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Sample records for experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

  1. Characteristics of edge-localized modes in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, M.; Xu, G.S.; Xiao, C.

    2012-01-01

    Edge-localized modes (ELMs) are the focus of tokamak edge physics studies because the large heat loads associated with ELMs have great impact on the divertor design of future reactor-grade tokamaks such as ITER. In the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST), the first ELMy high...... confinement modes (H-modes) were obtained with 1 MW lower hybrid wave power in conjunction with wall conditioning by lithium (Li) evaporation and real-time Li powder injection. The ELMs in EAST at this heating power are mostly type-III ELMs. They were observed close to the H-mode threshold power and produced...

  2. Plasma density remote control system of experimental advanced superconductive tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mingxin; Luo Jiarong; Li Guiming; Wang Hua; Zhao Dazheng; Xu Congdong

    2007-01-01

    In Tokamak experiments, experimental data and information on the density control are stored in the local computer system. Therefore, the researchers have to be in the control room for getting the data. Plasma Density Remote Control System (DRCS), which is implemented by encapsulating the business logic on the client in the B/S module, conducts the complicated science computation and realizes the synchronization with the experimental process on the client. At the same time, Web Services and Data File Services are deployed for the data exchange. It is proved in the experiments that DRCS not only meets the requirements for the remote control, but also shows an enhanced capability on the data transmission. (authors)

  3. Absolute intensity calibration of the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X.; Zhao, H. L.; Liu, Y., E-mail: liuyong@ipp.ac.cn; Li, E. Z.; Han, X.; Ti, A.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhang, X. D. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    This paper presents the results of the in situ absolute intensity calibration for the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. The hot/cold load method is adopted, and the coherent averaging technique is employed to improve the signal to noise ratio. Measured spectra and electron temperature profiles are compared with those from an independent calibrated Michelson interferometer, and there is a relatively good agreement between the results from the two different systems.

  4. New dual gas puff imaging system with up-down symmetry on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, S. C.; Shao, L. M.; Zweben, S. J.

    2012-01-01

    advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). The two views are up-down symmetric about the midplane and separated by a toroidal angle of 66.6 degrees. A linear manifold with 16 holes apart by 10 mm is used to form helium gas cloud at the 130x130 mm (radial versus poloidal) objective plane. A fast camera...

  5. Inward particle transport at high collisionality in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, G. Q.; Ma, J.; Weiland, J.; Zang, Q.

    2013-01-01

    We have made the first drift wave study of particle transport in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (Wan et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104011 (2009)). The results reveal that collisions make the particle flux more inward in the high collisionality regime. This can be traced back to effects that are quadratic in the collision frequency. The particle pinch is due to electron trapping which is not very efficient in the high collisionality regime so the approach to equilibrium is slow. We have included also the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode to give the right electron temperature gradient, since the Trapped Electron Mode (TE mode) is weak in this regime. However, at the ETG mode number ions are Boltzmann distributed so the ETG mode does not give particle transport

  6. Development of an alternating integrator for magnetic measurements for experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, D. M., E-mail: dmliu@live.cn; Zhao, W. Z.; He, Y. G.; Chen, B. [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Wan, B. N.; Shen, B.; Huang, J.; Liu, H. Q. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2014-11-15

    A high-performance integrator is one of the key electronic devices for reliably controlling plasma in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak for long pulse operation. We once designed an integrator system of real-time drift compensation, which has a low integration drift. However, it is not feasible for really continuous operations due to capacitive leakage error and nonlinearity error. To solve the above-mentioned problems, this paper presents a new alternating integrator. In the new integrator, the integrator system of real-time drift compensation is adopted as one integral cell while two such integral cells work alternately. To achieve the alternate function, a Field Programmable Gate Array built in the digitizer is utilized. The performance test shows that the developed integrator with the integration time constant of 20 ms has a low integration drift (<15 mV) for 1000 s.

  7. The study of heat flux for disruption on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhendong; Fang, Jianan; Luo, Jiarong; Cui, Zhixue; Gong, Xianzu; Gan, Kaifu; Zhao, Hailin; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Meiwen

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of the plasma is one of the most dangerous instabilities in tokamak. During the disruption, most of the plasma thermal energy is lost, which causes damages to the plasma facing components. Infrared (IR) camera is an effective tool to detect the temperature distribution on the first wall, and the energy deposited on the first wall can be calculated from the surface temperature profile measured by the IR camera. This paper concentrates on the characteristics of heat flux distribution onto the first wall under different disruptions, including the minor disruption and the vertical displacement events (VDE) disruption. Several minor disruptions have been observed before the major disruption under the high plasma density in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. During the minor disruption, the heat fluxes are mainly deposited on the upper/lower divertors. The magnetic configuration prior to the minor disruption is a lower single null with the radial distance between the two separatrices in the outer midplane dR_s_e_p = −2 cm, while it changes to upper single null (dR_s_e_p = 1.4 cm) during the minor disruption. As for the VDE disruption, the spatial distribution of heat flux exhibits strong toroidal and radial nonuniformity, and the maximum heat flux received on the dome plate can be up to 11 MW/m"2.

  8. The study of heat flux for disruption on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhendong; Fang, Jianan; Gong, Xianzu; Gan, Kaifu; Luo, Jiarong; Zhao, Hailin; Cui, Zhixue; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Meiwen

    2016-05-01

    Disruption of the plasma is one of the most dangerous instabilities in tokamak. During the disruption, most of the plasma thermal energy is lost, which causes damages to the plasma facing components. Infrared (IR) camera is an effective tool to detect the temperature distribution on the first wall, and the energy deposited on the first wall can be calculated from the surface temperature profile measured by the IR camera. This paper concentrates on the characteristics of heat flux distribution onto the first wall under different disruptions, including the minor disruption and the vertical displacement events (VDE) disruption. Several minor disruptions have been observed before the major disruption under the high plasma density in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. During the minor disruption, the heat fluxes are mainly deposited on the upper/lower divertors. The magnetic configuration prior to the minor disruption is a lower single null with the radial distance between the two separatrices in the outer midplane dRsep = -2 cm, while it changes to upper single null (dRsep = 1.4 cm) during the minor disruption. As for the VDE disruption, the spatial distribution of heat flux exhibits strong toroidal and radial nonuniformity, and the maximum heat flux received on the dome plate can be up to 11 MW/m2.

  9. Structural analysis and manufacture for the vacuum vessel of experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Yuntao; Yao Damao; Wu Songata; Weng Peide

    2006-01-01

    The experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) is an advanced steady-state plasma physics experimental device, which has been approved by the Chinese government and is being constructed as the Chinese national nuclear fusion research project. The vacuum vessel, that is one of the key components, will have to withstand not only the electromagnetic force due to the plasma disruption and the Halo current, but also the pressure of boride water and the thermal stress due to the 250 deg. C baking out by the hot pressure nitrogen gas, or the 100 deg. C hot wall during plasma operation. This paper is a report of the mechanical analyses of the vacuum vessel. According to the allowable stress criteria of American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Boiler and Pressure Vessel Committee (ASME), the maximum integrated stress intensity on the vacuum vessel is 396 MPa, less than the allowable design stress intensity 3S m (441 MPa). At the same time, some key R and D issues are presented, which include supporting system, bellows and the assembly of the whole vacuum vessel

  10. The circuit of polychromator for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak edge Thomson scattering diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang, Qing; Zhao, Junyu; Chen, Hui; Li, Fengjuan; Hsieh, C. L.

    2013-01-01

    The detector circuit is the core component of filter polychromator which is used for scattering light analysis in Thomson scattering diagnostic, and is responsible for the precision and stability of a system. High signal-to-noise and stability are primary requirements for the diagnostic. Recently, an upgraded detector circuit for weak light detecting in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) edge Thomson scattering system has been designed, which can be used for the measurement of large electron temperature (T e ) gradient and low electron density (n e ). In this new circuit, a thermoelectric-cooled avalanche photodiode with the aid circuit is involved for increasing stability and enhancing signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), especially the circuit will never be influenced by ambient temperature. These features are expected to improve the accuracy of EAST Thomson diagnostic dramatically. Related mechanical construction of the circuit is redesigned as well for heat-sinking and installation. All parameters are optimized, and SNR is dramatically improved. The number of minimum detectable photons is only 10

  11. Edge multi-energy soft x-ray diagnostic in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y. L.; Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.; Lan, H.; Liu, Y. L.; Wei, J.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Wang, H. Q.; Duan, Y. M.; Zhao, J. L.; Wang, L.; Liu, S. C.; Ye, Y.; Li, J.; Lin, X.; Li, X. L. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Tritz, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Zhu, Y. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-4575 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    A multi-energy soft x-ray (ME-SXR) diagnostic has been built for electron temperature profile in the edge plasma region in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) after two rounds of campaigns. Originally, five preamplifiers were mounted inside the EAST vacuum vessel chamber attached to five vertically stacked compact diode arrays. A custom mechanical structure was designed to protect the detectors and electronics under constraints of the tangential field of view for plasma edge and the allocation of space. In the next experiment, the mechanical structure was redesigned with a barrel structure to absolutely isolate it from the vacuum vessel. Multiple shielding structures were mounted at the pinhole head to protect the metal foils from lithium coating. The pre-amplifiers were moved to the outside of the vacuum chamber to avoid introducing interference. Twisted copper cooling tube was embedded into the back-shell near the diode to limit the temperature of the preamplifiers and diode arrays during vacuum vessel baking when the temperature reached 150 °C. Electron temperature profiles were reconstructed from ME-SXR measurements using neural networks.

  12. Edge multi-energy soft x-ray diagnostic in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y. L.; Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.; Lan, H.; Liu, Y. L.; Wei, J.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Wang, H. Q.; Duan, Y. M.; Zhao, J. L.; Wang, L.; Liu, S. C.; Ye, Y.; Li, J.; Lin, X.; Li, X. L.; Tritz, K.; Zhu, Y. B.

    2015-01-01

    A multi-energy soft x-ray (ME-SXR) diagnostic has been built for electron temperature profile in the edge plasma region in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) after two rounds of campaigns. Originally, five preamplifiers were mounted inside the EAST vacuum vessel chamber attached to five vertically stacked compact diode arrays. A custom mechanical structure was designed to protect the detectors and electronics under constraints of the tangential field of view for plasma edge and the allocation of space. In the next experiment, the mechanical structure was redesigned with a barrel structure to absolutely isolate it from the vacuum vessel. Multiple shielding structures were mounted at the pinhole head to protect the metal foils from lithium coating. The pre-amplifiers were moved to the outside of the vacuum chamber to avoid introducing interference. Twisted copper cooling tube was embedded into the back-shell near the diode to limit the temperature of the preamplifiers and diode arrays during vacuum vessel baking when the temperature reached 150 °C. Electron temperature profiles were reconstructed from ME-SXR measurements using neural networks

  13. New steady-state quiescent high-confinement plasma in an experimental advanced superconducting tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J S; Sun, Z; Guo, H Y; Li, J G; Wan, B N; Wang, H Q; Ding, S Y; Xu, G S; Liang, Y F; Mansfield, D K; Maingi, R; Zou, X L; Wang, L; Ren, J; Zuo, G Z; Zhang, L; Duan, Y M; Shi, T H; Hu, L Q

    2015-02-06

    A critical challenge facing the basic long-pulse high-confinement operation scenario (H mode) for ITER is to control a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability, known as the edge localized mode (ELM), which leads to cyclical high peak heat and particle fluxes at the plasma facing components. A breakthrough is made in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak in achieving a new steady-state H mode without the presence of ELMs for a duration exceeding hundreds of energy confinement times, by using a novel technique of continuous real-time injection of a lithium (Li) aerosol into the edge plasma. The steady-state ELM-free H mode is accompanied by a strong edge coherent MHD mode (ECM) at a frequency of 35-40 kHz with a poloidal wavelength of 10.2 cm in the ion diamagnetic drift direction, providing continuous heat and particle exhaust, thus preventing the transient heat deposition on plasma facing components and impurity accumulation in the confined plasma. It is truly remarkable that Li injection appears to promote the growth of the ECM, owing to the increase in Li concentration and hence collisionality at the edge, as predicted by GYRO simulations. This new steady-state ELM-free H-mode regime, enabled by real-time Li injection, may open a new avenue for next-step fusion development.

  14. Experimental investigation of density behaviors in front of the lower hybrid launcher in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.; Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.; Kong, E. H.; Wei, W.; Liu, F. K.; Shan, J. F.; Wu, Z. G.; Zhu, L.; Ma, W. D.; Tong, Y. Y.; Li, Y. C.; Wang, M.; Zhao, L. M.; Hu, H. C.; Liu, L.

    2013-01-01

    A triple Langmuir probe is mounted on the top of the Lower Hybrid (LH) antenna to measure the electron density near the LH grills in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. In this work, the LH power density ranges from 2.3 MWm −2 to 10.3 MWm −2 and the rate of puffing gas varies from 1.7 × 10 20 el/s to 14 × 10 20 el/s. The relation between the edge density (from 0.3 × n e-cutoff to 20 × n e-cutoff , where n e-cutoff is the cutoff density, n e-cutoff = 0.74 × 10 17 m −3 for 2.45 GHz lower hybrid current drive) near the LH grill and the LH power reflection coefficients is investigated. The factors, including the gap between the LH grills and the last closed magnetic flux surface, line-averaged density, LH power, edge safety factor, and gas puffing, are analyzed. The experiments show that injection of LH power is beneficial for increasing edge density. Gas puffing is beneficial for increasing grill density but excess gas puffing is unfavorable for coupling and current drive

  15. Development of high-speed and wide-angle visible observation diagnostics on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak using catadioptric optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J. H.; Hu, L. Q.; Zang, Q.; Han, X. F.; Shao, C. Q.; Sun, T. F.; Chen, H.; Wang, T. F.; Li, F. J.; Hu, A. L.; Yang, X. F.

    2013-01-01

    A new wide-angle endoscope for visible light observation on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) has been recently developed. The head section of the optical system is based on a mirror reflection design that is similar to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-like wide-angle observation diagnostic on the Joint European Torus. However, the optical system design has been simplified and improved. As a result, the global transmittance of the system is as high as 79.6% in the wavelength range from 380 to 780 nm, and the spatial resolution is <5 mm for the full depth of field (4000 mm). The optical system also has a large relative aperture (1:2.4) and can be applied in high-speed camera diagnostics. As an important diagnostic tool, the optical system has been installed on the HT-7 (Hefei Tokamak-7) for its final experimental campaign, and the experiments confirmed that it can be applied to the investigation of transient processes in plasma, such as ELMy eruptions in H-mode, on EAST

  16. Hydrocarbon deposition in gaps of tungsten and graphite tiles in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak edge plasma parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Qian; Yang Zhongshi; Luo Guangnan

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) Monte Carlo code PIC-EDDY has been utilized to investigate the mechanism of hydrocarbon deposition in gaps of tungsten tiles in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), where the sheath potential is calculated by the 2D in space and 3D in velocity particle-in-cell method. The calculated results for graphite tiles using the same method are also presented for comparison. Calculation results show that the amount of carbon deposited in the gaps of carbon tiles is three times larger than that in the gaps of tungsten tiles when the carbon particles from re-erosion on the top surface of monoblocks are taken into account. However, the deposition amount is found to be larger in the gaps of tungsten tiles at the same CH 4 flux. When chemical sputtering becomes significant as carbon coverage on tungsten increases with exposure time, the deposition inside the gaps of tungsten tiles would be considerable. (author)

  17. Simulation of Heating with the Waves of Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Cheng; Zhu Sizheng; Zhang Xinjun

    2010-01-01

    Simulation on the heating scenarios in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) was performed by using a full wave code TORIC. The locations of resonance layers for these heating schemes are predicted and the simulations for different schemes in ICRF experiments in EAST, for example, ion heating (both fundamental and harmonic frequency) or electron heating (by direct fast waves or by mode conversion waves), on-axis or off-axis heating, and high-field-side (HFS) launching or low-field-side (LFS) launching, etc, were conducted. For the on-axis minority ion heating of 3 He in D( 3 He) plasma, the impacts of both density and temperature on heating were discussed in the EAST parameter ranges.

  18. Simulations of the L-H transition on experimental advanced superconducting Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiland, Jan

    2014-01-01

    We have simulated the L-H transition on the EAST tokamak [Baonian Wan, EAST and HT-7 Teams, and International Collaborators, “Recent experiments in the EAST and HT-7 superconducting tokamaks,” Nucl. Fusion 49, 104011 (2009)] using a predictive transport code where ion and electron temperatures, electron density, and poloidal and toroidal momenta are simulated self consistently. This is, as far as we know, the first theory based simulation of an L-H transition including the whole radius and not making any assumptions about where the barrier should be formed. Another remarkable feature is that we get H-mode gradients in agreement with the α – α d diagram of Rogers et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 4396 (1998)]. Then, the feedback loop emerging from the simulations means that the L-H power threshold increases with the temperature at the separatrix. This is a main feature of the C-mod experiments [Hubbard et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 056109 (2007)]. This is also why the power threshold depends on the direction of the grad B drift in the scrape off layer and also why the power threshold increases with the magnetic field. A further significant general H-mode feature is that the density is much flatter in H-mode than in L-mode

  19. Simulations of toroidal Alfvén eigenmode excited by fast ions on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Youbin; Xiang, Nong; Shen, Wei; Hu, Youjun; Todo, Y.; Zhou, Deng; Huang, Juan

    2018-05-01

    Kinetic-MagnetoHydroDynamic (MHD) hybrid simulations are carried out to study fast ion driven toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). The first part of this article presents the linear benchmark between two kinetic-MHD codes, namely MEGA and M3D-K, based on a realistic EAST equilibrium. Parameter scans show that the frequency and the growth rate of the TAE given by the two codes agree with each other. The second part of this article discusses the resonance interaction between the TAE and fast ions simulated by the MEGA code. The results show that the TAE exchanges energy with the co-current passing particles with the parallel velocity |v∥ | ≈VA 0/3 or |v∥ | ≈VA 0/5 , where VA 0 is the Alfvén speed on the magnetic axis. The TAE destabilized by the counter-current passing ions is also analyzed and found to have a much smaller growth rate than the co-current ions driven TAE. One of the reasons for this is found to be that the overlapping region of the TAE spatial location and the counter-current ion orbits is narrow, and thus the wave-particle energy exchange is not efficient.

  20. Development and integration of a 50 Hz pellet injection system for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Xingjia [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Chen, Yue [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Hu, Jiansheng, E-mail: hujs@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Vinyar, Igor; Lukin, Alexander [PELIN, Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Yuan, Xiaoling; Li, Changzheng; Liu, Haiqing [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • The design of the pumping system fits the operation requirement well not only theoretically but also experimentally. • The data showed that the averaged pellet injection velocity and propellant gas pressure had a relationship submitting to the power function. • The reliability of the injected pellet was mostly around 90% which is higher than the PI-20 system thanks to the improved pumping system and the new pellet fabrication and acceleration system. - Abstract: A 50 Hz pellet injection system, which is designed for edge-localized mode (ELM) control, has been successfully developed and integrated for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). Pellet injection is achieved by two separated injection system modules that can be operated independently from 1 to 25 Hz. The nominal injection velocity is 250 m/s with a scatter of ±50 m/s at a repetition rate of 50 Hz. A buffer tank and a two-stage differential pumping system of the pellet injection system was designed to increase hydrogen/deuterium ice quality and eliminate the influence of propellant gas on plasma operation, respectively. The pressure of the buffer tank could be pumped to 1 × 10{sup 2} Pa, and the pressure in the second differential chamber could reach 1 × 10{sup −4} Pa during the experiment. Engineering experiments, which consisted of 50 Hz pellet injection and guiding tube mock-up experiments, were also systematically carried out in a laboratory environment and demonstrated that the pellet injection system can reliably inject pellets at a repetitive frequency of 50 Hz.

  1. Study on lower hybrid current drive efficiency at high density towards long-pulse regimes in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, M. H.; Ding, B. J.; Zhang, J. Z.; Gan, K. F.; Wang, H. Q.; Zhang, L.; Wei, W.; Li, Y. C.; Wu, Z. G.; Ma, W. D.; Jia, H.; Chen, M.; Yang, Y.; Feng, J. Q.; Wang, M.; Xu, H. D.; Shan, J. F.; Liu, F. K.; Peysson, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress on both L- and H-mode long-pulse discharges has been made recently in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) with lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) [J. Li et al., Nature Phys. 9, 817 (2013) And B. N. Wan et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 104006 (2013).]. In this paper, LHCD experiments at high density in L-mode plasmas have been investigated in order to explore possible methods of improving current drive (CD) efficiency, thus to extend the operational space in long-pulse and high performance plasma regime. It is observed that the normalized bremsstrahlung emission falls much more steeply than 1/n e-av (line-averaged density) above n e-av  = 2.2 × 10 19  m −3 indicating anomalous loss of CD efficiency. A large broadening of the operating line frequency (f = 2.45 GHz), measured by a radio frequency (RF) probe located outside the EAST vacuum vessel, is generally observed during high density cases, which is found to be one of the physical mechanisms resulting in the unfavorable CD efficiency. Collisional absorption of lower hybrid wave in the scrape off layer (SOL) may be another cause, but this assertion needs more experimental evidence and numerical analysis. It is found that plasmas with strong lithiation can improve CD efficiency largely, which should be benefited from the changes of edge parameters. In addition, several possible methods are proposed to recover good efficiency in future experiments for EAST

  2. Impact of E × B flow shear on turbulence and resulting power fall-off width in H-mode plasmas in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Q. Q., E-mail: yangqq@ipp.ac.cn; Zhong, F. C., E-mail: gsxu@ipp.ac.cn, E-mail: fczhong@dhu.edu.cn; Jia, M. N. [College of Science, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Xu, G. S., E-mail: gsxu@ipp.ac.cn, E-mail: fczhong@dhu.edu.cn; Wang, L.; Wang, H. Q.; Chen, R.; Yan, N.; Liu, S. C.; Chen, L.; Li, Y. L.; Liu, J. B. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2015-06-15

    The power fall-off width in the H-mode scrape-off layer (SOL) in tokamaks shows a strong inverse dependence on the plasma current, which was noticed by both previous multi-machine scaling work [T. Eich et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 093031 (2013)] and more recent work [L. Wang et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 114002 (2014)] on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. To understand the underlying physics, probe measurements of three H-mode discharges with different plasma currents have been studied in this work. The results suggest that a higher plasma current is accompanied by a stronger E×B shear and a shorter radial correlation length of turbulence in the SOL, thus resulting in a narrower power fall-off width. A simple model has also been applied to demonstrate the suppression effect of E×B shear on turbulence in the SOL and shows relatively good agreement with the experimental observations.

  3. A fast-time-response extreme ultraviolet spectrometer for measurement of impurity line emissions in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ling; Xu, Zong; Wu, Zhenwei; Zhang, Pengfei; Wu, Chengrui; Gao, Wei; Shen, Junsong; Chen, Yingjie; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Yumin; Gong, Xianzu; Hu, Liqun; Chen, Junlin; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wan, Baonian; Li, Jiangang [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230026, Anhui (China); Morita, Shigeru; Ohishi, Tetsutarou; Goto, Motoshi [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Dong, Chunfeng [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China); and others

    2015-12-15

    A flat-field extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer working in the 20-500 Å wavelength range with fast time response has been newly developed to measure line emissions from highly ionized tungsten in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) with a tungsten divertor, while the monitoring of light and medium impurities is also an aim in the present development. A flat-field focal plane for spectral image detection is made by a laminar-type varied-line-spacing concave holographic grating with an angle of incidence of 87°. A back-illuminated charge-coupled device (CCD) with a total size of 26.6 × 6.6 mm{sup 2} and pixel numbers of 1024 × 255 (26 × 26 μm{sup 2}/pixel) is used for recording the focal image of spectral lines. An excellent spectral resolution of Δλ{sub 0} = 3-4 pixels, where Δλ{sub 0} is defined as full width at the foot position of a spectral line, is obtained at the 80-400 Å wavelength range after careful adjustment of the grating and CCD positions. The high signal readout rate of the CCD can improve the temporal resolution of time-resolved spectra when the CCD is operated in the full vertical binning mode. It is usually operated at 5 ms per frame. If the vertical size of the CCD is reduced with a narrow slit, the time response becomes faster. The high-time response in the spectral measurement therefore makes possible a variety of spectroscopic studies, e.g., impurity behavior in long pulse discharges with edge-localized mode bursts. An absolute intensity calibration of the EUV spectrometer is also carried out with a technique using the EUV bremsstrahlung continuum at 20-150 Å for quantitative data analysis. Thus, the high-time resolution tungsten spectra have been successfully observed with good spectral resolution using the present EUV spectrometer system. Typical tungsten spectra in the EUV wavelength range observed from EAST discharges are presented with absolute intensity and spectral identification.

  4. Baking system for ports of experimental advanced super-conducting tokamak vacuum vessel and thermal stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Yali; Bao Liman; Song Yuntao; Yao Damao

    2006-01-01

    The baking system of Experimental Advanced Super-Conducting Toakamk (EAST) vacuum vessel is necessary to obtain the baking temperature of 150 degree C. In order to define suitable alloy heaters and achieve their reasonable layouts, thermal analysis was carried out with ANSYS code. The analysis results indicate that the temperature distribution and thermal stress of most parts of EAST vacuum vessel ports are uniform, satisfied for the requirement, and are safe based on ASME criterion. Feasible idea on reducing the stress focus is also considered. (authors)

  5. Experimental and theoretical basis for advanced tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, V.S.

    1994-09-01

    In this paper, arguments will be presented to support the attractiveness of advanced tokamaks as fusion reactors. The premise that all improved confinement regimes obtained to date were limited by magnetohydrodynamic stability will be established from experimental results. Accessing the advanced tokamak regime, therefore, requires means to overcome and enhance the beta limit. We will describe a number of ideas involving control of the plasma internal profiles, e.g. to achieve this. These approaches will have to be compatible with the underlying mechanisms for confinement improvement, such as shear rotation suppression of turbulence. For steady-state, there is a trade-off between full bootstrap current operation and the ability to control current profiles. The coupling between current drive and stability dictates the choice of sources and suggests an optimum for the bootstrap fraction. We summarize by presenting the future plans of the US confinement devices, DIII-D, PBX-M, C-Mod, to address the advanced tokamak physics issues and provide a database for the design of next-generation experiments

  6. Advanced fusion technologies developed for JT-60 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakasai, Akira; Ishida, S.; Matsukawa, M.

    2003-01-01

    The modification of JT-60U is planned as a full superconducting tokamak (JT-60SC). The objectives of the JT-60SC program are to establish scientific and technological bases for the steady-state operation of high performance plasmas and utilization of reduced-activation materials in economically and environmentally attractive DEMO reactor. Advanced fusion technologies relevant to DEMO reactor have been developed in the superconducting magnet technology and plasma facing components for the design of JT-60SC. To achieve a high current density in a superconducting strand, Nb 3 Al strands with a high copper ratio of 4 have been newly developed for the toroidal field coils (TFC) of JT-60SC. The R and D to demonstrate applicability of Nb 3 Al conductor to the TFC by a react-and-wind technique have been carried out using a full-size Nb 3 Al conductor. A full-size NbTi conductor with low AC loss using Ni-coated strands has been successfully developed. A forced cooling divertor component with high heat transfer using screw tubes has been developed for the first time. The heat removal performance of the CFC target was successfully demonstrated on the electron beam irradiation stand. (author)

  7. HESTER: a hot-electron superconducting tokamak experimental reactor at M.I.T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, J.H.; Montgomery, D.B.

    1983-04-01

    HESTER is an experimental tokamak, designed to resolve many of the central questions in the tokamak development program in the 1980's. It combines several unique features with new perspectives on the other major tokamak experiments scheduled for the next decade. The overall objectives of HESTER, in rough order of their presently perceived importance, are the achievement of reactor-like wall-loadings and plasma parameters for long pulse periods, determination of a good, reactor-relevant method of steady-state or very long pulse tokamak current drive, duplication of the planned very high temperature neutral injection experiments using only radio frequency heating, a demonstration of true steady-state tokamak operation, integration of a high-performance superconducting magnet system into a tokamak experiment, determination of the best methods of long term impurity control, and studies of transport and pressure limits in high field, high aspect ratio tokamak plasmas. These objectives are described

  8. First observation of a new zonal-flow cycle state in the H-mode transport barrier of the experimental advanced superconducting Tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G.S.; Wang, H. Q.; Wan, B. N.

    2012-01-01

    A new turbulence-flow cycle state has been discovered after the formation of a transport barrier in the H-mode plasma edge during a quiescent phase on the EAST superconducting tokamak. Zonal-flow modulation of high-frequency-broadband (0.05-1MHz) turbulence was observed in the steep-gradient region...... leading to intermittent transport events across the edge transport barrier. Good confinement (H-98y,H-2 similar to 1) has been achieved in this state, even with input heating power near the L-H transition threshold. A novel model based on predator-prey interaction between turbulence and zonal flows...... reproduced this state well. © 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4769852]...

  9. Superconducting coil design for a tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Wang, S.T.; Smelser, P.

    1977-01-01

    Superconducting toroidal field (TF) and polodial-field (PF) coils have been designed for the proposed Argonne National Laboratory experimental power reactor (EPR). Features of the design include: (1) Peak field of 8 T at 4.2 K or 10 T at 3.0 K. (2) Constant-tension shape for the TF coils, corrected for the finite number (16) of coils. (3) Analysis of errors in coil alignment. (4) Comparison of safety aspects of series-connected and parallel-connected coils. (5) A 60 kA sheet conductor of NbTi with copper stabilizer and stainless steel for support. (6) Superconducting PF coils outside the TF coils. (7) The TF coils shielded from pulsed fields by high-purity aluminum

  10. Conceptual design of superconducting magnet systems for the Argonne Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Turner, L.R.; Mills, F.E.; DeMichele, D.W.; Smelser, P.; Kim, S.H.

    1976-01-01

    As an integral effort in the Argonne Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor Conceptual Design, the conceptual design of a 10-tesla, pure-tension superconducting toroidal-field (TF) coil system has been developed in sufficient detail to define a realistic design for the TF coil system that could be built based upon the current state of technology with minimum technological extrapolations. A conceptual design study on the superconducting ohmic-heating (OH) coils and the superconducting equilibrium-field (EF) coils were also completed. These conceptual designs are developed in sufficient detail with clear information on high current ac conductor design, cooling, venting provision, coil structural support and zero loss poloidal coil cryostat design. Also investigated is the EF penetration into the blanket and shield

  11. Analysis of line integrated electron density using plasma position data on Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Y. U.; Chung, J.

    2010-01-01

    A 280 GHz single-channel horizontal millimeter-wave interferometer system has been installed for plasma electron density measurements on the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. This system has a triangular beam path that does not pass through the plasma axis due to geometrical constraints in the superconducting tokamak. The term line density on KSTAR has a different meaning from the line density of other tokamaks. To estimate the peak density and the mean density from the measured line density, information on the position of the plasma is needed. The information has been calculated from tangentially viewed visible images using the toroidal symmetry of the plasma. Interface definition language routines have been developed for this purpose. The calculated plasma position data correspond well to calculation results from magnetic analysis. With the position data and an estimated plasma profile, the peak density and the mean density have been obtained from the line density. From these results, changes of plasma density themselves can be separated from effects of the plasma movements, so they can give valuable information on the plasma status.

  12. Advanced Tokamak Stability Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Linjin

    2015-03-01

    The intention of this book is to introduce advanced tokamak stability theory. We start with the derivation of the Grad-Shafranov equation and the construction of various toroidal flux coordinates. An analytical tokamak equilibrium theory is presented to demonstrate the Shafranov shift and how the toroidal hoop force can be balanced by the application of a vertical magnetic field in tokamaks. In addition to advanced theories, this book also discusses the intuitive physics pictures for various experimentally observed phenomena.

  13. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampert, M. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Anda, G.; Réfy, D.; Zoletnik, S. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Czopf, A.; Erdei, G. [Department of Atomic Physics, BME IOP, Budapest (Hungary); Guszejnov, D.; Kovácsik, Á.; Pokol, G. I. [BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Nam, Y. U. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera’s measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  14. Experimental and calculating study on the stressed state of superconducting coils of toroidal field in the T-15 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaulina, I.G.; Gusev, S.V.; Sivkova, G.N.

    1987-01-01

    Results of calculational and experimental atudy of stress-deformed state of superconducting coils of the T-15 tokamak toroidal field are presented. The calculations are made using the method of finite elements and refined theory of cores. Experimental studies were carried out using elastic tensometric model of polymer materials. Test results are compared with the calculational results. Divergence between calculational and experimental values of displacement of characteristic points in the unit does not exceed 20 %. Results of model studies confirm the expediency of the calculational model used for designing SOTP unit for the T-15 tokamak

  15. Advanced control scenario of high-performance steady-state operation for JT-60 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, H.; Kurita, G.; Matsukawa, M.; Urata, K.; Sakurai, S.; Tsuchiya, K.; Morioka, A.; Miura, Y.M.; Kizu, K.; Kamada, Y.; Sakasai, A.; Ishida, S.

    2004-01-01

    Plasma control on high-β N steady-state operation for JT-60 superconducting modification is discussed. Accessibility to high-β N exceeding the free-boundary limit is investigated with the stabilising wall of reduced-activated ferritic steel and the active feedback control of the in-vessel non-axisymmetric field coils. Taking the merit of superconducting magnet, advanced plasma control for steady-state high performance operation could be expected. (authors)

  16. Experimental identification of nonlinear coupling between (intermediate, small)-scale microturbulence and an MHD mode in the core of a superconducting tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, P. J.; Li, Y. D.; Ren, Y.; Zhang, X. D.; Wu, G. J.; Xu, L. Q.; Chen, R.; Li, Q.; Zhao, H. L.; Zhang, J. Z.; Shi, T. H.; Wang, Y. M.; Lyu, B.; Hu, L. Q.; Li, J.; The EAST Team

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we present clear experimental evidence of core region nonlinear coupling between (intermediate, small)-scale microturbulence and an magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) mode during the current ramp-down phase in a set of L-mode plasma discharges in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST, Wan et al (2006 Plasma Sci. Technol. 8 253)). Density fluctuations of broadband microturbulence (k\\perpρi˜2{-}5.2 ) and the MHD mode (toroidal mode number m = -1 , poloidal mode number n = 1 ) are measured simultaneously, using a four-channel tangential CO2 laser collective scattering diagnostic in core plasmas. The nonlinear coupling between the broadband microturbulence and the MHD mode is directly demonstrated by showing a statistically significant bicoherence and modulation of turbulent density fluctuation amplitude by the MHD mode.

  17. Advanced tokamak burning plasma experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T.; Ramos, J.; Schultz, J.; Nevins, W.N.

    2001-01-01

    A new reduced size ITER-RC superconducting tokamak concept is proposed with the goals of studying burn physics either in an inductively driven standard tokamak (ST) mode of operation, or in a quasi-steady state advanced tokamak (AT) mode sustained by non-inductive means. This is achieved by reducing the radiation shield thickness protecting the superconducting magnet by 0.34 m relative to ITER and limiting the burn mode of operation to pulse lengths as allowed by the TF coil warming up to the current sharing temperature. High gain (Q≅10) burn physics studies in a reversed shear equilibrium, sustained by RF and NB current drive techniques, may be obtained. (author)

  18. Tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Bertoncini, P.J.

    1976-01-01

    A conceptual design has been developed for a tokamak Experimental Power Reactor to operate at net electrical power conditions with a plant capacity factor of 50 percent for 10 yr. The EPR operates in a pulsed mode at a frequency of approximately 1/min, with approximately 75 percent duty cycle, is capable of producing approximately 72 MWe and requires 42 MWe. The annual tritium consumption is 16 kg. The EPR vacuum chamber is 6.25 m in major radius and 2.4 m in minor radius, is constructed of 2 cm thick stainless steel, and has 2 cm thick detachable, beryllium-coated coolant panels mounted on the interior. A 0.28 m stainless steel blanket and a shield ranging from 0.6 to 1.0 m surround the vacuum vessel. The coolant is H 2 O. Sixteen niobium-titanium superconducting toroidal field coils provide a field of 10 T at the coil and 4.47 T at the plasma. Superconducting ohmic heating and equilibrium field coils provide 135 V-s to drive the plasma current. Plasma heating is accomplished by 12 neutral beam injectors which provide 60 MW. The energy transfer and storage system consists of a central superconducting storage ring, a homopolar energy storage unit, and a variety of inductor-convertors

  19. Examination of a duo-collection optics design for the Korea superconducting tokamak advanced research (KSTAR) Thomson scattering system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Seungtae; Lee, Jong Ha

    2011-01-01

    The comparison of collective optic designs is described for the Thomson scattering system of the Korea superconducting tokamak advanced research (KSTAR) device. The optical systems collecting the light emission induced through the interaction between the plasma electrons and a laser beam are the key components for the Thomson scattering system. In the first conceptual design of the collection optics for the KSTAR Thomson scattering system, a duo-lens system covering individually the core and the edge regions of the KSTAR plasma with two optical lens modules was proposed. In optical designs, the number of optical modules is a great concern in the case of limited system space. Here, the duo-lens system is evaluated through a comparison with a uni-lens system covering the whole region of the plasma with a single optical module. The duo-lens system turned out to have 2.0 times and 4.73 times higher light collections of the plasma core and edge compared with the uni-lens system

  20. Advanced commercial tokamak study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, S.L.; Dabiri, A.E.; Keeton, D.C.; Brown, T.G.; Bussell, G.T.

    1985-12-01

    Advanced commercial tokamak studies were performed by the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) as a participant in the Tokamak Power Systems Studies (TPSS) project coordinated by the Office of Fusion Energy. The FEDC studies addressed the issues of tokamak reactor cost, size, and complexity. A scoping study model was developed to determine the effect of beta on tokamak economics, and it was found that a competitive cost of electricity could be achieved at a beta of 10 to 15%. The implications of operating at a beta of up to 25% were also addressed. It was found that the economics of fusion, like those of fission, improve as unit size increases. However, small units were found to be competitive as elements of a multiplex plant, provided that unit cost and maintenance time reductions are realized for the small units. The modular tokamak configuration combined several new approaches to develop a less complex and lower cost reactor. The modular design combines the toroidal field coil with the reactor structure, locates the primary vacuum boundary at the reactor cell wall, and uses a vertical assembly and maintenance approach. 12 refs., 19 figs

  1. Overview of recent experimental results from the DIII-D advanced tokamak program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrell, K.H.

    2003-01-01

    The D III-D research program is developing the scientific basis for advanced tokamak (AT) modes of operation in order to enhance the attractiveness of the tokamak as an energy producing system. Since the last International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) meeting, we have made significant progress in developing the building blocks needed for AT operation: 1) We have doubled the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stable tokamak operating space through rotational stabilization of the resistive wall mode; 2) Using this rotational stabilization, we have achieved β N H 89 ≥ 10 for 4 τ E limited by the neoclassical tearing mode; 3) Using real-time feedback of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) location, we have stabilized the (m,n) = (3,2) neoclassical tearing mode and then increased β T by 60%; 4) We have produced ECCD stabilization of the (2,1) neoclassical tearing mode in initial experiments; 5) We have made the first integrated AT demonstration discharges with current profile control using ECCD; 6) ECCD and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been used to control the pressure profile in high performance plasmas; and 7) We have demonstrated stationary tokamak operation for 6.5 s (36 τ E ) at the same fusion gain parameter of β N H 89 /q 95 2 ≅ 0.4 as ITER but at much higher q 95 = 4.2. We have developed general improvements applicable to conventional and advanced tokamak operating modes: 1) We have an existence proof of a mode of tokamak operation, quiescent H-mode, which has no pulsed, ELM heat load to the divertor and which can run for long periods of time (3.8 s or 25 τ E ) with constant density and constant radiated power; 2) We have demonstrated real-time disruption detection and mitigation for vertical disruption events using high pressure gas jet injection of noble gases; 3) We have found that the heat and particle fluxes to the inner strike points of balanced, double-null divertors are much smaller than to the outer strike points. (author)

  2. Superconducting magnets and cryogenics for the steady state superconducting tokamak SST-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, Y.C.

    2000-01-01

    SST-1 is a steady state superconducting tokamak for studying the physics of the plasma processes in tokamak under steady state conditions and to learn technologies related to the steady state operation of the tokamak. SST-1 will have superconducting magnets made from NbTi based conductors operating at 4.5 K temperature. The design of the superconducting magnets and the cryogenic system of SST-1 tokamak are described. (author)

  3. Advanced limiter test (ALT-I) in the TEXTOR tokamak - concept and experimental design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Grotz, S.P.; Prinja, A.K.

    1983-01-01

    The concept and experimental design of a pump-limiter for the TEXTOR tokamak is described. The module is constructed of stainless steel with a compound curvature head designed to limit the maximum heat flux to 300 W/cm 2 . The head is made of TiC-coated graphite containing a variable aperture slot to admit plasma to a deflector plate for ballistic pumping action. The assembly is actively pumped using Zr-Al getters with an estimated hydrogen pumping speed of 2x10 4 1/s. The aspect ratio of the pump duct and the length of the plasma channel are both variable to permit study of plasma plugging, ballistic scattering, and enhanced gas conduction effects. The module can be moved radially by 10 cm to permit its operation either as the primary or secondary limiter. Major diagnostics include Langmuir and solid state probes, bolometers, infrared thermography, thermocouples, ion gauges, manometers, and a gas mass analyzer. (author)

  4. Overview of recent experimental results from the DIII-D advanced tokamak program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.L.

    2001-01-01

    The goals of DIII-D Advanced Tokamak (AT) experiments are to investigate and optimize the upper limits of energy confinement and MHD stability in a tokamak plasma, and to simultaneously maximize the fraction of non-inductive current drive. Significant overall progress has been made in the past 2 years, as the performance figure of merit β N H 89P of 9 has been achieved in ELMing H-mode for over 16 τ E without sawteeth. We also operated at β N ∼7 for over 35 τ E or 3 τ R , with the duration limited by hardware. Real-time feedback control of β (at 95% of the stability boundary), optimizing the plasma shape (e.g., δ, divertor strike- and X-point, double/single null balance), and particle control (n e /n GW ∼0.3, Z eff N H 89P of 7. The QDB regime has been obtained to date only with counter neutral beam injection. Further modification and control of internal transport barriers (ITBs) has also been demonstrated with impurity injection (broader barrier), pellets, and ECH (strong electron barrier). The new Divertor-2000, a key ingredient in all these discharges, provides effective density, impurity and heat flux control in the high-triangularity plasma shapes. Discharges at n e /n GW ∼1.4 have been obtained with gas puffing by maintaining the edge pedestal pressure; this operation is easier with Divertor-2000. We are developing several other tools required for AT operation, including real-time feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) with external coils, and control of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) with electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD). (author)

  5. Steady State Advanced Tokamak (SSAT): The mission and the machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.; Goldston, R.; Nevins, B.; Neilson, H.; Shannon, T.; Montgomery, B.

    1992-03-01

    Extending the tokamak concept to the steady state regime and pursuing advances in tokamak physics are important and complementary steps for the magnetic fusion energy program. The required transition away from inductive current drive will provide exciting opportunities for advances in tokamak physics, as well as important impetus to drive advances in fusion technology. Recognizing this, the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee and the US National Energy Strategy identified the development of steady state tokamak physics and technology, and improvements in the tokamak concept, as vital elements in the magnetic fusion energy development plan. Both called for the construction of a steady state tokamak facility to address these plan elements. Advances in physics that produce better confinement and higher pressure limits are required for a similar unit size reactor. Regimes with largely self-driven plasma current are required to permit a steady-state tokamak reactor with acceptable recirculating power. Reliable techniques of disruption control will be needed to achieve the availability goals of an economic reactor. Thus the central role of this new tokamak facility is to point the way to a more attractive demonstration reactor (DEMO) than the present data base would support. To meet the challenges, we propose a new ''Steady State Advanced Tokamak'' (SSAT) facility that would develop and demonstrate optimized steady state tokamak operating mode. While other tokamaks in the world program employ superconducting toroidal field coils, SSAT would be the first major tokamak to operate with a fully superconducting coil set in the elongated, divertor geometry planned for ITER and DEMO

  6. Tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Brooks, J.N.

    1978-01-01

    A tokamak experimental power reactor has been designed that is capable of producing net electric power over a wide range of possible operating conditions. A net production of 81 MW of electricity is expected from the design reference conditions that assume a value of 0.07 for beta-toroidal, a maximum toroidal magnetic field of 9 T and a thermal conversion efficiency of 30%. Impurity control is achieved through the use of a low-Z first wall coating. This approach allows a burn time of 60 seconds without the incorporation of a divertor. The system is cooled by a dual pressurized water/steam system that could potentially provide thermal efficiencies as high as 39%. The first surface facing the plasma is a low-Z coated water cooled panel that is attached to a 20 cm thick blanket module. The vacuum boundary is removed a total of 22 cm from the plasma, thereby minimizing the amount of radiation damage in this vital component. Consideration is given in the design to the possible use of the EPR as a materials test reactor. It is estimated that the total system could be built for less than 550 million dollars

  7. HT-7U superconducting tokamak: Physics design, engineering progress and schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Yuanxi

    2002-01-01

    The superconducting tokamak research program begun in China in ASIPP since 1994. The program is included in existent superconducting tokamak HT-7 and the next new superconducting tokamak HT-7U which is one of national key research projects in China. With the elongation cross-section, divertor and higher plasma parameter the main objectives of HT-7U are widely investigation both of the physics and technology for steady state advanced tokamak as well as the investigation of power and particle handle under steady-state operation condition. The physics and engineering design have been completed and significant progresses on R and D and fabrication have been achieved. HT-7U will begin assembly at 2003 and possible to get first plasma around 2004. (author)

  8. Conceptual radiation shielding design of superconducting tokamak fusion device by PHITS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukegawa, Atsuhiko M.; Kawasaki, Hiromitsu; Okuno, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    A complete 3D neutron and photon transport analysis by Monte Carlo transport code system PHITS (Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System) have been performed for superconducting tokamak fusion device such as JT-60 Super Advanced (JT-60SA). It is possible to make use of PHITS in the port streaming analysis around the devices for the tokamak fusion device, the duct streaming analysis in the building where the device is installed, and the sky shine analysis for the site boundary. The neutron transport analysis by PHITS makes it clear that the shielding performance of the superconducting tokamak fusion device with the cryostat is improved by the graphical results. From the standpoint of the port streaming and the duct streaming, it is necessary to calculate by 3D Monte Carlo code such as PHITS for the neutronics analysis of superconducting tokamak fusion device. (author)

  9. Texas Experimental Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report covers the period from November 1, 1990 to April 30, 1993. During that period, TEXT was operated as a circular tokamak with a material limiter. It was devoted to the study of basic plasma physics, in particular to study of fluctuations, turbulence, and transport. The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics, specifically to conduct a research program under the following main headings: (1) to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks, in particular to understand the role of turbulence; (2) to study physics of the edge plasma, in particular the turbulence; (3) to study the physics or resonant magnetic fields (ergodic magnetic divertors, intra island pumping); and (4) to study the physics of electron cyclotron heating (ECRH). Results of studies in each of these areas are reported

  10. Texas Experimental Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1990-04-01

    This paper discusses the following work on the text tokamak: data systems; particle confinement; impurity transport; plasma rotation; runaway electrons; electron cyclotron heating; FIR system; transient transport; internal turbulence; edge turbulence; ion temperature; EML experiments; impurity pellet experiments; MHD experiments and analysis; TEXT Upgrade; and Upgrade diagnostics

  11. TIBER: Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Research. Final design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.; Barr, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Research (TIBER) device is the smallest superconductivity tokamak designed to date. In the design plasma shaping is used to achieve a high plasma beta. Neutron shielding is minimized to achieve the desired small device size, but the superconducting magnets must be shielded sufficiently to reduce the neutron heat load and the gamma-ray dose to various components of the device. Specifications of the plasma-shaping coil, the shielding, coaling, requirements, and heating modes are given. 61 refs., 92 figs., 30 tabs

  12. Effect of Wave Accessibility on Lower Hybrid Wave Current Drive in Experimental Advanced Superconductor Tokamak with H-Mode Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xin-Xia; Xiang Nong; Gan Chun-Yun

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the wave accessibility condition on the lower hybrid current drive in the experimental advanced superconductor Tokamak (EAST) plasma with H-mode operation is studied. Based on a simplified model, a mode conversion layer of the lower hybrid wave between the fast wave branch and the slow wave branch is proved to exist in the plasma periphery for typical EAST H-mode parameters. Under the framework of the lower hybrid wave simulation code (LSC), the wave ray trajectory and the associated current drive are calculated numerically. The results show that the wave accessibility condition plays an important role on the lower hybrid current drive in EAST plasma. For wave rays with parallel refractive index n ‖ = 2.1 or n ‖ = 2.5 launched from the outside midplane, the wave rays may penetrate the core plasma due to the toroidal geometry effect, while numerous reflections of the wave ray trajectories in the plasma periphery occur. However, low current drive efficiency is obtained. Meanwhile, the wave accessibility condition is improved if a higher confined magnetic field is applied. The simulation results show that for plasma parameters under present EAST H-mode operation, a significant lower hybrid wave current drive could be obtained for the wave spectrum with peak value n ‖ = 2.1 if a toroidal magnetic field B T = 2.5 T is applied. (paper)

  13. Controlled thermonuclear fusion and the latest progress on China's HT-7 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiangang; Yang Yu

    2003-01-01

    After 50 years of research on controlled thermonuclear fusion, a new stage will be reached in 2003, when a site for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project will be chosen to start the construction. Scientists hope that this project could herald a new era in which the energy problem will be solved completely. The great progress made on the HT-7 superconducting tokamak in China has provided positive and powerful support for fusion research. The HT-7 is one of the only two superconducting tokamaks in the world that can carry out minute-scale high temperature plasma research, and has achieved a duration of 63.95s for the hot plasma discharge. This is a major step towards real steady-state operation of the tokamak configuration. We present an overview of the latest progress on the tokamak experiments in the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

  14. Advanced superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluekiger, R.

    1983-11-01

    The superconducting properties of various materials are reviewed in view of their use in high field magnets. The critical current densities above 12 T of conductors based on NbN or PbMo 6 S 8 are compared to those of the most advanced practical conductors based on alloyed by Nb 3 Sn. Different aspects of the mechanical reinforcement of high field conductors, rendered necessary by the strong Lorentz forces (e.g. in fusion magnets), are discussed. (orig.) [de

  15. Application of advanced composites in tokamak magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, C.J.

    1977-11-01

    The use of advanced (high-modulus) composites in superconducting magnets for tokamak fusion reactors is discussed. The most prominent potential application is as the structure in the pulsed poloidal-field coil system, where a significant reduction in eddy currents could be achieved. Present low-temperature data on the advanced composites are reviewed briefly; they are too meager to do more than suggest a broad class of composites for a particular application

  16. Observation of a new turbulence-driven limit-cycle state in H-modes with lower hybrid current drive and lithium-wall conditioning in the EAST superconducting tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, H.Q.; Xu, G.S.; Guo, H.Y.

    2012-01-01

    The first high confinement H-mode plasma has been obtained in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) with about 1 MW lower hybrid current drive after wall conditioning by lithium evaporation and real-time injection of Li powder. Following the L–H transition, a small-amplitude, low...

  17. Ion Bernstein wave heating experiments in HT-7 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yanping

    2005-01-01

    Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW) experiments have been carried out in recent years in the HT-7 superconducting Tokamak. The electron heating experiment has been concentrated on deuterium plasma with an injecting RF power up to 350 kw. The globe heating and localized heating can be seen clearly by controlling the ICRF resonance layer's position. On-axis and off-axis electron heating have been realized by properly setting the target plasma parameters. Experimental results show that the maximum increment in electron temperature has been more than 1 keV, the electron temperature profile has been modified by IBW under different plasma conditions, and both energy and particle confinement improvements have been obtained. (author)

  18. Advanced statistics for tokamak transport colinearity and tokamak to tokamak variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, K.S.

    1989-03-01

    This is a compendium of three separate articles on the statistical analysis of tokamak transport. The first article is an expository introduction to advanced statistics and scaling laws. The second analyzes two important problems of tokamak data---colinearity and tokamak to tokamak variation in detail. The third article generalizes the Swamy random coefficient model to the case of degenerate matrices. Three papers have been processed separately

  19. Tore-Supra: a Tokamak with superconducting toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turck, B.

    1987-07-01

    Tore Supra is a tokamak under construction on the site of Cen Cadarache by the Euratom-CEA Association. The machine technology integrates all problems related to the fabrication and the operation of large superconducting coils and of the associated cryogenic system. Tore Supra will provide a significant experience to prepare the next generation of machines for plasma physics and controlled fusion. Tore Supra is specially designed to implement a large physics program. The superconducting coils make possible the study of plasma confinement in long pulses (more than 60s), the impurities and the stability, and the efficiency of additional heating sources (neutral particle beams and radio frequency heating). The opportunity is taken to recall the particular features and requirements of the superconducting coils of the large future tokamaks in order to point out the problems that have to be faced by any new material (superconducting or not)

  20. Vacuum physics analysis of HT-7 superconducting tokamak pump limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jiansheng; Li Chengfu; He Yexi

    1998-10-01

    The pump limiter is analysed with HT-7 superconducting tokamak parameter and the pump limiter construction. The particle exhaust of the pump limiter can be to achieve about 7.7%. So the pump limiter can be applied in the HT-7 device and will make good affection in plasma discharge

  1. Experiments in the HT-7 Superconducting Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Baonian

    2002-01-01

    The HT-7 tokamak experiment research has made important progress. The main efforts have dealt with quasi-steady-state operation, lower-hybrid (LH) current drive (LHCD), plasma heating with ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), ion Bernstein waves (IBWs), fueling with pellets and supersonic molecular beams, first-wall conditioning techniques, and plasma and wall interaction. Plasma parameters in the experiments were much improved; for example, n e = 6.5 x 10 19 m -3 , and a plasma pulse length of >10 s was achieved. ICRF boronization and conditioning resulted in Z eff close to unity. Steady-state full LH wave current drive has been achieved for >3 s. LHCD rampup and recharge have also been demonstrated. The best [eta] CD exp of 10 19 m -2 A/W is achieved. Quasi-steady-state H-mode-like plasmas with a density close to the Greenwald limit were obtained by LHCD, where energy confinement time was nearly five times longer than in the ohmic case. The synergy between the IBW, pellet, and LHCD was investigated. New doped graphite as limiter material and ferritic steel used to reduce the ripples have been developed. Research on the mechanism of microturbulence has been extensively carried out experimentally

  2. Advanced tokamak physics in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petty, C.C.; Luce, T.C.; Politzer, P.A.; Bray, B.; Burrell, K.H.; Chu, M.S.; Ferron, J.R.; Gohil, P.; Greenfield, C.M.; Hsieh, C.-L.; Hyatt, A.W.; La Haye, R.J.; Lao, L.L.; Leonard, A.W.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Lohr, J.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Petrie, T.W.; Pinsker, R.I.; Prater, R.; Scoville, J.T.; Staebler, G.M.; Strait, E.J.; Taylor, T.S.; West, W.P. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA (United States); Wade, M.R.; Lazarus, E.A.; Murakami, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.; Jayakumar, R.; Lasnier, C.J.; Makowski, M.A.; Rice, B.W.; Wolf, N.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Austin, M.E. [University of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Fredrickson, E.D.; Gorelov, I.; Johnson, L.C.; Okabayashi, M.; Wong, K.-L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Garofalo, A.M.; Navratil, G.A. [Columbia University, New York (United States); Heidbrink, W. [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Kinsey, J.E. [Leheigh University, Bethlehem, PA (United States); McKee, G.R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Rettig, C.L.; Rhodes, T.L. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Watkins, J.G. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Advanced tokamaks seek to achieve a high bootstrap current fraction without sacrificing fusion power density or fusion gain. Good progress has been made towards the DIII-D research goal of demonstrating a high-{beta} advanced tokamak plasma in steady state with a relaxed, fully non-inductive current profile and a bootstrap current fraction greater than 50%. The limiting factors for transport, stability, and current profile control in advanced operating modes are discussed in this paper. (author)

  3. Development of superconducting poloidal field coils for medium and large size tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittrich, H.-G.; Forster, S.; Hofmann, A.

    1983-01-01

    Large long pulse tokamak fusion experiments require the use of superconducting poloidal field (PF) coils. In the past not much attention has been paid to the development of such coils. Therefore a development programme has been initiated recently at KfK. In this report start with summarizing the relevant PF coil parameters of some medium and large size tokamaks presently under construction or design, respectively. The most important areas of research and development work are deduced from these parameters. Design considerations and first experimental results concerning low loss conductors, cooling concepts and structural components are given

  4. Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) facility will be based on upgrades to the existing NML pulsed SRF facility. ASTA is envisioned to contain 3 to 6...

  5. System studies for quasi-steady-state advanced physics tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1983-11-01

    Parametric studies were conducted using the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) Tokamak Systems Code to investigate the impact of veriation in physics parameters and technology limits on the performance and cost of a low q/sub psi/, high beta, quasi-steady-state tokamak for the purpose of fusion engineering experimentation. The features and characteristics chosen from each study were embodied into a single Advanced Physics Tokamak design for which a self-consistent set of parameters was generated and a value of capital cost was estimated

  6. DEALS: a maintainable superconducting magnet system for tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hseih, S.Y.; Danby, G.; Powell, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of demountable superconducting magnet systems has been examined in a design study of a DEALS [Demountable Externally Anchored Low Stress] TF magnet for an HFITR [High Field Ignition Test Reactor] Tokamak device. All parts of the system appear feasible, including the demountable superconducting joints. Measurements on small scale prototype joints indicate that movable pressure contact joints exhibit acceptable electrical, mechanical, and cryogenic performance. Such joints permit a relatively simple support structure and are readily demountable. Assembly and disassembly sequences are described whereby any failed portion of the magnet, or any part of the reactor inside the TF coils can be removed and replaced if necessary

  7. Structural materials for large superconducting magnets for tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, C.J.

    1976-12-01

    The selection of structural materials for large superconducting magnets for tokamak-type fusion reactors is considered. The important criteria are working stress, radiation resistance, electromagnetic interaction, and general feasibility. The most advantageous materials appear to be face-centered-cubic alloys in the Fe-Ni-Cr system, but high-modulus composites may be necessary where severe pulsed magnetic fields are present. Special-purpose structural materials are considered briefly

  8. Machine Control System of Steady State Superconducting Tokamak-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masand, Harish, E-mail: harish@ipr.res.in; Kumar, Aveg; Bhandarkar, M.; Mahajan, K.; Gulati, H.; Dhongde, J.; Patel, K.; Chudasma, H.; Pradhan, S.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Central Control System. • SST-1. • Machine Control System. - Abstract: Central Control System (CCS) of the Steady State Superconducting Tokamak-1 (SST-1) controls and monitors around 25 plant and experiment subsystems of SST-1 located remotely from the Central-Control room. Machine Control System (MCS) is a supervisory system that sits on the top of the CCS hierarchy and implements the CCS state diagram. MCS ensures the software interlock between the SST-1 subsystems with the CCS, any subsystem communication failure or its local error does not prohibit the execution of the MCS and in-turn the CCS operation. MCS also periodically monitors the subsystem’s status and their vital process parameters throughout the campaign. It also provides the platform for the Central Control operator to visualize and exchange remotely the operational and experimental configuration parameters with the sub-systems. MCS remains operational 24 × 7 from the commencement to the termination of the SST-1 campaign. The developed MCS has performed robustly and flawlessly during all the last campaigns of SST-1 carried out so far. This paper will describe various aspects of the development of MCS.

  9. The superconducting magnet system for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, D.D.; Bulmer, R.J.; Chaplin, M.R.; O'Connor, T.G.; Slack, D.S.; Wong, R.L.; Zbasnik, J.P.; Schultz, J.H.; Diatchenko, N.; Montgomery, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system for the Tokamak Physics eXperiment (TPX) will be the first all superconducting magnet system for a Tokamak, where the poloidal field coils, in addition to the toroidal field coils are superconducting. The magnet system is designed to operate in a steady state mode, and to initiate the plasma discharge ohmically. The toroidal field system provides a peak field of 4.0 Tesla on the plasma axis at a plasma major radius of 2.25 m. The peak field on the niobium 3-tin, cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductor is 8.4 Tesla for the 16 toroidal field coils. The toroidal field coils must absorb approximately 5 kW due to nuclear heating, eddy currents, and other sources. The poloidal field system provides a total of 18 volt seconds to initiate the plasma and drive a plasma current up to 2 MA. The poloidal field system consists of 14 individual coils which are arranged symmetrically above and below the horizontal mid plane. Four pairs of coils make up the central solenoid, and three pairs of poloidal ring coils complete the system. The poloidal field coils all use a cable-in-conduit conductor, using either niobium 3-tin (Nb 3 Sn) or niobium titanium (NbTi) superconducting strands depending on the operating conditions for that coil. All of the coils are cooled by flowing supercritical helium, with inlet and outlet connections made on each double pancake. The superconducting magnet system has gone through a conceptual design review, and is in preliminary design started by the LLNL/MIT/PPPL collaboration. A number of changes have been made in the design since the conceptual design review, and are described in this paper. The majority of the design and all fabrication of the superconducting magnet system will be ,accomplished by industry, which will shortly be taking over the preliminary design. The magnet system is expected to be completed in early 2000

  10. Development of high field superconducting Tokamak 'TRIAM-1M'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Satoshi; Suzuki, Takao; Suzuki, Shohei; Nishi, Masatsugu; Kawasaki, Takahide.

    1984-01-01

    The tokamak nuclear fusion apparatus ''TRIAM-1M'' which is constructed in the Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, has a number of distinctive features as compared with other tokamak projects, that is, the toroidal field coils are made of superconductors for the first time in Japan, and the apparatus is small and has strong magnetic field. Hitachi Ltd. designed and has forwarded the manufacture of the TRIAM-1M. In this paper, the total constitution of the apparatus and the design and manufacture of the plasma vacuum vessel, superconducting toroidal coils and others are reported. The objectives of research are the containment of strong field tokamak plasma and the establishment of the law of proportion, the development of turbulent flow heating method, the adoption of mixed wave current driving method and the practical use of Nb 3 Sn superconducting coils. The apparatus is composed of the vacuum vessel containing plasma, toroidal field coils, poloidal field coils, current transformer coils and turbulent flow heating coils for plasma heating, heat insulating vacuum vessel and supporting structures. The evacuating facility, helium liquefying refrigerator and cooling water facility are installed around the main body. (Kako, I.)

  11. Recent advances in fullerene superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Margadonna, S

    2002-01-01

    Superconducting transition temperatures in bulk chemically intercalated fulleride salts reach 33 K at ambient pressure and in hole-doped C sub 6 sub 0 derivatives in field-effect-transistor (FET) configurations, they reach 117 K. These advances pose important challenges for our understanding of high-temperature superconductivity in these highly correlated organic metals. Here we review the structures and properties of intercalated fullerides, paying particular attention to the correlation between superconductivity and interfullerene separation, orientational order/disorder, valence state, orbital degeneracy, low-symmetry distortions, and metal-C sub 6 sub 0 interactions. The metal-insulator transition at large interfullerene separations is discussed in detail. An overview is also given of the exploding field of gate-induced superconductivity of fullerenes in FET electronic devices.

  12. About the Toroidal Magnetic Field of a Tokamak Burning Plasma Experiment with Superconducting Coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzucato, E.

    2002-01-01

    In tokamaks, the strong dependence on the toroidal magnetic field of both plasma pressure and energy confinement is what makes possible the construction of small and relatively inexpensive burning plasma experiments using high-field resistive coils. On the other hand, the toroidal magnetic field of tokamaks using superconducting coils is limited by the critical field of superconductivity. In this article, we examine the relative merit of raising the magnetic field of a tokamak plasma by increasing its aspect ratio at a constant value of the peak field in the toroidal magnet. Taking ITER-FEAT as an example, we find that it is possible to reach thermonuclear ignition using an aspect ratio of approximately 4.5 and a toroidal magnetic field of 7.3 T. Under these conditions, fusion power density and neutron wall loading are the same as in ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor], but the normalized plasma beta is substantially smaller. Furthermore, such a tokamak would be able to reach an energy gain of approximately 15 even with the deterioration in plasma confinement that is known to occur near the density limit where ITER is forced to operate

  13. Nanolayers with advanced properties for superconducting nanoelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prepelita, A.; Zdravkov, V.; Morari, R.; Socrovisciuc, A.; Antropov, E.; Sidorenko, A.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Elaborated advanced technology for superconducting spintronics - technological process, based on magnetron sputtering of the metallic films with non-metallic protective layers, yields significant improvement in superconducting properties of thin Nb films and Nb/CuNi nanostructures in comparison with common methods of films deposition. The developed advanced technological process is patented (Patent RM number 175 from 31.03.2010). First experimental observation of the double re-entrant superconductivity in superconductor/ ferromagnetic nanostructures (Nb/Cu 41 Ni 59 bilayers) in dependence on the thickness of the ferromagnetic layer (Published in : A.S. Sidorenko, V.I. Zdravkov, J. Kehrle, R.Morari, E.Antropov, G. Obermeier, S. Gsell, M. Schreck, C. Muller, V.V. Ryazanov, S. Horn, R. Tidecks, L.R. Tagirov. Extinction and recovery of superconductivity by interference in superconductor/ferromagnet bilayers. In: Nanoscale Phenomena . Fundamentals and Applications,Ed. by H.Hahn, A.Sidorenko, I.Tiginyanu, Springer, 2009 p.1-10. Perspectives of applications: design of a new generation of superconducting spintronic devices - high frequency operating superconducting spin-switch for telecommunication and computers. (author)

  14. A continuous winding scheme for superconducting tokamak coils with cable-in-conduit conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang-ho; Chung, Kie-hyung; Lee, Deok Kyo

    2001-01-01

    Superconducting magnet coils are essential for steady-state or long-pulse operation of tokamaks. In an advanced tokamak, the central solenoid (CS) coils are usually divided into several pairs of modules to provide for an extra plasma shaping capability in addition to those available from the shaping (poloidal field) coils. In the conventional pancake winding scheme of superconducting coils, each coil consists of separate superconducting 'double-pancake' coils connected together in series; however, such joints are not superconducting, which is one of the major disadvantages, especially in pulsed operations. A new type of winding was adopted for the ITER CS coil, which consists of cylindrical shell 'layers' joined in series. A disadvantage of this layer winding is its inability to yield modular coils that can provide certain degree of plasma shaping. Joints can be removed in a coil winding pack with the conventional pancake winding scheme, if the conductor is sufficiently long and the winding machine is properly equipped. The compactness, however, cannot be preserved with this scheme. The winding compactness is important since the radial build of the CS coils is one of the major parameters that determine the machine size. In this paper, we present a continuous winding scheme that requires no joints, allows coil fabrication at minimum dimension, and meets the flux swing requirement and other practical aspects

  15. Superconducting magnets of SST-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subrata Pradhan; Saxena, Y.C.; Sarkar, B.; Bansal, G.; Sharma, A.N.; Thomas, K.J.; Bedakihale, V.; Doshi, B.; Dhard, C.P.; Prasad, U.; Rathod, P.; Bahl, R.; Varadarajulu, A.; Mankani, A.

    2005-01-01

    Magnet System of SST-1 comprises of sixteen superconducting D-shaped Toroidal Field (TF) coils, nine superconducting Poloidal Field (PF) coils and a pair of resistive PF coils inside the vacuum vessel. TF magnets generate the basic 3.0 T field at the major radius of 1.1 m. Low resistance lap inter-pancake joints within and inter-coil joints between the coils have been made. Magnets are cooled with supercritical helium at 4 bar and 4.5 K, which is fed at the high field region in the middle of each of the double pancake over a hydraulic path length of 47 m. Voltage taps across joints and termination location are used for quench detection. The quench detection front-end electronics ensures fail proof quench detection based on subtraction logic. Quench detection system sends the quench trigger to the power supply system directly on a dedicated fiber optic link. Flow meters at the inlet of the TF and PF magnets, temperature sensors at the critical joint locations and at the outlet of the flow paths for enthalpy estimation, hall probes for field direction and magnitude measurements are the other sensors. A 20 V, 10 kA power supply will excite the TF magnets whereas the PF power supplies have voltages from few volts to in excess of 100 V to cater the fast current ramp-up of the PF magnets during start-up scenarios. All power supplies have been equipped with dump resisters of appropriate ratings in parallel with a series combination of DC circuit interrupters and pyro-breakers. (author)

  16. Tight aspect ratio tokamak power reactor with superconducting TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, S.; Tobita, K.; Konishi, S.; Ando, T.; Hiroki, S.; Kuroda, T.; Yamauchi, M.; Azumi, M.; Nagata, M.

    2003-01-01

    Tight aspect ratio tokamak power reactor with super-conducting toroidal field (TF) coils has been proposed. A center solenoid coil system and an inboard blanket were discarded. The key point was how to find the engineering design solution of the TF coil system with the high field and high current density. The coil system with the center post radius of less than 1 m can generate the maximum field of ∼ 20 T. This coil system causes a compact reactor concept, where the plasma major and minor radii of 3.75 m and 1.9 m, respectively and the fusion power of 1.8 GW. (author)

  17. Advanced statistics for tokamak transport colinearity and tokamak to tokamak variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper is an expository introduction to advanced statistics and scaling laws and their application to tokamak devices. Topics of discussion are as follows: implicit assumptions in the standard analysis; advanced regression techniques; specialized tools in statistics and their applications in fusion physics; and improved datasets for transport studies

  18. Advanced commercial Tokamak optimization studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitley, R.H.; Berwald, D.H.; Gordon, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Our recent studies have concentrated on developing optimal high beta (bean-shaped plasma) commercial tokamak configurations using TRW's Tokamak Reactor Systems Code (TRSC) with special emphasis on lower net electric power reactors that are more easily deployable. A wide range of issues were investigated in the search for the most economic configuration: fusion power, reactor size, wall load, magnet type, inboard blanket and shield thickness, plasma aspect ratio, and operational β value. The costs and configurations of both steady-state and pulsed reactors were also investigated. Optimal small and large reactor concepts were developed and compared by studying the cost of electricity from single units and from multiplexed units. Multiplexed units appear to have advantages because they share some plant equipment and have lower initial capital investment as compared to larger single units

  19. A commercial tokamak reactor using super high field superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.; Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Williams, J.E.C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper explores the range of possibilities for producing super high fields with advanced superconducting magnets. Obtaining magnetic fields greater than about 18 T at the coil in a large superconducting magnet system will require advances in many areas of magnet technology. These needs are discussed and potential solutions (advanced superconductors, structural materials and design methods) evaluated. A point design for a commercial reactor with magnetic field at the coil of 24 T and fusion power of 1800 MW is presented. Critical issues and parameters for magnet design are identified. 20 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs

  20. Simulations of the operational control of a cryogenic plant for a superconducting burning-plasma tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, N

    2001-01-01

    In recent proposals for next generation superconducting tokamaks, such as the ITER project, the nuclear burning plasma is confined by magnetic fields generated from a large set (up to 100 GJ stored energy) of superconducting magnets. These magnets suffer heat loads in operation from thermal and nuclear radiation from the surrounding components and plasma as well as eddy currents and AC losses generated within the magnets, together with the heat conduction through supports and resistive heat generated at the current lead transitions to room temperature. The initial cryoplant for such a tokamak is expected to have a steady state capacity of up to about 85 kW at 4.5 K, comparable to the system installed for LHC at CERN. Experimental tokamaks are expected to operate at least initially in a pulsed mode with 20-30 short plasma pulses and plasma burn periods each day. A conventional cryoplant, consisting of a cold box and a set of primary heat exchangers, is ill-suited to such a mode of operation as the instantaneou...

  1. A design study of superconducting energy storage system for a tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Kazuo

    1979-01-01

    A design study of a superconducting inductive energy storage system (SC-IES) has been carried out in commission with JAERI. The SC-IES is to be applied to the power supply system for a tokamak experimental fusion reactor. The study was initiated with the definition of the requirement for the SC-IES and selection of the coil shape. The design of the coil and the cryostat has been followed. The design parameters are: stored energy 10 GJ, B max 8 T, conductor Nb-Ti, overall size 18 m (diameter) x 10 m (height). Technical problems and usefullness of SC-IES are discussed also. (author)

  2. INTEGRATED PLASMA CONTROL FOR ADVANCED TOKAMAKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HUMPHREYS, D.A.; FERRON, J.R.; JOHNSON, R.D; LEUER, J.A.; PENAFLOR, B.G.; WALKER, M.L.; WELANDER, A.S.; KHAYRUTDINOV, R.R; DOKOUKA, V.; EDGELL, D.H.; FRANSSON, C.M.

    2004-03-01

    OAK-B135 Advanced tokamaks (AT) are distinguished from conventional tokamaks by their high degree of shaping, achievement of profiles optimized for high confinement and stability characteristics, and active stabilization of MHD instabilities to attain high values of normalized beta and confinement. These high performance fusion devices thus require accurate regulation of the plasma boundary, internal profiles, pumping, fueling, and heating, as well as simultaneous and well-coordinated MHD control action to stabilize such instabilities as tearing modes and resistive wall modes. Satisfying the simultaneous demands on control accuracy, reliability, and performance for all of these subsystems requires a high degree of integration in both design and operation of the plasma control system in an advanced tokamak. The present work describes the approach, benefits, and progress made in integrated plasma control with application examples drawn from the DIII-D tokamak. The approach includes construction of plasma and system response models, validation of models against operating experiments, design of integrated controllers which operate in concert with one another as well as with supervisory modules, simulation of control action against off-line and actual machine control platforms, and iteration of the design-test loop to optimize performance

  3. Experimental methods to study tokamak plasma stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Navarro, A.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental devices to measure external instability modes with small pick-up coils to detect poloidal magnetic field fluctuations, and internal modes with soft-X-ray detectors are discussed. The characteristics of these devices are calculated for a small tokamak (R 0 = 30 cm, a = 10 cm, I 0 50 KA). (author)

  4. Shielding and maintainability in an experimental tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.; Fuller, G.; Hager, E.R.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an attempt to develop an understanding of the various factors involved. This work was performed as a part of the task assigned to one of the expert groups on the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR). However, the results of this investigation are believed to be generally applicable to the broad class of the next generation of experimental tokamak facilities such as ETF. The shielding penalties for requiring personnel access are quantified. This is followed by a quantitative estimate of the benefits associated with personnel access. The penalties are compared to the benefits and conclusions and recommendations are developed on resolving the issue

  5. Design of the Cryostat for HT-7U Superconducting Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jie; Wu, Song-tao; Song, Yun-tao; Weng, Pei-de

    2002-06-01

    The cryostat of HT-7U tokamak is a large vacuum vessel surrounding the entire basic machine with a cylindrical shell, a dished top and a flat bottom. The main function of HT-7U cryostat is to provide a thermal barrier between an ambient temperature test hall and a liquid helium-cooled superconducting magnet. The loads applied to the cryostat are from sources of vacuum pressure, dead weight, seismic events and electromagnetic forces originated by eddy currents. It also provides feed-through penetrations for all the connecting elements inside and outside the cryostat. The main material selected for the cryostat is stainless steel 304L. The structural analyses including buckling for the cryostat vessel under the plasma operation condition have been carried out by using a finite element code. Stress analysis results show that the maximum stress intensity was below the allowable value. In this paper, the structural analyses and design of HT-7U cryostat are emphasized.

  6. A conceptual design of superconducting spherical tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagayama, Yoshio; Shinya, Kichiro; Tanaka, Yasutoshi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a fusion reactor concept named 'JUST (Japanese Universities' Super Tokamak reactor)'. From the plasma confinement system to the power generation system is evaluated in this work. JUST design has features as follows: the superconducting magnet, the steady state operation with high bootstrap current fraction, the easy replacement of neutron damaged first wall, the high heat flux in the divertor, and the low cost (or high β). By winding the OH solenoid over the center stack of toroidal field coil, we have the low aspect ratio and the 80cm thick neutron shield to protect the superconducting center stack. JUST is designed by using the 0-D transport code under the assumption that the energy confinement time is 1.8 times of the IPB98(y,2) scaling. Main parameters are as follows: the major radius of 4.5m, the aspect ratio of 1.8, the elongation ratio of 2.5, the toroidal field of 2.36T, the plasma current of 18MA, the toroidal beta of 22%, the central electron and ion temperature of 15keV and the fusion thermal power of 2.4GW. By using the mercury heat exchanger and the steam turbine, the heat efficiency is 33% and the electric power is 0.74GW. (author)

  7. TIBER (Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor) II as a precursor to an international thermonuclear experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Gilleland, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor (TIBER) was pursued in the US as one option for an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). This concept evolved from earlier work on the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) to develop a small, ignited tokamak. While the copper-coil versions of TFCX became the short-pulsed, 1.23-m radius, Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), the superconducting TIBER with long pulse or steady state and a 2.6-m radius was considered for international collaboration. Recently the design was updated to TIBER II, to accommodate more conservative confinement scaling, double-poloidal divertors for impurity control, steady-state current drive, and nuclear testing. 18 refs., 1 fig

  8. A step towards controlled fusion reactors: Tore Supra tokamak with superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turck, B.

    1988-01-01

    Tore Supra technology has to solve all the problems related to the development and the installaion of superconducting coils and associated cryogenic devices. Tore Supra will allow to get a significative experience to prepare next machines. Specifications and needs of tokamaks concerning the superconducting coils of future machines are recalled [fr

  9. Tokamak experimental power reactor conceptual design. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    A conceptual design has been developed for a tokamak Experimental Power Reactor to operate at net electrical power conditions with a plant capacity factor of 50 percent for 10 years. The EPR operates in a pulsed mode at a frequency of approximately 1/min., with an approximate 75 percent duty cycle, is capable of producing approximately 72 MWe and requires 42 MWe. The annual tritium consumption is 16 kg. The EPR vacuum chamber is 6.25 m in major radius and 2.4 m in minor radius, is constructed of 2-cm thick stainless steel, and has 2-cm thick detachable, beryllium-coated coolant panels mounted on the interior. An 0.28 m stainless steel blanket and a shield ranging from 0.6 to 1.0 m surround the vacuum vessel. The coolant is H 2 O. Sixteen niobium-titanium superconducting toroidal-field coils provide a field of 10 T at the coil and 4.47 T at the plasma. Superconducting ohmic-heating and equilibrium-field coils provide 135 V-s to drive the plasma current. Plasma heating is accomplished by 12 neutral beam-injectors, which provide 60 MW. The energy transfer and storage system consists of a central superconducting storage ring, a homopolar energy storage unit, and a variety of inductor-converters

  10. Design of new superconducting central solenoid of SST-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Upendra; Pradhan, Subrata; Ghate, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    The key role of the central solenoid (CS) magnet of a Tokamak is for gas breakdown, ramp up and maintaining of plasma current for longer duration. The magnetic flux change in CS along with other PF coils generates magnetic null and induces electric field in toroidal direction. The induced toroidal electric field accelerates the residual electrons which collide with the neutrals and an avalanche takes place which led to the net plasma in the vacuum vessel of a Tokamak. In order to maximize the CS volt-sec capability, the higher magnetic field with a greater magnetic flux linkage is necessary. In order to facilitate all these requirements of SST-1 a new superconducting CS has been designed for SST-1. The design of new central solenoid has two bases; first one is physics and second is smart engineering in limited bore diameter of ∼655 mm. The physics basis of the design includes volt-sec storage capacity of ∼0.8 volt-sec, magnetic field null around 0.2 m over major radius of 1.1 m and toroidal electric field of ∼0.3 volt/m.The engineering design of new CS consists of Nb 3 Sn cable in conduit conductor (CICC) of operating current of 14 kA @ 4.5 K at 6 T, consolidated winding pack, smart quench detection system, protection system, housing cryostat and conductor terminations and joint design. The winding pack consists of 576 numbers of turns distributed in four layers with 0.75 mm FRP tape soaked with cyanide Easter based epoxy resin turn insulation and 3 mm of ground insulation. The inter-layer low resistance (∼1 nΩ) at 14 kA @ 4.5 K terminal praying hand joints has been designed for making winding pack continuous. The total height of winding pack is 2500 mm. The stored energy of this winding pack is ∼3 MJ at 14 kA of operating current. The expected heat load at cryogenic temperature is ∼10 W per layer, which requires helium mass flow rate of 1.4 g/s at 1.4 bars @ 4.5 K. The typical diameter and height of housing cryostat are 650 mm and 2563 mm with 80 K

  11. Design study of superconducting inductive energy storages for tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    Design of the superconducting inductive energy storages (SC-IES) has been studied. One SC-IES is for the power supply system in a experimental tokamak fusion reactor, and the other in a future practical reactor. Study started with definition of the requirements of SC-IES, followed by optimization of the coil shape and determination of major parameters. Then, the coil and the vessel were designed, including the following: for SC-IES of the experimental reactor, stored energy 10 GJ, B max 8 T, conductor NbTi and size 18 m diameter x 10 m height; for SC-IES of the practical reactor, stored energy 56 GJ, B max 10.5 T, conductor Nb 3 Sn and size 26 m diameter x 15 m height. Design of the coil protection system and an outline of the auxiliary systems (for refrigeration and evacuation) are also given, and further, problems and usefullness of SC-IES. (auth.)

  12. High density operation on the HT-7 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Gao

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the operation region has been studied in the HT-7 superconducting tokamak, and progress on the extension of the HT-7 ohmic discharge operation region is reported. A density corresponding to 1.2 times the Greenwald limit was achieved by RF boronization. The density limit appears to be connected to the impurity content and the edge parameters, so the best results are obtained with very clean plasmas and peaked electron density profiles. The peaking factors of electron density profiles for different current and line averaged densities were observed. The density behaviour and the fuelling efficiency for gas puffing (20-30%), pellet injection (70-80%) and molecular beam injection (40-50%) were studied. The core crash sawteeth and MHD behaviour, which were induced by an injected pellet, were observed and the events correlated with the change of current profile and reversed magnetic shear. The MARFE phenomena on HT-7 are summarized. The best correlation has been found between the total input ohmic power and the product of the edge line averaged density and Z eff . HT-7 could be easily operated in the high density region MARFE-free using RF boronization. (author)

  13. Mechanical configuration for a superconducting ignition tokamak (TIBER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neef, W.S. Jr.; Johnston, B.M.

    1985-10-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is evaluating the engineering feasibility and economics of a superconducting ignition tokamak. Two major operational requirements had to be satisfied: (1) the conductive heat leak to the refrigerated structure had to be minimized, and (2) assembly and maintenance of the entire experiment had to be possible with remotely operated tools. The middle poloidal ''push coil'' must have many annular disks to transfer the TF-coil inward force to the post without crushing superconductor. The toppling moment on the TF-coil vertical legs is huge. A method of keying together the TF-coil cases has been developed. This forms an integrated structure that resists torque. The joining technique permits linear motion for simple assembly/disassembly. the topping moment on the outer vertical legs of the TF coils is very large. To react that moment and avoid great coil-case bulk, we have developed a method that allows the PF coil support structure to assist the TF case structure. Finite element techniques were used to determine the ability of the coal case and conductor to react the magnetic loads. The entire cold-coil structure is mounted on a circular plate that is suspended by several large tension rods, similar to the MFTF-B yin-yang support rods. The vacuum vessel is all at room temperature and is configured like a bell jar with sixteen side doors, one for each shield module

  14. LIDAR Thomson scattering for advanced tokamaks. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Lerche, R.A.; Nilson, D.G.

    1996-01-01

    The LIDAR Thomson Scattering for Advanced Tokamaks project made a valuable contribution by combining LLNL expertise from the MFE Program: tokamak design and diagnostics, and the ICF Program and Physics Dept.: short-pulse lasers and fast streak cameras. This multidisciplinary group evaluated issues involved in achieving a factor of 20 higher high spatial resolution (to as small as 2-3 mm) from the present state of the art in LIDAR Thomson scattering, and developed conceptual designs to apply LIDAR Thomson scattering to three tokamaks: Upgraded divertor measurements in the existing DIII-D tokamak; Both core and divertor LIDAR Thomson scattering in the proposed (now cancelled) TPX; and core, edge, and divertor LIDAR Thomson scattering on the presently planned International Tokamak Experimental Reactor, ITER. Other issues were evaluated in addition to the time response required for a few millimeter spatial resolution. These include the optimum wavelength, 100 Hz operation of the laser and detectors, minimizing stray light - always the Achilles heel of Thomson scattering, and time dispersion in optics that could prevent good spatial resolution. Innovative features of our work included: custom short pulsed laser concepts to meet specific requirements, use of a prism spectrometer to maintain a constant optical path length for high temporal and spatial resolution, the concept of a laser focus outside the plasma to ionize gas and form an external fiducial to use in locating the plasma edge as well as to spread the laser energy over a large enough area of the inner wall to avoid laser ablation of wall material, an improved concept for cleaning windows between shots by means of laser ablation, and the identification of a new physics issue - nonlinear effects near a laser focus which could perturb the plasma density and temperature that are to be measured

  15. Study of the L–I–H transition with a new dual gas puff imaging system in the EAST superconducting tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G.S.; Shao, L.M.; Liu, S.C.

    2014-01-01

    The intermediate oscillatory phase during the L–H transition, termed the I-phase, is studied in the EAST superconducting tokamak using a newly developed dual gas puff imaging (GPI) system near the L–H transition power threshold. The experimental observations suggest that the oscillatory behaviour...

  16. Fast reciprocating probe system on the EAST superconducting tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W.; Chang, J. F.; Wan, B. N.; Xu, G. S.; Li, B.; Xu, C. S.; Yan, N.; Wang, L.; Liu, S. C.; Jiang, M.; Liu, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Xiao, C. J. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Plasma Physics Laboratory, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon SK S7N 5E2 (Canada)

    2010-11-15

    A new fast reciprocating probe system (FRPS) has been built and installed on the outer midplane of the EAST tokamak to investigate the profiles of the boundary plasma parameters such as electron density and temperature. The system consists of a two-stage motion drive mechanism: slow motion and fast motion. The fast motion is powered by a servo motor, which drives the probe horizontally up to 50 cm to scan the edge region of the EAST tokamak. The maximum velocity achieved is 2 m/s. High velocity and flexible control of the fast motion are the remarkable features of this FRPS. A specially designed connector installed at the front end of the probe shaft makes it easy to install or replace the probe head on FRPS. During the latest experimental campaign in the spring of 2010, a probe head with seven tips, including two tips for a Mach probe, has been used. An example is given for simultaneous profile measurements of the plasma temperature, plasma density, and the plasma flow velocity.

  17. Tokamak advanced pump limiter experiments and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.

    1983-06-01

    Experiments with pump limiter modules on several operating tokamaks establish such limiters as efficient collectors of particles and has demonstrated the importance of ballistic scattering as predicted theoretically. Plasma interaction with recycling neutral gas appears to become important as the plasma density increases and the effective ionization mean free path within the module decreases. In limiters with particle collection but without active internal pumping, the neutral gas pressure is found to vary nonlinearly with the edge plasma density at the highest densities studies. Both experiments and theory indicate that the energy spectrum of gas atoms in the pump ducting is non-thermal, consistent with the results of Monte Carlo neutral atom transport calculations. The distribution of plasma power over the front surface of such modules has been measured and appears to be consistent with the predictions of simple theory. Initial results from the latest experiment on the ISX-B tokamak with an actively pumped limiter module demonstrates that the core plasma density can be controlled with a pump limiter and that the scrape-off layer plasma can partially screen the core plasma from gas injection. The results from module pump limiter experiments and from the theory and design analysis of advanced pump limiters for reactors are used to suggest the major features of a definitive, axisymmetric, toroidal belt pump limiter experiment

  18. Summary discussion: An integrated advanced tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauthoff, N.R.

    1994-01-01

    The tokamak concept improvement workshop addressed a wide range of issues involved in the development of a more attractive tokamak. The agenda for the workshop progressed from a general discussion of the long-range energy context (with the objective being the identification of a set of criteria and ''figures of merit'' for measuring the attractiveness of a tokamak concept) to particular opportunities for the improvement of the tokamak concept. The discussions concluded with a compilation of research program elements leading to an improved tokamak concept

  19. Design study of toroidal magnets for tokamak experimental power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stekly, Z.J.J.; Lucas, E.J.

    1976-12-01

    This report contains the results of a six-month study of superconducting toroidal field coils for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor to be built in the late 1980s. The designs are for 8 T and 12 T maximum magnetic field at the superconducting winding. At each field level two main concepts were generated; one in which each of the 16 coils comprising the system has an individual vacuum vessel and the other in which all the coils are contained in a single vacuum vessel. The coils have a D shape and have openings of 11.25 m x 7.5 m for the 8 T coils and 10.2 m x 6.8 m for the 12 T coils. All the designs utilize rectangular cabled conductor made from copper stabilized Niobium Titanium composite which operates at 4.2 K for the 8 T design and at 2.5 K for the 12 T design. Manufacturing procedures, processes and schedule estimates are also discussed

  20. ADVANCED TOKAMAK OPERATION USING THE DIII-D PLASMA CONTROL SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HUMPHREYS, DA; FERRON, JR; GAROFALO, AM; HYATT, AW; JERNIGAN, TC; JOHNSON, RD; LAHAYE, RJ; LEUER, JA; OKABAYASHI, M; PENAFLOR, BG; SCOVILLE, JT; STRAIT, EJ; WALKER, ML; WHYTE, DG

    2002-01-01

    A271 ADVANCED TOKAMAK OPERATION USING THE DIII-D PLASMA CONTROL SYSTEM. The principal focus of experimental operations in the DIII-D tokamak is the advanced tokamak (AT) regime to achieve, which requires highly integrated and flexible plasma control. In a high performance advanced tokamak, accurate regulation of the plasma boundary, internal profiles, pumping, fueling, and heating must be well coordinated with MHD control action to stabilize such instabilities as tearing modes and resistive wall modes. Sophisticated monitors of the operational regime must provide detection of off-normal conditions and trigger appropriate safety responses with acceptable levels of reliability. Many of these capabilities are presently implemented in the DIII-D plasma control system (PCS), and are now in frequent or routine operational use. The present work describes recent development, implementation, and operational experience with AT regime control elements for equilibrium control, MHD suppression, and off-normal event detection and response

  1. Experimental investigations at the Soviet tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobrovskij, G.A.; Golant, V.E.; AN SSSR, Leningrad. Fiziko-Tekhnicheskij Inst.)

    1978-01-01

    The review is devoted to the basic results obtained on the Soviet tokamaks during 1976-1977. Behaviour of impurities, tearing instability, additional methods of plasma heating, energy distribution function were investigated. A brief description of new T-7, TM-4, ''Tuman-3'' tokamaks is given. It is shown that despite inflow of impurities to the pinch periphery, no their appreciable accumulation is observed at least during the discharge time. It is shown that the helical perturbations with m=2 and 1 present the greatest danger. The suppression of the tearing instability is related with suppression of the mode with m=2. The helical perturbation prevents formation of skin configuration at the initial stage of the discharge. As a rule, the transition of an appreciable fraction of electrons to continuous acceleration does not take place, although a significant deformation of electron distribution function under the action of electric field occurs. Plasma compression by increasing magnetic field induces oscillations and improves thermal plasma isolation. It is shown experimentally that the considerable efficiency of energy contribution to the ion component at the central part of plasma may be obtained by means of HF heating under conditions of low-hybrid resonance. It is shown that the recombination has a considerable effect on concentration of neutral particles in the central region

  2. ECH pre-ionization and assisted startup in the fully superconducting KSTAR tokamak using second harmonic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Y.S.; Joung, M.; Kim, J.H.; Hahn, S.H.; Yoon, S.W.; Yang, H.L.; Kim, W.C.; Oh, Y.K.; England, A.C.; Bak, J.S.; Jeong, J.H.; Park, S.I.; Namkung, W.; Cho, M.H.; Jackson, G.L.

    2009-01-01

    This letter reports on the successful demonstration of the second harmonic electron cyclotron heating (ECH)-assisted startup in the first plasma experiments recently completed in the fully superconducting Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device whose major and minor radii are 1.8 m and 0.5 m, respectively. For the second harmonic ECH-assisted startup, an 84 GHz EC wave at 0.35 MW was launched before the onset of the toroidal electric field of the Ohmic system. And it was observed that this was sufficient to achieve breakdown in the ECH pre-ionization phase, allow burn-through and sustain the plasma during the current ramp with a low loop voltage of 2.0 V and a corresponding toroidal electric field of 0.24 V m -1 at the innermost vacuum vessel wall (R = 1.3 m). This is a lower value than 0.3 Vm -1 which is the maximum electric field in ITER. Due to the limited volt-seconds and the loop voltage of the Ohmic power system, the extended pulse duration of the ECH power up to 180 ms allowed the plasma current to rise up to more than 100 kA with a ramp-up rate of 0.8 MA s -1 . (letter)

  3. Design of Tokamak plasma with high Tc superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchimoto, T.; Miya, K.; Yoshida, Y.; Yamada, T.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a design of tokamak plasma in light of how the small ignited tokamak is possible with use of the HTSC coils as plasma stabilizer. The same data base and formulas as ITER are here used and any innovative technology other than the HTSC stabilizing coils is not assumed. (author)

  4. Characterizations of power loads on divertor targets for type-I, compound and small ELMs in the EAST superconducting tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.; Xu, G.S.; Guo, H.Y.

    2013-01-01

    -III ELMy H-modes. The energy loss and divertor power load are systematically characterized for these different ELMy H-modes to provide a physics basis for the next-step high-power long-pulse operations in EAST. Both type-I and compound ELMs exhibit good confinement (H98(y,2) ∼ 1). A significant loss......The Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) has recently achieved a variety of H-mode regimes with different edge-localized mode (ELM) dynamics, including type-I ELMs, compound ELMs, which are manifested by the onset of a large spike followed by a sequence of small spikes on Dα......-III ELMs. It is remarkable that the new very small ELMy H-modes exhibit even lower target power deposition than type-III ELMs, with the peak heat flux generally below 1 MW m−2. These very small ELMs are usually accompanied by broadband fluctuations with frequencies ranging from 20 to 50 kHz, which may...

  5. Criteria of the efficiency for radiation protection of tokamak reactor superconducting magnet coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimin, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    Factors determining serviceability of the main elements (superconductor, stabilizing conductor, insulation) of superconducting magnet coils for tokamak reactors are discussed. It is suggested that the limiting values of total and specific energy release in the material of superconducting coils, increase in electric resistance of the stabilizing conductor, decrease in the superconductor critical current and damage of the superconducting magnet insulation should be used as criteria of the reactor internal radiation protection efficiency. The conclusion is made that neutron fluence in the magnet coil components considered can be used as a generalized criterion of the first approximation for the evaluation of the protection efficiency

  6. Superconducting magnets advanced in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akira

    2000-01-01

    Superconducting magnet technology for particle detectors has been advanced to provide large-scale magnetic fields in particle physics experiments. The technology has been progressed to meet physics goals and the detector requirement of having maximum magnetic field with minimum material and space. This paper includes an overview of the advances of particle detector magnets and discusses key technologies

  7. Advanced tokamak research in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenfield, C M; Murakami, M; Ferron, J R

    2004-01-01

    Advanced tokamak (AT) research in DIII-D seeks to provide a scientific basis for steady-state high performance operation in future devices. These regimes require high toroidal beta to maximize fusion output and high poloidal beta to maximize the self-driven bootstrap current. Achieving these conditions requires integrated, simultaneous control of the current and pressure profiles and active magnetohydrodynamic stability control. The building blocks for AT operation are in hand. Resistive wall mode stabilization by plasma rotation and active feedback with non-axisymmetric coils allows routine operation above the no-wall beta limit. Neoclassical tearing modes are stabilized by active feedback control of localized electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD). Plasma shaping and profile control provide further improvements. Under these conditions, bootstrap supplies most of the current. Steady-state operation requires replacing the remaining inductively driven current, mostly located near the half radius, with non-inductive external sources. In DIII-D this current is provided by ECCD, and nearly stationary AT discharges have been sustained with little remaining inductive current. Fast wave current drive is being developed to control the central magnetic shear. Density control, with divertor cryopumps, of AT discharges with ELMing H-mode edges facilitates high current drive efficiency at reactor relevant collisionalities. An advanced plasma control system allows integrated control of these elements. Close coupling between modelling and experiment is key to understanding the separate elements, their complex nonlinear interactions, and their integration into self-consistent high performance scenarios. This approach has resulted in fully non-inductively driven plasmas with β N ≤ 3.5 and β T ≤ 3.6% sustained for up to 1 s, which is approximately equal to one current relaxation time. Progress in this area, and its implications for next-step devices, will be illustrated by

  8. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterson, John B

    2008-01-01

    Conceived as the definitive reference in a classic and important field of modern physics, this extensive and comprehensive handbook systematically reviews the basic physics, theory and recent advances in the field of superconductivity. Leading researchers, including Nobel laureates, describe the state-of-the-art in conventional and unconventional superconductors at a particularly opportune time, as new experimental techniques and field-theoretical methods have emerged. In addition to full-coverage of novel materials and underlying mechanisms, the handbook reflects continued intense research into electron-phone based superconductivity. Considerable attention is devoted to high-Tc superconductivity, novel superconductivity, including triplet pairing in the ruthenates, novel superconductors, such as heavy-Fermion metals and organic materials, and also granular superconductors. What’s more, several contributions address superconductors with impurities and nanostructured superconductors. Important new results on...

  9. Divertor asymmetry and scrape-off layer flow in various divertor configurations in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, S. C.; Guo, H. Y.; Xu, Guandong

    2012-01-01

    moving Mach probe at the outer midplane, which shows similar magnitude to the Pfirsch-Schluter flow. Its contribution to the poloidal particle flux is also assessed and comparison is made with that from the poloidal E x B drift. (C) 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4707396]...

  10. Observation of Molybdenum Emission from Impurity-Induced Long-Lived m = 1 Mode on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong-Cai, Shen; Bo, Lyu; Fu-Di, Wang; Yue-Jiang, Shi; Bin, Wu; Ying-Ying, Li; Jia, Fu; Bao-Nian, Wan; EAST Team

    2016-06-01

    Not Available Supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China under Grant Nos 2013GB112004 and 2015GB103002, the Natural Science Research Key Project of Education Department of Anhui Province under Grant No KJ2016A434, the Doctoral Scientific Research Foundation of Anqing Normal University under Grant No 044-140001000024, the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos 11275231, 11305212, 11405212 and 11261140328, the Innovative Program of Development Foundation of Hefei Center for Physical Science and Technology under Grant No 2014FXCX003, and the Hefei Science Center CAS Users with Potential Project under Grant No 2015HSC-UP007.

  11. Conceptual studies of toroidal field magnets for the tokamak experimental power reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buncher, B.R.; Chi, J.W.H.; Fernandez, R.

    1976-01-01

    This report documents the principal results of a Conceptual Design Study for the Superconducting Toroidal Field System for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor. Two concepts are described for peak operating fields at the windings of 8 tesla, and 12 tesla, respectively. The design and manufacturing considerations are treated in sufficient detail that cost and schedule estimates could be developed. Major uncertainties in the design are identified and their potential impact discussed, along with recommendations for the necessary research and development programs to minimize these uncertainties. The minimum dimensions of a sub-size test coil for experimental qualification of the full size design are developed and a test program is recommended

  12. Physics design and experimental study of tokamak divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Jiancheng; Gao Qingdi; Yan Longwen; Wang Mingxu; Deng Baiquan; Zhang Fu; Zhang Nianman; Ran Hong; Cheng Fayin; Tang Yiwu; Chen Xiaoping

    2007-06-01

    The divertor configuration of HL-2A tokamak is optimized, and the plasma performance in divertor is simulated with B2-code. The effects of collisionality on plasma-wall transition in the scrape-off layer of divertor are investigated, high performances of the divertor plasma in HL-2A are simulated, and a quasi- stationary RS operation mode is established with the plasma controlled by LHCD and NBI. HL-2A tokamak has been successfully operated in divertor configuration. The major parameters: plasma current I p =320 kA, toroidal field B t =2.2 T, plasma discharger duration T d =1580 ms ware achieved at the end of 2004. The preliminary experimental researches of advanced diverter have been carried out. Design studies of divertor target plate for high power density fusion reactor have been carried out, especially, the physical processes on the surface of flowing liquid lithium target plate. The exploration research of improving divertor ash removal efficiency and reducing tritium inventory resulting from applying the RF ponderomotive force potential is studied. The optimization structure design studies of FEB-E reactor divertor are performed. High flux thermal shock experiments were carried on tungsten and carbon based materials. Hot Isostatic Press (HIP) method was employed to bond tungsten to copper alloys. Electron beam simulated thermal fatigue tests were also carried out to W/Cu bondings. Thermal desorption and surface modification of He + implanted into tungsten have been studied. (authors)

  13. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Superconducting Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Nisenhoff, Martin; Superconducting Electronics

    1989-01-01

    The genesis of the NATO Advanced Study Institute (ASI) upon which this volume is based, occurred during the summer of 1986 when we came to the realization that there had been significant progress during the early 1980's in the field of superconducting electronics and in applications of this technology. Despite this progress, there was a perception among many engineers and scientists that, with the possible exception of a limited number of esoteric fundamental studies and applications (e.g., the Josephson voltage standard or the SQUID magnetometer), there was no significant future for electronic systems incorporating superconducting elements. One of the major reasons for this perception was the aversion to handling liquid helium or including a closed-cycle helium liquefier. In addition, many critics felt that IBM's cancellation of its superconducting computer project in 1983 was "proof" that superconductors could not possibly compete with semiconductors in high-speed signal processing. From our persp...

  14. Shield design for next-generation, low-neutron-fluence, superconducting tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V.D.; Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A shield design using stainless steel (SST), water, boron carbide, lead, and concrete materials was developed for the next-generation tokamak device with superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and low neutron fluence. A device such as the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) is representative of the tokamak design which could use this shield design. The unique feature of this reference design is that a majority of the bulk steel in the shield is in the form of spherical balls with two small, flat spots. The balls are purchased from ball-bearing manufacturers and are added as bulk shielding to the void areas of builtup, structural steel shells which form the torus cavity of the plasma chamber. This paper describes the design configuration of the shielding components

  15. Shield design for next-generation, low-neutron-fluence, superconducting tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V.D.; Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A shield design using stainless steel (SST), water, boron carbide, lead, and concrete materials was developed for the next-generation tokamak device with superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and low neutron fluence. A device such as the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) is representative of the tokamak design which could use this shield design. The unique feature of this reference design is that a majority of the bulk steel in the shield is in the form of spherical balls with two small, flat spots. The balls are purchased from ball-bearing manufacturers and are added as bulk shielding to the void areas of built-up, structural steel shells which form the torus cavity of the plasma chamber. This paper describes the design configuration of the shielding components

  16. Design and Structural Analysis for the Vacuum Vessel of Superconducting Tokamak JT-60SC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Y.; Sakurai, S.; Masaki, K.; Urata, K.; Sasajima, T.; Matsukawa, M.; Sakasai, A.; Ishida, S.

    2003-01-01

    A modification of the JT-60 is planned to be a superconducting tokamak (JT-60SC) in order to establish steady-state operation of high beta plasma for 100 s, and to ensure the applicability of ferritic steel as a reduced activation material for reactor relevant break-even class plasmas. This paper describes the detailed design of the vacuum vessel, which has a unique structure for cost effective manufacturing, as well as structural analysis results for a feasibility study

  17. The Effect of the Feedback Controller on Superconducting Tokamak AC Losses + AC-CRPP user manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaerz, B.; Bruzzone, P.; Favez, J.Y.; Lister, J.B.; Zapretilina, E.

    2001-11-01

    Superconducting coils in a Tokamak are subject to AC losses when the field transverse to the coil current varies. A simple model to evaluate the AC losses has been derived and benchmarked against a complete model used in the ITER design procedure. The influence of the feedback control strategy on the AC losses is examined using this model. An improved controller is proposed, based on this study. (author)

  18. Determination of settings in the protection system for Tokamak-15 superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudnovsky, A.N.; Khvostenko, P.P.; Posadsky, I.A.

    1996-01-01

    The calculations results of the maximal temperature heating of Tokamak-15 superconducting magnet (T-15 SM) under energy removal dependent on the current through the coil are given in paper. The calculations of SM thermomechanical strength have shown that the maximal coil heating temperature should not exceed 150--160 K. The range of the settings level in SM protection system for currents 1 ≤ 4 kA has been determined

  19. Computational model for superconducting toroidal-field magnets for a tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Abdou, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    A computational model for predicting the performance characteristics and cost of superconducting toroidal-field (TF) magnets in tokamak reactors is presented. The model can be used to compare the technical and economic merits of different approaches to the design of TF magnets for a reactor system. The model has been integrated into the ANL Systems Analysis Program. Samples of results obtainable with the model are presented

  20. The reconstruction of HT-7 superconducting tokamak and the present status of HT-7U project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, P.D.

    2000-01-01

    The first Chinese superconducting tokamak HT-7 was reconstructed from T-7. The main purposes of reconstruction are to improve the accessibility of the device and to provide a possibility of long pulse operation with high performance. The reconstruction has been done successfully. The HT-7U project has been approved and funded as a National Project, the engineering design and R and D are on the way. (author)

  1. Pioneering superconducting magnets in large tokamaks: evaluation after 16 years of operating experience in tore supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchateau, J.L.; Gravil, B.; Tena, E.; Henry, D.; Journeaux, J.Y.; Libeyre, P.

    2004-01-01

    The toroidal field (TF) system of Tore Supra (TS) is superconducting. After 16 years of operation it is possible to give an overview of the experience gained on a large superconducting system integrated in a large Tokamak. Quantitative data will be given, about the TF system for the cryogenic system and for the magnet system as well, concerning the number of plasmas shots and the availability of the machine. The origin and the number of breakdowns or incidents will be described, with emphasis on cryogenics, to document repairs and changes on the system components. Concerning the behaviour during operation, the Fast Safety Discharges (FSD) in operation are of particular interest for the Tokamak operation, as they interrupt it on a significant time of the order of one hour. This aspect is particularly documented. The approach followed to decrease the number of these FSD will be reported and explained. The Tore Supra Tokamak was the first important meeting between Superconductivity and Plasma Physics on a large scale. Overall, despite the differences in design and size, the accumulated experience over 16 years of operation is a useful tool to prepare the manufacturing and the operation of the ITER magnets. (authors)

  2. Pioneering superconducting magnets in large tokamaks: Evaluation after 16 years of operating experience in tore supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libeyre, P.; Duchateau, J.L.; Gravil, B.; Tena, E.; Henry, D.; Journeaux, J.Y.

    2005-01-01

    The toroidal field (TF) system of TORE SUPRA (TS) is superconducting. After 16 years of operation it is possible to give an overview of the experience gained on a large superconducting system integrated in a large Tokamak. Quantitative data will be given, about the TF system for the cryogenic system and for the magnet system as well, concerning the number of plasmas shots and the availability of the machine. The origin and the number of breakdowns or incidents will be described, with emphasis on cryogenics and associated repairs and changes on the system components along the time. As concerns the behaviour during operation, the fast safety discharges (FSD) in operation are of particular interest for the Tokamak operation, as they interrupt it for a significant time of the order of 1 h. This aspect is particularly documented. The approach followed to decrease the number of these FSD will be reported and explained. The TORE SUPRA Tokamak was the first important application of superconductivity in plasma physics on a large scale. Overall, despite the differences in design and size, the accumulated experience over 16 years of operation is a useful tool to prepare the manufacture and the operation of the ITER magnets

  3. Experimental observations related to the thermodynamic properties of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sozzi, C.; Minardi, E.; Lazzaro, E.; Cirant, S.; Mantica, P.; Esposito, B.; Marinucci, M.; Romanelli, M.; Imbeaux, F.

    2005-01-01

    The coarse-grained tokamak plasma description derived from the magnetic entropy concept presents appealing features as it involves a simple mathematics and it identifies a limited set of characteristic parameters of the macroscopic equilibrium. In this paper a comprehensive review of the work done in order to check the reliability of the Stationary Magnetic Entropy predictions against experimental data collected from different tokamaks, plasma regimes and heating methods is reported. (author)

  4. Improved confinement mode induced by the MARFE on the HT-7 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, X.; Zhao, Y.P.; Luo, J.R.; Jie, Y.X.; Gong, X.Z.; Wan, B.N.; Li, J.G.; Yin, F.X.; Kuang, G.L.; Zhang, X.D.; Zhang, S.Y.; Qiu, N.; Liu, X.N.; Zhao, J.Y.; Yang, Y.; Bao, Y.; Lin, B.L.; Wu, Z.W.; Li, Y.D.; Xu, Y.H.; Yang, K.; Wang, G.X.; Ye, W.W.; Chen, L.; Shi, Y.J.; Song, M.; Zhang, X.M.; Qin, P.J.; Gu, X.M.; Cui, N.Z.; Fan, H.Y.; Liu, S.X.; Chen, Y.F.; Hu, L.Q.; Hu, J.S.; Xia, C.Y.; Ruan, H.L.; Tong, X.D.; Mao, J.S.; Xie, J.K.; Wan, Y.X.

    1999-01-01

    In the HT-7 superconducting tokamak, the onset of a multifaceted asymmetric radiation from the edge (MARFE) usually occurs in the early ohmic discharges of each experimental campaign before wall conditioning. The occurrence and location of a MARFE is identified by different diagnostic systems. An improved confinement mode plasma which was induced by the MARFE is observed, and the global particle confinement time increases 1.9 times. The relaxation time between the MARFE event trigger and the L-H transition is about 1.4 ms, the following L-H transition time is 1.9 ms, and the improved confinement mode phase is maintained for about 40 ms. The MARFE cools the plasma edge, and the electron density profile is observed to become more narrow and peaked. The occurrence of a MARFE is strongly correlated with Z eff but not with the density, and it always occurs at Z eff = 3-8 ohmic discharges. In the case of a good wall condition (Z eff = 1-2), the onset of MARFEs has not been observed before reaching the Greenwald density limit. (author)

  5. Development in Diagnostics Application to Control Advanced Tokamak Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, Y.

    2008-01-01

    For continuous operation expected in DEMO, all the plasma current must be non-inductively driven, with self-generated neoclassical bootstrap current being maximized. The control of such steady state high performance tokamak plasma (so-called 'Advanced Tokamak Plasma') is a challenge because of the strong coupling between the current density, the pressure profile and MHD stability. In considering diagnostic needs for the advanced tokamak research, diagnostics for MHD are the most fundamental, since discharges which violate the MHD stability criteria either disrupt or have significantly reduced confinement. This report deals with the development in diagnostic application to control advanced tokamak plasma, with emphasized on recent progress in active feedback control of the current profile and the pressure profile under DEMO-relevant high bootstrap-current fraction. In addition, issues in application of the present-day actuators and diagnostics for the advanced control to DEMO will be briefly addressed, where port space for the advanced control may be limited so as to keep sufficient tritium breeding ratio (TBR)

  6. Shielding and maintainability in an experimental tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.; Fuller, G.; Hager, E.R.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an attempt to develop an understanding of the various factors involved. This work was performed as a part of the task assigned to one of the expert groups on the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR). The shielding penalties for requiring personnel access are quantified. This is followed by a quantitative estimate of the benefits associated with personnel access. The penalties to the benefits and conclusions and recommendations on resolving the issue are discussed

  7. Oak Ridge Tokamak experimental power reactor study reference design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, M.; Bettis, E.S.

    1975-11-01

    A Tokamak EPR Reference Design is presented as a basis for further design study leading to a Conceptual Design. The set of basic plasma parameters selected--minor radius of 2.25 m, major radius of 6.75 m, magnetic field on axis of 4.8 T and plasma current of 7.2 MA--should produce a reactor-grade plasma with a significant neutron flux, even with the great uncertainty in plasma physics scaling from present experience to large sizes. Neutronics and heat transfer calculations coupled with mechanical design and materials considerations were used to develop a blanket and shield capable of operating at high temperature, protecting the surrounding coils, being maintained remotely and, in a few experimental modules, breeding tritium. Nb 3 Sn and NbTi superconductors are used in the toroidal field coil design. The coil system was developed for a maximum field of 11 T at the winding (to give a field on axis of 4.8 T), and combines multifilamentary superconducting cable with forced flow of supercritical helium enclosed in a steel conduit. The structural system uses a stainless steel center bucking ring and intercoil box beam bracing to provide rigid support for coils against the centering force, overturning moments from poloidal fields and faults, other external forces, and thermal stresses. The poloidal magnetics system is specially designed both to reduce the total volt-second energy requirements and to reduce the magnitude of the rate of field change at the toroidal field coils. The rate of field change imposed upon the toroidal field coils is reduced by at least a factor of 3.3 compared to that due to the plasma alone. Tritium processing, tritium containment and vacuum systems employ double containment and atmospheric cleanup to minimize releases. The document also contains discussions of systems integration and assembly, key research and development needs, and schedule considerations

  8. Experimental results from the TUMAN 3 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golant, V.E.; Andrejko, M.V.; Askinazi, L.G.; Korneev, V.A.; Krikunov, S.V.; Lipin, B.M.; Lebedev, S.V.; Levin, L.S.; Podushnikova, K.A.; Razdobarin, G.T.; Rozhansky, V.A.; Rozhdestvensky, V.V.; Tendler, M.; Tukachinsky, A.S.; Jaroshevich, S.P.

    1995-01-01

    The open-quote open-quote TUMAN-3 close-quote close-quote Tokamak programme concentrates on issues of improved confinement. In 1989 the transition from an ordinary Ohmic regime into an improved confinement mode was achieved. The signatures of the H-mode in auxiliary heated tokamaks have been observed in this regime. The crucial role of the boundary radial electric field was found in the experiments with internal bias probe. Other techniques were demonstrated to disturb the boundary plasma which led to H-mode triggering: short increase of working gas puffing, minor radius magnetic compression and pellet injection. The role scaling of the energy confinement time in the Ohmic H-mode was obtained, which differs dramatically from the scaling for the ordinary Ohmic regime. There were found a strong dependence of τ E on plasma current and a weak dependence on density. The maximum value of τ E was 10 times longer than in the ordinary Ohmic region. The τ E scaling for the Ohmic H-mode is consistent with the scaling proposed for devices with powerful auxiliary heating. The results shows that H-mode physics is universal in tokamaks with different geometries and heating methods. (AIP) copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  9. DIII-D Advanced Tokamak Research Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V.S. Chan; C.M. Greenfield; L.L. Lao; T.C. Luce; C.C. Petty; G.M. Staebler

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews recent progress in the development of long-pulse, high performance discharges on the DIII-D tokamak. It is highlighted by a discharge achieving simultaneously β N H of 9, bootstrap current fraction of 0.5, noninductive current fraction of 0.75, and sustained for 16 energy confinement times. The physics challenge has changed in the long-pulse regime. Non-ideal MHD modes are limiting the stability, fast ion driven modes may play a role in fast ion transport which limits the stored energy and plasma edge behavior can affect the global performance. New control tools are being developed to address these issues

  10. Conceptual design study of the moderate size superconducting spherical tokamak power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gi, Keii; Ono, Yasushi; Nakamura, Makoto; Someya, Youji; Utoh, Hiroyasu; Tobita, Kenji; Ono, Masayuki

    2015-06-01

    A new conceptual design of the superconducting spherical tokamak (ST) power plant was proposed as an attractive choice for tokamak fusion reactors. We reassessed a possibility of the ST as a power plant using the conservative reactor engineering constraints often used for the conventional tokamak reactor design. An extensive parameters scan which covers all ranges of feasible superconducting ST reactors was completed, and five constraints which include already achieved plasma magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and confinement parameters in ST experiments were established for the purpose of choosing the optimum operation point. Based on comparison with the estimated future energy costs of electricity (COEs) in Japan, cost-effective ST reactors can be designed if their COEs are smaller than 120 mills kW-1 h-1 (2013). We selected the optimized design point: A = 2.0 and Rp = 5.4 m after considering the maintenance scheme and TF ripple. A self-consistent free-boundary MHD equilibrium and poloidal field coil configuration of the ST reactor were designed by modifying the neutral beam injection system and plasma profiles. The MHD stability of the equilibrium was analysed and a ramp-up scenario was considered for ensuring the new ST design. The optimized moderate-size ST power plant conceptual design realizes realistic plasma and fusion engineering parameters keeping its economic competitiveness against existing energy sources in Japan.

  11. Advances in superconductivity: new materials, critical currents and devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, R.; Malik, S.K.; Grover, A.K.; Ayyub, P.

    1997-01-01

    The discovery of superconductivity in the cuprates produced an explosive growth in research, driven by the quest for higher and higher superconducting transition temperatures. In the initial stages, the excitement was tremendous both in the physical sciences and in engineering. However, the complexity of the new materials on the one hand, and the absence of a viable theory on the other, have made further developments much more difficult. It is to be expected therefore, that the early excitement and the subsequent rapid advances have paved the way for more systematic and detailed studies of all aspects of superconductivity. The International Symposium was intended to provide a forum to review the progress in selected areas in superconductivity. The emphasis was on experimental and theoretical studies of the new superconductors, advances in the theoretical understanding, progress in studies of flux pinning and vortex dynamics which affect critical currents, and developments of novel material synthesis methods. Recent developments in the twin areas of thin films and devices were extensively discussed during the symposium. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  12. Design and construction of the KSTAR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, G.S.

    2001-01-01

    The extensive design effort has been focused on two major aspects of the KSTAR project mission, steady-state operation capability and 'advanced tokamak' physics. The steady-state aspect of mission is reflected in the choice of superconducting magnets, provision of actively cooled in-vessel components, and long-pulse current-drive and heating systems. The 'advanced tokamak' aspect of the mission is incorporated in the design features associated with flexible plasma shaping, double-null divertor and passive stabilizers, internal control coils , and a comprehensive set of diagnostics. Substantial progress in engineering has been made on superconducting magnets, vacuum vessel, plasma facing components, and power supplies. The new KSTAR experimental facility with cryogenic system and de-ionized water-cooling and main power systems has been designed, and the construction work has been on-going for completion in year 2004. (author)

  13. Cryogenic analysis of forced-cooled, superconducting TF magnets for compact tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, J.A.; Slack, D.S.; Miller, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Current designs for compact tokamak reactors require the toroidal- field (TF) superconducting magnets to produce fields from 10 to 15 T at the winding pack, using high-current densities to high nuclear heat loads (greater than 1 kW/coil in some instances), which are significantly greater than the conduction and radiation heat loads for which cryogenic systems are usually designed. A cryogenic system for the TF winding pack for two such tokamak designs has been verified by performing a detailed, steady-state heat-removal analysis. Helium properties along the forced-cooled conductor flow path for a range of nuclear heat loads have been calculated. The results and implications of this analysis are presented. 12 refs., 6 figs

  14. Revised design for the Tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Brooks, J.N.

    1977-03-01

    A new, preliminary design has been identified for the tokamak experimental power reactor (EPR). The revised EPR design is simpler, more compact, less expensive and has somewhat better performance characteristics than the previous design, yet retains many of the previously developed design concepts. This report summarizes the principle features of the new EPR design, including performance and cost

  15. Neutronic scoping studies for the tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.; Bettis, E.S.; McAlees, D.G.; Watts, H.L.; Williams, M.L.

    1976-02-01

    One-dimensional neutron and photon radiation transport methods have been used to investigate candidate blanket configurations and compositions for use in the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor. Seven blanket designs are compared in terms of energy recovery, radiation attenuation, potential radiation damage, and, where applicable, tritium breeding

  16. Improved plasma confinement by modulated toroidal current on HT-7 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Jianshan; Zhao Junyu; Shen Biao; Luo Jiarong

    2004-01-01

    The improved confinement phase was observed during modulating toroidal current on the Hefei superconducting Tokamak-7 (HT-7). This improved plasma confinement phase is characterized by suppressing magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities effectively, thus increased the central line averaged electron density and the central electron temperature about 33%, out-put steeper density profiles, and reduced hydrogen radiation from the edge as well. The global energy confinement time was increased by 27%-45%; The impurity radiation was reduced by modulation of plasma toroidal current; particle confinement time was increased about two times; a stronger radial negative electric field formed inside the limiter. The radial electric field during modulating current was calculated and disscused. (authors)

  17. Recent Activities on the Experimental Research Programme Using Small Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryaznevich, M. P.; Bosco, E. del; Malaquias, A.; Mank, G.; Oost, G. van

    2006-01-01

    A new concept of interactive co-ordinated research using small tokamaks in the mainstream fusion science areas, in testing of new diagnostics, materials and technologies as well as in education, training and broadening of the geography of fusion research in the scope of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) is discussed in this paper. Besides the presentation of the recent activities on the experimental research programme using small tokamaks and scientific results achieved at the participating laboratories, information is provided about the organisation of the co-ordinated research project. Future plans of the co-ordinated activities within the CRP are discussed

  18. Experimental study of external kink instabilities in the Columbia High Beta Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivers, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    The generation of power through controlled thermonuclear fusion reactions in a magnetically confined plasma holds promise as a means of supplying mankind's future energy needs. The device most technologically advanced in pursuit of this goal is the tokamak, a machine in which a current-carrying toroidal plasma is thermally isolated from its surroundings by a strong magnetic field. To be viable, the tokamak reactor must produce a sufficiently large amount of power relative to that needed to sustain the fusion reactions. Plasma instabilities may severely limit this possibility. In this work, I describe experimental measurements of the magnetic structure of large-scale, rapidly-growing instabilities that occur in a tokamak when the current or pressure of the plasma exceeds a critical value relative to the magnetic field, and I compare these measurements with theoretical predictions

  19. Design and analysis of plasma position and shape control in superconducting tokamak JT-60SC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsukawa, M. E-mail: matsukaw@naka.jaeri.go.jp; Ishida, S.; Sakasai, A.; Urata, K.; Senda, I.; Kurita, G.; Tamai, H.; Sakurai, S.; Miura, Y.M.; Masaki, K.; Shimada, K.; Terakado, T

    2003-09-01

    The analyses of the plasma position and shape control in the superconducting tokamak JT-60SC in JAERI are presented. The vacuum vessel and stabilizing plates located closely to the plasma are modeled in 3 dimension, and we can take into account the large ports in the vacuum vessel. The linear numerical model used in the design for the plasma feedback control system is based on Grad-Shafranov equation, which allows the plasma surface deformation. For a slower control of the plasma shape, the superconducting equilibrium field (EF) coils outside toroidal field coils are used, while for a fast control of the plasma position, in-vessel normal conducting coils (IV coil) are used. It is shown that the available loop voltages of the EF and IV coils are very limited, but there are sufficient accuracy and acceptable response time of plasma position and shape control.

  20. Design and analysis of plasma position and shape control in superconducting tokamak JT-60SC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsukawa, M.; Ishida, S.; Sakasai, A.; Urata, K.; Senda, I.; Kurita, G.; Tamai, H.; Sakurai, S.; Miura, Y.M.; Masaki, K.; Shimada, K.; Terakado, T.

    2003-01-01

    The analyses of the plasma position and shape control in the superconducting tokamak JT-60SC in JAERI are presented. The vacuum vessel and stabilizing plates located closely to the plasma are modeled in 3 dimension, and we can take into account the large ports in the vacuum vessel. The linear numerical model used in the design for the plasma feedback control system is based on Grad-Shafranov equation, which allows the plasma surface deformation. For a slower control of the plasma shape, the superconducting equilibrium field (EF) coils outside toroidal field coils are used, while for a fast control of the plasma position, in-vessel normal conducting coils (IV coil) are used. It is shown that the available loop voltages of the EF and IV coils are very limited, but there are sufficient accuracy and acceptable response time of plasma position and shape control

  1. Predictions of of fast wave heating, current drive, and current drive antenna arrays for advanced tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, D.B.; Baity, F.W.; Carter, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the advanced tokamak program is to optimize plasma performance leading to a compact tokamak reactor through active, steady state control of the current profile using non-inductive current drive and profile control. To achieve this objective requires compatibility and flexibility in the use of available heating and current drive systems - ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF), neutral beams, and lower hybrid. For any advanced tokamak, the following are important challenges to effective use of fast waves in various role of direct electron heating, minority ion heating, and current drive: (1) to employ the heating and current drive systems to give self-consistent pressure and current profiles leading to the desired advanced tokamak operating modes; (2) to minimize absorption of the fast waves by parasitic resonances, which limit current drive; (3) to optimize and control the spectrum of fast waves launched by the antenna array for the required mix of simultaneous heating and current drive. The paper addresses these issues using theoretical and computational tools developed at a number of institutions by benchmarking the computations against available experimental data and applying them to the specific case of TPX. (author). 6 refs, 3 figs

  2. Predictions of fast wave heating, current drive, and current drive antenna arrays for advanced tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, D.B.; Baity, F.W.; Carter, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the advanced tokamak program is to optimize plasma performance leading to a compact tokamak reactor through active, steady state control of the current profile using non-inductive current drive and profile control. To achieve these objectives requires compatibility and flexibility in the use of available heating and current drive systems--ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF), neutral beams, and lower hybrid. For any advanced tokamak, the following are important challenges to effective use of fast waves in various roles of direct electron heating, minority ion heating, and current drive: (1) to employ the heating and current drive systems to give self-consistent pressure and current profiles leading to the desired advanced tokamak operating modes; (2) to minimize absorption of the fast waves by parasitic resonances, which limit current drive; (3) to optimize and control the spectrum of fast waves launched by the antenna array for the required mix of simultaneous heating and current drive. The authors have addressed these issues using theoretical and computational tools developed at a number of institutions by benchmarking the computations against available experimental data and applying them to the specific case of TPX

  3. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    During 2007, a large amount of the work was centred on the ITER project and related tasks. The activities based on low-temperature superconducting (LTS) materials included the manufacture and qualification of ITER full-size conductors under relevant operating conditions, the design of conductors and magnets for the JT-60SA tokamak and the manufacture of the conductors for the European dipole facility. A preliminary study was also performed to develop a new test facility at ENEA in order to test long-length ITER or DEMO full-size conductors. Several studies on different superconducting materials were also started to create a more complete database of superconductor properties, and also for use in magnet design. In this context, an extensive measurement campaign on transport and magnetic properties was carried out on commercially available NbTi strands. Work was started on characterising MgB 2 wire and bulk samples to optimise their performance. In addition, an intense experimental study was started to clarify the effect of mechanical loads on the transport properties of multi-filamentary Nb 3 Sn strands with twisted or untwisted superconducting filaments. The experimental activity on high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials was mainly focussed on the development and characterisation of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-X (YBCO) based coated conductors. Several characteristics regarding YBCO deposition, current transport performance and tape manufacture were investigated. In the framework of chemical approaches for YBCO film growth, a new method, developed in collaboration with the Technical University of Cluj-Napoca (TUCN), Romania, was studied to obtain YBCO film via chemical solution deposition, which modifies the well-assessed metallic organic deposition trifluoroacetate (MOD-TFA) approach. The results are promising in terms of critical current and film thickness values. YBCO properties in films with artificially added pinning sites were characterised in collaboration with

  4. Optimization of the protective energy removal parameters for tokamak HT7-U superconducting magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khvostenko, P.P.; Chudnovsky, A.N.; Posadsky, I.A. [RRC ' Kurchatov Inst.' , Nuclear Fusion Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Bi, Y.F.; Cheng, S.M.; He, Y.X. [Academia Sinica, Hefei, Anhui (China). Inst. of Plasma Physics

    1998-07-01

    The design of the HT-7U superconducting tokamak is in progress now. The design incorporates superconducting magnets of the toroidal field and poloidal field systems. Toroidal field system consists of 16 D-shape coils and poloidal field system consists of 12 coils. All coils will be use NbTi/Cu cable-in-conduit conductor cooled with forced-flow supercritical helium at 4.5 K, 4 Bar. Quench in the superconducting magnets is accompanied byconversion of the stored magnetic field energy into a thermal one which is spent on heating of both the coil part which made transition into a normal state and dump resistors. A non-uniform heating of the coil part results in the emergence of thermomechanical stresses which can cause its destruction. The protective removal of a current is realized to prevent the coil destruction at the emergence of the quench. In that case, the faster the current removal occurs, the less the coil heating is. On the other hand, the current removal rate should not be too high in order to avoid an electric breakdown by the excited inductive voltage. Optimization of the protective energy removal parameters both for TF and PF superconducting magnets is presented. (author)

  5. Optimization of the protective energy removal parameters for tokamak HT7-U superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvostenko, P.P.; Chudnovsky, A.N.; Posadsky, I.A.; Bi, Y.F.; Cheng, S.M.; He, Y.X.

    1998-01-01

    The design of the HT-7U superconducting tokamak is in progress now. The design incorporates superconducting magnets of the toroidal field and poloidal field systems. Toroidal field system consists of 16 D-shape coils and poloidal field system consists of 12 coils. All coils will be use NbTi/Cu cable-in-conduit conductor cooled with forced-flow supercritical helium at 4.5 K, 4 Bar. Quench in the superconducting magnets is accompanied by conversion of the stored magnetic field energy into a thermal one which is spent on heating of both the coil part which made transition into a normal state and dump resistors. A non-uniform heating of the coil part results in the emergence of thermomechanical stresses which can cause its destruction. The protective removal of a current is realized to prevent the coil destruction at the emergence of the quench. In that case, the faster the current removal occurs, the less the coil heating is. On the other hand, the current removal rate should not be too high in order to avoid an electric breakdown by the excited inductive voltage. Optimization of the protective energy removal parameters both for TF and PF superconducting magnets is presented. (author)

  6. A conceptual design of a negative-ion-grounded advanced tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shin; Ohara, Yoshihiro; Tani, Keiji

    1988-05-01

    The NAVIGATOR concept is based on the negative-ion-grounded 500 keV 20 MW neutral beam injection system (NBI system), which has been proposed and studied at JAERI. The NAVIGATOR concept contains two categories; one is the NAVIGATOR machine as a tokamak reactor, and the other is the NAVIGATOR philosophy as a guiding principle in fusion research. The NAVIGATOR machine implies an NBI heated and full inductive ramped-up reactor. The NAVIGATOR concept should be applied in a phased approach to and beyond the operating goal for the FER (Fusion Experimental Reactor, the next generation tokamak machine in Japan). The mission of the FER is to realize self-ignition and a long controlled burn of about 800 seconds and to develop and test fusion technologies, including the tritium fuel cycle, superconducting magnet, remote maintenance and breeding blanket test modules. The NAVIGATOR concept is composed of three major elements, that is, reliable operation scenarios, reliable maintenability and sufficient flexibility of the reactor. The NAVIGATOR concept well supports the ideas of phased operation and phased construction of the FER, which will result in the reduction of technological risk. The NAVIGATOR concept is expected to bring forth the fruits growing up in the present large tokamak machines in the form of next generation machines. In addition, the NAVIGATOR concept will supply many required databases for the DEMO reactor. The details of the NAVIGATOR concept is described in this paper, and the concept may indicate a feasible strategy for developing fusion research. (author)

  7. Experimental operation of the KT-5C tokamak in USTC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Yizhi; Wan Shude; Zhai Kan; Liu Wandong

    1995-01-01

    Experimental operation of the KT-5C tokamak was started in early 1991. More than 3 x 10 4 shots of discharges have been performed so far. The authors deals with the major features of operation control of the KT-5C device. As the machine is usually controlled by an experimenter himself without duty operator, an audible indicator makes it much easier to control and operate. Accident and interference prevention systems prove to be reliable, and the operation system works successfully

  8. Experimental progress and innovation on the HL-2A tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Xuantong

    2010-01-01

    The HL-2A Tokamak is the first large controlled fusion experiment device with divertor in China. In this paper, the main experimental results on this device will be presented. Since its establishment, the operation conditions have been improved greatly. First, the divertor configuration was realized, the electron temperature was increased to 5.5 keV by electron cyclotron heating, and then the high confinement edge localized mode was achieved. With the development of high power auxiliary heating and advanced plasma diagnostic systems,innovative contributions have been made in certain plasma physics areas. The 3-dimension structure of the zonal flow has been identified, which is very important in the transport of fusion plasma. Supersonic molecular beam injection has also been developed and successfully used for plasma transport. The tearing mode has been suppressed by electron cyclotron resonance heating with low frequency modulation, and the confinement has been improved. The new phenomena of the internal kink mode and Alfen mode excited by energetic electrons have been observed. Future plans and new experiments on the device will also be briefly presented. (authors)

  9. Beam heating requirements for a tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertoncini, P.J.; Brooks, J.N.; Fasolo, J.A.; Stacey, W.M. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Typical beam heating requirements for effective tokamak experimental power reactor (TEPR) operation have been studied in connection with the Argonne preliminary conceptual TEPR design. For an ignition level plasma (approximately 100 MWt fusion power) for the nominal case envisioned, the neutral beam is only used to heat the plasma to ignition. This typically requires a beam power output of 40 MW at 180 keV for about 3 sec with a total energy of 114 MJ supplied to the plasma. The beam requirements for an ignition device are not very sensitive to changes in wall-sputtered impurity levels or plasma resistivity. For a plasma that must be driven due to poor confinement, the beam must remain on for most of the burn cycle. For representative cases, beam powers of approximately 23 MW are required for a total on-time of 20 to 50 sec. Reqirements on power level, beam energy, on-time, and beam-generation efficiency all represent considerable advances over present technology. For the Argonne TEPR design, a total of 16 to 32 beam injectors is envisioned. For a 40-MW, 180-keV, one-component beam, each injector supplies about 7 to 14 A of neutrals to the plasma. For positive ion sources, about 50 to 100 A of ions are required per injector and some form of particle and/or energy recycling appears to be essential in order to meet the power and efficiency requirements

  10. Potential minimum cost of electricity of superconducting coil tokamak power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Peng, Y-K. M.

    1989-01-01

    The potential minimum cost of electricity (COE) for superconducting tokamak power reactors is estimated by increasing the physics (confinement, beta limit, bootstrap current fraction) and technology [neutral beam energy, toroidal field (TF) coil allowable stresses, divertor heat flux, superconducting coil critical field, critical temperature, and quench temperature rise] constraints far beyond those assumed for ITER until the point of diminishing returns is reached. A version of the TETRA systems code, calibrated with the ITER design and modified for power reactors, is used for this analysis, limiting this study to reactors with the same basic device configuration and costing algorithms as ITER. A minimum COE is reduced from >200 to about 80 mill/kWh when the allowable design constraints are raised to 2 times those of ITER. At 4 times the ITER allowables, a minimum COE of about 60 mill/kWh is obtained. The corresponding tokamak has a major radius of approximately 4 m, a plasma current close to 10 MA, an aspect ratio of 4, a confinement H- factor ≤3, a beta limit of approximately 2 times the first stability regime, a divertor heat flux of about 20 MW/m 2 , a Β max ≤ 18 T, and a TF coil average current density about 3 times that of ITER. The design constraints that bound the minimum COE are the allowable stresses in the TF coil, the neutral beam energy, and the 99% bootstrap current (essentially free current drive). 14 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Identification of Plasma Parameters and Optimization of Magnetic Sensors in the Superconducting Steady-State Tokamak-1 Using Neural Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, A.; Ranjan, P.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the possibility of using a multilayered feedforward neural network to extract tokamak plasma parameters from magnetic measurements as an improvement over the traditional methodology of function parametrization. It is also used to optimize the number and locations of the magnetic diagnostics designed for the tokamak. This work has been undertaken with the specific purpose of application of the neural network technique to the newly designed (and currently under fabrication) Superconducting Steady-State Tokamak-1 (SST-1). The magnetic measurements will be utilized to achieve real-time control of plasma shape, position, and some global profiles. A trained neural network is tested, and the results of parameter identification are compared with function parametrization. Both techniques appear well suited for the purpose, but a definite improvement with neural networks is observed. Although simulated measurements are used in this work, confidence regarding the network performance with actual experimental data is ensured by testing the network's noise tolerance with Gaussian noise of up to 10%. Finally, three possible methods of ranking the diagnostics in decreasing order of importance are suggested, and the neural network is used to optimize the number and locations of the magnetic sensors designed for SST-1. The results from the three methods are compared with one another and also with function parametrization. Magnetic probes within the plasma-facing side of the outboard limiter have been ranked high. Function parametrization and one of the neural network methods show a distinct tendency to favor the probes in the remote regions of the vacuum vessel, proving the importance of redundancy. Fault tolerance of the optimized network is tested. The results obtained should, in the long run, help in the decision regarding the final effective set of magnetic diagnostics to be used in SST-1 for reconstruction of the control parameters

  12. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onnes, H.K.

    1988-01-01

    The author traces the development of superconductivity from 1911 to 1986. Some of the areas he explores are the Meissner Effect, theoretical developments, experimental developments, engineering achievements, research in superconducting magnets, and research in superconducting electronics. The article also mentions applications shown to be technically feasible, but not yet commercialized. High-temperature superconductivity may provide enough leverage to bring these applications to the marketplace

  13. A tangential CO{sub 2} laser collective scattering system for measuring short-scale turbulent fluctuations in the EAST superconducting tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, G.M., E-mail: gmcao@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 1126, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Li, Y.D. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 1126, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Li, Q. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhang, X.D.; Sun, P.J.; Wu, G.J.; Hu, L.Q. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 1126, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A tangential CO{sub 2} laser collective scattering system was first installed on EAST. • It can measure the short-scale fluctuations in different regions simultaneously. • It can study the broadband fluctuations, QC fluctuations, MHD phenomenon, etc. - Abstract: A tangential CO{sub 2} laser collective scattering system has been first installed on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) to measure short-scale turbulent fluctuations in EAST plasmas. The system can measure fluctuations with up to four distinct wavenumbers simultaneously ranging from 10 cm{sup −1} to 26 cm{sup −1}, and correspondingly k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub s}∼1.5−4.3. The system is designed based on the oblique propagation of the probe beam with respect to the magnetic field, and thus the enhanced spatial localization can be achieved by taking full advantage of turbulence anisotropy and magnetic field inhomogeneity. The simultaneous measurements of turbulent fluctuations in different regions can be taken by special optical setup. Initial measurements indicate rich short-scale turbulent dynamics in both core and outer regions of EAST plasmas. The system will be a powerful tool for investigating the features of short-scale turbulent fluctuations in EAST plasmas.

  14. Abstracts of the International seminar 'Experimental possibilities of KTM tokamak and research programme'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The International seminar 'Experimental possibilities of KTM tokamak and research programme' was held in 10-12 October 2005 in Astana city (Kazakhstan). The seminar was dedicated to problems of KTM tokamak commissioning. The Collection of abstracts comprises 45 papers

  15. Experimental results from the TFTR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Arunasalam, V.; Bell, J.D.

    1986-10-01

    Recent experiments on TFTR have extended the operating regime of TFTR in both ohmic- and neutral-beam-heated discharges. The TFTR tokamak has reached its original machine design specifications (I/sub p/ = 2.5 MA and B/sub T/ = 5.2 T). Initial neutral-beam-heating experiments used up to 6.3 MW of deuterium beams. With the recent installation of two additional beamlines, the power has been increased up to 11 MW. A deuterium pellet injector was used to increase the central density to 2.5 x 10 20 m -3 in high current discharges. At the opposite extreme, by operating at low plasma current (I/sub p/ ∼ 0.8 MA) and low density (anti n/sub e/ ∼ 1 x 10 19 m -3 ), high ion temperatures (9 +- 2 keV) and rotation speeds (7 x 10 5 m/s) have been achieved during injection. In addition, plasma compression experiments have demonstrated acceleration of beam ions from 82 keV to 150 keV, in accord with expectations. The wide operating range of TFTR, together with an extensive set of diagnostics and a flexible control system, has facilitated transport and scaling studies of both ohmic- and neutral-beam-heated discharges. The results of these confinement studies are presented

  16. INTEGATED ADVANCED TOKAMAK OPERATION ON DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WADE, M.R.; MURAKAMI, M.; LUCE, T.C.; FERRON, J.R.; PETTY, C.C.; BRENNEN, D.P.; GAROFALO, A.M.; GREENFIELD, C.M.; HYATT, A.W.; JAYAKUMAR, R.; KINSEY, J.E.; La HAYE, R.J.; LAO, L.L.; LOHR, J.; POLITZER, P.A.; PRATER, R.; STRAIT, E.J.; WATKINS, J.G.

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiments on DIII-D have demonstrated the ability to sustain plasma conditions that integrate and sustain the key ingredients of Advanced Tokamak (AT) operation: high β with 1.5 min min > 2.0, plasmas with β ∼ 2.9% and 90% of the plasma current driven non-inductively have been sustained for nearly 2 s (limited only by the duration of the ECCD pulse). Negative central magnetic shear is produced by the ECCD, leading to the formation of a weak internal transport barrier even in the presence of Type I ELMs. Separate experiments have demonstrated the ability to sustain a steady current density profile using ECCD for periods as long as 1 s with β = 3.3% and > 90% of the current driven non-inductively. In addition, stable operation well above the ideal no-wall β limit has been sustained for several energy confinement times with the duration only limited by resistive relaxation of the current profile to an unstable state. Stability analysis indicates that the experimental β limit depends on the degree to which the no-wall limit can be exceeded and weakly on the actual no-wall limit. Achieving the necessary density levels required for adequate ECCD efficiency requires active divertor exhaust and reducing the wall inventory buildup prior to the high performance phase. Simulation studies indicate that the successful integration of high β operation with current profile control consistent with these experimental results should result in high β, fully non-inductive plasma operation

  17. Advances in superconducting materials and electronics technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, D.N.

    1990-01-01

    Technological barriers blocking the early implementation of ceramic oxide high critical temperature [Tc] and LHe Nb based superconductors are slowly being dismantled. Spearheading these advances are mechanical engineers with diverse specialties and creative interests. As the technology expands, most engineers have recognized the importance of inter-disciplinary cooperation. Cooperation between mechanical engineers and material and system engineers is of particular importance. Recently, several problems previously though to be insurmountable, has been successfully resolved. These accomplishment were aided by interaction with other scientists and practitioners, working in the superconductor research and industrial communities, struggling with similar systems and materials problems. Papers published here and presented at the 1990 ASME Winter Annual Meeting held in Dallas, Texas 25-30 November 1990 can be used as a bellwether to gauge the progress in the development of both ceramic oxide and low temperature Nb superconducting device and system technologies. Topics are focused into two areas: mechanical behavior of high temperature superconductors and thermal and mechanical problems in superconducting electronics

  18. Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesson, John.

    1996-01-01

    This book is the first compiled collection about tokamak. At first chapter tokamak is represented from fusion point of view and also the necessary conditions for producing power. The following chapters are represent plasma physics, the specifications of tokamak, plasma heating procedures and problems related to it, equilibrium, confinement, magnetohydrodynamic stability, instabilities, plasma material interaction, plasma measurement and experiments regarding to tokamak; an addendum is also given at the end of the book

  19. Advanced tokamak research with integrated modeling in JT-60 Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, N.

    2010-01-01

    Researches on advanced tokamak (AT) have progressed with integrated modeling in JT-60 Upgrade [N. Oyama et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104007 (2009)]. Based on JT-60U experimental analyses and first principle simulations, new models were developed and integrated into core, rotation, edge/pedestal, and scrape-off-layer (SOL)/divertor codes. The integrated models clarified complex and autonomous features in AT. An integrated core model was implemented to take account of an anomalous radial transport of alpha particles caused by Alfven eigenmodes. It showed the reduction in the fusion gain by the anomalous radial transport and further escape of alpha particles. Integrated rotation model showed mechanisms of rotation driven by the magnetic-field-ripple loss of fast ions and the charge separation due to fast-ion drift. An inward pinch model of high-Z impurity due to the atomic process was developed and indicated that the pinch velocity increases with the toroidal rotation. Integrated edge/pedestal model clarified causes of collisionality dependence of energy loss due to the edge localized mode and the enhancement of energy loss by steepening a core pressure gradient just inside the pedestal top. An ideal magnetohydrodynamics stability code was developed to take account of toroidal rotation and clarified a destabilizing effect of rotation on the pedestal. Integrated SOL/divertor model clarified a mechanism of X-point multifaceted asymmetric radiation from edge. A model of the SOL flow driven by core particle orbits which partially enter the SOL was developed by introducing the ion-orbit-induced flow to fluid equations.

  20. Engineering Design of KSTAR tokamak main structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, K.H.; Cho, S.; Her, N.I.

    2001-01-01

    The main components of the KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) tokamak including vacuum vessel, plasma facing components, cryostat, thermal shield and magnet supporting structure are in the final stage of engineering design. Hundai Heavy Industries (HHI) has been involved in the engineering design of these components. The current configuration and the final engineering design results for the KSTAR main structure are presented. (author)

  1. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmieri, V.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on superconductivity the absence of electrical resistance has always fascinated the mind of researchers with a promise of applications unachievable by conventional technologies. Since its discovery superconductivity has been posing many questions and challenges to solid state physics, quantum mechanics, chemistry and material science. Simulations arrived to superconductivity from particle physics, astrophysic, electronics, electrical engineering and so on. In seventy-five years the original promises of superconductivity were going to become reality: a microscopical theory gave to superconductivity the cloth of the science and the level of technological advances was getting higher and higher. High field superconducting magnets became commercially available, superconducting electronic devices were invented, high field accelerating gradients were obtained in superconductive cavities and superconducting particle detectors were under study. Other improvements came in a quiet progression when a tornado brought a revolution in the field: new materials had been discovered and superconductivity, from being a phenomenon relegated to the liquid Helium temperatures, became achievable over the liquid Nitrogen temperature. All the physics and the technological implications under superconductivity have to be considered ab initio

  2. Structural analysis of a superconducting central solenoid for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, T.G.; Heim, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) concept design uses superconducting coils to accomplish magnetic confinement. The central solenoid (CS) magnet is divided vertically into 8 equal segments which are powered independently. The eddy current heating from the pulsed operation is too high for a case type construction; therefore, a open-quotes no caseclose quotes design has been chosen. This open-quotes no caseclose quotes design uses the conductor conduit as the primary structure and the electrical insulation as a structural adhesive. This electrical insulation is the open-quotes weak linkclose quotes in the coil winding pack structure and needs to be modeled in detail. A global finite element model with smeared winding pack properties was used to study the CS magnet structural behavior. The structural analysis results and peak stresses will be presented

  3. Removal of particles by ICRF cleaning in HT-7 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jiansheng; Li Jiangang; Zhang Shouyin; Gu Xuemao; Zhang Xiaodong; Zhao Yanping; Gong Xianzu; Kuang Guangli; Li Chengfu; Luo Jiarong; Wang Xiaoming; Gao Xiang; Wan Baonian; Xie Jikang; Wan Yuanxi

    2001-01-01

    The ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range Frequency) cleaning technique has been used as a routine wall cleaning method in the HT-7 superconducting tokamak. In a wide range of toroidal field, the removal rate of residual gas by ICRF cleaning was about twenty times higher than that of glow discharge cleaning (GDC). At different gas pressure and RF power levels, the ICRF cleaning is studied carefully. A good impurity cleaning effect and a very high hydrogen removal rate were obtained. The removal rate of hydrogen by 5 kW ICRF cleaning achieved was 1.6 x 10 -5 Torr.l/s. And the relationships among pressure P, outgassing rate Q, atomic layers L absorbed on surface and the cleaning mode were discussed briefly

  4. ICRF boronization. A new technique towards high efficiency wall coating for superconducting tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiangang; Zhao Yan Ping; Gu Xue Mao

    1999-01-01

    A new technique for wall conditioning that will be especially useful for future larger superconducting tokamaks, such as ITER, has been successfully developed and encouraging results have been obtained. Solid carborane powder, which is non-toxic and non-explosive, was used. Pulsed RF plasma was produced by a non-Faraday shielding RF antenna with RF power of 10 kW. The ion temperature was about 2 keV with a toroidal magnetic field of 1.8 T and a pressure of 3x10 -1 Pa. Energetic ions broke up the carborane molecules, and the resulting boron ions struck and were deposited on the first wall. In comparison with glow discharge cleaning boronization, the B/C coating film shows higher adhesion, more uniformity and longer lifetime during plasma discharges. The plasma performance was improved after ICRF boronization. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  5. Study of the Tokamak-15 Superconducting Toroidal Field Coil (STFC) heating under the quench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anashkin, I.O.; Kabanovsky, S.V.; Chudnovsky, A.N.; Khvostenko, P.P.; Vertiporokh, A.N.; Ivanov, D.P.; Posadsky, I.A.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments in Tokamak-15 were performed to study the STFC heating under the quench. The quench was specially caused by current introduction into STFC at the unchanged input helium temperature. The experimental results and simulation data on temperature heating and amount of heat realized in the pancakes under the quench are given. In the experiments was shown that quench occurs in the internal turns of pancakes and estimations of maximal temperature heating corresponds to calculated ones

  6. EFFECT OF PROFILES AND SHAPE ON IDEAL STABILITY OF ADVANCED TOKAMAK EQUILIBRIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAKOWSKI,MA; CASPER,TA; FERRON,JR; TAYLOR,TS; TURNBULL,AD

    2003-08-01

    OAK-B135 The pressure profile and plasma shape, parameterized by elongation ({kappa}), triangularity ({delta}), and squareness ({zeta}), strongly influence stability. In this study, ideal stability of single null and symmetric, double-null, advanced tokamak (AT) configurations is examined. All the various shapes are bounded by a common envelope and can be realized in the DIII-D tokamak. The calculated AT equilibria are characterized by P{sub 0}/

    {approx} 2.0-4.5, weak negative central shear, high q{sub min} (> 2.0), high bootstrap fraction, an H-mode pedestal, and varying shape parameters. The pressure profile is modeled by various polynomials together with a hyperbolic tangent pedestal, consistent with experimental observations. Stability is calculated with the DCON code and the resulting stability boundary is corroborated by GATO runs.

  7. Effect of Profiles and Space on Ideal Stability of Advanced Tokamak Equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makowski, M A; Casper, T A; Ferron, J R; Taylor, T S; Turnbull, A D

    2003-07-07

    The pressure profile and plasma shape, parameterized by elongation ({kappa}), triangularity ({delta}), and squareness ({zeta}), strongly influence stability. In this study, ideal stability of single null and symmetric, double-null, advanced tokamak (AT) configurations is examined. All the various shapes are bounded by a common envelope and can be realized in the DIII-D tokamak. The calculated AT equilibria are characterized by P{sub 0}/{l_angle}P{r_brace} {approx} 2.0-4.5, weak negative central shear, high q{sub min} (>2.0), high bootstrap fraction, an H-mode pedestal, and varying shape parameters. The pressure profile is modeled by various polynomials together with a hyperbolic tangent pedestal, consistent with experimental observations. Stability is calculated with the DCON code and the resulting stability boundary is corroborated by GATO runs.

  8. EFFECT OF PROFILES AND SHAPE ON IDEAL STABILITY OF ADVANCED TOKAMAK EQUILIBRIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MAKOWSKI, M.A.; CASPER, T.A.; FERRON, J.R.; TAYLOR, T.S.; TURNBULL, A.D.

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 The pressure profile and plasma shape, parameterized by elongation (κ), triangularity ((delta)), and squareness (ζ), strongly influence stability. In this study, ideal stability of single null and symmetric, double-null, advanced tokamak (AT) configurations is examined. All the various shapes are bounded by a common envelope and can be realized in the DIII-D tokamak. The calculated AT equilibria are characterized by P 0 / ∼ 2.0-4.5, weak negative central shear, high q min (> 2.0), high bootstrap fraction, an H-mode pedestal, and varying shape parameters. The pressure profile is modeled by various polynomials together with a hyperbolic tangent pedestal, consistent with experimental observations. Stability is calculated with the DCON code and the resulting stability boundary is corroborated by GATO runs

  9. Effect of Profiles and Space on Ideal Stability of Advanced Tokamak Equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowski, M A; Casper, T A; Ferron, J R; Taylor, T S; Turnbull, A D

    2003-01-01

    The pressure profile and plasma shape, parameterized by elongation (κ), triangularity ((delta)), and squareness (ζ), strongly influence stability. In this study, ideal stability of single null and symmetric, double-null, advanced tokamak (AT) configurations is examined. All the various shapes are bounded by a common envelope and can be realized in the DIII-D tokamak. The calculated AT equilibria are characterized by P 0 /(l a ngle)P} ∼ 2.0-4.5, weak negative central shear, high q min (>2.0), high bootstrap fraction, an H-mode pedestal, and varying shape parameters. The pressure profile is modeled by various polynomials together with a hyperbolic tangent pedestal, consistent with experimental observations. Stability is calculated with the DCON code and the resulting stability boundary is corroborated by GATO runs

  10. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakani, S.L.; Kakani, Shubhra

    2007-01-01

    The monograph provides readable introduction to the basics of superconductivity for beginners and experimentalists. For theorists, the monograph provides nice and brief description of the broad spectrum of experimental properties, theoretical concepts with all details, which theorists should learn, and provides a sound basis for students interested in studying superconducting theory at the microscopic level. Special chapter on the theory of high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates is devoted

  11. HTMR: an experimental tokamak reactor with hybrid copper/superconductor toroidal field magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avanzini, P.G.; Raia, G.; Rosatelli, F.; Zampaglione, V.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of a hybrid configuration superconducting coils/copper coils for a next generation tokamak TF magnet has been investigated. On the basis of this hybrid solution, the conceptual design has been developed for a medium-high toroidal field tokamak reactor (HTMR). The results of this study show the possibility of designing a tokamak reactor with reduced size in comparison with other INTOR like devices, still gaining some margins in front of the uncertainties in the scaling laws for plasma physics parameters and retaining the presence of a blanket with a tritium breeding ratio of about 1

  12. An advanced computational algorithm for systems analysis of tokamak power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragojlovic, Zoran; Rene Raffray, A.; Najmabadi, Farrokh; Kessel, Charles; Waganer, Lester; El-Guebaly, Laila; Bromberg, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    A new computational algorithm for tokamak power plant system analysis is being developed for the ARIES project. The objective of this algorithm is to explore the most influential parameters in the physical, technological and economic trade space related to the developmental transition from experimental facilities to viable commercial power plants. This endeavor is being pursued as a new approach to tokamak systems studies, which examines an expansive, multi-dimensional trade space as opposed to traditional sensitivity analyses about a baseline design point. The new ARIES systems code consists of adaptable modules which are built from a custom-made software toolbox using object-oriented programming. The physics module captures the current tokamak physics knowledge database including modeling of the most-current proposed burning plasma experiment design (FIRE). The engineering model accurately reflects the intent and design detail of the power core elements including accurate and adjustable 3D tokamak geometry and complete modeling of all the power core and ancillary systems. Existing physics and engineering models reflect both near-term as well as advanced technology solutions that have higher performance potential. To fully assess the impact of the range of physics and engineering implementations, the plant cost accounts have been revised to reflect a more functional cost structure, supported by an updated set of costing algorithms for the direct, indirect, and financial cost accounts. All of these features have been validated against the existing ARIES-AT baseline case. The present results demonstrate visualization techniques that provide an insight into trade space assessment of attractive steady-state tokamaks for commercial use.

  13. ADVANCES IN COMPREHENSIVE GYROKINETIC SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT IN TOKAMAKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WALTZ, R. E; CANDY, J; HINTON, F. L; ESTRADA-MILA, C; KINSEY, J.E

    2004-01-01

    A continuum global gyrokinetic code GYRO has been developed to comprehensively simulate core turbulent transport in actual experimental profiles and enable direct quantitative comparisons to the experimental transport flows. GYRO not only treats the now standard ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence, but also treats trapped and passing electrons with collisions and finite β, equilibrium ExB shear stabilization, and all in real tokamak geometry. Most importantly the code operates at finite relative gyroradius (ρ * ) so as to treat the profile shear stabilization and nonlocal effects which can break gyroBohm scaling. The code operates in either a cyclic flux-tube limit (which allows only gyroBohm scaling) or globally with physical profile variation. Bohm scaling of DIII-D L-mode has been simulated with power flows matching experiment within error bars on the ion temperature gradient. Mechanisms for broken gyroBohm scaling, neoclassical ion flows embedded in turbulence, turbulent dynamos and profile corrugations, are illustrated

  14. Overview on the progress of tokamak experimental research in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Jikang . E-mail; Liu Yong; Wen Yizhi; Wang Long

    2001-01-01

    Tokamak experimental research in China has made important progress. The main efforts were related to quasi-steady-state operation, LHCD, plasma heating with ICRF, IBW, NBI and ECRH, fuelling with pellets and supersonic molecular beams, and first wall conditioning techniques. Plasma parameters in the experiments were much improved, for example n e =8x10 19 m -3 and a plasma pulse length of >10 s were achieved. ICRF boronization and conditioning resulted in Z eff close to unity. Steady state full LH wave current drive has been achieved for more than 3 s. LHCD ramp-up and recharge have also been demonstrated. The best η CD exp ∼0.5(1+0.085exp(4.8(B T -1.45)))n e I CD R p /P LH =10 19 m -2 A W -1 . Quasi-steady-state H-mode-like plasmas with a density close to the Greenwald limit were obtained by LHCD, where the energy confinement time was nearly five times longer than in the ohmic case. The synergy between IBW, pellet and LHCD was tested. Research on the mechanism of macroturbulence has been extensively carried out experimentally. AC tokamak operation has been successfully demonstrated. (author)

  15. Small angle slot divertor concept for long pulse advanced tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H. Y.; Sang, C. F.; Stangeby, P. C.; Lao, L. L.; Taylor, T. S.; Thomas, D. M.

    2017-04-01

    SOLPS-EIRENE edge code analysis shows that a gas-tight slot divertor geometry with a small-angle (glancing-incidence) target, named the small angle slot (SAS) divertor, can achieve cold, dissipative/detached divertor conditions at relatively low values of plasma density at the outside midplane separatrix. SAS exhibits the following key features: (1) strong enhancement of the buildup of neutral density in a localized region near the plasma strike point on the divertor target; (2) spreading of the cooling front across the divertor target with the slot gradually flaring out from the strike point, thus effectively reducing both heat flux and erosion on the entire divertor target surface. Such a divertor may potentially provide a power and particle handling solution for long pulse advanced tokamaks.

  16. Saturated ideal modes in advanced tokamak regimes in MAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, I.T.; Hua, M.-D.; Pinches, S.D.; Akers, R.J.; Field, A.R.; Hastie, R.J.; Michael, C.A.; Graves, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    MAST plasmas with a safety factor above unity and a profile with either weakly reversed shear or broad low-shear regions, regularly exhibit long-lived saturated ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. The toroidal rotation is flattened in the presence of such perturbations and the fast ion losses are enhanced. These ideal modes, distinguished as such by the notable lack of islands or signs of reconnection, are driven unstable as the safety factor approaches unity. This could be of significance for advanced scenarios, or hybrid scenarios which aim to keep the safety factor just above rational surfaces associated with deleterious resistive MHD instabilities, especially in spherical tokamaks which are more susceptible to such ideal internal modes. The role of rotation, fast ions and ion diamagnetic effects in determining the marginal mode stability is discussed, as well as the role of instabilities with higher toroidal mode numbers as the safety factor evolves to lower values.

  17. Lower hybrid current drive experiments with graphite limiters in the HT-7 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.; Gao, X.; Hu, L.Q.; Asif, M.; Chen, Z.Y.; Ding, B.J.; Zhou, Q.; Liu, H.Q.; Jie, Y.X.; Kong, W.; Lin, S.Y.; Ding, Y.H.; Gao, L.; Xu, Q.

    2006-01-01

    Recent progress of lower hybrid (LH) experiments with new graphite limiters configuration in the HT-7 tokamak is presented. The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) efficiency can be determined by fitting based on experimental data. Improved particle confinement was observed via LHCD (P LHW >300 kW) characterized by the particle confinement time τ p increased about 1.56 times. It is found that runaways are suppressed during loop voltage is decreasing at the flat-top phase of LH discharges. The main limitations of pulse length are presented in long-pulse experiments with new limiter configuration

  18. Design parameters of Tokamak-7 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, D.P.; Keilin, V.E.; Klimenko, E.Yu.; Strelkov, V.S.

    Superconducting windings for the main magnetic field of Tokamak-7 are discussed. The parameters of this facility are based on the use of commercially available superconducting materials for fields up to 80 kOe. Experimental parameters are described. (U.S.)

  19. Korea Superconducting tokamak advanced research project - Development of heating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-10-01

    The heating and current drive systems for KSTAR based on multiple technologies (neutral beam, ion cyclotron, lower hybrid and electron cyclotron) have been designed to provide heating and current drive capabilities as well as flexibility in the control of current density and pressure profiles needed to meet the mission and research objectives of the machine. They are designed to operate for long-pulse lengths of up to 300 s. The NBI system initially delivers 8 MW of neutral beam power to the plasma from one co-directed beam line and shall be upgraded to provide 20 MW of neutral beam power with two co-directed beam lines plus one counter-directed beam line. It will be capable of being reconfigured such that the source arrangement is changed from horizontal to vertical stacking, with 6 MW beam power to the plasmas per beam line, in order to facilitate profile control. The RF system initially delivers 6 MW of rf power to the plasma, using a single four-strap antenna mounted in a midplane port. The system will be upgraded to proved 12 MW of rf power through 2 adjacent ports. In the first phase, we completed the basic design of RF system and the system have the capabilities to be operationable for pulse length up to 300 sec and in the 25-60 MHz frequency range. Lower hybrid system initially provides 1.5 MW LH rf power to the plasma at 3.7 GHz through a horizontal port, which has a capability to be operated for pulse length up to 300 sec, and shall be upgraded to provide 4.5 MW of LH rf power to the plasma. In the first phase, we completed the basic design of LHCD system which incorporate the TPX-type launcher and independently phase-changeable transmission system for the fully phased coupler. The ECH system will deliver up to 0.5 MW of power to the plasma for up to 0.5 sec. In the first phase, we completed the basic design of ECH system which includes an 84 GHz gyrotron system, a transmission system, and a launcher. The basic design of the low loss transmission system and regulated high voltage power supply for gyrotron was finished. (author). 8 refs., 197 figs., 23 tabs.

  20. Structural design of the superconducting Poloidal Field coils for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, T.G.; Zbasnik, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment concept design uses superconducting coils made from cable-in-conduit conductor to accomplish both magnetic confinement and plasma initiation. The Poloidal Field (PF) magnet system is divided into two subsystems, the central solenoid and the outer ring coils, the latter is focus of this paper. The eddy current heating from the pulsed operation is excessive for a case type construction; therefore, a ''no case'' design has been chosen. This ''no case'' design uses the conductor conduit as the primary structure and the electrical insulation (fiberglass/epoxy wrap) as a structural adhesive. The model integrates electromagnetic analysis and structural analysis into the finite element code ANSYS to solve the problem. PF coil design is assessed by considering a variety of coil current wave forms, corresponding to various operating modes and conditions. The structural analysis shows that the outer ring coils are within the requirements of the fatigue life and fatigue crack growth requirements. The forces produced by the Toroidal Field coils on the PF coils have little effect on the maximum stresses in the PF coils. In addition in an effort to reduce the cost of the coils new elongated PF coils design was proposed which changes the aspect ratio of the outer ring coils to reduce the number of turns in the coils. The compressive stress in the outer ring coils is increased while the tensile stress is decreased

  1. Study of LHW and IBW synergy experiment on the HT-7 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, X.

    2001-01-01

    A successful experiment on lower hybrid wave (LHW) and ion Bernstein wave (IBW) synergy has been carried out in the HT-7 superconducting tokamak. With 500 kW of LHW heating power and 200 kW of injected IBW power, it is observed that the ion temperature increases from 500 eV to about 850 eV, the electron temperature increases from 800 eV to 1.2 keV, and the averaged electron density increases from 0.9x10 19 m -3 to 2.6x10 19 m -3 . The plasma parameters were obviously enhanced by means of the LHW and IBW heating and their synergy. The charge-exchange spectra of the neutral particle analysis (NPA) diagnostics data clearly showed that the high-energy ion tail which was produced by the LHW was decreased by the synergy with the IBW, and the bulk ion temperature was increased. The mechanism of the LHW and IBW synergy effect is discussed. (author)

  2. Overview of time synchronization system of steady state superconducting tokamak SST-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A., E-mail: aveg@ipr.res.in; Masand, H.; Dhongde, J.; Patel, K.; Mahajan, K.; Gulati, H.; Bhandarkar, M.; Chudasama, H.; Pradhan, S.

    2016-11-15

    The Steady State Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) consists of many distributed and heterogeneous plant/experiment systems viz. Water-Cooling, Power Supplies, Cryogenics, Vacuum, Magnets, Auxiliary-Heating sources, Diagnostics, Front End Electronics (FEE) & Data Acquisition systems, having their own data acquisition & control systems and control & monitor by Central Control System (CCS) during the machine operation. With distributed computing and interdependent systems, it is essential that all the data/event acquired must be with disciplined & precise time-base, so as to make the co-relation of the data/event from various plant and experiment systems easy. Hence it is important to have accurate and precise Time Synchronization in place. The two systems fulfill the requirement of the time synchronization in SST-1. The VME based Timing System (TS) provides synchronization amongst various experiment systems during the plasma discharges and works as discharge control system (DCS) while the GPS based Time Synchronization System (TSS) caters the requirement of synchronization during the continuous operation of various plant systems by feeding a central clock to all the plant systems. This paper presents the Time Synchronization System of SST-1, the results of the integrated testing and engineering validation with various SST-1 subsystems.

  3. Observation of internal transport barrier in ELMy H-mode plasmas on the EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Gao, X.; Liu, H. Q.; Li, G. Q.; Zhang, T.; Zeng, L.; Liu, Y. K.; Wu, M. Q.; Kong, D. F.; Ming, T. F.; Han, X.; Wang, Y. M.; Zang, Q.; Lyu, B.; Li, Y. Y.; Duan, Y. M.; Zhong, F. B.; Li, K.; Xu, L. Q.; Gong, X. Z.; Sun, Y. W.; Qian, J. P.; Ding, B. J.; Liu, Z. X.; Liu, F. K.; Hu, C. D.; Xiang, N.; Liang, Y. F.; Zhang, X. D.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; Wan, Y. X.; EAST Team

    2017-08-01

    The internal transport barrier (ITB) has been obtained in ELMy H-mode plasmas by neutron beam injection and lower hybrid wave heating on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). The ITB structure has been observed in profiles of ion temperature, electron temperature, and electron density within ρ safety factor q(0) ˜ 1. Transport coefficients are calculated by particle balance and power balance analysis, showing an obvious reduction after the ITB formation.

  4. A novel superconducting toroidal field magnetic concept using advanced materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.

    1991-01-01

    The plasma physics database indicates that two distinct approaches to tokamak design may lead to commercial fusion reactors: Low Aspect ratio, high plasma current, relatively low magnetic field devices, and high Aspect ratio, high field devices. The former requires significant enhancements in plasma performance, while the latter depends primarily upon technology development. The key technology for the commercialization of the high-field approach is large, high magnetic field superconducting magnets. In this paper, the physics motivation for the high field approach and key superconducting magnet (SCM) development issues are reviewed. Improved SCM performance may be obtained from improved materials and/or improved engineering. Superconducting materials ranging from NbTi to high-T c oxides are reviewed, demonstrating the broad range of potential superconducting materials. Structural material options are discussed, including cryogenic steel alloys and fiber-reinforced composite materials. The potential for improved magnet engineering is quantified in terms of the Virial Theorem Limit, and two examples of approaches to highly optimized magnet configurations are discussed. The force-reduced concept, which is a finite application of the force-free solutions to Ampere's Law, appear promising for large SCMs but may be limited by the electromagnetics of a fusion plasma. The Solid Superconducting Cylinder (SSC) concept is proposed. This concept combines the unique properties of high-T c superconductors within a low-T c SCM to obtain (1) significant reductions in the structural material volume, (2) a decoupling of the tri-axial (compressive and tensile) stress rate, and (3) a demountable TF magnet system. The advantages of this approach are quantified in terms of a 24 T commercial reactor TF magnet system. Significant reductions in the mechanical stress and the TF radial build are demonstrated. 54 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs

  5. Proceedings of 1995 the first Taedok international fusion symposium on advanced tokamak researches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S K; Lee, K W; Hwang, C K; Hong, B G; Hong, G W [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-05-01

    This proceeding is from the First Taeduk International Fusion Symposium on advanced tokamak research, which was held at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taeduk Science Town, Korea on March 28-29, 1995. (Author) .new.

  6. Lessons learned from the tokamak Advanced Reactor Innovation and Evaluation Study (ARIES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; Werley, K.A.

    1994-01-01

    Lessons from the four-year ARIES (Advanced Reactor Innovation and Evaluation Study) investigation of a number of commercial magnetic-fusion-energy (MFE) power-plant embodiments of the tokamak are summarized. These lessons apply to physics, engineering and technology, and environmental, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) characteristics of projected tokamak power plants. Summarized herein are the composite conclusions and lessons developed in the course of four conceptual tokamak power-plant designs. A general conclusion from this extensive investigation of the commercial potential of tokamak power plants is the need for combined, symbiotic advances in both physics, engineering, and materials before economic competitiveness with developing advanced energy sources can be realized. Advances in materials are also needed for the exploitation of environmental advantages otherwise inherent in fusion power

  7. Proceedings of 1995 the first Taedok international fusion symposium on advanced tokamak researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. K.; Lee, K. W.; Hwang, C. K.; Hong, B. G.; Hong, G. W.

    1995-05-01

    This proceeding is from the First Taeduk International Fusion Symposium on advanced tokamak research, which was held at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taeduk Science Town, Korea on March 28-29, 1995. (Author) .new

  8. Lessons learned from the Tokamak Advanced Reactor Innovation and Evaluation Study (ARIES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; Werley, K.A.

    1994-01-01

    Lessons from the four-year ARIES (Advanced Reactor Innovation and Evaluation Study) investigation of a number of commercial magnetic-fusion-energy (MFE) power-plant embodiments of the tokamak are summarized. These lessons apply to physics, engineering and technology, and environmental, safety and health (ES ampersand H) characteristics of projected tokamak power plants. A general conclusion from this extensive investigation of the commercial potential of tokamak power plants is the need for combined, symbiotic advances relative to present understanding in physics, engineering, and materials before economic competitiveness with developing advanced energy sources can be realized. Advanced tokamak plasmas configured in the second-stability regime that achieve both high β and bootstrap fractions near unity through strong profile control offer high promise in this regard

  9. Advances in superconducting cyclotrons at MSU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blosser, H.; Antaya, T.; Au, R.

    1987-01-01

    Intensive work on superconducting cyclotrons began at MSU in late 1973 (a brief earlier study had occurred in the early 1960's) and continues vigorously at present. One large cyclotron, the ''K500'', has been operating for a number of years, a second, the ''K800'', is nearing completion, the first operating tests of its magnet having occurred at the time of the previous conference, and a third, the ''medical cyclotron'', is now also nearing completion with first operation of its magnet expected just after the present conference. These cyclotrons like other superconducting cyclotrons are all dramatically smaller than comparable room temperature machines; overall weight is typically about 1/20th of that of room temperature cyclotrons of the same energy. This large reduction in the quantities of materials is partially offset by added complexity, but finally, a net overall cost savings of 50 to 70 % typically results; as a consequence the superconducting cyclotron is widely viewed as the cyclotron of the future. The thirteen years of experience at MSU involving three of these cyclotrons, together with much important work at other laboratories, gives a rather clear view of the advantages and disadvantages of various design approaches including by now a rather significant period of long term evaluation. This paper reviews highlights of this program. (author)

  10. Advanced reactor experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amri, A.; Papin, J.; Uhle, J.; Vitanza, C.

    2010-01-01

    For many years, the NEA has been examining advanced reactor issues and disseminating information of use to regulators, designers and researchers on safety issues and research needed. Following the recommendation of participants at an NEA workshop, a Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) was initiated with the aim of providing an overview of facilities suitable for carrying out the safety research considered necessary for gas-cooled reactors (GCRs) and sodium fast reactors (SFRs), with other reactor systems possibly being considered in a subsequent phase. The TAREF was thus created in 2008 with the following participating countries: Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Korea and the United States. In a second stage, India provided valuable information on its experimental facilities related to SFR safety research. The study method adopted entailed first identifying high-priority safety issues that require research and then categorizing the available facilities in terms of their ability to address the safety issues. For each of the technical areas, the task members agreed on a set of safety issues requiring research and established a ranking with regard to safety relevance (high, medium, low) and the status of knowledge based on the following scale relative to full knowledge: high (100%-75%), medium (75 - 25%) and low (25-0%). Only the issues identified as being of high safety relevance and for which the state of knowledge is low or medium were included in the discussion, as these issues would likely warrant further study. For each of the safety issues, the TAREF members identified appropriate facilities, providing relevant information such as operating conditions (in- or out-of reactor), operating range, description of the test section, type of testing, instrumentation, current status and availability, and uniqueness. Based on the information collected, the task members assessed prospects and priorities

  11. High-β steady-state advanced tokamak regimes for ITER and FIRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meade, D.M.; Sauthoff, N.R.; Kessel, C.E.; Budny, R.V.; Gorelenkov, N.; Jardin, S.C.; Schmidt, J.A.; Navratil, G.A.; Bialek, J.; Ulrickson, M.A.; Rognlein, T.; Mandrekas, J.

    2005-01-01

    An attractive tokamak-based fusion power plant will require the development of high-β steady-state advanced tokamak regimes to produce a high-gain burning plasma with a large fraction of self-driven current and high fusion-power density. Both ITER and FIRE are being designed with the objective to address these issues by exploring and understanding burning plasma physics both in the conventional H-mode regime, and in advanced tokamak regimes with β N ∼ 3 - 4, and f bs ∼50-80%. ITER has employed conservative scenarios, as appropriate for its nuclear technology mission, while FIRE has employed more aggressive assumptions aimed at exploring the scenarios envisioned in the ARIES power-plant studies. The main characteristics of the advanced scenarios presently under study for ITER and FIRE are compared with advanced tokamak regimes envisioned for the European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS-C), the US ARIES-RS Power Plant Study and the Japanese Advanced Steady-State Tokamak Reactor (ASSTR). The goal of the present work is to develop advanced tokamak scenarios that would fully exploit the capability of ITER and FIRE. This paper will summarize the status of the work and indicate critical areas where further R and D is needed. (author)

  12. Ultra-long pulse operation using lower hybrid waves on the superconducting high field tokamak TRIAM-1M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Nagao, A.; Jotaki, E.; Nakamura, K.; Hiraki, N.; Itoh, S.

    1990-01-01

    Ultra-long pulse operation (>3 min) was achieved on the superconducting high field tokamak TRIAM-1M. In this operation, the plasma current was maintained with a relatively peaked current distribution by the 2.45 GHz radiofrequency power (P RF ≤ 35 kW) alone. A stationary plasma with a driven current of up to 35 kA and a line averaged electron density of up to 3x10 12 cm -3 was produced by precise plasma position and gas feed control. The extremely long discharge showed the interesting characteristics that the high temperatures of about 1 keV for the electrons and about 0.5 keV for the ions were kept almost constant during steady state current drive and that there was no impurity accumulation which could have a fatally adverse effect on steady state tokamak operation. (author). 16 refs, 17 figs

  13. Advances in comprehensive gyrokinetic simulations of transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltz, R.E.; Candy, J.; Hinton, F.L.; Estrada-Mila, C.; Kinsey, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    A continuum global gyrokinetic code GYRO has been developed to comprehensively simulate core turbulent transport in actual experimental profiles and enable direct quantitative comparisons to the experimental transport flows. GYRO not only treats the now standard ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence, but also treats trapped and passing electrons with collisions and finite β, equilibrium ExB shear stabilization, and all in real tokamak geometry. Most importantly the code operates at finite relative gyroradius (ρ*) so as to treat the profile shear stabilization and nonlocal effects which can break gyroBohm scaling. The code operates in either a cyclic flux-tube limit (which allows only gyroBohm scaling) or globally with physical profile variation. Bohm scaling of DIII-D L-mode has been simulated with power flows matching experiment within error bars on the ion temperature gradient. Mechanisms for broken gyroBohm scaling, neoclassical ion flows embedded in turbulence, turbulent dynamos and profile corrugations, are illustrated. (author)

  14. ADVANCES IN COMPREHENSIVE GYROKINETIC SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT IN TOKAMAKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WALTZ, RE; CANDY, J; HINTON, FL; ESTRADA-MILA, C; KINSEY, JE.

    2004-01-01

    A continuum global gyrokinetic code GYRO has been developed to comprehensively simulate core turbulent transport in actual experimental profiles and enable direct quantitative comparisons to the experimental transport flows. GYRO not only treats the now standard ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence, but also treats trapped and passing electrons with collisions and finite β, equilibrium ExB shear stabilization, and all in real tokamak geometry. Most importantly the code operates at finite relative gyroradius (ρ * ) so as to treat the profile shear stabilization and nonlocal effects which can break gyroBohm scaling. The code operates in either a cyclic flux-tube limit (which allows only gyroBohm scaling) or a globally with physical profile variation. Rohm scaling of DIII-D L-mode has been simulated with power flows matching experiment within error bars on the ion temperature gradient. Mechanisms for broken gyroBohm scaling, neoclassical ion flows embedded in turbulence, turbulent dynamos and profile corrugations, plasma pinches and impurity flow, and simulations at fixed flow rather than fixed gradient are illustrated and discussed

  15. ARIES-AT: An advanced tokamak, advanced technology fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najmabadi, F.; Jardin, S.C.; Tillack, M.; Waganer, L.M.

    2001-01-01

    The ARIES-AT study was initiated to assess the potential of high-performance tokamak plasmas together with advanced technology in a fusion power plant. Several avenues were pursued in order to arrive at plasmas with a higher β and better bootstrap alignment compared to ARIES-RS that led to plasmas with higher β N and β. Advanced technologies that are examined in detail include: (1) Possible improvements to the overall system by using high-temperature superconductors, (2) Innovative SiC blankets that lead to a high thermal cycle efficiency of ∼60%; and (3) Advanced manufacturing techniques which aim at producing near-finished products directly from raw material, resulting in low-cost, and reliable components. The 1000-MWe ARIES-AT design has a major radius of 5.4 m, minor radius of 1.3 M, a toroidal β of 9.2% (β N =6.0) and an on-axis field of 5.6 T. The plasma current is 13 MA and the current drive power is 24 MW. The ARIES-AT study shows that the combination of advanced tokamak modes and advanced technology leads to attractive fusion power plant with excellent safety and environmental characteristics and with a cost of electricity (5c/kWh), which is competitive with those projected for other sources of energy. (author)

  16. Perturbative transport experiments in JET Advanced Tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantica, P.; Gorini, G.; Sozzi, C. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milan (Italy); Imbeaux, F.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X. [Association Euratom-CEA, St. Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Kinsey, J. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, Pennsylvania (United States); Budny, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, New Jersey (United States); Coffey, I.; Parail, V.; Walden, A. [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Dux, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Garzotti, L. [Istituto Gas Ionizzati, Padova (Italy); Ingesson, C. [FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Kissick, M. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Perturbative transport experiments have been performed in JET Advanced Tokamak plasmas either in conditions of fully developed Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) or during a phase where an ITB was not observed. Transient peripheral cooling was induced by either Laser Ablation or Shallow Pellet Injection and the ensuing travelling cold pulse was used to probe the plasma transport in the electron and, for the first time, also in the ion channel. Cold pulses travelling through ITBs are observed to erode the ITB outer part, but, if the inner ITB portion survives, it strongly damps the propagating wave. The result is discussed in the context of proposed possible pictures for ITB formation. In the absence of an ITB, the cold pulse shows a fast propagation in the outer plasma half, which is consistent with a region of stiff transport, while in the inner half it slows down but shows the peculiar feature of amplitude growing while propagating. The data are powerful tests for the validation of theoretical transport models. (author)

  17. Plasma control issues for an advanced steady state tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with specific control issues related to the advanced tokamak scenarios in which rather accurate tailoring of the current density profile is a requirement in connection with the steady state operation of a reactor in a high confinement optimized shear mode. It is found that adequate current profile control can be performed if real-time magnetic flux reconstruction is available through a set of dedicated diagnostics and computers, with sufficient accuracy to deduce the radial profile of the safety factor and of the internal plasma loop voltage. It is also shown that the safety factor can be precisely controlled in the outer half of the plasma through the surface loop voltage and the off-axis current drive power, but that a compromise must be made between the accuracy of the core safety factor control and the total duration of the current and fuel density ramp-up phases, so that the demonstration of the steady state reactor potential of the optimized/reversed shear concept in the Next Step device will demand pulse lengths of the order of one thousand seconds (or more for an ITER-size machine). (author)

  18. Plasma control issues for an advanced steady state tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.; Voitsekhovitch, I.

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with specific control issues related to the advanced tokamak scenarios in which rather accurate tailoring of the current density profile is a requirement in connection with the steady state operation of a reactor in a high confinement optimized shear mode. It is found that adequate current profile control can be performed if real-time magnetic flux reconstruction is available through a set of dedicated diagnostics and computers, with sufficient accuracy to deduce the radial profile of the safety factor and of the internal plasma loop voltage. It is also shown that the safety factor can be precisely controlled in the outer half of the plasma through the surface loop voltage and the off-axis current drive power, but that a compromise must be made between the accuracy of the core safety factor control and the total duration of the current and fuel density ramp-up phases, so that the demonstration of the steady state reactor potential of the optimized/reversed shear concept in the Next Step device will demand pulse lengths of the order of one thousand seconds (or more for an ITER-size machine). (author)

  19. Magnetic field shielding system in a tokamak experimental power reactor (EPR): concept and calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Marcus, F.B.; Dory, R.A.; Moore, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    A poloidal magnetic field shielding system is proposed for a tokamak EPR. This coil system minimizes the pulsed poloidal field that intersects the TF (toroidal field) coils and hence reduces the risk of superconductor quenching and structural failure of the coils. Based on an idealized shielding model, we have determined the configurations for the OH (ohmic heating), the S-VF (shield-vertical field), and the T-VF (trimming-vertical field) coils in a typical tokamak EPR. It is found that the pulsed poloidal field strength is greatly reduced in the TF coil region. The overall requirement in stored plasma and vertical field energy is also substantially reduced when compared with conventional EPR designs. Use of this field shielding system is expected to enhance reliability of the superconducting TF coils in a tokamak EPR

  20. Magnetic field structure of experimental high beta tokamak equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deniz, A.V.

    1986-01-01

    The magnetic field structure of several low and high β tokamaks in the Columbia High Beta Tokamak (HBT) was determined by high-impedance internal magnetic probes. From the measurement of the magnetic field, the poloidal flux, toroidal flux, toroidal current, and safety factor are calculated. In addition, the plasma position and cross-sectional shape are determined. The extent of the perturbation of the plasma by the probe was investigated and was found to be acceptably small. The tokamaks have major radii of approx.0.24 m, minor radii of approx.0.05 m, toroidal plasma current densities of approx.10 6 A/m 2 , and line-integrated electron densities of approx.10 20 m -2 . The major difference between the low and high β tokamaks is that the high β tokamak was observed to have an outward shift in major radius of both the magnetic center and peak of the toroidal current density. The magnetic center moves inward in major radius after 20 to 30 μsec, presumably because the plasma maintains major radial equilibrium as its pressure decreases from radiation due to impurity atoms. Both the equilibrium and the production of these tokamaks from a toroidal field stabilized z-pinch are modeled computationally. One tokamak evolves from a state with low β features, through a possibly unstable state, to a state with high β features

  1. Progress of JT-60SA Project: EU-JA joint efforts for assembly and fabrication of superconducting tokamak facilities and its research planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirai, Hiroshi, E-mail: shirai.hiroshi@jaea.go.jp [JT-60SA Project Team, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Barabaschi, Pietro [JT-60SA EU-Home Team, Fusion for Energy, Boltsmannstr 2, Garching 85748 (Germany); Kamada, Yutaka [JT-60SA JA-Home Team, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • JT-60SA Project is promoted under the BA Agreement and JA national programme. • JT-60SA is designed to operate in break-even equivalent condition for a long period. • JT-60SA Project supports and complements the ITER project, and promotes DEMO design. • Fabrication of JT-60SA components and assembly in Naka are steadily going on. • JT-60SA Research Plan has been developed jointly by EU and JA fusion communities. - Abstract: Aiming at supporting the early realization of fusion energy, the JT-60SA Project has shown steady progress for several years toward the first plasma in 2019 under the dual frameworks: the Satellite Tokamak Programme of the Broader Approach Agreement between EU and Japan, and the Japanese national programme. JT-60SA is a superconducting tokamak designed to operate in break-even equivalent conditions for a long pulse duration (typically 100 s) with a maximum plasma current of 5.5 MA. A variety of plasma control capabilities enable JT-60SA to contribute directly to the ITER project and also to DEMO by addressing key engineering and physics issues for advanced plasma operation. Design and fabrication of JT-60SA components, shared by the EU and Japan, started in 2007. Assembly in the torus hall started in January 2013, and welding work of the vacuum vessel sectors (seven 40° sectors and two 30° sectors) is currently ongoing on the cryostat base. Other components such as TF coils, PF coils, power supplies, cryogenic system, cryostat vessel, thermal shields and so on were or are being delivered to the Naka site for installation, assembly and commissioning. This paper gives technical progress on fabrication, installation and assembly of tokamak components and ancillary systems, as well as progress of the JT-60SA Research Plan being developed jointly by European and Japanese fusion communities.

  2. Experimental device for the X-ray energetic distribution measurement in a tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Navarro, A.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental system to measure the X-ray spectrum in a tokamak plasma is described, emphasizing its characteristics: resolution, dead time and the pulse pile-up distortion effects on the X-ray spectra. (author) [es

  3. First results on fast wave current drive in advanced tokamak discharges in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prater, R.; Cary, W.P.; Baity, F.W.

    1995-07-01

    Initial experiments have been performed on the DIII-D tokamak on coupling, direct electron heating, and current drive by fast waves in advanced tokamak discharges. These experiments showed efficient central heating and current drive in agreement with theory in magnitude and profile. Extrapolating these results to temperature characteristic of a power plant (25 keV) gives current drive efficiency of about 0.3 MA/m 2

  4. Experimental result of poloidal limiter baking of Aditya tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadeja, K.A.; Arambhadiya, B.G.; Bhatt, S.B.; Bora, D.

    2005-01-01

    In tokamak Aditya, Poloidal limiter function as the operational limiter and are subjected to very high particles load and heat flux during plasma discharge. In addition, Poloidal limiter is the first material surface to come in contact with the hot plasma. In plasma discharge, the impurity generations from limiter are mostly by adsorbed particles. The baking of limiter provides high degassing rate and thermal desorption of adsorbed particles of limiter to reduce impurities from the limiter tiles. The series of experiments are done with different conditions like, Baking of limiter SS ring by heating element with and without limiter tiles in atmosphere and vacuum. Than Poloidal limiter is structured with 14 numbers of graphite tiles and electrical isolated to the vessel and support structure. As a heating element and for electrical isolation, Nychrome wire and ceramic block with ceramic tubes are used. In addition, Thermo couple and two DC power supply (0-10 Ampere) are used for limiter baking. Mass analyzer gives partial pressures of different species to observe effect of limiter baking. For the period of Poloidal limiter baking in Aditya, the partial pressures of different species like hydrogen, water vapor, and oxygen are extremely increased with time duration. This paper presents series of experimental results of poloidal limiter baking. (author)

  5. Oak Ridge Tokamak experimental power reactor study scoping report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, M.

    1977-03-01

    This report presents the scoping studies performed as the initial part of the program to produce a conceptual design for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor (EPR). The EPR as considered in this study is to employ all systems necessary for significant electric power production at continuous high duty cycle operation; it is presently scheduled to be the final technological step before a Demonstration Reactor Plant (Demo). The scoping study tasks begin with an exploration and identification of principal problem areas and then concentrate on consideration and evaluation of alternate design choices for each of the following major systems: Plasma Engineering and Physics, Nuclear, Electromagnetics, Neutral Beam Injection, and Tritium Handling. In addition, consideration has been given to the integration of these systems and requirements arising out of their incorporation into an EPR. One intent of this study is to document the paths explored in search of the appropriate EPR characteristics. To satisfy this intent, the explorations are presented in chart form outlining possible options in key areas with extensive supporting footnotes. An important result of the scoping study has been the development and definition of an EPR reference design to serve as (1) a common focus for the continuing design study and (2) a guide for associated development programs. In addition, the study has identified research and development requirements essential to facilitate the successful conceptual design, construction, and operation of an EPR

  6. The stability margin on EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin-Ping, Qian; Bao-Nian, Wan; Biao, Shen; Bing-Jia, Xiao; Walker, M.L.; Humphreys, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    The experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) is the first full superconducting tokamak with a D-shaped cross-sectional plasma presently in operation. Its poloidal coils are relatively far from the plasma due to the necessary thermal isolation from the superconducting magnets, which leads to relatively weaker coupling between plasma and poloidal field. This may cause more difficulties in controlling the vertical instability by using the poloidal coils. The measured growth rates of vertical stability are compared with theoretical calculations, based on a rigid plasma model. Poloidal beta and internal inductance are varied to investigate their effects on the stability margin by changing the values of parameters α n and γ n (Howl et al 1992 Phys. Fluids B 4 1724), with plasma shape fixed to be a configuration with k = 1.9 and δ = 0.5. A number of ways of studying the stability margin are investigated. Among them, changing the values of parameters κ and l i is shown to be the most effective way to increase the stability margin. Finally, a guideline of stability margin M s (κ, l i , A) to a new discharge scenario showing whether plasmas can be stabilized is also presented in this paper

  7. HIGH PERFORMANCE ADVANCED TOKAMAK REGIMES FOR NEXT-STEP EXPERIMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GREENFIELD, C.M.; MURAKAMI, M.; FERRON, J.R.; WADE, M.R.; LUCE, T.C.; PETTY, C.C.; MENARD, J.E; PETRIE, T.W.; ALLEN, S.L.; BURRELL, K.H.; CASPER, T.A; DeBOO, J.C.; DOYLE, E.J.; GAROFALO, A.M; GORELOV, Y.A; GROEBNER, R.J.; HOBIRK, J.; HYATT, A.W; JAYAKUMAR, R.J; KESSEL, C.E; LA HAYE, R.J; JACKSON, G.L; LOHR, J.; MAKOWSKI, M.A.; PINSKER, R.I.; POLITZER, P.A.; PRATER, R.; STRAIT, E.J.; TAYLOR, T.S; WEST, W.P.

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 Advanced Tokamak (AT) research in DIII-D seeks to provide a scientific basis for steady-state high performance operation in future devices. These regimes require high toroidal beta to maximize fusion output and poloidal beta to maximize the self-driven bootstrap current. Achieving these conditions requires integrated, simultaneous control of the current and pressure profiles, and active magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability control. The building blocks for AT operation are in hand. Resistive wall mode stabilization via plasma rotation and active feedback with non-axisymmetric coils allows routine operation above the no-wall beta limit. Neoclassical tearing modes are stabilized by active feedback control of localized electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD). Plasma shaping and profile control provide further improvements. Under these conditions, bootstrap supplies most of the current. Steady-state operation requires replacing the remaining Ohmic current, mostly located near the half-radius, with noninductive external sources. In DIII-D this current is provided by ECCD, and nearly stationary AT discharges have been sustained with little remaining Ohmic current. Fast wave current drive is being developed to control the central magnetic shear. Density control, with divertor cryopumps, of AT discharges with edge localized moding (ELMing) H-mode edges facilitates high current drive efficiency at reactor relevant collisionalities. A sophisticated plasma control system allows integrated control of these elements. Close coupling between modeling and experiment is key to understanding the separate elements, their complex nonlinear interactions, and their integration into self-consistent high performance scenarios. Progress on this development, and its implications for next-step devices, will be illustrated by results of recent experiment and simulation efforts

  8. Experimental evaluation of a high performance superconducting torquer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldie, J.H.; Avakian, K.M.; Downer, J.R.; Gerver, M.; Gondhalekar, V.; Johnson, B.G.

    1991-01-01

    SatCon has completed a two-year program to design and build a prototype demonstration of a torque actuator which employs a superconducting field magnet. The program culminated with the successful demonstration of close loop torque control, following a desired double version torque profile to an accuracy of approximately 1% of the peak torque of the profile. The targeted double version possessed a peak torque which matches the torque capacity of the M4500 CMG (controlled moment gyro), the largest Sperry double gimbal CMG. The research provided strong evidence of the feasibility of a SatCon-developed advanced concept CMG, depicted schematically in this paper, which would employ cryoresistive control coils in conjunction with an electromagnetically suspended rotor and superconducting source coil. The cryoresistive coils interact with the superconducting solenoid to develop the desired torque and, in addition, the required suspension forces

  9. Intrinsic and experimental quasiparticle recombination times in superconducting films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenmenger, W.; Lassmann, K.; Trumpp, H.J.; Krauss, R.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental quasiparticle recombination lifetime data for superconducting Al, Sn, and Pb films are compared with calculations based on a ray acoustic model taking account of the film thickness dependence of the reabsorption of recombination phonons. Information on the true or intrinsic quasiparticle recombination lifetime obtained from these and other data is discussed. (orig.) [de

  10. Transient heat transport studies in JET conventional and advanced tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantica, P.; Coffey, I.; Dux, R.

    2003-01-01

    Transient transport studies are a valuable complement to steady-state analysis for the understanding of transport mechanisms and the validation of physics-based transport models. This paper presents results from transient heat transport experiments in JET and their modelling. Edge cold pulses and modulation of ICRH (in mode conversion scheme) have been used to provide detectable electron and ion temperature perturbations. The experiments have been performed in conventional L-mode plasmas or in Advanced Tokamak regimes, in the presence of an Internal Transport Barrier (ITB). In conventional plasmas, the issues of stiffness and non-locality have been addressed. Cold pulse propagation in ITB plasmas has provided useful insight into the physics of ITB formation. The use of edge perturbations for ITB triggering has been explored. Modelling of the experimental results has been performed using both empirical models and physics-based models. Results of cold pulse experiments in ITBs have also been compared with turbulence simulations. (author)

  11. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Creswick, Richard J; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Superconductivity, Third Edition is an encyclopedic treatment of all aspects of the subject, from classic materials to fullerenes. Emphasis is on balanced coverage, with a comprehensive reference list and significant graphics from all areas of the published literature. Widely used theoretical approaches are explained in detail. Topics of special interest include high temperature superconductors, spectroscopy, critical states, transport properties, and tunneling. This book covers the whole field of superconductivity from both the theoretical and the experimental point of view. This third edition features extensive revisions throughout, and new chapters on second critical field and iron based superconductors.

  12. Overview of data acquisition and central control system of steady state superconducting Tokamak (SST-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, S.; Mahajan, K.; Gulati, H.K.; Sharma, M.; Kumar, A.; Patel, K.; Masand, H.; Mansuri, I.; Dhongde, J.; Bhandarkar, M.; Chudasama, H.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The paper gives overview on SST-1 data acquisition and central control system and future upgrade plans. • The lossless PXI based data acquisition of SST-1 is capable of acquiring around 130 channels with sampling frequency ranging from 10 KHz to 1 MHz sampling frequency. • Design, architecture and technologies used for central control system (CCS) of SST-1. • Functions performed by CCS. - Abstract: Steady State Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) has been commissioned successfully and has been carrying out limiter assisted ohmic plasma experiments since the beginning of 2014 achieving a maximum plasma current of 75 kA at a central field of 1.5 T and the plasma duration ∼500 ms. In near future, SST-1 looks forward to carrying out elongated plasma experiments and stretching plasma pulses beyond 1 s. The data acquisition and central control system (CCS) for SST-1 are distributed, modular, hierarchical and scalable in nature The CCS has been indigenously designed, developed, implemented, tested and validated for the operation of SST-1. The CCS has been built using well proven technologies like Redhat Linux, vxWorks RTOS for deterministic control, FPGA based hardware implementation, Ethernet, fiber optics backbone for network, DSP for real-time computation & Reflective memory for high-speed data transfer etc. CCS in SST-1 controls & monitors various heterogeneous SST-1 subsystems dispersed in the same campus. The CCS consists of machine control system, basic plasma control system, GPS time synchronization system, storage area network (SAN) for centralize data storage, SST-1 networking system, real-time networks, SST-1 control room infrastructure and many other supportive systems. Machine Control System (MCS) is a multithreaded event driven system running on Linux based servers, where each thread of the software communicates to a unique subsystem for monitoring and control from SST-1 central control room through network programming. The CCS hardware

  13. Overview of data acquisition and central control system of steady state superconducting Tokamak (SST-1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, S., E-mail: pradhan@ipr.res.in; Mahajan, K.; Gulati, H.K.; Sharma, M.; Kumar, A.; Patel, K.; Masand, H.; Mansuri, I.; Dhongde, J.; Bhandarkar, M.; Chudasama, H.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The paper gives overview on SST-1 data acquisition and central control system and future upgrade plans. • The lossless PXI based data acquisition of SST-1 is capable of acquiring around 130 channels with sampling frequency ranging from 10 KHz to 1 MHz sampling frequency. • Design, architecture and technologies used for central control system (CCS) of SST-1. • Functions performed by CCS. - Abstract: Steady State Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) has been commissioned successfully and has been carrying out limiter assisted ohmic plasma experiments since the beginning of 2014 achieving a maximum plasma current of 75 kA at a central field of 1.5 T and the plasma duration ∼500 ms. In near future, SST-1 looks forward to carrying out elongated plasma experiments and stretching plasma pulses beyond 1 s. The data acquisition and central control system (CCS) for SST-1 are distributed, modular, hierarchical and scalable in nature The CCS has been indigenously designed, developed, implemented, tested and validated for the operation of SST-1. The CCS has been built using well proven technologies like Redhat Linux, vxWorks RTOS for deterministic control, FPGA based hardware implementation, Ethernet, fiber optics backbone for network, DSP for real-time computation & Reflective memory for high-speed data transfer etc. CCS in SST-1 controls & monitors various heterogeneous SST-1 subsystems dispersed in the same campus. The CCS consists of machine control system, basic plasma control system, GPS time synchronization system, storage area network (SAN) for centralize data storage, SST-1 networking system, real-time networks, SST-1 control room infrastructure and many other supportive systems. Machine Control System (MCS) is a multithreaded event driven system running on Linux based servers, where each thread of the software communicates to a unique subsystem for monitoring and control from SST-1 central control room through network programming. The CCS hardware

  14. Study on H-mode access at low density with lower hybrid current drive and lithium-wall coatings on the EAST superconducting tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G.S.; Wan, B.N.; Li, J.G.

    2011-01-01

    The first high-confinement mode (H-mode) with type-III edge localized modes at an H factor of HIPB98(y,2) ~ 1 has been obtained with about 1 MW lower hybrid wave power on the EAST superconducting tokamak. The first H-mode plasma appeared after wall conditioning by lithium (Li) evaporation before ...

  15. Transients and burn dynamics in advanced tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantsinen, M.J.; Salomaa, R.R.E.

    1994-01-01

    Transient behavior of D 3 He-tokamak reactors is investigated numerically using a zero-dimensional code with prescribed profiles. Pure D 3 He start-up is compared to DT-assisted and DT-ignited start-ups. We have considered two categories of transients which could extinguish steady fusion burn: fuelling interruptions and sudden confinement changes similar to the L → H transients occurring in present-day tokamaks. Shutdown with various current and density ramp-down scenarios are studied, too. (author)

  16. ANL experimental program for pulsed superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Kim, S.H.; Praeg, W.F.; Krieger, C.I.

    1978-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) had recognized the clear advantage of a superconducting ohmic-heating (OH) coil and started in aggressive development program in FY 1977. The main objectives for FY 1977 are to develop cryostable basic cable configurations with reasonably low ac losses, to develop 12 kA cryostable cable, using it to design and build a 1.5 MJ pulsed coil, and to develop a rather inexpensive large fiberglass reinforced helium cryostat for the 1.5 MJ pulsed coil. The principal objective in building the 1.5 MJ ac coil is to demonstrate ac cryostability of a large coil ranging from 2 T/s up to 12 T/s. Another objective in the pulsed coil program is to determine the feasibility of parallel coil operation in order to avoid excessive voltage and current requirements and to minimize the number of turns for the equilibrium field (EF) coils, should the EF coils be connected in parallel with the OH coils. A two-coil section model using the 11 kA cable will be built and tested

  17. ANL experimental program for pulsed superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Kim, S.H.; Praeg, W.F.; Krieger, C.I.

    1977-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) had recognized the clear advantage of a superconducting ohmic-heating (OH) coil and started an aggressive development program in FY 1977. The main objectives for FY 1977 are to develop cryostable basic cable configurations with reasonably low ac losses, to develop 12 kA cryostable cable, using it to design and build a 1.5 MJ pulsed coil, and to develop a rather inexpensive large fiberglass reinforced helium cryostat for the 1.5 MJ pulsed coil. The principal objective in building the 1.5 MJ ac coil is to demonstrate ac cryostability of a large coil ranging from 2 T/s up to 12 T/s. Another objective in the pusled coil program is to determine the feasibility of parallel coil operation in order to avoid excessive voltage and current requirements and to minimize the number of turns for the equilibrium field (EF) coils, should the EF coils be connected in parallel with the OH coils. A two-coil section model using the 11 kA cable will be built and tested

  18. ADX: a high field, high power density, advanced divertor and RF tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Terry, J. L.; Vieira, R.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; Baek, S.; Beck, W.; Bonoli, P.; Brunner, D.; Doody, J.; Ellis, R.; Ernst, D.; Fiore, C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Kessel, C.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Leccacorvi, R.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Mahajan, S.; Minervini, J.; Mumgaard, R.; Nygren, R.; Parker, R.; Poli, F.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J.; Rognlien, T.; Rowan, W.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, D.; Theiler, C.; Titus, P.; Umansky, M.; Valanju, P.; Walk, J.; White, A.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, G.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-05-01

    The MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and collaborators are proposing a high-performance Advanced Divertor and RF tokamak eXperiment (ADX)—a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research programme on the pathway to next-step devices: fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF), fusion pilot plant (FPP) and/or demonstration power plant (DEMO). This high-field (⩾6.5 T, 1.5 MA), high power density facility (P/S ˜ 1.5 MW m-2) will test innovative divertor ideas, including an ‘X-point target divertor’ concept, at the required performance parameters—reactor-level boundary plasma pressures, magnetic field strengths and parallel heat flux densities entering into the divertor region—while simultaneously producing high-performance core plasma conditions that are prototypical of a reactor: equilibrated and strongly coupled electrons and ions, regimes with low or no torque, and no fuelling from external heating and current drive systems. Equally important, the experimental platform will test innovative concepts for lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequency actuators with the unprecedented ability to deploy launch structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-magnetic-field side—the latter being a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and favourable RF wave physics leads to efficient current drive, current profile control, heating and flow drive. This triple combination—advanced divertors, advanced RF actuators, reactor-prototypical core plasma conditions—will enable ADX to explore enhanced core confinement physics, such as made possible by reversed central shear, using only the types of external drive systems that are considered viable for a fusion power plant. Such an integrated demonstration of high-performance core-divertor operation with steady-state sustainment would pave the way towards an attractive pilot plant, as envisioned in the ARC concept

  19. Advanced Beamline Design for Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokop, Christopher [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab is a new electron accelerator currently in the commissioning stage. In addition to testing superconducting accelerating cavities for future accelerators, it is foreseen to support a variety of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments. Producing the required electron bunches with the expected flexibility is challenging. The goal of this dissertation is to explore via numerical simulations new accelerator beamlines that can enable the advanced manipulation of electron bunches. The work especially includes the design of a low-energy bunch compressor and a study of transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchangers.

  20. Trajectory planning of tokamak flexible in-vessel inspection robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hesheng; Chen, Weidong; Lai, Yinping; He, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A tokamak flexible in-vessel inspection robot is designed. • Two trajectory planning methods are used to ensure the full coverage of the first wall scanning. • The method is tested on a simulated platform of EAST with the flexible in-vessel inspection robot. • Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. - Abstract: Tokamak flexible in-vessel inspection robot is mainly designed to carry a camera for close observation of the first wall of the vacuum vessel, which is essential for the maintenance of the future tokamak reactor without breaking the working condition of the vacuum vessel. A tokamak flexible in-vessel inspection robot is designed. In order to improve efficiency of the remote maintenance, it is necessary to design a corresponding trajectory planning algorithm to complete the automatic full coverage scanning of the complex tokamak cavity. Two different trajectory planning methods, RS (rough scanning) and FS (fine scanning), according to different demands of the task, are used to ensure the full coverage of the first wall scanning. To quickly locate the damage position, the first trajectory planning method is targeted for quick and wide-ranging scan of the tokamak D-shaped section, and the second one is for careful observation. Furthermore, both of the two different trajectory planning methods can ensure the full coverage of the first wall scanning with an optimal end posture. The method is tested on a simulated platform of EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) with the flexible in-vessel inspection robot, and the results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  1. Trajectory planning of tokamak flexible in-vessel inspection robot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hesheng [Department of Automation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240 Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of System Control and Information Processing, Ministry of Education of China, 200240 Shanghai (China); Chen, Weidong, E-mail: wdchen@sjtu.edu.cn [Department of Automation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240 Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of System Control and Information Processing, Ministry of Education of China, 200240 Shanghai (China); Lai, Yinping; He, Tao [Department of Automation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240 Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of System Control and Information Processing, Ministry of Education of China, 200240 Shanghai (China)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A tokamak flexible in-vessel inspection robot is designed. • Two trajectory planning methods are used to ensure the full coverage of the first wall scanning. • The method is tested on a simulated platform of EAST with the flexible in-vessel inspection robot. • Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. - Abstract: Tokamak flexible in-vessel inspection robot is mainly designed to carry a camera for close observation of the first wall of the vacuum vessel, which is essential for the maintenance of the future tokamak reactor without breaking the working condition of the vacuum vessel. A tokamak flexible in-vessel inspection robot is designed. In order to improve efficiency of the remote maintenance, it is necessary to design a corresponding trajectory planning algorithm to complete the automatic full coverage scanning of the complex tokamak cavity. Two different trajectory planning methods, RS (rough scanning) and FS (fine scanning), according to different demands of the task, are used to ensure the full coverage of the first wall scanning. To quickly locate the damage position, the first trajectory planning method is targeted for quick and wide-ranging scan of the tokamak D-shaped section, and the second one is for careful observation. Furthermore, both of the two different trajectory planning methods can ensure the full coverage of the first wall scanning with an optimal end posture. The method is tested on a simulated platform of EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) with the flexible in-vessel inspection robot, and the results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  2. Comparison between 2D turbulence model ESEL and experimental data from AUG and COMPASS tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ondac, Peter; Horacek, Jan; Seidl, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    In this article we have used the 2D fluid turbulence numerical model, ESEL, to simulate turbulent transport in edge tokamak plasma. Basic plasma parameters from the ASDEX Upgrade and COMPASS tokamaks are used as input for the model, and the output is compared with experimental observations obtain...... for an extension of the ESEL model from 2D to 3D to fully resolve the parallel dynamics, and the coupling from the plasma to the sheath....

  3. Development on JET of Advanced Tokamak Operations for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuccillo, A.A.; Crisanti, F.; Litaudon, X.

    2005-01-01

    Recent research on Advanced Tokamak in JET has focused on scenarii with both monotonic and reversed shear q profiles having plasma parameters as relevant as possible for extrapolation to ITER. Wide ITBs, R∼3.7m, are formed at ITER relevant triangularity δ∼0.45, with n e /n G ∼60% and ELMs moderated by Ne injection. At higher current (I P ≤3.5MA, δ∼0.25) wide ITBs sitting at R≥ 3.5m (positive shear region) have been developed, generally MHD events terminate these barrier otherwise limited in strength by power availability. ITBs with core density close to Greenwald value are obtained with plasma target preformed by opportune timing of LHCD, pellet injection and small amount of NBI power. ITB start with toroidal rotation 4 times lower than the standard NBI heated ITBs. Full CD is achieved in reversed shear ITBs at 3T/1.8 MA, by using 10MW NBI, 5MW ICRH and 3MW LH. Wide ITBs located at R=3.6m, without impurity accumulation and type-III ELMs edge can be sustained for a time close to neo-classical resistive time. These discharges have been extended to the maximum duration allowed by subsystems (20s) with the JET record of injected energy: E∼330 MJ. Integrated control of pressure and current profile isit; feature used in these discharges. Central ICRF mode conversion electron heating, added to about 14MW NBI power, produced impressive ITBs with equivalent Q DT ∼ 0.25. Conversely ion ITBs are obtained with low torque injection, by ICRH 3 He minority heating of ions, on pure LHCD electron ITBs. Similarity experiments between JET and AUG have compared the dynamics of ITBs and have been the starting point of Hybrid Scenarios activity, then developed at ρ* as low as ρ*∼3*10 -3 . The development of hybrid regime with dominant electron heating has also started. Injection of trace of tritium and a mixture of Ar/Ne allowed studying fuel and impurities transport in many of the explored AT scenarios. (author)

  4. Magnetic confinement experiment -- 1: Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    This report reviews presentations made at the 15th IAEA Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion on experimental tokamak physics, particularly on advances in core plasma physics, divertor and edge physics, heating and current drive, and tokamak concept optimization

  5. Ideal MHD Stability Prediction and Required Power for EAST Advanced Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junjie; Li, Guoqiang; Qian, Jinping; Liu, Zixi

    2012-11-01

    The Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) is the first fully superconducting tokamak with a D-shaped cross-sectional plasma presently in operation. The ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and required power for the EAST advanced tokamak (AT) scenario with negative central shear and double transport barrier (DTB) are investigated. With the equilibrium code TOQ and stability code GATO, the ideal MHD stability is analyzed. It is shown that a moderate ratio of edge transport barriers' (ETB) height to internal transport barriers' (ITBs) height is beneficial to ideal MHD stability. The normalized beta βN limit is about 2.20 (without wall) and 3.70 (with ideal wall). With the scaling law of energy confinement time, the required heating power for EAST AT scenario is calculated. The total heating power Pt increases as the toroidal magnetic field BT or the normalized beta βN is increased.

  6. Ideal MHD Stability Prediction and Required Power for EAST Advanced Scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Junjie; Li Guoqiang; Qian Jinping; Liu Zixi

    2012-01-01

    The Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) is the first fully superconducting tokamak with a D-shaped cross-sectional plasma presently in operation. The ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and required power for the EAST advanced tokamak (AT) scenario with negative central shear and double transport barrier (DTB) are investigated. With the equilibrium code TOQ and stability code GATO, the ideal MHD stability is analyzed. It is shown that a moderate ratio of edge transport barriers' (ETB) height to internal transport barriers' (ITBs) height is beneficial to ideal MHD stability. The normalized beta β N limit is about 2.20 (without wall) and 3.70 (with ideal wall). With the scaling law of energy confinement time, the required heating power for EAST AT scenario is calculated. The total heating power P t increases as the toroidal magnetic field B T or the normalized beta β N is increased. (magnetically confined plasma)

  7. Operational region and sawteeth oscillation in the EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H Q; Gao, X; Zhao, J Y; Hu, L Q; Jie, Y X; Ling, B L; Xu, Q; Ti, A; Ming, T F; Yang, Y; Wu, Z W; Wang, J; Xu, G S; Gao, W; Zhong, G Q; Zang, Q; Shi, Y J; Shen, B; Zhou, Q; Li, Y D; Gong, X Z; Hu, J S; Sun, Y W; Zhao, Y P; Luo, J R; Mao, J S; Weng, P D; Wan, Y X; Zhang, X D; Wan, B N; Li, J

    2007-01-01

    The first plasma discharges were successfully achieved on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) in 2006. The sawteeth behaviours were observed by means of soft x-ray diagnostics and ECE signals in the EAST. The displacement and radius of the q = 1 surface was studied and compared with the result of equilibrium calculation. The density sawtooth oscillation was also observed by the HCN laser interferometer diagnostics. The structure of the EAST operational region was studied in detail. Plasma performance was obviously improved by the boronization and wall conditioning. It was observed that lower q a and a wider stable operating region is extended by the GDC boronization

  8. ADX: A high Power Density, Advanced RF-Driven Divertor Test Tokamak for PMI studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Dennis; ADX Team

    2015-11-01

    The MIT PSFC and collaborators are proposing an advanced divertor experiment, ADX; a divertor test tokamak dedicated to address critical gaps in plasma-material interactions (PMI) science, and the world fusion research program, on the pathway to FNSF/DEMO. Basic ADX design features are motivated and discussed. In order to assess the widest range of advanced divertor concepts, a large fraction (>50%) of the toroidal field volume is purpose-built with innovative magnetic topology control and flexibility for assessing different surfaces, including liquids. ADX features high B-field (>6 Tesla) and high global power density (P/S ~ 1.5 MW/m2) in order to access the full range of parallel heat flux and divertor plasma pressures foreseen for reactors, while simultaneously assessing the effect of highly dissipative divertors on core plasma/pedestal. Various options for efficiently achieving high field are being assessed including the use of Alcator technology (cryogenic cooled copper) and high-temperature superconductors. The experimental platform would also explore advanced lower hybrid current drive and ion-cyclotron range of frequency actuators located at the high-field side; a location which is predicted to greatly reduce the PMI effects on the launcher while minimally perturbing the core plasma. The synergistic effects of high-field launchers with high total B on current and flow drive can thus be studied in reactor-relevant boundary plasmas.

  9. Recent advances in the HL-2A tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.; Ding, X.T.; Yang, Q.W.; Yan, L.W.; Liu, D.Q.; Xuan, W.M.; Chen, L.Y.; Song, X.M.; Cao, Z.; Zhang, J.H.; Mao, W.C.; Zhou, C.P.; Li, X.D.; Wang, S.J.; Yan, J.C.; Bu, M.N.; Chen, Y.H.; Cui, C.H.; Cui, Z.Y.; Deng, Z.C.; Hong, W.Y.; Hu, H.T.; Huang, Y.; Kang, Z.H.; Li, B.; Li, W.; Li, F.Z.; Li, G.S.; Li, H.J.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.G.; Li, Z.J.; Liu, Yi; Liu, Z.T.; Luo, C.W.; Mao, X.H.; Pan, Y.D.; Rao, J.; Shao, K.; Song, X.Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, M.X.; Wang, Q.M.; Xiao, Z.G.; Xie, Y.F.; Yao, L.H.; Yao, L.Y.; Zheng, Y.J.; Zhong, G.W.; Zhou, Y.; Pan, C.H.

    2005-01-01

    Two experiment campaigns were conducted on the HL-2A tokamak in 2003 and 2004 after the first plasma was obtained at the end of 2002. Progresses in many aspects have been made, especially in the divertor discharge and feedback control of plasma configuration. Up to now, the following operation parameters have been achieved: I p = 320 kA, B t = 2.2 T and discharge duration T d = 1580 ms. With the feedback control of plasma current and horizontal position, an excellent repeatability of the discharge has been achieved. The tokamak has been operated at both limiter configuration and single null (SN) divertor configuration. The HL-2A SN divertor configuration is simulated with the MHD equilibrium code SWEQU. When the divertor configuration is formed, the impurity radiation in the main plasma decreases remarkably

  10. Advanced probes for edge plasma diagnostics on the CASTOR tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stöckel, Jan; Adámek, Jiří; Balan, P.; Hronová-Bilyková, Olena; Brotánková, Jana; Dejarnac, Renaud; Devynck, P.; Ďuran, Ivan; Gunn, J. P.; Hron, Martin; Horáček, Jan; Ionita, C.; Kocan, M.; Martines, E.; Pánek, Radomír; Peleman, P.; Schrittwieser, R.; Van Oost, G.; Žáček, František

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 0 (2006), 012001-012002 E-ISSN 1742-6596. [SECOND INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP AND SUMMER SCHOOL ON PLASMA PHYSICS. Kiten, 03.07.2006-09.07.2006] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100430504 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : plasma * tokamak * electric probes * diagnostics Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  11. Experimental demonstration of conflicting interest nonlocal games using superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Situ, Haozhen; Li, Lvzhou; Huang, Zhiming; He, Zhimin; Zhang, Cai

    2018-06-01

    Conflicting interest nonlocal games are special Bayesian games played by noncooperative players without communication. In recent years, some conflicting interest nonlocal games have been proposed where quantum advice can help players to obtain higher payoffs. In this work we perform an experiment of six conflicting interest nonlocal games using the IBM quantum computer made up of five superconducting qubits. The experimental results demonstrate quantum advantage in four of these games, whereas the other two games fail to showcase quantum advantage in the experiment.

  12. Superconducting A.C. generators. Some recent experimental investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, J.S.H.; Smith, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental work is reported which has been carried out in the past three years aimed at evaluating the materials and the design features applicable to large superconducting generators. Two main topics are considered: (1) A detailed and comprehensive investigation into the physical properties of a six tonne forging in austenitic stainless steel AISI 316LN. (2) The design of a system to transfer helium onto and from a rotating shaft. (UK)

  13. Numerical simulation and analysis for the baking out system of the HT-7U super-conducting tokamak device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Yuntao

    2004-01-01

    It can provide an ultrahigh vacuum location for the plasma operation. In order to improve its vacuum degree and attain a high quality operation environment for plasma, it is very important to proceed 250 degree C baking out to clear the wall before the plasma operation. The paper firstly gives two kinds of structures for the baking of the vacuum vessel, in which one is the baking by electricity and another is baking by the nitrogen gas. Secondly based on the numerical simulation and analysis, some results have been attained such as the baking power, temperature field distribution and thermal stress for the vacuum vessel, which can provide some valuable theory basis for the engineering design and optimization of the baking system of the HT-7U vacuum vessel or other similar super-conducting tokamak devices

  14. Design of an advanced bundle divertor for the Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T.F.; Lee, A.Y.; Ruck, G.W.; Prevenslik, T.V.; Smeltzer, G.

    1979-01-01

    The conclusion of this work is that a bundle divertor, using an improved method of designing the magnetic field configuration, is feasible for the Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (DTHR) investigated by Westinghouse. The most significant achievement of this design is the reduction in current density (1 kA/cm 2 ) in the divertor coils in comparison to the overall averaged current densities per tesla of field to be nulled for DITE (25 kA/cm 2 ) and for ISX-B 2 (11 kA/cm 2 ). Therefore, superconducting magnets can be built into the tight space available with a sound mechanical structure

  15. Superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo [ed.

    2005-07-01

    Research on superconductivity at ENEA is mainly devoted to projects related to the ITER magnet system. In this framework, ENEA has been strongly involved in the design, manufacturing and test campaigns of the ITER toroidal field model coil (TFMC), which reached a world record in operating current (up to 80 kA). Further to this result, the activities in 2004 were devoted to optimising the ITER conductor performance. ENEA participated in the tasks launched by EFDA to define and produce industrial-scale advanced Nb3Sn strand to be used in manufacturing the ITER high-field central solenoid (CS) and toroidal field (TF) magnets. As well as contributing to the design of the new strand and the final conductor layout, ENEA will also perform characterisation tests, addressing in particular the influence of mechanical stress on the Nb3Sn performance. As a member of the international ITER-magnet testing group, ENEA plays a central role in the measurement campaigns and data analyses for each ITER-related conductor and coil. The next phase in the R and D of the ITER magnets will be their mechanical characterisation in order to define the fabrication route of the coils and structures. During 2004 the cryogenic measurement campaign on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) by-pass diode stacks was completed. As the diode-test activity was the only LHC contract to be finished on schedule, the 'Centre Europeenne pour la Recherche Nucleaire' (CERN) asked ENEA to participate in an international tender for the cold check of the current leads for the LHC magnets. The contract was obtained, and during 2004, the experimental setup was designed and realised and the data acquisition system was developed. The measurement campaign was successfully started at the end of 2004 and will be completed in 2006.

  16. Accessibility and replacement as prime constraints in the design of large experimental tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Challender, R.S.; Reynolds, P.

    1976-01-01

    An attempt is made to bring together those design features of large, experimental Tokamaks, which would lead to better accessibility during non-active operation and, in particular, permit replacement and repair after activation, thereby making possible an extended period of experimental operation into the ignition phase

  17. Advanced superconducting power cable for MV urban power supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Frank [Nexans Deutschland GmbH, Hannover (Germany); Merschel, Frank [RWE Deutschland AG, Essen (Germany); Noe, Mathias [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In recent years the technology of superconducting power cable systems has progressed such that the technical hurdles preparing for commercial applications have been mastered. Several field tests of large scale prototypes for the applications of superconducting cables as well as superconducting fault current limiters have been successfully accomplished and the technology of such systems is ready for commercialization. The presentation will give a detailed overview of the German AmpaCity project. An overview will be given on the development, manufacturing and installation of the 10 kV, 40 MVA HTS system consisting of a fault current limiter and of a 1 km cable in the city of Essen. Since it is the first time that a one kilometer HTS cable system is installed together with an HTS fault current limiter in a real grid application between two substations within a city center area, AmpaCity serves as a lighthouse project. In addition it is worldwide the longest installed HTS cable system so far. It is expected that relatively large technical advances will be made in the future of the comparatively new HTS technology, which in turn will bring associated cost reductions. For this reason, the AmpaCity pilot project in the downtown area of Essen in Germany will be an important step on the way to achieving more widespread application of HTS technology.

  18. Review of ICRF antenna development and heating experiments up to advanced experiment I, 1989 on the JT-60 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Tsuneyuki

    1992-03-01

    Two main subjects of ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating on JT-60 are described in this paper from development phase of the JT-60 ICRF heating system up to advanced experiment I, 1989. One is antenna design and development for the high power JT-60 ICRF heating system (6 MW for 10 s at a frequency range of 108 - 132 MHz). The other is the experimental investigation of characteristics of second harmonic ICRF heating in a large tokamak. (J.P.N.)

  19. Nuclear design of the blanket/shield system for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    The various options and trade-offs in the nuclear design of the blanket/shield for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor (TEPR) are investigated. The TEPR size and cost are particularly sensitive to the blanket/shield thickness, Δ/sub BS/, on the inner side of the torus. Radition damage to the components of the superconducting magnet and refrigeration power requirements set lower limits on Δ/sub BS/. These limits are developed in terms of TEPR design parameters such as the wall loading, duty cycle, and frequency of magnet anneals. The study of the nuclear performance of various material compositions shows that mixtures of tungsten, or tantalum, or stainless-steel alloys and boron carbide require the smallest Δ/sub BS/ for a given attenuation. This Δ/sub BS/ has to be doubled if the low induced activation materials graphite and aluminum are used. The space problems are greatly eased in the Argonne National Laboratory ANL-TEPR reference design by using two separate segments of the blanket/shield. The inner segment occupies the region of the high magnetic field, uses very efficient attenuators (tungsten- or tantalum- or stainless-steel-boron carbide mixtures), and is only 1 m thick. The outer blanket/shield is 131 cm and consists of an optimized composition of stainless steel and boron carbide. For the design parameters of 0.2 MW/m 2 neutron wall loading and 50 percent duty cycle, the reactor components can operate satisfactorily up to (a) 10 yr for the stainless-steel first wall, (b) 10 yr for the superconductor composite after which magnet warmup becomes necessary, and (c) 30 yr for the Mylar insulation. Nuclear heat generation rates in the blanket/shield and magnet are well within the practical limits for heat removal

  20. Improved density measurement by FIR laser interferometer on EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Jie; Jie, Yinxian; Liu, Haiqing; Wei, Xuechao; Wang, Zhengxing; Gao, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • In 2012, the water-cooling Mo wall was installed in EAST. • A schottky barrier diode detector is designed and used on EAST for the first time. • The three-channel far-infrared laser interferometer can measure the electron density. • The improved measurement and latest experiment results are reported. • The signal we get in this experiment campaign is much better than we got in 2010. -- Abstract: A three-channel far-infrared (FIR) hydrogen cyanide (HCN) laser interferometer is in operation since 2010 to measure the line averaged electron density on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). The HCN laser signal is improved by means of a new schottky barrier diode (SBD) detector. The improved measurement and latest experiment results of the three-channel FIR laser interferometer on EAST tokamak are reported

  1. Improved density measurement by FIR laser interferometer on EAST tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Jie, E-mail: shenjie1988@ipp.ac.cn; Jie, Yinxian; Liu, Haiqing; Wei, Xuechao; Wang, Zhengxing; Gao, Xiang

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • In 2012, the water-cooling Mo wall was installed in EAST. • A schottky barrier diode detector is designed and used on EAST for the first time. • The three-channel far-infrared laser interferometer can measure the electron density. • The improved measurement and latest experiment results are reported. • The signal we get in this experiment campaign is much better than we got in 2010. -- Abstract: A three-channel far-infrared (FIR) hydrogen cyanide (HCN) laser interferometer is in operation since 2010 to measure the line averaged electron density on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). The HCN laser signal is improved by means of a new schottky barrier diode (SBD) detector. The improved measurement and latest experiment results of the three-channel FIR laser interferometer on EAST tokamak are reported.

  2. The contribution to the energy balance and transport in an advanced-fuel tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atzeni, S.; Vlad, G.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of synchrotron radiation emission on the energy balance of an advanced-fuel (such as D- 3 He, or catalyzed-D) tokamak plasma is considered. It is shown that a region in the β-T space exists, where the fusion energy delivered to the plasma overcomes synchrotron and bremsstrahlung energy losses, and which could then allow for ignited operation. 1-Dimensional codes results are also presented, which illustrate the main features of radial transport in a ignited, D- 3 He tokamak plasma

  3. ACHIEVING AND SUSTAINING STEADY-STATE ADVANCED TOKAMAK CONDITIONS ON DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WADE, MR; MURAKAMI, M; BRENNAN, DP; CASPER, TA; FERRON, JR; GAROFALO, AM; GREENFIELD, CM; HYATT, AW; JAYAKUMAR, R; KINSEY, JE; LAHAYE, RJ; LAO, LL; LAZARUS, EA; LOHR, J; LUCE, TC; PETTY, CC; POLITZER, PA; PRATER, R; STRAIT, EJ; TURNBULL, AD; WATKINS, JG; WEST, WP

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have demonstrated the feasibility of sustaining advanced tokamak conditions that combine high fusion power density (β > 4%), high bootstrap current fraction (f BS ∼ 65%), and high non-inductive current fractions (f NI ∼ 85%) for several energy confinement times. The duration of such conditions is limited only by resistive relaxation of the current density profile. Modeling studies indicate that the application of off-axis ECCD will be able to maintain a favorable current density profile for several seconds

  4. Achieving and sustaining steady-state advanced tokamak conditions on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, M.R.; Murakami, M.; Brennan, D.P.

    2003-01-01

    Recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have demonstrated the feasibility of sustaining advanced tokamak conditions that combine high fusion power density (β > 4%), high bootstrap current fraction (f BS ∼ 65%), and high non-inductive current fractions (f NI ∼85%) for several energy confinement times. The duration of such conditions is limited only by resistive relaxation of the current density profile. Modeling studies indicate that the application of off-axis ECCD will be able to maintain a favorable current density profile for several seconds. (author)

  5. Apollo-L2, an advanced fuel tokamak reactor utilizing direct conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Blanchard, J.P.; El-Guebaly, L.A.; Khater, H.Y.; Santarius, J.F.; Sawan, M.E.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Wittenberg, L.J.; Witt, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    A scoping study of a tokamak reactor fueled by a D- 3 He plasma is presented. The Apollo D- 3 He tokamak capitalizes on recent advances in high field magnets (20 T) and utilizes rectennas to convert the synchrotron radiation directly to electricity. The low neutron wall loading (0.1 MW/m 2 ) permits a first wall lasting the life of the plant and enables the reactor to be classified as inherently safe. The cost of electricity is less than that from a similar power level DT reactor. 10 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  6. q=1 advanced tokamak experiments in JET and comparison with ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joffrin, E.; Wolf, R.; Alper, B.

    2002-01-01

    The ASDEX Upgrade advanced tokamak scenario with central q close to 1 has been reproduced on JET. For almost identical q profiles, the comparative analysis does show similar features like the fishbone activity and the current profile evolution. In JET, transport analyses indicates that an internal transport barrier (ITB) has been produced. Gradient length criterions based on the ion temperature gradient turbulence stabilization are used to characterize the ITBs in both devices. The trigger of ITBs is associated with rational surfaces in both devices although the underlying physics for this triggering seems different. This experiment has the prospect to get closer to identity experiments between the two tokamaks. (author)

  7. The ARIES-AT advanced tokamak, Advanced technology fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najmabadi, Farrokh; Abdou, A.; Bromberg, L.

    2006-01-01

    The ARIES-AT study was initiated to assess the potential of high-performance tokamak plasmas together with advanced technology in a fusion power plant and to identifying physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving attractive and competitive fusion power in order to guide fusion R and D. The 1000-MWe ARIES-AT design has a major radius of 5.2 m, a minor radius of 1.3 m, a toroidal β of 9.2% (β N = 5.4) and an on-axis field of 5.6 T. The plasma current is 13 MA and the current-drive power is 35 MW. The ARIES-AT design uses the same physics basis as ARIES-RS, a reversed-shear plasma. A distinct difference between ARIES-RS and ARIES-AT plasmas is the higher plasma elongation of ARIES-AT (κ x = 2.2) which is the result of a 'thinner' blanket leading to a large increase in plasma β to 9.2% (compared to 5% for ARIES-RS) with only a slightly higher β N . ARIES-AT blanket is a simple, low-pressure design consisting of SiC composite boxes with a SiC insert for flow distribution that does not carry any structural load. The breeding coolant (Pb-17Li) enters the fusion core from the bottom, and cools the first wall while traveling in the poloidal direction to the top of the blanket module. The coolant then returns through the blanket channel at a low speed and is superheated to ∼1100 deg. C. As most of the fusion power is deposited directly into the breeding coolant, this method leads to a high coolant outlet temperature while keeping the temperature of the SiC structure as well as interface between SiC structure and Pb-17Li to about 1000 deg. C. This blanket is well matched to an advanced Brayton power cycle, leading to an overall thermal efficiency of ∼59%. The very low afterheat in SiC composites results in exceptional safety and waste disposal characteristics. All of the fusion core components qualify for shallow land burial under U.S. regulations (furthermore, ∼90% of components qualify as Class-A waste, the lowest level). The ARIES

  8. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, A.W.B.; Noakes, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    This book is an elementray introduction into superconductivity. The topics are the superconducting state, the magnetic properties of superconductors, type I superconductors, type II superconductors and a chapter on the superconductivity theory. (WL)

  9. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buller, L.; Carrillo, F.; Dietert, R.; Kotziapashis, A.

    1989-01-01

    Superconductors are materials which combine the property of zero electric resistance with the capability to exclude any adjacent magnetic field. This leads to many large scale applications such as the much publicized levitating train, generation of magnetic fields in MHD electric generators, and special medical diagnostic equipment. On a smaller-scale, superconductive materials could replace existing resistive connectors and decrease signal delays by reducing the RLC time constants. Thus, a computer could operate at much higher speeds, and consequently at lower power levels which would reduce the need for heat removal and allow closer spacing of circuitry. Although technical advances and proposed applications are constantly being published, it should be recognized that superconductivity is a slowly developing technology. It has taken scientists almost eighty years to learn what they now know about this material and its function. The present paper provides an overview of the historical development of superconductivity and describes some of the potential applications for this new technology as it pertains to the electronics industry

  10. Experimental measurement of electron heat diffusivity in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.; Jahns, G.L.

    1976-06-01

    The electron temperature perturbation produced by internal disruptions in the center of the Oak Ridge Tokamak (ORMAK) is followed with a multi-chord soft x-ray detector array. The space-time evolution is found to be diffusive in character, with a conduction coefficient larger by a factor of 2.5 - 15 than that implied by the energy containment time, apparently because it is a measurement for the small group of electrons whose energies exceed the cut-off energy of the detectors

  11. TIBER II: an upgraded tokamak igntion/burn experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.; Perkins, L.J.

    1986-01-01

    We are disIgning a minimum-size Tokamak ignition/Burn Reactor (TIBER II). This design incorporates physics requirements, neutron wall loading and fluence parameters that will make it compatible with a nuclear testing mission. Reactor relevant physics will be tested by using current drive and steady-state operation. Although the design accommodates several current drive options, including neutral beams, the base case uses a combination of lower hybrid and electron-cyclotron radio frequency power. Minimum neutron shielding, compact structures, high magnet-current densities, and remotely maintainable vacuum seals, all contribute to the compact size

  12. Superconducting systems of advanced sources of electrical energy in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirchian, K.S.

    1987-01-01

    Two examples illustrating some of the possible applications of the superconductivity effect are discussed in this presentation. One of these examples, the MHD method of energy conversion, illustrates the use of superconducting magnet systems for raising the efficiency of conversion of organic fuel energy to electrical energy. The other example, the magnet system of Tokamak-type fusion facility, illustrates the use of superconductivity in application to new sources of energy. The choice of these examples is governed by the fact that the availability of superconducting systems is essential in both cases. Furthermore, the development of such systems per se presents a major scientific and technical achievement based on extensive studies in the field of solid state physics, electro- and thermophysics and engineering

  13. Recent advances in the 5f-relevant electronic states and unconventional superconductivity of actinide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haga, Yoshinori; Sakai, Hironori; Kambe, Shinsaku

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the 5f-relevant electronic states and unconventional superconducting properties are reviewed in actinide compounds of UPd 2 Al 3 . UPt 3 , URu 2 Si 2 , UGe 2 , and PuRhGa 5 . These are based on the experimental results carried out on high-quality single crystal samples, including transuranium compounds, which were grown by using combined techniques. The paring state and the gap structure of these superconductors are discussed, especially for the corresponding Fermi surfaces which were clarified by the de Haas-van Alphen experiment and the energy band calculations. A detailed systematic study using the NQR/NMR spectroscopy reveals the d-wave superconductivity in PuRhGa 5 and the difference of magnetic excitations due to the difference of ground states in U-, Np-, and Pu-based AnTGa 5 (T: transition metal) compounds. (author)

  14. LH-power coupling in advanced tokamak plasmas in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joffrin, E.; Erents, K.; Gormezano, C.

    2000-02-01

    Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) is the most efficient tool to generate non-inductive current in tokamak plasmas. In JET, significant modifications of the current profile have been recently achieved in coupling up to 3MW of LH power in optimised shear discharges. However, the improved particle confinement during optimised shear plasmas results in a sharp decrease of the electron density in front the launcher close or below the cut-off density (ne=1.7.10 17 m -3 for f LH =37GHz) and makes difficult the coupling of the LH power. Deuterium gas near the launcher can help to improve the coupling, but has also the effect of increasing the ELM activity leading to the erosion of the internal transport barrier (ITB). Future development of lower hybrid launcher should include the constraints imposed by scenario such as the optimised shear. (author)

  15. Comments on experimental results of energy confinement of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.K.

    1989-04-01

    The results of energy-confinement experiments on steady-state tokamak plasmas are examined. For plasmas with auxiliary heating, an analysis based on the heat diffusion equation is used to define heat confinement time (the incremental energy confinement time). For ohmically sustained plasmas, experiments show that the onset of the saturation regime of energy confinement, marfeing, detachment, and disruption are marked by distinct values of the parameter /bar n//sub e///bar j/. The confinement results of the two types of experiments can be described by a single surface in 3-dimensional space spanned by the plasma energy, the heating power, and the plasma density: the incremental energy confinement time /tau//sub inc/ = ΔW/ΔP is the correct concept for describing results of heat confinement in a heating experiment; the commonly used energy confinement time defined by /tau//sub E/ = W/P is not. A further examination shows that the change of edge parameters, as characterized by the change of the effective collision frequency ν/sub e/*, governs the change of confinement properties. The totality of the results of tokamak experiments on energy confinement appears to support a hypothesis that energy transport is determined by the preservation of the pressure gradient scale length. 70 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  16. Fusion neutron yield and flux calculation on HT-7 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Yanzhang; Zhu Yubao; Chen Juequan

    2006-01-01

    Neutron yield and flux have been numerically estimated on HT-7 tokamak. The total fusion neutron yield and neutron flux distribution on different positions and azimuth angles of the device are presented. Analyses on the errors induced by ion temperature and density distribution factors are given in detail. The results of the calculations provide a useful database for neutron diagnostics and neutron radiation protection. (authors)

  17. Tokamaks. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesson, John; Campbell, D.J.; Connor, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    It is interesting to recall the state of tokamak research when the first edition of this book was written. My judgement of the level of real understanding at that time is indicated by the virtual absence of comparisons of experiment with theory in that edition. The need then was for a 'handbook' which collected in a single volume the concepts and models which form the basis of everyday tokamak research. The experimental and theoretical endeavours of the subsequent decade have left almost all of this intact, but have brought a massive development of the subject. Firstly, there are now several areas where the experimental behaviour is described in terms of accepted theory. This is particularly true of currents parallel to the magnetic field, and of the stability limitations on the plasma pressure. Next there has been the research on large tokamaks, hardly started at the writing of the first edition. Now our thinking is largely based on the results from these tokamaks and this work has led to the long awaited achievement of significant amounts of fusion power. Finally, the success of tokamak research has brought us face to face with the problems involved in designing and building a tokamak reactor. The present edition maintains the aim of providing a simple introduction to basic tokamak physics, but also includes an account of the advances outlined above. (Author)

  18. Transport and stability studies in negative central shear advanced tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    Achieving high performance for long duration is a key goal of Advanced Tokamak (AT) research around the world. To this end, tokamak experiments are focusing on obtaining (a) a high fraction of well-aligned non-inductive plasma current (b) wide internal transport barriers (ITBs) in the ion and electron transport channels to obtain high temperatures (c) control of resistive wall modes and neoclassical Tearing Modes which limit the achievable beta. A current profile that yields a negative central magnetic shear (NCS) in the core is consistent with the above focus; Negative central shear is conducive for obtaining internal transport barriers, for high degree of bootstrap current alignment and for reaching the second stability region for ideal ballooning modes, while being stable to ideal kink modes at high beta with wall stabilization. Much progress has been made in obtaining AT performance in several tokamaks through an increasing understanding of the stability and transport properties of tokamak plasmas. RF and neutral beam current drive scenarios are routinely developed and implemented in experiments to access new advanced regimes and control plasma profiles. Short duration and sustained Internal Transport Barriers (ITB) have been obtained in the ion and electron channels. The formation of an ITB is attributable to the stabilization of ion and electron temperature gradient (ITG and ETG) and trapped electron modes (TEM), enhancement of E x B flow shear rate and rarefaction of resonant surfaces near the rational q min values. (orig.)

  19. Transport and stability studies in negative central shear advanced tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, R.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Achieving high performance for long duration is a key goal of Advanced Tokamak (AT) research around the world. To this end, tokamak experiments are focusing on obtaining (a) a high fraction of well-aligned non-inductive plasma current (b) wide internal transport barriers (ITBs) in the ion and electron transport channels to obtain high temperatures (c) control of resistive wall modes and neoclassical Tearing Modes which limit the achievable beta. A current profile that yields a negative central magnetic shear (NCS) in the core is consistent with the above focus; Negative central shear is conducive for obtaining internal transport barriers, for high degree of bootstrap current alignment and for reaching the second stability region for ideal ballooning modes, while being stable to ideal kink modes at high beta with wall stabilization. Much progress has been made in obtaining AT performance in several tokamaks through an increasing understanding of the stability and transport properties of tokamak plasmas. RF and neutral beam current drive scenarios are routinely developed and implemented in experiments to access new advanced regimes and control plasma profiles. Short duration and sustained Internal Transport Barriers (ITB) have been obtained in the ion and electron channels. The formation of an ITB is attributable to the stabilization of ion and electron temperature gradient (ITG and ETG) and trapped electron modes (TEM), enhancement of E x B flow shear rate and rarefaction of resonant surfaces near the rational q{sub min} values. (orig.)

  20. Experimental test of far-infrared polarimetry for Faraday rotation measurements on the TFR 600 Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltwisch, H [Kernforschungsanlage Juelich G.m.b.H. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik; Association Euratom-Kernforschungsanlage Juelich G.m.b.H. (Germany, F.R.)); Equipe, T F.R. [Association Euratom-CEA sur la Fusion, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    1981-09-01

    The results are reported on the feasibility of using far-infrared polarimetry for Faraday rotation diagnostic measurements on the TRF Tokamak. Precise quantitative results were not obtained but a satisfactory agreement with a simple theoretical model leads to a good understanding of the experimental limitations of the method.

  1. Experimental observation of current generation by asymmetrical heating of ions in a tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahl, J.; Ishihara, O.; Wong, K.L.; Kristiansen, M.; Hagler, M.

    1986-01-01

    The first experimental observation of current generation by asymmetrical heating of ions is reported. Ions were asymmetrically heated by a unidirectional fast Alfven wave launched by a slow wave antenna inside a tokamak. Current generation was detected by measuring the asymmetry of the toroidal plasma current with probes at the top and bottom of the toroidal plasma column

  2. Wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, W.; Chen, Z. Y.; Jin, W.; Huang, D. W.; Ding, Y. H.; Li, J. C.; Zhang, X. Q.; Zhuang, G.; Lee, S. G.; Shi, Y. J.

    2014-01-01

    The wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer is a key issue for the measurements of plasma rotation. For the lack of available standard radiation source near 3.95 Å and there is no other diagnostics to measure the core rotation for inter-calibration, an indirect method by using tokamak plasma itself has been applied on joint Texas experimental tokamak. It is found that the core toroidal rotation velocity is not zero during locked mode phase. This is consistent with the observation of small oscillations on soft x-ray signals and electron cyclotron emission during locked-mode phase

  3. A cryogenic system for TIBER II [Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, D.S.; Kerns, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Phase II of the Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor (TIBER II) study describes one option for a small, economical, next-generation tokamak [1,2]. Because of its small size, minimum shielding is used between the plasma and the toroidal-field (TF) coils. Consequently, a large cryogenic system (approximately 70 kW at 4.5 K) capable of delivering forced-flow helium is required. This paper describes a cryogenic system that meets this requirement and includes TIBER-II requirements. 3 refs

  4. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Charles P; Farach, Horacio A

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity covers the nature of the phenomenon of superconductivity. The book discusses the fundamental principles of superconductivity; the essential features of the superconducting state-the phenomena of zero resistance and perfect diamagnetism; and the properties of the various classes of superconductors, including the organics, the buckministerfullerenes, and the precursors to the cuprates. The text also describes superconductivity from the viewpoint of thermodynamics and provides expressions for the free energy; the Ginzburg-Landau and BCS theories; and the structures of the high

  5. Planned High-brightness Channeling Radiation Experiment at Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, Ben [NICADD, DeKalb; Mihalcea, Daniel [NICADD, DeKalb; Panuganti, Harsha [NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, Philippe [Fermilab; Brau, Charles [Vanderbilt U.; Choi, Bo [Vanderbilt U.; Gabella, William [Vanderbilt U.; Ivanov, Borislav [Vanderbilt U.; Mendenhall, Marcus [Vanderbilt U.; Lynn, Christopher [Swarthmore Coll.; Sen, Tanaji [Fermilab; Wagner, Wolfgang [Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf

    2014-07-01

    In this contribution we describe the technical details and experimental setup of our study aimed at producing high-brightness channeling radiation (CR) at Fermilab’s new user facility the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA). In the ASTA photoinjector area electrons are accelerated up to 40-MeV and focused to a sub-micron spot on a ~40 micron thick carbon diamond, the electrons channel through the crystal and emit CR up to 80-KeV. Our study utilizes ASTA’s long pulse train capabilities and ability to preserve ultra-low emittance, to produce the desired high average brightness.

  6. High-Density Superconducting Cables for Advanced ACTPol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, C. G.; Austermann, J.; Beall, J. A.; Duff, S. M.; Gallardo, P. A.; Grace, E.; Henderson, S. W.; Ho, S. P.; Koopman, B. J.; Li, D.; McMahon, J.; Nati, F.; Niemack, M. D.; Niraula, P.; Salatino, M.; Schillaci, A.; Schmitt, B. L.; Simon, S. M.; Staggs, S. T.; Stevens, J. R.; Vavagiakis, E. M.; Ward, J. T.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-07-01

    Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) is an upcoming Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) receiver upgrade, scheduled to deploy in 2016, that will allow measurement of the cosmic microwave background polarization and temperature to the highest precision yet with ACT. The AdvACT increase in sensitivity is partly provided by an increase in the number of transition-edge sensors (TESes) per array by up to a factor of two over the current ACTPol receiver detector arrays. The high-density AdvACT TES arrays require 70 \\upmu m pitch superconducting flexible cables (flex) to connect the detector wafer to the first-stage readout electronics. Here, we present the flex fabrication process and test results. For the flex wiring layer, we use a 400-nm-thick sputtered aluminum film. In the center of the cable, the wiring is supported by a polyimide substrate, which smoothly transitions to a bare (uncoated with polyimide) silicon substrate at the ends of the cable for a robust wedge wire-bonding interface. Tests on the first batch of flex made for the first AdvACT array show that the flex will meet the requirements for AdvACT, with a superconducting critical current above 1 mA at 500 mK, resilience to mechanical and cryogenic stress, and a room temperature yield of 97 %.

  7. High-Density Superconducting Cables for Advanced ACTPol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, C. G.; Austermann, J.; Beall, J. A.; Duff, S. M.; Gallardo, P. A.; Grace, E.; Henderson, S. W.; Ho, S. P.; Koopman, B. J.; Li, D.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) is an upcoming Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) receiver upgrade, scheduled to deploy in 2016, that will allow measure- ment of the cosmic microwave background polarization and temperature to the highest precision yet with ACT. The AdvACT increase in sensitivity is partly provided by an increase in the number of transition-edge sensors (TESes) per array by up to a factor of two over the current ACTPol receiver detector arrays. The high-density AdvACT TES arrays require 70 µ m pitch superconducting flexible cables (flex) to connect the detec- tor wafer to the first-stage readout electronics. Here, we present the flex fabrication process and test results. For the flex wiring layer, we use a 400-nm-thick sputtered alu- minum film. In the center of the cable, the wiring is supported by a polyimide substrate, which smoothly transitions to a bare (uncoated with polyimide) silicon substrate at the ends of the cable for a robust wedge wire-bonding interface. Tests on the first batch of flex made for the first AdvACT array show that the flex will meet the requirements for AdvACT, with a superconducting critical current above 1 mA at 500 mK, resilience to mechanical and cryogenic stress, and a room temperature yield of 97%.

  8. Overview of recent experimental results from the Aditya tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanna, R. L.; Ghosh, J.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Raj, Harshita; Patel, Sharvil; Dhyani, P.; Gupta, C. N.; Jadeja, K. A.; Patel, K. M.; Bhatt, S. B.; Panchal, V. K.; Patel, N. C.; Chavda, Chhaya; Praveenlal, E. V.; Shah, K. S.; Makawana, M. N.; Jha, S. K.; Gopalkrishana, M. V.; Tahiliani, K.; Sangwan, Deepak; Raju, D.; Nagora, Umesh; Pathak, S. K.; Atrey, P. K.; Purohit, S.; Raval, J.; Joisa, Y. S.; Rao, C. V. S.; Chowdhuri, M. B.; Banerjee, S.; Ramaiya, N.; Manchanda, R.; Thomas, J.; Kumar, Ajai; Ajay, Kumar; Sharma, P. K.; Kulkarni, S. V.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Shukla, B. K.; Das, Amita; Jha, R.; Saxena, Y. C.; Sen, A.; Kaw, P. K.; Bora, D.; the ADITYA Team

    2017-10-01

    Several experiments, related to controlled thermonuclear fusion research and highly relevant for large size tokamaks, including ITER, have been carried out in ADITYA, an ohmically heated circular limiter tokamak. Repeatable plasma discharges of a maximum plasma current of ~160 kA and discharge duration beyond ~250 ms with a plasma current flattop duration of ~140 ms have been obtained for the first time in ADITYA. The reproducibility of the discharge reproducibility has been improved considerably with lithium wall conditioning, and improved plasma discharges are obtained by precisely controlling the position of the plasma. In these discharges, chord-averaged electron density ~3.0-4.0  ×  1019 m-3 using multiple hydrogen gas puffs, with a temperature of the order of ~500-700 eV, have been achieved. Novel experiments related to disruption control are carried out and disruptions, induced by hydrogen gas puffing, are successfully mitigated using the biased electrode and ion cyclotron resonance pulse techniques. Runaway electrons are successfully mitigated by applying a short local vertical field (LVF) pulse. A thorough disruption database has been generated by identifying the different categories of disruption. Detailed analysis of several hundred disrupted discharges showed that the current quench time is inversely proportional to the q edge. Apart from this, for volt-sec recovery during the plasma formation phase, low loop voltage start-up and current ramp-up experiments have been carried out using electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH). Successful recovery of volt-sec leads to the achievement of longer plasma discharge durations. In addition, the neon gas puff assisted radiative improved confinement mode has also been achieved in ADITYA. All of the above mentioned experiments will be discussed in this paper.

  9. Characterisation, modelling and control of advanced scenarios in the european tokamak jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tresset, G.

    2002-01-01

    The advanced scenarios, developed for less than ten years with the internal transport barriers and the control of current profile, give rise to a 'new deal' for the tokamak as a future thermonuclear controlled fusion reactor. The Joint European Torus (JET) in United Kingdom is presently the most powerful device in terms of fusion power and it has allowed to acquire a great experience in these improved confinement regimes. The reduction of turbulent transport, considered now as closely linked to the shape of current profile optimised for instance by lower hybrid current drive or the self-generated bootstrap current, can be characterised by a dimensionless criterion. Most of useful information related to the transport barriers are thus available. Large database analysis and real time plasma control are envisaged as attractive applications. The so-called 'S'-shaped transport models exhibit some interesting properties in fair agreement with the experiments, while the non-linear multivariate dependencies of thermal diffusivity can be approximated by a neural network, suggesting a new approach for transport investigation and modelling. Finally, the first experimental demonstrations of real time control of internal transport barriers and current profile have been performed on JET. Sophisticated feedback algorithms have been proposed and are being numerically tested to achieve steady-state and efficient plasmas. (author)

  10. Design and optimization of Artificial Neural Networks for the modelling of superconducting magnets operation in tokamak fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froio, A.; Bonifetto, R.; Carli, S.; Quartararo, A.; Savoldi, L., E-mail: laura.savoldi@polito.it; Zanino, R.

    2016-09-15

    In superconducting tokamaks, the cryoplant provides the helium needed to cool different clients, among which by far the most important one is the superconducting magnet system. The evaluation of the transient heat load from the magnets to the cryoplant is fundamental for the design of the latter and the assessment of suitable strategies to smooth the heat load pulses, induced by the intrinsically pulsed plasma scenarios characteristic of today's tokamaks, is crucial for both suitable sizing and stable operation of the cryoplant. For that evaluation, accurate but expensive system-level models, as implemented in e.g. the validated state-of-the-art 4C code, were developed in the past, including both the magnets and the respective external cryogenic cooling circuits. Here we show how these models can be successfully substituted with cheaper ones, where the magnets are described by suitably trained Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) for the evaluation of the heat load to the cryoplant. First, two simplified thermal-hydraulic models for an ITER Toroidal Field (TF) magnet and for the ITER Central Solenoid (CS) are developed, based on ANNs, and a detailed analysis of the chosen networks' topology and parameters is presented and discussed. The ANNs are then inserted into the 4C model of the ITER TF and CS cooling circuits, which also includes active controls to achieve a smoothing of the variation of the heat load to the cryoplant. The training of the ANNs is achieved using the results of full 4C simulations (including detailed models of the magnets) for conventional sigmoid-like waveforms of the drivers and the predictive capabilities of the ANN-based models in the case of actual ITER operating scenarios are demonstrated by comparison with the results of full 4C runs, both with and without active smoothing, in terms of both accuracy and computational time. Exploiting the low computational effort requested by the ANN-based models, a demonstrative optimization study

  11. Texas Experimental Tokamak, a plasma research facility: Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1995-08-01

    In the year just past, the authors made major progress in understanding turbulence and transport in both core and edge. Development of the capability for turbulence measurements throughout the poloidal cross section and intelligent consideration of the observed asymmetries, played a critical role in this work. In their confinement studies, a limited plasma with strong, H-mode-like characteristics serendipitously appeared and received extensive study though a diverted H-mode remains elusive. In the plasma edge, they appear to be close to isolating a turbulence drive mechanism. These are major advances of benefit to the community at large, and they followed from incremental improvements in diagnostics, in the interpretation of the diagnostics, and in TEXT itself. Their general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The work here demonstrates a continuing dedication to the problems of plasma transport which continue to plague the community and are an impediment to the design of future devices. They expect to show here that they approach this problem consistently, systematically, and effectively

  12. Advanced Antenna-Coupled Superconducting Detector Arrays for CMB Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, James

    2014-01-01

    We are developing high-sensitivity millimeter-wave detector arrays for measuring the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This development is directed to advance the technology readiness of the Inflation Probe mission in NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program. The Inflation Probe is a fourth-generation CMB satellite that will measure the polarization of the CMB to astrophysical limits, characterizing the inflationary polarization signal, mapping large-scale structure based on polarization induced by gravitational lensing, and mapping Galactic magnetic fields through measurements of polarized dust emission. The inflationary polarization signal is produced by a background of gravitational waves from the epoch of inflation, an exponential expansion of space-time in the early universe, with an amplitude that depends on the physical mechanism producing inflation. The inflationary polarization signal may be distinguished by its unique 'B-mode' vector properties from polarization from the density variations that predominantly source CMB temperature anisotropy. Mission concepts for the Inflation Probe are being developed in the US, Europe and Japan. The arrays are based on planar antennas that provide integral beam collimation, polarization analysis, and spectral band definition in a compact lithographed format that eliminates discrete fore-optics such as lenses and feedhorns. The antennas are coupled to transition-edge superconducting bolometers, read out with multiplexed SQUID current amplifiers. The superconducting sensors and readouts developed in this program share common technologies with NASA X-ray and FIR detector applications. Our program targets developments required for space observations, and we discuss our technical progress over the past two years and plans for future development. We are incorporating arrays into active sub-orbital and ground-based experiments, which advance technology readiness while producing state of the art CMB

  13. Cryogenic structures of superconducting coils for fusion experimental reactor 'ITER'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Hideo; Iguchi, Masahide; Hamada, Kazuya; Okuno, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Shimamoto, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes both structural materials and structural design of the Toroidal Field (TF) coil and Central Solenoid (CS) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). All the structural materials used in the superconducting coil system of the ITER are austenitic stainless steels. Although 316LN is used in the most parts of the superconducting coil system, the cryogenic stainless steels, JJ1 and JK2LB, which were newly developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and Japanese steel companies, are used in the highest stress area of the TF coil case and the whole CS conductor jackets, respectively. These two materials became commercially available based on demonstration of productivity and weldability of materials, and evaluations of 4 K mechanical properties of trial products including welded parts. Structural materials are classified into five grades depending on stress distribution in the TF coil case. JAEA made an industrial specification for mass production based on the ITER requirements. In order to simplify quality control in mass production, JAEA has used materials specified in the material section of 'Codes for Fusion Facilities - Rules on Superconducting Magnet Structure (2008)' issued by the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME) in October 2008, which was established using an extrapolation method of 4 K material strengths from room temperature strength and chemical compositions developed by JAEA. It enables steel suppliers to easily control the quality of products at room temperature. JAEA has already started actual production with several manufacturing companies. The first JJ1 product to be used in the TF coil case and the first JK2LB jackets for CS were completed in October and September 2013, respectively. (author)

  14. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langone, J.

    1989-01-01

    This book explains the theoretical background of superconductivity. Includes discussion of electricity, material fabrication, maglev trains, the superconducting supercollider, and Japanese-US competition. The authors reports the latest discoveries

  15. Optimization design study of an innovative divertor concept for future experimental tokamak-type fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willem Janssens, Ir.; Crutzen, Y.; Farfaletti-Casali, F.; Matera, R.

    1991-01-01

    The design optimization study of an innovative divertor concept for future experimental tokamak-type fusion devices is both an answer to the actual problems encountered in the multilayer divertor proposals and an illustration of a rational modelling philosophy and optimization strategy for the development of a new divertor structure. Instead of using mechanical attachment or metallurgical bonding of the protective material to the heat sink as in most actual divertor concepts, the so-called brush divertor in this study uses an array of unidirectional fibers penetrating in both the protective armor and the underling composite heat sink. Although the approach is fully concentrated on the divertor performance, including both a description of its function from the theoretical point of view and an overview of the problems related to the materials choice and evaluation, both the approach followed in the numerical modelling and the judgment of the results are thought to be valid also for other applications. Therefore the spin-off of the study must be situated in both the technological progress towards a feasible divertor solution, which introduces no additional physical uncertainties, and in the general area of the thermo-mechanical finite-element modelling on both macro-and microscale. The brush divertor itself embodies the use, and thus the modelling, of advanced materials such as tailor-made metal matrix composites and dispersion strengthened metals, and is shown to offer large potential advantages, demanding however and experimental validation under working conditions. It is clearly indicated where the need originates for an integrated experimental program which must allow to verify the basic modelling assumptions in order to arrive at the use of numerical computation as a powerful and realistic tool of structural testing and life-time prediction

  16. Experimental modeling of eddy currents and deflections for tokamak limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, T.Q.; Knott, M.J.; Turner, L.R.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    In this study, experiments were performed to investigate deflection, current, and material stress in cantilever beams with the Fusion ELectromagnetic Induction eXperiment (FELIX) at the Argonne National Laboratory. Since structures near the plasma are typically cantilevered, the beams provide a good model for the limiter blades of a tokamak fusion reactor. The test pieces were copper, aluminum, phosphor bronze, and brass cantilever beams, clamped rigidly at one end with a nonconducting support frame inside the FELIX test volume. The primary data recorded as functions of time were the beam deflection measured with a noncontact electro-optical device, the total eddy current measured with a Rogowski coil and linking through a central hole in the beam, and the material stress extracted from strain gauges. Measurements of stress and deflection were taken at selected positions along the beam. The extent of the coupling effect depends on several factors. These include the size, the electrical and mechanical properties of the beam, segmenting of the beam, the decay rate of the dipole field, and the strength of the solenoid field

  17. Test particle calculations for the Texas experimental tokamak with resonant magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.; McCool, S.C.; Zheng, S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a simple test particle model that attempts to describe particle motion in the presence of intrinsic electrostatic fluctuations in a prescribed tokamak magnetic field. In particular, magnetic field configurations that include externally produced magnetic islands and stochastic regions are considered. The resulting test particle transport is compared with the predictions of analytic models and with the experimentally measured electron heat and particle transport on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT). Agreement between the test particle results and applicable analytic theories is found. However, there is only partial agreement with the experimental results, and possible reasons for the discrepancies are explored. Good agreement is found between predicted and measured spatially asymmetric particle distributions. The particle collection efficiency of an apertured limiter inside a magnetic island (an intra-island pump limiter) is discussed

  18. A novel fast-scanning microwave heterodyne radiometer system for electron cyclotron emission measurements in the HT-7 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.Y.; Wan, Y.X.; Xie, J.K.; Luo, J.R.; Li, J.G.; Kuang, G.L.; Gao, X.; Zhang, X.D.; Wan, B.N.; Wang, K.J.; Mao, J.S.; Gong, X.Z.; Qin, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    Two sets of fast-scanning microwave heterodyne radiometer receiver systems employing backward-wave oscillators in the 78-118 GHz and 118-178 GHz ranges were developed for electron cyclotron emission measurements (ECE) on the HT-7 superconducting tokamak. The double-sideband radiometer in the 78-118 GHz range measures 16 ECE frequency points with a scanning period of 0.65 ms. The novel design of the 2 mm fast-scanning heterodyne radiometer in the 118-178 GHz range enables the unique system to measure 48 ECE frequency points in 0.65 ms periodically. The plasma profile consistency in reproducible ohmic plasmas was used to relatively calibrate each channel by changing the toroidal magnetic field shot-by-shot. The absolute temperature value was obtained by a comparison with the results from the soft x-ray pulse height analysis measurements and Thomson scattering system. A preliminary temperature profile measurement result in pellet injection plasma is presented. (author)

  19. Overview of JT-60U progress towards steady-state advanced tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, S.

    2005-01-01

    Recent experimental results on steady state advanced tokamak (AT) research on JT-60U are presented with emphasis on longer time scale in comparison with characteristics time scales in plasmas. Towards this, modification on control in operation, heating and diagnostics systems have been done. As the results, ∼ 60 s I p flat top and an ∼ 30 s H-mode are obtained. The long pulse modification has opened a door into a new domain for JT-60U. The high normalized beta (β N ) of 2.3 is maintained for 22.3 s and 2.5 for 16.5 s in a high β p H-mode plasma. A standard ELMy H-mode plasma is also extended and change in wall recycling in such a longer time scale has been unveiled. Development and investigation of plasmas relevant to AT operation has been continued in former 15 s discharges as well in which higherNB power (≤ 10 s) is available. Higher β N ∼ 3 is maintained for 6.2 s in high β p H-mode plasmas. High bootstrap current fraction (f BS ) of ∼ 75% is sustained for 7.4 s in an RS plasma. On NTM suppression by localized ECCD, ECRF injection preceding the mode saturation is found to be more effective to suppress the mode with less power compared to the injection after the mode saturated. The domain of the NTM suppression experiments is extended to the high β N regime, and effectiveness of m/n=3/2 mode suppression by ECCD is demonstrated at β N ∼ 2.5-3. Genuine center-solenoid less tokamak plasma start up is demonstrated. In a current hole region, it is shown that no scheme drives a current in any direction. Detailed measurement in both spatial and energy spaces of energetic ions showed dynamic change in the energetic ion profile at collective instabilities. Impact of toroidal plasma rotation on ELM behaviors is clarified in grassy ELM and QH domains. (author)

  20. Recent progresses on high performance steady-state plasmas in the superconducting tokamak TRIAM-1M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Satoshi; Sato, Kohnosuke; Nakamura, Kazuo

    1999-01-01

    The overview of TRIAM-1M experiments is described. The up-to-date issues for steady-state operation are presented through the experience of the achievement of super ultra long tokamak discharges (SULD) sustained by lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) over 2 hours. The importance of the control of an initial phase of plasma, the avoidance of the concentration of huge heat load, the wall conditioning, and abrupt stop of the long discharges are proposed as the indispensable issues for the achievement of the steady-state operation of tokamak. A high ion temperature (HIT) discharge fully sustained by 2.45 GHz LHCD with both high ion temperature and steep temperature gradient is successfully demonstrated for longer than 1 min in the limiter configuration. The HIT discharges can be obtained in the narrow window of density and position. Moreover, the avoidance of the concentration of heat load on a limiter is the key point for the achievement and its long sustainment. As the effective thermal insulation between the wall and the plasma is improved on the single null configuration, HIT discharges with peak ion temperature > 5keV and steeper gradient up to 85 keV/m can be achieved by the exquisite control of density and position. The plasmas with high κ ∼1.5 can be also demonstrated for longer than 1 min. The current profile is also well-controlled for about 2 orders in magnitude longer than the current diffusion time using combined LHCD. The serious damage to the material of the first wall caused by energetic neutral particles produced via charge exchange process is also described. As the neutral particles cannot be affected by magnetic field, this damage by neutral particles must be avoided by the new technique. (author)

  1. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, N.H.; Mortensen, K.

    1988-12-01

    This report contains lecture notes of the basic lectures presented at the 1st Topsoee Summer School on Superconductivity held at Risoe National Laboratory, June 20-24, 1988. The following lecture notes are included: L.M. Falicov: 'Superconductivity: Phenomenology', A. Bohr and O. Ulfbeck: 'Quantal structure of superconductivity. Gauge angle', G. Aeppli: 'Muons, neutrons and superconductivity', N.F. Pedersen: 'The Josephson junction', C. Michel: 'Physicochemistry of high-T c superconductors', C. Laverick and J.K. Hulm: 'Manufacturing and application of superconducting wires', J. Clarke: 'SQUID concepts and systems'. (orig.) With 10 tabs., 128 figs., 219 refs

  2. Experimentally stabilized superconducting magnet with inner diameter of 700 mm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetlitskii, I A; Belonogov, A V; Dobrov, V M; Krylov, V L; Lebedev, A V; Lomkatsi, G S; Nilov, A F; Smolyankin, V T

    1974-05-01

    An experimental magnet, SPM-70, with the following characteristics was constructed. The inner diameter of the winding was 730 mm; outer diameter of the winding 1000 mm; height of winding 310 mm; magnetic induction at the center of the magnet 1.45 T; maximum magnetic induction 2.4 T; operation current 820 A; ampere-turns 1.07 x 10/sup 6/; design current density 2560 A/cm/sup 2/; stored energy 500 kJ; superconducting alloy Nb+50% Zr; weight of superconductor 23 kg; weight of copper 210 kg; resistivity of the copper in the strips at T = 4.2 K, B = 2.5 T, 2.6 x 10/sup -8/ ..cap omega.. cm.

  3. A novel rotating experimental platform in a superconducting magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Da; Cao, Hui-Ling; Ye, Ya-Jing; Dong, Chen; Liu, Yong-Ming; Shang, Peng; Yin, Da-Chuan

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces a novel platform designed to be used in a strong static magnetic field (in a superconducting magnet). The platform is a sample holder that rotates in the strong magnetic field. Any samples placed in the platform will rotate due to the rotation of the sample holder. With this platform, a number of experiments such as material processing, culture of biological systems, chemical reactions, or other processes can be carried out. In this report, we present some preliminary experiments (protein crystallization, cell culture, and seed germination) conducted using this platform. The experimental results showed that the platform can affect the processes, indicating that it provides a novel environment that has not been investigated before and that the effects of such an environment on many different physical, chemical, or biological processes can be potentially useful for applications in many fields.

  4. Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, D B

    1974-01-01

    A short general review is presented of the progress made in applied superconductivity as a result of work performed in connection with the high-energy physics program in Europe. The phenomenon of superconductivity and properties of superconductors of Types I and II are outlined. The main body of the paper deals with the development of niobium-titanium superconducting magnets and of radio-frequency superconducting cavities and accelerating structures. Examples of applications in and for high-energy physics experiments are given, including the large superconducting magnet for the Big European Bubble Chamber, prototype synchrotron magnets for the Super Proton Synchrotron, superconducting d.c. beam line magnets, and superconducting RF cavities for use in various laboratories. (0 refs).

  5. Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) power supply design and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumeyer, C.; Bronner, G.; Lu, E.; Ramakrishnan, S.

    1995-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is an advanced tokamak project aimed at the production of quasi-steady state plasmas with advanced shape, heating, and particle control. TPX is to be built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) using many of the facilities from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). TPX will be the first tokamak to utilize superconducting (SC) magnets in both the toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) systems. This new feature requires a departure from the traditional tokamak power supply schemes. This paper describes the plan for the adaptation of the PPPL/FTR power system facilities to supply TPX. Five major areas are addressed, namely the AC power system, the TF, PF and Fast Plasma Position Control (FPPC) power supplies, and quench protection for the TF and PF systems. Special emphasis is placed on the development of new power supply and protection schemes

  6. Understanding and Control of Transport in Advanced Tokamak Regimes in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.M. Greenfield; J.C. DeBoo; T.C. Luce; B.W. Stallard; E.J. Synakowski; L.R. Baylor; K.H. Burrell; T.A. Casper; E.J. Doyle; D.R. Ernst; J.R. Ferron; P. Gohil; R.J. Groebner; L.L. Lao; M. Makowski; G.R. McKee; M. Murakami; C.C. Petty; R.I. Pinsker; P.A. Politzer; R. Prater; C.L. Rettig; T.L. Rhodes; B.W. Rice; G.L. Schmidt; G.M. Staebler; E.J. Strait; D.M. Thomas; M.R. Wade

    1999-01-01

    Transport phenomena are studied in Advanced Tokamak (AT) regimes in the DIII-D tokamak [Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, 1986 (International Atomics Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. I, p. 159], with the goal of developing understanding and control during each of three phases: Formation of the internal transport barrier (ITB) with counter neutral beam injection takes place when the heating power exceeds a threshold value of about 9 MW, contrasting to CO-NBI injection, where P threshold N H 89 = 9 for 16 confinement times has been accomplished in a discharge combining an ELMing H-mode edge and an ITB, and exhibiting ion thermal transport down to 2-3 times neoclassical. The microinstabilities usually associated with ion thermal transport are predicted stable, implying that another mechanism limits performance. High frequency MHD activity is identified as the probable cause

  7. Accessibility and replacement as prime constraints in the design of large experimental Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Challender, R.S.; Reynolds, P.

    1976-01-01

    Many of the designs being developed for large Tokamak experiments are based on the classical geometry of the small machines in laboratories throughout the world: a circular array of coils interlinked by an inner toroidal vessel. An attempt is made to bring together those design features which would lead to better accessibility during non-active operation and in particular permit replacement and repair after activation, thereby making possible an extended period of experimental operation into the ignition phase

  8. Neutronic analysis of fusion tokamak devices by PHITS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukegawa, Atsuhiko M.; Takiyoshi, Kouji; Amano, Toshio; Kawasaki, Hiromitsu; Okuno, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    A complete 3D neutronic analysis by PHITS (Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System) has been performed for fusion tokamak devices such as JT-60U device and JT-60 Superconducting tokamak device (JT-60 Super Advanced). The mono-energetic neutrons (E n =2.45 MeV) of the DD fusion devices are used for the neutron source in the analysis. The visual neutron flux distribution for the estimation of the port streaming and the dose rate around the fusion tokamak devices has been calculated by the PHITS. The PHITS analysis makes it clear that the effect of the port streaming of superconducting fusion tokamak device with the cryostat is crucial and the calculated neutron spectrum results by PHITS agree with the MCNP-4C2 results. (author)

  9. Progress on advanced tokamak and steady-state scenario development on DIII-D and NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, E J [Department of Electrical Engineering and PSTI, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Garofalo, A M [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Greenfield, C M [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Kaye, S M [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Menard, J E [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Murakami, M [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Sabbagh, S A [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Austin, M E [University of Texas-Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Bell, R E [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Burrell, K H [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Ferron, J R [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Gates, D A [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Groebner, R J; Hyatt, A W; Luce, T C; Petty, C C; Wade, M R; Waltz, R E [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Jayakumar, R J [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kinsey, J E [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); LeBlanc, B P [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); McKee, G R [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Okabayashi, M [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Peng, Y-K M [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Politzer, P A [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Rhodes, T L [Dept. of Electrical Engineering and PSTI, Univ. of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Advanced tokamak (AT) research seeks to develop steady-state operating scenarios for ITER and other future devices from a demonstrated scientific basis. Normalized target parameters for steady-state operation on ITER are 100% non-inductive current operation with a bootstrap current fraction f{sub BS} {>=} 60%, q{sub 95} {approx} 4-5 and G {identical_to}{beta}{sub N}H{sub scaling}/q{sub 95}{sup 2} {>=}0.3. Progress in realizing such plasmas is considered in terms of the development of plasma control capabilities and scientific understanding, leading to improved AT performance. NSTX has demonstrated active resistive wall mode stabilization with low, ITER-relevant, rotation rates below the critical value required for passive stabilization. On DIII-D, experimental observations and GYRO simulations indicate that ion internal transport barrier (ITB) formation at rational-q surfaces is due to equilibrium zonal flows generating high local E ? B shear levels. In addition, stability modelling for DIII-D indicates a path to operation at {beta}{sub N} {>=} 4 with q{sub min} {>=} 2, using broad, hollow current profiles to increase the ideal wall stability limit. Both NSTX and DIII-D have optimized plasma performance and expanded AT operational limits. NSTX now has long-pulse, high performance discharges meeting the normalized targets for an spherical torus-based component test facility. DIII-D has developed sustained discharges combining high beta and ITBs, with performance approaching levels required for AT reactor concepts, e.g. {beta}{sub N} = 4, H{sub 89} = 2.5, with f{sub BS} > 60%. Most importantly, DIII-D has developed ITER steady-state demonstration discharges, simultaneously meeting the targets for steady-state Q {>=} 5 operation on ITER set out above, substantially increasing confidence in ITER meeting its steady-state performance objective.

  10. Proposed experimental test of the theory of hole superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, J.E., E-mail: jhirsch@ucsd.edu

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • The conventional theory of superconductivity predicts no charge flow when the normal-superconductor phase boundary moves. • The theory of hole superconductivity predicts flow and counterflow of charge. • An experiment to measure a voltage is proposed. • No voltage will be measured if the conventional theory is correct. • A voltage will be measured if the theory of hole superconductivity is correct. - Abstract: The theory of hole superconductivity predicts that in the reversible transition between normal and superconducting phases in the presence of a magnetic field there is charge flow in direction perpendicular to the normal-superconductor phase boundary. In contrast, the conventional BCS-London theory of superconductivity predicts no such charge flow. Here we discuss an experiment to test these predictions.

  11. Advanced tokamak reactors based on the spherical torus (ATR/ST). Preliminary design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Copenhaver, C.; Schnurr, N.M.; Engelhardt, A.G.; Seed, T.J.; Zubrin, R.M.

    1986-06-01

    Preliminary design results relating to an advanced magnetic fusion reactor concept based on the high-beta, low-aspect-ratio, spherical-torus tokamak are summarized. The concept includes resistive (demountable) toroidal-field coils, magnetic-divertor impurity control, oscillating-field current drive, and a flowing liquid-metal breeding blanket. Results of parametric tradeoff studies, plasma engineering modeling, fusion-power-core mechanical design, neutronics analyses, and blanket thermalhydraulics studies are described. The approach, models, and interim results described here provide a basis for a more detailed design. Key issues quantified for the spherical-torus reactor center on the need for an efficient drive for this high-current (approx.40 MA) device as well as the economic desirability to increase the net electrical power from the nominal 500-MWe(net) value adopted for the baseline system. Although a direct extension of present tokamak scaling, the stablity and transport of this high-beta (approx.0.3) plasma is a key unknown that is resoluble only by experiment. The spherical torus generally provides a route to improved tokamak reactors as measured by considerably simplified coil technology in a configuration that allows a realistic magnetic divertor design, both leading to increased mass power density and reduced cost

  12. Characterisation, modelling and control of advanced scenarios in the european tokamak jet; Caracterisation, modelisation et controle des scenarios avances dans le tokamak europeen jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tresset, G

    2002-09-26

    The advanced scenarios, developed for less than ten years with the internal transport barriers and the control of current profile, give rise to a 'new deal' for the tokamak as a future thermonuclear controlled fusion reactor. The Joint European Torus (JET) in United Kingdom is presently the most powerful device in terms of fusion power and it has allowed to acquire a great experience in these improved confinement regimes. The reduction of turbulent transport, considered now as closely linked to the shape of current profile optimised for instance by lower hybrid current drive or the self-generated bootstrap current, can be characterised by a dimensionless criterion. Most of useful information related to the transport barriers are thus available. Large database analysis and real time plasma control are envisaged as attractive applications. The so-called 'S'-shaped transport models exhibit some interesting properties in fair agreement with the experiments, while the non-linear multivariate dependencies of thermal diffusivity can be approximated by a neural network, suggesting a new approach for transport investigation and modelling. Finally, the first experimental demonstrations of real time control of internal transport barriers and current profile have been performed on JET. Sophisticated feedback algorithms have been proposed and are being numerically tested to achieve steady-state and efficient plasmas. (author)

  13. Characterisation, modelling and control of advanced scenarios in the european tokamak jet; Caracterisation, modelisation et controle des scenarios avances dans le tokamak europeen jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tresset, G

    2002-09-26

    The advanced scenarios, developed for less than ten years with the internal transport barriers and the control of current profile, give rise to a 'new deal' for the tokamak as a future thermonuclear controlled fusion reactor. The Joint European Torus (JET) in United Kingdom is presently the most powerful device in terms of fusion power and it has allowed to acquire a great experience in these improved confinement regimes. The reduction of turbulent transport, considered now as closely linked to the shape of current profile optimised for instance by lower hybrid current drive or the self-generated bootstrap current, can be characterised by a dimensionless criterion. Most of useful information related to the transport barriers are thus available. Large database analysis and real time plasma control are envisaged as attractive applications. The so-called 'S'-shaped transport models exhibit some interesting properties in fair agreement with the experiments, while the non-linear multivariate dependencies of thermal diffusivity can be approximated by a neural network, suggesting a new approach for transport investigation and modelling. Finally, the first experimental demonstrations of real time control of internal transport barriers and current profile have been performed on JET. Sophisticated feedback algorithms have been proposed and are being numerically tested to achieve steady-state and efficient plasmas. (author)

  14. Results from a model system of superconducting solenoids and phase shifting bridge for pulsed power studies for proposed tokamak EF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuja, R.E.; Kustom, R.L.; Smith, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    A matched pair of superconducting solenoids and a phase-shifting bridge circuit has been constructed to study energy storage and transfer for application to tokamak EF coils. The intrinsically stable solenoids, each with 4 H self-inductance, incorporate sufficient cooling to allow charging at several hundred volts, corresponding to B approximately equal 1 T/sec. The three-phase inductor-convertor capacitive bridge network operating at up to 150 V rms transfers energy reversibly and at controllable rates from the storage coil to the load coil

  15. Results from a model system of superconducting solenoids and phase shifting bridge for pulsed power studies for proposed tokamak EF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuja, R.E.; Kustom, R.L.; Smith, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    A matched pair of superconducting solenoids and a phase-shifting bridge circuit has been constructed to study energy storage and transfer for application to tokamak EF coils. The intrinsically stable solenoids, each with 4 H self-inductance, incorporate sufficient cooling to allow charging at several hundred volts, corresponding to B = 1 T/sec. The three-phase inductor-convertor capacitive bridge network operating at up to 150 V rms transfers energy reversibly and at controllable rates from the storage coil to the load coil

  16. An advanced plasma control system for the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferron, J.R.; Kellman, A.; McKee, E.; Osborne, T.; Petrach, P.; Taylor, T.S.; Wight, J.; Lazarus, E.

    1991-11-01

    An advanced plasma control system is being implemented for the DIII-D tokamak utilizing digital technology. This system will regulate the position and shape of tokamak discharges that range from elongated limiter to single-null divertor and double-null divertor with elongation as high as 2.6. Development of this system is expected to lead to control system technology appropriate for use on future tokamaks such as ITER and BPX. The digital system will allow for increased precision in shape control through real time adjustment of the control algorithm to changes in the shape and discharge parameters such as β p , ell i and scrape-off layer current. The system will be used for research on real time optimization of discharge performance for disruption avoidance, current and pressure profile control, optimization of rf antenna loading, or feedback on heat deposition patterns through divertor strike point position control, for example. Shape control with this system is based on linearization near a target shape of the controlled parameters as a function of the magnetic diagnostic signals. This digital system is unique in that it is designed to have the speed necessary to control the unstable vertical motion of highly elongated tokamak discharges such as those produced in DIII-D and planned for BPX and ITER. a 40 MHz Intel i860 processor is interfaced to up to 112 channels of analog input signals. The commands to the poloidal field coils can be updated at 80 μs intervals for the control of vertical position with a delay between sampling of the analog signal and update of the command of less than 80 μs

  17. First experimental results with the Current Limit Avoidance System at the JET tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Tommasi, G. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CREATE, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Galeani, S. [Dipartimento di Informatica, Sistemi e Produzione, Università di Roma, Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Jachmich, S. [Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Koninklijke Militaire School - Ecole Royale Militaire, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Joffrin, E. [IRFM-CEA, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-paul-lez-Durance (France); Lennholm, M. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); European Commission, B-1049 Brussels (Belgium); Lomas, P.J. [Euratom-CCFE, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); Neto, A.C. [Associazione EURATOM-IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, IST, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Maviglia, F. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CREATE, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); McCullen, P. [Euratom-CCFE, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); Pironti, A. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CREATE, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Rimini, F.G. [Euratom-CCFE, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); Sips, A.C.C. [European Commission, B-1049 Brussels (Belgium); Varano, G.; Vitelli, R. [Dipartimento di Informatica, Sistemi e Produzione, Università di Roma, Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Zaccarian, L. [CNRS, LAAS, 7 Avenue du Colonel Roche, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Universitè de Toulouse, LAAS, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2013-06-15

    The Current Limit Avoidance System (CLA) has been recently deployed at the JET tokamak to avoid current saturations in the poloidal field (PF) coils when the eXtreme Shape Controller is used to control the plasma shape. In order to cope with the current saturation limits, the CLA exploits the redundancy of the PF coils system to automatically obtain almost the same plasma shape using a different combination of currents in the PF coils. In the presence of disturbances it tries to avoid the current saturations by relaxing the constraints on the plasma shape control. The CLA system has been successfully implemented on the JET tokamak and fully commissioned in 2011. This paper presents the first experimental results achieved in 2011–2012 during the restart and the ITER-like wall campaigns at JET.

  18. Design of charge exchange recombination spectroscopy for the joint Texas experimental tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Y.; Zhuang, G., E-mail: ge-zhuang@hust.edu.cn; Cheng, Z. F.; Hou, S. Y.; Cheng, C.; Li, Z.; Wang, J. R.; Wang, Z. J. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-11-15

    The old diagnostic neutral beam injector first operated at the University of Texas at Austin is ready for rejoining the joint Texas experimental tokamak (J-TEXT). A new set of high voltage power supplies has been equipped and there is no limitation for beam modulation or beam pulse duration henceforth. Based on the spectra of fully striped impurity ions induced by the diagnostic beam the design work for toroidal charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) system is presented. The 529 nm carbon VI (n = 8 − 7 transition) line seems to be the best choice for ion temperature and plasma rotation measurements and the considered hardware is listed. The design work of the toroidal CXRS system is guided by essential simulation of expected spectral results under the J-TEXT tokamak operation conditions.

  19. Experimental investigation of turbulent transport at the edge of a tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorczak, N.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript is devoted to the experimental investigation of particle transport in the edge region of the tokamak Tore Supra. The first part introduces the motivations linked to energy production, the principle of a magnetic confinement and the elements of physics essential to describe the dynamic of the plasma at the edge region. From data collected by a set of Langmuir probes and a fast visible imaging camera, we demonstrate that the particle transport is dominated by the convection of plasma filaments, structures elongated along magnetic field lines. They present a finite wave number, responsible for the high enhancement of the particle flux at the low field side of the tokamak. This leads to the generation of strong parallel flows, and the strong constraint of filament geometry by the magnetic shear. (author)

  20. Synergism between profile and cross section shape optimization for negative central shear advanced tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, A.D.; Taylor, T.S.; Lao, L.L.

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Tokamak (AT) concept is aimed at achieving high beta, high confinement, and a well aligned high bootstrap current fraction in a tokamak configuration consistent with steady state operation. The required improvements over the simple O-D scaling laws, normally used to predict standard, pulsed tokamak performance, axe obtained by taking into account the dependence of the stability and confinement on the 2-D equilibrium; the planned TPX experiment was designed to take full advantage of both advanced profiles and advanced cross-section shaping. Systematic stability studies of the promising Negative Central Shear (NCS) configuration have been performed for a wide variety of cross-section shapes and profile variations. The ideal MHD beta limit is found to be strongly dependent on both and, in fact, there is a clear synergistic relationship between the gains in beta from optimizing the profiles and optimizing the shape. Specifically, for a circular cross-section with highly peaked profiles, β is limited to normalized β values of β N = β/(I/aB) ∼ 2% (mT/MA). A small gain in beta can be achieved by broadening the pressure; however, the root-mean-square beta (β*) is slightly reduced. With peaked pressure profiles, a small increase in β N over that in a circular cross-section is also obtained by strong shaping. At fixed q, this translates to a much larger gain in β and β*. With both optimal profiles and strong shaping, however, the gain in all the relevant fusion performance parameters is dramatic; β and β* can be increased a factor 5 for example. Moreover, the bootstrap alignment is improved. For an optimized strongly shaped configuration, confinement, beta values, and bootstrap alignment adequate for a practical AT power plant appear to be realizable. Data from DIII-D supports these predictions and analysis of the DIII-D data will be presented

  1. Design study of blanket structure for tokamak experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-11-01

    Design study of the blanket structure for JAERI Experimental Fusion Reactor (JXFR) has been carried out. Studied here were fabrication and testing of the blanket structure (blanket cells, blanket rings, piping and blanket modules), assembly and disassembly of the blanket module, and monitering and testing technique. Problems in design and fabrication of the blanket structure could be revealed. Research and development problems for the future were also disclosed. (author)

  2. Cryogenic system of steady state superconducting Tokamak SST-1: Operational experience and controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, B.; Tank, Jignesh; Panchal, Pradip; Sahu, A.K.; Bhattacharya, Ritendra; Phadke, Gaurang; Gupta, N.C.; Gupta, Girish; Shah, Nitin; Shukla, Pawan; Singh, Manoj; Sonara, Dasarath; Sharma, Rajiv; Saradha, S.; Patel, J.C.; Saxena, Y.C.

    2006-01-01

    The cryogenic system of SST-1 consists of the helium cryogenic system and the nitrogen cryogenic system. The main components of the helium cryogenic system are (a) 1.3 kW helium refrigerator/liquefier (HRL) and (b) warm gas management system (WGM), where as, the nitrogen cryogenic system called as liquid nitrogen (LN 2 ) management system consists of storage tanks and a distribution system. The helium flow distribution and control to different sub-systems is achieved by the integrated flow distribution and control (IFDC) system. The HRL has been commissioned and operated for performing a single toroidal field coil test as well as for the first commissioning of SST-1 superconducting-magnets up to 68 K. Analysis of the results shows that the compressor and turbine parameters of the HRL, namely, the speed and pressure are very stable during operation of the HRL, confirming to the reliability in control of thermo-dynamic parameters of the system. The thermal shield of the SST-1 cryostat consists of ten different types of panels, which have been cooled down to the minimum temperature of 80 K and maintained during the first commissioning of SST-1. The operation and controls of the LN2 management system have been found to be as per the design consideration

  3. Current control of superconducting coils for fusion experimental facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ise, T.; Etou, D.; Chikaraishi, H.; Takami, S.; Inoue, T.

    2003-01-01

    The LHD (Large Helical Device) has twelve superconducting coils and six dc power supplies, and following specifications are required for its control system; each coil current must be controlled independently, the steady state control error is less than 0.01% of the reference value, the current settling time for 0.1% of control error is less than 1 second, and the control system must be robust against turbulence caused by appearance and disappearance of the plasma, parameter errors and external electro-magnetic noises. In this paper, the design and test results of the coil current control system for the LHD are described. The good response and robustness are in the relation of trade off each other. H-infinity controller is one of schemes to guarantee robustness for stability. However, the independent responses of six coils were impossible by the H-infinity controller only. To resolve this problem, we applied a feed-forward control with the H-infinity control. Moreover, the advanced design method of H-infinity controller using μ-synthesis was applied to guarantee the control performance in the whole operating condition. As a result, good control results were obtained by experiments. (author)

  4. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruana, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    Despite reports of new, high-temperature superconductive materials almost every day, participants at the First Congress on Superconductivity do not anticipate commercial applications with these materials soon. What many do envision is the discovery of superconducting materials that can function at much warmer, perhaps even room temperatures. Others hope superconductivity will usher in a new age of technology as semiconductors and transistors did. This article reviews what the speakers had to say at the four-day congress held in Houston last February. Several speakers voiced concern that the Reagan administration's apparent lack of interest in funding superconductivity research while other countries, notably Japan, continue to pour money into research and development could hamper America's international competitiveness

  5. Development of Experimental Superconducting Magnet for the Collector Ring of FAIR Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yinfeng; Wu Weiyue; Wu Songtao; Liu Changle; Xu Houchang

    2010-01-01

    A pool cooled experimental magnet based on the copper stabilized NbTi superconducting wire was designed, fabricated and tested, in order to evaluate the engineering design of the dipole superconducting magnet for the collector ring (CR) of the facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) project. In this paper, the experimental setup including quench protection system was presented. Performance of the liquid helium pool cooled test was introduced. All of the results indicate both the performance of conductor and the experimental superconducting magnet under low temperature is stable, which suggests the engineering design are feasible for the formal magnet in CR of the FAIR project.

  6. A novel approach to linearization of the electromagnetic parameters of tokamaks with an iron core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, P. E-mail: fupeng@mail.ipp.ac.cn; Liu, Z.Z.; Zou, J.H

    2002-05-01

    The equivalent model of an iron core tokamak is developed, in which the electromagnetic parameters of several pairs of coils in opposite series (PCOS) are not dependent on the saturation of the iron core during tokamak operation. With this the electromagnetic parameters of all the coils in an iron core tokamak can be linearized, As an example, the electromagnetic parameters of Hefei Super-conductive Tokamak with iron core (HT-7) are linearized, and it is in good agreement with the experimental results. The linearization approach can be applied in real time plasma control and electromagnetic analysis.

  7. Experimental Studies of Light Emission Phenomena in Superconducting RF Cavitites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, P.L.; /SLAC; Delayen, J.R.; /Jefferson Lab; Fryberger, D.; /SLAC; Goree, W.S.; Mammosser, J.; /Jefferson Lab /SNS Project, Oak Ridge; Szalata, Z.M.; II, J.G.Weisend /SLAC

    2009-08-04

    Experimental studies of light emission phenomena in superconducting RF cavities, which we categorize under the general heading of cavity lights, are described. The cavity lights data, which were obtained using a small CCD video camera, were collected in a series of nine experimental runs ranging from {approx} 1/2 to {approx} 2 h in duration. The video data were recorded on a standard VHS tape. As the runs progressed, additional instrumentation was added. For the last three runs a LabVIEW controlled data acquisition system was included. These runs furnish evidence for several, possibly related, light emission phenomena. The most intriguing of these is what appear to be small luminous objects {le} 1.5 mm in size, freely moving about in the vacuum space, generally without wall contact, as verified by reflections of the tracks in the cavity walls. In addition, on a number of occasions, these objects were observed to bounce off of the cavity walls. The wall-bounce aspect of most of these events was clearly confirmed by pre-bounce and post-bounce reflections concurrent with the tracks. In one of the later runs, a mode of behavior was observed that was qualitatively different from anything observed in the earlier runs. Perhaps the most perplexing aspect of this new mode was the observation of as many as seven luminous objects arrayed in what might be described as a macromolecular formation, coherently moving about in the interior of the cavity for extended periods of time, evidently without any wall contact. It is suggested that these mobile luminous objects are without explanation within the realm of established physics. Some remarks about more exotic theoretical possibilities are made, and future plans are discussed.

  8. Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    TPX is a national project involving a large number of US fusion laboratories, universities, and industries. The element of the TPX requirements that is a primary driver for the hardware design is the fact that TPX tokamak hardware is being designed to accommodate steady state operation if the external systems are upgraded from the 1,000 second initial operation. TPX not only incorporates new physics, but also pioneers new technologies to be used in ITER and other future reactors. TPX will be the first tokamak with fully superconducting magnetic field coils using advanced conductors, will have internal nuclear shielding, will use robotics for machine maintenance, and will remove the continuous, concentrated heat flow from the plasma with new dispersal techniques and with special materials that are actively cooled. The Conceptual Design for TPX was completed during Fiscal Year 1993. The Preliminary Design formally began at the beginning of Fiscal Year 1994. Industrial contracts have been awarded for the design, with options for fabrication, of the primary tokamak hardware. A large fraction of the design and R and D effort during FY94 was focused on the tokamak and in turn on the tokamak magnets. The reason for this emphasis is because the magnets require a large design and R and D effort, and are critical to the project schedule. The magnet development is focused on conductor development, quench protection, and manufacturing R and D. The Preliminary Design Review for the Magnets is planned for fall, 1995

  9. Numerical evaluation of experimental models to investigate the dynamic behavior of the ITER tokamak assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, M.; Takeda, N.; Nakahira, M.; Shimizu, K.; Nakamura, T.

    2003-01-01

    The most recent assessment method to evaluate the dynamic behavior of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak assembly is outlined. Three experimental models, including a 1/5.8-scale tokamak model, have been considered to validate the numerical analysis methods for dynamic events, particularly seismic ones. The experimental model has been evaluated by numerical calculations and the results are presented. In the calculations, equivalent linearization has been applied for the non-linear characteristics of the support flange connection, caused by the effects of the bolt-fastening and the friction between the flanges. The detailed connecting conditions for the support flanges have been developed and validated for the analysis. Using the conditions, the eigen-mode analysis has shown that the first and second eigen-mode are horizontal vibration modes with the natural frequency of 39 Hz, while the vertical vibration mode is the fourth mode with the natural frequency of 86 Hz. Dynamic analysis for seismic events has shown the maximum acceleration of approximately twofold larger than that of the applied acceleration, and the maximum stress of 104 MPa found in the flange connecting bolt. These values will be examined comparing with experimental results in order to validate the analysis methods

  10. Numerical evaluation of experimental models to investigate the dynamic behavior of the ITER tokamak assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, M. E-mail: masanori_onozuka@mhi.co.jp; Takeda, N.; Nakahira, M.; Shimizu, K.; Nakamura, T

    2003-09-01

    The most recent assessment method to evaluate the dynamic behavior of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak assembly is outlined. Three experimental models, including a 1/5.8-scale tokamak model, have been considered to validate the numerical analysis methods for dynamic events, particularly seismic ones. The experimental model has been evaluated by numerical calculations and the results are presented. In the calculations, equivalent linearization has been applied for the non-linear characteristics of the support flange connection, caused by the effects of the bolt-fastening and the friction between the flanges. The detailed connecting conditions for the support flanges have been developed and validated for the analysis. Using the conditions, the eigen-mode analysis has shown that the first and second eigen-mode are horizontal vibration modes with the natural frequency of 39 Hz, while the vertical vibration mode is the fourth mode with the natural frequency of 86 Hz. Dynamic analysis for seismic events has shown the maximum acceleration of approximately twofold larger than that of the applied acceleration, and the maximum stress of 104 MPa found in the flange connecting bolt. These values will be examined comparing with experimental results in order to validate the analysis methods.

  11. Radiation considerations for superconducting fusion magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation environment for the magnets is characterized for various conditions expected for tokamak power reactor operation. The radiation levels are translated into radiation effects using available experimental data. The impact of the tradeoffs in radiation shielding and the change in the properties of the superconducting magnets on reactor performance and economics is examined. It is shown that (1) superconducting magnets in fusion reactors will operate at much higher radiation level than was previously anticipated; (2) additional data on radiation damage is required to better accuracy than is presently available in order to accurately quantify the change in properties in the superconducting magnet components; and (3) there is a substantial penalty for increasing (or overestimating) the shielding requirements. A perspective of future tokamak power reactors is presented and questions relating to desirable magnetic field strength and selection of materials for superconducting magnets are briefly examined

  12. Experimental Study of Thermal Crisis in Connection with Tokamak Reactor High Heat Flux Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallo, D.; Giardina, M.; Castiglia, F.; Celata, G.P.; Mariani, A.; Zummo, G.; Cumo, M.

    2000-01-01

    The results of an experimental research on high heat flux thermal crisis in forced convective subcooled water flow, under operative conditions of interest to the thermal-hydraulic design of TOKAMAK fusion reactors, are here reported. These experiments, carried out in the framework of a collaboration between the Nuclear Engineering Department of Palermo University and the National Institute of Thermal - Fluid Dynamics of the ENEA - Casaccia (Rome), were performed on the STAF (Scambio Termico Alti Flussi) water loop and consisted, essentially, in a high speed photographic study which enabled focusing several information on bubble characteristics and flow patterns taking place during the burnout phenomenology

  13. Tokamaks with high-performance resistive magnets: advanced test reactors and prospects for commercial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Williams, J.E.C.; Becker, H.; Leclaire, R.; Yang, T.

    1981-10-01

    Scoping studies have been made of tokamak reactors with high performance resistive magnets which maximize advantages gained from high field operation and reduced shielding requirements, and minimize resistive power requirements. High field operation can provide very high values of fusion power density and n tau/sub e/ while the resistive power losses can be kept relatively small. Relatively high values of Q' = Fusion Power/Magnet Resistive Power can be obtained. The use of high field also facilitates operation in the DD-DT advanced fuel mode. The general engineering and operational features of machines with high performance magnets are discussed. Illustrative parameters are given for advanced test reactors and for possible commercial reactors. Commercial applications that are discussed are the production of fissile fuel, electricity generation with and without fissioning blankets and synthetic fuel production

  14. Tokamak Engineering Technology Facility scoping study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Bolta, C.C.

    1976-03-01

    A scoping study for a Tokamak Engineering Technology Facility (TETF) is presented. The TETF is a tokamak with R = 3 m and I/sub p/ = 1.4 MA based on the counterstreaming-ion torus mode of operation. The primary purpose of TETF is to demonstrate fusion technologies for the Experimental Power Reactor (EPR), but it will also serve as an engineering and radiation test facility. TETF has several technological systems (e.g., superconducting toroidal-field coil, tritium fuel cycle, impurity control, first wall) that are prototypical of EPR.

  15. Tokamak Engineering Technology Facility scoping study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Bolta, C.C.

    1976-03-01

    A scoping study for a Tokamak Engineering Technology Facility (TETF) is presented. The TETF is a tokamak with R = 3 m and I/sub p/ = 1.4 MA based on the counterstreaming-ion torus mode of operation. The primary purpose of TETF is to demonstrate fusion technologies for the Experimental Power Reactor (EPR), but it will also serve as an engineering and radiation test facility. TETF has several technological systems (e.g., superconducting toroidal-field coil, tritium fuel cycle, impurity control, first wall) that are prototypical of EPR

  16. Experimental system design for the integration of trapped-ion and superconducting qubit systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Motte, D.; Grounds, A. R.; Rehák, M.; Rodriguez Blanco, A.; Lekitsch, B.; Giri, G. S.; Neilinger, P.; Oelsner, G.; Il'ichev, E.; Grajcar, M.; Hensinger, W. K.

    2016-12-01

    We present a design for the experimental integration of ion trapping and superconducting qubit systems as a step towards the realization of a quantum hybrid system. The scheme addresses two key difficulties in realizing such a system: a combined microfabricated ion trap and superconducting qubit architecture, and the experimental infrastructure to facilitate both technologies. Developing upon work by Kielpinski et al. (Phys Rev Lett 108(13):130504, 2012. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.130504), we describe the design, simulation and fabrication process for a microfabricated ion trap capable of coupling an ion to a superconducting microwave LC circuit with a coupling strength in the tens of kHz. We also describe existing difficulties in combining the experimental infrastructure of an ion trapping set-up into a dilution refrigerator with superconducting qubits and present solutions that can be immediately implemented using current technology.

  17. Progress in Developing a High-Availability Advanced Tokamak Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T.; Goldston, R.; Kessel, C.; Neilson, G.; Menard, J.; Prager, S.; Scott, S.; Titus, P.; Zarnstorff, M., E-mail: tbrown@pppl.gov [Princeton University, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton (United States); Costley, A. [Henley on Thames (United Kingdom); El-Guebaly, L. [University of Wisconsin, Madison (United States); Malang, S. [Fusion Nuclear Technology Consulting, Linkenheim (Germany); Waganer, L. [St. Louis (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: A fusion pilot plant study was initiated to clarify the development needs in moving from ITER to a first of a kind fusion power plant, following a path similar to the approach adopted for the commercialization of fission. The mission of the pilot plant was set to encompass component test and fusion nuclear science missions yet produce net electricity with high availability in a device designed to be prototypical of the commercial device. The objective of the study was to evaluate three different magnetic configuration options, the advanced tokamak (AT), spherical tokamak (ST) and compact stellarator (CS) in an effort to establish component characteristics, maintenance features and the general arrangement of each candidate device. With the move to look beyond ITER the fusion community is now beginning to embark on DEMO reactor studies with an emphasis on defining configuration arrangements that can meet a high availability goal. In this paper the AT pilot plant design will be presented. The selected maintenance approach, the device arrangement and sizing of the in-vessel components and details of interfacing auxiliary systems and services that impact the ability to achieve high availability operations will be discussed. Efforts made to enhance the interaction of in-vessel maintenance activities, the hot cell and the transfer process to develop simplifying solutions will also be addressed. (author)

  18. Plasma profile and shape optimization for the advanced tokamak power plant, ARIES-AT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessel, C.E.; Mau, T.K.; Jardin, S.C.; Najmabadi, F.

    2006-01-01

    An advanced tokamak plasma configuration is developed based on equilibrium, ideal MHD stability, bootstrap current analysis, vertical stability and control, and poloidal field coil analysis. The plasma boundaries used in the analysis are forced to coincide with the 99% flux surface from the free-boundary equilibrium. Using an accurate bootstrap current model and external current drive profiles from ray tracing calculations in combination with optimized pressure profiles, β N values above 7.0 have been obtained. The minimum current drive requirement is found to lie at a lower β N of 6.0. The external kink mode is stabilized by a tungsten shell located at 0.33 times the minor radius and a feedback system. Plasma shape optimization has led to an elongation of 2.2 and triangularity of 0.9 at the separatrix. Vertical stability could be achieved by a combination of tungsten shells located at 0.33 times the minor radius and feedback control coils located behind the shield. The poloidal field coils were optimized in location and current, providing a maximum coil current of 8.6 MA. These developments have led to a simultaneous reduction in the power plant major radius and toroidal field from those found in a previous study [S.C. Jardin, C.E. Kessel, C.G. Bathke, D.A. Ehst, T.K. Mau, F. Najmabadi, T.W. Petrie, the ARIES Team, Physics basis for a reversed shear tokamak power plant, Fusion Eng. Design 38 (1997) 27

  19. An advanced conceptual Tokamak fusion power reactor utilizing closed cycle helium gas turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    UWMAK-III is a conceptual Tokamak reactor designed to study the potential and the problems associated with an advanced version of Tokamaks as power reactors. Design choices have been made which represent reasonable extrapolations of present technology. The major features are the noncircular plasma cross section, the use of TZM, a molybdenum based alloy, as the primary structural material, and the incorporation of a closed-cycle helium gas turbine power conversion system. A conceptual design of the turbomachinery is given together with a preliminary heat exchanger analysis that results in relatively compact designs for the generator, precooler, and intercooler. This paper contains a general description of the UWMAK-III system and a discussion of those aspects of the reactor, such as the burn cycle, the blanket design and the heat transfer analysis, which are required to form the basis for discussing the power conversion system. The authors concentrate on the power conversion system and include a parametric performance analysis, an interface and trade-off study and a description of the reference conceptual design of the closed-cycle helium gas turbine power conversion system. (Auth.)

  20. Experimental formation of a fractional vortex in a superconducting bi-layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Y.; Yamamori, H.; Yanagisawa, T.; Nishio, T.; Arisawa, S.

    2018-05-01

    We report the experimental formation of a fractional vortex generated by using a thin superconducting bi-layer in the form of a niobium bi-layer, observed as a magnetic flux distribution image taken by a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope. Thus, we demonstrated that multi-component superconductivity can be realized by an s-wave conventional superconductor, because, in these superconductors, the magnetic flux is no longer quantized as it is destroyed by the existence of an inter-component phase soliton (i-soliton).

  1. Recent advances in the theory and simulation of pellet ablation and fast fuel relocation in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, P.B.; Baylor, L.R.; Ishizaki, R.; Jardin, S.C.; Samtaney, R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents new theory and simulation of pellet ablation, and the rapid cross-field redistribution of the ionized pellet mass following pellet injection in tokamaks. The first 2-D time-dependent simulations describing the expansion of pellet ablation flow against the magnetic field is presented here using the Eulerian code CAP. The early-time expansion is characterized by the formation of an ellipsoidal diamagnetic cavity surrounding the pellet, which diverts heat flux around the pellet, thereby reducing the ablation rate. Near-pellet cloud properties from CAP provide initial conditions for the subsequent ExB advection of the ionized clouds caused by polarization in the inhomogeneous toroidal magnetic field. The first complete set of time-dependent equations describing mass redistribution has been developed and solved for numerically using the PRL code. New effects identified, including curvature drive by near sonic field-aligned flows, rotational transform of the magnetic field lines and magnetic shear are considered from the viewpoint of the parallel vorticity equation. Close agreement between theory and experimental fuel deposition profiles are obtained for both inner and outer wall pellet injection on the DIII-D tokamak, providing improved predictive capability for ITER. A new 3-D MHD simulation code AMR was started, which provides the required fine-scale mesh size needed for accurate modeling of pellet clouds having sharp perpendicular-to-B gradients. (author)

  2. Varennes Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cumyn, P.B.

    A consortium of five organizations under the leadership of IREQ, the Institute de Recherche d'Hydro-Quebec has completed a conceptual design study for a tokamak device, and in January 1981 its construction was authorized with funding being provided principally by Hydro-Quebec and the National Research Council, as well as by the Ministre d'Education du Quebec and Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC). The device will form the focus of Canada's magnetic-fusion program and will be located in IREQ's laboratories in Varennes. Presently the machine layout is being finalized from the physics point of view and work has started on equipment design and specification. The Tokamak de Varennes will be an experimental device, the purpose of which is to study plasma and other fusion related phenomena. In particular it will study: 1. Plasma impurities and plasma/liner interaction; 2. Long pulse or quasi-continuous operation using plasma rampdown and eventually plasma current reversal in order to maintain the plasma; and 3. Advanced diagnostics

  3. Modelling of advanced tokamak physics scenarios in ALCATOR C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonoli, P.T.; Porkolab, M.; Ramos, J.

    2001-01-01

    Advanced tokamak modes of operation in Alcator C-Mod have been investigated using a simulation model which combines an MHD equilibrium and current profile control calculation with an ideal MHD stability analysis. Stable access to high β t operating modes with reversed shear current density profiles has been demonstrated using 2.4-3.0 MW of off-axis lower hybrid current drive (LHCD). Here β t =2μ 0 (p)/B 2 0 is the volume averaged toroidal plasma beta. Current profile control at the β-limit and beyond has also been demonstrated. The effects of LH power level as well as changes in the profiles of density and temperature on shear reversal radius have been quantified and are discussed. (author)

  4. Control of the Resistive Wall Mode in Advanced Tokamak Plasmas on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garofalo, A.M.; Strait, E.J.; Bialek, J.; Frederickson, E.; Gryaznevich, M.; Jensen, T.H.; Johnson, L.C.; La Haye, R.J.; Navratil, G.A.; Lazarus, E.A.; Luce, T.C.; Makowski, M.; Okabayashi, M.; Rice, B.W.; Scoville, J.T.; Turnbull, A.D.; Walker, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    Resistive wall mode (RWM) instabilities are found to be a limiting factor in advanced tokamak (AT) regimes with low internal inductance. Even small amplitude modes can affect the rotation profile and the performance of these ELMing H-mode discharges. Although complete stabilization of the RWM by plasma rotation has not yet been observed, several discharges with increased beam momentum and power injection sustained good steady-state performance for record time extents. The first investigation of active feedback control of the RWM has shown promising results: the leakage of the radial magnetic flux through the resistive wall can be successfully controlled, and the duration of the high beta phase can be prolonged. The results provide a comparative test of several approaches to active feedback control, and are being used to benchmark the analysis and computational models of active control

  5. SELF-CONSISTENT,INTEGRATED,ADVANCED TOKAMAK OPERATION ON DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WADE, MR; MURAKAMI, M; LUCE, TC; FERRON, JR; PETTY, CC; BRENNAN, DP; GAROFALO, AM; GREENFIELD, CM; HYATT, AW; JAYAKUMAR, R; LAHAYE, RJ; LAO, LL; LOHR, J; POLITZER, PA; PRATER, R; STRAIT, EJ

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiments on DIII-D have demonstrated the ability to sustain plasma conditions that integrate and sustain the key ingredients of Advanced Tokamak (AT) operation: high β with q min >> 1, good energy confinement, and high current drive efficiency. Utilizing off-axis (ρ 0.4) electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) to modify the current density profile in a plasma operating near the no-wall ideal stability limit with q min > 2.0, plasmas with β = 2.9% and 90% of the plasma current driven non-inductively have been sustained for nearly 2 s (limited only by the duration of the ECCD pulse). Separate experiments have demonstrated the ability to sustain a steady current density profile using ECCD for periods as long as 1 s with β = 3.3% and > 90% of the current driven non-inductively

  6. Tore Supra. Basic design Tokamak system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymar, R.; Bareyt, B.; Bon Mardion, G.

    1980-10-01

    This document describes the basic design for the main components of the Tokamak system of Tora Supra. As such, it focuses on the engineering problems, and refers to last year report on Tora Supra (EUR-CEA-1021) for objectives and experimental programme of the apparatus on one hand, and for qualifying tests of the main technical solutions on the other hand. Superconducting toroidal field coil system, vacuum vessels and radiation shields, poloidal field system and cryogenic system are described

  7. Experimental evidence for vortex-glass superconductivity in Y-Ba-Cu-O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, R.H.; Foglietti, V.; Gallagher, W.J.; Koren, G.; Gupta, A.; Fisher, M.P.A.

    1989-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the existence of a continuous phase transition between a normal and a true superconducting phase (with zero linear resistivity) in epitaxial films of Y-Ba-Cu-O in strong magnetic fields fields, H much-gt H c1 . The nonlinear I-V curves show scaling behavior near the transition and the relevant critical exponents are extracted. These exponents are consistent with values expected for freezing into a superconducting vortex-glass phase

  8. Data acquisition, processing and display of experimental data for the Tokamak de Varennes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robins, E.S.; Larsen, J.M.; Lee, A.; Somers, G.

    1985-01-01

    The Tokamak de Varennes is to be a national facility for research into magnetic nuclear fusion. A centralised computer system is currently under development to facilitate the remote control, acquisition, processing and display of experimental data. The software (GALE-V) consists of a set of tasks to build data structures which mirror the physical arrangement of each experiment and provide the bases for the interpretation and presentation of the data to each experimenter. Data retrieval is accomplished through the graphics subsystem, and an interface for user-written data processing programs allows for the varied needs of data analysis of each experiment. Other facilities being developed provide the tools for a user to retrieve, process and view the data in a simple manner

  9. Technical diagnosis system for EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Jing; Weng, P.D.; Luo, J.R.; Chen, Z.M.; Wu, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Technical diagnosis system (TDS) is one of the important subsystems of EAST (experimental advanced superconducting tokamak) device, main function of which is to monitor status parameters in EAST device. Those status parameters include temperature of different positions of main components, resistance of each superconducting (SC) coils, joint resistance of SC coils and high-temperature superconducting (HTS) current leads, strain of cold-quality components endured force, and displacement and current of toroidal field (TF) coils in EAST device, which are analog input signals. In addition there are still some analog and digital output signals. The TDS monitors all of those signals in the period of EAST experiments. TDS data monitoring is described in detail for it plays important role during EAST campaign. And how to protect the SC magnet system during each plasma discharging is presented with data of temperature of coolant inlet and outlet of SC coils and feeders and cases of the TF coils and temperature in the upper and middle and bottom of the TF coil case. During construction of the TDS primary difficulties come from installation of Lakeshore Cernox temperature sensors, strain measurement of central solenoid coils support legs and installation of co-wound voltage sensors for quench detection. While during operation since the first commissioning big challenges are from temperature measurement changes in current leads and quench detection of PF coils. Those difficulties in both stages are introduced which are key to make the TDS reliable. Meanwhile analysis of experimental data like temperature as a back up to testify quench occurrence and stress on vacuum vessel thermal shield and vacuum vessel have also been discussed.

  10. Continuous tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.

    1978-04-01

    A tokamak configuration is proposed that permits the rapid replacement of a plasma discharge in a ''burn'' chamber by another one in a time scale much shorter than the elementary thermal time constant of the chamber first wall. With respect to the chamber, the effective duty cycle factor can thus be made arbitrarily close to unity minimizing the cyclic thermal stress in the first wall. At least one plasma discharge always exists in the new tokamak configuration, hence, a continuous tokamak. By incorporating adiabatic toroidal compression, configurations of continuous tokamak compressors are introduced. To operate continuous tokamaks, it is necessary to introduce the concept of mixed poloidal field coils, which spatially groups all the poloidal field coils into three sets, all contributing simultaneously to inducing the plasma current and maintaining the proper plasma shape and position. Preliminary numerical calculations of axisymmetric MHD equilibria in continuous tokamaks indicate the feasibility of their continued plasma operation. Advanced concepts of continuous tokamaks to reduce the topological complexity and to allow the burn plasma aspect ratio to decrease for increased beta are then suggested

  11. Tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of the new large tokamaks JET, JT-60 and TFTR important advances in magnetic confinement have been made. These include the exploitation of radio frequency and neutral beam heating on a much larger scale than previously, the demonstration of regimes of improved confinement and the demonstration of current drive at the Megamp level. A number of small and medium sized tokamaks have also come into operation recently such as WT-3 in Japan with an emphasis on radio frequency current drive and HL-1 a medium sized tokamak in China. Each of these new tokamaks is addressing specific problems which remain for the future development of the system. Of these particular problems: β, density and q limits remain important issues for the future development of the tokamak. β limits are being addressed on the DIII-D device in the USA. The anomalous confinement that the tokamak displays is being explored in detail on the TEXT device in the USA. Two other problems are impurity control and current drive. There is significant emphasis on divertor configurations at the present time with their enhanced confinement in the so called H mode. Due to improved discharge cleaning techniques and the ability to repetitively refuel using pellets, purer plasmas can be obtained even without divertors. Current drive remains a crucial issue for quasi of near steady state operation of the tokamak in the future and many current drive schemes are being investigated. (author) [pt

  12. Advances in experimental seismic engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthumani, K.; Gopalakrishnan, N.; Sathish Kumar, K.; Iyer, Nagesh R.

    2011-01-01

    Seismic testing plays a key role in better understanding physical phenomena, validating and improving analysis and design methods, and qualifying sensitive equipment. There are several different experimental techniques that can be used to test the response of structures to verify their seismic performance. These include (i) Quasi-static testing (ii) Shake table testing, (iii) Effective force testing (iv) Pseudodynamic testing and (v) Real-time dynamic hybrid testing. The sophisticated shaking table facilities and modern data acquisition and processing methods using high speed computers have made it possible to improve the accuracy and reliability of the experimental data, and to increase the number of gauge points, thus yielding a more detailed picture of the structural behavior. Lifeline structures like nuclear power plants and thermal power

  13. Magnetic topology changes induced by lower hybrid waves and their profound effect on edge-localized modes in the EAST tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Y; Gong, X Z; Gan, K F; Gauthier, E; Wang, L; Rack, M; Wang, Y M; Zeng, L; Denner, P; Wingen, A; Lv, B; Ding, B J; Chen, R; Hu, L Q; Hu, J S; Liu, F K; Jie, Y X; Pearson, J; Qian, J P; Shan, J F; Shen, B; Shi, T H; Sun, Y; Wang, F D; Wang, H Q; Wang, M; Wu, Z W; Zhang, S B; Zhang, T; Zhang, X J; Yan, N; Xu, G S; Guo, H Y; Wan, B N; Li, J G

    2013-06-07

    Strong mitigation of edge-localized modes has been observed on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak, when lower hybrid waves (LHWs) are applied to H-mode plasmas with ion cyclotron resonant heating. This has been demonstrated to be due to the formation of helical current filaments flowing along field lines in the scrape-off layer induced by LHW. This leads to the splitting of the outer divertor strike points during LHWs similar to previous observations with resonant magnetic perturbations. The change in the magnetic topology has been qualitatively modeled by considering helical current filaments in a field-line-tracing code.

  14. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narlikar, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    Amongst the numerous scientific discoveries that the 20th century has to its credit, superconductivity stands out as an exceptional example of having retained its original dynamism and excitement even for more than 80 years after its discovery. It has proved itself to be a rich field by continually offering frontal challenges in both research and applications. Indeed, one finds that a majority of internationally renowned condensed matter theorists, at some point of their career, have found excitement in working in this important area. Superconductivity presents a unique example of having fetched Nobel awards as many as four times to date, and yet, interestingly enough, the field still remains open for new insights and discoveries which could undeniably be of immense technological value. 1 fig

  15. Superconducting microstrip antennas: An experimental comparison of two feeding methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, M.A.; Claspy, P.C.; Bhasin, K.B.

    1993-01-01

    The recent discovery of high-temperature superconductors (HTS's) has generated a substantial amount of interest in microstrip antenna applications. However, the high permittivity of substrates compatible with HTS causes difficulty in feeding such antennas because of the high patch edge impedance. In this paper, two methods for feeding HTS microstrip antennas at K and Ka-band are examined. Superconducting microstrip antennas that are directly coupled and gap-coupled to a microstrip transmission line have been designed and fabricated on lanthanum aluminate substrates using Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting thin films. Measurements from these antennas, including input impedance, bandwidth, efficiency, and patterns, are presented and compared with published models. The measured results demonstrate that usable antennas can be constructed using either of these architectures, although the antennas suffer from narrow bandwidths. In each case, the HTS antenna shows a substantial improvement over an identical antenna made with normal metals

  16. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This book profiles the research activity of 42 companies in the superconductivity field, worldwide. It forms a unique and comprehensive directory to this emerging technology. For each research site, it details the various projects in progress, analyzes the level of activity, pinpoints applications and R and D areas, reviews strategies and provides complete contact information. It lists key individuals, offers international comparisons of government funding, reviews market forecasts and development timetables and features a bibliography of selected articles on the subject

  17. Advancement of highly charged ion beam production by superconducting ECR ion source SECRAL (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, L.; Lu, W.; Zhang, W. H.; Feng, Y. C.; Qian, C.; Ma, H. Y.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhao, H. W.; Guo, J. W.; Yang, Y.; Fang, X.

    2016-01-01

    At Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), the superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source SECRAL (Superconducting ECR ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou) has been put into operation for about 10 years now. It has been the main working horse to deliver intense highly charged heavy ion beams for the accelerators. Since its first plasma at 18 GHz, R&D work towards more intense highly charged ion beam production as well as the beam quality investigation has never been stopped. When SECRAL was upgraded to its typical operation frequency 24 GHz, it had already showed its promising capacity of very intense highly charged ion beam production. And it has also provided the strong experimental support for the so called scaling laws of microwave frequency effect. However, compared to the microwave power heating efficiency at 18 GHz, 24 GHz microwave heating does not show the ω 2 scale at the same power level, which indicates that microwave power coupling at gyrotron frequency needs better understanding. In this paper, after a review of the operation status of SECRAL with regard to the beam availability and stability, the recent study of the extracted ion beam transverse coupling issues will be discussed, and the test results of the both TE 01 and HE 11 modes will be presented. A general comparison of the performance working with the two injection modes will be given, and a preliminary analysis will be introduced. The latest results of the production of very intense highly charged ion beams, such as 1.42 emA Ar 12+ , 0.92 emA Xe 27+ , and so on, will be presented

  18. Software development of the KSTAR Tokamak Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.H.; Lee, T.G.; Baek, S.; Lee, S.I.; Chu, Y.; Kim, Y.O.; Kim, J.S.; Park, M.K.; Oh, Y.K.

    2008-01-01

    The Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) project, which is constructing a superconducting Tokamak, was launched in 1996. Much progress in instrumentation and control has been made since then and the construction phase will be finished in August 2007. The Tokamak Monitoring System (TMS) measures the temperatures of the superconducting magnets, bus-lines, and structures and hence monitors the superconducting conditions during the operation of the KSTAR Tokamak. The TMS also measures the strains and displacements on the structures in order to monitor the mechanical safety. There are around 400 temperature sensors, more than 240 strain gauges, 10 displacement gauges and 10 Hall sensors. The TMS utilizes Cernox sensors for low temperature measurement and each sensor has its own characteristic curve. In addition, the TMS needs to perform complex arithmetic operations to convert the measurements into temperatures for each Cernox sensor for this large number of monitoring channels. A special software development effort was required to reduce the temperature conversion time and multi-threading to achieve the higher performance needed to handle the large number of channels. We have developed the TMS with PXI hardware and with EPICS software. We will describe the details of the implementations in this paper

  19. Feedback control and stabilization experiments on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, T.; Richards, B.; Wootton, A.J.; Bengtson, R.D.; Bravenec, R.; Carreras, B.A.; Li, G.X.; Hurwitz, P.; Phillips, P.E.; Rowan, W.L.; Tsui, H.Y.W.; Uglum, J.R.; Wen, Y.; Winslow, D.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma edge feedback experiments on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) have been successful in controlling the edge plasma potential fluctuation level. The feedback wave-launcher is driven by the local edge potential fluctuations. The edge potential fluctuations are modified in a broad frequency band. Moreover, the potential fluctuations can be reduced (≤100 kHz) without enhancing other modes, or excited (10 to 12 kHz), depending on the phase difference between the driver and the launcher signal, and gain of the system. This turbulence modification is achieved not only locally but also halfway around the torus and has about 2 cm of poloidal extent. The local plasma parameters at the edge and the estimated fluctuation-induced radial particle flux are somewhat affected by the edge feedback. ((orig.))

  20. Theoretical and experimental studies of runaway electrons in the TEXTOR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullaev, S.S.; Finken, K.H.; Wongrach, K.; Willi, O.

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of runaway electrons in tokamaks and their mitigations, particularly the recent studies performed by a group of the Heinrich-Heine University Duesseldorf in collaboration with the Institute of Energy and Climate Research of the Research Centre (Forschungszentrum) of Juelich are reviewed. The main topics focus on (i) runaway generation mechanisms, (ii) runaway orbits in equilibrium plasma, (iii) transport in stochastic magnetic fields, (iv) diagnostics and investigations of transport of runaway electron and their losses in low density discharges (v) runaway electrons during plasma disruptions, and (vi) runaway mitigation methods. The development of runaway diagnostics enables the measurement of runaway electrons in both the centre and edge of the plasma. The diagnostics provide an absolute runaway energy resolved measurement, the radial decay length of runaway electrons and, the structure and dynamics of runaway electron beams. The new mechanism of runaway electron formation during plasma disruptions is discussed.

  1. Theoretical and experimental studies of runaway electrons in the TEXTOR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullaev, S.S.; Finken, K.H.; Wongrach, K.; Willi, O.

    2016-07-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of runaway electrons in tokamaks and their mitigations, particularly the recent studies performed by a group of the Heinrich-Heine University Duesseldorf in collaboration with the Institute of Energy and Climate Research of the Research Centre (Forschungszentrum) of Juelich are reviewed. The main topics focus on (i) runaway generation mechanisms, (ii) runaway orbits in equilibrium plasma, (iii) transport in stochastic magnetic fields, (iv) diagnostics and investigations of transport of runaway electron and their losses in low density discharges (v) runaway electrons during plasma disruptions, and (vi) runaway mitigation methods. The development of runaway diagnostics enables the measurement of runaway electrons in both the centre and edge of the plasma. The diagnostics provide an absolute runaway energy resolved measurement, the radial decay length of runaway electrons and, the structure and dynamics of runaway electron beams. The new mechanism of runaway electron formation during plasma disruptions is discussed.

  2. System engineering and design of a pulsed homopolar generator power supply for the Texas Experimental Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, W.L.; Grant, G.B.; Weldon, W.F.; Rylander, H.G.; Woodson, H.H.

    1977-01-01

    The design of a homopolar generator power supply for the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) is presented. Four series-connected disk type homopolar machines serve as inertial energy storage and conversion devices to supply 50 to 70 MW peak power to the toroidal field coil and ohmic heating coil circuits. The system is nominally operated at 150 MJ, 430 V to provide a 0.5 sec flat top, 160 kA TF current pulse and a 0.3 sec, 10 kA OH current pulse every 2.0 min on a continuous basis. The system has a maximum capacity of 200 MJ at a maximum open circuit voltage of 500 V. The homopolar machine design is described

  3. Experimental and theoretical study of particle transport in the TCV Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fable, E.

    2009-06-01

    The main scope of this thesis work is to compare theoretical models with experimental observations on particle transport in particular regimes of plasma operation from the Tokamak à Configuration Variable (TCV) located at CRPP–EPFL in Lausanne. We introduce the main topics in Tokamak fusion research and the challenging problems in the first Chapter. A particular attention is devoted to the modelling of heat and particle transport. In the second Chapter the experimental part is presented, including an overview of TCV capabilities, a brief review of the relevant diagnostic systems, and a discussion of the numerical tools used to analyze the experimental data. In addition, the numerical codes that are used to interpret the experimental data and to compare them with theoretical predictions are introduced. The third Chapter deals with the problem of understanding the mechanisms that regulate the transport of energy in TCV plasmas, in particular in the electron Internal Transport Barrier (eITB) scenario. A radial transport code, integrated with an external module for the calculation of the turbulence-induced transport coefficients, is employed to reproduce the experimental scenario and to understand the physics at play. It is shown how the sustainment of an improved confinement regime is linked to the presence of a reversed safety factor profile. The improvement of confinement in the eITB regime is visible in the energy channel and in the particle channel as well. The density profile shows strong correlation with the temperature profile and has a large local logarithmic gradient. This is an important result obtained from the TCV eITB scenario analysis and is presented in the fourth Chapter. In the same chapter we present the estimate of the particle diffusion and convection coefficients obtained from density transient experiments performed in the eITB scenario. The theoretical understanding of the strong correlation between density and temperature observed in the e

  4. Qualifying tests for TRIAM-1M superconducting toroidal magnetic field coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanura, Yukio; Hiraki, Naoji; Nakamura, Kazuo; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Nagao, Akihiro; Kawasaki, Shoji; Itoh, Satoshi

    1984-09-01

    In the strong toroidal magnetic field experimental facility ''TRIAM-1M'' currently under construction, construction of the superconducting toroidal magnetic field coil and the following qualifying tests conducted on the full-scale superconducting toroidal magnetic field coil actually fabricated are described: (1) coil excitation test, (2) superconducting stability test, (3) external magnetic field application test, and (4) high-speed excitation test. On the basis of these test results, stability was evaluated of the superconducting coil being operated in the tokamak device. In normal tokamak operation, there occurs no normal conduction transition. At the time of plasma disruption, though this transition takes place in part of the coil, the superconducting state is immediately restored. By its electromagnetic force analysis, the superconducting coil is also stable in structure.

  5. Data acquisition and online processing requirements for experimentation at the superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankford, A.J.; Barsotti, E.; Gaines, I.

    1990-01-01

    Differences in scale between data acquisition and online processing requirements for detectors at the Superconducting Super Collider and systems for existing large detectors will require new architectures and technological advances in these systems. Emerging technologies will be employed for data transfer, processing, and recording. (orig.)

  6. Data acquisition and online processing requirements for experimentation at the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankford, A.J.; Barsotti, E.; Gaines, I.

    1989-07-01

    Differences in scale between data acquisition and online processing requirements for detectors at the Superconducting Super Collider and systems for existing large detectors will require new architectures and technological advances in these systems. Emerging technologies will be employed for data transfer, processing, and recording. 9 refs., 3 figs

  7. Experimental investigations of driven Alfven wave resonances in a tokamak plasma using carbon dioxide laser interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, T.E.

    1984-09-01

    The first direct observation of the internal structure of driven global Alfven eigenmodes in a tokamak plasma is presented. A carbon dioxide laser scattering/interferometer has been designed, built, and installed on the PRETEXT tokamak. By using this diagnostic system in the interferometer configuration, we have for the first time, thoroughly investigated the resonance conditions required for, and the spatial wave field structure of, driven plasma eigenmodes at frequencies below the ion cyclotron frequency in a confined, high temperature, tokamak plasma

  8. Status of tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawls, J.M.

    1979-10-01

    An overall review of the tokamak program is given with particular emphasis upon developments over the past five years in the theoretical and experimental elements of the program. A summary of the key operating parameters for the principal tokamaks throughout the world is given. Also discussed are key issues in plasma confinement, plasma heating, and tokamak design

  9. Advances in the design of superconducting magnetic bearings for static and dynamic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siems, S O; Canders, W-R

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies have led to an overall design for superconducting magnetic bearings (SMB) that is suitable to meet the requirements of industrial applications. The main benefits are high load capacities, compact dimensions and a 'warm' suspended part of the application. Two applications have been designed with a suspension provided only by SMB; one has already been built and tested successfully

  10. Advanced antenna system for Alfven wave plasma heating and current drive in TCABR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruchko, L.F.; Ozono, E.; Galvao, R.M.O.; Nascimento, I.C.; Degasperi, F.T.; Lerche, E.

    1998-01-01

    An advanced antenna system that has been developed for investigation of Alfven wave plasma heating and current drive in the TCABR tokamak is described. The main goal was the development of such a system that could insure the excitation of travelling single helicity modes with predefined wave mode numbers M and N. The system consists of four similar modules with poloidal windings. The required spatial spectrum is formed by proper phasing of the RF feeding currents. The impedance matching of the antenna with the four-phase oscillator is accomplished by resonant circuits which form one assembly unit with the RF feeders. The characteristics of the antenna system design with respect to the antenna-plasma coupling and plasma wave excitation, for different phasing of the feeding currents, are summarised. The antenna complex impedance Z=Z R +Z I is calculated taking into account both the plasma response to resonant excitation of fast Alfven waves and the nonresonant excitation of vacuum magnetic fields in conducting shell. The matching of the RF generator with the antenna system during plasma heating is simulated numerically, modelling the plasma response with mutually coupled effective inductances with corresponding active Z R and reactive Z I impedances. The results of the numerical simulation of the RF system performance, including both the RF magnetic field spectrum analysis and the modeling of the RF generator operation with plasma load, are presented. (orig.)

  11. Plasma Profile and Shape Optimization for the Advanced Tokamak Power Plant, ARIES-AT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessel, C.E.; Mau, T.K.; Jardin, S.C.; Najmabadi, F.

    2001-01-01

    An advanced tokamak plasma configuration is developed based on equilibrium, ideal-MHD stability, bootstrap current analysis, vertical stability and control, and poloidal-field coil analysis. The plasma boundaries used in the analysis are forced to coincide with the 99% flux surface from the free-boundary equilibrium. Using an accurate bootstrap current model and external current-drive profiles from ray-tracing calculations in combination with optimized pressure profiles, beta(subscript N) values above 7.0 have been obtained. The minimum current drive requirement is found to lie at a lower beta(subscript N) of 5.4. The external kink mode is stabilized by a tungsten shell located at 0.33 times the minor radius and a feedback system. Plasma shape optimization has led to an elongation of 2.2 and triangularity of 0.9 at the separatrix. Vertical stability could be achieved by a combination of tungsten shells located at 0.33 times the minor radius and feedback control coils located behind the shield. The poloidal-field coils were optimized in location and current, providing a maximum coil current of 8.6 MA. These developments have led to a simultaneous reduction in the power plant major radius and toroidal field

  12. Development of burning plasma and advanced scenarios in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luce, T.C.

    2005-01-01

    Significant progress in the development of burning plasma scenarios, steady-state scenarios at high fusion performance, and basic tokamak physics has been made by the DIII-D Team. Discharges similar to the ITER baseline scenario have demonstrated normalized fusion performance nearly 50% higher than required for Q = 10 in ITER, under stationary conditions. Discharges that extrapolate to Q ∼ 10 for longer than one hour in ITER at reduced current have also been demonstrated in DIII-D under stationary conditions. Proof of high fusion performance with full noninductive operation has been obtained. Underlying this work are studies validating approaches to confinement extrapolation, disruption avoidance and mitigation, tritium retention, ELM avoidance, and operation above the no-wall pressure limit. In addition, the unique capabilities of the DIII-D facility have advanced studies of the sawtooth instability with unprecedented time and space resolution, threshold behavior in the electron heat transport, and rotation in plasmas in the absence of external torque. (author)

  13. Vertical Instability in EAST: Comparison of Model Predictions with Experimental Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Jinping; Wan Baonian; Shen Biao; Xiao Bingjia; Sun Youwen; Shi Yuejiang; Lin Shiyao; Li Jiangang; Gong Xianzu

    2008-01-01

    Growth rates of the axisymmetric mode in elongated plasmas in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) are measured with zero feedback gains and then compared with numerically calculated growth rates for the reconstructed shapes. The comparison is made after loss of vertical position control. The open-loop growth rates were scanned with the number of vessel eigenmodes, which up to 20 is enough to make the growth rates settled. The agreement between the growth rates measured experimentally and the growth rates determined numerically is good. The results show that a linear RZIP model is essentially good enough for the vertical position feedback control.

  14. Experimental validation of field cooling simulations for linear superconducting magnetic bearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, D H N; Motta, E S; Sotelo, G G; De Andrade Jr, R, E-mail: ddias@coe.ufrj.b [Laboratorio de aplicacao de Supercondutores (LASUP), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2010-07-15

    For practical stability of a superconducting magnetic bearing the refrigeration process must occur with the superconductor in the presence of the magnetic field (a field cooling (FC) process). This paper presents an experimental validation of a method for simulating this system in the FC case. Measured and simulated results for a vertical force between a high temperature superconductor and a permanent magnet rail are compared. The main purpose of this work is to consolidate a simulation tool that can help in future projects on superconducting magnetic bearings for MagLev vehicles.

  15. Theoretical and experimental determination of mechanical properties of superconducting composite wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, W.H.; Sun, C.T.

    1976-07-01

    The mechanical properties of a composite superconducting (NbTi/Cu) wire are characterized in terms of the mechanical properties of each constituent material. For a particular composite superconducting wire, five elastic material constants were experimentally determined and theoretically calculated. Since the Poisson's ratios for the fiber and the matrix material were very close, there was essentially no (less than 1 percent) difference among all the theoretical predictions for any individual mechanical constant. Because of the expense and difficulty of producing elastic constant data of 0.1 percent accuracy, and therefore conclusively determining which theory is best, no further experiments were performed

  16. Economic comparison of MHD equilibrium options for advanced steady state tokamak power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.; Kessel, C.E.; Jardin, S.C.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Mau, T.K.; Najmabadi, F.

    1998-01-01

    Progress in theory and in tokamak experiments leads to questions of the optimal development path for commercial tokamak power plants. The economic prospects of future designs are compared for several tokamak operating modes: (high poloidal beta) first stability, second stability and reverse shear. Using a simplified economic model and selecting uniform engineering performance parameters, this comparison emphasizes the different physics characteristics - stability and non- inductive current drive - of the various equilibria. The reverse shear mode of operation is shown to offer the lowest cost of electricity for future power plants. (author)

  17. Experimental studies on the thermal properties of fast pulsed superconducting accelerator magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleile, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The new Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR is being constructed at the GSI research center in Darmstadt (Germany). This wordwide unique accelerator facility will provide beams of ions and antiprotons at high intensities and high energies for the fundamental research in nuclear, atomic and plasma physics as well as for applied science. The superconducting synchrotron SIS100 with a magnetic rigidity of 100 T/m, the core component of the FAIR facility will provide primary ion beams of all types from hydrogen up to uranium. One of the key technical systems of a new synchrotron are fast ramped electromagnets for the generation of fast ramped magnetic fields for deflecting and focusing of the ion beams. To reduce the energy consumption and to keep the operating costs of the synchrotron as low as possible superconducting magnet technology is applied in the SIS100. Superconducting magnets have been developed at GSI within the scope of the FAIR project. Although the superconducting magnet technology promises high cost saving, the power consumption of the fast ramped superconducting magnets can't be completely neglected. The pulsed operation generates dynamic losses in the iron yokes as well as in the superconducting coils of the magnets. A forced two-phase helium flow provides effective cooling for supercounducting magnets exposed to a continous relative high heat flow. The subject of this PhD thesis is experimental investigations and analysis of the dynamic power losses in fast ramped superconducting magnets and their dependencies on the operation cycles of the synchrotron. This research was conducted on the the first series SIS100 dipole magnet. Based on the experimentally defined dynamic heat loads and helium mass flow rates in the dipole magnet the heat loads and helium consumption for all other types of superconducting magnet modules of the SIS100 have been estimated. These results are essential for the development of the cooling system for the the

  18. The Physics Basis For An Advanced Physics And Advanced Technology Tokamak Power Plant Configuration, ARIES-ACT1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles Kessel, et al

    2014-03-05

    The advanced physics and advanced technology tokamak power plant ARIES-ACT1 has a major radius of 6.25 m at aspect ratio of 4.0, toroidal field of 6.0 T, strong shaping with elongation of 2.2 and triangularity of 0.63. The broadest pressure cases reached wall stabilized βN ~ 5.75, limited by n=3 external kink mode requiring a conducting shell at b/a = 0.3, and requiring plasma rotation, feedback, and or kinetic stabilization. The medium pressure peaking case reached βN = 5.28 with BT = 6.75, while the peaked pressure case reaches βN < 5.15. Fast particle MHD stability shows that the alpha particles are unstable, but this leads to redistribution to larger minor radius rather than loss from the plasma. Edge and divertor plasma modeling show that about 75% of the power to the divertor can be radiated with an ITER-like divertor geometry, while over 95% can be radiated in a stable detached mode with an orthogonal target and wide slot geometry. The bootstrap current fraction is 91% with a q95 of 4.5, requiring about ~ 1.1 MA of external current drive. This current is supplied with 5 MW of ICRF/FW and 40 MW of LHCD. EC was examined and is most effective for safety factor control over ρ ~ 0.2-0.6 with 20 MW. The pedestal density is ~ 0.9x1020 /m3 and the temperature is ~ 4.4 keV. The H98 factor is 1.65, n/nGr = 1.0, and the net power to LH threshold power is 2.8- 3.0 in the flattop.

  19. Edge plasma diagnostics on Tore Supra tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Junji

    1991-01-01

    From 1988 to 1991, the international scientific research 'Diagnosis of peripheral plasma in Tore Supra tokamak' was carried out as a three-year plan receiving the support of the scientific research expense of the Ministry of Education. This is to apply the method of measuring electron density distribution by neutral lithium beam probe spectroscopy to the measurement of the electron density distribution in the peripheral plasma in Tore Supra Tokamak in France. Among many tokamaks in operation doing respective characteristics researches, the Tore Supra generates the toroidal magnetic field by using superconducting coils, and aims at the long time discharge for 30 sec. for the time being, and for 300 sec. in future. In the plasma generators for long time discharge like this, the technology of particle control is a large problem. For this purpose, a divertor was added to the Tore Supra. In order to advance the research on particle control, it is necessary to examine the behavior of plasma in the peripheral part in detail. The measurement of peripheral plasma in tokamaks, beam probe spectroscopy, the Tore Supra tokamak, the progress of the joint research, the problems in the joint research and the perspective of hereafter are reported. (K.I.)

  20. An experimental mechanical switch for 3 kA driven by superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, H.J.; Ten Haken, B.; Van de Klundert, L.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Usually mechanical switches that are built for use in superconducting circuits are driven in some way by a rod which is controlled at room temperature. In this paper, an alternative method to drive the electrodes of the switch is reported. In fact the new device is a superconducting relay that uses an antiseries connection of two superconducting air-core coils. The repulsing force of these relay coils enables the switch to be closed by applying a pressure to the electrodes. The off-state is effected by a set of springs which interrupt the electrodes when the coil current is switched off. We realized that this electro-magnetic method of producing large forces could be promising for driving a mechanical switch. The desired method was demonstrated by an experimental model. A switch-on resistance of 8*10 -8 Ω with a switch current of 3 kA and a contact force of 20 kN was measured

  1. Data acquisition and control system for the ECE imaging diagnostic on the EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, C.; Lan, T.; Zhu, Y.; Xie, J.; Gao, B.; Liu, W.; Yu, C.; Milne, P. G.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2017-06-01

    A 384-channel electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system is installed on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) and 7-gigabyte data is produced for each regular discharge of a 10-second pulse. The data acquisition and control (DAC) system for the EAST ECEI diagnostics covers the large data production and embeds the ability to report the data quality instantly after the discharge. The symmetric routing design of the timing signal distributions among the 384 channels provides a low-cost solution to the synchronization of a large number of channels. The application of the load-balance bond service largely reduces the configuration difficulty and the cost in the high-speed data transferring tasks. Benefiting from the various kinds of hardware units with dedicated functionalities, an automated and user interactive DAC work flow is achieved, including the pre-selections of the automation scheme and the observation region, 384-channel data acquisition and local caching, post-discharge imaging data quality evaluation, remote system status monitoring, and inter-discharge imaging system event handling. The system configuration in a specific physics experiment is further optimized through the associated operating software which is enhanced by the input of the tokamak operation status and the region of interest (ROI) from other diagnostics. The DAC system is based on a modularized design and scalable to the long-pulse discharges in the EAST tokamak.

  2. Data acquisition and control system for the ECE imaging diagnostic on the EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, C.; Lan, T.; Xie, J.; Gao, B.; Liu, W.; Yu, C.; Zhu, Y.; Domier, C.W.; Luhmann, N.C.; Milne, P.G.

    2017-01-01

    A 384-channel electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system is installed on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) and 7-gigabyte data is produced for each regular discharge of a 10-second pulse. The data acquisition and control (DAC) system for the EAST ECEI diagnostics covers the large data production and embeds the ability to report the data quality instantly after the discharge. The symmetric routing design of the timing signal distributions among the 384 channels provides a low-cost solution to the synchronization of a large number of channels. The application of the load-balance bond service largely reduces the configuration difficulty and the cost in the high-speed data transferring tasks. Benefiting from the various kinds of hardware units with dedicated functionalities, an automated and user interactive DAC work flow is achieved, including the pre-selections of the automation scheme and the observation region, 384-channel data acquisition and local caching, post-discharge imaging data quality evaluation, remote system status monitoring, and inter-discharge imaging system event handling. The system configuration in a specific physics experiment is further optimized through the associated operating software which is enhanced by the input of the tokamak operation status and the region of interest (ROI) from other diagnostics. The DAC system is based on a modularized design and scalable to the long-pulse discharges in the EAST tokamak.

  3. Filterscope diagnostic system on EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Z.; Wu, Z.W.; Gao, W.; Zhang, L.; Huang, J.; Chen, Y.J.; Wu, C.R.; Zhang, P.F.

    2015-01-01

    Filterscope diagnostic system, which is designed for monitoring the line emission in fusion plasma has been widely used on fusion devices such as DIII-D, NSTX, CDX-U, KSTAR etc. On EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak), a filterscope diagnostic system has been mounted to observe the line emission and visible bremsstrahlung emission in plasma from discharge campaign of 2014. It plays a crucial role in studying Edge Localized Modes (ELM) and H-mode, thanks to its high temporal resolution (0.005ms) and good spatial resolution (∼2cm). Furthermore, multi-channel signals at up to 200kHz sampling rates can be digitized simultaneously. The wavelength covers He II (468.5nm), Li I (670.8nm), Li II (548.3nm), C III (465.0nm), O II (441.5nm), Mo I (386.4nm), W I (400.9nm) and visible bremsstrahlung radiation at 538nm besides Dα (656.1nm) and Dγ (433.9nm) with the corresponding wavelength filters. The new developed filterscope system was operating during the EAST 2014 fall experimental campaign and several types ELMs has been observed. (author)

  4. Advanced superconducting technology for global science: The Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebrun, Ph.

    2002-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), presently in construction at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research near Geneva (Switzerland), will be, upon its completion in 2005 and for the next twenty years, the most advanced research instrument of the world's high-energy physics community, providing access to the energy frontier above 1 TeV per elementary constituent. Re-using the 26.7-km circumference tunnel and infrastructure of the past LEP electron-positon collider, operated until 2000, the LHC will make use of advanced superconducting technology-high-field Nb-Ti superconducting magnets operated in superfluid helium and a cryogenic ultra-high vacuum system-to bring into collision intense beams of protons and ions at unprecedented values of center-of-mass energy and luminosity (14 TeV and 10 34 cm -2 ·s -1 , respectively with protons). After some ten years of focussed R and D, the LHC components are presently series-built in industry and procured through world-wide collaboration. After briefly recalling the physics goals, performance challenges and design choices of the machine, we describe its major technical systems, with particular emphasis on relevant advances in the key technologies of superconductivity and cryogenics, and report on its construction progress

  5. Advanced superconducting technology for global science: The Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, Ph.

    2002-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), presently in construction at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research near Geneva (Switzerland), will be, upon its completion in 2005 and for the next twenty years, the most advanced research instrument of the world's high-energy physics community, providing access to the energy frontier above 1 TeV per elementary constituent. Re-using the 26.7-km circumference tunnel and infrastructure of the past LEP electron-positon collider, operated until 2000, the LHC will make use of advanced superconducting technology-high-field Nb-Ti superconducting magnets operated in superfluid helium and a cryogenic ultra-high vacuum system-to bring into collision intense beams of protons and ions at unprecedented values of center-of-mass energy and luminosity (14 TeV and 1034 cm-2ṡs-1, respectively with protons). After some ten years of focussed R&D, the LHC components are presently series-built in industry and procured through world-wide collaboration. After briefly recalling the physics goals, performance challenges and design choices of the machine, we describe its major technical systems, with particular emphasis on relevant advances in the key technologies of superconductivity and cryogenics, and report on its construction progress.

  6. The design of the KSTAR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, G.S.; Kim, J.; Hwang, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Korea superconducting tokamak advanced research (KSTAR) project is the major effort of the Korean national fusion program (KNFP) to develop a steady-state-capable advanced superconducting tokamak to establish a scientific and technological basis for an attractive fusion reactor. Major parameters of the tokamak are: major radius 1.8 m, minor radius 0.5 m, toroidal field 3.5 Tesla, and plasma current 2 MA with a strongly shaped plasma cross-section and double-null divertor. The initial pulse length provided by the poloidal magnet system is 20 s, but the pulse length can be increased to 300 s through non-inductive current drive. The plasma heating and current drive system consists of neutral beam, ion cyclotron waves, lower hybrid waves, and electron-cyclotron waves for flexible profile control. A comprehensive set of diagnostics is planned for plasma control and performance evaluation and physics understanding. The project has completed its conceptual design phase and moved to the engineering design phase. The target date of the first plasma is set for year 2002. (orig.)

  7. Feedback control and stabilization experiments on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, T.; Carreras, B.A.; Richards, B.; Wootton, A.J.; Bengtson, R.D.; Bravenec, R.; Li, G.X.; Hurwitz, P.D.; Phillips, P.E.; Rowan, W.L.

    1994-06-01

    Plasma edge feedback experiments on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) have been successful in controlling the edge plasma potential fluctuation level. The feedback wave-launcher, consisting of electrostatic probes located in the shadow of the limiter, is driven by the local edge potential fluctuations. In general, the edge potential fluctuations are modified in a broad frequency band. Moreover, it is observed that the potential fluctuations can be reduced (≤100 kHz) without enhancing other modes, or excited (10 to 12 kHz), depending on the phase difference between the driver and the launcher signal, and gain of the system. This turbulence modification is achieved not only locally but also halfway around the torus and has about 2 cm of poloidal extent. Experiments on the characterization of the global plasma parameters with the edge feedback are discussed. Effects of the edge feedback on the estimated fluctuation-induced radial particle flux as well as on the local plasma parameters are presented

  8. Experimental observations of MHD instabilities in the high-beta tokamak Torus-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, M.

    1982-01-01

    The CO 2 laser scattering and interferometry diagnostics have been used to study the MHD instabilities in the high-beta tokamak Torus-II. Detailed measurements of the density and density fluctuation profiles have been performed. In order to measure density fluctuations with wavelengths longer than 2 cm, an interferometric like, phase matching technique has been developed. The toroidal and poloidal mode numbers have been measured using a double-beam, two-position technique. Working at high-beta values, average β greater than or equal to 10%, we have found parameters where the growing instabilities are created or suppressed. The plasma lifetime for both cases is seen to be about the same and the loss of the plasma appears to be caused by the decay in the external fields. The growing instability parameters are within the MHD regime, and it only grows at the outer edge of the plasma. This is in agreement with the theoretical Ballooning mode instability. The frequency and mode number measurements also agree with the Kinetic theory description of Ballooning modes. The comparison with possible other modes, such as Tearing and Drift instabilities, is performed and the Ballooning growth rate is shown to be the best fit to the experimental values

  9. Cross-section sensitivity analyses for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, E.L.; Gerstl, S.A.W.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1977-09-01

    The objectives of this report were (1) to determine the sensitivity of neutronic responses in the preliminary design of the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor by Argonne National Laboratory, and (2) to develop the use of a neutron-gamma coupled cross-section set in the calculation of cross-section sensitivity analysis. Response functions such as neutron plus gamma kerma, Mylar dose, copper transmutation, copper dpa, and activation of the toroidal field coil dewar were investigated. Calculations revealed that the responses were most sensitive to the high-energy group cross sections of iron in the innermost regions containing stainless steel. For example, both the neutron heating of the toroidal field coil and the activation of the toroidal field coil dewar show an integral sensitivity of about -5 with respect to the iron total cross sections. Major contributors are the scattering cross sections of iron, with -2.7 and -4.4 for neutron heating and activation, respectively. The effects of changes in gamma cross sections were generally an order of 10 lower

  10. Experimental characteristics of ion Bernstein wave heating on JIPP T-IIU tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Ando, R.

    1986-03-01

    The directly launched Ion Bernstein Wave (IBW) heating experiments have been carried out on JIPP T-IIU tokamak for two experimental conditions; (a) the ''3rd-branch'' of the IBW between 3rd- and 4th-cyclotron harmonics of the deuterium, and (b) the ''2nd-branch'' of the IBW between 2nd- and 3rd-cyclotron harmonics. In the case (a), the direct hydrogen heating at ω = 1.5 Ω H has been found in previous experiments. Here we present additional data to support this subharmonics heating, i.e., the spectroscopic measurement of Fe XVIII lines and mass separated analysis of charge-exchange neutrals. While, in the case (b), the remarkable increase of the electron temperature has been observed, especially at the central region of the plasma, and it has been estimated from the global energy balance that almost all of IBW power is delivered to the electron. To investigate this difference of the heating mode, the power absorption has been calculated with the ray tracing code, taking into account of the effect of the plasma/antenna coupling. It is concluded from the consideration of the electron Landau damping that the transition from the ion heating mode to the electron one would be explained by the difference of the electron temperature at the ohmic phase; i.e., T e (0) = 0.7 keV for the case (a) and T e (0) = 1.3 keV for the case (b). (author)

  11. MHD activity in the ISX-B tokamak: experimental results and theoretical interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreras, B.A.; Dunlap, J.L.; Bell, J.D.; Charlton, L.A.; Cooper, W.A.; Dory, R.A.; Hender, T.C.; Hicks, H.R.; Holmes, J.A.; Lynch, V.E.

    1982-01-01

    The observed spectrum of MHD fluctuations in the ISX-B tokamak is clearly dominated by the n=1 mode when the q=1 surface is in the plasma. This fact agrees well with theoretical predictions based on 3-D resistive MHD calculations. They show that the (m=1; n=1) mode is then the dominant instability. It drives other n=1 modes through toroidal coupling and n>1 modes through nonlinear couplings. These theoretically predicted mode structures have been compared in detail with the experimentally measured wave forms (using arrays of soft x-ray detectors). The agreement is excellent. More detailed comparisons between theory and experiment have required careful reconstructions of the ISX-B equilibria. The equilibria so constructed have permitted a precise evaluation of the ideal MHD stability properties of ISX-B. The present results indicate that the high ..beta.. ISX-B equilibria are marginally stable to finite eta ideal MHD modes. The resistive MHD calculations also show that at finite ..beta.. there are unstable resistive pressure driven modes.

  12. Active probing of plasma edge turbulence and feedback studies on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, T.; Richards, B.; Bengtson, R.D.

    1993-08-01

    A novel experiment is under way on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) to actively modify the turbulence at the plasma edge by launching waves using electrostatic probes in the shadow of the limiter. The experiments are carried out with a wave launching system consisting of two Langmuir probes, which are about 1.8 cm apart in the poloidal direction, with respect to the magnetic field. These probes are operated in the electron side of the (I,V) characteristic. The probe tips are fed separately by independent ac power supplies. Measurements indicate that the wave, launched with a typical frequency image of 15--50 kHz from the edge of the machine top, is received by sensing probes located halfway around the torus. The detected signal strength depends on the frequency of the wave, the plasma current, and the phasing of the applied ac signal between the launching probes. Modifications to the spectra of the density and potential fluctuations are observed. These experiments have been extended to control of the edge plasma fluctuation level using feedback to explore its effects on confinement. When the launcher is driven by the floating potential of the fluctuating plasma at the location of the launching probes, then the fluctuations are suppressed or excited, depending on the phasing between the probe tips, both locally and at the downstream sensing probes. The fluctuation-induced particle flux also varies with the feedback phasing

  13. Investigation of particle transport through the measurement of the electron source in the Texas Experimental Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepper, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the electron source was measured spectroscopically in the Texas Experimental Tokamak. The method used involves the measurement of the emissivity of the Balmer α and β lines of neutral hydrogen. Modeling of the corresponding atomic transitions provides a relation between the emissivities and the electron source from the ionization of neutrals. Toroidal distributions were obtained by means of a set of relatively calibrated photodiode amplifier-filter packages referred to as plasma light monitors. Such monitors were distributed toroidally, and attached primarily to radial ports. Specially constructed, absolutely calibrated monitors provided absolute calibration. A scanning, rotating mirror system provided in-out brightness profiles. A TV camera system, viewing the limiter through a tangential port, provided a qualitative description of the poloidal asymmetry. Such description was necessary for the inversion of the rotating mirror data. Using electron density profiles obtained by means of far-infrared interferometry, and integrating the electron sources, the global particle confinement time (tau/sub p/) was computed. Parameter scans were performed in ohmically heated plasmas, varying the toroidal field, the plasma current, the electron density, and the plasma position with respect to the center of the poloidal ring limiter. It was found that tau/sub p/ peaks for a critical density that is independent of the other parameters

  14. Conceptual studies of toroidal field magnets for the tokamak (fusion) experimental power reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This report presents the results of ''Conceptual Studies of Toroidal Field Magnets for the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor'' performed for the Energy Research and Development Administration, Oak Ridge Operations. Two conceptual coil designs are developed. One design approach to produce a specified 8 Tesla maximum field uses a novel NbTi superconductor design cooled by pool-boiling liquid helium. For a highest practicable field design, a unique NbSn 3 conductor is used with forced-flow, single-phase liquid helium cooling to achieve a 12 Tesla peak field. Fabrication requirements are also developed for these approximately 7 meter horizontal bore by 11 meter vertical bore coils. Cryostat design approaches are analyzed and a hybrid cryostat approach selected. Structural analyses are performed for approaches to support in-plane and out-of-plane loads and a structural approach selected. In addition to the conceptual design studies, cost estimates and schedules are prepared for each of the design approaches, major uncertainties and recommendations for research and development identified, and test coil size for demonstration recommended

  15. Tokamak Systems Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Barrett, R.J.; Brown, T.G.

    1985-03-01

    The FEDC Tokamak Systems Code calculates tokamak performance, cost, and configuration as a function of plasma engineering parameters. This version of the code models experimental tokamaks. It does not currently consider tokamak configurations that generate electrical power or incorporate breeding blankets. The code has a modular (or subroutine) structure to allow independent modeling for each major tokamak component or system. A primary benefit of modularization is that a component module may be updated without disturbing the remainder of the systems code as long as the imput to or output from the module remains unchanged

  16. Development and experimental evaluation of theoretical models for ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantsinen, M.

    1999-01-01

    Heating with electromagnetic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is a well-established method for auxiliary heating of present-day tokamak plasmas and is envisaged as one of the main heating techniques for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and future reactor plasmas. In order to predict the performance of ICRF heating in future machines, it is important to benchmark present theoretical modelling with experimental results on present tokamaks. This thesis reports on development and experimental evaluation of theoretical models for ICRF heating at the Joint European Torus (JET). Several ICRF physics effects and scenarios have been studied. Direct importance to the ITER is the theoretical analysis of ICRF heating experiments with deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas. These experiments clearly demonstrate the potential of ICRF heating for auxiliary heating of reactor plasmas. In particular, scenarios with potential for good bulk ion heating and enhanced D-T fusion reactivity have been identified. Good bulk ion heating is essential for reactor plasmas in order to obtain a high ion temperature and a high fusion reactivity. In JET good bulk ion heating with ICRF waves has been achieved in high-performance discharges by adding ICRF heating to neutral beam injection. In these experiments, as in other JET discharges where damping at higher harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency takes place, so-called finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects play an important role. Due to FLR effects, the resonating ion velocity distribution function can have a strong influence on the power deposition. Evidence for this effect has been obtained from the third harmonic deuterium heating experiments. Because of FLR effects, the wave-particle interaction can also become weak at certain ion energies, which prevents resonating ions from reaching higher energies. When interacting with the wave, an ion receives not only a change in energy but also a change in

  17. Development and experimental evaluation of theoretical models for ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating of tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantsinen, M. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland). Dept. of Technical Physics

    1999-06-01

    Heating with electromagnetic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is a well-established method for auxiliary heating of present-day tokamak plasmas and is envisaged as one of the main heating techniques for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and future reactor plasmas. In order to predict the performance of ICRF heating in future machines, it is important to benchmark present theoretical modelling with experimental results on present tokamaks. This thesis reports on development and experimental evaluation of theoretical models for ICRF heating at the Joint European Torus (JET). Several ICRF physics effects and scenarios have been studied. Direct importance to the ITER is the theoretical analysis of ICRF heating experiments with deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas. These experiments clearly demonstrate the potential of ICRF heating for auxiliary heating of reactor plasmas. In particular, scenarios with potential for good bulk ion heating and enhanced D-T fusion reactivity have been identified. Good bulk ion heating is essential for reactor plasmas in order to obtain a high ion temperature and a high fusion reactivity. In JET good bulk ion heating with ICRF waves has been achieved in high-performance discharges by adding ICRF heating to neutral beam injection. In these experiments, as in other JET discharges where damping at higher harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency takes place, so-called finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects play an important role. Due to FLR effects, the resonating ion velocity distribution function can have a strong influence on the power deposition. Evidence for this effect has been obtained from the third harmonic deuterium heating experiments. Because of FLR effects, the wave-particle interaction can also become weak at certain ion energies, which prevents resonating ions from reaching higher energies. When interacting with the wave, an ion receives not only a change in energy but also a change in

  18. Advances in integrated plasma control on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, M.L.; Ferron, J.R.; Hahn, S.H.; Humphreys, D.A.; In, Y.; Johnson, R.D.; Kim, J.S.; La Haye, R.J.; Leuer, J.A.; Penaflor, B.G.; Welander, A.S.; Xiao, B.

    2007-01-01

    The DIII-D advanced tokamak physics program requires extremely high performance from the DIII-D plasma control system, including simultaneous accurate regulation of plasma shape, stored energy, density and divertor characteristics, as well as coordinated suppression of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. To satisfy these demanding control requirements, we apply the integrated plasma control method, consisting of construction of physics-based plasma and system response models, validation of models against operating experiments, design of integrated controllers that operate in concert with one another, simulation of control action against off-line and actual machine control platforms, and optimization through iteration of the design-test loop. The present work describes progress in development of physics models and development and experimental application of new model-based plasma controllers on DIII-D. We also describe the development of the control software, hardware, and model-based control algorithms for the superconducting EAST and KSTAR tokamaks

  19. Continuous and real-time data acquisition system for superconducting tokamaks HT-7 and TRIAM-1M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, F.; Luo, J.R.; Nakamura, K.; Sato, K.N.; Hanada, K.; Sakamoto, M.; Idei, H.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.

    2006-01-01

    Conventional data acquisition systems cannot deal with data acquisition for a long-time discharge of a nuclear fusion reactor. Thus, continuous data acquisition with a real-time data presentation during discharge must be developed. Two data acquisition systems, which include alternating CAMAC data acquisition and long-time PCI data acquisition, are designed for the long-time operation of HT-7 tokamak. Since an effective alternating mode is adopted, the alternating CAMAC data acquisition can accurately and continuously acquire data at a rate of 10 kHz. The acquired data is immediately transmitted to a data server and real-time results can be presented during the plasma discharge. As for the long-time PCI data acquisition, a special kind of PCI A/D card, which has a hard disk on board, is designed to collect data at a max speed of 200 kHz. Thus, the total sampling duration is only related to the capacity of the hard disk on board. These two types of data acquisitions were applied to HT-7 tokamak and a 250 s discharge was acquired. These data acquisition systems were also successfully demonstrated on a 2500 s plasma discharge on TRIAM-1M. This paper describes the two data acquisitions in detail

  20. Plasma Fluctuation Studies in the TCV Tokamak: Modeling of Shaping Effects and Advanced Diagnostic Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinoni, A.

    2009-10-01

    One of the most important issues for magnetic-confinement fusion research is the so-called anomalous transport across magnetic field lines, i.e. transport that is in excess of that caused by collisional processes. The need to reduce anomalous transport in order to increase the efficiency of a prospective fusion reactor must be addressed through an investigation of its fundamental underlying causes. This thesis is divided into two distinct components: one experimental and instrumental, and the other theoretical and based on numerical modeling. The experimental part consists of the design and installation of a new diagnostic for core turbulence fluctuations in the TCV tokamak. An extensive conceptual investigation of a number of possible solutions, including Beam Emission Spectroscopy, Reflectometry, Cross Polarization, Collective Scattering and different Imaging techniques, was carried out at first. A number of criteria, such as difficulties in data interpretation, costs, variety of physics issues that could be addressed and expected performance, were used to compare the different techniques for specific application to the TCV tokamak. The expected signal to noise ratio and the required sampling frequency for TCV were estimated on the basis of a large number of linear, local gyrokinetic simulations of plasma fluctuations. This work led to the choice of a Zernike phase contrast imaging system in a tangential launching configuration. The diagnostic was specifically designed to provide information on turbulence features up to now unknown. In particular, it is characterized by an outstanding spatial resolution and by the capability to measure a very broad range of fluctuations, from ion to electron Larmor radius scales, thus covering the major part of the instabilities expected to be at play in TCV. The spectrum accessible covers the wavenumber region from 0.9 cm -1 to 60 cm -1 at 24 radial positions with 3 MHz bandwidth. The diagnostic is an imaging technique and is

  1. Current distributions in superconducting wires subject to a random orientation magnetic field, and corresponding to the Tokamak usual conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artaud, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    The main themes of this thesis are: review of superconductivity principles; critical current in a random orientation magnetic field; the MHD model applied to superconductors (with comprehensive calculation of the field in a plate type conductor); the magnetization created by a variation of a random orientation magnetic field; the electric field in a superconductor in steady or quasi-steady state (MHD displacement, pinning and thermal effects). 145 figs., 166 refs

  2. Physics Basis for the Advanced Tokamak Fusion Power Plant ARIES-AT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.E.; Mau, T.K.; Miller, R.L.; Najmabadi, F.; Chan, V.S.; Chu, M.S.; LaHaye, R.; Lao, L.L.; Petrie, T.W.; Politzer, P.; John, St. H.E.; Snyder, P.; Staebler, G.M.; Turnbull, A.D.; West, W.P.

    2003-01-01

    The advanced tokamak is considered as the basis for a fusion power plant. The ARIES-AT design has an aspect ratio of A always equal to R/a = 4.0, an elongation and triangularity of kappa = 2.20, delta = 0.90 (evaluated at the separatrix surface), a toroidal beta of beta = 9.1% (normalized to the vacuum toroidal field at the plasma center), which corresponds to a normalized beta of bN * 100 x b/(I(sub)P(MA)/a(m)B(T)) = 5.4. These beta values are chosen to be 10% below the ideal-MHD stability limit. The bootstrap-current fraction is fBS * I(sub)BS/I(sub)P = 0.91. This leads to a design with total plasma current I(sub)P = 12.8 MA, and toroidal field of 11.1 T (at the coil edge) and 5.8 T (at the plasma center). The major and minor radii are 5.2 and 1.3 m, respectively. The effects of H-mode edge gradients and the stability of this configuration to non-ideal modes is analyzed. The current-drive system consists of ICRF/FW for on-axis current drive and a lower-hybrid system for off-axis. Tran sport projections are presented using the drift-wave based GLF23 model. The approach to power and particle exhaust using both plasma core and scrape-off-layer radiation is presented

  3. Physics Basis for the Advanced Tokamak Fusion Power Plant ARIES-AT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.C. Jardin; C.E. Kessel; T.K. Mau; R.L. Miller; F. Najmabadi; V.S. Chan; M.S. Chu; R. LaHaye; L.L. Lao; T.W. Petrie; P. Politzer; H.E. St. John; P. Snyder; G.M. Staebler; A.D. Turnbull; W.P. West

    2003-10-07

    The advanced tokamak is considered as the basis for a fusion power plant. The ARIES-AT design has an aspect ratio of A always equal to R/a = 4.0, an elongation and triangularity of kappa = 2.20, delta = 0.90 (evaluated at the separatrix surface), a toroidal beta of beta = 9.1% (normalized to the vacuum toroidal field at the plasma center), which corresponds to a normalized beta of bN * 100 x b/(I(sub)P(MA)/a(m)B(T)) = 5.4. These beta values are chosen to be 10% below the ideal-MHD stability limit. The bootstrap-current fraction is fBS * I(sub)BS/I(sub)P = 0.91. This leads to a design with total plasma current I(sub)P = 12.8 MA, and toroidal field of 11.1 T (at the coil edge) and 5.8 T (at the plasma center). The major and minor radii are 5.2 and 1.3 m, respectively. The effects of H-mode edge gradients and the stability of this configuration to non-ideal modes is analyzed. The current-drive system consists of ICRF/FW for on-axis current drive and a lower-hybrid system for off-axis. Tran sport projections are presented using the drift-wave based GLF23 model. The approach to power and particle exhaust using both plasma core and scrape-off-layer radiation is presented.

  4. Stability analysis of ELMs in long-pulse discharges with ELITE code on EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. F.; Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.; Li, G. Q.; Yan, N.; Li, Y. L.; Wang, H. Q.; Peng, Y.-K. Martin; Xia, T. Y.; Ding, S. Y.; Chen, R.; Yang, Q. Q.; Liu, H. Q.; Zang, Q.; Zhang, T.; Lyu, B.; Xu, J. C.; Feng, W.; Wang, L.; Chen, Y. J.; Luo, Z. P.; Hu, G. H.; Zhang, W.; Shao, L. M.; Ye, Y.; Lan, H.; Chen, L.; Li, J.; Zhao, N.; Wang, Q.; Snyder, P. B.; Liang, Y.; Qian, J. P.; Gong, X. Z.; EAST team

    2018-05-01

    One challenge in long-pulse and high performance tokamak operation is to control the edge localized modes (ELMs) to reduce the transient heat load on plasma facing components. Minute-scale discharges in H-mode have been achieved repeatedly on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) since the 2016 campaign and understanding the characteristics of the ELMs in these discharges can be helpful for effective ELM control in long-pulse discharges. The kinetic profile diagnostics recently developed on EAST make it possible to perform the pedestal stability analysis quantitatively. Pedestal stability calculation of a typical long-pulse discharge with ELITE code is presented. The ideal linear stability results show that the ELM is dominated by toroidal mode number n around 10–15 and the most unstable mode structure is mainly localized in the steep pressure gradient region, which is consistent with experimental results. Compared with a typical type-I ELM discharge with larger total plasma current (I p = 600 kA), pedestal in the long-pulse H-mode discharge (I p = 450 kA) is more stable in peeling-ballooning instability and its critical peak pressure gradient is evaluated to be 65% of the former. Two important features of EAST tokamak in the long-pulse discharge are presented by comparison with other tokamaks, including a wider pedestal correlated with the poloidal pedestal beta and a smaller inverse aspect ratio and their effects on the pedestal stability are discussed. The effects of uncertainties in measurements on the linear stability results are also analyzed, including the edge electron density profile position, the separatrix position and the line-averaged effective ion charge {Z}{{e}{{f}}{{f}}} value.

  5. Progress of recent experimental research on the J-TEXT tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, G.; Gentle, K. W.; Chen, Z. Y.; Chen, Z. P.; Yang, Z. J.; Zheng, Wei; Hu, Q. M.; Chen, J.; Rao, B.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhao, K. J.; Gao, L.; Cheng, Z. F.; Zhang, X. Q.; Wang, L.; Jiang, Z. H.; Xu, T.; Zhang, M.; Wang, Z. J.; Ding, Y. H.; Yu, K. X.; Hu, X. W.; Pan, Y.; Huang, H.; the J-TEXT Team

    2017-10-01

    The progress of experimental research over the last two years on the J-TEXT tokamak is reviewed and reported in this paper, including: investigations of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on the J-TEXT operation region show that moderate amplitude of applied RMPs either increases the density limit from less than 0.7n G to 0.85n G (n G is the Greenwald density, {{n}\\text{G}}={{I}\\text{p}}/π {{a}2} ) or lowers edge safety factor q a from 2.15 to nearly 2.0; observations of influence of RMPs with a large m/n  =  3/1 dominant component (where m and n are the toroidal and poloidal mode numbers respectively) on electron density indicate electron density first increases (decreases) inside (around/outside) of the 3/1 rational surface, and it is increased globally later together with enhanced edge recycling; investigations of the effect of RMPs on the behavior of runaway electrons/current show that application of RMPs with m/n  =  2/1 dominant component during disruptions can reduce runaway production. Furthermore, its application before the disruption can reduce both the amplitude and the length of runaway current; experimental results in the high-density disruption plasmas confirm that local current shrinkage during a multifaceted asymmetric radiation from the edge can directly terminate the discharge; measurements by a multi-channel Doppler reflectometer show that the quasi-coherent modes in the electron diamagnetic direction occur in the J-TEXT ohmic confinement regime in a large plasma region (r/a ~ 0.3-0.8) with frequency of 30-140 kHz.

  6. Experimental study of the interaction between RF antennas and the edge plasma of a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubic, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Antennas operating in the ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) provide a useful tool for plasma heating in many tokamaks and are foreseen to play an important role in ITER. However, in addition to the desired heating in the core plasma, spurious interactions with the plasma edge and material boundary are known to occur. Many of these deleterious effects are caused by the formation of radio-frequency (RF) sheaths. The aim of this thesis is to study, mainly experimentally, scrape-off layer (SOL) modifications caused by RF sheaths effects by means of Langmuir probes that are magnetically connected to a powered ICRH antenna. Effects of the two types of Faraday screens' operation on RF-induced SOL modifications are studied for different plasma and antenna configurations - scans of strap power ratio imbalance, injected power and SOL density. In addition to experimental work, the influence of RF sheaths on retarding field analyzer (RFA) measurements of sheath potential is investigated with one-dimensional particle-in-cell code. One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that the RFA is able to measure reliably the sheath potential only for ion plasma frequencies ω π similar to RF cyclotron frequency ω rf , while for the real SOL conditions (ω π ≥ ω rf ), when the RFA is magnetically connected to RF region, it is strongly underestimated. An alternative method to investigate RF sheaths effects is proposed by using broadening of the ion distribution function as an evidence of the RF electric fields in the sheath. RFA measurements in Tore Supra indicate that RF potentials do indeed propagate from the antenna 12 m along magnetic field lines. (author) [fr

  7. Impact of maximum TF magnetic field on performance and cost of an advanced physics tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Parametric studies were conducted using the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) Tokamak Systems Code to investigate the impact of variation in the maximum value of the field at the toroidal field (TF) coils on the performance and cost of a low q/sub psi/, quasi-steady-state tokamak. Marginal ignition, inductive current startup plus 100 s of inductive burn, and a constant value of epsilon (inverse aspect ratio) times beta poloidal were global conditions imposed on this study. A maximum TF field of approximately 10 T was found to be appropriate for this device

  8. Final technical report for DE-SC00012633 AToM (Advanced Tokamak Modeling)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Christopher [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Orlov, Dmitri [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Izzo, Valerie [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2018-02-05

    This final report for the AToM project documents contributions from University of California, San Diego researchers over the period of 9/1/2014 – 8/31/2017. The primary focus of these efforts was on performing validation studies of core tokamak transport models using the OMFIT framework, including development of OMFIT workflow scripts. Additional work was performed to develop tools for use of the nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics code NIMROD in OMFIT, and its use in the study of runaway electron dynamics in tokamak disruptions.

  9. Experimental equipment for an advanced ISOL facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baktash, C.; Lee, I.Y.; Rehm, K.E.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings and recommendations of the Workshop on the Experimental Equipment for an Advanced ISOL Facility which was held at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on July 22--25, 1998. The purpose of this workshop was to discuss the performance requirements, manpower and cost estimates, as well as a schedule of the experimental equipment needed to fully exploit the new physics which can be studied at an advanced ISOL facility. An overview of the new physics opportunities that would be provided by such a facility has been presented in the White Paper that was issued following the Columbus Meeting. The reactions and experimental techniques discussed in the Columbus White Paper served as a guideline for the formulation of the detector needs at the Berkeley Workshop. As outlined a new ISOL facility with intense, high-quality beams of radioactive nuclei would provide exciting new research opportunities in the areas of: the nature of nucleonic matter; the origin of the elements; and tests of the Standard Model. After an introductory section, the following equipment is discussed: gamma-ray detectors; recoil separators; magnetic spectrographs; particle detectors; targets; and apparatus using non-accelerated beams

  10. Mechanical Design of a High Energy Beam Absorber for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baffes, C.; Church, M.; Leibfritz, J.; Oplt, S.; Rakhno, I.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-10

    A high energy beam absorber has been built for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab. In the facility's initial configuration, an electron beam will be accelerated through 3 TTF-type or ILC-type SRF cryomodules to an energy of 750MeV. The electron beam will be directed to one of multiple downstream experimental and diagnostic beam lines and then deposited in one of two beam absorbers. The facility is designed to accommodate up to 6 cryomodules, which would produce a 75kW beam at 1.5GeV; this is the driving design condition for the beam absorbers. The beam absorbers consist of water-cooled graphite, aluminum and copper layers contained in a helium-filled enclosure. This paper describes the mechanical implementation of the beam absorbers, with a focus on thermal design and analysis. The potential for radiation-induced degradation of the graphite is discussed.

  11. Recent experimental studies of edge and internal transport barriers in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohil, P; Baylor, L R; Burrell, K H; Casper, T A; Doyle, E J; Greenfield, C M; Jernigan, T C; Kinsey, J E; Lasnier, C J; Moyer, R A; Murakami, M; Rhodes, T L; Rudakov, D L; Staebler, G M; Wang, G; Watkins, J G; West, W P; Zeng, L

    2003-01-01

    Results from recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have revealed many important details on transport barriers at the plasma edge and in the plasma core. These experiments include: (a) the formation of the H-mode edge barrier directly by pellet injection; (b) the formation of a quiescent H-mode edge barrier (QH-mode) which is free from edge localized modes, but which still exhibits good density and radiative power control; (c) the formation of multiple transport barriers, such as the quiescent double barrier (QDB) which combines an internal transport barrier with the quiescent H-mode edge barrier. Results from the pellet-induced H-mode experiments indicate that: (a) the edge temperature (electron or ion) does not need to attain a critical value for the formation of the H-mode barrier, (b) pellet injection leads to an increased gradient in the radial electric field, E r , at the plasma edge; (c) the experimentally determined edge parameters at barrier transition are well below the predictions of several theories on the formation of the H-mode barrier, (d) pellet injection can lower the threshold power required to form the H-mode barrier. The quiescent H-mode barrier exhibits good density control as the result of continuous magnetohydrodynamic activity at the plasma edge called the edge harmonic oscillation (EHO). The EHO enhances the edge particle transport whilst maintaining a good energy transport barrier. The ability to produce multiple barriers in the QDB regime has led to long duration, high-performance plasmas with β N H 89 values of 7 for up to 10 times the confinement time. Density profile control in the plasma core of QDB plasmas has been demonstrated using on-axis electron cyclotron heating

  12. Experimental and modeling researches of dust particles in the HL-2A tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhi-Hui; Yan, Long-Wen; Tomita, Yukihiro; Feng, Zhen; Cheng, Jun; Hong, Wen-Yu; Pan, Yu-Dong; Yang, Qing-Wei; Duan, Xu-Ru

    2015-02-01

    The investigation of dust particle characteristics in fusion devices has become more and more imperative. In the HL-2A tokamak, the morphologies and compositions of dust particles are analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) with mapping. The results indicate that the sizes of dust particles are in a range from 1 μm to 1 mm. Surprisingly, stainless steel spheres with a diameter of 2.5 μm-30 μm are obtained. The production mechanisms of dust particles include flaking, disintegration, agglomeration, and arcing. In addition, dynamic characteristics of the flaking dust particles are observed by a CMOS fast framing camera and simulated by a computer program. Both of the results display that the ion friction force is dominant in the toroidal direction, while the centrifugal force is crucial in the radial direction. Therefore, the visible dust particles are accelerated toriodally by the ion friction force and migrated radially by the centrifugal force. The averaged velocity of the grain is on the order of ˜ 100 m/s. These results provide an additional supplement for one of critical plasma-wall interaction (PWI) issues in the framework of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) programme. Project supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Grant Nos. 2014GB107000 and 2013GB112008), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11320101005, 11175060, 11375054, and 11075046), and the China-Korean Joint Foundation (Grant No. 2012DFG02230).

  13. ORPUS 1: a pulsed superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwall, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    A recent series of reference designs for Tokamak Experimental Power Reactors (EPR's) has indicated that superconducting poloidal field (PF) coils will be necessary for successful operation of these devices. It would also be desirable to use superconducting PF coils in earlier tokamak fusion devices if such coils could be developed quickly enough. The PF coil performance requirements are briefly reviewed and some implications for the coil design are developed. A small coil (stored energy 14 kJ) has been built using construction techniques similar to those which could be employed for PF coils. The coil has been charged at rates up to 2 T/sec. Both maximum field and charging rate were limited by available power supplies. Loss measurements were carried out during pulsed operation and data for hysteretic and eddy current loss are presented. The loss measurement system used allows considerable insight into the effects of conductor motion and training

  14. Tokamak concept innovations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    This document contains the results of the IAEA Specialists' Meeting on Tokamak Concept Innovations held 13-17 January 1986 in Vienna. Although it is the most advanced fusion reactor concept the tokamak is not without its problems. Most of these problems should be solved within the ongoing R and D studies for the next generation of tokamaks. Emphasis for this meeting was placed on innovations that would lead to substantial improvements in a tokamak reactor, even if they involved a radical departure from present thinking

  15. Experimental observations of surface electrostatic wave on KT-5B tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shiyao; Han Shensheng

    1991-01-01

    Shear Alfven waves have been successfully excited in KT-5B small tokamak by means of the one turn longitudinal loop antenna located in the shadow area. The measured antenna loadings show their rich structure, and the loadings are also found to be sensitive to the plasma current. Preliminary evidence of surface electrostatic wave was observed

  16. Numerical and experimental analysis of eddy currents induced in tokamak machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, T.; Takahashi, G.; Kazawa, Y.; Suzuki, Y.

    1977-01-01

    This paper deals with eddy current phenomena in Tokamak machines. A numerical method is presented which will permit eddy currents to be calculated. Examples of numerical results and a discussion of the JT-60 are shown. Calculations are checked by measurements in basic models

  17. Experimental study of parametric dependence of electron-scale turbulence in a spherical tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Y.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Mazzucato, E.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Domier, C. W.; Lee, K. C. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Smith, D. R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Yuh, H. [Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Electron-scale turbulence is predicted to drive anomalous electron thermal transport. However, experimental study of its relation with transport is still in its early stage. On the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX), electron-scale density fluctuations are studied with a novel tangential microwave scattering system with high radial resolution of {+-}2 cm. Here, we report a study of parametric dependence of electron-scale turbulence in NSTX H-mode plasmas. The dependence on density gradient is studied through the observation of a large density gradient variation in the core induced by an edge localized mode (ELM) event, where we found the first clear experimental evidence of density gradient stabilization of electron-gyro scale turbulence in a fusion plasma. This observation, coupled with linear gyro-kinetic calculations, leads to the identification of the observed instability as toroidal electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes. It is observed that longer wavelength ETG modes, k{sub Up-Tack }{rho}{sub s} Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10 ({rho}{sub s} is the ion gyroradius at electron temperature and k{sub Up-Tack} is the wavenumber perpendicular to local equilibrium magnetic field), are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in electron thermal diffusivity. Comparisons with nonlinear ETG gyrokinetic simulations show ETG turbulence may be able to explain the experimental electron heat flux observed before the ELM event. The collisionality dependence of electron-scale turbulence is also studied by systematically varying plasma current and toroidal field, so that electron gyroradius ({rho}{sub e}), electron beta ({beta}{sub e}), and safety factor (q{sub 95}) are kept approximately constant. More than a factor of two change in electron collisionality, {nu}{sub e}{sup *}, was achieved, and we found that the spectral power of electron-scale turbulence appears to increase as {nu}{sub e}{sup *} is

  18. Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant

  19. Advances in elementary particle physics with applied superconductivity. Contribution of superconducting technology to CERN large hadron collider accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akira

    2011-01-01

    The construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was started in 1994 and completed in 2008. The LHC consists of more than seven thousand superconducting magnets and cavities, which play an essential role in elementary particle physics and its energy frontier. Since 2010, physics experiments at the new energy frontier have been carried out to investigate the history and elementary particle phenomena in the early universe. The superconducting technology applied in the energy frontier physics experiments is briefly introduced. (author)

  20. Tokamak engineering mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yuntao; Wu, Weiyue; Du, Shijun

    2014-01-01

    Provides a systematic introduction to tokamaks in engineering mechanics. Includes design guides based on full mechanical analysis, which makes it possible to accurately predict load capacity and temperature increases. Presents comprehensive information on important design factors involving materials. Covers the latest advances in and up-to-date references on tokamak devices. Numerous examples reinforce the understanding of concepts and provide procedures for design. Tokamak Engineering Mechanics offers concise and thorough coverage of engineering mechanics theory and application for tokamaks, and the material is reinforced by numerous examples. Chapter topics include general principles, static mechanics, dynamic mechanics, thermal fluid mechanics and multiphysics structural mechanics of tokamak structure analysis. The theoretical principle of the design and the methods of the analysis for various components and load conditions are presented, while the latest engineering technologies are also introduced. The book will provide readers involved in the study of mechanical/fusion engineering with a general understanding of tokamak engineering mechanics.

  1. Measurement of the electron and ion temperatures by the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on joint Texas experimental tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, W.; Chen, Z. Y., E-mail: zychen@hust.edu.cn; Huang, D. W.; Tong, R. H.; Wang, S. Y.; Wei, Y. N.; Ma, T. K.; Zhuang, G. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Jin, W. [Center of Interface Dynamics for Sustainability, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan 610200 (China); Lee, S. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Y. J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    An x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer has been developed on joint Texas experimental tokamak for the measurement of electron and ion temperatures from the K{sub α} spectra of helium-like argon and its satellite lines. A two-dimensional multi-wire proportional counter has been applied to detect the spectra. The electron and ion temperatures have been obtained from the Voigt fitting with the spectra of helium-like argon ions. The profiles of electron and ion temperatures show the dependence on electron density in ohmic plasmas.

  2. New generation of cryogen free advanced superconducting magnets for neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirichek, O; Adroja, D T; Manuel, P; Bewley, R I; Brown, J; Kouzmenko, G; Wotherspoon, R

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in superconducting technology and cryocooler refrigeration have resulted in a new generation of advanced superconducting magnets for neutron beam applications. These magnets have outstanding parameters such as high homogeneity and stability at highest magnetic fields possible, a reasonably small stray field, low neutron scattering background and larger exposure to neutron detectors. At the same time the pulse tube refrigeration technology provides a complete re-condensing regime which allows to minimise the requirements for cryogens without introducing additional noise and mechanical vibrations. The magnets can be used with dilution refrigerator insert which expands the temperature range from 20mK to 300K. Here we are going to present design, test results and the operational data of the 14T magnet for neutron diffraction and the 9T wide angle chopper magnet for neutron spectroscopy developed by Oxford Instruments in collaboration with ISIS neutron source. First scientific results obtained from the neutron scattering experiments with these magnets are also going to be discussed.

  3. Advanced Superconducting Technology for Global Science The Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P

    2002-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), presently in construction at CERN, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research near Geneva (Switzerland), will be, upon its completion in 2005 and for the next twenty years, the most advanced research instrument of the world's high-energy physics community, providing access to the energy frontier above 1 TeV per elementary constituent. Re-using the 26.7-km circumference tunnel and infrastructure of the past LEP electron-positon collider, operated until 2000, the LHC will make use of advanced superconducting technology - high-field Nb-Ti superconducting magnets operated in superfluid helium and a cryogenic ultra-high vacuum system - to bring into collision intense beams of protons and ions at unprecedented values of center-of-mass energy and luminosity (14 TeV and 1034 cm-2.s-1, respectively with protons). After some ten years of focussed R&D, the LHC components are presently series-built in industry and procured through world-wide collaboration. After briefly recalling ...

  4. Key features and progress of the KSTAR tokamak engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bak, J.S.; Choi, C.H.; Oh, Y.K.

    2003-01-01

    Substantial progress of the KSTAR tokamak engineering has been made on major tokamak structures, superconducting magnets, in-vessel components, diagnostic system, heating system, and power supplies. The engineering design has been elaborated to the extent necessary to allow a realistic assessment of its feasibility, performance, and cost. The prototype fabrication has been carried out to establish the reliable fabrication technologies and to confirm the validation of analyses employed for the KSTAR design. The completion of experimental building with beneficial occupancy for machine assembly was accomplished in Sep. 2002. The construction of special utility such as cryo-plant, de-ionized water-cooling system, and main power station will begin upon completion of building construction. The commissioning, construction, fabrication, and assembly of the whole facility will be going on by the end of 2005. This paper describes the main design features and engineering progress of the KSTAR tokamak, and elaborates the work currently underway. (author)

  5. Advances in Integrated Plasma Control on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, M.L.; Ferron, J.R.; Humphreys, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    The DIII-D experimental program in advanced tokamak (AT) physics requires extremely high performance from the DIII-D plasma control system (PCS) [B.G.Penaflor, et al., 4 th IAEA Tech. Mtg on Control and Data Acq., San Diego, CA (2003)], including simultaneous and highly accurate regulation of plasma shape, stored energy, density, and divertor characteristics, as well as coordinated suppression of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. To satisfy these demanding control requirements, we apply the integrated plasma control method, consisting of construction of physics-based plasma and system response models, validation of models against operating experiments, design of integrated controllers that operate in concert with one another as well as with supervisory modules, simulation of control action against off-line and actual machine control platforms, and optimization through iteration of the design-test loop. The present work describes progress in development of physics models and development and experimental application of several new model-based plasma controllers on DIII-D. We discuss experimental use of advanced shape control algorithms containing nonlinear techniques for improving control of steady state plasmas, model-based controllers for optimal rejection of edge localized mode disturbances during resistive wall mode stabilization, model-based controllers for neoclassical tearing mode stabilization, including methods for maximizing stabilization effectiveness with substantial constraints on available power, model-based integrated control of plasma rotation and beta, and initial experience in development of model-based controllers for advanced tokamak current profile modification. The experience gained from DIII-D has been applied to the development of control systems for the EAST and KSTAR tokamaks. We describe the development of the control software, hardware, and model-based control algorithms for these superconducting tokamaks, with emphasis on relevance of

  6. Experimental apparatus and its operational characteristics for MHD rotating machine with superconducting rotor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsurai, Makoto; Karasaki, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Tadashi; Matsuda, Shoji; Ichikawa, Hayao.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents the construction and operational characteristics of the experimental apparatus of MHD rotating machine with superconducting rotor, which has the electromechanical energy conversion function based on the inductive interactions between travelling magnetic field produced by the rotor and MHD working fluid. The machine consists of a rotating-dewar type superconducting rotor and a coaxially rotating metal cylinder which simulates the liquid metal MHD working fluid, and the both of them are driven separately by speed-controlled driving motors. The superconducting magnets installed in the rotor has the 8 shaped winding whose outer diameter is 11 cm and hight is 11 cm, and with the excitation current of 200 A (rating), it produces screw type magnetic field in the inductive interaction region of the cylinder with the peak value of 0.2 Wb/m 2 , whereas the average field strength reaches almost 4 Wb/m 2 inside the winding. In this condition, mutual interaction force is 30 N in the peripheral direction and 8 N in the axial direction and the total driving power of motors is 1,300 W when the relative rotation speed of the rotor and the cylinder is 800 rpm. Observed characteristics of this machine are for the most part in agreement with those estimated by the theoretical analysis. (auth.)

  7. Experimental results of thermally controlled superconducting switches for high frequency operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, G.B.J.; IerAvest, D.; Tenkate, H.H.J.; Krooshoop, H.J.G.; Van de Klundert, L.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop thermally controlled switches which are to be used in superconducting rectifiers operating at a few hertz and 1 kA. Usually, the operating frequency of thermally controlled rectifiers is limited to about 0.1 Hz due to the thermal recovery times of the switches. The thermal switches have to satisfy two conditions which are specific for the application in a superconducting rectifier: a) they have to operate in the repetitive mode so beside short activation times, fast recovery times of the switches are equally important, b) the power required to effect and maintain the normal state of the switches should be low since it will determine the rectifier efficiency. To what extent these obviously conflicting demands can be satisfied depends on the material and geometry of the switch. This paper presents a theoretical model of the thermal behaviour of a switch. The calculations are compared with experimental results of several switches having recovery times between 40 and 200 ms. Also, the feasibility of such switches for application in superconducting rectifiers operating at a few hertz with an acceptable efficiency is demonstrated

  8. Cryogenic magnet case and distributed structural materials for high-field superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, L.T.; Miller, J.R.; Kerns, J.A.; Myall, J.O.

    1987-01-01

    The superconducting magnets of the Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor (TIBER II) will generate high magnetic fields over large bores. The resulting electromagnetic forces require the use of large volumes of distributed steel and thick magnet case for structural support. Here we review the design allowables, calculated loads and forces, and structural materials selection for TIBER II. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Experimental investigation on electron cyclotron absorption at down-shifted frequency in the PLT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzucato, E.; Fidone, I.; Cavallo, A.; von Goeler, S.; Hsuan, H.

    1986-05-01

    The absorption of 60 GHz electron cyclotron waves, with the extraordinary mode and an oblique angle of propagation, has been investigated in the PLT tokamak in the regime of down-shifted frequencies. The production of energetic electrons, with energies of up to 300 to 400 keV, peaks at values of toroidal field (approx. =29 kG) for which the wave frequency is significantly smaller than the electron cyclotron frequency in the whole plasma region. The observations are consistent with the predictions of the relativistic theory of electron cyclotron damping at down-shifted frequency. Existing rf sources make this process a viable method for assisting the current ramp-up, and for heating the plasma of present large tokamaks

  10. Experimental study on practicability of self-created spherical tokamak in coilless STPC-EX machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinman, S.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study is to recognize the physical basis of the alternative self organization mechanism occurred STPC-EX machine. The conventional diagnostic tools are used in this study and for photographic recording, open shutter integrated post-fogging method is preferred. The annular coaxial two plasma current sheets one within other at the same direction are created and flowed on the surface of floating conductive central rod. Consequently, spherical tokamak configurated by new creation mechanism of Dual Axial Z-Pinch. (DAZP) yields fairly high beta of 0.4-0.6 at self created spherical tokamak plasma. Sustainment time of DAZP is 5.6-6.3 mili second. (author)

  11. Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. Technical progress report, November 1, 1993--October 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics in order to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks and in particular to understand the role of turbulence. So that they can continue to study the physics that is most relevant to the fusion program, TEXT completed a significant device upgrade this year. The new capabilities of the device and new and innovative diagnostics were exploited in all main program areas including: (1) configuration studies; (2) electron cyclotron heating physics; (3) improved confinement modes; (4) edge physics/impurity studies; (5) central turbulence and transport; and (6) transient transport. Details of the progress in each of the research areas are described.

  12. Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. Technical progress report, November 1, 1993--October 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics in order to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks and in particular to understand the role of turbulence. So that they can continue to study the physics that is most relevant to the fusion program, TEXT completed a significant device upgrade this year. The new capabilities of the device and new and innovative diagnostics were exploited in all main program areas including: (1) configuration studies; (2) electron cyclotron heating physics; (3) improved confinement modes; (4) edge physics/impurity studies; (5) central turbulence and transport; and (6) transient transport. Details of the progress in each of the research areas are described

  13. Comparison Between 2D Turbulence Model ESEL and Experimental Data from AUG and Compass Tokamaks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondáč, Peter; Horáček, Jan; Seidl, Jakub; Vondráček, Petr; Müller, H.W.; Adámek, Jiří; Nielsen, A.H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 2 (2015), s. 128-135 ISSN 1210-2709 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/12/2327; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : turbulence * tokamak * computer model * probe measurements Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics https://ojs.cvut.cz/ojs/index.php/ap/article/viewFile/2257/2816

  14. Temperature dependence of the experimental penetration depth of superconducting thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, H.J.; Gruenfeld, V.; Pastawski, H.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental magnetic field penetration depths delta(t,d,H) of the stable and superheated Meissner state were calculated as a function of temperature for various applied magnetic fields and various film thicknesses for two cases: (1) lambda(t)/d<< kappa→infinity and (2) kappa< or approx. =2lambda(t)/d (lambda is the Ginzburg-Landau penetration depth, d is the film thickness, kappa is the GL parameter). The results of the first case should be a useful tool for obtaining lambda(0) of amorphous superconducting thin films

  15. Experimental and theoretical investigation of mechanical disturbances in epoxy-impregnated superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasa, Y.; Bobrov, E.S.; Tsukamoto, O.; Takaghi, T.; Fujita, H.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1985-01-01

    The theoretical correlation between shear stress and epoxy resin fracture developed in an earlier paper was verified experimentally using a series of epoxy-impregnated, thin-walled superconducting test coils. In test coils with both ends rigidly clamped, cracks occurred as transport current was increased; during a training sequence the test was terminated by a premature quench. Using acoustic emission and voltage signals, each premature quench was linked directly to a crack occurring near one of the ends. Test coils which had both ends unsupported, giving the winding freedom to expand radially, did not experience epoxy fracture and showed no premature quenches. (author)

  16. Tokamak control simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelbaum, T.N.; Serben, S.; Var, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    A computer model of a tokamak experimental power reactor and its control system is being constructed. This simulator will allow the exploration of various open loop and closed loop strategies for reactor control. This paper provides a brief description of the simulator and some of the potential control problems associated with this class of tokamaks

  17. Experimental studies of thermal and non-thermal electron cyclotron phenomena in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, F.S.

    1984-12-01

    A direct measurement of wave absorption in the ISX-B tokamak at the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency is reported. Measurements of the absorption of a wave polarized in the extraordinary mode and propagating perpendicular to the toroidal magnetic field are in agreement with the absorption predicted by the linearized Vlasov equation for a thermal plasma. Agreement is found both for an analytic approximation to the wave absorption and for a numerical simulation of ray propagation in toroidal geometry. Observations are also reported on a non-linear, three-wave interaction process occurring during high power electron cyclotron resonance heating in the Versator II tokamak. The measured spectra and the threshold power are consistent with a model in which the incident power in the extraordinary mode of polarization decays at the upper hybrid resonance layer into a lower hybrid wave and an electron Bernstein wave. Finally, measurements of non-thermal emission at the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency and below the electron plasma frequency are reported from low density, non-Maxwellian plasma in the Versator II tokamak. The emission spectra are in agreement with a model in which waves are driven unstable at the anomalous Doppler resonance, while only weakly damped at the Cerenkov resonance

  18. Discovering superconductivity an investigative approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ireson, Gren

    2012-01-01

    The highly-illustrated text will serve as excellent introduction for students, with and without a physics background, to superconductivity. With a strong practical, experimental emphasis, it will provide readers with an overview of the topic preparing them for more advanced texts used in more advanced undergraduate and post-graduate courses.

  19. Pure tension superconducting toroidal-field coil system design studies for the Argonne Experimental Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Purcell, J.R.; Demichele, D.W.; Turner, L.R.

    1975-11-01

    As part of the Argonne Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor (TEPR) design studies, a toroidal field (TF) coil system has been designed. NbTi was chosen as the most suitable superconductor and 8T was regarded as a practical peak field level in this study. The 16-coil design was chosen as a reasonable compromise between 2 percent field ripple and 3 m access gap. To minimize the coil structure and the bending moments on the conductor, a pure tension coil shape is necessary. A correct approach for determining the pure tension coil profile in a bumpy TF coil system is given. Verification of the pure tension coil by a three-dimensional stress analysis is presented. For coil quench protection, a series-connected scheme is proposed

  20. Experimental study of the β-limit in ohmic H-mode in the TUMAN-3M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, S.V.; Andreiko, M.V.; Askinazi, L.G.; Golant, V.E.; Kornev, V.A.; Krikunov, S.V.; Levin, L.S.; Rozhdestvensky, V.V.; Tukachinsky, A.S.; Yaroshevich, S.P.

    1998-01-01

    Because of its high confinement properties, the H-mode provides good opportunities to achieve high beta values in a tokamak. In this paper the results of an experimental study of β T and β N limits in the H-mode, obtained in a circular cross section tokamak without auxiliary heating are presented. The experiments were performed in the TUMAN-3M tokamak. The device has the following parameters: R 0 =0.53m, a s =0.22m (limiter configuration), B T ≤1.2T, I p ≤175kA, n-bar e ≤6.2x10 19 m -3 . The stored energy was measured using diamagnetic loops and compared with W calculated from kinetic data obtained by Thomson scattering and microwave interferometry. Measurements of the stored energy and of the β were performed in the ohmic H-mode before and after boronization and in the scenario with fast current ramp-down in ohmic H-mode. A maximum value of β T of 2.0% and β N of 2.0 were achieved. The β N limit achieved reveals itself as a 'soft' (non-disruptive) limit. The stored energy slowly decays after the current ramp-down. No correlation was found between beta restriction and MHD phenomena. Internal transport barrier (ITB) formation was observed in ohmic H-mode. An enhancement factor of 2.0 over ITER93H(ELM-free) was found in the ohmic H-mode with ITB. (author)

  1. Role of superconducting electronics in advancing science and technology (invited) (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, S. M.

    1988-08-01

    The promises of the ultrahigh-performance properties of superconductivity and Josephson junction technologies have been known for quite some time. This presentation describes the first superconducting electronics and measurement system and its important role as a major tool to advance microwave and millimeter wave technologies. This breakthrough tool is a sampling oscilloscope with 5-ps rise time, 50-μV sensitivity, and a time domain reflectometer with 8-ps rise time. In order to achieve these performance goals, several technological hurdles had to be overcome including perfecting a manufacturing process for building Josephson junction IC chips, developing an innovative cooling technique, developing interfaces and interconnections with bandwidths in excess of 70 GHz, and developing the room-temperature hardware and software necessary to make the instruments convenient, easy to use, easy to learn, in addition to making available functions and features users have come to expect from sophisticated digital test instrumentation. These technological developments are stepping stones leading to the realization of more sophisticated and complex electronic systems satisfying the needs of scientists, technologists, and engineers. The unprecedented speed and sensitivity make it possible to attack new frontiers.

  2. The basics of spherical tokamaks and progress in European research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, V K; Alladio, F; Morris, A W

    2003-01-01

    When the aspect ratio of a tokamak (A = R/a) decreases significantly, there is a transformation of the well studied tokamak toroidal magnetic configuration into the spherical tokamak (ST) configuration. This configuration has high natural plasma elongation and triangularity and other unique equilibrium and stability properties of ST configuration, which are discussed in this paper. European research into ST physics is well advanced in spite of the young age of this branch of fusion science. An overview of selected experimental and theoretical results obtained at Ioffe, Culham and Frascati is given with the emphasis on their complementarity and links to the main stream of tokamak research, such as ITER. An outline of the basic ST advantages and the potential of ST research for new insights into magnetic confinement is also given. More detailed descriptions of recent advances in ST theory and experiment may be found in the invited papers by Akers and Ono in the proceedings of this conference

  3. New development of advanced superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source SECRAL (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, H. W.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Guo, X. H.; Zhao, H. Y.; Feng, Y. C.; Li, J. Y.; Ma, H. Y.; Ma, B. H.; Wang, H.; Li, X. X.; Xie, D. Z.; Lu, W.; Cao, Y.; Shang, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with advance design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) is an 18-28 GHz fully superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source dedicated for highly charged heavy ion beam production. SECRAL, with an innovative superconducting magnet structure of solenoid-inside-sextupole and at lower frequency and lower rf power operation, may open a new way for developing compact and reliable high performance superconducting ECR ion source. One of the recent highlights achieved at SECRAL is that some new record beam currents for very high charge states were produced by 18 GHz or 18+14.5 GHz double frequency heating, such as 1 e μA of 129 Xe 43+ , 22 e μA of 209 Bi 41+ , and 1.5 e μA of 209 Bi 50+ . To further enhance the performance of SECRAL, a 24 GHz/7 kW gyrotron microwave generator was installed and SECRAL was tested at 24 GHz. Some promising and exciting results at 24 GHz with new record highly charged ion beam intensities were produced, such as 455 e μA of 129 Xe 27+ and 152 e μA of 129 Xe 30+ , although the commissioning time was limited within 3-4 weeks and rf power only 3-4 kW. Bremsstrahlung measurements at 24 GHz show that x-ray is much stronger with higher rf frequency, higher rf power. and higher minimum mirror magnetic field (minimum B). Preliminary emittance measurements indicate that SECRAL emittance at 24 GHz is slightly higher that at 18 GHz. SECRAL has been put into routine operation at 18 GHz for heavy ion research facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) accelerator complex since May 2007. The total operation beam time from SECRAL for HIRFL accelerator has been more than 2000 h, and 129 Xe 27+ , 78 Kr 19+ , 209 Bi 31+ , and 58 Ni 19+ beams were delivered. All of these new developments, the latest results, and long-term operation for the accelerator have again demonstrated that SECRAL is one of the best in the performance of ECR ion source for highly charged heavy ion beam production. Finally the future development

  4. Particle exhaust scheme using an in-vessel cryocondensation pump in the advanced divertor configuration of the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, M.M.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Owen, L.W.; Anderson, P.M.; Baxi, C.B.; Langhorn, A.; Luxon, J.L.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Schaffer, M.J.; Schaubel, K.M.; "" class="author-name" title=" (General Atomics Co., San Diego, CA (United States))" data-affiliation=" (General Atomics Co., San Diego, CA (United States))" >Smith, J.P>

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, a particle exhaust scheme using a cryocondensation pump in the advanced divertor configuration of the DIII-D tokamak is described. In this configuration, the pump is located inside a baffle chamber within the tokamak, designed to receive particles reflected off the divertor strike region. A concentric coaxial loop with forced-convection flow of two-phase helium is selected as the cryocondensation surface. The pumping configuration is optimized by Monte Carlo techniques to provide maximum exhaust efficiency while minimizing the deleterious effects of impingement of energetic plasma particles on cryogenic surfaces. Heat loading contributions from various sources on the cryogenic surfaces are estimated, based on which the cryogenic surfaces are estimated, based on which the cryogenic flow loop for the pump is designed. The mechanical aspects of the pump, designed to meet the many challenging requirements of operating the cryopump internal to the tokamak vacuum and in close proximity with the high-temperature plasma, are also outlined

  5. Experimental study of gas-cooled current leads for superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, R.P.

    1978-04-01

    Design details and experimental test results from several design variations of the gas-cooled, copper current leads used in conjunction with the superconducting dipole magnets for ESCAR (Experimental Superconducting Accelerator Ring) are reported. Thermal acoustic oscillations, which were experienced with an initial design, were eliminated in subsequent designs by a reduction of the hydraulic diameter. The occurrence of these oscillations is in general agreement with the stability analysis of Rott but the observed gas flow dependence is not in agreement with some other recently reported results for leads operated supercritical phase coolant. An empirically determined correlation was obtained by plotting lead resistance vs. enthalpy gain of the coolant gas. The resulting family of curves can be reduced to a single line on a plot of effective resistivity vs. the product of current and cross-sectional area divided by the product of the square of the mass flow of the coolant and the lead length. This correlation, which should be applicable to other designs of copper current leads in which ideal heat transfer to the coolant gas is approached, predicts that the enthalpy gain of the coolant, and therefore the peak lead temperature, is proportional to the cube of the ratio of current to coolant mass flow. The effective value of the strongly temperature-dependent kinematic viscosity of the coolant gas was found to vary linearly with the effective resistivity of the lead

  6. Development of laser-based technology for the routine first wall diagnostic on the tokamak EAST: LIBS and LIAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z.; Gierse, N.; Li, C.; Liu, P.; Zhao, D.; Sun, L.; Oelmann, J.; Nicolai, D.; Wu, D.; Wu, J.; Mao, H.; Ding, F.; Brezinsek, S.; Liang, Y.; Ding, H.; Luo, G.; Linsmeier, C.; EAST Team

    2017-12-01

    A laser based method combined with spectroscopy, such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser-induced ablation spectroscopy (LIAS), is a promising technology for plasma-wall interaction studies. In this work, we report the development of in situ laser-based diagnostics (LIBS and LIAS) for the assessment of static and dynamic fuel retention on the first wall without removing the tiles between and during plasma discharges in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). The fuel retention on the first wall was measured after different wall conditioning methods and daily plasma discharges by in situ LIBS. The result indicates that the LIBS can be a useful tool to predict the wall condition in EAST. With the successful commissioning of a refined timing system for LIAS, an in situ approach to investigate fuel retention is proposed.

  7. A beamline for high-pressure studies at the Advanced Light Source with a superconducting bending magnet as the source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Martin; MacDowell, Alastair A; Caldwell, Wendel A; Cambie, Daniella; Celestre, Richard S; Domning, Edward E; Duarte, Robert M; Gleason, Arianna E; Glossinger, James M; Kelez, Nicholas; Plate, David W; Yu, Tony; Zaug, Joeseph M; Padmore, Howard A; Jeanloz, Raymond; Alivisatos, A Paul; Clark, Simon M

    2005-09-01

    A new facility for high-pressure diffraction and spectroscopy using diamond anvil high-pressure cells has been built at the Advanced Light Source on beamline 12.2.2. This beamline benefits from the hard X-radiation generated by a 6 T superconducting bending magnet (superbend). Useful X-ray flux is available between 5 keV and 35 keV. The radiation is transferred from the superbend to the experimental enclosure by the brightness-preserving optics of the beamline. These optics are comprised of a plane parabola collimating mirror, followed by a Kohzu monochromator vessel with Si(111) crystals (E/DeltaE approximately equal 7000) and W/B4C multilayers (E/DeltaE approximately equal 100), and then a toroidal focusing mirror with variable focusing distance. The experimental enclosure contains an automated beam-positioning system, a set of slits, ion chambers, the sample positioning goniometry and area detector (CCD or image-plate detector). Future developments aim at the installation of a second endstation dedicated to in situ laser heating and a dedicated high-pressure single-crystal station, applying both monochromatic and polychromatic techniques.

  8. Scientific Affairs Division of NATO Advanced Study Institute: abstracts for nonequilibrium superconductivity, phonons and Kapitza boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-05-01

    Abstracts of papers presented at the meeting are given. Topics covered include: Kapitza resistance; superconducting tunneling; energy gap enhancement in superconductors; instabilities in nonequilibrium superconducting states; exchange of charge between superconducting pairs and quasiparticles; motion of magnetic flux (flux flow); and other new phenomena

  9. Advances in multi-megawatt lower hybrid technology in support of steady-state tokamak operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpech, L.; Achard, J.; Armitano, A.; Artaud, J. F.; Bae, Y. S.; Belo, J. H.; Berger-By, G.; Bouquey, F.; Cho, M. H.; Corbel, E.; Decker, J.; Do, H.; Dumont, R.; Ekedahl, A.; Garibaldi, P.; Goniche, M.; Guilhem, D.; Hillairet, J.; Hoang, G. T.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, H.; Kwak, J. G.; Magne, R.; Mollard, P.; Na, Y. S.; Namkung, W.; Oh, Y. K.; Park, S.; Park, H.; Peysson, Y.; Poli, S.; Prou, M.; Samaille, F.; Yang, H. L.; The Tore Supra Team

    2014-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) systems play a crucial role for steady-state tokamak operation, owing to their high current drive (CD) efficiency and hence their capability to reduce flux consumption. This paper describes the extensive technology programmes developed for the Tore Supra (France) and the KSTAR (Korea) tokamaks in order to bring continuous wave (CW) LHCD systems into operation. The Tore Supra LHCD generator at 3.7 GHz is fully CW compatible, with RF power PRF = 9.2 MW available at the generator to feed two actively water-cooled launchers. On Tore Supra, the most recent and novel passive active multijunction (PAM) launcher has sustained 2.7 MW (corresponding to its design value of 25 MW m-2 at the launcher mouth) for a 78 s flat-top discharge, with low reflected power even at large plasma-launcher gaps. The fully active multijunction (FAM) launcher has reached 3.8 MW of coupled power (24 MW m-2 at the launcher mouth) with the new TH2103C klystrons. By combining both the PAM and FAM launchers, 950 MJ of energy, using 5.2 MW of LHCD and 1 MW of ICRH (ion cyclotron resonance heating), was injected for 160 s in 2011. The 3.7 GHz CW LHCD system will be a key element within the W (for tungsten) environment in steady-state Tokamak (WEST) project, where the aim is to test ITER technologies for high heat flux components in relevant heat flux density and particle fluence conditions. On KSTAR, a 2 MW LHCD system operating at 5 GHz is under development. Recently the 5 GHz prototype klystron has reached 500 kW/600 s on a matched load, and studies are ongoing to design a PAM launcher. In addition to the studies of technology, a combination of ray-tracing and Fokker-Planck calculations have been performed to evaluate the driven current and the power deposition due to LH waves, and to optimize the N∥ spectrum for the future launcher design. Furthermore, an LHCD system at 5 GHz is being considered for a future upgrade of the ITER

  10. Experimental determination of the dimensionless scaling parameter of energy transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luce, T.C.; Petty, C.C.

    1995-07-01

    Controlled fusion experiments have focused on the variation of the plasma characteristics as the engineering or control parameters are systematically changed. This has led to the development of extrapolation formulae for prediction of future device performance using these same variables as a basis. Recently, it was noticed that present-day tokamaks can operate with all of the dimensionless variables which appear in the Vlasov-Maxwell system of equations at values projected for a fusion powerplant with the exception of the parameter ρ * , the gyroradius normalized to the machine size. The scaling with this parameter is related to the benefit of increasing the size of the machine either directly or effectively by increasing the magnetic field. It is exactly this scaling which is subject to systematic error in the inter-machine databases and the cost driver for any future machine. If this scaling can be fixed by a series of single machine experiments, much as the current and power scalings have been, the confidence in the prediction of future device performance would be greatly enhanced. While carrying out experiments of this type, it was also found that the ρ * scaling can illuminate the underlying physics of energy transport. Conclusions drawn from experiments on the DIII-D tokamak in these two areas are the subject of this paper

  11. Ultrafast two-dimensional lithium beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic on the EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoletnik, S.; Hu, G. H.; Tál, B.; Dunai, D.; Anda, G.; Asztalos, O.; Pokol, G. I.; Kálvin, S.; Németh, J.; Krizsanóczi, T.

    2018-06-01

    A diagnostic instrument is described for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) for the measurement of the edge plasma electron density profile and plasma turbulence properties. An accelerated neutral lithium beam is injected into the tokamak and the Doppler shifted 670.8 nm light emission of the Li2p-2s transition is detected. A novel compact setup is used, where the beam injection and observation take place from the same equatorial diagnostic port and radial-poloidal resolution is achieved with microsecond time resolution. The observation direction is optimized in order to achieve a sufficient Doppler shift of the beam light to be able to separate from the strong edge lithium line emission on this lithium coated device. A 250 kHz beam chopping technique is also demonstrated for the removal of background light. First results show the capability of measuring turbulence and its poloidal flow velocity in the scrape-off layer and edge region and the resolution of details of transient phenomena like edge localized modes with few microsecond time resolution.

  12. Recent advances in gyrokinetic full-f particle simulation of medium sized Tokamaks with ELMFIRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janhunen, S.J.; Kiviniemi, T.P.; Korpio, T.; Leerink, S.; Nora, M.; Heikkinen, J.A.; Ogando, F.

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale kinetic simulations of toroidal plasmas based on first principles are called for in studies of transition from low to high confinement mode and internal transport barrier formation in the core plasma. Such processes are best observed and diagnosed in detached plasma conditions in mid-sized tokamaks, so gyrokinetic simulations for these conditions are warranted. A first principles test-particle based kinetic model ELMFIRE[1] has been developed and used in interpretation[1,2] of FT-2 and DIII-D experiments. In this work we summarize progress in Cyclone (DIII-D core) and ASDEX Upgrade pedestal region simulations, and show that in simulations the choice of adiabatic electrons results in quenching of turbulence (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Unified Ideal Stability Limits for Advanced Tokamak and Spherical Torus Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menard, J.E.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Gates, D.A.; Kaye, S.M.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Jardin, S.C.; Maingi, R.; Manickam, J.; Mueller, D.; Ono, M.; Paoletti, F.; Peng, Y.-K.M.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stutman, D.; Synakowski, E.J.

    2003-01-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability limits of shaped tokamak plasmas with high bootstrap fraction are systematically determined as a function of plasma aspect ratio. For plasmas with and without wall stabilization of external kink modes, the computed limits are well described by distinct and nearly invariant values of a normalized beta parameter utilizing the total magnetic field energy density inside the plasma. Stability limit data from the low aspect ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment is compared to these theoretical limits and indicates that ideal nonrotating plasma no-wall beta limits have been exceeded in regimes with sufficiently high cylindrical safety factor. These results could impact the choice of aspect ratio in future fusion power plants

  14. Recent advances in gyrokinetic full-f particle simulation of medium sized Tokamaks with ELMFIRE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janhunen, S.J.; Kiviniemi, T.P.; Korpio, T.; Leerink, S.; Nora, M. [Helsinki University of Technology, Euratom-Tekes Association, Espoo (Finland); Heikkinen, J.A. [VTT, Euratom-Tekes Association, Espoo (Finland); Ogando, F. [Helsinki University of Technology, Euratom-Tekes Association, Espoo (Finland); Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    Large-scale kinetic simulations of toroidal plasmas based on first principles are called for in studies of transition from low to high confinement mode and internal transport barrier formation in the core plasma. Such processes are best observed and diagnosed in detached plasma conditions in mid-sized tokamaks, so gyrokinetic simulations for these conditions are warranted. A first principles test-particle based kinetic model ELMFIRE[1] has been developed and used in interpretation[1,2] of FT-2 and DIII-D experiments. In this work we summarize progress in Cyclone (DIII-D core) and ASDEX Upgrade pedestal region simulations, and show that in simulations the choice of adiabatic electrons results in quenching of turbulence (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Non-superconducting magnet structures for near-term, large fusion experimental devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    File, J.; Knutson, D.S.; Marino, R.E.; Rappe, G.H.

    1980-10-01

    This paper describes the magnet and structural design in the following American tokamak devices: the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), the Princeton Divertor Experiment (PDX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The Joint European Torus (JET), also presented herein, has a magnet structure evolved from several European programs and, like TFTR, represents state of the art magnet and structure design

  16. Survey of Tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickerton, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    The survey covers the following topics:- Introduction and history of tokamak research; review of tokamak apparatus, existing and planned; remarks on measurement techniques and their limitations; main results in terms of electron and ion temperatures, plasma density, containment times, etc. Empirical scaling; range of operating densities; impurities, origin, behaviour and control (including divertors); data on fluctuations and instabilities in tokamak plasmas; data on disruptive instabilities; experiments on shaped cross-sections; present experimental evidence on β limits; auxiliary heating; experimental and theoretical problems for the future. (author)

  17. Simulation Study of the Helical Superconducting Undulator Installation at the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajaev, V.; Borland, M.; Sun, Y.; Xiao, A.

    2017-06-25

    A helical superconducting undulator is planned for installation at the APS. Such an installation would be first of its kind – helical devices were never installed in synchrotron light sources before. Due to its reduced horizontal aperture, a lattice modification is required to accommodate for large horizontal oscillations during injection. We describe the lattice change details and show the new lattice experimental test results. To understand the effect of the undulator on single-particle dynamics, first, its kick maps were computed using different methods. We have found that often-used Elleaume formula* for kick maps gives wrong results for this undulator. We then used the kick maps obtained by other methods to simulate the effect of the undulator on injection and lifetime.

  18. Transient temperature response of in-vessel components due to pulsed operation in tokamak fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Akio; Tone, Tatsuzo

    1985-12-01

    A transient temperature response of the in-vessel components (first wall, blanket, divertor/limiter and shielding) surrounding plasma in Tokamak Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) has been analysed. Transient heat load during start up/shut down and pulsed operation cycles causes the transient temperature response in those components. The fatigue lifetime of those components significantly depends upon the resulting cyclic thermal stress. The burn time affects the temperature control in the solid breeder (Li 2 O) and also affects the thermo-mechanical design of the blanket and shielding which are constructed with thick structure. In this report, results of the transient temperature response obtained by the heat transfer and conduction analyses for various pulsed operation scenarios (start up, shut down, burn and dwell times) have been investigated in view of thermo-mechanical design of the in-vessel components. (author)

  19. Experimental results of superconducting magnet behaviour during discharging into the external load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Grega

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The basic part of every SMES (Superconducting magnetic energy storage system is a superconducting magnet. All eventsof electrical nature which happen during its charging,, bypassing and discharging are transient. The article deals with experimentalresults of the superconducting magnet behaviour, especially during the period of its discharging into the prepared external load.

  20. The tokamak as a neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendel, H.W.; Jassby, D.L.

    1989-11-01

    This paper describes the tokamak in its role as a neutron source, with emphasis on experimental results for D-D neutron production. The sections summarize tokamak operation, sources of fusion and non-fusion neutrons, principal neutron detection methods and their calibration, neutron energy spectra and fluxes outside the tokamak plasma chamber, history of neutron production in tokamaks, neutron emission and fusion power gain from JET and TFTR (the largest present-day tokamaks), and D-T neutron production from burnup of D-D tritons. This paper also discusses the prospects for future tokamak neutron production and potential applications of tokamak neutron sources. 100 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Experimental results on pellet injection and MHD from the RTP tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oomens, A.A.M.; Kloe, J. de; Salzedas, F.J.B.

    2001-01-01

    The ablation of hydrogen pellets has been studied in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project RTP with a diagnostic with high spatial and temporal resolution. It has been observed that (part of the) ablation cloud drifts away from the pellet in opposite direction. These drifts occur in semi-periodical bursts. A summary of a detailed analysis of this drift of the cloud and its implications for the fueling profile is presented. Stabilization of m/n=2/1 tearing modes preceding density limit disruptions, has been studied with modulated and continuous ECRH. The results indicate that EC heating of the islands under these conditions is very inefficient. The time dependence of the growth rate of the precursor mode is first algebraic, but becomes exponential in a later phase. (author)

  2. Experimental measurements of lower-hybrid wave propagation in the Versator II tokamak using microwave scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohatgi, R.; Chen, K.; Bekefi, G.; Bonoli, P.; Luckhardt, S.C.; Mayberry, M.; Porkolab, M.; Villasenor, J.

    1991-01-01

    A series of 139 GHz microwave scattering experiments has been performed on the Versator II tokamak (B. Richards, Ph.D. thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1981) to study the propagation of externally launched 0.8 GHz lower-hybrid waves. During lower-hybrid current drive, the launched waves are found to follow a highly directional resonance cone in the outer portion of the plasma. Wave power is also detected near the center of the plasma, and evidence of wave absorption is seen. Scattering of lower-hybrid waves in k space by density fluctuations appears to be a weak effect, although measurable frequency broadening by density fluctuations is found, Δω/ω=3x10 -4 . In the detectable range (2.5 parallel parallel spectra inferred from the scattering measurements are quite similar above and below the current drive density limit. Numerical modeling of these experiments using ray tracing is also presented

  3. Experimental survey of the L-H transition conditions in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlstrom, T.N.; Gohil, P.; Watkins, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    We present the global analysis of a recent survey of the H-mode power threshold in DIII-D using D o → D + NBI after boronization of the vacuum vessel. Single parameter scans of B T , I p , density, and plasma shape have been carried out on the DIII-D tokamak for neutral beam heated single-null and double-null diverted plasmas. In single-null discharges, the power threshold is found to increase approximately linearly with B T and n e but remains independent of I p . In double-null discharges, the power threshold is found to be approximately independent of both B T and n e . Various shape parameters such as plasma-wall gaps had only a weak effect on the power threshold. Imbalancing the double null configuration resulted in a large increase in the threshold power

  4. An experimental study of turbulence by phase-contrast imaging in the DIII-D tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coda, Stefano

    1997-10-01

    A CO2-laser imaging system employing the Zernike phase-contrast technique was designed, built, installed, and operated on the DIII-D tokamak. This system measures the line integrals of plasma density fluctuations along 16 vertical chords at the outer edge of the tokamak (0.85 Mechanical vibrations are damped by a novel dual-axis focal-spot feedback stabilization system. The theoretical treatment of scattering and imaging techniques was extended to finite-frequency fluctuations in the Rytov approximation. An extensive comparative analysis of the properties of phase-contrast imaging (PCI) and of other imaging and scintillation techniques was also carried out. Studies of edge turbulence were performed. The radial- wave-number spectrum peaks at finite wave numbers, both positive and negative. This first observation of radial modes is in agreement with recent predictions from theoretical and numerical work. The dependence of the correlation length and peak wave number on plasma parameters and on the frequency was studied in detail. Frequency spectra typically obey an inverse square law, consistent with a Lorentzian distribution. At the transition from L to H mode the amplitude and correlation length of the turbulence decrease, while the decorrelation time remains approximately constant. The Biglari-Diamond-Terry shear-decorrelation criterion was verified quantitatively; theoretical scaling laws for the correlation parameters were also tested. The turbulence amplitude follows a mixing-length scaling in L mode only: the lower level seen in H mode may indicate a weaker turbulence regime. The fluctuation content of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) was thoroughly characterized, and systematic differences between type-I and type-III ELMs were discovered. Future applications of PCI, including crossed-beam localization and heterodyne radio-frequency-wave detection, are also discussed. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617

  5. An experimental study of the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] magnet aperture criterion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merminga, N.; Edwards, D.; Finley, D.

    1988-01-01

    A beam dynamics experiment, performed in the Fermilab Tevatron, that was mainly motivated by planning for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is described. Nonlinearities are introduced in the Tevatron by special sextupoles in order to stimulate the SSC environment. ''Smear'' is one of the parameters used to characterize the deviation from linear behavior. Smear is extracted from experimental data and compared with calculation over a wide range of conditions. The agreement is excellent. The closed orbit at injection trajectory reveal no deterioration even at the highest sextupole excitations. Measurements of the dynamic aperture are in general agreement with prediction. Particles captured on nonlinear resonance islands are directly observed and measurements are performed for the first time. The stability of the islands under tune modulation is investigated. 4 refs., 8 figs

  6. AGOR: A superconducting cyclotron for light and heavy ions plans for experimental facilities and physics program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gales, S.

    1991-01-01

    The construction of the K600 superconducting cyclotron AGOR, a joint undertaking of the KVI Groningen and the Institut de Physique Nucleaire at Orsay, has reached the stage where the assembly of major subsystems is underway. Field measurements are scheduled to start in the fall of this year, beam tests should start at Orsay by the end of 1992 before AGOR final installation at Groningen. The beam guiding system, the location and equipments of the main experimental areas are currently being designed. Taking advantage of the broad range of ions and energies that AGOR will made available (from 200 MeV protons to 100 MeV/A α down to 6 MeV/A Pb ions), the first ideas about the physics research to be done will be presented. (author) 28 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Experimental transmission electron microscopy studies and phenomenological model of bismuth-based superconducting compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elboussiri, Khalid

    1991-01-01

    The main part of this thesis is devoted to an experimental study by transmission electron microscopy of the different phases of the superconducting bismuth cuprates Bi_2Sr_2Ca_n_-_1Cu_nO_2_n_+_4. In high resolution electron microscopy, the two types of incommensurate modulation realized in these compounds have been observed. A model of structure has been proposed from which the simulated images obtained are consistent with observations. The medium resolution images correlated with the electron diffraction data have revealed existence of a multi-soliton regime with latent lock in phases of commensurate periods between 4b and 10b. At last, a description of different phases of these compounds as a result of superstructures from a disordered perovskite type structure is proposed (author) [fr

  8. A strict experimental test of macroscopic realism in a superconducting flux qubit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee, George C; Kakuyanagi, Kosuke; Yeh, Mao-Chuang; Matsuzaki, Yuichiro; Toida, Hiraku; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Shiro; Leggett, Anthony J; Munro, William J

    2016-11-04

    Macroscopic realism is the name for a class of modifications to quantum theory that allow macroscopic objects to be described in a measurement-independent manner, while largely preserving a fully quantum mechanical description of the microscopic world. Objective collapse theories are examples which aim to solve the quantum measurement problem through modified dynamical laws. Whether such theories describe nature, however, is not known. Here we describe and implement an experimental protocol capable of constraining theories of this class, that is more noise tolerant and conceptually transparent than the original Leggett-Garg test. We implement the protocol in a superconducting flux qubit, and rule out (by ∼84 s.d.) those theories which would deny coherent superpositions of 170 nA currents over a ∼10 ns timescale. Further, we address the 'clumsiness loophole' by determining classical disturbance with control experiments. Our results constitute strong evidence for the superposition of states of nontrivial macroscopic distinctness.

  9. Development of 'low activation superconducting wire' for an advanced fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishinuma, Y.; Yamada, S.; Sagara, A.; Kikuchi, A.; Takeuchi, T.; Matsuda, K.; Taniguchi, H.

    2011-01-01

    In the D-T burning plasma reactor beyond ITER such as DEMO and fusion power plants assuming the steady-state and long time operation, it will be necessary to consider carefully induced radioactivity and neutron irradiation properties on the all components for fusion reactors. The decay time of the induced radioactivity can control the schedule and scenarios of the maintenance and shutdown on the fusion reactor. V 3 Ga and MgB 2 compound have shorter decay time within 1 years and they will be desirable as a candidate material to realize 'low activation and high magnetic field superconducting magnet' for advanced fusion reactor. However, it is well known that J c -B properties of V 3 Ga and MgB 2 wires are lower than that of the Nb-based A15 compound wires, so the J c -B enhancements on the V 3 Ga and MgB 2 wires are required in order to apply for an advanced fusion reactor. We approached and succeeded to developing the new process in order to improve J c properties of V 3 Ga and MgB 2 wires. In this paper, the recent activities for the J c improvements and detailed new process in V 3 Ga and MgB 2 wires are investigated. (author)

  10. Magnetic confinement experiment. I: Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.

    1995-08-01

    Reports were presented at this conference of important advances in all the key areas of experimental tokamak physics: Core Plasma Physics, Divertor and Edge Physics, Heating and Current Drive, and Tokamak Concept Optimization. In the area of Core Plasma Physics, the biggest news was certainly the production of 9.2 MW of fusion power in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, and the observation of unexpectedly favorable performance in DT plasmas. There were also very important advances in the performance of ELM-free H- (and VH-) mode plasmas and in quasi-steady-state ELM'y operation in JT-60U, JET, and DIII-D. In all three devices ELM-free H-modes achieved nTτ's ∼ 2.5x greater than ELM'ing H-modes, but had not been sustained in quasi-steady-state. Important progress has been made on the understanding of the physical mechanism of the H-mode in DIII-D, and on the operating range in density for the H-mode in Compass and other devices

  11. Application of SNAM to the nuclear analysis of EAST Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, H.; Chen, M.; Zeng, Q.; Wu, Y.

    2007-01-01

    EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) is the first non-round cross section complete superconducting fusion experimental tokamak device built at the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Since 2.45MeV neutrons from D-D fusion reaction and 14.1MeV neutrons from D-T fusion reaction can both be generated during the DD plasma discharge, the distribution of neutron flux and nuclear heat in the device has an important effect on the nuclear and safety analysis. For radiation transport calculations, the main calculation tool is Monte Carlo transport code (MCNP) which has been used to give specific nuclear responses in complex geometries. However, the discrete ordinate transport code (SN code) is more effective to calculate the distribution of neutron flux and nuclear heat in the whole device. It is a time-consuming and error prone task to prepare the neutronics model for SN code in manual way. And because of the self-limitation of SN method, most of SN codes only support some specified or regular geometries, such as cylindrical, Cartesian and tetrahedral geometry, etc. In practice, most of models are composed of irregular solids and can not be supported by SN code. A more efficient solution is to shift the geometric modeling into a computer aided design (CAD) system and use an interface for SN code to convert CAD model into the input file automatically. SNAM (SN Code Automatic Modeling) is an integrated interface code between CAD system and SN code. The CAD model can be automatically converted into the input file of SN code with SNAM. On the contrary, SNAM can convert already existed input file of SN code into CAD model, which can be used to check, analyze, modify and reuse the model for the user. In this contribution, the process of converting EAST CAD model to the input file of SN code with SNAM is described. The distribution of neutron flux and nuclear heat in the whole device are calculated using the input file, and the results of the

  12. Superconductivity: materials and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchateau, J.L.; Kircher, F.; Leveque, J.; Tixador, P.

    2008-01-01

    This digest paper presents the different types of superconducting materials: 1 - the low-TC superconductors: the multi-filament composite as elementary constituent, the world production of NbTi, the superconducting cables of the LHC collider and of the ITER tokamak; 2 - the high-TC superconductors: BiSrCaCuO (PIT 1G) ribbons and wires, deposited coatings; 3 - application to particle physics: the the LHC collider of the CERN, the LHC detectors; 4 - applications to thermonuclear fusion: Tore Supra and ITER tokamaks; 5 - NMR imaging: properties of superconducting magnets; 6 - applications in electrotechnics: cables, motors and alternators, current limiters, transformers, superconducting energy storage systems (SMES). (J.S.)

  13. An experimental program on advanced robotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, J.S.C.; Stovman, J.; MacDonald, R.; Norgate, G.

    1987-01-01

    Remote handling in hostile environments, including space, nuclear facilities, and mines, requires hybrid systems which permit close cooperation between state of the art teleoperation and advanced robotics. Teleoperation using hand controller commands and television feedback can be enhanced by providing force-feel feedback and simulation graphics enhancement of the display. By integrating robotics features such as computer vision and force/tactile feedback with advanced local control systems, the overall effectiveness of the system can be improved and the operator workload reduced. This has been demonstrated in the laboratory. Applications such as a grappling drifting satellite or transferring material at sea are envisaged

  14. Three novel tokamak plasma regimes in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1985-10-01

    Aside from extending ''standard'' ohmic and neutral beam heating studies to advanced plasma parameters, TFTR has encountered a number of special plasma regimes that have the potential to shed new light on the physics of tokamak confinement and the optimal design of future D-T facilities: (1) High-powered, neutral beam heating at low plasma densities can maintain a highly reactive hot-ion population (with quasi-steady-state beam fueling and current drive) in a tokamak configuration of modest bulk-plasma confinement requirements. (2) Plasma displacement away from limiter contact lends itself to clarification of the role of edge-plasma recycling and radiation cooling within the overall pattern of tokamak heat flow. (3) Noncentral auxiliary heating (with a ''hollow'' power-deposition profile) should serve to raise the central tokamak plasma temperature without deterioration of central region confinement, thus facilitating the study of alpha-heating effects in TFTR. The experimental results of regime (3) support the theory that tokamak profile consistency is related to resistive kink stability and that the global energy confinement time is determined by transport properties of the plasma edge region

  15. An experimental study of plasma fluctuations in the TCV and TEXTOR Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejeire de, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    The main body of this thesis reports on the commissioning and first measurements with a novel tangential phase-contrast imaging (TPCI) diagnostic, which had previously been installed in the TCV tokamak. The instrument measures fluctuations in line-integrated electron density along 9 parallel chords within a 6 cm diameter CO 2 laser beam. TPCI measurements reveal the first evidence in TCV of the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM), which is an oscillating zonal flow. Frequency, radial wavelength, radial extent and propagation are all in qualitative agreement with a gyro-kinetic simulation and recent theoretical work. The mode is found to have a modest, but measurable magnetic component, whose spatial structure is characterised for the first time in a toroidal plasma. For some experiments, clear evidence is found of the theoretically expected m/n = 2/0 mode structure, although in others the structure appears to be more complex. Electron energy confinement in X 2 heated TCV L-mode plasmas had previously been observed to increase on changing the triangularity (δ) of the poloidal plasma cross-section from δ = +0.4 to δ = −0.4. Measurements with the TPCI diagnostic reveal that this change coincides with a clear decrease in both the absolute level and the decorrelation time of broadband electron density fluctuations. This is in agreement with the conjecture that the increased confinement time is caused by a change in the turbulent state. The second part of the thesis reports on a fluctuation study in the TEXTOR tokamak. At sufficiently weak toroidal magnetic field, NBI heated, limited TEXTOR plasmas exhibit bursts of beam-ion driven ‘fishbone’ and Alfvén modes, which are characterised using the multi-antenna reflectometer and Mirnov coils. In H-mode the fishbone triggers ELMs and in L-mode it triggers previously unobserved bursts of particle recycling, resembling the ELMs. The reflectometer phase shows statistically significant bispectral coherence between the fishbone

  16. Experimental studies on the thermal properties of fast pulsed superconducting accelerator magnets; Experimentelle Untersuchungen thermischer Eigenschaften schnell gepulster supraleitender Beschleunigermagnete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleile, Alexander

    2016-01-06

    The new Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research FAIR is being constructed at the GSI research center in Darmstadt (Germany). This wordwide unique accelerator facility will provide beams of ions and antiprotons at high intensities and high energies for the fundamental research in nuclear, atomic and plasma physics as well as for applied science. The superconducting synchrotron SIS100 with a magnetic rigidity of 100 T/m, the core component of the FAIR facility will provide primary ion beams of all types from hydrogen up to uranium. One of the key technical systems of a new synchrotron are fast ramped electromagnets for the generation of fast ramped magnetic fields for deflecting and focusing of the ion beams. To reduce the energy consumption and to keep the operating costs of the synchrotron as low as possible superconducting magnet technology is applied in the SIS100. Superconducting magnets have been developed at GSI within the scope of the FAIR project. Although the superconducting magnet technology promises high cost saving, the power consumption of the fast ramped superconducting magnets can't be completely neglected. The pulsed operation generates dynamic losses in the iron yokes as well as in the superconducting coils of the magnets. A forced two-phase helium flow provides effective cooling for supercounducting magnets exposed to a continous relative high heat flow. The subject of this PhD thesis is experimental investigations and analysis of the dynamic power losses in fast ramped superconducting magnets and their dependencies on the operation cycles of the synchrotron. This research was conducted on the the first series SIS100 dipole magnet. Based on the experimentally defined dynamic heat loads and helium mass flow rates in the dipole magnet the heat loads and helium consumption for all other types of superconducting magnet modules of the SIS100 have been estimated. These results are essential for the development of the cooling system for the the

  17. Features and Initial Results of the DIII-D Advanced Tokamak Radiative Divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.C. O'Neill; A.S. Bozek; M.E. Friend; C.B. Baxi; E.E. Reis; M.A. Mahdavi; D.G. Nilson; S.L. Allen; W.P. West

    1999-01-01

    The Radiative Divertor Program of DIII-D is in its final phase with the installation of the cryopump and baffle structure (Phase 1B Divertor) in the upper inner radius of the DIII-D vacuum vessel at the end of this calendar year. This divertor, in conjunction with the Advanced Divertor and the Phase 1A Divertor, located in the lower and upper outer radius of the DIII-D vacuum vessel respectively, provides pumping for density control of the plasma while minimizing the effects on the core confinement. Each divertor consists of a cryobelium cooling ring and a shielded protective structure. The cryo/helium-cooled pumps of all three diverters exhaust helium from the plasma. The protective shielded structure or baffle structure, in the case of the diverters located at the top of the vacuum vessel, provides baffling of neutral charged particles and minimize the flow of impurities back into the core of the plasma. The baffles, which consist of water-cooled panels that allow for the attachment of tiles of various sizes and shapes, house gas puff systems. The intent of the puffing systems is to inject gas in and around the divertor to minimize the heat flux on specific areas on the divertor and its components. The reduction of the heat flux on the divertor minimizes the impurities that are generated from excess heat on divertor components, specifically tiles. Experiments involving the gas puff systems and the divertor structures have shown the heat flux can be spread over a large area of the divertor, reducing the peak heat flux in specific areas. The three diverters also incorporate a variety of diagnostic tools such as halo current monitors, magnetic probes and thermocouples to monitor certain plasma characteristics as well as determine the effectiveness of the cryopumps and baffle configurations. The diverters were designed to optimize pumping performance and to withstand the electromagnetic loads from both halo currents and toroidal induced currents. Incorporated also

  18. Active probing of plasma edge turbulence and feedback studies on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, T.; Richards, B.; Bengtson, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    The edge fluctuations play a critical role in the overall tokamak confinement. Experiments on TEXT show that electrostatic fluctuations in the edge plasma are the dominant mechanism for energy and particle transport. The basic mechanisms responsible for the edge turbulence are the subject of ongoing research in fusion devices. To understand the driving forces responsible for edge fluctuations, a novel experiment is underway on TEXT to actively modify the turbulence at the plasma edge by launching waves using electrostatic probes in the shadow of the limiter. This technique permits active probing of the spectral properties of the edge turbulence. This new approach to the study of edge fluctuations can provide more insight into the basic dynamics of the turbulence and may, in turn, enable detailed comparison with the theory. These experiments, which rely on the use of oscillating electric fields at the plasma edge, complement edge fluctuation control studies that are presently limited to the use of applied dc biasing to influence the edge electric field profile. These experiments have been extended to control of the edge plasma fluctuation level, using feedback to explore its effects on the edge turbulence characteristics as well as on confinement. (author) 8 refs., 7 figs

  19. Experimental study on plasma parameters in the mushroom limiter shadow in the T-10 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alferov, A.A.; Vershkov, V.A.; Grashin, S.A.; Chankin, A.V.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma parameters in the shadow of mashroom limiter installed in the lower tokamak outlet are studied. Investigation into asymmetry of plasma fluxes to the ion and electrone limiter sides leads to a consumption concerning two meachanisms of its occurrance-toroidal plasma rotation and prevailing plasma departure to the wall through the external torus encirclement. Asymmetry of plasma drift potentials near the limiter observed during the experiment leads to current drift through the limiter close to Spitzer j s one. It is shown that with the increase of mean plasma density the plasma density in the limiter channels grows and its temperature is decreased so the charged particle losses for the limiter are weakly dependent on the mean density which is connected with plasma confinement degradation under the density reduction. A complete flux of charged particles to the limiter is comparable to their flux from plasma filament. Plasma flux into the channels is close to ambipolar one and the power fluxes to neutralization plates are of the order of 10 j s Te/e. Neutral gas pressure dependence in the volume under the limiter on the plasma fluxes to channels is nonlinear, the maximum pressure achieves 3x10 -2 T

  20. Active probing of plasma edge turbulence and feedback studies on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, T.; Carreras, B.A.; Richards, B.; Bengtson, R.D.; Crockett, D.B.; Gentle, K.W.; Li, G.X.; Hurwitz, P.D.; Rowan, W.L.; Tsui, H.Y.W.; Wootton, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    The edge fluctuations play a critical role in the overall tokamak confinement. Experiments on TEXT show that electrostatic fluctuations in the edge plasma are the dominant mechanism for energy and particle transport. The basic mechanisms responsible for the edge turbulence are the subject of ongoing research in fusion devices. To understand the driving forces responsible for edge fluctuations, a novel experiment is underway on TEXT to actively modify the turbulence at the plasma edge by launching waves using electrostatic probes in the shadow of the limiter. This technique permits active probing of the spectral properties of the edge turbulence. This new approach to the study of edge fluctuations can provide more insight into the basic dynamics of the turbulence and may, in turn, enable detailed comparison with the theory. These experiments, which rely on the use of oscillating electric fields at the plasma edge, complement edge fluctuation control studies that are presently limited to the use of applied dc biasing to influence the edge electric field profile. These experiments have been extended to control of the edge plasma fluctuation level, using feedback to explore its effects on the edge turbulence characteristics as well as on confinement

  1. The engineering design of the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    A mission and supporting physics objectives have been developed, which establishes an important role for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) in developing the physic basis for a future fusion reactor. The design of TPX include advanced physics features, such as shaping and profile control, along with the capability of operating for very long pulses. The development of the superconducting magnets, actively cooled internal hardware, and remote maintenance will be an important technology contribution to future fusion projects, such as ITER. The Conceptual Design and Management Systems for TPX have been developed and reviewed, and the project is beginning Preliminary Design. If adequately funded the construction project should be completed in the year 2000

  2. Magnet design considerations for Tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purcell, J.R.; Chen, W.; Thomas, R.

    1976-01-01

    Design problems for superconducting ohmic heating and toroidal field coils for large Tokamak fusion reactors are discussed. The necessity for making these coils superconducting is explained, together with the functions of these coils in a Tokamak reactor. Major problem areas include materials related aspects and mechanical design and cryogenic considerations. Projections and comparisons are made based on existing superconducting magnet technology. The mechanical design of large-scale coils, which can contain the severe electromagnetic loading and stress generated in the winding, are emphasized. Additional major tasks include the development of high current conductors for pulsed applications to be used in fabricating the ohmic heating coils. It is important to note, however, that no insurmountable technical barriers are expected in the course of developing superconducting coils for Tokamak fusion reactors. (Auth.)

  3. A need for non-tokamak approaches to magnetic fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Focusing exclusively on conventional tokamak physics in the quest for commercial fusion power is premature, and the options for both advanced-tokamak and non-tokamak concepts need continued investigation. The basis for this claim is developed, and promising advanced-tokamak and non-tokamak options are suggested

  4. Advances in biomagnetic research using high- T{sub c} superconducting quantum interference devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hong-Chang [Department of Physics/Institute of Applied Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Horng, Herng-Er; Yang, S Y [Institute of Electro-Optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Liao, Shu-Hsien, E-mail: hcyang@phys.ntu.edu.t [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China)

    2009-09-15

    This review reports the advances of biomagnetic research using high- T{sub c} superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). It especially focuses on SQUID-detected magnetocardiography (MCG), magnetically labeled immunoassays (MLIs) as well as nuclear magnetic resonance and imaging (NMR/MRI). The progress in MCG that scientists have made and the encountered challenges are discussed here. This study includes the early detection of the electromagnetic change in cardiac activity in animal studies of hypercholesterolemic rabbits, which suggests the possibility of early diagnosis of cardiac disease in clinical applications. The progress on MLIs using measurements of remanence, magnetic relaxation and magnetic susceptibility reduction is presented. The wash-free immunomagnetic reduction shows both high sensitivity and high specificity. NMR/MRI of high spectral resolution and of high signal-to-noise ratio are addressed and discussed. The proton-phosphate J-coupling of trimethyl phosphate ((CH{sub 3}){sub 3}PO{sub 4}) in one shot in microtesla fields is demonstrated. The prospects of biomagnetic applications are addressed. (topical review)

  5. Estimate of thermoelastic heat production from superconducting composites in pulsed poloidal coil systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballou, J.K.; Gray, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    In the design of the cryogenic system and superconducting magnets for the poloidal field system in a tokamak, it is important to have an accurate estimate of the heat produced in superconducting magnets as a result of rapidly changing magnetic fields. A computer code, PLASS (Pulsed Losses in Axisymmetric Superconducting Solenoids), was written to estimate the contributions to the heat production from superconductor hysteresis losses, superconductor coupling losses, stabilizing material eddy current losses, and structural material eddy current losses. Recently, it has been shown that thermoelastic dissipation in superconducting composites can contribute as much to heat production as the other loss mechanisms mentioned above. A modification of PLASS which takes into consideration thermoelastic dissipation in superconducting composites is discussed. A comparison between superconductor thermoelastic dissipation and the other superconductor loss mechanisms is presented in terms of the poloidal coil system of the ORNL Experimental Power Reactor design

  6. Theoretical and experimental study on the magnetomechanical behavior of superconducting helical coils for a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaghi, T.; Miya, K.; Yamada, H.; Takagi, T.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetomechanical behavior of superconducting helical coils for a magnetic fusion reactor was investigated experimentally and theoretically. Deformations of straight and torus type helical coils were caused due to static electromagnetic forces in the liquid helium cryostat and were analysed with the finite element computer code made here. Despite of a large scatter of experimental data due to a non-uniform friction force between the helical coil and the torus of stainless steel, the numerical results are very close to the mean value of the data. Numerical analysis of the force distribution acting on the helical coils was also performed for a Heliotron's coil system to characterize its nature. The force could be categorized conveniently as an extensional force, a tangential force and a toroidal force which correspond respectively to the kind of forces acting on toroidal field coils. Additionally, the effect of mechanical constraint on the magnetomechanical behavior is discussed and shows that the location of the constraint significantly affects the stress distributions in the coils. (orig.)

  7. Introduction condition of a tokamak fusion power plant as an advanced technology in world energy scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiwatari, R.; Tokimatsu, K.; Asaoka, Y.; Okano, K.; Konishi, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The present study reveals the following two introduction conditions of a tokamak fusion power plant in a long term world energy scenario. The first condition is the electric breakeven condition, which is required for the fusion energy to be recognized as a suitable candidate of an alternative energy source in the long term world energy scenario. As for the plasma performance (normalized beta value β N , confinement improvement factor for H-mode HH, the ratio of plasma density to Greenwald density limit fn GW ), the electric breakeven condition requires the simultaneous achievement of 1.2 N GW tmax =16 T, thermal efficiency η e =30%, and current drive power P NBI N ∼1.8, HH∼1.0, and fn GW ∼0.9, which correspond to the ITER reference operation parameters, have a strong potential to achieve the electric breakeven condition. The second condition is the economic breakeven condition, which is required to be selected as an alternative energy source. By using a long term world energy and environment model, the potential of the fusion energy in the long term world energy scenario is being investigated. Under the constraint of 550 ppm CO 2 concentration in the atmosphere, a breakeven price for introduction of the fusion energy in the year 2050 is estimated from 65mill/kWh to 135mill/kWh, which is considered as the economic breakeven condition in the present study. Under the conditions of B tmax =16T, η e =40%, plant availability 60%, and a radial build with/without CS coil, the economic breakeven condition requires β N ∼2.5 for 135mill/kWh of higher breakeven price case and β N ∼6.0 for 65mill/kWh of lower breakeven price case. Finally, the demonstration of steady state operation with β N ∼3.0 in the ITER project leads to the prospect to achieve the upper region of breakeven price in the world energy scenario. (author)

  8. Advances in measurement and modeling of the high-confinement-mode pedestal on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, J.W.; LaBombard, B.; Mossessian, D.A.; Hubbard, A.E.; Terry, J.; Biewer, T.

    2006-01-01

    Edge transport barrier (ETB) studies on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] investigate pedestal scalings and the radial transport of plasma and neutrals. Pedestal profiles show trends with plasma operational parameters such as total current I P . A ballooning-like I P 2 dependence is seen in the pressure gradient, despite calculated stability to ideal ballooning modes. A similar scaling is seen in the near scrape-off layer for both low-confinement (L-mode) and H-mode discharges, possibly due to electromagnetic fluid drift turbulence setting transport near the separatrix. Neutral density diagnosis allows an examination of D 0 fueling in H-modes, yielding profiles of effective particle diffusivity in the ETB, which vary as I P is changed. Edge neutral transport is studied using a one-dimensional kinetic treatment. In both experiment and modeling, the C-Mod density pedestal exhibits a weakly increasing pedestal density and a nearly invariant density pedestal width as the D 0 source rate increases. Identical modeling performed on pedestal profiles typical of DIII-D [Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] reveal differences in pedestal scalings qualitatively similar to experimental results

  9. Experimental and theoretical advances in fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Klapp, Jaime; Fuentes, Oscar Velasco

    2011-01-01

    The book is comprised of lectures and selected contributions presented at the Enzo Levi and XVI Annual Meeting of the Fluid Dynamic Division of the Mexican Physical Society in 2010. It is aimed at fourth year undergraduate and graduate students, as well as scientists in the fields of physics, engineering and chemistry with an interest in fluid dynamics from the experimental and theoretical point of view. The lectures are introductory and avoid the use of complicated mathematics. The other selected contributions are also geared to fourth year undergraduate and graduate students. The fluid dynam

  10. 100 years of superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalla, Horst

    2011-01-01

    Even a hundred years after its discovery, superconductivity continues to bring us new surprises, from superconducting magnets used in MRI to quantum detectors in electronics. 100 Years of Superconductivity presents a comprehensive collection of topics on nearly all the subdisciplines of superconductivity. Tracing the historical developments in superconductivity, the book includes contributions from many pioneers who are responsible for important steps forward in the field.The text first discusses interesting stories of the discovery and gradual progress of theory and experimentation. Emphasizi

  11. High-temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, V.L.

    1987-07-01

    After a short account of the history of experimental studies on superconductivity, the microscopic theory of superconductivity, the calculation of the control temperature and its possible maximum value are presented. An explanation of the mechanism of superconductivity in recently discovered superconducting metal oxide ceramics and the perspectives for the realization of new high-temperature superconducting materials are discussed. 56 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs

  12. Present status of Tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Jayanta

    1991-01-01

    The scenario of thermonuclear fusion research is presented, and the tokamak which is the most promising candidate as a fusion reactor is introduced. A brief survey is given of the most noteworthy tokamaks in the global context, and fusion programmes relating to Next Step devices are outlined. Supplementary heating of tokamak plasma by different methods is briefly reviewed; the latest achievements in heating to fusion temperatures are also reported. The progress towards the high value of the fusion product necessary for ignition is described. The improvement in plasma confinement brought about especially by the H-mode, is discussed. The latest situation in pushing up Β for increasing the efficiency of a tokamak is elucidated. Mention is made of the different types of wall treatment of the tokamak vessel for impurity control, which has led to a significant improvement in tokamak performance. Different methods of current drive for steady state tokamak operation are reviewed, and the issue of current drive efficiency is addressed. A short resume is given of the various diagnostic methods which are employed on a routine basis in the major tokamak centres. A few diagnostics recently developed or proposed in the context of the advanced tokamaks as well as the Next Step devices are indicated. The important role of the interplay between theory, experiment and simulation is noted, and the areas of investigation requiring concerted effort for further progress in tokamak research are identified. (author). 17 refs

  13. Application of internally cooled superconductors to tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materna, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    Recent proposals for ignition tokamaks containing superconductors are reviewed. As the funding prospects for the U.S. fusion program have worsened, the proposed designs have been shrinking to smaller machines with less ambitious goals. The most recent proposal, the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX), was based on internally cooled cabled Nb 3 Sn conductors for the options which used superconductors. Internally cooled conductors are particularly advantageous in their electrical insulating properties and in the similarity of their winding procedures to those of conventional copper coils. Epoxy impregnation is possible and is advantageous both structurally and electrically. The allowable current density for this type of conductor was shown to be larger than the current density for more conventional superconducting technology. The TFCX effort identified research and development needed in advance of TFCX or any other large ignition machine. These topics include the metal used for the conduit; nuclear effects on materials; properties of electrical and thermal insulators; extension of superconducting technology to the sizes of coils envisioned and to the field level envisioned; pulsed coil superconducting technology; joints and insulating breaks in conductors; heat removal or flow path length limitations; mechanical behavior of potted conductor bundles; instrumentation; and fault modes and various questions integrated with overall machine design

  14. Influence of INCONEL 625 composition on the activation characteristics of the vacuum vessel of experimental fusion tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambi, G.; Cepraga, D.G.; Boeriu, S.; Maganzani, I.

    1995-01-01

    The radioactive inventory, the decay heat and the contact dose rate of permanent components such as the vacuum vessel of two experimental fusion tokamaks, the compact IGNITOR-ULT and the ITER-EDA fusion machines, are evaluated by using the ENEA-Bologna integrated methodology. The vacuum vessel material considered is the INCONEL 625. The neutron flux is calculated using the VITAMIN-C 171-group library, based on EFF-2 data and the 1-D transport code XSDRNPM in the S 8 -P 3 approximation. The ANITA-2 code, using updated cross sections and decay data libraries based on EAF-3 and IRDF90 evaluation files is used for activation calculations. The fusion neutron source has been normalised to a neutron first wall load of 2 MW/m 2 and 1 MW/m 2 for IGNITOR-ULT and ITER, respectively. The material irradiation have been described by multistep time histories, resulting in the designed total fluence. Variations in the composition of INCONEL 625 have been assessed and their impact on the activation characteristics are discussed, also from the point of view of waste disposal. (orig.)

  15. High power 1 MeV neutral beam system and its application plan for the international tokamak experimental reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemsworth, R S [ITER Joint Central Team, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    This paper describes the Neutral Beam Injection system which is presently being designed for the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor, ITER, in Europe Japan and Russia, with co-ordination by the Joint Central Team of ITER at Naka, Japan. The proposed system consists of three negative ion based neutral injectors, delivering a total of 50 MW of 1 MeV D{sup 0} to the ITER plasma for a pulse length of >1000 s. Each injectors uses a single caesiated volume arc discharge negative ion source, and a multi-grid, multi-aperture accelerator, to produce about 40 A of 1 MeV D{sup -}. This will be neutralized by collisions with D{sub 2} in a sub-divided gas neutralizer, which has a conversion efficiency of about 60%. The charged fraction of the beam emerging from the neutralizer is dumped in an electrostatic residual ion dump. A water cooled calorimeter can be moved into the beam path to intercept the neutral beam, allowing commissioning of the injector independent of ITER. ITER is scheduled to produce its first plasma at the beginning of 2008, and the planning of the R and D, construction and installation foresees the neutral injection system being available from the start of ITER operations. (author)

  16. Investigation and experimental data de-noising of Damavand tokamak by using fourier series expansion and wavelet code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Computer Programs are important tools in physics. Analysis of the experimental data and the control of complex handle physical phenomenon and the solution of numerical problem in physics help scientist to the behavior and simulate the process. In this paper, calculation of several Fourier series gives us a visual and analytic impression of data analyses from Fourier series. One of important aspect in data analyses is to find optimum method for de-noising. Wavelets are mathematical functions that cut up data into different frequency components, and then study each component with a resolution corresponding to its scale. They have advantages over usual traditional methods in analyzing physical situations where the signal contains discontinuities and sharp spikes. Transformed data by wavelets in frequency space has time information and can clearly show the exact location in time of the discontinuity. This aspect makes wavelets an excellent tool in the field of data analysis. In this paper, we show how Fourier series and wavelets can analyses data in Damavand tokamak. ?

  17. Electron Heating of LHCD Plasma in HT-7 Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Yonghua; Wan Baonian; Lin Shiyao; Chen Zhongyong; Hu Xiwei; Shi Yuejiang; Hu Liqun; Kong Wei; Zhang Xiaoqing

    2006-01-01

    Electron heating via lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) has been investigated in HT-7 superconducting tokamak. Experiments show that the central electron temperature T e0 , the volume averaged electron temperature e > and the peaking factor of the electron temperature Q Te = T e0 / e > increase with the lower hybrid wave (LHW) power. Simultaneously the electron heating efficiency and the electron temperature as the function of the central line-averaged electron density (n e ) and the plasma current (I p ) have also been investigated. The experimental results are in a good agreement with those of the classical collision theory and the LHW power deposition theory

  18. An experimental study on a superconducting generator with dual machine shield system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigohka, T.; Ninomiya, A.; Okada, T.; Nitta, T.; Shintani, T.; Mukai, E.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have studied the optimal machine shield system through experiments on a 20kVa superconducting generator. The first experiment is carried out on a fully iron-less aluminum-shield machine which has only an aluminum eddy current machine shield in the stator. The second experiment is carried out on a generator with a dual-shield system which has both an aluminum eddy current shield and an iron magnetic shield. From the first one, the authors have got an experimental result that the aluminum-shield machine exhibits so large eddy current loss in the shield that it would be difficult to operate the machine continuously. On the other hand, the second experiment shows that the dual-shield machine exhibits much smaller loss in the shielding system, and that it has higher output power than the aluminum-shield machine. From these experiments, it becomes clear that insertion of a very thin iron shield between the armature winding and the eddy current shield can improve the machine performance eminently without large weight increase even if the iron shield were saturated

  19. Nuclear fusion research at Tokamak Energy Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windridge, Melanie J.; Gryaznevich, Mikhail; Kingham, David

    2017-01-01

    Tokamak Energy's approach is close to the mainstream of nuclear fusion, and chooses a spherical tokamak, which is an economically developed form of Tokamak reactor design, as research subjects together with a high-temperature superconducting magnet. In the theoretical prediction, it is said that spherical tokamak can make tokamak reactor's scale compact compared with ITER or DEMO. The dependence of fusion energy multiplication factor on reactor size is small. According to model studies, it has been found that the center coil can be protected from heat and radiation damage even if the neutron shielding is optimized to 35 cm instead of 1 m. As a small tokamak with a high-temperature superconducting magnet, ST25 HTS, it demonstrated in 2015 continuous operation for more than 24 hours as a world record. Currently, this company is constructing a slightly larger ST40 type, and it is scheduled to start operation in 2017. ST40 is designed to demonstrate that it can realize a high magnetic field with a compact size and aims at attaining 8-10 keV (reaching the nuclear fusion reaction temperature at about 100 million degrees). This company will verify the startup and heating technology by the coalescence of spherical tokamak expected to have plasma current of 2 MA, and will also use 2 MW of neutral particle beam heating. In parallel with ST40, it is promoting a development program for high-temperature superconducting magnet. (A.O.)

  20. Steady state heat transfer experimental studies of LHC superconducting cables operating in cryogenic environment of superfluid helium

    CERN Document Server

    Santandrea, Dario; Tuccillo, Raffaele; Granieri, Pier Paolo

    The heat management is a basic and fundamental aspect of the superconducting magnets used in the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Indeed, the coil temperature must be kept below the critical value, despite the heat which can be generated or deposited in the magnet during the normal operations. Therefore, this thesis work aims at determining the heating power which can be extracted from the superconducting cables of the LHC, specially through their electrical insulation which represents the main thermal barrier. An experimental measurement campaign in superfluid helium bath was performed on several samples reproducting the main LHC magnets. The heating power was generated in the sample by Joule heating and the temperature increase was measured by means of Cernox bare chip and thermocouples. An innovative instrumentation technique which also includes the in-situ calibration of the thermocouples was developed. A thorough uncertainty analysis on the overall measurement chain concluded the experimental setup. The prese...

  1. Performance and operation of advanced superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source SECRAL at 24 GHza)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H. W.; Lu, W.; Zhang, X. Z.; Feng, Y. C.; Guo, J. W.; Cao, Y.; Li, J. Y.; Guo, X. H.; Sha, S.; Sun, L. T.; Xie, D. Z.

    2012-02-01

    SECRAL (superconducting ECR ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou) ion source has been in routine operation for Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) accelerator complex since May 2007. To further enhance the SECRAL performance in order to satisfy the increasing demand for intensive highly charged ion beams, 3-5 kW high power 24 GHz single frequency and 24 GHz +18 GHz double frequency with an aluminum plasma chamber were tested, and some exciting results were produced with quite a few new record highly charged ion beam intensities, such as 129Xe35+ of 64 eμA, 129Xe42+ of 3 eμA, 209Bi41+ of 50 eμA, 209Bi50+ of 4.3 eμA and 209Bi54+ of 0.2 eμA. In most cases SECRAL is operated at 18 GHz to deliver highly charged heavy ion beams for the HIRFL accelerator, only for those very high charge states and very heavy ion beams such as 209Bi36+ and 209Bi41+, SECRAL has been operated at 24 GHz. The total operation beam time provided by SECRAL up to July 2011 has exceeded 7720 hours. In this paper, the latest performance, development, and operation status of SECRAL ion source are presented. The latest results and reliable long-term operation for the HIRFL accelerator have demonstrated that SECRAL performance for production of highly charged heavy ion beams remains improving at higher RF power with optimized tuning.

  2. Performance and operation of advanced superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source SECRAL at 24 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, H. W.; Zhang, X. Z.; Feng, Y. C.; Guo, J. W.; Li, J. Y.; Guo, X. H.; Sha, S.; Sun, L. T.; Xie, D. Z.; Lu, W.; Cao, Y.

    2012-01-01

    SECRAL (superconducting ECR ion source with advanced design in Lanzhou) ion source has been in routine operation for Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) accelerator complex since May 2007. To further enhance the SECRAL performance in order to satisfy the increasing demand for intensive highly charged ion beams, 3-5 kW high power 24 GHz single frequency and 24 GHz +18 GHz double frequency with an aluminum plasma chamber were tested, and some exciting results were produced with quite a few new record highly charged ion beam intensities, such as 129 Xe 35+ of 64 eμA, 129 Xe 42+ of 3 eμA, 209 Bi 41+ of 50 eμA, 209 Bi 50+ of 4.3 eμA and 209 Bi 54+ of 0.2 eμA. In most cases SECRAL is operated at 18 GHz to deliver highly charged heavy ion beams for the HIRFL accelerator, only for those very high charge states and very heavy ion beams such as 209 Bi 36+ and 209 Bi 41+ , SECRAL has been operated at 24 GHz. The total operation beam time provided by SECRAL up to July 2011 has exceeded 7720 hours. In this paper, the latest performance, development, and operation status of SECRAL ion source are presented. The latest results and reliable long-term operation for the HIRFL accelerator have demonstrated that SECRAL performance for production of highly charged heavy ion beams remains improving at higher RF power with optimized tuning.

  3. Ion cyclotron system design for KSTAR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, B. G.; Hwang, C. K.; Jeong, S. H.; Yoony, J. S.; Bae, Y. D.; Kwak, J. G.; Ju, M. H.

    1998-05-01

    The KSTAR (Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) tokamak (R=1.8 m, a=0.5 m, k=2, b=3.5T, I=2MA, t=300 s) is being constructed to do long-pulse, high-b, advanced-operating-mode fusion physics experiments. The ion cyclotron (IC) system (in conjunction with an 8-MW neutral beam and a 1.5-MW lower hybrid system) will provide heating and current drive capability for the machine. The IC system will deliver 6 MW of RF power to the plasma in the 25 to 60 MHz frequency range, using a single four-strap antenna mounted in a midplane port. It will be used for ion heating, fast-wave current drive (FWCD), and mode-conversion current drive (MCCD). The phasing between current straps in the antenna will be adjustable quickly during operation to provide the capability of changing the current-drive efficiency. This report describes the design of the IC system hardware: the electrical characteristics of the antenna and the matching system, the requirements on the power sources, and electrical analyses of the launcher. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs., 40 figs

  4. Ion cyclotron system design for KSTAR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, B. G.; Hwang, C. K.; Jeong, S. H.; Yoony, J. S.; Bae, Y. D.; Kwak, J. G.; Ju, M. H

    1998-05-01

    The KSTAR (Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) tokamak (R=1.8 m, a=0.5 m, k=2, b=3.5T, I=2MA, t=300 s) is being constructed to do long-pulse, high-b, advanced-operating-mode fusion physics experiments. The ion cyclotron (IC) system (in conjunction with an 8-MW neutral beam and a 1.5-MW lower hybrid system) will provide heating and current drive capability for the machine. The IC system will deliver 6 MW of RF power to the plasma in the 25 to 60 MHz frequency range, using a single four-strap antenna mounted in a midplane port. It will be used for ion heating, fast-wave current drive (FWCD), and mode-conversion current drive (MCCD). The phasing between current straps in the antenna will be adjustable quickly during operation to provide the capability of changing the current-drive efficiency. This report describes the design of the IC system hardware: the electrical characteristics of the antenna and the matching system, the requirements on the power sources, and electrical analyses of the launcher. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs., 40 figs.

  5. Superconductivity and fusion energy—the inseparable companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzone, Pierluigi

    2015-02-01

    Although superconductivity will never produce energy by itself, it plays an important role in energy-related applications both because of its saving potential (e.g., power transmission lines and generators), and its role as an enabling technology (e.g., for nuclear fusion energy). The superconducting magnet’s need for plasma confinement has been recognized since the early development of fusion devices. As long as the research and development of plasma burning was carried out on pulsed devices, the technology of superconducting fusion magnets was aimed at demonstrations of feasibility. In the latest generation of plasma devices, which are larger and have longer confinement times, the superconducting coils are a key enabling technology. The cost of a superconducting magnet system is a major portion of the overall cost of a fusion plant and deserves significant attention in the long-term planning of electricity supply; only cheap superconducting magnets will help fusion get to the energy market. In this paper, the technology challenges and design approaches for fusion magnets are briefly reviewed for past, present, and future projects, from the early superconducting tokamaks in the 1970s, to the current ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) and W7-X projects and future DEMO (Demonstration Reactor) projects. The associated cryogenic technology is also reviewed: 4.2 K helium baths, superfluid baths, forced-flow supercritical helium, and helium-free designs. Open issues and risk mitigation are discussed in terms of reliability, technology, and cost.

  6. Advances in ultracold collisions: Experimentation and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiner, J.

    1995-01-01

    Collisions between optically cooled and trapped atoms have been the subject of intensive investigation since early proposals discussed their novel features and key importance to the achievement of a gaseous ensemble in a single quantum state. Progress in both experimentation and theory has accelerated rapidly over the last three years, and two reviews, one emphasizing theory and the other, experiments, recount the state of the art published up to about the midpoint of 1993. The purpose of this chapter is to update continuing lines of research set forth in these and earlier works and to relate new results, establishing novel directions for investigation that have appeared in the literature. Two principal questions motivate research into the nature of ultracold collisions: (1) what new phenomena arise when collisionally interacting particles also exchange photons with modes of the radiation field and (2) what are the important two-body collisional heating mechanisms and how can they be overcome in order to achieve the temperature and density conditions appropriate for Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC)? In fact these two questions are not mutually exclusive, and one of the most notable developments in the past year, relevant to both, has been the demonstration of optical control of two-body ultracold collisional processes. Other important issues touching, on one or both of these questions are the magnitude and sign of the scattering length in s-wave collisions between species in various well-defined quantum states, progress in high-resolution trap loss and photoassociation spectroscopy, and application of optical cooling and compression to atomic beams. 58 refs., 21 figs

  7. Organic superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerome, D.

    1980-01-01

    We present the experimental evidences for the existence of a superconducting state in the Quasi One Dimensional organic conductor (TMTSF) 2 PF 6 . Superconductivity occuring at 1 K under 12 kbar is characterized by a zero resistance diamagnetic state. The anistropy of the upper critical field of this type II superconductor is consistent with the band structure anistropy. We present evidences for the existence of large superconducting precursor effects giving rise to a dominant paraconductive contribution below 40 K. We also discuss the anomalously large pressure dependence of T sb(s), which drops to 0.19 K under 24 kbar in terms of the current theories. (author)

  8. Investigation of runaway electrons in the current ramp-up by a fully non-inductive lower hybrid current drive on the EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, H W; Zha, X J; Zhong, F C; Hu, L Q; Zhou, R J

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of using a lower hybrid wave (LHW) to ramp up the plasma current (I p ) from a low level to a high enough level required for fusion burn in the EAST (experimental advanced superconducting tokamak) tokamak is examined experimentally. The focus in this paper is on investigating how the relevant plasma parameters evolve during the current ramp-up (CRU) phase driving by a lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) with poloidal field (PF) coil cut-off, especially the behaviors of runaway electrons generated during the CRU phase. It is found that the intensity of runaway electron emission increases first, and then decreases gradually as the discharge goes on under conditions of PF coil cut-off before LHW was launched into plasma, PF coil cut-off at the same time as LHW was launched into plasma, as well as PF coil cut-off after LHW was launched into plasma. The relevant plasma parameters, including H α line emission (Ha), impurity line emission (UV), soft x-ray emission and electron density n e , increase to a high level. The loop voltage decreases from positive to negative, and then becomes zero because of the cut-off of PF coils. Also, the magnetohydrodynamic activity takes place during the CRU driving by LHCD. (paper)

  9. Compatibility of advanced tokamak plasma with high density and high radiation loss operation in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaga, H.; Asakura, N.; Kubo, H.; Higashijima, S.; Konoshima, S.; Nakano, T.; Oyama, N.; Ide, S.; Fujita, T.; Takizuka, T.; Kamada, Y.; Miura, Y.; Porter, G.D.; Rognlien, T.D.; Rensink, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Compatibility of advanced tokamak plasmas with high density and high radiation loss has been investigated in both reversed shear (RS) plasmas and high β p H-mode plasmas with a weak positive shear on JT-60U. In the RS plasmas, the operation regime is extended to high density above the Greenwald density (n GW ) with high confinement (HH y2 >1) and high radiation loss fraction (f rad >0.9) by tailoring the internal transport barriers (ITBs). High confinement of HH y2 =1.2 is sustained even with 80% radiation from the main plasma enhanced by accumulated metal impurity. The divertor radiation is enhanced by Ne seeding and the ratio of the divertor radiation to the total radiation is increased from 20% without seeding to 40% with Ne seeding. In the high β p H-mode plasmas, high confinement (HH y2 =0.96) is maintained at high density (n-bar e /n GW =0.92) with high radiation loss fraction (f rad ∼1) by utilizing high-field-side pellets and Ar injections. The high n-bar e /n GW is obtained due to a formation of clear density ITB. Strong core-edge parameter linkage is observed, as well as without Ar injection. In this linkage, the pedestal β p , defined as β p ped =p ped /(B p 2 /2μ 0 ) where p ped is the plasma pressure at the pedestal top, is enhanced with the total β p . The radiation profile in the main plasma is peaked due to Ar accumulation inside the ITB and the measured central radiation is ascribed to Ar. The impurity transport analyses indicate that Ar accumulation by a factor of 2 more than the electron, as observed in the high β p H-mode plasma, is acceptable even with peaked density profile in a fusion reactor for impurity seeding. (author)

  10. Scoping studies of tritium handling in a tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherdack, R.; Watson, J.S.; Clinton, S.D.; Fisher, P.W.

    1975-01-01

    Tritium handling techniques in an experimental fusion power reactor (EPR) are evaluated to determine the requirements of the system and to compare different equipment and techniques for meeting those requirements. Tritium process equipment is needed to (1) evacuate and maintain a vacuum in the plasma vessel and the neutral beam injectors, (2) purify and recycle tritium and deuterium for the plasma fuel cycle, (3) recover tritium from experimental breeding modules, and (4) provide tritium containment and atmospheric cleanup. A development program is outlined to develop and demonstrate the required techniques and equipment and to permit confident design of an EPR for operation by the mid-1980s

  11. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    The technical reports in this document were presented at the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting ''Research on Small Tokamaks'', September 1990, in three sessions, viz., (1) Plasma Modes, Control, and Internal Phenomena, (2) Edge Phenomena, and (3) Advanced Configurations and New Facilities. In Section (1) experiments at controlling low mode number modes, feedback control using external coils, lower-hybrid current drive for the stabilization of sawtooth activity and continuous (1,1) mode, and unmodulated and fast modulated ECRH mode stabilization experiments were reported, as well as the relation to disruptions and transport of low m,n modes and magnetic island growth; static magnetic perturbations by helical windings causing mode locking and sawtooth suppression; island widths and frequency of the m=2 tearing mode; ultra-fast cooling due to pellet injection; and, finally, some papers on advanced diagnostics, i.e., lithium-beam activated charge-exchange spectroscopy, and detection through laser scattering of discrete Alfven waves. In Section (2), experimental edge physics results from a number of machines were presented (positive biasing on HYBTOK II enhancing the radial electric field and improving confinement; lower hybrid current drive on CASTOR improving global particle confinement, good current drive efficiency in HT-6B showing stabilization of sawteeth and Mirnov oscillations), as well as diagnostic developments (multi-chord time resolved soft and ultra-soft X-ray plasma radiation detection on MT-1; measurements on electron capture cross sections in multi-charged ion-atom collisions; development of a diagnostic neutral beam on Phaedrus-T). Theoretical papers discussed the influence of sheared flow and/or active feedback on edge microstability, large edge electric fields, and two-fluid modelling of non-ambipolar scrape-off layers. Section (3) contained (i) a proposal to construct a spherical tokamak ''Proto-Eta'', (ii) an analysis of ultra-low-q and runaway

  12. Applications of a superconducting solenoidal separator in the experimental investigation of nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinde, D J; Carter, I P; Dasgupta, M; Simpson, E C; Cook, K J; Kalkal, Sunil; Luong, D H; Williams, E

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes applications of a novel superconducting solenoidal separator, with magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla, for studies of nuclear reactions using the Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility at the Australian National University. (paper)

  13. The density limit in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alladio, F.

    1985-01-01

    A short summary of the present status of experimental observations, theoretical ideas and understanding of the density limit in tokamaks is presented. It is the result of the discussion that was held on this topic at the 4th European Tokamak Workshop in Copenhagen (December 4th to 6th, 1985). 610 refs

  14. START: the creation of a spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, Alan

    1992-01-01

    The START (Small Tight Aspect Ratio Tokamak) plasma fusion experiment is now operational at AEA Fusion's Culham Laboratory. It is the world's first experiment to explore an extreme limit of the tokamak - the Spherical Tokamak - which theoretical studies predict may have substantial advantages in the search for economic fusion power. The Head of the START project, describes the concept, some of the initial experimental results and the possibility of developing a spherical tokamak power reactor. (author)

  15. New System For Tokamak T-10 Experimental Data Acquisition, Data Handling And Remote Access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, M. M.; Igonkina, G. B.; Koutcherenko, I. Yu.; Nurov, D. N.

    2008-01-01

    For carrying out the experiments on nuclear fusion devices in the Institute of Nuclear Fusion, Moscow, a system for experimental data acquisition, data handling and remote access (further 'DAS-T10') was developed and has been used in the Institute since the year 2000. The DAS-T10 maintains the whole cycle of experimental data handling: from configuration of data measuring equipment and acquisition of raw data from the fusion device (the Device), to presentation of math-processed data and support of the experiment data archive. The DAS-T10 provides facilities for the researchers to access the data both at early stages of an experiment and well afterwards, locally from within the experiment network and remotely over the Internet.The DAS-T10 is undergoing a modernization since the year 2007. The new version of the DAS-T10 will accommodate to modern data measuring equipment and will implement improved architectural solutions. The innovations will allow the DAS-T10 to produce and handle larger amounts of experimental data, thus providing the opportunities to intensify and extend the fusion researches. The new features of the DAS-T10 along with the existing design principles are reviewed in this paper

  16. A two-time-scale dynamic-model approach for magnetic and kinetic profile control in advanced tokamak scenarios on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.; Mazon, D.; Ariola, M.; Tommasi, G. De; Laborde, L.; Piccolo, F.; Sartori, F.; Zabeo, L.; Boboc, A.; Brix, M.; Challis, C.D.; Felton, R.; Hawkes, N.; Tala, T.; Bouvier, E.; Cordoliani, V.; Brzozowski, J.; Cocilovo, V.; Crisanti, F.; Luna, E. de la

    2008-01-01

    Real-time simultaneous control of several radially distributed magnetic and kinetic plasma parameters is being investigated on JET, in view of developing integrated control of advanced tokamak scenarios. This paper describes the new model-based profile controller which has been implemented during the 2006-2007 experimental campaigns. The controller aims to use the combination of heating and current drive (H and CD) systems-and optionally the poloidal field (PF) system-in an optimal way to regulate the evolution of plasma parameter profiles such as the safety factor, q(x), and gyro-normalized temperature gradient, ρ Te *(x). In the first part of the paper, a technique for the experimental identification of a minimal dynamic plasma model is described, taking into account the physical structure and couplings of the transport equations, but making no quantitative assumptions on the transport coefficients or on their dependences. To cope with the high dimensionality of the state space and the large ratio between the time scales involved, the model identification procedure and the controller design both make use of the theory of singularly perturbed systems by means of a two-time-scale approximation. The second part of the paper provides the theoretical basis for the controller design. The profile controller is articulated around two composite feedback loops operating on the magnetic and kinetic time scales, respectively, and supplemented by a feedforward compensation of density variations. For any chosen set of target profiles, the closest self-consistent state achievable with the available actuators is uniquely defined. It is reached, with no steady state offset, through a near-optimal proportional-integral control algorithm. Conventional optimal control is recovered in the limiting case where the ratio of the plasma confinement time to the resistive diffusion time tends to zero. Closed-loop simulations of the controller response have been performed in preparation for

  17. Data-driven robust control of the plasma rotational transform profile and normalized beta dynamics for advanced tokamak scenarios in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, W.; Wehner, W.P.; Barton, J.E.; Boyer, M.D. [Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Schuster, E., E-mail: schuster@lehigh.edu [Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Moreau, D. [CEA, IRFM, F-13018 St Paul lez Durance (France); Walker, M.L.; Ferron, J.R.; Luce, T.C.; Humphreys, D.A.; Penaflor, B.G.; Johnson, R.D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    A control-oriented, two-timescale, linear, dynamic, response model of the rotational transform ι profile and the normalized beta β{sub N} is proposed based on experimental data from the DIII-D tokamak. Dedicated system-identification experiments without feedback control have been carried out to generate data for the development of this model. The data-driven dynamic model, which is both device-specific and scenario-specific, represents the response of the ι profile and β{sub N} to the electric field due to induction as well as to the heating and current drive (H&CD) systems during the flat-top phase of an H-mode discharge in DIII-D. The control goal is to use both induction and the H&CD systems to locally regulate the plasma ι profile and β{sub N} around particular target values close to the reference state used for system identification. A singular value decomposition (SVD) of the plasma model at steady state is carried out to decouple the system and identify the most relevant control channels. A mixed-sensitivity robust control design problem is formulated based on the dynamic model to synthesize a stabilizing feedback controller without input constraints that minimizes the reference tracking error and rejects external disturbances with minimal control energy. The feedback controller is then augmented with an anti-windup compensator, which keeps the given controller well-behaved in the presence of magnitude constraints in the actuators and leaves the nominal closed-loop system unmodified when no saturation is present. The proposed controller represents one of the first feedback profile controllers integrating magnetic and kinetic variables ever implemented and experimentally tested in DIII-D. The preliminary experimental results presented in this work, although limited in number and constrained by actuator problems and design limitations, as it will be reported, show good progress towards routine current profile control in DIII-D and leave valuable lessons

  18. Stability of superconducting cables for use in large magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tateishi, Hiroshi; Schmidt, C.

    1992-01-01

    The construction of large superconducting magnets requires the development of complicated conductor types, which can fulfill the specific requirements of different types of magnets. A rather hard boundary condition for large magnets is the presence of fast changing magnetic fields. In the Institute of Technical Physics of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, Germany, a superconducting cable was developed for use in poloidal field coils in Tokamak experiments. This 'POLO'-cable exhibits low losses in a magnetic ac-field and a high stability margin. In the present article the requirements on a superconducting cable are described, as well as the mechanisms of ac-losses and the calculation of the stability limit. Calculated values are compared with experimental data. Some unresolved problems concerning the stability of large magnets are discussed taking the example of the POLO-cable. (author)

  19. Experimental studies of processes with vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules that are important for tokamak edge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadez, I.; Markelj, S.; Rupnik, Z.; Pelicon, P.

    2006-01-01

    We are currently conducting a series of different laboratory experimental studies of processes involving vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules that are relevant to fusion edge plasma. A general overview of our activities is presented together with results of studies of hydrogen recombination on surfaces. This includes vibrational spectroscopy of molecules formed by recombination on metal surfaces exposed to the partially dissociated hydrogen gas and recombination after hydrogen permeation through metal membrane. The goal of these studies is to provide numerical parameters needed for edge plasma modelling and better understanding of plasma wall interaction processes. (author)

  20. Development of a visualized software for tokamak experiment data processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Jianyong; Ding Xuantong; Luo Cuiwen

    2004-01-01

    With the VBA programming in Microsoft Excel, the authors have developed a post-processing software of experimental data in tokamak. The standard formal data in the HL-1M and HL-2A tokamaks can be read, displayed in Excel, and transmitted directly into the MATLAB workspace, for displaying pictures in MATLAB with the software. The authors have also developed data post-processing software in MATLAB environment, which can read standard format data, display picture, supply visual graphical user interface and provide part of advanced signal processing ability