than decrease the survival of existing individuals. This study provides direct experimental evidence that herbivores can limit the treeline below its potential at the landscape scale and even at low herbivore densities in this climatic zone. Land use changes should thus be considered in addition to climatic changes as potential drivers of ecotone shifts.

  9. Single-subject experimental design for evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byiers, Breanne J; Reichle, Joe; Symons, Frank J

    2012-11-01

    Single-subject experimental designs (SSEDs) represent an important tool in the development and implementation of evidence-based practice in communication sciences and disorders. The purpose of this article is to review the strategies and tactics of SSEDs and their application in speech-language pathology research. The authors discuss the requirements of each design, followed by advantages and disadvantages. The logic and methods for evaluating effects in SSED are reviewed as well as contemporary issues regarding data analysis with SSED data sets. Examples of challenges in executing SSEDs are included. Specific exemplars of how SSEDs have been used in speech-language pathology research are provided throughout. SSED studies provide a flexible alternative to traditional group designs in the development and identification of evidence-based practice in the field of communication sciences and disorders.

  10. Experimental evidence of planar channeling in a periodically bent crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagli, E.; Bandiera, L.; Bellucci, V.; Camattari, R.; Germogli, G.; Guidi, V.; Mazzolari, A. [Univ. di Ferrara, Dipartimento di Fisica, Ferrara (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Ferrara (Italy); Berra, A.; Lietti, D.; Prest, M. [Univ. dell' Insubria, Como (Italy); INFN Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); De Salvador, D. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Univ. di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Padua (Italy); Lanzoni, L. [San Marino Univ. (San Marino). Dept. of Engineering; Tikhomirov, V.V. [Belarusian State University, Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Minsk (Belarus); Vallazza, E. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    The usage of a crystalline undulator (CU) has been identified as a promising solution for generating powerful and monochromatic γ-rays. A CU was fabricated at Sensors and Semiconductors Lab (SSL) through the grooving method, i.e., by the manufacturing of a series of periodical grooves on the major surfaces of a crystal. The CU was extensively characterized both morphologically via optical interferometry at SSL and structurally via X-ray diffraction at ESRF. Then, it was finally tested for channeling with a 400 GeV/c proton beam at CERN. The experimental results were compared to Monte Carlo simulations. Evidence of planar channeling in the CU was firmly observed. Finally, the emission spectrum of the positron beam interacting with the CU was simulated for possible usage in currently existing facilities. (orig.)

  11. Experimental evidence for action imitation in killer whales (Orcinus orca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, José Z; Hernández-Lloreda, Victoria; Call, Josep; Colmenares, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Comparative experimental studies of imitative learning have focused mainly on primates and birds. However, cetaceans are promising candidates to display imitative learning as they have evolved in socioecological settings that have selected for large brains, complex sociality, and coordinated predatory tactics. Here we tested imitative learning in killer whales, Orcinus orca. We used a 'do-as-other-does' paradigm in which 3 subjects witnessed a conspecific demonstrator's performance that included 15 familiar and 4 novel behaviours. The three subjects (1) learned the copy command signal 'Do that' very quickly, that is, 20 trials on average; (2) copied 100 % of the demonstrator's familiar and novel actions; (3) achieved full matches in the first attempt for 8-13 familiar behaviours (out of 15) and for the 2 novel behaviours (out of 2) in one subject; and (4) took no longer than 8 trials to accurately copy any familiar behaviour, and no longer than 16 trials to copy any novel behaviour. This study provides experimental evidence for body imitation, including production imitation, in killer whales that is comparable to that observed in dolphins tested under similar conditions. These findings suggest that imitative learning may underpin some of the group-specific traditions reported in killer whales in the field.

  12. CHANGING OF THE BIOCHEMICAL INDICES ON REGENERATION OF EXPERIMENTAL DEFECT OF THE MANDIBLE BONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Borysenko

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The results of an experimental biochemical investigation on the influence of the proposed drug composition for the experimental mandible bone defect regeneration in rats were presented. The high efficiency and osteoregenerative properties of this paste were shown. The experimental investigations showed that the proposed drug composition exerts a considerable normalization influence upon the biochemical indicators of bone mineral metabolism, comparable to Collapan influence.

  13. Screen Time and Health Indicators Among Children and Youth: Current Evidence, Limitations and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Travis J; Vallance, Jeff K

    2017-06-01

    Despite accumulating evidence linking screen-based sedentary behaviours (i.e. screen time) with poorer health outcomes among children and youth self-esteem, pro-social behaviour, academic achievement, depression and anxiety. However, few longitudinal or intervention studies have been conducted, with most of these studies focusing on physical health indicators. While most studies have used self-reported assessments of screen time, the availability of more objective assessment methods presents important opportunities (e.g. more accurate and precise assessment of sedentary time and screen time) and challenges (e.g. privacy and participant burden). Novel statistical approaches such as isotemporal substitution modelling and compositional analysis, as well as studies using longitudinal and experimental methodologies, are needed to better understand the health impact of excessive screen time, and to develop strategies to minimise or reverse the negative impacts of these behaviours. The evidence to date suggests a clear need for policy aimed at minimising the hazardous health consequences associated with screen time among children and youth.

  14. The mechanics of intermediate and deep focus earthquakes: experimental evidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubnel, A.; Hilairet, N.; Ferrand, T. P.; Incel, S.; Labrousse, L.; Renner, J.; Gasc, J.; Wang, Y.; Green, H. W., II

    2015-12-01

    At least part of the subducting slab seismic activity could be triggered by phase transformations and mineral reactions. However, the way mineral reactions can modify the deformation regime of deep rocks, from ductile to brittle (embrittlement) is still poorly understood and remains one of the outstanding unsolved problems of geophysics and rock mechanics. Here, we provide experimental evidence that, under differential stress at high pressure and temperature conditions (3-5GPa/800-1000°C), shear fractures nucleate and propagate at the onset of the olivine -> spinel transition in the Mg2GeO4 analogue system. The propagation of these fractures is sufficiently rapid to radiate energy in the form of intense acoustic emissions (AEs). Using a similar set-up, a second set of experiments demonstrates that glaucophane and lawsonite mixtures, two of the principal mineral water carriers in the subducted oceanic crust, undergo dynamic fracture instabilities when deformed within the eclogite field (3GPa/400-800°C). This time, AEs are observed due respectively to the glaucophane breakdown into jadeite and talc under low temperature and lawsonite dehydration under higher temperature. Finally, deformation experiments performed on partially serpentinized peridotites at 2-4GPa, 500-700°C, demonstrate that 5% serpentine in sufficient to trigger dehydration embrittlement of the peridotite body. In this case, low serpentine contents may favor initiation of mechanical failure of the olivine "load bearing" network. In all these three cases, various post-mortem microstructural observations techniques (SEM, TEM, Raman, Microprobe, X-ray tomography) reveals that samples deformed under stress almost systematically present high presure (HP) faulting, to the contrary of samples transformed under isostatic conditions. In addition, AEs correspond to acoustic waves radiated by dynamic HP transformational faulting and follow the Gutenberg-Richter law over sometimes more than 4 orders of moment

  15. Experimental and modelling evidence of shortening heat in cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Kenneth; Han, June-Chiew; Crampin, Edmund John; Taberner, Andrew James; Loiselle, Denis Scott

    2017-10-01

    Heat associated with muscle shortening has been repeatedly demonstrated in skeletal muscle, but its existence in cardiac muscle remains contentious after five decades of study. By iterating between experiments and computational modelling, we show compelling evidence for the existence of shortening heat in cardiac muscle and reveal, mechanistically, the source of this excess heat. Our results clarify a long-standing uncertainty in the field of cardiac muscle energetics. We provide a revised partitioning of cardiac muscle energy expenditure to include this newly revealed thermal component. When a muscle shortens against an afterload, the heat that it liberates is greater than that produced by the same muscle contracting isometrically at the same level of force. This excess heat is defined as 'shortening heat', and has been repeatedly demonstrated in skeletal muscle but not in cardiac muscle. Given the micro-structural similarities between these two muscle types, and since we imagine that shortening heat is the thermal accompaniment of cross-bridge cycling, we have re-examined this issue. Using our flow-through microcalorimeter, we measured force and heat generated by isolated rat trabeculae undergoing isometric contractions at different muscle lengths and work-loop (shortening) contractions at different afterloads. We simulated these experimental protocols using a thermodynamically constrained model of cross-bridge cycling and probed the mechanisms underpinning shortening heat. Predictions generated by the model were subsequently validated by a further set of experiments. Both our experimental and modelling results show convincing evidence for the existence of shortening heat in cardiac muscle. Its magnitude is inversely related to the afterload or, equivalently, directly related to the extent of shortening. Computational simulations reveal that the heat of shortening arises from the cycling of cross-bridges, and that the rate of ATP hydrolysis is more sensitive to

  16. Semantics guide infants' vowel learning: Computational and experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Schure, S M M; Junge, C M M; Boersma, P P G

    2016-05-01

    In their first year, infants' perceptual abilities zoom in on only those speech sound contrasts that are relevant for their language. Infants' lexicons do not yet contain sufficient minimal pairs to explain this phonetic categorization process. Therefore, researchers suggested a bottom-up learning mechanism: infants create categories aligned with the frequency distributions of sounds in their input. Recent evidence shows that this bottom-up mechanism may be complemented by the semantic context in which speech sounds occur, such as simultaneously present objects. To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether discrimination of a non-native vowel contrast improves when sounds from the contrast were paired consistently or randomly with two distinct visually presented objects, while the distribution of speech tokens suggested a single broad category. This was assessed in two ways: computationally, namely in a neural network simulation, and experimentally, namely in a group of 8-month-old infants. The neural network, trained with a large set of sound-meaning pairs, revealed that two categories emerge only if sounds are consistently paired with objects. A group of 49 real 8-month-old infants did not immediately show sensitivity to the pairing condition; a later test at 18 months with some of the same infants, however, showed that this sensitivity at 8 months interacted with their vocabulary size at 18 months. This interaction can be explained by the idea that infants with larger future vocabularies are more positively influenced by consistent training (and/or more negatively influenced by inconsistent training) than infants with smaller future vocabularies. This suggests that consistent pairing with distinct visual objects can help infants to discriminate speech sounds even when the auditory information does not signal a distinction. Together our results give computational as well as experimental support for the idea that semantic context plays a role in disambiguating

  17. Total systematic error in redox titrations with visual indicators--II. Experimental verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulanicki, A; Głab, S

    1976-08-01

    The equations for calculating the transition potential of a redox indicator and the total titration error have been verified experimentally. Good agreement has been obtained for reversible indicators such as Variamine Blue, 4-methyl-4'-aminodiphenylamine and ferroin. In the latter case it was shown that at the usual concentrations the indicator acts as a one-colour indicator, whereas for higher concentrations its behaviour is typical of a two-colour indicator. In the case of a pseudoreversible indicator--diphenylaminosulphonic acid--the calculated values give only the minimum error. In real conditions the error is always more positive.

  18. Early-Life Nutritional Programming of Type 2 Diabetes: Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M. Vaiserman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Consistent evidence from both experimental and human studies suggest that inadequate nutrition in early life can contribute to risk of developing metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes (T2D in adult life. In human populations, most findings supporting a causative relationship between early-life malnutrition and subsequent risk of T2D were obtained from quasi-experimental studies (‘natural experiments’. Prenatal and/or early postnatal exposures to famine were demonstrated to be associated with higher risk of T2D in many cohorts around the world. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of epigenetic regulation of gene expression as a possible major contributor to the link between the early-life famine exposure and T2D in adulthood. Findings from these studies suggest that prenatal exposure to the famine may result in induction of persistent epigenetic changes that have adaptive significance in postnatal development but can predispose to metabolic disorders including T2D at the late stages of life. In this review, quasi-experimental data on the developmental programming of T2D are summarized and recent research findings on changes in DNA methylation that mediate these effects are discussed.

  19. Models of Investor Forecasting Behavior — Experimental Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Bonetto

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Different forecasting behaviors affect investors’ trading decisions and lead to qualitatively different asset price trajectories. It has been shown in the literature that the weights that investors place on observed asset price changes when forecasting future price changes, and the nature of their confidence when price changes are forecast, determine whether price bubbles, price crashes, and unpredictable price cycles occur. In this paper, we report the results of behavioral experiments involving multiple investors who participated in a market for a virtual asset. Our goal is to study investors’ forecast formation. We conducted three experimental sessions with different participants in each session. We fit different models of forecast formation to the observed data. There is strong evidence that the investors forecast future prices by extrapolating past price changes, even when they know the fundamental value of the asset exactly and the extrapolated forecasts differ significantly from the fundamental value. The rational expectations hypothesis seems inconsistent with the observed forecasts. The forecasting models of all participants that best fit the observed forecasting data were of the type that cause price bubbles and cycles in dynamical systems models, and price bubbles and cycles ended up occurring in all three sessions.

  20. Experimental Evidence for Abiotic Sulfurization of Marine Dissolved Organic Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika M. Pohlabeln

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic sulfur (DOS is the largest pool of organic sulfur in the oceans, and as such it is an important component of the global sulfur cycle. DOS in the ocean is resistant against microbial degradation and turns over on a millennium time scale. However, sources and mechanisms behind its stability are largely unknown. Here, we hypothesize that in sulfate-reducing sediments sulfur is abiotically incorporated into dissolved organic matter (DOM and released to the ocean. We exposed natural seawater and the filtrate of a plankton culture to sulfidic conditions. Already after 1-h at 20°C, DOS concentrations had increased 4-fold in these experiments, and 14-fold after 4 weeks at 50°C, indicating that organic matter does not need long residence times in natural sulfidic environments to be affected by sulfurization. Molecular analysis via ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry showed that sulfur was covalently and unselectively bound to DOM. Experimentally produced and natural DOS from sediments were highly similar on a molecular and structural level. By combining our data with published benthic DOC fluxes we estimate that 30–200 Tg DOS are annually transported from anaerobic and sulfate reducing sediments to the oceans. Uncertainties in this first speculative assessment are large. However, this first attempt illustrates that benthic DOS flux is potentially one order of magnitude larger than that via rivers indicating that this could balance the estimated global net removal of refractory DOS.

  1. A preliminary study of wildland fire pattern indicator reliability following an experimental fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert Simeoni; Zachary C. Owens; Erik W. Christiansen; Abid Kemal; Michael Gallagher; Kenneth L. Clark; Nicholas Skowronski; Eric V. Mueller; Jan C. Thomas; Simon Santamaria; Rory M. Hadden

    2017-01-01

    An experimental fire was conducted in 2016, in the Pinelands National Reserve of New Jersey, to assess the reliability of the fire pattern indicators used in wildland fire investigation. Objects were planted in the burn area to support the creation of the indicators. Fuel properties and environmental data were recorded. Video and infrared cameras were used to document...

  2. Predicting the Unpredictable: 75 Years of Experimental Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radin, Dean I.

    2011-11-01

    From time immemorial, people have reported foreknowledge of future events. To determine whether such experiences are best understood via conventional explanations, or whether a retrocausal phenomenon might be involved in some instances, researchers have conducted hundreds of controlled laboratory experiments over the past 75 years. These studies fall into four general classes, and each class has generated repeatable evidence consistent with retrocausation. The statistical results for a class of forced-choice studies is associated with odds against chance of about 1024; for a class of free-response studies, odds about 1020; for psychophysiological-based studies, odds about 1017; and for implicit decision studies, odds about 1010. Effect sizes observed in the latter three classes are nearly identical, indicating replication of similar underlying effects. These effects are also in close agreement with the average effect size across 25,000 conventional social psychology experiments conducted over the last century, suggesting that retrocausal phenomena may not be especially unique, at least not in terms of the magnitude of effect. Bayesian analyses of the most recent classes of experiments confirm that the evidence is strongly in favor of a genuine effect, with Bayes Factors ranging from 13,669 to 1 for implicit decision experiments, to 2.9×1013 to 1 for psychophysiological designs. For the two most recent classes of studies examining retrocausal effects via unconscious physiological or behavioral measures, 85 of 101 studies (84%) reported by 25 different laboratories from the United States, Italy, Spain, Holland, Austria, Sweden, England, Scotland, Iran, Japan, and Australia, have produced results in the direction predicted by a retrocausal effect (odds against chance = 1.3×1012, via a sign test). Assessment of the methodologies used in these studies has not identified plausible conventional alternatives for the observed outcomes, suggesting the existence of a

  3. Self-Organization of Blood Pressure Regulation: Experimental Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortrat, Jacques-Olivier; Levrard, Thibaud; Courcinous, Sandrine; Victor, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure regulation is a prime example of homeostatic regulation. However, some characteristics of the cardiovascular system better match a non-linear self-organized system than a homeostatic one. To determine whether blood pressure regulation is self-organized, we repeated the seminal demonstration of self-organized control of movement, but applied it to the cardiovascular system. We looked for two distinctive features peculiar to self-organization: non-equilibrium phase transitions and hysteresis in their occurrence when the system is challenged. We challenged the cardiovascular system by means of slow, 20-min Tilt-Up and Tilt-Down tilt table tests in random order. We continuously determined the phase between oscillations at the breathing frequency of Total Peripheral Resistances and Heart Rate Variability by means of cross-spectral analysis. We looked for a significant phase drift during these procedures, which signed a non-equilibrium phase transition. We determined at which head-up tilt angle it occurred. We checked that this angle was significantly different between Tilt-Up and Tilt-Down to demonstrate hysteresis. We observed a significant non-equilibrium phase transition in nine healthy volunteers out of 11 with significant hysteresis (48.1 ± 7.5° and 21.8 ± 3.9° during Tilt-Up and Tilt-Down, respectively, p < 0.05). Our study shows experimental evidence of self-organized short-term blood pressure regulation. It provides new insights into blood pressure regulation and its related disorders.

  4. Gender differences in cooperation: experimental evidence on high school students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Alberto Molina

    Full Text Available The emergence of cooperation among unrelated human subjects is a long-standing conundrum that has been amply studied both theoretically and experimentally. Within the question, a less explored issue relates to the gender dependence of cooperation, which can be traced back to Darwin, who stated that "women are less selfish but men are more competitive". Indeed, gender has been shown to be relevant in several game theoretical paradigms of social cooperativeness, including prisoner's dilemma, snowdrift and ultimatum/dictator games, but there is no consensus as to which gender is more cooperative. We here contribute to this literature by analyzing the role of gender in a repeated Prisoners' Dilemma played by Spanish high-school students in both a square lattice and a heterogeneous network. While the experiment was conducted to shed light on the influence of networks on the emergence of cooperation, we benefit from the availability of a large dataset of more 1200 participants. We applied different standard econometric techniques to this dataset, including Ordinary Least Squares and Linear Probability models including random effects. All our analyses indicate that being male is negatively associated with the level of cooperation, this association being statistically significant at standard levels. We also obtain a gender difference in the level of cooperation when we control for the unobserved heterogeneity of individuals, which indicates that the gender gap in cooperation favoring female students is present after netting out this effect from other socio-demographics factors not controlled for in the experiment, and from gender differences in risk, social and competitive preferences.

  5. Gender differences in cooperation: experimental evidence on high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, J Alberto; Giménez-Nadal, J Ignacio; Cuesta, José A; Gracia-Lazaro, Carlos; Moreno, Yamir; Sanchez, Angel

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of cooperation among unrelated human subjects is a long-standing conundrum that has been amply studied both theoretically and experimentally. Within the question, a less explored issue relates to the gender dependence of cooperation, which can be traced back to Darwin, who stated that "women are less selfish but men are more competitive". Indeed, gender has been shown to be relevant in several game theoretical paradigms of social cooperativeness, including prisoner's dilemma, snowdrift and ultimatum/dictator games, but there is no consensus as to which gender is more cooperative. We here contribute to this literature by analyzing the role of gender in a repeated Prisoners' Dilemma played by Spanish high-school students in both a square lattice and a heterogeneous network. While the experiment was conducted to shed light on the influence of networks on the emergence of cooperation, we benefit from the availability of a large dataset of more 1200 participants. We applied different standard econometric techniques to this dataset, including Ordinary Least Squares and Linear Probability models including random effects. All our analyses indicate that being male is negatively associated with the level of cooperation, this association being statistically significant at standard levels. We also obtain a gender difference in the level of cooperation when we control for the unobserved heterogeneity of individuals, which indicates that the gender gap in cooperation favoring female students is present after netting out this effect from other socio-demographics factors not controlled for in the experiment, and from gender differences in risk, social and competitive preferences.

  6. Fostering Early Math Comprehension: Experimental Evidence from Paraguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Naslund-Hadley

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Research indicates that preschool children need to learn pre-math skills to build a foundation for primary- and secondary-level mathematics. This paper presents the results from the early stages of a pilot mathematics program implemented in Cordillera, Paraguay. In a context of significant gaps in teacher preparation and pedagogy, the program uses interactive audio segments that cover the entire preschool math curriculum. Since Paraguayan classrooms tend to be bilingual, the audio and written materials use a combination of Spanish and Guaraní. Based on an experimental evaluation since the program’s implementation, we document positive and significant improvements of 0.16 standard deviations in standardized test scores. The program helped narrow learning gaps between low- and high-performing students, and between students with trained teachers and those whose teachers lack formal training in early childhood education. Moreover, the program improved learning equally among both Guaraní- and Spanish-speaking students. But not all learning gaps narrowed as a result of the program. Although girls improved significantly, boys improved much more, ultimately increasing the gender gap. To close this gender gap, the program has been modified to encourage girls’ increased participation in the classroom and general interest in math

  7. Negative experimental evidence for magneto-orbital dichroism

    CERN Document Server

    Mathevet, Renaud; Pruvost, Laurence; Rikken, Geert L J A

    2012-01-01

    A light beam can carry both spin angular momentum (SAM) and orbital angular momentum (OAM). SAM is commonly evidenced by circular dichroism (CD) experiments i. e. differential absorption of left and right-handed circularly polarized light. Recent experiments, supported by theoretical work, indicate that the corresponding effect with OAM instead of SAM is not observed in chiral matter. Isotropic materials can show CD when subjected to a magnetic field (MCD). We report a set of experiments, under well defined conditions, searching for magnetic orbital dichroism (MOD), differential absorption of light as a function of the sign of its OAM. We experimentally demonstrate that this effect, if any, is smaller than a few 10^{-4} of MCD for the Nd:YAG ^4I_{9/2} ^4F_{5/2} transition. This transition is essentially of electric dipole nature. We give an intuitive argument suggesting that the lowest order of light matter interaction leading to MOD is the electric quadrupole term.

  8. XMM-Newton evidence of shocked ISM in SN 1006: indications of hadronic acceleration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miceli, M.; Bocchino, F.; Decourchelle, A.; Maurin, G.; Vink, J.; Orlando, S.; Reale, F.; Broersen, S.

    2012-01-01

    Context. Shock fronts in young supernova remnants are the best candidates for being sites of cosmic ray acceleration up to a few PeV, though conclusive experimental evidence is still lacking. Aims. Hadron acceleration is expected to increase the shock compression ratio, providing higher postshock

  9. Reviewing the strength of evidence of biodiversity indicators for forest ecosystems in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Tian; Nielsen, Anders Busse; Hedblom, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    reported contradictory results. For the species richness relationships, there was strong evidence for positive correlations between deadwood volume and wood-living fungal species richness; deadwood volume and saproxylic beetle species richness; deadwood diversity and saproxylic beetle species richness; age...... of canopy trees and epiphytic lichen species richness. There was strong evidence for a negative correlation between tree canopy cover and spider species richness. Concerning species composition-related correlation, there was strong evidence that the species composition of epiphytic lichens changed...... groups and 83 individual indicators were identified with application from stand scale up to landscape scale in 142 eligible scientific papers. In 62 of the 142 studies no statistical correlations between indicator(s) and indicandum were performed and 42 (out of the 62) did not even present a clear...

  10. Recent reproducibility estimates indicate that negative evidence is observed 30-200 times before publication

    CERN Document Server

    Ingre, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Open Science Collaboration recently reported that 36% of published findings from psychological studies were reproducible by their independent team of researchers. We can use this information to estimate the statistical power needed to produce these findings under various assumptions of prior probabilities and type-1 errors to calculate the expected distribution of positive and negative evidence. And we can compare this distribution to observations indicating that 90% of published findings in the psychological literature is statistically significant and supporting the authors hypothesis to get an estimate of publication bias. Such estimate indicates that negative evidence was expected to be observed 30-200 times before one was published assuming plausible priors.

  11. Analysis of experimental evidence that shows adverse effects of salt and its relation to hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Bravo A.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The study by Taylor et al published in June 2010 in the American Journal of Hypertension questions the effectiveness of reducing salt intake in the diet in the prevention and treatment of high blood pressure and other cardiovascular conditions. The publication of this article has lead to great controversy and medical associations and learned societies responded promptly. The response criticized the results of the meta-analysis and pointed out its methodological shortcomings. In this review we critically appraise the experimental evidence that shows the importance of diet salt intake and its role as a determinant of blood pressure. We briefly describe the paradigm that explains the role of salt intake in contributing in the regulation of blood pressure (Guyton hypothesis and model and we mention the experimental evidence that supports this. We briefly comment on the classical studies that indicate that salt intake (NaCl contributes directly to the development of high blood pressure and target tissues. Finally, we briefly mention the experimental data that is related with the controversy on the role of salt (NaCl or sodium as prohypertensive agents.

  12. Field experimental evidence for diffuse competition among Southwestern riparian birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, C E; Cruz, A; Grant, M C; Aid, C S; Strong, T R

    1992-11-01

    In a 6-yr study of 70 generally insectivorous bird species in Arizona riparian woodlands, abundances of cavity-nesting species increased on 50 experimental plots compared with 49 control plots, following addition of artificial nest boxes. Open-nesting birds increased in abundance on control plots during the study but avoided experimental plots relative to control plots after box addition. Multivariate analysis revealed that a negative response of open nesters to the experiment was widespread among a large and ecologically diverse group of species. Results of this field experiment suggest that communitywide (diffuse) competition was an important factor influencing the distribution and abundance of birds in these riparian ecosystems.

  13. Experimental Shock Transformation of Gypsum to Anhydrite: A New Low Pressure Regime Shock Indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Mary S.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    The shock behavior of gypsum is important in understanding the Cretaceous/Paleogene event and other terrestrial impacts that contain evaporite sediments in their targets (e.g., Mars Exploration Rover Spirit detected sulfate at Gusev crater, [1]). Most interest focuses on issues of devolatilization to quantify the production of SO2 to better understand its role in generating a temporary atmosphere and its effects on climate and biota [2,3]. Kondo and Ahrens [4] measured induced radiation emitted from single crystal gypsum shocked to 30 and 40 GPa. They observed greybody emission spectra corresponding to temperatures in the range of 3,000 to 4,000 K that are a factor of 2 to 10 times greater than calculated pressure-density energy equation of state temperatures (Hugoniot) and are high enough to melt gypsum. Chen et al. [5] reported results of shock experiments on anhydrite, gypsum, and mixtures of these phases with silica. Their observations indicated little or no devolatilization of anhydrite shocked to 42 GPa and that the fraction of sulfur, by mass, that degassed is approx.10(exp -2) of theoretical prediction. In another report of shock experiments on calcite, anhydrite, and gypsum, Badjukov et al. [6] observed only intensive plastic deformation in anhydrite shock loaded at 63 GPa, and gypsum converted to anhydrite when shock loaded at 56 GPa but have not experimentally shocked gypsum in a step-wise manner to constrain possible incipient transformation effects. Schmitt and Hornemann [7] shock loaded anhydrite and quartz to a peak pressure of 60 GPa and report the platy anhydrite grains were completely pseudomorphed by small crystallized anhydrite grains. However, no evidence of interaction between the two phases could be observed and they suggested that recrystallization of anhydrite grains is the result of a solid-state transformation. They concluded that significant decomposition of anhydrite requires shock pressures higher than 60 GPa. Gupta et al. [8

  14. Experimental evidence for a phylogenetic Janzen-Connell effect in a subtropical forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Xubing; Liang, Minxia; Etienne, Rampal S.; Wang, Yongfan; Staehelin, Christian; Yu, Shixiao

    Observational evidence increasingly suggests that the JanzenConnell effect extends beyond the species boundary. However, this has not been confirmed experimentally. Herein, we present both observational and experimental evidence for a phylogenetic JanzenConnell effect. In a subtropical forest in

  15. Experimental evidence for density dependence of reproduction in great tits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, Christiaan

    1998-01-01

    1.  Density dependence of avian reproduction has often been analysed using correlations between annual mean reproductive output and population density. Experiments are necessary to prove that density is the cause of the observed patterns, but so far, three out of four experimental studies do not

  16. Experimental evidence for density dependence of reproduction in great tits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, C.

    1998-01-01

    1. Density dependence of avian reproduction has often been analysed using correlations between annual mean reproductive output and population density. Experiments are necessary to prove that density is the cause of the observed patterns, but so far, three out of four experimental studies do not

  17. Transparency in markets for experience goods : Experimental evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henze, B.; Schütt, F.; Sluijs, J.P.J.B.

    We propose an experimental design to investigate the role of information disclosure in the market for an experience good. The market is served by a duopoly of firms that choose both the quality and the price of their product. Consumers differ in their taste for quality and choose from which firm to

  18. Are the supergiant halos experimental evidence for the pionic radioactivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, D. B.; Ion-Mihai, R.

    1994-10-01

    Pionic radiohalos (PIRH), as an integral time record of the pionic nuclear radioactivity of the heavy nuclides with Z > 80 from the inclusions from ancient minerals, are introduced. It is then shown that the essential characteristic features of the observed supergiant halos (SGH) are reproduced with a surprisingly high accuracy by those of the pionic radiohalos. For the clarification of this problem new experimental investigations including pionic detection methods are suggested.

  19. Gender differences in cooperation: experimental evidence on high school students

    OpenAIRE

    J Alberto Molina; J Ignacio Giménez-Nadal; José A. Cuesta; Carlos Gracia-Lazaro; Yamir Moreno; Angel Sanchez

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of cooperation among unrelated human subjects is a long-standing conundrum that has been amply studied both theoretically and experimentally. Within the question, a less explored issue relates to the gender dependence of cooperation, which can be traced back to Darwin, who stated that "women are less selfish but men are more competitive". Indeed, gender has been shown to be relevant in several game theoretical paradigms of social cooperativeness, including prisoner's dilemma, sn...

  20. What Behaviors are Disapproved? Experimental Evidence from Five Dictator Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Vorsatz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The literature on social norms has often stressed that social disapproval is crucial to foster compliance with norms and promote fair and cooperative behavior. With this in mind, we explore the disapproval of allocation decisions using experimental data from five dictator games with a feedback stage. Our data suggests that subjects are heterogeneous in their disapproval patterns, distinguishing two main groups: (1 Subjects who only disapprove choices that harm them, and (2 subjects who disapprove socially inefficient choices.

  1. Gender discrimination and social identity: Experimental evidence from urban Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Delavande, Adeline; Zafar, Basit

    2013-01-01

    Gender discrimination in South Asia is a well-documented fact. However, gender is only one of an individual's many identities. This paper investigates how gender discrimination depends on the social identities of interacting parties. We use an experimental approach to identify gender discrimination by randomly matching 2,836 male and female students pursuing bachelor's-equivalent degrees in three different types of institutions - Madrassas (religious seminaries), Islamic universities, and lib...

  2. Price-level targeting and inflation expectations: Experimental evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Amano, Rober; Engle-Warnick, Jim; Shukayev, Malik

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we use an economics decision-making experiment to test a key assumption underpinning the efficacy of price-level targeting relative to inflation targeting for business cycle stabilization and mitigating the effects of the zero lower bound on nominal interest rates. In particular, we attempt to infer whether experimental participants understand the stationary nature of the price level under price-level targeting by observing their inflation forecasting behaviour in a laboratory ...

  3. CB7-: Experimental and Theoretical Evidence Against Hypercoordinated Planar Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Leiming; Huang, Wei; Averkiev, Boris B.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.; Wang, Lai S.

    2007-06-11

    The B82– cluster was previously shown to possess a planar molecular wheel structure with a heptacoordinated boron. Substitution of one B– by C in B82– is expected to yield a closed shell CB7– molecular wheel, which has been produced experimentally in a cluster beam and probed by photoelectron spectroscopy. Ab initio calculations show that the CB7– cluster possesses an extremely stable planar C2v structure, in which the C atom substitutes a B– atom at the edge of the B82– molecular wheel, whereas the D7h structure with a heptacoordinated C is a high-lying isomer 63.2 kcal/mol (CCSD(T)/6-311+G(2df)//CCSD(T)/6-311+G*) above the global minimum. The combined experimental and ab initio study demonstrates that a heptacoordinated planar carbon in CB7– is extremely unfavorable and is not a viable candidate for experimental realization of hypercoordinated planar carbon molecules.

  4. Do incentives exert undue influence on survey participation? Experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Eleanor; Couper, Mick P

    2008-09-01

    MONETARY INCENTIVES ARE INCREASINGLY used to help motivate survey participation. Research Ethics Committees have begun to ask whether, and under what conditions, the use of monetary incentives to induce participation might be coercive. The article reports research from an online vignette-based study bearing on this question, concluding that at present the evidence suggests that larger incentives do not induce research participants to accept higher risks than they would be unwilling to accept with smaller ones.

  5. The effect of peer observation on consumption choices: experimental evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Grohmann, Antonia; Sakha, Sahra

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of peer observation on the consumption decisions of rural households in Thailand using a lab-in-the-field experiment. We find that those groups that observe each other show lower within group standard deviation in their decisions. Thus, we find evidence for conformity. Further, we find that individual's consumption choice is influenced by the group choice controlling for large number of individual, household, and village characteristics. We find that unfamil...

  6. Multiple Openings and Competitiveness of Forward Markets: Experimental Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, José Luis; Kujal, Praveen; Rassenti, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    We test the competition enhancing effect of selling forward in experimental Cournot duopoly and quadropoly with multiple forward markets. We find that two forward periods yields competitive outcomes and that the results are very close to the predicted theoretical results for quantity setting duopolies and quadropolies. Our experiments lend strong support to the hypothesis that forward markets are competition enhancing. We then test a new market that allows for endogenously determined indefinitely many forward periods that only close when sellers coordinate on selling a zero amount in a forward market. We find that the outcomes under an endogenous close rule are also very competitive. These results hold for both duopolies and quadropolies.

  7. Strategic sophistication of individuals and teams. Experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Matthias; Czermak, Simon; Feri, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Many important decisions require strategic sophistication. We examine experimentally whether teams act more strategically than individuals. We let individuals and teams make choices in simple games, and also elicit first- and second-order beliefs. We find that teams play the Nash equilibrium strategy significantly more often, and their choices are more often a best response to stated first order beliefs. Distributional preferences make equilibrium play less likely. Using a mixture model, the estimated probability to play strategically is 62% for teams, but only 40% for individuals. A model of noisy introspection reveals that teams differ from individuals in higher order beliefs. PMID:24926100

  8. Experimental evidence of resonant effective permittivity in a dielectric metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepetit, T.; Akmansoy, É.; Ganne, J.-P.

    2011-01-01

    We designed and fabricated a dielectric metamaterial consisting of one set of high permittivity resonators. We experimentally showed that this metamaterial exhibits resonant effective permittivity, issued from the second mode of Mie resonances of these resonators. Therefore, metamaterials consisting of high permittivity resonators may provide either effective permeability or permittivity issued from the first two modes of Mie resonances, respectively. This ensures that all-dielectric metamaterials involving two sets of matched high permittivity resonators may exhibit negative index issued from these two modes, notably up to the terahertz domain.

  9. Experimental evidence of turbulent transport regulation by zonal flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkenmeier, G; Ramisch, M; Schmid, B; Stroth, U

    2013-04-05

    The regulation of turbulent transport by zonal flows is studied experimentally on a flux surface of the stellarator experiment TJ-K. Data of 128 Langmuir probes at different toroidal and poloidal positions on a single flux surface enable us to measure simultaneously the zonal flow activity and the turbulent transport in great detail. A reduction of turbulent transport by 30% during the zonal flow phase is found. It is shown that the reduction process is initiated by a modification in the cross phase between density and electric field followed by a reduction in the fluctuation levels, which sustain low transport levels on larger time scales than the zonal flow lifetime.

  10. Experimental evidence of ericoid mycorrhizal potential within Serendipitaceae (Sebacinales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohník, Martin; Pánek, Matěj; Fehrer, Judith; Selosse, Marc-André

    2016-11-01

    The Sebacinales are a monophyletic group of ubiquitous hymenomycetous mycobionts which form ericoid and orchid mycorrhizae, ecto- and ectendomycorrhizae, and nonspecific root endophytic associations with a wide spectrum of plants. However, due to the complete lack of fungal isolates derived from Ericaceae roots, the Sebacinales ericoid mycorrhizal (ErM) potential has not yet been tested experimentally. Here, we report for the first time isolation of a serendipitoid (formerly Sebacinales Group B) mycobiont from Ericaceae which survived in pure culture for several years. This allowed us to test its ability to form ericoid mycorrhizae with an Ericaceae host in vitro, to describe its development and colonization pattern in host roots over time, and to compare its performance with typical ErM fungi and other serendipitoids derived from non-Ericaceae hosts. Out of ten serendipitoid isolates tested, eight intracellularly colonized Vaccinium hair roots, but only the Ericaceae-derived isolate repeatedly formed typical ericoid mycorrhiza morphologically identical to ericoid mycorrhiza commonly found in naturally colonized Ericaceae, but yet different from ericoid mycorrhiza formed in vitro by the prominent ascomycetous ErM fungus Rhizoscyphus ericae. One Orchidaceae-derived isolate repeatedly formed abundant hyaline intracellular microsclerotia morphologically identical to those occasionally found in naturally colonized Ericaceae, and an isolate of Serendipita (= Piriformospora) indica produced abundant intracellular chlamydospores typical of this species. Our results confirm for the first time experimentally that some Sebacinales can form ericoid mycorrhiza, point to their broad endophytic potential in Ericaceae hosts, and suggest possible ericoid mycorrhizal specificity in Serendipitaceae.

  11. The fungal colonisation of rock-art caves: experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Valme; Fernandez-Cortes, Angel; Cuezva, Soledad; Laiz, Leonila; Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2009-09-01

    The conservation of rock-art paintings in European caves is a matter of increasing interest. This derives from the bacterial colonisation of Altamira Cave, Spain and the recent fungal outbreak of Lascaux Cave, France-both included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Here, we show direct evidence of a fungal colonisation of rock tablets in a testing system exposed in Altamira Cave. After 2 months, the tablets, previously sterilised, were heavily colonised by fungi and bacteria. Most fungi isolated were labelled as entomopathogens, while the bacteria were those regularly identified in the cave. Rock colonisation was probably promoted by the dissolved organic carbon supplied with the dripping and condensation waters and favoured by the displacement of aerosols towards the interior of the cave, which contributed to the dissemination of microorganisms. The role of arthropods in the dispersal of spores may also help in understanding fungal colonisation. This study evidences the fragility of rock-art caves and demonstrates that microorganisms can easily colonise bare rocks and materials introduced into the cavity.

  12. Context-dependent cheating: Experimental evidence from 16 countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pascual-ezama, David; Fosgaard, Toke R.; Cardenas, Juan Camilo; Kujal, Praveen; Veszteg, Robert; Gil-gómez De Liaño, Beatriz; Gunia, Brian; Weichselbaumer, Doris; Hilken, Katharina; Antinyan, Armenak; Delnoij, Joyce|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371752213; Proestakis, Antonios; Tira, Michael D.; Pratomo, Yulius; Jaber-lópez, Tarek; Brañas-garza, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Policy makers use several international indices that characterize countries according to the quality of their institutions. However, no effort has been made to study how the honesty of citizens varies across countries. This paper explores the honesty among citizens across 16 countries with 1440

  13. GEOMORPHOLOGY. Experimental evidence for hillslope control of landscape scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, K E; Roering, J J; Ellis, C

    2015-07-03

    Landscape evolution theory suggests that climate sets the scale of landscape dissection by modulating the competition between diffusive processes that sculpt convex hillslopes and advective processes that carve concave valleys. However, the link between the relative dominance of hillslope and valley transport processes and landscape scale is difficult to demonstrate in natural landscapes due to the episodic nature of erosion. Here, we report results from laboratory experiments combining diffusive and advective processes in an eroding landscape. We demonstrate that rainsplash-driven disturbances in our experiments are a robust proxy for hillslope transport, such that increasing hillslope transport efficiency decreases drainage density. Our experimental results demonstrate how the coupling of climate-driven hillslope- and valley-forming processes, such as bioturbation and runoff, dictates the scale of eroding landscapes. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. A Tax Evasion - Bribery Game: Experimental Evidence from Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Bilotkach

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the issue of tax evasion by enterprises through underreporting activity. We develop a view of this phenomenon as an equilibrium of the game between a businessman and an imperfectly monitored supervising official, in which a businessman can hide part of his profit and offer bribe to official. We determine conditions under which such tax evasion and bribery become wide-spread in the society, resulting in shadow economy. The game is put into an experimental setting in Kiev, Ukraine, with the emphasis of spreading of the tax evasion and bribery activity in the laboratory setting. We find that once it becomes known that substantial share of subjects playing the role of supervising officials agree to accept bribes from subjects playing the role of businessmen, the latter offer bribes more aggressively. Yet, this in turn does not affect the behavior of subjects playing the role of supervising officials.

  15. Multiple Openings and Competitiveness of Forward Markets: Experimental Evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Ferreira

    Full Text Available We test the competition enhancing effect of selling forward in experimental Cournot duopoly and quadropoly with multiple forward markets. We find that two forward periods yields competitive outcomes and that the results are very close to the predicted theoretical results for quantity setting duopolies and quadropolies. Our experiments lend strong support to the hypothesis that forward markets are competition enhancing. We then test a new market that allows for endogenously determined indefinitely many forward periods that only close when sellers coordinate on selling a zero amount in a forward market. We find that the outcomes under an endogenous close rule are also very competitive. These results hold for both duopolies and quadropolies.

  16. Selection of experimental strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) hybrids based on selection indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, S D; de Souza, D C; Martins, I A; Ribeiro, G H M R; Resende, L V; Ferraz, A K L; Galvão, A G; de Resende, J T V

    2017-03-08

    The strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Dutch.), is the only vegetable belonging to the rosacea family. All strawberry species have now emerged from wild species and belong to the genus Fragaria, being that this genus presents more than 45 described species, and only 11 are considered natural species. Due to the octoploid nature of strawberry and its variability after hybridization, selecting one or more characters may result in unfavorable genotypes and even the exclusion of promising ones, because negative genetic correlations have been observed among them that cause inefficient selection. Therefore, the objective of this study was to verify the efficiency of selection indices in selecting experimental strawberry hybrids for in natura consumption and processing. Seven commercial cultivars and 103 hybrids were used, which were obtained from populations derived from their crossings. The experiment was conducted in augmented blocks, in which four agronomical traits (total mass, amount of commercial fruit, amount of noncommercial fruit, and average fruit mass) and seven physical-chemical traits (soluble solids, soluble solids:titratable acidity ratio, total sugars, total pectin, vigor, and internal and external coloration) were evaluated. For hybrid selection, the following indices were used: Mulamba and Mock (1978), Smith (1936), Hazel (1943), and genotype-ideotype, which selected 20% of the genotypes evaluated. The three indices selected about 9% of the hybrids. The selection of two experimental hybrids (89 and 495) and the use of selection indices resulted in larger estimates of selection gains. The Mulamba and Mock (1978), Smith (1936), and Hazel (1943) indices had the highest percentage of gains on selection, and are therefore recommended for the selection of strawberry clones.

  17. Further evidence for periodontal disease as a risk indicator for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, Mervyn; Africa, Charlene W J

    2017-06-01

    Although there is increasing evidence to suggest an association between periodontal disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes, the issue remains controversial. This study tested the hypothesis that periodontal disease is a risk indicator for preterm delivery of low-birthweight infants. The study sample comprised 443 pregnant women with a mean (± standard deviation) age of 24.13 (±5.30) years. At first visit, maternal oral health status was assessed by the measurement of probing pocket depth and clinical attachment loss, and periodontal status was graded as absent, mild, moderate or severe. An association was sought between pregnancy outcomes and maternal periodontal status. While controlling for other factors, significant associations were found between pregnancy outcomes and maternal periodontal index scores. This study provides further evidence that periodontal disease is a risk indicator for adverse pregnancy outcomes. © 2016 FDI World Dental Federation.

  18. Experimental evidence of a delta-shock in nonlinear chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, Marco; Tarafder, Abhijit; Cornel, Jeroen; Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2010-03-26

    We report about a new type of composition front in nonlinear chromatography that is called delta-shock, which has to be added to the family of classical transitions, i.e. simple waves, shocks and semi-shocks. Recently, the occurrence of delta-shocks in the case of mixed competitive-cooperative isotherms of the following type n(i) = H(i)c(i)/(1 - K1c1 + K2c2) (i = 1, 2), (with H2 > H1, where components 1 and 2 have anti-Langmuir and Langmuir adsorption behavior, respectively) was predicted theoretically and their behavior was analyzed in the frame of the equilibrium theory of chromatography. The delta-shock can be viewed as a growing traveling spike superimposed to the discontinuity separating the initial and the feed state, which propagates along the column at constant speed and constant rate of growth. In this work we complement these findings from an experimental point of view. The binary system consisting of phenetole (component 1) and 4-tert-butylphenol (component 2) in methanol-water (about 2:1, v/v) on a Zorbax 300StableBond-C18 column from Agilent has been shown, through a series of overloaded pulse experiments and of frontal analysis experiments with the pure compounds, to be subject to the competitive-cooperative isotherm of the type above, up to rather large concentrations. This system does exhibit a delta-shock when the operating conditions are chosen according to theory, namely when phenetole initially saturating the column is displaced by 4-tert-butylphenol, both at high concentrations (the minimum concentrations exhibiting a fully developed delta-shock in this series of experiments were c1 = 20 g/L and c2 = 75 g/L). The propagation of the delta-shock matches the theoretical predictions in terms of both the effect of concentration and the effect of column length. This is the first experimental observation ever of a delta-shock in chromatography. It is noteworthy that the proof of the occurrence of the delta-shock reported here has been obtained in both

  19. Experimental evidence of a delta-shock in nonlinear chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritti, Fabrice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guiochon, Georges A [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    We report about a new type of composition front in nonlinear chromatography that is called delta-shock, which has to be added to the family of classical transitions, i.e. simple waves, shocks and semi-shocks. Recently, the occurrence of delta-shocks in the case of mixed competitive-cooperative isotherms of the following type n{sub i} = H{sub i}c{sub i}/1 = K{sub 1}c{sub 1} + K{sub 2}c{sub 2} (i = 1,2), (with H{sub 2} > H{sub 1}, where components 1 and 2 have anti-Langmuir and Langmuir adsorption behavior, respectively) was predicted theoretically and their behavior was analyzed in the frame of the equilibrium theory of chromatography. The delta-shock can be viewed as a growing traveling spike superimposed to the discontinuity separating the initial and the feed state, which propagates along the column at constant speed and constant rate of growth. In this work we complement these findings from an experimental point of view. The binary system consisting of phenetole (component 1) and 4-tert-butylphenol (component 2) in methanol-water (about 2:1, v/v) on a Zorbax 300StableBond-C18 column from Agilent has been shown, through a series of overloaded pulse experiments and of frontal analysis experiments with the pure compounds, to be subject to the competitive-cooperative isotherm of the type above, up to rather large concentrations. This system does exhibit adelta-shock when the operating conditions are chosen according to theory, namely when phenetole initially saturating the column is displaced by 4-tert-butylphenol, both at high concentrations (the minimum concentrations exhibiting a fully developed delta-shock in this series of experiments were c{sub 1} = 20 g/L and c{sub 2} = 75 g/L). The propagation of the delta-shock matches the theoretical predictions in terms of both the effect of concentration and the effect of column length. This is the first experimental observation ever of adelta-shock in chromatography. It is noteworthy that the proof of the occurrence of

  20. Intraoperative radiotherapy in early stage breast cancer: potential indications and evidence to date

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, A M

    2015-01-01

    Following early results of recent studies of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in the adjuvant treatment of patients with early breast cancer, the clinical utility of IORT is a subject of much recent debate within the breast oncology community. This review describes the intraoperative techniques available, the potential indications and the evidence to date pertaining to local control and toxicity. We also discuss any implications for current practice and future research. PMID:25734489

  1. Insight of scent: experimental evidence of olfactory capabilities in the wandering albatross (Diomedea exulans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardon, J; Nesterova, A P; Traugott, J; Saunders, S M; Bonadonna, F

    2010-02-15

    Wandering albatrosses routinely forage over thousands of kilometres of open ocean, but the sensory mechanisms used in the food search itself have not been completely elucidated. Recent telemetry studies show that some spatial behaviours of the species are consistent with the 'multimodal foraging strategy' hypothesis which proposes that birds use a combination of olfactory and visual cues while foraging at sea. The 'multimodal foraging strategy' hypothesis, however, still suffers from a lack of experimental evidence, particularly regarding the olfactory capabilities of wandering albatrosses. As an initial step to test the hypothesis, we carried out behavioural experiments exploring the sensory capabilities of adult wandering albatrosses at a breeding colony. Three two-choice tests were designed to investigate the birds' response to olfactory and visual stimuli, individually or in combination. Perception of the different stimuli was assessed by comparing the amount of exploration directed towards an 'experimental' display or a 'control' display. Our results indicate that birds were able to perceive the three types of stimulus presented: olfactory, visual and combined. Moreover, olfactory and visual cues were found to have additional effects on the exploratory behaviours of males. This simple experimental demonstration of reasonable olfactory capabilities in the wandering albatross supports the 'multimodal foraging strategy' and is consistent with recent hypotheses of the evolutionary history of procellariiforms.

  2. Experimental Evidence for Static Charge Density Waves in Iron Oxypnictides

    KAUST Repository

    Martinelli, A.

    2017-02-01

    In this Letter we report high-resolution synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction and transmission electron microscope analysis of Mn-substituted LaFeAsO samples, demonstrating that a static incommensurate modulated structure develops across the low-temperature orthorhombic phase, whose modulation wave vector depends on the Mn content. The incommensurate structural distortion is likely originating from a charge-density-wave instability, a periodic modulation of the density of conduction electrons associated with a modulation of the atomic positions. Our results add a new component in the physics of Fe-based superconductors, indicating that the density wave ordering is charge driven.

  3. Experimental evidence for the influence of cognitions on compulsive buying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, Paul; Moulding, Richard; Kyrios, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Compulsive buying is a disabling condition, where individuals are unable to resist or control their buying behavior, leading to substantial social and financial problems. Cognitive models implicate the role of beliefs as one factor in buying behavior, for example, "this item is unique and will help me improve my life". This study experimentally examined the contribution of such beliefs to the disorder, in individuals who compulsively buy (N = 18) and in non-clinical controls (N = 17). Participants were presented with photographs of idiosyncratically appealing and unappealing items, in the context of imagined scenarios that either minimized or maximized aspects relevant to hypothesized "compulsive buying beliefs" (i.e., beliefs that acquisition can compensate for negative feelings, beliefs regarding uniqueness and lost opportunities, and emotional reasons for buying). It was found that individuals who compulsively buy demonstrated stronger urges to purchase than control participants, regardless of context, but the overall strength of these urges was responsive to manipulations of beliefs about consumer items said to be associated with compulsive buying. The main limitation of the study was a small sample size, potentially reducing power. Nonetheless, these findings provide insights into the processes underlying compulsive phenomena, in particular supporting the role of cognitions in compulsive buying. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ethnic and Gender Discrimination in Recruitment: Experimental Evidence From Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmela Liebkind

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We ask (1 how the position of an ethnic (majority or minority group in the local ethnic hierarchy affects the amount of recruitment discrimination faced by applicants from that group, and (2 whether gender discrimination is dependent on occupational gender stereotypes in the same way among ethnic majority and minority applicants. We use the situation testing method for the first time in Finland: In an experimental study (Study 1, 103 dentistry students made recruitment decisions based on the CVs of three bogus applicants from different ethnic groups (Finnish, Austrian and Polish and in a field experiment (Study 2, four test applicants (male and female Finns and Russians with equivalent CVs applied for 1,258 vacant jobs, addressing gender discrimination in relation to occupational gender stereotypes as well as ethnic discrimination. Together these studies cover both skilled (Study 1 and semi-skilled jobs (Study 2 and applicants from ethnic minority groups originating from within as well as outside the EU. Results show that majority group members are more likely to be hired compared to minority members (both Studies and that minority members from a higher status group are more likely to be hired than those from a lower status group (Study 1. Results also show that male applicants from the majority group were discriminated compared to women in occupations characterised as feminine, while Russian men faced recruitment discrimination compared to Russian women independently of the job’s gender stereotype (Study 2. Implications of recruitment discrimination based on ethnicity and gender are discussed.

  5. Renal Biopsy in 2015--From Epidemiology to Evidence-Based Indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Marco; Bolignano, Davide; Tesar, Vladimir; Pisano, Anna; Van Biesen, Wim; D'Arrigo, Graziella; Tripepi, Giovanni; Gesualdo, Loreto

    2016-01-01

    Although the number of patients reaching end-stage kidney disease without a biopsy-proven diagnosis is increasing, the utility of renal biopsy is still an object of debate. We analyzed epidemiological data and the main indications for renal biopsy with a systematic, evidence-based review at current literature. There is a high discrepancy observed in biopsy rates and in the epidemiology of glomerular diseases worldwide, related to the different time frame of the analyzed reports, lack of data collection, the different reference source population and the heterogeneity of indications. The evidence-based analysis of indications showed that renal biopsy should be crucial in adults with nephrotic syndrome or urinary abnormalities as coexistent hematuria and proteinuria and in corticosteroid resistant-children with severe proteinuria. The knowledge of renal histology can change the clinical management in patients with acute kidney injury significantly, after the exclusion of pre-renal or obstructive causes of kidney damage. Scarce evidence indicates that renal biopsy can be useful in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease and its use should always be considered after weighing the benefits and potential risks. Renal biopsy should be crucial in patients with renal involvement due to systemic disease. In patients with diabetes with atypical features, renal biopsy may be fundamental to diagnose an unexpected parenchymal disease mislabeled as diabetic nephropathy. Finally, in elderly patients, the indications and the risks are not different from those in the general population. Renal biopsy still remains a concrete approach for managing a substantial percentage of renal diseases. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. [Is it possible a bioethics based on the experimental evidence?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Luis Miguel

    2013-01-01

    For years there are different types of criticism about principialist bioethics. One alternative that has been proposed is to introduce empirical evidence within the bioethical discourse to make it less formal, less theoretical and closer to reality. In this paper we analyze first in synthetic form diverse alternative proposals to make an empirical bioethics. Some of them are strongly naturalistic while others aim to provide empirical data only for correct or improve bioethical work. Most of them are not shown in favor of maintaining a complete separation between facts and values, between what is and what ought to be. With different nuances these proposals of moderate naturalism make ethical judgments depend normative social opinion resulting into a certain social naturalism. Against these proposals we think to make a bioethics in that relates the empirical facts with ethical duties, we must rediscover empirical reality of human action. Only from it and, in particular, from the activity of discernment that makes practical reason, when judged on the object of his action, it is possible to integrate the mere descriptive facts with ethical judgments of character prescriptive. In conclusion we think that it is not possible to perform bioethics a mode of empirical science, as this would be contrary to natural reason, leading to a sort of scientific reductionism. At the same time we believe that empirical data are important in the development of bioethics and to enhance and improve the innate ability of human reason to discern good. From this discernment could develop a bioethics from the perspective of ethical agents themselves, avoiding the extremes of an excessive normative rationalism, accepting empirical data and not falling into a simple pragmatism.

  7. Experimental Evidence of Mechanical Isotropy in Porcine Lung Parenchyma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Weed

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary injuries are a major source of morbidity and mortality associated with trauma. Trauma includes injuries associated with accidents and falls as well as blast injuries caused by explosives. The prevalence and mortality of these injuries has made research of pulmonary injury a major priority. Lungs have a complex structure, with multiple types of tissues necessary to allow successful respiration. The soft, porous parenchyma is the component of the lung which contains the alveoli responsible for gas exchange. Parenchyma is also the portion which is most susceptible to traumatic injury. Finite element simulations are an important tool for studying traumatic injury to the human body. These simulations rely on material properties to accurately recreate real world mechanical behaviors. Previous studies have explored the mechanical properties of lung tissues, specifically parenchyma. These studies have assumed material isotropy but, to our knowledge, no study has thoroughly tested and quantified this assumption. This study presents a novel methodology for assessing isotropy in a tissue, and applies these methods to porcine lung parenchyma. Briefly, lung parenchyma samples were dissected so as to be aligned with one of the three anatomical planes, sagittal, frontal, and transverse, and then subjected to compressive mechanical testing. Stress-strain curves from these tests were statistically compared by a novel method for differences in stresses and strains at percentages of the curve. Histological samples aligned with the anatomical planes were also examined by qualitative and quantitative methods to determine any differences in the microstructural morphology. Our study showed significant evidence to support the hypothesis that lung parenchyma behaves isotropically.

  8. Experimental Evidence on the Nature of the Danish Employment Miracle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosholm, Michael

    in an activity is included as an explanatory variable, it removes the difference in job-finding rates between treatment and control  roups completely in one of the counties, and reduces it dramatically and renders it insignificant in the other county. The interpretation we attach to these results......-6. The treatment consisted of a dramatic intensification of labour market policies. The results show that the intensification of labour market policies is highly effective, leading to increases in the exit rate from unemployment ranging from 20 to 40%. When introducing time-varying indicators for the various...... specific treatments actually prescribed to the unemployed workers, none of those treatments have a positive effect on the exit rate from unemployment, neither during the week in which the activity takes place, nor after the activity is completed. However, when the estimated risk of participating...

  9. Experimental Evidence on the Nature of the Danish Employment Miracle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosholm, Michael

    in an activity is included as an explanatory variable, it removes the difference in job-finding rates between treatment and control groups completely in one of the counties, and reduces it dramatically and renders it insignificant in the other county. The interpretation we attach to these results......-6. The treatment consisted of a dramatic intensification of labour market policies. The results show that the intensification of labour market policies is highly effective, leading to increases in the exit rate from unemployment ranging from 20 to 40%. When introducing time-varying indicators for the various...... specific treatments actually prescribed to the unemployed workers, none of those treatments have a positive effect on the exit rate from unemployment, neither during the week in which the activity takes place, nor after the activity is completed. However, when the estimated risk of participating...

  10. Experimental evidence for extreme dispersal limitation in tropical forest birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R P; Robinson, W D; Lovette, I J; Robinson, T R

    2008-09-01

    Movements of organisms between habitat remnants can affect metapopulation structure, community assembly dynamics, gene flow and conservation strategy. In the tropical landscapes that support the majority of global biodiversity and where forest fragmentation is accelerating, there is particular urgency to understand how dispersal across habitats mediates the demography, distribution and differentiation of organisms. By employing unique dispersal challenge experiments coupled with exhaustive inventories of birds in a Panamanian lacustrine archipelago, we show that the ability to fly even short distances (birds, and that this variation correlates strongly with species' extinction histories and current distributions across the archipelago. This extreme variation in flight capability indicates that species' persistence in isolated forest remnants will be differentially mediated by their respective dispersal abilities, and that corridors connecting such fragments will be essential for the maintenance of avian diversity in fragmented tropical landscapes.

  11. Laparoscopic surgery for benign and malign diseases of the digestive system: indications, limitations, and evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küper, Markus Alexander; Eisner, Friederike; Königsrainer, Alfred; Glatzle, Jörg

    2014-05-07

    The laparoscopic technique was introduced in gastrointestinal surgery in the mid 1980s. Since then, the development of this technique has been extraordinary. Triggered by technical innovations (stapling devices or coagulation/dissecting devices), nowadays any type of gastrointestinal resection has been successfully performed laparoscopically and can be performed laparoscopically dependent on the patient's condition. This summary gives an overview over 30 years of laparoscopic surgery with focus on today's indications and evidence. Main indications remain the more common procedures, e.g., appendectomy, cholecystectomy, bariatric procedures or colorectal resections. For all these indications, the laparoscopic approach has become the gold standard with less perioperative morbidity. Regarding oncological outcome there have been several high-quality randomized controlled trials which demonstrated equivalency between laparoscopic and open colorectal resections. Less common procedures like esophagectomy, oncological gastrectomy, liver and pancreatic resections can be performed successfully as well by an experienced surgeon. However, the evidence for these special indications is poor and a general recommendation cannot be given. In conclusion, laparoscopic surgery has revolutionized the field of gastrointestinal surgery by reducing perioperative morbidity without disregarding surgical principles especially in oncological surgery.

  12. Experimental evidence against transmission of Hepatozoon canis by Ixodes ricinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannelli, Alessio; Ramos, Rafael Antonio Nascimento; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Mencke, Norbert; Baneth, Gad; Otranto, Domenico

    2013-09-01

    Hepatozoon canis is among the most widespread tick-borne protozoa infecting domestic and wild carnivores. Its distribution is related to the occurrence of its major vector, the brown dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus. However, the role of Ixodes ricinus as a vector of H. canis has been hypothesized. In the present study, the development of H. canis was investigated in I. ricinus and R. sanguineus nymphs collected from a naturally infested dog. All I. ricinus ticks examined (n=133) were negative by cytological examination at days 20, 30, and 90 post collection, although H. canis DNA was detected in one nymph at day 20 and in 2 nymphs at day 30 post collection. On the other hand, H. canis sporogony was documented by cytology, and H. canis DNA was detected by PCR in R. sanguineus at day 30 post collection. These results indicate that H. canis sporogony does not occur in I. ricinus, but in R. sanguineus, suggesting that I. ricinus does not act as a vector of H. canis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Health effects of trans-fatty acids: experimental and observational evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffarian, D; Aro, A; Willett, W C

    2009-05-01

    acids, respectively. The differential effects of specific TFA isomers may be important but are less well established. The available evidence indicates that trans-18:1 and particularly trans-18:2 isomers have stronger CHD effects than trans-16:1 isomers. The limited data suggest that the experimental effects of ruminant and industrial TFA are similar when consumed in similar quantities, but very few persons consume such high levels of ruminant TFA, and observational studies do not support adverse CHD effects of ruminant TFA in amounts actually consumed. Controlled trials and observational studies provide concordant evidence that consumption of TFA from partially hydrogenated oils adversely affects multiple cardiovascular risk factors and contributes significantly to increased risk of CHD events. The public health implications of ruminant TFA consumption appear much more limited. The effects of specific TFA isomers require further investigation.

  14. Non-Respiratory Indications for Polysomnography and Related Procedures in Children: An Evidence-Based Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotagal, Suresh; Nichols, Cynthia D.; Grigg-Damberger, Madeleine M.; Marcus, Carole L.; Witmans, Manisha B.; Kirk, Valerie G.; D'Andrea, Lynn A.; Hoban, Timothy F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This evidence-based review provides a systematic and comprehensive review of the literature regarding the utility of polysomnography for the evaluation of non-respiratory sleep disorders in children including hypersomnias, parasomnias, sleep-related movement disorders, and sleep in other special populations. Methods: A task force of pediatric sleep medicine experts performed a systematic review of the literature regarding the use of polysomnography for non-respiratory sleep disorders in children. They identified and graded 76 papers as evidence. Results: The main results include (1) polysomnography combined with the multiple sleep latency test is useful for evaluating disorders of excessive somnolence to objectively quantify sleepiness. The results have to be interpreted with consideration of the pubertal stage and regularity of the sleep patterns of the child; (2) polysomnography is indicated in children with parasomnias or sleep related movement disorders who have a high likelihood of having obstructive sleep apnea (OSA); (3) polysomnography is not routinely indicated in children with enuresis unless there is a high likelihood of OSA; (4) polysomnography can be helpful in evaluating children with restless legs syndrome (RLS) and when periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD) is suspected. Conclusions: These findings suggest that, in children with non-respiratory sleep disorders, polysomnography should be a part of a comprehensive sleep evaluation in selected circumstances to determine the nature of the events in more detail or when the suspicion of OSA is relatively high. Citation: Kotagal S; Nichols CD; Grigg-Damberger MM; Marcus CL; Witmans MB; Kirk VG; D'Andrea LA; Hoban TF. Non-respiratory indications for polysomnography and related procedures in children: an evidence-based review. SLEEP 2012;35(11):1451-1466. PMID:23115394

  15. Indication for cataract surgery. Do we have evidence of who will benefit from surgery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Andresen, Jens; Erngaard, Ditte

    2015-01-01

    The need for cataract surgery is expected to rise dramatically in the future due to the increasing proportion of elderly citizens and increasing demands for optimum visual function. The aim of this study was to provide an evidence-based recommendation for the indication of cataract surgery based...... on which group of patients are most likely to benefit from surgery. A systematic literature search was performed in the MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE and COCHRANE LIBRARY databases. Studies evaluating the outcome after cataract surgery according to preoperative visual acuity and visual complaints were included...

  16. Experimental evidence and molecular modeling of the interaction between hRSV-NS1 and quercetin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Deriane Elias; Caruso, Ícaro Putinhon; de Araujo, Gabriela Campos; de Lourenço, Isabella Otenio; de Melo, Fernando Alves; Cornélio, Marinônio Lopes; Fossey, Marcelo Andrés; de Souza, Fátima Pereira

    2016-04-01

    Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus is one of the major causes of acute respiratory infections in children, causing bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Non-Structural Protein 1 (NS1) is involved in immune system evasion, a process that contributes to the success of hRSV replication. This protein can act by inhibiting or neutralizing several steps of interferon pathway, as well as by silencing the hRSV ribonucleoproteic complex. There is evidence that quercetin can reduce the infection and/or replication of several viruses, including RSV. The aims of this study include the expression and purification of the NS1 protein besides experimental and computational assays of the NS1-quercetin interaction. CD analysis showed that NS1 secondary structure composition is 30% alpha-helix, 21% beta-sheet, 23% turn and 26% random coils. The melting temperature obtained through DSC analysis was around 56°C. FRET analysis showed a distance of approximately 19Å between the NS1 and quercetin. Fluorescence titration results showed that the dissociation constant of the NS1-quercetin interaction was around 10(-6)M. In thermodynamic analysis, the enthalpy and entropy balanced forces indicated that the NS1-quercetin interaction presented both hydrophobic and electrostatic contributions. The computational results from the molecular modeling for NS1 structure and molecular docking regarding its interaction with quercetin corroborate the experimental data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Theoretical and experimental evidence for a nodal energy gap in MgB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agassi, Y. Dan; Oates, Daniel E.

    2017-11-01

    We present a phenomenological model that strongly suggests that the smaller of the two energy gaps in MgB2, the so-called π gap, contains nodal lines with a six-fold symmetry (i-wave). The model also indicates that the larger gap, the so-called σ gap, is conventional s-wave. The model is an extension of the BCS gap equation that accounts for the elastic anisotropy in MgB2 and the Coulomb repulsion. It is based on a phononic pairing mechanism and assumes no coupling between the two energy gaps in MgB2 at zero temperature. All of the parameters of the model, such as sound velocities and masses, are independently determined material constants. The results agree with a previous ad-hoc hypothesis that the π energy gap has six nodal lines. That hypothesis was motivated by low-temperature measurements of the surface impedance and intermodulation distortion in high-quality thin films. We briefly review experimental evidence in the literature that is relevant to the energy-gap symmetry. We find that the evidence from the literature for s-wave is inconclusive. Our finding is that the π gap has six nodal lines.

  18. Infectivity of DWV associated to flower pollen: experimental evidence of a horizontal transmission route.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Mazzei

    Full Text Available Deformed wing virus (DWV is a honeybee pathogen whose presence is generally associated with infestation of the colony by the mite Varroa destructor, leading to the onset of infections responsible for the collapse of the bee colony. DWV contaminates bee products such as royal jelly, bee-bread and honey stored within the infected hive. Outside the hive, DWV has been found in pollen loads collected directly from infected as well as uninfected forager bees. It has been shown that the introduction of virus-contaminated pollen into a DWV-free hive results in the production of virus-contaminated food, whose role in the development of infected bees from virus-free eggs has been experimentally demonstrated. The aim of this study was twofold: (i to ascertain the presence of DWV on pollen collected directly from flowers visited by honeybees and then quantify the viral load and (ii determine whether the virus associated with pollen is infective. The results of our investigation provide evidence that DWV is present on pollen sampled directly from visited flowers and that, following injection in individuals belonging to the pollinator species Apis mellifera, it is able to establish an active infection, as indicated by the presence of replicating virus in the head of the injected bees. We also provide the first indication that the pollinator species Osmia cornuta is susceptible to DWV infection.

  19. Price discrimination in essential medicines: evidence from International Drug Price Indicator Guide data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Michael; Zhang, Raymond

    2013-03-01

    Few data are available on what donors, governments and other implementing organisations pay for the medicines they procure. To partly address this shortcoming, we analyse transactions of pharmaceuticals on the WHO's essential medicines list. Our objective was to identify the determinants of prices paid for these drugs. We used data from the 2008 version of the International Drug Price Indicator Guide. We normalised transactions by representing their value as a 'price per daily dose'. We used a mixed-effects regression model to quantify the impact of observable characteristics on prices paid. We present evidence of first-degree price discrimination in the market for essential medicines. We find that as a country's per capita wealth doubles, prices paid for the same pharmaceutical increase by 33%. These data indicate that purchasing agents from wealthier countries pay more for essential medicines, all factors constant. This behaviour is not a form of development assistance for health but rather is indicative of inefficient markets in which buyers' lack of information enables suppliers to charge higher prices than they could otherwise.

  20. Educational evidence based interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorders: experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saverio Fontani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The educational interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorders are a relatively unexplored topic, in the face of numerous studies on the educational intervention models for the child population. In this paper the results of major studies and meta-analysis on the topic are presented and their implications for educational intervention are discussed.Interventi educativi evidence based per adulti con disturbi dello spettro autistico: evidenze sperimentaliGli interventi educativi per adulti con Disturbi dello Spettro Autistico rappresentano un’area relativamente poco esplorata, a fronte di numerosi studi dedicati ai modelli di intervento educativo rivolti alla popolazione infantile. In questo articolo sono presentati i risultati dei principali studi e delle meta-analisi sul tema e vengono discusse le loro implicazioni per l’intervento educativo.

  1. Is the Internet making markets more efficient? The evidence according to price indicators in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferran Sabate

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been theorized that low search costs associated with e-commerce imply greater levels of efficiency relative to the conventional retail channels. Multiple empirical studies confirm this hypothesis concerning price level, although the evidence is mixed relative to price dispersion. This article empirically compares the efficiency of the Internet with the conventional retail channel through 4 price indicators for the CD market. The results, based on 1,603 prices collected in Spain, are surprising. The conventional channel shows greater efficiency for both posted and final prices. These findings together with the coincident results of other reviewed studies would suggest key factors related to the development of e-commerce. Implications of the study and future considerations are discussed.

  2. Dual Antiplatelet Therapy of Clopidogrel and Aspirin in Secondary Prevention of Ischemic Stroke: Evidence and Indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ya; Cheng, Xin; Dong, Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays the dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) becomes more widely used in patients with ischemic stroke. Nevertheless, controversies exist for indications of DAPT. In view of evidence-based medicine analysis, patients with high-risk transient ischemic attack and minor stroke, severe symptomatic intracranial artery stenosis, symptomatic intracranial and extracranial artery stenosis causing artery-to-artery embolism, ischemic stroke attributed to aortic arch plaques, high-risk atrial fibrillation not suitable for oral anticoagulants, intracranial and extracranial stent implantation, and ischemic stroke with acute coronary syndrome may gain great benefit from DAPT of clopidogrel and aspirin. In clinical practice, individualized antiplatelet therapy strategies should be taken by weighing risks of ischemia and hemorrhage. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The process of construction of evidence: An analysis of the use of indicators in two decisions of innovation policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boavida, N.; Moniz, A.; Laranja, M.

    2016-07-01

    Despite increasing calls for evidence-based policies, knowledge about the practical use of evidences remains limited. This paper studies the process of construction of evidences in decisions of innovation policy to understand how evidences were used. It analysis the use of indicators and other evidences through interviews conducted to inquire about the two decisions: an electric mobility policy and a nanotechnology laboratory. Results show indicators and other evidences were brought to decision processes according to their availability and capacity to support the different interests of the actors and the stakeholders. Their role was influenced by the particular situation of the decision makers. More importantly, the use of persuasive analytical evidences appears to be related with the adversity of the policy context. In addition, research suggests that indicators are one tool among others to foster innovation decisions. In fact, the relatively minor instrumental role of indicators suggests that indicators are mostly a complementary instrument of decision. When used relevantly, indicators can offer support to a decision. But there are other significant influences that need to be taken into account to understand the specific role indicators and other evidences play, such as the social relations of the decision makers and their emotional-intuitive decisions. (Author)

  4. The glycaemic outcomes of Cinnamon, a review of the experimental evidence and clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Medagama, Arjuna B

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cinnamon is currently marketed as a remedy for obesity, glucose intolerance, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidaemia. Integrative medicine is a new concept that combines conventional treatment with evidence-based complementary therapies. Aim The aim of this review is to critically evaluate the experimental evidence available for cinnamon in improving glycaemic targets in animal models and humans. Results Insulin receptor auto-phosphorlylation and de-phosphorylation, glucose transport...

  5. Cosmetics for acne: indications and recommendations for an evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'oglio, F; Tedeschi, A; Fabbrocini, G; Veraldi, S; Picardo, M; Micali, G

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this review was to evaluate, by a thorough revision of the literature, the true efficacy of currently available topic and systemic cosmetic acne agents. The efficacy of currently available cosmetic acne agents has been retrospectively evaluated via thorough revision of the literature on matched electronic databases (PubMed). All retrieved studies, either randomized clinical trials or clinical trials, controlled or uncontrolled were considered. Scientific evidence suggests that most cosmetic products for acne may enhance the clinical outcome. Cleansers should be indicated to all acne patients; those containing benzoyl peroxide or azelaic/salicylic acid/triclosan show the best efficacy profile. Sebum-controlling agents containing nicotinamide or zinc acetate may minimize excessive sebum production. Cosmetics with antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory substances such as, respectively, ethyl lactate or phytosphingosine and nicotinamide or resveratrol, may speed acne recovery. Topical corneolytics, including retinaldehyde/glycolic acid or lactic acid, induce a comedolytic effect and may also facilitate skin absorption of topical drugs. Finally, the use of specific moisturizers should be strongly recommended in all acne patients. Cosmetics, if correctly prescribed, may improve the performance of the therapy, whereas wrong procedures and/or inadequate cosmetics may worsen acne. Cosmetological recommendations may allow clinicians to make informed decisions about the role of various cosmetics and to indentify the appropriate indications and precautions. The choice of the most effective product should take into consideration the ongoing pharmacological therapy and acne type/severity as well.

  6. Competition and quality indicators in the health care sector: empirical evidence from the Dutch hospital sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croes, R R; Krabbe-Alkemade, Y J F M; Mikkers, M C

    2018-01-01

    There is much debate about the effect of competition in healthcare and especially the effect of competition on the quality of healthcare, although empirical evidence on this subject is mixed. The Netherlands provides an interesting case in this debate. The Dutch system could be characterized as a system involving managed competition and mandatory healthcare insurance. Information about the quality of care provided by hospitals has been publicly available since 2008. In this paper, we evaluate the relationship between quality scores for three diagnosis groups and the market power indicators of hospitals. We estimate the impact of competition on quality in an environment of liberalized pricing. For this research, we used unique price and production data relating to three diagnosis groups (cataract, adenoid and tonsils, bladder tumor) produced by Dutch hospitals in the period 2008-2011. We also used the quality indicators relating to these diagnosis groups. We reveal a negative relationship between market share and quality score for two of the three diagnosis groups studied, meaning that hospitals in competitive markets have better quality scores than those in concentrated markets. We therefore conclude that more competition is associated with higher quality scores.

  7. An Evidence-Based Review Literature About Risk Indicators and Management of Unknown-Origin Xerostomia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Agha-hosseini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This evidence-based article reviews risk indicators and management of unknown-origin xerostomia. Xerostomia and hyposalivation refer to different aspects of dry mouth. Xerostomia is a subjective sensation of dry mouth, whilst hyposalivation is defined as an objective assessment of reduced salivary flow rate. About 30% of the elderly (65 years and older experience xerostomia and hyposalivation. Structural and functional factors, or both may lead to salivary gland dysfunction.Study Selection: The EBM literature search was conducted by using the medical literature database MEDLINE via PubMed and OvidMedline search engines. Results were limited to English language articles (1965 to present including clinical trials (CT, randomized controlled trials (RCT, systematic reviews and review articles. Case control or cohort studies were included for the etiology.Results: Neuropathic etiology such as localized oral alteration of thermal sensations, saliva composition change (for example higher levels of K, Cl, Ca, IgA, amylase, calcium, PTH and cortisol, lower levels of estrogen and progesterone, smaller salivary gland size, and illnesses such as lichen planus, are risk indicators for unknown-origin xerostomia. The management is palliative and preventative. Management of symptoms includes drug administration (systemic secretogogues, saliva substitutes and bile secretion-stimulator, night guard, diet and habit modifications. Other managements may be indicated to treat adverse effects.Conclusion: Neuropathic etiology, saliva composition change, smaller salivary gland size, and illnesses such as oral lichen planus can be suggestive causes for unknown-origin xerostomia. However, longitudinal studies will be important to elucidate the causes of unknown-origin xerostomia.

  8. An Evidence-Based Review Literature About Risk Indicators and Management of Unknown-Origin Xerostomia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha-Hosseini, Farzaneh; Moosavi, Mahdieh-Sadat

    2013-01-01

    This evidence-based article reviews risk indicators and management of unknown-origin xerostomia. Xerostomia and hyposalivation refer to different aspects of dry mouth. Xerostomia is a subjective sensation of dry mouth, whilst hyposalivation is defined as an objective assessment of reduced salivary flow rate. About 30% of the elderly (65 years and older) experience xerostomia and hyposalivation. Structural and functional factors, or both may lead to salivary gland dysfunction. The EBM literature search was conducted by using the medical literature database MEDLINE via PubMed and OvidMedline search engines. Results were limited to English language articles (1965 to present) including clinical trials (CT), randomized controlled trials (RCT), systematic reviews and review articles. Case control or cohort studies were included for the etiology. Neuropathic etiology such as localized oral alteration of thermal sensations, saliva composition change (for example higher levels of K, Cl, Ca, IgA, amylase, calcium, PTH and cortisol), lower levels of estrogen and progesterone, smaller salivary gland size, and illnesses such as lichen planus, are risk indicators for unknown-origin xerostomia. The management is palliative and preventative. Management of symptoms includes drug administration (systemic secretogogues, saliva substitutes and bile secretion-stimulator), night guard, diet and habit modifications. Other managements may be indicated to treat adverse effects. Neuropathic etiology, saliva composition change, smaller salivary gland size, and illnesses such as oral lichen planus can be suggestive causes for unknown-origin xerostomia. However, longitudinal studies will be important to elucidate the causes of unknown-origin xerostomia. PMID:25512755

  9. Genomic Regions Associated with Feed Efficiency Indicator Traits in an Experimental Nellore Cattle Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Ferreira Olivieri

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify genomic regions and metabolic pathways associated with dry matter intake, average daily gain, feed efficiency and residual feed intake in an experimental Nellore cattle population. The high-density SNP chip (Illumina High-Density Bovine BeadChip, 777k was used to genotype the animals. The SNP markers effects and their variances were estimated using the single-step genome wide association method. The (covariance components were estimated by Bayesian inference. The chromosome segments that are responsible for more than 1.0% of additive genetic variance were selected to explore and determine possible quantitative trait loci. The bovine genome Map Viewer was used to identify genes. In total, 51 genomic regions were identified for all analyzed traits. The heritability estimated for feed efficiency was low magnitude (0.13±0.06. For average daily gain, dry matter intake and residual feed intake, heritability was moderate to high (0.43±0.05; 0.47±0.05, 0.18±0.05, respectively. A total of 8, 17, 14 and 12 windows that are responsible for more than 1% of the additive genetic variance for dry matter intake, average daily gain, feed efficiency and residual feed intake, respectively, were identified. Candidate genes GOLIM4, RFX6, CACNG7, CACNG6, CAPN8, CAPN2, AKT2, GPRC6A, and GPR45 were associated with feed efficiency traits. It was expected that the response to selection would be higher for residual feed intake than for feed efficiency. Genomic regions harboring possible QTL for feed efficiency indicator traits were identified. Candidate genes identified are involved in energy use, metabolism protein, ion transport, transmembrane transport, the olfactory system, the immune system, secretion and cellular activity. The identification of these regions and their respective candidate genes should contribute to the formation of a genetic basis in Nellore cattle for feed efficiency indicator traits, and these

  10. Genomic Regions Associated with Feed Efficiency Indicator Traits in an Experimental Nellore Cattle Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Bianca Ferreira; Mercadante, Maria Eugênia Zerlotti; Cyrillo, Joslaine Noely Dos Santos Gonçalves; Branco, Renata Helena; Bonilha, Sarah Figueiredo Martins; de Albuquerque, Lucia Galvão; Silva, Rafael Medeiros de Oliveira; Baldi, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify genomic regions and metabolic pathways associated with dry matter intake, average daily gain, feed efficiency and residual feed intake in an experimental Nellore cattle population. The high-density SNP chip (Illumina High-Density Bovine BeadChip, 777k) was used to genotype the animals. The SNP markers effects and their variances were estimated using the single-step genome wide association method. The (co)variance components were estimated by Bayesian inference. The chromosome segments that are responsible for more than 1.0% of additive genetic variance were selected to explore and determine possible quantitative trait loci. The bovine genome Map Viewer was used to identify genes. In total, 51 genomic regions were identified for all analyzed traits. The heritability estimated for feed efficiency was low magnitude (0.13±0.06). For average daily gain, dry matter intake and residual feed intake, heritability was moderate to high (0.43±0.05; 0.47±0.05, 0.18±0.05, respectively). A total of 8, 17, 14 and 12 windows that are responsible for more than 1% of the additive genetic variance for dry matter intake, average daily gain, feed efficiency and residual feed intake, respectively, were identified. Candidate genes GOLIM4, RFX6, CACNG7, CACNG6, CAPN8, CAPN2, AKT2, GPRC6A, and GPR45 were associated with feed efficiency traits. It was expected that the response to selection would be higher for residual feed intake than for feed efficiency. Genomic regions harboring possible QTL for feed efficiency indicator traits were identified. Candidate genes identified are involved in energy use, metabolism protein, ion transport, transmembrane transport, the olfactory system, the immune system, secretion and cellular activity. The identification of these regions and their respective candidate genes should contribute to the formation of a genetic basis in Nellore cattle for feed efficiency indicator traits, and these results would support

  11. Field experimental evidence that stochastic processes predominate in the initial assembly of bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yi-Qi; Zhao, Xin-Feng; Zhang, Da-Yong

    2016-06-01

    To assess the relative importance of environmental selection, dispersal and stochastic processes in structuring ecological communities, we conducted a bacterial community assembly experiment using microcosms filled with sterile liquid medium under field conditions in the Inner Mongolian grasslands. Multiple replicate microcosms containing different carbon substrates were placed at nine locations across three spatial scales (10, 300 and 10 000 m distance between locations) in such a way that the environment of microcosms varies independently of the geographical distance. The operational taxonomic units within the experimental communities were assessed via the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism techniques on the 10th and 17th days after the onset of the experiment. We found no evidence of distance decay in community similarity, and communities within a given location were more similar to each other regardless of environment than communities at other locations within the same spatial scale. Variance partitioning indicated that location explained more compositional variation in microbial communities than environment, particularly on the 17th day, despite that environment and location in combination could only explain less than half of the total variation. These results suggest that bacterial dispersal is not limited by distance in this experiment, and community assembly in microcosms is not environmentally determined but governed by stochastic processes. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Adam D I; Guillory, Jamie E; Hancock, Jeffrey T

    2014-06-17

    Emotional states can be transferred to others via emotional contagion, leading people to experience the same emotions without their awareness. Emotional contagion is well established in laboratory experiments, with people transferring positive and negative emotions to others. Data from a large real-world social network, collected over a 20-y period suggests that longer-lasting moods (e.g., depression, happiness) can be transferred through networks [Fowler JH, Christakis NA (2008) BMJ 337:a2338], although the results are controversial. In an experiment with people who use Facebook, we test whether emotional contagion occurs outside of in-person interaction between individuals by reducing the amount of emotional content in the News Feed. When positive expressions were reduced, people produced fewer positive posts and more negative posts; when negative expressions were reduced, the opposite pattern occurred. These results indicate that emotions expressed by others on Facebook influence our own emotions, constituting experimental evidence for massive-scale contagion via social networks. This work also suggests that, in contrast to prevailing assumptions, in-person interaction and nonverbal cues are not strictly necessary for emotional contagion, and that the observation of others' positive experiences constitutes a positive experience for people.

  13. Experimental evidence for synchronization to a musical beat in a nonhuman animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Aniruddh D; Iversen, John R; Bregman, Micah R; Schulz, Irena

    2009-05-26

    The tendency to move in rhythmic synchrony with a musical beat (e.g., via head bobbing, foot tapping, or dance) is a human universal [1] yet is not commonly observed in other species [2]. Does this ability reflect a brain specialization for music cognition, or does it build on neural circuitry that ordinarily serves other functions? According to the "vocal learning and rhythmic synchronization" hypothesis [3], entrainment to a musical beat relies on the neural circuitry for complex vocal learning, an ability that requires a tight link between auditory and motor circuits in the brain [4, 5]. This hypothesis predicts that only vocal learning species (such as humans and some birds, cetaceans, and pinnipeds, but not nonhuman primates) are capable of synchronizing movements to a musical beat. Here we report experimental evidence for synchronization to a beat in a sulphur-crested cockatoo (Cacatua galerita eleonora). By manipulating the tempo of a musical excerpt across a wide range, we show that the animal spontaneously adjusts the tempo of its rhythmic movements to stay synchronized with the beat. These findings indicate that synchronization to a musical beat is not uniquely human and suggest that animal models can provide insights into the neurobiology and evolution of human music [6].

  14. Experimental evidence for the formation of liquid saline water on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Erik; Martínez, Germán M; Elliott, Harvey M; Rennó, Nilton O

    2014-07-16

    Evidence for deliquescence of perchlorate salts has been discovered in the Martian polar region while possible brine flows have been observed in the equatorial region. This appears to contradict the idea that bulk deliquescence is too slow to occur during the short periods of the Martian diurnal cycle during which conditions are favorable for it. We conduct laboratory experiments to study the formation of liquid brines at Mars environmental conditions. We find that when water vapor is the only source of water, bulk deliquescence of perchlorates is not rapid enough to occur during the short periods of the day during which the temperature is above the salts' eutectic value, and the humidity is above the salts' deliquescence value. However, when the salts are in contact with water ice, liquid brine forms in minutes, indicating that aqueous solutions could form temporarily where salts and ice coexist on the Martian surface and in the shallow subsurface. The formation of brines at Martian conditions was studied experimentallyBulk deliquescence from water vapor is too slow to occur diurnally on MarsBrines form in minutes when salts are placed in direct contact with ice.

  15. Experimental evidence of lateral flow in unsaturated homogeneous isotropic sloping soil due to rainfall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinai, G.; Dirksen, C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes laboratory experimental evidence for lateral flow in the top layer of unsaturated sloping soil due to rainfall. Water was applied uniformly on horizontal and V-shaped surfaces of fine sand, at rates about 100 times smaller than the saturated hydraulic conductivity. Flow regimes

  16. The Development of Experimentation and Evidence Evaluation Skills at Preschool Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekny, Jeanette; Grube, Dietmar; Maehler, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Researchers taking a domain-general approach to the development of scientific reasoning long thought that the ability to engage in scientific reasoning did not develop until adolescence. However, more recent studies have shown that preschool children already have a basic ability to evaluate evidence and a basic understanding of experimentation.…

  17. Direct experimental evidence of the weak $\\Lambda n p \\rightarrow n n p$ hypernucleus decay

    CERN Document Server

    Agnello, M; Bertani, M; Bhang, H C; Bonomi, G; Botta, E; Bregant, M; Bressani, T; Bufalino, S; Busso, L; Calvo, D; Camerini, P; Dalena, B; De Mori, F; D'Erasmo, G; Fabbri, F L; Feliciello, A; Filippi, A; Fiore, E M; Fontana, A; Fujioka, H; Genova, P; Gianotti, P; Grion, N; Lucherini, V; Marcello, S; Mirfakhrai, N; Moia, F; Morra, O; Nagae, T; Outa, H; Pantaleo, A; Paticchio, V; Paino, S; Rui, R; Simonetti, G; Wheadon, R; Zenoni, A

    2011-01-01

    A direct experimental evidence of the occurrence of the weak reaction $\\Lambda np\\rightarrow nnp$ in nuclei has been obtained by the FINUDA experiment. Three events have been found that can be attributed to $^{7}_{\\Lambda}$Li and $^{9}_{\\Lambda}$Be two nucleon-induced non mesonic weak decays. The kinematic analysis of such events is presented here.

  18. Development of an epiphyte indicator of nutrient enrichment. A critical evaluation of observational and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    An extensive review of the literature on epiphytes on submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), primarily seagrasses but including some brackish and freshwater rooted macrophytes, was conducted in order to evaluate the evidence for response of epiphyte metrics to increased nutrients. ...

  19. Negative heat capacity in the critical region of nuclear fragmentation: an experimental evidence of the liquid-gas phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, M.; Gulminelli, F.; Chomaz, P.; Bruno, M.; Cannata, F.; Bougault, R.; Gramegna, F.; Iori, I.; Le Neindre, N.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Moroni, A.; Vannini, G.

    2000-02-01

    An experimental indication of negative heat capacity in excited nuclear systems is inferred from the event by event study of energy fluctuations in Au quasi-projectile sources formed in Au+Au collisions at 35 A.MeV. Equilibrated events are selected and the excited source configuration is reconstructed through a calorimetric analysis of its de-excitation products. Fragment partitions show signs of a critical behavior at about 4.5 A.MeV excitation energy. Around this value the heat capacity shows a negative branch providing a direct evidence of a first order liquid gas phase transition.

  20. Floristic indicators of tropical landuse systems: Evidence from mining areas in Southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehinde Akinbiola

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Most forests in the tropics have not only been reduced in size but have also experienced forest degradation. The delicate balance of the components of the forest ecosystem has been altered largely by the landuse systems which have resulted in the disappearance of some species and the introduction of new ones. In order to understand the influence of human disturbance caused by artisanal mining on plant biodiversity and the physical environment, this study assessed changes in vegetation characteristics using plant functional groups, such as invasive, pioneer and understory species. The study was conducted at two sites in two Southwestern states of Nigeria, Itagunmodi in Atakumosa West Local Government Area of Osun State and Olode in Oluyole Local Government Area of Oyo State. Complete enumerations of woody, non-woody and herbaceous plant species were carried out in 20 m by 20 m plots selected using stratified random sampling as representative of landuse classes: freshly mined (6 months and a control plot (secondary forest. The results showed that the control plot in Itagunmodi had undergone degradation as indicated by the presence of Alchornea laxiflora, Geophilia obvallata, Musa sapientum,Elaeis guineensis and Keetia hispida. However, if left undisturbed, it has the potential of regeneration back to its original state because of its woody tree species composition and lianas (Triclisia gilletii. In addition the forest soils in the mines had been exposed to direct insolation for a long period, and the soil structure and texture have been affected, consequently altering the viability of the seed bank. Poaceae and Papilionoideae were the most common in the freshly mined plots while invasive species were the most common in abandoned mined plots. In conclusion, the floristic composition in the mining sites has been altered and there was no clear evidence that regrowth would bring restoration of the lost ecosystem services.

  1. [Changes in the morphometric indices of the microvascular bed of the brain in experimental hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, T B; Rodionov, I M; Shinkarenko, V S

    1984-09-01

    Brain stem microvessels up to 15 microns in diameter of spontaneously hypertensive rats and rats with experimental renal hypertension were investigated in histological sections with the aid of a texture analysis system. Hypertensive animals showed a reduction in the vascular diameter per unit volume of cerebral tissue, in the mean vascular diameter as well as in the area occupied by the vessels, thus attesting to the lessened density of brain vascularization. The proportion of the vessels measuring from 6 to 15 microns in diameter per unit volume of cerebral tissue decreased whereas the proportion of the vessels measuring up to 5 microns in diameter remained unchanged. The characteristics under study demonstrated the same line of changes in both spontaneous and experimental renal hypertension.

  2. Experimental evidence for a significant contribution of cellulose to indoor aerosol mass concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Mário; Marques, Daniel; Caseiro, Alexandre; Pio, Casimiro

    2010-02-01

    An apartment bedroom located in a residential area of Aveiro (Portugal) was selected with the aim of characterizing the cellulose content of indoor aerosol particles. Two sets of samples were taken: (1) PM 10 collected simultaneously in indoor and outdoor air; (2) PM 10 and PM 2.5 collected simultaneously in indoor air. The aerosol particles were concentrated on quartz fibre filters with low-volume samplers equipped with size selective inlets. The filters were weighed and then extracted for cellulose analysis by an enzymatic method. The average indoor cellulose concentration was 1.01 ± 0.24 μg m -3, whereas the average outdoor cellulose concentration was 0.078 ± 0.047 μg m -3, accounting for 4.0% and 0.4%, respectively, of the PM 10 mass. The corresponding average ratio between indoor and outdoor cellulose concentrations was 11.1 ± 4.9, indicating that cellulose particles were generated indoors, most likely due to the handling of cotton-made textiles as a result of routine daily activities in the bedroom. Indoor cellulose concentrations averaged 1.22 ± 0.53 μg m -3 in the aerosol coarse fraction (determined from the difference between PM 10 and PM 2.5 concentrations) and averaged 0.38 ± 0.13 μg m -3 in the aerosol fine fraction. The average ratio between the coarse and fine fractions of cellulose concentrations in the indoor air was 3.6 ± 2.1. This ratio is in line with the primary origin of this biopolymer. Results from this study provide the first experimental evidence in support of a significant contribution of cellulose to the mass of suspended particles in indoor air.

  3. The Development of Experimentation and Evidence Evaluation Skills at Preschool Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekny, Jeanette; Grube, Dietmar; Maehler, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Researchers taking a domain-general approach to the development of scientific reasoning long thought that the ability to engage in scientific reasoning did not develop until adolescence. However, more recent studies have shown that preschool children already have a basic ability to evaluate evidence and a basic understanding of experimentation. Data providing insights into when exactly in the preschool years significant gains in these abilities occur are scarce. Drawing on a sample of 138 preschool children, this longitudinal study therefore examined how children's ability to evaluate evidence and their understanding of experimentation develop between the ages of four and six. Findings showed that the ability to evaluate evidence was already well developed at age four and increased steadily and significantly over time as long as the pattern of covariation was perfect. In the case of imperfect covariation, the proportion of correct answers was low over the period of observation, but showed a significant increase between the ages of four and five. If the data did not allow relationship between variables to be inferred, the proportion of correct answers was low, with a significant increase between the ages of five and six. The children's understanding of experimentation increased significantly between the ages of five and six. The implications of these findings for age-appropriate science programs in preschool are discussed.

  4. Are the olive oil and other dietary lipids related to cancer? Experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escrich, E; Solanas, M; Moral, R; Costa, I; Grau, L

    2006-12-01

    There is a wealth of evidence supporting the relationship between dietary lipids and cancer, particularly those of the breast, colon and rectum and prostate. The main support comes from the international correlational studies and, especially, from experimental ones. The evidence from human analytical studies is less consistent because of several conflicting findings, probably due to methodological issues. Experimentally, it has been clearly demonstrated that quantity and type of dietary lipids as well as the particular critical phases of the carcinogenesis in which they act, are the essential factors in this relationship. Thus, whereas high dietary intake of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), primarily LA, and saturated fat has tumor-enhancing effects, long chain n-3 PUFA, CLA and GLA have inhibitory effects. Monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), mainly OA, present in high quantities in olive oil, seem to be protective although some inconsistent results have been reported. Bioactive compounds of virgin olive oil may also account for the protective effect of this oil, which is the main source of fat in the Mediterranean diet. Experimental studies have also provided evidence of several putative mechanisms of action of dietary lipids on cancer. Lipids can influence the hormonal status, modify cell membranes structure and function, cell signalling transduction pathways and gene expression, and modulate the function of the immune system. Although further studies are needed to evaluate and verify these mechanisms in humans, based on the multiple ways dietary lipids can act, they may have an important influence on tumorigenesis.

  5. Experimental evidence of large complete bandgaps in zig-zag lattice structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Lin; Zhao, Sheng-Dong; Wang, Yue-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, experimental evidence of large complete bandgaps in a kind of light-weighted zig-zag lattice structure (ZLS) is presented. Ultrasonic experiments are conducted on the stainless steel slab designed with ZLS to detect the complete bandgaps. Also, the numerical simulations of the experiments by the finite element method are carried out. For comparison, we conduct the same experiments and numerical simulations on the stainless steel slab with straight lattice structure (SLS). Good agreement is obtained between the experimental and numerical results. The complete bandgaps of ZLS are successfully tested and no complete bandgap is found in SLS. The band structures and vibration modes of both ZLS and SLS are calculated via the finite element method to understand the experimental data. The effects of the geometry parameters of ZLS on the complete bandgaps are discussed in detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Experimental justification of indicative microbiological values for the safety of water bodies in the recreation areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е.V. Drozdova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article provides the assessment of the microbiological values of water bodies if they are used for recreational purposes and distinguishes the epidemiologically significant parameters. In order to validate the indicative safety values taking into account the existing conditions of the recreational use of water we conducted the hygienic assessment of water in the water bodies used for recreational purposes under the indicative microbiological values (total microbial count, thermotolerant coliform bacteria, E. coli; enterococcus, spores of sulfite-reducing Clostridia; coliphages; Ps. aeruginosa and the content of pathogenic microorganisms; also the microbiological profile of water was identified. The obtained data will be used to improve the system for monitoring of water bodies in the recreation areas.

  7. Selected CSF biomarkers indicate no evidence of early neuroinflammation in Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Börnsen, Lars Svend; Budtz-Jorgensen, Esben

    2016-01-01

    was the only biomarker that increased in premanifest stages and no evidence of early involvement of neuroinflammation in HD was found. However, we found that the biomarkers for neurodegeneration, MBP and tau, increased during the disease course in manifest HD gene-expansion carriers and were associated...

  8. Electrical Resistivity as an Indicator of Saturation in Fractured Geothermal Reservoir Rocks: Experimental Data and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detwiler, R L; Roberts, J J

    2003-06-23

    The electrical resistivity of rock cores under conditions representative of geothermal reservoirs is strongly influenced by the state and phase (liquid/vapor) of the pore fluid. In fractured samples, phase change (vaporization/condensation) can result in resistivity changes that are more than an order of magnitude greater than those measured in intact samples. These results suggest that electrical resistivity monitoring of geothermal reservoirs may provide a useful tool for remotely detecting the movement of water and steam within fractures, the development and evolution of fracture systems and the formation of steam caps. We measured the electrical resistivity of cores of welded tuff containing fractures of various geometries to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to determine the effects of variable fracture dimensions and surface area on water extraction from the matrix. We then used the Nonisothermal Unsaturated Flow and Transport model (NUFT) (Nitao, 1998) to simulate the propagation of boiling fronts through the samples. The simulated saturation profiles combined with previously reported measurements of resistivity-saturation curves allow us to estimate the evolution of the sample resistivity as the boiling front propagates into the rock matrix. These simulations provide qualitative agreement with experimental measurements suggesting that our modeling approach may be used to estimate resistivity changes induced by boiling in more complex systems.

  9. Induced Cannibalism in Experimental Populations of the Forensic Indicator Chrysomya putoria Wiedemann (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botteon, V W; Fernandes, F S; Godoy, W A C

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed the behavior of third-instars of Chrysomya putoria as potential cannibals in experimental populations. Cannibalism rates were evaluated in three settings observed for 3, 6, 9, and 24 h, placing injured and uninjured larvae of C. putoria together. Our data heavily support that C. putoria larvae behave as cannibals when induced by a wound in another larva, and also after starving for 24 h. The probability of cannibalism increased as a function of time, both in no-choice and in choice experiments evidencing that time is a determining factor for cannibalism induction in C. putoria. However, the treatment combining injured with uninjured larvae showed the highest probability of cannibalism. These results suggest that C. putoria larvae may cannibalize under scarcity of food over long time or the presence of injured larvae. This study is useful to understand the behavior of C. putoria feeding on ephemeral substrates such as carrion or corpses and brings relevant and significant contribution to population ecology of blowflies and also forensic entomology.

  10. Sensitivity of stock market indices to oil prices: Evidence from manufacturing sub-sectors in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eksi Halil Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Crude oil price is a critical cost factor for manufacturing industries that are of vital importance for economic growth. This study examines the relationship between crude oil prices and the indices of seven Turkish manufacturing sub-sectors over the period 1997:01-2009:12. The error correction model results reveal the long term causality from crude oil prices to chemical petroleum-plastic and basic metal sub-sectors indicating that these sub-sectors are highly sensitive to crude oil prices. We find no causal relationship for other sector indices for short or long time periods.

  11. Experimental Study of Fluid Flow in an Aneurysm for Varying Shape Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Paulo; Choi, Cyrus; Durgesh, Vibhav

    2014-11-01

    An aneurysm is an abnormal bulging of a blood vessel wall. A ruptured aneurysm can be severely debilitating or fatal. There is a lack of understanding of fluid flow parameters leading to aneurysm growth and rupture. Clinical studies have shown that certain aneurysm shape indices are strongly correlated to rupture. The overall goal of this study is to comprehensively characterize fluid dynamics parameters inside an aneurysm sac, for varying shape indices. As part of this work, two different idealized aneurysm glass models are used, and an in-house flow loop system has been developed to simulate constant and physiological pressure gradients. Index of refraction matching techniques have been used for accurate estimation of fluid flow parameters. Laser Doppler Velocimetry measurements are conducted for Reynolds number values from 10-200 to understand impact of inflow conditions on flow structures and parameters inside aneurysm sac. Particle Image Velocimetry measurements are performed on several horizontal and vertical planes inside aneurysm sac and show the presence of secondary fluid structures inside the sac, not observed in mid-plane measurements from earlier studies. The results show dependence of flow parameters/structures on aneurysm shape and inflow conditions. This work is supported through the California State University Northridge Research Fellowship Program 2013-14.

  12. Less-invasive MR indices of clinically evident esophageal variceal bleeding in biliary atresia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Heng Mo

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: Less-invasive indices, including the corrected splenic length platelet ratio and the splenic volume index-to-platelet count ratio, may be valuable predictors of esophageal variceal bleeding in patients with biliary atresia.

  13. Evidence-based nursing-sensitive indicators for patients hospitalized with depression in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapinta, Darawan; Anders, Robert L; Mahatnirunkul, Suwat; Srikosai, Soontaree

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate nursing-sensitive indicators for patients hospitalized with depression in Thailand. The initial draft, consisting of 12 categories with 37 subcategories, was then evaluated by experts in the US and Thailand. Hospital records were then utilized to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of the indicators. The finalized instrument consisted of 11 categories with 43 items with a validity of .98 and internal consistency of .88. This is the first set of indicators developed to evaluate nursing-sensitivity for patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of depression in Thailand. Having nursing indicators for depressed patients provides nurses with concrete tools to evaluate their work with depressed patients, allowing these staff to assess their work in a very specific, methodical, and consistent manner. When problems are discovered, both the staff and administration can work to address these issues through training, procedural changes, and departmental shifts.

  14. Native vitamin D supplementation: indication in the light of current scientific evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kélcia Rosana da Silva Quadros

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of native vitamin D in the bone tissue physiology is clear not only as an essential nutrient able to treat and prevent rickets but also as a regulator of calcium and phosphate homeostasis, as of bone metabolism. A wide spectrum of biological activities has been described, including effects on cardiovascular, central nervous, and immunological systems, in the cellular growth, as in the control of other hormonal systems. Epidemiological evidences have linked vitamin D deficiency with many other diseases as cancer, diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, autoimmune diseases, infections and mortality increase. Overall, this information boosted the use of vitamin D in different clinical settings, without strong scientific evidences, even in doubtful clinical situations. However, clinical trials are showing inconsistent results, putting into question the widespread use of vitamin D. This article presents a review about vitamin D and lists some key scientific evidence on the real benefits of supplementation in humans in various conditions. enefícios de sua suplementação em seres humanos em diversas condições.

  15. Prostaglandin E2 Indicates Therapeutic Efficacy of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, Daniel J; Prabhakara, Karthik S; Toledano-Furman, Naama; Bhattarai, Deepa; Chen, Qingzheng; DiCarlo, Bryan; Smith, Philippa; Triolo, Fabio; Wenzel, Pamela L; Cox, Charles S; Olson, Scott D

    2017-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is soon predicted to become the third leading cause of death and disability worldwide. After the primary injury, a complex set of secondary injuries develops hours and days later with prolonged neuroinflammation playing a key role. TBI and other inflammatory conditions are currently being treated in preclinical and clinical trials by a number of cellular therapies. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are of great interest due to their widespread usage, safety, and relative ease to isolate and culture. However, there has been a wide range in efficacy reported using MSC clinically and in preclinical models, likely due to differences in cell preparations and a significant amount of donor variability. In this study, we seek to find a correlation between in vitro activity and in vivo efficacy. We designed assays to explore the responsiveness of MSC to immunological cues to address the immunomodulatory properties of MSC, one of their primary modes of therapeutic activity in TBI. Our results showed intrinsic differences in the immunomodulatory capacity of MSC preparations from different bone marrow and amniotic fluid donors. This difference mirrored the therapeutic capacity of the MSC in an experimental model of TBI, an effect confirmed using siRNA knockdown of COX2 followed by overexpressing COX2. Among the immunomodulatory factors assessed, the therapeutic benefit correlated with the secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) by MSC prior to treatment, suggesting that measurement of PGE2 could be a very useful potency marker to create an index of predicted efficacy for preparations of MSC to treat TBI. Stem Cells 2017;35:1416-1430. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  16. Experimental Infection of Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera, Triatominae with Mycobacterium leprae Indicates Potential for Leprosy Transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur da Silva Neumann

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a chronic dermato-neurological disease caused by infection with Mycobacterium leprae. In 2013 almost 200,000 new cases of leprosy were detected around the world. Since the first symptoms take from years to decades to appear, the total number of asymptomatic patients is impossible to predict. Although leprosy is one of the oldest records of human disease, the mechanisms involved with its transmission and epidemiology are still not completely understood. In the present work, we experimentally investigated the hypothesis that the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus and the hemiptera Rhodnius prolixus act as leprosy vectors. By means of real-time PCR quantification of M. leprae 16SrRNA, we found that M. leprae remained viable inside the digestive tract of Rhodnius prolixus for 20 days after oral infection. In contrast, in the gut of both mosquito species tested, we were not able to detect M. leprae RNA after a similar period of time. Inside the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus digestive tract, M. leprae was initially restricted to the anterior midgut, but gradually moved towards the hindgut, in a time course reminiscent of the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, a well-known pathogen transmitted by this insect. The maintenance of M. leprae infectivity inside the digestive tract of this kissing bug is further supported by successful mice footpad inoculation with feces collected 20 days after infection. We conclude that Rhodnius prolixus defecate infective M. leprae, justifying the evaluation of the presence of M. leprae among sylvatic and domestic kissing bugs in countries endemic for leprosy.

  17. Experimental Infection of Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera, Triatominae) with Mycobacterium leprae Indicates Potential for Leprosy Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Arthur da Silva; Dias, Felipe de Almeida; Ferreira, Jéssica da Silva; Fontes, Amanda Nogueira Brum; Rosa, Patricia Sammarco; Macedo, Rafael Enrique; Oliveira, José Henrique; Teixeira, Raquel Lima de Figueiredo; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Suffys, Philip Noel; Oliveira, Pedro L; Sorgine, Marcos Henrique Ferreira; Lara, Flavio Alves

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic dermato-neurological disease caused by infection with Mycobacterium leprae. In 2013 almost 200,000 new cases of leprosy were detected around the world. Since the first symptoms take from years to decades to appear, the total number of asymptomatic patients is impossible to predict. Although leprosy is one of the oldest records of human disease, the mechanisms involved with its transmission and epidemiology are still not completely understood. In the present work, we experimentally investigated the hypothesis that the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus and the hemiptera Rhodnius prolixus act as leprosy vectors. By means of real-time PCR quantification of M. leprae 16SrRNA, we found that M. leprae remained viable inside the digestive tract of Rhodnius prolixus for 20 days after oral infection. In contrast, in the gut of both mosquito species tested, we were not able to detect M. leprae RNA after a similar period of time. Inside the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus digestive tract, M. leprae was initially restricted to the anterior midgut, but gradually moved towards the hindgut, in a time course reminiscent of the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, a well-known pathogen transmitted by this insect. The maintenance of M. leprae infectivity inside the digestive tract of this kissing bug is further supported by successful mice footpad inoculation with feces collected 20 days after infection. We conclude that Rhodnius prolixus defecate infective M. leprae, justifying the evaluation of the presence of M. leprae among sylvatic and domestic kissing bugs in countries endemic for leprosy.

  18. Evidence of Experimental Bias in the Life Sciences: Why We Need Blind Data Recording.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Holman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Observer bias and other "experimenter effects" occur when researchers' expectations influence study outcome. These biases are strongest when researchers expect a particular result, are measuring subjective variables, and have an incentive to produce data that confirm predictions. To minimize bias, it is good practice to work "blind," meaning that experimenters are unaware of the identity or treatment group of their subjects while conducting research. Here, using text mining and a literature review, we find evidence that blind protocols are uncommon in the life sciences and that nonblind studies tend to report higher effect sizes and more significant p-values. We discuss methods to minimize bias and urge researchers, editors, and peer reviewers to keep blind protocols in mind.

  19. Evidence of Experimental Bias in the Life Sciences: Why We Need Blind Data Recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Luke; Head, Megan L; Lanfear, Robert; Jennions, Michael D

    2015-07-01

    Observer bias and other "experimenter effects" occur when researchers' expectations influence study outcome. These biases are strongest when researchers expect a particular result, are measuring subjective variables, and have an incentive to produce data that confirm predictions. To minimize bias, it is good practice to work "blind," meaning that experimenters are unaware of the identity or treatment group of their subjects while conducting research. Here, using text mining and a literature review, we find evidence that blind protocols are uncommon in the life sciences and that nonblind studies tend to report higher effect sizes and more significant p-values. We discuss methods to minimize bias and urge researchers, editors, and peer reviewers to keep blind protocols in mind.

  20. The treatment of dissociative identity disorder with cognitive analytic therapy: experimental evidence of sudden gains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellett, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    The central aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of cognitive analytic therapy (CAT) with a patient presenting with DID. The methodology employed an A/B single case experimental design with six-months continuous follow-up in seven experimental measures. A and B represent the assessment of seven dissociative experimental variables under two conditions: baseline (A) and treatment (B). Treatment consisted of 24 sessions of CAT with four follow-up sessions, which is standard within the CAT model for personality disorder patients. A battery of measures of general psychological functioning was also completed at assessment, termination, and follow-up. During treatment the intensity of a range of dissociative symptoms was observed to be reduced, with sudden gains evident due to specific CAT interventions in specific dissociative symptoms. The long-term effectiveness of the intervention was established by the illustration of either continued stability or continued improvement in experimental variables across the follow-up period. Analysis of the general measures illustrates clinically significant change across a variety of robust psychometric measures. The study illustrates the utility of single-case approaches with dissociative disorders and the potential for utilizing CAT generally with such presentations.

  1. The significance of secondary organic aerosol formation and growth in buildings: experimental and computational evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarwar, G.; Corsi, R.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in an 11 m3 environmental chamber to investigate secondaryparticles resulting from homogeneous reactions between ozone and alpha-pinene. Experimental results indicate that rapid fine particle growth occurs due to homogeneous reactions between ozone and alpha...... measured particle size distributions and were in reasonable agreement with results predicted from the model. Both experimental and model results indicate that secondary particle mass concentrations incfrease substantially with lower air exchange rates. This is an interesting results, given a continuing...... trend toward more energy-efficient buildings. Seconary particle mass concentrations are also predictedc to increase with lower indoor temperatures, higher outdoor ozone concentrations, higher outdoor particle concentrations, and higher indoor alpha-pinene emissions rates....

  2. Bacteria are not too small for spatial sensing of chemical gradients: An experimental evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thar, Roland; Kühl, Michael

    2003-01-01

    By analyzing the chemotactic behavior of a recently described marine bacterial species, we provide experimental evidence that bacteria are not too small for sensing chemical gradients spatially. The bipolar flagellated vibrioid bacteria (typical size 2 × 6 µm) exhibit a unique motility pattern...... the band toward the oxic region typically return to the band within 16 s following a U-shaped track. A detailed analysis of the tracks reveals that the cells must be able to sense the oxygen gradient perpendicular to their swimming direction. Thus, they can detect oxygen gradients along a distance of ˜5 µm...

  3. MarketversusResidence Principle: Experimental Evidence on the Effects of a Financial Transaction Tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Jürgen; Kirchler, Michael; Kleinlercher, Daniel; Sutter, Matthias

    2017-10-01

    The effects of a financial transaction tax (FTT) are scientifically disputed, as seemingly small details of its implementation may matter a lot. In this article, we provide experimental evidence on the different effects of an FTT, depending on whether it is implemented as a tax on markets, on residents, or a combination of both. We find that a tax on markets has negative effects on volatility and trading volume, whereas a tax on residents shows none of these undesired effects. Additionally, we observe that individual risk attitude is not related to traders' reaction to the different forms of an FTT.

  4. Disrupting Education? Experimental Evidence on Technology-Aided Instruction in India

    OpenAIRE

    Muralidharan, Karthik; Singh, Abhijeet; Alejandro J. Ganimian

    2017-01-01

    We present experimental evidence on the impact of a technology-aided after-school instruction program on learning outcomes in middle school grades in urban India, using a lottery that provided students with a voucher to cover program costs. A key feature of the program was its ability to individually customize educational content to match the level and rate of progress of each student. We find that lottery winners had large increases in test scores of 0.36ó in math and 0.22ó in Hindi over jus...

  5. Granger Causality between Stock Market and Macroeconomic Indicators: Evidence from Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Plíhal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate informational efficiency of the stock market in Germany. Granger causality between the stock market and the selected macroeconomic variables is investigated by bivariate analysis using Toda-Yamamoto (1995 approach. This study focuses on monthly data from January 1999 to September 2015, and the stock market is represented by blue chip stock market index DAX. Investigated macroeconomic indicators include industrial production, inflation, money supply, interest rate, trade balance and exchange rate. Stock market Granger-causes industrial production and interest rate, and is therefore leading indicator of these variables. Between money supply and stock prices is Granger causality in both directions. Other variables seem to be independent on development of the stock market. We do not find any violation of Efficient market hypothesis which indicates that the stock market in Germany is informational efficient.

  6. Searching for evidence of changes in extreme rainfall indices in the Central Rift Valley of Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muluneh, Alemayehu; Bewket, Woldeamlak; Keesstra, Saskia; Stroosnijder, Leo

    2017-05-01

    Extreme rainfall events have serious implications for economic sectors with a close link to climate such as agriculture and food security. This holds true in the Central Rift Valley (CRV) of Ethiopia where communities rely on highly climate-sensitive rainfed subsistence farming for livelihoods. This study investigates changes in ten extreme rainfall indices over a period of 40 years (1970-2009) using 14 meteorological stations located in the CRV. The CRV consists of three landscape units: the valley floor, the escarpments, and the highlands all of which are considered in our data analysis. The Belg (March-May) and Kiremt (June-September) seasons are also considered in the analysis. The Mann-Kendall test was used to detect trends of the rainfall indices. The results indicated that at the annual time scale, more than half (57 %) of the stations showed significant trends in total wet-day precipitation (PRCPTOT) and heavy precipitation days (R10mm). Only 7-35 % of stations showed significant trends, for the other rainfall indices. Spatially, the valley floor received increasing annual rainfall while the escarpments and the highlands received decreasing annual rainfall over the last 40 years. During Belg, 50 % of the stations showed significant increases in the maximum number of consecutive dry days (CDD) in all parts of the CRV. However, most other rainfall indices during Belg showed no significant changes. During Kiremt, considering both significant and non-significant trends, almost all rainfall indices showed an increasing trend in the valley floor and a decreasing trend in the escarpment and highlands. During Belg and Kiremt, the CDD generally showed increasing tendency in the CRV.

  7. Experimental inoculation study indicates swine as a potential host for Hendra virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingyi; Embury-Hyatt, Carissa; Weingartl, Hana M.

    2010-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is a zoonotic virus from the family Paramyxoviridae causing fatal disease in humans and horses. Five-week-old Landrace pigs and 5-month-old Gottingen minipigs were inoculated with approximately 107 plaque forming units per animal. In addition to fever and depression exhibited in all infected pigs, one of the two Landrace pigs developed respiratory signs at 5 days post-inoculation (dpi) and one of the Gottingen minipigs developed respiratory signs at 5 dpi and mild neurological signs at 7 dpi. Virus was detected in all infected pigs at 2–5 dpi from oral, nasal, and rectal swabs and at 3–5 dpi from ocular swabs by real-time RT-PCR targeting the HeV M gene. Virus titers in nasal swab samples were as high as 104.6 TCID50/mL. The viral RNA was mainly distributed in tissues from respiratory and lymphoid systems at an early stage of infection and the presence of virus was confirmed by virus isolation. Pathological changes and immunohistochemical staining for viral antigen were consistent with the tissue distribution of the virus. This new finding indicates that pigs are susceptible to HeV infections and could potentially play a role as an intermediate host in transmission to humans. PMID:20167195

  8. Effect of land use change on ecosystem function of dung beetles: experimental evidence from Wallacea Region in Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHAHABUDDIN

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Shahabuddin (2011 Effect of land use change on ecosystem function of dung beetles: experimental evidence from Wallacea Region in Sulawesi, Indonesia. Biodiversitas 12: 177-181. The deforestation of tropical forests and their subsequent conversion to human-dominated land-use systems is one of the most significant causes of biodiversity loss. However clear understanding of the links between ecological functions and biodiversity is needed to evaluate and predict the true environmental consequences of human activities. This study provided experimental evidence comparing ecosystem function of dung beetles across a land use gradient ranging from natural tropical forest and agroforestry systems to open cultivated areas in Central Sulawesi. Therefore, standardized dung pats were exposed at each land-use type to assess dung removal and parasite suppression activity by dung beetles. The results showed that ecosystem function of dung beetles especially dung burial activity were remarkably disrupted by land use changes from natural forest to open agricultural area. Dung beetles presence enhanced about 53% of the total dung removed and reduced about 83% and 63% of fly population and species number respectively, indicating a pronounce contribution of dung beetles in our ecosystem.

  9. Skeletal Indicators of Shark Feeding on Human Remains: Evidence from Florida Forensic Anthropology Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Michala K; Winburn, Allysha P; Burgess, George H

    2017-05-02

    This research examines a series of six Florida forensic anthropology cases that exhibit taphonomic evidence of marine deposition and shark-feeding activities. In each case, we analyzed patterns of trauma/damage on the skeletal remains (e.g., sharp-force bone gouges and punctures) and possible mechanisms by which they were inflicted during shark predation/scavenging. In some cases, shark teeth were embedded in the remains; in the absence of this evidence, we measured interdental distance from defects in the bone to estimate shark body length, as well as to draw inferences about the potential species responsible. We discuss similarities and differences among the cases and make comparisons to literature documenting diagnostic shark-inflicted damage to human remains from nearby regions. We find that the majority of cases potentially involve bull or tiger sharks scavenging the remains of previously deceased, adult male individuals. This scavenging results in a distinctive taphonomic signature including incised gouges in cortical bone. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  10. Quality management: where is the evidence? Developing an indicator-based approach in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prytherch, Helen; Nafula, Maureen; Kandie, Charles; Brodowski, Marc; Marx, Irmgard; Kubaj, Sandy; Omogi, Irene; Zurkuhlen, Alexia; Herrler, Claudia; Goetz, Katja; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Marx, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda emphasizes the importance of quality of care in the drive to achieve universal health coverage. Despite recent progress, challenges in service delivery, efficiency and resource utilization in the health sector remain. The Ministry of Health Department of Standards and Regulations sought to operationalize the Kenya Quality Assurance Model for Health. To this end, the European Practice Assessment (EPA) was adapted to the area of Reproductive and Maternal and Neonatal Health. The adaptation process made use of a ten step-modified RAND Corporation/University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Appropriateness Method. The steps included a scoping workshop, definition of five critical domains of quality in the Kenyan context ('People, Management, Clinical Care, Quality & Safety, Interface between inpatients and outpatients care'), a review of policy documents, management and clinical guidelines, grey and scientific literature to identify indicators in use in the Kenyan health system and an expert panel process to rate their feasibility and validity. The resulting 278 indicators, clustered across the five domains, were broken-down into 29 dimensions and assigned measure specifications. A set of data collection tools were developed to furnish the indicators and piloted at two health facilities. They were subsequently finalized for use in 30 health facilities in 3 counties. The integrative and indicator-based aspects of the EPA process could be readily adapted to facilitate the operationalization of a practical quality assurance approach in Kenya.

  11. Indicators of activity-friendly communities: an evidence-based consensus process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan Ramirez, Laura K; Hoehner, Christine M; Brownson, Ross C; Cook, Rebeka; Orleans, C Tracy; Hollander, Marla; Barker, Dianne C; Bors, Philip; Ewing, Reid; Killingsworth, Richard; Petersmarck, Karen; Schmid, Thomas; Wilkinson, William

    2006-12-01

    Regular physical activity, even at modest intensities, is associated with many health benefits. Most Americans, however, do not engage in the recommended levels. As practitioners seek ways to increase population rates of physical activity, interventions and advocacy efforts are being targeted to the community level. Yet, advocates, community leaders, and researchers lack the tools needed to assess local barriers to and opportunities for more active, healthy lifestyles. Investigators used a systematic review process to identify key indicators of activity-friendly communities that can assess and improve opportunities for regular physical activity. Investigators conducted a comprehensive literature review of both peer-reviewed literature and fugitive information (e.g., reports and websites) to generate an initial list of indicators for review (n=230). The review included a three-tiered, modified Delphi consensus-development process that incorporated input of international, national, state, and local researchers and practitioners from academic institutions, federal and state government agencies, nonprofit organizations, and funding agencies in public health, transportation, urban planning, parks and recreation, and public policy. Ten promising indicators of activity-friendly communities were identified: land use environment, access to exercise facilities, transportation environment, aesthetics, travel patterns, social environment, land use economics, transportation economics, institutional and organizational policies, and promotion. Collaborative, multidisciplinary approaches are underway to test, refine, and expand this initial list of indicators and to develop measures that communities, community leaders, and policymakers can use to design more activity-friendly community environments.

  12. Development of quality indicators based on a multidisciplinary, evidence-based guideline on pediatric constipation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stienen, J.J.C.; Tabbers, M.M.; Benninga, M.A.; Harmsen, M.; Ouwens, M.M.T.J.

    2011-01-01

    Several clinical guidelines for childhood functional constipation have been developed, but none of them is accompanied by a set of quality indicators. It is important to gain insight into the quality of care in daily practice in order to improve the implementation of clinical guidelines. This can be

  13. Student Perceptions of Auditor Responses to Evidence of Suspicious Activities: An Experimental Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Murphy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed student perceptions of auditor responses to evidence that a client failed to respond appropriately to suspicious activities that could indicate money laundering. Subjects were presented with a series of randomized cases in which partner type (new vs. experienced, firm type (regional vs. international and audit fee materiality (not material, material to the local office only, material to the firm were manipulated asked to indicate their perceptions of the likelihood that an audit partner would discuss such evidence with the client, and the likelihood that the issue would be disclosed by the auditor. Both partner type and audit fee materiality was found to have significant effects on perceived likelihoods.

  14. Socioeconomic-related inequalities in child malnutrition: evidence from the Ghana multiple indicator cluster survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novignon, Jacob; Aboagye, Emmanuel; Agyemang, Otuo Serebour; Aryeetey, Genevieve

    2015-12-01

    Malnutrition is a prevalent public health concern in Ghana. While studies have identified factors that influence child malnutrition and related inequalities in Ghana, very little efforts have been made to decompose these inequalities across various household characteristics. This study examined the influence of socioeconomic factors on inequality in child malnutrition using a decomposition approach. The study employed cross section data from the 2011 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS). Analysis was done at three levels: First, concentration curves were constructed to explore the nature of inequality in child malnutrition. Secondly, concentration indices were computed to quantify the magnitude of inequality. Thirdly, decomposition analysis was conducted to determine the role of mother's education and health insurance coverage in inequality of child malnutrition. The concentration curves showed that there exists a pro-poor inequality in child malnutrition measured by stunting and wasting. The concentration indices of these measures indicated that the magnitude of inequality was higher and significant at 1 % for weight-for-age (WAZ) (-0.1641), relative to height-for-age (HAZ) (-0.1613). The decomposition analyses show that whilst mother's education contributed about 13 and 11 % to inequality in HAZ, it contributed about 18.9 and 11.8 % to inequality in WAZ for primary and secondary or above education attainments, respectively. Finally, health insurance contributed about 1.91 and 1.03 % to inequality in HAZ and WAZ, respectively. The results suggest that there is the need to encourage critical policies directed towards improving female literacy in the country. The existence of a functional health insurance system and increasing universal coverage are recommended to mitigate child malnutrition.

  15. Does national scale economic and environmental indicators spur logistics performance? Evidence from UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Syed Abdul Rehman; Qianli, Dong

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the association between national economic and environmental indicators with green logistics performance in a time series data of UK since 1981 to 2016. The research used autoregressive distributed lag method to understand the long-run and short-run relationships of national scale economic (foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows, per capita income) and environmental indicators (total greenhouse gases, fossil fuel, and renewable energy) on green logistics. In the short run, the research findings indicate that the green logistics and renewable energy have positive relationship, while fossil fuel is negatively correlated with green logistics operations. On the other hand, in the long run, the results show that FDI inflows, renewable energy sources, and per capita income have statistically significant and positive association with green logistics activities, while foreign investments attracted by environmental friendly policies and practices adopted in global logistics operations, which not only increase the environmental sustainability but also enhance economic activities with greater export opportunities in the region.

  16. Experimental Evidence for a Liquid-Liquid Crossover in Deeply Cooled Confined Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupane, Antonio; Fomina, Margarita; Piazza, Irina; Peters, Judith; Schirò, Giorgio

    2014-11-01

    In this work we investigate, by means of elastic neutron scattering, the pressure dependence of mean square displacements (MSD) of hydrogen atoms of deeply cooled water confined in the pores of a three-dimensional disordered SiO2 xerogel; experiments have been performed at 250 and 210 K from atmospheric pressure to 1200 bar. The "pressure anomaly" of supercooled water (i.e., a mean square displacement increase with increasing pressure) is observed in our sample at both temperatures; however, contrary to previous simulation results and to the experimental trend observed in bulk water, the pressure effect is smaller at lower (210 K) than at higher (250 K) temperature. Elastic neutron scattering results are complemented by differential scanning calorimetry data that put in evidence, besides the glass transition at about 170 K, a first-order-like endothermic transition occurring at about 230 K that, in view of the neutron scattering results, can be attributed to a liquid-liquid crossover. Our results give experimental evidence for the presence, in deeply cooled confined water, of a crossover occurring at about 230 K (at ambient pressure) from a liquid phase predominant at 210 K to another liquid phase predominant at 250 K; therefore, they are fully consistent with the liquid-liquid transition hypothesis.

  17. The fetal programming of food preferences: current clinical and experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle Molle, R; Bischoff, A R; Portella, A K; Silveira, P P

    2015-09-28

    Increased energy consumption is one of the major factors implicated in the epidemic of obesity. There is compelling evidence, both clinical and experimental, that fetal paucity of nutrients may have programming effects on feeding preferences and behaviors that can contribute to the development of diseases. Clinical studies in different age groups show that individuals born small for their gestational age (SGA) have preferences towards highly caloric foods such as carbohydrates and fats. Some studies have also shown altered eating behaviors in SGA children. Despite an apparent discrepancy in different age groups, all studies seem to converge to an increased intake of palatable foods in SGA individuals. Small nutrient imbalances across lifespan increase the risk of noncommunicable diseases in adult life. Homeostatic factors such as altered responses to leptin and insulin and alterations in neuropeptides associated with appetite and satiety are likely involved. Imbalances between homeostatic and hedonic signaling are another proposed mechanism, with the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic pathway having differential reward and pleasure responses when facing palatable foods. Early exposure to undernutrition also programs hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, with SGA having higher levels of cortisol in different ages, leading to chronic hyperactivity of this neuroendocrine axis. This review summarizes the clinical and experimental evidence related to fetal programming of feeding preferences by SGA.

  18. Delayed school start times and adolescent sleep: A systematic review of the experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minges, Karl E; Redeker, Nancy S

    2016-08-01

    Many schools have instituted later morning start times to improve sleep, academic, and other outcomes in response to the mismatch between youth circadian rhythms and early morning start times. However, there has been no systematic synthesis of the evidence on the effects of this practice. To examine the impact of delayed school start time on students' sleep, health, and academic outcomes, electronic databases were systematically searched and data were extracted using the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Six studies satisfied selection criteria and used pre-post, no control (n = 3), randomized controlled trial (n = 2), and quasi-experimental (n = 1) designs. School start times were delayed 25-60 min, and correspondingly, total sleep time increased from 25 to 77 min per weeknight. Some studies revealed reduced daytime sleepiness, depression, caffeine use, tardiness to class, and trouble staying awake. Overall, the evidence supports recent non-experimental study findings and calls for policy that advocates for delayed school start time to improve sleep. This presents a potential long-term solution to chronic sleep restriction during adolescence. However, there is a need for rigorous randomized study designs and reporting of consistent outcomes, including objective sleep measures and consistent measures of health and academic performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Live Fast, Die Young: Experimental Evidence of Population Extinction Risk due to Climate Change.

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    Elvire Bestion

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Evidence has accumulated in recent decades on the drastic impact of climate change on biodiversity. Warming temperatures have induced changes in species physiology, phenology, and have decreased body size. Such modifications can impact population dynamics and could lead to changes in life cycle and demography. More specifically, conceptual frameworks predict that global warming will severely threaten tropical ectotherms while temperate ectotherms should resist or even benefit from higher temperatures. However, experimental studies measuring the impacts of future warming trends on temperate ectotherms' life cycle and population persistence are lacking. Here we investigate the impacts of future climates on a model vertebrate ectotherm species using a large-scale warming experiment. We manipulated climatic conditions in 18 seminatural populations over two years to obtain a present climate treatment and a warm climate treatment matching IPCC predictions for future climate. Warmer temperatures caused a faster body growth, an earlier reproductive onset, and an increased voltinism, leading to a highly accelerated life cycle but also to a decrease in adult survival. A matrix population model predicts that warm climate populations in our experiment should go extinct in around 20 y. Comparing our experimental climatic conditions to conditions encountered by populations across Europe, we suggest that warming climates should threaten a significant number of populations at the southern range of the distribution. Our findings stress the importance of experimental approaches on the entire life cycle to more accurately predict population and species persistence in future climates.

  20. Evolution and maintenance of sexual size dimorphism: Aligning phylogenetic and experimental evidence

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    Matjaz eKuntner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Integrating the insights derived from both phylogenetic and experimental approaches offers a more complete understanding of evolutionary patterns and processes, yet it is rarely a feature of investigations of the evolutionary significance of trait variation. We combine these approaches to reinterpret the patterns and processes in the evolution of female biased sexual size dimorphism in Nephilidae, a spider lineage characterized by the most extreme sexual size dimorphism among terrestrial animals. We use a molecular phylogeny to reconstruct the size evolution for each sex and reveal a case of sexually dimorphic gigantism: both sexes steadily outgrow their ancestral sizes, but the female and male slopes differ, and hence sexual size dimorphism steadily increases. A review of the experimental evidence reveals a predominant net selection for large size in both sexes, consistent with the phylogenetic pattern for females but not for males. Thus, while sexual size dimorphism in spiders most likely originates and is maintained by fecundity selection on females, it is unclear what selection pressures prevent males from becoming as large as females. This integrated approach highlights the dangers of inferring evolutionary significance from experimental studies that isolate the effects of single selection pressures.

  1. Archaeogenetic evidence of ancient nubian barley evolution from six to two-row indicates local adaptation.

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    Sarah A Palmer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Archaeobotanical samples of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. found at Qasr Ibrim display a two-row phenotype that is unique to the region of archaeological sites upriver of the first cataract of the Nile, characterised by the development of distinctive lateral bracts. The phenotype occurs throughout all strata at Qasr Ibrim, which range in age from 3000 to a few hundred years. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: We extracted ancient DNA from barley samples from the entire range of occupancy of the site, and studied the Vrs1 gene responsible for row number in extant barley. Surprisingly, we found a discord between the genotype and phenotype in all samples; all the barley had a genotype consistent with the six-row condition. These results indicate a six-row ancestry for the Qasr Ibrim barley, followed by a reassertion of the two-row condition. Modelling demonstrates that this sequence of evolutionary events requires a strong selection pressure. CONCLUSIONS: The two-row phenotype at Qasr Ibrim is caused by a different mechanism to that in extant barley. The strength of selection required for this mechanism to prevail indicates that the barley became locally adapted in the region in response to a local selection pressure. The consistency of the genotype/phenotype discord over time supports a scenario of adoption of this barley type by successive cultures, rather than the importation of new barley varieties associated with individual cultures.

  2. Female house sparrows "count on" male genes: experimental evidence for MHC-dependent mate preference in birds

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    Biard Clotilde

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Females can potentially assess the quality of potential mates using their secondary sexual traits, and obtain "good genes" that increase offspring fitness. Another potential indirect benefit from mating preferences is genetic compatibility, which does not require extravagant or viability indicator traits. Several studies with mammals and fish indicate that the genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC influence olfactory cues and mating preferences, and such preferences confer genetic benefits to offspring. We investigated whether individual MHC diversity (class I influences mating preferences in house sparrows (Passer domesticus. Results Overall, we found no evidence that females preferred males with high individual MHC diversity. Yet, when we considered individual MHC allelic diversity of the females, we found that females with a low number of alleles were most attracted to males carrying a high number of MHC alleles, which might reflect a mating-up preference by allele counting. Conclusions This is the first experimental evidence for MHC-dependent mating preferences in an avian species to our knowledge. Our findings raise questions about the underlying mechanisms through which birds discriminate individual MHC diversity among conspecifics, and they suggest a novel mechanism through which mating preferences might promote the evolution of MHC polymorphisms and generate positive selection for duplicated MHC loci.

  3. Female house sparrows "count on" male genes: experimental evidence for MHC-dependent mate preference in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggio, Matteo; Biard, Clotilde; Penn, Dustin J; Hoi, Herbert

    2011-02-14

    Females can potentially assess the quality of potential mates using their secondary sexual traits, and obtain "good genes" that increase offspring fitness. Another potential indirect benefit from mating preferences is genetic compatibility, which does not require extravagant or viability indicator traits. Several studies with mammals and fish indicate that the genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) influence olfactory cues and mating preferences, and such preferences confer genetic benefits to offspring. We investigated whether individual MHC diversity (class I) influences mating preferences in house sparrows (Passer domesticus). Overall, we found no evidence that females preferred males with high individual MHC diversity. Yet, when we considered individual MHC allelic diversity of the females, we found that females with a low number of alleles were most attracted to males carrying a high number of MHC alleles, which might reflect a mating-up preference by allele counting. This is the first experimental evidence for MHC-dependent mating preferences in an avian species to our knowledge. Our findings raise questions about the underlying mechanisms through which birds discriminate individual MHC diversity among conspecifics, and they suggest a novel mechanism through which mating preferences might promote the evolution of MHC polymorphisms and generate positive selection for duplicated MHC loci.

  4. Resilience of experimentally seeded dietary traditions in wild vervets: Evidence from group fissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Waal, Erica; van Schaik, Carel P; Whiten, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    Controlled laboratory experiments have delivered extensive and compelling evidence for the diffusion and maintenance of socially learned behavior in primates and other animals. Such evidence is rarer in the wild, but we show that a behavior seeded in a majority of individuals within vervet monkey (Chlorocebus pygerythus) groups may be sustained across several years. Here, we report results of two natural fission events in such groups that offer novel evidence of the resilience of socially transmitted group norms of behavior. Before fission, high ranked females exhibited an almost exclusive adherence to a group preference among two food options, originally introduced through a distasteful additive in one option, but no longer present in repeated later tests. Because of rank-dependent competition, low-ranked females ate more of the formerly distasteful food and so discovered it was now as palatable as the alternative. Despite this experience, low ranked females who formed the splinter groups then expressed a 100% bias for the preferred option of their original parent group, revealing these preferences to be resilient. We interpret this effect as conformity to either the preferences of high rankers or of a majority in the parent group, or both. However, given fissioned individuals' familiarity with their habitat and experimental options, we question the adequacy of the informational function usually ascribed to conformity and discuss alternatives under a concept of "social conformity". © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Are Front of Pack Claims Indicators of Nutrition Quality? Evidence from 2 Product Categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Debra; Hooker, Neal H; Stanton, John L

    2016-01-01

    American grocery shoppers face an array of front of pack (FOP) nutrition and health claims when making food selections. Such systems have been categorized as summary or nutrient specific. Either type should help consumers make judgments about the nutrition quality of a product. This research tests if the type or quantity of FOP claims are indeed good indicators of objective nutrition quality. Claim and nutrition information from more than 2200 breakfast cereals and prepared meals launched between 2006 and 2010 were analyzed using binary and multinomial logistic regression models. Results suggest that no type or number of front of pack claims could distinguish "healthy" foods. However, some types and frequencies of FOP claims were significant predictors of higher or lower levels of certain key nutrients. Given the complex and crowded label environment in which these FOP claims reside, one may be concerned that such cues are not closely related to objective measures of nutrition quality. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Geomorphic Indicators of Ground Ice on Mars and Evidence for Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, J. F.

    2003-12-01

    Until recently, indications of the presence of ice in the near surface of Mars, outside the polar caps, has depended upon the interpretation of morphology from imaging data. Early work in this area was based primarily on Viking orbiter images where several large landforms (100s to 1000s of meters in scale) were interpreted to be related to the presence of ice in the regolith or upper crust. These include lineated valley fill, concentric crater fill, softened terrain, and polygons, and are typically found between the latitudes of 30° -60° N and S. Without direct measurements of the presence of water, the interpretations rely on analogies with Earth's periglacial and glacial morphologies as well as geophysical modeling of ice-rich soils and crustal material. New spacecraft data from the Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey missions have significantly added to the family of morphologies with ground-ice affinities. From the high spatial resolution images acquired by Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) a new array of polygons have been detected which range in size from 25-200 m and show strong latitudinal gradients above 50° . A possibly related morphology exhibiting a regularly spaced surface texture resembling the texture of a basketball is also found in these high latitudes. A number of morphologies indicating viscous flow on steep slopes are found in the mid-latitudes and are consistent with an ice-rich soils deforming under martian surface conditions. A continuous deposit, meters-thick and interpreted to be ice rich is observed at latitudes above 60° , but that is in a degraded condition at lower latitudes (formerly ice-rich) and absent in the equatorial regions (within 30° ). The neutron spectrometer on the Odyssey spacecraft made direct measurements of hydrogen which shows clearly the presence of high water-ice abundance (>70% by volume) in the surface soils in the northern and southern latitudes above 60° . This critical observation ties in well with theoretical

  7. Does psychomotor agitation in major depressive episodes indicate bipolarity? Evidence from the Zurich Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angst, Jules; Gamma, Alex; Benazzi, Franco; Ajdacic, Vladeta; Rössler, Wulf

    2009-02-01

    Kraepelin's partial interpretation of agitated depression as a mixed state of "manic-depressive insanity" (including the current concept of bipolar disorder) has recently been the focus of much research. This paper tested whether, how, and to what extent both psychomotor symptoms, agitation and retardation in depression are related to bipolarity and anxiety. The prospective Zurich Study assessed psychiatric and somatic syndromes in a community sample of young adults (N = 591) (aged 20 at first interview) by six interviews over 20 years (1979-1999). Psychomotor symptoms of agitation and retardation were assessed by professional interviewers from age 22 to 40 (five interviews) on the basis of the observed and reported behaviour within the interview section on depression. Psychiatric diagnoses were strictly operationalised and, in the case of bipolar-II disorder, were broader than proposed by DSM-IV-TR and ICD-10. As indicators of bipolarity, the association with bipolar disorder, a family history of mania/hypomania/cyclothymia, together with hypomanic and cyclothymic temperament as assessed by the general behavior inventory (GBI) [15], and mood lability (an element of cyclothymic temperament) were used. Agitated and retarded depressive states were equally associated with the indicators of bipolarity and with anxiety. Longitudinally, agitation and retardation were significantly associated with each other (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.0-3.2), and this combined group of major depressives showed stronger associations with bipolarity, with both hypomanic/cyclothymic and depressive temperamental traits, and with anxiety. Among agitated, non-retarded depressives, unipolar mood disorder was even twice as common as bipolar mood disorder. Combined agitated and retarded major depressive states are more often bipolar than unipolar, but, in general, agitated depression (with or without retardation) is not more frequently bipolar than retarded depression (with or without agitation), and

  8. Exploring the limitations of pathophysiological indicators used for targeted selective treatment in sheep experimentally infected with Haemonchus contortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chylinski, C; Cortet, J; Neveu, C; Cabaret, J

    2015-01-15

    Identifying which sheep to treat as part of a Targeted Selective Treatment approach to gastro-intestinal nematode control relies entirely on the efficacy of the indicators. Indicators such as FAMACHA© (anaemia), DISCO (diarrhea) and reductions in weight gains were designed specifically to reflect those sheep experiencing symptomatic consequences of infection. Using the gastro-intestinal nematode Haemonchus contortus as a model species, this study explored the utility and sensitivity of these indicators under controlled experimental conditions on 63 adult sheep. The potential effect of sheep with different H. contortus resistance phenotypes on indicator efficacy was compared in three different phenotypes, i.e. high (Blackbelly females), medium (Blackbelly rams) and low resistance (Romane rams). The potential effect of the H. contortus isolate on indicator efficacy was also explored by using four different isolates, with varying anthelmintic resistance capacities, to infect the sheep. We limited the study to the first month of infection to evaluate the interest of these indicators as an early predictive means for controlling infection. The pathophysiological indicators FAMACHA© and DISCO do not reflect infection intensity based on Faecal Egg Counts, nor do reductions in weight gains. FAMACHA© was however a good indicator of anaemia with strong correlations to haematocrit. There was little agreement among the three indicators to identify the same animals in need of treatment and even combining them did not increase their predictive value of infection intensity or relative host damage from infection. The indicator sensitivity was influenced by the H. contortus isolate and sheep resistance phenotype in which they were tested. One isolate was poorly infective but induced high levels of anaemia (FAMACHA©) and diarrhea (DISCO) compared to the three others. The FAMACHA© and DISCO had higher values in the sheep group with a medium resistance phenotype (Blackbelly rams

  9. Scopolamine Reduces Electrophysiological Indices of Distractor Suppression: Evidence from a Contingent Capture Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Laube

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Limited resources for the in-depth processing of external stimuli make it necessary to select only relevant information from our surroundings and to ignore irrelevant stimuli. Attentional mechanisms facilitate this selection via top-down modulation of stimulus representations in the brain. Previous research has indicated that acetylcholine (ACh modulates this influence of attention on stimulus processing. However, the role of muscarinic receptors as well as the specific mechanism of cholinergic modulation remains unclear. Here we investigated the influence of ACh on feature-based, top-down control of stimulus processing via muscarinic receptors by using a contingent capture paradigm which specifically tests attentional shifts toward uninformative cue stimuli which display one of the target defining features In a double-blind, placebo controlled study we measured the impact of the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine on behavioral and electrophysiological measures of contingent attentional capture. The results demonstrated all the signs of functional contingent capture, i.e., attentional shifts toward cued locations reflected in increased amplitudes of N1 and N2Pc components, under placebo conditions. However, scopolamine did not affect behavioral or electrophysiological measures of contingent capture. Instead, scopolamine reduced the amplitude of the distractor-evoked Pd component which has recently been associated with active suppression of irrelevant distractor information. The findings suggest a general cholinergic modulation of top-down control during distractor processing.

  10. Experimental evidence that electrical fatigue failure obeys a generalized Coffin–Manson law

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xiangtong; Fu, John Y., E-mail: johnyfu2016@gmail.com

    2017-05-10

    The empirical Coffin–Manson law has been used to characterize the low-cycle mechanical fatigue failure of metallic materials for decades. Our experimental studies reported in this letter have shown that the electrical fatigue failure in dielectrics can be well described by a fitting function having the same mathematical expression as that of the Coffin–Manson law. This observation indicates that the physical mechanism beneath the formation and evolution of atomic disordered structures, the key factor influencing both mechanical and electrical fatigue, might be the same.

  11. The scientific consensus on climate change as a gateway belief: experimental evidence.

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    Sander L van der Linden

    Full Text Available There is currently widespread public misunderstanding about the degree of scientific consensus on human-caused climate change, both in the US as well as internationally. Moreover, previous research has identified important associations between public perceptions of the scientific consensus, belief in climate change and support for climate policy. This paper extends this line of research by advancing and providing experimental evidence for a "gateway belief model" (GBM. Using national data (N = 1104 from a consensus-message experiment, we find that increasing public perceptions of the scientific consensus is significantly and causally associated with an increase in the belief that climate change is happening, human-caused and a worrisome threat. In turn, changes in these key beliefs are predictive of increased support for public action. In short, we find that perceived scientific agreement is an important gateway belief, ultimately influencing public responses to climate change.

  12. Behavioural evidence of magnetoreception in dolphins: detection of experimental magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremers, Dorothee; López Marulanda, Juliana; Hausberger, Martine; Lemasson, Alban

    2014-11-01

    Magnetoreception, meaning the perception of magnetic fields, is supposed to play an important role for orientation/navigation in some terrestrial and aquatic species. Although some spatial observations of free-ranging cetaceans' migration routes and stranding sites led to the assumption that cetaceans may be sensitive to the geomagnetic field, experimental evidence is lacking. Here, we tested the spontaneous response of six captive bottlenose dolphins to the presentation of two magnetized and demagnetized controlled devices while they were swimming freely. Dolphins approached the device with shorter latency when it contained a strongly magnetized neodymium block compared to a control demagnetized block that was identical in form and density and therefore undistinguishable with echolocation. We conclude that dolphins are able to discriminate the two stimuli on the basis of their magnetic properties, a prerequisite for magnetoreception-based navigation.

  13. Antioxidants and skeletal muscle performance: ’Common knowledge’ vs. experimental evidence.

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    Andrés eHernández

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants are assumed to provide numerous benefits, including better health, a reduced rate of aging, and improved exercise performance. Specifically, antioxidants are commonly ‘prescribed’ by the media, supplement industry, and ‘fitness experts’ for individuals prior to training and performance, with assumed benefits of improved fatigue resistance and recovery. This has provoked expansion of the supplement industry which responded by creation of a plethora of products aimed at facilitating the needs of the active individual. However, what does the experimental evidence say about the efficacy of antioxidants on skeletal muscle function? Are antioxidants actually as beneficial as the general populous believes? Or, could they in fact lead to deleterious effects on skeletal muscle function and performance? This mini review addresses these questions with an unbiased look at what we know about antioxidant effects on skeletal muscle, and what we still need to know before conclusions can be made.

  14. Housing Interventions and the Chronic and Acute Risks of Family Homelessness: Experimental Evidence for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutuli, J J; Herbers, Janette E

    2018-02-21

    This study considers risk associated with family homelessness for school functioning and experimental evidence on the effects of different housing interventions over time. Students in homeless families (N = 172; M age  = 7.31; SD = 4.15) were randomized to housing interventions that focus on acute risks (community-based rapid rehousing), chronic risks (permanent subsidy), or usual care (UC). A matched group of low-income, housed students served as an additional reference for effects on attendance, school mobility, and reading and math achievement across 4 years. Findings partially support the chronic-risk hypothesis that family homelessness interferes with achievement through its relation to deep poverty. Children randomly assigned to UC perform as well or better than children assigned to housing interventions in this municipality. © 2018 The Authors. Child Development © 2018 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  15. Intergenerational Programming of Metabolic Disease: Evidence from Human Populations and Experimental Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY We are in the midst of unparalleled epidemics of obesity and type 2 diabetes - complex phenotypes originating at the intersection of genetic and environmental risk. As detailed in other chapters, evidence indicates that non-genetic, or environmental, risk may initiate during prenatal and early postnatal life1. Striking examples in humans include the association of low birth weight (LBW) and/or accelerated early growth with increased risk of insulin resistance, obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2DM), and cardiovascular disease (CVD), and the close relationship between maternal obesity or diabetes with childhood obesity. In this chapter, we will focus on the intriguing emerging data from both humans and animal models which indicate that intrauterine and childhood exposures can also influence risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease in subsequent generations. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for these effects is critical in order to develop effective metabolic and nutritional interventions to interrupt such vicious intergenerational cycles potentiating risk for metabolic disorders. PMID:23435955

  16. Experimental and observational evidence for plume-induced subduction on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davaille, A.; Smrekar, S. E.; Tomlinson, S.

    2017-04-01

    Why Venus lacks plate tectonics remains an unanswered question in terrestrial planet evolution. There is observational evidence for subduction--a requirement for plate tectonics--on Venus, but it is unclear why the features have characteristics of both mantle plumes and subduction zones. One explanation is that mantle plumes trigger subduction. Here we compare laboratory experiments of plume-induced subduction in a colloidal solution of nanoparticles to observations of proposed subduction sites on Venus. The experimental fluids are heated from below to produce upwelling plumes, which in turn produce tensile fractures in the lithosphere-like skin that forms on the upper surface. Plume material upwells through the fractures and spreads above the skin, analogous to volcanic flooding, and leads to bending and eventual subduction of the skin along arcuate segments. The segments are analogous to the semi-circular trenches seen at two proposed sites of plume-triggered subduction at Quetzalpetlatl and Artemis coronae. Other experimental deformation structures and subsurface density variations are also consistent with topography, radar and gravity data for Venus. Scaling analysis suggests that this regime with limited, plume-induced subduction is favoured by a hot lithosphere, such as that found on early Earth or present-day Venus.

  17. Experimental evidence that sexual conflict influences the opportunity, form and intensity of sexual selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Matthew D; Bussière, Luc F; Hunt, John; Brooks, Robert

    2008-09-01

    Sexual interactions are often rife with conflict. Conflict between members of the same sex over opportunities to mate has long been understood to effect evolution via sexual selection. Although conflict between males and females is now understood to be widespread, such conflict is seldom considered in the same light as a general agent of sexual selection. Any interaction between males or females that generates variation in fitness, whether due to conflict, competition or mate choice, can potentially influence sexual selection acting on a range of male traits. Here we seek to address a lack of direct experimental evidence for how sexual conflict influences sexual selection more broadly. We manipulate a major source of sexual conflict in the black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus, and quantify the resulting changes in the nature of sexual selection using formal selection analysis to statistically compare multivariate fitness surfaces. In T. commodus, sexual conflict occurs over the attachment time of an external spermatophore. By experimentally manipulating the ability of males and females to influence spermatophore attachment, we found that sexual conflict significantly influences the opportunity, form, and intensity of sexual selection on male courtship call and body size. When males were able to harass females, the opportunity for selection was smaller, the form of selection changed, and sexual selection was weaker. We discuss the broader evolutionary implications of these findings, including the contributions of sexual conflict to fluctuating sexual selection and the maintenance of additive genetic variation.

  18. Experimental evidence for melt partitioning between olivine and orthopyroxene in partially molten harzburgite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin J.; Zhu, Wen-lu; Montési, Laurent G. J.; Gaetani, Glenn A.; Le Roux, Véronique; Xiao, Xianghui

    2016-08-01

    Observations of dunite channels in ophiolites and uranium series disequilibria in mid-ocean ridge basalt suggest that melt transport in the upper mantle beneath mid-ocean ridges is strongly channelized. We present experimental evidence that spatial variations in mineralogy can also focus melt on the grain scale. This lithologic melt partitioning, which results from differences in the interfacial energies associated with olivine-melt and orthopyroxene-melt boundaries, may complement other melt focusing mechanisms in the upper mantle such as mechanical shear and pyroxene dissolution. We document here lithologic melt partitioning in olivine-/orthopyroxene-basaltic melt samples containing nominal olivine to orthopyroxene ratio of 3 to 2 and melt fractions of 0.02 to 0.20. Experimental samples were imaged using synchrotron-based X-ray microcomputed tomography at a resolution of 700 nm per voxel. By analyzing the local melt fraction distributions associated with olivine and orthopyroxene grains in each sample, we found that the melt partitioning coefficient, i.e., the ratio of melt fraction around olivine to that around orthopyroxene grains, varies between 1.1 and 1.6. The permeability and electrical conductivity of our digital samples were estimated using numerical models and compared to those of samples containing only olivine and basaltic melt. Our results suggest that lithologic melt partitioning and preferential localization of melt around olivine grains might play a role in melt focusing, potentially enhancing average melt ascent velocities.

  19. The glycaemic outcomes of Cinnamon, a review of the experimental evidence and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medagama, Arjuna B

    2015-10-16

    Cinnamon is currently marketed as a remedy for obesity, glucose intolerance, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidaemia. Integrative medicine is a new concept that combines conventional treatment with evidence-based complementary therapies. The aim of this review is to critically evaluate the experimental evidence available for cinnamon in improving glycaemic targets in animal models and humans. Insulin receptor auto-phosphorlylation and de-phosphorylation, glucose transporter 4 (GLUT-4 ) receptor synthesis and translocation, modulation of hepatic glucose metabolism through changes in Pyruvate kinase (PK) and Phosphenol Pyruvate Carboxikinase (PEPCK), altering the expression of PPAR (γ) and inhibition of intestinal glucosidases are some of the mechanisms responsible for improving glycaemic control with cinnamon therapy. We reviewed 8 clinical trials that used Cinnamomum cassia in aqueous or powder form in doses ranging from 500 mg to 6 g per day for a duration lasting from 40 days to 4 months as well as 2 clinical trials that used cinnamon on treatment naïve patients with pre-diabetes. An improvement in glycaemic control was seen in patients who received Cinnamon as the sole therapy for diabetes, those with pre-diabetes (IFG or IGT) and in those with high pre-treatment HbA1c. In animal models, cinnamon reduced fasting and postprandial plasma glucose and HbA1c. Cinnamon has the potential to be a useful add-on therapy in the discipline of integrative medicine in managing type 2 diabetes. At present the evidence is inconclusive and long-term trials aiming to establish the efficacy and safety of cinnamon is needed. However, high coumarin content of Cinnamomum cassia is a concern, but Cinnamomum zeylanicum with its low coumarin content would be a safer alternate.

  20. How experimental biology and ecology can support evidence-based decision-making in conservation: avoiding pitfalls and enabling application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Steven J; Birnie-Gauvin, Kim; Lennox, Robert J; Taylor, Jessica J; Rytwinski, Trina; Rummer, Jodie L; Franklin, Craig E; Bennett, Joseph R; Haddaway, Neal R

    2017-01-01

    Policy development and management decisions should be based upon the best available evidence. In recent years, approaches to evidence synthesis, originating in the medical realm (such as systematic reviews), have been applied to conservation to promote evidence-based conservation and environmental management. Systematic reviews involve a critical appraisal of evidence, but studies that lack the necessary rigour (e.g. experimental, technical and analytical aspects) to justify their conclusions are typically excluded from systematic reviews or down-weighted in terms of their influence. One of the strengths of conservation physiology is the reliance on experimental approaches that help to more clearly establish cause-and-effect relationships. Indeed, experimental biology and ecology have much to offer in terms of building the evidence base that is needed to inform policy and management options related to pressing issues such as enacting endangered species recovery plans or evaluating the effectiveness of conservation interventions. Here, we identify a number of pitfalls that can prevent experimental findings from being relevant to conservation or would lead to their exclusion or down-weighting during critical appraisal in a systematic review. We conclude that conservation physiology is well positioned to support evidence-based conservation, provided that experimental designs are robust and that conservation physiologists understand the nuances associated with informing decision-making processes so that they can be more relevant.

  1. How experimental biology and ecology can support evidence-based decision-making in conservation: avoiding pitfalls and enabling application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnie-Gauvin, Kim; Lennox, Robert J.; Taylor, Jessica J.; Rytwinski, Trina; Rummer, Jodie L.; Franklin, Craig E.; Bennett, Joseph R.; Haddaway, Neal R.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Policy development and management decisions should be based upon the best available evidence. In recent years, approaches to evidence synthesis, originating in the medical realm (such as systematic reviews), have been applied to conservation to promote evidence-based conservation and environmental management. Systematic reviews involve a critical appraisal of evidence, but studies that lack the necessary rigour (e.g. experimental, technical and analytical aspects) to justify their conclusions are typically excluded from systematic reviews or down-weighted in terms of their influence. One of the strengths of conservation physiology is the reliance on experimental approaches that help to more clearly establish cause-and-effect relationships. Indeed, experimental biology and ecology have much to offer in terms of building the evidence base that is needed to inform policy and management options related to pressing issues such as enacting endangered species recovery plans or evaluating the effectiveness of conservation interventions. Here, we identify a number of pitfalls that can prevent experimental findings from being relevant to conservation or would lead to their exclusion or down-weighting during critical appraisal in a systematic review. We conclude that conservation physiology is well positioned to support evidence-based conservation, provided that experimental designs are robust and that conservation physiologists understand the nuances associated with informing decision-making processes so that they can be more relevant. PMID:28835842

  2. Method matters: Experimental evidence for shorter avian sperm in faecal compared to abdominal massage samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Girndt

    Full Text Available Birds are model organisms in sperm biology. Previous work in zebra finches, suggested that sperm sampled from males' faeces and ejaculates do not differ in size. Here, we tested this assumption in a captive population of house sparrows, Passer domesticus. We compared sperm length in samples from three collection techniques: female dummy, faecal and abdominal massage samples. We found that sperm were significantly shorter in faecal than abdominal massage samples, which was explained by shorter heads and midpieces, but not flagella. This result might indicate that faecal sampled sperm could be less mature than sperm collected by abdominal massage. The female dummy method resulted in an insufficient number of experimental ejaculates because most males ignored it. In light of these results, we recommend using abdominal massage as a preferred method for avian sperm sampling. Where avian sperm cannot be collected by abdominal massage alone, we advise controlling for sperm sampling protocol statistically.

  3. Reaction time effects in lab- versus Web-based research: Experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbig, Benjamin E

    2016-12-01

    Although Web-based research is now commonplace, it continues to spur skepticism from reviewers and editors, especially whenever reaction times are of primary interest. Such persistent preconceptions are based on arguments referring to increased variation, the limits of certain software and technologies, and a noteworthy lack of comparisons (between Web and lab) in fully randomized experiments. To provide a critical test, participants were randomly assigned to complete a lexical decision task either (a) in the lab using standard experimental software (E-Prime), (b) in the lab using a browser-based version (written in HTML and JavaScript), or (c) via the Web using the same browser-based version. The classical word frequency effect was typical in size and corresponded to a very large effect in all three conditions. There was no indication that the Web- or browser-based data collection was in any way inferior. In fact, if anything, a larger effect was obtained in the browser-based conditions than in the condition relying on standard experimental software. No differences between Web and lab (within the browser-based conditions) could be observed, thus disconfirming any substantial influence of increased technical or situational variation. In summary, the present experiment contradicts the still common preconception that reaction time effects of only a few hundred milliseconds cannot be detected in Web experiments.

  4. SPATIAL INTERPRETATION OF THE RESULTS OF SLOPE PROCESSES EXPERIMENTAL STUDY USING INDICATIVE POTENTIAL OF CHERNOBYL ORIGIN CESIUM-137

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Trofimets

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the authors's experimental data made it possible to discover that the Cesium-137 variability on the arable slope caused by geting sampling points in the area of block or interblock depressions that compose paleocryogenic polygonal-block microrelief. The surveys accomplished on experimental area were intended to clarify the Cesium-137 indicative potential for study of topsoil loss due to flushing. Estimation of the flushed topsoil thickness has been performed basing on comparison between the thickness of plow horizon in 1986 and current depth of Cesium-137 distribution. Two main problems were solved during research. First is the identification of erosion processes features within the elementary catchment areas with varying ruggedness degree. And the second is the detection of flush and accumulation features on the slopes of northern and southern exposure. Calculation of the Cesium-137 reserve in the modern plow horizon (0 - 20 cm with the catchment area and profile curvature modeling made it possible to derive the preliminary relationship formula between soil loss in the elementary catchment area thalwegs and profile curvature.

  5. Biparental incubation-scheduling: no experimental evidence for major energetic constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, Martin; Cresswell, Will; Rutten, Anne L; Valcu, Mihai; Kempenaers, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Incubation is energetically demanding, but it is debated whether these demands constrain incubation-scheduling (i.e., the length, constancy, and timing of incubation bouts) in cases where both parents incubate. Using 2 methods, we experimentally reduced the energetic demands of incubation in the semipalmated sandpiper, a biparental shorebird breeding in the harsh conditions of the high Arctic. First, we decreased the demands of incubation for 1 parent only by exchanging 1 of the 4 eggs for an artificial egg that heated up when the focal bird incubated. Second, we reanalyzed the data from the only published experimental study that has explicitly tested energetic constraints on incubation-scheduling in a biparentally incubating species (Cresswell et al. 2003). In this experiment, the energetic demands of incubation were decreased for both parents by insulating the nest cup. We expected that the treated birds, in both experiments, would change the length of their incubation bouts, if biparental incubation-scheduling is energetically constrained. However, we found no evidence that heating or insulation of the nest affected the length of incubation bouts: the combined effect of both experiments was an increase in bout length of 3.6min (95% CI: -33 to 40), which is equivalent to a 0.5% increase in the length of the average incubation bout. These results demonstrate that the observed biparental incubation-scheduling in semipalmated sandpipers is not primarily driven by energetic constraints and therefore by the state of the incubating bird, implying that we still do not understand the factors driving biparental incubation-scheduling.

  6. Experimental evidence supports the abscess theory of development of radicular cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, P N R; Sundqvist, Göran; Sjögren, Ulf

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this study was to experimentally induce inflammatory cysts in an animal model so as to test the hypothesis that radicular cysts develop via the "abscess pathway." Twenty-eight perforated custom-made Teflon cages were surgically implanted into defined locations in the back of 7 Sprague Dawley rats. A week after the implantation of the cages, a known quantity of freshly grown, close allogeneic oral keratinocytes in phosphate buffer solution (PBS) was injected into each cage. One cage per animal was treated as the control that received only epithelial cells. The remaining 3 cages of each animal were trials. Seven days post epithelial cell inoculation; a suspension of 0.2 mL of Fusobacterium nucleatum (10(8) bacteria per mL) was injected into each of the 3 trial cages. Two, 12, and 24 weeks after the inoculation of the bacteria, the cages were taken out, and the tissue contents were fixed and processed by correlative light and transmission electron microscopy. Sixteen of the 21 trial cages could be processed and yielded results. Inoculations of epithelial cells followed 1 week later by F. nucleatum into tissue cages resulted in the development inflammatory cysts in 2 of the 16 cages. The 2 cages contained a total of 4 cystic sites. None of the control cages showed the presence of any cyst-like pathology. Inflammatory cysts were induced by initiating acute inflammatory foci (abscess/necrotic area) by bacterial injection that got enclosed by a proliferating epithelium. This finding provides strong experimental evidence in support of the "abscess theory" of development of radicular cysts.

  7. Non-invasive monitoring of central blood pressure by electrical impedance tomography: first experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solà, Josep; Adler, Andy; Santos, Arnoldo; Tusman, Gerardo; Sipmann, Fernando Suárez; Bohm, Stephan H

    2011-04-01

    There is a strong clinical demand for devices allowing continuous non-invasive monitoring of central blood pressure (BP). In the state of the art a new family of techniques providing BP surrogates based on the measurement of the so-called pulse wave velocity (PWV) has been proposed, eliminating the need for inflation cuffs. PWV is defined as the velocity at which pressure pulses propagate along the arterial wall. However, no technique to assess PWV within central arteries in a fully unsupervised manner has been proposed so far. In this pilot study, we provide first experimental evidence that electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is capable of measuring pressure pulses directly within the descending aorta. To obtain a wide range of BP values, we administrated noradrenalin and nitroglycerine to an anesthetized pig under mechanical ventilation. An arterial line was inserted into the ascending aorta for measuring reference BP. EIT images were generated from 32 impedance electrodes placed around the chest at the level of the axilla. Regions of Interest (ROI) such as the descending aorta and the lungs were automatically identified by a novel time-based processing algorithm as the respective EIT pixels representing these structures. The correct positions of these ROIs were confirmed by bolus injections of highly conductive concentrated saline into the right heart and into the ascending aorta. Aortic pulse transit time (PTT) values were determined as the delay between the opening of the aortic valve (obtained from arterial line) and the arrival of pressure pulses at the aortic ROI within the EIT plane. For 11 experimental conditions, with mean BP ranging from 73 to 141 mmHg, strongly significant correlation (r = -0.97, P invasive surrogate of central BP.

  8. The benefits of synchronous collaborative information visualization: evidence from an experimental evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresciani, Sabrina; Eppler, Martin J

    2009-01-01

    A great corpus of studies reports empirical evidence of how information visualization supports comprehension and analysis of data. The benefits of visualization for synchronous group knowledge work, however, have not been addressed extensively. Anecdotal evidence and use cases illustrate the benefits of synchronous collaborative information visualization, but very few empirical studies have rigorously examined the impact of visualization on group knowledge work. We have consequently designed and conducted an experiment in which we have analyzed the impact of visualization on knowledge sharing in situated work groups. Our experimental study consists of evaluating the performance of 131 subjects (all experienced managers) in groups of 5 (for a total of 26 groups), working together on a real-life knowledge sharing task. We compare (1) the control condition (no visualization provided), with two visualization supports: (2) optimal and (3) suboptimal visualization (based on a previous survey). The facilitator of each group was asked to populate the provided interactive visual template with insights from the group, and to organize the contributions according to the group consensus. We have evaluated the results through both objective and subjective measures. Our statistical analysis clearly shows that interactive visualization has a statistically significant, objective and positive impact on the outcomes of knowledge sharing, but that the subjects seem not to be aware of this. In particular, groups supported by visualization achieved higher productivity, higher quality of outcome and greater knowledge gains. No statistically significant results could be found between an optimal and a suboptimal visualization though (as classified by the pre-experiment survey). Subjects also did not seem to be aware of the benefits that the visualizations provided as no difference between the visualization and the control conditions was found for the self-reported measures of satisfaction

  9. Genetic evidence for involvement of classical complement pathway in induction of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüzün, Erdem; Scott, Benjamin G; Goluszko, Elzbieta; Higgs, Stephen; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2003-10-01

    Abs to acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and complement are the major constituents of pathogenic events causing neuromuscular junction destruction in both myasthenia gravis (MG) and experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG). To analyze the differential roles of the classical vs alternative complement pathways in EAMG induction, we immunized C3(-/-), C4(-/-), C3(+/-), and C4(+/-) mice and their control littermates (C3(+/+) and C4(+/+) mice) with AChR in CFA. C3(-/-) and C4(-/-) mice were resistant to disease, whereas mice heterozygous for C3 or C4 displayed intermediate susceptibility. Although C3(-/-) and C4(-/-) mice had anti-AChR Abs in their sera, anti-AChR IgG production by C3(-/-) mice was significantly suppressed. Both C3(-/-) and C4(-/-) mice had reduced levels of B cells and increased expression of apoptotis inducers (Fas ligand, CD69) and apoptotic cells in lymph nodes. Immunofluorescence studies showed that the neuromuscular junction of C3(-/-) and C4(-/-) mice lacked C3 or membrane attack complex deposits, despite having IgG deposits, thus providing in vivo evidence for the incapacity of anti-AChR IgGs to induce full-blown EAMG without the aid of complements. The data provide the first direct genetic evidence for the classical complement pathway in the induction of EAMG induced by AChR immunization. Accordingly, severe MG and other Ab- and complement-mediated diseases could be effectively treated by inhibiting C4, thus leaving the alternative complement pathway intact.

  10. The Impact of Smoking Bans on Smoking and Consumer Behavior: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Stefan; Marti, Joachim; Maclean, Johanna Catherine

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we exploit the progressive implementation of smoking bans in public venues at the state level in Switzerland to evaluate both the direct effects on smoking and the potential unintended consequences of these legislations on consumer behaviors as measured by visiting restaurants/bars and discos ('going out'). Our results indicate that public venue smoking bans in Switzerland reduce smoking rates, but the findings do not emerge until 1 year following the ban. This pattern of results is consistent with delays in ban enforcement on the part of business owners, difficulties in changing addictive behaviors such as smoking, and/or learning on the part of smokers. We find evidence that smoking bans influence going-out behavior and there is substantial heterogeneity across venue and consumer characteristics. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Experimental evidence for convergent evolution of maternal care heuristics in industrialized and small-scale populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnick, Geoff; Hanowell, Ben; Kim, Jun-Hong; Langstieh, Banrida; Magnano, Vittorio; Oláh, Katalin

    2015-06-01

    Maternal care decision rules should evolve responsiveness to factors impinging on the fitness pay-offs of care. Because the caretaking environments common in industrialized and small-scale societies vary in predictable ways, we hypothesize that heuristics guiding maternal behaviour will also differ between these two types of populations. We used a factorial vignette experiment to elicit third-party judgements about likely caretaking decisions of a hypothetical mother and her child when various fitness-relevant factors (maternal age and access to resources, and offspring age, sex and quality) were varied systematically in seven populations-three industrialized and four small-scale. Despite considerable variation in responses, we found that three of five main effects, and the two severity effects, exhibited statistically significant industrialized/ small-scale population differences. All differences could be explained as adaptive solutions to industrialized versus small-scale caretaking environments. Further, we found gradients in the relationship between the population-specific estimates and national-level socio-economic indicators, further implicating important aspects of the variation in industrialized and small-scale caretaking environments in shaping heuristics. Although there is mounting evidence for a genetic component to human maternal behaviour, there is no current evidence for interpopulation variation in candidate genes. We nonetheless suggest that heuristics guiding maternal behaviour in diverse societies emerge via convergent evolution in response to similar selective pressures.

  12. Bisphenol A and Reproductive Health: Update of Experimental and Human Evidence, 2007–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Jackye; Vrooman, Lisa; Ricke, William A.; Hunt, Patricia A.; Ehrlich, Shelley; Hauser, Russ; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Taylor, Hugh S.; Swan, Shanna H.; VandeVoort, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    health: update of experimental and human evidence, 2007–2013. Environ Health Perspect 122:775–786; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307728 PMID:24896072

  13. The impact of energy, agriculture, macroeconomic and human-induced indicators on environmental pollution: evidence from Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asumadu-Sarkodie, Samuel; Owusu, Phebe Asantewaa

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the impact of energy, agriculture, macroeconomic and human-induced indicators on environmental pollution from 1971 to 2011 is investigated using the statistically inspired modification of partial least squares (SIMPLS) regression model. There was evidence of a linear relationship between energy, agriculture, macroeconomic and human-induced indicators and carbon dioxide emissions. Evidence from the SIMPLS regression shows that a 1% increase in crop production index will reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 0.71%. Economic growth increased by 1% will reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 0.46%, which means that an increase in Ghana's economic growth may lead to a reduction in environmental pollution. The increase in electricity production from hydroelectric sources by 1% will reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 0.30%; thus, increasing renewable energy sources in Ghana's energy portfolio will help mitigate carbon dioxide emissions. Increasing enteric emissions by 1% will increase carbon dioxide emissions by 4.22%, and a 1% increase in the nitrogen content of manure management will increase carbon dioxide emissions by 6.69%. The SIMPLS regression forecasting exhibited a 5% MAPE from the prediction of carbon dioxide emissions.

  14. Spray drift of pesticides and stream macroinvertebrates: Experimental evidence of impacts and effectiveness of mitigation measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltby, Lorraine [Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom)], E-mail: l.maltby@sheffield.ac.uk; Hills, Louise [Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Impoverished stream communities in agricultural landscapes have been associated with pesticide contamination, but conclusive evidence of causality is rare. We address this deficiency by adopting an experimental approach to investigate the effects of the insecticides cypermethrin and chlorpyrifos on benthic macroinvertebrates. Three treatments were established and a combination of biomarker, bioassay and biomonitoring approaches was employed to investigate, individual, population and community-level effects. Animals deployed during pesticide application had altered enzyme activity, depressed feeding rate and reduced survival, but these effects were only observed where pesticide was sprayed to the stream edge. There were no clear pesticide-related effects on macroinvertebrate community structure or on the population densities of individual species. Hence, short-term pesticide exposure did cause individual-level effects in stream macroinvertebrates, but these were not translated to effects at the population or community-level and were effectively mitigated by the adoption of a no-spray buffer zone. - Pulsed pesticide exposures via spray drift adversely affected stream invertebrates but did not cause population or community-level effects and were mitigated by no-spray buffer zones.

  15. Proprioceptive dysfunction in focal dystonia: from experimental evidence to rehabilitation strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eAvanzino

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dystonia has historically been considered a disorder of the basal ganglia, mainly affecting planning and execution of voluntary movements. This notion comes from the observation that most lesions responsible for secondary dystonia involve the basal ganglia. However, what emerges from recent research is that dystonia is linked to the dysfunction of a complex neural network that comprises basal ganglia-thalamic-frontal cortex, but also the inferior parietal cortex and the cerebellum. While dystonia is clearly a motor problem, it turned out that sensory aspects are also fundamental, especially those related to proprioception.We outline experimental evidence for proprioceptive dysfunction in focal dystonia from intrinsic sensory abnormalities to impaired sensorimotor integration, that is the process by which sensory information is used to plan and execute volitional movements. Particularly, we will focus on proprioceptive aspects of dystonia, including: i processing of vibratory input, ii temporal discrimination of two passive movements, iii multimodal integration of visual-tactile and proprioceptive inputs and, iv motor control in the absence of visual feedback. We suggest that these investigations contribute not only to a better understanding of dystonia pathophysiology, but also to develop rehabilitation strategies aimed at facilitating the processing of proprioceptive input.

  16. Spontaneous Time Symmetry Breaking in System with Mixed Strategy Nash Equilibrium: Evidences in Experimental Economics Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijian; Xu, Bin; Zhejiang Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    In social science, laboratory experiment with human subjects' interaction is a standard test-bed for studying social processes in micro level. Usually, as in physics, the processes near equilibrium are suggested as stochastic processes with time-reversal symmetry (TRS). To the best of our knowledge, near equilibrium, the breaking time symmetry, as well as the existence of robust time anti-symmetry processes, has not been reported clearly in experimental economics till now. By employing Markov transition method to analysis the data from human subject 2x2 Games with wide parameters and mixed Nash equilibrium, we study the time symmetry of the social interaction process near Nash equilibrium. We find that, the time symmetry is broken, and there exists a robust time anti-symmetry processes. We also report the weight of the time anti-symmetry processes in the total processes of each the games. Evidences in laboratory marketing experiments, at the same time, are provided as one-dimension cases. In these cases, time anti-symmetry cycles can also be captured. The proposition of time anti-symmetry processes is small, but the cycles are distinguishable.

  17. The fishermen were right: experimental evidence for tributary refuge hypothesis during floods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Itsuro; Kanazawa, Yukiyo; Tanaka, Yuuki

    2013-05-01

    Fishermen often anecdotally report an unexpected increase of fish caught in small tributary streams during floods, presumably due to refuge-seeking behavior from the main stem. From a population perspective, this implies the significance of refuge habitats and connectivity for population viability against natural disturbances. Despite the plausibility, however, surprisingly few studies have examined the tributary refuge hypothesis, mainly due to the difficulty in field survey during floods. Here, we made use of a large-scale controlled flood to assess whether fishes move into tributaries during flooding in the main stem. A planned water release from the Satsunai River Dam located on Hokkaido Island in Japan rapidly increased the main stem discharge by more than 20-fold. Before, during, and after flooding censuses in four tributaries provided evidence of the refuge-seeking behavior of fishes from the main stem. For example, more than 10 Dolly Varden char, a salmonid fish, were caught in a tributary during the flood, even though almost no individuals were captured before or after the flood. The fish responded immediately to the flooding, suggesting the need for studies during disturbances. In addition, the likelihood of refuge movements varied among tributaries, suggesting the importance of local environmental differences between tributary and the main stem habitats. This is the first study to experimentally confirm the tributary refuge hypothesis, and underscores the roles of habitat diversity and connectivity during disturbances, even though some habitats are not used during normal conditions.

  18. Experimental evidence concerning the significant information depth of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisniewski, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.w@uni-jena.de [Otto-Schott-Institut, Jena University, Fraunhoferstr. 6, 07743 Jena (Germany); Saager, Stefan [Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP, Winterbergstraße 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Böbenroth, Andrea [Fraunhofer Institute for the Microstructure of Materials and Systems IMWS, Walter-Huelse-Straße 1, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Rüssel, Christian [Otto-Schott-Institut, Jena University, Fraunhoferstr. 6, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Experiments concerning the information depth of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) are performed on samples featuring an amorphous wedge on a crystalline substrate and a crystalline wedge on an amorphous substrate. The effects of the acceleration voltage and exemplary software settings on the ability to measure through an amorphous layer are presented. Changes in the EBSD-signal could be detected through a ≈142 nm thick layer of amorphous Si while orientation measurements could be performed through a ≈116 nm thick layer when using a voltage of 30 kV. The complexity of the information depth significant to a given EBSD-pattern and the multiple parameters influencing it are discussed. It is suggested that a “core information depth” is significant to high quality patterns while a larger “maximum information depth” becomes relevant when the pattern quality decreases or the sample is inhomogeneous within the information volume, i.e. in the form of partially crystalline materials or crystal layers in the nm scale. - Highlights: • Experimental evidence of the significant information depth of EBSD is presented. • Effects of the voltage and exemplary software settings are discussed. • Dependence of the significant information depth on the pattern quality is proposed. • The information depth may reach up to 142 nm in Si when using a voltage of 30 kV. • The information depth depends on the available technology.

  19. Experimental evidence that ecological effects of an invasive fish are reduced at high densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornis, Matthew S; Carlson, Jedchada; Lehrer-Brey, Gabrielle; Vander Zanden, M Jake

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the relationship between invasive species density and ecological impact is a pressing topic in ecology, with implications for environmental management and policy. Although it is widely assumed that invasive species impact will increase with density, theory suggests interspecific competition may diminish at high densities due to increased intraspecific interactions. To test this theory, we experimentally examined intra- and interspecific interactions between a globally invasive fish, round goby (Neogobius melanostomus), and three native species at different round goby densities in a tributary of the Laurentian Great Lakes. Eighteen 2.25 m(2) enclosures were stocked with native fish species at natural abundances, while round gobies were stocked at three different densities: 0 m(-2), 2.7 m(-2), and 10.7 m(-2). After 52 days, native fish growth rate was significantly reduced in the low density goby treatment, while growth in the high density goby treatment mirrored the goby-free treatment for two of three native species. Invertebrate density and gut content weight of native fishes did not differ among treatments. Conversely, gut content weight and growth of round gobies were lower in the high goby density treatment, suggesting interactions between round gobies and native fishes are mediated by interference competition amongst gobies. Our experiment provides evidence that invasive species effects may diminish at high densities, possibly due to increased intraspecific interactions. This is consistent with some ecological theory, and cautions against the assumption that invasive species at moderate densities have low impact.

  20. Sugars as source indicators of biogenic organic carbon in aerosols collected above the Howland Experimental Forest, Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Patricia M.; Conte, Maureen H.; Weber, John C.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    Bulk aerosols (>1 μm) were collected continuously above the canopy at the Howland Experimental Forest, Maine, USA from May to October 2002. Each sample integrated over an approximately 2-week period. Mono- and disaccharide sugars were extracted using a microscale technique and were analyzed as their TMS derivatives by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Concentrations of total aerosol sugars ranged from 10 to 180 ng m -3. Glucose was the most abundant sugar (40-75% of the total sugars). The monosaccharides arabinose, fructose, galactose, mannose, arabitol and mannitol, and the disaccharides sucrose, maltose and mycose (aka trehalose) were also present in lower concentrations. The sugar composition in the aerosols varied seasonally. Fructose and sucrose were prevalent in early spring and decreased in relative abundance as the growing season progressed. Sugar polyols (arabitol and mannitol) and the disaccharide mycose (a fungal metabolite) were more prevalent in autumn during the period of leaf senescence. The changes in the sugar composition in the aerosol samples appear to reflect the seasonality of sugar production and utilization by the ecosystem. Plant waxes were present as significant components also indicating an input from biogenic background. Smoke plumes from Quebec forest fires passed over the Howland site in early July 2002. Levoglucosan, a biomarker of biomass burning, increased by an order of magnitude in the aerosol samples collected during this time. Glucose, mannose, arabinose, galactose, and also, plant waxes increased in concentration by factors of 2-5 in the smoke-impacted samples, indicating that wildfires enhance atmospheric emissions of uncombusted organic compounds. In contrast, concentrations of fructose, sugar polyols and disaccharides were not significantly higher in the smoke-impacted samples and indicated that biomass burning was not a significant source of these compounds in the aerosols.

  1. A multidisciplinary weight of evidence approach for environmental risk assessment at the Costa Concordia wreck: Integrative indices from Mussel Watch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regoli, Francesco; Pellegrini, David; Cicero, Anna Maria; Nigro, Marco; Benedetti, Maura; Gorbi, Stefania; Fattorini, Daniele; D'Errico, Giuseppe; Di Carlo, Marta; Nardi, Alessandro; Gaion, Andrea; Scuderi, Alice; Giuliani, Silvia; Romanelli, Giulia; Berto, Daniela; Trabucco, Benedetta; Guidi, Patrizia; Bernardeschi, Margherita; Scarcelli, Vittoria; Frenzilli, Giada

    2014-05-01

    A complex framework of chemical, biological and oceanographic activities was immediately activated after the Costa Concordia shipwreck, to assess possible contamination events and the environmental impact during both emergency and wreck removal operations. In the present paper, we describe the results obtained with caged mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis, chosen as bioindicator organisms to detect variations of bioavailability and the early onset of molecular and cellular effects (biomarkers). Seven translocation experiments were carried out during the first year from the incident, with organisms deployed at 2 depths in 3 different sites. After 4-6 weeks, tissue concentrations were measured for the main classes of potentially released chemicals (trace metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, volatile and aliphatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, halogenated pesticides, organotin compounds, brominated flame retardants, anionic surfactants); a wide battery of biomarkers covered responses indicative of exposure, detoxification, oxidative stress, cell damage and genotoxic effects. Results excluded serious contamination events or a consistent increase of environmental pollution although some episodic spills with reversible effects were detected. Data were elaborated within a quantitative weight of evidence (WOE) model which provided synthetic hazard indices for each typology of data, before their overall integration in an environmental risk index, which generally ranged from slight to moderate. The proposed WOE model was confirmed a useful tool to summarize large datasets of complex data in integrative indices, and to simplify the interpretation for stakeholders and decision makers, thus supporting a more comprehensive process of "site-oriented" management decisions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nitrate ammonification by Nautilia profundicola AmH: experimental evidence consistent with a free hydroxylamine intermediate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Thomas E.; Campbell, Barbara J.; Kalis, Katie M.; Campbell, Mark A.; Klotz, Martin G.

    2013-01-01

    The process of nitrate reduction via nitrite controls the fate and bioavailability of mineral nitrogen within ecosystems; i.e., whether it is retained as ammonium (ammonification) or lost as nitrous oxide or dinitrogen (denitrification). Here, we present experimental evidence for a novel pathway of microbial nitrate reduction, the reverse hydroxylamine:ubiquinone reductase module (reverse-HURM) pathway. Instead of a classical ammonia-forming nitrite reductase that performs a 6 electron-transfer process, the pathway is thought to employ two catalytic redox modules operating in sequence: the reverse-HURM reducing nitrite to hydroxylamine followed by a hydroxylamine reductase that converts hydroxylamine to ammonium. Experiments were performed on Nautilia profundicola strain AmH, whose genome sequence led to the reverse-HURM pathway proposal. N. profundicola produced ammonium from nitrate, which was assimilated into biomass. Furthermore, genes encoding the catalysts of the reverse-HURM pathway were preferentially expressed during growth of N. profundicola on nitrate as an electron acceptor relative to cultures grown on polysulfide as an electron acceptor. Finally, nitrate-grown cells of N. profundicola were able to rapidly and stoichiometrically convert high concentrations of hydroxylamine to ammonium in resting cell assays. These experiments are consistent with the reverse-HURM pathway and a free hydroxylamine intermediate, but could not definitively exclude direct nitrite reduction to ammonium by the reverse-HURM with hydroxylamine as an off-pathway product. N. profundicola and related organisms are models for a new pathway of nitrate ammonification that may have global impact due to the wide distribution of these organisms in hypoxic environments and symbiotic or pathogenic associations with animal hosts. PMID:23847604

  3. Designing a light fabric metamaterial being highly macroscopically tough under directional extension: first experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    dell'Isola, Francesco; Lekszycki, Tomasz; Pawlikowski, Marek; Grygoruk, Roman; Greco, Leopoldo

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we study a metamaterial constructed with an isotropic material organized following a geometric structure which we call pantographic lattice. This relatively complex fabric was studied using a continuous model (which we call pantographic sheet) by Rivlin and Pipkin and includes two families of flexible fibers connected by internal pivots which are, in the reference configuration, orthogonal. A rectangular specimen having one side three times longer than the other is cut at 45° with respect to the fibers in reference configuration, and it is subjected to large-deformation plane-extension bias tests imposing a relative displacement of shorter sides. The continuum model used, the presented numerical models and the extraordinary advancements of the technology of 3D printing allowed for the design of some first experiments, whose preliminary results are shown and seem to be rather promising. Experimental evidence shows three distinct deformation regimes. In the first regime, the equilibrium total deformation energy depends quadratically on the relative displacement of terminal specimen sides: Applied resultant force depends linearly on relative displacement. In the second regime, the applied force varies nonlinearly on relative displacement, but the behavior remains elastic. In the third regime, damage phenomena start to occur until total failure, but the exerted resultant force continues to be increasing and reaches a value up to several times larger than the maximum shown in the linear regime before failure actually occurs. Moreover, the total energy needed to reach structural failure is larger than the maximum stored elastic energy. Finally, the volume occupied by the material in the fabric is a small fraction of the total volume, so that the ratio weight/resistance to extension is very advantageous. The results seem to require a refinement of the used theoretical and numerical methods to transform the presented concept into a promising technological

  4. Nitrate ammonification by Nautilia profundicola AmH: experimental evidence consistent with a free hydroxylamine intermediate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E Hanson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The process of nitrate reduction via nitrite controls the fate and bioavailability of mineral nitrogen within ecosystems; i.e. whether it is retained as ammonium (ammonification or lost as nitrous oxide or dinitrogen (denitrification. Here, we present experimental evidence for a novel pathway of microbial nitrate reduction, the reverse hydroxylamine:ubiquinone reductase module (reverse-HURM pathway. Instead of a classical ammonia-forming nitrite reductase that performs a 6 electron-transfer process, the pathway is thought to employ two catalytic redox modules operating in sequence: the reverse-HURM reducing nitrite to hydroxylamine followed by a hydroxylamine reductase that converts hydroxylamine to ammonium. Experiments were performed on Nautilia profundicola strain AmH, whose genome sequence led to the reverse-HURM pathway proposal. N. profundicola produced ammonium from nitrate, which was assimilated into biomass. Furthermore, genes encoding the catalysts of the reverse-HURM pathway were preferentially expressed during growth of N. profundicola on nitrate as an electron acceptor relative to cultures grown on polysulfide as an electron acceptor. Finally, nitrate-grown cells of N. profundicola were able to rapidly and stoichiometrically convert high concentrations of hydroxylamine to ammonium in resting cell assays. These experiments are consistent with the reverse-HURM pathway and a free hydroxylamine intermediate, but could not definitively exclude direct nitrite reduction to ammonium by the reverse-HURM with hydroxylamine as an off-pathway product. N. profundicola and related organisms are models for a new pathway of nitrate ammonification that may have global impact due to the wide distribution of these organisms in hypoxic environments and symbiotic or pathogenic associations with animal hosts.

  5. The response of cerebral cortex to haemorrhagic damage: experimental evidence from a penetrating injury model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraman Purushothuman

    Full Text Available Understanding the response of the brain to haemorrhagic damage is important in haemorrhagic stroke and increasingly in the understanding the cerebral degeneration and dementia that follow head trauma and head-impact sports. In addition, there is growing evidence that haemorrhage from small cerebral vessels is important in the pathogenesis of age-related dementia (Alzheimer's disease. In a penetration injury model of rat cerebral cortex, we have examined the neuropathology induced by a needlestick injury, with emphasis on features prominent in the ageing and dementing human brain, particularly plaque-like depositions and the expression of related proteins. Needlestick lesions were made in neo- and hippocampal cortex in Sprague Dawley rats aged 3-5 months. Brains were examined after 1-30 d survival, for haemorrhage, for the expression of hyperphosphorylated tau, Aβ, amyloid precursor protein (APP, for gliosis and for neuronal death. Temporal cortex from humans diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease was examined with the same techniques. Needlestick injury induced long-lasting changes-haem deposition, cell death, plaque-like deposits and glial invasion-along the needle track. Around the track, the lesion induced more transient changes, particularly upregulation of Aβ, APP and hyperphosporylated tau in neurons and astrocytes. Reactions were similar in hippocampus and neocortex, except that neuronal death was more widespread in the hippocampus. In summary, experimental haemorrhagic injury to rat cerebral cortex induced both permanent and transient changes. The more permanent changes reproduced features of human senile plaques, including the formation of extracellular deposits in which haem and Aβ-related proteins co-localised, neuronal loss and gliosis. The transient changes, observed in tissue around the direct lesion, included the upregulation of Aβ, APP and hyperphosphorylated tau, not associated with cell death. The findings support the

  6. Experimental Evidence of Classical Conditioning and Microscopic Engrams in an Electroconductive Material.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Rouleau

    Full Text Available Synthetic experimental substrates are indispensable tools which can allow researchers to model biological processes non-invasively in three-dimensional space. In this study, we investigated the capacities of an electroconductive material whose properties converge upon those of the brain. An electrically conductive material composed of carbohydrates, proteins, fats, ions, water, and trace amounts of other organic compounds and minerals was classically conditioned as inferred by electrophysiological measurements. Spectral densities evoked during the display of a conditioned stimulus (CS probe were strongly congruent with those displayed during the conditioned-unconditioned stimulus pairing (CS-UCS. The neutral stimulus consisted of the pulsed light from a LED. The unconditioned stimulus was an alternating current. Interstimulus intervals >130 ms did not result in conditioned responses. Microscopic analysis of the chemically-fixed substratum revealed 10-200 μm wide 'vessel structures' within samples exposed to a stimulus. Greater complexity (increased fractal dimensions was clearly discernable by light microscopy for stained sections of fixed samples that had been conditioned compared to various controls. The denser pixels indicated greater concentration of stain and increased canalization. Implications for learning and memory formation are discussed.

  7. Passionate love and relationship thinkers: experimental evidence for acute cortisol elevations in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loving, Timothy J; Crockett, Erin E; Paxson, Aubri A

    2009-07-01

    We assessed the impact of an individual difference variable, relationship-focused thinking, on women's acute salivary cortisol responses during and after a guided imagery task. Specifically, 29 healthy women, all of whom were experiencing high levels of passionate love, but varied on levels of relationship-focused thinking, were assigned to one of two experimental conditions: a partner reflection condition or a cross-sex friend reflection condition. Results indicated that women experiencing passionate love evidenced increased cortisol levels when asked to reflect on their romantic partner and relationship relative to women asked to reflect on a cross-sex friendship, but this difference was particularly pronounced and relatively long-lasting for those women characterized by a high amount of relationship-focused thinking. Our study significantly expands extant work on the passionate love-cortisol link by isolating the impact of a specific psychological variable, relationship-focused thinking, on the physiological experience of falling in love. We believe our work highlights the advances that can be made when established work in the close relationships and neuroendocrine fields are integrated.

  8. User preferences and willingness to pay for safe drinking water: Experimental evidence from rural Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Zachary; Njee, Robert M; Mbatia, Yolanda; Msimbe, Veritas; Brown, Joe; Clasen, Thomas F; Malebo, Hamisi M; Ray, Isha

    2017-01-01

    Almost half of all deaths from drinking microbiologically unsafe water occur in Sub-Saharan Africa. Household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) systems, when consistently used, can provide safer drinking water and improve health. Social marketing to increase adoption and use of HWTS depends both on the prices of and preferences for these systems. This study included 556 households from rural Tanzania across two low-income districts with low-quality water sources. Over 9 months in 2012 and 2013, we experimentally evaluated consumer preferences for six "low-cost" HWTS options, including boiling, through an ordinal ranking protocol. We estimated consumers' willingness to pay (WTP) for these options, using a modified auction. We allowed respondents to pay for the durable HWTS systems with cash, chickens or mobile money; a significant minority chose chickens as payment. Overall, our participants favored boiling, the ceramic pot filter and, where water was turbid, PuR™ (a combined flocculant-disinfectant). The revealed WTP for all products was far below retail prices, indicating that significant scale-up may need significant subsidies. Our work will inform programs and policies aimed at scaling up HWTS to improve the health of resource-constrained communities that must rely on poor-quality, and sometimes turbid, drinking water sources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Experimental evidence that mutual and tracer diffusion coefficients for hemoglobin are not equal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Richard S.; Johnson, Charles S.

    1980-04-01

    Photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) has been used to measure the mutual diffusion coefficient Dm for unliganded hemoglobin in the concentration range 0.86 to 15.7 g/dl. The result corrected to water at 20 °C is Dm=Do[1-(0.0057±.0003)c] where Do= (6.75±0.05) ×10-7 cm2/s and c is in units of g/dl. It is shown that Dm can be used with the phenomenological theory of diffusion to predict the tracer diffusion coefficient Dt and that the predictions agree with the results of diaphragm cell measurements [Keller, et al., J. Phys. Chem., 75, 379 (1971)]. In contrast to this, diaphragm cell measurements of Dm do not agree with PCS measurements, with open capillary and free diffusion experiments [Kitchen, et al., J. Polymer Sci. Sym. No. 55, 39 (1976)], or with ultrafiltration measurements [Probstein, et al., J. Phys. Chem. 83, 1228 (1979)]. The evidence indicates that Dm≠Dt for hemoglobin, and that diaphragm cell measurements of Dm are not reliable for proteins. (AIP)

  10. Taurine in health and diseases: consistent evidence from experimental and epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamori, Yukio; Taguchi, Takashi; Hamada, Atsumi; Kunimasa, Kazuhiro; Mori, Hideki; Mori, Mari

    2010-08-24

    foods and be free from CVD 200 years ago, but they presently have nearly the highest CVD risks indicating that T- and/or M-containing seafood, vegetables, fruits, nuts, milk, etc, similar to prehistoric hunters' and gatherers' food should be good for CVD prevention. The preventive effects of T, good for health and longevity, first noted experimentally, were also proven epidemiologically in humans.

  11. A Radioactive Heat Source in Planetary Cores: Experimental Evidence for Potassium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, V.; van Westrenen, W.; Fei, Y.

    2003-12-01

    The idea and the extent to which potassium is a radioactive heat source in the Earth's core has been highly controversial for the past thirty years because of ambiguous and contradictory experimental results, presumably due to unsuspected experimental difficulties. We present here results of studies free of such difficulties to show conclusively that K is soluble in Fe-S melts. In synthetic systems composed of K-silicate, Fe-metal, and FeS, potassium is readily enters the Fe-S melt at 2 GPa and magmatic temperatures, at fO2 1.5 log units below the iron-wustite (IW) buffer. The data show a precise loglinear relationship between the partition coefficient DK (concentration of K in sulfide/concentration of K in silicate) and inverse temperature, indicating that the solubility of K in the sulfide melt shows a strong positive correlation with temperature (T). If the Earth's core formed by segregation of metallic liquids in the Fe-FeS system, these observations suggests the presence of a significant amount of potassium in the core with consequent radiogenic heat production. The effects of pressure and composition on the partitioning of K in to Fe-S melt are not well constrained at this time. Our preliminary data show no effect of pressure in the limited range of our experiments but a significant effect of silicate melt composition. Until the effects of these parameters are defined better, only a heuristic estimate of the core radiogenic heat production is possible. For a range of 3000-4000 K core mantle equilibration temperature, the K content of the core is 60-130 ppm with a present-day heat production at 0.4-0.8x 1012 Watts and exponentially more in the past. A similar analysis suggests the radioactive heat production in Mars core to be 3x 1010 Watts. This additional heat source in the cores of Earth and Mars has major implications for a number of global processes and the early history of these planets. Among these are, the early but now extinct global magnetic field of

  12. Are bilingualism effects on the L1 byproducts of implicit knowledge? Evidence from two experimental tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Augusto de Souza

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudos experimentais em Linguística apoiam-se em dados oriundos de desempenho de participantes em tarefas linguísticas. Portanto, a compreensão dos construtos abordados por tais tarefas é fundamental para a interpretação dos resultados gerados pelo trabalho experimental. Neste estudo, explora-se questões trazidas por um estudo previamente publicado baseado em uma tarefa de julgamento de gramaticalidade temporizada que não replicou evidências anteriormente relatadas acerca de efeitos de interações translinguísticas no processamento bilíngue de construções de estrutura argumental que não fazem parte do repertório construcional da L1 dos bilíngues. Apesar da tarefa de julgamento de gramaticalidade temporizada ter sido defendida como uma medida válida de conhecimento linguístico implícito, resenha-se estudos psicométricos recentes que põem este pressuposto em dúvida, ao mostrar que tal tarefa ou não captura conhecimento implícito, ou não o captura tão completamente quanto o fazem tarefas psicolinguísticas de processamento online. Neste estudo, conduz-se dois experimentos com a mesma amostra de sujeitos. Um dos experimentos empregou uma tarefa de processamento online, e o outro empregou uma tarefa de julgamento de gramaticalidade temporizada. Nessas tarefas, sentenças em português do Brasil que emulavam o comportamento linguístico da construção resultativa do inglês constituíram os itens alvo. Relata-se resultados que mostram a discrepância de observações geradas pelos dois tipos de tarefa, com somente a tarefa de processamento online revelando os aparentes efeitos da L2 sobre o desempenho linguístico da L1. Interpreta-se os resultados como sugestivos de que o local das interações translinguísticas de bilíngues é majoritariamente nos processos implícitos.

  13. Differential activities of the two closely related withanolides, Withaferin A and Withanone: bioinformatics and experimental evidences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti Vaishnavi

    Full Text Available Withanolides are naturally occurring chemical compounds. They are secondary metabolites produced via oxidation of steroids and structurally consist of a steroid-backbone bound to a lactone or its derivatives. They are known to protect plants against herbivores and have medicinal value including anti-inflammation, anti-cancer, adaptogenic and anti-oxidant effects. Withaferin A (Wi-A and Withanone (Wi-N are two structurally similar withanolides isolated from Withania somnifera, also known as Ashwagandha in Indian Ayurvedic medicine. Ashwagandha alcoholic leaf extract (i-Extract, rich in Wi-N, was shown to kill cancer cells selectively. Furthermore, the two closely related purified phytochemicals, Wi-A and Wi-N, showed differential activity in normal and cancer human cells in vitro and in vivo. We had earlier identified several genes involved in cytotoxicity of i-Extract in human cancer cells by loss-of-function assays using either siRNA or randomized ribozyme library.In the present study, we have employed bioinformatics tools on four genes, i.e., mortalin, p53, p21 and Nrf2, identified by loss-of-function screenings. We examined the docking efficacy of Wi-N and Wi-A to each of the four targets and found that the two closely related phytochemicals have differential binding properties to the selected cellular targets that can potentially instigate differential molecular effects. We validated these findings by undertaking parallel experiments on specific gene responses to either Wi-N or Wi-A in human normal and cancer cells. We demonstrate that Wi-A that binds strongly to the selected targets acts as a strong cytotoxic agent both for normal and cancer cells. Wi-N, on the other hand, has a weak binding to the targets; it showed milder cytotoxicity towards cancer cells and was safe for normal cells. The present molecular docking analyses and experimental evidence revealed important insights to the use of Wi-A and Wi-N for cancer treatment and

  14. Differential activities of the two closely related withanolides, Withaferin A and Withanone: bioinformatics and experimental evidences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishnavi, Kirti; Saxena, Nishant; Shah, Navjot; Singh, Rumani; Manjunath, Kavyashree; Uthayakumar, M; Kanaujia, Shankar P; Kaul, Sunil C; Sekar, Kanagaraj; Wadhwa, Renu

    2012-01-01

    Withanolides are naturally occurring chemical compounds. They are secondary metabolites produced via oxidation of steroids and structurally consist of a steroid-backbone bound to a lactone or its derivatives. They are known to protect plants against herbivores and have medicinal value including anti-inflammation, anti-cancer, adaptogenic and anti-oxidant effects. Withaferin A (Wi-A) and Withanone (Wi-N) are two structurally similar withanolides isolated from Withania somnifera, also known as Ashwagandha in Indian Ayurvedic medicine. Ashwagandha alcoholic leaf extract (i-Extract), rich in Wi-N, was shown to kill cancer cells selectively. Furthermore, the two closely related purified phytochemicals, Wi-A and Wi-N, showed differential activity in normal and cancer human cells in vitro and in vivo. We had earlier identified several genes involved in cytotoxicity of i-Extract in human cancer cells by loss-of-function assays using either siRNA or randomized ribozyme library. In the present study, we have employed bioinformatics tools on four genes, i.e., mortalin, p53, p21 and Nrf2, identified by loss-of-function screenings. We examined the docking efficacy of Wi-N and Wi-A to each of the four targets and found that the two closely related phytochemicals have differential binding properties to the selected cellular targets that can potentially instigate differential molecular effects. We validated these findings by undertaking parallel experiments on specific gene responses to either Wi-N or Wi-A in human normal and cancer cells. We demonstrate that Wi-A that binds strongly to the selected targets acts as a strong cytotoxic agent both for normal and cancer cells. Wi-N, on the other hand, has a weak binding to the targets; it showed milder cytotoxicity towards cancer cells and was safe for normal cells. The present molecular docking analyses and experimental evidence revealed important insights to the use of Wi-A and Wi-N for cancer treatment and development of new anti

  15. Differential Activities of the Two Closely Related Withanolides, Withaferin A and Withanone: Bioinformatics and Experimental Evidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunath, Kavyashree; Uthayakumar, M.; Kanaujia, Shankar P.; Kaul, Sunil C.; Sekar, Kanagaraj; Wadhwa, Renu

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Withanolides are naturally occurring chemical compounds. They are secondary metabolites produced via oxidation of steroids and structurally consist of a steroid-backbone bound to a lactone or its derivatives. They are known to protect plants against herbivores and have medicinal value including anti-inflammation, anti-cancer, adaptogenic and anti-oxidant effects. Withaferin A (Wi-A) and Withanone (Wi-N) are two structurally similar withanolides isolated from Withania somnifera, also known as Ashwagandha in Indian Ayurvedic medicine. Ashwagandha alcoholic leaf extract (i-Extract), rich in Wi-N, was shown to kill cancer cells selectively. Furthermore, the two closely related purified phytochemicals, Wi-A and Wi-N, showed differential activity in normal and cancer human cells in vitro and in vivo. We had earlier identified several genes involved in cytotoxicity of i-Extract in human cancer cells by loss-of-function assays using either siRNA or randomized ribozyme library. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, we have employed bioinformatics tools on four genes, i.e., mortalin, p53, p21 and Nrf2, identified by loss-of-function screenings. We examined the docking efficacy of Wi-N and Wi-A to each of the four targets and found that the two closely related phytochemicals have differential binding properties to the selected cellular targets that can potentially instigate differential molecular effects. We validated these findings by undertaking parallel experiments on specific gene responses to either Wi-N or Wi-A in human normal and cancer cells. We demonstrate that Wi-A that binds strongly to the selected targets acts as a strong cytotoxic agent both for normal and cancer cells. Wi-N, on the other hand, has a weak binding to the targets; it showed milder cytotoxicity towards cancer cells and was safe for normal cells. The present molecular docking analyses and experimental evidence revealed important insights to the use of Wi-A and

  16. The Modulation of Pain by Circadian and Sleep-Dependent Processes: A Review of the Experimental Evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagenauer, Megan; Crodelle, Jennifer; Piltz, Sofia Helena

    2017-01-01

    in an effort to identify constraints for the models. While it is well accepted that sleep behavior is regulated by a daily (circadian) timekeeping system and homeostatic sleep drive, the joint modulation of these two primary biological processes on pain sensitivity has not been considered. Under experimental...... disruption. To explore the interaction between these two biological processes using modeling, we first compare the magnitude of their effects across a variety of experimental pain studies in humans. To do this comparison, we normalize the results from experimental pain studies relative to the range...... of physiologically meaningful stimulation levels. Following this normalization, we find that the estimated impact of the daily rhythm and of sleep deprivation on experimental pain measurements is surprisingly consistent across different pain modalities. We also review evidence documenting the impact of circadian...

  17. Quasi-experimental study designs series-paper 12: strengthening global capacity for evidence synthesis of quasi-experimental health systems research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockers, Peter C; Tugwell, Peter; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Oliver, Sandy; Atun, Rifat; Røttingen, John-Arne; Fretheim, Atle; Ranson, M Kent; Daniels, Karen; Luiza, Vera Lucia; Bärnighausen, Till

    2017-09-01

    Evidence from quasi-experimental studies is often excluded from systematic reviews of health systems research despite the fact that such studies can provide strong causal evidence when well conducted. This article discusses global coordination of efforts to institutionalize the inclusion of causal evidence from quasi-experiments in systematic reviews of health systems research. In particular, we are concerned with identifying opportunities for strengthening capacity at the global and local level for implementing protocols necessary to ensure that reviews that include quasi-experiments are consistently of the highest quality. We first describe the current state of the global infrastructure that facilitates the production of systematic reviews of health systems research. We identify five important types of actors operating within this infrastructure: review authors; synthesis collaborations that facilitate the review process; synthesis interest groups that supplement the work of the larger collaborations; review funders; and end users, including policymakers. Then, we examine opportunities for intervening to build the capacity of each type of actors to support the inclusion of quasi-experiments in reviews. Finally, we suggest practical next steps for proceeding with capacity building efforts. Because of the complexity and relative nascence of the field, we recommend a carefully planned and executed approach to strengthening global capacity for the inclusion of quasi-experimental studies in systematic reviews. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Experimental evidence for the role of cross-relaxation in proton nuclear magnetic resonance spin lattice relaxation time measurements in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, B D; Hull, W E; Snyder, G H

    1978-02-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin lattice relaxation time (T1) and spin-spin relaxation time (T2) measurements are presented for a number of proteins with molecular weights spanning the range of 6,500-150,000 daltons. These measurements provide experimental evidence for the role of cross-relaxation in 1H NMR T1 measurements in proteins. The relationship between these measurements and the theory recently presented by Kalk and Berendsen is discussed. The results indicate that cross-relaxation dominates the T1 measurements for the larger proteins, even at relatively low resonance frequencies such as 100 MHz.

  19. Monitoring reproductive health in Europe: what are the best indicators of reproductive health? A need for evidence-based quality indicators of reproductive health care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelen, W.L.D.M.; Hermens, R.P.M.G.; Mourad, S.M.; Haagen, E.C.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Kremer, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Monitoring reproductive health by the Reprostat indicators in Europe will facilitate the transparency of reproductive health as well as comparisons over time and between countries. However, for the monitoring and improvement of reproductive health care, we suggest the systematic development of

  20. ANTHROPOGENIC POLLEN INDICATORS (API FROM ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES AS LOCAL EVIDENCE OF HUMAN-INDUCED ENVIRONMENTS IN THE ITALIAN PENINSULA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Mercuri

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pollen data from twenty-six archaeological sites are reviewed to investigate the development of human-induced environments through the presence of selected Anthropogenic Pollen Indicators (API. The sites are located in six Italian regions - Veneto, Emilia Romagna, Tuscany, Basilicata, Calabria, and Sicily - and in the Republic of San Marino. Their chronology spans from the Bronze to the Renaissance ages, from approximately 4200 to 500 years BP. The API which are common in these sites are properly considered important markers of human activity and anthropization in the Mediterranean area. The most frequent API taxa in pollen spectra are seven: Artemisia, Centaurea, Cichorieae and Plantago are ubiquitous and therefore they have the major relevance, followed by cereals and Urtica, and by Trifolium type. The spread of plants producing these pollen grains is sometimes marked by high percentage values in pollen spectra. Pollen records show that, as expected, cereals and wild synanthropic herbs were widespread near archaeological sites but local differences are evident. Ecological and chrono-cultural reasons may be at the base of the observed differences. In general, the synanthropic plants well represent the xeric environments that developed as a result of the continuous human pressure and changes in soil compositions. These changes have occurred especially during the mid and late Holocene.

  1. Theoretical and experimental evidence indicates that there is no detectable auxin gradient in the angiosperm female gametophyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lituiev, Dmytro S; Krohn, Nádia G; Müller, Bruno; Jackson, David; Hellriegel, Barbara; Dresselhaus, Thomas; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2013-11-01

    The plant life cycle alternates between a diploid sporophytic and a haploid gametophytic generation. The female gametophyte (FG) of flowering plants is typically formed through three syncytial mitoses, followed by cellularisation that forms seven cells belonging to four cell types. The specification of cell fates in the FG has been suggested to depend on positional information provided by an intrinsic auxin concentration gradient. The goal of this study was to develop mathematical models that explain the formation of this gradient in a syncytium. Two factors were proposed to contribute to the maintenance of the auxin gradient in Arabidopsis FGs: polar influx at early stages and localised auxin synthesis at later stages. However, no gradient could be generated using classical, one-dimensional theoretical models under these assumptions. Thus, we tested other hypotheses, including spatial confinement by the large central vacuole, background efflux and localised degradation, and investigated the robustness of cell specification under different parameters and assumptions. None of the models led to the generation of an auxin gradient that was steep enough to allow sufficiently robust patterning. This led us to re-examine the response to an auxin gradient in developing FGs using various auxin reporters, including a novel degron-based reporter system. In agreement with the predictions of our models, auxin responses were not detectable within the FG of Arabidopsis or maize, suggesting that the effects of manipulating auxin production and response on cell fate determination might be indirect.

  2. The Role of Task Meaning on Output in Groups: Experimental Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Bäker, Agnes; Mechtel, Mario

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes experimentally how the interaction of task meaning and peer presence affects work effort. We build on the experimental designs of Falk and Ichino (2006) and Ariely et al. (2008). Confirming previous results from the literature, we find positive peer effects and negative effects of low task meaning. In addition, we find that peer effects are even stronger if task meaning is low. We conclude that a peer setting is able to overcome the negative effort effect of low task meaning.

  3. Experimental evidence on RH-dependent crossover from an electronic to protonic conduction with an oscillatory behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Vanaraj; Krupanidhi, S. B.; Nanda, K. K.

    2017-06-01

    An oxide semiconductor changes its resistance with exposure of water molecules and is accepted to be governed by electronic and protonic conduction in low and high humid atmosphere, respectively, without any experimental evidences. Here, we report on the experimental evidence of a relative humidity (RH) dependent crossover, from an electronic to protonic conduction and its oscillatory behaviour in mesoporous SnO2. Interestingly, oscillatory conduction observed in the intermediate humidity range (70%-90% RH) lies in between two monotonic variations that substantiate the competitive adsorption and desorption processes of oxygen species and water molecules. In addition, we have shown that the conduction process can be tuned predominantly electronic or protonic by pre- and post-UV treatment. The conductance increases by 2-3 orders as the conduction changes from pure electronic to protonic, suggesting an insulator-to-metal like transition.

  4. Avoid or Follow? Modelling Route Choice Based on Experimental Empirical Evidences

    OpenAIRE

    Crociani, Luca; Yanagisawa, Daichi; Vizzari, Giuseppe; Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Bandini, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Computer-based simulation of pedestrian dynamics reached meaningful results in the last decade, thanks to empirical evidences and acquired knowledge fitting fundamental diagram constraints and space utilization. Moreover, computational models for pedestrian wayfinding often neglect extensive empirical evidences supporting the calibration and validation phase of simulations. The paper presents the results of a set of controlled experiments (with human volunteers) designed and performed to unde...

  5. Experimental determination of spectral indices by scanning of fuel rod in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor; Determinacao experimental de indices espectrais por varredura gama de vareta combustivel no reator IPEN/MB-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanaro, Leda Cristina Cabelo Bernardes

    2009-07-01

    In this work, the spectral indexes 28{rho}{sup *} and 25{delta}{sup *}, and gamma efficiency factor in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor were determined experimentally employing a rod scanning technique. In the case of 28{rho}{sup *}, this method has the advantage of eliminating most of the correction factors derived from the calculations. Only the fission yield factor and the relative fission rate in the {sup 235}U remain in the determination of the 25{delta}{sup *}. The experiments were performed with different thicknesses of cadmium sleeves: 0.55 mm, 1.10 mm and 2.20 mm. The final experimental uncertainty achieved in the experiment, less that 1 %, and the excellent geometrical and material data characterization of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor allow to use the results as benchmark for validate calculation methods and related nuclear data libraries. The comparison between calculated values and experimental values was performed by employing the MCNP-5 code and the nuclear data libraries: ENDF/B-VI.8, ENDF/B-VII.0, JENDL-3.3 and JEFF-3.1. The results demonstrate that the difference among libraries is very small. Also, the comparison between calculated values and experimental values shows that there has been considerable progress in the recent nuclear data libraries. The best result is obtained with ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library, and the highest discrepancy was obtained with JEFF-3.1 and JENDL-3.3 nuclear data libraries. (author)

  6. The price elasticity of demand for heroin: Matched longitudinal and experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Todd A; Alessi, Sheila M; Kline, Brendan; Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Petry, Nancy M

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports estimates of the price elasticity of demand for heroin based on a newly constructed dataset. The dataset has two matched components concerning the same sample of regular heroin users: longitudinal information about real-world heroin demand (actual price and actual quantity at daily intervals for each heroin user in the sample) and experimental information about laboratory heroin demand (elicited by presenting the same heroin users with scenarios in a laboratory setting). Two empirical strategies are used to estimate the price elasticity of demand for heroin. The first strategy exploits the idiosyncratic variation in the price experienced by a heroin user over time that occurs in markets for illegal drugs. The second strategy exploits the experimentally induced variation in price experienced by a heroin user across experimental scenarios. Both empirical strategies result in the estimate that the conditional price elasticity of demand for heroin is approximately -0.80. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The price elasticity of demand for heroin: matched longitudinal and experimental evidence#

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Todd A.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Kline, Brendan; Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Petry, Nancy M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports estimates of the price elasticity of demand for heroin based on a newly constructed dataset. The dataset has two matched components concerning the same sample of regular heroin users: longitudinal information about real-world heroin demand (actual price and actual quantity at daily intervals for each heroin user in the sample) and experimental information about laboratory heroin demand (elicited by presenting the same heroin users with scenarios in a laboratory setting). Two empirical strategies are used to estimate the price elasticity of demand for heroin. The first strategy exploits the idiosyncratic variation in the price experienced by a heroin user over time that occurs in markets for illegal drugs. The second strategy exploits the experimentally-induced variation in price experienced by a heroin user across experimental scenarios. Both empirical strategies result in the estimate that the conditional price elasticity of demand for heroin is approximately −0.80. PMID:25702687

  8. Psychoneuroimmunology: an interpretation of experimental and case study evidence towards a paradigm for predictable results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalt, H W

    2000-07-01

    This paper surveys a number of key experiments and case studies relating to psychoneuroimmunology. It finds that most techniques to influence or even direct the immune system via the mind fall into a series of theoretical categories called passive, active and targeted effects. By examining the results of experiments and studies in the light of these categories a number of important conclusions are drawn. These conclusions explain differences in experimental results, describe those variables that appear to be central to obtaining results, and describe in detail where experimentation should be concentrated to further knowledge of psychoneuroimmunology.

  9. Experimental evidence of skyrmion-like configurations in bilayer nanodisks with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stebliy, Maxim E., E-mail: stebliyme@gmail.com; Kolesnikov, Alexander G.; Davydenko, Alexander V.; Ognev, Alexey V.; Samardak, Alexander S.; Chebotkevich, Ludmila A. [Laboratory of Thin Film Technologies, School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok 690950 (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-07

    Formation and existence of magnetic skyrmion-like configurations in bilayer nanodisks (Ta(3 nm)/[Co(0.37 nm)/Ni(0.58 nm)]{sub 10}){sub 2} with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are shown experimentally at room temperature. Magnetization reversal through the skyrmion state is studied using magnetic hysteresis measurements. An evolution of skyrmion configurations in the nanodisk structure is analyzed. Experimental methods and micromagnetic simulations help to understand the magnetization reversal processes occurring through the stable skyrmion-like configurations. Formation of the intermediate C-states during magnetization reversal is demonstrated. The skyrmion number for all possible spin configurations is calculated.

  10. Evidence-based review of oral traditional Chinese medicine compound recipe administration for treating weight drop-induced experimental traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Zhe; Sheng, Chenxia; Wang, Yang; Zhou, Jing; Xiong, Xin-gui; Peng, Weijun

    2016-03-09

    Recently, a number of studies conducted and published in China have suggested that traditional Chinese medicine compound recipe (TCMCR) may be beneficial in the treatment of experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this study, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the efficacy of TCMCR in TBI model with weight drop method to provide robust evidence on the effects of TCMCR and to determine whether TCMCR can be recommended for routine treatment or considered as a standard treatment for TBI. We identified eligible studies by searching five electronic databases on April 1, 2014, and pooled the data using the random-effects model. Results were reported in terms of standardized mean difference (SMD). We also calculated statistical heterogeneity, evaluated the studies' methodological quality and investigated the presence of publication bias. Totally, 187 relevant publications were searched from databases, 25 of which met our inclusion criteria. The overall methodological quality of the most studies was poor, and there was evidence of statistical heterogeneity among studies along with small-study effects. Meta-analysis showed statistically significant effects indicating that TCMCR has a beneficial effect on TBI. Despite the limitations, we concluded that TCMCR may reduce brain water content, improve BBB permeability, and decrease TNF-α/NO expression after experimental TBI in terms of overall efficacy. However, our review also indicates that more well-designed and well-reported animal studies are needed.

  11. Evidence-based nursing: a stereotyped view of quantitative and experimental research could work against professional autonomy and authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonell, C

    1999-07-01

    In recent years, there have been calls within the United Kingdom's National Health Service (NHS) for evidence-based health care. These resonate with long-standing calls for nursing to become a research-based profession. Evidence-based practice could enable nurses to demonstrate their unique contribution to health care outcomes, and support their seeking greater professionalization, in terms of enhanced authority and autonomy. Nursing's professionalization project, and, within this, various practices comprising the 'new nursing', whilst sometimes not delivering all that was hoped of them, have been important in developing certain conditions conducive to developing evidence-based practice, notably a critical perspective on practice and a reluctance merely to follow physicians' orders. However, nursing has often been hesitant in its adoption of quantitative and experimental research. This hesitancy, it is argued, has been influenced by the propounding by some authors within the new nursing of a stereotyped view of quantitative/experimental methods which equates them with a number of methodological and philosophical points which are deemed, by at least some of these authors, as inimical to, or problematic within, nursing research. It is argued that, not only is the logic on which the various stereotyped views are based flawed, but further, that the wider influence of these viewpoints on nurses could lead to a greater marginalization of nurses in research and evidence-based practice initiatives, thus perhaps leading to evidence-based nursing being led by other groups. In the longer term, this might result in a form of evidence-based nursing emphasizing routinization, thus--ironically--working against strategies of professional authority and autonomy embedded in the new nursing. Nursing research should instead follow the example of nurse researchers who already embrace multiple methods. While the paper describes United Kingdom experiences and debates, points raised about

  12. How to Help Unemployed Find Jobs Quickly : Experimental Evidence from a Mandatory Activation Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graversen, B.K.; van Ours, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates how a mandatory activation program in Denmark affects the job finding rate of unemployed workers.The activation program was introduced in an experimental setting where about half of the workers who became unemployed in the period from November 2005 to March 2006 were randomly

  13. Experimental evidence for interference competition in oystercatchers, Haematopus ostralegus. II. Free-living birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Anne L.; Oosterbeek, Kees; Verhulst, Simon; Dingemanse, Niels J.; Ens, Bruno J.

    2010-01-01

    Field studies of interference competition in free-living animals have relied on natural fluctuations in forager density, which are often confounded with other factors. We therefore experimentally studied interference in the wild, capitalizing on 2 cockle beds in an isolated bay that were exploited

  14. Finite nuclear fragmenting systems:. An experimental evidence of a first order liquid gas phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, M.; Gulminelli, F.; Chomaz, Ph.; Bruno, M.; Cannata, F.; Le Neindre, N.; Bougault, R.; Fiandri, M. L.; Fuschini, E.; Gramegna, F.; Iori, I.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Moroni, A.; Vannini, G.; Verondini, E.

    2001-11-01

    An experimental observation of negative heat capacity is inferred from the event by event study of partial energy fluctuations in Quasi-Projectile sources, formed in Au + Au peripheral collisions at 35 A.MeV. Between about 2.5 and 5 A.MeV excitation energy, the system undergoes a first order phase transition.

  15. Testing the theory of emissions trading : Experimental evidence on alternative mechanisms for global carbon trading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Ger; Nentjes, Andries; Smith, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Simulation models and theory prove that emission trading converges to market equilibrium. This paper sets out to test these results using experimental economics. Three experiments are conducted for the six largest carbon emitting industrialized regions. Two experiments use auctions, the first a

  16. Experimental evidence of human recreational disturbance effects on bird-territory establishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bötsch, Yves; Tablado, Zulima; Jenni, Lukas

    2017-07-12

    The worldwide increase in human outdoor activities raises concerns for wildlife. Human disturbances, even at low levels, are likely to impact species during sensitive periods of the annual cycle. However, experimental studies during the putative sensitive period of territory establishment of birds which not only investigate low disturbance levels, but which also exclude the effect of habitat modification (e.g. walking trails) are lacking. Here, we experimentally disturbed birds in forest plots by walking through twice a day during territory establishment. Later we compared the breeding bird community of experimentally disturbed plots with that of undisturbed control plots. We discovered that the number of territories (-15.0%) and species richness (-15.2%) in disturbed plots were substantially reduced compared with control plots. Species most affected included those sensitive to human presence (assessed by flight-initiation distances), open-cup nesters and above-ground foragers. Long-distance migrants, however, were unaffected due to their arrival after experimental disturbance took place. These findings highlight how territory establishment is a sensitive period for birds, when even low levels of human recreation may be perceived as threatening, and alter settlement decisions. This can have important implications for the conservation of species, which might go unnoticed when focusing only on already established birds. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. Experimental evidence for interference competition in oystercatchers, Haematopus oastralegus. II. Free-living birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, A.L.; Oosterbeek, K.; Verhulst, S.; Dingemanse, N.J.; Ens, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    Field studies of interference competition in free-living animals have relied on natural fluctuations in forager density, which are often confounded with other factors. We therefore experimentally studied interference in the wild, capitalizing on 2 cockle beds in an isolated bay that were exploited

  18. "No Excuses" Charter Schools: A Meta-Analysis of the Experimental Evidence on Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Albert; Hitt, Collin; Kisida, Brian; Mills, Jonathan N.

    2017-01-01

    Many most well-known charter schools in the United States use a "No Excuses" approach. We conduct the first meta-analysis of the achievement impacts of No Excuses charter schools, focusing on experimental, lottery-based studies. We estimate that No Excuses charter schools increase student math and literacy achievement by 0.25 and 0.17,…

  19. Supplying Disadvantaged Schools with Effective Teachers: Experimental Evidence on Secondary Math Teachers from Teach For America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hanley S.; Clark, Melissa A.; McConnell, Sheena

    2017-01-01

    Teach For America (TFA) is an important but controversial source of teachers for hard-to-staff subjects in high-poverty U.S. schools. We present findings from the first large-scale experimental study of secondary math teachers from TFA. We find that TFA teachers are more effective than other math teachers in the same schools, increasing student…

  20. Do decentralized innovation systems promote agricultural technology adoption? Experimental evidence from Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pamuk, H.; Bulte, E.H.; Adekunle, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    We use experimental data collected in 8 African countries to investigate whether a decentralized approach can promote the adoption of agricultural innovations. This participatory model is based on the creation of so-called 'innovation platforms' where local stakeholders meet and seek to identify

  1. Waterbirds as endozoochorous dispersers of aquatic organisms: a review of experimental evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charalambidou, I.; Santamaría, L.

    2002-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that waterbirds act as dispersal vectors of aquatic organisms. In this paper we review experimental work focusing on the endozoochorous transport of propagules by waterbirds with the aim to determine what aspects of this mechanism have been investigated. We discuss (i) the

  2. Experimental evidence of a symbiosis between red-cockaded woodpeckers and fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelle A. Jusino; Daniel L. Lindner; Mark T. Banik; Kevin R. Rose; Jeffrey R. Walters

    2016-01-01

    Primary cavity excavators, such as woodpeckers, are ecosystem engineers in many systems. Associations between cavity excavators and fungi have long been hypothesized to facilitate cavity excavation, but these relationships have not been experimentally verified. Fungi may help excavators by softening wood, while excavators may facilitate fungal dispersal. Here we...

  3. Does evidence presentation format affect judgment? An experimental evaluation of displays of data for judgments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanfey, A.G.; Hastie, R.

    1998-01-01

    Information relevant to a prediction was presented in one of eight formats: a table of numbers, a brief text, a longer biographical story, and five different types of bar graphs. Experimental participants made judgments of marathon finishing times based on information about the runners' ages, prior

  4. Confounding by indication in non-experimental evaluation of vaccine effectiveness : the example of prevention of influenza complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hak, E; Verheij, Th J M; Grobbee, D E; Nichol, K L; Hoes, A W

    2002-01-01

    Randomised allocation of vaccine or placebo is the preferred method to assess the effects of the vaccine on clinical outcomes relevant to the individual patient. In the absence of phase 3 trials using clinical end points, notably post-influenza complications, alternative non-experimental designs to

  5. New approach for the determination of aerosol refractive indices - Part II: Experimental set-up and application to amorphous silica particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, P.; Herbin, H.; Visez, N.; Pujol, O.; Petitprez, D.

    2017-10-01

    This article is the Part II of a work aimed at proposing a new method for determining the optical constants of aerosols. The Part I detailed the theoretical and numerical basis of an algorithm devoted to retrieve the imaginary and the real part of complex refractive indices from extinction spectra of aerosols. This algorithm associates the Mie theory, the single subtractive Kramers-Kronig relation, and an optimal estimation method in an iterative process. This Part II presents the experimental set-up developed to record simultaneously high spectral resolution extinction spectra and size distributions of airborne silica particles. Extinction spectra are measured with a high spectral resolution on a broad spectral range, including both infrared (650 - 2 , 500cm-1) and UV-visible (9 , 000 - 32 , 500cm-1) spectral regions. Experimental data were used to retrieve the complex refractive indices of aerosol particles. By associating the numerical procedure presented in the first paper and this experimental set-up, complex refractive indices of silica spherical aerosol particles have been determined under controlled experimental conditions. Additional comparison between experimental and simulated extinction spectra from retrieved complex refractive indices shows that this new methodology provides optical properties representative of the material.

  6. Nurse staffing and system integration and change indicators in acute care hospitals: evidence from a balanced scorecard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillis Hall, Linda; Peterson, Jessica; Baker, G Ross; Brown, Adalsteinn D; Pink, George H; McKillop, Ian; Daniel, Imtiaz; Pedersen, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    This study examined relationships between financial indicators for nurse staffing and organizational system integration and change indicators. These indicators, along with hospital location and type, were examined in relation to the nursing financial indicators. Results showed that different indicators predicted each of the outcome variables. Nursing care hours were predicted by the hospital type, geographic location, and the system. Both nursing and patient care hours were significantly related to dissemination and benchmarking of clinical data.

  7. The curse of knowledge increases self-selection into competition: Experimental evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Danz, David

    2014-01-01

    The psychology literature provides ample evidence that people have difficulties taking the perspective of less-informed others. This paper presents a controlled experiment showing that this "curse of knowledge" can cause comparative overconfidence and overentry into competition. In a broader context, the results provide an explanation for the overconfidence of nascent entrepreneurs and the substantial rate of failure among new businesses. (author's abstract)

  8. The effects of public service motivation on collaborative behavior : Evidence from three experimental games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esteve, M.; van Witteloostuijn, A.; Boyne, G.

    Although research on the antecedents of collaboration is vast, no study has examined the effects of public service motivation (PSM). The current study relates PSM to decisions on whether or not to collaborate, while controlling for the Big Six personality traits. Empirical evidence is gathered by

  9. Crystal structures and photoelectron spectra of some trimethanoanthracenes, tetramethanonaphthacenes, and pentamethanopentacenes. Experimental evidence for laticyclic hyperconjugation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paddon-Row, Michael N.; Englehardt, Lutz M.; Skelton, Brian W.

    1987-01-01

    interactions through six [sigma] bonds (OIT-6-B), and this, taken with the p.e. data for the dienes ()-(), provides convincing evidence for the long-range nature of OIT--B. The larger [small pi]-splitting energy of 0.52 eV observed for (), compared with (), has been explained in terms of the presence of two...

  10. Experimental evidence for a dual pathway model analysis of coping with the climate crisis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zomeren, Martijn; Spears, Russell; Leach, Colinn Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments examined the psychological power of fear and group efficacy beliefs to increase environmental action intentions against the climate crisis Extending a dual pathway model of coping with collective disadvantage results showed evidence for emotion-focused approach coping Environmental

  11. Effects of feedback and educational Training on Maximization in choice Tasks: Experimental-game Evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonides, G.; Maital, S.

    2002-01-01

    Compelling evidence exists that behavior is inconsistent with the assumptions of expected-utility maximization. However, if learning occurs, then maximization may take place asymptotically (albeit slowly). But a series of experiments by Herrnstein and his associates show that under very general

  12. Probability Judgements in Multi-Stage Problems : Experimental Evidence of Systematic Biases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gneezy, U.

    1996-01-01

    We report empirical evidence that in problems of random walk with positive drift, bounded rationality leads individuals to under-estimate the probability of success in the long run.In particular, individuals who were given the stage by stage probability distribution failed to aggregate this

  13. Experimental evidence for electron localization on Au upon photo-activation of Au/anatase catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carneiro, J.T.; Carneiro, Joana T.; Savenije, Tom J.; Mul, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Time resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) measurements show that the presence of Au on anatase Hombikat UV100 significantly reduces the lifetime of mobile electrons formed by photo-excitation of this photocatalyst at 300 nm, providing evidence for the widely acclaimed electron localization effect

  14. Exposure affects the risk of an owl being mobbed - experimental evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendrichsen, Ditte Katrine; Christiansen, Peter; Nielsen, Elsemarie K.

    2006-01-01

    Mobbing is a widespread anti-predator strategy in birds, and predators are generally expected to avoid mobbing. For example, observational studies suggest that the cryptic roosting behaviour of nocturnal predators, such as many owls, may be a strategy to limit mobbing. In this paper, we present...... the results of the first experimental study investigating to what degree roost exposure influences the risk of being mobbed, and the intensity of a mobbing incidence once initiated. To determine these factors, we used an experimental setup with taxidermic mounts of tawny owls Strix aluco in Grib Skov forest......, Denmark. The risk of an owl being mobbed during a 50 min morning survey period increased with the exposure of its roosting position, from 24% when hidden to 85% when openly exposed. The corresponding increase in the afternoon was from 6% to 36%. This suggests that an owl may minimize the mobbing rate...

  15. Memories affect mood: evidence from covert experimental assignment to positive, neutral, and negative memory recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillihan, Seth J; Kessler, Jennifer; Farah, Martha J

    2007-06-01

    Memory recall has been proposed as a common and effective mood regulation strategy. Although several studies have presented results suggesting that recalling valenced memories affects subsequent mood, their designs allow for alternative interpretations of the observed effects. Two such alternatives include the reverse effect (mood effects on memory due to non-experimental assignment to memory recall condition) and demand characteristics of the experiment. We used covert experimental assignment to memory condition, asking subjects (N=314; 56% female) to recall memories that were primarily positive, neutral, or negative. Results showed the expected effect on mood (pmood worst in the negative memory condition, better in the neutral condition, and best in the positive condition. These results suggest that valenced memory recall does indeed exert an effect on mood, and may do so even without the individual's awareness.

  16. Measuring the relative productivity of multitasking to sole-tasking in household production: New experimental evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, Gigi; Kalenkoski, Charlene

    2012-01-01

    We present a household production model that incorporates multitasking and results from a customized experiment designed to measure the individual-specific productivity parameters from this model. We observe these productivity parameters under alternative incentive scenarios, designed to mimic changes in the relative utility payoffs to the two tasks. Using information on demographic and other characteristics collected through an on-screen survey taken by our experimental participants, we exam...

  17. Do Choice Experiments Generate Reliable Willingness to Pay Estimates Theory and Experimental Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    paper we set up a three-stage experimental and theoretical framework to investigate strategic behaviour and design induced status quo bias in choice...enable researchers to estimate the potential economic benefits from the good or program being valued as well as consumers ’ willingness to pay (WTP) for...various attributes of the good or program. Initially applied to problems in marketing (Louviere and Woodworth 1983), the methodology has been

  18. Experimental evidence for strong stabilizing forces at high functional diversity of aquatic microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Francesco; Giometto, Andrea; Seymour, Mathew; Rinaldo, Andrea; Altermatt, Florian

    2015-05-01

    Unveiling the mechanisms that promote coexistence in biological communities is a fundamental problem in ecology. Stable coexistence of many species is commonly observed in natural communities. Most of these natural communities, however, are composed of species from multiple trophic and functional groups, while theory and experiments on coexistence have been focusing on functionally similar species. Here, we investigated how functional diversity affects the stability of species coexistence and productivity in multispecies communities by characterizing experimentally all pairwise species interactions in a pool of 11 species of eukaryotes (10 protists and one rotifer) belonging to three different functional groups. Species within the same functional group showed stronger competitive interactions compared to among-functional group interactions. This often led to competitive exclusion between species that had higher functional relatedness, but only at low levels of species richness. Communities with higher functional diversity resulted in increased species coexistence and community biomass production. Our experimental findings and the results of a stochastic model tailored to the experimental interaction matrix suggest the emergence of strong stabilizing forces when species from different functional groups interact in a homogeneous environment. By combining theoretical analysis with experiments we could also disentangle the relationship between species richness and functional diversity, showing that functional diversity per se is a crucial driver of productivity and stability in multispecies community.

  19. Experimental evidence for density-dependent responses to mortality of snake-necked turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordham, Damien A; Georges, Arthur; Brook, Barry W

    2009-03-01

    Density-dependent compensation has rarely been demonstrated in long-lived vertebrates in highly variable environments, such as the wet-dry tropics, where complex factors impact on vital rates. We used an experimental manipulation of population density in six replicated wild populations of the northern snake-necked turtle (Chelodina rugosa). We show that this species can rebound rapidly following reductions in density, and so is resilient to harvest and predation by pigs. Remarkably, in some populations, turtle abundance took as little as 1 year to recover from a strong negative perturbation (>50% experimental population reduction) in adult density. This was achieved through an increase in hatchling recruitment and survival into larger size classes. Our manipulative experiments, viewed concomitantly with previous experimental and correlative research, challenge the general perceptions that freshwater turtles universally are highly susceptible to any form of off-take and that high sub-adult and adult survival is crucial for achieving long-term population stability in freshwater turtles generally. In the case of C. rugosa, such generalities would produce overly cautious prescriptions for sustainable management.

  20. Strain rate sensitivity of the tensile strength of two silicon carbides: experimental evidence and micromechanical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinszner, Jean-Luc; Erzar, Benjamin; Forquin, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic materials are commonly used to design multi-layer armour systems thanks to their favourable physical and mechanical properties. However, during an impact event, fragmentation of the ceramic plate inevitably occurs due to its inherent brittleness under tensile loading. Consequently, an accurate model of the fragmentation process is necessary in order to achieve an optimum design for a desired armour configuration. In this work, shockless spalling tests have been performed on two silicon carbide grades at strain rates ranging from 103 to 104 s-1 using a high-pulsed power generator. These spalling tests characterize the tensile strength strain rate sensitivity of each ceramic grade. The microstructural properties of the ceramics appear to play an important role on the strain rate sensitivity and on the dynamic tensile strength. Moreover, this experimental configuration allows for recovering damaged, but unbroken specimens, giving unique insight on the fragmentation process initiated in the ceramics. All the collected data have been compared with corresponding results of numerical simulations performed using the Denoual-Forquin-Hild anisotropic damage model. Good agreement is observed between numerical simulations and experimental data in terms of free surface velocity, size and location of the damaged zones along with crack density in these damaged zones. This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  1. Natural and experimental evidence of viscerotropic infection caused by Leishmania tropica from North Sinai, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doha, Said A; Shehata, Magdi G; Fahmy, Adel R; Samy, Abdallah M

    2014-08-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a neglected clinical form that is quite prevalent in Eastern North parts of the country in Sinai Peninsula. Leishmania tropica was identified by previous reports as the causative agent responsible for viscerotropic infections in-patients and experimental animals. Here, we reported the viscerotropic infections from naturally infected rodent Gerbillus pyramidum floweri collected from North-Sinai. Footpad and tail lesions, spleenomegaly, and malformed dark-colored spleen were the characteristic CL symptoms. The spleen of the rodent found positive to amastigote impression smear. ITS-1 DNA was sequenced and revealed 100% identity of the strain in the current study to the other L. tropica sequences identified from the patients with the suspected CL and inhabited the same study area. The current findings confirmed the susceptibility of gerbil to L. tropica, and raise the concerns for the role of rodents as accidental host suffering the infections. The susceptibility of wild and experimental rodents to the same L. tropica strain was also investigated; BALB/c and G. pyramidum were more susceptible to L. tropica (24.33 ± 4.37 and 25 ± 4.58 days post-infection, respectively). Similar viscerotropic pathologies were reported in experimental infection of only golden hamster (≈ 120 days post-infection), and G. p. floweri (≈ 160 days post-infection).

  2. Experimental evidence for the conditions necessary to sustain meandering in coarse-bedded rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braudrick, Christian A; Dietrich, William E; Leverich, Glen T; Sklar, Leonard S

    2009-10-06

    Meandering rivers are common on Earth and other planetary surfaces, yet the conditions necessary to maintain meandering channels are unclear. As a consequence, self-maintaining meandering channels with cutoffs have not been reproduced in the laboratory. Such experimental channels are needed to explore mechanisms controlling migration rate, sinuosity, floodplain formation, and planform morphodynamics and to test theories for wavelength and bend propagation. Here we report an experiment in which meandering with near-constant width was maintained during repeated cutoff and regeneration of meander bends. We found that elevated bank strength (provided by alfalfa sprouts) relative to the cohesionless bed material and the blocking of troughs (chutes) in the lee of point bars via suspended sediment deposition were the necessary ingredients to successful meandering. Varying flood discharge was not necessary. Scaling analysis shows that the experimental meander migration was fast compared to most natural channels. This high migration rate caused nearly all of the bedload sediment to exchange laterally, such that bar growth was primarily dependent on bank sediment supplied from upstream lateral migration. The high migration rate may have contributed to the relatively low sinuosity of 1.19, and this suggests that to obtain much higher sinuosity experiments at this scale may have to be conducted for several years. Although patience is required to evolve them, these experimental channels offer the opportunity to explore several fundamental issues about river morphodynamics. Our results also suggest that sand supply may be an essential control in restoring self-maintaining, actively shifting gravel-bedded meanders.

  3. Oxytocin and Major Depressive Disorder: Experimental and Clinical Evidence for Links to Aetiology and Possible Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga D. Neumann

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Affective disorders represent the most common psychiatric diseases, with substantial co-morbidity existing between major depressive disorders (MDD and anxiety disorders. The lack of truly novel acting compounds has led to non-monoaminergic based research and hypotheses in recent years. The large number of brain neuropeptides, characterized by discrete synthesis sites and multiple receptors, represent likely research candidates for novel therapeutic targets. The present review summarises the available preclinical and human evidence regarding the neuropeptide, oxytocin, and its implications in the aetiology and treatment of MDD. While the evidence is not conclusive at present additional studies are warranted to determine whether OXT may be of therapeutic benefit in subsets of MDD patients such as those with comorbid anxiety symptoms and low levels of social attachment.

  4. A review of the evidence regarding associations between attachment theory and experimentally induced pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Pamela Joy

    2013-04-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence suggests that adult attachment and pain-related variables are predictably and consistently linked, and that understanding these links may guide pain intervention and prevention efforts. In general, insecure attachment has been portrayed as a risk factor, and secure attachment as a protective factor, for people with chronic pain conditions. In an effort to better understand the relationships among attachment and pain variables, these links have been investigated in pain-free samples using induced-pain techniques. The present paper reviews the available research linking adult attachment and laboratory-induced pain. While the diverse nature of the studies precludes definitive conclusions, together these papers offer support for associations between insecure attachment and a more negative pain experience. The evidence presented in this review highlights areas for further empirical attention, as well as providing some guidance for clinicians who may wish to employ preventive approaches and other interventions informed by attachment theory.

  5. Experimental evidence of adiabatic splitting of charged particle beams using stable islands of transverse phase space

    CERN Document Server

    Gilardoni, S S; Martini, M; Métral, E; Steerenberg, R; Müller, A-S

    2006-01-01

    Recently, a novel technique to perform multi-turn extraction from a circular particle accelerator was proposed. It is based on beam splitting and trapping, induced by a slow crossing of a nonlinear resonance, inside stable islands of transverse phase space. Experiments at the CERN Proton Synchrotron started in 2002 and evidence of beam splitting was obtained by summer 2004. In this paper the measurement results achieved with both a low- and a high-intensity, single-bunch proton beam are presented.

  6. Experimental evidence for particle stability of {sup 34}Ne and {sup 37}Na

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukyanov, S.M.; Penionzhkevich, Y.E.; Astabatyan, R.; Lobastov, S.; Sobolev, Y. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Flerov Lab. of Nuclear Reaction, Dubna (Russian Federation); Guillemaud-Mueller, D.; Faivre, G.; Ibrahim, F.; Mueller, A.C.; Pougheon, F.; Perru, O.; Sorlin, O. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91 - Orsay (France); Matea, I.; Anne, R.; Cauvin, C.; Hue, R.; Georgiev, G.; Lewitowicz, M.; Oliveira Santos, F. de; Verney, D. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Dlouhy, Z.; Mrazek, J.; Baiborodin, D. [Nuclear Physics Institute, Rez (Czech Republic); Negoita, F.; Borcea, C.; Buta, A.; Stefan, I. [Institute of Atomic Physics, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Grevy, S. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, 14 - Caen (France)

    2002-07-01

    The neutron drip line in neon-magnesium region has been explored by the projectile fragmentation of a 59.8 A MeV {sup 48}Ca beam using the new fragment separator LISE-2000 at GANIL. New neutron-rich isotopes, {sup 34}Ne and {sup 37}Na, have been observed together with some evidence for the particle instability of {sup 33}Ne and {sup 36}Na. (authors)

  7. Effects of Tax Morale on Tax Compliance: Experimental and Survey Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Ronald G. Cummings; Martinez-Vazquez, Jorge; McKee, Michael; Torgler, Benno

    2007-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that enforcement efforts can increase tax compliance. However, there must be other forces at work because observed compliance levels cannot be fully explained by the level of enforcement actions typical of most tax authorities. Further, there are observed differences, not related to enforcement effort, in the levels of compliance across countries and cultures. To fully understand differences in compliance behavior across cultures one needs to understand diffe...

  8. Effects of culture on tax compliance: A cross check of experimental and survey evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Ronald G. Cummings; Jorge Martinez-Vazquez; Michael McKee; Benno Torgler

    2004-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that enforcement efforts can increase tax compliance. However, there must be other forces at work because observed compliance levels cannot be fully explained by the level of enforcement actions typical of most tax authorities. Further, there are observed differences, not related to enforcement effort, in the levels of compliance across countries and cultures. To fully understand differences in compliance behavior across cultures one needs to understand differen...

  9. Delayed School Start Times and Adolescent Sleep: A Systematic Review of the Experimental Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Minges, Karl E.; Redeker, Nancy S.

    2015-01-01

    Many schools have instituted later morning start times to improve sleep, academic, and other outcomes in response to the mismatch between youth circadian rhythms and early morning start times. However, there has been no systematic synthesis of the evidence on the effects of this practice. To examine the impact of delayed school start time on students’ sleep, health, and academic outcomes, electronic databases were systematically searched and data were extracted using the Preferred Reporting I...

  10. Individual and population indicators of Zostera japonica respond quickly to experimental addition of sediment-nutrient and organic matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Q.; Soissons, L.M.; Liu, D.; van Katwijk, M.; Bouma, T.J.

    2017-01-01

    Amanipulative field experimentwas designed to investigate the effects of sediment-nutrients and sediment-organicmatterson seagrasses, Zostera japonica, using individual and population indicators. The results showed thatseagrasses quickly responded to sediment-nutrient and organicmatter loading. That

  11. Experimental evidence for the role of ions in particle nucleation under atmospheric conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Henrik; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Marsh, N.D.

    2007-01-01

    Experimental studies of aerosol nucleation in air, containing trace amounts of ozone, sulphur dioxide and water vapour at concentrations relevant for the Earth's atmosphere, are reported. The production of new aerosol particles is found to be proportional to the negative ion density and yields...... nucleation rates of the order of 0.1 1 cm(-3) s(-1). This suggests that the ions are active in generating an atmospheric reservoir of small thermodynamically stable clusters, which are important for nucleation processes in the atmosphere and ultimately for cloud formation....

  12. Experimental evidences of a large extrinsic spin Hall effect in AuW alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laczkowski, P.; Rojas-Sánchez, J.-C. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales and Université Paris-Sud 11, 91767 Palaiseau (France); INAC/SP2M, CEA-Université Joseph Fourier, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Savero-Torres, W.; Notin, L.; Beigné, C.; Marty, A.; Attané, J.-P.; Vila, L. [INAC/SP2M, CEA-Université Joseph Fourier, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Jaffrès, H.; Reyren, N.; Deranlot, C.; George, J.-M.; Fert, A. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales and Université Paris-Sud 11, 91767 Palaiseau (France)

    2014-04-07

    We report an experimental study of a gold-tungsten alloy (7 at. % W concentration in Au host) displaying remarkable properties for spintronics applications using both magneto-transport in lateral spin valve devices and spin-pumping with inverse spin Hall effect experiments. A very large spin Hall angle of about 10% is consistently found using both techniques with the reliable spin diffusion length of 2 nm estimated by the spin sink experiments in the lateral spin valves. With its chemical stability, high resistivity, and small induced damping, this AuW alloy may find applications in the nearest future.

  13. Experimental evidence of the effect of nutrient enrichment on the zooplankton in a Brazilian coastal lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. KOZLOWSKY-SUZUKI

    Full Text Available Non-treated sewage disposal is one of the main impacts to which Imboassica Lagoon has been subjected. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a potential increase in the artificial enrichment on the environmental conditions and zooplankton of this system. To this end, an experimental study was conducted in mesocosms where nutrients were added daily. Bacterial numbers, chlorophyll-a, and picoplanktonic cyanobacteria densities showed an increase with the availability of nutrients. Bacterio- and phytoplankton seemed to be regulated by the rotifers Brachionus rotundiformis and Hexarthra brandorffi.

  14. An Experimental Investigation of Implicit Hiv And Prep Stigma: Evidence For Ancillary Benefits of Prep Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Sarit A; Lelutiu-Weinberger, Corina; Surace, Anthony

    2017-11-13

    PrEP stigma (i.e., negative attitudes toward PrEP users) has been widely documented and is considered a significant barrier to implementation. However, few studies have examined PrEP stigma using implicit measures designed to reduce demand characteristics in responding. This study examined implicit PrEP- and HIV-related stigma among gay and bisexual men using geospatial social networking applications (i.e., "hookup apps"). Participants were presented with four simulated online profiles (pre-tested for comparability) paired with each of the following characteristics: HIV-negative, HIV-positive, on PrEP, or Substance User. Participants rated the profiles on attractiveness, desirability, trustworthiness, likelihood of condom use, and riskiness of sex. There was no evidence of PrEP-related stigma, i.e., participants did not rate profiles of PrEP users more negatively than profiles of HIV-negative individuals not disclosing PrEP use. However, profiles of HIV-positive individuals were rated significantly less attractive and desirable than HIV-negative or PrEP profiles. When the sample was split by history of PrEP use, negative ratings of HIV-positive profiles remained only among participants who had never taken PrEP. Participants with any history of PrEP use demonstrated no difference in ratings by HIV status. These data provide the first empirical evidence for lower HIV stigma among PrEP users. Individuals who have used PrEP may "see" HIV-positive individuals differently than those without a history of PrEP use. The lack of evidence for PrEP-related stigma is encouraging and suggests that negative stereotypes about PrEP users may not extend to negative implicit judgements about them on social networking sites.

  15. Gender Performance Gaps: Quasi-Experimental Evidence on the Role of Gender Differences in Sleep Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Lusher, Lester; Yasenov, Vasil

    2016-01-01

    Sleep studies suggest that girls go to sleep earlier, are more active in the morning, and cope with sleep deprivation better than boys. We provide the first causal evidence on how gender differences in sleep cycles can help explain the gender performance gap. We exploit over 240,000 assignment-level grades from a quasi-experiment with a community of middle and high schools where students' schedules alternated between morning and afternoon start times each month. Relative to girls, we find tha...

  16. Experimental evidence of adiabatic splitting of charged particle beams using stable islands of transverse phase space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gilardoni

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a novel technique to perform multiturn extraction from a circular particle accelerator was proposed. It is based on beam splitting and trapping, induced by a slow crossing of a nonlinear resonance, inside stable islands of transverse phase space. Experiments at the CERN Proton Synchrotron started in 2002 and evidence of beam splitting was obtained by summer 2004. In this paper, the measurement results achieved with both a low- and a high-intensity, single-bunch proton beam are presented.

  17. The Role of Framing, Inequity and History in a Corruption Game: Some Experimental Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananish Chaudhuri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the role of framing, inequity in initial endowments and history in shaping behavior in a corrupt transaction by extending the one-shot bribery game introduced by Cameron et al. (2009 to a repeated game setting. We find that the use of loaded language significantly reduces the incidence of bribery and increases the level of punishment. Punishment of bribery leads to reduced bribery in future. The evidence suggests that this game captures essential features of a corrupt transaction, over and above any sentiments of inequity aversion or negative reciprocity However, showing subjects the history of past play has little effect on the level of corruption.

  18. The influence of iron deficiency on the functioning of skeletal muscles: experimental evidence and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stugiewicz, Magdalena; Tkaczyszyn, Michał; Kasztura, Monika; Banasiak, Waldemar; Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal and respiratory myopathy not only constitutes an important pathophysiological feature of heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but also contributes to debilitating symptomatology and predicts worse outcomes in these patients. Accumulated evidence from laboratory experiments, animal models, and interventional studies in sports medicine suggests that undisturbed systemic iron homeostasis significantly contributes to the effective functioning of skeletal muscles. In this review, we discuss the role of iron status for the functioning of skeletal muscle tissue, and highlight iron deficiency as an emerging therapeutic target in chronic diseases accompanied by a marked muscle dysfunction. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2016 European Society of Cardiology.

  19. Serial correlation in neural spike trains: experimental evidence, stochastic modeling, and single neuron variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkhooi, Farzad; Strube-Bloss, Martin F; Nawrot, Martin P

    2009-02-01

    The activity of spiking neurons is frequently described by renewal point process models that assume the statistical independence and identical distribution of the intervals between action potentials. However, the assumption of independent intervals must be questioned for many different types of neurons. We review experimental studies that reported the feature of a negative serial correlation of neighboring intervals, commonly observed in neurons in the sensory periphery as well as in central neurons, notably in the mammalian cortex. In our experiments we observed the same short-lived negative serial dependence of intervals in the spontaneous activity of mushroom body extrinsic neurons in the honeybee. To model serial interval correlations of arbitrary lags, we suggest a family of autoregressive point processes. Its marginal interval distribution is described by the generalized gamma model, which includes as special cases the log-normal and gamma distributions, which have been widely used to characterize regular spiking neurons. In numeric simulations we investigated how serial correlation affects the variance of the neural spike count. We show that the experimentally confirmed negative correlation reduces single-neuron variability, as quantified by the Fano factor, by up to 50%, which favors the transmission of a rate code. We argue that the feature of a negative serial correlation is likely to be common to the class of spike-frequency-adapting neurons and that it might have been largely overlooked in extracellular single-unit recordings due to spike sorting errors.

  20. Serial correlation in neural spike trains: Experimental evidence, stochastic modeling, and single neuron variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkhooi, Farzad; Strube-Bloss, Martin F.; Nawrot, Martin P.

    2009-02-01

    The activity of spiking neurons is frequently described by renewal point process models that assume the statistical independence and identical distribution of the intervals between action potentials. However, the assumption of independent intervals must be questioned for many different types of neurons. We review experimental studies that reported the feature of a negative serial correlation of neighboring intervals, commonly observed in neurons in the sensory periphery as well as in central neurons, notably in the mammalian cortex. In our experiments we observed the same short-lived negative serial dependence of intervals in the spontaneous activity of mushroom body extrinsic neurons in the honeybee. To model serial interval correlations of arbitrary lags, we suggest a family of autoregressive point processes. Its marginal interval distribution is described by the generalized gamma model, which includes as special cases the log-normal and gamma distributions, which have been widely used to characterize regular spiking neurons. In numeric simulations we investigated how serial correlation affects the variance of the neural spike count. We show that the experimentally confirmed negative correlation reduces single-neuron variability, as quantified by the Fano factor, by up to 50%, which favors the transmission of a rate code. We argue that the feature of a negative serial correlation is likely to be common to the class of spike-frequency-adapting neurons and that it might have been largely overlooked in extracellular single-unit recordings due to spike sorting errors.

  1. The behaviour of mosquitoes in relation to humans under holed bednets: the evidence from experimental huts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth R Irish

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The physical integrity of bednets is a concern of national malaria control programs, as it is a key factor in determining the rate of replacement of bednets. It is largely assumed that increased numbers of holes will result in a loss of protection of sleepers from potentially infective bites. Experimental hut studies are valuable in understanding mosquito behaviour indoors, particularly as it relates to blood feeding and mortality. This review summarises findings from experimental hut studies, focusing on two issues: (i the effect of different numbers or sizes of holes in bednets and (ii feeding behaviour and mortality with holed nets as compared with unholed nets. As might be expected, increasing numbers and area of holes resulted in increased blood feeding by mosquitoes on sleepers. However, the presence of holes did not generally have a large effect on the mortality of mosquitoes. Successfully entering a holed mosquito net does not necessarily mean that mosquitoes spend less time in contact with the net, which could explain the lack in differences in mortality. Further behavioural studies are necessary to understand mosquito behaviour around nets and the importance of holed nets on malaria transmission.

  2. Involvement of platelets in experimental mouse trypanosomiasis: evidence of mouse platelet cytotoxicity against Trypanosoma equiperdum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momi, S; Perito, S; Mezzasoma, A M; Bistoni, F; Gresele, P

    2000-06-01

    Platelets play an important role in the human response to parasites. Trypanosoma equiperdum, a parasite that has the horse as its natural host, is able to induce infection in mice and thus it may represent a simple model for studying the role of platelets in the development of a parasitosis. Although several aspects of the murine response to T. equiperdum infection have been clarified, the precise mechanism of killing of the parasite is still unclear. We have studied the involvement of blood platelets in experimental murine infection with T. equiperdum. Infected mice show a progressive decrease of the number of circulating platelets. The production of thromboxane A2 (TxA2) by platelets stimulated with collagen decreases progressively with the progression of T. equiperdum infection, compatible with in vivo platelet activation or with a possible antagonistic effect by trypanosomes on the production of TxA2. Finally, mouse platelets exert in vitro a direct parasitocidal activity on T. equiperdum at ratios >/=20:1. Complement fractions do not enhance platelet trypanocidal activity, whereas IgM fractions do, at least in short-term coincubation experiments. Our data show that platelets are involved in experimental murine T. equiperdum infection and confirm that platelet parasitocidal activity is a generalized phenomenon in mammals. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  3. Selective Cooperation in the Supermarket : Field Experimental Evidence for Indirect Reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Florian; Eggert, Frank

    2015-12-01

    Numerous laboratory experiments suggest that mechanisms of indirect reciprocity might account for human cooperation. However, conclusive field data supporting the predictions of indirect reciprocity in everyday life situations is still scarce. Here, we attempt to compensate for this lack by examining the determinants of cooperative behavior in a German supermarket. Our methods were as follows: Confederates of the experimenter lined up at the checkout, apparently to buy a single item. As an act of cooperation, the waiting person in front (the potential helper) could allow the confederate to go ahead. By this means, the potential helper could take a cost (additional waiting time) by providing the confederate with a benefit (saved waiting time). We recorded the potential helpers' behavior and the number of items they purchased as a quantitative measure proportional to the confederate's benefit. Moreover, in a field experimental design, we varied the confederates' image by manipulating the item they purchased (beer vs. water). As predicted, the more waiting time they could save, the more likely the confederates were to receive cooperation. This relationship was moderated by the confederates' image. Cost-to-benefit ratios were required to be more favorable for beer-purchasing individuals to receive cooperation. Our results demonstrate that everyday human cooperation can be studied unobtrusively in the field and that cooperation among strangers is selective in a way that is consistent with current models of indirect reciprocity.

  4. Experimental evidence of independence of nuclear de-channeling length on the particle charge sign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagli, E.; Guidi, V.; Mazzolari, A.; Bandiera, L.; Germogli, G.; Sytov, A.I. [Universita di Ferrara, Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra (Italy); INFN Sezione di Ferrara (Italy); De Salvador, D. [Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Padua (Italy); INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy); Berra, A.; Prest, M. [Universita dell' Insubria, Como (Italy); INFN Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Vallazza, E. [INFN Sezione di Trieste (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    Under coherent interactions, particles undergo correlated collisions with the crystal lattice and their motion result in confinement in the fields of atomic planes, i.e. particle channeling. Other than coherently interacting with the lattice, particles also suffer incoherent interactions with individual nuclei and may leave their bounded motion, i.e., they de-channel. The latter is the main limiting factor for applications of coherent interactions in crystal-assisted particle steering. We experimentally investigated the nature of de-channeling of 120 GeV/c e{sup -} and e{sup +} in a bent silicon crystal at H4-SPS external line at CERN. We found that while channeling efficiency differs significantly for e{sup -} (2 ± 2%) and e{sup +} (54 ± 2%), their nuclear de-channeling length is comparable, (0.6 ± 0.1) mm for e{sup -} and (0.7 ± 0.3) mm for e{sup +}. The experimental proof of the equality of the nuclear de-channeling length for positrons and electrons is interpreted in terms of similar dynamics undergone by the channeled particles in the field of nuclei irrespective of their charge. (orig.)

  5. In silico modeling and experimental evidence of coagulant protein interaction with precursors for nanoparticle functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoli, Chuka; Sengottaiyan, Selvaraj; Arul Murugan, N; Pavankumar, Asalapuram R; Agren, Hans; Kuttuva Rajarao, Gunaratna

    2013-10-01

    The design of novel protein-nanoparticle hybrid systems has applications in many fields of science ranging from biomedicine, catalysis, water treatment, etc. The main barrier in devising such tool is lack of adequate information or poor understanding of protein-ligand chemistry. Here, we establish a new strategy based on computational modeling for protein and precursor linkers that can decorate the nanoparticles. Moringa oleifera (MO2.1) seed protein that has coagulation and antimicrobial properties was used. Superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPION) with precursor ligands were used for the protein-ligand interaction studies. The molecular docking studies reveal that there are two binding sites, one is located at the core binding site; tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) or 3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APTES) binds to this site while the other one is located at the side chain residues where trisodium citrate (TSC) or Si60 binds to this site. The protein-ligand distance profile analysis explains the differences in functional activity of the decorated SPION. Experimentally, TSC-coated nanoparticles showed higher coagulation activity as compared to TEOS- and APTES-coated SPION. To our knowledge, this is the first report on in vitro experimental data, which endorses the computational modeling studies as a powerful tool to design novel precursors for functionalization of nanomaterials; and develop interface hybrid systems for various applications.

  6. Experimental evidence for Raman-induced limits to efficient squeezing in optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, R.; Heersink, J.; Corney, J.

    2008-01-01

    polarization squeezing as a function of optical pulse energy, which spans a wide range from 3.5-178.8 pJ, shows a very good agreement with the quantum simulations and for the first time we see the experimental proof that Raman effects limit and reduce squeezing at high pulse energy.......We report new experiments on polarization squeezing using ultrashort photonic pulses in a single pass of a birefringent fiber. We measure what is to our knowledge a record squeezing of -6.8 +/- 0.3 dB in optical fibers which when corrected for linear losses is -10.4 +/- 0.8 dB. The measured...

  7. Experimental evidence of EDGE turbulence driven by multiple mechanisms in ATF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidalgo, C.

    1993-07-01

    The scaling properties of edge fluctuations have been investigated using Langmuir probes in the edge region of the Advance Toroidal Facility (ATF). Fluctuations in the ion saturation current (ls/ls) and transport inferred from the fluctuations increase with increasing density gradient, while keeping unchanged local electron temperature. The modification of the electron temperature in the range (10-50) eV, Keeping constant the density profile, does not have any significant influence on ls/ ls. In regions were Er/B =0, the poloidal phase velocity of the fluctuations is given by vph 2Te/LnB. More then one of any so far proposed mechanisms must be invoked to explain all the experimental observations. (Author) 14 refs.

  8. Experimental evidence of population differences in reproductive investment conditional on environmental stochasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthey, Zoé [INRA, UMR 1224, Ecologie Comportementale et Biologie des Populations de Poissons, Aquapôle, quartier Ibarron, 64310 Saint-Pée sur Nivelle (France); Univ Pau & Pays Adour, UMR 1224, Ecologie Comportementale et Biologie des Populations de Poissons, UFR Sciences et Techniques de la Côte Basque, Allée du parc Montaury, 64600 Anglet (France); Panserat, Stéphane [INRA, UR 107, Nutrition Metabolism Aquaculture, Aquapôle, 64310 Saint Pée sur Nivelle (France); Elosegi, Arturo [Faculty of Science and Technology, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Herman, Alexandre [INRA, UR 107, Nutrition Metabolism Aquaculture, Aquapôle, 64310 Saint Pée sur Nivelle (France); Tentelier, Cédric [INRA, UMR 1224, Ecologie Comportementale et Biologie des Populations de Poissons, Aquapôle, quartier Ibarron, 64310 Saint-Pée sur Nivelle (France); Univ Pau & Pays Adour, UMR 1224, Ecologie Comportementale et Biologie des Populations de Poissons, UFR Sciences et Techniques de la Côte Basque, Allée du parc Montaury, 64600 Anglet (France); and others

    2016-01-15

    Environmental stochasticity is expected to shape life histories of species, wherein organisms subjected to strong environmental variation should display adaptive response by being able to tune their reproductive investment. For riverine ecosystems, climate models forecast an increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme events such as floods and droughts. The speed and the mechanisms by which organisms may adapt their reproductive investment are therefore of primary importance to understand how species will cope with such radical environmental changes. In the present study, we sampled spawners from two different populations of wild brown trout, originating from two environments with contrasting levels of flow stochasticity. We placed them in sympatry within an experimental channel during reproductive season. In one modality, water flow was maintained constant, whereas in another modality, water flow was highly variable. Reproductive investment of all individuals was monitored using weight and energetic plasma metabolite variation throughout the reproductive season. Only the populations originating from the most variable environment showed a plastic response to experimental manipulation of water flow, the females being able to reduce their weight variation (from 19.2% to 13.1%) and metabolites variations (from 84.2% to 18.6% for triglycerides for instance) under variable flow conditions. These results imply that mechanisms to cope with environmental stochasticity can differ between populations of the same species, where some populations can be plastic whereas other cannot. - Highlights: • We place two populations of brown trout under contrasting water flow for reproduction. • Energetic metabolite variation is used as a cue of reproductive investment. • In constant flow, both populations show the same reproductive investment. • In variable flow, only one of the populations modifies its reproductive investment. • Divergent evolution of reproductive

  9. Antioxidants and embryo phenotype: is there experimental evidence for strong integration of the antioxidant system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possenti, Cristina Daniela; Karadas, Filiz; Colombo, Graziano; Caprioli, Manuela; Rubolini, Diego; Milzani, Aldo; Donne, Isabella Dalle; Saino, Nicola; Parolini, Marco

    2017-02-15

    Organisms have evolved complex defense systems against oxidative stress. Bird eggs contain maternally derived antioxidants that protect embryos from oxidative damage. The antioxidant system components are thought to be integrated, but few studies have analyzed the covariation between antioxidant concentrations, embryo 'oxidative status' and morphology. In addition, no study has tested the effects of experimental change in yolk antioxidant concentration on other antioxidants, on their reciprocal relationships and on their relationships with embryo oxidative status or growth, which are expected if antioxidants defenses are integrated. In yellow-legged gull (Larus michahellis) embryos, we analyzed the covariation between several antioxidants, markers of 'oxidative status' [total antioxidant capacity (TAC), concentration of pro-oxidants (TOS), lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein carbonylation (PC)] in the yolk, liver and brain, and morphology. Yolk and liver antioxidant concentrations were positively correlated reciprocally and with embryo size, and positively predicted TAC but not oxidative status. TOS and LPO were positively correlated in the liver, while TAC and LPO were negatively correlated in the brain. Weak relationships existed between antioxidants and TOS, PC and LPO. The effects of antioxidants on oxidative status and morphology were non-synergistic. An experimental physiological increase in yolk vitamin E had very weak effects on the relationships between other antioxidants or oxidative status and vitamin E concentration, the concentration of other antioxidants or oxidative status; the covariation between other antioxidants and oxidative status, and relationships between morphology or oxidative status and other antioxidants, challenging the common wisdom of strong functional relationships among antioxidants, at least for embryos in the wild. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Experimental evidence of VO-Zni complex to be intrinsic donor in bulk ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, M.; Mahmood, K.; Hasan, M.-A.; Tsu, R.; Ferguson, I. T.

    2014-02-01

    Theoretical evidence of VO-Zni to be a native donor in bulk ZnO has been under debate. To resolve the issue, we annealed several pieces of as grown zinc rich n-type ZnO thin film having ND ˜ 3.26 × 1017 cm-3 grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si (001) substrate in oxygen environment at 500°C - 800°C, keeping a step of 100°C for one hour, each. Room temperature Hall measurements demonstrated that free donor concentration decreased exponentially and Arrhenius plot yielded activation energy to be 1.2±0.02 eV. This value is in an agreement with the theoretically reported activation energy of VO-Zni donor complex in ZnO.

  11. Anthranilamides as bioinspired molecular electrets: experimental evidence for a permanent ground-state electric dipole moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bing; Bao, Duoduo; Upadhyayula, Srigokul; Jones, Guilford; Vullev, Valentine I

    2013-03-01

    As electrostatic equivalents of magnets, organic electrets offer unparalleled properties for impacting energy conversion and electronic applications. While biological systems have evolved to efficiently utilize protein α-helices as molecular electrets, the synthetic counterparts of these conjugates still remain largely unexplored. This paper describes a study of the electronic properties of anthranilamide oligomers, which proved to be electrets based on their intrinsic dipole moments as evident from their spectral and dielectric properties. NMR studies provided the means for estimating the direction of the intrinsic electric dipoles of these conjugates. This study sets the foundation for the development of a class of organic materials that are de novo designed from biomolecular motifs and possess unexplored electronic properties.

  12. Fayalite Oxidation Processes: Experimental Evidence for the Stability of Pure Ferric Fayalite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Keller, L. P.; Medard, E.; Devouard, B.; Rahman, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Olivine is one of the most important minerals in Earth and planetary sciences. Fayalite Fe2(2+)SiO4, the ferrous end-member of olivine, is present in some terrestrial rocks and primitive meteorites (CV3 chondrites). A ferric fayalite (or ferri-fayalite), Fe(2+) Fe2(3+)(SiO4)2 laihunite, has been reported in Earth samples (magnetite ore, metamorphic and volcanic rocks...) and in Martian meteorites (nakhlites). Laihunite was also synthesized at 1 atmosphere between 400 and 700 C. We show evidence for the stability of a pure ferrifayalite end-member and for potential minerals with XFe(3+) between 2/3 and 1.

  13. Experimental evidence of vocal recognition in young and adult black-legged kittiwakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulard, Hervé; Aubin, T.; White, J.F.; Hatch, Shyla A.; Danchin, E.

    2008-01-01

    Individual recognition is required in most social interactions, and its presence has been confirmed in many species. In birds, vocal cues appear to be a major component of recognition. Curiously, vocal recognition seems absent or limited in some highly social species such as the black-legged kittiwake, Rissa tridactyla. Using playback experiments, we found that kittiwake chicks recognized their parents vocally, this capacity being detectable as early as 20 days after hatching, the youngest age tested. Mates also recognized each other's long calls. Some birds reacted to their partner's voice when only a part of the long call was played back. Nevertheless, only about a third of the tested birds reacted to their mate's or parents' call and we were unable to detect recognition among neighbours. We discuss the low reactivity of kittiwakes in relation to their cliff-nesting habit and compare our results with evidence of vocal recognition in other larids. ?? 2008 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

  14. The emotional and attitudinal consequences of religious hypocrisy: experimental evidence using a cognitive dissonance paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousaf, Omar; Gobet, Fernand

    2013-01-01

    We explored the emotional and attitudinal consequences of personal attitude-behavior discrepancies using a religious version of the hypocrisy paradigm. We induced cognitive dissonance in participants (n = 206) by making them feel hypocritical for advocating certain religious behaviors that they had not recently engaged in to their own satisfaction. In Experiment 1, this resulted in higher levels of self-reported guilt and shame compared to the control condition. Experiment 2 further showed that a religious self-affirmation task eliminated the guilt and shame. In Experiment 3, participants boosted their religious attitudes as a result of dissonance, and both religious and non-religious self-affirmation tasks eliminated this effect. The findings provide evidence that dissonance induced through religious hypocrisy can result in guilt and shame as well as an attitude bolstering effect, as opposed to the attitude reconciliation effect that is prevalent in previous dissonance research.

  15. Theoretical approaches and experimental evidence for liquid-vapor phase transitions in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretto, L.G.; Elliott, J.B.; Phair, L.; Wozniak, G.J.; Mader, C.M.; Chappars, A.

    2001-01-01

    The leptodermous approximation is applied to nuclear systems for T > 0. The introduction of surface corrections leads to anomalous caloric curves and to negative heat capacities in the liquid-gas coexistence region. Clusterization in the vapor is described by associating surface energy to clusters according to Fisher's formula. The three-dimensional Ising model, a leptodermous system par excellence, does obey rigorously Fisher's scaling up to the critical point. Multifragmentation data from several experiments including the ISiS and EOS Collaborations, as well as compound nucleus fragment emission at much lower energy follow the same scaling, thus providing the strongest evidence yet of liquid-vapor coexistence.

  16. Bisphenol a and reproductive health: update of experimental and human evidence, 2007-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Jackye; Vrooman, Lisa; Ricke, William A; Hunt, Patricia A; Ehrlich, Shelley; Hauser, Russ; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Taylor, Hugh S; Swan, Shanna H; VandeVoort, Catherine A; Flaws, Jodi A

    2014-08-01

    In 2007, an expert panel reviewed associations between bisphenol A (BPA) exposure and reproductive health outcomes. Since then, new studies have been conducted on the impact of BPA on reproduction. In this review, we summarize data obtained since 2007, focusing on a) findings from human and animal studies, b) the effects of BPA on a variety of reproductive end points, and c) mechanisms of BPA action. We reviewed the literature published from 2007 to 2013 using a PubMed search based on keywords related to BPA and male and female reproduction. Because BPA has been reported to affect the onset of meiosis in both animal and in vitro models, interfere with germ cell nest breakdown in animal models, accelerate follicle transition in several animal species, alter steroidogenesis in multiple animal models and women, and reduce oocyte quality in animal models and women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF), we consider it an ovarian toxicant. In addition, strong evidence suggests that BPA is a uterine toxicant because it impaired uterine endometrial proliferation, decreased uterine receptivity, and increased implantation failure in animal models. BPA exposure may be associated with adverse birth outcomes, hyperandrogenism, sexual dysfunction, and impaired implantation in humans, but additional studies are required to confirm these associations. Studies also suggest that BPA may be a testicular toxicant in animal models, but the data in humans are equivocal. Finally, insufficient evidence exists regarding effects of BPA on the oviduct, the placenta, and pubertal development. Based on reports that BPA impacts female reproduction and has the potential to affect male reproductive systems in humans and animals, we conclude that BPA is a reproductive toxicant.

  17. Petrological and experimental evidence for differentiation of water-rich magmas beneath St. Kitts, Lesser Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melekhova, Elena; Blundy, Jon; Martin, Rita; Arculus, Richard; Pichavant, Michel

    2017-12-01

    St. Kitts lies in the northern Lesser Antilles, a subduction-related intraoceanic volcanic arc known for its magmatic diversity and unusually abundant cognate xenoliths. We combine the geochemistry of xenoliths, melt inclusions and lavas with high pressure-temperature experiments to explore magma differentiation processes beneath St. Kitts. Lavas range from basalt to rhyolite, with predominant andesites and basaltic andesites. Xenoliths, dominated by calcic plagioclase and amphibole, typically in reaction relationship with pyroxenes and olivine, can be divided into plutonic and cumulate varieties based on mineral textures and compositions. Cumulate varieties, formed primarily by the accumulation of liquidus phases, comprise ensembles that represent instantaneous solid compositions from one or more magma batches; plutonic varieties have mineralogy and textures consistent with protracted solidification of magmatic mush. Mineral chemistry in lavas and xenoliths is subtly different. For example, plagioclase with unusually high anorthite content (An≤100) occurs in some plutonic xenoliths, whereas the most calcic plagioclase in cumulate xenoliths and lavas are An97 and An95, respectively. Fluid-saturated, equilibrium crystallisation experiments were performed on a St. Kitts basaltic andesite, with three different fluid compositions ( XH2O = 1.0, 0.66 and 0.33) at 2.4 kbar, 950-1025 °C, and fO2 = NNO - 0.6 to NNO + 1.2 log units. Experiments reproduce lava liquid lines of descent and many xenolith assemblages, but fail to match xenolith and lava phenocryst mineral compositions, notably the very An-rich plagioclase. The strong positive correlation between experimentally determined plagioclase-melt KdCa-Na and dissolved H2O in the melt, together with the occurrence of Al-rich mafic lavas, suggests that parental magmas were water-rich (> 9 wt% H2O) basaltic andesites that crystallised over a wide pressure range (1.5-6 kbar). Comparison of experimental and natural (lava

  18. Anomalous cutaneous absorption of allergens as cause of skin prick testing adverse reactions in adult patients. Clinical and experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antico, A; Arisi, M; Lima, G

    2015-07-01

    Paediatric age, active eczema and high number of allergens tested in poly-sensitized patients have been pinpointed as possible risk factors of systemic reactions by skin prick testing. As far as atopic eczema concerns, the higher penetration of the allergens into the skin because of the scraping or micro-injuries is an intuitive rationalization. Purpose of the present study is to provide documentary evidence that adverse reactions elicited by anomalous absorption of allergens can occur also in adult patients with apparently normal skin. Report of some exemplifying clinical and experimental observations. Measuring the inoculum volume into impaired skin and its variability in relation to the variation of the chemical-physical characteristic of the solutions used for the tests by means of a method of direct assay based on the use of a gamma-camera. Localized impairments of the skin permeability can cause a significant increase in inoculum volume by prick-test. Critical amounts of allergens can be introduced into the skin because of the possibility of direct absorption, also without pricking, of allergy diagnostic solutions. The greater water content of the solutions used for prick-testing can significantly increase the inoculum volume. This study adds clinical and experimental evidences that localized impairments of permeability can occur in adult patients with apparently normal skin. Special precautions should be taken when a change of the drops' normal shape and cohesion is seen, because allergy prick-testing in such areas is potentially associated with increased risk of large local or systemic reactions.

  19. Analysis of a morphometric indicator subject to abrupt change in the sediment supply in a braided stream: an experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vito Papa, Daniel; Ancey, Christophe

    2017-04-01

    Braiding is a complex fluvial process in which sediment-laden water flows are split into multiple threads. Thread joining and splitting at the nodes occurs continuously in the floodplain. Understanding how braiding responds to external factors is a key issue. A number of braided-pattern intensity indices have been proposed to characterize the degree of braiding. Due to the inherent complexity of their dynamics braided rivers exhibit a complex morphology that is difficult to study using simple indices. In this study, we propose a series of experiments to investigate the influence of sediment supply in the evolution of the braiding patterns. To that end, we use a set of morphological indicators, including the index proposed by Redolfi et al. (2016). The experiments are carried out in a 4-m-long and 1-m-wide flume. The bed is made of moderately sorted sand grains whose median diameter is 1 mm. A classic braided pattern configuration composed of various channels, confluences and bifurcations is observed. The experiments satisfy the Froude similarity criterion. Each run starts from an initial straight channel with rectangular cross section. After a certain time (approximately 40 hours) the system reaches equilibrium. This equilibrium is then perturbed by suddenly increasing the sediment feeding until a new point of equilibrium is reached (this takes approximately 40 hours again). During the whole run, bed elevation and water height are measured optically using laser sheets projected on the bed surface. Cross sections are calculated at 2 cm intervals from each others. The entire morphology is then obtained from these cross sections every hour. Sediment is feeded at the flume inlet and sediment transport rates are measured every 15 minutes at the flume outlet.

  20. Prediction and Experimental Evidence for Thermodynamically Stable Charged Orbital Domain Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing’an Li

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available On theoretical grounds, we show that orbital domain walls (ODWs, which are known to exist in the charge and orbital ordered layered manganite LaSr_{2}Mn_{2}O_{7}, should be partially charged as a result of competition between orbital-induced strain and Coulomb repulsion. This unexpected result provides the necessary condition for the known thermodynamic stability of these ODWs, which are unlike the more typical domain walls that arise only from an external field. We offer experimental data consistent with this theoretical framework through a combined transport and x-ray-diffraction study. In particular, our transport data on this charge and orbital ordered manganite exhibit abrupt transformations to higher conductance at a threshold electric field. As transport phenomena closely resemble effects found for sliding charge-density waves (SCDWs in pseudo-one-dimensional (1D materials, a SCDW along such pseudo-1D ODWs provides a natural explanation of our data. Importantly, x-ray-diffraction data eliminate heating and melting of charge order as tenable alternative explanations of our data.

  1. Moral Entitlements and Aspiration Formation in Asymmetric Bargaining: Experimental Evidence from Germany and China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Hennig-Schmidt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Using a unique experimental data set, we investigate how asymmetric legal rights shape bargainers’ aspiration levels through moral entitlements derived from equity norms and number prominence. Aspiration formation is typically hard to observe in real life. Our study involves 15 negotiations from Germany and China. Over the course of the negotiation, bargainers discuss the distribution of an amount of money by alternating offers until they consent or break off. Legal rights are randomly assigned by asymmetric outside options. We videotape and code the in-group discussions. In total, verbal data from 30 groups, 1100 pages of transcripts, and 65 h of discussions are content-analyzed. Our main finding is that strong groups derive and defend moral entitlements from equity concerns with regard to their outside options. They strive for equitable but unequal distributions (e.g., proportional split and split the difference. Moral entitlements materialize in the recorded aspiration levels and final payoffs, which exceed the equal split. By contrast, weak groups aim at equality. Over the course of the negotiation, equity tends to lose, while the prominence of round numbers gains importance. Similarities between the subject pools are found in that equity and prominence are both decisive for the formation of aspiration levels. Chinese negotiations are characterized by long periods of stagnation, only minimal concessions, and the communication of false goals. By contrast, Germans steadily reduce their goals and make concessions.

  2. Circadian rhythms of liver physiology and disease: experimental and clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Yu; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2016-04-01

    The circadian clock system consists of a central clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus and peripheral clocks in peripheral tissues. Peripheral clocks in the liver have fundamental roles in maintaining liver homeostasis, including the regulation of energy metabolism and the expression of enzymes controlling the absorption and metabolism of xenobiotics. Over the past two decades, research has investigated the molecular mechanisms linking circadian clock genes with the regulation of hepatic physiological functions, using global clock-gene-knockout mice, or mice with liver-specific knockout of clock genes or clock-controlled genes. Clock dysfunction accelerates the development of liver diseases such as fatty liver diseases, cirrhosis, hepatitis and liver cancer, and these disorders also disrupt clock function. Food is an important regulator of circadian clocks in peripheral tissues. Thus, controlling the timing of food consumption and food composition, a concept known as chrononutrition, is one area of active research to aid recovery from many physiological dysfunctions. In this Review, we focus on the molecular mechanisms of hepatic circadian gene regulation and the relationships between hepatic circadian clock systems and liver physiology and disease. We concentrate on experimental data obtained from cell or mice and rat models and discuss how these findings translate into clinical research, and we highlight the latest developments in chrononutritional studies.

  3. Chemical, experimental, and morphological evidence for diagenetically altered melanin in exceptionally preserved fossils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colleary, Caitlin; Dolocan, Andrei; Gardner, James; Singh, Suresh; Wuttke, Michael; Rabenstein, Renate; Habersetzer, Jörg; Schaal, Stephan; Feseha, Mulugeta; Clemens, Matthew; Jacobs, Bonnie F; Currano, Ellen D; Jacobs, Louis L; Sylvestersen, Rene Lyng; Gabbott, Sarah E; Vinther, Jakob

    2015-10-13

    In living organisms, color patterns, behavior, and ecology are closely linked. Thus, detection of fossil pigments may permit inferences about important aspects of ancient animal ecology and evolution. Melanin-bearing melanosomes were suggested to preserve as organic residues in exceptionally preserved fossils, retaining distinct morphology that is associated with aspects of original color patterns. Nevertheless, these oblong and spherical structures have also been identified as fossilized bacteria. To date, chemical studies have not directly considered the effects of diagenesis on melanin preservation, and how this may influence its identification. Here we use time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry to identify and chemically characterize melanin in a diverse sample of previously unstudied extant and fossil taxa, including fossils with notably different diagenetic histories and geologic ages. We document signatures consistent with melanin preservation in fossils ranging from feathers, to mammals, to amphibians. Using principal component analyses, we characterize putative mixtures of eumelanin and phaeomelanin in both fossil and extant samples. Surprisingly, both extant and fossil amphibians generally exhibit melanosomes with a mixed eumelanin/phaeomelanin composition rather than pure eumelanin, as assumed previously. We argue that experimental maturation of modern melanin samples replicates diagenetic chemical alteration of melanin observed in fossils. This refutes the hypothesis that such fossil microbodies could be bacteria, and demonstrates that melanin is widely responsible for the organic soft tissue outlines in vertebrates found at exceptional fossil localities, thus allowing for the reconstruction of certain aspects of original pigment patterns.

  4. Impact of bisphenol a on the cardiovascular system - epidemiological and experimental evidence and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoqian; Wang, Hong-Sheng

    2014-08-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a ubiquitous plasticizing agent used in the manufacturing of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. There is well-documented and broad human exposure to BPA. The potential risk that BPA poses to the human health has attracted much attention from regulatory agencies and the general public, and has been extensively studied. An emerging and rapidly growing area in the study of BPA's toxicity is its impact on the cardiovascular (CV) system. Recent epidemiological studies have shown that higher urinary BPA concentration in humans is associated with various types of CV diseases, including angina, hypertension, heart attack and coronary and peripheral arterial disease. Experimental studies have demonstrated that acute BPA exposure promotes the development of arrhythmias in female rodent hearts. Chronic exposure to BPA has been shown to result in cardiac remodeling, atherosclerosis, and altered blood pressure in rodents. The underlying mechanisms may involve alteration of cardiac Ca2+ handling, ion channel inhibition/activation, oxidative stress, and genome/transcriptome modifications. In this review, we discuss these recent findings that point to the potential CV toxicity of BPA, and highlight the knowledge gaps in this growing research area.

  5. Experimental evidence that density dependence strongly influences plant invasions through fragmented landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jennifer L; Levine, Jonathan M

    2018-01-20

    Populations of range expanding species encounter patches of both favorable and unfavorable habitat as they spread across landscapes. Theory shows that increasing patchiness slows the spread of populations modeled with continuously varying population density when dispersal is not influence by the environment or individual behavior. However, as is found in uniformly favorable landscapes, spread remains driven by fecundity and dispersal from low density individuals at the invasion front. In contrast, when modeled populations are composed of discrete individuals, patchiness causes populations to build up to high density before dispersing past unsuitable habitat, introducing an important influence of density dependence on spread velocity. To test the hypothesized interaction between habitat patchiness and density dependence, we simultaneously manipulated these factors in a greenhouse system of annual plants spreading through replicated experimental landscapes. We found that increasing the size of gaps and amplifying the strength of density dependence both slowed spread velocity, but contrary to predictions, the effect of amplified density dependence was similar across all landscape types. Our results demonstrate that the discrete nature of individuals in spreading populations has a strong influence on how both landscape patchiness and density dependence influence spread through demographic and dispersal stochasticity. Both finiteness and landscape structure should be critical components to theoretical predictions of future spread for range expanding native species or invasive species colonizing new habitat. © 2018 by the Ecological Society of America.

  6. Female attractiveness affects paternal investment: experimental evidence for male differential allocation in blue tits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahr Katharina

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The differential allocation hypothesis (DAH predicts that individuals should adjust their parental investment to their current mate’s quality. Although in principle the DAH holds for both sexes, male adjustment of parental investment has only been tested in a few experimental studies, revealing contradictory results. We conducted a field experiment to test whether male blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus allocate their parental effort in relation to female ornamentation (ultraviolet colouration of the crown, as predicted by the DAH. Results We reduced the UV reflectance in a sample of females and compared parental care by their mates with that of males paired to sham-manipulated control females. As predicted by the DAH our results demonstrate that males paired with UV-reduced females invested less in feeding effort but did not defend the chicks less than males paired with control females. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies providing support for male differential allocation in response to female ornamentation.

  7. The racialized construction of exceptionality: Experimental evidence of race/ethnicity effects on teachers' interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Rachel Elizabeth

    2017-02-01

    Scholars, policy-makers, and practitioners have long argued that students of color are over-represented in special education and under-represented in gifted education, arguing that educators make racially/ethnically biased decisions to refer and qualify students with disabilities and giftedness. Recent research has called this into question, focusing on the role of confounders of race/ethnicity. However, the role of educator decisions in the disproportionality is still unclear. In this study, I examine the role of student race/ethnicity in teachers' categorization of student needs as "exceptional" and in need of special or gifted education services. I use an original survey experiment in which teachers read case studies of fictional male students in which the race/ethnicity, English Language Learner status, and exceptionality characteristics were experimentally manipulated. The teachers are then asked whether they would refer the student for exceptionality testing. My findings suggest a complex intersection of race/ethnicity and exceptionality, in which white boys are more likely to be suspected of having exceptionalities when they exhibit academic challenges, while boys of color are more likely to be suspected when they exhibit behavioral challenges. This suggests that the racialized construction of exceptionalities reflects differential academic expectations and interpretations of behavior by race/ethnicity, with implications for the subjectivity of exceptionality identification and for the exacerbation of racial/ethnic inequalities in education. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Chemical, experimental, and morphological evidence for diagenetically altered melanin in exceptionally preserved fossils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colleary, Caitlin; Dolocan, Andrei; Gardner, James; Singh, Suresh; Wuttke, Michael; Rabenstein, Renate; Habersetzer, Jörg; Schaal, Stephan; Feseha, Mulugeta; Clemens, Matthew; Jacobs, Bonnie F.; Currano, Ellen D.; Jacobs, Louis L.; Lyng Sylvestersen, Rene; Gabbott, Sarah E.; Vinther, Jakob

    2015-10-01

    In living organisms, color patterns, behavior, and ecology are closely linked. Thus, detection of fossil pigments may permit inferences about important aspects of ancient animal ecology and evolution. Melanin-bearing melanosomes were suggested to preserve as organic residues in exceptionally preserved fossils, retaining distinct morphology that is associated with aspects of original color patterns. Nevertheless, these oblong and spherical structures have also been identified as fossilized bacteria. To date, chemical studies have not directly considered the effects of diagenesis on melanin preservation, and how this may influence its identification. Here we use time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry to identify and chemically characterize melanin in a diverse sample of previously unstudied extant and fossil taxa, including fossils with notably different diagenetic histories and geologic ages. We document signatures consistent with melanin preservation in fossils ranging from feathers, to mammals, to amphibians. Using principal component analyses, we characterize putative mixtures of eumelanin and phaeomelanin in both fossil and extant samples. Surprisingly, both extant and fossil amphibians generally exhibit melanosomes with a mixed eumelanin/phaeomelanin composition rather than pure eumelanin, as assumed previously. We argue that experimental maturation of modern melanin samples replicates diagenetic chemical alteration of melanin observed in fossils. This refutes the hypothesis that such fossil microbodies could be bacteria, and demonstrates that melanin is widely responsible for the organic soft tissue outlines in vertebrates found at exceptional fossil localities, thus allowing for the reconstruction of certain aspects of original pigment patterns.

  9. Message and price components of Family Caps: experimental evidence from New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Radha; Camasso, Michael J

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we examine the relative efficacy of two mechanisms--price consideration and the message of social responsibility--in accounting for Family Cap effects on fertility behavior. The Family Cap is a component of welfare reform policy that denies additional cash benefits to children born 10 or more months after a woman entered the welfare rolls. We use data from the New Jersey Family Development Program (FDP) evaluation that employed a classical experimental design. We find that fertility behaviors are influenced by both Family Cap price and message mechanisms but that these effects are conditioned by welfare recipients' time on welfare and race. Black women who have longer stays on welfare are more likely to be influenced by price while women with shorter stays are influenced by both price and the social message. We believe our results have implications not only for future public welfare policy initiatives but for any social policies that attempt to influence behavior directly, through individual rewards and punishments, and indirectly through the activation of social or community pressures. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bifurcation Scenarios of Neural Firing Patterns across Two Separated Chaotic Regions as Indicated by Theoretical and Biological Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaguang Gu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear dynamics can be used to identify relationships between different firing patterns, which play important roles in the information processing. The present study provides novel biological experimental findings regarding complex bifurcation scenarios from period-1 bursting to period-1 spiking with chaotic firing patterns. These bifurcations were found to be similar to those simulated using the Hindmarsh-Rose model across two separated chaotic regions. One chaotic region lay between period-1 and period-2 burstings. This region has not attracted much attention. The other region is a well-known comb-shaped chaotic region, and it appears after period-2 bursting. After period-2 bursting, the chaotic firings lay in a period-adding bifurcation scenario or in a period-doubling bifurcation cascade. The deterministic dynamics of the chaotic firing patterns were identified using a nonlinear prediction method. These results provided details regarding the processes and dynamics of bifurcation containing the chaotic bursting between period-1 and period-2 burstings and other chaotic firing patterns within the comb-shaped chaotic region. They also provided details regarding the relationships between different firing patterns in parameter space.

  11. Experimental Evidence and In Silico Identification of Tryptophan Decarboxylase in Citrus Genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Masi, Luigi; Castaldo, Domenico; Pignone, Domenico; Servillo, Luigi; Facchiano, Angelo

    2017-02-11

    Plant tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) converts tryptophan into tryptamine, precursor of indolealkylamine alkaloids. The recent finding of tryptamine metabolites in Citrus plants leads to hypothesize the existence of TDC activity in this genus. Here, we report for the first time that, in Citrus x limon seedlings, deuterium labeled tryptophan is decarboxylated into tryptamine, from which successively deuterated N,N,N-trimethyltryptamine is formed. These results give an evidence of the occurrence of the TDC activity and the successive methylation pathway of the tryptamine produced from the tryptophan decarboxylation. In addition, with the aim to identify the genetic basis for the presence of TDC, we carried out a sequence similarity search for TDC in the Citrus genomes using as a probe the TDC sequence reported for the plant Catharanthus roseus. We analyzed the genomes of both Citrus clementina and Citrus sinensis, available in public database, and identified putative protein sequences of aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase. Similarly, 42 aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase sequences from 23 plant species were extracted from public databases. Potential sequence signatures for functional TDC were then identified. With this research, we propose for the first time a putative protein sequence for TDC in the genus Citrus.

  12. Experimental evidence of landscape reorganization under changing external forcing: implications to climate-driven knickpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arvind; Tejedor, Alejandro; Grimaud, Jean-Louis; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    2017-04-01

    Understanding and quantifying geomorphic and topologic re-organization of landscape in response to changing climatic or tectonic forcing is of scientific and practical interest. Although several studies have addressed the large-scale response (e.g., change in mean relief), studies on the smaller-scale drainage pattern re-organization and quantification of landscape vulnerability to the timing, magnitude, and frequency of changing forcing are lacking. To that goal, a series of controlled laboratory experiments were conducted to study the effect of changing precipitation patterns on landscape evolution at the short and long-time scales. High resolution digital elevation (DEM) both in space and time were measured for a range of rainfall patterns and uplift rates. Results from our study show a distinct signature of the precipitation increase on the probabilistic and geometrical structure of landscape features, evident in widening and deepening of channels and valleys, change in drainage patterns within sub-basins and change in the space-time structure of erosional and depositional events. A spatially explicit analysis of the locus of these erosional and depositional events show an acceleration of erosion in the hillslopes when the rainfall intensity is increased, while the incision in fluvial channels is slowed down exhibiting a sediment-flux dependent behavior. Finally, we document the changes in the longitudinal river profiles with increasing precipitation intensity, revealing the formation of knickpoints at certain confluences where large discontinuities in the ratio Qs/Qw are observed.

  13. Experimental evidence of polymorphysm of sexual development in Capitella sp. B (Polychaeta: Capitellidae from Barcelona, Spain

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    Nuria Méndez

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The development and growth of Capitella sp. B obtained from Barcelona were studied under culture conditions. Trochophore and metatrochophore larvae hatched non-simultaneously (two release periods from single brood tubes. This is the first laboratory evidence of polymorphysm of sexual development in the Capitella capitata species-complex. During the first release period, only free swimming trochophores hatched. The females, still bearing larvae inside the brood tube, were transferred to another dish. After three days, ciliated metatrochophores hatched from 8.7% of the transferred broods. In a culture experiment, larvae maintained in sediment enriched with artificial food grew to immature and mature adults. In this condition, the larvae that hatched during the first release reached the immature adult stage, while the larvae derived from the second release became mature adults. Oogenesis was observed three times in one female from the second release, though no spawning and fertilization occurred under incubation with sib mature males. Two different sizes of coelomic oocytes were observed. Polymorphysm of sexual development is discussed as an advantageous reproductive strategy enhancing survival in organic enriched sediments.

  14. Experimental evidence of enhanced ferroelectricity in Ca doped BiFeO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, L.V.; Deus, R.C. [Universidade Estadual Paulista, UNESP, Faculdade de Engenharia de Guaratinguetá, Av. Dr. Ariberto Pereira da Cunha, 333, Bairro Portal das Colinas, CEP 12516-410 Guaratinguetá, SP (Brazil); Foschini, C.R.; Longo, E. [Universidade Estadual Paulista, UNESP, Faculdade de Engenharia de Bauru, Dept. de Eng. Mecânica, Av. Eng. Luiz Edmundo C. Coube 14-01, 17033-360 Bauru, SP (Brazil); Cilense, M. [Universidade Estadual Paulista, UNESP, Instituto de Química – Laboratório Interdisciplinar em Cerâmica (LIEC), Rua Professor Francisco Degni s/n, 14800-90 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Simões, A.Z., E-mail: alezipo@yahoo.com [Universidade Estadual Paulista, UNESP, Faculdade de Engenharia de Guaratinguetá, Av. Dr. Ariberto Pereira da Cunha, 333, Bairro Portal das Colinas, CEP 12516-410 Guaratinguetá, SP (Brazil)

    2014-04-01

    Calcium (Ca)-doped bismuth ferrite (BiFeO{sub 3}) thin films prepared by using the polymeric precursor method (PPM) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), polarization and piezoelectric measurements. Structural studies by XRD and TEM reveal the co-existence of distorted rhombohedral and tetragonal phases in the highest doped BiFeO{sub 3} where enhanced ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties are produced by internal strain. Resistive switching is observed in BFO and Ca-doped BFO which are affected by the barrier contact and work function of multiferroic materials and Pt electrodes. A high coercive field in the hysteresis loop is observed for the BiFeO{sub 3} film. Piezoelectric properties are improved in the highest Ca-doped sample due to changes in the crystal structure of BFO for a primitive cubic perovskite lattice with four-fold symmetry and a large tetragonal distortion within the crystal domain. This observation introduces magnetoelectronics at room temperature by combining electronic conduction with electric and magnetic degrees of freedom which are already present in the multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3}. - Highlights: • Ca doped BiFeO{sub 3} thin films were obtained by the polymeric precursor method. • Co-existence of distorted rhombohedral and tetragonal phases are evident. • Enhanced ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties are produced by the internal strain in the Ca doped BiFeO{sub 3} film.

  15. Experimental Evidence and In Silico Identification of Tryptophan Decarboxylase in Citrus Genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi De Masi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC converts tryptophan into tryptamine, precursor of indolealkylamine alkaloids. The recent finding of tryptamine metabolites in Citrus plants leads to hypothesize the existence of TDC activity in this genus. Here, we report for the first time that, in Citrus x limon seedlings, deuterium labeled tryptophan is decarboxylated into tryptamine, from which successively deuterated N,N,N-trimethyltryptamine is formed. These results give an evidence of the occurrence of the TDC activity and the successive methylation pathway of the tryptamine produced from the tryptophan decarboxylation. In addition, with the aim to identify the genetic basis for the presence of TDC, we carried out a sequence similarity search for TDC in the Citrus genomes using as a probe the TDC sequence reported for the plant Catharanthus roseus. We analyzed the genomes of both Citrus clementina and Citrus sinensis, available in public database, and identified putative protein sequences of aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase. Similarly, 42 aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase sequences from 23 plant species were extracted from public databases. Potential sequence signatures for functional TDC were then identified. With this research, we propose for the first time a putative protein sequence for TDC in the genus Citrus.

  16. Experimental Evidence of Arctic Summer Mesospheric Upwelling and Its Connection to Cold Summer Mesopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskar, F. I.; Chau, J. L.; St.-Maurice, J. P.; Stober, G.; Hall, C. M.; Tsutsumi, M.; Höffner, J.; Hoffmann, P.

    2017-09-01

    Common volume mesospheric meteor detections from two radar stations separated by about 130 km were used to retrieve horizontal wind fields between 82 and 96 km altitudes at high latitudes, near 69°N. The horizontal wind divergence was estimated from the gradients of the wind fields. This determination is the first of its kind for the mesosphere. Twelve years of nearly continuous data sets reveal systematic summer signatures in the horizontal wind divergence field, namely, a transition from negative to positive with increasing altitude while moving across the mesopause. There are indications that the reversal altitude is also anticorrelated with the mesopause temperature in addition for a tendency for the altitude of the reversal to increase over the years. We show that the reversal in the horizontal wind divergence at the mesosphere is consistent with upward winds peaking near the mesopause. These winds indicate that adiabatic cooling was strongest at the region of the deep temperature minimum seen in the summer mesopause.

  17. Use of murinometrics indices and bioelectrical impedance (BIA in the determination of experimental obesity in oophorectomized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Soares Marreiros Ferraz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we tested the use of murinometric indices and bioimpedance (BIA to determine obesity in rats. Female Wistar rats (8 weeks/130-160 g were divided into control and oophorectomy group. The Body Mass Index (BMI and Lee index (LI were used as anthropometric techniques to determine obesity, and the determination of body composition by BIA, as a way to partition body weight into fat mass and lean mass components. The dissection of muscle tissues and adipose deposits was used as a direct determination of body fat content. The groups had body weight gain (p <0.05 after the trial period, with a differential gain in body fat (p <0.05 observed by the dissection of tissue in the oophorectomy group. This gain in body fat was detected more accurately by BIA, due to the greater ability of this method to distinguish lean from fat mass. BIA was able to measure the differential gain of body fat in a BMI considered as eutrophic by murinometric indices.

  18. Experimental evidence of biological interactions among different isolates of Trypanosoma cruzi from the Chaco Region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula G Ragone

    Full Text Available Many infectious diseases arise from co-infections or re-infections with more than one genotype of the same pathogen. These mixed infections could alter host fitness, the severity of symptoms, success in pathogen transmission and the epidemiology of the disease. Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, exhibits a high biological variability often correlated with its genetic diversity. Here, we developed an experimental approach in order to evaluate biological interaction between three T. cruzi isolates belonging to different Discrete Typing Units (DTUs TcIII, TcV and TcVI. These isolates were obtained from a restricted geographical area in the Chaco Region. Different mixed infections involving combinations of two isolates (TcIII + TcV, TcIII + TcVI and TcV + TcVI were studied in a mouse model. The parameters evaluated were number of parasites circulating in peripheral blood, histopathology and genetic characterization of each DTU in different tissues by DNA hybridization probes. We found a predominance of TcVI isolate in blood and tissues respect to TcIII and TcV; and a decrease of the inflammatory response in heart when the damage of mice infected with TcVI and TcIII + TcVI mixture were compared. In addition, simultaneous presence of two isolates in the same tissue was not detected. Our results show that biological interactions between isolates with different biological behaviors lead to changes in their biological properties. The occurrence of interactions among different genotypes of T. cruzi observed in our mouse model suggests that these phenomena could also occur in natural cycles in the Chaco Region.

  19. Experimental evidence for enhanced top-down control of freshwater macrophytes with nutrient enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Elisabeth S; Nolet, Bart A

    2014-11-01

    The abundance of primary producers is controlled by bottom-up and top-down forces. Despite the fact that there is consensus that the abundance of freshwater macrophytes is strongly influenced by the availability of resources for plant growth, the importance of top-down control by vertebrate consumers is debated, because field studies yield contrasting results. We hypothesized that these bottom-up and top-down forces may interact, and that consumer impact on macrophyte abundance depends on the nutrient status of the water body. To test this hypothesis, experimental ponds with submerged vegetation containing a mixture of species were subjected to a fertilization treatment and we introduced consumers (mallard ducks, for 8 days) on half of the ponds in a full factorial design. Over the whole 66-day experiment fertilized ponds became dominated by Elodea nuttallii and ponds without extra nutrients by Chara globularis. Nutrient addition significantly increased plant N and P concentrations. There was a strong interactive effect of duck presence and pond nutrient status: macrophyte biomass was reduced (by 50%) after the presence of the ducks on fertilized ponds, but not in the unfertilized ponds. We conclude that nutrient availability interacts with top-down control of submerged vegetation. This may be explained by higher plant palatability at higher nutrient levels, either by a higher plant nutrient concentration or by a shift towards dominance of more palatable plant species, resulting in higher consumer pressure. Including nutrient availability may offer a framework to explain part of the contrasting field observations of consumer control of macrophyte abundance.

  20. Experimental Insight on the Conformational Landscape of the SF_6 Dimer: Evidence for Three Conformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselin, Pierre; Potapov, Alexey; Boudon, Vincent; Bruel, Laurent; Gaveau, Marc-André; Mons, Michel

    2017-06-01

    The rovibrational spectrum of both parallel and perpendicular bands of the SF_6 dimer near the νb{3} band of SF_6 monomer was reinvestigated using high resolution jet-cooled infrared laser spectroscopy to provide deeper insight on its conformational landscape. Taking advantage of our versatile set-upjet,-cooled spectra were recorded by combining different geometries of supersonic expansions, SF_6 concentrations seeded in a carrier gas and axial distances. Relaxation effects could be evidenced at very low rotational temperature leading to different conformational populations. Three spectral features (noted #1, #2 and #3) belonging to three dimer conformers are unambiguously identified on the grounds of 3 distinct S-S distances derived from the rovibrational analysis of parallel band contours in the 932-935 \\wn range. Symmetry assignment, a priori accessible from the perpendicular band structure of a spherical top dimer, could not be clearly proved. The dependence of such conformational infrared signatures as a function of expansion conditions provides additional information about population dependence and interconversion processes taking place between these three forms predicted to be nearly isoenergetic by theoretical calculations. Based on experimental considerations, a qualitative picture of the nearly flat potential energy surface of the SF_6 dimer is proposed which could explain the dominant presence of #1 and #3 populations in fast/cold axisymmetric expansions and that of #1 and #2 populations in slow/hot planar ones. R.-D. Urban and M. Takami, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 9132 (1995). P. Asselin, Y. Berger, T. R. Huet, R. Motiyenko, L. Margulès, R. J. Hendricks, M. R. Tarbutt, S. Tokunaga, B. Darquié, PCCP 19, 4576 (2017). T. Vazhappilly, A. Marjolin and K. J. Jordan, J. Phys. Chem. B 120, 1788 (2016).

  1. Siliceous sponge spicule dissolution: In field experimental evidences from temperate and tropical waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolino, Marco; Cattaneo-Vietti, Riccardo; Pansini, Maurizio; Santini, Chiara; Bavestrello, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Sponge siliceous spicules are considered a sink in the silica balance of the oceans as their dissolution rate seems to be negligible, but no field data are available about this process. The aim of this study was a first evaluation of the quantitative dissolution rates of some demosponge and hexactinellid spicules (collected in different localities at different latitudes), left at sea for six months in two localities characterised by different water average temperatures: Mediterranean Sea and Celebes Sea. The effects of silica dissolution on the experimented spicules, studied by SEM analysis, produced an enlargement of the axial canal sometimes resulting in empty spicules. While in demosponges the axial canal wall of eroded spicules was perfectly smooth or slightly rough, the hexactinellid Rossella racovitzae showed a cavernous, well recognisable pattern of dissolution. The dissolution rates were determined evaluating the decrease in outer diameter and in the expansion of the axial channel of about 300 spicules for each considered species and locality. The spicules from the Mediterranean Geodia cydonium did not show any detectable dissolution in both localities, while those from Tethya citrina showed a loose of silica of about 23% in the Mediterranean and 47% in the Celebes Sea. Paratetilla bacca from the Red Sea decreased the silica content of about 30% in both the localities. Tetilla leptoderma from Mar del Plata lost about 8% and 42% of silica respectively in Mediterranean and Celebes Sea. Finally, the hexactinellid spicules from the Antarctic Rossella racovitzae showed highest dissolution rates in both experimental sites (37% and 66% in the Mediterranean and Celebes Sea, respectively). The different levels of dissolution can be related to the different taxonomic position in terms of specular structures as well as to the temperatures at which the spicules have been deposited and exposed. In fact, spicules from the same species showed a dissolution rate generally

  2. Direct experimental evidence that early-life farm environment influences regulation of immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Marie C; Inman, Charlotte F; Patel, Dilip; Schmidt, Bettina; Mulder, Imke; Miller, Bevis; Gill, Bhupinder P; Pluske, John; Kelly, Denise; Stokes, Christopher R; Bailey, Michael

    2012-05-01

      In mammals, early-life environmental variations appear to affect microbial colonization and therefore competent immune development, and exposure to farm environments in infants has been inversely correlated with allergy development. Modelling these effects using manipulation of neonatal rodents is difficult due to their dependency on the mother, but the relatively independent piglet is increasingly identified as a valuable translational model for humans. This study was designed to correlate immune regulation in piglets with early-life environment.   Piglets were nursed by their mother on a commercial farm, while isolator-reared siblings were formula fed. Fluorescence immunohistology was used to quantify T-reg and effector T-cell populations in the intestinal lamina propria and the systemic response to food proteins was quantified by capture ELISA.   There was more CD4(+) and CD4(+) CD25(+) effector T-cell staining in the intestinal mucosa of the isolator-reared piglets compared with their farm-reared counterparts. In contrast, these isolator-reared piglets had a significantly reduced CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T-cell population compared to farm-reared littermates, resulting in a significantly higher T-reg-to-effector ratio in the farm animals. Consistent with these findings, isolator-reared piglets had an increased serum IgG anti-soya response to novel dietary soya protein relative to farm-reared piglets.   Here, we provide the first direct evidence, derived from intervention, that components of the early-life environment present on farms profoundly affects both local development of regulatory components of the mucosal immune system and immune responses to food proteins at weaning. We propose that neonatal piglets provide a tractable model which allows maternal and treatment effects to be statistically separated. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Experimental Evidence for Weathering and Martian Sulfate Formation Under Extremely Cold Weather-Limited Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Paul B.; Golden, D. C.; Michalski, J.

    2013-01-01

    High resolution photography and spectroscopy of the martian surface (MOC, HiRISE) from orbit has revolutionized our view of Mars with one of the most important discoveries being wide-spread layered sedimentary deposits associated with sulfate minerals across the low to mid latitude regions of Mars [1, 2]. The mechanism for sulfate formation on Mars has been frequently attributed to playa-like evaporative environments under prolonged warm conditions [3]. However, there are several problems with the presence of prolonged surface temperatures on Mars above 273 K during the Noachian including the faint young Sun [4] and the presence of suitable greenhouse gases [5]. The geomorphic evidence for early warm conditions may instead be explained by periodic episodes of warming rather than long term prolonged warm temperatures [6]. An alternate view of the ancient martian climate contends that prolonged warm temperatures were never present and that the atmosphere and climate has been similar to modern conditions throughout most of its history [6]. This view is more consistent with the climate models, but has had a difficult time explaining the sedimentary history of Mars and in particular the presence of sulfate minerals. We suggest here that mixtures of atmospheric aerosols, ice, and dust have the potential for creating small films of cryo-concentrated acidic solutions that may represent an important unexamined environment for understanding weathering processes on Mars [7, 8]. This study seeks to test whether sulfate formation may be possible at temperatures well below 0 C in water limited environments removing the need for prolonged warm periods to form sulfates on early Mars.

  4. The biotechnology communication paradox: Experimental evidence and the need for a new strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim; Frewer, Lynn J.

    2003-01-01

    experiments involving 1655 consumers from Denmark, Germany, Italy, and the UK. Different information strategies were tested against a control group for their ability to change consumer attitudes. No attitude change occurred. Rather, results indicate that all strategies had a uniform attitude activation effect......In the past, communication strategies aimed at facilitating consumer acceptance of genetically modified foods have focused on technology-driven, top-down practices. The utility of these practices in influencing the extent to which consumers accept specific GM foods was tested in attitude change...... that significantly decreased consumers' preferences for GM foods as compared to the control group. The discussion focuses on why technology-driven information strategies have failed to convince consumers of the merits of GM foods, and relates these results to recent changes in consumer policy that are aimed...

  5. Experimental evidence for the involvement of PDLIM5 in mood disorders in hetero knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasue Horiuchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reports indicate that PDLIM5 is involved in mood disorders. The PDLIM5 (PDZ and LIM domain 5 gene has been genetically associated with mood disorders; it's expression is upregulated in the postmortem brains of patients with bipolar disorder and downregulated in the peripheral lymphocytes of patients with major depression. Acute and chronic methamphetamine (METH administration may model mania and the evolution of mania into psychotic mania or schizophrenia-like behavioral changes, respectively. METHODS: To address whether the downregulation of PDLIM5 protects against manic symptoms and cause susceptibility to depressive symptoms, we evaluated the effects of reduced Pdlim5 levels on acute and chronic METH-induced locomotor hyperactivity, prepulse inhibition, and forced swimming by using Pdlim5 hetero knockout (KO mice. RESULTS: The homozygous KO of Pdlim5 is embryonic lethal. The effects of METH administration on locomotor hyperactivity and the impairment of prepulse inhibition were lower in Pdlim5 hetero KO mice than in wild-type mice. The transient inhibition of PDLIM5 (achieved by blocking the translocation of protein kinase C epsilon before the METH challenge had a similar effect on behavior. Pdlim5 hetero KO mice showed increased immobility time in the forced swimming test, which was diminished after the chronic administration of imipramine. Chronic METH treatment increased, whereas chronic haloperidol treatment decreased, Pdlim5 mRNA levels in the prefrontal cortex. Imipramine increased Pdlim5 mRNA levels in the hippocampus. CONCLUSION: These findings are partially compatible with reported observations in humans, indicating that PDLIM5 is involved in psychiatric disorders, including mood disorders.

  6. Favorable results from the use of herbal and plant products in inflammatory bowel disease: evidence from experimental animal studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafillidis, John K.; Triantafyllidi, Aikaterini; Vagianos, Constantinos; Papalois, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    The use of herbal therapy for inflammatory bowel disease is increasing worldwide. The aim of this study was to review the available literature on the efficacy of herbal therapy in experimental colitis. All relevant studies published in Medline and Embase up to June 2015 have been reviewed. The results of bowel histology and serum parameters have been recorded. A satisfactory number of published experimental studies, and a quite large one of both herbal and plant products tested in different studies have been reported. The results showed that in the majority of the studies, herbal therapy reduced the inflammatory activity of experimental colitis and diminished the levels of many inflammatory indices, including serum cytokines and indices of oxidative stress. The most promising plant and herbal products were tormentil extracts, wormwoodherb, Aloe vera, germinated barley foodstuff, curcumin, Boswellia serrata, Panax notoginseng, Ixeris dentata, green tea, Cordia dichotoma, Plantago lanceolata, Iridoidglycosides, and mastic gum. Herbal therapies exert their therapeutic benefit via various mechanisms, including immune regulation, anti-oxidant activity, inhibition of leukotriene B4 and nuclear factor-κB, and antiplatelet activity. Large, double-blind clinical studies assessing these natural substances should be urgently conducted. PMID:27366027

  7. SHANNON DIVERSITY INDICES OF PHYTOPLANKTON IN EXPERIMENTAL FISH-REARING PONDS UNDER THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF ORGANIC FERTILIZERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Chuzhma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To perform a comparative analysis of information diversity indices of phytoplankton development in fish-rearing ponds fertilized with biohumus, Riverm and traditional types of organic fertilizers for the determination of the presence or absence of phytoplankton degradation in these water bodies under the effect of the application of these fertilizers. Methodology. The article describes the results obtained during three years of the studies of phytoplankton in fish-rearing ponds, in which was carp seeds were grown in monoculture and polyculture using intensive and extensive cultivation technologies. The information diversity of algal communities of ponds was determined by calculating the Shannon index based on quantitative characteristics of phytoplankton development. Findings. The performed studies have shown that the application of the studied fertilizers did not lead to the degeneration of algal communities in fish-rearing ponds, which would be expressed as a depleted information diversity of phytoplankton quantitative characteristics; the degree of the information diversity of phytoplankton abundance and biomass varied in time independently; the seasonal dynamics of the informative diversity of phytoplankton biomass was shaped by the amounts applied studied organic fertilizers such as cattle humus, biohumus and Riverm; the seasonal dynamics of the information diversity degree of phytoplankton abundance depends mainly on natural factors; an increase in the abundance of blue-green algae by the end of the season, like algal blooms during the season, is not a consequence of the effect of the applied fertilizer. Originality. For the first time Shannon diversity index was used to characterize the development of phytoplankton in fish-rearing ponds after the application of biohumus and Riverm for their fertilization. Practical value. The obtained results indicate on the promising use of biohumus and Riverm to stimulate the development of the

  8. Joint impact of ERP systems and non financial performance indicators on corporate financial performance: Evidence from French listed companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Kouki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to examine the joint impact of Enterprise Resource Planning systems (ERP systems and Non Financial Performance Indicators (NFPI on corporate financial performance. Our study is based on a comparative analysis between firms that adopt ERP only, firms that use NFPI only and firms that combining both strategies (ERP and NFPI during the period from 2001 to 2006.The implementation process remains highly uncertain. In fact, the use of Non Financial performance indicators is an important determinant of corporate financial performance. At the operational level, combining ERP systems with NFPI reflects a long-term business strategy to improve business process. In summary, the ERP and NFPI literatures demonstrate the vital importance of aligning business process, information technologies and key performance indicators with the strategic objectives of the firm. Results support the hypothesis in which firms that combining ERP and NFPI have significantly higher ROA than either ERP-only or NFPI-only firms.

  9. Intrapopulation variability shaping isotope discrimination and turnover: experimental evidence in arctic foxes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Lecomte

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tissue-specific stable isotope signatures can provide insights into the trophic ecology of consumers and their roles in food webs. Two parameters are central for making valid inferences based on stable isotopes, isotopic discrimination (difference in isotopic ratio between consumer and its diet and turnover time (renewal process of molecules in a given tissue usually measured when half of the tissue composition has changed. We investigated simultaneously the effects of age, sex, and diet types on the variation of discrimination and half-life in nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes (δ¹⁵N and δ¹³C, respectively in five tissues (blood cells, plasma, muscle, liver, nail, and hair of a top predator, the arctic fox Vulpes lagopus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We fed 40 farmed foxes (equal numbers of adults and yearlings of both sexes with diet capturing the range of resources used by their wild counterparts. We found that, for a single species, six tissues, and three diet types, the range of discrimination values can be almost as large as what is known at the scale of the whole mammalian or avian class. Discrimination varied depending on sex, age, tissue, and diet types, ranging from 0.3‰ to 5.3‰ (mean  = 2.6‰ for δ¹⁵N and from 0.2‰ to 2.9‰ (mean  = 0.9‰ for δ¹³C. We also found an impact of population structure on δ¹⁵N half-life in blood cells. Varying across individuals, δ¹⁵N half-life in plasma (6 to 10 days was also shorter than for δ¹³C (14 to 22 days, though δ¹⁵N and δ¹³C half-lives are usually considered as equal. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, our multi-factorial experiment revealed that at least six levels of isotopic variations could co-occur in the same population. Our experimental analysis provides a framework for quantifying multiple sources of variation in isotopic discrimination and half-life that needs to be taken into account when designing and analysing ecological

  10. Experimental evidences on the scaling behavior of a sandy porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallico, C.; Straface, S.; Chidichimo, F.; Ferrante, A. P.; De Bartolo, S.

    2012-04-01

    Various authors treated the scaling of the hydrodispersive parameters in porous media. Nevertheless several studies and reports finding in literature on this matter, specifically on the dispersivity increases with scale of measurement, are based on a statistical or experimental approach (Neuman, 1990; Wheatcraft & Tylor, 1988; Clauser, 1992; Schulze-Makuch, 2005). Following this last approach, we analysed the scale behaviour of a sandy porous media, the grain size of which was characterized carefully in laboratory. For this aim we carried out several tracer tests on three cylindrical samples of the considered sandy soil. The diameter of these samples was the same, equal to 0.0635 m, and the lengths respectively equal to 0.15 m, 0.30 m and 0.60 m. At the bottom and the top of the cylindrical sample two membrane were located to allow the water flow. The water arrived in the sample from the bottom by a plastic tube and came out from the top to exclude the presence of air in the soil sample. The flow was produced by a peristaltic pump, able to develop different rates and therefore different flow velocities. For all tests the utilized tracer was NaCl, that was melted in 50 ml of solution with concentration of 5 g/l. The letting in of the solution was performed immediately up pump, by a connection of plastic tubes and a tap. The tests was carried out at first letting in the tracer in short times and after repeating it with continuous letting in. In this way the tests was carried out, repeating them five times with different rates and, therefore, velocities. For each of test the breakthrough curves were obtained and successively the longitudinal dispersivity (αL) and the coefficient of longitudinal dispersion (DL) were calculated. These values, considering also the lengths of the samples, allowed to verify the scaling behaviour of the examined sandy porous media. In fact a specific law to describe the increase of αL with scale was determined. Analogously another law was

  11. Preliminary Results Indicate That Inactivated Vaccine against Paratuberculosis Could Modify the Course of Experimental Mycobacterium bovis Infection in Calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Serrano

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Although paratuberculosis (PTB vaccination has been recognized as an effective tool to control the disease, its use has been limited in countries undergoing bovine tuberculosis (bTB eradication programs because of its interference with the diagnostic techniques. Due to this restraint, little is known about the effect of vaccinating against PTB on the progression of bTB infection. To assess this topic, an experimental infection was carried out including the following three groups of five calves each: non-vaccinated infected with Mycobacterium bovis (NVI, vaccinated against PTB infected with M. bovis (VI, and vaccinated against PTB non-infected (VNI. The level of infection attending to pathological and bacteriological parameters was evaluated at necropsy in collected tissue samples. Infection was confirmed in all challenged animals being the lung and thoracic regions most affected for all studied parameters. The VI group presented 15.62% less gross lesions in the thoracic region than the NVI, although no significant differences were found. Only one vaccinated animal presented gross lesions in the lung, compared to three non-vaccinated calves. NVI animals showed an average of 1.8 lung lobes with gross lesions whereas in the vaccinated group the average number of affected lobes was 0.2, representing an 89% reduction. Significant differences were not found, although a tendency was observed (p = 0.126. Pathological and culture scores showed the same tendency. Vaccination induced a 71.42 and 60% reduction in lesion and culture scores in the lung as well as a 23.75 and 26.66% decline, respectively, in the thoracic region. The VI group showed lower positivity in the rest of the areas for all measured criteria except for the head. In order to reinforce our results, further research on a larger sample size is needed, but the results from this study suggest that PTB vaccination could confer certain degree of protection against bTB infection, supporting

  12. Study of tolerance of enterobacteria to chlorine-based biocides in experimental models using chromogenic indicator tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.R. Efimochkina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The species-specific composition of microbial contaminants of vegetable raw materials and equipment used in the production of biotechnological products and beverages fermentation are studied. 85 enterobacteria strains was isolated and investigated, 46 strains of the genera Enterobacter, Pantoea, Citrobacter, Serratia, Escherichia, Cronobacter was identified to the species level; the most frequently detected bacteria of the genera Enterobacter and Pantoea (about 50 %. For the first time developed and tested chromogenic in vitro model based that allows to quantify the degree of inhibition of gram-negative microflora under the influence of antimicrobial agents depending on the concentrations of biocides and density of bacterial populations. A comparative analysis of the tolerance of Enterobacteriaceae strains from different biotopes was conducted. Sensitivity to the treatment of chlorine-containing biocides in 26 strains of enterobacteria from plant material and 9 strains of Escherichia coli from the intestine of male rats of Wistar line was tested. Enterobacteria from vegetable raw materials and swabs were more resistant to antimicrobial action of chlorine, than the representatives of the populations of the normal intestinal microbiota. It is established that the active chlorine concentration of 50–100 mg/dm 3 , the most commonly used in the processing of vegetable raw materials, is not effective for Enterobacteriaceae, if the density of the microbial population is 10 5–7 cells/cm 3 and above. At an initial level of contamination with Enterobacteriaceae not more than 10 3 cells/cm 3 processing solutions with a concentration of active chlorine of 75 to 100 mg/dm 3 can provide effective disinfection of raw materials, equipment, or inventory. Experimental chromogenic in vitro model proposed to assess the impact of chlorine-based biocides on the degree of the enterobacteria inhibition, can be used to justify the selection and doses of

  13. Absence of postzygotic isolating mechanisms: evidence from experimental hybridization between two species of tropical sea urchins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. Aminur; Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Arshad, Aziz; Yusoff, Fatimah Md.; Shamsudin, Mariana Nor

    2012-01-01

    Two reef margin species of tropical sea urchins, Echinometra sp. C (Ec) and Echinometra oblonga (Eo), occur sympatrically on Okinawa intertidal reefs in southern Japan. Hybridization between these species was examined through a series of cross-fertilization experiments. At limited sperm concentrations, where conspecific crosses reached near 100% fertilization, both heterospecific crosses showed high fertilization rates (81%–85%). The compatibility of the gametes demonstrated that if gamete recognition molecules are involved in fertilization of these species, they are not strongly species-specific. We found that conspecific crosses reached peak fertilization levels much faster than did heterospecific crosses, indicating the presence of a prezygotic barrier to hybridization in the gametes. Larval survival, metamorphosis, and juvenile and adult survival of hybrid groups were nearly identical to those of their parent species. Hybrids from crosses in both directions developed normally through larval stages to sexually mature adults, indicating that neither gametic incompatibility nor hybrid inviability appeared to maintain reproductive isolation between these species. In adults, Ec×Ec crosses gave the highest live weight, followed by Eo (ova)×Ec (sperm), Ec (ova)×Eo (sperm), and Eo×Eo. Other growth performance measures (viz., test size, Aristotle’s lantern length, and gonad index) of hybrid groups and their parental siblings showed the same trends. The phenotypic color patterns of the hybrids were closer to the maternal coloration, whereas spine length, tube-foot and gonad spicule characteristics, pedicellaria valve length, and gamete sizes showed intermediate features. Adult F1 hybrids were completely fertile and displayed high fertilization success in F1 backcrosses, eliminating the likelihood that hybrid sterility is a postzygotic mechanism of reproductive isolation. Conversely, intensive surveys failed to find hybrid individuals in the field, suggesting the

  14. Absence of postzygotic isolating mechanisms: evidence from experimental hybridization between two species of tropical sea urchins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Aminur; Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Arshad, Aziz; Yusoff, Fatimah Md; Shamsudin, Mariana Nor

    2012-10-01

    Two reef margin species of tropical sea urchins, Echinometra sp. C (Ec) and Echinometra oblonga (Eo), occur sympatrically on Okinawa intertidal reefs in southern Japan. Hybridization between these species was examined through a series of cross-fertilization experiments. At limited sperm concentrations, where conspecific crosses reached near 100% fertilization, both heterospecific crosses showed high fertilization rates (81%-85%). The compatibility of the gametes demonstrated that if gamete recognition molecules are involved in fertilization of these species, they are not strongly species-specific. We found that conspecific crosses reached peak fertilization levels much faster than did heterospecific crosses, indicating the presence of a prezygotic barrier to hybridization in the gametes. Larval survival, metamorphosis, and juvenile and adult survival of hybrid groups were nearly identical to those of their parent species. Hybrids from crosses in both directions developed normally through larval stages to sexually mature adults, indicating that neither gametic incompatibility nor hybrid inviability appeared to maintain reproductive isolation between these species. In adults, Ec×Ec crosses gave the highest live weight, followed by Eo (ova)×Ec (sperm), Ec (ova)×Eo (sperm), and Eo×Eo. Other growth performance measures (viz., test size, Aristotle's lantern length, and gonad index) of hybrid groups and their parental siblings showed the same trends. The phenotypic color patterns of the hybrids were closer to the maternal coloration, whereas spine length, tube-foot and gonad spicule characteristics, pedicellaria valve length, and gamete sizes showed intermediate features. Adult F(1) hybrids were completely fertile and displayed high fertilization success in F(1) backcrosses, eliminating the likelihood that hybrid sterility is a postzygotic mechanism of reproductive isolation. Conversely, intensive surveys failed to find hybrid individuals in the field, suggesting the

  15. Validity Evidence for the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator as a Measure of Hemisphere Dominance: Another View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, William M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Relationships among the scales of the Myers Briggs Type Indicator and the Human Information Processing Survey revealed in a study by S. C. Shiflett (1989) were reinvestigated in a study involving 554 college students (270 males and 284 females). One significant gender difference among the correlations was found. (SLD)

  16. Data from: Evidence from pyrosequencing indicates that natural variation in animal personality is associated with DRD4 DNA methylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulst, E.C.; Mateman, A.C.; Zwier, Mathijs V.; Caro, Samuel P.; Verhoeven, K.J.F.; Oers, van Kees

    2015-01-01

    Contain all the individual methylation levels per CpG position for assays A-D. Each tab ($data_$assay_$tissuetype) contains the results from one pyrosequence run and one type of tissue (blood or brain). The columns indicate: SampleID: bird sample Note: EEB score, F is Fast exploring, S is Slow

  17. Estimating valence from the sound of a word: Computational, experimental, and cross-linguistic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louwerse, Max; Qu, Zhan

    2017-06-01

    It is assumed linguistic symbols must be grounded in perceptual information to attain meaning, because the sound of a word in a language has an arbitrary relation with its referent. This paper demonstrates that a strong arbitrariness claim should be reconsidered. In a computational study, we showed that one phonological feature (nasals in the beginning of a word) predicted negative valence in three European languages (English, Dutch, and German) and positive valence in Chinese. In three experiments, we tested whether participants used this feature in estimating the valence of a word. In Experiment 1, Chinese and Dutch participants rated the valence of written valence-neutral words, with Chinese participants rating the nasal-first neutral-valence words more positive and the Dutch participants rating nasal-first neutral-valence words more negative. In Experiment 2, Chinese (and Dutch) participants rated the valence of Dutch (and Chinese) written valence-neutral words without being able to understand the meaning of these words. The patterns replicated the valence patterns from Experiment 1. When the written words from Experiment 2 were transformed into spoken words, results in Experiment 3 again showed that participants estimated the valence of words on the basis of the sound of the word. The computational study and psycholinguistic experiments indicated that language users can bootstrap meaning from the sound of a word.

  18. Experimental and Computational Evidence on the Interaction of Cycloalkyl α-Aminobisphosphonates with Calf Thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholivand, Mohammad Bagher; Peyman, Hossein; Gholivand, Khodayar; Roshanfekr, Hamideh; Taherpour, Avat Arman; Yaghoubi, Rouhollah

    2017-07-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, viscometry, cyclic voltammetry, and differential pulse voltammetry were applied to investigate the competitive interaction of DNA with the three new cycloalkyl α-aminobisphosphonates (D 1 -D 3 ) and spectroscopic probe, neutral red dye, and Hoechst (HO), in a Tris-hydrogen chloride buffer (pH 7.4). The spectroscopic and voltammetric studies showed that the groove binding mode of interaction is predominant in the solution containing DNA and α-aminobisphosphonates. Furthermore, the results indicated that α-aminobisphosphonate with the lengthy N alkyl chains and larger heterocyclic ring size had a stronger interaction. The principal component analysis and theoretical quantum mechanical and molecular mechanics (QM-DFT B3LYP/6-31+G* and MM-SYBYL) methods were also applied to determine the number of chemical components presented in complexation equilibrium and identify the structure complexes of DNA with the three new cycloalkyl α-aminobisphosphonates (D 1 -D 3 ), respectively.

  19. Indications and determinants of caesarean section delivery: Evidence from a population-based study in Matlab, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Tahmina; Rahman, Aminur; Nababan, Herfina; Hoque, Dewan Md Emdadul; Khan, Al Fazal; Ali, Taslim; Anwar, Iqbal

    2017-01-01

    Caesarean section (C-section) is a major obstetric intervention for saving lives of women and their newborns from pregnancy and childbirth related complications. Un-necessary C-sections may have adverse impact upon maternal and neonatal outcomes. In Bangladesh there is paucity of data on clinical indication of C-section at population level. We conducted a retrospective study in icddr,b Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) area of Matlab to look into the indications and determinants of C-sections. All resident women in HDSS service area who gave birth in 2013 with a known birth outcome, were included in the study. Women who underwent C-section were identified from birth and pregnancy files of HDSS and their indication for C-section were collected reviewing health facility records where the procedure took place, supplemented by face-to-face interview of mothers where data were missing. Indications of C-section were presented as frequency distribution and further divided into different groups following 3 distinct classification systems. Socio-demographic predictors were explored following statistical method of binary logistic regression. During 2013, facility delivery rate was 84% and population based C-section rate was 35% of all deliveries in icddr,b service area. Of all C-sections, only 1.4% was conducted for Absolute Maternal Indications (AMIs). Major indications of C-sections included: repeat C-section (24%), foetal distress (21%), prolonged labour (16%), oligohydramnios (14%) and post-maturity (13%). More than 80% C-sections were performed in for-profit private facilities. Probability of C-section delivery increased with improved socio-economic status, higher education, lower birth order, higher age, and with more number of Antenatal Care use and presence of bad obstetric history. Eight maternal deaths occurred, of which five were delivered by C-section. C-section rate in this area was much higher than national average as well as global

  20. Student Preferences and Performance in Online and Face-to-Face Classes Using Myers-Briggs Indicator: A Longitudinal Quasi-Experimental Study

    OpenAIRE

    Seta Boghikian-Whitby; Yehia Mortagy

    2016-01-01

    This longitudinal, quasi-experimental study investigated students’ cognitive personality type using the Myers-Briggs personality Type Indicator (MBTI) in Internet-based Online and Face-to-Face (F2F) modalities. A total of 1154 students enrolled in 28 Online and 32 F2F sections taught concurrently over a period of fourteen years. The study measured whether the sample is similar to the national average percentage frequency of all 16 different personality types; whether specific personality ty...

  1. The impact of citizenship on intermarriage: Quasi-experimental evidence from two European Union Eastern enlargements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Azzolini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to assimilation theory, the more immigrants are integrated within host countries the more likely they are to intermarry. However, status exchange theory argues instead that when integration is low, immigrants may use intermarriage as a means of improving their integration prospects in host countries, in which case an increase in levels of integration would reduce immigrants' propensity to intermarry. Objective: To test these two hypotheses, this paper assesses the causal effect of a positive shift in immigrants' level of integration, namely the acquisition of citizenship, on intermarriage in Italy. Over the past 20 years Italy has experienced an unprecedented growth in intermarriage involving primarily Eastern European women. Methods: We study two EU Eastern enlargements, following which citizens of the new EU member countries became EU citizens and thus experienced a marked improvement in their legal status. We apply the synthetic control method to data on marriages between native men and foreign women. Results: We find that the acquisition of citizenship has a significant negative impact on immigrant women's propensity to marry native men. That impact is much greater for immigrants coming from less affluent countries. Conclusions: Our results support the status exchange hypothesis. This can be explained by the poor socioeconomic integration and precarious legal status of immigrants in Italy. Contribution: The growth of intermarriage per se cannot be seen as an indicator of greater immigrant integration. The negative impact of citizenship acquisition on immigrants' propensity to intermarry also calls for a rethinking of the role of institutions such as marriage and citizenship in the process of immigrant integration.

  2. Geomorphometric variability of "monogenetic" volcanic cones: Evidence from Mauna Kea, Lanzarote and experimental cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kervyn, M.; Ernst, G. G. J.; Carracedo, J.-C.; Jacobs, P.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic cones are the most common volcanic constructs on Earth. Their shape can be quantified using two morphometric ratios: the crater/cone base ratio (W cr/W co) and the cone height/width ratio (H co/W co). The average values for these ratios obtained over entire cone fields have been explained by the repose angle of loose granular material (i.e. scoria) controlling cone slopes. The observed variability in these ratios between individual cones has been attributed to the effect of erosional processes or contrasting eruptive conditions on cone morphometry. Using a GIS-based approach, high spatial resolution Digital Elevation Models and airphotos, two new geomorphometry datasets for cone fields at Mauna Kea (Hawaii, USA) and Lanzarote (Canary Islands, Spain) are extracted and analyzed here. The key observation in these datasets is the great variability in morphometric ratios, even for simple-shape and well-preserved cones. Simple analog experiments are presented to analyze factors influencing the morphometric ratios. The formation of a crater is simulated within an analog cone (i.e. a sand pile) by opening a drainage conduit at the cone base. Results from experiments show that variability in the morphometric ratios can be attributed to variations in the width, height and horizontal offset of the drainage point relative to the cone symmetry axis, to the dip of the underlying slope or to the influence of a small proportion of fine cohesive material. GIS analysis and analog experiments, together with specific examples of cones documented in the field, suggest that the morphometric ratios for well-preserved volcanic cones are controlled by a combination of 1) the intrinsic cone material properties, 2) time-dependent eruption conditions, 3) the local setting, and 4) the method used to estimate the cone height. Implications for interpreting cone morphometry solely as either an age or as an eruption condition indicator are highlighted.

  3. The implications of financial performance on stock exchange indicators of listed companies: empirical evidence for the Romanian capital market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia-Oana ȘTEFAN(BELCIC-ȘTEFAN

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines and quantifies the implications of financial indicators of performance on the share return of companies listed on Bucharest Stock Exchange. These implications are even more relevant as the Romanian capital market could benefit from increased visibility with its reclassification as an emerging capital market in the near future. The research is conducted at the level of 33 companies listed on BSE for the time frame 2011-2013, building a multiple linear regression model that quantifies the variation in price to book value depending on the evolution of nine financial indicators of performance out of a total of 38 such possible indicators. Correcting the effects of serial correlation within the model led to its respecification resorting to the generalized differences procedure. The value of the R-squared coefficient of determination for the processed model is 0.543, eight of the nine independent variables being significant at the 1% level. The 0 probability associated to the F-test as well as its value confirm that the regression equation is globally significant. Also, all the assumptions for validating the estimated model are confirmed, both general ones, characteristic to the multiple linear regression procedure, and, in particular, according to the specific set of data under processing. The applied usefulness of the regression model is valued in the next step of the research, that of testing the effectiveness of the Romanian capital market, after which it was found that the influence of financial performance indicators was already incorporated into the market price since the end of the reporting period.

  4. Experimental evidence of turbulence regulation by time-varying E  ×  B flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, C.; Henriques, R.; Hidalgo, C.; Fernandes, H.

    2018-02-01

    The interaction between zonal flows and turbulence is a self-regulating mechanism. Understanding this interaction is crucial to control plasma confinement. Results presented in this paper aim at understanding the conditions under which geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) influence turbulent transport. This is achieved by performing perturbative experiments where GAMs are stimulated and externally controlled. Experiments on ISTTOK revealed that increasing the GAM shear rate over its natural value leads to a reduction of the turbulent transport and to an enhancement in particle confinement. Taking advantage of our unique experimental tools, it is shown that GAMs play an important role in the regulation of the fluctuations, constituting further evidence that the GAM shear rate is enough to regulate the ambient fluctuations without totally suppressing the turbulence.

  5. The effects of prosocial video games on prosocial behaviors: international evidence from correlational, longitudinal, and experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Douglas A; Anderson, Craig A; Yukawa, Shintaro; Ihori, Nobuko; Saleem, Muniba; Ming, Lim Kam; Shibuya, Akiko; Liau, Albert K; Khoo, Angeline; Bushman, Brad J; Rowell Huesmann, L; Sakamoto, Akira

    2009-06-01

    Although dozens of studies have documented a relationship between violent video games and aggressive behaviors, very little attention has been paid to potential effects of prosocial games. Theoretically, games in which game characters help and support each other in nonviolent ways should increase both short-term and long-term prosocial behaviors. We report three studies conducted in three countries with three age groups to test this hypothesis. In the correlational study, Singaporean middle-school students who played more prosocial games behaved more prosocially. In the two longitudinal samples of Japanese children and adolescents, prosocial game play predicted later increases in prosocial behavior. In the experimental study, U.S. undergraduates randomly assigned to play prosocial games behaved more prosocially toward another student. These similar results across different methodologies, ages, and cultures provide robust evidence of a prosocial game content effect, and they provide support for the General Learning Model.

  6. Modulation of Antioxidant Enzymatic Activities by Certain Antiepileptic Drugs (Valproic Acid, Oxcarbazepine, and Topiramate: Evidence in Humans and Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemí Cárdenas-Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that at least 100 million people worldwide will suffer from epilepsy at some point in their lives. This neurological disorder induces brain death due to the excessive liberation of glutamate, which activates the postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptors, which in turn cause the reuptake of intracellular calcium (excitotoxicity. This excitotoxicity elicits a series of events leading to nitric oxide synthase (NOS activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Several studies in experimental models and in humans have demonstrated that certain antiepileptic drugs (AEDs exhibit antioxidant effects by modulating the activity of various enzymes associated with this type of stress. Considering the above-mentioned data, we aimed to compile evidence elucidating how AEDs such as valproic acid (VPA, oxcarbazepine (OXC, and topiramate (TPM modulate oxidative stress.

  7. The Effects of Prosocial Video Games on Prosocial Behaviors: International Evidence from Correlational, Longitudinal, and Experimental Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Douglas A.; Anderson, Craig A.; Yukawa, Shintaro; Ihori, Nobuko; Saleem, Muniba; Ming, Lim Kam; Shibuya, Akiko; Liau, Albert K.; Khoo, Angeline; Bushman, Brad J.; Huesmann, L. Rowell; Sakamoto, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Although dozens of studies have documented a relation between violent video games and aggressive behaviors, very little attention has been paid to potential effects of prosocial games. Theoretically, games in which game characters help and support each other in nonviolent ways should increase both short-term and long-term prosocial behaviors. We report three studies conducted in three countries with three age groups to test this hypothesis. In the correlational study, Singaporean middle-school students who played more prosocial games behaved more prosocially. In the two longitudinal samples of Japanese children and adolescents, prosocial game play predicted later increases in prosocial behavior. In the experimental study, U.S. undergraduates randomly assigned to play prosocial games behaved more prosocially toward another student. These similar results across different methodologies, ages, and cultures provide robust evidence a prosocial game content effect, and provide support for the General Learning Model. PMID:19321812

  8. Heterogeneity in predictive power of early childhood nutritional indicators for mid-childhood outcomes: Evidence from Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Le Thuc; Behrman, Jere R

    2017-08-01

    We utilize longitudinal data on nearly 1800 children in Vietnam to study the predictive power of alternative measures of early childhood undernutrition for outcomes at age eight years: weight-for-age (WAZ8), height-for-age (HAZ8), and education (reading, math and receptive vocabulary). We apply two-stage procedures to derive unpredicted weight gain and height growth in the first year of life. Our estimates show that a standard deviation (SD) increase in birth weight is associated with an increase of 0.14 (standard error [SE]: 0.03) in WAZ8 and 0.12 (SE: 0.02) in HAZ8. These are significantly lower than the corresponding figures for a SD increase in unpredicted weight gain: 0.51 (SE: 0.02) and 0.33 (SE: 0.02). The heterogeneity of the predictive power of early childhood nutrition indicators for mid-childhood outcomes reflects both life-cycle considerations (prenatal versus postnatal) and the choice of anthropometric measure (height versus weight). Even though all the nutritional indicators that involve postnatal nutritional status are important predictors for all the mid-childhood outcomes, there are some important differences between the indicators on weight and height. The magnitude of associations with the outcomes is one aspect of the heterogeneity. More importantly there is a component of height-for-age z-score (at age 12 months) that adds predictive power for all the mid-childhood outcomes beyond that of birth weight and weight gain in the first year of life. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Direct evidence from intraoperative electrocortical stimulation indicates shared and distinct speech production center between Chinese and English languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinsong; Lu, Junfeng; Zhang, Han; Zhang, Jie; Yao, Chengjun; Zhuang, Dongxiao; Qiu, Tianming; Guo, Qihao; Hu, Xiaobing; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liangfu

    2015-12-01

    Chinese processing has been suggested involving distinct brain areas from English. However, current functional localization studies on Chinese speech processing use mostly "indirect" techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography, lacking direct evidence by means of electrocortical recording. In this study, awake craniotomies in 66 Chinese-speaking glioma patients provide a unique opportunity to directly map eloquent language areas. Intraoperative electrocortical stimulation was conducted and the positive sites for speech arrest, anomia, and alexia were identified separately. With help of stereotaxic neuronavigation system and computational modeling, all positive sites elicited by stimulation were integrated and a series of two- and three-dimension Chinese language probability maps were built. We performed statistical comparisons between the Chinese maps and previously derived English maps. While most Chinese speech arrest areas located at typical language production sites (i.e., 50% positive sites in ventral precentral gyrus, 28% in pars opercularis and pars triangularis), which also serve English production, an additional brain area, the left middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann's areas 6/9), was found to be unique in Chinese production (P neurolinguistics differences in human beings. The Chinese language atlas will also helpful in brain surgery planning for Chinese-speakers. Copyright © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A review of in vitro experimental evidence for the effect of spatial and temporal modulation of radiation dose on response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suchowerska, Natalka (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, New South Wales (Australia)), E-mail: Natalka@email.cs.nsw.gov.au; McKenzie, David R. (School of Physics, Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)); Ebert, Martin A. (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Western Australia (Australia)); Jackson, Michael (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales (Australia))

    2010-11-15

    Background. Intensity modulated radiation therapy introduces strong spatial and temporal modulation of the dose delivery that may have therapeutic benefits, as yet unrealized. Material and methods. Experimental evidence for spatial and temporal modulation affecting the cell survival following in vitro irradiation has been derived using clonogenic assays. Results and discussion. The experimental results show that the survival status of a cell is strongly influenced by the spatial dose modulation. The classical bystander effect of decreased survival has now been supplemented by observations of increased survival, which may result from the same or different signaling mechanisms. Temporal dose modulation experiments show that dose protraction significantly increases cell survival. An appropriate choice of temporal dose modulation pattern enables cell death to be maximized or minimized for a constant dose and delivery time. Conclusion. Bystander effects challenge the assumption that outcome is solely dependent on local dose. Intra-fractional temporal modulation via protracted treatments and time varying dose delivery both affect the cell survival. The presence of bystander and temporal effects emphasize the need for a mathematical framework which incorporates their influence on cell survival

  11. Experimental evidence for the intention-behavior relationship in the physical activity domain: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Ryan E; Dickau, Leanne

    2012-11-01

    Most contemporary theories of physical activity include an intention construct as the proximal determinant of behavior. Support of this premise has been found through correlational research. The purpose of this paper was to appraise the experimental evidence for the intention-behavior relationship through meta-analysis. Studies were eligible if they included: (1) random assignment of participants to intervention/no intervention groups; (2) an intervention that produced a significant difference in intention between groups; and (3) a measure of behavior was taken after the intention measure. Literature searches were concluded in December 2010 among five key search engines. This search yielded a total of 1,033 potentially relevant records; of these, 11 passed the eligibility criteria. Random effects meta-analysis procedures with correction for sampling bias were employed in the analysis. The sample-weighted average effect size derived from these studies was d+ = .45 (95% CI .30 to .60) for intention, yet d+ = .15 (95% CI .06 to .23) for behavior. These results demonstrate a weak relationship between intention and behavior that may be below meaningful/practical value. We suggest that prior evidence was probably biased by the limits of correlation coefficients in passive designs. It is recommended that contemporary research apply models featuring intention-behavior mediators or action control variables in order to account for this intention-behavior gap.

  12. Probabilistic evidential assessment of gunshot residue particle evidence (Part II): Bayesian parameter estimation for experimental count data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, A; Bozza, S; Taroni, F

    2011-03-20

    Part I of this series of articles focused on the construction of graphical probabilistic inference procedures, at various levels of detail, for assessing the evidential value of gunshot residue (GSR) particle evidence. The proposed models--in the form of Bayesian networks--address the issues of background presence of GSR particles, analytical performance (i.e., the efficiency of evidence searching and analysis procedures) and contamination. The use and practical implementation of Bayesian networks for case pre-assessment is also discussed. This paper, Part II, concentrates on Bayesian parameter estimation. This topic complements Part I in that it offers means for producing estimates usable for the numerical specification of the proposed probabilistic graphical models. Bayesian estimation procedures are given a primary focus of attention because they allow the scientist to combine (his/her) prior knowledge about the problem of interest with newly acquired experimental data. The present paper also considers further topics such as the sensitivity of the likelihood ratio due to uncertainty in parameters and the study of likelihood ratio values obtained for members of particular populations (e.g., individuals with or without exposure to GSR). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Chlorine-rich amphibole in deep layered gabbros as evidence for brine/rock interaction in the lower oceanic crust: a microstructural and experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currin, Adriana; Koepke, Juergen; Almeev, Renat; Ildefonse, Benoit; Wolff, Paul Eric

    2017-04-01

    The occurrence of amphiboles in the lower oceanic crust indicates the presence of water during rock formation or alteration, either in the parental melt or in reacting hydrothermal fluids. Amphibole-rich high temperature metamorphic veins and magmatic dykes are found in MOR-associated layered olivine gabbros from Wadi Wariyah of the deep palaeocrust of the Sumail ophiolite, Sultanate of Oman. These veins contain different types of amphiboles: pargasite, hornblende, actinolite and Cl-rich pargasite. In some cases, amphibole grains are zoned and contain a range of compositions, from pargasite formed at magmatic conditions to Cl-rich pargasite formed at subsolidus conditions. Pargasite and ferropargasite are found containing up to 5 wt% Cl (1.4 a.p.f.u.). This variety of amphibole compositions occurring in layered gabbros evidences a complex history of brine/rock interaction and hydrothermal cooling at the base of the oceanic crust. However, the precise origin of these amphibole- and Cl-rich veins associated to hydrothermal activity is still poorly understood. We investigated the formation of Cl-rich amphibole by means of a microstructural study using EBSD (electron backscattered diffraction) and, in addition, an experimental simulation of hydrothermal processes affecting amphibole formation in gabbro at subsolidus conditions. The microstructural EBSD study on natural gabbro from Oman confirms that the hydrothermally-formed amphiboles (hornblende, actinolite, Cl-pargasite) are epitactic in relation to high-temperature pargasite areas adjacent to them. This implies a coherent process, where magmatic pargasite formed initially was subsequently transformed by a Cl-rich hydrothermal brine and fluid at decreasing temperatures, ranging from the magmatic regime down to greenschist facies. Experiments were performed with a starting material of millimetre-sized pargasite pieces (with Cl content pressure of 200 MPa, and oxygen fugacity of QFM+1. Our experimental results show

  14. Experimental evidence for subradiance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavolini, D.; Crubellier, A.; Pillet, P.; Cabaret, L.; Liberman, S.

    1985-04-01

    The first observation of the subradiance phenomenon is reported. As previously predicted, destructive interatomic interference may prevent cooperative deexcitation of a collection of atoms from being complete. In the case of a j = 3/2 to j' = 1/2 transition, for example, half the atoms remain excited when the initial atomic state is a full statistical mixture with equal weights of all Zeeman sublevels of the upper level. The experiment has been realized with gallium atoms. The results agree with semiclassical calculations. 16 references.

  15. DEVELOPING MEASURES TO IMPROVE STRENGTH INDICES OF SUPPORTING STRUCTURES FOR HEAD CARS OF DIESEL TRAINS DR1A ON THE BASIS OF EXPERIMENTAL-AND-THEORETICAL WORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Bondarev

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The objective is to determine the stress-strain state of supporting structures of the head car body and the traction transmission unit, which can be created in the operation of emergency situations, and to develop the measures aimed at improving the stress-strain state of these elements. Methodology. In order to achieve this objective, in performing the work an experimental determination of efforts and stress levels in the most loaded elements of supporting structures as well as the traction transmission units was conducted; design models for the theoretical determination of stress and effort levels were developed. Findings. Based on the analysis of the calculation results the best options for the upgrades, which have been put into the basis of proposals aimed at improving the strength indices, were revealed. Originality. Based on the experimental and theoretical studies, scientific monitoring of development works on modernization and improvement of strength indices of supporting structures of head cars of diesel trains DR1A was performed. Practical value. The technical solution to the measures, which are to be carried out beyond the limits of assigned operation lifetime for diesel train of the series specified was developed and transferred to the Ukrzaliznytsia experts to introduce the proposed measures on improving the strength indices.

  16. Is regular drinking in later life an indicator of good health? Evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Clare; Mendonça, Marina; Pikhart, Hynek; Frisher, Martin; de Oliveira, Cesar; Shelton, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    Older people who drink have been shown to have better health than those who do not. This might suggest that moderate drinking is beneficial for health, or, as considered here, that older people modify their drinking as their health deteriorates. The relationship between how often older adults drink and their health is considered for two heath states: self-rated health (SRH) and depressive symptoms. Data were analysed from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), a prospective cohort study of older adults, using multilevel ordered logit analysis. The analysis involved 4741 participants present at wave 0, (1998/1999 and 2001), wave 4 (2008/2009) and wave 5 (2010/2011). The outcome measure was frequency of drinking in last year recorded at all three time points. Older adults with fair/poor SRH at the onset of the study drank less frequently compared with adults with good SRH (phealth statuses, though respondents with both continual fair/poor SRH and declining SRH experienced a sharper reduction in the frequency of their drinking over time compared with older adults who remained in good SRH or whose health improved. The findings were similar for depression, though the association between depressive symptoms and drinking frequency at the baseline was not significant after adjusting for confounding variables. The frequency of older adults' drinking responds to changes in health status and drinking frequency in later life may be an indicator, rather than a cause, of health status. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Socioeconomic Inequality in Malnutrition in Under-5 Children in Iran: Evidence From the Multiple Indicator Demographic and Health Survey, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasian Kia, Abdollah; Rezapour, Aziz; Khosravi, Ardeshir; Afzali Abarghouei, Vajiheh

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the socioeconomic inequality in malnutrition in under-5 children in Iran in order to help policymakers reduce such inequality. Data on 8443 under-5 children were extracted from the Iran Multiple Indicator Demographic and Health Survey. The wealth index was used as proxy for socioeconomic status. Socioeconomic inequality in stunting, underweight, and wasting was calculated using the concentration index. The concentration index was calculated for the whole sample, as well as for subcategories defined in terms of categories such as area of residence (urban and rural) and the sex of children. Stunting was observed to be more prevalent than underweight or wasting. The results of the concentration index at the national level, as well as in rural and urban areas and in terms of children's sex, showed that inequality in stunting and underweight was statistically significant and that children in the lower quintiles were more malnourished. The wasting index was not sensitive to socioeconomic status, and its concentration index value was not statistically significant. This study showed that it can be misleading to assess the mean levels of malnutrition at the national level without knowledge of the distribution of malnutrition among socioeconomic groups. Significant socioeconomic inequalities in stunting and underweight were observed at the national level and in both urban and rural areas. Regarding the influence of nutrition on the health and economic well-being of preschool-aged children, it is necessary for the government to focus on taking targeted measures to reduce malnutrition and to focus on poorer groups within society who bear a greater burden of malnutrition.

  18. Experimental evidence of the tonic vibration reflex during whole-body vibration of the loaded and unloaded leg.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa N Zaidell

    Full Text Available Increased muscle activation during whole-body vibration (WBV is mainly ascribed to a complex spinal and supraspinal neurophysiological mechanism termed the tonic vibration reflex (TVR. However, TVR has not been experimentally demonstrated during low-frequency WBV, therefore this investigation aimed to determine the expression of TVR during WBV. Whilst seated, eight healthy males were exposed to either vertical WBV applied to the leg via the plantar-surface of the foot, or Achilles tendon vibration (ATV at 25 Hz and 50 Hz for 70s. Ankle plantar-flexion force, tri-axial accelerations at the shank and vibration source, and surface EMG activity of m. soleus (SOL and m. tibialis anterior (TA were recorded from the unloaded and passively loaded leg to simulate body mass supported during standing. Plantar flexion force was similarly augmented by WBV and ATV and increased over time in a load- and frequency dependent fashion. SOL and TA EMG amplitudes increased over time in all conditions independently of vibration mode. 50 Hz WBV and ATV resulted in greater muscle activation than 25 Hz in SOL when the shank was loaded and in TA when the shank was unloaded despite the greater transmission of vertical acceleration from source to shank with 25 Hz and WBV, especially during loading. Low-amplitude WBV of the unloaded and passively loaded leg produced slow tonic muscle contraction and plantar-flexion force increase of similar magnitudes to those induced by Achilles tendon vibration at the same frequencies. This study provides the first experimental evidence supporting the TVR as a plausible mechanism underlying the neuromuscular response to whole-body vibration.

  19. Reproductive interference and fecundity affect competitive interactions of sibling species with low mating barriers: experimental and theoretical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebiola, M; Kelly, S E; Velten, L; Zug, R; Hammerstein, P; Giorgini, M; Hunter, M S

    2017-12-01

    When allopatric species with incomplete prezygotic isolation come into secondary contact, the outcome of their interaction is not easily predicted. The parasitoid wasp Encarsia suzannae (iES), infected by Cardinium inducing cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), and its sibling species E. gennaroi (EG), not infected by bacterial endosymbionts, may have diverged because of the complementary action of CI and asymmetric hybrid incompatibilities. Whereas postzygotic isolation is now complete because of sterility of F1 hybrid progeny, prezygotic isolation is still incipient. We set up laboratory population cage experiments to evaluate the outcome of the interaction between ES and EG in two pairwise combinations: iES vs EG and cured ES (cES, where Cardinium was removed with antibiotics) vs EG. We also built a theoretical model aimed at exploring the role of life-history differences and asymmetric mating on competitive outcomes. In three of four cages in each treatment, ES dominated the interaction. We found evidence for reproductive interference, driven by asymmetric mating preferences, that gave a competitive edge to ES, the species that better discriminated against heterospecifics. However, we did not find the fecundity cost previously shown to be associated with Cardinium infection in iES. The model largely supported the experimental results. The finding of only a slight competitive edge of ES over EG in population cages suggests that in a more heterogeneous environment the species could coexist. This is supported by evidence that the two species coexist in sympatry, where preliminary data suggest reproductive character displacement may have reinforced postzygotic isolation.

  20. The Influence of Evidence-Based Surgical Indications and Techniques on Failure Rates After Arthroscopic Shoulder Stabilization in the Contact or Collision Athlete With Anterior Shoulder Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Timothy S; Saltzman, Bryan M; Meyer, Maximilian; Frank, Rachel M; Bach, Bernard R; Cole, Brian J; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2017-04-01

    It has been reported that arthroscopic shoulder stabilization yields higher rates of failure in contact or collision athletes as compared with open shoulder stabilization; however, this is largely based upon studies that do not employ modern, evidence-based surgical indications and techniques for arthroscopic shoulder stabilization. To (1) determine the pooled failure rate across all studies reporting failure after primary arthroscopic shoulder stabilization for anterior shoulder instability in contact or collision athletes and (2) stratify failure rates according to studies that use evidence-based surgical indications and techniques. Systematic review. A review of PubMed, Medline, and Embase was performed to identify all clinical studies with a minimum of 1-year follow-up that reported failure rates after arthroscopic shoulder stabilization for anterior shoulder instability in contact or collision athletes. Data pertaining to patient demographics, clinical and radiographic preoperative assessment, surgical indications, surgical technique, rehabilitation, and outcome were collected from each included study. An overall failure rate was determined across all included studies. After this, a secondary literature review was performed to identify factors related to patient selection and surgical technique that significantly influence failure after primary arthroscopic shoulder stabilization. Failure rates were then determined among included studies that used these evidence-based indications and techniques. Overall, 26 studies reporting on 779 contact or collision athletes met the inclusion criteria. The mean patient age was 19.9 years, 90.3% were male, and the most common sport was rugby. There was considerable variability in the reporting of patient demographics, preoperative assessment, surgical indications, surgical technique, and patient outcomes. Across all included studies, the pooled failure rate after arthroscopic shoulder stabilization in the contact or

  1. THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF STRENGTH INDICES OF BOGIE FRAME TRANSOMS FOR TRAILING CARS OF ELECTRIC TRAINS ER9M, ER9E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Bondarev

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article objectives are to identify the factors, which can contribute to the formation of cracks and to develop the measures on improving the strength indices of bogie frame transoms of trailing cars. Methodology. In order to achieve these objectives, in performing the work it was conducted the inspection of the technical condition of supporting structures for bogie frames of trailing cars; measured the Brіnell hardness numbers and estimated the endurance limits of transom material; tested on determination of the levels of efforts and stresses being created in the specified transoms under operation; developed the computational models for the theoretical determination of stress levels in the transom by simulating both normal and abnormal conditions of operating loading. Findings. Based on the analysis of results obtained: the situations with the highest stress levels were found; the measures on improving the strength indices of bogie frame transoms of trailing cars were developed. Originality. Based on the experimental and theoretical studies, the scientific monitoring of works to develop the measures on improving the strength indices of bogie frame transoms of trailing cars was carried out. Practical value. The developed measures on improving the strength indices were passed to professionals of Ukrzaliznytsia to introduce the proposed activities during the repairs of electric trains of specified series.

  2. Traffic jams without bottlenecks—experimental evidence for the physical mechanism of the formation of a jam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Yuki; Fukui, Minoru; Kikuchi, Macoto; Hasebe, Katsuya; Nakayama, Akihiro; Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Tadaki, Shin-ichi; Yukawa, Satoshi

    2008-03-01

    A traffic jam on a highway is a very familiar phenomenon. From the physical viewpoint, the system of vehicular flow is a non-equilibrium system of interacting particles (vehicles). The collective effect of the many-particle system induces the instability of a free flow state caused by the enhancement of fluctuations, and the transition to a jamming state occurs spontaneously if the average vehicle density exceeds a certain critical value. Thus, a bottleneck is only a trigger and not the essential origin of a traffic jam. In this paper, we present the first experimental evidence that the emergence of a traffic jam is a collective phenomenon like 'dynamical' phase transitions and pattern formation in a non-equilibrium system. We have performed an experiment on a circuit to show the emergence of a jam with no bottleneck. In the initial condition, all the vehicles are moving, homogeneously distributed on the circular road, with the same velocity. The average density of the vehicles is prepared for the onset of the instability. Even a tiny fluctuation grows larger and then the homogeneous movement cannot be maintained. Finally, a jam cluster appears and propagates backward like a solitary wave with the same speed as that of a jam cluster on a highway.

  3. Does vitamin C deficiency increase lifestyle-associated vascular disease progression? Evidence based on experimental and clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2013-12-10

    Despite continuous advances in the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), critical issues associated with an unhealthy lifestyle remain an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries. A growing body of literature supports a specific role for vitamin C in a number of reactions that are associated with vascular function and control including, for example, nitric oxide bioavailability, lipid metabolism, and vascular integrity. A large body of epidemiological evidence supports a relationship between poor vitamin C status and increased risk of developing CVD, and the prevalence of deficiency continues to be around 10%-20% of the general Western population although this problem could easily and cheaply be solved by supplementation. However, large intervention studies using vitamin C have not found a beneficial effect of supplementation. This review outlines the proposed mechanism by which vitamin C deficiency worsens CVD progression. In addition, it discusses problems with the currently available literature, including the discrepancies between the large intervention studies and the experimental and epidemiological literature. Increased insights into vitamin C deficiency-mediated CVD progression will enable the design of future randomized controlled trials that are better suited to test the efficacy of vitamin C in disease prevention as well as the identification of high-risk individuals which could possibly benefit from supplementation.

  4. The Pay-What-You-Want game: What can be learned from the experimental evidence on Dictator and Trust Games?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greiff Matthias

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the Pay-What-You-Want game which represents the interaction between a buyer and a seller in a Pay-What-You-Want (PWYW situation. The PWYW game embeds the dictator game and the trust game as subgames. This allows us to use previous experimental studies with the dictator and the trust game to identify three factors that can influence the success of PWYW pricing in business practice: (i social context, (ii social information, and (iii deservingness. Only few cases of PWYW pricing for a longer period of time have been documented. By addressing repeated games, we isolate two additional factors which are likely to contribute to successful implementations of PWYW as a long term pricing strategy. These are (iv communication and (v the reduction of goal conflicts. The central contribution of this study is an attempt to bridge the gap between laboratory experiments and the research on PWYW pricing, which relies largely on evidence from the field. By reviewing the relevant experiments, this study identifies factors crucial for the success of PWYW pricing and provides guidance to developing long-term applications of PWYW pricing.

  5. Quality indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth-Andersen, Christian

    1991-01-01

    to the issue of how well these indicators perform, using market data provided by consumer magazines from 3 countries. The results strongly indicate that price is a poor quality indicator. The paper also presents some evidence which suggests that seller reputation and easily observable characteristics are also......In recent literature it has been suggested that consumers need have no knowledge of product quality as a number of quality indicators (or signals) may be used as substitutes. Very little attention has been paid to the empirical verification of these studies. The present paper is devoted...

  6. Experimental Evaluation of Faecal Escherichia coli and Hepatitis E Virus as Biological Indicators of Contacts Between Domestic Pigs and Eurasian Wild Boar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, S; Geue, L; Hinsching, A; Jenckel, M; Schlosser, J; Eiden, M; Pietschmann, J; Menge, C; Beer, M; Groschup, M; Jori, F; Etter, E; Blome, S

    2017-04-01

    Domestic pigs and Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) share several important viral and bacterial pathogens. Therefore, direct and indirect contacts between domestic pigs and wild boar present a risk of pathogen spillover and can lead to long-term perpetuation of infection. Biological indicators could be a powerful tool to understand and characterize contacts between wild boar and domestic pigs. Here, faecal Escherichia coli and Hepatitis E virus (HEV) were explored as potential biological indicators under experimental conditions. The data gained in our pilot study suggest that faecal E. coli can be used as biological indicator of contact between wild boar and domestic pig. For HEV, faecal transmission was also confirmed. However, molecular studies on full-genome basis did not reveal markers that would allow tracing of transmission direction. Based on these promising results, future field studies will especially target the practicability of E. coli microbiome molecular typing as surrogate of contacts at the wildlife-livestock interface. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Experimental and clinical evidence of differential effects of magnesium sulfate on neuroprotection and angiogenesis in the fetal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecuyer, Matthieu; Rubio, Marina; Chollat, Clément; Lecointre, Maryline; Jégou, Sylvie; Leroux, Philippe; Cleren, Carine; Leroux-Nicollet, Isabelle; Marpeau, Loic; Vivien, Denis; Marret, Stéphane; Gonzalez, Bruno J

    2017-08-01

    Clinical studies showed beneficial effects of magnesium sulfate regarding the risk of cerebral palsy. However, regimen protocols fluctuate worldwide and risks of adverse effects impacting the vascular system have been reported for human neonates, keeping open the question of the optimal dosing. Using clinically relevant concentrations and doses of magnesium sulfate, experiments consisted of characterizing, respectively, ex vivo and in vivo, the effects of magnesium sulfate on the nervous and vascular systems of mouse neonates by targeting neuroprotection, angiogenesis, and hemodynamic factors and in measuring, in human fetuses, the impact of a 4-g neuroprotective loading dose of magnesium sulfate on brain hemodynamic parameters. Preclinical experiments using cultured cortical slices from mouse neonates showed that the lowest and highest tested concentrations of magnesium sulfate were equally potent to prevent excitotoxic-induced cell death, cell edema, cell burst, and intracellular calcium increase, whereas no side effects were found regarding apoptosis. In contrast, in vivo data revealed that magnesium sulfate exerted dose-dependent vascular effects on the fetal brain. In particular, it induced brain hypoperfusion, stabilization of Hif-1α, long-term upregulation of VEGF-R2 expression, impaired endothelial viability, and altered cortical angiogenesis. Clinically, in contrast to 6-g loading doses used in some protocols, a 4-g bolus of magnesium sulfate did not altered fetal brain hemodynamic parameters. In conclusion, these data provide the first mechanistic evidence of double-sword and dose-dependent actions of magnesium sulfate on nervous and vascular systems. They strongly support the clinical use of neuroprotection protocols validated for the lowest (4-g) loading dose of magnesium sulfate. © 2017 The Authors. Pharmacology Research & Perspectives published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd, British Pharmacological Society and American Society for Pharmacology and

  8. Ashwagandha derived withanone targets TPX2-Aurora A complex: computational and experimental evidence to its anticancer activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Grover

    Full Text Available Cancer is largely marked by genetic instability. Specific inhibition of individual proteins or signalling pathways that regulate genetic stability during cell division thus hold a great potential for cancer therapy. The Aurora A kinase is a Ser/Thr kinase that plays a critical role during mitosis and cytokinesis and is found upregulated in several cancer types. It is functionally regulated by its interactions with TPX2, a candidate oncogene. Aurora A inhibitors have been proposed as anticancer drugs that work by blocking its ATP binding site. This site is common to other kinases and hence these inhibitors lack specificity for Aurora A inhibition in particular, thus advocating the need of some alternative inhibition route. Previously, we identified TPX2 as a cellular target for withanone that selectively kill cancer cells. By computational approach, we found here that withanone binds to TPX2-Aurora A complex. In experiment, withanone treatment to cancer cells indeed resulted in dissociation of TPX2-Aurora A complex and disruption of mitotic spindle apparatus proposing this as a mechanism of the anticancer activity of withanone. From docking analysis, non-formation/disruption of the active TPX2-Aurora A association complex could be discerned. Our MD simulation results suggesting the thermodynamic and structural stability of TPX2-Aurora A in complex with withanone further substantiates the binding. We report a computational rationale of the ability of naturally occurring withanone to alter the kinase signalling pathway in an ATP-independent manner and experimental evidence in which withanone cause inactivation of the TPX2-Aurora A complex. The study demonstrated that TPX2-Aurora A complex is a target of withanone, a potential natural anticancer drug.

  9. Ashwagandha derived withanone targets TPX2-Aurora A complex: computational and experimental evidence to its anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Abhinav; Singh, Rumani; Shandilya, Ashutosh; Priyandoko, Didik; Agrawal, Vibhuti; Bisaria, Virendra S; Wadhwa, Renu; Kaul, Sunil C; Sundar, Durai

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is largely marked by genetic instability. Specific inhibition of individual proteins or signalling pathways that regulate genetic stability during cell division thus hold a great potential for cancer therapy. The Aurora A kinase is a Ser/Thr kinase that plays a critical role during mitosis and cytokinesis and is found upregulated in several cancer types. It is functionally regulated by its interactions with TPX2, a candidate oncogene. Aurora A inhibitors have been proposed as anticancer drugs that work by blocking its ATP binding site. This site is common to other kinases and hence these inhibitors lack specificity for Aurora A inhibition in particular, thus advocating the need of some alternative inhibition route. Previously, we identified TPX2 as a cellular target for withanone that selectively kill cancer cells. By computational approach, we found here that withanone binds to TPX2-Aurora A complex. In experiment, withanone treatment to cancer cells indeed resulted in dissociation of TPX2-Aurora A complex and disruption of mitotic spindle apparatus proposing this as a mechanism of the anticancer activity of withanone. From docking analysis, non-formation/disruption of the active TPX2-Aurora A association complex could be discerned. Our MD simulation results suggesting the thermodynamic and structural stability of TPX2-Aurora A in complex with withanone further substantiates the binding. We report a computational rationale of the ability of naturally occurring withanone to alter the kinase signalling pathway in an ATP-independent manner and experimental evidence in which withanone cause inactivation of the TPX2-Aurora A complex. The study demonstrated that TPX2-Aurora A complex is a target of withanone, a potential natural anticancer drug.

  10. Neurovascular Unit Dysfunction and Blood–Brain Barrier Hyperpermeability Contribute to Schizophrenia Neurobiology: A Theoretical Integration of Clinical and Experimental Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souhel Najjar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a psychotic disorder characterized by delusions, hallucinations, negative symptoms, as well as behavioral and cognitive dysfunction. It is a pathoetiologically heterogeneous disorder involving complex interrelated mechanisms that include oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. Neurovascular endothelial dysfunction and blood–brain barrier (BBB hyperpermeability are established mechanisms in neurological disorders with comorbid psychiatric symptoms such as epilepsy, traumatic brain injury, and Alzheimer’s disease. Schizophrenia is frequently comorbid with medical conditions associated with peripheral vascular endothelial dysfunction, such as metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes mellitus. However, the existence and etiological relevance of neurovascular endothelial dysfunction and BBB hyperpermeability in schizophrenia are still not well recognized. Here, we review the growing clinical and experimental evidence, indicating that neurovascular endotheliopathy and BBB hyperpermeability occur in schizophrenia patients. We present a theoretical integration of human and animal data linking oxidative stress and neuroinflammation to neurovascular endotheliopathy and BBB breakdown in schizophrenia. These abnormalities may contribute to the cognitive and behavioral symptoms of schizophrenia via several mechanisms involving reduced cerebral perfusion and impaired homeostatic processes of cerebral microenvironment. Furthermore, BBB disruption can facilitate interactions between brain innate and peripheral adaptive immunity, thereby perpetuating harmful neuroimmune signals and toxic neuroinflammatory responses, which can also contribute to the symptoms of schizophrenia. Taken together, these findings support the “mild encephalitis” hypothesis of schizophrenia. If neurovascular abnormalities prove to be etiologically relevant to the neurobiology of schizophrenia, then targeting these abnormalities may represent a

  11. Experimental analysis of multivariate female choice in gray treefrogs (Hyla versicolor): evidence for directional and stabilizing selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, H Carl; Brooks, Robert

    2009-10-01

    Even simple biological signals vary in several measurable dimensions. Understanding their evolution requires, therefore, a multivariate understanding of selection, including how different properties interact to determine the effectiveness of the signal. We combined experimental manipulation with multivariate selection analysis to assess female mate choice on the simple trilled calls of male gray treefrogs. We independently and randomly varied five behaviorally relevant acoustic properties in 154 synthetic calls. We compared response times of each of 154 females to one of these calls with its response to a standard call that had mean values of the five properties. We found directional and quadratic selection on two properties indicative of the amount of signaling, pulse number, and call rate. Canonical rotation of the fitness surface showed that these properties, along with pulse rate, contributed heavily to a major axis of stabilizing selection, a result consistent with univariate studies showing diminishing effects of increasing pulse number well beyond the mean. Spectral properties contributed to a second major axis of stabilizing selection. The single major axis of disruptive selection suggested that a combination of two temporal and two spectral properties with values differing from the mean should be especially attractive.

  12. Aminooxy analog of histamine is an efficient inhibitor of mammalian L-histidine decarboxylase: combined in silico and experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Oropeza, R; Pino-Ángeles, A; Khomutov, M A; Urdiales, J L; Moya-García, A A; Vepsäläinen, J; Persson, L; Sarabia, F; Khomutov, A; Sánchez-Jiménez, F

    2014-03-01

    Histamine plays highlighted roles in the development of many common, emergent and rare diseases. In mammals, histamine is formed by decarboxylation of L-histidine, which is catalyzed by pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent histidine decarboxylase (HDC, EC 4.1.1.22). The limited availability and stability of the protein have delayed the characterization of its structure-function relationships. Our previous knowledge on mammalian HDC, derived from both in silico and experimental approaches, indicates that an effective competitive inhibitor should be capable to form an "external aldimine-like structure" and have an imidazole group, or its proper mimetic, which provides additional affinity of PLP-inhibitor adduct to the HDC active center. This is confirmed using HEK-293 cells transfected to express human HDC and the aminooxy analog of histidine, 4(5)-aminooxymethylimidazole (O-IMHA, IC₅₀ ≈ 2 × 10(-7) M) capable to form a PLP-inhibitor complex (oxime) in the enzyme active center. Taking advantage of the availability of the human HDC X-ray structure, we have also determined the potential interactions that could stabilize this oxime in the active site of mammalian HDC.

  13. Nutrition, weight gain, and eating behavior in pregnancy: a review of experimental evidence for long-term effects on the risk of obesity in offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity has reached near epidemic proportions in the developed world. As reproductive age women are a part of this trend, the effect of maternal obesity on the developing fetus must be investigated. In this review, we evaluated the experimental evidence relating maternal nutritional status and eat...

  14. The impact of positive affect on health cognitions and behaviours: a meta-analysis of the experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, David S; Bertenshaw, Emma J; Sheeran, Paschal

    2015-01-01

    Several reviews suggest that positive affect is associated with improved longevity, fewer physical symptoms, and biological indicators of good health. It is possible that positive affect could influence these outcomes by promoting healthful cognitions and behaviours. The present review identified conceptual pathways from positive affect to health cognitions and behaviour, and used random effects meta-analysis to quantify the impact of positive affect inductions (versus neutral affect conditions) on these outcomes. Literature searches located 54 independent tests that could be included in the review. Across all studies, the findings revealed no reliable effects on intentions (d+ = -.12, 95% CI = -.32 to .08, k = 15) or behaviour (d+ = .15, 95% CI = -.03 to .33, k = 23). There were four reliable effects involving specific cognitions and behaviours, but little clear evidence for generalised benefits or adverse effects of positive emotions on health-related cognitions or actions. Conclusions must be cautious given the paucity of tests available for analysis. The review offers suggestions about research designs that might profitably be deployed in future studies, and calls for additional tests of the impact of discrete positive emotions on health cognitions and behaviour.

  15. Regulation of dorso‐ventral polarity by the nerve cord during annelid regeneration: A review of experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boilly‐Marer, Yolande; Bely, Alexandra E.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract An important goal for understanding regeneration is determining how polarity is conferred to the regenerate. Here we review findings in two groups of polychaete annelids that implicate the ventral nerve cord in assigning dorso‐ventral polarity, and specifically ventral identity, to the regenerate. In nereids, surgical manipulations indicate that parapodia develop where dorsal and ventral body wall territories contact. Without a nerve cord at the wound site, the regenerate differentiates no evident polarity (with no parapodia) and only dorsal identity, while with two nerve cords the regenerate develops a twinned dorso‐ventral axis (with four parapodia per segment instead of the normal two). In sabellids, a striking natural dorso‐ventral inversion in parapodial morphology occurs along the body axis and this inversion is morphologically correlated with the position of the nerve cord. Parapodial inversion also occurs in segments in which the nerve cord has been removed, even without any segment amputation. Together, these data strongly support a role for the nerve cord in annelid dorso‐ventral pattern regulation, with the nerve cord conferring ventral identity. PMID:28616245

  16. Improving implementation of evidence-based practice in mental health service delivery: protocol for a cluster randomised quasi-experimental investigation of staff-focused values interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Virginia; Oades, Lindsay G; Deane, Frank P; Crowe, Trevor P; Ciarrochi, Joseph; Andresen, Retta

    2013-07-02

    There is growing acceptance that optimal service provision for individuals with severe and recurrent mental illness requires a complementary focus on medical recovery (i.e., symptom management and general functioning) and personal recovery (i.e., having a 'life worth living'). Despite significant research attention and policy-level support, the translation of this vision of healthcare into changed workplace practice continues to elude. Over the past decade, evidence-based training interventions that seek to enhance the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of staff working in the mental health field have been implemented as a primary redress strategy. However, a large body of multi-disciplinary research indicates disappointing rates of training transfer. There is an absence of empirical research that investigates the importance of worker-motivation in the uptake of desired workplace change initiatives. 'Autonomy' is acknowledged as important to human effectiveness and as a correlate of workplace variables like productivity, and wellbeing. To our knowledge, there have been no studies that investigate purposeful and structured use of values-based interventions to facilitate increased autonomy as a means of promoting enhanced implementation of workplace change. This study involves 200 mental health workers across 22 worksites within five community-managed organisations in three Australian states. It involves cluster-randomisation of participants within organisation, by work site, to the experimental (values) condition, or the control (implementation). Both conditions receive two days of training focusing on an evidence-based framework of mental health service delivery. The experimental group receives a third day of values-focused intervention and 12 months of values-focused coaching. Well-validated self-report measures are used to explore variables related to values concordance, autonomy, and self-reported implementation success. Audits of work files and staff work samples

  17. Influences of Electromagnetic Energy on Bio-Energy Transport through Protein Molecules in Living Systems and Its Experimental Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Pang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The influences of electromagnetic fields (EMFs on bio-energy transport and its mechanism of changes are investigated through analytic and numerical simulation and experimentation. Bio-energy transport along protein molecules is performed by soliton movement caused by the dipole–dipole electric interactions between neighboring amino acid residues. As such, EMFs can affect the structure of protein molecules and change the properties of the bio-energy transported in living systems. This mechanism of biological effect from EMFs involves the amino acid residues in protein molecules. To study and reveal this mechanism, we simulated numerically the features of the movement of solitons along protein molecules with both a single chain and with three channels by using the Runge–Kutta method and Pang’s soliton model under the action of EMFs with the strengths of 25,500, 51,000, 76,500, and 102,000 V/m in the single-chain protein, as well as 17,000, 25,500, and 34,000 V/m in the three-chain protein, respectively. Results indicate that electric fields (EFs depress the binding energy of the soliton, decrease its amplitude, and change its wave form. Also, the soliton disperses at 102,000 V/m in a single-chain protein and at 25,500 and 34,000 V/m in three-chain proteins. These findings signify that the influence of EMFs on the bio-energy transport cannot be neglected; however, these variations depend on both the strength and the direction of the EF in the EMF. This direction influences the biological effects of EMF, which decrease with increases in the angle between the direction of the EF and that of the dipole moment of amino acid residues; however, randomness at the macroscopic level remains. Lastly, we experimentally confirm the existence of a soliton and the validity of our conclusion by using the infrared spectra of absorption of the collagens, which is activated by another type of EF. Thus, we can affirm that both the described mechanism and the

  18. Influences of Electromagnetic Energy on Bio-Energy Transport through Protein Molecules in Living Systems and Its Experimental Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaofeng; Chen, Shude; Wang, Xianghui; Zhong, Lisheng

    2016-07-25

    The influences of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on bio-energy transport and its mechanism of changes are investigated through analytic and numerical simulation and experimentation. Bio-energy transport along protein molecules is performed by soliton movement caused by the dipole-dipole electric interactions between neighboring amino acid residues. As such, EMFs can affect the structure of protein molecules and change the properties of the bio-energy transported in living systems. This mechanism of biological effect from EMFs involves the amino acid residues in protein molecules. To study and reveal this mechanism, we simulated numerically the features of the movement of solitons along protein molecules with both a single chain and with three channels by using the Runge-Kutta method and Pang's soliton model under the action of EMFs with the strengths of 25,500, 51,000, 76,500, and 102,000 V/m in the single-chain protein, as well as 17,000, 25,500, and 34,000 V/m in the three-chain protein, respectively. Results indicate that electric fields (EFs) depress the binding energy of the soliton, decrease its amplitude, and change its wave form. Also, the soliton disperses at 102,000 V/m in a single-chain protein and at 25,500 and 34,000 V/m in three-chain proteins. These findings signify that the influence of EMFs on the bio-energy transport cannot be neglected; however, these variations depend on both the strength and the direction of the EF in the EMF. This direction influences the biological effects of EMF, which decrease with increases in the angle between the direction of the EF and that of the dipole moment of amino acid residues; however, randomness at the macroscopic level remains. Lastly, we experimentally confirm the existence of a soliton and the validity of our conclusion by using the infrared spectra of absorption of the collagens, which is activated by another type of EF. Thus, we can affirm that both the described mechanism and the corresponding theory are

  19. The contribution of phytoplankton degradation to chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in eutrophic shallow lakes: field and experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunlin; van Dijk, Mark A; Liu, Mingliang; Zhu, Guangwei; Qin, Boqiang

    2009-10-01

    Eight field campaigns in the eutrophic, shallow, Lake Taihu in the summers from 2005 to 2007, and a phytoplankton degradation experiment of 33 days, were carried out to determine the contribution of phytoplankton degradation to CDOM. Significant and positive correlations were found between the CDOM absorption coefficient at 355 nm [a(CDOM)(355)], normalized fluorescence emission (QSU) at 450 nm from excitation at 355 nm [F(n)(355)], and the chlorophyll a (Chla) concentration for all eight field campaigns, which indicates that the decomposition and degradation of phytoplankton is an important source of CDOM. In the degradation experiment, the CDOM absorption coefficient increased as phytoplankton broke down during the first 12 days, showing the production of CDOM from phytoplankton. After 12 days, a(CDOM)(355) had increased from the initial value 0.41+/-0.03 m(-1) to 1.37+/-0.03 m(-1) (a 234% increase), and the Chla concentration decreased from the initial value of 349.1+/-11.2 microg/L to 30.4+/-13.2 microg/L (a 91.3% decrease). The mean daily production rate of CDOM from phytoplankton was 0.08 m(-1) for a(CDOM)(355). Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC) was used to assess CDOM composition from EEM spectra, and four components were identified: a terrestrial-like humic component, two marine-like humic components, and a protein-like component. The rapid increase in marine-like humic fluorophores (C3 and C4) during the degradation experiment suggests that in situ production of CDOM plays an important role in the dynamics of CDOM. The field campaigns and experimental data in the present study show that phytoplankton can be one of the important CDOM producers in eutrophic shallow lakes.

  20. Evidence for a cosmogenic origin of fired glaciofluvial beds in the northwestern Andes: Correlation with experimentally heated quartz and feldspar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaney, William C.; Krinsley, David; Kalm, Volli

    2010-11-01

    Fired sediment, considered equivalent to the 'Black Mat' impact of 12.9 ka, has been located and analyzed in the Andes of northwestern Venezuela. The 'Black Mat' refers to possible fallout from the Encke Comet airburst presumed to have occurred over the Laurentide Ice Sheet, the impact spreading ejecta over large portions of North America and Europe, making it an interhemispheric event of considerable magnitude. These possible equivalent beds in the northern Andes, first considered to result from a lightning-induced conflagration adjacent to the retreating Late Wisconsinan (Mérida Glaciation) ice, are now known to have undergone intense heating upon impact to a temperature much higher than what would occur in a wet, first-stage, successional tundra. Analyses carried out by SEM and FESEM, in SE and BSE modes, show massive micro-disruption on grain surfaces, fractures diminishing with depth toward grain interiors and C welded onto quartz and plagioclase minerals. Bubbles on some grains, possibly the result of exclusion of water-of-crystallization, are seen on some samples, principally quartz. The presence of copious monazite in the carbonaceous coatings is considered part of the incoming ejecta, as it is not a common indicator mineral in the local lithology. Analysis by SEM and FESEM of quartz and plagioclase subjected experimentally to temperatures ranging from 500 to 900 °C shows that intense heating affects resident mineralogies to differing extents, with grain disruption more prevalent along cleavage planes deep into grain interiors. The intergrowth of carbonaceous "black mat" material with thermally disrupted and fragmented quartz and feldspar, a "welded" patina of 100-400 nm thickness could only occur with temperatures in excess of 900 °C, the event interpreted here to be of cosmogenic origin.

  1. Infiltration-soil moisture redistribution under natural conditions: experimental evidence as a guideline for realizing simulation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Morbidelli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The evolution in time, t, of the experimental soil moisture vertical profile under natural conditions is investigated in order to address the corresponding simulation modelling. The measurements were conducted in a plot with a bare silty loam soil. The soil water content, θ, was continuously monitored at different depths, z, using a Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR system. Four buriable three-rod waveguides were inserted horizontally at different depths (5, 15, 25 and 35 cm. In addition, we used sensors of air temperature and relative humidity, wind speed, solar radiation, evaporation and rain as supports for the application of selected simulation models, as well as for the detection of elements leading to their improvement. The results indicate that, under natural conditions, very different trends of the θ(z, t function can be observed in the given fine-textured soil, where the formation of a sealing layer over the parent soil requires an adjustment of the simulation modelling commonly used for hydrological applications. In particular, because of the considerable variations in the shape of the moisture content vertical profile as a function of time, a generalization of the existing models should incorporate a first approximation of the variability in time of the saturated hydraulic conductivity, K1s, of the uppermost soil. This conclusion is supported by the fact that the observed shape of θ(z, t can be appropriately reproduced by adopting the proposed approach with K1s kept constant during each rainfall event but considered variable from event to event, however the observed rainfall rate and the occurrence of freeze-thaw cycles with high soil moisture contents have to be explicitly incorporated in a functional form for K1s(t.

  2. Chronological evidence fails to support claim of an isochronous widespread layer of cosmic impact indicators dated to 12,800 years ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, David J; Holliday, Vance T; Cannon, Michael D; Miller, D Shane

    2014-05-27

    According to the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis (YDIH), ∼ 12,800 calendar years before present, North America experienced an extraterrestrial impact that triggered the Younger Dryas and devastated human populations and biotic communities on this continent and elsewhere. This supposed event is reportedly marked by multiple impact indicators, but critics have challenged this evidence, and considerable controversy now surrounds the YDIH. Proponents of the YDIH state that a key test of the hypothesis is whether those indicators are isochronous and securely dated to the Younger Dryas onset. They are not. We have examined the age basis of the supposed Younger Dryas boundary layer at the 29 sites and regions in North and South America, Europe, and the Middle East in which proponents report its occurrence. Several of the sites lack any age control, others have radiometric ages that are chronologically irrelevant, nearly a dozen have ages inferred by statistically and chronologically flawed age-depth interpolations, and in several the ages directly on the supposed impact layer are older or younger than ∼ 12,800 calendar years ago. Only 3 of the 29 sites fall within the temporal window of the YD onset as defined by YDIH proponents. The YDIH fails the critical chronological test of an isochronous event at the YD onset, which, coupled with the many published concerns about the extraterrestrial origin of the purported impact markers, renders the YDIH unsupported. There is no reason or compelling evidence to accept the claim that a cosmic impact occurred ∼ 12,800 y ago and caused the Younger Dryas.

  3. Demographic and Indication-Specific Characteristics Have Limited Association With Social Network Engagement: Evidence From 24,954 Members of Four Health Care Support Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mierlo, Trevor; Li, Xinlong; Hyatt, Douglas; Ching, Andrew T

    2017-02-17

    Digital health social networks (DHSNs) are widespread, and the consensus is that they contribute to wellness by offering social support and knowledge sharing. The success of a DHSN is based on the number of participants and their consistent creation of externalities through the generation of new content. To promote network growth, it would be helpful to identify characteristics of superusers or actors who create value by generating positive network externalities. The aim of the study was to investigate the feasibility of developing predictive models that identify potential superusers in real time. This study examined associations between posting behavior, 4 demographic variables, and 20 indication-specific variables. Data were extracted from the custom structured query language (SQL) databases of 4 digital health behavior change interventions with DHSNs. Of these, 2 were designed to assist in the treatment of addictions (problem drinking and smoking cessation), and 2 for mental health (depressive disorder, panic disorder). To analyze posting behavior, 10 models were developed, and negative binomial regressions were conducted to examine associations between number of posts, and demographic and indication-specific variables. The DHSNs varied in number of days active (3658-5210), number of registrants (5049-52,396), number of actors (1085-8452), and number of posts (16,231-521,997). In the sample, all 10 models had low R2 values (.013-.086) with limited statistically significant demographic and indication-specific variables. Very few variables were associated with social network engagement. Although some variables were statistically significant, they did not appear to be practically significant. Based on the large number of study participants, variation in DHSN theme, and extensive time-period, we did not find strong evidence that demographic characteristics or indication severity sufficiently explain the variability in number of posts per actor. Researchers should

  4. Evidence Evaluation: Measure "Z" Corresponds to Human Utility Judgments Better than Measure "L" and Optimal-Experimental-Design Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, Patrice; Marelli, Marco; D'Addario, Marco; Russo, Selena; Cherubini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Evidence evaluation is a crucial process in many human activities, spanning from medical diagnosis to impression formation. The present experiments investigated which, if any, normative model best conforms to people's intuition about the value of the obtained evidence. Psychologists, epistemologists, and philosophers of science have proposed…

  5. Student Preferences and Performance in Online and Face-to-Face Classes Using Myers-Briggs Indicator: A Longitudinal Quasi-Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seta Boghikian-Whitby

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This longitudinal, quasi-experimental study investigated students’ cognitive personality type using the Myers-Briggs personality Type Indicator (MBTI in Internet-based Online and Face-to-Face (F2F modalities. A total of 1154 students enrolled in 28 Online and 32 F2F sections taught concurrently over a period of fourteen years. The study measured whether the sample is similar to the national average percentage frequency of all 16 different personality types; whether specific personality type students preferred a specific modality of instructions and if this preference changed over time; whether learning occurred in both class modalities; and whether specific personality type students learned more from a specific modality. Data was analyzed using regression, t-test, frequency, and Chi-Squared. The study concluded that data used in the study was similar to the national statistics; that no major differences in preference occurred over time; and that learning did occur in all modalities, with more statistically significant learning found in the Online modality versus F2F for Sensing, Thinking, and Perceiving types. Finally, Sensing and Thinking (ST and Sensing and Perceiving (SP group types learned significantly more in Online modality versus F2F.

  6. Validated Stability-Indicating RP-HPLC Method for Simultaneous Determination of Clorsulon and Ivermectin Employing Plackett-Burman Experimental Design for Robustness Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Ahmed S; Ismail, Nahla S; Soliman, Marwa; Zaazaa, Hala E

    2016-01-01

    A sensitive and highly selective stability-indicating gradient HPLC method was developed and validated for simultaneous determination of clorsulon (CLO) and ivermectin (IVM) in the presence of their degradation products. The drugs were subjected to different stress conditions, including acid and alkaline hydrolysis, oxidative, thermal, and photolytic forced degradation. The robustness of the proposed method was assessed using the Plackett-Burman experimental design, the factors affecting system performance were defined, and nonsignificant intervals for the significant factors were determined. The separation was carried out on a ZORBAX SB phenyl analytical column (250 × 4.6 mm id, 5 μm particle size), with gradient elution utilizing 10 mM sodium dihydrogen phosphate and acetonitrile as mobile phase. UV detection was performed for CLO and IVM at 254 nm over a concentration range of 4-140 and 5-50 μg/mL, respectively, with mean percentage recoveries of 99.90 ± 1.30 and 98.59 ± 1.16%, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to a pharmaceutical dosage form containing the investigated drugs. The results were statistically compared with the official HPLC methods, and no significant differences were found.

  7. Metal-free α-Amination of Secondary Amines: Computational and Experimental Evidence for Azaquinone Methide and Azomethine Ylide Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckmann, Arne; Richers, Matthew T.; Platonova, Alena Yu.; Zhang, Chen; Seidel, Daniel; Houk, K. N.

    2013-01-01

    We have performed a combined computational and experimental study to elucidate the mechanism of a metal-free α-amination of secondary amines. Calculations predicted azaquinone methides and azomethine ylides as the reactive intermediates and showed that iminium ions are unlikely to participate in these transformations. These results were confirmed by experimental deuterium labeling studies and the successful trapping of the postulated azomethine ylide and azaquinone methide intermediates. In addition, computed barrier heights for the rate-limiting step correlate qualitatively with experimental findings. PMID:23517448

  8. Experimental evidence for a new transmission route in a parasitic mite and its mucus-dependent orientation towards the host snail

    OpenAIRE

    SCHÜPBACH, H. U.; BAUR, B.

    2017-01-01

    The route of transmission and host finding behaviour are fundamental components of a parasite's fitness. Riccardoella limacum, a haematophagous mite, lives in the mantle cavity of helicid land snails. To date it has been assumed that this parasitic mite is transmitted during courtship and mating of the host. Here we present experimental evidence for a new transmission route in the host snail Arianta arbustorum. Parasite-free snails were kept on soil on which previously infected host snails ha...

  9. Experimental evidence of the dependence of spin tunneling on the concentration of dislocations in Mn{sub 12} crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, F. E-mail: francesc@ubxlab.com; Hernandez, J.M.; Garcia-Santiago, A. E-mail: antonio@ubxlab.com; Tejada, J.; Molins, E

    2004-05-01

    We present experimental results on the influence of the concentration of dislocations on resonant spin tunneling in a thermally treated single crystal of Mn{sub 12}-2Cl benzoate. The time evolution of the magnetization follows a stretched exponential law over a few time decades for all concentrations. The experimental values for the parameters entering this law were used to derive the thermal-dependent concentration of dislocations. We propose a new scaling term to account for the thermally assisted resonant tunneling at finite temperatures.

  10. Quasi-Experimental Evidence of Peer Effects in First-Year Economics Courses at a Chinese University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qihui; Tian, Guoqiang; Okediji, Tade O.

    2014-01-01

    The authors of this article implement a quasi-experimental strategy to estimate peer effects in economic education by exploiting the institutional setting in a large public university in China, where roommates are randomly assigned conditional on a student's major and province of origin. They found significant impacts of peer academic quality,…

  11. The harmony of programs package: Quasi-experimental evidence on deworming and canteen interventions in rural Senegal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azomahou, T.T.; Diallo, F.L.; Raymond, W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses a unique and large-scale quasi-experimental data to study the effect of deworming and school meals programs as a package on educational outcomes (pupils' test scores: aggregate, French or math; enrollment, promotion or dropout rates) in rural Senegal. We extend the endogenous

  12. Influence of Birth Weight on the Renal Development and Kidney Diseases in Adulthood: Experimental and Clinical Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Maria C. P.; Oliveira, Vanessa; Ponzio, Beatriz; Rangel, Marina; Palomino, Zaira; Gil, Frida Zaladek

    2012-01-01

    Several clinical and experimental studies support the hypothesis that foetal programming is an important determinant of nephropathy, hypertension, coronary heart disease, and type 2 diabetes during adulthood. In this paper, the renal repercussions of foetal programming are emphasised, and the physiopathological mechanisms are discussed. The programming of renal diseases is detailed based on the findings of kidney development and functional parameters. PMID:22778952

  13. Early-life adversity accelerates cellular ageing and affects adult inflammation: Experimental evidence from the European starling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettle, Daniel; Andrews, Clare; Reichert, Sophie; Bedford, Tom; Kolenda, Claire; Parker, Craig; Martin-Ruiz, Carmen; Monaghan, Pat; Bateson, Melissa

    2017-01-17

    Early-life adversity is associated with accelerated cellular ageing during development and increased inflammation during adulthood. However, human studies can only establish correlation, not causation, and existing experimental animal approaches alter multiple components of early-life adversity simultaneously. We developed a novel hand-rearing paradigm in European starling nestlings (Sturnus vulgaris), in which we separately manipulated nutritional shortfall and begging effort for a period of 10 days. The experimental treatments accelerated erythrocyte telomere attrition and increased DNA damage measured in the juvenile period. For telomere attrition, amount of food and begging effort exerted additive effects. Only the combination of low food amount and high begging effort increased DNA damage. We then measured two markers of inflammation, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and interleukin-6, when the birds were adults. The experimental treatments affected both inflammatory markers, though the patterns were complex and different for each marker. The effect of the experimental treatments on adult interleukin-6 was partially mediated by increased juvenile DNA damage. Our results show that both nutritional input and begging effort in the nestling period affect cellular ageing and adult inflammation in the starling. However, the pattern of effects is different for different biomarkers measured at different time points.

  14. Experimental evidence that an asteroid impact led to the extinction of many species 65 million years ago

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, L.W.

    1982-09-01

    The development of the theory that the mass extinction of the dinosaurs at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary was caused by an asteroid impact is reviewed. The personnel involved, the objections to the theory, and the evidence refuting those objections are presented chronologically. (ACR)

  15. Evidence for the use of isoflurane as a replacement for chloral hydrate anesthesia in experimental stroke: an ethical issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maud, Pétrault; Thavarak, Ouk; Cédrick, Lachaud; Michèle, Bastide; Vincent, Bérézowski; Olivier, Pétrault; Régis, Bordet

    2014-01-01

    Since an ethical issue has been raised regarding the use of the well-known anesthetic agent chloral hydrate, owing to its mutagenic and carcinogenic effects in animals, attention of neuroscientists has turned to finding out an alternative agent able to meet not only potency, safety, and analgesic efficacy, but also reduced neuroprotective effect for stroke research. The aim of this study was to compare the potential of chloral hydrate and isoflurane for both modulating the action of the experimental neuroprotectant MK801 and exerting analgesia. After middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats, no difference was observed in 24 h survival rate, success of ischemia, or infarct volume reduction between both anesthetics. However, isoflurane exerted a more pronounced analgesic effect than chloral hydrate as evidenced by formalin test 3 hours after anesthesia onset, thus encouraging the use of isoflurane in experimental stroke models.

  16. Evidence for the Use of Isoflurane as a Replacement for Chloral Hydrate Anesthesia in Experimental Stroke: An Ethical Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pétrault Maud

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since an ethical issue has been raised regarding the use of the well-known anesthetic agent chloral hydrate, owing to its mutagenic and carcinogenic effects in animals, attention of neuroscientists has turned to finding out an alternative agent able to meet not only potency, safety, and analgesic efficacy, but also reduced neuroprotective effect for stroke research. The aim of this study was to compare the potential of chloral hydrate and isoflurane for both modulating the action of the experimental neuroprotectant MK801 and exerting analgesia. After middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats, no difference was observed in 24 h survival rate, success of ischemia, or infarct volume reduction between both anesthetics. However, isoflurane exerted a more pronounced analgesic effect than chloral hydrate as evidenced by formalin test 3 hours after anesthesia onset, thus encouraging the use of isoflurane in experimental stroke models.

  17. The Impact of Vocational Education and Training Programs on Recidivism: A Systematic Review of Current Experimental Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Danielle; Day, Andrew; Giles, Margaret; Wodak, Joanne; Graffam, Joe; Baldry, Eileen

    2018-01-01

    Although the association between unemployment and offending is well established, relatively little is known about the impact of vocational education and training programs on re-offending, with much of the previous work in this area failing to control for, or correct, selection bias. This article reports the findings of a systematic review, which considers the findings of only those studies that have used experimental or quasi-experimental designs to evaluate vocational training and employment program outcomes for adult offenders. The analysis identifies key features, based on these studies, of those programs associated with the best outcomes and recommends selection criteria for those who are most likely to benefit from prison vocational education and training.

  18. The Effect of Feedback by SMS-text messages and email on Household Electricity Consumption: Experimental Evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effect of supplying online feedback by SMS-text messages and email about electricity consumption on the level of total household electricity consumption. An experiment was conducted in which 1,452 households were randomly allocated to three experimental groups and two...... the invitation. Results suggest that the type of feedback provided in this experiment can reduce consumption by up to 3%. The feedback technology is cheap to implement and therefore likely to be cost-effective....

  19. Silica-rich lavas in the oceanic crust: experimental evidence for fractional crystallization under low water activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Martin; Koepke, Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    We experimentally investigated phase relations and phase compositions as well as the influence of water activity ( aH2O) and redox conditions on the equilibrium crystallization path within an oceanic dacitic potassium-depleted system at shallow pressure (200 MPa). Moreover, we measured the partitioning of trace elements between melt and plagioclase via secondary ion mass spectrometry for a highly evolved experiment (SiO2 = 74.6 wt%). As starting material, we used a dacitic glass dredged at the Pacific-Antarctic Rise. Phase assemblages in natural high-silica systems reported from different locations of fast-spreading oceanic crust could be experimentally reproduced only in a relatively small range of temperature and melt-water content ( T ~950 °C; melt H2O magnetite buffer. The relatively low water content is remarkable, because distinct hydrothermal influence is generally regarded as key for producing silica-rich rocks in an oceanic environment. However, our conclusion is also supported by mineral and melt chemistry of natural evolved rocks; these rocks are only congruent to the composition of those experimental phases that are produced under low aH2O. Low FeO contents under water-saturated conditions and the characteristic enrichment of Al2O3 in high aH2O experiments, in particular, contradict natural observations, while experiments with low aH2O match the natural trend. Moreover, the observation that highly evolved experimental melts remain H2O-poor while they are relatively enriched in chlorine implies a decoupling between these two volatiles during crustal contamination.

  20. Experimental evidence of E × B plasma rotation in a 2.45 GHz hydrogen discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortázar, O. D., E-mail: daniel.cortazar@uclm.es [Institute for Energy Research-INEI, University of Castilla-La Mancha, C.J. Cela s/n, 13170 Ciudad Real (Spain); Megía-Macías, A. [CERN, BE-ABP-HSL Department, CH1211 Geneva (Switzerland); E.S.S. Bilbao, Polígono Ugaldeguren III, A-7B, 48170 Zamudio (Spain); Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H. [Department of Physics, Accelerator Laboratory, University of Jyväskylä, PO Box 35 (YFL), 40500 Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2015-12-15

    An experimental observation of a rotating plasma structure in a 2.45 GHz microwave-driven hydrogen discharge is reported. The rotation is presumably produced by E × B drift. The formation of the rotating plasma structure is sensitive to the strength of the off-resonance static magnetic field. The rotation frequency is on the order of 10 kHz and is affected by the neutral gas pressure and applied microwave power.

  1. Protective effect of curcumin on experimentally induced inflammation, hepatotoxicity and cardiotoxicity in rats: evidence of its antioxidant property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Suresh R; Thakare, Vishnu N; Patil, Snehal R

    2011-07-01

    The present study investigates the protective effects of curcumin on experimentally induced inflammation, hepatotoxicity, and cardiotoxicity using various animal models with biochemical parameters like serum marker enzymes and antioxidants in target tissues. In addition, liver and cardiac histoarchitecture changes were also studied. Curcumin treatment inhibited carrageenin and albumin induced edema, cotton pellet granuloma formation. The increased relative weight of liver and heart in CCl(4) induced liver injury and isoproterenol induced cardiac necrosis were also reduced by curcumin treatment. Elevated serum marker enzymes, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) increased lipid peroxidation, decreased gluthione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in edematous, granulomatus, liver and heart tissues during inflammation, liver injury and cardiac necrosis, respectively. Curcumin treatment reversed all these above mentioned biochemical changes significantly in all animal models studied. Even histoarchitecture alterations observed in liver injury and cardiac necrosis observed were partially reversed (improved) by curcumin treatments. In in vitro experiments too curcumin inhibited iron catalyzed lipid peroxidation in liver homogenates, scavenged nitric oxide spontaneously generated from nitroprusside and inhibited heat induced hemolysis of rat erythrocytes. The present in vitro and in vivo experimental findings suggest the protective effect of curcumin on experimentally induced inflammation, hepatotoxicity, and cardiotoxicity in rats. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent Functional MRI of Early Evidences of Brain Plasticity after Hemodialysis Session by Helixone Membrane of Patients with Indices of Adrenal Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boujraf, Saïd; Belaïch, Rachida; Housni, Abdelkhalek; Maaroufi, Mustapha; Tizniti, Siham; Sqalli, Tarik; Benzagmout, Mohammed

    2017-05-01

    Various alterations of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function have been described in patients with chronic renal failure. Nevertheless, controversial evidences were stated about the association between adrenal function deficiency (AD) and hemodialysis (HD). The goal of this paper was to estimate indirect indices of the adrenal gland dysfunction which is potentially influenced by oxidative stress (OS) that still generates brain plasticity and reorganization of the functional control. Two male patients undergoing HD by the synthetic Helixone membrane for more than 6 months at the HD Center of the University Hospital of Fez, Fez, Morocco, were recruited. They underwent identical assessment immediately before and after the full HD session; this consisted of a blood ionogram revealing rates of sodium and calcium, and brain blood oxygenation level-dependent functional MRI (BOLD-fMRI) using a motor paradigm in block design. The blood ionogram revealed hypercalcemia and hyponatremia in both patients. Both biological assessment and BOLD-fMRI study results revealed a high level of OS that induced activation of a significantly large brain volume area suggesting the occurrence of possible brain plasticity and functional control reorganization induced by free radicals and enhanced by AD. The occurrence of brain plasticity and functional control reorganization was demonstrated in both patients studied who were undergoing HD by BOLD-fMRI with a notable sensitivity; this plasticity is induced by elevated OS occasioned by HD technique itself and probably amplified by AD. Similar results were found in a previous study performed on the same patients undergoing HD by a polysulfone membrane.

  3. Experimental evidence of giant pure optical activity in a metasurface based on a complementary twisted cross configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz-Rubio, Ana; Carbonell, Jorge; Sánchez-Dehesa, José; Hibbins, Alastair

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an experimental study of giant and pure optical activity in a periodic structure consisting of twisted crosses and complementary crosses patterned on the sides of a copper coated dielectric board. Additionally, a multilayer system is proposed and numerically studied to broaden the transmission bandwidth. Our results show that a dual band behavior can be obtained due to coupling effects between the layers whilst maintaining the dispersionless giant optical activity and negligible circular dichroism. We theoretically study the effect of the separation between layers and its influence on the transmission spectra.

  4. Accumulation and transport of microbial-size particles in a pressure protected model burn unit: CFD simulations and experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimoun Maurice

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Controlling airborne contamination is of major importance in burn units because of the high susceptibility of burned patients to infections and the unique environmental conditions that can accentuate the infection risk. In particular the required elevated temperatures in the patient room can create thermal convection flows which can transport airborne contaminates throughout the unit. In order to estimate this risk and optimize the design of an intensive care room intended to host severely burned patients, we have relied on a computational fluid dynamic methodology (CFD. Methods The study was carried out in 4 steps: i patient room design, ii CFD simulations of patient room design to model air flows throughout the patient room, adjacent anterooms and the corridor, iii construction of a prototype room and subsequent experimental studies to characterize its performance iv qualitative comparison of the tendencies between CFD prediction and experimental results. The Electricité De France (EDF open-source software Code_Saturne® (http://www.code-saturne.org was used and CFD simulations were conducted with an hexahedral mesh containing about 300 000 computational cells. The computational domain included the treatment room and two anterooms including equipment, staff and patient. Experiments with inert aerosol particles followed by time-resolved particle counting were conducted in the prototype room for comparison with the CFD observations. Results We found that thermal convection can create contaminated zones near the ceiling of the room, which can subsequently lead to contaminate transfer in adjacent rooms. Experimental confirmation of these phenomena agreed well with CFD predictions and showed that particles greater than one micron (i.e. bacterial or fungal spore sizes can be influenced by these thermally induced flows. When the temperature difference between rooms was 7°C, a significant contamination transfer was observed to

  5. Effect of brand and advertising medium on demand for e-cigarettes: Evidence from an experimental auction ?

    OpenAIRE

    Rousu, Matthew C.; O'Connor, Richard; Corrigan, Jay

    2017-01-01

    Print and television advertisements for e-cigarettes are currently legal in the United States. Given that e-cigarettes are a lower-risk alternative to cigarettes, these ads could have a positive public health impact if they motivate smokers to switch to e-cigarettes. However, the public health impact of e-cigarette ads could be negative if ads increase demand for both e-cigarettes and cigarettes. We use experimental auctions –in which participants bid in real auctions and winners pay for the ...

  6. Accumulation and transport of microbial-size particles in a pressure protected model burn unit: CFD simulations and experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchêne, Christian; Laudinet, Nicolas; Choukri, Firas; Rousset, Jean-Luc; Benhamadouche, Sofiane; Larbre, Juliette; Chaouat, Marc; Benbunan, Marc; Mimoun, Maurice; Lajonchère, Jean-Patrick; Bergeron, Vance; Derouin, Francis

    2011-03-03

    Controlling airborne contamination is of major importance in burn units because of the high susceptibility of burned patients to infections and the unique environmental conditions that can accentuate the infection risk. In particular the required elevated temperatures in the patient room can create thermal convection flows which can transport airborne contaminates throughout the unit. In order to estimate this risk and optimize the design of an intensive care room intended to host severely burned patients, we have relied on a computational fluid dynamic methodology (CFD). The study was carried out in 4 steps: i) patient room design, ii) CFD simulations of patient room design to model air flows throughout the patient room, adjacent anterooms and the corridor, iii) construction of a prototype room and subsequent experimental studies to characterize its performance iv) qualitative comparison of the tendencies between CFD prediction and experimental results. The Electricité De France (EDF) open-source software Code_Saturne® (http://www.code-saturne.org) was used and CFD simulations were conducted with an hexahedral mesh containing about 300 000 computational cells. The computational domain included the treatment room and two anterooms including equipment, staff and patient. Experiments with inert aerosol particles followed by time-resolved particle counting were conducted in the prototype room for comparison with the CFD observations. We found that thermal convection can create contaminated zones near the ceiling of the room, which can subsequently lead to contaminate transfer in adjacent rooms. Experimental confirmation of these phenomena agreed well with CFD predictions and showed that particles greater than one micron (i.e. bacterial or fungal spore sizes) can be influenced by these thermally induced flows. When the temperature difference between rooms was 7°C, a significant contamination transfer was observed to enter into the positive pressure room when the

  7. Role of Nigella sativa and Its Constituent Thymoquinone on Chemotherapy-Induced Nephrotoxicity: Evidences from Experimental Animal Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Cascella

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most chemotherapeutic drugs are known to cause nephrotoxicity. Therefore, new strategies have been considered to prevent chemotherapy-induced nephrotoxicity. It is of note that Nigella sativa (NS, or its isolated compound Thymoquinone (TQ, has a potential role in combating chemotherapy-induced nephrotoxicity. AIM: To analyze and report the outcome of experimental animal studies on the protective effects of NS/TQ on chemotherapy-associated kidney complications. Design: Standard systematic review and narrative synthesis. Data Sources: MEDLINE, EMBASE databases were searched for relevant articles published up to March 2017. Additionally, a manual search was performed. Criteria for a study’s inclusion were: conducted in animals, systematic reviews and meta-analysis, containing data on nephroprotective effects of NS/TQ compared to a placebo or other substance. All strains and genders were included. Results: The database search yielded 71 studies, of which 12 (cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity 8; methotrexate-induced nephrotoxicity 1; doxorubicin-induced nephrotoxicity 2; ifosfamide-induced nephrotoxicity 1 were included in this review. Conclusions: Experimental animal studies showed the protective effect of NS, or TQ, on chemotherapy-induced nephrotoxicity. These effects are caused by decreasing lipid peroxidation and increasing activity of antioxidant enzymes in renal tissue of chemotherapy-treated animals.

  8. The effect of heterogeneity on invasion in spatial epidemics: from theory to experimental evidence in a model system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco M Neri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity in host populations is an important factor affecting the ability of a pathogen to invade, yet the quantitative investigation of its effects on epidemic spread is still an open problem. In this paper, we test recent theoretical results, which extend the established "percolation paradigm" to the spread of a pathogen in discrete heterogeneous host populations. In particular, we test the hypothesis that the probability of epidemic invasion decreases when host heterogeneity is increased. We use replicated experimental microcosms, in which the ubiquitous pathogenic fungus Rhizoctonia solani grows through a population of discrete nutrient sites on a lattice, with nutrient sites representing hosts. The degree of host heterogeneity within different populations is adjusted by changing the proportion and the nutrient concentration of nutrient sites. The experimental data are analysed via Bayesian inference methods, estimating pathogen transmission parameters for each individual population. We find a significant, negative correlation between heterogeneity and the probability of pathogen invasion, thereby validating the theory. The value of the correlation is also in remarkably good agreement with the theoretical predictions. We briefly discuss how our results can be exploited in the design and implementation of disease control strategies.

  9. Teaching to make stone tools: new experimental evidence supporting a technological hypothesis for the origins of language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombao, D; Guardiola, M; Mosquera, M

    2017-10-31

    The relationship between lithic technology, learning and language is a topic of growing interest in human evolution studies, and has therefore been the subject of numerous scientific papers in recent years. To evaluate the role of language in the social transmission of lithic technology, we designed and developed an experimental protocol through which we compared the acquisition of knapping skills in thirty non-experts in the early stages of learning, by means of three mechanisms of social transmission: imitation-emulation, gestural communication, and verbal communication. All the apprentice knappers carried out the experimental task with blanks that were equal in shape and size, and were requested to replicate what the expert knapper was doing: the alternating method, a sufficiently simple, but systematic technique for detaching flakes from a core. We analysed each participant's actions, including those of the master knapper, the final products (flakes and cores), and the knapping sequences, by analysing the refits. Our results show that the apprentices improved their knapping skills in teaching conditions -both gestural and verbal communication-, and specially through the latter. In conclusion, our study supports the hypothesis of co-evolution between lithic technology and social learning, which could have favoured the emergence of verbal language.

  10. Food as ego-protective remedy for people experiencing shame. Experimental evidence for a new perspective on weight-related shame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ying-Hsien; Yang, Chao-Chin; Chiou, Wen-Bin

    2012-10-01

    The well-explored association between shame and bulimia is based on research with clinical samples, which limits its generalizability. Moreover, these correlational studies are unable to draw clear conclusions about causality. To fill this gap, we conducted two experimental studies to examine whether shame elicits a desire for food in nonclinical participants. Compared with controls, participants experiencing shame found a buffet meal more desirable and were more likely to binge eat (Experiment 1); they also ate more than controls in a comparative taste test (Experiment 2). Our findings suggest that shame elicits the desire to obtain food to protect the devalued self but may lead to overeating and the risk of losing control over one's weight. We provide the first experimental evidence showing the link between shame and desire for food and offer a new perspective on the causal relationship between shame and binge eating. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental evidence of coupling between sheared-flow development and an increase in the level of turbulence in the TJ-II stellarator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, C; Pedrosa, M A; García, L; Ware, A

    2004-12-01

    The link between the development of sheared flows and the structure of turbulence has been investigated in the plasma boundary region of the TJ-II stellarator. The development of the naturally occurring velocity shear layer requires a minimum plasma density. Near this critical density, the level of edge turbulent transport and the turbulent kinetic energy significantly increases in the plasma edge. The resulting shearing rate in the phase velocity of fluctuations is comparable to the one required to trigger a transition to improved confinement regimes with reduction of edge turbulence, suggesting that spontaneous sheared flows and fluctuations keep themselves near marginal stability. These findings provide the experimental evidence of coupling between sheared flows development and increasing in the level of edge turbulence. The experimental results are consistent with the expectations of second-order transition models of turbulence-driven sheared flows.

  12. Honest sexual signaling in turtles: experimental evidence of a trade-off between immune response and coloration in red-eared sliders Trachemys scripta elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, Alejandro; Polo-Cavia, Nuria; López, Pilar; Martín, José

    2014-10-01

    Sexual signals can be evolutionarily stable if they are honest and condition dependent or costly to the signaler. One possible cost is the existence of a trade-off between maintaining the immune system and the elaboration of ornaments. This hypothesis has been experimentally tested in some groups of animals but not in others such as turtles. We experimentally challenged the immune system of female red-eared sliders Trachemys scripta elegans, with a bacterial antigen (lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) without pathogenic effects to explore whether the immune activation affected visual colorful ornaments of the head. The LPS injection altered the reflectance patterns of color ornaments. In comparison to the control animals, the yellow chin stripes of injected animals exhibited (1) reduced brightness, (2) lower long wavelength (>470 nm) reflectance, and (3) lower values for carotenoid chroma. The postorbital patches of injected individuals also showed reduced very long wavelength (>570 nm) reflectance but did not change in carotenoid chroma. Thus, experimental turtles showed darker and less "yellowish" chin stripes and less "reddish" postorbital patches at the end of the experiment, whereas control turtles did not change their coloration. This is the first experimental evidence supporting the existence of a trade-off between the immune system and the expression of visual ornaments in turtles. We suggest that this trade-off may allow turtles to honestly signal individual quality via characteristics of coloration, which may have an important role in intersexual selection processes.

  13. Single case design studies in music therapy: resurrecting experimental evidence in small group and individual music therapy clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Kamile; Hitchcock, John H

    2014-01-01

    The profession would benefit from greater and routine generation of causal evidence pertaining to the impact of music therapy interventions on client outcomes. One way to meet this goal is to revisit the use of Single Case Designs (SCDs) in clinical practice and research endeavors in music therapy. Given the appropriate setting and goals, this design can be accomplished with small sample sizes and it is often appropriate for studying music therapy interventions. In this article, we promote and discuss implementation of SCD studies in music therapy settings, review the meaning of internal study validity and by extension the notion of causality, and describe two of the most commonly used SCDs to demonstrate how they can help generate causal evidence to inform the field. In closing, we describe the need for replication and future meta-analysis of SCD studies completed in music therapy settings. SCD studies are both feasible and appropriate for use in music therapy clinical practice settings, particularly for testing effectiveness of interventions for individuals or small groups. © the American Music Therapy Association 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors as Mediators of Phthalate-Induced Effects in the Male and Female Reproductive Tract: Epidemiological and Experimental Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Latini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that male as well as female reproductive function has been declining in human and wildlife populations over the last 40 years. Several factors such as lifestyle or environmental xenobiotics other than genetic factors may play a role in determining adverse effects on reproductive health. Among the environmental xenobiotics phthalates, a family of man-made pollutants are suspected to interfere with the function of the endocrine system and therefore to be endocrine disruptors. The definition of endocrine disruption is today extended to broader endocrine regulations, and includes activation of metabolic sensors, such as the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs. Toxicological studies have shown that phthalates can activate a subset of PPARs. Here, we analyze the epidemiological and experimental evidence linking phthalate exposure to both PPAR activation and adverse effects on male and female reproductive health.

  15. Responses of the reflectance indices PRI and NDVI to experimental warming and drought in European shrublands along a north-south climatic gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mänd, P.; Hallik, L.; Peñuelas, J.; Nilson, T.; Duce, P.; Emmett, B.A.; Beier, C.; Estiarte, M.; Garadnai, J.; Kalapos, T.; Schmidt, I.K.; Kovács-Láng, E.; Prieto, P.; Tietema, A.; Westerveld, J.W.; Kull, O.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of ground-based canopy reflectance measurements to detect changes in physiology and structure of vegetation in response to experimental warming and drought treatment at six European shrublands located along a North-South climatic gradient. We measured

  16. An Experimental Test of Student Verbal Reports and Teacher Evaluations as a Source of Validity Evidence for Test Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, Jacqueline P.; Heffernan, Colleen; Cor, M. Kenneth; Gokiert, Rebecca J.; Cui, Ying

    2011-01-01

    The "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing" indicate that test instructions, and by extension item objectives, presented to examinees should be sufficiently clear and detailed to help ensure that they respond as developers intend them to respond (Standard 3.20; AERA, APA, & NCME, 1999). The present study investigates…

  17. L'Indice du Développement Humain ou l'indice monétaire de développement ? Evidences par l’Analyse en Composantes Principales

    OpenAIRE

    Dialga, Issaka

    2016-01-01

    L’article discute de quatre questions cruciales relatives à l’Indice du Développement Humain (IDH). Le choix des seuils de normalisation de l’indice revenu influence-t-il le classement des pays ? Est-il opportun de mesurer le progrès humain au travers un indice synthétique ? Les performances des pays sont-elles expliquées par la seule dimension monétaire ? Le choix d’une pondération égale des composantes de l’indice a-t-il une validité statistique ? En reprenant les données du rapport 2014 su...

  18. CO2-crystal wettability in potassic magmas: implications for eruptive dynamics in light of experimental evidence for heterogeneous nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottili, Gianluca; Fanara, Sara; Silleni, Aurora; Palladino, Danilo M.; Schmidt, Burkhard C.

    2017-05-01

    The volatile content in magmas is fundamental for the triggering and style of volcanic eruptions. Carbon dioxide, the second most abundant volatile component in magmas after H2O, is the first to reach saturation upon ascent and depressurization. We investigate experimentally CO2-bubble nucleation in trachybasalt and trachyte melts at high temperature and high pressure (HT and HP) through wetting-angle measurements on different (sialic, mafic or oxide) phenocryst phases. The presence of crystals lowers the supersaturation required for CO2-bubble nucleation up to 37 per cent (heterogeneous nucleation, HeN), with a minor role of mineral chemistry. Different from H2O-rich systems, feldspar crystals are effective in reducing required supersaturation for bubble nucleation. Our data suggest that leucite, the dominant liquidus phase in ultrapotassic systems at shallow depth (i.e. explosive behaviour.

  19. Experimental evidence of a xylose-catabolic pathway on the pAO1 megaplasmid of Arthrobacter nicotinovorans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Mihasan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The pAO1 megaplasmid of A. nicotinovorans consists of 165 ORF's related mainly to nicotine degradation, uptake and utilization of carbohydrates, amino acids and sarcosine. A putative sugar catabolic pathway consisting of 11 ORF's organized as a single operon were previously described. The current work brings experimental data supporting the existence of a D-Xylose catabolic pathway on the pAO1 megaplasmid. When grown on D-xylose containing media, the cells harboring the pAO1 megaplasmid grow to higher cell densities and also express the OxRe protein coded by the megaplasmid. A putative pathway similar to Weimberg pentose pathway is postulated, in which D-xylose is transported in the cell by the ABC-type transport system and then transformed using the putative sugar-dehidrogenase OxRe to D-xylonate, which is further degrated to 2-ketoglutarate and integrated into the general metabolism of the cell

  20. How communication changes when we cannot mime the world: Experimental evidence for the effect of iconicity on combinatoriality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gareth; Lewandowski, Jirka; Galantucci, Bruno

    2015-08-01

    Communication systems are exposed to two different pressures: a pressure for transmission efficiency, such that messages are simple to produce and perceive, and a pressure for referential efficiency, such that messages are easy to understand with their intended meaning. A solution to the first pressure is combinatoriality--the recombination of a few basic meaningless forms to express an infinite number of meanings. A solution to the second is iconicity--the use of forms that resemble what they refer to. These two solutions appear to be incompatible with each other, as iconic forms are ill-suited for use as meaningless combinatorial units. Furthermore, in the early stages of a communication system, when basic referential forms are in the process of being established, the pressure for referential efficiency is likely to be particularly strong, which may lead it to trump the pressure for transmission efficiency. This means that, where iconicity is available as a strategy, it is likely to impede the emergence of combinatoriality. Although this hypothesis seems consistent with some observations of natural language, it was unclear until recently how it could be soundly tested. This has changed thanks to the development of a line of research, known as Experimental Semiotics, in which participants construct novel communication systems in the laboratory using an unfamiliar medium. We conducted an Experimental Semiotic study in which we manipulated the opportunity for iconicity by varying the kind of referents to be communicated, while keeping the communication medium constant. We then measured the combinatoriality and transmission efficiency of the communication systems. We found that, where iconicity was available, it provided scaffolding for the construction of communication systems and was overwhelmingly adopted. Where it was not available, however, the resulting communication systems were more combinatorial and their forms more efficient to produce. This study enriches

  1. Experimental evidence suggesting slow or weak response of nematode community structure to a large suspension-feeder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austen, Melanie C.; Thrush, Simon F.

    2001-08-01

    An experiment was carried out in a shallow, subtidal site in Mahurangi Harbour, New Zealand, to examine the effects of the large pinnid bivalve Atrina zelandica on benthic communities. Early on in the experiment, after 47 days, samples were taken specifically to examine the response of the meiofauna communities and particularly nematode assemblage structure to the presence of different densities of Atrina. Dead shell treatments were included in the experiment to discriminate between the effects of the physical presence of Atrina and the effects of their biological activity. There were no observable effects of either different densities of Atrina or of the dead shell treatments on nematode assemblage structure. There were no consistent treatment-related effects on community structure of meiofaunal major taxa. A previous field study had shown that nematode communities differed inside and outside dense natural patches of Atrina. Data manipulations combined with the use of ANOSIM show that the experimental design was sufficiently powerful to have detected these differences if they had occurred in the experiment. Speculations on the current lack of the experimental effect include: (1) the meiofauna communities in field sites containing high densities of Atrina are structured by other factors (which may be coincidentally attractive to the Atrina) rather than by the presence or activities of the Atrina themselves; and (2) Atrina in natural patches may condition the sediment in some way that can affect the meiofauna, perhaps through alteration in flow regime which could affect sediment chemistry or through changes in biodeposit levels within the sediment, but these habitat alterations or the reaction of meiofauna to them do not occur within the 47-day time scale of our experiment.

  2. Mental Practice Combined with Motor Rehabilitation to Treat Upper Limb Hemiparesis of Post-Stroke Patients: Clinical and Experimental Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Sergio; Lattari, Eduardo; Paes, Flávia; Rocha, Nuno B F; Nardi, Antonio E; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Mura, Gioia; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Carta, Mauro G; Campos, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of disability in the world. Due to the extended lifetime of the world's population, the number of people affected by stroke has increased substantially over the last years. Stroke may lead to sensorimotor deficits, usually causing hemiplegia or hemiparesia. In order to reduce motor deficits and accelerate functional recovery, MP combined with motor rehabilitation was introduced to the rehabilitation process of post-stroke patients. Evidence has shown that MP combining with motor rehabilitation based on activities of daily living was more effective than conventional motor rehabilitation used per se. This combination proved very useful and effective, with significant results in improvement of motor deficits in post-stroke patients. However, further studies must be conducted to determine specific parameters, such as type of imagery, frequency or duration.

  3. Mental Practice Combined with Motor Rehabilitation to Treat Upper Limb Hemiparesis of Post-Stroke Patients: Clinical and Experimental Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Sergio; Lattari, Eduardo; Paes, Flávia; Rocha, Nuno B.F.; Nardi, Antonio E.; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Mura, Gioia; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Carta, Mauro G.; Campos, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of disability in the world. Due to the extended lifetime of the world's population, the number of people affected by stroke has increased substantially over the last years. Stroke may lead to sensorimotor deficits, usually causing hemiplegia or hemiparesia. In order to reduce motor deficits and accelerate functional recovery, MP combined with motor rehabilitation was introduced to the rehabilitation process of post-stroke patients. Evidence has shown that MP combining with motor rehabilitation based on activities of daily living was more effective than conventional motor rehabilitation used per se. This combination proved very useful and effective, with significant results in improvement of motor deficits in post-stroke patients. However, further studies must be conducted to determine specific parameters, such as type of imagery, frequency or duration. PMID:27346996

  4. Experimental evidence of false-positive Comet test results due to TiO2 particle--assay interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Katarina; Drobne, Damjana; Kastelec, Damijana; Marinsek-Logar, Romana

    2013-08-01

    We have studied the genotoxicity of TiO2 particles with a Comet assay on a unicellular organism, Tetrahymena thermophila. Exposure to bulk- or nano-TiO2 of free cells, cells embedded in gel or nuclei embedded in gel, all resulted in a positive Comet assay result but this outcome could not be confirmed by cytotoxicity measures such as lipid peroxidation, elevated reactive oxygen species or cell membrane composition. Published reports state that in the absence of cytotoxicity, nano- and bulk-TiO2 genotoxicity do not occur directly, and a possible explanation of our Comet assay results is that they are false positives resulting from post festum exposure interactions between particles and DNA. We suggest that before Comet assay is used for nanoparticle genotoxicity testing, evidence for the possibility of post festum exposure interactions should be considered. The acellular Comet test described in this report can be used for this purpose.

  5. Effects of Exercise on Physical and Mental Health, and Cognitive and Brain Functions in Schizophrenia: Clinical and Experimental Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimes, Ridson Rosa; de Souza Moura, Antonio Marcos; Lamego, Murilo Khede; de Sá Filho, Alberto Souza; Manochio, João; Paes, Flávia; Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Mura, Gioia; Wegner, Mirko; Budde, Henning; Ferreira Rocha, Nuno Barbosa; Rocha, Joana; Tavares, João Manuel R S; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Machado, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Exercise promotes several health benefits, such as cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory improvements. It is believed that the practice of exercise in individuals with psychiatric disorders, e.g. schizophrenia, can cause significant changes. Schizophrenic patients have problematic lifestyle habits compared with general population; this may cause a high mortality rate, mainly caused by cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Thus, the aim of this study is to investigate changes in physical and mental health, cognitive and brain functioning due to the practice of exercise in patients with schizophrenia. Although still little is known about the benefits of exercise on mental health, cognitive and brain functioning of schizophrenic patients, exercise training has been shown to be a beneficial intervention in the control and reduction of disease severity. Type of training, form of execution, duration and intensity need to be better studied as the effects on physical and mental health, cognition and brain activity depend exclusively of interconnected factors, such as the combination of exercise and medication. However, one should understand that exercise is not only an effective nondrug alternative, but also acts as a supporting linking up interventions to promote improvements in process performance optimization. In general, the positive effects on mental health, cognition and brain activity as a result of an exercise program are quite evident. Few studies have been published correlating effects of exercise in patients with schizophrenia, but there is increasing evidence that positive and negative symptoms can be improved. Therefore, it is important that further studies be undertaken to expand the knowledge of physical exercise on mental health in people with schizophrenia, as well as its dose-response and the most effective type of exercise.

  6. EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE FOR THE FORMATION OF HIGHLY SUPERHYDROGENATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS THROUGH H ATOM ADDITION AND THEIR CATALYTIC ROLE IN H2 FORMATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrower, John; Jørgensen, Bjarke; Friis, Emil Enderup

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry measurements show the formation of highly superhydrogenated derivatives of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecule coronene through H atom addition reactions. The observed product mass distribution provides evidence also for abstraction reactions resulting in H2 formation......, in agreement with recent IR measurements. Complementary density functional theory calculations confirm the stability of the observed superhydrogenated species toward spontaneous H and H2 loss indicating that abstraction reactions may be the dominant route to H2 formation involving neutral polycyclic aromatic...... hydrocarbons (PAHs). The results indicate that highly superhydrogenated PAHs could well be formed and could act as efficient catalysts for H2 formation in the interstellar medium in low UV flux regions....

  7. Review: geological and experimental evidence for secular variation in seawater Mg/Ca (calcite-aragonite seas and its effects on marine biological calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Ries

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Synchronized transitions in the polymorph mineralogy of the major reef-building and sediment-producing calcareous marine organisms and abiotic CaCO3 precipitates (ooids, marine cements throughout Phanerozoic time are believed to have been caused by tectonically induced variations in the Mg/Ca ratio of seawater (molar Mg/Ca>2="aragonite seas", <2="calcite seas". Here, I assess the geological evidence in support of secular variation in seawater Mg/Ca and its effects on marine calcifiers, and review a series of recent experiments that investigate the effects of seawater Mg/Ca (1.0–5.2 on extant representatives of calcifying taxa that have experienced variations in this ionic ratio of seawater throughout the geologic past.

    Secular variation in seawater Mg/Ca is supported by synchronized secular variations in (1 the ionic composition of fluid inclusions in primary marine halite, (2 the mineralogies of late stage marine evaporites, abiogenic carbonates, and reef- and sediment-forming marine calcifiers, (3 the Mg/Ca ratios of fossil echinoderms, molluscs, rugose corals, and abiogenic carbonates, (4 global rates of tectonism that drive the exchange of Mg2+ and Ca2+ along zones of ocean crust production, and (5 additional proxies of seawater Mg/Ca including Sr/Mg ratios of abiogenic carbonates, Sr/Ca ratios of biogenic carbonates, and Br concentrations in marine halite.

    Laboratory experiments have revealed that aragonite-secreting bryopsidalean algae and scleractinian corals and calcite-secreting coccolithophores exhibit higher rates of calcification and growth in experimental seawaters formulated with seawater Mg/Ca ratios that favor their skeletal mineral. These results support the assertion that seawater Mg/Ca played an important role in determining which hypercalcifying marine organisms were the major reef-builders and sediment-producers throughout Earth history. The observation that primary

  8. Studies on Crop Growth Damage due to Ash Fall form Mt. Minamidake of Sakurajima : (1)Experimental Indications of Crop Damage due to Ash Fall

    OpenAIRE

    角, 明夫; 鈴木, 義則; Akio, SUMI; Yoshinori, SUZUKI; 鹿児島大学農学部生物生産学科; 九州大学農学部農業工学科; Department of Agricultural Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University; Department of Agricultural Engineering, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyusyu University

    1998-01-01

    The occurrence mechanisms of crop growth damage due to ash fall were examined experimentally. When volcanic ash was mixed into arable soil, the crop growth was reduced with increasing in its amount because of the deterioration in physical and chemical properties of soil. When the normal soil was arranged concentrically around the main root of a crop, the improvement effect by soil admixing could be found on the smaller replacement. The crop growth was also inhibited when volcanic ash accumula...

  9. Experimental pulmonary schistosomiasis: lack of morphological evidence of modulation in schistosomal pulmonary granulomas Esquistossomose pulmonar experimental: falta de evidência morfológica de modulação nos granulomas esquistosomóticos pulmonares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura R. F. Souza Vidal

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous pulmonary schistosome egg granulomas were present in mice submitted to partial portal vein ligation (Warren's model. The granulomas were characterized by cellular aggregations formed within alveolar tissue. Main cellular types were macrophages (epithelioid cells, eosinophils, plasma cells and lymphocytes. These cells were supported by scanty fibrous stroma and exhibited close membrane contact points amongst themselves, but without forming specialized adhesion apparatus. When granulomas involved arterial structures, proliferation of cndothelial and smooth muscle cells occurred and fibrosis associated with angiogenesis became more evident. Granulomas formed around mature eggs in the pulmonary alveolar tissue presented approximately the same size and morphology regardless of the time of infection, the latter being 10, 18 and 25 weeks after cercarial exposure. This persistence of morphological appearance suggests that pulmonary granulomas do not undergo immunological modulation, as is the case with the granulomas in the liver and, to a lesser extent, in the intestines. Probably, besides general immunological factors, local (stromal factors play an important role in schistosomal granuloma modulation.Em camundongos submetidos à ligadura parcial da veia porta e infecção pelo Schistosoma mansoni, os granulomas periovulares apareceram em grande número nos pulmões, comprovando a validade do modelo de Warren. Histologicamente os granulomas eram representados por agregados celulares compactos no seio de escasso estroma. Os macrófagos (células epitelióides e eosinófilos eram os elementos celulares predominantes, vindo em seguida os linfóticos e plasmócitos. Ultraestruturalmenle, as células do granuloma exibiam íntimo contacto de suas membranas, com varios pontos de adesão, mas sem formar estruturas juncionais mais específicas. Os granulomas formados em torno a ovos maduros tinham tamanho, forma e composição celular similares ap

  10. BMI is not related to altruism, fairness, trust or reciprocity: Experimental evidence from the field and the lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brañas-Garza, Pablo; Espín, Antonio M; Lenkei, Balint

    2016-03-15

    Over the past few decades obesity has become one of the largest public policy concerns among the adult population in the developed world. Obesity and overweight are hypothesized to affect individuals' sociability through a number of channels, including discrimination and low self-esteem. However, whether these effects translate into differential behavioural patterns in social interactions remains unknown. In two large-scale economic experiments, we explore the relationship between Body Mass Index (BMI) and social behaviour, using three paradigmatic economic games: the dictator, ultimatum, and trust games. Our first experiment employs a representative sample of a Spanish city's population (N=753), while the second employs a sample of university students from the same city (N=618). Measures of altruism, fairness/equality, trust and reciprocity are obtained from participants' experimental decisions. Using a variety of regression specifications and control variables, our results suggest that BMI does not exert an effect on any of these social preferences. Some implications of these findings are discussed. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Temperature effects on soil bulk dielectric permittivity measured by time domain reflectometry: Experimental evidence and hypothesis development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wraith, Jon M.; Or, Dani

    1999-02-01

    Reports on temperature (T) effects on time domain reflectometry (TDR) measurements of soil water content (θ) are contradictory and often exhibit conflicting trends. We imposed step T changes on sealed columns of four soils having variable θ, while monitoring bulk apparent dielectric constant (or permittivity ɛb) and bulk electrical conductivity (σb) using TDR. Measured ɛb increased substantially with increasing temperature for one silt loam soil, for all θ. For another silt loam soil and for an Oxisol, measured ɛb increased with increasing T at relatively low θ but decreased with increasingT at higher θ. For a sandy loam soil, measured ɛb decreased with increasing T for all θ. The experimental results led to the hypothesis that TDR-measured ɛb is determined by an interplay between two competing phenomena: (1) the reduction in the dielectric constant of bulk water with increased T; and (2) the increase in TDR-measured ɛb with increased T due to release of bound water. TDRmeasured ɛb is thus dependent on solid surface area and wetness. Our results have implications for routine use of TDR in fine-textured and organic soils and potentially for microwave remote sensing of soil water status.

  12. Ultrastructural and biochemical aspects of liver mitochondria during recovery from ethanol-induced alterations. Experimental evidence of mitochondrial division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, O. R.; Roatta de Conti, L. L.; Bolaños, L. P.; Stoppani, A. O.

    1978-01-01

    To study the morphologic and biochemical changes occuring in liver mitochondria during recovery from ethanol-induced injury, rats fed a 6-month high-alcohol regimen plus a nutritionally adequate diet which did not induce fatty liver were compared with isocalorically fed controls. After this period the alcohol-fed animals displayed striking ultrastructural changes of liver mitochondria and a decreased respiratory activity with succinate or malate-glutamate as substrate. On the contrary, the respiratory rate with I-glycerophosphate was 50% increased. Regression changes were studied after alcohol was withdrawn from the diet. Enlarged mitochondria rapidly disappeared (in 24 hours), although a few megamitochondria were still present after 8 days of abstinence. A similar recovery was observed for the functional alterations. At the end of the experimental period, only a slight decrease of the maximal respiratory rate using malate-glutamate as a substrate was noted. The ultrastructural findings and the morphometric data suggest that the way in which mitochondrial normalization takes place is based on partition of these organelles. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 13 PMID:623205

  13. Electro-physiological evidence of intercostal nerve injury after thoracotomy: an experimental study in a sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruoyu; Schwabe, Kerstin; Krüger, Marcus; Haverich, Axel; Krauss, Joachim K; Alam, Mesbah

    2017-08-01

    Although intercostal nerve injury is one of the major causes for post-thoracotomy pain, the exact mechanisms are still unclear. We sought to evaluate the electro-physiological changes of intercostal nerve injury after thoracotomy in a sheep model. Adult sheep underwent thoracotomy in the sixth intercostal space by employing diathermy to superior border of the seventh rib. In two sheep, ribs were then spread using retractor spreading for a distance of 7 cm for 30 minutes. In the third sheep, thoracotomy was followed by harvesting intercostal muscles including the neurovascular bundle adjacent to inferior edge of the sixth rib. Thereafter, ribs were spread in the same way, but with the muscle flap dangled between the blades for intercostal nerve protection (dangling muscle flap technique). The nerve conduction velocity of the intercostal nerve was recorded before and after incision of intercostal muscles, immediately and 30 minutes after retractor placement and 30 minutes after removal of the retractor. In the sheep undergoing conventional thoracotomy, the physiological conductivity of intercostal nerve was completely blocked immediately after retractor placement using the same stimulation intensity or even the supra-threshold intensity. The conduction block persisted for 30 minutes during the retractor placement and further 30 minutes after removal of the retractor. In contrast, intercostal nerve conduction was not impaired throughout the experiment with the dangling muscle flap technique. Our experiment provides electro-physiological evidence for intercostal nerve injury after thoracotomy. The injury is primarily attributed to mechanical compression caused by the rib retractor.

  14. Experimental evidence for reduced hybrid viability between dwarf and normal ecotypes of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis Mitchill)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatchez, L.

    1998-01-01

    Forces driving the evolution of reproductive isolation among natural populations, as well as the mechanisms involved to maintain it, are still poorly understood. Because sympatric fish ecotypes mainly differ in phenotypic traits associated with occupying distinct trophic niches, it is generally believed that reproductive isolation is mainly driven by ecological divergent selection, excluding genome incompatibility as a basis for postmating isolation. We did cross experiments between dwarf and normal ecotypes of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis Mitchill) originating from distinct glacial refugia to test the hypothesis that their geographical isolation during the Pleistocene may have led to sufficient genetic divergence for the development of reproductive isolation between them before their secondary contact. Similar fertilization success in pure and hybrid crosses indicated the absence of gametic incompatibility between the two ecotypes. In contrast, daily embryonic mortality rates were 2.4–4.7 times higher in reciprocal hybrid crosses compared to pure crosses, which supports our working hypothesis. These results, along with previous morphological and population genetic studies, indicate that both genetic and ecological mechanisms may jointly act to promote speciation among northern freshwater fish ecotypes.

  15. Dependence of invadopodia function on collagen fiber spacing and cross-linking: computational modeling and experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enderling, Heiko; Alexander, Nelson R; Clark, Emily S; Branch, Kevin M; Estrada, Lourdes; Crooke, Cornelia; Jourquin, Jérôme; Lobdell, Nichole; Zaman, Muhammad H; Guelcher, Scott A; Anderson, Alexander R A; Weaver, Alissa M

    2008-09-01

    Invadopodia are subcellular organelles thought to be critical for extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation and the movement of cells through tissues. Here we examine invadopodia generation, turnover, and function in relation to two structural aspects of the ECM substrates they degrade: cross-linking and fiber density. We set up a cellular automaton computational model that simulates ECM penetration and degradation by invadopodia. Experiments with denatured collagen (gelatin) were used to calibrate the model and demonstrate the inhibitory effect of ECM cross-linking on invadopodia degradation and penetration. Incorporation of dynamic invadopodia behavior into the model amplified the effect of cross-linking on ECM degradation, and was used to model feedback from the ECM. When the model was parameterized with spatial fibrillar dimensions that closely matched the organization, in real life, of native ECM collagen into triple-helical monomers, microfibrils, and macrofibrils, little or no inhibition of invadopodia penetration was observed in simulations of sparse collagen gels, no matter how high the degree of cross-linking. Experimental validation, using live-cell imaging of invadopodia in cells plated on cross-linked gelatin, was consistent with simulations in which ECM cross-linking led to higher rates of both invadopodia retraction and formation. Analyses of invadopodia function from cells plated on cross-linked gelatin and collagen gels under standard concentrations were consistent with simulation results in which sparse collagen gels provided a weak barrier to invadopodia. These results suggest that the organization of collagen, as it may occur in stroma or in vitro collagen gels, forms gaps large enough so as to have little impact on invadopodia penetration/degradation. By contrast, dense ECM, such as gelatin or possibly basement membranes, is an effective obstacle to invadopodia penetration and degradation, particularly when cross-linked. These results provide a

  16. Evidence of a drug-specific impact of experimentally selected paromomycin and miltefosine resistance on parasite fitness in Leishmania infantum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickx, S; Beyers, J; Mondelaers, A; Eberhardt, E; Lachaud, L; Delputte, P; Cos, P; Maes, L

    2016-07-01

    Although miltefosine and paromomycin were only recently introduced to treat visceral leishmaniasis, increasing numbers of miltefosine treatment failures and occasional primary resistance to both drugs have been reported. Understanding alterations in parasite behaviour linked to drug resistance is essential to assess the propensity for emergence and spread of resistant strains, particularly since a positive effect on fitness has been reported for antimony-resistant parasites. This laboratory study compared the fitness of a drug-susceptible parent WT clinical Leishmania infantum isolate (MHOM/FR/96/LEM3323) and derived miltefosine and paromomycin drug-resistant lines that were experimentally selected at the intracellular amastigote level. Parasite fitness of WT, paromomycin-resistant and miltefosine-resistant strains, in vitro and in vivo parasite growth, metacyclogenesis, infectivity and macrophage stress responses were comparatively evaluated. No significant differences in promastigote fitness were noted between the WT and paromomycin-resistant strain, while clear benefits could be demonstrated for paromomycin-resistant amastigotes in terms of enhanced in vitro and in vivo growth potential and intracellular stress response. The miltefosine-resistant phenotype showed incomplete promastigote metacyclogenesis, decreased intracellular growth and weakened stress response, revealing a reduced fitness compared with WT parent parasites. The rapid selection and fitness advantages of paromomycin-resistant amastigotes endorse the current use of paromomycin in combination therapy. Although a reduced fitness of miltefosine-resistant strains may explain the difficulty of miltefosine resistance selection in vitro, the growing number of miltefosine treatment failures in the field still requires further exploratory research. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  17. Effect of brand and advertising medium on demand for e-cigarettes: Evidence from an experimental auction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C. Rousu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Print and television advertisements for e-cigarettes are currently legal in the United States. Given that e-cigarettes are a lower-risk alternative to cigarettes, these ads could have a positive public health impact if they motivate smokers to switch to e-cigarettes. However, the public health impact of e-cigarette ads could be negative if ads increase demand for both e-cigarettes and cigarettes. We use experimental auctions –in which participants bid in real auctions and winners pay for the items they purchase – to study the effect of print and TV e-cigarettes ads on demand for the brand from the ad, for another e-cigarettes brand, and for cigarettes. We ran experiments with 288 Pennsylvania smokers in November 2014–March 2015 and we found that in cases where an ad affects demand for e-cigarettes, the ad moves demand for cigarettes in the same direction. For example, the Blu print ad increases demand for Blu e-cigarettes and cigarettes among non-white participants. The Vuse TV ad reduces demand for both types of e-cigarettes and for cigarettes. We also find that non-white participants are willing to pay more for e-cigarettes in the absence of advertising, and that smokers who worry most about their health are willing to pay more for e-cigarettes. The results of this study point to the need for greater scrutiny of advertising for e-cigarette products such that they do not also induce demand for tobacco cigarettes.

  18. Protective Role of Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in Experimental Lung Injury: Evidence of a Lipoxin A(4)-Mediated Effect.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Polymorphoneutrophils (PMNs) are activated by inflammatory mediators following splanchnic ischemia\\/reperfusion (I\\/R), potentially injuring organs such as the lung. As a result, some patients develop respiratory failure following abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Pulmonary cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 protects against acid aspiration and bacterial instillation via lipoxins, a family of potent anti-inflammatory lipid mediators. We explored the role of COX-2 and lipoxin A(4) in experimental I\\/R-mediated lung injury. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of the following five groups: (1) controls; (2) aortic cross-clamping for 45 min and reperfusion for 4 h (I\\/R group); (3) I\\/R and SC236, a selective COX-2 inhibitor; (4) I\\/R and aspirin; and (5) I\\/R and iloprost, a prostacyclin (PGI(2)) analogue. Lung injury was assessed by wet\\/dry ratio, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) neutrophil counts. BAL levels of thromboxane, PGE(2), 6-keto-PGF(1)alpha (a hydrolysis product of prostacyclin), lipoxin A(4), and 15-epi-lipoxin A(4) were analyzed by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Immunostaining for COX-2 was performed. RESULTS: I\\/R significantly increased tissue MPO, the wet\\/dry lung ratio, and neutrophil counts. These measures were significantly further aggravated by SC236 and improved by iloprost. I\\/R increased COX-2 immunostaining and both PGE(2) and 6-keto-PGF(1alpha) levels in BAL. SC236 markedly reduced these prostanoids and lipoxin A(4) compared with I\\/R alone. Iloprost markedly increased lipoxin A(4) levels. The deleterious effect of SC236 and the beneficial effect of iloprost was associated with a reduction and an increase, respectively, in lipoxin A(4) levels. CONCLUSIONS: Lipoxin A(4) warrants further evaluation as a mediator of COX-2 regulated lung protection.

  19. Experimental evidence for the interplay of exogenous and endogenous factors on the movement ecology of a migrating songbird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily B Cohen

    Full Text Available Movement patterns during songbird migration remain poorly understood despite their expected fitness consequences in terms of survival, energetic condition and timing of migration that will carry over to subsequent phases of the annual cycle. We took an experimental approach to test hypotheses regarding the influence of habitat, energetic condition, time of season and sex on the hour-by-hour, local movement decisions of a songbird during spring stopover. To simulate arrival of nocturnal migrants at unfamiliar stopover sites, we translocated and continuously tracked migratory red-eyed vireos (Vireo olivaceus throughout spring stopover with and without energetic reserves that were released in two replicates of three forested habitat types. Migrants moved the most upon release, during which time they selected habitat characterized by greater food abundance and higher foraging attack rates. Presumably under pressure to replenish fuel stores necessary to continue migration in a timely fashion, migrants released in poorer energetic condition moved faster and further than migrants in better condition and the same pattern was true for migrants released late in spring relative to those released earlier. However, a migrant's energetic condition had less influence on their behavior when they were in poor quality habitat. Movement did not differ between sexes. Our study illustrates the importance of quickly finding suitable habitat at each stopover site, especially for energetically constrained migrants later in the season. If an initial period prior to foraging were necessary at each stop along a migrant's journey, non-foraging periods would cumulatively result in a significant energetic and time cost to migration. However, we suggest behavior during stopover is not solely a function of underlying resource distributions but is a complex response to a combination of endogenous and exogenous factors.

  20. Experimental evidence of nitrogen control on pCO2 in phosphorus-enriched humic and clear coastal lagoon waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Bittencourt Peixoto

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural and human-induced controls on carbon dioxide (CO2 in tropical waters may be very dynamic (over time and among or within ecosystems considering the potential role of warmer temperatures intensifying metabolic responses and playing a direct role on the balance between photosynthesis and respiration. The high magnitude of biological processes at low latitudes following eutrophication by nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P inputs into inland waters may be a relevant component of the C cycle, showing controls on partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2 that are still poorly understood. Here we assessed the strength of N control on pCO2 in P-enriched humic and clear coastal lagoons waters, using four experimental treatments in microcosms: control (no additional nutrients and three levels of N additions coupled to P enrichments. In humic coastal lagoon waters, a persistent CO2 supersaturation was reported in controls and all nutrient-enriched treatments, ranging from 24-fold to fourfold the atmospheric equilibrium value. However, both humic and clear coastal lagoon waters only showed significant decreases in pCO2 in relation to the controlled microcosms in the two treatments with higher N addition levels. Additionally, clear coastal lagoon water microcosms showed a shift from CO2 sources to CO2 sinks, in relation to the atmosphere. Only in the two more N-enriched treatments did pCO2 substantially decrease, from 650 µatm in controls and less N-enriched treatments to 10 µatm in more N-enriched microcosms. Humic substrates and N inputs can modulate pCO2 even in P-enriched coastal lagoon waters, thereby being important drivers on CO2 outgassing from inland waters.

  1. Experimental and Natural Infections of Goats with Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus: Evidence for Ticks as Viral Vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Jiao

    Full Text Available Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV, the causative agent for the fatal life-threatening infectious disease, severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS, was first identified in the central and eastern regions of China. Although the viral RNA was detected in free-living and parasitic ticks, the vector for SFTSV remains unsettled.Firstly, an experimental infection study in goats was conducted in a bio-safety level-2 (BSL-2 facility to investigate virus transmission between animals. The results showed that infected animals did not shed virus to the outside through respiratory or digestive tract route, and the control animals did not get infected. Then, a natural infection study was carried out in the SFTSV endemic region. A cohort of naïve goats was used as sentinel animals in the study site. A variety of daily samples including goat sera, ticks and mosquitoes were collected for viral RNA and antibody (from serum only detection, and virus isolation. We detected viral RNA from free-living and parasitic ticks rather than mosquitoes, and from goats after ticks' infestation. We also observed sero-conversion in all members of the animal cohort subsequently. The S segment sequences of the two recovered viral isolates from one infected goat and its parasitic ticks showed a 100% homology at the nucleic acid level.In our natural infection study, close contact between goats does not appear to transmit SFTSV, however, the naïve animals were infected after ticks' infestation and two viral isolates derived from an infected goat and its parasitic ticks shared 100% of sequence identity. These data demonstrate that the etiologic agent for goat cohort's natural infection comes from environmental factors. Of these, ticks, especially the predominant species Haemaphysalis longicornis, probably act as vector for this pathogen. The findings in this study may help local health authorities formulate and focus preventive measures to contain

  2. Bioengineer effects on understory species richness, diversity, and composition change along an environmental stress gradient: Experimental and mensurative evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Cortney A.; Scrosati, Ricardo A.

    2013-05-01

    Canopy-forming bioengineer species are commonly assumed to increase local species richness and diversity. We tested this notion by investigating the effects of fucoid seaweed canopies on understory communities along rocky intertidal elevation gradients in Atlantic Canada. Such gradients exhibit increasing thermal extremes and variation from low to high elevations, and are broadly used in stress gradient studies. A manipulative experiment created canopy and no-canopy treatments at the low, middle, and high intertidal zones, eliminating all species (except fucoid canopies) from replicate quadrats. After recolonization, overall richness and diversity (considering all primary producers and consumers) were higher under canopies than uncovered by canopies at the high and middle zones, but no effects occurred at the low zone. Similarly, species composition was affected by canopies at the high and middle zones, but not at the low zone. A mensurative study that surveyed the full range of canopy cover (0-100%) using nearly five times more quadrats from pristine areas yielded the same results: richness and diversity increased with canopy cover at the high and middle zones (approaching stabilization toward high cover values), but no effects occurred at the low zone. Lack of canopy effects at low elevations is related to mild habitat conditions, which canopies are unable to modify, while positive effects at higher elevations relate to the capacity of canopies to ameliorate harsh conditions. This is the first time that a combined experimental and mensurative approach shows that the same bioengineer species affect overall species richness, diversity, and composition differently along a stress gradient. Overall, protecting canopy-forming bioengineers to preserve local biodiversity should be most effective in stressful environments.

  3. Two-stage inference in experimental design using dea: an application to intercropping and evidence from randomization theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Gonçalves Gomes

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article we propose the use of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA measures of efficiency, under constant returns to scale and input equal to unity, in the analysis of multidimensional nonnegative responses in the design of experiments. The approach agrees with the standard Analysis of Variance (Covariance for univariate responses and simplifies the statistical analysis in the multivariate case. The best treatments provided by the analysis optimize a combined output defined by shadow prices, which are the solutions of the DEA problem. The approach is particularly useful for the analysis of intercropping (crop mixtures experiments. In this context we discuss two examples. To properly address the issue of correlation and non-normality of DEA measurements in different experimental plots we validate the results via Randomization Theory.Neste artigo é proposto o uso de medidas de eficiência DEA, com retornos constantes à escala e input unitário, na análise de respostas multidimensionais não negativas de ensaios experimentais. A abordagem proposta concorda com a Análise de Variância (Covariância clássica para respostas unidimensionais e simplifica a análise estatística para o caso multidimensional. Os melhores tratamentos indicados pela análise otimizam um output combinado, definido por preços sombra, que são as soluções dos problemas lineares de DEA. A abordagem é particularmente útil na análise de experimentos consorciados (plantio simultâneo de mais de uma cultura agrícola. São aqui discutidos dois exemplos. Os resultados são validados via Teoria de Aleatorização, de modo a estudar apropriadamente as questões de correlação e não-normalidade das medidas DEA nas diferentes parcelas experimentais.

  4. Subduction indices in Calabro-Sicilian arc : Training for Experimental Skills Testing and collaborative work for students in scientific terminal class in high school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, Faustine; Bollori, Lucas; Villeneuve, Felix

    2017-04-01

    In France, at the end of the last year in high school, students of the scientific terminal class have written exams in all subjects they are studying, and in "Life and Earth's Sciences", they also have an Experimental Skills Testing in order to rate them in scientific approach. This one-hour evaluation is made of four steps: - During the first evaluation, students have to show that they are able to propose a scientific strategy connected to a scientific problem. - During the second evaluation, they have to experiment. - During the third evaluation, they have to introduce their results. - During the last evaluation, they have to deduce and conclude. The final testing take place at the end of May, but during all the school year, teachers have to train their students, and it's impossible to make them work on real subjects. Therefore, it's necessary to produce new subjects every year. Linked to a fall school in Sicily last October, my colleagues and I have decided to create a new Experimental Skills Test to use new examples and illustrate subduction in the Mediterranean Sea with Aeolian Islands. We would like to make our pupils understand what the Aeolian volcanism is due to, by using information, equipment and software, etc. we have in our classrooms in our high school. Since we have found several ways for our students to prove that the Aeolian Islands are linked to a subduction zone, we have decided, following our research, to divide the new experimental skills testing in three different tests, in order to make students train on most of the equipment and then to share their results to produce a collaborative final work.

  5. Experimental evidence for the effect of small wind turbine proximity and operation on bird and bat activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen Minderman

    Full Text Available The development of renewable energy technologies such as wind turbines forms a vital part of strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. Although large wind farms generate the majority of wind energy, the small wind turbine (SWT, units generating <50 kW sector is growing rapidly. In spite of evidence of effects of large wind farms on birds and bats, effects of SWTs on wildlife have not been studied and are likely to be different due to their potential siting in a wider range of habitats. We present the first study to quantify the effects of SWTs on birds and bats. Using a field experiment, we show that bird activity is similar in two distance bands surrounding a sample of SWTs (between 6-18 m hub height and is not affected by SWT operation at the fine scale studied. At shorter distances from operating turbines (0-5 m, bat activity (measured as the probability of a bat "pass" per hour decreases from 84% (71-91% to 28% (11-54% as wind speed increases from 0 to 14 m/s. This effect is weaker at greater distances (20-25 m from operating turbines (activity decreases from 80% (65-89% to 59% (32-81%, and absent when they are braked. We conclude that bats avoid operating SWTs but that this effect diminishes within 20 m. Such displacement effects may have important consequences especially in landscapes where suitable habitat is limiting. Planning guidance for SWTs is currently lacking. Based on our results we recommend that they are sited at least 20 m away from potentially valuable bat habitat.

  6. Adaptation to the sky: Defining the feather with integument fossils from Mesozoic China and experimental evidence from molecular laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Wu, Ping; Zhang, Fu-Cheng; Xu, Xing; Yu, Minke; Widelitz, Randall B.; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Hou, Lianhai

    2015-01-01

    In this special issue of Evo-Devo of the amniote integument, Alibardi has discussed the adaptation of the integument to the land. Here we will discuss the adaptation to the sky. We first review a series of fossil discoveries representing intermediate forms of feathers or feather-like appendages from dinosaurs and Mesozoic birds from the Jehol Biota of China. We then discuss results from the molecular and developmental biological experiments using chicken integument as the model. Feather forms can be modulated using retrovirus mediated gene mis-expression that mimics those found in nature today and in the evolutionary past. The molecular conversions among different types of integument appendages (feather, scale, tooth) are discussed. From these evidences, we recognize that not all organisms with feathers are birds, and that not all skin appendages with hierarchical branches are feathers. We develop a set of criteria for true avian feathers: 1) possessing actively proliferating cells in the proximal follicle for a proximo – distal growth mode; 2) forming hierarchical branches of rachis, barbs and barbules, with barbs shaped by differential cell death into either bilaterally or radially symmetric structures; 3) having a follicle structure, with a mesenchyme core during development; 4) maturing into a structure consisting of epithelia without a mesenchyme core with two sides of the vane facing the previous basal and supra-basal layer, respectively; and 5) having stem cells and dermal papilla in the follicle and hence the ability to molt and regenerate. A model of feather evolution from feather bud → barbs → barbules → rachis is presented, which is opposite to the old view of scale plate → rachis → barbs → barbules. PMID:12949768

  7. Experimental Evidence on the Impact of Food Advertising on Children’s Knowledge about and Preferences for Healthful Food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisch, Lucia A.; Gwozdz, Wencke; Barba, Gianvincenzo

    2013-01-01

    To understand the rising prevalence of childhood obesity in affluent societies, it is necessary to take into account the growing obesity infrastructure,which over past decades has developed into an obesogenic environment. This study examines the effects of one of the constituent factors of consumer...... societies and a potential contributory factor to childhood obesity: commercial food communication targeted to children. Specifically, it investigates the impact of TV advertising on children’s food knowledge and food preferences and correlates these findings with their weight status. Evaluations....... The results indicate that advertising has divergent effects on children’s food knowledge and preferences and that food knowledge is unrelated to food preferences.This finding has important implications for both future research and public policy....

  8. Evidence from pupillometry and fMRI indicates reduced neural response during vicarious social pain but not physical pain in autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krach, Soeren; Kamp-Becker, Inge; Einhaeuser, Wolfgang; Sommer, Jens; Fraessle, Stefan; Jansen, Andreas; Rademacher, Lena; Mueller-Pinzler, Laura; Gazzola, Valeria; Paulus, Frieder M.

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by substantial social deficits. The notion that dysfunctions in neural circuits involved in sharing another's affect explain these deficits is appealing, but has received only modest experimental support. Here we evaluated a complex paradigm on the

  9. Cytoreductive surgery plus hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy improves survival of gastric cancer with peritoneal carcinomatosis: evidence from an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonemura Yutaka

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytoreductive surgery (CRS plus hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC has been considered as a promising treatment modality for gastric cancer with peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC. However, there have also been many debates regarding the efficacy and safety of this new approach. Results from experimental animal model study could help provide reliable information. This study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of CRS + HIPEC to treat gastric cancer with PC in a rabbit model. Methods VX2 tumor cells were injected into the gastric submucosa of 42 male New Zealand rabbits using a laparotomic implantation technique, to construct rabbit model of gastric cancer with PC. The rabbits were randomized into control group (n = 14, CRS alone group (n = 14 and CRS + HIPEC group (n = 14. The control group was observed for natural course of disease progression. Treatments were started on day 9 after tumor cells inoculation, including maximal removal of tumor nodules in CRS alone group, and maximal CRS plus heperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion with docetaxel (10 mg/rabbit and carboplatin (40 mg/rabbit at 42.0 ± 0.5°C for 30 min in CRS + HIPEC group. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS. The secondary endpoints were body weight, biochemistry, major organ functions and serious adverse events (SAE. Results Rabbit model of gastric cancer with PC was successfully established in all animals. The clinicopathological features of the model were similar to human gastric PC. The median OS was 24.0 d (95% confidence interval 21.8 - 26.2 d in the control group, 25.0 d (95% CI 21.3 - 28.7 d in CRS group, and 40.0 d (95% CI 34.6 - 45.4 d in CRS + HIPEC group (P = 0.00, log rank test. Compared with CRS only or control group, CRS + HIPEC could extend the OS by at least 15 d (60%. At the baseline, on the day of surgery and on day 8 after surgery, the peripheral blood cells counts, liver and kidney functions, and biochemistry

  10. An experimental study of the job demand-control model with measures of heart rate variability and salivary alpha-amylase: Evidence of increased stress responses to increased break autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Emma; Landolt, Kathleen; Hazi, Agnes; Dragano, Nico; Wright, Bradley J

    2015-01-01

    We assessed in an experimental design whether the stress response towards a work task was moderated by the autonomy to choose a break during the assigned time to complete the task. This setting is defined in accordance with the theoretical framework of the job-demand-control (JDC) model of work related stress. The findings from naturalistic investigations of a stress-buffering effect of autonomy (or 'buffer hypothesis') are equivocal and the experimental evidence is limited, especially with relation to physiological indices of stress. Our objective was to investigate if increased autonomy in a particular domain (break time control) was related with adaptive physiology using objective physiological markers of stress; heart rate variability (HRV) and salivary alpha amylase (sAA). We used a within-subject design and the 60 female participants were randomly assigned to an autonomy (free timing of break) and standard conditions (fixed timing of break) of a word processing task in a simulated office environment in a random order. Participants reported increased perceptions of autonomy, no difference in demand and performed worse in the task in the break-time autonomy versus the standard condition. The results revealed support for the manipulation of increased autonomy, but in the opposing direction. Increased autonomy was related with dysregulated physiological reactivity, synonymous with typical increased stress responses. Potentially, our findings may indicate that autonomy is not necessary a resource but could become an additional stressor when it adds additional complexity while the amount of work (demands) remains unchanged. Further, our findings underscore the need to collect objective physiological evidence of stress to supplement self-reported information. Self-report biases may partially explain the inconsistent findings with the buffer hypothesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental Evidence on the Impact of Food Advertising on Children’s Knowledge about and Preferences for Healthful Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia A. Reisch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the rising prevalence of childhood obesity in affluent societies, it is necessary to take into account the growing obesity infrastructure, which over past decades has developed into an obesogenic environment. This study examines the effects of one of the constituent factors of consumer societies and a potential contributory factor to childhood obesity: commercial food communication targeted to children. Specifically, it investigates the impact of TV advertising on children’s food knowledge and food preferences and correlates these findings with their weight status. Evaluations of traditional information- and education-based interventions suggest that they may not sustainably change food patterns. Based on prior consumer research, we propose five hypotheses, which we then test using a subsample from the IDEFICS study, a large-scale pan-European intervention study on childhood obesity. The results indicate that advertising has divergent effects on children’s food knowledge and preferences and that food knowledge is unrelated to food preferences. This finding has important implications for both future research and public policy.

  12. Acid-catalysed chlorine transfer from N-chloramines to iodide ion: experimental evidence for a predicted change in mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Paula; Crugeiras, Juan; Ríos, Ana

    2010-09-21

    Rate constants for acid catalysis of the reactions of N-chlorodimethylamine (1), N-chloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethylamine (2) and N,N-dichlorotaurine (3) with iodide ion were determined in H(2)O at 25 degrees C and I = 0.5 (NaClO(4)). The failure to detect significant catalysis by general acids of chlorine transfer from 1 to the nucleophile, together with the observed inverse solvent deuterium isotope effect on the hydronium ion-catalysed reaction (k(H)/k(D) = 0.37), indicates that this process occurs by protonation of 1 in a fast equilibrium step, followed by rate determining chlorine transfer to iodide ion. The appearance of general acid catalysis for the reactions of 2 and 3 shows that increasing the leaving group ability leads to a change to a concerted mechanism, which is suggested to be enforced by the absence of a significant lifetime of the protonated chloramine intermediate in the presence of iodide ion.

  13. Lianas escape self-thinning: Experimental evidence of positive density dependence in temperate lianas Celastrus orbiculatus and C. scandens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicht-Young, S. A.; Latimer, A.M.; Silander, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    The neighborhood density of plants strongly affects their growth, reproduction, and survival. In most cases, high density increases competition and negatively affects a focal plant in predictable ways, leading to the self-thinning law. There are, however, situations in which high densities of plants facilitate focal plant performance, resulting in positive density dependence. Despite their importance in forest gap dynamics and distinctive growth form, there have been very few studies of the effect of density on lianas or vines. We grew an invasive (Celastrus orbiculatus) and a native (Celastrus scandens) liana species together in three different density treatments, while also manipulating the light and support availability. We found that across treatment conditions, C. orbiculatus always out-performed C. scandens, showing greater relative growth rate in height and diameter, greater biomass and higher survival. Both species responded similarly to the density treatments: with plants in high density not showing a decrease in relative height growth rate compared to medium density. Aboveground biomass for C. scandens was not affected by density, while for C. orbiculatus, the most massive plants were growing in medium density without support. More surprisingly, survival analysis indicated that the two species both had significantly lower mortality rates in the highest density treatment; this trend held true across the other treatments of light and supports. More generally, this study demonstrates that these lianas can escape the consequences of high density and thus the self-thinning law that affects self-supporting plants. This suggests a broader hypothesis about lianas in general: their greater flexibility in allocating growth resources allows them to grow taller and thinner without collapsing and thereby potentially escape shading and mortality even at high densities.

  14. New experimental evidence for mechanism of arrhythmogenic membrane potential alternans based on balance of electrogenic I(NCX)/I(Ca) currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaoping; Cutler, Michael; Song, Zhen; Karma, Alain; Matsuda, Toshio; Baba, Akemichi; Rosenbaum, David S

    2012-10-01

    Computer simulations have predicted that the balance of various electrogenic sarcolemmal ion currents may control the amplitude and phase of beat-to-beat alternans of membrane potential (V(m)). However, experimental evidence for the mechanism by which alternans of calcium transients produces alternation of V(m) (V(m)-ALT) is lacking. To provide experimental evidence that Ca-to-V(m) coupling during alternans is determined by the balanced influence of 2 Ca-sensitive electrogenic sarcolemmal ionic currents: I(NCX) and I(Ca). V(m)-ALT and Ca-ALT were measured simultaneously from isolated guinea pig myocytes (n = 41) by using perforated patch and Indo-1(AM) fluorescence, respectively. There were 3 study groups: (1) control, (2) I(NCX) predominance created by adenoviral-induced NCX overexpression, and (3) I(Ca) predominance created by I(NCX) inhibition (SEA-0400) or enhanced I(Ca) (As(2)O(3)). During alternans, 14 of 14 control myocytes demonstrated positive Ca-to-V(m) coupling, consistent with I(NCX), but not I(Ca), as the major electrogenic current in modulating action potential duration. Positive Ca-to-V(m) coupling was maintained during I(NCX) predominance in 8 of 8 experiments with concurrent increase in Ca-to-V(m) gain (P <.05), reaffirming the role of increased forward-mode electrogenic I(NCX). Conversely, I(Ca) predominance produced negative Ca-to-V(m) coupling in 14 of 19 myocytes (P < .05) and decreased Ca-to-V(m) gain compared with control (P <.05). Furthermore, computer simulation demonstrated that Ca-to-V(m) coupling changes from negative to positive because of a shift from I(Ca) to I(NCX) predominance with increasing pacing rate. These data provide the first direct experimental evidence that coupling in phase and magnitude of Ca-ALT to V(m)-ALT is strongly determined by the relative balance of the prominence of I(NCX) vs I(Ca) currents. Copyright © 2012 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Wind shear and wet and dry thermodynamic indices as predictors of thunderstorm motion and severity and application to the AVE 4 experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, J. R.; Ey, L.

    1977-01-01

    Two types of parameters are computed and mapped for use in assessing their individual merits as predictors of occurrence and severity of thunderstorms. The first group is comprised of equivalent potential temperature, potential temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and wind speed. Equivalent potential temperature maxima and strong gradients of equivalent potential temperature at the surface correlate well with regions of thunderstorm activity. The second type, comprised of the energy index, shear index, and energy shear index, incorporates some model dynamics of thunderstorms, including nonthermodynamic forcing. The energy shear index is found to improve prediction of tornadic and high-wind situations slightly better than other indices. It is concluded that further development and refinement of nonthermodynamic aspects of predictive indices are definitely warranted.

  16. Responses of the reflectance indices PRI and NDVI to experimental warming and drought in European shrublands along a north–south climatic gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänd, Pille; Hallik, Lea; Peñuelas, Josep

    2010-01-01

    canopy reflectance, effective green leaf area index (green LAIe) and chlorophyll fluorescence of dominant species. The treatment effects on green LAIe varied among sites. We calculated three reflectance indices: photochemical reflectance index PRI [531 nm; 570 nm], normalized difference vegetation index...... NDVI680 [780 nm; 680 nm] using red spectral region, and NDVI570 [780 nm; 570 nm] using the same green spectral region as PRI. All three reflectance indices were significantly related to green LAIe and were able to detect changes in shrubland vegetation among treatments. In general warming treatment...... in vegetation areas with low green LAIe. As both soil reflectance and LAI varied between northern and southern sites it is problematic to draw universal conclusions of climate-derived changes in all vegetation types based merely on PRI measurements. We propose that canopy level PRI measurements can be more...

  17. Experimental and epidemiological evidence on non-organ specific cancer preventive effect of Korean ginseng and identification of active compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, T.-K

    2003-03-01

    Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer has been the most highly recognized medicinal herb in the Orient. The prolonged administration of red ginseng extract significantly inhibits the incidence of hepatoma and also proliferation of pulmonary tumors induced by aflatoxin B{sub 1} and urethane. Statistically significant anticarcinogenic effects were in aged or heat treated extracts of ginseng and red ginseng made by steaming in a 9 weeks medium-term anticarcinogenicity test using benzo[a]pyrene. In case-control studies, odds ratios (OR) of the cancer of lip, oral cavity and pharynx, larynx, lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, pancreas, ovary, and colorectum were significantly reduced. As to the type of ginseng, the ORs for cancer were reduced in user of fresh ginseng extract intakers, white ginseng extract, white ginseng powder, and red ginseng. In a cohort study with 5 years follow-up conducted in a ginseng cultivation area, ginseng users had a decreased relative risk (RR) compared with non-users. The relative risks (RRs) of ginseng users were decreased in gastric cancer and lung cancer. These findings strongly suggest that Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer cultivated in Korea has non-organ specific cancer preventive effects against various cancers. To investigate the active components for cancer prevention, several fractions of fresh and red ginseng and four semi-synthetic ginsenoside Rh{sub 1}, Rh{sub 2}, Rg{sub 3} and Rg{sub 5}, the major saponin components in red ginseng, were prepared among the ginsenosides. By using Yun's model, Rg{sub 3} and Rg{sub 5} showed statistically significant reduction of lung tumor incidence and Rh{sub 2} had a tendency to decrease the incidence. In conclusion, these results strongly suggested that Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer cultivated in Korea is a non-organ specific cancer preventive against human cancers and also indicated that the anticarcinogenicity or human cancer preventive effect of Panax ginseng is due to ginsenoside Rg{sub 3}, Rg{sub 5} and Rh

  18. Long-term geochemical evolution of the near field repository: Insights from reactive transport modelling and experimental evidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcos, David; Grandia, Fidel; Domènech, Cristina; Fernández, Ana M.; Villar, María V.; Muurinen, Arto; Carlsson, Torbjörn; Sellin, Patrik; Hernán, Pedro

    2008-12-01

    The KBS-3 underground nuclear waste repository concept designed by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) includes a bentonite buffer barrier surrounding the copper canisters and the iron insert where spent nuclear fuel will be placed. Bentonite is also part of the backfill material used to seal the access and deposition tunnels of the repository. The bentonite barrier has three main safety functions: to ensure the physical stability of the canister, to retard the intrusion of groundwater to the canisters, and in case of canister failure, to retard the migration of radionuclides to the geosphere. Laboratory experiments (barrier, which is a key issue in the safety assessments of the KBS-3 concept. In this work we aim to study the long-term geochemical evolution of bentonite and its pore water in the evolving geochemical environment due to climate change. In order to do this, reactive transport simulations are used to predict the interaction between groundwater and bentonite which is simulated following two different pathways: (1) groundwater flow through the backfill in the deposition tunnels, eventually reaching the top of the deposition hole, and (2) direct connection between groundwater and bentonite rings through fractures in the granite crosscutting the deposition hole. The influence of changes in climate has been tested using three different waters interacting with the bentonite: present-day groundwater, water derived from ice melting, and deep-seated brine. Two commercial bentonites have been considered as buffer material, MX-80 and Deponit CA-N, and one natural clay (Friedland type) for the backfill. They show differences in the composition of the exchangeable cations and in the accessory mineral content. Results from the simulations indicate that pore water chemistry is controlled by the equilibrium with the accessory minerals, especially carbonates. pH is buffered by precipitation/dissolution of calcite and dolomite, when present. The

  19. Indicative properties on snow cover based on the results of experimental studies in the winter 2011/12 in the central part of the East European Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Kitaev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Local and regional differences in the snow formation were studied in different landscapes of the central part of the East European Plain – within reserves in the Moscow and Tver’ regions (south-north direction; the study period is the winter 2011/12. The observed increase of snow storage in 1.3–1.5 times in the direction south-north is connected, apparently. The difference in the five-day appearance of snow cover maximum is related to differences in regional winter air temperature. Throughout the snow depth and snow storage in spruce are smaller than in deciduous forest – in the ratio of 0.81 in south area and 0.93 in north area; in spruce the large part of solid precipitation is intercepted by the crowns pine trees. Snow stratigraphy at south areas has four layers, six layers at the north area are more variable in snow density and snow storage. Perhaps, gravitational conversion is more noticeable due to larger snow depth. Snow density and snow storage at the open areas are more heterogeneous than in the forest. This is due to sharp fluctuations in air temperature, wind transport and compaction of snow, evaporation from the snow surface. The stratigraphy of snow also reflects the history of winter changes of air temperature and snow accumulation. Common feature for reserves at south and north is the availability of layers with maximum snow storage in the middle of the snow thickness, which were formed during the air temperature drops to the lowest seasonal values in period with increase of snow depth to maximum. Formation of depth hoar in snow thickness are touched everywhere the bottom and middle layers, respectively, it was formed both before and during the period with minimal air temperature. Thus, the results of experimental studies confirm the significance of the differences of individual components of the landscape setting. Analytical conclusions are largely qualitative in nature due to the lack to date of initial information, and

  20. Pregnancy-Associated Plasma Protein-A and its Role in Cardiovascular Disease. Biology, Experimental/Clinical Evidences and Potential Therapeutic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziviello, Francesca; Conte, Stefano; Cimmino, Giovanni; Sasso, Ferdinando Carlo; Trimarco, Bruno; Cirillo, Plinio

    2017-01-01

    Pregnancy-Associated Plasma Protein-A (PAPP-A) is a zinc-binding metalloproteinase protein produced by placental syncytio-trophoblasts and secreted into the maternal circulation where its concentration progressively increases until term. In recent years, PAPP-A has been studied for its potential involvement in cardiovascular (CV) disease. However, all those studies did not provide a clear view to identify the pathophysiological links between PAPP-A plasma levels and the occurrence of CV events. In this review, starting from a complete description of PAPP-A structure and biology, we present an updated overview of experimental as well as clinical evidence on the role of this metalloproteinase in CV disease. Finally, we discuss possible therapeutic approaches to antagonize its potential detrimental CV effects. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Effect of protonation and hydrogen bonding on 2, 4, 6-substituted pyrimidine and its salt complex-experimental and theoretical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Chithra Neelakanda; Chellapan, James

    2014-03-01

    Quantum molecular simulations of chemical systems can provide detailed information that is often inaccessible to direct experimental measurement. Pyrimidine is an interesting π-electron heterocyclic aromatic system which acts as the building block of many nucleic acid bases. The hydrogen bonds associated with the 2, 4, and 6-substituted pyrimidine and its hydrogen sulfate anion are considered for this current work. The experimental and computational evidence for the strength of these intra and intermolecular hydrogen are determined using vibrational spectra and quantum chemical calculations. Thus the effect of hydrogen bonding on the title compound is studied using its geometrical parameters, interaction energies, and vibrational spectra. Aromaticity and charge transfer studies have been performed to ascertain the aromatic behavior of the molecule. The PES scan studies have been done by varying the bond length to ascertain the protonation process of the compound. The IR spectral red shift (∼100 cm⁻¹), blue shift (∼97 cm⁻¹) and broadening of the polar stretching peaks shows the inter and intramolecular hydrogen bonding strength. Bond length alternation of proton donors along with the enormous interaction energies (∼0.5-150 kJ mol⁻¹) between the lone pair and proton donors provides clear evidence for this hydrogen bonding. The charge transfer due to the methyl substitutions which enhances the possibility of hydrogen bonding has been discussed. The main scope of this work is to study the protonation and hydrogen bonding associated with charge transfer which has great effect on the 2-amino-4, 6-dimethyl pyrimidinium hydrogen sulfate (ADHS) molecule.

  2. Experimental evidence for negative turgor pressure in small leaf cells of Robinia pseudoacacia L versus large cells of Metasequoia glyptostroboides Hu et W.C.Cheng. 1. Evidence from pressure-volume curve analysis of dead tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongmei; Pan, Shaoan; Ding, Yiting; Tyree, Melvin T

    2017-03-01

    This paper provides a mini-review of evidence for negative turgor pressure in leaf cells starting with experimental evidence in the late 1950s and ending with biomechanical models published in 2014. In the present study, biomechanical models were used to predict how negative turgor pressure might be manifested in dead tissue, and experiments were conducted to test the predictions. The main findings were as follows: (i) Tissues killed by heating to 60 or 80 °C or by freezing in liquid nitrogen all became equally leaky to cell sap solutes and all seemed to pass freely through the cell walls. (ii) Once cell sap solutes could freely pass the cell walls, the shape of pressure-volume curves was dramatically altered between living and dead cells. (iii) Pressure-volume curves of dead tissue seem to measure negative turgor defined as negative when inside minus outside pressure is negative. (iv) Robinia pseudoacacia leaves with small palisade cells had more negative turgor than Metasequoia glyptostroboides with large cells. (v) The absolute difference in negative turgor between R. pseudoacacia and M. glyptostroboides approached as much as 1.0 MPa in some cases. The differences in the manifestation of negative turgor in living versus dead tissue are discussed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Field evidence of differential food utilization of phytal harpacticoids collected from Fucus serratus indicated by δ 13C and δ 15N stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinarsdóttir, M. B.; Ingólfsson, A.; Ólafsson, E.

    2010-06-01

    The present study is the first to compare trophic relationships of several co-occurring phytal harpacticoid species, in their natural habitat, using both δ 13C and δ 15N signatures. Three phytal harpacticoid species/taxa ( Zaus spinatus, Tisbe spp., and Parathalestris cf. intermedia) all collected from the alga Fucus serratus, at different times of the year, were analyzed. The results indicated that the harpacticoids were utilizing food sources differently. Specific food sources of the three species/taxa could not be accurately pinpointed, but there were strong indications that F. serratus and fragments from it did contribute significantly to the diet of P. cf. intermedia and Tisbe spp. Both of these harpacticoid species overlapped in δ 13C and δ 15N values with some of the macrofaunal species, collected from the same site in Hvassahraun, Iceland, while no overlap was seen for Z. spinatus. The signatures for Z. spinatus indicated that its food sources changed seasonally.

  4. Stress-induced allodynia--evidence of increased pain sensitivity in healthy humans and patients with chronic pain after experimentally induced psychosocial stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Crettaz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Experimental stress has been shown to have analgesic as well as allodynic effect in animals. Despite the obvious negative influence of stress in clinical pain conditions, stress-induced alteration of pain sensitivity has not been tested in humans so far. Therefore, we tested changes of pain sensitivity using an experimental stressor in ten female healthy subjects and 13 female patients with fibromyalgia. METHODS: Multiple sensory aspects of pain were evaluated in all participants with the help of the quantitative sensory testing protocol before (60 min and after (10 and 90 min inducing psychological stress with a standardized psychosocial stress test ("Trier Social Stress Test". RESULTS: Both healthy subjects and patients with fibromyalgia showed stress-induced enhancement of pain sensitivity in response to thermal stimuli. However, only patients showed increased sensitivity in response to pressure pain. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide evidence for stress-induced allodynia/hyperalgesia in humans for the first time and suggest differential underlying mechanisms determining response to stressors in healthy subjects and patients suffering from chronic pain. Possible mechanisms of the interplay of stress and mediating factors (e.g. cytokines, cortisol on pain sensitivity are mentioned. Future studies should help understand better how stress impacts on chronic pain conditions.

  5. Downregulation of CX3CR1 ameliorates experimental colitis: evidence for CX3CL1-CX3CR1-mediated immune cell recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Felix; Holthoff, Christina; Anthoni, Christoph; Rijcken, Emile; Alexander, J Steven; Gavins, Felicity N E; Spiegel, H U; Senninger, Norbert; Vowinkel, Thorsten

    2017-03-01

    Inflammatory conditions like inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are characterized by increased immune cell infiltration. The chemokine ligand CX3CL1 and its receptor CX3CR1 have been shown to be involved in leukocyte adhesion, transendothelial recruitment, and chemotaxis. Therefore, the objective of this study was to describe CX3CL1-CX3CR1-mediated signaling in the induction of immune cell recruitment during experimental murine colitis. Acute colitis was induced by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), and sepsis was induced by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Serum concentrations of CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 were measured by ELISA. Wild-type and CX3CR1-/- mice were challenged with DSS, and on day 6, intravital microscopy was performed to monitor colonic leukocyte and platelet recruitment. Intestinal inflammation was assessed by disease activity, histopathology, and neutrophil infiltration. CX3CR1 was upregulated in DSS colitis and LPS-induced sepsis. CX3CR1-/- mice were protected from disease severity and intestinal injury in DSS colitis, and CX3CR1 deficiency resulted in reduced rolling of leukocytes and platelets. In the present study, we provide evidence for a crucial role of CX3CL1-CX3CR1 in experimental colitis, in particular for intestinal leukocyte recruitment during murine colitis. Our findings suggest that CX3CR1 blockade represents a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment of IBD.

  6. Effects of aerogel-like disorder on the critical behavior of O(m-vector models. Recent simulations and experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.Vásquez

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We review recent results on the effect of a specific type of quenched disorder on well known O(m-vector models in three dimensions: the XY model (3DXY, m=2 and the Ising model (3DIS, m=1. Evidence of changes of criticality in both systems, when confined in aerogel pores, is briefly referenced. The 3DXY model represents the universality class to which the λ-transition of bulk superfluid 4He belongs. Experiments report interesting changes of critical exponents for this transition, when superfluid 4He is confined in aerogels. Numerical evidence has also been presented that the 3DXY model, confined in aerogel-like structures, exhibits critical exponents different from those of bulk, in agreement with experiments. Both results seem to contradict Harris criterion: being the specific heat exponent negative for the pure system (α3DXY≈-0.0114He and N2 confined in aerogels, also showed changes in critical-point exponents. Being the LV critical-point in the O(1 universality class, criticality may be affected by both short-range correlated (SRC and LRC subsets of disorder. Simulations of the 3DIS in DLCA aerogels can corroborate experimental results. Both experiments and simulations suggest a shift in critical exponents to values closer to the SRC instead of those of the LRC fixed point.

  7. Construct validity of the Groningen Frailty Indicator established in a large sample of home-dwelling elderly persons : Evidence of stability across age and gender

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, L. L.; Boter, H.; Burgerhof, J. G. M.; Slaets, J. P. J.; Buskens, E.

    Background: The primary objective of the present study was to evaluate the validity of the Groningen frailty Indicator (GFI) in a sample of Dutch elderly persons participating in LifeLines, a large population-based cohort study. Additional aims were to assess differences between frail and non-frail

  8. The Structure of Subjective Well-Being and Its Relation to Objective Well-Being Indicators: Evidence from EU-SILC for Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladisavljević, Marko; Mentus, Vladimir

    2018-01-01

    In this article, we examine the structure of the subjective well-being and its relation to objective well-being indicators using the data from the European Union's Survey on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) from Serbia. This is one of the first papers to analyze a new module on subjective well-being from EU-SILC micro-dataset (with over 20,000 respondents). We investigate the factor structure of the items and the differences in the association of subjective well-being dimensions with objective indicators of well-being within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Better Life Initiative framework. Three factors emerge from the principal components analysis: general life satisfaction, affective well-being, and satisfaction with the local environment. The analysis further reveals that life satisfaction is more related to the material living conditions, such as income, unemployment, and housing conditions, while affective well-being is more related to non-material indicators of well-being such as perceived health, personal security, and social connections. On the other hand, positive and negative affect within the affective well-being are not clearly separable, nor is the eudaimonic indicator from either life satisfaction or affective well-being.

  9. Development and Validation of a Precise and Stability Indicating LC Method for the Determination of Benzalkonium Chloride in Pharmaceutical Formulation Using an Experimental Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshal K. Trivedi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple, precise, shorter runtime and stability indicating reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatographic method has been developed and validated for the quantification of benzalkonium chloride (BKC preservative in pharmaceutical formulation of sparfloxacin eye drop. The method was successfully applied for determination of benzalkonium chloride in various ophthalmic formulations like latanoprost, timolol, dexametasone, gatifloxacin, norfloxacin, combination of moxifloxacin and dexamethasone, combination of nepthazoline HCl, zinc sulphate and chlorpheniramine maleate, combination of tobaramycin and dexamethasone, combination of phenylephrine HCl, naphazoline HCl, menthol and camphor. The RP-LC separation was achieved on an Purospher Star RP-18e 75 mm × 4.0 mm, 3.0 μ in the isocratic mode using buffer: acetonitrile (35: 65, v/v, as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.8 mL/min. The methods were performed at 215 nm; in LC method, quantification was achieved with PDA detection over the concentration range of 50 to 150 μg/mL. The method is effective to separate four homologs with good resolution in presence of excipients, sparfloxacin and degradable compound due to sparfloxacin and BKC within five minutes. The method was validated and the results were compared statistically. They were found to be simple, accurate, precise and specific. The proposed method was validated in terms of specificity, precision, recovery, solution stability, linearity and range. All the validation parameters were within the acceptance range and concordant to ICH guidelines.

  10. Inequality and riots: experimental evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbink, K.; Masclet, D.; Mirza, D.

    2009-01-01

    We study the relationship between inequality and inter-groups conflicts (riots), focussing on social inequality. Disadvantaged societal groups experience discrimination and thus have limited access to some social and labour resources like education or employment. The aim of our paper is twofold.

  11. Britholite-group minerals as sensitive indicators of changing fluid composition during pegmatite formation: evidence from the Keivy alkaline province, Kola peninsula, NW Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zozulya, Dmitry R.; Lyalina, Lyudmila M.; Savchenko, Yevgeny E.

    2017-09-01

    The Keivy alkaline province, Kola Peninsula, NW Russia, consists of vast alkali granite massifs and several dike-like nepheline syenite bodies. It contains numerous rare-metal occurrences, formed by a complex sequence of magmatic, late-magmatic and post-magmatic (including pegmatitic) processes. The Sakharjok nepheline syenite pegmatite contains a remarkably diverse number of britholite group minerals, pointing to different physico-chemical conditions in the fluid. REE and actinides distribution in the host rock indicates that the late-magmatic (and pegmatitic) fluids were alkaline, with significant amounts of F and CO2. From REE and F variations of the britholite group minerals possible fluid compositions at different stages are suggested. The earliest fluorbritholite-(Ce) formed locally from a late magmatic, high temperature F-rich fluid. Fluorbritholite-(Y) presumably crystallized from a F-bearing and CO2-rich fluid; marked F saturation resulted in precipitation of abundant fluorite due to a temperature drop. Variations in REE and F contents in the most abundant fluorcalciobritholite indicate a successive decrease of F in the fluid during its evolution. The relationship between intergrown fluorapatite and fluorcalciobritholite and the presence of zones with a REE-rich fluorapatite between them indicate a continuous to sudden crystallization in this mineral sequence. The crystallization of the latest "calciobritholite" is related to the input into the fluid of CO2 and/or H2O.

  12. Comparing indices of diet quality with chronic disease mortality risk in postmenopausal women in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study: evidence to inform national dietary guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Stephanie M; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Manson, JoAnn E; Reedy, Jill; Shikany, James M; Subar, Amy F; Tinker, Lesley F; Vitolins, Mara; Neuhouser, Marian L

    2014-09-15

    Poor diet quality is thought to be a leading risk factor for years of life lost. We examined how scores on 4 commonly used diet quality indices-the Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI), the Alternative Healthy Eating Index 2010 (AHEI), the Alternate Mediterranean Diet (aMED), and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-are related to the risks of death from all causes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer among postmenopausal women. Our prospective cohort study included 63,805 participants in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study (from 1993-2010) who completed a food frequency questionnaire at enrollment. Cox proportional hazards models were fit using person-years as the underlying time metric. We estimated multivariate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for death associated with increasing quintiles of diet quality index scores. During 12.9 years of follow-up, 5,692 deaths occurred, including 1,483 from CVD and 2,384 from cancer. Across indices and after adjustment for multiple covariates, having better diet quality (as assessed by HEI, AHEI, aMED, and DASH scores) was associated with statistically significant 18%-26% lower all-cause and CVD mortality risk. Higher HEI, aMED, and DASH (but not AHEI) scores were associated with a statistically significant 20%-23% lower risk of cancer death. These results suggest that postmenopausal women consuming a diet in line with a priori diet quality indices have a lower risk of death from chronic disease. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2014. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. Evidence from pupillometry and fMRI indicates reduced neural response during vicarious social pain but not physical pain in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krach, Sören; Kamp-Becker, Inge; Einhäuser, Wolfgang; Sommer, Jens; Frässle, Stefan; Jansen, Andreas; Rademacher, Lena; Müller-Pinzler, Laura; Gazzola, Valeria; Paulus, Frieder M

    2015-11-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by substantial social deficits. The notion that dysfunctions in neural circuits involved in sharing another's affect explain these deficits is appealing, but has received only modest experimental support. Here we evaluated a complex paradigm on the vicarious social pain of embarrassment to probe social deficits in ASD as to whether it is more potent than paradigms currently in use. To do so we acquired pupillometry and fMRI in young adults with ASD and matched healthy controls. During a simple vicarious physical pain task no differences emerged between groups in behavior, pupillometry, and neural activation of the anterior insula (AIC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). In contrast, processing complex vicarious social pain yielded reduced responses in ASD on all physiological measures of sharing another's affect. The reduced activity within the AIC was thereby explained by the severity of autistic symptoms in the social and affective domain. Additionally, behavioral responses lacked correspondence with the anterior cingulate and anterior insula cortex activity found in controls. Instead, behavioral responses in ASD were associated with hippocampal activity. The observed dissociation echoes the clinical observations that deficits in ASD are most pronounced in complex social situations and simple tasks may not probe the dysfunctions in neural pathways involved in sharing affect. Our results are highly relevant because individuals with ASD may have preserved abilities to share another's physical pain but still have problems with the vicarious representation of more complex emotions that matter in life. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Vitamins Associated with Brain Aging, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Alzheimer Disease: Biomarkers, Epidemiological and Experimental Evidence, Plausible Mechanisms, and Knowledge Gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenech, Michael

    2017-11-01

    The key to preventing brain aging, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer disease (AD) via vitamin intake is first to understand molecular mechanisms, then to deduce relevant biomarkers, and subsequently to test the level of evidence for the impact of vitamins in the relevant pathways and their modulation of dementia risk. This narrative review infers information on mechanisms from gene and metabolic defects associated with MCI and AD, and assesses the role of vitamins using recent results from animal and human studies. Current evidence suggests that all known vitamins and some "quasi-vitamins" are involved as cofactors or influence ≥1 of the 6 key sets of pathways or pathologies associated with MCI or AD, relating to 1 ) 1-carbon metabolism, 2 ) DNA damage and repair, 3 ) mitochondrial function and glucose metabolism, 4 ) lipid and phospholipid metabolism and myelination, 5 ) neurotransmitter synthesis and synaptogenesis, and 6 ) amyloidosis and Tau protein phosphorylation. The contemporary level of evidence for each of the vitamins varies considerably, but it is notable that B vitamins are involved as cofactors in all of the core pathways or pathologies and, together with vitamins C and E, are consistently associated with a protective role against dementia. Outcomes from recent studies indicate that the efficacy and safety of supplementation with vitamins to prevent MCI and the early stages of AD will most likely depend on 1 ) which pathways are defective, 2 ) which vitamins are deficient and could correct the relevant metabolic defects, and 3 ) the modulating impact of nutrient-nutrient and nutrient-genotype interaction. More focus on a precision nutrition approach is required to realize the full potential of vitamin therapy in preventing dementia and to avoid causing harm. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  15. Evidence that the p53 negative / Bcl-2 positive phenotype is an independent indicator of good prognosis in colorectal cancer: A tissue microarray study of 460 patients

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    Ellis Ian O

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in our understanding of the molecular biology of colorectal cancer have fuelled the search for novel molecular prognostic markers to complement existing staging systems. Markers assessed in combination may perform better than those considered individually. Using high-throughput tissue microarray technology, we describe the prognostic value of combined p53 / Bcl-2 status in colorectal cancer. Patients and methods Tumour samples from 462 patients who underwent elective surgery to resect a primary colorectal cancer between 1994 and 2000 (mean follow-up of 75 months were assembled in tissue microarray format. Clinico-pathological data including tumour grade, stage, vascular invasion status along with disease specific survival data has been collected prospectively. Immunohistochemical analysis of p53 and Bcl-2 expression was performed using antibodies DO-7 (p53 and 124 (Bcl-2, and results correlated with known clinico-pathological variables and outcomes. Results Abnormal nuclear p53 accumulation and Bcl-2 overexpression were detected in 221/445 (49.6% and199/437 (45.5% tumours respectively, with a significant inverse correlation between the two markers (p = 0.023. On univariate analysis no correlations were found between either marker and standard clinico-pathological variables, however nuclear p53 expression was associated with a significantly reduced survival (p = 0.024. Combined analysis of the two markers indicated that 112/432 (24.2% cases displayed a p53(-/Bcl-2(+ phenotype, this occurring more frequently in earlier stage tumours. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a significant survival advantage in these p53(-/Bcl-2(+ tumours compared with the remaining cases (p = 0.0032. On multivariate analysis using the Cox proportional hazards model, neither p53 expression nor Bcl-2 expression alone were of independent prognostic significance, however the combined p53(-/Bcl-2(+ phenotype was significantly associated with a good

  16. Water-insoluble fiber-rich fraction from pineapple peel improves intestinal function in hamsters: evidence from cecal and fecal indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Ling; Tsai, Yung-Hsiang; Chow, Chau-Jen

    2014-04-01

    Pineapple peel, a byproduct of agricultural processing, contains high levels of water-insoluble fiber-rich fraction (WIFF) (~42%, wt/wt). Our previous work has demonstrated that cellulose, hemicellulose (xylan and xyloglucan), and pectic substances are the major polysaccharides of pineapple-peel WIFF. Based on its chemical composition and unique characteristics, we hypothesized that daily consumption of WIFF would improve intestinal function in hamsters. Male Golden Syrian hamsters were fed a diet supplemented with either 5% cellulose or various amounts of WIFF (2.5%, 5%, or 10%). Activities of fecal bacterial enzymes, short-chain fatty acid concentrations, and microbial number in the cecal content, and also biochemical indicators in the cecal and feces of hamsters, were evaluated in all groups. The supplementation of WIFF in a diet at a level of 2.5% significantly (P pineapple-peel WIFF could be a promising candidate for a functional ingredient beneficial to human intestinal function and health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evidences of +896 A/G TLR4 Polymorphism as an Indicative of Prevalence of Complications in T2DM Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Rita Balistreri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available T2DM is today considered as world-wide health problem, with complications responsible of an enhanced mortality and morbidity. Thus, new strategies for its prevention and therapy are necessary. For this reason, the research interest has focused its attention on TLR4 and its polymorphisms, particularly the rs4986790. However, no conclusive findings have been reported until now about the role of this polymorphism in development of T2DM and its complications, even if a recent meta-analysis showed its T2DM association in Caucasians. In this study, we sought to evaluate the weight of rs4986790 polymorphism in the risk of the major T2DM complications, including 367 T2DM patients complicated for the 55.6%. Patients with A/A and A/G TLR4 genotypes showed significant differences in complication’s prevalence. In particular, AG carriers had higher risk prevalence for neuropathy (P=0.026, lower limb arteriopathy (P=0.013, and the major cardiovascular pathologies (P=0.017. Their cumulative risk was significant (P=0.01, with a threefold risk to develop neuropathy, lower limb arteriopathy, and major cardiovascular events in AG cases compared to AA cases. The adjusted OR for the confounding variables was 3.788 (95% CI: 1.642–8.741. Thus, the rs4986790 polymorphism may be an indicative of prevalence of complications in T2DM patients.

  18. Serological evidence indicates that foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O, C and SAT1 are most dominant in eritrea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekleghiorghis, T; Moormann, R J M; Weerdmeester, K; Dekker, A

    2014-12-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is endemic in Eritrea and in most parts of Africa. To be able to control FMD using vaccination, information on the occurrence of various foot-and-mouth disease serotypes in Eritrea is needed. In this cross-sectional study, 212 sera samples were collected from FMD infected and recovered animals in Eritrea. These samples were tested for the presence of antibodies against FMD non-structural proteins (NSP) and neutralizing antibodies against six of the seven (all but SAT 3) serotypes of FMD virus (FMDV). Of these, 67.0% tested positive to non-structural protein antibodies in the FMD NS ELISA. By virus neutralization, FMDV serotype O antibodies were shown to be the most dominant (approximately 50%). Virus neutralization test results indicate that infection with serotype C and SAT 1 might have occurred, although there are no reports of isolation of these two serotypes. Because the samples were not randomly selected, further random serological surveillance in all age group animals is necessary both to estimate the prevalence of FMD in the country and to confirm the serological results with serotype C and SAT 1. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Environmental logistics performance indicators affecting per capita income and sectoral growth: evidence from a panel of selected global ranked logistics countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Syed Abdul Rehman; Qianli, Dong; SongBo, Wei; Zaman, Khalid; Zhang, Yu

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the study is to examine the long-run and causal relationship between environmental logistics performance indicators (ELPI) and growth-specific factors in a panel of 15 selected global ranked logistics countries over a period of 2007-2015. This study is exclusive as we utilized a number of LPI factors including logistics performance, logistics competence, and logistics infrastructure with mediation of sustainable factors, i.e., carbon dioxide (CO2), fossil fuel, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in a region. The results show that the per capita income, industry, manufacturing, and service share to GDP is affected by CO2 emissions and GHG emissions. Logistics competence and infrastructure promote economic growth and sectoral value added, while energy demand and FDI inflows both are prerequisite for sustainable agriculture in a region. The causal relationships confirm that more energy demand results in an increase in economic growth, industry value added, and the service sector (i.e., feedback hypothesis), while the sustainable supply chain system improves energy demand, FDI inflows, economic growth, and sectoral growth (i.e., conservation hypothesis) in a panel of countries.

  20. The dominant role of structure for solute transport in soil: experimental evidence and modelling of structure and transport in a field experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-J. Vogel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A classical transport experiment was performed in a field plot of 2.5 m2 using the dye tracer brilliant blue. The measured tracer distribution demonstrates the dominant role of the heterogeneous soil structure for solute transport. As with many other published experiments, this evidences the need of considering the macroscopic structure of soil to predict flow and transport. We combine three different approaches to represent the relevant structure of the specific situation of our experiment: i direct measurement, ii statistical description of heterogeneities and iii a conceptual model of structure formation. The structure of soil layers was directly obtained from serial sections in the field. The sub-scale heterogeneity within the soil horizons was modelled through correlated random fields with estimated correlation lengths and anisotropy. Earthworm burrows played a dominant role at the transition between the upper soil horizon and the subsoil. A model based on percolation theory is introduced that mimics the geometry of earthworm burrow systems. The hydraulic material properties of the different structural units were obtained by direct measurements where available and by a best estimate otherwise. From the hydraulic structure, the 3-dimensional velocity field of water was calculated by solving Richards' Equation and solute transport was simulated. The simulated tracer distribution compares reasonably well with the experimental data. We conclude that a rough representation of the structure and a rough representation of the hydraulic properties might be sufficient to predict flow and transport, but both elements are definitely required.

  1. Experimental evidence for a new transmission route in a parasitic mite and its mucus-dependent orientation towards the host snail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüpbach, H U; Baur, B

    2008-12-01

    The route of transmission and host finding behaviour are fundamental components of a parasite's fitness. Riccardoella limacum, a haematophagous mite, lives in the mantle cavity of helicid land snails. To date it has been assumed that this parasitic mite is transmitted during courtship and mating of the host. Here we present experimental evidence for a new transmission route in the host snail Arianta arbustorum. Parasite-free snails were kept on soil on which previously infected host snails had been maintained for 6 weeks. R. limacum was successfully transmitted via soil without physical contact among hosts in 10 out of 22 (45.5%) cases. In a series of experiments we also examined the off-host locomotion of R. limacum on snail mucus and control substrates using an automated camera system. Parasitic mites showed a preference to move on fresh mucus. Our results support the hypothesis that R. limacum uses mucus trails to locate new hosts. These findings should be considered in commercial snail farming and when examining the epidemiology of wild populations.

  2. Infection with HIV and HCV enhances the release of fatty acid synthase into circulation: evidence for a novel indicator of viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aragonès Gerard

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatty acid synthase (FASN is an enzyme synthesized by the liver and plays an important role in lipogenesis. The present study aimed to investigate whether serum FASN concentration may provide a direct link between HIV and/or HCV viral infections and lipid metabolic disorders commonly observed in HIV/HCV-infected patients. Methods We evaluated serum FASN concentration in 191 consecutive HIV-infected patients in the absence or presence of HCV co-infection. For comparison, 102 uninfected controls were included. Metabolic and inflammatory phenotype was also compared with respect to the presence of HCV co-infection. Results Serum FASN concentration was significantly higher in HIV-infected patients than in healthy participants and HCV co-infected patients showed higher levels than those without co-infection. Levels were also affected by treatment regimen, but marginally influenced by virological variables. Insulin concentration was the sole variable among metabolic parameters that demonstrated a significant correlation with serum FASN concentrations. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT values correlated significantly with serum FASN concentration and provided the best discrimination with respect to the presence or absence of HCV co-infection. In multivariate analysis, only ALT, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and the presence of antiretroviral treatment regimen significantly contributed to explain serum FASN concentration in HIV/HCV co-infected patients. Conclusion Serum FASN concentration is significantly increased in HIV-infected individuals. The release of FASN into the circulation is further enhanced in patients who are co-infected with HCV. Subsequent studies should explore the usefulness of this indicator to monitor the effect of viral infections on disease progression and survival.

  3. Infection with HIV and HCV enhances the release of fatty acid synthase into circulation: evidence for a novel indicator of viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragonès, Gerard; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Beltrán-Debón, Raúl; Rull, Anna; Rodríguez-Sanabria, Fernando; Camps, Jordi; Martín, Alejandro Vázquez; Menéndez, Javier A; Joven, Jorge

    2010-08-13

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is an enzyme synthesized by the liver and plays an important role in lipogenesis. The present study aimed to investigate whether serum FASN concentration may provide a direct link between HIV and/or HCV viral infections and lipid metabolic disorders commonly observed in HIV/HCV-infected patients. We evaluated serum FASN concentration in 191 consecutive HIV-infected patients in the absence or presence of HCV co-infection. For comparison, 102 uninfected controls were included. Metabolic and inflammatory phenotype was also compared with respect to the presence of HCV co-infection. Serum FASN concentration was significantly higher in HIV-infected patients than in healthy participants and HCV co-infected patients showed higher levels than those without co-infection. Levels were also affected by treatment regimen, but marginally influenced by virological variables. Insulin concentration was the sole variable among metabolic parameters that demonstrated a significant correlation with serum FASN concentrations. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) values correlated significantly with serum FASN concentration and provided the best discrimination with respect to the presence or absence of HCV co-infection. In multivariate analysis, only ALT, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and the presence of antiretroviral treatment regimen significantly contributed to explain serum FASN concentration in HIV/HCV co-infected patients. Serum FASN concentration is significantly increased in HIV-infected individuals. The release of FASN into the circulation is further enhanced in patients who are co-infected with HCV. Subsequent studies should explore the usefulness of this indicator to monitor the effect of viral infections on disease progression and survival.

  4. Sexual abstinence behavior among never-married youths in a generalized HIV epidemic country: evidence from the 2005 Côte d'Ivoire AIDS indicator survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawahara Kazuo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sexual abstinence is the best available option for preventing both pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, including HIV/AIDS. Identifying the factors associated with sexual abstinence among youths would have meaningful implications in a generalized HIV epidemic country such as the Côte d'Ivoire. Thus, we explored sexual abstinence behavior among never-married individuals aged 15 to 24 in Côte d'Ivoire and assessed factors that predict sexual abstinence. Methods We obtained data from the nationally representative and population-based 2005 Côte d'Ivoire AIDS Indicator Survey, conducted from September 2004 to October 2005. Our sample included 3041 never-married people aged 15 to 24. Of these, 990 reported never having sexual intercourse (primary abstinence and 137 reported sexual experience but not in the 12 months prior to the survey (secondary abstinence. In all, 1127 youths reported sexual abstinence practice. Results Of the 3041 never-married youths, 54.4% were male and 45.6% were female. About 33.0%, 6.7%, and 37.1% of them were practicing primary, secondary, and sexual abstinence behavior, respectively. Females of higher education level were significantly 11.14 times as likely as those of no education to practice either primary or secondary abstinence. Males who were animists, had no religion, or were practicing religions other than Christianity or Muslim were significantly less likely than other male youths to practice sexual abstinence (OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.30–0.95. Living in the north-west region of the country significantly decreased the odds of sexual abstinence among female youths. Similarly, female youths living in rural areas were significantly 0.42 times as likely as those in the urban zones to practice sexual abstinence. Conclusion HIV/AIDS prevention program components could include media campaigns, educational intervention improvement, as well as promoting policies that shape female youth

  5. Phonology competes with syntax: experimental evidence for the interaction of word order and accent placement in the realization of Information Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, F; Alexopoulou, T

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the interaction of phonological and syntactic constraints on the realization of Information Structure in Greek, a free word order language. We use magnitude estimation as our experimental paradigm, which allows us to quantify the influence of a given linguistic constraint on the acceptability of a sentence. We present results from two experiments. In the first experiment, we focus on the interaction of word order and context. In the second experiment, we investigate the additional effect of accent placement and clitic doubling. The results show that word order, in contrast to standard assumptions in the theoretical literature, plays only a secondary role in marking the Information Structure of a sentence. Order preferences are relatively weak and can be overridden by constraints on accent placement and clitic doubling. Our experiments also demonstrate that a null context shows the same preference pattern as an all focus context, indicating that 'default' word order and accent placement (in the absence of context) can be explained in terms of Information Structure. In the theoretical part of this paper, we formalize the interaction of syntactic and phonological constraints on Information Structure. We argue that this interaction is best captured using a notion of grammatical competition, such as the one developed by Optimality Theory (Prince & Smolensky, 1993, Optimality theory: constraint interaction in generative grammar (Technical Report No. 2). Center for Cognitive Science, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ; Science 275 (1997) 1604). In particular, we exploit the optimality theoretic concept of constraint ranking to account for the fact that some constraint violations are more serious than others. We extend standard Optimality Theory to obtain a grammar model that predicts not only the optimal (i.e. grammatical) realization of a given input, but also makes predictions about the relative grammaticality of suboptimal structures. This

  6. Waste indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall, O.; Lassen, C.; Hansen, E. [Cowi A/S, Lyngby (Denmark)

    2003-07-01

    The Waste Indicator Project focuses on methods to evaluate the efficiency of waste management. The project proposes the use of three indicators for resource consumption, primary energy and landfill requirements, based on the life-cycle principles applied in the EDIP Project. Trial runs are made With the indicators on paper, glass packaging and aluminium, and two models are identified for mapping the Danish waste management, of which the least extensive focuses on real and potential savings. (au)

  7. No evidence of horizontal infection in horses kept in close contact with dogs experimentally infected with canine influenza A virus (H3N8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamanaka Takashi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since equine influenza A virus (H3N8 was transmitted to dogs in the United States in 2004, the causative virus, which is called canine influenza A virus (CIV, has become widespread in dogs. To date, it has remained unclear whether or not CIV-infected dogs could transmit CIV to horses. To address this, we tested whether or not close contact between horses and dogs experimentally infected with CIV would result in its interspecies transmission. Methods Three pairs of animals consisting of a dog inoculated with CIV (108.3 egg infectious dose50/dog and a healthy horse were kept together in individual stalls for 15 consecutive days. During the study, all the dogs and horses were clinically observed. Virus titres in nasal swab extracts and serological responses were also evaluated. In addition, all the animals were subjected to a gross pathological examination after euthanasia. Results All three dogs inoculated with CIV exhibited clinical signs including, pyrexia, cough, nasal discharge, virus shedding and seroconversion. Gross pathology revealed lung consolidations in all the dogs, and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus was isolated from the lesions. Meanwhile, none of the paired horses showed any clinical signs, virus shedding or seroconversion. Moreover, gross pathology revealed no lesions in the respiratory tracts including the lungs of the horses. Conclusions These findings may indicate that a single dog infected with CIV is not sufficient to constitute a source of CIV infection in horses.

  8. Evidence-based indications for hindfoot endoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spennacchio, Pietro; Cucchi, Davide; Randelli, Pietro S.; van Dijk, Niek C.

    2016-01-01

    The 2-portal hindfoot endoscopic technique with the patient in prone position, first introduced by van Dijk et al. (Arthroscopy 16:871-876, 2000), is currently the most used by foot and ankle surgeons to address endoscopically pathologies located in the hindfoot. This article aims to review the

  9. Solar Indices

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  10. RBC indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this. The results are used to diagnose different types of anemia . ... These test results indicate the type of anemia: MCV below normal. Microcytic anemia (may be due to low iron levels, lead poisoning, or thalassemia ). MCV normal. Normocytic anemia (may ...

  11. Geographical Indications

    OpenAIRE

    Anechitoae Constantin; Grigoru? Lavinia-Maria

    2011-01-01

    “The denomination of origin” may be the name of a region, a specific place or country used to describe an agricultural or food product. "The geographical indication" may be the name of a region, a specific place or a country, used to describe an agricultural or food product. The indication of provenance and the denomination of origin serve to identify the source and origin of goods or services.

  12. Further evidence of the cross-reactivity of the Binax NOW® Filariasis ICT cards to non-Wuchereria bancrofti filariae: experimental studies with Loa loa and Onchocerca ochengi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanji, Samuel; Amvongo-Adjia, Nathalie; Njouendou, Abdel Jelil; Kengne-Ouafo, Jonas Arnaud; Ndongmo, Winston Patrick Chounna; Fombad, Fanny Fri; Koudou, Benjamin; Enyong, Peter A; Bockarie, Moses

    2016-05-05

    The immunochromatographic test (ICT) for lymphatic filariasis is a serological test designed for unequivocal detection of circulating Wuchereria bancrofti antigen. It was validated and promoted by WHO as the primary diagnostic tool for mapping and impact monitoring for disease elimination following interventions. The initial tests for specificity and sensitivity were based on samples collected in areas free of loiasis and the results suggested a near 100% specificity for W. bancrofti. The possibility of cross-reactivity with non-Wuchereria bancrofti antigens was not investigated until recently, when false positive results were observed in three independent studies carried out in Central Africa. Associations were demonstrated between ICT positivity and Loa loa microfilaraemia, but it was not clearly established if these false positive results were due to L. loa or can be extended to other filarial nematodes. This study brought further evidences of the cross-reactivity of ICT card with L. loa and Onchocerca ochengi (related to O. volvulus parasite) using in vivo and in vitro systems. Two filarial/host experimental systems (L. loa-baboon and O. ochengi-cattle) and the in vitro maintenance of different stages (microfilariae, infective larvae and adult worm) of the two filariae were used in three experiments per filarial species. First, whole blood and sera samples were prepared from venous blood of patent baboons and cattle, and applied on ICT cards to detect circulating filarial antigens. Secondly, larval stages of L. loa and O. ochengi as well as O. ochengi adult males were maintained in vitro. Culture supernatants were collected and applied on ICT cards after 6, 12 and 24 h of in vitro maintenance. Finally, total worm extracts (TWE) were prepared using L. loa microfilariae (Mf) and O. ochengi microfilariae, infective larvae and adult male worms. TWE were also tested on ICT cards. For each experiment, control assays (whole blood and sera from uninfected babon

  13. Experimental evidence of resonant energy collisional transfers between argon 1s and 2p states and ground state H atoms by laser collisional induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Emile; van Dijk, Jan; Kroesen, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, laser collisional induced fluorescence (LCIF) is used to probe resonant excitation transfers in an argon/hydrogen plasma resulting from heavy particle collisions. Different radiative transitions between the 1s and 2p states (in Paschen's notation) of argon are optically pumped by a nanosecond laser pulse. The spontaneous fluorescence and collisional responses of the argon and hydrogen systems are monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. A surfatron plasma source is used to generate an argon plasma with a few per cent hydrogen addition at pressures between 0.65 and 20 mbar. The electron density is measured independently by means of Thomson scattering. The overall response of the plasma due to optical pumping of argon is briefly discussed and an overview of the known heteronuclear excitation transfers in an argon/hydrogen plasma is given. The propagation of the shortcut in the Ar(1s) to H(n = 2) excitation transfer due to the optical pumping of the Ar(1s) states is seen in the atomic hydrogen LCIF responses. For the first time, we give direct experimental evidence of the existence of an efficient excitation transfer: Additionally, measurements are performed in order to estimate the resonant energy transfer between the resonant argon 1s states and hydrogen atoms: for which no previously measured cross sections could be found in the literature. These are extra quenching channels of argon 1s and 2p states that should be included in collisional-radiative modeling of argon-hydrogen discharges. The high repetition rate of the dye laser allows us to obtain a high sensitivity in the measurements. LCIF is shown to be a powerful tool for unraveling electron and also heavy particle excitation channels in situ in the plasma phase. The technique was previously developed for measuring electron or species densities locally in the plasma, but we show that it can be advantageously used to probe collisional transfers between very short-lived species which exist

  14. Position indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, David E.

    1981-01-01

    A nuclear reactor system is described in which a position indicator is provided for detecting and indicating the position of a movable element inside a pressure vessel. The movable element may be a valve element or similar device which moves about an axis. Light from a light source is transmitted from a source outside the pressure vessel to a first region inside the pressure vessel in alignment with the axis of the movable element. The light is redirected by a reflector prism to a second region displaced radially from the first region. The reflector prism moves in response to movement of the movable element about its axis such that the second region moves arcuately with respect to the first region. Sensors are arrayed in an arc corresponding to the arc of movement of the second region and signals are transmitted from the sensors to the exterior of the reactor vessel to provide indication of the position of the movable element.

  15. Varying the number of bidders in the first-price sealed-bid auction: experimental evidence for the one-shot game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Füllbrunn, S.C.; Neugebauer, T.

    2013-01-01

    The paper reports experimental data on the behavior in the first-price sealed-bid auction for a varying number of bidders when values and bids are private information. This feedback-free design is proposed for the experimental test of the one-shot game situation. We consider both within-subjects and

  16. yield indicators

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    YIELD INDICATORS. P. NTAWURUHUNGA, P.R. RUBAIHAYOI, J.B.A. WHYTE, A.G.O. DIXONZ and use. osnzu1. International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, East and Southern Africa, Centre, PO. Box 7878, l Kampala ... most important sources of food energy in several ... efficiency in selecting and identifying cassava.

  17. Anthropometric indices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oguoma, V. M.; Nwose, E. U.; Skinner, T. C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The current anthropometric indices used for diagnosis of cardio-metabolic syndrome (CMS) in sub-Saharan Africa are those widely validated in the western world. We hereby aim to compare the sensitivity and specificity of these tools in identifying risk factors for CMS. METHOD: The study...

  18. Biological indicators and biological indication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haseloff, H.P.

    1982-02-01

    Pollutants in the environment cause more and more situations of burden for living beings. In certain organisms, i.e. in biological indicators, there is a correlation between the extent of the damage and the degree of the burden. That is why environmental burdens can be recognized and, in part, be quantitatively recorded. Depending of the choice of materials and the damage parameters the respective differentiated statements can be made. Compared to technical measuring stations biological indicators facilitate the assessment of situations of burden with the help of biological-ecological parameters.

  19. Exacerbation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in prion protein (PrPc-null mice: evidence for a critical role of the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourdain Pauline

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cellular prion protein (PrPc is a host-encoded glycoprotein whose transconformation into PrP scrapie (PrPSc initiates prion diseases. The role of PrPc in health is still obscure, but many candidate functions have been attributed to the protein, both in the immune and the nervous systems. Recent data show that experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is worsened in mice lacking PrPc. Disease exacerbation has been attributed to T cells that would differentiate into more aggressive effectors when deprived of PrPc. However, alternative interpretations such as reduced resistance of neurons to autoimmune insult and exacerbated gliosis leading to neuronal deficits were not considered. Method To better discriminate the contribution of immune cells versus neural cells, reciprocal bone marrow chimeras with differential expression of PrPc in the lymphoid or in the central nervous system (CNS were generated. Mice were subsequently challenged with MOG35-55 peptide and clinical disease as well as histopathology were compared in both groups. Furthermore, to test directly the T cell hypothesis, we compared the encephalitogenicity of adoptively transferred PrPc-deficient versus PrPc-sufficient, anti-MOG T cells. Results First, EAE exacerbation in PrPc-deficient mice was confirmed. Irradiation exacerbated EAE in all the chimeras and controls, but disease was more severe in mice with a PrPc-deleted CNS and a normal immune system than in the reciprocal construction. Moreover, there was no indication that anti-MOG responses were different in PrPc-sufficient and PrPc-deficient mice. Paradoxically, PrPc-deficient anti-MOG 2D2 T cells were less pathogenic than PrPc-expressing 2D2 T cells. Conclusions In view of the present data, it can be concluded that the origin of EAE exacerbation in PrPc-ablated mice resides in the absence of the prion protein in the CNS. Furthermore, the absence of PrPc on both neural and immune cells does not

  20. Novel Role of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein in the Pathophysiology of the Diabetic Kidney: Evidence from Experimental and Human Diabetic Nephropathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Romero, Montserrat; Ortega, Arantxa; Olea, Nuria; Arenas, María Isabel; Izquierdo, Adriana; Bover, Jordi; Esbrit, Pedro; Bosch, Ricardo J

    2013-01-01

    ... to glomerular diseases, such as diabetic nephropathy (DN). In experimental DN, the overexpression of both PTHrP and the PTH1R contributes to the development of renal hypertrophy as well as proteinuria...