WorldWideScience

Sample records for experiencing menopausal symptoms

  1. Role of the body self and self-esteem in experiencing the intensity of menopausal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włodarczyk, Małgorzata; Dolińska-Zygmunt, Grażyna

    2017-10-29

    The aim of the study was to test differences in self-esteem and strength of the body self, body image, comfort with closeness with others and body protection among women reporting high and low intensity of psychological, vasomotor and somatic symptoms of menopause. The sample included 201 women aged 45-55 years. The Menopause Symptom List was used to test the intensity of menopausal symptoms, the Body Self Questionnaire was used to diagnose the body self, and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale was used to examine participants'levels of self-esteem. Differences between women experiencing high and low intensity of symptoms were analyzed using Student's t-test for independent samples. Women experiencing high-intensity psychological, vasomotor and somatic symptoms of menopause showed significantly lower self-esteem and poorer body-self functioning in all its dimensions except for body protection. Women experiencing high-intensity psychological, vasomotor and somatic symptoms of menopause demonstrated poorer functioning of the body self and lower self-esteem.

  2. Immigration transition and sleep-related symptoms experienced during menopausal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eun-Ok; Ko, Young; Chee, Eunice; Chee, Wonshik

    2017-01-01

    The transition due to immigration from one country to another country (referred to as immigration transition henceforth) is inherently stressful, placing an additional dimension of stress to midlife women in the menopausal transition. However, few studies have examined the association of immigration to sleep-related symptoms experienced by midlife women in the menopausal transition. The authors' purpose for this study was to explore the associations of immigration to sleep-related symptoms among four major racial/ethnic groups of 1,054 midlife women in the United States. This was a secondary analysis of data from two national surveys that were collected from 2005 to 2013. The instruments included questions on background characteristics, health and menopausal status, immigration transition, and the Sleep Index for Midlife Women. The data were analyzed using t-tests, chi-square tests, correlation analyses, and hierarchical multiple regression analyses. Immigrants reported fewer total numbers of and lower total severity scores of sleep-related symptoms than non-immigrants (p < .01). Yet, when background characteristics and health and menopausal status were controlled, self-reported racial/ethnic identity was the only significant factor associated with sleep-related symptoms (ΔR2 = 0.02, p < .01). Health-care providers need to consider self-reported racial/ethnic identity as a factor significantly related to sleep-related symptoms during the menopausal transition.

  3. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by women experiencing menopausal symptoms in Bologna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lombardo Flavia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study describes Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM use amongst Italian women transitioning through menopause. Popularity and perceived effectiveness of CAM treatments, use of pharmaceutical medications, characteristics of CAM users, the extent of communication between medical practitioners and women about their use of CAM, and variables associated with CAM use were also investigated. Methods Women, aged 45-65 years attending Family Planning and Women's Health clinics or Menopause Centres in Bologna were invited to complete a voluntary, anonymous, self administered questionnaire, which was used in a previous study in Sydney. The questionnaire was translated and adapted for use amongst Italian women. Data on general demographic and health characteristics, menopause related symptoms and the use of CAM and pharmaceutical treatments during the previous 12 months were collected. Results In total, 1,203 women completed the survey, of which 1,106 were included in the final sample. Of women who had symptoms linked with menopause and/or used remedies to alleviate symptoms, 33.5% reported to have used CAM. Among these, 23.5% had consulted one or more practitioners and 24% had used at least one CAM product. Approximately nine out of ten respondents reported medical practitioners did not seek information about their use of CAM; while one third of CAM users did not disclose the use of CAM to their physician. Nevertheless, medical practitioners were the most popular source of information. From the multivariate analysis, variables associated with CAM use were: professional employment, time since the last natural menses, use of CAM for conditions other than menopause, and presence of some severe symptoms. Conclusions The relatively high prevalence of CAM use by women transitioning through menopause should encourage research initiatives into determining which CAM treatments are the safest and effective. The increasing and

  4. Associations of Immigration Transition to Cardiovascular Symptoms Experienced in Menopausal Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eun-Ok; Ko, Young; Chee, Eunice; Chee, Wonshik

    The purpose of this study was to explore the associations of immigration transition to cardiovascular symptoms among 4 major racial/ethnic groups of 1054 midlife women in the United States. This was a secondary analysis of the data from 2 large national survey studies. The instruments included questions on background characteristics and immigration transition and the Cardiovascular Symptom Index for Midlife Women. The data were analyzed using inferential statistics including hierarchical multiple regressions. Immigrants reported fewer numbers (t = 5.268, P < .01) and lower severity scores (t = 5.493, P < .01) of cardiovascular symptoms compared with nonimmigrants. Self-reported racial/ethnic identify was a significant factor influencing cardiovascular symptoms (P < .01).

  5. Management of Menopausal Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaunitz, Andrew M; Manson, JoAnn E

    2015-10-01

    Most menopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms with bothersome symptoms often lasting longer than one decade. Hormone therapy (HT) represents the most effective treatment for these symptoms with oral and transdermal estrogen formulations having comparable efficacy. Findings from the Women's Health Initiative and other recent randomized clinical trials have helped to clarify the benefits and risks of combination estrogen-progestin and estrogen-alone therapy. Absolute risks observed with HT tended to be small, especially in younger women. Neither regimen increased all-cause mortality rates. Given the lower rates of adverse events on HT among women close to menopause onset and at lower baseline risk of cardiovascular disease, risk stratification and personalized risk assessment appear to represent a sound strategy for optimizing the benefit-risk profile and safety of HT. Systemic HT should not be arbitrarily stopped at age 65 years; instead treatment duration should be individualized based on patients' risk profiles and personal preferences. Genitourinary syndrome of menopause represents a common condition that adversely affects the quality of life of many menopausal women. Without treatment, symptoms worsen over time. Low-dose vaginal estrogen represents highly effective treatment for this condition. Because custom-compounded hormones have not been tested for efficacy or safety, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved HT is preferred. A low-dose formulation of paroxetine mesylate currently represents the only nonhormonal medication FDA-approved to treat vasomotor symptoms. Gynecologists and other clinicians who remain abreast of data addressing the benefit-risk profile of hormonal and nonhormonal treatments can help menopausal women make sound choices regarding management of menopausal symptoms.

  6. Management of Menopausal Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Kaunitz, Andrew M.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2015-01-01

    Most menopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms, with bothersome symptoms often lasting longer than one decade. Hormone therapy (HT) represents the most effective treatment for these symptoms, with oral and transdermal estrogen formulations having comparable efficacy. Findings from the Women’s Health Initiative and other recent randomized clinical trials have helped to clarify the benefits and risks of combination estrogen-progestin and estrogen-alone therapy. Absolute risks observed with...

  7. Menopausal hormone therapy and menopausal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Safi, Zain A; Santoro, Nanette

    2014-04-01

    A majority of women will experience bothersome symptoms related to declining and/or fluctuating levels of estrogen during their menopausal transition. Vasomotor symptoms, vaginal dryness, poor sleep, and depressed mood have all been found to worsen during the menopausal transition. While vasomotor symptoms gradually improve after menopause, the time course can be many years. Vaginal dryness does not improve without treatment, while the long-term course of sleep and mood deterioration is not clearly defined at this time. A small minority of women have vasomotor symptoms that persist throughout the remainder of their lives. These common menopausal symptoms all improve with estrogen treatment. Over the last 10 years, we have witnessed a dramatic reduction in enthusiasm for menopausal hormone therapy, despite its high efficacy relative to other treatments. We have also seen the emergence of sound, evidence-based clinical trials of non-hormonal alternatives that can control the common menopausal symptoms. Understanding the natural history of menopausal symptoms, and the risks and benefits of both hormonal and non-hormonal alternatives, helps the clinician individualize management plans to improve quality of life. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Laser acupuncture does not improve menopausal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kylie A; Varigos, Euhna; Black, Catherine; Komesaroff, Paul A

    2010-01-01

    Acupuncture is commonly used to treat menopausal symptoms and other gynecological conditions. Laser acupuncture, more accurately named "laser acupoint stimulation," has the advantages of being noninvasive, reproducible, and convenient. A few studies of conventional acupuncture have suggested a beneficial effect in treating menopausal symptoms. This study sought to investigate the effectiveness of laser acupoint stimulation in relieving symptoms associated with menopause. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 40 women experiencing active symptoms of menopause. Outcome variables were numbers of diurnal and nocturnal flushes and symptom score, determined using a previously validated scale. A laser acupoint stimulation device was altered to produce identical flashing lights whether or not the laser was operating to allow for a placebo ("laser off") control. Participants received either active or placebo treatment on a fortnightly basis for 12 weeks. The acupoint selection in both groups was individualized to each participant, selected from a set of 10 acupoints. There were no significant differences between the active and placebo treatment groups in numbers of diurnal or nocturnal flushes or in nonflushing symptom scores. Laser acupoint stimulation chosen from a fixed set of acupoints is no more efficacious than manual stimulation with an inert laser probe in altering menopausal symptoms.

  9. Prevalence and severity of menopause symptoms and associated factors across menopause status in Korean women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Gyeyoon; Ahn, Younjhin; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Lim, Joong-Yeon; Kang, Danbee; Choi, Eun-Kyung; Ahn, Jiin; Choi, Yuni; Cho, Juhee; Park, Hyun-Young

    2015-10-01

    The present study investigated the prevalence and severity of menopause symptoms experienced by Korean women aged 44 to 56 years and their associated factors. A cross-sectional study was performed on 2,201 women aged 44 to 56 years in health checkup centers between November 2012 and March 2013. The 29-item Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire was used to assess vasomotor, psychosocial, physical, and sexual symptoms related to menopause. The guidelines for the classification of reproductive aging stages proposed at the Stages of Reproductive Aging Workshop were used. Multivariable linear regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with severity of menopause symptoms. Among participants, 42.6% were premenopausal, 36.7% were perimenopausal, and 20.7% were postmenopausal. Although physical symptoms were the most severe menopause symptoms experienced by premenopausal and perimenopausal women, postmenopausal women reported sexual symptoms as the most bothersome. The mean scores for each domain increased from the premenopausal period through the postmenopausal period (P for trend obesity (for vasomotor and physical symptoms) were significantly associated with severity of menopause symptoms (P menopause than inactive women. Postmenopausal women experience the most severe symptoms. Obesity and physical activity are the main modifiable factors associated with symptom severity. Further studies are needed to examine the effects of physical activity promotion and weight control interventions on preventing menopause symptoms in Korean women.

  10. Black cohosh (Cimicifuga spp.) for menopausal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Matthew J; Moore, Vivienne

    2012-09-12

    Menopause can be a distressing and disruptive time for many women, with many experiencing hot flushes, night sweats, vaginal atrophy and dryness. Postmenopausal women are also at increased risk of osteoporosis. Interventions that decrease the severity and frequency of these menopausal symptoms are likely to improve a woman's well-being and quality of life. Hormone therapy has been shown to be effective in controlling the symptoms of menopause; however, many potentially serious adverse effects have been associated with this treatment. Evidence from experimental studies suggests that black cohosh may be a biologically plausible alternative treatment for menopause; even so, findings from studies investigating the clinical effectiveness of black cohosh have, to date, been inconsistent. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa or Actaea racemosa) for treating menopausal symptoms in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. Relevant studies were identified through AARP Ageline, AMED, AMI, BioMed Central gateway, CAM on PubMed, CINAHL, CENTRAL, EMBASE, Health Source Nursing/Academic edition, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, MEDLINE, Natural medicines comprehensive database, PsycINFO, TRIP database, clinical trial registers and the reference lists of included trials; up to March 2012. Content experts and manufacturers of black cohosh extracts were also contacted. All randomised controlled trials comparing orally administered monopreparations of black cohosh to placebo or active medication in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. Two review authors independently selected trials, extracted data and completed the 'Risk of bias' assessment. Study authors were contacted for missing information. Sixteen randomised controlled trials, recruiting a total of 2027 perimenopausal or postmenopausal women, were identified. All studies used oral monopreparations of black cohosh at a median daily dose of 40 mg, for a mean duration of

  11. 'Menopausal symptoms' : associations with menopausal status and psychosocial factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanwesenbeeck, [No Value; Vennix, P; van de Wiel, H

    This study investigated the relative importance of psychosocial factors as opposed to menopausal status in relation to so-called 'menopausal symptoms' among a large sample of premenopausal, perimenopausal and (naturally and surgically) postmenopausal women (n = 4308) in The Netherlands. The

  12. Alternative treatments for menopausal symptoms. Qualitative study of women's experiences.

    OpenAIRE

    Seidl, M. M.; Stewart, D. E.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe women's experiences with alternative treatments for symptoms attributed to menopause. DESIGN: Descriptive qualitative study. SETTING: Personal interviews and focus groups were conducted in private rooms at the Toronto Hospital; telephone interviews were conducted at mutually convenient times. PARTICIPANTS: Thirteen perimenopausal women with a mean age of 52.6 +/- 2.6 years who were experiencing symptoms attributed to menopause and were using alternative therapies partic...

  13. Exercise for vasomotor menopausal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Amanda; Stokes-Lampard, Helen; Thomas, Adèle; MacArthur, Christine

    2014-11-28

    Evidence suggests that many perimenopausal and early postmenopausal women will experience menopausal symptoms; hot flushes are the most common. Symptoms caused by fluctuating levels of oestrogen may be alleviated by hormone therapy (HT), but a marked global decline in its use has resulted from concerns about the risks and benefits of HT. Consequently, many women are seeking alternatives. As large numbers of women are choosing not to take HT, it is increasingly important to identify evidence-based lifestyle modifications that have the potential to reduce vasomotor menopausal symptoms. To examine the effectiveness of any type of exercise intervention in the management of vasomotor symptoms in symptomatic perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. Searches of the following electronic bibliographic databases were performed to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs): Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Specialised Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Wiley Internet interface), MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), PsycINFO (Ovid), the Science Citation Index and the Social Science Citation Index (Web of Science), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (Ovid) and SPORTDiscus. Searches include findings up to 3 March 2014. RCTs in which any type of exercise intervention was compared with no treatment/control or other treatments in the management of menopausal vasomotor symptoms in symptomatic perimenopausal/postmenopausal women. Five studies were deemed eligible for inclusion. Two review authors independently selected the studies, and three review authors independently extracted the data. The primary review outcome was vasomotor symptoms, defined as hot flushes and/or night sweats. We combined data to calculate standardised mean differences (SMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Statistical heterogeneity was assessed using the I(2) statistic. We assessed the overall quality of the

  14. An overview of menopause associated Vaso Motor Symptoms and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Vasomotor Symptoms are the most common and distressing menopausal complaint, for which women seek advice from their physician. OBJECTIVE: To review menopausal associated vasomotor symptoms and options available in its management. METHODS: Pertinent literature on menopause associated ...

  15. Yoga for menopausal symptoms: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Kim, Jong-In; Ha, Jeong Yong; Boddy, Kate; Ernst, Edzard

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of yoga as a treatment option for menopausal symptoms. We searched the literature using 14 databases from their inception to July 2008 and included all types of clinical studies regardless of their design. The methodological quality of all studies was assessed using a modified Jadad score. Seven studies met our inclusion criteria. Two randomized clinical trials compared the effects of yoga with those of walking or physical exercise. The meta-analysis of these data failed to show specific effects of yoga on menopausal complaints including psychological, somatic, and vasomotor symptoms. Two randomized clinical trials found no effects of yoga on total menopausal symptoms compared with wait-list control or no treatment. The remaining studies were either non-randomized (n = 1) or uncontrolled clinical trials (n = 3). They reported favorable effects of yoga on menopausal symptoms. These data collectively show that the results of rigorous studies of the effects of yoga for menopausal symptoms are unconvincing. The evidence is insufficient to suggest that yoga is an effective intervention for menopause. Further research is required to investigate whether there are specific benefits of yoga for treating menopausal symptoms.

  16. Effect of yoga on menopausal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Sulabha; Khandwe, Rambhau; Bapat, Dinesh; Deshmukh, Ujwala

    2011-09-01

    To observe the effect of yoga on menopausal symptoms using a prospective, randomized, controlled and interventional study. Main outcome measures Total Menopause Rating Scale (MRS) score and three subscale scores (somatovegetative, psychological and urogenital) were measured on day 1 and day 90 in the study group which performed yoga (asana, pranayam and meditation) under supervision for three months, and were compared with the control group that did not perform yoga. MRS has been designed to measure health-related quality of life of ageing women. It consists of 11 symptoms and three subscales. It was observed that on day 1 the scores in both the groups were comparable. On day 90, the scores in the yoga group showed a reduction in score on all the subscales, which was statistically significant. No significant difference was noted in the control group. Yoga is effective in reducing menopausal symptoms and should be considered as alternative therapy for the management of menopausal symptoms.

  17. Approach to the patient with menopausal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kathryn Ann; Manson, Joann E

    2008-12-01

    Many women experience menopausal symptoms during the menopausal transition and postmenopausal years. Hot flashes, the most common symptom, typically resolve after several years, but for 15-20% of women, they interfere with quality of life. For these women, estrogen therapy, the most effective treatment for hot flashes, should be considered. The decision to use hormone therapy involves balancing the potential benefits of hormone therapy against its potential risks. Accumulating data suggest that initiation of estrogen many years after menopause is associated with excess coronary risk, whereas initiation soon after menopause is not. Therefore, most now agree that short-term estrogen therapy, using the lowest effective estrogen dose, is a reasonable option for recently menopausal women with moderate to severe symptoms who are in good cardiovascular health. Short-term therapy is considered to be not more than 4-5 yr because symptoms diminish after several years, whereas the risk of breast cancer increases with longer duration of hormone therapy. A minority of women may need long-term therapy for severe, persistent vasomotor symptoms after stopping hormone therapy. However, these women should first undergo trials of nonhormonal options such as gabapentin, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, returning to estrogen only if these alternatives are ineffective or cause significant side effects. Low-dose vaginal estrogens are highly effective for genitourinary atrophy symptoms, with minimal systemic absorption and endometrial effects.

  18. Assessment of menopausal symptoms using modified Menopause Rating Scale (MRS among middle age women in Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Syed

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Menopausal symptoms can be assessed by several tools, and can be influenced by various socio-demographic factors. Objectives To determine the commonly reported menopausal symptoms among Sarawakian women using a modified Menopause Rating Scale (MRS. Methods By using modified MRS questionnaire, 356 Sarawakian women aged 40-65 years were interview to document of 11 symptoms (divided into somatic, psychological and urogenital domain commonly associated with menopause. Results The mean age of menopause was 51.3 years (range 47 - 56 years. The most prevalent symptoms reported were joint and muscular discomfort (80.1%; physical and mental exhaustion (67.1%; and sleeping problems (52.2%. Followed by symptoms of hot flushes and sweating (41.6%; irritability (37.9%; dryness of vagina (37.9%; anxiety (36.5%; depressive mood (32.6%. Other complaints noted were sexual problem (30.9%; bladder problem (13.8% and heart discomfort (18.3%. Perimenopausal women (n = 141 experienced higher prevalence of somatic and psychological symptoms compared to premenopausal (n = 82 and postmenopausal (n = 133 women. However urogenital symptoms mostly occur in the postmenopausal group of women. Conclusions The prevalence of menopausal symptoms using modified MRS in this study correspond to other studies on Asian women however the prevalence of classical menopausal symptoms of hot flushes, sweating was lower compared to studies on Caucasian women.

  19. Prevalence of menopausal symptoms in women in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Hardip Kaur; Singh, Harbindar Jeet; Shuib, Rashidah; Hamid, Abdul Manaf; Mohd Zaki Nik Mahmood, Nik

    2006-06-20

    The aim of the study was to document the prevalence of 16 symptoms commonly associated with menopause, in women living in Kelantan. After verification, a semi-structured questionnaire in the Malay language was administered to 326 naturally menopaused healthy women in Kelantan (mean age of 57.1+/-6.58 (S.D.) years) to assess the prevalence of 16 common symptoms, which had been identified through focus group discussions and those that have been repeatedly reported in the literature. Mean age at menopause was 49.4+/-3.4 (S.D.) years while both the mode and median were 50 years. Of these, 75% were within the first 10 years of menopause and the rest were within the range of 11 to more than 20 years postmenopause. The mode for the number of symptoms complained by each woman was 8 (range 0-16). The prevalence of atypical symptoms was as follows: tiredness (79.1%), reduced level of concentration (77.5%), musculo-skeletal aches (70.6%) and backache (67.7%). Night sweats (53%), headache (49.4%) and hot flushes (44.8%) were the typical vasomotor symptoms, whereas mood swings (51%), sleep problems (45.1%), loneliness (41.1%), anxiety (39.8%) and crying spells (33.4%) were the main psychological symptoms. Uro-genital symptoms such as vaginal discomfort (45.7%), occasional stress incontinence (40%), weak bladder control (24%) and urinary tract infection (19.3%) were also reported. The symptoms are somewhat similar to those experienced by postmenopausal women elsewhere, albeit at different frequencies. There was a tendency for the women to admit to having more of the atypical symptoms, the prevalence of some which increased with increasing menopausal status, and lesser of the vasomotor and psychological symptoms.

  20. Emerging hormonal treatments for menopausal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genazzani, Andrea R; Komm, Barry S; Pickar, James H

    2015-03-01

    The majority of women experience bothersome symptoms postmenopause (e.g., hot flushes, vaginal symptoms). Estrogen receptor agonists remain the most effective options for ameliorating menopausal symptoms. However, use of hormonal therapies has declined in the wake of issues raised by the Women's Health Initiative trials. As a result, there is a need for new safe and effective alternatives to estrogen-progestogen hormone therapy. We review the efficacy and safety profile of hormonal menopausal therapies that are in Phase III clinical trials or recently approved. Investigational treatments discussed include two new vaginal estrogen products (TX-004HR, WC-3011); the first combination of estradiol and progesterone, and a novel combination of dehydroepiandrosterone and acolbifene. We also review a new selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), ospemifene, recently approved for treatment of dyspareunia related to menopause, and conjugated estrogens plus bazedoxifene, an estrogens/SERM combination, recently approved for moderate-to-severe vasomotor symptoms and prevention of osteoporosis. New and emerging hormonal treatments for managing menopausal symptoms may have improved safety and efficacy profiles compared with traditional estrogen-progestogen therapy; however, long-term safety data will be needed.

  1. Culture and symptom reporting at menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melby, Melissa K; Lock, Margaret; Kaufert, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to review recent research on the relationship of culture and menopausal symptoms and propose a biocultural framework that makes use of both biological and cultural parameters in future research. Medline was searched for English-language articles published from 2000 to 2004 using the keyword 'menopause' in the journals--Menopause, Maturitas, Climacteric, Social Science and Medicine, Medical Anthropology Quarterly, Journal of Women's Health, Journal of the American Medical Association, American Journal of Epidemiology, Lancet and British Medical Journal, excluding articles concerning small clinical samples, surgical menopause or HRT. Additionally, references of retrieved articles and reviews were hand-searched. Although a large number of studies and publications exist, methodological differences limit attempts at comparison or systematic review. We outline a theoretical framework in which relevant biological and cultural variables can be operationalized and measured, making it possible for rigorous comparisons in the future. Several studies carried out in Japan, North America and Australia, using similar methodology but different culture/ethnic groups, indicate that differences in symptom reporting are real and highlight the importance of biocultural research. We suggest that both biological variation and cultural differences contribute to the menopausal transition, and that more rigorous data collection is required to elucidate how biology and culture interact in female ageing.

  2. Can acupuncture ease the symptoms of menopause?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Susan M; Rousseau, Mary Ellen; Carey, Bonnie L

    2003-01-01

    In a randomized, 2-group clinical study, acupuncture was used for the relief of menopausal hot flushes, sleep disturbances, and mood changes. The experimental acupuncture treatment consisted of specific acupuncture body points related to menopausal symptoms. The comparison acupuncture treatment consisted of a treatment designated as a general tonic specifically designed to benefit the flow of Ch'i (energy). Results from the experimental acupuncture treatment group showed a decrease in mean monthly hot flush severity for site-specific acupuncture. The comparison acupuncture treatment group had no significant change in severity from baseline over the treatment phase. Sleep disturbances in the experimental acupuncture treatment group declined over the study. Mood changes in both the experimental acupuncture treatment group and the comparison acupuncture treatment group showed a significant difference between the baseline and the third month of the study. Acupuncture using menopausal-specific sites holds promise for nonhormonal relief of hot flushes and sleep disturbances.

  3. Association between physical activity and menopausal symptoms in perimenopausal women

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Min-Ju; Cho, Juhee; Ahn, Younjhin; Yim, Gyeyoon; Park, Hyun-Young

    2014-01-01

    Background Physical activity may be an effective way of preventing or attenuating menopause-related symptoms, and it has been shown to improve quality of life in menopausal women. However, there have been some inconsistencies regarding between exercise and menopausal symptoms, and study investigating this association has been scarce in Korea. In this study, the association between physical activity and menopausal symptoms in perimenopausal women in Korea was assessed. Methods This cross-secti...

  4. Factors associated with the age of natural menopause and menopausal symptoms in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Wu, Jie; Pu, Danhua; Zhao, Yang; Wan, Chunhua; Sun, Lihua; Shen, Cai-e; Sun, Weihua; Yuan, Zhimin; Shen, Qin; He, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Jian; Luo, Naimei; He, Ya; Qian, Qiuju; Cai, Peiqin; Zhang, Mei

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the factors associated with the age of natural menopause and menopausal symptoms in a large population of Chinese middle-aged women. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 20,275 women (40-65 years) attending health screening in Jiangsu Province of China were enrolled. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data of demographics, menopausal status, chronic diseases, reproductive history, etc. Also we evaluated the severity of menopausal symptoms by Kupperman menopause index (KMI). Menopausal age and scorings of Kupperman menopause index. The overall median age at natural menopause was 50 years. Lower educational level, poor economic status, lower body mass index (BMI), age at menarche less than 14 years, nulliparity and smoking were associated with earlier onset of natural menopause (PKMI scores (P<0.05). The study provided an estimate of median age at natural menopause in Chinese women. The main factors contributing to earlier onset of menopause and severity of menopausal symptoms were lower educational level, poor economic status, and smoking. Thus, this study provides important insights for physicians to prevent and treat menopause related symptoms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment options for vasomotor symptoms in menopause: focus on desvenlafaxine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uml

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Elena M Umland, Laura FalconieriJefferson School of Pharmacy, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Vasomotor symptoms (VMS, including hot flashes and night sweats, occur in as many as 68.5% of women as a result of menopause. While the median duration of these symptoms is 4 years, approximately 10% of women continue to experience VMS as many as 12 years after their final menstrual period. As such, VMS have a significant impact on the quality of life and overall physical health of women experiencing VMS, leading to their pursuance of treatment to alleviate these symptoms. Management of VMS includes lifestyle modifications, some herbal and vitamin supplements, hormonal therapies including estrogen and tibolone, and nonhormonal therapies including clonidine, gabapentin, and some of the serotonin and serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. The latter agents, including desvenlafaxine, have been the focus of increased research as more is discovered about the roles of serotonin and norepinephrine in the thermoregulatory control system. This review will include an overview of VMS as they relate to menopause. It will discuss the risk factors for VMS as well as the proposed pathophysiology behind their occurrence. The variety of treatment options for VMS will be discussed. Focus will be given to the role of desvenlafaxine as a treatment option for VMS management.Keywords: menopause, vasomotor symptoms, hot flashes, vasomotor symptom treatment, desvenlafaxine

  6. What Are the Treatments for Other Symptoms of Menopause?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Research Information Find a Study More Information Preeclampsia and Eclampsia About NICHD Research Information Find a ... Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What are the treatments for other symptoms of menopause? Menopause is a ...

  7. Improvement of menopausal symptoms with acupuncture not reflected in changes to heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Cheryl L; Aickin, Mikel

    2011-03-01

    Hypothesis Studies indicate that menopausal symptoms are relieved by acupuncture. Additional studies have suggested that acupuncture may affect heart rate variability (HRV). This paper reports a pilot study that investigated whether menopausal symptoms responded to acupuncture, and if changes in the spectral analysis of HRV, either suppression of low frequency or augmentation of high frequency bands, corresponded with symptom report. Methods/interventions 12 healthy menopausal subjects were enrolled in this feasibility study. At baseline, subjects were experiencing moderately distressing menopausal symptoms, scoring at least 22 of a possible 44 points on the Menopausal Rating Scale. 10 traditional Chinese medicine-based, protocol acupuncture treatments were administered over a 4 week period, three times a week for 2 weeks, followed by twice a week for 2 weeks. Outcome measures Menopausal Rating Scale questionnaire, 11 menopausal symptoms were evaluated on a zero to four severity scale via self-administered daily checklist for 4 weeks. Dynamic measures of HRV (autoregressive model) were captured before, during and after acupuncture at each session. Spectral analysis of the heart rate was used to compute power in the low frequency and high frequency bands, and their ratio. All subjects complied fully with the protocol without any reported adverse events. While all 11 symptoms showed significant improvement, and one HRV measure changed, on average over the study period, there was essentially no support for a relationship between HRV, menopausal symptom report and acupuncture intervention.

  8. Advances in the treatment of menopausal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V; Stovall, Dale W; Kightlinger, Rebecca S

    2009-07-01

    Vasomotor symptoms and vaginal atrophy are both common menopausal symptoms. Hormone therapy is currently the only FDA-approved treatment for hot flashes. Current recommendations are to use the lowest dose of hormone therapy for the shortest period that will allow treatment goals to be met. Although the reanalysis of the WHI in 2007 by Roussow et al. provided evidence of coronary heart safety for users of hormone therapy under the age of 60 years and within 10 years of the onset of menopause, not all women desire or are candidates for hormone therapy. In this review we present an evidence-based discussion considering the effectiveness of hormonal and nonhormonal therapies for the relief of vasomotor symptoms and vaginal atrophy. Concern exists regarding systemic absorption of vaginal estrogen and possible adverse effects on the breast and uterus. Selective estrogen receptor modulators and estrogen agonists offer benefits through targeted estrogen agonist/antagonistic effects and are being evaluated with and without estrogen for symptomatic menopausal women. Centrally acting nonhormonal therapies that are effective for the relief of vasomotor symptoms include various antidepressants, gabapentin and clonidine. A limited number of clinical trials have been conducted with nonprescription remedies, including paced respiration, yoga, acupuncture, exercise, homeopathy and magnet therapy, and some, but not all of these, have been found to be more effective than placebo. Dietary herbal supplements, such as soy and black cohosh, have demonstrated mixed and inconclusive results in placebo-controlled trials. Potential therapies for vasomotor symptoms and vaginal atrophy require randomized, placebo-controlled trials of sufficient duration to establish efficacy and safety. Agents under investigation for vasomotor symptoms relief include neuroactive agents, such as gabapentin and desvenlafaxine; an estrogen receptor-beta-targeted herbal therapy, MF-101; and the selective estrogen

  9. Perspectives in clinical research of acupuncture on menopausal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumelou, Alain; Liu, Bingkai; Wang, Xiao-Yun; Nie, Guang-Ning

    2011-12-01

    Seventy percentage of perimenopausal and early postmenopausal women will experience menopause symptoms. Primary menopause symptoms in Western countries included hot flashes, insomnia, somatic pain, depression, and fatigue. Hot flashes were most commonly treated. Menopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) continues to have a clinical role in the management of vasomotor symptoms, but since 2002 there has been a marked global decline in its use due to concerns about the risks and benefits of HRT; consequently many women with menopause symptoms are now seeking alternatives including acupuncture. Acupuncture has a long tradition of use for the treatment of different menopause symptoms. Its effectiveness has been studied for natural menopause or chemical and surgery induced menopause. Here we provide an update on recent advances in the field for clinicians. The recent systematic reviews on acupuncture in menopausal symptoms suggest that acupuncture is an effective and valuable option for women suffering from menopause. However, the science of acupuncture therapies is still inadequate to sufficiently support the benefits of acupuncture therapies. Finally, we discuss our points of view on clinical trials of acupuncture for menopause symptoms.

  10. Psychiatric disorders and menopause symptoms in Brazilian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barazzetti, Lidiane; Pattussi, Marcos Pascoal; Garcez, Anderson da Silva; Mendes, Karina Giane; Theodoro, Heloísa; Paniz, Vera Maria Vieira; Olinto, Maria Teresa Anselmo

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the association between minor psychiatric disorders and menopause symptoms and their associated factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 615 women aged 40 to 65 years treated in a public menopause and gynecological outpatient clinic in the South Region of Brazil. Minor psychiatric disorders were assessed using the Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20) and menopause symptoms using the Menopause Rating Scale. Score for menopause symptoms was categorized into three levels of symptoms: mild, moderate, and severe. Multivariate analyses used ordinal logistic regression. The prevalence of mild, moderate, and severe menopause symptoms was 34.1% (95% CI 30.3-37.9), 29.6% (95% CI 25.8-33.1), and 36.3% (95% CI 32.4-40.0), respectively. The overall prevalence of minor psychiatric disorders was 66.6% (95% CI 62.8-70.3). After adjustment, the odds ratio (OR) of the occurrence of menopause symptoms were approximately eight times higher in women relating minor psychiatric disorders compared with those without such disorders (OR = 7.76; 95% CI 5.27-11.44). The following factors were also associated with the menopause symptoms: women older than 50 years, living with a partner, lower educational level, smokers, larger number of pregnancies, obese, and those using psychotropic and/or postmenopause medication. The minor psychiatric disorders exhibited strong association with the presence of menopause symptoms independently of sociodemographic, behavioral, and reproductive factors, and of use of psychotropic medication.

  11. Menopausal symptoms among breast cancer patients: a potential indicator of favorable prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Chen

    Full Text Available Menopausal symptoms have been suggested to be an indicator of better prognosis among patients treated for breast cancer, because women who experience these symptoms usually have a lower level of estrogen. We tested this hypothesis in a population-based, prospective cohort study involving 4,842 women with stage 0 to III primary breast cancer who were enrolled in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study between March 2002 and April 2006, were aged 20 to 75 years, and were recruited 6 months post-diagnosis. They were followed-up by in-person surveys and record linkages with the vital statistics registry. Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate the association of menopausal symptoms at baseline with breast cancer recurrence. Approximately 56% of patients experienced at least one menopausal symptom, including hot flashes, night sweats, and/or vaginal dryness at baseline. During a median follow-up period of 5.3 years, 720 women had a recurrence. Experiencing hot flashes or having ≥2 menopausal symptoms was associated with lower risk of recurrence among premenopausal women (hazard ratio [HR]=0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.62-0.96 for hot flashes; 0.73, 0.56-0.96 for ≥2 menopausal symptoms. Lower recurrence risk in relation to hot flashes was also observed among women who were not overweight/obese (HR=0.78, 95% CI: 0.64-0.99, those with relatively low waist-to-hip ratio (WHR (HR=0.77, 95% CI: 0.61-0.97, and those who used tamoxifen (HR=0.75, 95% CI: 0.58-0.98. Consistently experiencing multiple menopausal symptoms was associated with lower recurrence risk among women with low WHR or who used tamoxifen. This large, population-based cohort study of women with breast cancer confirms that experiencing menopausal symptoms is an indicator of favorable breast cancer prognosis.

  12. Managing menopausal symptoms after gynecological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelson-Cohen, Rachel; Beller, Uziel

    2009-09-01

    As the length of survival in patients with gynecological malignancies increases due to advances in early diagnosis and therapy, quality of life becomes a major issue for the survivors. These women frequently suffer symptoms following an iatrogenically induced menopause. Many gynecologists advise these patients against hormonal replacement therapy. This review attempts to provide the clinician with information based on current evidence. The most recent two prospective studies did not find an increase in the recurrence rates in endometrial cancer patients who used hormonal replacement therapy. To date, there are few studies on hormonal replacement therapy in patients with ovarian cancer but the available data suggest that there is no detriment to overall or disease-free survival. There are no data showing an association between poorer outcome and hormonal replacement therapy use in patients with cervical or vulvar cancers. There is no evidence showing hormones negatively influence survival after treatment for epithelial ovarian, squamous cervical or vulvar cancer. Their use can be considered in symptomatic patients with endometrial cancer, after weighing the benefits against the risk of recurrence. Gynecologic cancer survivors suffering from menopausal symptoms should be supported by advice about the alternatives to hormonal replacement therapy and by giving them nonbiased information on the present knowledge on the effects of hormonal use in women with a previous cancer. It is reasonable to prescribe hormonal replacement therapy to symptomatic, well informed patients.

  13. Exercise to reduce vasomotor and other menopausal symptoms: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, A J; Stokes-Lampard, H J; Macarthur, C

    2009-07-20

    Many women are reluctant to consider HRT as a therapeutic option for menopausal symptoms and are keen to use non-pharmacological treatments. Evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) concerning the effects of aerobic exercise on vasomotor and other menopausal symptoms is limited but what evidence we do have suggests that aerobic exercise can improve psychological health and quality of life in vasomotor symptomatic women. In addition, several RCTs of middle-aged/menopausal-aged women have found that aerobic exercise can invoke significant improvements in several common menopause-related symptoms (e.g. mood, health-related QoL and insomnia), relative to non-exercise comparison groups. There is some evidence that alternative forms of low intensity exercise such as yoga are beneficial in reducing vasomotor symptoms and improving psychological well-being in menopausal women. Collectively, these RCTs highlight the broader potential that exercise could have for women during the menopause transition. Whilst both the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists in the UK and the North American Menopause Society have recommended that women be advised to consider aerobic exercise as a treatment for vasomotor menopausal symptoms, to make any evidence-based conclusions regarding the effectiveness of exercise in managing these symptoms, more high quality research is needed.

  14. Treatment options for vasomotor symptoms in menopause: focus on desvenlafaxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umland, Elena M; Falconieri, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Vasomotor symptoms (VMS), including hot flashes and night sweats, occur in as many as 68.5% of women as a result of menopause. While the median duration of these symptoms is 4 years, approximately 10% of women continue to experience VMS as many as 12 years after their final menstrual period. As such, VMS have a significant impact on the quality of life and overall physical health of women experiencing VMS, leading to their pursuance of treatment to alleviate these symptoms. Management of VMS includes lifestyle modifications, some herbal and vitamin supplements, hormonal therapies including estrogen and tibolone, and nonhormonal therapies including clonidine, gabapentin, and some of the serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. The latter agents, including desvenlafaxine, have been the focus of increased research as more is discovered about the roles of serotonin and norepinephrine in the thermoregulatory control system. This review will include an overview of VMS as they relate to menopause. It will discuss the risk factors for VMS as well as the proposed pathophysiology behind their occurrence. The variety of treatment options for VMS will be discussed. Focus will be given to the role of desvenlafaxine as a treatment option for VMS management.

  15. Clinical intervention to reduce central obesity and menopausal symptoms in women aged 35 to 55 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitner, Diana L; Wild, Robert A

    2014-09-01

    Central obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Women commonly increase central fat deposition during the menopausal transition. The purpose of this demonstration project was to determine whether a personalized sex-specific intervention, WAIPointes (WAI stands for Who Am I), could reduce central obesity in women undergoing perimenopausal transition. Eighty-three of 103 women aged 35 to 55 years and experiencing symptoms of the menopausal transition completed a 6-month WAIPointes demonstration project; 75 consented to data review.Sex-specific history was obtained on visit 1; directed physical examination for body mass index, body fat percentage, waist circumference, and blood pressure were performed at each of four or five subsequent monthly visits. Other tests were ordered as necessary to determine risk stratification.Participants were assessed for menopause status, and they reported activity and menopausal symptoms at each visit. Personalized strategies for health improvement were developed in partnership. Women served as their own controls. Data from visit 2 were compared with data from visit 4. The intervention reduced waist circumference and diastolic blood pressure and improved self-reported menopausal symptoms and physical activity levels. Although further study is needed, findings suggest that the WAIPointes program offers potential as an effective office-based clinical intervention to reduce cardiovascular risk factors and symptoms of menopause in women during the menopausal transition.

  16. The efficacy of acupuncture on menopausal symptoms (ACOM study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Kamma Sundgaard; Brodersen, John; Siersma, Volkert

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Around 75% of menopausal women experience hot flushes (HF) and 10-20% of all postmenopausal women find this very distressing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture on moderate-to-severe menopausal symptoms in general and HF in particular. METHODS: An un...... acupuncturists will be medical doctors educated in acupuncture. The primary outcome is change in HF from baseline to week 6 measured by the HF scale from the MenoScores Questionnaire (MSQ). Secondary outcomes are change in other menopausal symptoms, in particular day and night sweats and menopausal......: In the ACOM study, we explore the potential benefits of acupuncture on moderate-to-severe meno-pausal symptoms. The cross-over design offers the possi-bility of examining the legacy effect of acupuncture. FUNDING: The Idella Foundation, the University of Copenhagen and the Research Foundation of General...

  17. The association of depression status with menopause symptoms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The majority of Chinese rural midlife women do not experience depression. The relationship between depression, VMS and sleep disturbances tends to change with menopausal status in Chinese rural midlife women. Keywords: depression, poor sleep, vasomotor symptoms, menopause, rural women ...

  18. The effect of soy intake on menopausal symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pérez-Rovira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The menopause is characterized by a reduction in ovarian function and estrogen production. Altogether, these changes together lead to a series of disorders that may affect the woman’s life style. Currently, medicine, influenced by the pharmaceutical industry, is prone to act aggressively against any symptoms, resulting in. polymedicated population. Doctors usually prescribe treatments such as hormone replacement therapy (HRT, to help them manage menopause symptoms. However, recently, several studies have reported adverse effects associated with this treatment. The influence of diet on several chronic diseases in western societies is currently well known. Therefore, dietary therapies, including dietary soy and isoflavone supplements, have been proposed for the reduction of menopause symptoms. Several published studies have suggested isoflavones, which have a great estrogenic power, as an HRT alternative for the relief of menopause symptoms. However, our current understanding on the effects of isoflavone supplements on the menopause symptoms is limited, and scientific publications show heterogenous results. Due to those arguments, the objective of this review is to address some of the mechanisms of isoflavones and their role in the menopausal period, postulating that, as food supplements, they could be used as a complementary therapy for menopause symptoms.

  19. Chinese herbal medicine for menopausal symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoshu; Liew, Yuklan; Liu, Zhao Lan

    2016-01-01

    Background Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) usage is expected to increase as women suffering from menopausal symptoms are seeking alternative therapy due to concerns from the adverse effects (AEs) associated with hormone therapy (HT). Scientific evidence for their effectiveness and safety is needed. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of CHM in the treatment of menopausal symptoms. Search methods We searched the Gynaecology and Fertility Group’s Specialised Register of controlled trials, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 3), MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, AMED, and PsycINFO (from inception to March 2015). Others included Current Control Trials, Citation Indexes, conference abstracts in the ISI Web of Knowledge, LILACS database, PubMed, OpenSIGLE database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure database (CNKI, 1999 to 2015). Other resources included reference lists of articles as well as direct contact with authors. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effectiveness of CHM with placebo, HT, pharmaceutical drugs, acupuncture, or another CHM formula in women over 18 years of age, and suffering from menopausal symptoms. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed 864 studies for eligibility. Data extractions were performed by them with disagreements resolved through group discussion and clarification of data or direct contact with the study authors. Data analyses were performed in accordance with Cochrane Collaboration guidelines. Main results We included 22 RCTs (2902 women). Participants were from different ethnic backgrounds with the majority of Chinese origin. When CHM was compared with placebo (eight RCTs), there was little or no evidence of a difference between the groups for the following pooled outcomes: hot flushes per day (MD 0.00, 95% CI −0.88 to 0.89; 2 trials, 199 women; moderate quality evidence); hot flushes per day assessed by an overall hot

  20. Obesity is related to increased menopausal symptoms among Spanish women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Alonso, Ana M; Cuadros, José L; Chedraui, Peter; Mendoza, Marcela; Cuadros, Angela M; Pérez-López, Faustino R

    2010-09-01

    To assess the metabolic syndrome (METS) and its components in postmenopausal women using updated diagnostic criteria and explore their relation to menopausal symptom severity. Medical records of the first visit of 574 postmenopausal Caucasian Spanish women attending a menopause clinic were retrospectively reviewed. Recorded information included general demographic data, type of menopause, menopausal symptom intensity (Kupperman index) and baseline hormonal and metabolic parameters. METS was established if three or more of the following criteria were met: body mass index (BMI) >28.8 kg/m(2), fasting glycaemia ≥100 mg/dL, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) menopause and 38.9% were obese. In all, 23.1% met diagnostic criteria for METS who were significantly older and displayed higher rates of being married, obesity and abnormal glucose, triglyceride, HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and blood pressure values, when compared with those without the syndrome. The mean Kupperman index score for the whole sample was 26.4±10.6, with 73.8% displaying moderate to severe scores (20 or more). Logistic regression analysis determined that obesity and marriage status were independent risk factors related to more severe menopausal symptoms (Kupperman index scores of 20 or more). Although METS was observed in a lower frequency than previous reports, obesity was associated with more severe menopausal symptoms among postmenopausal Spanish women.

  1. Menopause symptoms versus life satisfaction and self-esteem among women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Czarnecka-Iwańczuk, Marta; Stanisławska-Kubiak, Maja; Mojs, Ewa; Wilczak, Maciej; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2012-01-01

    .... Moreover, they also influence the quality of life and self-esteem. Aim of the study: The aim of survey was to analyze the level of self-esteem and life satisfaction in the context of menopausal symptoms experienced by women in this period of life...

  2. A pilot study of a Hatha yoga treatment for menopausal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth-LaForce, Cathryn; Thurston, Rebecca C; Taylor, Mary R

    2007-07-20

    To assess the feasibility and efficacy of a yoga treatment for menopausal symptoms. Both physiologic and self-reported measures of hot flashes were included. A prospective within-group pilot study was conducted. Participants were 12 peri- and post-menopausal women experiencing at least 4 menopausal hot flashes per day, at least 4 days per week. Assessments were administered before and after completion of a 10-week yoga program. Pre- and post-treatment measures included: Severity of questionnaire-rated menopausal symptoms (Wiklund Symptom Check List), frequency, duration, and severity of hot flashes (24-h ambulatory skin-conductance monitoring; hot-flash diary), interference of hot flashes with daily life (Hot Flash Related Daily Interference Scale), and subjective sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index). Yoga classes included breathing techniques, postures, and relaxation poses designed specifically for menopausal symptoms. Participants were asked to practice at home 15 min each day in addition to weekly classes. Eleven women completed the study and attended a mean of 7.45 (S.D. 1.63) classes. Significant pre- to post-treatment improvements were found for severity of questionnaire-rated total menopausal symptoms, hot-flash daily interference; and sleep efficiency, disturbances, and quality. Neither 24-h monitoring nor accompanying diaries yielded significant changes in hot flashes. The yoga treatment and study procedures were feasible for midlife women. Improvement in symptom perceptions and well being warrant further study of yoga for menopausal symptoms, with a larger number of women and including a control group.

  3. What Are the Symptoms of Menopause?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... does not change the risk of contracting a sexually transmitted disease . In addition, getting a good night's sleep can sometimes be difficult for menopausal women. Whether sleep is disrupted due to night sweats ...

  4. Menopausal Symptoms and Complementary Health Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body practice with historical origins in ancient Indian philosophy. Various styles of yoga typically combine physical postures ... nia.nih.gov/health/publication/menopause-time-change/introduction on February 17, 2016. National Institute on Aging. ...

  5. [Survey on epidemiologic factors associated with the age of natural menopause and menopausal symptoms in Jiangsu women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Wu, Jie; Jiang, Xiao-qing; Pu, Dan-hua; Zhao, Yang

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the epidemiologic factors associated with the age of natural menopause and menopausal symptoms in a large population at age of 40 to 65 years in Jiangsu Province. From May 2010 to Oct.2011, a total of 20 275 women (40 to 65 years) attending health examination in Jiangsu Province were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data of demographics, menopausal status, chronic diseases, reproductive history. Also the menopausal symptoms were evaluated by Kupperman menopause index (KMI). Cox proportional hazards regression model and Logistic regression were performed to identify risk factors for earlier age of natural menopause and menopausal symptoms, respectively. The overall median age at natural menopause in Jiangsu women was 50 years.Lower educational level, poor economic status, lower body mass index (BMI), age at menarche less than 14 years, nulliparity and smoking were associated with earlier onset of natural menopause (P < 0.05). The most frequently symptoms in perimenopausal women were fatigue (46.84%, 1880/4014), insomnia (44.67%, 1793/4014) and muscle/joint pain (43.80%, 1758/4014), while sexual problems (57.06%, 3463/6070), muscle/joint pain (53.30%, 3235/6070) and insomnia (51.03%, 3097/6070) were predominant symptoms in postmenopausal women. After adjusting for confounding factors, it was revealed that women with poor educational background, low income, divorce, higher BMI, higher parity, and smoking presented positive correlation with menopausal symptoms (P < 0.05). The study suggested that an estimate of median age at natural menopause were 50 years in Jiangsu women. The main factors contributing to earlier onset of menopause and menopausal symptoms were lower educational level, poor economic status, and smoking. Moreover, there were different menopausal symptoms between perimenopausal and postmenopausal women, which provided the important insights for physicians to prevent and treat menopause

  6. Severe menopausal symptoms associated with reduced adherence to antiretroviral therapy among perimenopausal and menopausal women living with HIV in Metro Vancouver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Putu K; Money, Deborah M; Ogilvie, Gina S; Ranville, Florence; Kestler, Mary; Braschel, Melissa C; Pick, Neora; Shannon, Kate

    2017-12-04

    Although more women living with HIV (WLWH) are entering midlife, the experiences of perimenopausal and menopausal WLWH, including the effects of menopausal symptoms severity, remain understudied. This study longitudinally investigated the correlates of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among perimenopausal and menopausal WLWH from Metro Vancouver. Analyses drew on longitudinal data (2014-2017) from Sexual health and HIV/AIDS: Women's Longitudinal Needs Assessment, an ongoing community-based cohort of WLWH, aged 14+, from Metro Vancouver, Canada. At baseline and biannually, participants completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression with generalized estimating equations were used to identify the correlates of self-reported <95% ART adherence. The sample included 109 perimenopausal and menopausal WLWH (233 observations), with a median age of 49 years (IQR 44-53). Whereas most (68.8%) participants experienced menopausal symptoms, only 17% had received treatment (eg, antidepressants, hormone therapy) at baseline. In multivariable analysis, severe menopausal symptoms (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00-1.06), injection drug use (AOR 2.86, 95% CI 1.44-5.55), and physical/sexual violence (AOR 2.33, 95% CI 1.02-5.26) independently and positively correlated with <95% adherence. These findings suggest that menopausal symptoms may undermine ART adherence, with overlapping vulnerabilities such as injection drug use and sexual/physical violence further exacerbating poor ART adherence. Women-centred, trauma-informed care approaches to detect menopause and treat menopausal symptoms are urgently needed. Such approaches should holistically address the intersecting barriers to adherence and link WLWH to peripheral health and social services, including trauma counseling and evidence-based harm reduction services.

  7. Effects of acupuncture on menopause-related symptoms and quality of life in women in natural menopause: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hsiao-Yean; Pan, Chieh-Hsin; Shyu, Yuh-Kae; Han, Bor-Cheng; Tsai, Pei-Shan

    2015-02-01

    This meta-analysis aims to evaluate the effects of acupuncture on hot flash frequency and severity, menopause-related symptoms, and quality of life in women in natural menopause. We systematically searched PubMed/Medline, PsychINFO, Web of Science, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and CINAHL using keywords such as acupuncture, hot flash, menopause-related symptoms, and quality of life. Heterogeneity, moderator analysis, publication bias, and risk of bias associated with the included studies were examined. Of 104 relevant studies, 12 studies with 869 participants met the inclusion criteria and were included in this study. We found that acupuncture significantly reduced the frequency (g = -0.35; 95% CI, -0.5 to -0.21) and severity (g = -0.44; 95% CI, -0.65 to -0.23) of hot flashes. Acupuncture significantly decreased the psychological, somatic, and urogenital subscale scores on the Menopause Rating Scale (g = -1.56, g = -1.39, and g = -0.82, respectively; P Acupuncture improved the vasomotor subscale score on the Menopause-Specific Quality of Life questionnaire (g= -0.46; 95% CI, -0.9 to -0.02). Long-term effects (up to 3 mo) on hot flash frequency and severity (g = -0.53 and g = -0.55, respectively) were found. This meta-analysis confirms that acupuncture improves hot flash frequency and severity, menopause-related symptoms, and quality of life (in the vasomotor domain) in women experiencing natural menopause.

  8. The efficacy of acupuncture on menopausal symptoms (ACOM study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Kamma Sundgaard; Brodersen, John; Siersma, Volkert

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Around 75% of menopausal women experience hot flushes (HF) and 10-20% of all postmenopausal women find this very distressing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture on moderate-to-severe menopausal symptoms in general and HF in particular. METHODS: An un......-blinded randomised trial (cross-over) with 1:1 allocation to early (intervention) versus late (control) acupuncture. The included women suffer from moderate-to-severe HF and will receive a weekly treatment during five consecutive weeks in the following predefined acupuncture points: CV-3, CV-4, LR-8, SP-6, SP-9. All...... acupuncturists will be medical doctors educated in acupuncture. The primary outcome is change in HF from baseline to week 6 measured by the HF scale from the MenoScores Questionnaire (MSQ). Secondary outcomes are change in other menopausal symptoms, in particular day and night sweats and menopausal...

  9. Physical activity, symptoms, esteem, and life satisfaction during menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elavsky, Steriani; McAuley, Edward

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined the relationships among physical activity (PA), symptom reporting, self-esteem, and satisfaction with life (SWL) in 133 women (M age=51.12, S.D.=4.10) of varying menopausal status. Multivariate analyses of co-variance (MANCOVA) revealed that independent of menopausal status, women who were more physically active reported significantly less severe vaso-somatic and general somatic symptoms, and higher levels of physical self-worth (PSW). Subsequent hierarchical regression analyses indicated that expended MET-h/week, reported symptoms (frequency and severity, respectively), and PSW accounted for significant variance in SWL (R2 model=0.32, for symptom frequency, and 0.33, for symptom severity). Physical activity was significantly related to SWL through the mediation of PSW. However, both reported symptom frequency and severity retained significant association with SWL after controlling for PSW, although the original associations were significantly reduced. Finally, both symptoms and MET-h/week were independent contributors to the variance in PSW (R2 model=0.33 and 0.34). The results suggest that being physically active may reduce perceived severity of menopausal symptoms and enhance psychological well-being, and that the relationship between physical activity and QOL in mid-life women may be mediated by factors such as physical self-perceptions and menopausal symptoms.

  10. Association between physical activity and menopausal symptoms in perimenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Ju; Cho, Juhee; Ahn, Younjhin; Yim, Gyeyoon; Park, Hyun-Young

    2014-10-03

    Physical activity may be an effective way of preventing or attenuating menopause-related symptoms, and it has been shown to improve quality of life in menopausal women. However, there have been some inconsistencies regarding between exercise and menopausal symptoms, and study investigating this association has been scarce in Korea. In this study, the association between physical activity and menopausal symptoms in perimenopausal women in Korea was assessed. This cross-sectional observational study was conducted between November 2012 and March 2013. In total, 2,204 healthy women aged 44-56 years were recruited from a healthcare center at the Kangbuk Samsung hospitals for investigating women's attitudes towards menopause. To investigate the influence of physical activity on perimenopause-associated symptoms, 631 perimenopausal women were selected for this study. Their physical activity levels were assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) short form. The Menopause-specific Quality of Life (MENQOL) questionnaire was used to assess menopause-related symptoms. The study participants were, on average, 48.5 ± 2.7 years old and had a mean body mass index of 22.8 ± 3.1 kg/m2. The total MENQOL score and the psychosocial and physical subscores exhibited U-shaped trends in relation to the level of physical activity. Multiple linear regression analysis adjusted for confounding variables showed that perimenopausal women who performed moderate physical activity reported significantly lower psychosocial (β = -0.413, P = 0.012) and physical symptoms (β = -0.445, P = 0.002) than women who performed low physical activity. By contrast, a high level of physical activity did not influence the MENQOL total score and subscores relative to the low activity group. In addition, no associations were observed between physical activity and the vasomotor and sexual symptoms in any group. Moderate level of physical activity was associated

  11. Trajectories of response to acupuncture for menopausal vasomotor symptoms: the Acupuncture in Menopause study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avis, Nancy E; Coeytaux, Remy R; Levine, Beverly; Isom, Scott; Morgan, Timothy

    2017-02-01

    To examine the trajectories of responses to acupuncture treatment for menopausal vasomotor symptoms (VMS) and the characteristics of women in each trajectory. Two hundred nine perimenopausal and postmenopausal women aged 45 to 60 years experiencing at least four VMS per day were recruited and randomized to receive up to 20 acupuncture treatments within 6 months or to a waitlist control group. The primary outcome was percent change from baseline in the mean daily VMS frequency. Finite mixture modeling was used to identify patterns of percent change in weekly VMS frequencies over the first 8 weeks. The Freeman-Holton test and analysis of variance were used to compare characteristics of women in different trajectories. Analyses revealed four distinct trajectories of change in VMS frequency by week 8 in the acupuncture group. A small group of women (11.6%, n = 19) had an 85% reduction in VMS. The largest group (47%, n = 79) reported a 47% reduction in VMS frequency, 37.3% (n = 65) of the sample showed only a 9.6% reduction in VMS frequency, and a very small group (4.1%, n = 7) had a 100% increase in VMS. Among women in the waitlist control group, 79.5% reported a 10% decrease in VMS frequency at week 8. Baseline number of VMS, number of acupuncture treatments in the first 8 weeks, and traditional Chinese medicine diagnosis were significantly related to trajectory group membership in the acupuncture group. Approximately half of the treated sample reported a decline in VMS frequency, but identifying clear predictors of clinical response to acupuncture treatment of menopausal VMS remains challenging.

  12. Trajectories of Response to Acupuncture for Menopausal Vasomotor Symptoms: the Acupuncture in Menopause (AIM) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avis, Nancy E.; Coeytaux, Remy R.; Levine, Beverly; Isom, Scott; Morgan, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the trajectories of responses to acupuncture treatment for menopausal vasomotor symptoms (VMS) and the characteristics of women in each trajectory. Methods 209 perimenopausal and postmenopausal women aged 45-60 years experiencing ≥4 VMS per day were recruited and randomized to receive up to 20 acupuncture treatments within 6 months or to a waitlist control group. The primary outcome was percent change from baseline in the mean daily VMS frequency. Finite mixture modeling was used to identify patterns of percent change in weekly VMS frequencies over the first 8 weeks. The Freeman-Holton test and ANOVA were used to compare characteristics of women in different trajectories. Results Analyses revealed four distinct trajectories of change in VMS frequency by week 8 in the acupuncture group. A small group of women (11.6%, n=19) had an 85% reduction in VMS. The largest group (47%, n=79) reported a 47% reduction in VMS frequency, 37.3% (n=65) of the sample showed only a 9.6% reduction in VMS frequency, and a very small group (4.1%, n=7) had a 100% increase in VMS. Among women in the waitlist control group, 79.5% reported a 10% decrease in VMS frequency at week 8. Baseline number of VMS, number of acupuncture treatments in the first 8 weeks, and traditional Chinese medicine diagnosis were significantly related to trajectory group membership in the acupuncture group. Conclusions Approximately half of the treated sample reported a decline in VMS frequency, but identifying clear predictors of clinical response to acupuncture treatment of menopausal VMS remains challenging. PMID:27676631

  13. Assessment of Menopausal Symptoms During Perimenopause and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    who attended Gynecology out patient department (OPD) for treatment of menopausal complaints were assessed using the. MRS questionnaire before starting therapy. ... which in turn is caused by aging of the ovaries.[4‑6]. Studies have shown that the frequency ... and occupational background. Section B dealt with detailed.

  14. Experiencing menopause in the context of cancer: Women's constructions of gendered subjectivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, Chloe; Ussher, Jane M; Perz, Janette

    2017-09-01

    Many women experience premature menopause following cancer treatment, accompanied by psychological distress, and poor health-related quality of life. In this qualitative study, we examined how women construct their gendered subjectivities - their sense of self as a woman - in the context of premature menopause after cancer. We analysed data from open-ended survey items and semi-structured interviews with women who had experienced cancer. Six hundred and ninety-five women completed the online survey and 61 took part in a semi-structured interview. A thematic decomposition was conducted to identify the subject positions associated with menopause taken up by the women. Three overall themes were identified: 'The Incomplete Woman,' 'The Abject, Asexual Woman' and 'Out of Time and Social Isolation.' Menopause was predominantly constructed as a negative experience, similar to older post-menopausal women and dissimilar to peers, contributing to experiences of social isolation. Menopause also signified the presence of a medically diagnosed cancer condition, and uncertainty around cancer prognosis. It is important for cancer support group leaders and other service providers to be sensitive to women's negotiation of menopause following cancer, in the context of broader cultural constructions, in order to provide appropriate information and support.

  15. The impact of menopausal symptoms on work ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geukes, Marije; van Aalst, Mariëlle P; Nauta, Mary C E; Oosterhof, Henk

    2012-03-01

    Menopause is an important life event that may have a negative influence on quality of life. Work ability, a concept widely used in occupational health, can predict both future impairment and duration of sickness absence. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of menopausal symptoms on work ability. This was a cross-sectional study that used a sample of healthy working Dutch women aged 44 to 60 years. Work ability was measured using the Work Ability Index, and menopausal symptoms were measured using the Greene Climacteric Scale. Stepwise multiple linear regression models were used to examine the relationship between menopausal symptoms and work ability. A total of 208 women were included in this study. There was a significant negative correlation between total Greene Climacteric Scale score and Work Ability Index score. Total Greene Climacteric Scale score predicted 33.8% of the total variance in the Work Ability Index score. Only the psychological and somatic subscales of the Greene Climacteric Scale were significant predictors in multiple linear regression analysis. Together, they accounted for 36.5% of total variance in Work Ability Index score. Menopausal symptoms are negatively associated with work ability and may increase the risk of sickness absence.

  16. Impact of age and body mass on the intensity of menopausal symptoms in 5968 Brazilian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Fonseca, Angela Maggio; Bagnoli, Vicente Renato; Souza, Marilene Alícia; Azevedo, Raymundo Soares; Couto, Euro De Barros; Soares, José Maria; Baracat, Edmund Chada

    2013-02-01

    To assess the relationship of onset of menopause and body mass on the menopausal symptoms in post-menopausal Brazilian women. Observational study conducted by the selection and inclusion of 5968 Brazilian women after menopause. The following variables were analyzed in this study: time at menopause; the relationship between age at menarche and age at menopause; vasomotor symptoms compared with age at the time of menopause and the time of menopause; Kupperman menopausal index (KMI) versus total time of menopause; body mass index (BMI) compared to the time of menopause, vasomotor symptoms, and KMI total score. We used the Chi-square test, and the significance level was set at 5%. The age at natural menopause ranged from 41 to 62 years (mean 48.1 ± 4.07 years). A younger age at menopause was associated with a high intensity of vasomotor symptoms. These symptoms were more intense in the first 5 years of menopause and decreased with time. The KMI total also decreased with time after menopause, with the exception of arthralgia, myalgia, and insomnia, which did not tend to improve over time. In addition, the vasomotor symptoms and total KMI were more frequent with increasing BMI. Our results suggested that the age of menopause and BMI may influence the intensity of vasomotor symptoms.

  17. Severity of menopausal symptoms and cardiovascular and osteoporosis risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Pérez, J A; Palacios, S; Chavida, F; Pérez, M

    2013-04-01

    To assess whether the severity of menopausal symptoms is related to increased cardiovascular and osteoporosis risk factors, and to determine whether women with more severe menopausal symptoms present a greater percentage of osteoporosis disease. This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study encompassing women aged 45-65 years in the whole Spanish territory. The study population sample was collected through random sampling. A total of 10 514 women were included. Their sociodemographic, medical history and lifestyle data were assessed by means of a survey. The Kupperman Index was used to assess the severity of menopausal symptoms. Bone mineral density was measured by the dual X-ray absorptiometry method. The prevalences of risk factors for osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease were 67.6% and 74.8%, respectively. Women with a higher intensity of symptoms also had a greater percentage of cardiovascular (p osteoporosis (p osteoporosis disease (p obesity (OR 2.23; 95% CI 1.55-2.91; p osteoporosis disease (OR 3.71; 95% CI 2.9-4.52; p osteoporosis disease risk factors and suffered more from osteoporosis disease compared to those who had milder or no menopausal symptoms.

  18. The association of depression status with menopause symptoms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The association of depression status with menopause symptoms among rural midlife women in China. Hongyan Zang1, Lianping He2 , Yan Chen2, Jianfeng Ge2, Yingshui Yao2. 1. Hongyan Zang, Women's health department, Yancheng Maternal and Child Health Hospital,. Yancheng 224400, Jiangsu, People's Republic ...

  19. The efficacy of acupuncture on menopausal symptoms (ACOM study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Kamma Sundgaard; Brodersen, John; Siersma, Volkert

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Around 75% of menopausal women experience hot flushes (HF) and 10-20% of all postmenopausal women find this very distressing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture on moderate-to-severe menopausal symptoms in general and HF in particular. METHODS: An un......-blinded randomised trial (cross-over) with 1:1 allocation to early (intervention) versus late (control) acupuncture. The included women suffer from moderate-to-severe HF and will receive a weekly treatment during five consecutive weeks in the following predefined acupuncture points: CV-3, CV-4, LR-8, SP-6, SP-9. All...

  20. Mind-body therapies for menopausal symptoms: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Kim E; Selfe, Terry Kit; Vishnu, Abhishek

    2010-06-01

    To systematically review the peer-reviewed literature regarding the effects of self-administered mind-body therapies on menopausal symptoms. To identify qualifying studies, we searched 10 scientific databases and scanned bibliographies of relevant review papers and all identified articles. The methodological quality of all studies was assessed systematically using predefined criteria. Twenty-one papers representing 18 clinical trials from 6 countries met our inclusion criteria, including 12 randomized controlled trials (N=719), 1 non-randomized controlled trial (N=58), and 5 uncontrolled trials (N=105). Interventions included yoga and/or meditation-based programs, tai chi, and other relaxation practices, including muscle relaxation and breath-based techniques, relaxation response training, and low-frequency sound-wave therapy. Eight of the nine studies of yoga, tai chi, and meditation-based programs reported improvement in overall menopausal and vasomotor symptoms; six of seven trials indicated improvement in mood and sleep with yoga-based programs, and four studies reported reduced musculoskeletal pain. Results from the remaining nine trials suggest that breath-based and other relaxation therapies also show promise for alleviating vasomotor and other menopausal symptoms, although intergroup findings were mixed. Most studies reviewed suffered methodological or other limitations, complicating interpretation of findings. Collectively, findings of these studies suggest that yoga-based and certain other mind-body therapies may be beneficial for alleviating specific menopausal symptoms. However, the limitations characterizing most studies hinder interpretation of findings and preclude firm conclusions regarding efficacy. Additional large, methodologically sound trials are needed to determine the effects of specific mind-body therapies on menopausal symptoms, examine long-term outcomes, and investigate underlying mechanisms. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  1. Treatment options for vasomotor symptoms in menopause: focus on desvenlafaxine

    OpenAIRE

    Uml; EM; Falconieri L

    2012-01-01

    Elena M Umland, Laura FalconieriJefferson School of Pharmacy, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Vasomotor symptoms (VMS), including hot flashes and night sweats, occur in as many as 68.5% of women as a result of menopause. While the median duration of these symptoms is 4 years, approximately 10% of women continue to experience VMS as many as 12 years after their final menstrual period. As such, VMS have a significant impact on the quality of life and overall physical...

  2. Effect of Tribulus terrestris , ginger, saffron, and Cinnamomum on menopausal symptoms: a randomised, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simin Taavoni

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Menopausal symptoms experienced by women vary widely, and while many women transition through menopause with manageable symptoms, others experience severe symptoms, which may impair their quality of life. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of Tribulus terrestris , ginger, saffron, and Cinnamomum on menopausal symptoms. A randomised, triple-blind, controlled trial design was used for this study. The participants were 80 postmenopausal women aged 50–60 years. A demographic data form and the Menopause Rating Scale were used to collect data. The women were randomly divided into two groups, each of which received either an Aphrodit capsule or a placebo twice a day for four weeks. The two bottles looked exactly the same, so that the investigator and the participants were not aware of the contents of the bottles. Each Aphrodit capsule contained 40 mg of Tribulus terrestris , 12.27 mg of Zingiber officinale, 3 mg of Crocus sativus extract, and 11 mg of Cinnamomum zeylanicum, while the placebo capsules contained 50 mg of starch. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the data. A statistically significant change was reported in the menopausal symptoms of the intervention group compared with the placebo group. The results of the study demonstrate that the Aphrodit capsule was effective in reducing menopausal symptoms.

  3. Effect ofTribulus terrestris, ginger, saffron, and Cinnamomum on menopausal symptoms: a randomised, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taavoni, Simin; Ekbatani, Neda Nazem; Haghani, Hamid

    2017-03-01

    Menopausal symptoms experienced by women vary widely, and while many women transition through menopause with manageable symptoms, others experience severe symptoms, which may impair their quality of life. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of Tribulus terrestris , ginger, saffron, and Cinnamomum on menopausal symptoms. A randomised, triple-blind, controlled trial design was used for this study. The participants were 80 postmenopausal women aged 50-60 years. A demographic data form and the Menopause Rating Scale were used to collect data. The women were randomly divided into two groups, each of which received either an Aphrodit capsule or a placebo twice a day for four weeks. The two bottles looked exactly the same, so that the investigator and the participants were not aware of the contents of the bottles. Each Aphrodit capsule contained 40 mg of Tribulus terrestris , 12.27 mg of Zingiber officinale , 3 mg of Crocus sativus extract, and 11 mg of Cinnamomum zeylanicum , while the placebo capsules contained 50 mg of starch. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the data. A statistically significant change was reported in the menopausal symptoms of the intervention group compared with the placebo group. The results of the study demonstrate that the Aphrodit capsule was effective in reducing menopausal symptoms.

  4. Yoga of Awareness program for menopausal symptoms in breast cancer survivors: results from a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, James W; Carson, Kimberly M; Porter, Laura S; Keefe, Francis J; Seewaldt, Victoria L

    2009-10-01

    Breast cancer survivors have limited options for the treatment of hot flashes and related symptoms. Further, therapies widely used to prevent recurrence in survivors, such as tamoxifen, tend to induce or exacerbate menopausal symptoms. The aim of this preliminary, randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effects of a yoga intervention on menopausal symptoms in a sample of survivors of early-stage breast cancer (stages IA-IIB). Thirty-seven disease-free women experiencing hot flashes were randomized to the 8-week Yoga of Awareness program (gentle yoga poses, meditation, and breathing exercises) or to wait-list control. The primary outcome was daily reports of hot flashes collected at baseline, posttreatment, and 3 months after treatment via an interactive telephone system. Data were analyzed by intention to treat. At posttreatment, women who received the yoga program showed significantly greater improvements relative to the control condition in hot-flash frequency, severity, and total scores and in levels of joint pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, symptom-related bother, and vigor. At 3 months follow-up, patients maintained their treatment gains in hot flashes, joint pain, fatigue, symptom-related bother, and vigor and showed additional significant gains in negative mood, relaxation, and acceptance. This pilot study provides promising support for the beneficial effects of a comprehensive yoga program for hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms in early-stage breast cancer survivors.

  5. Short-Term Exercise Approaches on Menopausal Symptoms, Psychological Health, and Quality of Life in Postmenopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül Ağıl

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study was designed to determine the effects of different short-term exercise programs on menopausal symptoms, psychological health, and quality of life in postmenopausal women. Material and Methods. Forty-two women were chosen from volunteering postmenopausal women presenting to the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Bayındır Hospital between March and December 2009. The women aged 45–60 years and experiencing menopause naturally were included in the study. They were randomly divided into aerobic (=18 and resistance (=18 exercise groups. The women exercised 3 days per week for 8 weeks under the supervision of a physiotherapist. Aerobic exercise training was performed through a bicycle ergometer. Before and after the training, lipid profiles were measured and menopausal symptoms, psychological health, depression, and the quality of life were assessed through questionnaires. Results. In both exercise groups, no significant changes in lipid profiles were observed. In the resistance exercise group, excluding the urogenital complaints, there were significant improvements in all subscales of Menopausal Rating Scale (MRS. In the resistance exercise group, excluding the phobic anxiety, there were significant improvements in all subscales of The Symptom Checklist. Depression levels significantly decreased in both groups. Improvements were observed in all subscales of menopause-specific quality of life questionnaire in both groups except for sexual symptoms. Conclusion. Resistance exercise and aerobic exercise were found to have a positive impact on menopausal symptoms, psychological health, depression, and quality of life.

  6. Association between use of self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine and menopause-related symptoms: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wenbo; Sibbritt, David W; Hickman, Louise; Adams, Jon

    2015-10-01

    To examine the association between self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine use and menopause-related symptoms, stratified by menopausal status. Data were obtained from a cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of 10,011 menopausal women from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, conducted in 2010. Multivariable logistic regression models were applied to identify if the use of selected self-prescribed complementary and alternative medicine was significantly associated with a range of menopause-related symptoms. Vitamins/minerals were more likely to be used by natural menopausal women experiencing anxiety (adjusted OR=1.20) and/or stiff/painful joints (adjusted OR=1.16). Yoga/meditation was more likely to be used by women with hysterectomy (adjusted OR=1.76) or natural menopausal women (adjusted OR=1.38) experiencing anxiety. Herbal medicines were more likely to be used by natural menopausal women experiencing anxiety (adjusted OR=1.22), tiredness (adjusted OR=1.20), and/or stiff/painful joints (adjusted OR=1.17), and by women with oophorectomy experiencing tiredness (adjusted OR=1.45). Aromatherapy oils were more likely to be used by natural menopausal women experiencing night sweats (adjusted OR=1.25) and by women with hysterectomy experiencing anxiety (adjusted OR=2.02). Chinese medicines were more likely to be used by women with oophorectomy experiencing stiff/painful joints (adjusted OR=4.06) and/or palpitations (adjusted OR=3.06). Our study will help improve the patient-provider communication regarding complementary and alternative medicine use for menopause, and we conclude that menopausal status should be taken into account by providers for menopause care. The women's experience and motivations of such use warrant further research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hormone Therapy and Other Treatments for Symptoms of Menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, D Ashley; Crider, Mark; Hill, Susan R

    2016-12-01

    The results of large clinical trials have led physicians and patients to question the safety of hormone therapy for menopause. In the past, physicians prescribed hormone therapy to improve overall health and prevent cardiac disease, as well as for symptoms of menopause. Combined estrogen/progestogen therapy, but not estrogen alone, increases the risk of breast cancer when used for more than three to five years. Therefore, in women with a uterus, it is recommended that physicians prescribe combination therapy only to treat menopausal symptoms such as vasomotor symptoms (hot flashes) and vaginal atrophy, using the smallest effective dosage for the shortest possible duration. Although estrogen is the most effective treatment for hot flashes, nonhormonal alternatives such as low-dose paroxetine, venlafaxine, and gabapentin are effective alternatives. Women with a uterus who are using estrogen should also take a progestogen to reduce the risk of endometrial cancer. Women who cannot tolerate adverse effects of progestogens may benefit from a combined formulation of estrogen and the selective estrogen receptor modulator bazedoxifene. There is no highquality, consistent evidence that yoga, paced respiration, acupuncture, exercise, stress reduction, relaxation therapy, and alternative therapies such as black cohosh, botanical products, omega-3 fatty acid supplements, and dietary Chinese herbs benefit patients more than placebo. One systematic review suggests modest improvement in hot flashes and vaginal dryness with soy products, and small studies suggest that clinical hypnosis significantly reduces hot flashes. Patients with genitourinary syndrome of menopause may benefit from vaginal estrogen, nonhormonal vaginal moisturizers, or ospemifene (the only nonhormonal treatment approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for dyspareunia due to menopausal atrophy). The decision to use hormone therapy depends on clinical presentation, a thorough evaluation of the risks and

  8. Acupuncture for vasomotor menopausal symptoms: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seung-Hun; Whang, Wei-Wan

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to critically assess whether acupuncture therapy reduces vasomotor menopausal symptoms and to evaluate the adverse effects of acupuncture therapy on the basis of the results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Nineteen electronic databases, including English, Korean, Japanese, and Chinese databases, were systematically searched for RCTs in which acupuncture was used to reduce vasomotor menopausal symptoms before July 2008. There were no language restrictions. The methodological quality of the eligible studies was assessed using the categories provided by the Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Review Group. Eleven studies, which included a total of 764 individual cases, were systematically reviewed. The methodological quality of the trials varied substantially. Six trials compared acupuncture treatment to sham or placebo acupuncture. Only one study using a nonpenetrating placebo needle found a significant difference in the severity outcomes of hot flashes between groups (mean difference, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.05-0.91). Five studies reported a reduced frequency of hot flashes within groups; however, none found a significant difference between groups. An analysis of the outcomes of the trials that compared acupuncture with hormone therapy or oryzanol for reducing vasomotor symptoms showed that acupuncture was superior. Three RCTs reported minimal acupuncture-related adverse events. There is no evidence from RCTs that acupuncture is an effective treatment in comparison to sham acupuncture for reducing menopausal hot flashes. Some studies have shown that acupuncture therapies are better than hormone therapy for reducing vasomotor symptoms. However, the number of RCTs compared with a nonpenetrating placebo control needle or hormone therapy was too small, and the methodological quality of some of the RCTs was poor. Further evaluation of the effects of acupuncture on vasomotor menopausal symptoms based on a well-controlled placebo trial is

  9. Acupuncture in managing menopausal symptoms: hope or mirage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfhaily, F; Ewies, A A A

    2007-10-01

    There is an increased interest amongst women in seeking alternatives for hormone replacement therapy because of their fear of side-effects. It is claimed that acupuncture is effective for curing menopausal symptoms, and to be a safe treatment in the hands of well-trained and qualified practitioners. About one million acupuncture treatments are given in the National Health Service and two million privately each year in England for various indications. However, because its mechanism of action is not fully understood in physiological terms, acupuncture is considered by many clinicians to be of no value. This article reviews the currently available evidence as regards the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture in treating menopausal symptoms.

  10. EFFECTIVENESS OF STP AND YOGA THERAPY ON MENOPAUSAL SYMPTOMS AMONG MENOPAUSAL WOMEN RESIDING IN SELECTED VILLAGES AT NAMAKKAL DISTRICT – PILOT STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    T. Jayadeepa; Dr. P. Muthulakshmi; P. Padmavathi

    2016-01-01

    Menopause is one of the women’s most important life stages. Objectives: to assess the effectiveness of STP and Yoga therapy on menopausal symptoms among menopausal women. Design: A Quasi experimental research where pre and post test with control group design. Sample: Menopausal women with menopausal symptoms in Namakkal (Dt). Sampling Technique: Snowball sampling technique was used to select the sample. Data collection: A Structured interview questionnaire used to assess the knowledge on...

  11. Treatment of Insomnia, Insomnia Symptoms, and Obstructive Sleep Apnea During and After Menopause: Therapeutic Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Tal, Joshua Z.; Suh, Sooyeon A.; Dowdle, Claire L.; Nowakowski, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Understanding sleep complaints among menopausal women is an emerging area of clinical and research interest. Several recent reviews have focused on mechanisms of menopausal insomnia and symptoms. In this review, we present a discussion on the most relevant and recent publications on the treatment of sleep disorders for menopausal women, with a focus on menopause-related insomnia, insomnia symptoms, and obstructive sleep apnea. We discuss both nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatments,...

  12. Acupuncture for menopausal vasomotor symptoms: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirotta, Marie; Ee, Carolyn; Teede, Helena; Chondros, Patty; French, Simon; Myers, Stephen; Xue, Charlie

    2014-06-12

    Hot flushes and night sweats (vasomotor symptoms) are common menopausal symptoms, often causing distress, sleep deprivation and reduced quality of life. Although hormone replacement therapy is an effective treatment, there are concerns about serious adverse events. Non-hormonal pharmacological therapies are less effective and can also cause adverse effects. Complementary therapies, including acupuncture, are commonly used for menopausal vasomotor symptoms. While the evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating vasomotor symptoms is inconclusive, acupuncture has a low risk of adverse effects, and two small studies suggest it may be more effective than non-insertive sham acupuncture. Our objective is to assess the efficacy of needle acupuncture in improving hot flush severity and frequency in menopausal women. Our current study design is informed by methods tested in a pilot study. This is a stratified, parallel, randomised sham-controlled trial with equal allocation of participants to two trial groups. We are recruiting 360 menopausal women experiencing a minimum average of seven moderate hot flushes a day over a seven-day period and who meet diagnostic criteria for the Traditional Chinese Medicine diagnosis of Kidney Yin deficiency. Exclusion criteria include breast cancer, surgical menopause, and current hormone replacement therapy use. Eligible women are randomised to receive either true needle acupuncture or sham acupuncture with non-insertive (blunt) needles for ten treatments over eight weeks. Participants are blinded to treatment allocation. Interventions are provided by Chinese medicine acupuncturists who have received specific training on trial procedures. The primary outcome measure is hot flush score, assessed using the validated Hot Flush Diary. Secondary outcome measures include health-related quality of life, anxiety and depression symptoms, credibility of the sham treatment, expectancy and beliefs about acupuncture, and adverse events

  13. Effects of Acupuncture on Menopause-Related Symptoms in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hsiao-Yean; Shyu, Yuh-Kae; Chang, Pi-Chen; Tsai, Pei-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Evidence regarding the effects of acupuncture on hot flashes in breast cancer survivors is conflicting. Little is known about the intermediate-term effects of acupuncture on hot flashes and other menopause-related symptoms in breast cancer survivors. The objective of this study was to evaluate the short-term and intermediate-term effects of acupuncture on menopause-related symptoms and particularly on hot flashes in breast cancer survivors. Electronic databases including EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, CINAHL, Wanfang Data Chinese Database, and China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database from inception until June 15, 2014, were searched. Randomized controlled trials in which acupuncture was compared with sham controls or other interventions according to the reduction of hot flashes or menopause-related symptoms in breast cancer survivors were included. We analyzed 7 studies involving 342 participants. Acupuncture significantly reduced the frequency of hot flashes and severity of menopause-related symptoms (g = -0.23 and -0.36, respectively) immediately after the completion of treatment. In comparison with sham acupuncture, effects of true acupuncture on the frequency and severity of hot flashes were not significantly different. At 1 to 3 months' follow-up, the severity of menopause-related symptoms remained significantly reduced (g = -0.56). Acupuncture yielded small-size effects on reducing hot-flash frequency and the severity of menopause-related symptoms. Acupuncture may be used as a complementary therapy for breast cancer survivors experiencing hot flashes and other menopause-related symptoms; however, whether acupuncture exerts specific treatment effects other than needling or placebo effects needs to be further evaluated.

  14. [Menopause-related symptoms in middle-aged women residing in the Zaragoza Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Roncero, Gonzalo Ramón; Martínez-Dearth, Rebeca; López-Baena, María Teresa; Ornat-Clemente, Lía

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess menopausal symptoms and related sociodemographic conditions in middle-aged women from the Spanish province of Zaragoza. This was a cross-sectional study in which 241 women (40-59 years old) from the Zaragoza province completed the Menopause Rating Scale (MRS) and a sociodemographic questionnaire containing personal and partner data to assess symptoms associated with the menopause. The most prevalent symptoms were musculoskeletal, followed by hot flushes and perspiration. Somatic, psychological and urogenital symptoms were more severe in post-menopausal women. Somatic and urogenital symptoms worsen with age, body mass index, age at menopause, and partner age. Multiple linear regression analysis (MA) for somatic symptoms was related with the menopausal status, psychiatric treatment, problems with sexual relationships, and history of gender violence. The MA for psychological symptoms was associated with menopausal status, psychiatric treatment and a history of gender violence. The MA for urogenital symptoms was associated with menopausal status, problems with sexual relationships, urinary incontinence and partner alcohol abuse. A history of gender violence was reported by 11.6% of the women. In this sample of middle-aged women, menopausal symptoms were related to menopausal status, and other factors associated with their partner factors, including gender violence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. An update on drugs for the treatment of menopausal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Santiago; Mejias, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Vasomotor symptoms (VMS) and the genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM) are recognized as the most frequent and bothersome symptoms associated with menopause. There are different treatments for both groups of symptoms, being necessary to individualize them. There are different therapies for VMS including hormonal treatments with estrogen, with and without progestins; the new alternative, tissue-selective estrogen complex (TSEC), tibolone, phytoestrogens and only progestins. Evidence also shows efficacy with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Other nonhormonal alternatives exist as second-line treatments, all with not conclusive results. The GSM can be treated with nonhormonal treatments such as vaginal lubricants and moisturizers, other alternatives as vaginal laser needs to have more evidence. On the other hand, there is the possibility to use the hormonal treatments with systemic or local estrogen, which are the most effective treatment, the TSEC and the newest selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), ospemifene. Therapies with testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) are still under study. The GSM can be treated with nonhormonal treatments such as vaginal lubricants and moisturizers, and other alternatives as vaginal laser need to have more evidence. On the other hand, there is the possibility to use the hormonal treatments with systemic or local estrogen, which are the most effective treatment, the TSEC and the newest SERM, ospemifene. Therapies with testosterone and DHEA are still under study. The increasing numbers of therapies for menopausal symptoms open up new options, but we must individualize treatments. New possibilities arise in patients who did not have them and which can improve compliance and is also important to design strategies using combined or sequential treatments.

  16. MsFLASH participants' priorities for alleviating menopausal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, J S; Woods, N F; Otte, J L; Guthrie, K A; Hohensee, C; Newton, K M; Joffe, H; Cohen, L; Sternfeld, B; Lau, R J; Reed, S D; LaCroix, A Z

    2015-01-01

    To describe self-reported menopausal symptom priorities and their association with demographics and other symptoms among participants in an intervention trial for vasomotor symptoms (VMS). Cross-sectional study embedded in the MsFLASH 02 trial, a three-by-two factorial design of yoga vs. exercise vs. usual activity and omega-3-fatty acid vs. placebo. At baseline, women (n = 354) completed hot flush diaries, a card sort task to prioritize symptoms they would most like to alleviate, and standardized questionnaires. The most common symptom priorities were: VMS (n = 322), sleep (n = 191), concentration (n = 140), and fatigue (n = 116). In multivariate models, women who chose VMS as their top priority symptom (n = 210) reported significantly greater VMS severity (p = 0.004) and never smoking (p = 0.012), and women who chose sleep as their top priority symptom (n = 100) were more educated (p ≤ 0.001) and had worse sleep quality (p < 0.001). ROC curves identified sleep scale scores that were highly predictive of ranking sleep as a top priority symptom. Among women entering an intervention trial for VMS and with relatively low prevalence of depression and anxiety, VMS was the priority symptom for treatment. A card sort may be a valid tool for quickly assessing symptom priorities in clinical practice and research.

  17. Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for you. Menopause and Hormones: Common Questions La menopausia y las hormonas: Preguntas más frecuentes Menopause: Medicines ... PDF - 1.3MB) Menopause and Hormones Card La menopausia y las hormonas tarjeta (PDF - 1.6MB) Order ...

  18. Menopause-related symptoms: traditional Chinese medicine vs hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Hoda; Feng Liu, Yan; Du, Lin; Hua Wang, Chao; Bahrami-Taghanaki, Hamidreza; Ollah Esmaily, Habib; Azizi, Hamideh; Ou Xue, Xiao

    2011-01-01

    To compare the therapeutic effect of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM), acupuncture, and hormone therapy on menopause- related symptoms of peri- and postmenopausal women. Fifty-seven Chinese women completed 2 months of treatment with either CHM (5 g twice daily, n = 22), acupuncture plus CHM (Kun Bao Wan) 5 g twice daily plus sessions of acupuncture, n = 20), or hormone therapy (n = 15). Kupperman index score, levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and estradiol, and the number of symptoms before and after treatment were the main outcome measures. CHM, acupuncture plus CHM, and hormone therapy significantly decreased Kupperman score (P acupuncture plus CHM and CHM with significantly better results by acupuncture plus CHM. Acupuncture plus CHM, as well as hormone therapy, significantly reduced the level of FSH (P .05). The mean difference in the level of FSH between baseline and 2 months among the three groups was significantly different (P = .02). This difference was only between CHM and hormone therapy with significantly better results by hormone therapy. The three treatments didn't make any significant increase in the level of E2 (P > .05). application of the combination of Chinese herbal medicine and acupuncture proved as effective as hormone therapy in the treatment of menopause-related symptoms, and it achieved better outcomes than herbal medicine alone.

  19. Effect of aromatherapy massage on menopausal symptoms: a randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darsareh, Fatemeh; Taavoni, Simin; Joolaee, Soodabeh; Haghani, Hamid

    2012-09-01

    Menopause is a significant event in most women's lives because it marks the end of a woman's natural reproductive life. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of aromatherapy massage on menopausal symptoms. A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted at a menopausal clinic at a gynecology hospital in Tehran. The study population comprised 90 women who were assigned to an aromatherapy massage group, a placebo massage group, or a control group. Each participant in the aromatherapy massage group received 30-minute aromatherapy treatment sessions twice a week for 4 weeks with aroma oil, whereas participants in the placebo massage group received the same treatment with plain oil. No treatment was provided to participants in the control group. The outcome measures in this study were menopausal symptoms, as obtained through the Menopause Rating Scale. The mean baseline level of the menopausal score did not differ among all groups. However, after eight sessions of intervention, the Menopause Rating Scale score differed significantly among the three groups (P aromatherapy massage group and the placebo massage group had a lower menopausal score than the control group (P aromatherapy massage and the placebo massage groups were compared, the menopausal score for the aromatherapy massage group was found to be significantly lower (P aromatherapy massage were effective in reducing menopausal symptoms. However, aromatherapy massage was more effective than only massage.

  20. Feasibility of an iPad application for studying menopause-related symptom clusters and women's heuristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Rita; Linder, Lauri A; MacPherson, Catherine Fiona; Fugate Woods, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate feasibility, including usability and utility, of the Computerized Symptom Capture Tool for Menopause (C-SCAT-M), a symptom heuristics application (app) for the iPad, with midlife women. Thirty midlife women aged 40-60 and experiencing symptoms they associated with menopause were recruited through flyers posted on a university campus, primary care and women's health clinics. The C-SCAT-M guided participants to identify symptoms they experienced, draw temporal and causal relationships between symptoms and identify symptom clusters. Women were encouraged to think aloud as they encountered questions or problems and their comments were audio recorded. After completing the C-SCAT-M, they completed a 22-item acceptability survey and a demographic survey. Data were downloaded from catalyst website and analyzed using SPSS. Women completed the C-SCAT-M with minimal difficulty, with most indicating that using the app was very/extremely easy and most (57%) preferred using the iPad app to paper. Most women stated that the final diagrams were very/extremely accurate depictions of their symptom clusters and relationships (77%). The C-SCAT-M demonstrated initial feasibility, including usability and utility, for collecting data about symptom clusters experienced by midlife women.

  1. Effects of mind-body therapies on symptom clusters during the menopausal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, N F; Mitchell, E S; Schnall, J G; Cray, L; Ismail, R; Taylor-Swanson, L; Thomas, A

    2014-02-01

    Although most women experience symptom clusters during the menopausal transition and early postmenopause, investigators reporting clinical trial effects for hot flushes often omit co-occurring symptoms. Our aim was to review controlled clinical trials of mind-body therapies for hot flushes and at least one other co-occurring symptom from these groups: sleep, cognitive function, mood, and pain. An experienced reference librarian performed an extensive search of PubMed/Medline, CINAHL Plus, PsycInfo, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, EMBASE, AMED, and Alt-Health Watch for randomized controlled trials reported in English between 2004 and July 2011. Of 1193 abstracts identified, 58 trials examining effectiveness of therapies for hot flushes and at least one additional co-occurring symptom of interest were identified. Eight trials (ten publications) examined relaxation, yoga, or exercise. Physical activity/exercise trials (six) yielded mixed results; only one significantly reduced hot flushes and mood symptoms. Of two relaxation therapy trials, only mindfulness-based stress reduction training reduced sleep and mood symptoms and had within-group treatment effects on hot flushes. Yoga (one trial) significantly reduced hot flushes and improved cognitive symptoms more than exercise, and also had within-group effects on sleep and pain symptoms. Studies of mind-body therapies for hot flushes increasingly measure multiple symptom outcomes, but few report treatment effects in ways that allow clinicians to consider symptom clusters when prescribing therapies. Future studies need to measure and report results for individual symptoms or group like symptoms together into subscales rather than use subscales with mixed dimensions. Trials with larger numbers of participants are essential to allow evaluation of these therapies on multiple co-occurring symptoms.

  2. Treatment of vasomotor symptoms in the menopausal transition and postmenopausally: psychiatric comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jeanne Leventhal; Burger, Henry; Dennerstein, Lorraine; Woods, Nancy Fugate; Davis, Susan R; Kotz, Krista; Van Winkle, Julie; Richardson, Gregg; Ratka, Anna; Kessel, Bruce

    2007-11-01

    This article aims to educate the nonpsychiatric as well as the psychiatric clinician on the impact of vasomotor symptoms in women with comorbid psychiatric problems and the challenges of treating vasomotor symptoms in these women. The pathophysiology, prevalence and common risk factors associated with disturbing hot flashes in the menopausal transition are reviewed. Hormonal, nonhormonal and behavioral treatment options of vasomotor symptoms for these women are discussed. Special pharmacokinetic implications for hormonal treatment of those women on anticonvulsant medications for the treatment of their mood disorders, on tamoxifen and/or with high or low sex hormone-binding globulin are examined. An in-depth discussion of mood and the menopausal transition, theoretical mechanisms for mood problems with the symptomatic menopause and the impact of stress on the symptomatic menopause are found elsewhere in this clinical review series on psychiatric illness, stress and the symptomatic menopause.

  3. Experiencing menopause in the UK: The interrelated narratives of normality, distress, and transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Salis, Isabel; Owen-Smith, Amanda; Donovan, Jenny L; Lawlor, Debbie A

    2017-11-02

    We investigated the experience and perspectives of menopause among 48 UK mothers through qualitative in-depth interviews. Interviews were analyzed thematically then explored using social science theories. Three interdependent narratives emerged: menopause as a normal, biological process, distinct from self and social transitions; menopause as struggle, an "idiom of distress" expressing upset, identity loss, shame, and social upheaval; and menopause as transformative and liberating, arising from biopsychic and relational changes. Some women followed a predictable "rite of passage" trajectory with transformation emerging from distress, but not all: Menopause arises from a complex interplay of personal predicament, somatic change, and sociocultural context.

  4. Acupuncture for menopausal vasomotor symptoms: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Pirotta, Marie; Ee, Carolyn; Teede, Helena; Chondros, Patty; French, Simon; Myers, Stephen; Xue, Charlie

    2014-01-01

    Background Hot flushes and night sweats (vasomotor symptoms) are common menopausal symptoms, often causing distress, sleep deprivation and reduced quality of life. Although hormone replacement therapy is an effective treatment, there are concerns about serious adverse events. Non-hormonal pharmacological therapies are less effective and can also cause adverse effects. Complementary therapies, including acupuncture, are commonly used for menopausal vasomotor symptoms. While the evidence for th...

  5. A natural S-equol supplement alleviates hot flushes and other menopausal symptoms in equol nonproducing postmenopausal Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Takeshi; Uchiyama, Shigeto; Matsumura, Yasuhiro; Taguchi, Makoto; Nozaki, Masahiro; Takamatsu, Kiyoshi; Ishizuka, Bunpei; Kubota, Toshiro; Mizunuma, Hideki; Ohta, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this clinical trial was to examine the efficacy of a supplement containing natural S-(-)equol, a daidzein metabolite, in reducing menopausal symptoms. In this multicenter, double-blind placebo-controlled trial, 160 equol nonproducing, postmenopausal Japanese women who experienced at least 1 hot flush/day were randomly assigned to consume 10 mg/day S-(-)equol (n=77 women) or placebo (n=83 women) for 12 weeks. Participants completed a standardized menopausal symptom checklist and rated five common menopause symptoms by a visual analog scale at baseline, week 12, and week 18 (6-week postintervention). Physical, blood, and urine examinations were conducted. One hundred twenty-six women completed the study. At baseline, daily hot flush frequency was 2.9±2.1 for the S-(-)equol group and 3.2±2.4 for the placebo group. After the 12-week intervention, the S-(-)equol group had a greater decrease from baseline in hot flush frequency compared with the placebo group (-1.9±1.8/day, -58.7%, vs. -1.0±2.0/day, -34.5%, p=0.009). The severity of hot flushes and neck or shoulder muscle stiffness significantly decreased in the S-(-)equol group compared with the placebo group. No changes in clinical parameters or serious adverse effects were reported. This is the first trial to show beneficial effects of a 10-mg natural S-(-)equol supplement consumed daily for 12 weeks on major menopausal symptoms, specifically, hot flushes and neck or shoulder muscle stiffness, in postmenopausal Japanese women. This supplement offers a promising alternative for management of menopausal symptoms.

  6. Acupuncture in the treatment of menopause-related symptoms in women taking tamoxifen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porzio, Giampiero; Trapasso, Tiziana; Martelli, Silvia; Sallusti, Elisa; Piccone, Caterina; Mattei, Antonella; Di Stanislao, Carlo; Ficorella, Corrado; Marchetti, Paolo

    2002-01-01

    Fifteen patients were enrolled in a pilot study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of acupuncture for the treatment of menopausal symptoms in tamoxifen-treated patients. Patients were evaluated before treatment and after one, three and six months with the Greene Menopause Index and were treated according to the traditional Chinese medicine. Anxiety, depression, somatic and vasomotor symptoms were improved by the treatment; libido was not modified. Acupuncture seems to be safe and effective for the treatment of menopausal symptoms in women with previous breast cancer taking tamoxifen. Confirmatory studies with a larger number of patients and with a placebo-treated group are warranted.

  7. Yoga and meditation for menopausal symptoms in breast cancer survivors-A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Holger; Rabsilber, Sybille; Lauche, Romy; Kümmel, Sherko; Dobos, Gustav

    2015-07-01

    Breast cancer survivors have only very limited treatment options for menopausal symptoms. The objective of this trial was to evaluate the effects of a 12-week traditional Hatha yoga and meditation intervention on menopausal symptoms in breast cancer survivors. Patients were randomly assigned either to a 12-week yoga and meditation intervention or to usual care. The primary outcome measure was total menopausal symptoms (Menopause Rating Scale [MRS] total score). Secondary outcome measures included MRS subscales, quality of life (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast), fatigue (Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue), depression, and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). Outcomes were assessed at week 12 and week 24 after randomization. In total, 40 women (mean age ± standard deviation, 49.2 ± 5.9 years) were randomized to yoga (n = 19) or to usual care (n = 21). Women in the yoga group reported significantly lower total menopausal symptoms compared with the usual care group at week 12 (mean difference, -5.6; 95% confidence interval, -9.2 to -1.9; P = .004) and at week 24 (mean difference, -4.5; 95% confidence interval, -8.3 to -0.7; P = .023). At week 12, the yoga group reported less somatovegetative, psychological, and urogenital menopausal symptoms; less fatigue; and improved quality of life (all P menopausal symptoms. Short-term effects on menopausal symptoms remained significant when only women who were receiving antiestrogen medication (n = 36) were analyzed. Six minor adverse events occurred in each group. Yoga combined with meditation can be considered a safe and effective complementary intervention for menopausal symptoms in breast cancer survivors. The effects seem to persist for at least 3 months. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  8. Chinese medicine treatment for menopausal symptoms in the UK health service: is a clinical trial warranted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheid, Volker; Tuffrey, Veronica; Weijburg, Thomas; Bovey, Mark; Ward, Trina

    2015-02-01

    The aims of this pilot study were to evaluate treatment effects, ascertain safety and formulate best practice Chinese medicine protocols relevant for London women suffering from menopausal symptoms. This clinical pilot study employed a case series design within a wider action-based research project. 117 perimenopausal women between 45 and 55 years of age recruited from the general population were treated for menopausal symptoms by six experienced practitioners of Chinese medicine at the Polyclinic of the University of Westminster. Practitioners were instructed to treat as near to their usual practice style as possible. This involved using Chinese herbal medicine and/or acupuncture along with dietary and lifestyle advice. A maximum of 12 treatments over 6 months was allowed per patient. The menopause specific quality of life questionnaire (MenQoL), the Greene climacteric scale, and flushing diaries were used to evaluate treatment outcomes. Liver and kidney function tests were carried out at intake and after 1, 6 and 12 treatments to evaluate the safety particularly in relation to the use of herbal medicines. Patients showed significant improvement across all domains measured by the MenQoL and Greene climacteric scales. Reduction on the MenQoL scale between first and last visit was from 4.31 to 3.27 (p<0.001) and on the Green climacteric scale from 21.01 to 13.00 (p<0.001). Study participants did not reliably complete their flushing diaries. No adverse events or abnormal liver or kidney function values were observed during the course of the study. Further research that seeks to investigate the effects observed in more detail and to evaluate them against other forms of treatment and/or no-treatment controls is warranted. This could be achieved by way of a pragmatic randomized controlled trial that evaluated Chinese medicine against orthodox medical care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of the severity of menopausal symptoms on sexual function in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nazarpour

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sexual function can be affected by several factors. Menopause and its symptoms including somatic, psychological, and urogenital symptoms can be associated with sexual dysfunction during menopause. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of the severity of menopausal symptoms on sexual function in postmenopausal women. Methods: This analytical study was conducted in 405 postmenopausal women -40 to 60 years old- in Nowshahr and Chaloos during 2013 and 2014. Subjects were selected by multi-stage random sampling method. Data were collected using the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI, the Menopause Rating Scale (MRS, and a researcher-made questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficient, Spearman correlation coefficient, T-test, multiple linear regression and logistic regression. Findings: Sixty one percent of the subjects had sexual dysfunction. The most severe menopausal symptoms were related to psychological domain and the lowest score was related to urogenital domain. All domains of MRS and the MRS total score had significantly negative correlation with the FSFI total score. The urogenital score (r=0.283, P<0.001 and the MRS total score (r=0.116, P=0.020 had significantly positive correlation with sexual dissatisfaction. Urogenital score and MRS total score were significantly higher in women with decreased sexuality and sexual relationship after menopause compared to others. The severity of menopausal symptoms was negative predictor of all domains of sexual function except for satisfaction and the FSFI total score. The MRS total score was a predictor of variation in sexuality and sexual relationship after menopause and satisfaction. Conclusion: The severity of menopausal symptoms could have a negative effect on sexual function. Controlling these symptoms should be noted to improve sexual function for women's health policy making.

  10. Spirituality and severity of menopausal symptoms in a sample of religious women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Patrick R; Soto, Marilyn

    2011-09-01

    Menopause represents an important life change, particularly for religious women whose identity is significantly related to family. Two competing hypotheses are examined: one, because religious women have their identity focused on family and child rearing, spirituality will be related to increased menopausal symptoms because menopause represents a loss of identity and purpose; and two, because spirituality can provide strength and comfort during difficult times, it will, therefore, be related to decreased menopausal symptoms. To test these competing hypotheses, questionnaires were administered to 218 women (average age 55, 35% premenopausal, 26% peri-menopausal, 39% postmenopausal) who were members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Regression analyses indicated that higher levels of spiritual strength were related to decreased levels of reported menopausal symptoms. Spiritual strength was also related to increased benefit finding during menopause, decreased concern with body appearance, and increased use of adaptive coping strategies. We conclude that finding strength in spirituality may help religious women cope better with the life changes associated with menopause.

  11. Menopausal Symptoms and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Evidence Base The evidence base on efficacy of acupuncture for menopause consists of many randomized controlled trials and several ... for hot flashes related to natural or induced menopause. The studies that the ... to acupuncture studies performed using needles stimulated by hand or ...

  12. Depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms in menopausal arab women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The association between depression, anxiety, and stress among Arab menopause and postmenopausal women have been explored in detailed. Aim: The objective of this study was to determine the correlation between depression, anxiety, and stress in menopausal and postmenopausal women and shedding ...

  13. Personality, Menopausal Symptoms, and Physical Activity Outcomes in Middle-Aged Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elavsky, Steriani; McAuley, Edward

    2009-01-01

    The menopausal transition is characterized by increased reporting of various symptoms, however, little is known about what underlies individual differences in their reporting. The present study examined the contribution of personality factors to the reporting of menopausal symptoms in the context of a 4-month randomized controlled exercise trial. Symptomatic middle-aged women (N = 164 M age = 49.9, SD = 3.6) completed measures of menopausal symptoms, personality, physical activity, fitness and body composition assessment at the beginning and end of a 4-month randomized controlled trial involving walking and yoga. After controlling for baseline values, psychological symptoms at the end of the trial were associated with trait anxiety (beta = .47, p menopause however improvements in physical parameters such as fitness may reduce reported symptomatology.

  14. Time to Talk: 4 Things to Know about Menopausal Symptoms and Complementary Health Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... menopausal symptoms: Mind and body practices such as hypnosis, mindfulness meditation, and tai chi may help improve ... joint pain. There is also some evidence that hypnotherapy may help women manage hot flashes. Many natural ...

  15. Association of Vasomotor and Other Menopausal Symptoms with Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taulant Muka

    Full Text Available Vasomotor symptoms (hot flushes and night sweats and other symptoms, including depression, anxiety and panic attacks, are commonly experienced by menopausal women and have been associated with an unfavourable cardiovascular risk profile.To investigate whether presence of menopausal symptoms is associated with the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD.Five electronic databases (Medline, EMBASE and Web of Science were search until February 17th, 2015 to identify relevant studies. Observational cohort studies or randomised intervention studies were eligible for inclusion if they followed participants prospectively (at least 1 year of follow-up, and reported relevant estimates on the association of any vasomotor symptoms, or other menopausal symptoms, with risk of CVD, coronary heart disease (CHD, or stroke in perimenopausal, menopausal, or postmenopausal women. Data were extracted by two independent reviewers using a pre-designed data collection form. Separate pooled relative risks (RRs for age and non-established cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., education, ethnicity adjusted data and for established cardiovascular risk factors and potential mediators-adjusted data (e.g., smoking, body mass index, and hypertension were calculated.Out of 9,987 initially identified references, ten studies were selected, including 213,976 women with a total of 10,037 cardiovascular disease outcomes. The age and non-established cardiovascular risk factors adjusted RRs [95% confidence intervals] for development of CHD, Stroke and CVD comparing women with and without any menopausal symptoms were 1.34 [1.13-1.58], 1.30 [0.99-1.70], 1.48 [1.21-1.80] respectively, and the corresponding RRs adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors and potential mediators were 1.18 [1.03-1.35], 1.08 [0.89-1.32], 1.29 [0.98-1.71]. However, these analyses were limited by potential unmeasured confounding and the small number of studies on this topic.Presence of vasomotor symptoms and

  16. Evaluation of Symptoms and Prevention of Cancer in Menopause: The Value of Vulvar Exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, A R; Fasolino, C; Santoro, G; Gargano, V; Rinaldi, M; Arduino, B; Belli, M; Guida, M

    2016-11-01

    Vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA), is a chronic medical condition experienced by postmenopausal women, with prevalence estimated ranging from 10% to 50% [1]. VVA is characterized by a constellation of symptoms, that may affect daily activities, sexuality, relationships, and quality of life [3]. Early recognition and effective treatment of VVA may enhance sexual health and the quality of life of women and their partners. Some vulvar conditions such as lichen sclerosus are more prevalent in the postmenopausal years. Lichen sclerosus has been suggested as a precursor of Vulvar squamous cell carcinoma. The vulvar exam in post-menopausal women plays an essential role in prevention of cancer because it allows to identify women who should undergo vulvar skin biopsy in order to early detect pre-neoplastic lesions for early diagnosis of cancer of the vulva.

  17. Overview of methods used in cross-cultural comparisons of menopausal symptoms and their determinants: Guidelines for Strengthening the Reporting of Menopause and Aging (STROMA) studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melby, Melissa K; Sievert, Lynnette Leidy; Anderson, Debra; Obermeyer, Carla Makhlouf

    2011-10-01

    This paper reviews the methods used in cross-cultural studies of menopausal symptoms with the goal of formulating recommendations to facilitate comparisons of menopausal symptoms across cultures. It provides an overview of existing approaches and serves to introduce four separate reviews of vasomotor, psychological, somatic, and sexual symptoms at midlife. Building on an earlier review of cross-cultural studies of menopause covering time periods until 2004, these reviews are based on searches of Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL and Google Scholar for English-language articles published from 2004 to 2010 using the terms "cross cultural comparison" and "menopause." Two major criteria were used: a study had to include more than one culture, country, or ethnic group and to have asked about actual menopausal symptom experience. We found considerable variation across studies in age ranges, symptom lists, reference period for symptom recall, variables included in multivariate analyses, and the measurement of factors (e.g., menopausal status and hormonal factors, demographic, anthropometric, mental/physical health, and lifestyle measures) that influence vasomotor, psychological, somatic and sexual symptoms. Based on these reviews, we make recommendations for future research regarding age range, symptom lists, reference/recall periods, and measurement of menopausal status. Recommendations specific to the cross-cultural study of vasomotor, psychological, somatic, and sexual symptoms are found in the four reviews that follow this introduction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A critical review of traditional Chinese medicine use amongst women with menopausal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, W; Sibbritt, D W; Hickman, L; Kong, X; Yang, L; Adams, J

    2014-12-01

    To provide the first critical review of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) use amongst symptomatic menopausal women, drawing upon work examining the perspectives of both TCM users and TCM practitioners. A search was conducted in three English-language databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL and AMED) and three Chinese-language databases (CNKI, VIP and CBM Disc) for 2002-2013 international peer-reviewed articles reporting empirical findings of TCM use in menopause. A total of 25 journal articles reporting 22 studies were identified as meeting the review inclusion criteria. Chinese herbal medicine appears to be the most common therapy amongst symptomatic menopausal women, and vasomotor symptoms and emotional changes are the most frequent symptoms for which TCM is sought. However, evidence regarding the prevalence of TCM use and users' profile in menopause is limited. Existing studies are of varied methodological quality, often reporting low response rate, extensive recall bias and a lack of syndrome differentiation. This review provides insights for practitioners and health policy-makers regarding TCM care to symptomatic menopausal women. More nationally representative studies are required to rigorously examine TCM use for the management of menopausal symptoms. Syndrome differentiation of menopausal women is an area which also warrants further attention.

  19. EMAS position statement: Non-hormonal management of menopausal vasomotor symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintziori, Gesthimani; Lambrinoudaki, Irene; Goulis, Dimitrios G; Ceausu, Iuliana; Depypere, Herman; Erel, C Tamer; Pérez-López, Faustino R; Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin; Simoncini, Tommaso; Tremollieres, Florence; Rees, Margaret

    2015-07-01

    To review non-hormonal therapy options for menopausal vasomotor symptoms. The current EMAS position paper aims to provide to provide guidance for managing peri- and postmenopausal women who cannot or do not wish to take menopausal hormone therapy (MHT). Literature review and consensus of expert opinion. Non-hormonal management of menopausal symptoms includes lifestyle modifications, diet and food supplements, non-hormonal medications and application of behavioral and alternative medicine therapies. There is insufficient or conflicting evidence to suggest that exercise, supplements or a diet rich in phytoestrogens are effective for vasomotor menopausal symptoms. Selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin norepinephrine-reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) and gabapentin could be proposed as alternatives to MHT for menopausal symptoms, mainly hot flushes. Behavioral therapies and alternative medicine interventions have been tried, but the available evidence is still limited. A number of interventions for non-hormonal management of menopausal vasomotor symptoms are now available. For women who cannot or do not wish to take estrogens, non-hormonal management is now a realistic option. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Maca (Lepidium meyenii) for treatment of menopausal symptoms: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Yang, Eun Jin; Lim, Hyun-Ja; Ernst, Edzard

    2011-11-01

    Maca (Lepidium meyenii), an Andean plant of the brassica (mustard) family has been used for centuries in the Andes as an adaptogenic plant to manage anemia, infertility and female hormone balance. The aim of this review was to assess the evidence for and against the effectiveness of the maca plant as a treatment for menopausal symptoms. We searched 17 databases from their inception up to June 2011 and included all randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that compared any type of maca-based intervention to a placebo for the treatment of menopausal symptoms. All studies were assessed for methodological quality using the Cochrane 'risk of bias' assessment tool. Four RCTs met all inclusion criteria. These RCTs tested the effects of maca on menopausal symptoms in healthy perimenopausal, early postmenopausal, and late postmenopausal women. Using the Kupperman Menopausal Index and the Greene Climacteric Score, all RCTs demonstrated favorable effects of maca. There have been very few rigorous trials of maca for menopausal symptoms. The results of our systematic review provide limited evidence for the effectiveness of maca as a treatment for menopausal symptoms. However, the total number of trials, the total sample size, and the average methodological quality of the primary studies, were too limited to draw firm conclusions. Furthermore, the safety has not been proved yet. Therefore, the efficacy and safety should be tested in larger studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence of menopausal symptoms in Asian midlife women: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M Rakibul; Gartoulla, P; Bell, R J; Fradkin, P; Davis, S R

    2015-04-01

    To systematically review published articles for the prevalence of menopausal symptoms in Asian women. A comprehensive and systematic literature search was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, SCOPUS and Google scholar in June 2013 to retrieve all English-language studies that included information on the prevalence of menopausal symptoms in women living in Asian countries. Risk of bias of included studies was assessed using a risk-of-bias tool explicitly designed for the systematic review of prevalence studies. Twenty-three independent studies met our inclusion criteria. Physical symptoms were the most prevalent symptoms compared to psychological, vasomotor and sexual symptoms. There was a wide variation in the prevalence of all symptoms across the menopausal stages due to the differences in modes of recruitment, study design, sampling procedures, the time frame over which symptoms were assessed and use of different diagnostic or screening tools. A high level of bias was observed for both external and internal validity for most studies. Although there is a wide variation in the reported prevalence of menopausal symptoms, physical symptoms predominate, followed by psychological symptoms, vasomotor symptoms and sexual symptoms. Further studies of representative samples are necessary to understand whether the variations in prevalence reporting are a function of methodological issues or due to ethnic, cultural or other socioeconomic differences.

  2. Strategies and issues for managing menopause-related symptoms in diverse populations: ethnic and racial diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Valerie Montgomery

    2005-12-19

    Menopause is a naturally occurring "equal opportunity" event that every woman who lives beyond the age of approximately 52 years will experience. During the next 20 years, approximately 3.5 million African American women, 2 million Latinas, and 1 million Asian American women will enter the menopause. How a woman approaches the menopausal transition depends on a number of factors, from educational level to socioeconomic status; health-related factors, including stress; and marital status. Increasingly, the roles of race and ethnicity, as they relate to menopausal symptoms, are being explored. Understanding similarities and differences among women of color in perceptions, attitudes, and expectations surrounding the menopause can help provide culturally appropriate care and promote lifestyles that may decrease symptoms and increase quality of life. For example, minority women are usually the gatekeepers for healthcare for themselves and their families and have a highly developed social support network, often including extended family, a church community, and involvement in sororal or social organizations. In the future, research on menopausal symptoms among women of different racial/ethnic groups should focus on exploring in greater detail the effect of dietary factors and body mass index, additional evaluation of pituitary sensitivity, and use of complementary and alternative medicines in symptom management, with a better understanding of the risks and benefits of such therapies.

  3. Severity and clustering of menopausal symptoms among obese and nonobese postmenopausal women in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E S Sharanya Shre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The symptoms of menopause have a negative impact on quality of life, especially in women transitioning to menopause and earlier transitions. This study was conducted with the objective of assessing the effect of obesity on the severity of menopausal symptoms and the clustering of symptoms in postmenopausal women in India. Methodology: The Menopausal Rating Scale (MRS was used to assess the severity of menopausal symptoms of postmenopausal women of Chennai, visiting Saveetha Medical College, Chennai, India. This cross-sectional study was conducted from August to November 2013 in Chennai, India. Sociodemographic characteristics, anthropometric measurements, blood pressure level, menopausal history, personal health history, and hormonal disorder issues were investigated. Results: The results have shown that 24% of the participants had complaint of mild to severe hot flushes, half of them had reported heart ailments (49%; n = 74, and disturbed sleep (48%; n = 72. The proportion of overweight/obese participants was higher in married (64% than widows (41%, and this difference was found statistically significant (P = 0.005. There were no significant differences in MRS scores of obese and nonobese postmenopausal participants. Conclusion: There is a need of developing interactive, user friendly, technology based education module for addressing the chronic ailments of postmenopausal women.

  4. NIH State-of-the-Science Conference Statement on management of menopause-related symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To provide health care providers, patients, and the general public with a responsible assessment of currently available data on the management of menopause-related symptoms. A non-DHHS, nonadvocate 12-member panel representing the fields of obstetrics and gynecology, general internal medicine, endocrinology, rheumatology, family and health psychology, geriatric medicine, health services research, demography, biochemistry, epidemiology, clinical research, and biostatistics. In addition, 26 experts in fields related to the conference topic presented data to the panel and to the conference audience. Presentations by experts and a systematic review of the medical literature prepared by the Oregon Evidence-based Practice Center, through the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's Evidence-based Practice Centers Program. Scientific evidence was given precedence over clinical anecdotal experience. Answering pre-determined questions, the panel drafted its statement based on scientific evidence presented in open forum and on the published scientific literature. The draft statement was read in its entirety on the final day of the conference and circulated to the audience for comment. The panel then met in executive session to consider the comments received, and released a revised statement later that day at http://consensus.nih.gov. This statement is an independent report of the panel and is not a policy statement of the NIH or the Federal Government. A final copy of this statement is available, along with other recent conference statements, at the same web address of http://consensus.nih.gov. Menopause is the permanent cessation of menstrual periods that occurs naturally in women, usually in their early 50s. Many women have few or no symptoms; these women are not in need of medical treatment. Premenopausal or perimenopausal women who have menopause induced by surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation are more likely to experience bothersome and even disabling symptoms. These

  5. Aromatherapy Massage Affects Menopausal Symptoms in Korean Climacteric Women: A Pilot-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Myung-Haeng; Yang, Yun Seok

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of aromatherapy massage on menopausal symptoms in Korean climacteric women. Kupperman's menopausal index was used to compare an experimental group of 25 climacteric women with a wait-listed control group of 27 climacteric women. Aromatherapy was applied topically to subjects in the experimental group in the form of massage on the abdomen, back and arms using lavender, rose geranium, rose and jasmine in almond and primrose oils once a week for 8 weeks (eight times in total). The experimental group reported a significantly lower total menopausal index than wait-listed controls (P aromatherapy massage may be an effective treatment of menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, depression and pain in climacteric women. However, it could not be verified whether the positive effects were from the aromatherapy, the massage or both. Further rigorous studies should be done with more objective measures. PMID:18830459

  6. Complementary and alternative therapies for the management of menopause-related symptoms: a systematic evidence review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedrow, Anne; Miller, Jill; Walker, Miranda; Nygren, Peggy; Huffman, Laurie Hoyt; Nelson, Heidi D

    2006-07-24

    Nearly half of adults in the United States use complementary and alternative therapies each year for a variety of reasons. These therapies are increasingly popular among women seeking alternatives to treatment with estrogen for managing menopausal symptoms. The objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness of complementary and alternative therapies in the management of menopausal symptoms. MEDLINE, PsychINFO, Cochrane Library database, MANTIS, and AMED. Full-text, English-language, randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses comparing a complementary or alternative therapy with placebo or control for treatment of menopausal symptoms. All eligible trials were reviewed, abstracted into evidence tables, and rated for quality. Seventy randomized controlled trials met inclusion criteria. Forty-eight studies of phytoestrogens and other biologically based agents showed mixed results. Smaller numbers of studies using mind-body, energy, manipulative, and body-based therapies and whole medical systems showed little benefit in treating menopausal symptoms. Although individual trials suggest benefits from certain therapies, data are insufficient to support the effectiveness of any complementary and alternative therapy in this review for the management of menopausal symptoms. Many of these potential therapies warrant further study in trials with rigorous scientific designs to determine benefit and safety.

  7. Psychosocial and socioeconomic burden of vasomotor symptoms in menopause: A comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utian Wulf H

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many women experience vasomotor symptoms at or around the time of menopause. Hot flushes and night sweats are considered primary menopausal symptoms that may also be associated with sleep and mood disturbances, as well as decreased cognitive function. All of these symptoms may lead to social impairment and work-related difficulties that significantly decrease overall quality of life. Hot flushes have shown a great deal of variability in their frequency and severity in women. In some women, hot flushes persist for several months; in others, they may last for more than 10 years. Traditionally vasomotor symptoms were reported to begin 5 to 10 years prior to the cessation of the final menstrual cycle, corresponding with the initial decline in circulating gonadal hormones; however, night sweats in particular most often begin in perimenopause. The pathogenesis of hot flushes has not yet been fully elucidated, but the circuitry involving estrogen and neurotransmitters, norepinephrine and serotonin specifically, are hypothesized to play a major role in the altered homeostatic thermoregulatory mechanisms underlying these events. Menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms are associated with significant direct and indirect costs. Overall costs of traditional pharmacotherapy or complementary and alternative medicine modalities, including over-the-counter treatments and dietary supplements, for managing menopause-related vasomotor symptoms are substantial and include initial and follow-up physician visits and telephone calls. Additional costs include laboratory testing, management of adverse events, loss of productivity at work, and personal and miscellaneous costs. Pharmacoeconomic analyses, including those that consider risks identified by the Women's Health Initiative, generally support the cost-effectiveness of hormonal therapy for menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms, which have been the mainstay for the management of these symptoms for more

  8. Psychosocial and socioeconomic burden of vasomotor symptoms in menopause: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utian, Wulf H

    2005-08-05

    Many women experience vasomotor symptoms at or around the time of menopause. Hot flushes and night sweats are considered primary menopausal symptoms that may also be associated with sleep and mood disturbances, as well as decreased cognitive function. All of these symptoms may lead to social impairment and work-related difficulties that significantly decrease overall quality of life. Hot flushes have shown a great deal of variability in their frequency and severity in women. In some women, hot flushes persist for several months; in others, they may last for more than 10 years. Traditionally vasomotor symptoms were reported to begin 5 to 10 years prior to the cessation of the final menstrual cycle, corresponding with the initial decline in circulating gonadal hormones; however, night sweats in particular most often begin in perimenopause. The pathogenesis of hot flushes has not yet been fully elucidated, but the circuitry involving estrogen and neurotransmitters, norepinephrine and serotonin specifically, are hypothesized to play a major role in the altered homeostatic thermoregulatory mechanisms underlying these events. Menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms are associated with significant direct and indirect costs. Overall costs of traditional pharmacotherapy or complementary and alternative medicine modalities, including over-the-counter treatments and dietary supplements, for managing menopause-related vasomotor symptoms are substantial and include initial and follow-up physician visits and telephone calls. Additional costs include laboratory testing, management of adverse events, loss of productivity at work, and personal and miscellaneous costs. Pharmacoeconomic analyses, including those that consider risks identified by the Women's Health Initiative, generally support the cost-effectiveness of hormonal therapy for menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms, which have been the mainstay for the management of these symptoms for more than 50 years. However

  9. Efficacy of electroacupuncture for symptoms of menopausal transition: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhishun; Wang, Yang; Xu, Huanfang; Wu, Jiani; He, Liyun; Jiang, John Yi; Yan, Shiyan; Du, Ruosang; Liu, Baoyan

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that acupuncture can alleviate postmenopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes, but few studies have assessed symptoms during the menopausal transition (MT) period. Thus, the effect of acupuncture upon MT symptoms is unclear. We designed a large-scale trial aimed at evaluating the efficacy of electroacupuncture for MT symptoms compared with sham electroacupuncture and at observing the safety of electroacupuncture. Methods/design In this multicenter randomiz...

  10. Correlation of Menopausal Symptoms and Quality of Life with Physical Performance in Middle-Aged Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rívea Trindade da; Câmara, Saionara Maria Aires da; Moreira, Mayle Andrade; Nascimento, Rafaela Andrade do; Vieira, Mariana Carmem Apolinário; Morais, Maria Socorro Medeiros de; Maciel, Álvaro Campos Cavalcanti

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Some studies have investigated the influence of hormonal deficits and menopausal status in muscle disorders of women. However, it has not been investigated the relationship of both climacteric symptoms and the perception of quality of life with physical performance. Objective To evaluate the correlation of menopausal symptoms and quality of life with physical performance in middle-aged women. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed from April to November 2013 in the municipality of Parnamirim, in the Brazilian state, Rio Grande do Norte. The sample was composed of 497 women aged 40-65 years. The Menopause Rating Scale (MRS) and the Utian Quality of Life (UQOL) questionnaire were used to evaluate menopausal symptoms and quality of life respectively. Measures of physical performance included handgrip strength, knee extensor and flexor strengths (using an isometric dynamometer), gait speed, and chair stand test. The correlation between menopausal symptoms and quality of life with physical performance was assessed by Pearson's correlation coefficient with significance set at p quality of life items including occupational (p = 0.001), emotional (p = 0.005), and total UQOL (p = 0.01), but a negative correlation with sit-to-stand time and all quality of life domains (p quality of life were related with worse physical performance. Thus, preventive measures should be implemented to avoid adverse effects on physical performance at more advanced ages. Thieme Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  11. Review of Efficacy of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatments for Menopausal Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thea R; Franks, Rachel B; Fox, Carol

    2017-05-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments have been used for thousands of years around the world. There has been increased interest in utilizing CAM for menopausal symptoms since the release of results of the Women's Health Initiative elucidated long-term adverse effects associated with hormone therapy. Women looking for more natural or safer means to treat hot flushes, night sweats, and other menopausal symptoms often turn to CAM such as yoga, phytoestrogens, or black cohosh. Yet there have been few well-conducted studies looking at the efficacy of these treatments. This review examines randomized clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses evaluating the effectiveness of commonly used CAM for the treatment of menopausal symptoms. © 2017 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  12. The influence of selected socio-demographic variables on symptoms occurring during the menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Makara-Studzińska

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is considered that the lifestyle conditioned by socio-demographic or socio-economic factors determines the health condition of people to the greatest extent. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of selected socio-demographic factors on the kinds of symptoms occurring during menopause. Material and methods : The study group consisted of 210 women aged 45 to 65, not using hormone replacement therapy, staying at healthcare centers for rehabilitation treatment. The study was carried out in 2013-2014 in the Silesian, Podlaskie and Lesser Poland voivodeships. The set of tools consisted of the authors’ own survey questionnaire and the Menopause Rating Scale (MRS. Results : The most commonly occurring symptom in the group of studied women was a depressive mood, from the group of psychological symptoms, followed by physical and mental fatigue, and discomfort connected with muscle and joint pain. The greatest intensity of symptoms was observed in the group of women with the lowest level of education, reporting an average or bad material situation, and unemployed women. Conclusions : An alarmingly high number of reported psychological symptoms in the group of menopausal women was observed, and in particular among the group of low socio-economic status. Career seems to be a factor reducing the risk of occurrence of psychological symptoms. There is an urgent need for health promotion and prophylaxis in the group of menopausal women, and in many cases for implementation of specialist psychological assistance.

  13. Hatha Yoga practice decreases menopause symptoms and improves quality of life: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Márcia P; Santaella, Danilo F; Pontes, Isabella M O; Shiramizu, Victor K M; Nascimento, Ezequiel B; Cabral, Alícia; Lemos, Telma M A M; Silva, Regina H; Ribeiro, Alessandra M

    2016-06-01

    Yoga practice includes a group of specific psychophysical techniques. Although previous studies showed beneficial effects of yoga for health and rehabilitation, improving quality of life, there are few studies on the possible therapeutic application of yoga during the climacteric period. The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychophysiological effects of Hatha Yoga regular practice in post-menopausal women. Eighty-eight post-menopausal women volunteered for this 12-week trial. They were randomly assigned to one of three groups: control (no intervention), exercise, and yoga. Questionnaires were applied in order to evaluate climacteric syndrome (Menopause Rating Scale), stress (Lipp Stress Symptom Inventory), quality of life (Brief World Health Organization Quality of Life), depression (Beck Depression Inventory) and anxiety (State/Trait Anxiety Inventories). Physiological changes were evaluated through hormone levels (cortisol, FSH, LH, progesterone and estradiol). At 12 weeks, yoga practitioners showed statistically lower scores for menopausal symptoms, stress levels and depression symptoms, as well as significantly higher scores in quality of life when compared to control and exercise groups. Only control group presented a significant increase in cortisol levels. The yoga and exercise groups showed decreased levels of FSH and LH when compared to control group. These results suggest that yoga promotes positive psychophysiological changes in post-menopausal women and may be applied as a complementary therapy towards this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sedentary lifestyle in middle-aged women is associated with severe menopausal symptoms and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blümel, Juan E; Fica, Juan; Chedraui, Peter; Mezones-Holguín, Edward; Zuñiga, María C; Witis, Silvina; Vallejo, María S; Tserotas, Konstantinos; Sánchez, Hugo; Onatra, William; Ojeda, Eliana; Mostajo, Desireé; Monterrosa, Alvaro; Lima, Selva; Martino, Mabel; Hernández-Bueno, José A; Gómez, Gustavo; Espinoza, María T; Flores, Daniel; Calle, Andrés; Bravo, Luz M; Benítez, Zully; Bencosme, Ascanio; Barón, Germán; Aedo, Sócrates

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between sedentary lifestyle and the severity of menopausal symptoms and obesity in middle-aged women. The Menopause Rating Scale, the Goldberg Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Athens Insomnia Scale were administered to 6,079 Latin American women aged 40 to 59 years. Sedentary lifestyle was defined as fewer than three weekly, 30-minute periods of physical activity. Sedentary women had more severe menopausal symptoms (total Menopause Rating Scale score: 9.57 ± 6.71 vs 8.01 ± 6.27 points, P sedentary women. They also had greater mean waist circumference (86.2 ± 12.3 vs 84.3 ± 1.8 cm, P sedentary lifestyle. Having a stable partner (OR 0.85; 95% CI, 0.76-0.96), using hormone therapy (OR 0.75; 95% CI, 0.64-0.87) and having a higher educational level (OR 0.66; 95% CI, 0.60-0.74) were negatively related to sedentary lifestyle. There was a high prevalence of sedentary lifestyle in this middle-aged Latin American female sample which was associated with more severe menopausal symptoms and obesity.

  15. Complementary and alternative medicine for menopausal symptoms: a review of randomized, controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Fredi; Fugh-Berman, Adriane

    2002-11-19

    Women commonly use soy products, herbs, and other complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies for menopausal symptoms. Randomized, controlled trials have evaluated the efficacy and short-term safety of these therapies. To review randomized, controlled trials of CAM therapies for menopausal symptoms in order to better inform practice and guide future research. Searches of MEDLINE for articles published from January 1966 through March 2002, of the Alternative and Complementary Database (AMED) of the British Library for articles published from January 1985 through December 2000, and of the authors' own extensive files. Search terms were hot flash/flush, menopause, and climacteric, combined with phytoestrogens, alternative medicine, herbal medicine, traditional medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM ), Ayurveda, naturopathy, chiropractic, osteopathy, massage, yoga, relaxation therapy, homeopathy, aromatherapy, and therapeutic touch. 29 randomized, controlled clinical trials of CAM therapies for hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms were identified; of these, 12 dealt with soy or soy extracts, 10 with herbs, and 7 with other CAM therapies. Each author extracted information from half of the studies on the number of patients, study design, outcome measures, and results; the other author then checked these results. Soy seems to have modest benefit for hot flashes, but studies are not conclusive. Isoflavone preparations seem to be less effective than soy foods. Black cohosh may be effective for menopausal symptoms, especially hot flashes, but the lack of adequate long-term safety data (mainly on estrogenic stimulation of the breast or endometrium) precludes recommending long-term use. Single clinical trials have found that dong quai, evening primrose oil, a Chinese herb mixture, vitamin E, and acupuncture do not affect hot flashes; two trials have shown that red clover has no benefit for treating hot flashes. Black cohosh and foods that contain

  16. Design of a randomized controlled trial of Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy for treatment-induced menopausal symptoms in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atema, Vera; van Leeuwen, Marieke; Oldenburg, Hester S A; Retèl, Valesca; van Beurden, Marc; Hunter, Myra S; Aaronson, Neil K

    2016-11-25

    Menopausal symptoms are common and may be particularly severe in younger women who undergo treatment-induced menopause. Medications to reduce menopausal symptoms are either contra-indicated or have bothersome side effects. Previous studies have demonstrated that face-to-face cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is effective in alleviating menopausal symptoms in women with breast cancer. However, compliance with face-to-face CBT programs can be problematic. A promising approach is to use the Internet to make this form of CBT more accessible and feasible for patients. This study is evaluating the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of an Internet-based CBT program, with or without therapist guidance, in alleviating or reducing the severity of menopausal symptoms. In a multicenter, randomized controlled trial we are evaluating the efficacy of two Internet-based CBT programs in alleviating or reducing the impact of menopausal symptoms, and particularly hot flushes and night sweats, in breast cancer survivors who have experienced a treatment-induced menopause. Secondary outcomes include sexual functioning, sleep quality, hot flush frequency, psychological distress, health-related quality of life and cost-effectiveness. We will recruit 248 women who will be randomized to either a therapist guided or a self-management version of the 6-week Internet-based CBT program, or to a usual care, waiting list control group. Self-administered questionnaires are completed at baseline (T0), and at 10 weeks (T1) and 24 weeks (T2) post-randomization. Internet-based CBT is a potentially useful treatment for reducing menopausal symptoms in breast cancer survivors. This study will provide evidence on the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of such an Internet-based CBT program, with or without therapist support. If demonstrated to be efficacious and cost-effective, the availability of such structured supportive intervention programs will be a welcome addition to standard medical treatment offered

  17. Coping with menopausal symptoms: An internet survey of Belgian postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depypere, H; Pintiaux, A; Desreux, J; Hendrickx, M; Neven, P; Marchowicz, E; Albert, V; Leclercq, V; Van den Branden, S; Rozenberg, S

    2016-08-01

    An internet survey was performed to obtain data on the current use in Belgium of hormone replacement therapy and alternative treatments for the alleviation of menopausal symptoms. A supplementary aim was to assess the use of opt-in internet opinion panels (TalkToChange, http://www.talktochange.com, and GMI, http://www.gmi-mr.com/global-panel) as a potential new way to obtain data on menopausal issues. Data were collected via an internet platform from 696 postmenopausal women aged 45-60 years. Respondents were asked questions about their socio-demographic profile, their experience of the menopause, the burden of the menopause, its impact on their quality of life and the treatment of menopausal symptoms (if any). The opt-in internet opinion panels proved a quick way (19days) to obtain reliable information with a low error margin (3.7%). The online survey collected detailed socio-demographic data. Almost all of the women (98%) had heard about the menopause before. Sixty-one percent perceived the menopause as a temporary phase (17% thought it lasted for one or two years and 44% thought it lasted for three to five years) and only 39% realized the menopause would last for the rest of their life. Twenty-three percent of the women reported any kind of impact of the menopause on their quality of life. However, for the other 77% the menopause had resulted in complaints. No differences according to the women's age, level of education or professional status were found in this respect. Sixty-nine percent of the women had 'ever' used some type of treatment for menopausal symptoms and 53% were currently using a treatment. Forty percent of those with more than three symptoms were currently untreated. Of those who were not on hormone replacement therapy (HRT), 61% would not consider taking it (54% were 'strongly opposed' and 7% simply 'opposed'), while 8% would consider asking their doctor for HRT. Among those women who were opposed to HRT, 25% indicated that they were afraid of

  18. Severe menopausal symptoms in middle-aged women are associated to female and male factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chedraui, Peter; Pérez-López, Faustino R; Mendoza, Marcela; Morales, Bella; Martinez, María A; Salinas, Ana M; Hidalgo, Luis

    2010-05-01

    The frequency and intensity of menopausal symptoms within a given population, as assessed by several tools, may vary and depend on several factors, such as age, menopausal status, chronic conditions and personal and partner socio-demographic profile. To determine the frequency and intensity of menopausal symptoms and related risk factors among middle-aged women. In this cross-sectional study a total of 404 women aged 40 to 59 years, visiting inpatients at the Enrique C. Sotomayor Gynecology and Obstetrics Hospital, Guayaquil, Ecuador, were requested to fill out the menopause rating scale (MRS) and a questionnaire containing personal and partner data. Mean age of surveyed women (n=404) was 48.2+/-5.7 years, 85.1% had 12 or less years of schooling and 44.8% were postmenopausal. None was on hormonal therapy (HT) for the menopause or psychotropic drugs. Regarding their partner, erectile dysfunction was present in 23.8%, premature ejaculation in 21.2% and 43.5% abused alcohol. The four most frequently found symptoms of those composing the MRS were muscle and joint problems (80%), depressive mood (73.5%), physical and mental exhaustion (71.3%) and irritability (68%). Mean total MRS score was 18+/-10.6 (median 17) and for subscales: 7.2+/-4.5 (somatic); 6.9+/-4.8 (psychological) and 3.9+/-3.4 (urogenital). Women presented severe scores in 53, 36.1, 48.3 and 49.8% for total MRS and somatic, psychological and urogenital subscales, respectively. After adjusting for confounding factors, logistic regression analysis determined that female higher parity and partner premature ejaculation increased the risk for presenting severe total MRS scores (impaired female quality of life), whereas women who had a positive perception of their health status were at decreased risk. In this middle-aged series psychological menopausal symptoms were the most frequent in which severity was associated to parity and partner sexual dysfunction.

  19. Gender Differences in Some Stress Symptoms and Intensity of Experiencing Stress Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Maja Mesko Stok; Mateja Videmsek; Joze Stihec; Zlatka Mesko Stok; Damir Karpljuk

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the symptoms of stress and to establish gender differences in stress symptoms. We tried to find out if there are gender differences in the stress level at work, if there are gender differences in terms of stress symptoms frequency, and if there are gender differences in terms of the intensity of experiencing stress symptoms. In this study 85 randomly selected managers from Slovene companies participated. The results of the study have shown that there are ...

  20. The management of menopausal symptoms in breast cancer survivors : A case-based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerink, Ellen A. G.; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Schroder, Carolien P.; Mourits, Marian J. E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The intensified treatment of breast cancer improves survival but has a price in terms of side-effects. The main side-effects, such as vasomotor symptoms and impaired sexual functioning, are related to premature menopause due to chemotherapy and/or anti-hormonal therapy. Though for some

  1. Methods for the design of vasomotor symptom trials: the menopausal strategies: finding lasting answers to symptoms and health network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Katherine M; Carpenter, Janet S; Guthrie, Katherine A; Anderson, Garnet L; Caan, Bette; Cohen, Lee S; Ensrud, Kristine E; Freeman, Ellen W; Joffe, Hadine; Sternfeld, Barbara; Reed, Susan D; Sherman, Sheryl; Sammel, Mary D; Kroenke, Kurt; Larson, Joseph C; Lacroix, Andrea Z

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the Menopausal Strategies: Finding Lasting Answers to Symptoms and Health network and methodological issues addressed in designing and implementing vasomotor symptom trials. Established in response to a National Institutes of Health request for applications, the network was charged with conducting rapid throughput randomized trials of novel and understudied available interventions postulated to alleviate vasomotor and other menopausal symptoms. Included are descriptions of and rationale for criteria used for interventions and study selection, common eligibility and exclusion criteria, common primary and secondary outcome measures, consideration of placebo response, establishment of a biorepository, trial duration, screening and recruitment, statistical methods, and quality control. All trial designs are presented, including the following: (1) a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitalopram in reducing vasomotor symptom frequency and severity; (2) a two-by-three factorial design trial to test three different interventions (yoga, exercise, and ω-3 supplementation) for the improvement of vasomotor symptom frequency and bother; and (3) a three-arm comparative efficacy trial of the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor venlafaxine and low-dose oral estradiol versus placebo for reducing vasomotor symptom frequency. The network's structure and governance are also discussed. The methods used in and the lessons learned from the Menopausal Strategies: Finding Lasting Answers to Symptoms and Health trials are shared to encourage and support the conduct of similar trials and to encourage collaborations with other researchers.

  2. Treating the root cause: acupuncture for the treatment of migraine, menopausal vasomotor symptoms, and chronic insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammes, Amber E; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L; Bauer, Brent A

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the effectiveness of a single intervention, acupuncture, for relieving or abolishing severe migraines, menopausal vasomotor symptoms, and chronic insomnia and, thus, markedly improving quality of life. A 49-year-old woman was referred for acupuncture treatment of her daily migraines, menopausal vasomotor symptoms, and chronic insomnia. The patient had received polypharmacy treatment for these conditions for several years but had rather limited relief of her symptoms. The patient received 10 weekly or biweekly acupuncture treatments over three months. Her migraines reduced in frequency and intensity after her first acupuncture treatment, and she was able to discontinue use of her migraine medications after her eighth treatment. Subsequently, her menopausal vasomotor symptoms and chronic insomnia resolved. This case illustrates successful treatment of the symptoms of three medical conditions with a single complementary, alternative, and integrative medicine procedure, namely, acupuncture, one of the key elements of traditional Chinese medicine. The patient's medical problems had been treated for years with a multitude of medications, which led to adverse effects and little symptomatic improvement. Providers of complementary, alternative, and integrative medicine and providers practicing allopathic medicine should seek treatment options for their patients that promise to be helpful for various symptoms or diseases, that is, treating the root cause rather than using polypharmacy for various symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cognitive-behavioral intervention among women with slight menopausal symptoms: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larroy García, Cristina; Gómez-Calcerrada, Sonia Gutiérrez

    2011-05-01

    Menopause is associated with a considerable variety of physical, psychological and social symptoms that can be treated using cognitive-behavioral techniques. In the present study, 21 women took part in an eight-week group intervention consisting of weekly two-hour sessions to address their slight symptoms related to the climacteric stage of life. The intervention included: psycho education on menopause, relaxation techniques, nutrition and fitness exercises, Kegel exercises, and problem-solving techniques. A control group was included that did not receive treatment and consisted of 28 women. The results revealed a significant reduction in most symptoms (including depression and anxiety) after intervention as compared to the baseline period. No changes appeared in the control group. The relevance of this work lies in the potential element of prevention this therapeutic package could offer to relieve various symptoms, slight and incipient, during the perimenopausal stage.

  4. Influence of habitual physical activity on the symptoms of climacterium/menopause and the quality of life of middle-aged women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guimarães ACA

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Adriana Coutinho de Azevedo Guimarães1, Fátima Baptista2 1Physical Education Department, Health and Sport Sciences Center, State University of Santa Catarina, Santa Catarina, Brazil; 2Exercise and Health Laboratory, Faculty of Human Movement, Technical University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal Aim: To analyze the influence of the duration of habitual physical activity (PA on the symptoms of climacterium/menopause and on several domains of the health-related quality of life (QOL in middle-aged women. Methods: One hundred and four 45- to 59-year-old women were placed into three groups: group A, subjects who maintained PA less than 30 minutes/day; group B, subjects who maintained or began to perform PA 30–60 minutes/day; and group C, subjects who maintained or increased PA to more than 60 minutes/day. Symptoms of menopause, QOL (physical, psychological, and social, and PA were assessed through the Kupperman Menopausal Index, World Health Organization Quality of Life Brief Version questionnaire, and International Physical Activity Questionnaire, respectively. Results: The analysis of covariance (ANCOVA results, adjusted for age, initial body mass index, schooling years, hormonal replacement therapy, and the number of diseases, indicated that the women who maintained or increased their total habitual PA to more than 60 minutes/day had reduced symptoms of climacterium/menopause (-5.4 ± 0.5; P = 0.001 and improved QOL in the psychological (4.4% ± 0.8%; P = 0.001 and social domains (2.0% ± 0.9%; P = 0.035. ANCOVA revealed a further improvement of approximately 5% in the psychological domain of QOL in group C, who also experienced decreased menopause symptoms (P = 0.001 and lost weight (P = 0.009. Conclusion: The habitual practice of at least moderate-intensity PA for 60 minutes/day has a favorable effect on climacterium/menopause symptoms and on QOL, particularly on its psychological and social domains. The influence of habitual PA at the

  5. Depressive symptoms and weight in midlife women: the role of stress eating and menopause status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Dana R; Dautovich, Natalie D

    2017-10-01

    Obesity is prevalent in midlife women and contributes to poor health outcomes. Understanding mechanisms leading to weight gain in this population is of importance for prevention and intervention. The current study investigated the association between depressive symptoms and weight in midlife women by examining stress eating as a mediator between depressive symptoms and weight; and menopause status as a moderator of the associations of depressive symptoms, stress eating, and weight. An archival analysis was performed using data from the Midlife in the United States II study. The sample consisted of 815 premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Measures included the Composite International Diagnostic Interview-Short Form, a coping questionnaire, and body mass index. Moderated mediation analyses were conducted with ordinary least squares path analyses using Hayes' PROCESS macro. Controlling for covariates, depressive symptoms were not directly associated with weight (b = -0.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.4, 0.1). However, stress eating was a significant mediator between depressive symptoms and weight (b = 0.3, 95% CI 0.06, 0.3).The mediation was conditional on menopausal stage (b = 0.2, 95% CI 0.05, 0.4), with depressive symptoms and stress eating significantly associated in postmenopausal, not premenopausal women (b = 0.3, 95% CI 0.2, 0.5). Both stress eating and menopause status significantly contributed to the depressive symptom-weight association. Psychosocial factors play an important role in the association between depressive symptoms and weight, and the results highlight the need to focus on both behavioral factors, and also menopause status, when identifying who is at risk for the development of poor weight outcomes.

  6. Migraine in the post-menopausal period is associated with higher levels of mood disorders, disability, and more menopausal symptoms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carturan, Paula; Scorcine, Claudio; Fragoso, Yara Dadalti

    2016-01-01

    .... Only those with non-surgical menopause and no hormone replacement therapy were included. Prevalence and characterization of headaches were assessed, as well as the burden of migraine, traits of anxiety and depression, and menopausal symptomatology...

  7. Relationship between sociodemographic, reproductive, and lifestyle factors and the severity of menopausal symptoms among Egyptian women in Alexandria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Raya, Suzan; Sadek, Sameh; AbelBaqy, Mohammed; ElSharkawy, Omneya; Bakr, Lobna; Ismail, Karim; Abou-Raya, Anna

    2016-08-01

    During menopause, women often experience some symptoms which may affect their daily activities. Information about menopausal experiences among different racial and ethnic groups is important for healthcare personnel to provide appropriate and specific interventions. The aim of the present study was thus to determine the frequency and determinants of severity of menopausal symptoms among Egyptian women using the Menopause Rating Scale as a screening tool for identification of menopausal symptoms. A total of 540 women (aged 40-65 y) were recruited in this cross-sectional study. Demographic information was collected, and the Menopause Rating Scale questionnaire was administered. Most frequently reported symptoms were joint and muscular discomfort (501, 92.8%) followed by urogenital symptoms (460, 85.2%). A significant association was found between the number of menopausal symptoms and working status of participants (r = 0.504, P = 0.005), number of children (r = 0.474, P = 0.042), and body mass index (r = 0.544, P = 0.006). Women who reported urogenital symptoms and self-perceived general health as poor were more frequently referred to a gynecologist for moderate-to-severe menopausal symptoms. Participant-related information such as working status, which was shown to increase the frequency of psychological symptoms in our ethnic group, should be noted by the physician, and a suitable approach should be adopted to achieve better therapy outcomes. Counseling about the importance of maintaining an ideal body weight and exercise should be emphasized to reduce menopausal symptoms. Appropriate advice and support in improving the overall state of the postmenopausal women is essential.

  8. Aromatherapy Massage Affects Menopausal Symptoms in Korean Climacteric Women: A Pilot-Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Haeng Hur

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of aromatherapy massage on menopausal symptoms in Korean climacteric women. Kupperman's menopausal index was used to compare an experimental group of 25 climacteric women with a wait-listed control group of 27 climacteric women. Aromatherapy was applied topically to subjects in the experimental group in the form of massage on the abdomen, back and arms using lavender, rose geranium, rose and jasmine in almond and primrose oils once a week for 8 weeks (eight times in total. The experimental group reported a significantly lower total menopausal index than wait-listed controls (P < 0.05. There were also significant intergroup differences in subcategories such as vasomotor, melancholia, arthralgia and myalgia (all P < 0.05. These findings suggest that aromatherapy massage may be an effective treatment of menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, depression and pain in climacteric women. However, it could not be verified whether the positive effects were from the aromatherapy, the massage or both. Further rigorous studies should be done with more objective measures.

  9. The efficacy of acupuncture on menopausal symptoms (ACOM study): protocol for a randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Kamma Sundgaard; Brodersen, John; Siersma, Volkert; Waldorff, Frans Boch

    2017-03-01

    Around 75% of menopausal women experience hot flushes (HF) and 10-20% of all postmenopausal women find this very distressing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture on moderate-to-severe menopausal symptoms in general and HF in particular. An un-blinded randomised trial (cross-over) with 1:1 allocation to early (intervention) versus late (control) acupuncture. The included women suffer from moderate-to-severe HF and will receive a weekly treatment during five consecutive weeks in the following predefined acupuncture points: CV-3, CV-4, LR-8, SP-6, SP-9. All acupuncturists will be medical doctors educated in acupuncture. The primary outcome is change in HF from baseline to week 6 measured by the HF scale from the MenoScores Questionnaire (MSQ). Secondary outcomes are change in other menopausal symptoms, in particular day and night sweats and menopausal-specific sleeping problems, also measured by other scales from the MSQ. A total of 68 patients must be enrolled to detect a relevant clinical reduction on the above MSQ scales. Both intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses will be conducted; four or more treatments are considered adequate adherence. In the ACOM study, we explore the potential benefits of acupuncture on moderate-to-severe meno-pausal symptoms. The cross-over design offers the possi-bility of examining the legacy effect of acupuncture. The Idella Foundation, the University of Copenhagen and the Research Foundation of General Practice. Clinicaltrials NCT02746497.

  10. Prediction of risk of depressive symptoms in menopausal women based on hot flash and sweating symptoms: a multicentre study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng YW

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Yanwei Zheng,1 Yibei Zhou,1 Jiangshan Hu,1 Jieping Zhu,2 Qi Hua,3 Minfang Tao1 1Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital, 2Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital East Branch, 3Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, International Peace Maternal and Child Health Hospital of the China Welfare Institute, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Objective: The present study aimed to develop a symptom-based (namely, hot flashes and sweating scoring system for predicting the risk of depressive symptoms in menopausal women via a multicentre cross-sectional survey. Methods: The data examined in the present study were obtained from 1,004 women aged 40–60 years who underwent physical examination at A Hospital. The basic information was obtained using a questionnaire-based survey. A self-rating depression scale was used to obtain the depressive symptom scores, while the Kupperman Menopausal Index was used to obtain the scores for the frequency of hot flashes and sweating. A logistic regression model was also established. The resulting β coefficient was employed to calculate and predict the risk of depressive symptoms in these women and a risk scoring system was established. The scoring system was validated using samples from 2 other centers (validation sample 1: B Hospital, 440 women; validation sample 2: C Hospital, 247 women. Results: The scoring system developed to predict the risk of depressive symptoms in menopausal women was based on hot flash and sweating symptoms and associated with menopausal status, hot flash scores, education level (high school education and below and being diabetic. The scoring system yielded a total score of 0–54 points. For women in the study sample, the area under the curve (AUC of depressive symptom risk score was 0.750 (95% CI, 0.708–0.793. Validation sample 1 had an AUC of 0.731 (95% CI, 0.667–0.794, while

  11. Effectiveness of Yoga for Menopausal Symptoms: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Cramer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To systematically review and meta-analyze the effectiveness of yoga for menopausal symptoms. Methods. Medline, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO were screened through April 2012. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs were included if they assessed the effect of yoga on major menopausal symptoms, namely, (1 psychological symptoms, (2 somatic symptoms, (3 vasomotor symptoms, and/or (4 urogenital symptoms. For each outcome, standardized mean differences (SMDs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated. Two authors independently assessed risk of bias using the risk of bias tool recommended by the Cochrane Back Review Group. Results. Five RCTs with 582 participants were included in the qualitative review, and 4 RCTs with 545 participants were included in the meta-analysis. There was moderate evidence for short-term effects on psychological symptoms (SMD=−0.37; 95% CI −0.67 to −0.07; P=0.02. No evidence was found for total menopausal symptoms, somatic symptoms, vasomotor symptoms, or urogenital symptoms. Yoga was not associated with serious adverse events. Conclusion. This systematic review found moderate evidence for short-term effectiveness of yoga for psychological symptoms in menopausal women. While more rigorous research is needed to underpin these results, yoga can be preliminarily recommended as an additional intervention for women who suffer from psychological complaints associated with menopause.

  12. Effectiveness of yoga for menopausal symptoms: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Holger; Lauche, Romy; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To systematically review and meta-analyze the effectiveness of yoga for menopausal symptoms. Methods. Medline, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO were screened through April 2012. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included if they assessed the effect of yoga on major menopausal symptoms, namely, (1) psychological symptoms, (2) somatic symptoms, (3) vasomotor symptoms, and/or (4) urogenital symptoms. For each outcome, standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Two authors independently assessed risk of bias using the risk of bias tool recommended by the Cochrane Back Review Group. Results. Five RCTs with 582 participants were included in the qualitative review, and 4 RCTs with 545 participants were included in the meta-analysis. There was moderate evidence for short-term effects on psychological symptoms (SMD = -0.37; 95% CI -0.67 to -0.07; P = 0.02). No evidence was found for total menopausal symptoms, somatic symptoms, vasomotor symptoms, or urogenital symptoms. Yoga was not associated with serious adverse events. Conclusion. This systematic review found moderate evidence for short-term effectiveness of yoga for psychological symptoms in menopausal women. While more rigorous research is needed to underpin these results, yoga can be preliminarily recommended as an additional intervention for women who suffer from psychological complaints associated with menopause.

  13. Design of a randomized controlled trial of Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy for treatment-induced menopausal symptoms in breast cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atema, Vera; van Leeuwen, Marieke; Oldenburg, Hester S. A.; Retel, Valesca; van Beurden, Marc; Hunter, Myra S.; Aaronson, Neil K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Menopausal symptoms are common and may be particularly severe in younger women who undergo treatment-induced menopause. Medications to reduce menopausal symptoms are either contra-indicated or have bothersome side effects. Previous studies have demonstrated that face-to-face cognitive

  14. Burgeoning menopausal symptoms: An urgent public health concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Kulkarni

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: There is a high burden of postmenopausal symptoms which have shown an increasing trend with advancement of age. This calls for establishment of specific health interventions for postmenopausal women in the health-care settings.

  15. Management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms: Current treatment options, challenges and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Pachman, Deirdre R; Jones, Jason M; Loprinzi, Charles L

    2010-01-01

    Deirdre R Pachman1, Jason M Jones1, Charles L Loprinzi21Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Hot flashes are one of the most common and distressing symptoms associated with menopause, occurring in more than 75% of postmenopausal women. They are especially problematic in breast cancer patients since some breast cancer therapies can induce hot flashes. For mild hot flashes, it is proposed that behavioral modifications ar...

  16. [Few alternatives to estrogen replacement therapy for vegetative symptoms after menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammar, Mats; Nedstrand, Elizabeth; Wyon, Yvonne

    2004-04-29

    Vasomotor symptoms with hot flushes and sweating are reported by about 75 percent of women around menopause. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is the treatment of choice but some women have medical contraindications or side effects. There is, therefore, a need of alternative therapies. Progestagens may decrease hot flushes, as will clonidin and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Phytoestrogens, which exist in some dietary products and complementary and alternative medicines have estrogen-like effects and may decrease hot flushes, although there are contradictory scientific reports. Acupuncture, exercise and behavioral therapy may also decrease vasomotor symptoms. No alternative therapy is as effective as HRT.

  17. Supplementation with Pycnogenol® improves signs and symptoms of menopausal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errichi, S; Bottari, A; Belcaro, G; Cesarone, M R; Hosoi, M; Cornelli, U; Dugall, M; Ledda, A; Feragalli, B

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Pycnogenol® standardized pine bark extract for alleviation of signs and symptoms associated with menopausal transition. Pycnogenol® was used by 38 women as daily supplement in a dosage of 100 mg over an eight week period and menopausal symptoms were evaluated by means of a scoring system, based on a total number of 33 common signs and symptoms. A parallel control group of 32 comparable women was also followed up for the same period. Pycnogenol® was well tolerated, no side effects were reported and the compliance was very good with 98.6% of tablets used as prescribed. A range of 33 menopausal symptoms were evaluated using a scoring system with values ranging from zero (absent) to maximum 4 (very serious). A subset of six most common symptoms comprising hot flushes, night sweats, mood swings, irregular periods, loss of libido and vaginal dryness showed a decrease from average 2.67/4 to 1.45/4 after 8 weeks supplementation with Pycnogenol®. The control group of women showed no change from initial average 2.72/4 to 2.73/4 after eight weeks. The improvement of symptoms was statistical significant compared to the control group. Further symptoms related to fatigue, sleeping disorders, concentration and memory problems, dizziness, depression and irritability all improved significantly with Pycnogenol® compared to baseline values but did not reach statistical significance compared to the control group of women. The sensation of pain related to headaches, breast pain, the feeling of "electric shocks", tingling extremities, burning tongue and itchy skin all improved significantly after intake of Pycnogenol® for eight weeks compared to baseline. Specifically the sensation of "electric shocks" and digestive problems improved significantly with Pycnogenol® as compared to women in the control group. The presence of elevated oxidative stress in women was investigated measuring capillary blood plasma free radicals

  18. Menopausal symptoms in young survivors of breast cancer: a growing problem without an ideal solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Vijayashree; Chamberlain, Ronald S

    2012-10-01

    New breast cancers occur in 25% to 30% of women yoga may be helpful in mild cases of vasomotor symptoms, whereas newer antidepressants are promising in moderate to severe cases, and stellate ganglion block may be used in refractory cases. Local vaginal moisturizers, and in refractory cases low-dose estrogen creams, may ameliorate most urogenital symptoms. Bisphosphonates, vitamin D, and calcium can treat osteoporosis, and weight-bearing exercises decrease bone mineral density loss and help to control weight. Smoking cessation, exercise, and dietary modifications should be recommended to all young patients to decrease cardiac morbidity. At present, there is insufficient evidence to support any natural agent as a viable alternative to hormone replacement therapy to treat these symptoms. No single agent can ameliorate vasomotor, cardiac, skeletal, and sexual concerns of young breast cancer survivors coping with menopausal symptoms. Quality-of-life research involving premenopausal breast cancer survivors is lacking. Further study is needed to identify safe and effective treatments for menopausal symptoms and to confirm their long-term safety in young breast cancer survivors.

  19. Nanostructured transdermal hormone replacement therapy for relieving menopausal symptoms: a confocal Raman spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botelho, Marco Antonio; Queiroz, Dinalva Brito; Barros, Gisele; Guerreiro, Stela; Umbelino, Sonia; Lyra, Arao; Borges, Boniek; Freitas, Allan, E-mail: marcobotelho@pq.cnpq.br [Universidade Potiguar, Natal, RN (Brazil). Lab. de Nanotecnologia; Fechine, Pierre [Universidade Federal do Ceara (GQMAT/UFCE), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Analitica. Grupo Avancado de Biomateriais em Quimica; Queiroz, Danilo Caldas de [Instituto Federal de Ciencia e Tecnologia (IFCT), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia; Ruela, Ronaldo [Instituto de Biotecnologia Aplicada (INBIOS), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Almeida, Jackson Guedes [Universidade Federal do Vale de Sao Francisco (UNIVALE), Petrolina, PE (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas; Quintans Junior, Lucindo [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFSE), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisiologia

    2014-06-01

    Objective:to determine the safety and efficacy of a transdermal nanostructured formulation of progesterone (10%) combined with estriol (0.1%) + estradiol (0.25%) for relieving postmenopausal symptoms. Methods: a total of 66 postmenopausal Brazilian women with climacteric symptoms of natural menopause received transdermal nanostructured formulations of progesterone and estrogens in the forearm daily for 60 months to mimic the normal ovarian secretory pattern. Confocal Raman spectroscopy of hormones in skin layers was performed. Clinical parameters, serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone, blood pressure, BI-RADS classification from bilateral mammography, and symptomatic relief were compared between baseline and 60 months post-treatment. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02033512. Results: an improvement in climacteric symptoms was reported in 92.5% of women evaluated before and after 60 months of treatment. The serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone changed significantly (p<0.05) after treatment; the values of serum follicle-stimulating hormone decreased after 60 months from 82.04 ± 4.9 to 57.12 ± 4.1 IU/mL. A bilateral mammography assessment of the breasts revealed normal results in all women. No adverse health-related events were attributed to this hormone replacement therapy protocol. Conclusion: the nanostructured formulation is safe and effective in re-establishing optimal serum levels of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone and relieving the symptoms of menopause. This transdermal hormone replacement therapy may alleviate climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women. (author)

  20. Nanostructured transdermal hormone replacement therapy for relieving menopausal symptoms: a confocal Raman spectroscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Botelho

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the safety and efficacy of a transdermal nanostructured formulation of progesterone (10% combined with estriol (0.1% + estradiol (0.25% for relieving postmenopausal symptoms. METHODS: A total of 66 postmenopausal Brazilian women with climacteric symptoms of natural menopause received transdermal nanostructured formulations of progesterone and estrogens in the forearm daily for 60 months to mimic the normal ovarian secretory pattern. Confocal Raman spectroscopy of hormones in skin layers was performed. Clinical parameters, serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone, blood pressure, BI-RADS classification from bilateral mammography, and symptomatic relief were compared between baseline and 60 months post-treatment. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02033512. RESULTS: An improvement in climacteric symptoms was reported in 92.5% of women evaluated before and after 60 months of treatment. The serum concentrations of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone changed significantly (p<0.05 after treatment; the values of serum follicle-stimulating hormone decreased after 60 months from 82.04±4.9 to 57.12±4.1 IU/mL. A bilateral mammography assessment of the breasts revealed normal results in all women. No adverse health-related events were attributed to this hormone replacement therapy protocol. CONCLUSION: The nanostructured formulation is safe and effective in re-establishing optimal serum levels of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone and relieving the symptoms of menopause. This transdermal hormone replacement therapy may alleviate climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women.

  1. A challenge to the menopause stereotype: young Australian women's reflections of 'being diagnosed' as menopausal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughton, Maureen; Halliday, Lesley

    2008-12-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study designed to examine (i) possible explanations for difficulties young Australian women (under 40 years) encountered in the process of gaining a diagnosis of premature menopause and (ii) to address issues underpinning this aspect of menopause. Drawing on hermeneutic phenomenology, face-to-face interviews were carried out with 35 women who consented to share their experiences of 'being diagnosed' with premature menopause. The participants responded to an advertisement in a newspaper article, a radio announcement or through a menopause support centre. While all participants were located in Australia, larger numbers were from the metropolitan areas of Sydney, New South Wales, and Perth, Western Australia. This research reports that the process of finding an explanation for the physical and emotional symptoms the women were experiencing was very complex. The findings varied regarding the psychological and physical symptoms experienced, described feelings, and reasons that led to a diagnosis of menopause. This paper suggests that the age of the women and the non-specific symptoms experienced by them contributed significantly to the delay and uncertainty surrounding the experience of being diagnosed with premature menopause. There was uncertainty of the origin of symptoms, which led the women to feel as though they were 'going insane' or that it was 'all in their heads'. This frequently led to symptoms of menopause being attributed (by health professionals) to a psychiatric basis and menopause being overlooked for varying lengths of time.

  2. Nonhormonal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms: 2015 position statement of The North American Menopause Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    To update and expand The North American Menopause Society's evidence-based position on nonhormonal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms (VMS), previously a portion of the position statement on the management of VMS. NAMS enlisted clinical and research experts in the field and a reference librarian to identify and review available evidence. Five different electronic search engines were used to cull relevant literature. Using the literature, experts created a document for final approval by the NAMS Board of Trustees. Nonhormonal management of VMS is an important consideration when hormone therapy is not an option, either because of medical contraindications or a woman's personal choice. Nonhormonal therapies include lifestyle changes, mind-body techniques, dietary management and supplements, prescription therapies, and others. The costs, time, and effort involved as well as adverse effects, lack of long-term studies, and potential interactions with medications all need to be carefully weighed against potential effectiveness during decision making. Clinicians need to be well informed about the level of evidence available for the wide array of nonhormonal management options currently available to midlife women to help prevent underuse of effective therapies or use of inappropriate or ineffective therapies. Recommended: Cognitive-behavioral therapy and, to a lesser extent, clinical hypnosis have been shown to be effective in reducing VMS. Paroxetine salt is the only nonhormonal medication approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the management of VMS, although other selective serotonin reuptake/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, gabapentinoids, and clonidine show evidence of efficacy. Recommend with caution: Some therapies that may be beneficial for alleviating VMS are weight loss, mindfulness-based stress reduction, the S-equol derivatives of soy isoflavones, and stellate ganglion block, but additional studies of these therapies are

  3. The Effects of Yoga Participation on Women's Quality of Life and Symptom Management During the Menopausal Transition: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Brandi M; Van Puymbroeck, Marieke; Linder, Sandra M; Mcguire, Francis A; Watt, Paula J

    2015-01-01

    Typically lasting 5-10 years, the menopausal transition is associated with symptoms including hot flashes, night sweats, and labile mood. As these symptoms often hinder a woman's successful functioning in everyday life, hormone therapy is commonly prescribed as a means to diminish symptoms. Many women, however, are seeking complementary and alternative treatments due to side effects and/or detrimental health-risks associated with conventional therapies. We completed a mixed methods study to determine changes in physiological symptoms associated with menopause and changes in women's quality of life, as a result of participation in a 10-week yoga intervention.

  4. Estrogenic effects of herbal medicines from Costa Rica used for the management of menopausal symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Brian J.; Frasor, Jonna; Bellows, Lauren E.; Locklear, Tracie D.; Perez, Alice; Gomez- Laurito, Jorge; Mahady, Gail. B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Outcomes from the Women's Health Initiative have demonstrated adverse effects associated with hormone therapy (HT), and have prioritized the need to develop new alternative treatments for the management of menopause and osteoporosis. To this end, we have been investigating natural herbal medicines used by Costa Rican women to manage menopausal symptoms. Design Seventeen plant species were collected and extracted in Costa Rica. To establish possible mechanisms of action, and determine their potential future use for menopause or osteoporosis, the estrogenic activities of the herbal extracts were investigated in an estrogen reporter gene ERβ-CALUX® assay in U2-OS cells, and in reporter and endogenous gene assays in MCF-7 cells. Results Six of the plant extracts bound to the estrogen receptors. Four of the six extracts stimulated reporter gene expression in the ERβ-CALUX® assay. All six extracts modulated expression of endogenous genes in MCF-7 cells, with four extracts acting as estrogen agonists and two extracts, Pimenta dioica and Smilax domingensis, acting as partial agonist/antagonists by enhancing E2-stimulated pS2 mRNA expression, but reducing E2-stimulated PR and PTGES mRNA expression. Both P. dioica and S. domingensis induced a 2ERE-luciferase reporter gene in transient transfected MCF-7 cells, which was inhibited by the ER antagonist ICI 182780. Conclusions This work presents a plausible mechanism of action for many of the herbal medicines used by Costa Rican women to treat menopausal symptoms. However, it further suggests that studies of safety and efficacy are needed before these herbs should be used as alternative therapies to HT. PMID:19424091

  5. Treatment strategies for reducing the burden of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umland, Elena M

    2008-04-01

    Vasomotor symptoms (VMS), such as hot flashes and night sweats, are the most bothersome symptoms of menopause and affect an estimated 75% of women aged over 50 years. To discuss the burden, pathophysiology, and management of menopause-associated VMS and to evaluate pharmacologic options available for the treatment of VMS, including herbal remedies, hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and nonhormonal therapies. Lifestyle changes, including regulation of core body temperature, relaxation techniques, regular physical activity, weight loss, and smoking cessation may help reduce the risk of VMS and should be implemented by all women with menopause-associated VMS. The role of herbal remedies in the treatment of VMS remains unclear, as clinical trial efficacy data are inconsistent and inconclusive. Nevertheless, soy isoflavones, red clover isoflavones, black cohosh, and vitamin E are commonly used to treat VMS and may be considered in women with mild symptoms that are not controlled by lifestyle changes alone. These herbal remedies appear to be safe when used for short durations (d 6 months). HRT, consisting of estrogen (in women without a uterus) or estrogen plus progestin (in women with a uterus) is the most widely studied and most effective treatment option for relief of menopause-associated VMS and is considered the standard of care for women with moderate-to-severe VMS. HRT should be used at the lowest effective dose and for the shortest duration possible (preferably d 5 years) in women in whom the potential benefits outweigh the potential risks. Nonhormonal therapies, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, gabapentin, and clonidine, may be appropriate alternatives in women who cannot or will not use HRT for VMS relief, such as those with a history of or at risk for breast cancer. The physical and financial burden imposed by menopauseassociated VMS is immense. Optimum management of VMS includes lifestyle changes

  6. Vortioxetine for major depressive disorder, vasomotor, and cognitive symptoms associated with the menopausal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Marlene P; Cheng, Laura J; Moustafa, Danna; Davies, Abigail; Sosinsky, Alexandra Z; Wang, Betty; Petrillo, Laura F; Hogan, Charlotte; Cohen, Lee S

    2017-11-01

    In a preliminary trial, we assessed the efficacy of vortioxetine for major depressive disorder (MDD) during the menopausal transition. Secondary outcomes included hot flashes (HFs), anxiety, and cognitive complaints. Perimenopausal and early postmenopausal women with MDD (N = 27) received 8 weeks of open-label, flexible-dose treatment with vortioxetine. The Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) was the primary outcome measure. Secondary measures included: HF frequency, the Greene Climacteric Scale (GCS), Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (MEN-QOL), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Cognitive and Physical Functioning Questionnaire (CPFQ), Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST), and Cogstate testing. Of the 27 women, 24 (88.8%) were evaluated (≥1 follow-up), and 21 (77.8%) completed the study; 1 discontinued because of adverse effects. The mean MADRS score decreased significantly (P = .0001) from 31.3 (standard deviation [SD] = 5.5) at pretreatment to 8.1 (SD = 7.8) at posttreatment. The depression response rate (≥50% reduction in MADRS) and remission rate (final MADRS ≤10) were 75% and 70.8%, respectively. GCS, MEN-QOL, BAI, CPFQ, and DSST scores improved significantly (P = .0030, P = .0001, P = .0001, P = .0001, and P = .0133, respectively); Cogstate test scores did not. Frequency and severity of HFs improved significantly (P = .0291 and P = .0299, respectively). These data support further study of vortioxetine for treating menopausal depression and associated symptoms.

  7. The impact of education, cultural background, and lifestyle on symptoms of the menopausal transition: the Women's Health at Midlife Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner-Geva, Liat; Boyko, Valentina; Blumstein, Tzvia; Benyamini, Yael

    2010-05-01

    This study aimed to examine differences in symptom clusters among women in midlife from different cultural origins and to identify sociodemographic, lifestyle, and health characteristics that could account for the differences between the cultural groups in symptom reporting. Israeli women aged 45-64 were randomly selected according to age and population strata of three groups: long-term Jewish residents (LTR), Jewish immigrants from the former Soviet Union, and Arab women (mostly Israeli-born). Interviews were conducted with 540 LTR, 151 immigrants, and 123 Arab women. The survey instrument included the occurrence and rating of how bothersome to everyday function were 16 symptoms. Three outcome variables included hot flashes and two scales for mental and somatic symptoms extracted from exploratory factor analysis. Multivariate logistic regressions showed that immigrants and Arab women (compared to LTR) had a significantly lower risk of reporting hot flashes and mental and somatic symptoms. Menopausal status was related only to hot flashes. Low education and depression were associated with the three symptom scales, whereas nonhealthy lifestyle was related only to somatic symptoms. Our main finding is that cultural group is an independent predictor of each of the three menopausal symptom scales. A possible explanation for the lower reporting of symptoms among Arab and immigrant groups is that they differ from the LTR in level of acculturation and attitudes toward menopause. These findings support the proposition of a cultural factor in menopausal symptomatology that needs to be addressed by clinicians caring for women at midlife.

  8. A study assessing the quality of life related to voiding symptoms and sexual functions in menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Ji Youn; Min, Kweon Sik; Kang, Dong Il

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the impact of menopause on the quality of life (QoL) of middle-aged and older women, including their general well-being, voiding-related symptoms, and sexual distress. To assess QoL, we administered a questionnaire that included questions about voiding-related symptoms and female sexual distress and part of the Women's Health Questionnaire. The self-administered questionnaires were completed by 1,679 women in the Korea. Data for 1,262 women were available for analysis, including premenopausal (n=307), perimenopausal (n=240), and postmenopausal (n=715) groups. Voiding-related discomfort increased significantly in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women compared with premenopausal women (psexual distress. In the menopausal group, employed women had better general well-being than did unemployed women. Menopause negatively affected the QoL of middle-aged and older women because of decreased general well-being and increased voiding-related symptoms. General health, even in menopausal women, was important to maintain a better QoL. To preserve the QoL of women undergoing menopause, control of menopause and underlying disease should be considered.

  9. Glutamic acid ameliorates estrogen deficiency-induced menopausal-like symptoms in ovariectomized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Na-Ra; Kim, Hee-Yun; Yang, Woong Mo; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2015-09-01

    Some amino acids are considered alternative therapies for improving menopausal symptoms. Glutamic acid (GA), which is abundant in meats, fish, and protein-rich plant foods, is known to be a neurotransmitter or precursor of γ-aminobutyric acid. Although it is unclear if GA functions in menopausal symptoms, we hypothesized that GA would attenuate estrogen deficiency-induced menopausal symptoms. The objective to test our hypothesis was to examine an estrogenic effect of GA in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, estrogen receptor (ER)-positive human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells, and ER-positive human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. The results demonstrated that administration with GA to mice suppressed body weight gain and vaginal atrophy when compared with the OVX mice. A microcomputed tomographic analysis of the trabecular bone showed increases in bone mineral density, trabecular number, and connectivity density as well as a significant decrease in total porosity of the OVX mice treated with GA. In addition, GA increased serum levels of alkaline phosphatase and estrogen compared with the OVX mice. Furthermore, GA induced proliferation and increased ER-β messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, estrogen response element (ERE) activity, extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, and alkaline phosphatase activity in MG-63 cells. In MCF-7 cells, GA also increased proliferation, Ki-67 mRNA expression, ER-β mRNA expression, and ERE activity. Estrogen response element activity increased by GA was inhibited by an estrogen antagonist. Taken together, our data demonstrated that GA has estrogenic and osteogenic activities in OVX mice, MG-63 cells, and MCF-7 cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A randomized trial of acupuncture for vasomotor symptoms in post-menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venzke, Liane; Calvert, James F; Gilbertson, Barbara

    2010-04-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether acupuncture would relieve the vasomotor symptoms of post-menopausal women. A randomized, single-blind trial. A small city in a rural area of Eastern Oregon. Women were recruited into the study from the community by advertising or physician referral. All study subjects were in non-surgical menopause and medically stable. Study subjects were randomly assigned to receive 12 weeks of treatment with either Chinese Traditional Medicine (TCM) acupuncture (n=27) or shallow needle (sham) acupuncture (n=24). Study participants kept a diary recording their hot flashes each day. At baseline, study participants filled out Greene Climacteric Scales and the Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories. These same outcomes were also measured at week 4 of treatment and at 1 week and 12 weeks after treatment. The number of hot flashes and the numeric scores on the Climacteric Scales and the Beck inventories were compared between the verum and shallow needling groups using two-way repeated measures. Both groups of women showed statistically significant improvement on all study parameters. However, there was no difference between the improvement in the shallow needle and verum acupuncture groups. Study subjects were not able to guess which group they had been assigned to. This study showed that both shallow needling and verum acupuncture were effective treatments of post-menopausal vasomotor symptoms. Study subjects were not able to distinguish shallow needling from real TCM acupuncture. Shallow needling may have therapeutic effects in itself reducing its utility as a "placebo" control for verum acupuncture. This result is consistent with other published studies. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Management of osteoporosis and menopausal symptoms: focus on bazedoxifene/conjugated estrogen combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirkin S

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Mirkin,1 James H Pickar21Pfizer Inc, Collegeville, PA, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Loss of estrogen production in women during menopause results in a state of estrogen deficiency which has been associated with multiple problems, including vasomotor symptoms, symptoms of vulvovaginal atrophy, bone loss, and difficulties with sleep, mood, memory, and sexual activity. The only treatment option currently available to address multiple postmenopausal symptoms in women with an intact uterus is estrogen/progestin-containing hormone therapy (HT. Concerns surrounding side effects and published data regarding the association of HT with the increased risk for breast cancer have induced a decrease in the number of women seeking, initiating, and continuing this type of therapy. A combination containing bazedoxifene and conjugated estrogens (BZA/CE maintains the established benefits of estrogen therapy for treatment of postmenopausal vasomotor symptoms, vulvovaginal atrophy, and osteoporosis, while certain estrogenic effects, such as stimulation of the uterus and breast, are antagonized without the side effects associated with HT. BZA/CE has been evaluated in a series of multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, and active-controlled Phase III trials known as the Selective estrogens, Menopause, And Response to Therapy (SMART trials. BZA/CE demonstrated clinically meaningful improvements in vasomotor symptoms, vulvovaginal atrophy, and a protective effect on the skeleton. These clinical benefits were associated with an acceptable safety profile and an improved tolerability compared with HT. BZA/CE showed a favorable safety profile on the breast, endometrium, and ovaries. The incidence of venous thromboembolism was low and the risk does not appear to be any greater than for CE alone or BZA alone or greater than HT. The incidence of coronary heart disease and

  12. Low-dose paroxetine 7.5 mg for menopausal vasomotor symptoms: two randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, James A; Portman, David J; Kaunitz, Andrew M; Mekonnen, Hana; Kazempour, Kazem; Bhaskar, Sailaja; Lippman, Joel

    2013-10-01

    The efficacy and safety of low-dose paroxetine 7.5 mg for the treatment of menopausal vasomotor symptoms were evaluated in two multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 studies of 12 and 24 weeks' duration. Postmenopausal women were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive paroxetine 7.5 mg or placebo once daily. The four primary efficacy endpoints included mean changes in the frequency and severity of moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms on weeks 4 and 12; an additional endpoint was persistence of treatment benefit on week 24. Five hundred ninety-one participants were randomly assigned to treatment with paroxetine 7.5 mg, and 593 participants were randomly assigned to treatment with placebo. All primary endpoints were met in the 24-week study; three of four primary endpoints were met in the 12-week study. In both studies, paroxetine 7.5 mg significantly reduced the mean weekly vasomotor symptom frequency compared with placebo on week 4 (P paroxetine 7.5 mg than for placebo on week 4 (P = 0.0048) in the 12-week study and on week 4 (P = 0.0452) and week 12 (P = 0.0114) in the 24-week study. Persistence of treatment benefit was demonstrated in the 24-week study. Most treatment-emergent adverse events were mild or moderate in severity. No clinically significant changes in laboratory values or vital signs were noted, and no short-term discontinuation of symptoms followed treatment cessation. Paroxetine 7.5 mg is well-tolerated, is effective in reducing the frequency and severity of menopausal vasomotor symptoms, and demonstrates persistence of treatment benefit through 24 weeks of treatment.

  13. Aerobic exercise as a treatment for vasomotor menopausal symptoms: randomised controlled trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Amanda J; Stokes-Lampard, Helen; Thomas, Adèle; Rees, Margaret; Coleman, Sarah; Roalfe, Andrea; Hunter, Myra S; MacArthur, Christine

    2013-12-01

    Evidence suggests that a high proportion of perimenopausal and postmenopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms (hot flushes/night sweats) that can be severe and disruptive and which are the principal reason for seeking medical intervention. Hormone therapy (HT) is known to be an effective treatment for troublesome hot flushes/night sweats but research has raised questions about the safety of HT and there have been negative high profile media reports about its use. Consequently many women are seeking alternatives and exercise might be one such option but there is a lack of high quality evidence on its effectiveness. This RCT initially aims to investigate the feasibility/acceptability of two exercise interventions identified from our previous preference study in 165 women, and if found to be feasible/acceptable, continue to recruit sufficient women (n=261) to examine the effect of these interventions on hot flushes/night sweats and other outcomes relevant to menopausal women. We aim to recruit inactive perimenopausal and menopausal symptomatic women not using HT and randomise them to one of two exercise interventions or usual care for six months. We will assess outcomes at baseline and 6 and 12 months from randomisation. We hope this RCT will contribute towards increasing the evidence regarding the question of whether exercise is an effective treatment for vasomotor symptoms in women not taking HT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms: Current treatment options, challenges and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre R Pachman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Deirdre R Pachman1, Jason M Jones1, Charles L Loprinzi21Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Hot flashes are one of the most common and distressing symptoms associated with menopause, occurring in more than 75% of postmenopausal women. They are especially problematic in breast cancer patients since some breast cancer therapies can induce hot flashes. For mild hot flashes, it is proposed that behavioral modifications are the first step in management. Hormonal therapies, including estrogens and progestogens, are the most well known effective agents in relieving hot flashes; however, the safety of these agents is controversial. There is an increasing amount of literature on nonhormonal agents for the treatment of hot flashes. The most promising data regard newer antidepressant agents such as venlafaxine, which reduces hot flashes by about 60%. Gabapentin is another nonhormonal agent that is effective in reducing hot flashes. While many complimentary therapies, including phytoestrogens, black cohosh, and dehydroepiandrosterone, have been explored for the treatment of hot flashes; none can be recommended at this time. Furthermore, there is a lack of strong evidence to support exercise, yoga, or relaxation for the treatment of hot flashes. Paced respirations and hypnosis appear to be promising enough to warrant further investigation. Another promising nonpharmacological therapy, currently under investigation, involves a stellate ganglion block.Keywords: vasomotor symptoms, hot flashes, menopause, therapy

  15. Acupuncture-ameliorated menopausal symptoms: single-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luca, A Castelo Branco; da Fonseca, A Maggio; Lopes, C M Carvalho; Bagnoli, V R; Soares, J M; Baracat, E C

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of acupuncture and sham-acupuncture on women with menopausal symptoms as reflected in the intensity of their hot flushes and the Kupperman Menopausal Index (KMI). This was a randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial with 81 patients assigned to two groups: Group 1 received 12 months of acupuncture, then 6 months of sham-acupuncture treatment (n = 56) and Group 2 received 6 months of sham-acupuncture, then 12 months of acupuncture treatment (n = 25). The needles were inserted in a harmonic craniocaudal manner at a depth of about 2 cm, and each session lasted approximately 40  min. The efficacy of acupuncture in ameliorating the climacteric symptoms of patients in postmenopause was determined through the KMI and the intensity of hot flushes. The analysis of variance method for two factors and repeated measures was applied. The baseline values of the women in both groups were similar for the KMI score and number of hot flushes. At the end of 6 months, the values for the KMI and hot flushes for the women in Group 1 were lower than those of the women in Group 2 (p KMI and hot flush data were similar in both groups. After 18 months, the values of the KMI and hot flushes for the women in Group 2 for were lower than those of the women in Group 1 (p KMI score in postmenopausal women.

  16. Effect of acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in breast cancer- A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Tsai-Ju; Hsu, Chung-Hua; Liu, Chia-Yu; Fang, Ching-Ju

    2017-01-01

    Many breast cancer patients suffer from hot flush and medical menopause as side effects of treatment. Some patients undergo acupuncture, rather than hormone therapy, to relieve these symptoms, but the efficacy of acupuncture is uncertain. This meta-analysis evaluated the efficacy of acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in women with breast cancer. A literature search was performed, following the PRISMA Statement and without language restrictions, of 7 databases from inception through March 2017. All selected studies were randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that examined the effect of needle acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in patients with breast cancer. The methodological quality of these trials was assessed using Cochrane criteria, and meta-analysis software (RevMan 5.2) was used to analyze the data. We examined 844 breast cancer patients (average age: 58 years-old) from 13 RCTs. The trials had medium-to-high quality, based on the modified Jadad scale. The meta-analysis showed that acupuncture had no significant effect on the frequency and the severity of hot flush (p = 0.34; p = 0.33), but significantly ameliorated menopause symptoms (p = 0.009). None of the studies reported severe adverse events. Acupuncture significantly alleviated menopause symptoms, but had no effect on hot flush. Breast cancer patients concerned about the adverse effects of hormone therapy should consider acupuncture. Further large-scale studies that also measure biomarkers or cytokines may help to elucidate the mechanism by which acupuncture alleviates menopause symptoms in patients with breast cancer.

  17. Effect of acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in breast cancer- A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai-Ju Chien

    Full Text Available Many breast cancer patients suffer from hot flush and medical menopause as side effects of treatment. Some patients undergo acupuncture, rather than hormone therapy, to relieve these symptoms, but the efficacy of acupuncture is uncertain. This meta-analysis evaluated the efficacy of acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in women with breast cancer.A literature search was performed, following the PRISMA Statement and without language restrictions, of 7 databases from inception through March 2017. All selected studies were randomized clinical trials (RCTs that examined the effect of needle acupuncture on hot flush and menopause symptoms in patients with breast cancer. The methodological quality of these trials was assessed using Cochrane criteria, and meta-analysis software (RevMan 5.2 was used to analyze the data.We examined 844 breast cancer patients (average age: 58 years-old from 13 RCTs. The trials had medium-to-high quality, based on the modified Jadad scale. The meta-analysis showed that acupuncture had no significant effect on the frequency and the severity of hot flush (p = 0.34; p = 0.33, but significantly ameliorated menopause symptoms (p = 0.009. None of the studies reported severe adverse events.Acupuncture significantly alleviated menopause symptoms, but had no effect on hot flush. Breast cancer patients concerned about the adverse effects of hormone therapy should consider acupuncture. Further large-scale studies that also measure biomarkers or cytokines may help to elucidate the mechanism by which acupuncture alleviates menopause symptoms in patients with breast cancer.

  18. Patient considerations in the management of menopausal symptoms: role of conjugated estrogens with bazedoxifene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kagan R

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Risa Kagan,1,2 Steven R Goldstein,3 James H Pickar,4 Barry S Komm5 1Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, 2East Bay Physicians Medical Group, Berkeley, CA, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, 5Global Medical Affairs, Pfizer Inc., Collegeville, PA, USA Abstract: Menopausal symptoms (eg, hot flushes and vaginal symptoms are common, often bothersome, and can adversely impact women’s sexual functioning, relationships, and quality of life. Estrogen–progestin therapy was previously considered the standard care for hormone therapy (HT for managing these symptoms in nonhysterectomized women, but has a number of safety and tolerability concerns (eg, breast cancer, stroke, pulmonary embolism, breast pain/tenderness, and vaginal bleeding and its use has declined dramatically in the past decade since the release of the Women’s Health Initiative trial results. Conjugated estrogens paired with bazedoxifene (CE/BZA represent a newer progestin-free alternative to traditional HT for nonhysterectomized women. CE/BZA has demonstrated efficacy in reducing the frequency and severity of vasomotor symptoms and preventing loss of bone mineral density in postmenopausal women. CE/BZA provides an acceptable level of protection against endometrial hyperplasia and does not increase mammographic breast density. Compared with traditional estrogen–progestin therapy, it is associated with lower rates of breast pain/tenderness and vaginal bleeding. Patient-reported outcomes indicate that CE/BZA improves menopause-specific quality of life, sleep, some measures of sexual function (especially ease of lubrication, and treatment satisfaction. This review looks at the rationale for selection and combination of CE with BZA at the dose ratio in the approved product and provides

  19. Nonpharmacologic, nonherbal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms: an umbrella systematic review (protocol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Karen M; McDuffie, Jennifer R; Shepherd-Banigan, Megan; Befus, Deanna; Coeytaux, Remy R; Van Noord, Megan G; Goode, Adam P; Masilamani, Varsha; Adam, Soheir; Nagi, Avishek; Williams, John W

    2016-04-07

    Vasomotor symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats are a common concern of perimenopausal and postmenopausal women and are associated with a decreased quality of life. These symptoms can be effectively managed with hormone therapy, but safety concerns limit its use. Thus, understanding the effectiveness of nonpharmacologic therapies such as acupuncture or yoga is critical to managing these common symptoms in older women. Our review seeks to address the following question: In women with menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms, what are the effects on health-related quality of life, vasomotor symptoms, and adverse events of the following nonpharmacologic, nonherbal interventions as compared with any inactive control or active comparator: (a) acupuncture, (b) yoga, tai chi, and qigong, (c) structured exercise, and (d) meditation, mindfulness-based practices, and relaxation? We describe a protocol for an umbrella review approach, supplemented by evaluating randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published after the most recent good-quality systematic review for each of the eligible interventions. Specific interventions were chosen based on current literature and with input from a technical expert panel and organizational stakeholders. We will conduct a thorough literature search and perform a quality assessment of potentially included systematic reviews and RCTs. Our umbrella review, supplemented by an additional search for eligible RCTs, aims to synthesize existing evidence on the use of nonpharmacologic, nonherbal interventions to manage bothersome vasomotor symptoms in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. PROSPERO CRD42016029335.

  20. Randomized controlled trial of whole soy and isoflavone daidzein on menopausal symptoms in equol-producing Chinese postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhao-min; Ho, Suzanne C; Woo, Jean; Chen, Yu-ming; Wong, Carmen

    2014-06-01

    Dietary supplements containing soy or isoflavones are widely used as alternatives to hormone therapy. However, their efficacy is still inconclusive, and limited data on equol producers are available. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of whole soy (soy flour) or purified daidzein (one major soy isoflavone and the precursor of equol) on menopausal symptoms in equol-producing postmenopausal women, a population most likely to benefit from soy intervention. This is a 6-month parallel-group, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Two hundred seventy equol-producing prehypertensive Chinese postmenopausal women were randomized to one of three treatment groups: 40 g of soy flour (whole soy group), 40 g of low-fat milk powder + 63 mg of daidzein (daidzein group), or 40 g of low-fat milk powder (placebo group) daily, each given as a solid beverage for 6 months. Changes in menopausal symptoms were assessed by a validated and structured symptom checklist at baseline and 6 months. Two hundred fifty-three participants completed the study according to protocol. Urinary isoflavones indicated good compliance with the interventions. Baseline menopausal symptoms were comparable among the three study groups. Intention-to-treat analysis indicated that there was no significant difference in the 6-month changes or percent changes in the total number of menopausal symptoms, in the five dimensions of symptoms, and in the frequencies of individual symptoms among the three treatment groups. Whole soy and purified daidzein have no significant effect on alleviation of menopausal symptoms among equol-producing postmenopausal women with prehypertension.

  1. Postmenopausal hormone therapy: impact on menopause-related symptoms, chronic disease and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Mooren, Marius Jan; Kenemans, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Quality of life in climacteric and postmenopausal women is often compromised. This overview addresses the many factors that may interfere with health and well-being in such women. Hormonal changes during the menopausal transition, finally resulting in estrogen deficiency, play a pivotal role in the incidence of climacteric symptoms and also in the development of chronic diseases. Such symptoms and diseases can contribute to impaired quality of life in climacteric and postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal hormone therapy (PHT) is the treatment of first choice to alleviate symptoms of estrogen deficiency. Besides effectively relieving climacteric symptoms and complaints, PHT can also protect against some chronic diseases, such as osteoporosis and colorectal cancer. Presently, available PHTs vary widely in type, estrogen and progestogen dosage, and route and duration of administration. Furthermore, the number of alternatives to treat climacteric symptoms, and/or to prevent chronic diseases, has increased. Therefore, doctors involved in the care of climacteric women in the 21st century are much more able to meet the specific needs of individual patients and improve health and quality of life.

  2. Efficacy of Drospirenone-Containing Hormone Replacement Therapy to Reduce Vasomotor Symptoms of Menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana A. Brown

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hormone replacement therapy has been proven efficacious for controlling vasomotor symptoms such as hot flushes associated with menopause. Drospirenone is a progestin with antiandrogenic and antimineralocorticoid activity that may be used in combination with estrogen to control hot flushes and offers the potential benefit of minimizing breast tenderness, blood pressure elevations and weight gain. Six clinical trials were reviewed. Of these, four trials explicitly listed hot flushes as a primary outcome. Efficacy with regards to hot flushes was found to range from modest to large (i.e., 37.5% to 94.6%, and four of the studies utilized diary cards to assess hot flushes. Results from these studies must be interpreted cautiously as quite a few limitations existed such as small population sizes involving specific ethnic groups, lack of p values with regards to baseline characteristics lending question to homogeneity, and inclusion of mostly healthy participants. Additionally, while the studies were long enough to see an effect, the long term effects of drospirenone-containing hormone replacement therapy (HRT is unknown. The available data supports the use of drospirenone-containing HRT for the treatment of hot flushes associated with menopause.

  3. Combined Red Clover isoflavones and probiotics potently reduce menopausal vasomotor symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Norman Tandrup Lambert

    Full Text Available Natural estrogen decline leads to vasomotor symptoms (VMS. Hormone therapy alleviates symptoms but increases cancer risk. Effective treatments against VMS with minimal cancer risks are needed. We investigate the effects of a highly bioavailable aglycone rich Red Clover isoflavone treatment to alleviate existing menopausal VMS, assessed for the first time by 24hour ambulatory skin conductance (SC.We conducted a parallel, double blind, randomised control trial of 62 peri-menopausal women aged 40-65, reporting ≥ 5 hot flushes/day and follicle stimulating hormone ≥35 IU/L. Participants received either twice daily treatment with bioavailable RC extract (RCE, providing 34 mg/d isoflavones and probiotics, or masked placebo formulation for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was change in daily hot flush frequency (HFF from baseline to 12 weeks using 24hr SC. Secondary outcomes were change in SC determined hot flush intensity (HFI, self-reported HFF (rHFF and hot flush severity (rHFS, blood pressure and plasma lipids. A significant decrease in 24hr HFF (P < 0.01 and HFI (P<0.05 was found when comparing change from baseline to 12 months of the RCE (-4.3 HF/24hr, CI -6.8 to -2.3; -12956 μS s-1, CI -20175 to -5737 with placebo (0.79 HF/24hr, CI -1.56 to 3.15; 515 μS s-1, CI -5465 to 6496. rHFF was also significantly reduced (P <0.05in the RCE (-2.97 HFs/d, CI -4.77 to -1.17 group compared to placebo (0.036 HFs/d, CI -2.42 to 2.49. Other parameters were non-significant. RCE was well tolerated.Results suggest that moderate doses of RCE were more effective and superior to placebo in reducing physiological and self-reported VMS. Findings support that objective physiological symptom assessment methods should be used together with self-report measures in future studies on menopausal VMS.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02028702.

  4. Menopause and breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sayakhot, Padaphet

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although 27% of women will be premenopausal at diagnosis; treatment for BC may cause menopause/menopausal symptoms in up to 80% of these women. Both short term symptoms and long term health problems such as osteoporosis and heart disease are associated with early menopause (EM). Menopausal symptoms have a major negative impact on quality of life, sexual dysfunction and changes in body image and self-esteem in BC women. Overseas studies indicate that 2/3 of postmenopausal w...

  5. More vasomotor symptoms in menopause among women with a history of hypertensive pregnancy diseases compared with women with normotensive pregnancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drost, J.T.D.; Schouw, Y.T. van der; Herber-Gast, G.C.; Maas, A.H.E.M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of mortality in women worldwide. In recent years, several female-specific cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertensive pregnancy diseases (HPDs) and vasomotor menopausal symptoms (VMS), have been identified. In this study, we evaluated the

  6. Menopausal symptoms: prevalence, severity and correlation with sociodemographic and reproductive characteristics. A cross sectional community based survey from rural Sindh Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, Nusrat; Sikandar, Raheel; Sohoo, Nisar Ahmed

    2015-04-01

    To determine prevalence and severity of menopausal symptoms and to investigate any correlation of sociodemographic and reproductive characteristics with menopausal symptoms in rural women. The cross-sectional study was conducted in 2007-08 in rural Sindh, Pakistan, and comprised women of age 40-70 years who were selected through multistage random sampling. Sociodemographic information was collected on a predesigned proforma. Menopause Rating Scale was used to collect information regarding the prevalence and severity of menopausal symptoms. Multivariate logistic regression was used to adjust prevalence odds ratio for demographic and reproductive characteristics. From among a population of 525,082, the study selected 3062(0.5%) women. The prevalence of menopausal symptoms was mostly higher except bladder problems 1138(37.7%) and dryness of vagina 1008(34%). The frequency of symptoms - all mild in nature - were hot flushes 1287(42%), sleep problems 1251(40.9%), depressive mode 1169(38.2%), physical and mental exertion 1169(38.2%), and muscle and joint pain 861(28.1%). Significant association of the symptoms was found with age, education and menopausal status (p<0.05 each). The prevalence of most of the menopausal symptoms was high except for bladder problems and dryness of vagina. Majority of the symptoms were categorised as mild.

  7. [Effects of Aromatherapy on Menopausal Symptoms, Perceived Stress and Depression in Middle-aged Women: A Systematic Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shinmi; Song, Ji Ah; Kim, Mi Eun; Hur, Myung Haeng

    2016-10-01

    This study was a systematic review to evaluate the effects of aromatherapy on menopausal symptoms, perceived stress and depression in middle aged-women. Eight databases were searched from their inception September 8, 2015. Two reviewers independently performed the selection of the studies, data abstraction and validations. The risk of bias was assessed using Cochrane criteria. For analysis of the data, a meta-analysis of the studies was performed. From the electronic databases, 73 articles were selected, and 19 removed due to duplication. After two reviewers read the abstracts of 54 studies, 34 studies were selected. Complete papers for 34 original articles were read and, 12 studies which met selection criteria were reviewed and the effects of aromatherapy on menopausal symptoms, stress and depression analyzed using meta-analysis with RevMan. In the 2 studies which included Randomized Controlled Trials testing of aromatherapy on menopausal symptoms and comparison of control and placebo groups were done. Aromatherapy massage was favorably effective in reducing the menopausal symptoms compared to the control group (n=118, MD=-6.33; 95% CI -11.51 to -1.15), and compared to the placebo group (n=117, MD=-4.14; 95% CI -7.63 to -0.64). Also aromatherapy was effective in reducing stress (n=72, SMD=-0.64; 95% CI -1.12 to -0.17) and depression (n=158, MD=-5.63; 95% CI -10.04 to -1.22). There is limited evidence suggesting that aromatherapy for middle-aged women may be effective in controlling menopausal symptoms, perceived stress and depression.

  8. Menopausal symptoms, sexual function, depression, and quality of life in Korean patients with breast cancer receiving chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyojung; Yoon, Hyeon Gyeong

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to study the relationships among menopausal symptoms, sexual function, depression, and quality of life in women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. Two hundred women participated in this cross-sectional study. Data were collected with the Menopause Rating Scale (MRS), Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II), and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast Cancer (FACT-B). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-tests, ANOVA, Scheffe's test, and Pearson product moment correlations using SPSS v. 20. Participants had alterations in menopausal symptoms and sexual function, and were depressed with a decreased quality of life. These factors are known to influence satisfaction with family support (p sexual relationships (p sexual issues and encourage them to attend family support programs. They should also encourage family members to be proactive in addressing menopausal and depressive symptoms in these women with a goal to enhance their sexual functioning and quality of life.

  9. Pomegranate (Punica granatum) Seed Oil for Treating Menopausal Symptoms: An Individually Controlled Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Roman; Gminski, Richard; Tang, Tao; Weinert, Tomas; Schulz, Sabine; Linke-Cordes, Margareta; Martin, Ines; Fischer, Heide

    2017-03-01

    Context • In the folk medicine of Mediterranean countries and in ancient Ayurveda, Punica granatum seeds (ie, pomegranate seeds) have been used for treatment of various disorders, including those that nowadays are classified as menopausal symptoms (MSs). Pomegranate seed oil (PSO) from those seeds mainly contains unsaturated fatty acids such as γ-linoleic acid and linolenic acid, but it also includes phytoestrogens. It is, therefore, regarded as a promising option for treating MSs today. Objectives • The study intended to investigate the safety and effectiveness of PSO as a defined P granatum seed oil for patients with MSs. Design • The research team designed an individually controlled, investigator-initiated cohort study. Setting • The treatments were performed at 2 institutions: (1) the Center for Complementary Medicine at the University Medical Center Freiburg (Freiburg, Germany); and (2) in the medical practice of H. Fischer (Freiburg, Germany). Participants • Seventy-eight patients, who had a mean duration of MSs of 46 mo, participated in the study. Intervention • After 4 wk without treatment, which functioned as a period providing an individual control, each participant took 1000 mg of PSO daily in 2 capsules for 8 wk. Outcome Measures • The symptom severity was scored on the German version of the menopausal rating scale (MRS) at baseline, after 4 wk without treatment, after 4 wk of treatment, and postintervention, with 0 = absence of symptoms and 4 = very strong symptoms. The efficacy and tolerability were estimated on scales from 0-4. Each participant's 17ß estradiol was determined at baseline and after postintervention using the patient's sera. The content of the β-sitosterol was determined in the PSO preparations by gas chromatography. Results • The content of β-sitosterol in the PSO used in the study was 6.3 mg/1000 mg. In the intention to treat analysis, most MRS symptoms were significantly and relevantly reduced (eg, hot flushes

  10. Psychological Symptoms and Concerns Experienced by International Students: Outreach Implications for Counseling Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyrazli, Senel

    2015-01-01

    This study examines psychological symptoms and concerns experienced by international students. Participants identified with a variety of psychological symptoms and concerns. The top three were related to academics (71%), career (60%), and stress (43%). In addition, 34% of the participants indicated being concerned about depression and/or anxiety.…

  11. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation do not influence menopause-related symptoms: Results of the Women's Health Initiative Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Erin S; Hedlin, Haley; Qin, FeiFei; Desai, Manisha; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Perrin, Nancy; Manson, JoAnn E; Johnson, Karen C; Masaki, Kamal; Tylavsky, Frances A; Stefanick, Marcia L

    2015-07-01

    It is unknown whether supplementation with calcium and vitamin D has an impact on menopause-related symptoms. As part of the Women's Health Initiative Calcium/Vitamin D Supplementation Trial (CaD), women were randomized at 40 clinical sites to elemental calcium carbonate 1000 mg with vitamin D 400 IU daily or placebo. At the CaD baseline visit (year 1 or year 2) and during a mean follow-up of 5.7 years, participants provided data on menopause-related symptoms via questionnaires. Generalized linear mixed effects techniques were used to address research questions. After excluding participants with missing data (N=2125), we compared menopause-related symptoms at follow-up visits of 17,101 women randomized to CaD with those of 17,056 women given the placebo. Women in the CaD arm did not have a different number of symptoms at follow-up compared to women taking the placebo (p=0.702). Similarly, there was no difference between sleep disturbance, emotional well-being, or energy/fatigue at follow-up in those who were randomized to CaD supplementation compared to those taking the placebo. Our data suggest that supplementation with 1000 mg of calcium plus 400 IU of vitamin D does not influence menopause-related symptoms over an average of 5.7 years of follow-up among postmenopausal women with an average age of 64 at the WHI baseline visit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. S-equol: a potential nonhormonal agent for menopause-related symptom relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utian, Wulf H; Jones, Michelle; Setchell, Kenneth D R

    2015-03-01

    Many women suffering from vasomotor symptoms (VMS) are now seeking nonpharmaceutical treatments for symptom relief. Recently, S-equol, an intestinal bacterial metabolite of the soybean isoflavone daidzein has received attention for its ability to alleviate VMS and provide other important health benefits to menopausal women. S-equol is found in very few foods and only in traces. About 50% of Asians and 25% of non-Asians host the intestinal bacteria that convert daidzein into S-equol. Clinical trials that evaluated the efficacy of an S-equol-containing product found that VMS were alleviated but these trials were limited in scope and primarily involved Japanese women for whom hot flashes are a minor complaint. The only trial in the United States evaluating hot flashes found symptoms were significantly reduced by S-equol, but the study lacked a placebo group, although it did include a positive control. The daily dose of S-equol used in most trials was 10 mg, and because the half-life of S-equol is 7-10 hours, to maximize efficacy, it was taken twice daily. Subanalysis of epidemiologic studies suggests that equol producers are more likely to benefit from soyfood consumption than nonproducers with respect to both cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis, although the data are inconsistent. The limited safety data for S-equol do not suggest cause for concern, especially with regard to its effects on breast and endometrial tissue. Further studies are needed before definitive conclusions of its effectiveness for VMS can be made, but the preliminary evidence warrants clinicians discussing the potential of S-equol for the alleviation of VMS with patients.

  13. Effects of traditional Chinese medicine on symptom clusters during the menopausal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Swanson, L; Thomas, A; Ismail, R; Schnall, J G; Cray, L; Mitchell, E S; Woods, N F

    2015-04-01

    To review controlled clinical trials of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) therapies for hot flushes and at least one other co-occurring symptom among sleep, cognitive function, mood, and pain. An experienced reference librarian performed an extensive search of PubMed/Medline, CINAHL Plus, PsycInfo, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, EMBASE, AMED, and Alt-Health Watch for randomized, controlled trials reported in English between 2004 and July 2011. Of 1193 abstracts identified, 58 trials examined effectiveness of therapies for hot flushes and at least one additional co-occurring symptom. Eleven trials (13 publications) examined TCM therapeutics of acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) or moxibustion. Acupuncture trials (eight) yielded mixed results; five trials significantly reduced hot flushes. Of those five trials, one also showed benefit for sleep and pain and two trials found benefit for mood symptoms. Of three CHM trials, three trials had significant findings: one for hot flushes and mood, one for hot flushes and pain, and one for hot flushes, sleep, mood symptoms and pain. Moxibustion and counseling (one trial) significantly reduced hot flushes, mood symptoms and pain. None of the trials reported any serious adverse events. TCM therapeutics of acupuncture, CHM and moxibustion show promising results for the treatment of mood and pain symptoms co-occurring with hot flushes. Although the controlled clinical trials of TCM therapeutics reviewed here measured multiple symptom outcomes, few report treatment effects in ways that allow clinicians to consider symptom clusters when prescribing therapies. Future studies need to measure and report results for individual symptoms or group like symptoms together into subscales. Controlled clinical trials with larger numbers of participants are essential to allow evaluation of these therapies on hot flushes and multiple co-occurring symptoms.

  14. The role of transdermal estrogen sprays and estradiol topical emulsion in the management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M Egras

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Amy M Egras, Elena M UmlandJefferson School of Pharmacy, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Vasomotor symptoms (VMS are among the most bothersome complaints of postmenopausal women. To date, the most widely studied and effective treatment for VMS is hormone replacement therapy, consisting of estrogen (in women without a uterus or estrogen plus progestin (in women with a uterus. Traditionally, oral estrogens have been used for treatment. However, over the years, additional estrogen formulations have been developed including transdermal patches; vaginal rings, creams, and tablets; and injectable preparations. Two newer formulations are transdermal estrogen spray and estradiol topical emulsion. This review evaluates the current literature assessing the use of these two newer formulations for the treatment of VMS associated with menopause.Keywords: menopause, vasomotor symptoms, transdermal estrogen spray, estradiol topical emulsion

  15. Evaluation of Symptoms and Prevention of Cancer in Menopause: The Value of Vulvar Exam

    OpenAIRE

    Palumbo, AR; Fasolino, C; Santoro, G.; Gargano, V.; Rinaldi, M.; Arduino, B; Belli, M.; Guida, M.

    2016-01-01

    Vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA), is a chronic medical condition experienced by postmenopausal women, with prevalence estimated ranging from 10% to 50% [1]. VVA is characterized by a constellation of symptoms, that may affect daily activities, sexuality, relationships, and quality of life [3]. Early recognition and effective treatment of VVA may enhance sexual health and the quality of life of women and their partners. Some vulvar conditions such as lichen sclerosus are more prevalent in the ...

  16. Možnosti zdravljenja klimakteričnih težav pri bolnicah z rakom dojk: Treatment possibilities of menopausal symptoms in breast cancer patients:

    OpenAIRE

    Arko, Darja

    2009-01-01

    Background. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Menopausal symptoms, which can highly reduce quality of life in women of all ages, are frequent side-effects of systemic treatment of early breast cancer whether treated by hormonal or cytotoxic therapy. Methods. The article presents literature review of the causes, assessment and management of menopausal syptoms in breast cancer patients. Results. There are a number of non-hormonal drugs effective in treating vasomotor symptoms, a...

  17. Management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms: Current treatment options, challenges and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachman, Deirdre R; Jones, Jason M; Loprinzi, Charles L

    2010-08-09

    Hot flashes are one of the most common and distressing symptoms associated with menopause, occurring in more than 75% of postmenopausal women. They are especially problematic in breast cancer patients since some breast cancer therapies can induce hot flashes. For mild hot flashes, it is proposed that behavioral modifications are the first step in management. Hormonal therapies, including estrogens and progestogens, are the most well known effective agents in relieving hot flashes; however, the safety of these agents is controversial. There is an increasing amount of literature on nonhormonal agents for the treatment of hot flashes. The most promising data regard newer antidepressant agents such as venlafaxine, which reduces hot flashes by about 60%. Gabapentin is another nonhormonal agent that is effective in reducing hot flashes. While many complimentary therapies, including phytoestrogens, black cohosh, and dehydroepiandrosterone, have been explored for the treatment of hot flashes; none can be recommended at this time. Furthermore, there is a lack of strong evidence to support exercise, yoga, or relaxation for the treatment of hot flashes. Paced respirations and hypnosis appear to be promising enough to warrant further investigation. Another promising nonpharmacological therapy, currently under investigation, involves a stellate ganglion block.

  18. Management of Menopause Symptoms with Acupuncture: An Umbrella Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Befus, Deanna; Coeytaux, Remy R; Goldstein, Karen M; McDuffie, Jennifer R; Shepherd-Banigan, Megan; Goode, Adam P; Kosinski, Andrzej; Van Noord, Megan G; Adam, Soheir S; Masilamani, Varsha; Nagi, Avishek; Williams, John W

    2018-01-03

    Vasomotor symptoms (VMSs) are the most common symptoms reported during menopause. Although hormone therapy is effective for reducing VMSs, its use is restricted in some women. Many women with VMSs thus seek nonhormonal, nonpharmacologic treatment options such as acupuncture. An umbrella systematic review (SR) was conducted, supplemented by a search of published randomized controlled trials (RCTs), that assessed the effectiveness of acupuncture for VMSs, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and adverse effects of treatment in perimenopausal or postmenopausal women. Meta-analyses were conducted using a random-effects model when data were sufficient. Three SRs and four new RCTs were identified that met eligibility criteria. Meta-analyses of this study revealed statistically significant standardized mean differences (SMDs) associated with acupuncture compared with no acupuncture at reducing VMS frequency (SMD -0.66, 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.06 to -0.26, I2 = 61.7%, 5 trials) and VMS severity (SMD -0.49, 95% CI -0.85 to -0.13, I2 = 18.1%, 4 trials) and improving HRQOL outcomes (SMD -0.93, 95% CI -1.20 to -0.67, I2 = 0.0%, 3 trials). SMDs were smaller or not statistically significant when acupuncture was compared with sham acupuncture. Evidence from RCTs supports the use of acupuncture as an adjunctive or stand-alone treatment for reducing VMSs and improving HRQOL outcomes, with the caveat that observed clinical benefit associated with acupuncture may be due, in part, or in whole to nonspecific effects. The safety of acupuncture in the treatment of VMSs has not been rigorously examined, but there is no clear signal for a significant potential for harm.

  19. Exploring Australian Aboriginal women's experiences of menopause: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgenson, Janelle R; Jones, Emma K; Haynes, Emma; Green, Charmaine; Thompson, Sandra C

    2014-03-20

    Despite extensive literature demonstrating differing experiences in menopause around the world, documentation of the experience of menopause in Australian Aboriginal women is scarce, and thus their menopausal experience is relatively unknown. This study aimed to understand Australian Aboriginal women's understanding and experience of menopause and its impact on their lives. The study was an exploratory qualitative study. Twenty-five Aboriginal women were recruited from a regional centre in the Mid-West region of Western Australia using opportunistic and snowballing sampling. Interviews and focus group discussions were undertaken from February 2011 to February 2012 using open-ended questioning with a yarning technique. Thematic analysis was undertaken of the transcribed interviews. A number of themes were revealed. These related to the language used, meanings and attitudes to menopause, symptoms experienced, the role of men, a lack of understanding, coping mechanisms and the attribution of menopausal changes to something else. The term "change of life" was more widely recognised and signified the process of ageing, and an associated gain of respect in the local community. A fear of menopausal symptoms or uncertainty about their origin was also common. Overall, many women reported insufficient understanding and a lack of available information to assist them and their family to understand the transition. There are similarities between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal experiences of menopause, including similar symptom profiles. The current language used within mainstream health settings may not be appropriate to this population if it fails to recognise the importance of language and reflect the attributed meaning of menopause. The fear of symptoms and uncertainty of their relationship to menopause demonstrated a need for more information which has not adequately been supplied to Australian Aboriginal women through current services. While this study is with a select

  20. The effects of yoga and self-esteem on menopausal symptoms and quality of life in breast cancer survivors-A secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Anna K; Rabsilber, Sybille; Lauche, Romy; Kümmel, Sherko; Dobos, Gustav; Langhorst, Jost; Cramer, Holger

    2017-11-01

    Previous research has found that yoga can enhance quality of life and ease menopausal symptoms of breast cancer survivors. The study examined whether self-esteem mediated the effects of yoga on quality of life, fatigue and menopausal symptoms, utilizing validated outcome measures. This is a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of yoga with those of usual care in 40 breast cancer survivors who suffered from menopausal symptoms. All participants completed all 3 assessments (week 0, week 12, and week 24) and provided full data. Outcomes were measured using self-rating instruments. Mediation analyses were performed using SPSS. Self-esteem mediated the effect of yoga on total menopausal symptoms (B=-2.11, 95% BCI [-5.40 to -0.37]), psychological menopausal symptoms (B=-0.94, 95% BCI [-2.30 to -0.01]), and urogenital menopausal symptoms (B=-0.66, 95% BCI [-1.65 to -0.15]), quality of life (B=8.04, 95% BCI [3.15-17.03]), social well-being (B=1.80, 95% BCI [0.54-4.21]), emotional well-being (B=1.62, 95% BCI [0.70-3.34]), functional well-being (B=1.84, 95% BCI [0.59-4.13]), and fatigue (B=4.34, 95% BCI [1.28-9.55]). Self-esteem had no effect on somatovegetative menopausal symptoms (B=-0.50, 95% BCI n.s.) or on physical well-being (B=0.79, 95% BCI n.s.). Findings support the assumption that self-esteem plays a vital role in the beneficial effect of yoga and that yoga can have long-term benefits for women diagnosed with breast cancer and undergoing menopausal transition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Sleep symptoms during the menopausal transition and early postmenopause: observations from the Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Nancy Fugate; Mitchell, Ellen Sullivan

    2010-04-01

    Describe the severity of getting to sleep, nighttime awakening, and early morning awakening across the menopausal transition (MT) and early postmenopause (PM) and their relationship to age, menopausal transition factors, symptoms, stress-related factors, and health related factors. Cohort. community. 286 women from the Seattle Midlife Women's Health Study cohort. Participants completed annual menstrual calendars for MT staging, diaries in which they rated their symptoms, stress levels, and perceived health multiple times per year from 1990-2007 and provided first morning urine samples assayed for E1G, FSH, cortisol, and catecholamines. Multilevel modeling (R program) was used for data analysis. Severity of self-reported problems going to sleep was associated with all symptoms, perceived stress, history of sexual abuse, perceived health (-), alcohol use (-) (all P health (-), and alcohol use (-) (all P health (-) (all P health. Sleep symptoms during the MT may be amenable to symptom management strategies that take into account the symptom clusters and promote women's general health rather than focusing only on the MT.

  2. A Study Assessing the Quality of Life Related to Voiding Symptoms and Sexual Functions in Menopausal Women

    OpenAIRE

    Chun, Ji Youn; Min, Kweon Sik; Kang, Dong Il

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the impact of menopause on the quality of life (QoL) of middle-aged and older women, including their general well-being, voiding-related symptoms, and sexual distress. Materials and Methods To assess QoL, we administered a questionnaire that included questions about voiding-related symptoms and female sexual distress and part of the Women's Health Questionnaire. The self-administered questionnaires were completed by 1,679 women in the Korea. Data for 1,262 women were av...

  3. A hidden reason for menopausal symptoms in premenopausal aged women: depression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cekmez, Yasemin; Torun, Fuat; Göçmen, Ahmet; Şanlıkan, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between depression and reproductive hormone changes in menopausal women is well konown but recent animal studies showed that depression can also cause changes in reproductive hormone levels...

  4. A study of menopausal symptoms in relation to habits of smoking and make-up using in Japanese women aged 35-59.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oi, N; Ohi, K

    2012-08-01

    We conducted a survey to elucidate the influence with menopause symptoms and the impact of not only smoking but also using make-up among for Japanese women, included ages above and below the menopausal generation. The subjects of this study were 335 Japanese women from 35 to 59 years of age who were examined for the first time in the specialized women's outpatient clinic of our institution from July 2010 to June 2011 for 1 year period. We used the items of the Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire. Similarly, we analysed the scores in relation to menopausal symptoms and whether the subject smoked, whether the subject used make-up depend on women (including foundation, lip rouge, brush one's eyebrows), how frequently she used make-up. The JMP version 9.0 software program was used to statistically analyse the score data. Significant associations were observed in psychosocial (P = 0.0196), tended to be more severe in women before menopause and after climacteric. Furthermore, the frequency of using make-up were negative relations with menopause symptoms (P = 0.0251) after climacteric. Smoking had made worse for physical symptoms (P women, especially, psychological symptoms. Also, physical conditions were influenced by smoking. Using make-up frequently was often seen after climacteric because of appearance changes by oestrogen dynamic decline. © 2012 The Authors. ICS © 2012 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  5. An International Menopause Society study of climate, altitude, temperature (IMS-CAT) and vasomotor symptoms in urban Indian regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanopoulou, E; Shah, D; Shah, R; Gupta, P; Sturdee, D W; Hunter, M S

    2014-08-01

    To examine the relationships between climate (season, temperature, humidity), lifestyle, health, mood and beliefs and experience of hot flushes and night sweats amongst mid-aged women living in eight urban Indian centers. A total of 717 peri- and postmenopausal women, aged 45-55 years, from urban centers in different regions of India were included. Data were collected during both summer and winter months. Participants completed questionnaires eliciting information about sociodemographics, hot flushes (prevalence, frequency and problem-rating), health and lifestyle (body mass index, diet, exercise, alcohol use), mood (Women's Health Questionnaire) and attributions and beliefs (Menopause Representations Questionnaire). The prevalence of vasomotor symptoms was low, with 34% of the sample reporting hot flushes and/or night sweats. Seasonal variation in temperature was not associated with hot flush prevalence, frequency or problem rating. Hot flush prevalence was mainly associated with higher anxiety and intake of spicy foods, frequency with (older) age and (more) frequent exercise, while hot flushes were more problematic for women who reported poorer general health and more negative beliefs about menopause. In this study of Indian women, seasonal temperature variation did not appear to influence hot flush reporting. Health, mood, beliefs and lifestyle factors appear to explain some, but not all, of the variance in experience of menopausal symptoms.

  6. Herbal Treatment in Menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigdem Gun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The digest has been prepared to review available clinical evidence on herbs used in treatment of menopause symptoms. Effectiveness of Humulus lupulus, Vitex agnus-castus, Dioskorea vilosa, Linum usitatissimum, Pinus pinaster, cruciferous vegetables, Cimicifuga racemosa L., Angelica sinensis, Oenothera biennis L., Hypericum perforatum L., Panax ginseng, Ginkgo biloba, Glycine soja, Trifolium pratense and Piper methysticum herbs were assessed for treatment of menopausal symptoms in the studies. Herbs used as alternative supplementary treatment for menopause symptoms have been found to have a limited effect. Thus more studies are warranted to assess effectiveness of herbal treatments for menopausal symptoms. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(4.000: 520-530

  7. Topical, geospatial, and temporal diffusion of the 2015 North American Menopause Society position statement on nonhormonal management of vasomotor symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Janet S; Laine, Tei; Harrison, Blake; LePage, Meghan; Pierce, Taran; Hoteling, Nathan; Börner, Katy

    2017-10-01

    We sought to depict the topical, geospatial, and temporal diffusion of the 2015 North American Menopause Society position statement on the nonhormonal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms released on September 21, 2015, and its associated press release from September 23, 2015. Three data sources were used: online news articles, National Public Radio, and Twitter. For topical diffusion, we compared keywords and their frequencies among the position statement, press release, and online news articles. We also created a network figure depicting relationships across key content categories or nodes. For geospatial diffusion within the United States, we compared locations of the 109 National Public Radio (NPR) stations covering the statement to 775 NPR stations not covering the statement. For temporal diffusion, we normalized and segmented Twitter data into periods before and after the press release (September 12, 2015 to September 22, 2015 vs September 23, 2015 to October 3, 2015) and conducted a burst analysis to identify changes in tweets from before to after. Topical information diffused across sources was similar with the exception of the more scientific terms "vasomotor symptoms" or "vms" versus the more colloquial term "hot flashes." Online news articles indicated media coverage of the statement was mainly concentrated in the United States. NPR station data showed similar proportions of stations airing the story across the four census regions (Northeast, Midwest, south, west; P = 0.649). Release of the statement coincided with bursts in the menopause conversation on Twitter. The findings of this study may be useful for directing the development and dissemination of future North American Menopause Society position statements and/or press releases.

  8. Adherence to Mediterranean dietary pattern and menopausal symptoms in relation to overweight/obesity in Spanish perimenopausal and postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayón-Orea, Carmen; Santiago, Susana; Cuervo, Marta; Martínez-González, Miguel A; Garcia, Aquilino; Martínez, Jose Alfredo

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to assess the relationship of adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern, as well as the presence of menopausal symptoms, with overweight/obesity in Spanish perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. Participants in this cross-sectional study were 8,954 Spanish perimenopausal or postmenopausal women. Anthropometric measurements were recorded, and all women were interviewed to assess their adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern, using a validated questionnaire and the Menopause and Health subscale of the validated Cervantes Scale. A logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between categories of adherence to the Mediterranean diet and the odds of being overweight/obese. Multinomial logistic regression was used to study the association between menopausal symptoms and the odds of being overweight/obese (reference categories: participants in the low-adherence category and participants with no menopausal problems). After adjustment for relevant confounders, the odds ratio (95% CI) for being overweight/obese among women in the highest category of adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern was 0.68 (0.60-0.78; P for trend obese was 3.05 (1.98-4.71) for the category "severe problems" in comparison with the category "no problems." Higher adherence to a healthy dietary pattern (Mediterranean diet) is inversely associated with overweight/obesity in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. The occurrence of low to severe problems during perimenopause or postmenopause is positively associated with overweight/obesity. Therefore, high adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern and a body mass index of 25kg/m(2) or lower might improve quality of life in women at these stages.

  9. Quality of life and menopausal and sexual symptoms in gynecologic cancer survivors: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Ana F; Pinto-Neto, Aarão M; Conde, Délio M; Costa-Paiva, Lúcia; Morais, Sirlei S; Pedro, Adriana O; Esteves, Sérgio B

    2011-06-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the frequency of menopausal and sexual symptoms and the proportion of sexually active women and to assess and identify quality of life (QOL) predictors in gynecologic cancer survivors. A prospective case series following a cohort of women under radiation therapy was conducted, including 107 women (aged 21-75 y) with gynecologic cancer (cervical or endometrial cancer) who underwent pelvic radiotherapy in the Radiotherapy Division of the Women's Integral Healthcare Center at the Universidade Estadual de Campinas. Adverse effects of radiotherapy were evaluated using the Common Terminology Criteria Adverse Event Scale. QOL was measured using the abbreviated version of the World Health Organization's Quality of Life instrument before radiotherapy (T0) and at 4 months (T1), 1 year (T2), and 3 years (T3) after radiotherapy. QOL scores were assessed over time using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to identify QOL predictors. A decrease in the frequency of vaginal dryness (26.7% in T0 vs 8.3% in T3; P women (21.5% in T0 vs 44.2% in T3; P health and overall QOL. Dyspareunia negatively affected the physical (P health (P = 0.04). Family income was positively related to environment domain (P health (P gynecologic cancer survivors had a lower frequency of vaginal dryness and a higher proportion of these women were sexually active 3 years after completion of radiotherapy. Furthermore, QOL improved and dyspareunia negatively affected various QOL dimensions.

  10. Obese and Overweight Youth: Risk for Experiencing Bullying Victimization and Internalizing Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waasdorp, Tracy Evian; Mehari, Krista; Bradshaw, Catherine P

    2018-01-22

    Obese and overweight youth are at an increased risk for poor peer relations and psychosocial adjustment. Of particular concern is the high rate of bullying victimization experienced by obese and overweight youth. While it is known that victimized youth are at an increased risk for internalizing symptoms, few studies have examined if weight status exacerbates the association between victimization and internalizing symptoms. The current study drew upon data from over 43,000 youth attending 107 middle and high schools. Multilevel results suggested that compared with normal weight youth, both overweight and obese youth were at an increased risk for experiencing relational, verbal, and cyber victimization, with only obese youth being at an increased risk for experiencing physical victimization. Notably, the odds for experiencing cyber victimization were higher than the odds for experiencing other forms of victimization. Frequently victimized obese youth, but not frequently victimized overweight youth, had significantly higher levels of internalizing symptoms compared to their frequently victimized, normal-weight peers. Together, these findings highlight the increased risk for psychosocial adjustment problems among frequently victimized overweight and obese youth, suggesting these youth may require preventive interventions tailored to meet their unique needs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Factors associated with traumatic symptoms and internalizing problems among adolescents who experienced a traumatic event

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deković, M.; Koning, I.M.; Stams, G.J.J.M.; Buist, K.L.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify factors that are related to the traumatic symptoms and problem behavior among adolescents who experienced the New Years fire in 2001 in Volendam, The Netherlands. Three groups of factors were considered: pre-trauma (personality and coping), traumarelated

  12. Discontinuing postmenopausal hormone therapy: an observational study of tapering versus quitting cold turkey: is there a difference in recurrence of menopausal symptoms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, Sally G; Bean-Mayberry, Bevanne; Gordon, Kirsha

    2009-01-01

    Because no current evidence-based guidelines for postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) discontinuation strategies exist, we compared female veterans who tapered HT to those who stopped abruptly with regard to patient-specific health factors and recurrence of menopausal symptoms. We identified female veterans who used combined estrogen/medroxyprogesterone HT in 2001 using the VA Pharmacy Benefits Management database. We then randomly sorted and selected 4,000 women for a mailed invitation to participate in a HT survey. Women who agreed to participate were mailed the National Women Veterans Hormone Replacement Survey. Of 836 participants who discontinued HT, 75% stopped cold turkey and 25% tapered. In bivariate analysis, taperers were more likely to report higher incomes, less smoking, and more use of alternatives such as vitamin E, other dietary supplements, and exercise or yoga for menopausal symptoms. They also more frequently reported discussions of menopausal symptoms with providers and used HT for menopausal symptoms and had longer median years of HT (P menopausal symptoms (OR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.06-2.62), moderate (OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.11-2.51) or prolonged (OR, 2.86; 95% CI, 1.76-4.65) years of HT use, use of vitamin E (OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.02-2.44), use of yoga (OR, 2.41; 95% CI, 1.05-5.55), and higher income (OR for income menopausal symptom scores after discontinuation (beta = -0.58 +/- 0.21, P = 0.01). However, tapering HT also had a significant association with resumption of hormones at a later date (OR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.20-3.52). Tapering HT may lessen recurrence of menopausal symptoms after discontinuation, but some women may remain inclined to return to HT. Separately, in the Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System, female veterans resuming HT need providers who can discuss HT options.

  13. Prevalence and predictors of complementary and alternative medicine/non-pharmacological interventions use for menopausal symptoms within the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentry-Maharaj, A; Karpinskyj, C; Glazer, C

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The negative publicity about menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) has led to increased use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) and non-pharmacological interventions (NPI) for menopausal symptom relief. We report on the prevalence and predictors of CAM/NPI among UK postmenopau......OBJECTIVES: The negative publicity about menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) has led to increased use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) and non-pharmacological interventions (NPI) for menopausal symptom relief. We report on the prevalence and predictors of CAM/NPI among UK...... for herbal therapies (43.8%; 9725/22 206), vitamins (42.6%; 9458/22 206), lifestyle approaches (32.1%; 7137/22 206) and phytoestrogens (21.6%; 4802/22 206). Older women reported less ever-use of herbal therapies, vitamins and phytoestrogens. Lifestyle approaches, aromatherapy...

  14. Low-dose paroxetine (7.5 mg) improves sleep in women with vasomotor symptoms associated with menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V; Joffe, Hadine; Kazempour, Kazem; Mekonnen, Hana; Bhaskar, Sailaja; Lippman, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are common among women in midlife; prevalence increases among perimenopausal/postmenopausal women with vasomotor symptoms. Paroxetine 7.5 mg is the only nonhormonal treatment that has been approved in the United States for moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms associated with menopause. In two pivotal phase 3 studies evaluating its efficacy and safety, improvements in sleep disturbances were also prospectively evaluated. Postmenopausal women with moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms were randomly assigned to paroxetine 7.5 mg (n = 591) or placebo (n = 593) once daily for 12 weeks (both studies) or 24 weeks (24-wk study). Predefined assessments on weeks 4, 12, and 24 included number of nighttime awakenings attributed to vasomotor symptoms, sleep-onset latency, sleep duration, and sleep-related adverse events. The two studies' data for weeks 1 to 12 were pooled. At baseline, participants reported a mean of 3.6 awakenings/night attributed to vasomotor symptoms. Nighttime awakenings attributed to vasomotor symptoms were significantly reduced within 4 weeks of initiating paroxetine 7.5 mg treatment (39% reduction vs 28% for placebo; P = 0.0049), and reductions were sustained through 12 or 24 weeks of treatment. Paroxetine 7.5 mg treatment also significantly increased nighttime sleep duration (week 4, +31 vs +16 min for placebo; P = 0.0075), but no significant between-group differences in sleep-onset latency or sleep-related adverse events such as sedation were observed. In postmenopausal women treated for menopausal vasomotor symptoms, paroxetine 7.5 mg significantly reduces the number of nighttime awakenings attributed to vasomotor symptoms and increases sleep duration without differentially affecting sleep-onset latency or sedation.

  15. Obesity and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Safi, Zain A; Polotsky, Alex J

    2015-05-01

    Over the recent decades, the prevalence of obesity in the United States has increased to epidemic proportions to more than 35% of adults, along with an increased risk of a number of health conditions, including hypertension, adverse lipid concentrations, and type 2 diabetes. The relationships between menopausal transition, weight gain, and obesity are reported but incompletely understood. The association between menopause and these measures has been the subject of many studies, along with examining their effect on reproductive hormones and menopausal symptoms. The purpose of this review is to summarize what is published in the literature on this subject and examine it through: (1) the possible impact of obesity on the timing of menopause; (2) the effect of obesity on menopausal symptoms and reproductive hormones around the time of menopause; and (3) the effect of menopause on obesity, weight gain, and body composition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Yoga and menopausal transition

    OpenAIRE

    Vaze, Nirmala; Joshi, Sulabha

    2010-01-01

    With increased life expectancy, today, women spend one-third of their life after menopause. Thus more attention is needed towards peri- and post-menopausal symptoms. Estrogen replacement therapy is the most effective treatment, however, it has its own limitations. The present need is to explore new options for the management of menopausal symptoms. Yogic life style is a way of living which aims to improve the body, mind and day to day life of individuals. The most commonly performed Yoga prac...

  17. SELUK BELUK MENOPAUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lannywati Ghani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Menopause, especially the symptoms and complications, is always an interesting topic to be discussed. It is actually a normal part of woman's life entering ages of 50. The symptoms of menopause are highly individual to each woman. Some may experience multiple physical and psychological symptoms that may continue to social impacts. Misinterpretation as other disease symptoms could happen and lead to incorrect treatment. Many studies have been done to learn more about the menopause physiological process, symptoms, complication, and treatment. So many preventive and treatment options are offered, including hormone therapy and practicing healthy life style. By understanding the menopause, it is expected that symptoms could be controlled and complications could be avoided.   Key words : Woman, Menstrual Period, Menopause, Healthy

  18. Suicidality and symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation in patients experiencing manic episodes with depressive symptoms: a naturalistic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eberhard J

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Jonas Eberhard,1 Emmanuelle Weiller2 1Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; 2H. Lundbeck A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark Purpose: Patients with a bipolar I disorder (BD-I manic episode meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5, criteria for “with mixed features” have a high incidence of suicide attempts and of anxiety, irritability, and agitation (AIA symptoms. The aim of this analysis was to explore the relationship between suicidality and AIA symptoms in patients with BD-I experiencing mania with depressive symptoms, using data from a previous naturalistic study.Patients and methods: Psychiatrists completed an online questionnaire about their adult patients who had a current BD-I manic episode. Questions covered the DSM-5 “with mixed features” specifier, the severity of AIA symptoms, the frequency and controllability of suicidal ideation, and the number of suicide attempts.Results: Of 1,035 patients with BD-I mania who were included in the analyses, 348 (33.6% met the criteria for the DSM-5 “with mixed features” specifier (three or more depressive symptoms. These patients were further stratified according to the severity of their AIA symptoms: “mild AIA” (zero or one AIA symptom above a severity threshold; 105 patients or “severe AIA” (all three AIA symptoms above a severity threshold; 167 patients. A greater incidence of suicidal ideation was observed in the severe AIA group (71.9% than in the mild AIA group (47.6%. Twice as many patients had easily controlled suicidal ideation than difficult-to-control suicidal ideation in both subgroups. The mean number of suicide attempts was higher in the severe AIA group than in the mild AIA group, during the current episode (0.84 vs 0.34 attempts, respectively; P<0.05 and over the patient’s lifetime (1.56 vs 1.04 attempts, respectively.Conclusion: The high risk of suicide among BD-I mania patients with depressive

  19. Risk factors of anxiety and depressive symptoms in female patients experiencing intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakuła Juchnowicz, Hanna; Łukasik, Paulina; Morylowska-Topolska, Justyna; Krukow, Paweł

    2017-02-26

    The aim of the study was to find factors associated with higher severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms in female patients experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV). The study was conducted in six randomly selected primary healthcare centers in Lublin province. The HADS (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and a structured questionnaire designed by the authors were administered to a total of 350 consecutive female patients visiting a GP. Fully completed questionnaire forms were obtained from 200 women. 102 (51%) participants who confirmed experiencing IPV ultimately made up the study cohort. Sequential models were created using backward stepwise multiple regression to investigate the potential risk and the protective factors associated with higher severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms in the study group. 68% and 56% of the participants respectively had positive scores on the HADS anxiety and depression subscales. Living in a small town or in the countryside was associated with higher scores on the anxiety subscale (b = -1.18, p = 0.003), but not on the depression subscale. Chronic physical illness (b = 2.42, p = 0.013; b = 2.86, p = 0.015), being unemployed (b = 0.58, p = 0.024; b = 0.69, p = 0.008), and exposure to economic violence (b = 3.97, p anxiety subscale. The type of violence and socioeconomic characteristics were more strongly associated with anxiety and depressive symptoms in women experiencing IPV than demographic variables.

  20. Symptoms and responses to critical incidents in paramedics who have experienced childhood abuse and neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maunder, Robert G; Halpern, Janice; Schwartz, Brian; Gurevich, Maria

    2012-03-01

    Mental and physical symptoms are common in paramedics, which may relate to high work stress, including critical incidents. As previous trauma is a risk factor for psychological symptoms after exposure to critical incidents, the prevalence of childhood experiences with abuse and neglect and paramedics' adaptation to critical incidents may be important. 635 paramedics were surveyed regarding childhood experiences of physical, sexual or emotional abuse as well an index critical incident from the past, acute stress responses to that event and current mental and physical symptoms. A comparison group of 159 female hospital-based healthcare workers completed the same survey of childhood abuse and neglect in a separate study. 232 paramedics (36.5%) responded. Among these, physical, sexual or emotional childhood abuse was reported by 38.4%. Female paramedics reported significantly more emotional and physical abuse and neglect than female hospital workers. Paramedics who reported childhood abuse or neglect more frequently experienced signs of acute stress immediately following the index critical incident and for the following 2 weeks. Childhood abuse and neglect were associated with significantly higher scores for depressive symptoms, physical symptoms and burnout, and a higher prevalence of 'cases' scoring above thresholds of clinical significance. Childhood abuse may be more common in paramedics than in other healthcare workers, at least in women. Childhood abuse and neglect is associated with acute stress responses to critical incidents and to current physical and mental symptoms. These results are based on a low response rate and may not be generalisable.

  1. Combined red clover isoflavones and probiotics potently reduce menopausal vasomotor symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambert, Max Norman Tandrup; Thorup, Anne Cathrine Sønderstgaard; Søvsø Szocska Hansen, Esben

    2017-01-01

    treatment to alleviate existing menopausal VMS, assessed for the first time by 24hour ambulatory skin conductance (SC) Methods and results We conducted a parallel, double blind, randomised control trial of 62 peri-menopausal women aged 40±65, reporting 5 hot flushes/day and follicle stimulating hormone 35...... IU/L. Participants received either twice daily treatment with bioavailable RC extract (RCE), providing 34 mg/d isoflavones and probiotics, or masked placebo formulation for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was change in daily hot flush frequency (HFF) from baseline to 12 weeks using 24hr SC. Secondary...... outcomes were change in SC determined hot flush intensity (HFI), self-reported HFF (rHFF) and hot flush severity (rHFS), blood pressure and plasma lipids. A significant decrease in 24hr HFF (P

  2. Women's knowledge, attitude and practice towards menopause and hormone replacement therapy: a facility based study in Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Saima; Al-Ghufli, Fatma Rashid; Raeesi, Hanan Ali; Al-Dliufairi, Khawla Mohammed; Al-Dhaheri, Noura Salem; Al-Maskari, Fatma; Blair, Iain; Shah, Syed Mahboob

    2014-01-01

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is an effective treatment for menopausal symptoms like vasomotor symptoms, sleep disturbances, mood alteration, depression, urinary tract infection, vaginal atrophy and increased health risks for osteoporosis, cardiovascular diseases and loss of cognitive function. This study was conducted to determine knowledge, attitude and practice toward menopause among women in UAE. A clinic-based cross-sectional study was carried out among women of age 40 and above. Study subjects were recruited from four Primary Health Care centres in Al Ain city. The participants were administered a questionnaire in Arabic and English, which included 33 items; socio-demographic variables, and questions related to knowledge, attitude and practices regarding menopause and HRT. Out of 177 study subjected selected, 150 (85%) completed the survey. Almost half of the participants (51%) had already experienced menopause. A substantial number of women had poor know knowledge about menopause (67%) and HRT (73%). Sixty percent of women had positive attitude towards menopause. Of the fifty three percent of women with symptoms, 35% of them did not use anything to relieve their symptoms. Knowledge about menopause varied significantly (pattitude towards menopause and HRT was found to be statistically significant. Women with reported symptoms that were bothersome had positive attitude towards HRT uptake. The study indicated that there is poor knowledge about menopause and HRT among the participants. Level of knowledge was associated with the level of education. There was a positive attitude towards menopause, with women suffering the most from menopausal symptoms showing positive attitude towards HRT.

  3. Migration and symptom reporting at menopause: a comparative survey of migrant women from Turkey in Berlin, German women in Berlin, and women in Istanbul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boral, Şengül; Borde, Theda; Kentenich, Heribert; Wernecke, Klaus D; David, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    The goal of this study was to compare perceptions of menopausal symptoms among migrant women from Turkey in Berlin (TB), German women in Berlin (GB), and women in Istanbul (TI). The aim was to analyze findings in light of the possible influences of sociodemographic, psychosocial, and migration-related aspects. The study participants (aged 45-60 y) were recruited via random and snowball sampling and surveyed with a structured questionnaire in the German and Turkish languages, which contained questions about their experiences with the menopausal phase and related symptoms (Menopause Rating Scale II), menopausal hormone therapy, and sociodemographic, psychosocial, and migration-related aspects. Statistical analysis was performed with univariate Fisher's exact test, factor analysis, and multivariate logistic regression. A total of 963 women participated in the study. Premenopausal/perimenopausal migrant women from Turkey in Berlin most frequently reported severe vegetative complaints (TB, 49.9%; GB, 34.9%; TI, 34.9%) and genital complaints (TB, 39.2%; GB, 32.3%; TI, 29.4%), as defined by factor analysis. In postmenopausal migrant women from Turkey in Berlin, the most frequently reported symptoms belonged to the domain of psychological complaints (TB, 52.7% vs GB, 24.0%; TI, 55.7%). Gradual multivariate logistic regression revealed sociodemographic and health-related risk factors as predictive factors for the defined menopausal complaints. Migration-related factors might be decisive for women's experience of menopause. Improvement of population-tailored access to factual information about menopause and treatment options is an area of great potential to support women in this phase.

  4. [Experienced bullying and hostile behavior in the workplace and symptoms of burnout in teachers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mościcka-Teske, Agnieszka; Drabek, Marcin; Pyżalski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between the exposure to workplace bullying and hostile behavior and occupational burnout in a sample of Polish teachers. In our research we studied a nationwide random sample of 1214 teachers. The frequency and type of hostile behaviors against employees was measured with the use of MDM Questionnaire, ("Mobbing, dręczenie, molestowanie" - "Bullying, harrasement, maltreatment") by Mościcka, Drabek, Merecz, developed in the Department of Occupational Psychology of the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine in Łódź (Poland), and the level of burnout was assessed with Maslach Burnout Inventory - General Survey (MBI-GS). As many as 63% of teachers experienced hostile behavior in their workplace and 7% of them experienced workplace bullying. Employees affected by bullying and hostile behavior reported more symptoms of professional burnout, such as emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and lower level of professional efficacy. The majority of teachers in this study experienced some form of hostile behavior in the workplace. One in ten respondents was the subject of workplace bullying. The experience of hostile behavior and bullying at work was significantly connected with symptoms of professional burnout. Therefore, it is desirable to take care of good interpersonal relationships in educational institutions, strengthen teachers' abilities to cope with difficult interpersonal situations, and implement procedures to prevent bullying and hostile behavior in the workplace.

  5. Experienced bullying and hostile behavior in the workplace and symptoms of burnout in teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Mościcka-Teske

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between the exposure to workplace bullying and hostile behavior and occupational burnout in a sample of Polish teachers. Material and Methods: In our research we studied a nationwide random sample of 1214 teachers. The frequency and type of hostile behaviors against employees was measured with the use of MDM Questionnaire, (“Mobbing, dręczenie, molestowanie” – “Bullying, harrasement, maltreatment” by Mościcka, Drabek, Merecz, developed in the Department of Occupational Psychology of the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine in Łódź (Poland, and the level of burnout was assessed with Maslach Burnout Inventory – General Survey (MBI-GS. Results: As many as 63% of teachers experienced hostile behavior in their workplace and 7% of them experienced workplace bullying. Employees affected by bullying and hostile behavior reported more symptoms of professional burnout, such as emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and lower level of professional efficacy. Conclusions: The majority of teachers in this study experienced some form of hostile behavior in the workplace. One in ten respondents was the subject of workplace bullying. The experience of hostile behavior and bullying at work was significantly connected with symptoms of professional burnout. Therefore, it is desirable to take care of good interpersonal relationships in educational institutions, strengthen teachers’ abilities to cope with difficult interpersonal situations, and implement procedures to prevent bullying and hostile behavior in the workplace. Med Pr 2014;65(4:535–542

  6. Physical activity and mental health outcomes during menopause: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elavsky, Steriani; McAuley, Edward

    2007-04-01

    Many women experience detriments in mental health during the menopausal transition. Physical activity may attenuate these adverse outcomes but few studies investigating such effects exist. This study examined the effects of a 4-month randomized controlled exercise trial on mental health outcomes in 164 previously low-active middle-aged women (M age = 49.9; SD = 3.6). Participants completed body composition and fitness assessment and a battery of psychological measures at the beginning and end of a 4-month randomized controlled exercise trial with three arms: walking, yoga, control. The results indicated that walking and yoga were effective in enhancing positive affect and menopause-related QOL and reducing negative affect. Women who experienced decreases in menopausal symptoms across the trial also experienced improvements in all positive mental health and QOL outcomes and reductions in negative mental health outcomes. Whether menopausal symptoms increased or decreased across the trial appeared to be determined in part by whether there were increases or decreases in cardiorespiratory fitness. Physical activity appears to enhance mood and menopause-related QOL during menopause, however, other aspects of mental health may be affected only as a result of reduction in menopausal symptoms. Increasing cardiorespiratory fitness could be one way to reduce menopausal symptoms.

  7. A randomized, double-blind, multiple-dose escalation study of a Chinese herbal medicine preparation (Dang Gui Buxue Tang) for moderate to severe menopausal symptoms and quality of life in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi Chiu; Cheng, King Fai; Lo, Wing Man; Law, Cindy; Li, Lu; Leung, Ping Chung; Chung, Tony Kwok Hung; Haines, Christopher John

    2013-02-01

    This study is a phase II clinical trial that aims to investigate the dose-response relationship of a Chinese herbal medicine preparation, Dang Gui Buxue Tang (DBT), with short-term menopausal symptoms and quality of life in local postmenopausal women. A randomized, double-blind, multiple-dose escalation trial was performed in 60 postmenopausal women experiencing severe hot flashes and night sweats. The participants were randomized to receive DBT preparations at 1.5, 3.0, or 6.0 g/day for 12 weeks. The primary outcomes were vasomotor symptoms, Greene Climacteric Scale (GCS) score, and Menopause-Specific Quality of Life (MENQOL) score. Secondary outcomes included serum hormones and lipids. There were between-group differences in psychological/psychosocial (P = 0.015, GCS; P = 0.013, MENQOL) and somatic/physical (P = 0.019, GCS; P = 0.037, MENQOL) domains, and improvement was significantly greatest (P DBT preparations at 6.0 g/day significantly improve physical and psychological scores and significantly reduce vasomotor symptoms from baseline. The treatment was well tolerated, with no serious adverse events noted during the 12-week intervention period. The changes do not affect hormones and lipid profiles.

  8. Managing menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Robert; Abramson, Beth L; Blake, Jennifer; Desindes, Sophie; Dodin, Sylvie; Johnston, Shawna; Rowe, Timothy; Sodhi, Namrita; Wilks, Penny; Wolfman, Wendy

    2014-09-01

    To provide updated guidelines for health care providers on the management of menopause in asymptomatic healthy women as well as in women presenting with vasomotor or urogenital symptoms and on considerations related to cardiovascular disease, breast cancer, urogynaecology, and sexuality. Lifestyle interventions, prescription medications, and complementary and alternative therapies are presented according to their efficacy in the treatment of menopausal symptoms. Counselling and therapeutic strategies for sexuality concerns in the peri- and postmenopausal years are reviewed. Approaches to the identification and evaluation of women at high risk of osteoporosis, along with options for prevention and treatment, are presented in the companion osteoporosis guideline. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed and The Cochrane Library in August and September 2012 with the use of appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., hormone therapy, menopause, cardiovascular diseases, and sexual function) and key words (e.g., hormone therapy, perimenopause, heart disease, and sexuality). Results were restricted to clinical practice guidelines, systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. Results were limited to publication dates of 2009 onwards and to material in English or French. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline until January 5, 2013. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, national and international medical specialty societies, and clinical practice guideline collections.

  9. Integrative therapies for menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Julie; Warber, Sara L

    2005-03-01

    Menopause is a transitional time for women. This gives practitioners an opportunity to focus on recommending healthy life-style changes. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has been the mainstay of therapy for menopausal symptoms. With recent research findings, women and their physicians are seeking alternatives that do not carry the risks associated with HRT. Exercise has been shown to help some women with symptoms of hot flashes, as have relaxation techniques and deep breathing. Dietary changes to incorporate whole foods and soy are thought by some to help with menopausal symptoms, and are recommended because of a positive impact on heart disease and obesity; soy isoflavones may also help with menopausal symptoms. Botanicals such as black cohosh and red clover have been shown in some studies to decrease severity and frequency of hot flashes. We recommend that HRT be prescribed when other measures have failed to adequately control symptoms. Bioidentical hormones are preferred in our practice.

  10. Anxiety and Posttraumatic Stress Symptom Pathways to Substance Use Problems among Community Women Experiencing Intimate Partner Violence

    OpenAIRE

    Jaquier, Véronique; Flanagan, Julianne C.; Sullivan, Tami P.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines effects of psychological, physical, and sexual intimate partner violence (IPV) to alcohol and drug problems through anxiety and posttraumatic stress symptom severity among 143 community women currently experiencing IPV. Anxiety and posttraumatic stress symptom severity had unique effects on alcohol and drug problems. Higher anxiety symptom severity and higher physical IPV severity were associated with greater alcohol and drug problems. Higher posttraumatic stress symptom s...

  11. Safety, efficacy and patient acceptability of drospirenone and estradiol in the treatment of menopausal vasomotor symptoms: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Carranza-Lira

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Sebastián Carranza-LiraReproductive Medicine, UMAE Hospital de Ginecología y Obstetricia “Luis Castelazo Ayala” Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, MéxicoAbstract: During menopause vasomotor symptoms are one of the main complaints about which women seek medical advice. For symptom control, several therapies have been used, among which hormone therapy has produced good results. One of these is estrogen monotherapy, which unfortunately may induce endometrial hyperplasia in women with an intact uterus. A progestin must be added to avoid this risk. Progestins may induce several secondary effects such as breast tenderness, hirsutism, edema and unfavorable lipid profile modifications. Recently a new progestin called drospirenone has been synthesized and used in combination with estradiol for the treatment of postmenopausal women. This progestin is derived from spironolactone, and lacks estrogenic, androgenic and glucocorticoid activities. Several studies have evaluated safety, efficacy and patient tolerability, and have shown a good profile in all these parameters. All studies agree that the combination of estradiol 1 mg plus drospirenone 2 mg is a good choice for postmenopausal women with vasomotor symptoms.Keywords: estradiol, drospirenone, postmenopause, review

  12. Effects of Inhalation of Essential Oil of Citrus aurantium L. var. amara on Menopausal Symptoms, Stress, and Estrogen in Postmenopausal Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Yeon Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhalation of the essential oil of Citrus aurantium L. var. amara (neroli oil on menopausal symptoms, stress, and estrogen in postmenopausal women. Sixty-three healthy postmenopausal women were randomized to inhale 0.1% or 0.5% neroli oil or almond oil (control for 5 minutes twice daily for 5 days. Menopause-related symptoms, as determined by the Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (MENQOL; sexual desire visual analog scale (VAS; serum cortisol and estrogen concentrations, blood pressure, pulse, and stress VAS, were measured before and after inhalation. Compared with the control group, the two neroli oil groups showed significant improvements in the physical domain score of the MENQOL and in sexual desire. Systolic blood pressure was significantly lower in the group inhaling 0.5% neroli oil than in the control group. Compared with the control group, the two neroli oil groups showed significantly lower diastolic blood pressure and tended to improve pulse rate and serum cortisol and estrogen concentrations. These findings indicate that inhalation of neroli oil helps relieve menopausal symptoms, increase sexual desire, and reduce blood pressure in postmenopausal women. Neroli oil may have potential as an effective intervention to reduce stress and improve the endocrine system.

  13. A Pilot Randomized, Single Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Traditional Acupuncture for Vasomotor Symptoms and Mechanistic Pathways of Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painovich, Jeannette M.; Shufelt, Chrisandra L.; Azziz, Ricardo; Yang, Yuching; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Braunstein, Glenn D.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Stewart, Paul M.; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2011-01-01

    Objective To conduct a pilot study for feasibility of planning a definitive clinical trial comparing traditional acupuncture (TA) to sham acupuncture (SA) and waiting control (WC) on menopause related vasomotor symptoms (VMS), quality of life (QOL), and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in peri and post-menopausal women. Methods Thirty-three peri and post-menopausal women with at least 7 VMS daily were randomized to TA, SA or WC. The TA and SA groups were given three treatments per week for 12 weeks. Outcomes included the number and severity of VMS, MENQOL questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, Spielberg State-Trait Anxiety Instrument, Pittsburgh Quality Sleep Index, 24 hour urine cortisol and metabolites, and ACTH stimulation testing. Results Both TA and SA groups demonstrated improved VMS trends compared to WC (Δ −3.5±3.00 vs. −4.1±3.79 vs. −1.2±2.4, respectively, p=.20), and significantly improved MENQOL vasomotor scores (Δ − 1.5±2.02 vs. −1.8±1.52 vs. 0.3±0.64, respectively, p=.04). There were no psychosocial group differences. Exit 24-hour urinary measures were lower in the TA vs the SA or WC in total cortisol metabolites (4,658.9±1,670.9 vs 7,735.8±3,747.9 vs 5,166.0±2,234.5, p=0.03, respectively) and DHEA (41.4±27.46, 161.2±222.77, 252.4±385.40, respectively, p=0.05). The ACTH stimulation cortisol response data also trended in the hypothesized direction (p=0.17). Conclusion Both TA and SA reduce VMS frequency and severity and improve VMS-related quality of life compared to WC; however, TA alone may impact the HPA axis. This association is viewed as preliminary and hypothesis-generating and should be explored in a large clinical trial. PMID:21968279

  14. Increased generalization of learned associations is related to re-experiencing symptoms in veterans with symptoms of post-traumatic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasides, Nicole; Beck, Kevin D; Pang, Kevin C H; Servatius, Richard J; Gilbertson, Mark W; Orr, Scott P; Myers, Catherine E

    2015-01-01

    One interpretation of re-experiencing symptoms in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is that memories related to emotional information are stored strongly, but with insufficient specificity, so that stimuli which are minimally related to the traumatic event are sufficient to trigger recall. If so, re-experiencing symptoms may reflect a general bias against encoding background information during a learning experience, and this tendency might not be limited to learning about traumatic or even autobiographical events. To test this possibility, we administered a discrimination-and-transfer task to 60 Veterans (11.2% female, mean age 54.0 years) self-assessed for PTSD symptoms in order to examine whether re-experiencing symptoms were associated with increased generalization following associative learning. The discrimination task involved learning to choose the rewarded object from each of six object pairs; each pair differed in color or shape but not both. In the transfer phase, the irrelevant feature in each pair was altered. Regression analysis revealed no relationships between re-experiencing symptoms and initial discrimination learning. However, re-experiencing symptom scores contributed to the prediction of transfer performance. Other PTSD symptom clusters (avoidance/numbing, hyperarousal) did not account for significant additional variance. The results are consistent with an emerging interpretation of re-experiencing symptoms as reflecting a learning bias that favors generalization at the expense of specificity. Future studies will be needed to determine whether this learning bias may pre-date and confer risk for, re-experiencing symptoms in individuals subsequently exposed to trauma, or emerges only in the wake of trauma exposure and PTSD symptom development.

  15. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Endocrinologist Search Featured Resource Menopause Map™ View Bioidentical Hormones January 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Howard ... take HT for symptom relief. What are bioidentical hormones? Bioidentical hormones are identical to the hormones that ...

  16. Soy isoflavones as a first-line approach to the treatment of vasomotor symptoms of menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Schmidt

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The link between higher uptake of isoflavones and a reduced frequency of menopause-related hot flushes were first described in 1992 based on a lower incidence of hot flushes in countries with high dietary soy intake1. Since then, a number of clinical trials with different sources of isoflavones, including soy and red clover, have been performed, and in almost all studies with an appropriate design the outcome was in favour of isoflavone supplementation2. A detailed risk assessment3 revealed that a number of data in humans do not confirm the alleged adverse effect resulting from possible interaction between isoflavones and the hormone-sensitive tissues of the mammary glands, uterus and thyroid. Safety was demonstrated by long-term intake of 150 mg of isoflavones per day, which lasted at least three years. It was also found that a high intake of isoflavones prevented the occurrence of breast cancer4-7. Clinical findings indicate potential benefits of exposure to isoflavones during breast cancer treatment with tamoxifen or anastrozole.

  17. Prevalence of depressive and alcohol abuse symptoms among women VA outpatients who report experiencing sexual assault while in the military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, C S; Skinner, K M; Sullivan, L M; Miller, D R; Frayne, S; Tripp, T J

    1999-10-01

    Among a national sample of 3,632 women VA outpatients, we determined self-reported prevalence of sexual assault experienced during military service and compared screening prevalence for current symptoms of depression and alcohol abuse between those who did and did not report this history. Data were obtained by mailed questionnaire. Military-related sexual assault was reported by 23%. Screening prevalence for symptoms of current depression was 3 times higher and for current alcohol abuse was 2 times higher among those who reported experiencing military-related sexual assault. Recent mental health treatment was reported by 50% of those who reported experiencing sexual assault during military service and screened positive for symptoms of depression, and by 40% of those who screened positive for symptoms of alcohol abuse.

  18. Predictors of psychological adjustment, experienced parenting burden and chronic sorrow symptoms in parents of children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittingham, K; Wee, D; Sanders, M R; Boyd, R

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the role of child behaviour, parental coping and experiential avoidance in predicting the psychological outcomes of: (i) psychological symptoms; (ii) chronic sorrow symptoms; and (iii) experienced parenting burden in parents of children with cerebral palsy (CP). This study is a cross-sectional, correlational study. Ninety-four parents of children (aged 2-12 years) with CP (various levels of motor functioning GMFCS I-V) participated. Together, the three predictors of child behaviour, parental coping and experiential avoidance explained 36.8% of the variance in psychological symptoms with child behavioural problems and experiential avoidance as significant unique predictors. In addition, 15.8% of the variance in chronic sorrow symptoms was explained by the three predictors with experiential avoidance alone as a significant unique predictor. Lastly, the predictors together explained 24.3% of the variance in experienced parenting burden with child behavioural problems and experiential avoidance as significant unique predictors. This study demonstrates a relationship between child behavioural problems and parental psychological symptoms and experienced parenting burden as well as a relationship between experiential avoidance and parental psychological symptoms, experienced parenting burden and chronic sorrow symptoms. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Use of Alternative Medications for Menopause-Related Symptoms in Three Major Ethnic Groups of Ipoh, Perak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohn Mar, Saw; Malhi, Fatehpal; Syed Rahim, Syed Hamid; Chua, Chin Tong; Sidhu, Sarjeet Singh; Sandheep, Sugathan

    2015-11-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated the use of alternative medications to alleviate menopause-related symptoms among Malay, Chinese, and Indian women of Ipoh city. The prevalence, types, effectiveness, and associated factors were determined. The prevalence of alternative medication use was 41.4%. Evening primrose oil (EPO) was the most popular medication used (18.1%), followed by soy-based products (12.3%), green tea (6.8%), and gingko (5.8%). The medication was reported to be highly effective by 58.3% of soya bean diet users and 41.1% of EPO users. Significant variables associated with the use were Chinese or Indian ethnicity (P < .001), age between 50 and 54 years (P < .01), lower self-health rating (P < .05), education level of diploma or professional degree (P < .05), employment as professionals or entrepreneurs (P < .05), and the use of hormone replacement therapy (P < .05). Regression analysis showed that Chinese and Indians had significantly higher odds for the use than Malays (Chinese: odds ratio [OR] = 4.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.392-7.837; Indians: OR = 3.248, 95% CI = 1.586-6.654). © 2015 APJPH.

  20. Relationships between Menopausal and Mood Symptoms and EEG Sleep Measures in a Multi-ethnic Sample of Middle-Aged Women: The SWAN Sleep Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Howard M.; Avery, Elizabeth; Sowers, MaryFran; Bromberger, Joyce T.; Owens, Jane F.; Matthews, Karen A.; Hall, Martica; Zheng, Huiyong; Gold, Ellen B.; Buysse, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Examine associations of vasomotor and mood symptoms with visually scored and computer-generated measures of EEG sleep. Design: Cross-sectional analysis. Setting: Community-based in-home polysomnography (PSG). Participants: 343 African American, Caucasian, and Chinese women; ages 48–58 years; pre-, peri- or post-menopausal; participating in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Sleep Study (SWAN Sleep Study). Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Measures included PSG-assessed sleep duration, continuity, and architecture, delta sleep ratio (DSR) computed from automated counts of delta wave activity, daily diary-assessed vasomotor symptoms (VMS), questionnaires to collect mood (depression, anxiety) symptoms, medication, and lifestyle information, and menopausal status using bleeding criteria. Sleep outcomes were modeled using linear regression. Nocturnal VMS were associated with longer sleep time. Higher anxiety symptom scores were associated with longer sleep latency and lower sleep efficiency, but only in women reporting nocturnal VMS. Contrary to expectations, VMS and mood symptoms were unrelated to either DSR or REM latency. Conclusions: Vasomotor symptoms moderated associations of anxiety with EEG sleep measures of sleep latency and sleep efficiency and was associated with longer sleep duration in this multi-ethnic sample of midlife women. Citation: Kravitz HM; Avery E; Sowers MF; Bromberger JT; Owens JF; Matthews KA; Hall M; Zheng H; Gold EB; Buysse DJ. Relationships between menopausal and mood symptoms and Eeg sleep measures in a multi-ethnic sample of middle-aged women: the SWAN Sleep Study. SLEEP 2011;34(9):1221-1232. PMID:21886360

  1. "I should live and finish it": A qualitative inquiry into Turkish women's menopause experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unalan Pemra C

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While bio-medically, menopause could be treated as an illness, from a psychosocial and cultural perspective it could be seen as a "natural" process without requiring medication unless severe symptoms are present. Our objective is to explore the perceptions of Turkish women regarding menopause and Hormone Therapy (HT to provide health care workers with an insight into the needs and expectations of postmenopausal women. Methods A qualitative inquiry through semi-structured, in-depth interviews was used to explore the study questions. We used a purposive sampling and included an equal number of participants who complained about the climacteric symptoms and those who visited the outpatient department for a problem other than climacteric symptoms but when asked declared that they had been experiencing climacteric symptoms. The interview questions focused on two areas; 1 knowledge, experiences, attitudes and beliefs about menopause and; 2 menopause-related experiences and ways to cope with menopause and perception of HT. Results Most of the participants defined menopause as a natural transition process that one should go through. Cleanliness, maturity, comfort of not having a period and positive changes in health behaviour were the concepts positively attributed to menopause, whereas hot flushes, getting old and difficulties in relationships were the negatives. Osteoporosis was an important concern for most of the participants. To deal with the symptoms, the non-pharmacological options were mostly favoured. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first qualitative study which focuses on Turkish women's menopausal experiences. Menopause was thought to be a natural process which was characterised by positive and negative features. Understanding these features and their implications in these women's lives may assist healthcare workers in helping their clients with menopause.

  2. A randomised controlled trial of a cognitive behavioural intervention for women who have menopausal symptoms following breast cancer treatment (MENOS 1: Trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellier Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a group cognitive behavioural intervention to alleviate menopausal symptoms (hot flushes and night sweats in women who have had breast cancer treatment. Hot flushes and night sweats are highly prevalent but challenging to treat in this population. Cognitive behaviour therapy has been found to reduce these symptoms in well women and results of an exploratory trial suggest that it might be effective for breast cancer patients. Two hypotheses are tested: Compared to usual care, group cognitive behavioural therapy will: 1. Significantly reduce the problem rating and frequency of hot flushes and nights sweats after six weeks of treatment and at six months post-randomisation. 2. Improve mood and quality of life after six weeks of treatment and at six months post-randomisation. Methods/Design Ninety-six women who have completed their main treatment for breast cancer and who have been experiencing problematic hot flushes and night sweats for over two months are recruited into the trial from oncology and breast clinics in South East London. They are randomised to either six weekly group cognitive behavioural therapy (Group CBT sessions or to usual care. Group CBT includes information and discussion about hot flushes and night sweats in the context of breast cancer, monitoring and modifying precipitants, relaxation and paced respiration, stress management, cognitive therapy for unhelpful thoughts and beliefs, managing sleep and night sweats and maintaining changes. Prior to randomisation women attend a clinical interview, undergo 24-hour sternal skin conductance monitoring, and complete questionnaire measures of hot flushes and night sweats, mood, quality of life, hot flush beliefs and behaviours, optimism and somatic amplification. Post-treatment measures (sternal skin conductance and questionnaires are collected six to eight weeks later and follow-up measures (questionnaires and a use

  3. Menopause, micronutrients, and hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie-Rosett, Judith

    2005-05-01

    Micronutrient and herbal/phytochemical supplements are of increasing interest as potential alternatives to using estrogen therapy in treating menopausal symptoms. This article provides an overview of the questionnaires that assess menopausal symptoms and research efforts to better standardize symptom assessment. The reported rate of symptoms varies by ethnicity, stage of menopause, hormonal therapy and the measurement method. The use of estrogen therapy has declined sharply after the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Hormone Trial was stopped early because the potential risks outweighed potential benefits. There is a limited research base that addresses the efficacy of supplements in controlling menopausal symptoms. The generalizability of several studies is limited because the study participants experiences menopause as the results of treatment for breast cancer. The article concludes with a review of guidelines and of issues that need to be addressed in future research studies with emphasis on questions related to clinical practice.

  4. Activation of professional and personal network relations when experiencing a symptom: a population-based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnegaard, Sandra; Andersen, Rikke Sand; Pedersen, Anette Fischer; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg

    2017-10-15

    To describe patterns of disclosure of symptoms experienced among people in the general population to persons in their personal and/or professional network. A population-based cross-sectional study. Data were collected from a web-based survey. The general population in Denmark. 100 000 individuals randomly selected, representative of the adult Danish population aged ≥20 years were invited. Approximately 5% were not eligible for inclusion. 49 706 (men=23 240; women=26 466) of 95 253 eligible individuals completed the questionnaire; yielding a response rate of 52.2%. Individuals completing all questions regarding social network relations form the study base (n=44 313). Activation of personal and/or professional relations when experiencing a symptom. The 44 313 individuals reported in total 260 079 symptom experiences within the last 4 weeks. No professional network relation was used in two-thirds of all reported symptoms. The general practitioner (GP) was the most frequently reported professional relation activated (22.5%). People reporting to have available personal relations were slightly less inclined to contact the GP (21.9%) when experiencing a symptom compared with people with no reported personal relations (26.8%). The most commonly activated personal relations were spouse/partner (56.4%) and friend (19.6%). More than a quarter of all reported symptom experiences was not shared with anyone, personal nor professional. The symptom experiences with the lowest frequency of network activation were symptoms such as black stool, constipation, change in stool texture and frequent urination. This study emphasises variation in the activation of network relations when experiencing a symptom. Symptoms were shared with both personal and professional relations, but different patterns of disclosures were discovered. For symptoms derived from the urogenital or colorectal region, the use of both personal and professional relations was relatively small, which

  5. Razlike med spoloma pri nekaterih simptomih stresa ter intenzivnost doživljanja stresnih simptomov = Gender Differences in Some Stress Symptoms and Intensity of Experiencing Stress Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Meško

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the symptoms of stress and to establishgender differences in stress symptoms. We tried to find out ifthere are gender differences in the stress level at work, if there aregender differences in terms of stress symptoms frequency, and if thereare gender differences in terms of the intensity of experiencing stresssymptoms. In this study 85 randomly selected managers from Slovenecompanies participated. The results of the study have shown that thereare gender differences in terms of all the above mentioned factors,namely a statistically higher level of stress in women. In terms of stresssymptoms occurrence there are gender differences in some stress symptomsas well as in the intensity of experiencing stress symptoms.

  6. Alexithymia, Coping Styles and Traumatic Stress Symptoms in a Sample of Veterans Who Experienced Military Sexual Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaher, Raluca M; O'Brien, Carol; Smiley, Paul; Hahn, Austin M

    2016-02-01

    The current study examined the association between alexithymia and coping styles (planning, positive reinterpretation and growth, social-emotion coping, and denial), and trauma symptoms in a clinical sample of 170 male and female veterans who experienced sexual trauma during military service. Denial was the only coping style positively associated with trauma symptoms, and it mediated the relationship between alexithymia and trauma symptoms. Alexithymia was negatively associated with planning. Likewise, alexithymia was negatively associated with social-emotional coping and with positive reinterpretation and growth. The results speak to the significant role that alexithymia has in predicting individual coping styles. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Evaluation of estrogenic activity of licorice species in comparison with hops used in botanicals for menopausal symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atieh Hajirahimkhan

    Full Text Available The increased cancer risk associated with hormone therapies has encouraged many women to seek non-hormonal alternatives including botanical supplements such as hops (Humulus lupulus and licorice (Glycyrrhiza spec. to manage menopausal symptoms. Previous studies have shown estrogenic properties for hops, likely due to the presence of 8-prenylnarigenin, and chemopreventive effects mainly attributed to xanthohumol. Similarly, a combination of estrogenic and chemopreventive properties has been reported for various Glycyrrhiza species. The major goal of the current study was to evaluate the potential estrogenic effects of three licorice species (Glycyrrhiza glabra, G. uralensis, and G. inflata in comparison with hops. Extracts of Glycyrrhiza species and spent hops induced estrogen responsive alkaline phosphatase activity in endometrial cancer cells, estrogen responsive element (ERE-luciferase in MCF-7 cells, and Tff1 mRNA in T47D cells. The estrogenic activity decreased in the order H. lupulus > G. uralensis > G. inflata > G. glabra. Liquiritigenin was found to be the principle phytoestrogen of the licorice extracts; however, it exhibited lower estrogenic effects compared to 8-prenylnaringenin in functional assays. Isoliquiritigenin, the precursor chalcone of liquiritigenin, demonstrated significant estrogenic activities while xanthohumol, a metabolic precursor of 8-prenylnaringenin, was not estrogenic. Liquiritigenin showed ERβ selectivity in competitive binding assay and isoliquiritigenin was equipotent for ER subtypes. The estrogenic activity of isoliquiritigenin could be the result of its cyclization to liquiritigenin under physiological conditions. 8-Prenylnaringenin had nanomolar estrogenic potency without ER selectivity while xanthohumol did not bind ERs. These data demonstrated that Glycyrrhiza species with different contents of liquiritigenin have various levels of estrogenic activities, suggesting the importance of precise labeling of

  8. Women's experience of menopause: a systematic review of qualitative evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoga, Luiza; Rodolpho, Juliana; Gonçalves, Bruna; Quirino, Bruna

    2015-09-16

    are pleasant or not; and (vi) The women should be prepared and have their needs supported according to their perspectives. The systematic review shows that menopause is a stage of life experienced in different ways. The experience of menopause is characterized by personal challenges and changes in personal roles within the family and society. Hot flushes and night sweats are the strongest symptoms of those reported by women affected by the changes experienced during menopause. The positive or negative ways in which each woman approaches the changes during menopause are influenced by their personal, family and sociocultural background. Health care providers pay little attention to women´s perceptions regarding menopause. Considering menopause is a time when women feel vulnerable, personal and tailored healthcare according to individual needs, preferences and expectations should be provided. Coping strategies regarding the effects of menopause should be determined in creative and dynamic ways through the identification and consideration of the complex issues involved. These measures are essential to ensuring effective support for menopausal women. The Joanna Briggs Institute.

  9. Vasomotor symptoms resulting from natural menopause: a systematic review and network meta-analysis of treatment effects from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guideline on menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarri, G; Pedder, H; Dias, S; Guo, Y; Lumsden, M A

    2017-09-01

    Vasomotor symptoms (VMSs) are the hallmarks of menopause, occurring in approximately 75% of postmenopausal women in the UK, and are severe in 25%. To identify which treatments are most clinically effective for the relief of VMSs for women in natural menopause without hysterectomy. English publications in MEDLINE, Embase, and The Cochrane Library up to 13 January 2015 were searched. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of treatments for women with a uterus for the outcomes of frequency of VMSs (up to 26 weeks), vaginal bleeding, and discontinuation. Bayesian network meta-analysis (NMA) using mean ratios (MRs) and odd ratios (ORs). Across the three networks, 47 RCTs of 16 treatment classes (n = 8326 women) were included. When compared with placebo, transdermal estradiol and progestogen (O+P) had the highest probability of being the most effective treatment for VMS relief (69.8%; MR 0.23; 95% credible interval, 95% CrI 0.09-0.57), whereas oral O+P was ranked lower than transdermal O+P, although oral and transdermal O+P were no different for this outcome (MR 2.23; 95% CrI 0.7-7.1). Isoflavones and black cohosh were more effective than placebo, although not significantly better than O+P. Not only were selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) found to be ineffective in relieving VMSs, but they also had significantly higher odds of discontinuation than placebo. Limited data were available for bleeding, therefore no conclusions could be made. For women who have not undergone hysterectomy, transdermal O+P was the most effective treatment for VMS relief. Which treatment best relieves menopause flushes? Results from the #NICE guideline network meta-analysis. © 2017 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  10. Diagnosis and management of mood disorders during the menopausal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lee S; Soares, Claudio N; Joffe, Hadine

    2005-12-19

    Recent census data indicate that, in the United States, an increasing number of women--almost 1.5 million each year--are reaching menopause. The menopausal transition is marked by intense hormonal fluctuations, and may be accompanied by vasomotor complaints, sleep disturbances, changes in sexual function, and increased risk for osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. In addition, there is evidence of increased risk for developing depression, even among women who never experienced depressive symptoms before. Thus depression during the perimenopause may have a substantial impact on personal, family, and professional spheres of life. A challenge to clinicians and health professionals lies in the identification of the most tolerable treatments to manage depression and improve quality of life in an aging population. Any treatment strategy should take into account not only the spectrum of side effects that may complicate treatment but also other menopause-related factors (e.g., vasomotor symptoms, psychosocial stressors) that may modulate risk for the development of mood disturbance. This article reviews the current literature on the prevalence and risk factors associated with depression during the menopausal transition. The benefits and risks of using hormonal and nonhormonal strategies for the management of depression and other menopause-related somatic symptoms are critically reviewed.

  11. A pilot observational study to assess the safety and efficacy of Menoprogen for the management of menopausal symptoms in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daniel; Lu, Ye; Ma, Hong; Wei, Rong-Cheng; Li, Jingrong; Fang, Jin; Mahady, G B

    2009-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, the interest in alternative therapies for menopause has increased dramatically due to the findings of the Women's Health Initiative (U.S. National Institutes of Health). Menoprogen, a traditional Chinese medicine formulation is an herbal remedy that has been used in China for the management of menopause-related symptoms. An observational pilot study was performed to assess the effects of Menoprogen in the management of menopausal symptoms in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. A multicenter prospective study was conducted at four clinical centers in China. Female subjects were eligible if they had menopausal diagnosis for at least 3 months and wished to use an alternative to hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Subjects received two capsules of Menoprogen (a combination product containing 0.2 g extracts of five herbs per capsule) orally, twice daily. The primary outcome measured was an improvement of Kupperman Menopausal Index (KMI) from baseline. Secondary outcomes measured included hormone levels and the status of the endometrial and vaginal cytology after completion of treatment. After treatment with Menoprogen, a significant reduction in the KMI was observed (mean of paired difference = -14.875; p < 0.01) as compared with baseline. Endogenous estrogen levels were significantly increased with Menoprogen (mean of paired difference = -3.145; p < 0.01). Progesterone levels increased with Menoprogen (mean of paired difference = -10.003; p < 0.01). Both follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels showed significant before-and-after treatment difference (mean of paired difference = 6.125 mIU/mL for FSH and 4.938 mIU/mL for LH; p < 0.01). No significant endometrial hyperplasia was observed post-treatment with Menoprogen. Most of the postmenopausal women exhibited a vaginal cell proliferation degree of 2-3, suggesting a possible estrogenic effect. The present pilot study found that Menoprogen reduced symptoms

  12. [Urinary incontinence and menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, G; Fritel, X; Ringa, V; Lesavre, M; Fernandez, H

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this review was to examine the relationship between menopause and urinary incontinence (UI). Our work is based on a review of the literature on the epidemiology of UI in women and the effects of hormone therapy on symptoms of urinary leakage. A search of the Medline database between January 2000 and April 2012 was performed by crossing the keywords "urinary incontinence, stress urinary incontinence (SUI), urge incontinence, over active bladder, menopause, estrogen therapy". Twenty-nine articles over the 482 articles were initialy selected. The UI was a common symptom during menopause, with a prevalence of 15 to 30% and an annual incidence of 5 to 10%. The association between UI and menopause was controversial. Indeed, although underpinned by pathophysiological mechanisms such as the sensitivity of tissues of the urogenital sinus to estrogen, the epidemiological data available were contradictory and should be interpreted, if possible, depending on the type of UI. Thus, it remained difficult to distinguish the effect of menopause of the aging. The effects of estrogen on IU differed depending on the route of administration and of the type of UI. Randomized trials showed that oral administration of estrogen after menopause increased the occurrence of UI or SUI. However a vaginal administration of estrogen improved urge urinary incontinence (UUI) and overactive bladder. The data of this review were consistent with the French and European guidelines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Yoga and menopausal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaze, Nirmala; Joshi, Sulabha

    2010-07-01

    With increased life expectancy, today, women spend one-third of their life after menopause. Thus more attention is needed towards peri- and post-menopausal symptoms. Estrogen replacement therapy is the most effective treatment, however, it has its own limitations. The present need is to explore new options for the management of menopausal symptoms. Yogic life style is a way of living which aims to improve the body, mind and day to day life of individuals. The most commonly performed Yoga practices are postures (asana), controlled breathing (pranayama), and meditation (dhyana). Yoga has been utilized as a therapeutic tool to achieve positive health and control and cure diseases. The exact mechanism as to how Yoga helps in various disease states is not known. There could be neuro-hormonal pathways with a selective effect in each pathological situation. There have been multiple studies that have combined the many aspects of Yoga into a general Yoga session in order to investigate its effects on menopausal symptoms. Integrated approach of Yoga therapy can improve hot flushes and night sweats. There is increasing evidence suggesting that even the short-term practice of Yoga can decrease both psychological and physiological risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Studies conclude that our age old therapy, Yoga, is fairly effective in managing menopausal symptoms.

  14. of menopause and sexual satisfaction in menopausal women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    menopause and the prevalence rates of depression fall post- menopause.“ Genazzani', Spinetti, Gallo, et ... previous history of poor physical and psychosocial health at age 36 also reported more symptoms at 47 ..... Hammer M, Berg G and Hindgren R: Does physical exercise influence the frequency ofpostmenopausal hot ...

  15. Equol status and changes in faecal microbiota in menopausal women receiving long-term treatment for menopause symptoms with a soy-isoflavone concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baltasar eMayo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge regarding the intestinal microbial types involved in isoflavone bioavailabililty and metabolism is still limited. The present work reports the influence of a treatment with isoflavones for six months on the faecal bacterial communities of 16 menopausal women, as determined by culturing and culture-independent microbial techniques. Changes in faecal communities were analysed with respect to the womenʼs equol-producing phenotype. Compared to baseline, at 1 and 3 months the counts for all microbial populations in the faeces of equol-producing women had increased strongly. In contrast, among the non-producers, the counts for all microbial populations at 1 month were similar to those at baseline, and decreased significantly by 3 and 6 months. Following isoflavone intake, major bands in the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE profiles appeared and disappeared, suggesting important changes in majority populations. In some women, increases were seen in the intensity of specific DGGE bands corresponding to microorganisms known to be involved in the metabolism of dietary phytoestrogens (Lactonifactor longoviformis, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Bifidobacterium spp., Ruminococcus spp.. Real-Time quantitative PCR revealed that the Clostridium leptum and Clostridium coccoides populations increased in equol producers, while those of bifidobacteria and enterobacteria decreased, and vice versa in the non-producers. Finally, the Atopobium population increased in both groups, but especially in the non-producers at three months. As the main findings of this study, (i variations in the microbial communities over the six-month period of isoflavone supplementation were large; (ii no changes in the faecal microbial populations that were convincingly treatment-specific were seen; and (iii the production of equol did not appear to be associated with the presence of, or increase in the population of, any of the majority bacterial types analysed.

  16. Illness Symptoms Experienced by Children Exposed to Benzene After a Flaring Incident at the BP Refinery Facility in Texas City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Mark A; Reddy, G Kesava

    2016-10-01

    Objective To evaluate the illness symptoms experienced by children who were exposed to benzene following a flaring incident at the BP refinery in Texas City, Texas. Methods A total of 641 children, aged 5 year (P = .04). Conversely, urinary phenol levels were significantly lower in children 5 years (P = .00). Conclusion Together, these findings reveal that children exposed to benzene experience a range of illness symptoms and an altered profile of urinary phenol indicating their vulnerability to potentially increased health complications. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Palliative Care: The Relief You Need When You're Experiencing Symptoms of Serious Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from this type of care. What is palliative care? Palliative care is comprehensive treatment of the discomfort, symptoms ... of life. Palliative care is different from hospice care. Palliative care is available to you at any time ...

  18. Premature menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeke, Tc; Anyaehie, Ub; Ezenyeaku, Cc

    2013-01-01

    Premature menopause affects 1% of women under the age of 40 years. The women are at risk of premature death, neurological diseases, psychosexual dysfunction, mood disorders, osteoporosis, ischemic heart disease and infertility. There is need to use simplified protocols and improved techniques in oocyte donation to achieve pregnancy and mother a baby in those women at risk. Review of the pertinent literature on premature menopause, selected references, internet services using the PubMed and Medline databases were included in this review. In the past, pregnancy in women with premature menopause was rare but with recent advancement in oocyte donation, women with premature menopause now have hoped to mother a child. Hormone replacement therapy is beneficial to adverse consequences of premature menopause. Women with premature menopause are at risk of premature death, neurological diseases, psychosexual dysfunction, mood disorders, osteoporosis, ischemic heart disease and infertility. Public enlightenment and education is important tool to save those at risk.

  19. Design and Methods of a Multi-Site, Multi-Behavioral Treatment Trial for Menopausal Symptoms: The MsFLASH Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternfeld, Barbara; LaCroix, Andrea; Caan, Bette J.; Dunn, Andrea L.; Newton, Katherine M.; Reed, Susan D.; Guthrie, Katherine A; Booth-LaForce, Cathryn; Sherman, Karen J; Cohen, Lee; Freeman, Marlene P.; Carpenter, Janet S.; Hunt, Julie R.; Roberts, Melanie; Ensrud, Kristine E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Behavioral strategies are recommended for menopausal symptoms, but little evidence exists regarding efficacy. Purpose Describe design and methodology of a randomized controlled 3 by 2 factorial trial of yoga, exercise and omega-3 fatty acids. Methods Women from three geographic areas with a weekly average of ≥14 hot flashes/night sweats, who met exclusion/inclusion criteria, were randomized to 12 weeks of: 1) yoga classes and daily home practice; 2) supervised, facility-based aerobic exercise training; or 3) usual activity. Women in each arm were further randomized to either omega-3 supplement or placebo. Standardized training, on-going monitoring, and site visits were adopted to ensure consistency across sites and fidelity to the intervention. Participant adherence to the intervention protocol was monitored continuously, and retention was actively encouraged by staff. Information on adverse events was systematically collected. Results Of 7,377 women who responded to mass mailings, 355 (4.8%) were randomized; mean age was 54.7 (sd=3.7), 26.2% were African American, 81.7% were post-menopausal, and mean baseline frequency of daily hot flashes/night sweats was 7.6 (sd=3.8). Adherence of ≥ 80% was 59% for yoga, 77% for exercise training, and 80% for study pills. Final week 12 data were collected from 95.2% Conclusions Conducting a multi-site, multi-behavioral randomized trial for menopausal symptoms is challenging but feasible. Benefits included cost-effective study design, centralized recruitment, and methodologic standardization. PMID:23462342

  20. Efficacy and safety of remifemin on peri-menopausal symptoms induced by post-operative GnRH-a therapy for endometriosis: a randomized study versus tibolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiming; Gao, Hongyan; Li, Qin; Cong, Jing; Wu, Jie; Pu, Dahua; Jiang, Guohua

    2014-10-16

    The aim of this study was to investigate clinical efficacy and safety of Remifemin on peri-menopausal symptoms in endometriosis patients with a post-operative GnRH-a therapy. We treated 116 women who had endometriosis with either Remifemin (n=56) 20 mg bid po or Tibolone (n=60) 2.5 mg qd po for 12 weeks after GnRH-a injection. The efficacy was evaluated by Kupperman menopausal index (KMI), and hot flash/sweating scores. The safety parameters such as liver and renal functions, lipid profile, endometrial thickness, and serum sex hormone level, as well as the incidence of adverse events were recorded. (1) After GnRH-a therapy, KMI and hot flash/sweating scores in both groups increased significantly (PKMI (2.87±1.40 for Remifemin and 2.70±1.26 for Tibolone) and hot flash/sweating scores (0.94±1.72 for Remifemin and 1.06±1.78 for Tibolone) between the 2 groups (P>0.05). (2) No statistical change was observed in liver or renal functions and lipid profile in both groups before and after the treatment (P>0.05). The post-therapeutic serum FSH, LH, and E2 level and endometrial thickness decreased remarkably in both groups (P0.05). The Remifemin group had far fewer adverse events than the Tibolone group (P<0. 05). Compared with Tibolone, Remifemin had a similar clinical efficacy and was safer for the peri-menopausal symptoms induced by GnRH-a in endometriosis patients.

  1. Alternative therapies for traditional disease states: menopause

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morelli, Vincent; Naquin, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    With growing concern about the use of hormone replacement therapy, some women are looking for alternative treatments for menopausal symptoms and preventing postmenopausal cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis...

  2. Depressive Symptoms among Female College Students Experiencing Gender-Based Violence in Awassa, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelaye, Bizu; Arnold, Dodie; Williams, Michelle A.; Goshu, Miruts; Berhane, Yemane

    2009-01-01

    Little epidemiologic research has focused on the mental health effects of gender-based violence among sub-Saharan African women. The objective of this study was to assess risk of depression and depressive symptoms among 1,102 female undergraduate students who were victims of gender-based violence. Students who reported experience of any…

  3. Efficacy of intravaginal dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on moderate to severe dyspareunia and vaginal dryness, symptoms of vulvovaginal atrophy, and of the genitourinary syndrome of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrie, Fernand; Archer, David F; Koltun, William; Vachon, Andrée; Young, Douglas; Frenette, Louise; Portman, David; Montesino, Marlene; Côté, Isabelle; Parent, Julie; Lavoie, Lyne; Beauregard, Adam; Martel, Céline; Vaillancourt, Mario; Balser, John; Moyneur, Érick

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to confirm the local beneficial effects of intravaginal dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, Prasterone) on moderate to severe dyspareunia or pain at sexual activity, the most frequent symptom of vulvovaginal atrophy due to menopause or genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM). In a prospective, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled phase III clinical trial, the effect of daily intravaginal 0.50% DHEA (6.5 mg) (Prasterone, EndoCeutics) was examined on four coprimary objectives, namely percentage of parabasal cells, percentage or superficial cells, vaginal pH, and moderate to severe pain at sexual activity (dyspareunia) identified by the women as their most bothersome vulvovaginal atrophy symptom. The intent-to-treat population included 157 and 325 women in the placebo and DHEA-treated groups, respectively. After daily intravaginal administration of 0.50% DHEA for 12 weeks, when compared to baseline by the analysis of covariance test, the percentage of parabasal cells decreased by 27.7% over placebo (P DHEA (Prasterone) has shown clinically and highly statistically significant effects on the four coprimary parameters suggested by the US Food and Drug Administration. The strictly local action of Prasterone is in line with the absence of significant drug-related adverse events, thus showing the high benefit-to-risk ratio of this treatment based upon the novel understanding of the physiology of sex steroids in women.

  4. Correlation between impulsivity and executive function in patients with Parkinson disease experiencing depression and anxiety symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonoff, Fernanda Colucci; Fonoff, Erich Talamoni; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Quaranta, Thais; Machado, Rachael Brant; de Andrade, Daniel Ciampi; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Fuentes, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Depression and anxiety are comorbidities often associated with Parkinson disease (PD). Recent studies debate on how affective disorders can influence the cognition of patients with PD. This study sought to investigate how depression and anxiety affect specific executive functions and impulsivity traits in these patients. Twenty-eight patients with advanced PD and 28 closely matched healthy volunteers (HV) were assessed for depressive and anxiety symptoms, impulsivity, executive function and control attention and behavioral response. Compared to the HV group, the PD group showed significantly higher perseverative responses and slowness to adapt to changes in environmental stimuli and longer reaction time for inter-stimulus interval change. Depression symptoms were significantly correlated to motor impulsivity score and total Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS -11) score. Moreover, there was also significant correlation between anxiety symptoms and attentional impulsivity score and total BIS-11 score. Correlation analysis between impulsivity and control attention indicated a positive correlation in commission and a negative correlation in reaction time and detectability in the PD group. The present results suggest that depression and anxiety were highly correlated to impulsivity but not to executive functions changes in these PD patients. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Association between selected socio demographic variables and musculoskeletal symptoms experienced by dentists in a southern Karnataka district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, A B; Sripathi Rao, B H; Hussain, A; D'Sa, J L

    2012-01-01

    The majority of working dentists experience some type of musculoskeletal discomfort during the course of their professional career. The prevalence and location of musculoskeletal symptoms are influenced by work habits, postures adopted by dentists while performing their professional work and socio demographic variables. The current study was carried out to find the association between musculoskeletal symptoms experienced by dentists and selected socio demographic variables in a southern Karnataka district. For this study 300 dentists were selected by using convenience sampling method among post graduate dental students, faculty members and private practitioners with more than one year of experience from in and around Mangalore city. In order to find the association, a pre-tested, self-administered questionnaire - Musculoskeletal Disorder Rating Scale was used. The study showed that there was statistically significant association between frequency of pain and average patient(s) treated per day. The association between intensity of pain and average patient(s) treated per day was highly significant. Further there was a significant association between intensity of pain and field of dental practice. With regard to the field of dental practice, frequency of stiffness was significantly associated with the age. The association between frequency of stiffness and no. of year(s) in profession was highly significant. The study revealed a significant association between musculoskeletal symptoms experienced by the dentists and socio demographic variables like; age, field of dental practice, no. of years in profession and average patients treated per day.

  6. Premature Menopause

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    therapy is beneficial to adverse consequences of premature menopause. Women .... [32] Maternal aging and oestrogen deficiency as a result of .... The pathology of female genital tuberculosis. Obstet Gynecol 1979;53:422‑8. 17. Jick A, Porter J, Morrison AS. The relationship between smoking and age of natural menopause.

  7. Comparison of experienced burnout symptoms in specialist oncology nurses working in hospital oncology units or in hospices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostacoli, Luca; Cavallo, Marco; Zuffranieri, Marco; Negro, Manuela; Sguazzotti, Erica; Picci, Rocco Luigi; Tempia, Patrizia; La Ciura, Pietro; Furlan, Pier Maria

    2010-12-01

    This study aimed to clarify the differential contributions of situational and individual factors to burnout symptoms experienced by two independent groups of specialist oncology nurses working in oncology hospital units or in hospices. The study involved a group of specialist oncology nurses working in hospital oncology units (n = 59) and a group of specialist oncology nurses working in hospices (n = 33). Participants were invited to provide demographic data, and indicate the clinical setting in which they worked and their work experience; the Italian versions of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) (a measure of burnout symptoms), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) (a measure of anxiety and depression), and the Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ) (a measure of relational style) were then administered. The two groups of nurses were well matched for age, work experience, and levels of anxiety and depression. Regarding their relational style, the two groups only differed significantly on two subscales of the ASQ (i.e. "Confidence" and "Relationships as Secondary"). The two groups significantly differed in the levels of all burnout symptoms investigated (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal achievement), with nurses working in hospital units showing higher levels of burnout symptoms. Interestingly, multivariate regression analyses showed that the institutional factor (clinical setting in which nurses worked) clearly emerged as the only factor that influenced the level of all burnout symptoms, whereas the contribution of individual factors was less significant. These findings help to clarify the differential contributions of institutional and individual factors to burnout symptoms in specialist oncology nurses, and corroborate the need for interventions to contain nurses' burnout symptoms.

  8. Menopausal transition and depression: who is at risk and how to treat it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Claudio N

    2007-10-01

    The menopausal transition may impose a challenge to clinicians and health professionals who are invested in improving women's quality of life; after all, this period in life is commonly marked by significant hormone fluctuations accompanied by bothersome vasomotor symptoms (e.g., hot flushes and night sweats) and other somatic complaints. In addition, more recent epidemiologic data demonstrate that some women transitioning to menopause may be at higher risk for developing depression when compared with their risk during premenopausal years; this increased risk appears to be true even among those who had never experienced depression before. In this article, putative contributing factors for this window of vulnerability for depression during the menopausal transition are critically reviewed. Hormonal and nonhormonal factors that may contribute to the occurrence of physical and/or psychiatric complaints during the menopausal transition are discussed. Lastly, existing evidence-based treatment strategies are summarized.

  9. Oophorectomy, menopause, estrogen treatment, and cognitive aging: clinical evidence for a window of opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Walter A.; Grossardt, Brandon R.; Shuster, Lynne T.

    2010-01-01

    The neuroprotective effects of estrogen have been demonstrated consistently in cellular and animal studies but the evidence in women remains conflicted. We explored the window of opportunity hypothesis in relation to cognitive aging and dementia. In particular, we reviewed existing literature, reanalyzed some of our data, and combined results graphically. Current evidence suggests that estrogen may have beneficial, neutral, or detrimental effects on the brain depending on age at the time of treatment, type of menopause (natural versus medically or surgically induced), or stage of menopause. The comparison of women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy with referent women provided evidence for a sizeable neuroprotective effect of estrogen before age 50 years. Several case-control studies and cohort studies also showed neuroprotective effects in women who received estrogen treatment (ET) in the early postmenopausal stage (most commonly at ages 50–60 years). The majority of women in those observational studies had undergone natural menopause and were treated for the relief of menopausal symptoms. However, recent clinical trials by the Women’s Health Initiative showed that women who initiated ET alone or in combination with a progestin in the late postmenopausal stage (ages 65–79 years) experienced an increased risk of dementia and cognitive decline regardless of the type of menopause. The current conflicting data can be explained by the window of opportunity hypothesis suggesting that the neuroprotective effects of estrogen depend on age at the time of administration, type of menopause, and stage of menopause. Therefore, women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before the onset of menopause or women who experienced premature or early natural menopause should be considered for hormonal treatment until approximately age 51 years. PMID:20965156

  10. Longitudinal Analysis of the Association Between Vasomotor Symptoms and Race/Ethnicity Across the Menopausal Transition: Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ellen B.; Colvin, Alicia; Avis, Nancy; Bromberger, Joyce; Greendale, Gail A.; Powell, Lynda; Sternfeld, Barbara; Matthews, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated whether vasomotor symptom reporting or patterns of change in symptom reporting over the perimenopausal transition among women enrolled in a national study differed according to race/ethnicity. We also sought to determine whether racial/ethnic differences were explained by sociodemographic, health, or lifestyle factors. Methods. We followed 3198 women enrolled in the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation during 1996 through 2002. We analyzed frequency of vasomotor symptom reporting using longitudinal multiple logistic regressions. Results. Rates of vasomotor symptom reporting were highest among African Americans (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=1.63; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.21, 2.20). The transition to late perimenopause exhibited the strongest association with vasomotor symptoms (adjusted OR = 6.64; 95% CI = 4.80, 9.20). Other risk factors were age (adjusted OR=1.17; 95% CI=1.13, 1.21), having less than a college education (adjusted OR = 1.91; 95% CI = 1.40, 2.61), increasing body mass index (adjusted OR=1.03 per unit of increase; 95% CI=1.01, 1.04), smoking (adjusted OR=1.63; 95% CI=1.25, 2.12), and anxiety symptoms at baseline (adjusted OR=3.10; 95% CI=2.33, 4.12). Conclusions. Among the risk factors assessed, vasomotor symptoms were most strongly associated with menopausal status. After adjustment for covariates, symptoms were reported most often in all racial/ethnic groups in late perimenopause and nearly as often in postmenopause. PMID:16735636

  11. Influence of cortisol and DHEA-S on pain and other symptoms in post menopausal women with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Rodrigo Pegado de Abreu; Lemos, Telma Maria Araújo Moura; Spyrides, Maria Helena Constantino; Sousa, Maria Bernardete Cordeiro de

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to assess cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) levels in post-menopausal women with FMS and correlate it with pain threshold and tolerance, depression and quality of life. We conducted a cross sectional observational study of 17 women with FMS (FMS group), and 19 healthy volunteers (CT group). Algometry, the Beck Depression Index (BDI) and Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) were used. Blood samples were collected in the morning (8:00-9:30 am) to determine cortisol and DHEA-S plasmatic levels by chemiluminescence. Significant differences between groups were recorded for pain threshold and tolerance (pcortisol levels were found between the two groups (p=0.325). In the FMS group, a tangential effect was observed for DHEA-S (p=0.094) and positive correlations were found between DHEA-S, pain threshold (p=0.017) and pain tolerance (p=0.044). No correlation was observed between cortisol and DHEA-S levels and the variables of depression and quality of life for either group. There seems to be an influence of the decreased levels of DHEA-S and increased pain sensitivity in post-menopausal women with FMS.

  12. Can depression be a menopause-associated risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares Claudio N

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is little doubt that women experience a heightened psychiatric morbidity compared to men. A growing body of evidence suggests that, for some women, the menopausal transition and early postmenopausal years may represent a period of vulnerability associated with an increased risk of experiencing symptoms of depression, or for the development of an episode of major depressive disorder. Recent research has begun to shed some light on potential mechanisms that influence this vulnerability. At the same time, a number of studies and clinical trials conducted over the past decade have provided important data regarding efficacy and safety of preventative measures and treatment strategies for midlife women; some of these studies have caused a shift in the current thinking of how menopausal symptoms should be appropriately managed. Essentially, most women will progress from premenopausal into postmenopausal years without developing significant depressive symptoms. However, those with prior history of depression may face a re-emergence of depression during this transition while others may experience a first episode of depression in their lives. Here I provide an overview of what is known about risk factors for depression and the risk posed by the menopausal transition, its associated symptoms, and the underlying changes in the reproductive hormonal milieu, discussing the evidence for the occurrence of mood symptoms in midlife women and the challenges that face clinicians and health professionals who care for this population.

  13. Management of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelo-Branco, C; Rostro, F

    2006-04-01

    Menopause signifies the permanent cessation of ovarian function and the end of a woman's reproductive potential. A universal experience in women's aging, it is the culmination of many years of reproductive aging; a process that unfolds as a continuum from birth through ovarian senescence to the menopausal transition and the postmenopause. The menopausal transition is known to play a major role in the etiology of many symptoms common in middle age and may contribute to chronic conditions and disorders of aging such as osteoporosis, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Recent data suggest an unacceptable increase in morbidity in a number of women using hormone therapy (HT). Thus, during the past few years, many women and doctors have revised their opinions on HT for menopause-related symptoms, and a substantial number of individuals have discontinued its use because of concerns about side-effects, owing to this, numerous alternatives to HT are promoted, and researches have pointed out the interest in a group of molecules such as selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) (i.e. raloxifene) and phytoestrogens. Further studies may open a new panorama in patient-specific management of postmenopausal health. Careful assessment of the midlife woman allows for individualized risk-benefit analysis with the formulation of a specific health management plan.

  14. Beer Polyphenols and Menopause: Effects and Mechanisms—A Review of Current Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berner Andrée Sandoval-Ramírez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Beer is one of the most frequently consumed fermented beverages in the world, and it has been part of the human diet for thousands of years. Scientific evidence obtained from the development of new techniques of food analysis over the last two decades suggests that polyphenol intake derived from moderate beer consumption may play a positive role in different health outcomes including osteoporosis and cardiovascular risk and the relief of vasomotor symptoms, which are commonly experienced during menopause and are an important reason why women seek medical care during this period; here, we review the current knowledge regarding moderate beer consumption and its possible effects on menopausal symptoms. The effect of polyphenol intake on vasomotor symptoms in menopause may be driven by the direct interaction of the phenolic compounds present in beer, such as 8-prenylnaringenin, 6-prenylnaringenin, and isoxanthohumol, with intracellular estrogen receptors that leads to the modulation of gene expression, increase in sex hormone plasma concentrations, and thus modulation of physiological hormone imbalance in menopausal women. Since traditional hormone replacement therapies increase health risks, alternative, safer treatment options are needed to alleviate menopausal symptoms in women. The present work aims to review the current data on this subject.

  15. Beer Polyphenols and Menopause: Effects and Mechanisms—A Review of Current Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Ramírez, Berner Andrée; M. Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa; Estruch, Ramon; Sasot, Gemma; Doménech, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Beer is one of the most frequently consumed fermented beverages in the world, and it has been part of the human diet for thousands of years. Scientific evidence obtained from the development of new techniques of food analysis over the last two decades suggests that polyphenol intake derived from moderate beer consumption may play a positive role in different health outcomes including osteoporosis and cardiovascular risk and the relief of vasomotor symptoms, which are commonly experienced during menopause and are an important reason why women seek medical care during this period; here, we review the current knowledge regarding moderate beer consumption and its possible effects on menopausal symptoms. The effect of polyphenol intake on vasomotor symptoms in menopause may be driven by the direct interaction of the phenolic compounds present in beer, such as 8-prenylnaringenin, 6-prenylnaringenin, and isoxanthohumol, with intracellular estrogen receptors that leads to the modulation of gene expression, increase in sex hormone plasma concentrations, and thus modulation of physiological hormone imbalance in menopausal women. Since traditional hormone replacement therapies increase health risks, alternative, safer treatment options are needed to alleviate menopausal symptoms in women. The present work aims to review the current data on this subject. PMID:28904736

  16. Comparison of Psychopathological Symptoms in Adolescents Who Experienced Sexual Violence as a Victim and/or as a Perpetrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlert, Jeannine; Seidler, Corinna; Rau, Thea; Fegert, Jörg; Allroggen, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Research on sexual violence victims and perpetrators indicates that victims in general are found to report higher levels of psychopathological symptoms, especially internalizing behavior, whereas perpetrators often show externalizing behavior. Little is known, however, about the psychopathology of perpetrators of sexual violence who have also experienced sexual victimization (victim-perpetrators). Thus, the aim of the current study was to examine this group within a sample of adolescents living in residential care or federal boarding schools. Participants reported their lifetime experience with sexual violence (both as victim and perpetrator) and completed the Youth Self Report. Results indicate that all three groups of adolescents with sexual violence experience report higher total problem scores than adolescents without this experience. Victim-perpetrators show results more similar to those of perpetrators only than those of victims only. The discussion deals with the implications of our findings for the treatment of victims of sexual violence.

  17. MENOPAUSE AND NATURAL HEALING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucija Vrabič Dežman

    2008-12-01

    The studies could not decisively confirm the effectiveness of various phytoestrogens inamelioration of climacteric symptoms. Most studies have proven the effectiveness of thenatural medication made of Cimicifuga racemosa and its safe short-term use. Gynecologists should be familiar with the basics of phytotherapy and the results of clinical studiesin this field in order to confidently advise women to use the natural medications in caseswhere despite the climacteric symptoms they cannot or will not use HRT, consequentlygreatly reducing the quality of their lives. In cases where climacteric symptoms are mild tomoderate, some menopausal societies around the globe suggest trying natural medicationfirst, and only later implementing HRT

  18. A pilot randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled trial of traditional acupuncture for vasomotor symptoms and mechanistic pathways of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painovich, Jeannette M; Shufelt, Chrisandra L; Azziz, Ricardo; Yang, Yuching; Goodarzi, Mark O; Braunstein, Glenn D; Karlan, Beth Y; Stewart, Paul M; Merz, C Noel Bairey

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a pilot study for the feasibility of planning a definitive clinical trial comparing traditional acupuncture (TA) with sham acupuncture (SA) and waiting control (WC) on menopause-related vasomotor symptoms (VMS), quality of life, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. Thirty-three perimenopausal and postmenopausal women with at least seven VMS daily were randomized to TA, SA, or WC. The TA and SA groups were given three treatments per week for 12 weeks. Outcomes included the number and severity of VMS, Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, Spielberg State-Trait Anxiety Instrument, Pittsburgh Quality Sleep Index, 24-hour urine cortisol and metabolites, and adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation testing. Both the TA and SA groups demonstrated improved VMS trends compared with the WC group (Δ -3.5 ± 3.00 vs -4.1 ± 3.79 vs -1.2 ± 2.4, respectively; P = 20) and significantly improved Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire vasomotor scores (Δ -1.5 ± 2.02 vs -1.8 ± 1.52 vs -0.3 ± 0.64, respectively; P = 0.04). There were no psychosocial group differences. Exit 24-hour urinary measures were lower in the TA versus the SA or WC group in total cortisol metabolites (4,658.9 ± 1,670.9 vs 7,735.8 ± 3,747.9 vs 5,166.0 ± 2,234.5, P = 0.03; respectively) and dehydroepiandrosterone (41.4 ± 27.46, 161.2 ± 222.77, and 252.4 ± 385.40, respectively; P = 0.05). The response data on adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation cortisol also trended in the hypothesized direction (P = 0.17). Both TA and SA reduce VMS frequency and severity and improve VMS-related quality of life compared with WC; however, TA alone may impact the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. This association is viewed as preliminary and hypothesis generating and should be explored in a large clinical trial.

  19. Assessment of bioelectrical activity of pelvic floor muscles depending on the orientation of the pelvis in menopausal women with symptoms of stress urinary incontinence: continued observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptaszkowski, Kuba; Zdrojowy, Romuald; Slupska, Lucyna; Bartnicki, Janusz; Dembowski, Janusz; Halski, Tomasz; Paprocka-Borowicz, Malgorzata

    2017-08-01

    Menopausal women often experience the prolapse of the uterus, bladder and rectum resulting from the failure and weakening of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM). Strengthening of the PFM through the standard exercises is recognized as an effective way of preventive measures and conservative treatment of the symptoms listed above, but still need to be improved. The goal was the objective assessment of resting and functional bioelectrical activity of PFM in women during menopause and its comparison in three different positions of the pelvis: anterior pelvic tilt - position 1 (P1), posterior pelvic tilt - position 2 (P2), and neutral pelvic tilt - position 3 (P3). Prospective, cross-sectional observational study. Department and Clinic of Urology of a University Hospital. The target group of this study included women in the menopausal period (inpatient and outpatient). The study evaluating resting and functional activity of the PFM depending on the orientation of pelvis. Bioelectric activity was assessed with an electromyographic instrument (sEMG) and endovaginal electrodes. The inclination angle was measured with an inclinometer. The comparisons of results between the values obtained in P1, P2, and P3 were performed using one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). One hundred thirty-one registered for the study were screened for inclusion and exclusion criteria and on the basis of the results 82 participants were enrolled for analysis. The highest mean resting activity of sEMG PFM (µV) was observed in P2 and it amounted to 11.6 µV (SD=5.5 µV) in P1 the value equaled 9.8 µV (SD=4.8 µV) and P3-9.0 µV (SD=4.2 µV). The results revealed a significant statistical difference (main effect: P=0.0007). Considering the functional sEMG activity of PFM (µV), the highest mean value was recorded in P2. Posterior pelvic tilt position determines higher resting and functional bioelectric activity of PFM. Additionally, electromyographic activity of PFM increases during the pelvic movement

  20. Effects of low-dose paroxetine 7.5 mg on weight and sexual function during treatment of vasomotor symptoms associated with menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portman, David J; Kaunitz, Andrew M; Kazempour, Kazem; Mekonnen, Hana; Bhaskar, Sailaja; Lippman, Joel

    2014-10-01

    Two phase 3, randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrated that low-dose paroxetine 7.5 mg reduced the frequency and severity of vasomotor symptoms (VMS) associated with menopause and had a favorable tolerability profile. The impact of paroxetine 7.5 mg on body weight and sexual function was evaluated in a pooled analysis. Postmenopausal women aged 40 years or older who had moderate to severe VMS were randomly assigned to receive paroxetine 7.5 mg or placebo once daily for 12 or 24 weeks. Assessments included changes in body mass index (BMI) and weight, Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale score, Hot Flash-Related Daily Interference Scale sexuality subscore, and adverse events related to weight or sexual dysfunction. Pooled efficacy and safety populations comprised 1,174 and 1,175 participants, respectively. Baseline values were similar for median weight (∼75 kg), median BMI (∼28 kg/m), and the proportion of women with sexual dysfunction (∼58%). No clinically meaningful or statistically significant changes from baseline in weight or sexual function assessments occurred in the paroxetine 7.5 mg group. Small but statistically significant increases in weight and BMI were observed in the placebo group only on week 4. No significant difference between treatment groups was observed in the proportion of participants who had 7% or higher gain in body weight on week 4, 12, or 24. Rates of adverse events suggestive of sexual dysfunction were low and similar in both treatment groups. Paroxetine 7.5 mg does not cause weight gain or negative changes in libido when used to treat menopause-associated VMS in postmenopausal women.

  1. Psychosocial Adjustment Needs of Menopausal Women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Menopause is a period in the life of women who have experienced ceasation ... concerns such as lower estrogen level, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, ... began menstruation. However, she realized that 255 of the women polled had a positive attitude towards menopause, especially because it signified end of.

  2. Menopausal Status, Depression, and Life-Satisfaction among some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined menopausal status, timing of menopause and their influence on experience of depression and life satisfaction among 188 working women. The participants were drawn from organizations in Lagos and Ibadan. Results of the study revealed that (I) currently menopausal women experienced a ...

  3. Cognitive-behavior therapy for menopausal symptoms (hot flushes and night sweats): moderators and mediators of treatment effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Sam; Chilcot, Joseph; Hunter, Myra S

    2014-06-01

    Cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) has been found in recent randomized controlled trials (MENOS1 and MENOS2) to reduce the impact of hot flushes and night sweats (HFNS). In the MENOS2 trial, group CBT was found to be as effective as self-help CBT in reducing the impact of HFNS. This study investigates for whom and how CBT works for women in the MENOS2 trial. This study performed a secondary analysis of 140 women with problematic HFNS who were recruited to the MENOS2 trial: 48 were randomly assigned to group CBT, 47 were randomly assigned to self-help CBT, and 45 were randomly assigned to usual care. Self-report questionnaires were completed at baseline, 6 weeks postrandomization, and 26 weeks postrandomization. Potential moderators and mediators of treatment effects on the primary outcome-hot flush problem rating-were examined using linear mixed-effects models and path analysis, respectively. CBT was effective at reducing HFNS problem rating regardless of age, body mass index, menopause status, or psychological factors at baseline. Fully reading the manual in the self-help CBT arm and completing most homework assignments in the group CBT arm were related to greater improvement in problem rating at 6 weeks. The effect of CBT on HFNS problem rating was mediated by changes in cognitions (beliefs about coping/control of hot flushes, beliefs about night sweats and sleep) but not by changes in mood. These findings suggest that CBT is widely applicable for women having problematic HFNS, regardless of sociodemographic or health-related factors, and that CBT works mainly by changing the cognitive appraisal of HFNS.

  4. Predictors of the quality of life of women in peri-menopausal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanadys, Katarzyna; Wiktor-Stoma, Anna; Lewicka, Magdalena; Sulima, Magdalena; Wiktor, Henryk

    2016-12-23

    The peri-menopausal period is the time of many biological, psychological and social changes. The quality of life of women in this period may be conditioned by many factors, and analysis of these factors may indicate the optimum directions of prophylactic and educational actions. Analysis of selected predictive factors of the quality of life of women in the peri-menopausal period. The study covered 268 peri-menopausal women. The qualification criteria were: age 45-55, lack of mental disorders and diseases requiring hospitalization during the period of study. The study was conducted using standardized instruments: Women's Health Questionnaire - WHQ, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and an author-constructed questionnaire. The presented study of the quality of life showed that the women examined felt physically unattractive, lacking the full joy of life, and frequently experienced somatic complaints. Nevertheless, the respondents enjoyed life, had no constant feeling of anxiety and concern. Multi-factor analysis showed that the quality of life in the group of women in the study was affected by the following factors: level of depression, self-reported state of health, occurrence of menopausal symptoms, education level, and marital status. The quality of life of the peri-menopausal women examined was the highest with respect to depressive mood (DEP) and anxiety/depressed mood (ANX), while it was the lowest with respect to the sense of attractiveness (ATT), and somatic symptoms (SOM). In addition, in the group of women in peri-menopausal period the quality of life was conditioned: level of depression, self-reported state of health, occurrence of menopausal symptoms, education level, and marital status.

  5. [Menopause and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirelles, Ricardo M R

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease increases considerably after the menopause. One reason for the increased cardiovascular risk seems to be determined by metabolic syndrome, in which all components (visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and glucose metabolism disorder) are associated with higher incidence of coronary artery disease. After menopause, metabolic syndrome is more prevalent than in premenopausal women, and may plays an important role in the occurrence of myocardial infarction and other atherosclerotic and cardiovascular morbidities. Obesity, an essential component of the metabolic syndrome, is also associated with increased incidence of breast, endometrial, bowel, esophagus, and kidney cancer. The treatment of metabolic syndrome is based on the change in lifestyle and, when necessary, the use of medication directed to its components. In the presence of symptoms of the climacteric syndrome, hormonal therapy, when indicated, will also contribute to the improvement of the metabolic syndrome.

  6. Depression in postmenopause: a study on a subsample of the Acupuncture on Hot Flushes Among Menopausal Women (ACUFLASH) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dørmænen, Annbjørg; Heimdal, Marte Rye; Wang, Catharina Elisabeth Arfwedson; Grimsgaard, Anne Sameline

    2011-05-01

    The current study was conducted on a subsample of postmenopausal women with a high frequency of hot flashes who participated in the Norwegian Acupuncture on Hot Flushes Among Menopausal Women study. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of depressive symptoms, as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory; the effect of acupuncture therapy for menopausal hot flashes on depressive symptoms; and the associations between depressive symptoms and hot flashes, sleep disturbances, and self-reported health. The Acupuncture on Hot Flushes Among Menopausal Women study was a multicenter, pragmatic, randomized controlled trial. The present subsample consisted of 72 women who were randomized to two groups: self-care only and acupuncture in addition to self-care for a period of 12 weeks. The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 30.6% at baseline, decreased similarly in both study groups during the study period, and was 14.1% at the end of the intervention. Depressive symptoms were significantly associated with sleep disturbances and self-reported health, but not with frequency of hot flashes. Postmenopausal women experiencing a high frequency of hot flashes reported a high prevalence of depressive symptoms compared with the general female population. Study results lend support to previous findings of an increased risk for depression during menopause, at least in women with severe hot flashes. Results further indicate that symptoms of depression in postmenopausal women may be alleviated with limited resources.

  7. Menopause and Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women Menopause and Hormones: Common Questions Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... reproduction and distribution. Learn More about Menopause and Hormones Menopause--Medicines to Help You Links to other ...

  8. Compounded bioidentical menopausal hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Although improvement in long-term health is no longer an indication for menopausal hormone therapy, evidence supporting fewer adverse events in younger women, combined with its high overall effectiveness, has reinforced its usefulness for short-term treatment of menopausal symptoms. Menopausal therapy has been provided not only by commercially available products but also by compounding, or creation of an individualized preparation in response to a health care provider's prescription to create a medication tailored to the specialized needs of an individual patient. The Women's Health Initiative findings, coupled with an increase in the direct-to-consumer marketing and media promotion of compounded bioidentical hormonal preparations as safe and effective alternatives to conventional menopausal hormone therapy, have led to a recent increase in the popularity of compounded bioidentical hormones as well as an increase in questions about the use of these preparations. Not only is evidence lacking to support superiority claims of compounded bioidentical hormones over conventional menopausal hormone therapy, but these claims also pose the additional risks of variable purity and potency and lack efficacy and safety data. The Committee on Gynecologic Practice of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Practice Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine provide an overview of the major issues of concern surrounding compounded bioidentical menopausal hormone therapy and provide recommendations for patient counseling. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Distress During the Menopause Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcianna Nosek

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, nearly 400 million women worldwide were of menopause age (45-54. Although many women transition through menopause with ease, some experience distress and a subsequent decrease in quality of life. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the experiences of distress in women during the menopause transition. A narrative analysis methodology was used maintaining participants’ complete narratives when possible. In-person interviews of 15 midlife women were digitally audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Women shared narratives of distress related to menstrual changes, emotional instability, vaginal dryness, and decreased libido affected by their relationships with self, partners, work, and family. Some experiences were presented against a backdrop of the past and influenced by concerns for the future. Detailed stories illuminated the effect that distressful symptoms had on quality of life and captured how intricately woven symptoms were with the women’s interpersonal and social lives.

  10. The physiology, medical management and oral implications of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Arthur H

    2002-01-01

    Approximately 36 million women in the United States are in the postmenopausal phase of life. The vast majority of these women experienced spontaneous cessation of menses between the ages of 47 and 55 years when the production of estrogen decreased because of an inadequate number of functioning follicles within their ovaries. Fewer women entered menopause after surgical removal of both ovaries. This procedure usually is performed prophylactically to prevent ovarian cancer in conjunction with a hysterectomy, which is required to treat abnormal bleeding, endometriosis or pelvic inflammatory disease. The physiological changes associated with spontaneous or surgical menopause cause some women to experience uncomfortable symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats and vaginal dryness. In addition, estrogen deprivation arising from menopause in association with age-related factors disproportionately increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (that is, myocardial infarct, stroke), osteoporosis, Alzheimer's disease and oral disease. Hormone replacement therapy, or HRT (estrogen or estrogen and progestin), often is prescribed on a short-term basis to alleviate the uncomfortable symptoms associated with estrogen deficiency and on a long-term basis to prevent some of the chronic illnesses common to postmenopausal women. Dentists who treat women entering menopause need to consider the stressful phase of life their patients are experiencing. Clinical findings of postmenopausal problems on dental examination may include a paucity of saliva, increased dental caries, dysesthesia, taste alterations, atrophic gingivitis, periodontitis and osteoporotic jaws unsuitable for conventional prosthetic devices or dental implants. Panoramic dental radiographs may reveal calcified carotid artery atheromas. Dentists have an opportunity to refer women who are not under the care of a gynecologist for an evaluation to determine the appropriateness of HRT for its systemic and oral

  11. Sleep problems during the menopausal transition: prevalence, impact, and management challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Fiona C; de Zambotti, Massimiliano; Colrain, Ian M; Bei, Bei

    2018-01-01

    A substantial number of women experience sleep difficulties in the approach to menopause and beyond, with 26% experiencing severe symptoms that impact daytime functioning, qualifying them for a diagnosis of insomnia. Here, we review both self-report and polysomnographic evidence for sleep difficulties in the context of the menopausal transition, considering severity of sleep complaints and links between hot flashes (HFs) and depression with poor sleep. Longitudinal population-based studies show that sleep difficulties are uniquely linked with menopausal stage and changes in follicle-stimulating hormone and estradiol, over and above the effects of age. A major contributor to sleep complaints in the context of the menopausal transition is HFs, and many, although not all, HFs are linked with polysomnographic-defined awakenings, with HF-associated wake time contributing significantly to overall wakefulness after sleep onset. Some sleep complaints may be comorbid with depressive disorders or attributed to sleep-related breathing or movement disorders, which increase in prevalence especially after menopause, and for some women, menopause, age, and environmental/behavioral factors may interact to disrupt sleep. Considering the unique and multifactorial basis for sleep difficulties in women transitioning menopause, we describe clinical assessment approaches and management options, including combination treatments, ranging from cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia to hormonal and nonhormonal pharmacological options. Emerging studies suggest that the impact of severe insomnia symptoms could extend beyond immediate health care usage and quality of life issues to long-term mental and physical health, if left untreated in midlife women. Appropriate treatment, therefore, has immediate benefit as well as advantages for maintaining optimal health in the postmenopausal years.

  12. Use of alternative therapies in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Michelle P; Shortle, Barbara; Dominguez, Jennifer E

    2002-06-01

    Hormone replacement therapy has traditionally been used to treat the accompanying symptoms of oestrogen deficiency in menopause. However, not all women can, or prefer to, receive this treatment and alternatives should be considered to reduce the increased risk of osteoporosis and heart disease in menopausal women. This chapter reviews the current literature on the efficacy of phyto-oestrogens in preventing cardiovascular disease, various cancers and osteoporosis, as well as treating the vasomotor and other menopause-related symptoms. Select herbal therapies, as well as selective oestrogen receptor modulators, are also considered. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  13. Contemporary alternatives to plant estrogens for menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Stacie E; Studee, Laura

    2006-11-01

    Every year, millions of women begin the peri-menopause and may experience a number of symptoms related to this transition. Many women are reluctant to use exogenous hormone therapy for treatment of menopausal symptoms and are turning to botanical and dietary supplements (BDS) for relief. This paper reviews the literature on alternatives to plant estrogens for relief of menopausal symptoms. The MEDLINE database was searched for clinical trials of non-estrogenic plant extracts for menopausal symptoms. To be included, studies had to include peri- or postmenopausal women as subjects. All clinical trials (randomized-controlled trials, open trials, and comparison group studies) were included for this review. Black cohosh appears to be one of the most effective botanicals for relief of vasomotor symptoms, while St. John's wort can improve mood disorders related to the menopausal transition. Many other botanicals have limited evidence to demonstrate safety and efficacy for relief of symptoms related to menopause. A growing body of evidence suggests that some botanicals and dietary supplements could result in improved clinical outcomes. Health care providers should discuss these issues with their patients so they can assist them in managing these alternative therapies through an evidence-based approach.

  14. Quality of life and menopausal symptoms in women with liver transplants Qualidade de vida e sintomas da menopausa em mulheres transplantadas hepáticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Francisco Baccaro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess quality of life and climacteric symptoms in women with and without liver transplants. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of 52 women undergoing follow-up at a university hospital in southeastern Brazil from February 4th, 2009 to January 5th, 2011. Twenty-four of these women were 35 years old or older and had undergone liver transplantation at least one year before study entry. The remaining 28 women had no liver disease and were matched by age and menstrual patterns to the patients with transplants. The abbreviated version of the World Health Organization (WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire was used to assess quality of life. Menopausal symptoms were assessed using the Menopause Rating Scale (MRS. Statistical analysis was carried out by Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney test and analysis of variance. Correlations between MRS and the WHOQOL-BREF were established by correlation coefficients. RESULTS: The mean age of the women included in the study was 52.2 (±10.4 years and the mean time since transplantation was 6.1 (±3.3 years. Women with liver transplants had better quality of life scores in the environment domain (p=0.01. No difference was noted between the two groups in any domain of the MRS. For women in the comparison group, there was a strongly negative correlation between somatic symptoms in the MRS and the physical domain of the WHOQOL-BREF (pOBJETIVO: Avaliar a qualidade de vida e os sintomas do climatério em mulheres com e sem transplante de fígado. MÉTODOS: Estudo de corte transversal com 52 mulheres em acompanhamento ambulatorial em um hospital universitário na região sudeste do Brasil no período de 04/02/09 a 05/01/11. Dessas mulheres, 24 tinham 35 anos ou mais e haviam sido submetidas a transplante de fígado a pelo menos um ano antes do início do estudo. As outras 28 mulheres não tinham doença hepática e suas idades e padrões menstruais eram similares ao das transplantadas hepáticas. Para avaliação da

  15. EXPERIENCED STRESS, PSYCHOLOGICAL SYMPTOMS, SELF-RATED HEALTH AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT: A LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF SWEDISH UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vaez, Marjan; Laflamme, Lucie

    2008-01-01

    ...) by self-administered questionnaires. Students' sociodemographic characteristics, their experience of stressors, psychological symptoms, and mental and general health ratings were linked to their academic achievement (degree completed...

  16. Anxiety and posttraumatic stress symptom pathways to substance use problems among community women experiencing intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaquier, Véronique; Flanagan, Julianne C; Sullivan, Tami P

    2015-01-01

    Although intimate partner violence (IPV) has demonstrated strong associations with anxiety and posttraumatic stress, these constructs have rarely been examined simultaneously in IPV research. Gaps in knowledge remain as to their differential associations to substance use problems among IPV-victimized women. A sample of 143 community women self-reported on their current IPV victimization, mental health and substance use problems. Hierarchical entry multiple regressions were used to test for the direct and indirect effects of psychological, physical, and sexual IPV to alcohol and drug problems through anxiety and posttraumatic stress. Higher anxiety symptom severity and higher physical IPV severity were associated with greater alcohol and drug problems. Higher posttraumatic stress symptom severity was associated with greater alcohol and drug problems. Mediation analyses indicated (i) significant indirect pathways of IPV types to alcohol problems through posttraumatic stress symptom severity controlling for anxiety symptom severity and (ii) significant indirect pathways of IPV types to drug problems through anxiety symptom severity controlling for posttraumatic stress symptom severity. In examining the indirect pathways of psychological, physical, and sexual IPV to substance use problems this study highlights that anxiety and posttraumatic stress symptom severity have unique effects on alcohol and drug problems among IPV-victimized women.

  17. Perceived racial, sexual identity, and homeless status-related discrimination among Black adolescents and young adults experiencing homelessness: Relations with depressive symptoms and suicidality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattis, Maurice N; Larson, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    There is a dearth of empirical evidence that addresses how racial minority, sexual minority, and homeless statuses, with their accompanying experiences of stigma and discrimination, are related to mental health in adolescent and young adult populations. The current study addresses this gap by examining the associations between multiple forms of discrimination, depressive symptoms, and suicidality in a sample of 89 Black adolescents and young adults (52% female; 47% nonheterosexual, ages 16-24) experiencing homelessness. Results from a series of ordinary least squares and logistic regressions suggested that perceived homelessness stigma and racial discrimination were associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms, controlling for gender, age, and other types of discrimination, while perceived sexual identity discrimination showed no association. Having ever spent a homeless night on the street, an indicator of homelessness severity, accounted for a substantial amount of the association between homelessness stigma and depressive symptoms. In contrast, suicidality was not significantly associated with any measure of discrimination, homelessness severity, or personal characteristics. We also found no indication that the associations between perceived discrimination targeted at racial and homelessness statuses and mental health differed by sexual minority status. Our results suggest that depressive symptoms and suicidality are prevalent among Black homeless youth, and that depressive symptoms are particularly associated with racial discrimination and indicators of homelessness. The roles of discrimination and a lack of safe housing may be taken into account when designing programs and policies that address the mental health of Black adolescents and young adults experiencing homelessness. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. South African Menopause Society revised consensus position statement on menopausal hormone therapy, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidozzi, Franco; Alperstein, A; Bagratee, J S; Dalmeyer, P; Davey, M; de Villiers, T J; Hirschowitz, S; Kopenhager, T; Moodley, S P; Roos, P; Shaw, A; Shimange, O; Smith, T; Thomas, C; Titus, J; van der Spuy, Z; van Waart, J

    2014-06-19

    The South African Menopause Society (SAMS) consensus position statement on menopausal hormone therapy (HT) 2014 is a revision of the SAMS Council consensus statement on menopausal HT published in the SAMJ in May 2007. Information presented in the previous statement has been re-evaluated and new evidence has been incorporated. While the recommendations pertaining to HT remain similar to those in the previous statement, the 2014 revision includes a wider range of clinical benefits for HT, the inclusion of non-hormonal alternatives such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors for the management of vasomotor symptoms, and an appraisal of bioidentical hormones and complementary medicines used for treatment of menopausal symptoms. New preparations that are likely to be more commonly used in the future are also mentioned. The revised statement emphasises that commencing HT during the 'therapeutic window of opportunity' maximises the benefit-to-risk profile of therapy in symptomatic menopausal women.

  19. Menopause and sexuality: key issues in premature menopause and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziottin, Alessandra

    2010-09-01

    Woman's sexuality encompasses sexual identity, sexual function, and sexual relationships. It is modulated throughout life by life and reproduction-related events, health, relationships, and sociocultural variables. The aging process and menopause are two potent contributors to female sexual dysfunction. The earlier the menopause, the more severe and complex the impact on sexuality is. The younger the woman, the less she realizes the different key goals of her life cycle (falling in love, having a satisfying sexual life, forming a stable couple, getting married, having a family) and the more pervasive the consequences on her sexual identity, sexual function, and sexual relationship can be. Premature menopause is an amplified paradigm of the complex impact menopause can have on women's and couple's sexuality. This paper will focus on biologically based sexual issues, namely desire, arousal, orgasm, and pain disorders, as well as key questions encountered in infertility. The concepts of "symptom inducer" and "symptom carrier" will also be addressed. © 2010 New York Academy of Sciences.

  20. Supplementing with Opuntia ficus-indica Mill and Dioscorea nipponica Makino extracts synergistically attenuates menopausal symptoms in estrogen-deficient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Byoung-Seob; Lee, Hye Won; Kim, Da Sol; Kang, Suna; Ryuk, Jin Ah; Park, Sunmin

    2014-08-08

    metabolism by OVX, suggesting potential efficacy of the combination for alleviating menopausal symptoms. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Alternatives for women through menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, M L; Taylor, M B

    2001-08-01

    Today, 42% of Americans use alternative nonprescription therapies to treat medical conditions; 46% of nonprescription alternative use for principal medical conditions is done without consulting either a medical doctor or a nonphysician practitioner of alternative therapy. Many nontraditional alternatives are used to treat the hot flashes and somatic complaints of menopause, for which options such as hormone replacement therapy and other prescription and over-the-counter drugs are also available. To date, no one agent treats all menopausal symptoms as effectively as estrogen. Selective estrogen-receptor modulators can help prevent osteoporosis but do not relieve menopausal symptoms. However, some women are unwilling or unable to take hormone replacement therapy, and some decide to discontinue therapy. Evidence supporting the use of some nonprescription alternatives for conditions related to menopause is limited. Patients need to be aware of the potential for drug interactions when these alternative therapies are used concomitantly with prescription drugs. The current evidence to support use of hormone replacement therapy, selective estrogen-receptor modulators, and nontraditional alternatives is reviewed here.

  2. Positive symptoms in first-episode psychosis patients experiencing low maternal care and stressful life events: a pilot study to explore the role of the COMT gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ira, Elisa; De Santi, Katia; Lasalvia, Antonio; Bonetto, Chiara; Zanatta, Gioia; Cristofalo, Doriana; Bertani, Mariaelena; Bissoli, Sarah Saviana; Riolo, Rossana; Gardellin, Francesco; Morandin, Idana; Ramon, Luana; Tansella, Michele; Ruggeri, Mirella; Tosato, Sarah

    2014-09-01

    COMT Val(158)Met moderates the effect of stress on psychotic symptoms. Exposure to stress is also associated with mesolimbic dopamine release in individuals experiencing low maternal care. We therefore test the hypothesis that recent stressful life events are associated with more severe positive symptoms (associated with mesolimbic dopamine release) in first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients who experienced low maternal care during childhood. We hypothesized that COMT Val(158)Met moderates this association. A total of 149 FEP patients recruited within the Psychosis Incident Cohort Outcome Study (PICOS) participated in the present study. Maternal care was assessed by the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI), stressful life events were collected by the List of Events Scale and positive symptoms were assessed by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). We found that low maternal care and recent stressful life events were associated with higher level of positive symptoms at the onset (analysis of variance [ANOVA], p = 0.012), and that patients who were also homozygotes for the COMT Val(158) allele had the highest level of positive symptoms (ANOVA, p = 0.024). Low maternal care and severe stressful life events may contribute to a symptomatology characterized by more severe positive symptoms at the onset, possibly due to an increased mesolimbic dopamine release. Homozygosity for the COMT Val(158) allele seems to confer a biological predisposition to the stress-related hyperactivity of the mesolimbic dopaminergic system. The data imply that the mesolimbic dopaminergic system is involved in the mediation/modulation of the effect of stressful events on the vulnerability for psychosis.

  3. Menopause in highland Guatemala Mayan women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Donna E

    2003-04-25

    To explore any feelings and symptoms surrounding menopause among Mayan women in three ethnolinguistic groups in highland Guatemala and compare these with previous reports from Mexico. This was a qualitative exploratory study of the experiences around menopause of eight middle aged women and one local key informant in each of three villages in western highland Guatemala (n=27). Individual interviews were conducted in women with irregular menses or whose menses has ceased in the last 3 years. Field notes were kept and then an analysis undertaken by the author. Twenty-four Mayan women, aged 38-55, and three Mayan key informants (all women over age 50) were interviewed. Most women reported some symptoms, including hot flashes, night sweats, changes in libido, irritability, moodiness, abdominal cramps and menstrual clots occurring at some stage during the last 3 years. Although women reported symptoms, they mostly accepted them with equanimity; and rejoiced at the cessation of their periods. Highland Guatemalan Mayan women reported symptoms that were not reported in Mayan women in Yucatan, Mexico in the years surrounding menopause. The reasons for this disparity are unclear but may reflect differences in body weight and diet. Despite these symptoms, Mayan women looked forward to menopause and their newfound freedom and status. Symptoms in women in the years around menopause must be interpreted in geographical, nutritional, biological, psychological and cultural context.

  4. Socio-cultural, psychosexual and biomedical factors associated with genital symptoms experienced by men in rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautham, Meenakshi; Singh, Rajesh; Weiss, Helen; Brugha, Ruairi; Patel, Vikram; Desai, Nimesh G; Nandan, Deoki; Kielmann, Karina; Grosskurth, Heiner

    2008-03-01

    Biomedical, anthropological and psychiatric frameworks have been used to research different elements of men's sexual health - sexually transmitted infections, psychosexual concerns and psychological distress - but rarely within the same study. We combined these in a study in rural north India. In Tehri Garhwal and Agra districts, we explored male perceptions of genital and sexual symptoms through focus group discussions and then conducted a clinic-based survey of 366 symptomatic men who presented at rural private provider clinics. Men's urine specimens were tested for gonorrhoea and chlamydia infection using polymerase chain reaction techniques. Researchers screened them for probable psychological distress by administering the General Health Questionnaire (12- items). Results revealed that local and traditional notions of health influenced men's symptom perceptions, with semen loss their predominant concern. Dhat, commonly perceived as an involuntary semen loss, corresponded most closely with the symptom of urethral discharge, but was attributed mainly to non-infectious causes. It could also manifest as a syndrome with physical weakness and mental lethargy. FGD participants lacked correct and complete information on reproductive health. Around 75% of the symptomatic men presented with dhat, but only 5.5% tested positive for gonorrhoea or chlamydia. Application of syndromic sexually transmitted infection (STI) guidelines in these settings could result in over diagnosis and over treatment with antibiotics. In contrast, there was a significant association between dhat and probable psychological distress as detected by the GHQ (Adjusted OR, GHQ case positive: 2.66, 95% CI: 1.51-4.68). Our study confirms the existence of a dhat syndrome in rural India, which is culturally influenced and reflects heightened psychosexual concerns as well as mental distress states. Comprehensive health services for men should include assessments of their psychosexual needs and be supported

  5. North American Menopause Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Evaluation and Counseling Chapter 6: Complementary and Alternative Medicine Chapter 7: Nonprescription Options Chapter 8: Prescription Therapies Professional Publications Menopause Journal Contents Position Statements & Other Reports Menopause Practice ...

  6. Sexual Health and Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Evaluation and Counseling Chapter 6: Complementary and Alternative Medicine Chapter 7: Nonprescription Options Chapter 8: Prescription Therapies Professional Publications Menopause Journal Contents Position Statements & Other Reports Menopause Practice ...

  7. Rural women's understanding of the concept of menopause in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The word 'menopause' is derived from men and pausis and is a direct description of the psychological and physical events in women where menstruation ceases to occur. It is the time in a woman's life when she has experienced the last menstrual bleed. Menopause is not a disease per se but a condition associated with ...

  8. Dermatosis associated with menopause

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nair, Pragya A

    2014-01-01

    .... Dermatosis seen due to estrogen deficiency includes Atrophic Vulvovaginitis, Vulvar Lichen Sclerosus, Dyaesthetic Vulvodynia, Hirsutism, Alopecia, Menopausal Flushing, Keratoderma Climactericum...

  9. The Impact of Severe Stalking Experienced by Acutely Battered Women: An Examination of Violence, Psychological Symptoms and Strategic Responding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanic, Mindy B.; Uhlmansiek, Mary H.; Weaver, Terri L.; Resick, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01

    Stalking has been relatively understudied compared to other dimensions of intimate partner violence. The purpose of this article was to examine concurrent and subsequent intimate partner abuse, strategic responses and symptomatic consequences of severe stalking experienced by battered women. Thirty-five battered women classified as “relentlessly stalked” and 31 infrequently stalked battered women were compared. Compared to infrequently stalked battered women, relentlessly stalked battered women reported: (a) more severe concurrent physical violence, sexual assault and emotional abuse: (b) increased post-separation assault and stalking; (c) increased rates of depression and PTSD; and (d) more extensive use of strategic responses to abuse. Results underscore the scope and magnitude of stalking faced by battered women and have implications for assessment and intervention strategies. PMID:11288940

  10. Menopause Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the following symptoms? Irregular menstrual cycles Hot flashes Sleep disturbances or insomnia Night sweats Elevated heart rate Mood changes, such as irritability, anxiety, or depression Vaginal dryness or discomfort during sexual intercourse Urinary ...

  11. Female Sexual Function During the Menopausal Transition in a Group of Iranian Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Eftekhar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence of sexual problems in Iranian women and association of sexual dysfunction with menopausal symptoms.Materials and methods: In this cross-sectional study, 151 married women with the age of 40-60 yearsold who were referred for treatmentto Department of Gynecology in Vali-e-Asr Hospital (Tehran, Iran from April to July 2012, were recruited. They were evaluated concerning their sexual function in the domains of desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction and pain with the female sexual function index (FSFI questionnaire.Menopause rating scale (MRS was developed for the diagnosis and quantification of climacteric symptoms.Results: Total frequency of sexual dysfunction was 53% with the domains of lubrication, arusal and desire being commonly affected 62%, 70% and 98.5% of cases respectively. There is a relationship between severity of somatic and urogenital symptoms with sexual dysfunction (p = 0.03, p = 0.00 respectively.Conclusion: A considerable percentage of women experienced sexual dysfunctions in this period. Somatic and urogenital symptoms during the menopausal period could be a factor to maintain or intensity of sexual dysfunctions.

  12. [Treatment of menopause with acupuncture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Torres, Maribel; Domingo, Cristina

    2002-02-01

    After analyzing the causes of hot flashes caused by menopause according to the theories of Traditional Chinese Medicine, the author describe nine clinical case studies and their corresponding diagnoses according to the five basic elements: water, wood, fire, land and metal. In virtually every case study, once the corresponding treatment of choice was applied, an improvement in the patient's symptoms was observed along with a positive evaluation on behalf of these patients.

  13. Influência dos sintomas climatéricos sobre a função sexual de mulheres de meia-idade Influence of menopausal symptoms on sexual function in middle-aged women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Uchôa Leitão Cabral

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a influência dos sintomas climatéricos na função sexual de mulheres de meia-idade. MÉTODOS: Estudo populacional de corte transversal, com amostra de 370 mulheres entre 40 e 65 anos, atendidas nas Unidades Básicas de Saúde da cidade de Natal, no estado do Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. Aplicou-se um questionário referente s características sociodemográficas, clínicas e comportamentais das mulheres. A função sexual foi avaliada pelo Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI, enquanto os sintomas do climatério pelo Menopause Rating Scale (MRS. RESULTADOS: No grupo estudado, 67% das mulheres apresentaram risco de disfunção sexual (FSFI≤26,5. Todos os domínios do FSFI (desejo, excitação, lubrificação, orgasmo, satisfação e dor apresentaram escores mais baixos nas mulheres com risco de disfunção sexual (pPURPOSE: To evaluate the influence of climacteric symptoms on the sexual function in middle-aged women. METHODS: A cross-sectional population study was conducted on a sample of 370 middle-aged women, aged 40 to 65 years-old, cared for at the Basic Health Units in Natal, in the state of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. We used a questionnaire containing questions on sociodemographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics. Sexual function was evaluated by the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI, while the menopause symptoms by the Menopause Rating Scale (MRS. RESULTS: In the studied group, 67% of the women reported risk for sexual dysfunction (FSFI≤26.5. All FSFI domains (desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and pain were lower in women with risk for sexual dysfunction (p<0.001. The arousal, orgasm, and pain domains were most likely to contribute to lower FSFI scores. All somatovegetative, urogenital, and psychological MRS symptoms were more elevated in women with risk for sexual dysfunction, being significant for all comparisons (p<0.001. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the likelihood of

  14. The Use Of Alternative Methods In Reducing Menopausal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: 37.4% of women were determined to use alternative methods to reduce their menopausal symptoms. In the consequence of statistical analysis, a significant relation was found between the menopausal complaints such as hot flashes, night sweats and sleeping problem and the use of alternative methods in order to ...

  15. Effect of lavender aromatherapy on menopause hot flushing: A crossover randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafat Kazemzadeh

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: This study indicated that the use of lavender aromatherapy reduced menopause flushing. Given the impact of stress on flushing and the undesirable effects of menopause symptoms on the quality of life, it would appear that this simple, noninvasive, safe, and effective method can be used by menopausal women with noticeable benefits.

  16. Knowledge, attitudes and perceptions towards menopause among highly educated Asian women in their midlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Fouzia R; Jonker, Leon; Qazi, Roshan A

    2014-12-01

    To determine knowledge levels, and attitudes and perceptions towards, menopause among highly educated Asian women in their midlife. A cross-sectional survey. Five teaching institutions in Hyderabad, Pakistan. In total, 200 out of 225 (89% response rate) teachers, lecturers and professors, aged 40-59 years, were surveyed in 2013 using a self-administered questionnaire. The mean age of responders was 48 years. Premenopausal and perimenopausal women attributed for 58%, whereas 42% were postmenopausal. All women had a masters degree; 15% had a PhD degree. Forty-six percent of responders thought they had sufficient knowledge about the menopause and 87% had positive perceptions about it, with 76% feeling life was easier and calmer as a result of it. Reported negative perceptions included 30% of women experiencing feelings of grumpiness, irritability, altered work capability and loss of femininity. Health professionals were an information resource. of 60% of cases, only 5% of participants knew about hormone replacement therapy and none knew about available alternative therapies. Despite the fact that the majority of women felt well informed and exhibited a positive attitude towards menopause, a strong urge for more knowledge was expressed. Public health care systems should mobilize resources and take measures to improve women's awareness and knowledge about menopause-related changes through a variety of educational tools and media, including the Internet. A recommendation would be for physicians to provide more information about menopausal symptoms and also therapies to alleviate these symptoms, regardless of the patient's socioeconomic background. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. Menopause-specific health literacy in Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suka, Machi; Taniuchi, Asako; Igarashi, Suguru; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Ishizuka, Bunpei

    2016-09-01

    This study proposed a method for assessing menopause-specific health literacy (knowledge and beliefs about menopausal symptoms which aid their recognition, assessment, and management) using a vignette methodology. A cross-sectional web-based survey was conducted in September 2015 among Japanese women aged 30-59 years. Of 1236 women surveyed, 1196 eligible participants who were not under treatment for menopausal symptoms were included. Participants were presented with a vignette describing a woman with menopausal symptoms and were then asked a series of questions to assess their recognition of menopausal symptoms, attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavior control, availability, and intention to seek medical care if they themselves had the problems described in the vignette. The majority (87%) of participants correctly labelled the vignette as menopausal symptoms and 60% expressed an intention to seek medical care if they had the symptoms presented. Logistic regression showed that attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavior control were significant predictors of the intention to seek medical care. A structural equation model depicting these relationships with intention to seek medical care revealed acceptable fit indices: goodness of fit index (GFI)=0.948, adjusted goodness of fit index (AGFI)=0.913, comparative fit index (CFI)=0.883, and root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA)=0.089. Subjective norm had the greatest direct effect on intention to seek medical care. The assessment of menopause-specific health literacy may be useful for understanding why women hesitate to seek medical care for menopausal symptoms and for developing interventions to improve the coping behaviors of women with menopausal symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sleep problems during the menopausal transition: prevalence, impact, and management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker FC

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Fiona C Baker,1,2 Massimiliano de Zambotti,1 Ian M Colrain,1,3 Bei Bei4,5 1Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA, USA; 2Brain Function Research Group, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; 3Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, 4Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Psychological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, 5Centre for Women’s Mental Health, Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Royal Women’s Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: A substantial number of women experience sleep difficulties in the approach to menopause and beyond, with 26% experiencing severe symptoms that impact daytime functioning, qualifying them for a diagnosis of insomnia. Here, we review both self-report and polysomnographic evidence for sleep difficulties in the context of the menopausal transition, considering severity of sleep complaints and links between hot flashes (HFs and depression with poor sleep. Longitudinal population-based studies show that sleep difficulties are uniquely linked with menopausal stage and changes in follicle-stimulating hormone and estradiol, over and above the effects of age. A major contributor to sleep complaints in the context of the menopausal transition is HFs, and many, although not all, HFs are linked with polysomnographic-defined awakenings, with HF-associated wake time contributing significantly to overall wakefulness after sleep onset. Some sleep complaints may be comorbid with depressive disorders or attributed to sleep-related breathing or movement disorders, which increase in prevalence especially after menopause, and for some women, menopause, age, and environmental/behavioral factors may interact to disrupt sleep. Considering the unique and multifactorial basis for sleep difficulties in women transitioning menopause, we describe clinical assessment

  19. What works? Evidence for lifestyle and nonprescription therapies in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnecke, Emma

    2011-05-01

    Effective prescription medications are available to treat menopausal symptoms. However, due to adverse effects and risks associated with use, many women are seeking complementary and alternative options to treat their symptoms. Nonpharmacological options for the management of menopausal symptoms are widely available and frequently used. This article outlines the use of, and evidence for, nonprescription therapies and complementary therapies for menopausal symptom management. There are a large number of studies on complementary and alternative therapies for the management of menopausal symptoms. Lifestyle changes are beneficial and studies on relaxation training are revealing encouraging results. Studies of the benefits of yoga have mixed results. Current evidence from systematic reviews does not support the use of over-the-counter complementary therapies or acupuncture. A large placebo effect exists for the management of hot flushes, therefore further research against active controls is required. Management options should be collaboratively explored.

  20. Measurement-specific quality-of-life satisfaction during the menopause in an Arabian Gulf country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bener, A; Rizk, D E; Shaheen, H; Micallef, R; Osman, N; Dunn, E V

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this study was to use an instrument, the menopause-specific quality-of-life satisfaction questionnaire for the postmenopausal period, in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). A cross-sectional descriptive study was used to generate menopause symptoms experienced by Arabian Gulf women. Measurement-specific quality-of-life satisfaction questionnaires were used and face-to-face interviews were performed. The study was based in primary health-care clinics in Al Ain City, Sharjah and Dubai Emirates, UAE. A multistage sampling design was used, and a representative sample of 450 UAE females aged 45 years and above were included during January-April 1999. Of the 450 women living in both urban and rural areas, 390 women agreed to participate (86.7%) and responded to the study. The mean age and standard deviation (SD) of the subjects was 56.5 +/- 6.6 years, and the median age of natural menopause in the present study was 48 years (mean +/- SD 48.4 +/- 3.8). The rate of consanguinous marriages in the sample was found to be 47.2%. The most common disease was found to be diabetes mellitus (10.3%), followed by osteoarthritis (7.7%), hypertension (7.2%) and asthma (6.2%), but the majority of subjects (68.7%) had no specific disease. Out of 29 possible symptoms, the mean number of symptoms was 7.57 (range 0-24). The most frequent symptom was 'aches in the back of the neck or head' at 46.4% followed by 'aches in the muscles/joints' at 34.6%. The least reported symptom was 'facial hair' at 15.9%. Increasing education resulted in more symptoms reported, and increasing parity resulted in fewer symptoms reported. In the present study, it was found that employed women experienced more symptoms and disorders. Of the total sample, 28.5% of the subjects reported no symptoms. In the four domains, 69% reported physical symptoms, 58.7% reported psychosocial symptoms, 40% reported vasomotor symptoms and 37.9% reported sexual symptoms. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient indicated that

  1. Preliminary effects of progressive muscle relaxation on cigarette craving and withdrawal symptoms in experienced smokers in acute cigarette abstinence: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limsanon, Thatsanee; Kalayasiri, Rasmon

    2015-03-01

    Cigarette craving usually occurs in conjunction with unpleasant feelings, including stress, as part of a withdrawal syndrome. Progressive muscle relaxation (PMR), a behavioral technique used to reduce stress by concentrating on achieving muscle relaxation, may reduce levels of cigarette craving and other substance-related negative feelings and withdrawal symptoms. Demographic and cigarette use data were collected from 32 experienced smokers at the King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand using the Semi-Structured Assessment for Drug Dependence and Alcoholism. Participants were asked to refrain from smoking for at least 3 hours before the visit (acute abstinence) and were randomly allocated to a 1-session PMR group (n =16) or a control activity group (e.g., reading newspaper, n =16). The intervention group was instructed to practice PMR individually in a quiet, private, air-conditioned room for about 20minutes. Craving, other substance-related feelings, and autonomic nervous responses (e.g., blood pressure and pulse rate) were assessed immediately before and after the 1-session intervention. There were no differences in demographics, cigarette use/dependence, and baseline craving characteristics between the PMR and control groups. However, the control group had higher levels of high and paranoia feeling, and pulse rate than the PMR group at baseline. After practicing PMR, but not after a control activity, smokers undergoing acute abstinence had significantly lower levels of cigarette craving, withdrawal symptoms, and systolic blood pressure than at baseline. After controlling for baseline differences, abstaining smokers using PMR had lower levels of cigarette craving, withdrawal symptoms, and systolic blood pressure than smokers who undertook a control activity. PMR significantly reduces cigarette craving, withdrawal symptoms, and blood pressure in smokers undergoing acute abstinence. PMR may be used as an adjunct to cigarette dependency treatments

  2. Insomnia in women approaching menopause: Beyond perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Fiona C; Willoughby, Adrian R; Sassoon, Stephanie A; Colrain, Ian M; de Zambotti, Massimiliano

    2015-10-01

    The menopausal transition is marked by increased prevalence in disturbed sleep and insomnia, present in 40-60% of women, but evidence for a physiological basis for their sleep complaints is lacking. We aimed to quantify sleep disturbance and the underlying contribution of objective hot flashes in 72 women (age range: 43-57 years) who had (38 women), compared to those who had not (34 women), developed clinical insomnia in association with the menopausal transition. Sleep quality was assessed with two weeks of sleep diaries and one laboratory polysomnographic (PSG) recording. In multiple regression models controlling for menopausal transition stage, menstrual cycle phase, depression symptoms, and presence of objective hot flashes, a diagnosis of insomnia predicted PSG-measured total sleep time (p insomnia had, on average, 43.5 min less PSG-measured sleep time (p insomnia reported more WASO (p = 0.002), more night-to-night variability in WASO (p insomnia in the approach to menopause have a measurable sleep deficit, with almost 50% of the sample having less than 6h of sleep. Compromised sleep that develops in the context of the menopausal transition should be addressed, taking into account unique aspects of menopause like hot flashes, to avoid the known negative health consequences associated with insufficient sleep and insomnia in midlife women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Metabolic disorders in menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Stachowiak

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders occurring in menopause, including dyslipidemia, disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (impaired glucose tolerance – IGT, type 2 diabetes mellitus – T2DM or components of metabolic syndrome, constitute risk factors for cardiovascular disease in women. A key role could be played here by hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and visceral obesity, all contributing to dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, alter coagulation and atherosclerosis observed during the menopausal period. Undiagnosed and untreated, metabolic disorders may adversely affect the length and quality of women’s life. Prevention and treatment preceded by early diagnosis should be the main goal for the physicians involved in menopausal care. This article represents a short review of the current knowledge concerning metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome or thyroid diseases in menopause, including the role of a tailored menopausal hormone therapy (HT. According to current data, HT is not recommend as a preventive strategy for metabolic disorders in menopause. Nevertheless, as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic diseases after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered (after balancing benefits/risks and excluding women with absolute contraindications to this therapy. Life-style modifications, with moderate physical activity and healthy diet at the forefront, should be still the first choice recommendation for all patients with menopausal metabolic abnormalities.

  4. Hot flushes and quality of life during menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luoto Riitta

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Menopausal health is important since this stage of life is not to be avoided. A recent article in BMC Women's Health from the Estonian Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy trial has concluded that quality of life is not related to hormonal therapy use. The commentary article discusses this finding and considers other factors related to symptoms and quality of life during menopause. Important factors known to affect hot flushes and quality of life are smoking and high body weight. Since both these factors are modifiable, menopause is a suitable area for health promotion. However, evidence concerning lifestyle changes in symptom relief or increase of quality of life is weak. More trials in this area are needed before women may consider non-pharmacological treatment of symptoms as a reliable option for menopausal symptom cure.

  5. Managing Depression during the Menopausal Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Quinn M.

    2010-01-01

    The menopausal transition is associated with both first onset of depression and recurrent depression. Risk factors include vasomotor symptoms, a history of premenstrual dysphoria, postpartum depression, major depression, and sleep disturbances. Hormone replacement therapy, complementary and alternative medicine approaches, and counseling…

  6. Empowerment and coping strategies in menopause women: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdkhasti, Mansoureh; Simbar, Masoumeh; Abdi, Fatemeh

    2015-03-01

    Menopause is described as a period of psychological difficulties that changes the lifestyle of women in multiple ways. Menopausal women require more information about their physical and psychosocial needs. Empowerment during the menopause can contribute to improving the perception of this stage and the importance of self-care. It is essential to increase women's awareness and adaptation to menopause, using empowerment programs. The aim of this study was to review the empowerment and coping strategies in menopause women. In this review, PubMed, EMBASE, ISI, and Iranian databases were scanned for relevant literature. A comprehensive search was performed, using the combinations of the keywords "empowerment, menopause, coping with" to review relevant literature and higher education journals. Most interventions for menopause women have focused on educational intervention, physical activity/exercise, healthy diet, stress management, healthy behaviors, preventing certain diseases and osteoporosis. Health education intervention strategy is one of the alternative strategies for improving women's attitudes and coping with menopause symptoms, identified as severalof the subcategories of health promotion programs. Empowerment of menopausal women will guarantee their health during the last third of their life. It will also help them benefit from their final years of reproductive life. The results of the present study can pave the way for future research about women's health promotion and empowerment.

  7. Guidelines for dietary management of menopausal women with simple obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Brończyk-Puzoń

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of obesity affects all age groups. It is also observed among menopausal women. Menopause is the time in a woman’s life when, as a consequence of hormonal changes occurring in the body, the risk of overweight and obesity increases significantly and, therefore, so does the risk of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Excess body weight in menopausal women may also be of social and psychological importance since the occurring symptoms may considerably decrease quality of life and sexual activity of these women. Reduction of body weight in obese menopausal women should play a vital role in treatment of this group of patients. Therefore, adequate management seems to be essential, and it should involve dietary, pharmacological and/or surgical treatment, depending on the patient’s needs. Following a rational weight loss plan provided by a dietician under medical supervision may contribute to improvement of the health condition and quality of life. It is recommended to observe the guidelines on dietary management described in this article by adjusting a diet plan individually. The following work constitutes a review of articles from 2004-2014 which are available in the PubMed medical knowledge base and the Polish Medical Bibliography (Polska Bibliografia Lekarska. For this purpose, the following controlled vocabulary has been used: menopausal woman, menopausal diet, menopausal weight gain, menopausal weight loss, dietary management in menopause.

  8. Efeitos da isoflavona sobre os sintomas climatéricos e o perfil lipídico na mulher em menopausa Effects of isoflavone on menopausal symptoms and blood lipids in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Aguiar Petri Nahás

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar os efeitos da isoflavona, do gérmen da soja, sobre os sintomas climatéricos e o perfil lipídico na mulher em menopausa. MÉTODOS: foi conduzido estudo prospectivo, com 50 mulheres em menopausa, divididas em: G1, usuárias de isoflavona (60 mg/dia (n=25, e G2, placebo (n=25. Os critérios de inclusão foram FSH >40 mUI/mL e presença de fogachos. Foram excluídas as vegetarianas, fumantes, asiáticas, portadoras de doenças gastrointestinais e usuárias de terapia de reposição hormonal. No seguimento, de seis meses, foram obtidos o índice menopausal de Kupperman (IMK, o perfil hormonal e o lipídico. Na análise estatística, empregaram-se ANOVA, o teste t pareado e as provas não paramétricas de Wilcoxon e Mann-Whitney. RESULTADOS: os valores medianos do IMK, inicialmente iguais entre os grupos (IMK = 20, reduziram-se nas usuárias de isoflavona aos 2 e 4 meses (IMK = 14 e 9, respectivamente e no grupo controle, apenas aos 2 meses (IMK = 15 (pPURPOSE: to evaluate the effects of soy germ isoflavone on menopausal symptoms and blood lipids in postmenopausal women. METHODS: a prospective study was performed on 50 women, randomly divided into two groups: 25 women on soy germ isoflavones (60 mg/day, capsules (G1 and 25 women on placebo (G2. Inclusion criteria: women with hot flushes and FSH >40 mIU/mL, non-vegetarian, non-smoker, non-Asiatic, not in use of hormone replacement therapy and without disease of the gastrointestinal tract. For six months, the menopausal Kupperman index (MKI and hormonal and lipid profiles were assessed. For statistical analysis, ANOVA, t test and the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used. RESULTS: the median MKI values, initially similar in both groups, decreased in G1 at two and four months (MKI = 14 and 9, respectively, and in G2 at two months (MKI = 15 (p<0.01. At six months, isoflavone was significantly superior to placebo in reducing hot flushes (44 versus 12

  9. Menopause perception and care of menopausal women in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Opinions of the women were sought on socio-cultural differences in the perception of menstruation, causes and consequences of menopause, sexual intercourse after menopause, social support networks for menopausal women, and types of care and treatment for women in menopause. The participants in the FGDs used ...

  10. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to soy isoflavones and maintenance of bone mineral density (ID 1655) and reduction of vasomotor symptoms associated with menopause (ID 1654, 1704, 2140, 3093, 3154, 3590

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to provide a scientific opinion on health claims pursuant to Article 13 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 in the framework of further assessment related to soy isoflavones...... and maintenance of bone mineral density and reduction of vasomotor symptoms associated with menopause. The food constituent that is the subject of the claim, soy isoflavones, is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effects, maintenance of bone mineral density and reduction of vasomotor symptoms associated...... between the consumption of soy isoflavones and maintenance of bone mineral density, and between the consumption of soy isoflavones and reduction of vasomotor symptoms associated with menopause....

  11. Minnesota multiphasic personality inventory as related factor for post traumatic stress disorder symptoms according to job stress level in experienced firefighters: 5-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, In-Sung; Lee, Mi-Young; Jung, Sung-Won; Nam, Chang-Wook

    2015-01-01

    As first responders to an increasing number of natural and manmade disasters, active-duty firefighters are at increased risk for physical and psychiatric impairment as reflected by high rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Because little is known about related factor with PTSD according to job stress level among firefighters, we assessed utility of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) using 5-year medical surveillance. Data were analyzed from 185 male firefighters without psychiatric disease history and who at assessments in 2006 and 2011 completed all questionnaires on personal behaviors (including exercise, drinking and smoking habits) and job history (including job duration and department). MMPI, Events Scale-Revised-Korean version (IES-R-K) and Korean Occupational Stress Scale-Short Form (KOSS-SF) were used to screen for personality trait, PTSD symptom presence and job stress level, respectively. IES-R-K subgroups were compared using two-sample t- and χ2 tests, and factors influencing IES-R-K according to KOSS-SF were determined using uni- and multivariate logistic regression. Mean age and job duration were higher in PTSD-positive than negative groups. In multivariate analysis, increased PTSD risk was associated with: job duration (Odds ratio (OR) = 1.064, 95 % CI 1.012-1.118) for firefighters overall; masculinity-femininity (OR = 5.304, 95 % CI 1.191-23.624) and job duration (OR = 1.126, 95 % CI 1.003-1.265) for lower job stress level; and social introversion (OR = 3.727, 95 % CI 1.096-12.673) for higher job stress level. MMPI relates with PTSD according to job stress level among experienced firefighters. Masculinity-femininity and social introversion were the strongest related factor for PTSD symptom development in low and high job stress levels, respectively.

  12. The role of traditional Japanese medicine (Kampo) in the practice of psychosomatic medicine: the usefulness of Kampo in the treatment of the stress-related symptoms of women, especially those with peri-menopausal disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushiroyama, Takahisa

    2013-10-22

    A serious problem currently plaguing the medical field is the widening gap between academic medicine, which studies the features and causes of illness, and the medical care that patients desire. An example of this gap can be observed in the practice of psychotherapy, which is effective only for certain patients. Kampo medicine that combines the advantages of Western medicine with those of traditional Japanese medicine is currently undergoing a revival in the healthcare sector. The therapeutic policies underlying Kampo medicine are based on the physical constitution and current symptoms of each patient. For this reason, Kampo medicine is referred to as "tailor-made medicine" and has properties similar to "mind and body" or psychosomatic medicine. Some women exhibit multiple undefined stress-related symptoms during the peri-menopausal period. In order to accurately diagnose and provide patient-specific treatment, physicians should not only investigate the various stress factors in patients' lives but should also provide a Sho, or a Kampo diagnosis. The therapeutic approach in Kampo medicine is aimed at harmonizing the mind, body, and spirit; this practice involves the use of narrative and holistic medication that treats the entire being of the patient, resulting in an increased number of specialized treatment plans.There are many Kampo prescriptions tailored to treat women who exhibit various stress-related symptoms. Both Kampo and psychosomatic medicine are based on the principles of narrative-based medicine, and by integrating these two medical systems, an ideal system can be devised to better cope with the various needs of patients. This new medical system established by integrating and harmonizing Western and Eastern medicine can be used for the treatment of women with stress-related symptoms.

  13. A Comparative study on sexual dysfunctions before and after menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigi, Marjan; Fahami, Fariba

    2012-01-01

    Background: Sexual instinct which is the cause of numerous changes in an individual’s life could be influenced by different factors such as menopause and ageing. This study was designed to compare sexual dysfunction before and after menopause. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Participants were 174 menopausal women who referred to medical health centers of Isfahan, Iran. Data were collected through self constructed sexual dysfunctions questionnaire in relation to their sexual activities before and after menopause. The reliability and validity of this questionnaire was determined by content validity and Cronbach’s alpha coefficient. Findings: Findings showed that the relative frequency of sexual dysfunctions was 38% in the productive period and 72.4% in the menopause period. There was a significant association between sexual dysfunctions before and after the menopause period (p vaginismus, respectively. Conclusions: A considerable percentage of women experienced sexual dysfunctions in productive and menopause periods, and menopause could be a factor to maintain or intensify sexual dysfunctions. PMID:23833604

  14. Menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Baziad

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The global population in the 21st century has reached 6.2 billion people, by the year 2025 it is to be around 8.3-8.5 billion, and will increase further. Elderly people are expected to grow rapidly than other groups. The fastest increase in the elderly population will take place in Asia. Life expectancy is increasing steadily throughout developed and developing countries. For many  menopausal women, increased life expectancy will accompanied by many health problems. The consequences of estrogen deficiency are the menopausal symptoms. The treatment of menopause related complaints and diseases became an  important socioeconomic and medical issue. Long term symptoms, such as the increase in osteoporosis fractures, cardio and cerebrovascular disesses and dementia, created a large financial burden on individuals and society. All these health problems can be lreated or prevented by hormone replacement therapy (HRT. Natural HRT is usually prefened. Synthetic  estrogen in oral contraceptives (oc are not recommended for HRT. Many contra-indications for oc, but now it is widely usedfor HRT. The main reasons for discontinuing HRT are unwanted bleeding, fear of cancer, and negative side effects. Until now there are sill debates about the rebrtonship between HRT and the incidence of breast cancer. Many data showed that there were no clear relationship between the use of HRT and breast cancer. ThereÎore, nwny experts advocate the use of HRTfrom the first sign of climacteric complaints until death. (Med J Indones 2001;10: 242-51Keywords: estrogen deficiency, climacteric phases, tibolone.

  15. Menopause: Prevention and Health Promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mª Rivas Hidalgo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account that climacteric constitutes a physiological state in woman’s life, which covers a large stage of her life cycle, it is important that nursery professionals will develop an Action Plan, whose main objective will be health. Covering, then, this stage from a multidisciplinary and holistic field is going to contribute to both: the adoption of healthy life habits and the repercussions that symptoms and physiological processes associated with menopause have on women. Another objective for nurses there must be to provide all our knowledge in a detailed and focused on the individual needs that may come up way. That way, we lay the foundations for facing climacteric with the minimum deterioration of the quality of life and well being.This article is an analysis of the etiology of every one of the most prevalent menopause problems, the predisposing factors to suffer them or to make them get worse, and the habits that are going to prevent larger spill-over effects of those problems. Furthermore, a revision about how nutrition, exercise, toxic substances consumption, etc. have repercussions on musculoskeletal problems, vascular symptoms, urogenital problems, psychological alterations, and gynaecological and breast cancer is made.

  16. Menopause and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... up bone loss. After menopause your ovaries stop producing the hormone estrogen, which helps to keep your ... you minimize and treat bone loss? Diet and lifestyle can help prevent and treat bone loss. Successful ...

  17. Metabolic and hormone influences on emotion processing during menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berent-Spillson, Alison; Marsh, Courtney; Persad, Carol; Randolph, John; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Smith, Yolanda

    2017-02-01

    Disturbances of emotion regulation and depressive symptoms are common during the menopause transition. Reproductive hormone levels are not directly correlated with depressive symptoms, and other factors may influence mood symptoms during menopause. In this study, we sought to determine the role of metabolic function in mood symptoms during menopause, hypothesizing an association with menopause status and long-term glucose load. We studied 54 women across three menopause transition stages (15 premenopause, 11 perimenopause, and 28 postmenopause), examining effects of age, hormones, and metabolism on mood and neural activation during emotional discrimination. We assessed participants using behavioral and functional MRI measures of negative emotion and emotion discrimination, and glycated hemoglobin A1c, to assess long-term glucose load. We found that emotionally unpleasant images activated emotion regulation (amygdala) and cognitive association brain regions (prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate, temporal-parietal-occipital (TPO) junction, hippocampus). Cognitive association region activity increased with menopause stage. Perimenopausal women had left TPO junction activation, and postmenopausal women had prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate, and TPO junction activation. Negative affect was associated with decreased amygdala activation, while depression symptoms and negative mood were associated with increased TPO junction activation. Hemoglobin A1c was associated with negative interpretation bias of neutral images and cognitive region recruitment during emotion discrimination. FSH levels, indicating menopause stage, were associated with negative mood. Age was not associated with any behavioral measures or activation patterns during the emotion task. Our results suggest that an interaction between metabolic and hormonal factors may influence emotion regulation, leading to increased risk for depression during menopause. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  18. Menopause-specific quality of life of a group of urban women, West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, N; Roy, P; Ray, S

    2014-12-01

    To find out the association of menopause-specific quality of life of women with menopausal status. In this cross-sectional study, we involved 250 Bengali-speaking women of Hindu ethnic group (118 perimenopausal and 132 postmenopausal), aged 40-65 years from urban areas of North 24 Paraganas, a district of West Bengal, India. The Menopause-Specific Quality of Life questionnaire (MENQOL) consisting of 29 menopausal symptoms, grouped under four menopausal domains (vasomotor, psychosocial, physical and sexual), was used to assess menopause-specific quality of life. Scores of four menopausal domains generated a composite score of 'Quality of Life'. Additionally, participants were also interviewed for their sociodemographic characteristics. Bivariate analyses showed significant difference in all the domains of menopause-specific quality of life (barring vasomotor domain) when compared for menopausal status. Results of ANCOVA showed that menopausal status was significantly associated only with the physical domain after removing the effects of sociodemographic characteristics. Menopausal status had a significant association with the physical domain of menopause-specific quality of life of women.

  19. Guidelines for dietary management of menopausal women with simple obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Brończyk-Puzoń; Dariusz Piecha; Justyna Nowak; Aneta Koszowska; Karolina Kulik-Kupka; Anna Dittfeld; Barbara Zubelewicz-Szkodzińska

    2015-01-01

    The problem of obesity affects all age groups. It is also observed among menopausal women. Menopause is the time in a woman’s life when, as a consequence of hormonal changes occurring in the body, the risk of overweight and obesity increases significantly and, therefore, so does the risk of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Excess body weight in menopausal women may also be of social and psychological importance since the occurring symptoms may considerably decrease quality of life and s...

  20. Experiencing control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monaci, G.; Braspenning, R.A.C.; Meerbeek, B.W.; Bingley, P.; Rajagopalan, R.; Triki, M.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the activities carried out in the first part of the Experiencing Control project (2008-324). The guiding idea of the project is to make control part of the experience, exploring new interaction solutions for complex, engaging interactions with Philips devices in the living

  1. Skin academy: hair, skin, hormones and menopause - current status/knowledge on the management of hair disorders in menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Atkin, Stephen; Gieler, Uwe; Grimalt, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    Menopause is defined by 12 months of amenorrhea after the final menstrual period. The reduction in ovarian hormones and increased androgen levels can manifest as hair and skin disorders. Although hirsutism, unwanted facial hair, alopecia, skin atrophy and slackness of facial skin are common issues encountered by post-menopausal women, these problems receive very little attention relative to other menopausal symptoms. The visibility of these disorders has been shown to cause significant anxiety and may impact on patients' self-esteem and quality of life, particularly given the strong association of hair and skin with a woman's femininity and beauty, which is demonstrated by extensive marketing by the cosmetic industry targeting this population and the large expenditure on these products by menopausal women. The proportion of the female population who are in the post-menopausal age group is rising. Therefore, the prevalence of these dermatological symptoms is likely to increase. Current therapies aim to rectify underlying hormonal imbalances and improve cosmetic appearance. However, there is little evidence to support treatment for these disorders specifically in post-menopausal women. This review discusses the assessment and treatment of both the physiological and psychological aspects of hair and skin disorders pertinent to the growing post-menopausal population.

  2. Menopausa ou Menopausas? Menopause or Menopauses?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkis Trench

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Na vida das mulheres existem marcos concretos e objetivos que sinalizam diferentes fases ou passagens de suas vidas, tais como a menarca, o rompimento do hímen, a última menstruação. São marcos visíveis no corpo físico e cada cultura os investe de sua rubrica. Na nossa cultura, historicamente, associam-se à menopausa inúmeras afecções (físicas e psíquicas. A partir do trabalho de Robert Wilson, publicado no livro Eternamente Feminina (1966, a menopausa adquire o estatuto de doença e a sua prevenção, tratamento e cura vinculam-se à terapia de reposição hormonal (TRH. Os diferentes discursos que circulam sobre a menopausa em nossa cultura não só contribuem para que tal associação seja mantida, como partem do pressuposto que as questões relacionadas à menopausa e envelhecimentos se apresentam igualitariamente às mulheres, independentemente de sua condição física, psíquica, social, econômica e cultural. O estudo tem como objetivo abordar alguns aspectos da construção da menopausa em nossa cultura e simultaneamente mostrar o quanto este evento deve ser percebido em seu caráter particular e relativo, e não como sendo da ordem do universal ou padronizado.There are concrete and objective signs in women's lives that mark different phases or passages of their lives such as the menarche, the breaking of the hymen, the last period. These are visible marks in the physical body and each culture invests them with its seal. Historically in our culture, countless diseases (physic and psychic are associated with the menopause. Starting with Robert Wilson's studies, published in the book Feminine Forever (1966, the menopause acquires the statute of disease and its prevention, treatment and cure are linked to the Hormonal Replacement Therapy (HRT. The different discourses that circulate on the menopause in our culture not only contribute to the maintenance of such an association, but also assume that the subjects related to

  3. A multi-level modeling approach examining PTSD symptom reduction during prolonged exposure therapy: moderating effects of number of trauma types experienced, having an HIV-related index trauma, and years since HIV diagnosis among HIV-positive adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junglen, Angela G; Smith, Brian C; Coleman, Jennifer A; Pacella, Maria L; Boarts, Jessica M; Jones, Tracy; Feeny, Norah C; Ciesla, Jeffrey A; Delahanty, Douglas L

    2017-11-01

    People living with HIV (PLWH) have extensive interpersonal trauma histories and higher rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than the general population. Prolonged exposure (PE) therapy is efficacious in reducing PTSD across a variety of trauma samples; however, research has not examined factors that influence how PTSD symptoms change during PE for PLWH. Using multi-level modeling, we examined the potential moderating effect of number of previous trauma types experienced, whether the index trauma was HIV-related or not, and years since HIV diagnosis on PTSD symptom reduction during a 10-session PE protocol in a sample of 51 PLWH. In general, PTSD symptoms decreased linearly throughout the PE sessions. Experiencing more previous types of traumatic events was associated with a slower rate of PTSD symptom change. In addition, LOCF analyses found that participants with a non-HIV-related versus HIV-related index trauma had a slower rate of change for PTSD symptoms over the course of PE. However, analyses of raw data decreased this finding to marginal. Years since HIV diagnosis did not impact PTSD symptom change. These results provide a better understanding of how to tailor PE to individual clients and aid clinicians in approximating the rate of symptom alleviation. Specifically, these findings underscore the importance of accounting for trauma history and index trauma type when implementing a treatment plan for PTSD in PLWH.

  4. Experiencing variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Sofie; Berge, Maria; Grout, Brian William Wilson

    2017-01-01

    This study contributes towards a better understanding of learning dynamics in doctoral supervision by analysing how learning opportunities are created in the interaction between supervisors and PhD students, using the notion of experiencing variation as a key to learning. Empirically, we have bas...... were discussed, created more complex patterns of variation. Both PhD students and supervisors can learn from this. Understanding of this mechanism that creates learning opportunities can help supervisors develop their competences in supervisory pedagogy....

  5. Natural menopause among women below 50 years in India: A population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saseendran Pallikadavath

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Associations of natural menopause with sociocultural, family planning and demographic variables were noted. Most importantly, there was an association with poverty that would require further investigation as to causality. The proportion of women experiencing early menopause may represent a useful overall indicator of women's health. The data are reassuring with regard to possible late effects of sterilization on ovarian function.

  6. Breast cancer and menopause: partners' perceptions and personal experiences--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayakhot, Padaphet; Vincent, Amanda; Teede, Helena

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the partners' perceptions, understanding, and personal experiences of early menopause and menopausal therapy in women with breast cancer. A questionnaire study was completed by 50 partners of women with diagnoses of breast cancer, recruited via outpatient clinics and the community. Descriptive statistics and χ tests were applied. Most (68%) of the partners perceived hot flushes as the meaning of menopause. Most (60%) partners perceived that loss of sexuality was the key problem/fears about being menopausal. Partners perceived that exercise (72%) and reducing stress (64%) were most effective in alleviating symptoms of menopause. Most partners reported that they did not understand the risks/benefits of hormone therapy (50%), bioidentical hormones (90%), and herbal therapies (84%). The general practitioner was considered the best source of information on menopause (68%). Partners expected menopause to affect a women's everyday life and relationships with family and partner and, particularly, to cause intermittent stress on the relationship (66%) and to decrease libido or sexual interest (64%). Forty-four percent of partners reported that there was some difficulty in communication/discussion about menopause with family and partners. This pilot study highlights (1) the lack of understanding of menopause and menopausal therapies that partners of women with breast cancer have, (2) the personal experience of having a female partner with breast cancer, and (3) the partners' attitudes and responses toward menopause in women with breast cancer.

  7. Anthropology and the study of menopause: evolutionary, developmental, and comparative perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievert, Lynnette Leidy

    2014-10-01

    This work aims to consider how the discipline of anthropology contributes to the study of menopause through evolutionary, developmental, and comparative perspectives. This study was a review of skeletal and ethnographic evidence for menopause and postreproductive life in humans' distant past, hypotheses for the evolution of menopause and long postreproductive life, variation in age at menopause with focus on childhood environments, and the study of variation in symptom experience across populations. Longevity, rather than capacity for menopause, sets humans apart from other primates. Skeletal evidence demonstrates that some Neanderthals and archaic Homo sapiens lived to the age at menopause and that at least one third of women in traditional foraging populations live beyond menopause. The evolutionary reasons for why women experience a long postreproductive life continue to be debated. A developmental perspective suggests that early childhood may be a critical time for the environment to irreversibly influence the number of oocytes or rate of follicular atresia and, ultimately, age at menopause. A comparative perspective examines symptom experience at midlife through participant observation, qualitative interviews, and quantitative instruments to gain a holistic understanding of the meaning, experience, and sociocultural context of menopause. An evolutionary perspective suggests that menopause is not a recent phenomenon among humans. A developmental perspective focuses on the influence of early childhood on ovarian function. A comparative perspective expands clinical norms and provides knowledge about the range of human variations.

  8. Competency in menopause management: whither goest the internist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santen, Richard J; Stuenkel, Cynthia A; Burger, Henry G; Manson, Joann E

    2014-04-01

    After publication of the Women's Health Initiative study in 2002, use of menopausal hormone therapy (HT) has declined by nearly 80% worldwide and internists now play only a limited role in menopause management. Over the past decade, new data have increased our knowledge of the multiple effects and mechanisms of HT. Existing literature was reviewed. A consensus has emerged that the benefits of HT outweigh the risks for the relief of symptoms in women who have recently undergone menopause and are not at excess risk of breast cancer and cardiovascular disease. Non-hormonal agents, selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), and tibolone are also useful in management. Factors entering into the decision-making process regarding menopause management are increasingly complex and involve consideration of effects on multiple systems and potential disease-related events. These considerations suggest that internists trained to evaluate and integrate factors influencing multiple organ systems should re-engage in menopause management. Most internists currently lack the core competencies and experience necessary to address menopausal issues and meet the needs of women who have completed their reproductive years. We believe that this situation is detrimental to women's health, leads to fragmented care, and should change. We propose that the multidimensional expertise that characterizes the internist may provide the most comprehensive approach to menopause management. For the internist to meet this need, a set of core competencies must be attained, which will require new didactic programs to be developed for medical students, residents and practicing physicians.

  9. Managing menopause in women living with HIV: A survey of primary care practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirwa, Mimie; Ma, Richard; Guallar, Cristina; Tariq, Shema

    2017-09-01

    Objective One in three women living with HIV (WLHIV) in the UK is aged 45-56, and therefore of potentially menopausal age. Little is known about the management of menopause in WLHIV in primary care. We aim to describe current knowledge and practice in the management of menopause in WLWH among primary care practitioners (PCPs). Methods A questionnaire-based study of 88 PCPs attending two sexual and reproductive health conferences. Results Almost all respondents (n = 87, 99%) routinely managed women with menopause-related symptoms; however, only 18 (20%) reported having managed menopause in WLHIV. Over 95% (n = 85) reported being confident in managing menopause in general, whereas less than half (n = 40) reported confidence in managing menopause in WLHIV ( p confidence in managing menopause-related symptoms in WLHIV. Nearly all PCPs had concerns about managing menopause-related symptoms in WLHIV, many stating that this should be managed outside primary care. Development of national guidance and specialised training, coupled with good liaison between HIV services and PCPs, may improve confidence in this area.

  10. Racial/ethnic differences moderate associations of coping strategies and posttraumatic stress disorder symptom clusters among women experiencing partner violence: a multigroup path analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Nicole H; Johnson, Clinesha D; Contractor, Ateka; Peasant, Courtney; Swan, Suzanne C; Sullivan, Tami P

    2017-05-01

    Past research underscores the key role of coping strategies in the development, maintenance, and exacerbation of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. The goal of the current study was to extend existing literature by examining whether race/ethnicity moderates the relations among coping strategies (social support, problem-solving, avoidance) and PTSD symptom clusters (intrusion, avoidance, numbing, arousal). Participants were 369 community women (134 African Americans, 131 Latinas, 104 Whites) who reported bidirectional aggression with a current male partner. Multigroup path analysis was utilized to test the moderating role of race/ethnicity in a model linking coping strategies to PTSD symptom clusters. The strength and direction of relations among coping strategies and PTSD symptom clusters varied as a function of race/ethnicity. Greater social support coping was related to more arousal symptoms for Latinas and Whites. Greater problem-solving coping was related to fewer arousal symptoms for Latinas. Greater avoidance coping was related to more symptoms across many of the PTSD clusters for African Americans, Latinas, and Whites, however, these relations were strongest for African Americans. Results provide support for the moderating role of race/ethnicity in the relations among coping strategies and PTSD symptom clusters, and highlight potential targets for culturally informed PTSD treatments.

  11. Vaginal, endometrial, and reproductive hormone findings: randomized, placebo-controlled trial of black cohosh, multibotanical herbs, and dietary soy for vasomotor symptoms: the Herbal Alternatives for Menopause (HALT) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Susan D; Newton, Katherine M; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Grothaus, Louis C; Grieco, Verena S; Ehrlich, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate vaginal, endometrial, and reproductive hormone effects of three herbal regimens compared with placebo and hormone therapy (HT). This was a 1-year, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 351 women, ages 45 to 55, with two or more vasomotor symptoms per day. Women were randomly assigned to (1) black cohosh, (2) a multibotanical containing black cohosh, (3) the same multibotanical plus dietary soy counseling, (4) HT, or (5) placebo. Women were ineligible if they had used HT in the previous 3 months or menopausal herbal therapies in the previous month. Data on vaginal cytology and dryness were collected (at baseline and 3 and 12 mo). Daily menstrual diaries were maintained by 313 women with a uterus, and abnormal bleeding was evaluated. Serum estradiol, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and steroid hormone-binding globulin were assessed (baseline and 12 mo) among 133 postmenopausal women. Gynecologic outcomes of the five groups were compared. The five groups did not vary in baseline vaginal cytology profiles, vaginal dryness, menstrual cyclicity, or hormone profiles. The HT group had a lower percentage of parabasal cells and vaginal dryness than the placebo group at 3 and 12 months (P < 0.05). Abnormal bleeding occurred in 53 of 313 (16.9%) women. There were no differences in frequency of abnormal bleeding between any of the herbal and placebo groups, whereas women in the HT group had a greater risk than those in the placebo group (P < 0.001). Among postmenopausal women, HT significantly decreased follicle-stimulating hormone and increased estradiol; none of the herbal interventions showed significant effects on any outcomes at any time point. Black cohosh, used alone or as part of a multibotanical product with or without soy dietary changes, had no effects on vaginal epithelium, endometrium, or reproductive hormones.

  12. Relationship between Type-D personality, physical activity behaviour and climacteric symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkoles, Erika; Reynolds, Nick; Ski, Chantal F; Stojanovska, Lilly; Thompson, David R; Polman, Remco C J

    2015-01-01

    A number of factors have been identified which might influence the variation observed in climacteric symptoms in peri- and post-menopausal women. We examined the role of the distressed or Type-D personality and mode of physical activity or exercise on the climacteric symptoms experienced by peri- or post-menopausal women. 213 Women (M age 52.2 years, SD = 5.9), 58% classified as peri- and 42% as post-menopausal completed a questionnaire pack consisting of demographic questions, the DS14 (Type-D personality), Kaiser Physical Activity Survey (assessing household care giving, occupational, active living and sport and exercise index) and the Greene Climacteric Scale (Psychological, somatic/physical, vasomotor and sexual symptoms). Type-D personality and increased levels of household care-giving physical activity were both associated with increased bothersomness for all four climacteric factors. Increased levels of sport and exercise participation on the other hand resulted in less psychological, somatic/physical and sexual functioning problems whereas the active living index was inversely related to somatic/physical climacteric symptoms. Finally, lower income was associated with more psychological and somatic/physical symptoms and being peri-menopausal resulted in more vasomotor symptoms. The results suggest that mode of physical activity is an important moderator in alleviating climacteric symptoms. In addition, our results support previous findings in that Type-D personality is associated with negative health outcomes. In particular menopausal women with Type-D personality would benefit from interventions (coping, mindfulness training) and regular sport and exercise participation to reduce climacteric symptomology.

  13. Dangguijihwang-tang and Dangguijakyak-san Prevent Menopausal Symptoms and Dangguijihwang-tang Prevents Articular Cartilage Deterioration in Ovariectomized Obese Rats with Monoiodoacetate-Induced Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Won Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether dangguijakyak-san (DJY and dangguijihwang-tang (DJH, oriental medicines traditionally used for inflammatory diseases, could prevent and/or delay the progression of postmenopausal symptoms and osteoarthritis in osteoarthritis-induced estrogen-deficient rats. Treated ovariectomized (OVX rats consumed either 1% DJY or 1% DJH in the diets. Positive-control rats were given 30 μg/kg bw 17β-estradiol and control rats were given 1% fat as were the normal-control rats. All rats received high-fat diets for 8 weeks. At the 9th week, OVX rats received articular injections of monoiodoacetate (MIA or saline (normal control into the right knee. At 3 weeks after MIA injection, DJY reduced visceral-fat mass and improved glucose metabolism by reducing insulin resistance, whereas DJH increased BMD and decreased insulin resistance. DJH improved weight distribution in the right knee and maximum running velocity on a treadmill at days 14 and 21 as much as those of the positive control. TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels in articular cartilage were much higher in the control than the positive control, whereas both DJY and DJH reduced the levels to those of the positive control. The histological analysis assessed articular cartilage damage near the tidemark and proteoglycan loss in the control versus the positive control; DJY and DJH prevented this damage and proteoglycan loss. In conclusion, DJY may provide an effective treatment for improving glucose tolerance, and DJH may be appropriate for preventing osteoarthritis.

  14. Biochemistry of the menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honour, John W

    2018-01-01

    The life of a human female is characterized from teenage years by monthly menstruation which ceases (the menopause) typically between the age of 40 and 60 years. The potential for reproduction declines and ceases as the ovaries become depleted of follicles. A transition period in mid-life, for 2 to 10 years, when menstruation is less regular is called the perimenopause. The menopause is associated with a significant decline in plasma concentrations of sex hormones, an increase in the concentrations of the gonadotrophins and changes in other hormones such as the inhibins. These changes are superimposed with effects of aging, social and metabolic factors, daily activity and well-being. Although the menopause is entirely natural, in some cases ovarian failure can occur earlier than usual; this is pathological and warrants careful biochemical investigations to distinguish it from conditions causing infertility. Elderly females are affected by a range of clinical disorders including endocrine, cardiovascular, skeletal, urogenital tract and immunological systems, body mass, vasomotor tone, mood and sleep pattern. Reference intervals for many diagnostic biochemical tests for the menopause need to be used when interpreting results in clinical investigations for patient management. The standardization and harmonization of assays are being addressed. Many women now choose to develop their career before bearing children, and the health service has had to change services around this. This review does not cover screening for and tests during pregnancy. The review is timely since the population is aging and there will be more demand on healthcare services.

  15. Evidence for prolonged and unique amenorrhea-related symptoms in women with premature ovarian failure/primary ovarian insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allshouse, Amanda A; Semple, Amy L; Santoro, Nanette F

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to describe premature ovarian failure (POF)/primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) symptoms experienced by women from a non-clinic-based sample of members of a POF/POI-specific support group. Two hundred ninety women were surveyed for 6 weeks. The survey included demographics, health history, and a validated menopause-related quality-of-life questionnaire. Symptom prevalence was described. One hundred sixty (55%) women aged 18 to 63 years (mean [SD], 39.3 [7.3] y) responded. Age at diagnosis ranged from 10 to 39 years (median [interquartile range], 30 [24-35] y). Most respondents were white (87%), college educated (76%), and employed full time (61%). Among women reporting a history of depression (43%), 26% reported that depression occurred more than 5 years before POF/POI diagnosis. Of 29 commonly assessed menopausal symptoms, women reported a mean (SD) of 14.7 (7.4) symptoms; symptom scores did not substantially decrease with time since diagnosis, and relationship with age at diagnosis was negligible. Other common symptoms included mood swings and mental fog (>75%); hair loss, dry eyes, cold intolerance, and joint clicking (>50%); tingling in limbs and low blood pressure (∼33%); hypothyroidism (17%); hypoglycemia (16%); and gluten allergies (10%). Ninety unique symptoms were written in as free text. Symptom checklists created for age-appropriate postmenopausal women do not adequately capture the scope of symptoms observed in this sample. Menopausal symptoms do not seem to diminish across time in women with POF/POI, in contrast to women with age-appropriate menopause. Depression is very commonly reported in this sample, with some women clearly experiencing depression well before their diagnosis of POF/POI. Hypothyroidism in this sample is more than three times the population mean.

  16. Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an Allergic Reaction to Food Symptoms of an Allergic Reaction to Food Learn about the mild and severe ... the food to which you are allergic. An allergic reaction to food can affect the skin, the gastrointestinal ...

  17. Effectiveness of coaching for enhancing the health of menopausal Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Kaoru

    2017-01-01

    We conducted and evaluated a coaching intervention aimed at encouraging menopausal women's engagement in goal-oriented actions, self-efficacy enhancement, menopausal symptom alleviation, and quality of life improvement. The study was a randomized controlled trial comprising women aged 40-60 who were not receiving hormone therapy. The intervention group received leaflets and three monthly coaching sessions. Instruments included the Simplified Menopausal Index, Medical Outcome Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, and goal achievement scale. Participants were measured preintervention, immediately postintervention, and three months postintervention. A 3-month coaching intervention to enhance menopausal women's health increased their self-efficacy. This effect was not maintained 3 months postintervention.

  18. Quality of life among menopausal women – is it still an enigma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somak Majumdar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Menopause is a universal event in a women’s life occurring in the middle period causing a variety of physical, vasomotor, psychological and sexual symptoms. These symptoms generally tend to usually go underreported. Aims & Objectives: To find out the quality of life among the menopausal women and associations of menopausal symptom domains with their socio-demographic parameters. Material & Methods: The present cross-sectional study was undertaken in a slum of Chetla, Kolkata. Response to each question in the MENQOL questionnaire, was assigned a score and the composite scores assessed the quality of life and impact of menopause among the study population.  Results: Out of a total of 100 women, psychosocial symptoms were the most prevalent with anxiety, loss of memory and nervousness to be 76%. Occurrence of vasomotor symptoms was average with 55% of them reporting hot flashes and 40% reporting sweating. Physical symptoms were highly variable and sexual symptoms were not prevalent. Psychosocial symptoms had the most associations and religion, literacy, marital status, and abortion all had significant associations. Conclusion: It is indeed imperative that quality of life among menopausal women is affected by the symptoms of menopause and measures should be taken for mitigation of the same 

  19. Perceptions of menopause and aging in rural villages of Limpopo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The term 'menopause' is derived from the Greek words men (month) and pausis (a cessation, a pause). It is a direct description of the psychological and physical events in women where menstruation ceases to occur. It is the time in a woman's life when she has experienced her last menstrual bleed.

  20. Oral Health and Menopause: A Comprehensive Review on Current ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The menopause is physiological changes in women that give rise to adaptive changes at both systemic and oral level. As we all begin to reach an older age, dental health and hygiene becomes a major concern. The dentist is often the first person to appreciate numerous changes that are experienced throughout the body ...

  1. Role of hormone therapy in the management of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifren, Jan L; Schiff, Isaac

    2010-04-01

    There are many options available to address the quality of life and health concerns of menopausal women. The principal indication for hormone therapy (HT) is the treatment of vasomotor symptoms, and benefits generally outweigh risks for healthy women with bothersome symptoms who elect HT at the time of menopause. Although HT increases the risk of coronary heart disease, recent analyses confirm that this increased risk occurs principally in older women and those a number of years beyond menopause. These findings do not support a role for HT in the prevention of heart disease but provide reassurance regarding the safety of use for hot flushes and night sweats in otherwise healthy women at the menopausal transition. An increased risk of breast cancer with extended use is another reason short-term treatment is advised. Hormone therapy prevents and treats osteoporosis but is rarely used solely for this indication. If only vaginal symptoms are present, low-dose local estrogen therapy is preferred. Contraindications to HT use include breast or endometrial cancer, cardiovascular disease, thromboembolic disorders, and active liver disease. Alternatives to HT should be advised for women with or at increased risk for these disorders. The lowest effective estrogen dose should be provided for the shortest duration necessary because risks increase with increasing age, time since menopause, and duration of use. Women must be informed of the potential benefits and risks of all therapeutic options, and care should be individualized, based on a woman's medical history, needs, and preferences.

  2. A randomized controlled trial of brief Somatic Experiencing for chronic low back pain and comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tonny Elmose; Lahav, Yael; Elllegaard, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    Background: It is well documented that comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in chronic pain is associated with a more severe symptom profile with respect to pain, disability and psychological distress. However, very few intervention studies exist targeting both PTSD and pain. The current...... the inclusion criteria and volunteered to participate in the study. Treatment effects were evaluated by self report questionnaires comparing baseline measures with 12-month follow-up measures. Results: The additional SE intervention significantly reduced the number of PTSD symptoms compared with TAU alone...

  3. Musculoskeletal pain among women of menopausal age in Puebla, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievert, Lynnette Leidy; Goode-Null, Susan K

    2005-06-01

    Worldwide, complaints of musculoskeletal pain are more frequent than complaints of hot flashes amongst women of menopausal age. The purpose of this study was to examine musculoskeletal pain among women of menopausal age in the city of Puebla, Mexico. An opportunity sample was recruited from public parks and markets, with representation from all social classes (n=755). Mean age was 50.1 years, and the majority were employed as saleswomen in small businesses. Symptom frequencies were collected by open-ended interviews and with a structured symptom list that queried symptom experience during the two weeks prior to interview. In response to open-ended questions, "dolores de huesos" (bone pain) was volunteered by 47% of respondents as a symptom associated with menopause, second only to hot flashes (53%). From the structured symptom list, 55.8% and 55.6% reported back pain and joint stiffness during the two weeks prior to interview. Women with back pain and joint stiffness were less likely to report being active during their leisure time (p<.01). The results of backwards stepwise logistic regressions indicate that women with back pain were more likely to be older, with less education, a higher BMI, and ate less meat. Women with joint pain were more likely to be post-menopausal, with less education, more children, a higher BMI, and were likely to drink milk and coffee more than once/week but less than once/day. While menopause is not necessarily a risk factor for musculoskeletal pain, it is important to recognize the pervasiveness of this complaint among women of menopausal age.

  4. Midlife women's symptom cluster heuristics: evaluation of an iPad application for data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Nancy Fugate; Ismail, Rita; Linder, Lauri A; Macpherson, Catherine Fiona

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to elicit midlife women's heuristics about symptom clusters they were experiencing, as identified by the Computerized Symptom Capture Tool for Menopause (C-SCAT M). Women aged 40 to 60 years who were experiencing symptoms that they associated with menopause were recruited through flyers posted on campus and in clinics. Women completed the C-SCAT M application (app), using an iPad, by identifying and drawing symptom clusters they experienced during the last 24 hours, indicating relationships among symptoms, prioritizing the clusters and symptoms within them, making causal attributions, and identifying exacerbating and ameliorating factors. They were asked to prioritize the clusters and a symptom within each cluster. While women were completing the app, they were asked to "think aloud" about their experience using the app. Data generated from the C-SCAT M app were transmitted securely to an Amazon Web Services account and saved as screen images and Excel files to preserve both graphical images and text elicited from the app. Qualitative data were saved in verbatim phrases. Conventional content analysis was used to analyze qualitative data. Thirty women completed the app. Most women (77%) stated that the final diagrams were very/extremely accurate in depicting their symptoms and their connections. Women reported between 1 and 22 symptoms (median, 11). Hot flashes, waking up during the night, night sweats, and early morning awakening were the most commonly reported symptoms. Women rated hot flashes as their most bothersome symptom, followed by waking up during the night and fatigue. They reported more than 300 different bivariate relationships between their symptoms and more than 150 unique causal paths. They believed that hot flashes caused several symptoms, especially sleep disruption, and most could describe the time order of their symptoms. Women reported clusters consisting of 2 to 18 symptoms. Women also named each cluster based on their

  5. Class, gender and culture in the experience of menopause. A comparative survey in Tunisia and France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delanoë, Daniel; Hajri, Selma; Bachelot, Annie; Mahfoudh Draoui, Dorra; Hassoun, Danielle; Marsicano, Elise; Ringa, Virginie

    2012-07-01

    The experience of menopause can vary strongly from one society to another: frequency of hot flushes, other somatic and psychological symptoms, and changes in family and social relations. Several studies have shown that country of residence, country of birth, ethnicity, and social class all play roles in these variations. But few comparative anthropological studies have analysed the social processes that construct the experience of menopause or considered menopausal women's social and financial autonomy. To study the impact of the social status accorded to menopausal women and their social resources, during 2007 and 2008 we conducted a series of 75 in-depth interviews with women in different sociocultural settings: Tunisian women in Tunisia, Tunisian women in France, and French women in France, all aged from 45 to 70 years. Our methodological approach to the data included content analysis, typology development and socio-demographic analysis. Quite substantial differences appeared, as a function of social class and cultural environment. We identified three principal experiences of menopause. Tunisian working class women, in Tunisia and France, experience menopause with intense symptoms and strong feelings of social degradation. Among Tunisian middle-class women in both countries, menopause was most often accompanied by a severe decline in aesthetic and social value but few symptoms. For most of the French women, menopause involved few symptoms and little change in their social value. The distribution of types of experiences according to social but not geographic or national factors indicates that, in the populations studied here, the differences in symptoms are not biologically determined. Different experiences of menopause are linked to social class and to the degree of male domination. A given level of independence and emancipation allows women an identity beyond their reproductive function and a status unimpaired by menopause. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All

  6. [Obesity and menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavón de Paz, I; Alameda Hernando, C; Olivar Roldán, J

    2006-01-01

    Menopause is one of the critical periods of a woman's life during which weight gain and onset or worsening of obesity are favoured. It is at this period when obesity prevalence is the highest. There are several causes for this disorder, ones clearly related with hypo-oestrogenism and others depend on age favouring increased food intake and decreased energy waste. This weight gain is related to adverse health effects that get worse due to changes in fat distribution observed during menopause. The increase in visceral fat favours the development of insulin resistance and its clinical consequences such as carbohydrate metabolism impairments and type 2 diabetes, arterial hypertension, and dyslipidaemia, leading to increased cardiovascular risk, among other complications.

  7. The feasibility and acceptability of a brief intervention for clients of substance use services experiencing symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Katherine L; Ewer, Philippa; Dore, Glenys; Teesson, Maree; Baker, Amanda; Kay-Lambkin, Frances; Sannibale, Claudia

    2014-06-01

    Trauma exposure and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are common among clients of substance use services. Existing treatments for these co-occurring conditions tend to be lengthy, treatment retention is relatively poor, and they require extensive training and clinical supervision. The aim of the present study was to conduct a preliminary examination of the feasibility and acceptability of a brief intervention for PTSD symptoms among individuals seeking substance use treatment. An uncontrolled open-label pilot study was conducted among 29 inpatients of a medicated detoxification unit in Sydney, Australia. All participants completed a baseline interview followed by the brief intervention. The intervention consists of a single, one-hour manualised session providing psychoeducation pertaining to common trauma reactions and symptom management. PTSD and substance use outcomes were assessed at 1-week, 1-month and 3-month post-intervention. PTSD symptom severity (assessed using the Clinicians Administered PTSD Scale) decreased significantly from baseline to 1-week follow up (β -10.87, 95%CI: -19.75 to -1.99) and again between the 1-week and 3-month follow-ups (β -15.38, 95%CI: -23.20 to -7.57). Despite these reductions, the majority of participants continued to meet criteria for a diagnosis of PTSD and there was no change in participants' negative post-traumatic cognitions. Participants expressed high levels of satisfaction with the intervention. Brief psychoeducation for traumatised clients attending substance use services appears to be feasible, acceptable, and may be of some benefit in reducing PTSD symptoms. However, participants continued to experience symptoms at severe levels; thus, brief intervention may best be conceptualised as a "stepping stone" to further trauma treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Skin and menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensaleh, H; Belgnaoui, F Z; Douira, L; Berbiche, L; Senouci, K; Hassam, B

    2006-12-01

    Important changes related to declining level of several hormones occur during menopause: vasomotor instability, bone loss, anxiety, sexual dysfunction, skin aging... Our objective was a review of the literature concerning the histological and clinical changes seen in post menopausal skin, and also an analysis of the effect of hormonal replacement therapy in slowing down the aging process. Decline in progesterone increases the impact of androgen on the sebaceous glands and hair. Decreased estrogen slows down mitotic activity in the epidermal basal layer, reduces the synthesis of collagen and contributes to thickening of the dermo-epidermal junction. This hypoestrogenemia may be spontaneously attenuated by local synthesis of oestradiol in peripheral target tissues according to the intracrine process. This new hormonal pattern is associated with skin atrophy, hyperseborrhea, increased pilosity on the cheeks and upper lip, loss of scalp hair, increase in degeneration of elastic tissue, atrophy and dryness of the vaginal mucosa. Estrogen treatment in post menopausal women has been shown to increase collagen content, dermal thickness and elasticity. Biophysical properties are also significantly improved for the parameters reflecting hydration and sebum secretion. However, numerous side effects such as increased incidence of cancer and cardiovascular morbidity limit the use of this treatment. So non hormonal alternatives are proposed. Laser and lifting remain the most important options.

  9. Metabolic syndrome and menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouyandeh Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome is defined as an assemblage of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and menopause is associated with an increase in metabolic syndrome prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among postmenopausal women in Tehran, Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study in menopause clinic in Tehran, 118 postmenopausal women were investigated. We used the adult treatment panel 3 (ATP3 criteria to classify subjects as having metabolic syndrome. Results Total prevalence of metabolic syndrome among our subjects was 30.1%. Waist circumference, HDL-cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, diastolic blood pressure ,Systolic blood pressure, and triglyceride were significantly higher among women with metabolic syndrome (P-value Conclusions Our study shows that postmenopausal status is associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome. Therefore, to prevent cardiovascular disease there is a need to evaluate metabolic syndrome and its components from the time of the menopause.

  10. A health survey of Beijing middle-aged registered nurses during menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengfang; Wang, Ying; Li, Xu; Liu, Peihao; Yao, Chen; Ding, Yanming; Zhu, Sainan; Bai, Wenpei; Liu, Jun-E

    2013-01-01

    To collect health information of Beijing middle-aged registered nurses during menopause. We distributed self-administered questionnaires to 2100 registered nurses aged 40-55 from 20 hospitals in Beijing. The objects of interest were selected by cluster sampling. A total of 1686 questionnaires met the criteria and were used for statistical analysis. The average natural menopause age was 48.68 ± 3.61 years old. We determined that 37.83% of the objects had modified Kupperman Menopausal Index (KMI) scores ≥ 15. The top three menopause symptoms were fatigue (82.72%), irritability (70.24%), and arthralgia/myalgia (69.55%); hot flashes ranked eleventh (30.83%). A total of 37.83% Beijing middle-aged registered nurses had menopause syndrome, and the top three symptoms were fatigue, irritability, and arthralgia/myalgia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Relationship between arsenic skin lesions and the age of natural menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Fakir Md; Rahman, Musarrat Jabeen; Alam, Md Zahidul; Hore, Samar Kumar; Rahman, Mahfuzar

    2014-05-02

    Chronic exposure to arsenic is associated with neoplastic, cardiovascular, endocrine, neuro-developmental disorders and can have an adverse effect on women's reproductive health outcomes. This study examined the relationship between arsenic skin lesions (a hallmark sign of chronic arsenic poisoning) and age of natural menopause (final menopausal period) in populations with high levels of arsenic exposure in Bangladesh. We compared menopausal age in two groups of women--with and without arsenic skin lesions; and presence of arsenic skin lesions was used as an indicator for chronic arsenic exposure. In a cross-sectional study, a total of 210 participants were randomly identified from two ongoing studies--participants with arsenic skin lesions were identified from an ongoing clinical trial and participants with no arsenic skin lesions were identified from an ongoing cohort study. Mean age of menopause between these two groups were calculated and compared. Multivariable linear regression was used to estimate the relationship between the status of the arsenic skin lesions and age of natural menopause in women. Women with arsenic skin lesions were 1.5 years younger (p arsenic skin lesions. After adjusting with contraceptive use, body mass index, urinary arsenic level and family history of premature menopause, the difference between the groups' age at menopause was 2.1 years earlier (p arsenic skin lesions. The study showed a statistically significant association between chronic exposure to arsenic and age at menopause. Heavily exposed women experienced menopause two years earlier than those with lower or no exposure.

  12. What Are the Symptoms of Menopause?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Health Equity (OHE) Office of Legislation and Public Policy (OLPP) Office of Science Policy, Reporting, and Program Analysis (OSPRA) Division of ... on Sleep Medicine and Research, Board on Health Science Policy. (2006). Extent and ... An unmet public health problem (page 55). Washington, DC: The National ...

  13. Prescribing menopausal hormone therapy: an evidence-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sood R

    2014-01-01

    within 10 years of onset of natural menopause, MHT for the treatment of bothersome menopausal symptoms poses low risk and is an acceptable option, particularly when nonhormonal management approaches fail. Keywords: hormone therapy, hot flash, flush, menopause

  14. Sleep disturbance associated factors in menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Haghani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep is necessary in life and approximately 1/3 of human life is devoted to sleep. One of the most common problems in menopausal women is sleep disturbance. The aim of this study was to determine frequency of sleep disorders and its related factors in 50 – 60 years old women Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted on 200 eligible women who referred to selected health centers of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS. Demographic form, ten-point slide to review sexual satisfaction and Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index Questioner (PSQI were used for data collection. Data was analyzed using ANOVA, t-test, and Pearson correlation tests.Results: The mean age of women was 53.6±3.6 year, menopause age 47.8±4, number of children 4.76±2 and partner age was 57.99±6.6. 34.5% of women were satisfied from their sexual relationship and their score was 8-10. Rate of sleep disturbances in this group was about 70%. The results showed that between four variables: economical status, occupation, partner occupation and educational status were significantly associated with sleep disturbance (P=0.002. There was not significant difference between other demographic information and sleep disturbance.Conclusion: The results show high prevalence of sleep disturbance symptoms among menopausal women. According to the relationship between some personal characters and sleep disturbance, health care providers need to consider these variables.

  15. A randomized controlled trial of brief Somatic Experiencing for chronic low back pain and comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tonny Elmose; Lahav, Yael; Ellegaard, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    in comparison with an active control group. Objective: The aim of the current study was to compare the effect of an SE intervention in addition to treatment-as-usual (TAU) for patients with chronic low back pain and comorbid PTSD compared to TAU alone. Method: The study was a two-group randomized controlled...... study is the first randomized controlled trial evaluating the effect of the body-oriented trauma approach of Somatic Experiencing (SE) for comorbid PTSD and low back pain. Although the method is well recognized by clinicians and widely used, SE still needs to be tested in a randomized clinical trial...... clinical trial. A cohort of patients (n = 1045) referred to a large Danish spine centre between February 2013 and October 2014 were screened for PTSD and randomized to either TAU (4–12 sessions of supervised exercises for low back pain) or TAU plus SE (6–12 sessions). In total, 91 patients fulfilled...

  16. Assessing menopausal status in women aged 40 - 49 using depot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To investigate menopausal symptoms in women aged 40 - 49 using injectable contraceptives depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), norethisterone enanthate (NET-EN) or combined oral contraceptives (COCs), compared with non-users of hormonal contraception. Methods. Women using DMPA (N=127), NET-EN ...

  17. Menopause: Weighing Your Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the area of non-hormonal therapies for menopause? In 2002, the WHI found that there were harms in hormone therapy and there was a compelling need for women to have alternatives. Taking oral estrogen around menopause or after was ...

  18. Menopause prediction and potential implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daan, Nadine M P; Fauser, Bart C J M

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive ageing in women is characterized by a decline in both the quantity and quality of oocytes. Menopause is reached upon exhaustion of the resting primordial follicle pool, occurring on average at 51 years of age (range 40-60 years). The mean global age at natural menopause (ANM) appears

  19. [Phytoestrogens in the treatment of menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remport, Júlia; Blázovics, Anna

    2017-08-01

    In previous centuries many women did not even live until their menopause years due to poor economic conditions, deficiencies of medicine, epidemics and wars. Nowadays in the developed countries, people live until they are 75-80 years old, and with the expansion of average age, the number of people affected by menopause and the years spent in that state increase. Nowadays women spend one third of their lives in the menopausal stage. The only effective way to treat unpleasant symptoms for centuries was with the use of herbs, and the knowledge about them spread through oral tradition. In the 20th century, this therapeutic form was pushed into the background by the development of synthetic drug production and the introduction of hormone replacement therapy. Thanks to the influence of media in the 20th century, women began to have the social need for preserving their beauty and youth for as long as they could. Hormone replacement therapy enjoyed great popularity because women were temporarily relieved of their life quality-impairing menopausal symptoms, but years later it turned out that hormone replacement therapy could pose serious risks. A distinct advantage of herbal therapy is the more advantageous side-effect-profile opposite the used synthetics in hormone replacement therapy. Women are therefore happy to turn to valuable and well-tried natural therapies, which have been used for thousands of years. There is growing interest in herbal remedies. Studying the effects of phytoestrogens has now become an active area for research. However, the results of studies in animals and humans are controversial, some sources suggest that phytoestrogens are effective and safe, other authors claim that they are ineffective in menopause or they have particularly dangerous properties, and cannot be recommended to everyone. It is important to address this issue for the sake of health, mental health and safety of women, and so it is necessary to assess the benefits and the risks

  20. Type II diabetes mellitus and menopause: a multinational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterrosa-Castro, A; Blümel, J E; Portela-Buelvas, K; Mezones-Holguín, E; Barón, G; Bencosme, A; Benítez, Z; Bravo, L M; Calle, A; Chedraui, P; Flores, D; Espinoza, M T; Gómez, G; Hernández-Bueno, J A; Laribezcoa, F; Lima, S; Martino, M; Mostajo, D; Ojeda, E; Onatra, W; Sánchez, H; Navarro, D; Tserotas, K; Vallejo, M S; Witis, S; Zuñiga, M C

    2013-12-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus causes metabolic changes that may lead to early menopause and worsen climacteric symptoms. To determine the risk factors for type II diabetes mellitus and assess the impact of this disease on the age of menopause and on climacteric symptoms. A total of 6079 women aged between 40 and 59 years from 11 Latin American countries were requested to answer the Menopause Rating Scale and Goldberg Anxiety-Depression Scale. The prevalence of diabetes was 6.7%. Diabetes mellitus was associated with arterial hypertension (odds ratio (OR) 4.49; 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.47-5.31), the use of psychotropic drugs (OR 1.54; 95% CI 1.22-1.94), hormonal therapy (OR 1.46; 95% CI 1.11-1.92), ≥ 50 years of age (OR 1.48; 95% CI 1.17-1.86), overweight or obese (OR 1.47; 95% CI 1.15-1.89), and waist circumference ≥ 88 cm (OR 1.32; 95% CI 1.06-1.65). Factors associated with lower risk of diabetes were the use of hormonal contraceptives (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.35-0.87), alcohol (OR 0.73; 95% CI 0.54-0.98) and living in cities > 2500 meters above sea level (OR 0.70; 95% CI 0.53-0.91) or with high temperatures (OR 0.67; 95% CI 0.51-0.88). In turn, diabetes tripled the risk of menopause in women under 45 years of age. Diabetes did not increase the risk of deterioration of quality of life due to climacteric symptoms. Menopause does not increase the risk of type II diabetes mellitus. Diabetes is associated with early menopause in women under 45 years of age.

  1. Deconstructing the genitourinary syndrome of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira-Baptista, Pedro; Marchitelli, Claudia; Haefner, Hope K; Donders, Gilbert; Pérez-López, Faustino

    2017-05-01

    The concept of genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM) was recently introduced and has been gaining widespread use. While some justifications for its introduction are straightforward, others may be questionable. Numerous unspecific symptoms and signs were included in the definition of the syndrome, but the minimum number required for diagnosis was not established. While the GSM definition is designed to facilitate identifying vulvovaginal and urinary estrogen-deprivation-associated symptoms and signs, several concerns have evolved: (1) the syndrome may result in the underdiagnosis of vulvar and urinary pathology; and (2) serious conditions (e.g., high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions of the vulva or vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia, differentiated type) may be missed while others may not receive appropriate treatment (e.g., lichen sclerosus, overactive bladder). In addition, the transformation of urogenital symptoms and signs into a syndrome may create an iatrogenization of menopause, which, consequently, can lead to demand for (and offer of) a panacea of treatments. This can be detrimental to the care of women who require focused therapy rather than global treatment addressing a variety of genitourinary conditions, not all of which even require any form of intervention. Women's needs may be better served by having a more precise urogenital diagnosis.

  2. The 2017 hormone therapy position statement of The North American Menopause Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The 2017 Hormone Therapy Position Statement of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) updates the 2012 Hormone Therapy Position Statement of The North American Menopause Society and identifies future research needs. An Advisory Panel of clinicians and researchers expert in the field of women's health and menopause was recruited by NAMS to review the 2012 Position Statement, evaluate new literature, assess the evidence, and reach consensus on recommendations, using the level of evidence to identify the strength of recommendations and the quality of the evidence. The Panel's recommendations were reviewed and approved by the NAMS Board of Trustees.Hormone therapy (HT) remains the most effective treatment for vasomotor symptoms (VMS) and the genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM) and has been shown to prevent bone loss and fracture. The risks of HT differ depending on type, dose, duration of use, route of administration, timing of initiation, and whether a progestogen is used. Treatment should be individualized to identify the most appropriate HT type, dose, formulation, route of administration, and duration of use, using the best available evidence to maximize benefits and minimize risks, with periodic reevaluation of the benefits and risks of continuing or discontinuing HT.For women aged younger than 60 years or who are within 10 years of menopause onset and have no contraindications, the benefit-risk ratio is most favorable for treatment of bothersome VMS and for those at elevated risk for bone loss or fracture. For women who initiate HT more than 10 or 20 years from menopause onset or are aged 60 years or older, the benefit-risk ratio appears less favorable because of the greater absolute risks of coronary heart disease, stroke, venous thromboembolism, and dementia. Longer durations of therapy should be for documented indications such as persistent VMS or bone loss, with shared decision making and periodic reevaluation. For bothersome GSM symptoms not

  3. Physical Symptoms at the Time of Dying Was Diagnosed: A Consecutive Cohort Study To Describe the Prevalence and Intensity of Problems Experienced by Imminently Dying Palliative Care Patients by Diagnosis and Place of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Katherine; Connolly, Alanna; Clapham, Sabina; Quinsey, Karen; Eagar, Kathy; Currow, David C

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze routine assessments recorded, when a patient was documented as likely to die in hours to days, to determine the prevalence, intensity, and associations of physical symptoms. Although death inevitably occurs, very little prospective data describe at population level the physical symptoms confronting imminently dying people. Using prospectively collected data from participating palliative care services in the Australian Palliative Care Outcomes Collaboration between July 1, 2013, and December 31, 2014, factors associated with worse symptom experiences were explored using logistic regression modeling. The experiences of 18,975 patients who died after being identified as imminently terminal were analyzed, with 75% (n = 14,238) of these being cancer deaths. Seventy percent (n = 13,051) occurred in a palliative care unit, 8.7% (n = 1657) in an acute hospital with palliative care support, and 22.5% (n = 4266) at home. More than half were assessed as experiencing acceptable symptom control especially those with nonmalignant disease. The notable exception was breathing problems, where compared to cancer patients, those with nonmalignant disease were 34% more likely to experience distressing breathlessness (odds ratio 1.34; 95% confidence interval 1.23-147). Regardless of the cause, deaths in a community setting were more likely to be complicated by more severe symptoms with the exception of breathlessness, where those dying in acute hospitals were most likely to be assessed as requiring further help. The terminal phase is perceived as a time where the majority will experience distressing symptoms, but this work suggests a contrary view. However, there did seem to be a detrimental effect depending on place of care with more significant problems recorded when people were dying at home. More work is needed to clarify this given the current push for more home deaths.

  4. Burning mouth syndrome and menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen Dahiya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is a physiological process typically occurring in the fifth decade of life. One of the most annoying oral symptoms in this age group is the burning mouth syndrome (BMS, which may be defined as an intraoral burning sensation occurring in the absence of identifiable oral lesion or laboratory findings. Pain in burning mouth syndrome may be described as burning, tender, tingling, hot, scalding, and numb sensation in the oral mucosa. Multiple oral sites may be involved, but the anterior two-third part and the tip of tongue are most commonly affected site. There is no definite etiology for BMS other than the precipitating causative factors, and it is still considered idiopathic. Various treatment options like use of benzodiazepine, anti-depressants, analgesics, capsaicin, alpha lipoic acids, and cognitive behavioral therapy are found to be effective, but definite treatment is still unknown. The present article discusses some of the recent concepts of etiopathogenesis of BMS as well as the role of pharmacotherapeutic management in this disorder.

  5. Cellulite in menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Menopause is a physiological process related to the increasing insufficiency of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-ovarian axis. The pool of ovarian follicles capable of synthesizing female sex hormones becomes gradually depleted. In response to the sequence of endocrine changes of premenopause, perimenopause, and postmenopause, systemic somatic and emotional disturbances appear. Skin is the target organ for sex hormones. In women, the trophicity and appearance of the skin are most significantly affected by female sex hormones, estrogens and progesterone. However, this review also emphasizes the influences of other hormones on the skin and subcutaneous tissue. During menopause, a low estrogen concentration is responsible for increased vascular permeability and decreased vascular tone, which lead to microcirculation impairment and are important factors predisposing to the development of cellulite. The effects of estrogen deficiency on the skin connective tissue include a decreased production and topical content of both type I and III collagen and elastin fibers, which also contributes to cellulite. This paper presents diagnostic methods and clinical types of cellulite, as well as principal instrumental and manual treatments used for the reduction of the condition. Preparations containing ingredients which help to improve the metabolism of subcutaneous fat and enhance blood and lymphatic circulation, applied in cosmetology and esthetic medicine practice, have been reviewed. Furthermore, we provide an array of opinions regarding the effectiveness of treatment modalities presented here. PMID:26327870

  6. Cellulite in menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Leszko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is a physiological process related to the increasing insufficiency of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-ovarian axis. The pool of ovarian follicles capable of synthesizing female sex hormones becomes gradually depleted. In response to the sequence of endocrine changes of premenopause, perimenopause, and postmenopause, systemic somatic and emotional disturbances appear. Skin is the target organ for sex hormones. In women, the trophicity and appearance of the skin are most significantly affected by female sex hormones, estrogens and progesterone. However, this review also emphasizes the influences of other hormones on the skin and subcutaneous tissue. During menopause, a low estrogen concentration is responsible for increased vascular permeability and decreased vascular tone, which lead to microcirculation impairment and are important factors predisposing to the development of cellulite. The effects of estrogen deficiency on the skin connective tissue include a decreased production and topical content of both type I and III collagen and elastin fibers, which also contributes to cellulite. This paper presents diagnostic methods and clinical types of cellulite, as well as principal instrumental and manual treatments used for the reduction of the condition. Preparations containing ingredients which help to improve the metabolism of subcutaneous fat and enhance blood and lymphatic circulation, applied in cosmetology and esthetic medicine practice, have been reviewed. Furthermore, we provide an array of opinions regarding the effectiveness of treatment modalities presented here.

  7. Cellulite in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszko, Marta

    2014-10-01

    Menopause is a physiological process related to the increasing insufficiency of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-ovarian axis. The pool of ovarian follicles capable of synthesizing female sex hormones becomes gradually depleted. In response to the sequence of endocrine changes of premenopause, perimenopause, and postmenopause, systemic somatic and emotional disturbances appear. Skin is the target organ for sex hormones. In women, the trophicity and appearance of the skin are most significantly affected by female sex hormones, estrogens and progesterone. However, this review also emphasizes the influences of other hormones on the skin and subcutaneous tissue. During menopause, a low estrogen concentration is responsible for increased vascular permeability and decreased vascular tone, which lead to microcirculation impairment and are important factors predisposing to the development of cellulite. The effects of estrogen deficiency on the skin connective tissue include a decreased production and topical content of both type I and III collagen and elastin fibers, which also contributes to cellulite. This paper presents diagnostic methods and clinical types of cellulite, as well as principal instrumental and manual treatments used for the reduction of the condition. Preparations containing ingredients which help to improve the metabolism of subcutaneous fat and enhance blood and lymphatic circulation, applied in cosmetology and esthetic medicine practice, have been reviewed. Furthermore, we provide an array of opinions regarding the effectiveness of treatment modalities presented here.

  8. Managing the menopause - British Menopause Society Council consensus statement on hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkin, Joan; Rees, Margaret C P; Gray, Sarah; Lumsden, Mary Ann; Stevenson, John; Williamson, Jennifer

    2003-09-01

    The British Menopause Society Council aims to aid health professionals to inform and advise women about the menopause. The oestrogen plus progestogen arm of the Women's Health Initiative was stopped in July 2002. This guidance regarding hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use responds to the results and analysis that have been published since then. Because there are few effective alternatives to HRT for vasomotor and urogenital symptoms, oestrogen-based treatments still have a major role. HRT is also most effective for prevention of osteoporosis. Unopposed oestrogens are contraindicated in women with an intact uterus, and hence a range of oestrogen and progestogen combinations, with differing routes of delivery, now exists under the title of "HRT". Treatment choice should be based on up to date information and targeted to individual women's needs. Hormone replacement still offers the potential for benefit to outweigh harm, providing the appropriate regimen has been instigated in terms of dose, route and combination.

  9. Menopause and HIV infection: age at onset and associated factors, ANRS CO3 Aquitaine cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pommerol, M; Hessamfar, M; Lawson-Ayayi, S; Neau, D; Geffard, S; Farbos, S; Uwamaliya, B; Vandenhende, M-A; Pellegrin, J-L; Blancpain, S; Dabis, F; Morlat, P

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the paper is to describe the characteristics of postmenopausal HIV-infected women and to investigate the factors associated with an earlier onset of menopause in a hospital-based cohort. Information was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. A Cox model was used to determine factors associated with menopause. Among the 404 women who completed the questionnaire, 69 were naturally postmenopausal at the time of the study (median age at onset: 49 years, premature menopause <40 years: 12%). The onset of menopause was studied among the 41 women still menstruating at the enrollment in the cohort, and who experienced menopause during follow-up. African origin (hazard ratio [HR] = 8.16; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.23-29.89) and history of injecting drug use (IDU) (HR = 2.46; 95% CI = 1.03-5.85) were associated with an increased risk of earlier menopause. Women with a CD4 cell count <200 cells/mm(3) tended to reach menopause earlier (HR = 2.25; 95% CI = 0.94-5.39). Earlier occurrence of menopause seems to be associated with factors already reported in HIV-negative women (IDU, ethnicity) and with HIV-related immunodeficiency.

  10. Health-related quality of life of women with menopausal hot flushes and night sweats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, B; Hunter, M S

    2013-04-01

    Despite a large body of research on menopause, there is little definitive evidence of the impact of vasomotor symptoms on health-related quality of life (HrQoL). Therefore, this study describes the HrQoL of menopausal women with hot flushes and night sweats and examines predictors of HrQoL. A total of 140 women reporting at least ten hot flushes/night sweats (vasomotor symptoms) a week for at least a month completed an assessment interview (including medical history, past and current physical and mental health and menopausal status) and questionnaires eliciting sociodemographic and help-seeking information, HrQoL and the Hot Flush Rating Scale. Women with vasomotor symptoms reported somewhat reduced HrQoL compared to SF-36 US norms and a general sample of UK menopausal women; 53% reported comorbid physical illness and 66% had current psychosocial concerns; 77% had visited their doctor about menopausal symptoms; 28% were past and 3% current users of hormone therapy. Overall, poor HrQoL was associated with having problematic hot flushes, current psychosocial concerns, (younger) age, (higher) body mass index and poor general health. This sample of relatively healthy mid-aged women with vasomotor symptoms reported reduced HrQoL compared to age-matched norms and a general sample of menopausal women. Problem rating, rather than frequency, of hot flushes was associated with reduced HrQoL, as were health and psychosocial factors.

  11. Overweight and obesity and factors associated with menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Jaqueline Teixeira Teles; Silveira, Marise Fagundes; Campos, Maria Cecília Costa; Costa, Lúcia Helena Rodrigues

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to check the association between overweight and obesity and sociodemographic, behavioral and clinical factors in menopausal women. A cross-sectional study of a sample of 253 menopausal women who answered questions about socioeconomic and demographic factors, health in general, eating habits and behaviors. Body-mass index (BMI) was used to assess participant nutritional status. The Menopause Rating Scale (MRS) was used to assess quality of life. To assess sexual performance we used SQ-F (Sexual Quotient, Female Version). We used bivariate analysis and hierarchical multiple regression to identify the factors associated with being overweight during menopause. Using BMI we found that 30.8% of the sample was overweight and 35.2% obese, totaling 66% overweight women in the sample. In the multiple analysis, not owning a home, the severity of symptoms using MRS, use of continuous use medication and having been on any type of diet were associated with being overweight or obese. Nutritional intervention for weight control and changing behaviors could produce considerable benefits in terms of the health and quality of life of menopausal women.

  12. Evidence-based review of therapies at the menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclennan, Alastair H

    2009-06-01

    Background and Objective  The highest level of scientific evidence available for each therapy for menopausal symptoms was sought, for example, systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Results  There is reasonable evidence that some symptoms are modified by lifestyle, for example, cessation of smoking, exercise, reduction of alcohol, diet and alleviation of psychosocial stress. No complementary medicine, for example, phytoestrogens, black cohosh, herbal or homeopathic medicines or complementary therapies, for example, acupuncture, yoga, chiropractic manipulation, reflexology or magnetic devices have a greater effect than the usual placebo effect seen in quality blinded RCTs. Some have potential side-effects. So-called 'bioidentical hormones' have no evidence-base and potential for harm. None of the above therapies have evidence of efficacy and long-term safety. Selective serotonin and noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitors ameliorate vasomotor symptoms and sometimes menopausal depression better than placebo. The most effective therapy for menopausal (oestrogen) deficiency symptoms is oestrogen which is the main component of hormone replacement therapies (HRT). Compared with placebo HRT is highly effective in relieving hot flushes, night sweats, dry vagina and dyspareunia. It also improved joint pains, sexuality and sleeplessness and reduced subsequent fractures in RCTs. The increased risk of oral HRT for thromboembolism is small around menopause, for those without thrombotic risk factors, and is not elevated with non-oral routes. Cardiovascular disease may be reduced when HRT is initiated near menopause. Breast cancer risk increases after several years with the use of oral HRT containing progestogens at an annual rate of 8/10 000 (<0.1%). No increase in breast cancer risk was seen with oestrogen-only HRT. © 2009 The Author. Journal Compilation © Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Women's decision making during the menopausal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theroux, Rosemary

    2010-11-01

    To describe women's experiences during decision making about hormonal and nonhormonal therapies during the menopausal transition. Transcripts from 21 semi-structured audio taped interviews with seven peri- and postmenopausal women who had a recently visited a nurse practitioner (NP) and were making a decision about menopausal management. Decision making was a nonlinear process in which women considered available options, weighed benefits and risks and likely outcomes. Reevaluation of the decision was ongoing. Both internal and external conditions influenced their decisions. Media reports of findings from the Women's Health Initiative study may have influenced some women's perceptions of the risk of using hormones for symptom relief. Women described caring and empowering consultations with the NPs. They appreciated provision of information, adequate time spent at the visit, and decision support. NPs have a critical role to play in providing women with current research findings about hormone therapy and alternatives for symptom relief, and assisting women with understanding risks and benefits of each possible choice. Both individual and group approaches for decision support should be available to women. The approach of a collaborative partnership in decision making is a model that is congruent with nursing practice. ©2010 The Author Journal compilation ©2010 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  14. The menopause transition in women living with HIV: current evidence and future avenues of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Shema; Anderson, Jane; Burns, Fiona; Delpech, Valerie; Gilson, Richard; Sabin, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    As the life expectancy of people living with HIV improves as a result of antiretroviral therapy, increasing numbers of women living with HIV (WLHIV) are now reaching menopausal age. The menopause transition in WLHIV remains a relatively overlooked area in clinical HIV research. Whilst there is some evidence to suggest that WLHIV experience menopause at an earlier age and that they have more menopausal symptoms, there is no clear consensus in the literature around an impact of HIV infection on either timing or symptomatology of the menopause. Data are also conflicting on whether HIV-related factors such as HIV viral load and CD4 cell count have an impact on the menopause. Furthermore, menopausal symptoms in WLHIV are known to go under-recognised by both healthcare providers and women themselves. There is likely to be a burden of unmet health needs among WLHIV transitioning through the menopause, with significant gaps in the evidence base for their care. With this in mind, we have developed the PRIME study (Positive Transitions Through the Menopause). This mixed-methods observational study will explore, for the first time in the UK, the impact of the menopause on the health and wellbeing of 1500 ethnically diverse WLHIV. In establishing a cohort of women in their midlife and following them up longitudinally, we hope to develop a nuanced understanding of the gendered aspects of ageing and HIV, informing the provision of appropriate services for WLHIV to ensure that they are supported in maintaining optimal health and wellbeing as they get older.

  15. An exploratory pilot study of acupuncture on the quality of life and reproductive hormone secretion in menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, H; Lüdicke, F; Comte, I; Campana, A; Graff, P; Bischof, P

    2001-12-01

    The majority of menopausal women suffer from climacteric symptoms. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of acupuncture on the quality of life and reproductive hormones secretion in menopausal women. Eleven (11) menopausal women with climacteric symptoms entered this prospective study. The Menopause Specific Quality of life Questionnaire was filled out by the patients before the first acupuncture session, after the last one (5 weeks later), and 3 months after the last acupuncture session. Reproductive hormones including follicular-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol, progesterone, and prolactin were measured before and after treatment. Acupuncture significantly improved menopausal vasomotor symptoms (p = 0.001 and p = 0.003 for the end of treatment and 3 months later, respectively) and physical symptoms (p = 0.014 at the end of treatment and p = 0.046 3 months later). It did not change psychosocial or sexual symptoms, nor did it change the measured reproductive hormones. In conclusion, acupuncture is shown to be effective in relieving vasomotor and physical disturbances of menopausal women with effects lasting at least up to 3 months after termination of the treatment. Acupuncture may be a useful treatment alternative for women who are unable or do not want to receive hormone replacement therapy. A prospective study with larger sample sizes will be needed to define the role of acupuncture in the management of menopausal symptoms.

  16. From menarche to menopause: the fertile life span of celiac women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santonicola, Antonella; Iovino, Paola; Cappello, Carmelina; Capone, Pietro; Andreozzi, Paolo; Ciacci, Carolina

    2011-10-01

    We evaluated menopause-associated disorders and fertile life span in women with celiac disease (CD) under untreated conditions and after long-term treatment with a gluten-free diet. The participants were 33 women with CD after menopause (untreated CD group), 25 celiac women consuming a gluten-free diet at least 10 years before menopause (treated CD group), and 45 healthy volunteers (control group). The Menopause Rating Scale questionnaire was used to gather information on menopause-associated disorders. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to acquire information on physical activity. Untreated celiac women had a shorter duration of fertile life span than did the control women because of an older age of menarche and a younger age of menopause (P celiac women than in the control women (higher by 49.4%, 121.4%, and 58.6%, respectively; P celiac women compared with control women. A gluten-free diet that started at least 10 years before menopause prolongs the fertile life span of celiac women. The perception of intensity of hot flushes and irritability is more severe in untreated celiac women than in controls. Low physical exercise and/or poorer quality of life frequently reported by untreated celiac women might be the cause of reduced discomfort tolerance, thus increasing the subjective perception of menopausal symptoms.

  17. RISK OF LONG TERM HOT FLASHES AFTER NATURAL MENOPAUSE: EVIDENCE FROM THE PENN OVARIAN AGING COHORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ellen W.; Sammel, Mary D.; Sanders, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the risk of hot flashes relative to natural menopause and evaluate associations of hormone levels, behavioral and demographic variables with the risk of hot flashes following menopause. Methods Annual assessments of 255 women who were premenopausal at baseline and reached natural menopause during 16 years of follow-up. Results The prevalence of moderate/severe hot flashes increased in each premenopausal year, reaching a peak of 46% in the first two years after the final menstrual period (FMP). Hot flashes decreased slowly following menopause and did not return to premenopausal levels until 9 years after FMP. The mean duration of moderate/severe hot flashes after FMP was 4.6 (SD2.9) years (4.9, SD3.1 years for any hot flashes). One-third of women at 10 or more years following menopause continued to experience moderate/severe hot flashes. African American women (obese and non-obese) and obese white women had significantly greater risk of hot flashes compared to non-obese white women (interaction P=0.01). In multivariable analysis, increasing FSH levels before FMP (Pmenopause; more than one- third of women observed for 10 or more years following menopause had moderate/severe hot flashes. Continuation of hot flashes for more than 5 years following menopause underscores the importance of determining individual risk/benefit when selecting hormone or non-hormonal therapy for menopausal symptoms. PMID:24473530

  18. Hormone replacement therapy in menopause

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pardini, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Although estrogen has been clinically available for more than six decades, women have been confused by different opinions regarding the risks and benefits of menopausal hormone therapy (HT), estrogen therapy (ET...

  19. The effect of aromatherapy massage on the psychological symptoms of postmenopausal Iranian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taavoni, S; Darsareh, F; Joolaee, S; Haghani, H

    2013-06-01

    Menopausal symptoms experienced by women vary widely, and while many women transition through menopause with manageable symptoms, others experience severe symptoms, which may impair their quality of life. A randomized clinical trial was conducted to determine the effect of aromatherapy massage on psychological symptoms during menopause. The study population comprised 90 women. Each subject in the aromatherapy massage group received 30 min aromatherapy sessions with aroma oil, twice a week, for four weeks; each subject in the massage therapy group received the same treatment with odorless oil, while no treatment was provided to subjects in the control group. The outcome measures were psychological symptoms, as obtained through the psychological subscale of the Menopause Rating Scale. A total of 87 women were evaluated. A statistically significant difference was found between the participants' pre- and post-application psychological score in intervention groups, whereas the score in the control group did not differ significantly. Aromatherapy massage decreased the psychological score MD: -3.49 (95% Confidence Interval of Difference: -4.52 to -2.47). Massage therapy also decreased the psychological score MD: -1.20 (95% Confidence Interval of Difference: -2.19 to -0.08). To distinguish the effect of aromatherapy from massage separately, we compared the reduction in the psychological score. Aromatherapy massage decreased the psychological score more than massage therapy MD: -2.29 (95% Confidence Interval of Difference: -3.01 to -0.47). Both aromatherapy massage and massage were effective in reducing psychological symptoms, but, the effect of aromatherapy massage was higher than massage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Vasomotor symptoms and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomikoski, Pauliina; Savolainen-Peltonen, Hanna

    2017-03-01

    A vast majority of menopausal women suffer from vasomotor symptoms, such as hot flushes and night sweats, the mean duration of which may be up to 7-10 years. In addition to a decreased quality of life, vasomotor symptoms may have an impact on overall health. Vasomotor symptoms are associated with overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system, and sympathetic overdrive in turn is associated with metabolic syndrome, which is a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Menopausal hot flushes have a complex relationship to different features of the metabolic syndrome and not all data point towards an association between vasomotor symptoms and metabolic syndrome. Thus, it is still unclear whether vasomotor symptoms are an independent risk factor for metabolic syndrome. Research in this area is constantly evolving and we present here the most recent data on the possible association between menopausal vasomotor symptoms and the metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Clinical, vegetative and cognitive disorders in hypertensive postmenopausal women in relation to menopause causes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbasnikov, S V; Bakhareva, O N

    2006-01-01

    To specify clinical, vegetative and cognitive disorders in hypertensive women depending on the type of menopause. A total of 195 hypertensive women were divided into three groups: group 1 (n = 50, age 45.6 +/- 4.5 years) consisted of premenopausal women, group 2 (n = 100, age 57.4 +/- 4.7 years) - of women with natural menopause, group 3 (n = 45, age 55.1 +/- 5.9 years)--with early and/or surgical menopause. Severity of the menopausal syndrome, anxiety, depression, alexitimia, mental performance, vegetative regulation of heart rhythm were examined. The premenopausal women were characterized by cardial and cerebral disorders, unaffected psychovegetative function and initial symptoms of lowering mental performance. Hypertensive women with natural menopause showed combination of cardial and cerebral symptoms with moderate anxio-depressive disorders, alexitimia, subnormal parasympathetic activity of the autonomic nervous system in high centralization of heart rhythm regulation and attention disturbances. Patients with surgical and/or early menopause had marked cardial and cerebral symptoms, moderate anxiodepressive disorders, alexitimia, inhibition of mental performance, vegetative dysfunction, overcentralization of heart rhythm control. With development of postmenopausal metabolic symptom complex, severity of hypertension grows with emergence of anxiodepressive disorders which combine with vegetative regulation disorders and attenuation of mental performance.

  2. The use of complementary and alternative medicines among a sample of Canadian menopausal-aged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunny, Carole A; Fraser, Shawn N

    2010-01-01

    Despite questionable efficacy and safety, many women use a variety of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies to relieve menopause symptoms. We examined the determinants and use of CAM therapies among a sample of menopausal-aged women in Canada by using a cross-sectional Web-based survey. Four hundred twenty-three women who were contacted through list serves, e-mail lists, and Internet advertisements provided complete data on demographics, use of CAM, therapies, and menopausal status and symptoms. Ninety-one percent of women reported trying CAM therapies for their symptoms. Women reported using an average of five kinds of CAM therapies. The most common treatments were vitamins (61.5%), relaxation techniques (57.0%), yoga/meditation (37.6%), soy products (37.4%), and prayer (35.7%). The most beneficial CAM therapies reported were prayer/spiritual healing, relaxation techniques, counseling/therapy, and therapeutic touch/Reiki. Demographic factors and menopausal symptoms contributed to 14% of the variance (P menopausal women have high user rates of CAM therapy and show that specific demographic factors and somatic symptomatology relate to use of CAM therapies. Health care providers can benefit from understanding the determinants and use of CAM by women during the menopause transition if they are to help and provide quality care for this population. Copyright 2010 American College of Nurse-Midwives. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Understanding weight gain at menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S R; Castelo-Branco, C; Chedraui, P; Lumsden, M A; Nappi, R E; Shah, D; Villaseca, P

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this review was to summarize the literature regarding the impact of the menopause transition on body weight and body composition. We conducted a search of the literature using Medline (Ovid, 1946-present) and PubMed (1966-2012) for English-language studies that included the following search terms: 'menopause', 'midlife', 'hormone therapy' or 'estrogen' combined with 'obesity', 'body weight' or 'body composition'. Whereas weight gain per se cannot be attributed to the menopause transition, the change in the hormonal milieu at menopause is associated with an increase in total body fat and an increase in abdominal fat. Weight excess at midlife is not only associated with a heightened risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease, but also impacts adversely on health-related quality of life and sexual function. Animal and human studies indicate that this tendency towards central abdominal fat accumulation is ameliorated by estrogen therapy. Studies mostly indicate a reduction in overall fat mass with estrogen and estrogen-progestin therapy, improved insulin sensitivity and a lower rate of development of type 2 diabetes. The hormonal changes across the perimenopause substantially contribute to increased abdominal obesity which leads to additional physical and psychological morbidity. There is strong evidence that estrogen therapy may partly prevent this menopause-related change in body composition and the associated metabolic sequelae. However, further studies are required to identify the women most likely to gain metabolic benefit from menopausal hormone therapy in order to develop evidence-based clinical recommendations.

  4. Prevention of diseases after menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, R A; Davis, S R; De Villiers, T J; Gompel, A; Henderson, V W; Hodis, H N; Lumsden, M A; Mack, W J; Shapiro, S; Baber, R J

    2014-10-01

    Women may expect to spend more than a third of their lives after menopause. Beginning in the sixth decade, many chronic diseases will begin to emerge, which will affect both the quality and quantity of a woman's life. Thus, the onset of menopause heralds an opportunity for prevention strategies to improve the quality of life and enhance longevity. Obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis, cognitive decline, dementia and depression, and cancer are the major diseases of concern. Prevention strategies at menopause have to begin with screening and careful assessment for risk factors, which should also include molecular and genetic diagnostics, as these become available. Identification of certain risks will then allow directed therapy. Evidence-based prevention for the diseases noted above include lifestyle management, cessation of smoking, curtailing excessive alcohol consumption, a healthy diet and moderate exercise, as well as mentally stimulating activities. Although the most recent publications from the follow-up studies of the Women's Health Initiative do not recommend menopause hormonal therapy as a prevention strategy, these conclusions may not be fully valid for midlife women, on the basis of the existing data. For healthy women aged 50-59 years, estrogen therapy decreases coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality; this interpretation is entirely consistent with results from other randomized, controlled trials and observational studies. Thus. as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic disease after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered as part of the armamentarium.

  5. Exercise beyond menopause: Dos and Don'ts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Nalini; Mishra, V N; Devanshi

    2011-07-01

    With a significant number of women belonging to the status of menopause and beyond, it is imperative to plan a comprehensive health program for them, including lifestyle modifications. Exercise is an integral part of the strategy. The benefits are many, most important being maintenance of muscle mass and thereby the bone mass and strength. The exercise program for postmenopausal women should include the endurance exercise (aerobic), strength exercise and balance exercise; it should aim for two hours and 30 minutes of moderate aerobic activity each week. Every woman should be aware of her target heart rate range and should track the intensity of exercise employing the talk test. Other deep breathing, yoga and stretching exercises can help to manage the stress of life and menopause-related symptoms. Exercises for women with osteoporosis should not include high impact aerobics or activities in which a fall is likely. The women and the treating medical practitioner should also be aware of the warning symptoms and contraindications regarding exercise prescription in women beyond menopause. The role of exercise in hot flashes, however, remains inconclusive. Overall, exercising beyond menopause is the only noncontroversial and beneficial aspect of lifestyle modification and must be opted by all.

  6. Exercise beyond menopause: Dos and Don’ts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Nalini; Mishra, V. N.; Devanshi

    2011-01-01

    With a significant number of women belonging to the status of menopause and beyond, it is imperative to plan a comprehensive health program for them, including lifestyle modifications. Exercise is an integral part of the strategy. The benefits are many, most important being maintenance of muscle mass and thereby the bone mass and strength. The exercise program for postmenopausal women should include the endurance exercise (aerobic), strength exercise and balance exercise; it should aim for two hours and 30 minutes of moderate aerobic activity each week. Every woman should be aware of her target heart rate range and should track the intensity of exercise employing the talk test. Other deep breathing, yoga and stretching exercises can help to manage the stress of life and menopause-related symptoms. Exercises for women with osteoporosis should not include high impact aerobics or activities in which a fall is likely. The women and the treating medical practitioner should also be aware of the warning symptoms and contraindications regarding exercise prescription in women beyond menopause. The role of exercise in hot flashes, however, remains inconclusive. Overall, exercising beyond menopause is the only noncontroversial and beneficial aspect of lifestyle modification and must be opted by all. PMID:22408332

  7. Effect of lavender aromatherapy on menopause hot flushing: A crossover randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, Rafat; Nikjou, Roya; Rostamnegad, Masoumeh; Norouzi, Hosein

    2016-09-01

    Flushing is generally considered to be the primary symptom of menopause and is typically the most common complaint in menopausal women. Although flushing poses no danger to a woman's health, it decreases the quality of life. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of lavender aromatherapy on menopause flushing. This double-blinded crossover clinical trial included 100 menopausal women 45-55 years of age who were referred to various health centers in Ardabil, Iran in 2013-2014. Samples were blocked randomly and divided into two intervention (lavender) and control (diluted milk) groups. Lavender aroma was smelled for 20 minutes twice a day, over a 12-week period. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire, and flushing numbers were duly recorded. Data analysis was performed by SPSS version 16 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) using the Chi-square and t test. The results of our investigation showed that both groups had no significant difference according to demographic characteristics (p > 0.05). Additionally, the flushing number significantly decreased in the intervention group than in the control group (p aromatherapy reduced menopause flushing. Given the impact of stress on flushing and the undesirable effects of menopause symptoms on the quality of life, it would appear that this simple, noninvasive, safe, and effective method can be used by menopausal women with noticeable benefits. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  8. Sleep During Menopausal Transition: A 6-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampio, Laura; Polo-Kantola, Päivi; Himanen, Sari-Leena; Kurki, Samu; Huupponen, Eero; Engblom, Janne; Heinonen, Olli J; Polo, Olli; Saaresranta, Tarja

    2017-07-01

    Menopausal transition is associated with increased dissatisfaction with sleep, but the effects on sleep architecture are conflicting. This prospective 6-year follow-up study was designed to evaluate the changes in sleep stages and sleep continuity that occur in women during menopausal transition. Sixty women (mean age 46.0 years, SD 0.9) participated. All women were premenopausal at baseline, and at the 6-year follow-up, women were in different stages of menopausal transition. Polysomnography was used to study sleep architecture at baseline and follow-up. The effects of aging and menopause (assessed as change in serum follicle-stimulating hormone [S-FSH]) on sleep architecture were evaluated using linear regression models. After controlling for body mass index, vasomotor, and depressive symptoms, aging of 6 years resulted in shorter total sleep time (B -37.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] -71.5 to (-3.3)), lower sleep efficiency (B -6.5, 95%CI -12.7 to (-0.2)), as well as in increased transitions from slow-wave sleep (SWS) to wakefulness (B 1.0, 95%CI 0.1 to 1.9), wake after sleep onset (B 37.7, 95%CI 12.5 to 63.0), awakenings per hour (B 1.8, 95%CI 0.8 to 2.8), and arousal index (B 2.3, 95%CI 0.1 to 4.4). Higher S-FSH concentration in menopausal transition was associated with increased SWS (B 0.09, 95%CI 0.01 to 0.16) after controlling for confounding factors. A significant deterioration in sleep continuity occurs when women age from 46 to 52 years, but change from premenopausal to menopausal state restores some SWS.

  9. Symptoms of depressed mood, disturbed sleep, and sexual problems in midlife women: cross-sectional data from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prairie, Beth A; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Luther, James; Hess, Rachel; Thurston, Rebecca C; Wisner, Katherine L; Bromberger, Joyce T

    2015-02-01

    Women report many nonvasomotor symptoms across the menopausal transition, including sleep disturbances, depressed mood, and sexual problems. The co-occurrence of these three symptoms may represent a specific menopausal symptom triad. We sought to evaluate the interrelatedness of disturbed sleep, depressed mood, and sexual problems in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) and determine the characteristics of women exhibiting this symptom triad. SWAN is a multisite, multiethnic observational cohort study of the menopausal transition in the United States. Sleep disturbance, sexual problems, and depressed mood were determined based on self-report. Women who reported all three symptoms simultaneously were compared to those who did not. Logistic regression models estimated the association of demographic, psychosocial, and clinical characteristics with the symptom triad. Study participants (n=1716) were 49.8 years old on average and primarily in very good or excellent health. Sixteen and a half percent had depressed mood, 36.6% had a sleep problem, and 42.2% had any sexual problem. Five percent of women (n=90) experienced all three symptoms. Women with the symptom triad compared with those without had lower household incomes, less education, were surgically postmenopausal or late perimenopausal, rated their general health as fair or poor, and had more stressful life events and lower social support. The symptom triad of sleep disturbance, depressed mood, and sexual problems occurred in only 5% of women, and occurred most often among women with lower socioeconomic status, greater psychosocial distress, and who were surgically menopausal or in the late perimenopause.

  10. Insulin resistance and management of the menopause: a clinical hypothesis in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcroft, Sovra; Herriot, Anne

    2011-03-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is associated with a number of metabolic abnormalities including glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia and central obesity (the metabolic syndrome), which predispose to cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus and some cancers. The incidence of many of these conditions increases after the menopause, a time when IR also increases. Medical intervention to help alleviate menopausal symptoms, frequently vasomotor in origin, usually involves hormone replacement therapy (HRT), but some women may only experience partial symptom relief. We have hypothesized that this may be due to concurrent IR. Our approach is therefore to manage menopausal symptoms in conjunction with the treatment of any concurrent IR, achieved through a combination of hormone replacement, dietary intervention and, if necessary, an insulin sensitizer. We suggest that this approach may not only improve symptom relief but may also reduce the risk of developing more serious health complaints in the future.

  11. Menopause 101: A Primer for the Perimenopausal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Evaluation and Counseling Chapter 6: Complementary and Alternative Medicine Chapter 7: Nonprescription Options Chapter 8: Prescription Therapies Professional Publications Menopause Journal Contents Position Statements & Other Reports Menopause Practice ...

  12. Positive aspects of menopause: a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, L

    2001-01-01

    As a part of a larger study, "Menopause described from the woman's perspective", it has been the aim to explore whether women have any positive experiences in relation to menopause, and if so, the nature of these experiences....

  13. Menopausal women's positive experience of growing older

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvas, Lotte

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to describe menopausal women's positive experience of growing older and becoming middle-aged.......This paper aims to describe menopausal women's positive experience of growing older and becoming middle-aged....

  14. Menopause, hormone therapy and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuenkel, C A

    2017-02-01

    Over the past three decades, the prevalence of diabetes has increased four-fold. Coupled with the global obesity epidemic and aging of the world's population, a perfect metabolic storm is brewing. The influence of menopause and exogenous estrogen and progestogens must be included in this equation. In this review, criteria for diagnosing diabetes and recommendations for screening are described. The reported effects of menopause on diabetes risk in healthy women are reviewed as well as the relationship between established diabetes and the timing of menopause. The effects of menopausal hormone therapies (MHT) on glucose control in women with diabetes and the effect of MHT on diabetes risk in menopausal women without diabetes are described. Evidence-based strategies to prevent diabetes in midlife women are highlighted. The augmenting effect of diabetes on chronic health concerns of aging women, such as cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and cancer, along with current recommendations for screening and prevention are presented. Given the current demographics of today's world, the content of this review may apply to as many as one-third of the average practitioner's postmenopausal patient population.

  15. Bone fractures after menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Every year 30% of individuals above age 65 fall, and falls are the principal cause of bone fractures. To reduce fracture incidence requires both prevention of falls and maintenance of bone strength. PubMed searches were performed, for studies of the epidemiology of fractures, bone physiology, endocrine effects, osteoporosis measurement, genetics, prevention and effectiveness. Topic summaries were presented to the Workshop Group and omissions or disagreements were resolved by discussion. Ageing reduces bone strength in post-menopausal women because estrogen deficiency causes accelerated bone resorption. Bone mineral density (BMD) decreased more than 2.5 standard deviation below the mean of healthy young adults defines osteoporosis, a condition associated with an increased risk of fractures. Risk factors such as age and previous fracture are combined with BMD for a more accurate prediction of fracture risk. The most widely used assessment tool is FRAX™ which combines clinical risk factors and femoral neck BMD. General preventive measures include physical exercise to reduce the risk of falling and vitamin D to facilitate calcium absorption. Pharmacological interventions consist mainly in the administration of inhibitors of bone resorption. Randomized controlled trials show treatment improves BMD, and may reduce the relative fracture risk by about 50% for vertebral, 20-25% for non-vertebral and up to 40% for hip fractures although the absolute risk reductions are much lower. Although diagnosis of osteoporosis is an important step, the threshold for treatment to prevent fractures depends on additional clinical risk factors. None of the presently available treatment options provide complete fracture prevention.

  16. [Calcium metabolism after the menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanovitch, D; Klotz, H P

    1976-02-16

    The authors recall the antagonism between estradiol and parathormone. Estradiol tends to lower serum calcium and fix calcium in the bones as shown by one of us 25 years ago. The mechanism of this action of estrogen on calcium metabolism has been determined by numerous authors but some points are still not clear, e.g. the interferences between estrogen and calcitonin. Classically, parathormone is known to increase bony reabsorption and raise serum calcium. After the menopause the gradual reduction in estradiol secretion leads to post-menopausal osteoporosis. It is better to administer estrogens prophylactically to women after the menopause provided a cervical smear and mammography have been carried out to eliminate latent carcinoma of the breast or uterine cervix.

  17. [Menopause: Hypertension and vascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman, J M

    2018-01-28

    Hypertension is the main cardiovascular risk factor affecting 25% of women. Hormone changes and hypertension after menopause may lead to higher target organ damage and cardiovascular disease such as increased arterial stiffness, coronary diseases, chronic heart failure and stroke. The physiopathological mechanisms involved in the development of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases in menopausal women are controversial. There are pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences in both sexes, the women have more coughing when using the converting-enzyme inhibitors, more cramps when using thiazide diuretics and more oedema in the inferior limbs when using calcium antagonists. The aim of this review is to analyse possible physiopathological mechanisms involved in hypertension after menopause and to gain a better understanding of the biological effects mediated by vascular ageing in women when the level of oestrogen protective effect decreases over the vascular system. Copyright © 2017 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Daydreaming in 40- to 60-Year-Old Women: Menopause, Health, Values, and Sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambra, Leonard M.

    1983-01-01

    Investigated midlife influences on daydreaming for 477 women from 40 to 60 years of age. Examined 42 variables including health status, symptom presence, menstruation difficulties, sexual activities, and effects of menopause. Results indicated daydreaming was more prevalent among women with various psychological symptoms. (PAS)

  19. Sintomas climatéricos e estado nutricional de mulheres na pós-menopausa usuárias e não usuárias de terapia hormonal Climacteric symptoms and nutritional status of women in post-menopause users and non-users of hormone therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Andréia França Gravena

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar os sintomas climatéricos e estado nutricional em mulheres na pós-menopausa, usuárias e não usuárias de terapia hormonal (TH. MÉTODOS: Estudo analítico, exploratório, tipo inquérito populacional domiciliar, realizado na área urbana do município de Maringá, Paraná, incluindo 456 mulheres com idade entre 45 e 69 anos, no período pós-menopausa. A coleta teve como base de referência os setores censitários urbanizados (368 do município, de acordo com o Censo Demográfico Brasileiro. Foi utilizada amostra aleatória simples proporcional às mulheres residentes em cada setor censitário e, por meio de visita domiciliar, aplicou-se um questionário e verificaram-se as medidas antropométricas e pressão arterial. Para avaliação dos sintomas climatéricos, foi utilizado o Índice Menopausal de Blatt e Kupperman. A variável desfecho foi o uso de TH. RESULTADOS: A média de idade foi de 58,7 anos. O excesso de peso esteve presente em 72,6% das mulheres e a obesidade abdominal em 81,4% delas. Sintomas climatéricos de intensidade leve foram evidenciados em 69,5% das mulheres. Apenas 18,4% das mulheres faziam uso de TH e eram, na sua maioria, brancas, não fumantes, sem comorbidades e sem companheiro. Usuárias de TH apresentaram menor frequência de excesso de peso e obesidade abdominal e tiveram menor prevalência de sintomas climatéricos de intensidade severa. CONCLUSÃO: O excesso de peso e a obesidade abdominal foram prevalentes na amostra estudada. Embora em menor número, as usuárias de TH apresentaram uma frequência menor de excesso de peso e sintomas climatéricos leves e intensos na pós-menopausa.PURPOSE: To analyze the climacteric symptoms, nutritional status and distribution of abdominal fat in postmenopausal women using or not hormone therapy. METHODS: exploratory analytical study of the population survey type in the urban area of Maringa, Parana, conducted on 456 postmenopausal women aged 45 to 69

  20. Physical activity, menopause, and quality of life: the role of affect and self-worth across time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elavsky, Steriani

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity has been shown to enhance quality of life (QOL); however, few investigations of these effects exist in women undergoing the menopausal transition. The present study examined the long-term effects of physical activity on menopause-related QOL and tested the mediating effects of physical self-worth and positive affect in this relationship. Middle-aged women previously enrolled in a 4-month randomized controlled trial involving walking and yoga, and a control group completed a follow-up mail-in survey 2 years after the end of the trial. The survey included a battery of psychological and physical activity measures, including measures of menopausal symptoms and menopause-related QOL. Longitudinal linear panel analysis was conducted within a covariance modeling framework to test whether physical self-worth and positive affect mediated the physical activity-QOL relationship over time. At the end of the trial, physical activity and menopausal symptoms were related to physical self-worth and positive affect, and in turn, greater levels of physical self-worth and positive affect were associated with higher levels of menopause-related QOL. Analyses indicated that increases in physical activity and decreases in menopausal symptoms over the 2-year period were related to increases in physical self-worth (betas = 0.23 and -0.52, physical activity and menopausal symptoms, respectively) and, for symptoms, also to decreased positive affect (beta = -0.47), and both physical self-worth (beta = 0.34) and affect (beta = 0.43) directly influenced enhancements in QOL (R = 0.775). The findings support the position that the effects of physical activity on QOL are mediated, in part, by intermediate psychological outcomes and that physical activity can have long-term benefits for women undergoing the menopausal transition.

  1. Factors affecting sexual function in menopause: A review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Nazarpour

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to systematically review the articles on factors affecting sexual function during menopause. Searching articles indexed in Pubmed, Science Direct, Iranmedex, EMBASE, Scopus, and Scientific Information Database databases, a total number of 42 studies published between 2003 and 2013 were selected. Age, estrogen deficiency, type of menopause, chronic medical problems, partner's sex problems, severity of menopause symptoms, dystocia history, and health status were the physical factors influencing sexual function of menopausal women. There were conflicting results regarding the amount of androgens, hormonal therapy, exercise/physical activity, and obstetric history. In the mental–emotional area, all studies confirmed the impact of depression and anxiety. Social factors, including smoking, alcohol consumption, the quality of relationship with husband, partner's loyalty, sexual knowledge, access to health care, a history of divorce or the death of a husband, living apart from a spouse, and a negative understanding of women's health were found to affect sexual function; however, there were conflicting results regarding the effects of education, occupation, socioeconomic status, marital duration, and frequency of sexual intercourse.

  2. The perceptions of African women regarding natural menopause in Mamelodi, Tshwane district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria N. Makuwa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The majority of South African aging population are women, who spend late adulthood experiencing natural menopause. Despite the government spending billions of rand on different services for ageing women, menopausal challenges to African women still receive little attention.Objectives: The aim of the study was to explore and describe the perceptions of African women regarding natural menopause, in order to propose recommendations for health and social support systems for women in Mamelodi, Tshwane district.Method: A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual design was used to conduct the study. The population of the study consisted of menopausal women, between the ages 45 and 60 years or more, visiting the clinics for collection of chronic medication and othe rhealth assessment. Individual face-to-face interviews were conducted, using a semi-structured interview guide to collect data. Tesch’s method of qualitative data analysis was used in the study.Results: The main theme that emerged from the study was ‘attitude toward menopause’, which was supported by cultural beliefs and experience. The African menopausal women expressed the importance of health support systems that will meet their needs within their context.Conclusion: Women’s health programs and educational health information at facilities should include menopausal education to promote and improve health of all African menopausal women during their adulthood. There is a need to establish a women’s health support group network within communities to share menopausal experiences with peers. The training and education curriculum of healthcare providers should include detailed menopause in order to provide comprehensive, congruent care.

  3. The menopause and urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldspang, Anders; Mommsen, Søren

    1994-01-01

    the year of final menstruation. The findings suggest perimenopausal processes rather than the menopause in general to be responsible for an increased risk of developing UI. The elevation of UI prevalence in the perimenopause may reflect the adjustment of the female continence mechanism to function...

  4. Factors associated with the use of complementary medicine and non-pharmacological interventions in symptomatic menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, A; MacArthur, C; McManus, R; Stokes-Lampard, H; Wilson, S; Roalfe, A; Mutrie, N

    2006-10-01

    Hormone replacement therapy is now thought to have serious adverse effects; consequently, many menopausal women are seeking to use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), including non-pharmacological interventions (NPI), to alleviate symptoms. The prevalence and perceived effectiveness of CAM and NPI for ameliorating menopausal symptoms are not widely known and factors likely to predict CAM and NPI utilization for menopausal symptom management have not been comprehensively documented. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine the prevalence of using CAM and NPI for menopausal symptoms; (2) describe the perceived effectiveness of CAM and NPI for symptom management; and (3) investigate lifestyle and demographic factors associated with CAM/NPI use among menopausal women with vasomotor symptoms. Women aged 46-55 years were recruited via six socioeconomically diverse general practices. Participants completed a postal questionnaire that contained items relating to demographics, lifestyle factors, weight, height, exercise behavior, menopausal status, vasomotor symptoms and utilization and perceived effectiveness of a range of CAM/NPI for symptom management. Of 1,206 women who responded, 563 (47%) were symptomatic. The most commonly used CAM/NPI for symptom management were diet/nutrition (44.3%), exercise/yoga (41.5%), relaxation/stress management (27.4%) and homeopathic/naturopathic remedies (25.4%). Of women who used these interventions, large proportions reported them to be helpful. The characteristics that were independently associated with use of CAM/NPI were White ethnicity, being physically active, and not smoking. Many menopausal symptomatic women are using a wide range of CAM/NPI and report these to be effective, particularly those who are white, physically active and do not smoke.

  5. Evaluation of Bioelectrical Activity of Pelvic Floor Muscles and Synergistic Muscles Depending on Orientation of Pelvis in Menopausal Women with Symptoms of Stress Urinary Incontinence: A Preliminary Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Halski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Evaluation of resting and functional bioelectrical activity of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM and the synergistic muscles, depending on the orientation of the pelvis, in anterior (P1 and posterior (P2 pelvic tilt. Design. Preliminary, prospective observational study. Setting. Department and Clinic of Urology, University Hospital in Wroclaw, Poland. Participants. Thirty-two menopausal and postmenopausal women with stress urinary incontinence were recruited. Based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, sixteen women aged 55 to 70 years were enrolled in the study. Primary Outcome Measures. Evaluation of resting and functional bioelectrical activity of the pelvic floor muscles by electromyography (sEMG and vaginal probe. Secondary Outcome Measures. Evaluation of activity of the synergistic muscles by sEMG and surface electrodes. Results. No significant differences between orientations P1 and P2 were found in functional and resting sEMG activity of the PFM. During resting and functional PFM activity, higher electrical activity in P2 than in P1 has been recorded in some of the synergistic muscles. Conclusions. This preliminary study does not provide initial evidence that pelvic tilt influences PFM activation. Although different activity of synergistic muscles occurs in various orientations of the pelvic tilt, it does not have to affect the sEMG activity of the PFM.

  6. Evaluation of bioelectrical activity of pelvic floor muscles and synergistic muscles depending on orientation of pelvis in menopausal women with symptoms of stress urinary incontinence: a preliminary observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halski, Tomasz; Słupska, Lucyna; Dymarek, Robert; Bartnicki, Janusz; Halska, Urszula; Król, Agata; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata; Dembowski, Janusz; Zdrojowy, Romuald; Ptaszkowski, Kuba

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of resting and functional bioelectrical activity of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) and the synergistic muscles, depending on the orientation of the pelvis, in anterior (P1) and posterior (P2) pelvic tilt. Preliminary, prospective observational study. Department and Clinic of Urology, University Hospital in Wroclaw, Poland. Thirty-two menopausal and postmenopausal women with stress urinary incontinence were recruited. Based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, sixteen women aged 55 to 70 years were enrolled in the study. Evaluation of resting and functional bioelectrical activity of the pelvic floor muscles by electromyography (sEMG) and vaginal probe. Evaluation of activity of the synergistic muscles by sEMG and surface electrodes. No significant differences between orientations P1 and P2 were found in functional and resting sEMG activity of the PFM. During resting and functional PFM activity, higher electrical activity in P2 than in P1 has been recorded in some of the synergistic muscles. This preliminary study does not provide initial evidence that pelvic tilt influences PFM activation. Although different activity of synergistic muscles occurs in various orientations of the pelvic tilt, it does not have to affect the sEMG activity of the PFM.

  7. Cross-cultural comparisons: midlife, aging, and menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermeyer, Carla Makhlouf; Sievert, Lynnette Leidy

    2007-01-01

    This summary of the 3-day "Cross-Cultural Comparisons, Midlife, and Aging" workshop introduces 15 papers that examine menopause from biological, cultural, and health perspectives. The workshop was designed to critically examine the conceptual and methodological bases of cross-cultural studies and to make recommendations regarding future research on midlife and aging. This summary first reviews the comparative method with an emphasis on cross-cultural studies of menopause. Then the difference between etic and emic data is introduced. Etic data are collected by standardized instruments according to the interests of the investigator, whereas emic data reflect the concerns of individuals in the community studied. A brief review of cross-country studies concludes that there is a set of "core" menopausal symptoms but that the nuances of those symptoms seem to be culture-specific. The workshop concluded with a unanimous plea for the collection of similar information, both emic and etic data, to improve cross-cultural comparisons. This multidisciplinary collection of papers is an impressive commentary on what has been done in cross-cultural research and a compendium of suggestions for the future.

  8. Oestrogen therapy and the menopausal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S; Whitehead, M

    1977-04-01

    Sixty-four patients with severe menopausal symptoms completed a four month double-blind placebo trial with conjugated equine oestrogens (premarin). Using a graphic rating scale system of assessment, a statistically significant improvement with premarin was observed in 12 psychological and symptomatic scores (Table 3). From a comparison between these results and the results of the 20 patients without vasomotor symptoms it would appear that many of these symptomatic improvements result from the relief of hot flushes (i.e. a domino effect). However, the improvement in memory and reduction of anxiety in these 20 patients suggest that oestrogens have a direct tonic effect on the mental state which is independent of vasomotor symptoms. Sixty-one patients with less severe menopausal symptoms completed the second twelve month double-blind placebo trial and, as assessed by graphic rating scales, a significant improvement with premarin was observed in five psychological and symptomatic scores (Table 3). In both the twelve and four month studies the marked placebo effect of "youthful skin appearance", and on skin greasiness in the twelve month study, indicate that no reliance can be placed on patient judgement of skin texture and appearance. Despite the lessening of the domino effect there was a slight improvement with premarin over placebo in 15 of the remaining 16 symptoms and it is likely that the cumulative effect of these small improvements results in an overall enhancement of well-being. The relief of atrophic vaginitis by premarin did not result in an improvement in libido and this suggests that the ability and the desire to have sexual intercourse are not related. The strength and duration of the placebo effect were well demonstrated in the three standard psychiatric scoring systems, the Beck score (for depression), the General Health Questionnaire and the Eysenck Personality Index (formula: see text) (for neuroticism). We observed a highly significant placebo effect

  9. Effect of age at menopause on disease presentation in early rheumatoid arthritis: results from the Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lauren E; Huang, Wei-Ti; Pope, Janet E; Haraoui, Boulos; Boire, Gilles; Thorne, J Carter; Hitchon, Carol A; Tin, Diane; Keystone, Edward C; Bykerk, Vivian P

    2015-05-01

    Studies suggest that hormonal states affect disease characteristics in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study investigated how age at menopause affects disease in women presenting with early RA. This was a cross-sectional study of postmenopausal women with early RA under age 65 years at time of enrollment in the Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort. RA-related disease characteristics in women who had early age at menopause (EM; age at menopause age at menopause (age at menopause ≥45 years). The t-test was applied to continuous variables and the chi-square test to categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for age at menopause, smoking, and use of exogenous hormones. A total of 534 women were included; 93 were in the EM group. The age at RA onset was similar between groups. The EM group had higher mean patient global and pain scores and was more likely to be rheumatoid factor (RF) positive and meet the 1987 American College of Rheumatology criteria for RA. Using multivariate logistic regression, the EM group was more likely to be RF positive (odds ratio 2.2 [95% confidence interval 1.3-3.8], P = 0.005). Symptom duration, joint counts, Disease Activity Score in 28 joints, Health Assessment Questionnaire scores, and inflammatory markers did not differ between groups. These data suggest that early age at menopause, compared to usual age at menopause, is associated with seropositivity in women with early RA. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  10. Efficacy of menopausal hormone therapy on sleep quality: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintron, Dahima; Lipford, Melissa; Larrea-Mantilla, Laura; Spencer-Bonilla, Gabriela; Lloyd, Robin; Gionfriddo, Michael R; Gunjal, Shalak; Farrell, Ann M; Miller, Virginia M; Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2017-03-01

    Sleep complaints are reported by 40-60 % of menopausal women. Poor sleep is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity. The effect of menopausal hormone therapy on sleep quality is unclear. A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to summarize the efficacy of menopausal hormone therapy on self-reported sleep quality. Electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBM Reviews CENTRAL, and PsycInfo) were searched from 2002 to October 2015. Randomized trials assessing the effect of menopausal hormone therapy with a minimum follow up of 8 weeks were included. Titles, abstracts, and full texts were screened independently and in duplicate. Primary outcome included sleep items within a questionnaire, scale or diary. Standardized mean differences across trials were pooled using random-effects models. The search identified 424 articles, from which 42 trials were included. Seven trials at a moderate to high risk of bias enrolling 15,468 women were pooled in meta-analysis. Menopausal hormone therapy improved sleep quality in women who had vasomotor symptoms at baseline [standardized mean difference -0.54 (-0.91 to -0.18), moderate quality evidence]. No difference was noted when women without such symptoms were analyzed separately or combined. Across 31 sleep quality questionnaires, daytime dysfunction was the most evaluated sleep domain. Menopausal hormone therapy improves sleep in women with concomitant vasomotor symptoms. Heterogeneity of trials regarding study population, formulations, and sleep scales; limit overall certainty in the evidence. Future menopausal hormone therapy trials should include assessment of self-reported sleep quality using standardized scales and adhere to reporting guidelines.

  11. The management of menopause in women with a history of endometriosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, L C; Webster, K E; Kirtley, S; Vincent, K; Zondervan, K T; Becker, C M

    2017-07-01

    Endometriosis is typically regarded as a premenopausal disease, resolving after natural or iatrogenic menopause due to declining oestrogen levels. Nonetheless, case reports over the years have highlighted the incidence of recurrent postmenopausal endometriosis. It is now clear that both recurrence and malignant transformation of endometriotic foci can occur in the postmenopausal period. Postmenopausal women are commonly treated with hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to treat climacteric symptoms and prevent bone loss; however, HRT may reactivate endometriosis and stimulate malignant transformation in women with a history of endometriosis. Given the uncertain risks of initiating HRT, it is difficult to determine the best menopausal management for this group of women. The aim of this study was to systematically review the existing literature on management of menopausal symptoms in women with a history of endometriosis. We also aimed to evaluate the published literature on the risks associated with HRT in these women, and details regarding optimal formulations and timing (i.e. initiation and duration) of HRT. Four electronic databases (MEDLINE via OVID, Embase via OVID, PsycINFO via OVID and CINAHL via EbscoHost) were searched from database inception until June 2016, using a combination of relevant controlled vocabulary terms and free-text terms related to 'menopause' and 'endometriosis'. Inclusion criteria were: menopausal women with a history of endometriosis and menopausal treatment including HRT or other preparations. Case reports/series, observational studies and clinical trials were included. Narrative review articles, organizational guidelines and conference abstracts were excluded, as were studies that did not report on any form of menopausal management. Articles were assessed for risk of bias and quality using GRADE criteria. We present a synthesis of the existing case reports of endometriosis recurrence or malignant transformation in women undergoing

  12. Menopausal women: perceiving continuous power through the experience of regular exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Chii; Yang, Shun-Hsuan; Chang, Pi-Chen; Tsao, Lee-Ing

    2004-05-01

    Menopausal women are at high risk for cardiovascular diseases and osteoporosis. However, for so long, women have devoted much of their time and energy to family, children, and work such that they could not regularly exercise. There are few studies addressing the experiences of Taiwanese women who regularly exercise. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of regularly exercising, defined as thoughts or actions by menopausal women who did not regularly exercise before menopause, but who now exercise regularly. A grounded theory research design was used. In-depth interviews were undertaken with a purposive sampling of 12 menopausal women who began to do regular exercises after menopause and who have continued exercising for more than 6 months. The constant comparative method was used to analyse the interview data. 'Perceiving Continuous Power' was the core category during the process of regularly exercising. Every participating woman perceived that her body and mind were filled with continuous power including the subcategories of 'Overcoming the initial discomfort', 'Experiencing Benefits to Body and Mind' and 'Broadening' during the process. 'Awareness of Health Crisis', which included the subcategories of 'Cureless Chronic Disease', 'Mood Swings', and 'Conflict on Medication', was identified as occurring when these women first began regularly exercising. Throughout the process of perceiving continuous power, women experienced the following interactive behaviour categories: 'Exercise Selection' with subcategories of 'Self-Evaluation', 'Seeking and Fitting', 'Comparing' and 'Health Becoming' with the subcategories of 'Releasing Health Crisis', 'Regaining Flowering Life', and 'Self-Fulfilling'. Regular exercises provided continuous power for menopausal women. The experiences with exercise we uncovered in this study can provide a reference for nurses to guide menopausal women with their regular exercise plans.

  13. Progestogens in menopausal hormone therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Bińkowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Progestogens share one common effect: the ability to convert proliferative endometrium to its secretory form. In contrast, their biological activity is varied, depending on the chemical structure, pharmacokinetics, receptor affinity and different potency of action. Progestogens are widely used in the treatment of menstrual cycle disturbances, various gynaecological conditions, contraception and menopausal hormone therapy. The administration of progestogen in menopausal hormone therapy is essential in women with an intact uterus to protect against endometrial hyperplasia and cancer. Progestogen selection should be based on the characteristics available for each progestogen type, relying on the assessment of relative potency of action in experimental models and animal models, and on the indirect knowledge brought by studies of the clinical use of different progestogen formulations. The choice of progestogen should involve the conscious use of knowledge of its benefits, with a focus on minimizing potential side effects. Unfortunately, there are no direct clinical studies comparing the metabolic effects of different progestogens.

  14. [Complications of menopause. Nutritional implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Saavedra, E; Rovira Magariños, M J; Rodríguez Liz, G A; López Eimil, T

    1998-11-01

    In this article, the authors analyze the pathological alterations which women suffer in which menopause is assumed to be a risk factor leading to the outbreak of these pathologies. Taken together, all of these alterations present some clear nutritional considerations; therefore, adequate dietetical care, followed by women during this phase, could help in their prevention and control. These alterations are: osteoporosis, obesity, arterial hypertension, arteriosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Menopause: Treatment Tips From the National Institute on Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menopause Treatment Tips From the National Institute on Aging Past Issues / Winter 2017 Table of Contents Possible ... Menopause / Treatment Tips From the National Institute on Aging / Menopause Mayhem / Weighing Your Treatment Options Winter 2017 ...

  16. Menopause: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FSH (Follicle-Stimulating Hormone) Test (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Hot Flashes (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Signs of the Menopausal Transition (National Institute on ...

  17. Portraits of menopause in the mass media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, L; Stevens, J

    1998-01-01

    This examination of menopause as presented by the popular print media was conducted in the context of furthering our understanding of the development of attitudes toward menopause. All articles indexed under "menopause" in the Reader's Guide in the years 1981, 1982, 1985, 1986, 1989, 1990, 1993, and 1994 were located and examined. The data revealed that, although there has been an increase in the frequency of articles on menopause in the last 15 years, the media's portrayal of menopause is problematic in several respects: (a) in spite of the increased attention, the information available on menopause through the popular media is minimal and insufficient; (b) there was little variability in terms of perspective, discipline, or focus; almost all were focused on menopause as a negative experience or disease and in need of medical treatment; (c) there was considerable contradiction and inconsistency among the articles with respect to descriptions of menopause and intervention advice for menopausal women; (d) aging, stress, life-style factors, race and ethnicity, exercise and diet were, with few exceptions, ignored or trivialized.

  18. Quality of life and related factors in Menopausal women in Kashan city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoomeh Abedzadeh

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Menopause is a physiological event that occurs in women's life and result in physical, emotional and social changes which affects their quality of life. Because of controversial finding in previous researches and lack of such study in kashan city, this study investigated the quality of life in menopausal women and its related factors. Methods: A cross - sectional study was performed on 700 menopausal women aged 40-60 in Kashan city with cluster sampling. Menopausal Specific Quality of life questionnaire (MENQOL was used for estimation of QOL and related factor such as age, job, educational level, marital status, duration of menopause, child at home, income satisfaction, marital satisfaction, exercise, smoking and family smoking were examined with statistical tests. Results: The quality of life was high in 17.9%, intermediate in 68.9% and low in 13.3% of women. Most of women had intermediate quality of life at vasomotor domain (67.3 %, psychosomatic domain (67.4%, physical domain(46.3% and sexual domain (51.6%.Also there was a significant difference between quality of life and educational level (P=0.004, income satisfaction (P=0.01 and exercise (P=0.0001. Conclusions: Educational level, exercise and income satisfaction are related with quality of life in menopausal women. Based on our findings, we emphasis on teaching about menopause, its symptom and adverse effects. Also emphasizes the necessity use of non pharmacological methods such as exercise and change in life style and diet to improve quality of life in menopausal women.

  19. Menopause and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindler, Natalia M; Santoro, Nanette F

    2015-12-01

    Accumulating data suggest that regular physical exercise reduces mortality and extends the functional life span of men and women. This review seeks to describe the current state of the medical literature on this topic. A narrative review of the current medical literature including randomized clinical trials and clinical guidelines that address the benefits of physical fitness and regular exercise on the health of midlife and postmenopausal women. Reduction and avoidance of obesity and its related comorbidities (hypertension, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, and heart disease) are one major benefit of exercise. However, long-term physical exercise is also associated with reduced rates of cancer, dementia and cognitive decline, adverse mood and anxiety symptoms, and reduction of osteoporosis, osteopenia, falls, and fractures. Beneficial physical activity includes exercise that will promote cardiovascular fitness (aerobic), muscle strength (resistance), flexibility (stretching), and balance (many of the preceding, and additional activities such as yoga). Given that it is unambiguously beneficial, inexpensive, and minimal risk, maintaining a healthy exercise regimen should be a goal for every participant to enhance lifelong wellness. Clinicians should use a number of behavioral strategies to support the physical fitness goals of their participants.

  20. The Effect of Tibolone on Climacteric Symptoms of Healthy Postmenopausal Women

    OpenAIRE

    S Moghassemi; S Ziaei

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Menopause is related to many symptoms that have an effect on women’s life quality. HRT and its alternatives such as Tibolone are some of the routes for enhancement of different aspects of QoL in menopause. The aim of this study was the comparison of the effects of Tibolone and placebo on climacteric symptoms of healthy menopausal women. Materials & Methods: This is a randomized, prospective clinical study. A total of 96 women with no absolute con...

  1. Prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use by menopausal women: a systematic review of surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadzki, P; Lee, M S; Moon, T W; Choi, T Y; Park, T Y; Ernst, E

    2013-05-01

    Large proportions of women have turned to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for relief from their menopausal symptoms. This highlights the need for more rigorous research into CAM. This article is aimed at critically reviewing surveys that examine the prevalence of CAM use by menopausal women worldwide. Eleven databases were searched for peer-reviewed surveys published in any language between 01 January 2000 and 27 October 2012. The bibliographies of the retrieved articles and relevant book chapters were also hand searched. Twenty-six surveys were identified, and they included a total of 32,465 menopausal women. The majority of these surveys were of poor methodological quality. Based on 6 surveys, 32.9% of women stated they were current/regular CAM users. Based on 9 surveys, 50.5% of women reported that they used CAM specifically for their menopausal symptoms. The average 12-month prevalence of CAM use was 47.7% (range: 33.1-56.2). Fifty-five percent of women did not disclose their use of CAM to their healthcare professional. The majority of women sought information about CAM from the media. The most popular CAM modality was herbal medicine, followed by soy/phytoestrogens, evening primrose oil, relaxation and yoga. There are a large number of predominantly low-quality surveys monitoring the prevalence of CAM use among menopausal women worldwide. The available evidence suggests that the prevalence of CAM use is high. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Escitalopram reduces hot flashes in nondepressed menopausal women: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defronzo Dobkin, Roseanne; Menza, Matthew; Allen, Lesley A; Marin, Humberto; Bienfait, Karina L; Tiu, Jade; Howarth, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Hot flashes are one of the most troubling manifestations of menopause, affecting about 80% of women. Due to recent controversies about hormone replacement therapy, many women seek alternative treatments. The use of antidepressants to treat hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms has been an active area of investigation. However, the majority of past research in this area has included women with significant medical or psychiatric histories that may influence treatment response. This was the first study to examine the impact of escitalopram on hot flashes, mood, sleep, and quality of life in a sample of healthy nondepressed menopausal women. This study enrolled 25 menopausal women who had no significant psychiatric or medical history. All women were treated with escitalopram (10 to 20 mg flexibly dosed) for 8 weeks. The active treatment phase was preceded by a single-blind placebo lead-in period. Over the course of the study, women reported significant decreases in both hot flash frequency and severity as well as improvements in dysphoria, anxiety, quality of life, and sleep. These preliminary findings suggest that escitalopram may be a feasible and effective option for treating hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms in healthy women who might not ordinarily consider antidepressant treatment.

  3. Diabetes and the menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Cheen Leen; Perera, Mahesh

    2005-03-01

    As life expectancy increases, women are spending more time in the postmenopausal phase of life. Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in the world and its prevalence is increasing. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is more common than type 1 (it accounts for 90% of all cases) and is most frequent in obese individuals over the age of 40 years. In this review, the main problems faced by postmenopausal diabetic women are examined, and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in this group of women is discussed. HRT appears to decrease the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and to improve glycaemic control; the results vary according to the type of HRT and the route of administration. HRT also improves lipid profiles and transdermal delivery seems to decrease triglyceride levels in particular. There are conflicting data on the effect of HRT on coronary heart disease (CHD); however, it may be beneficial in younger postmenopausal diabetic women. Cardioprotective treatment adjuncts (such as statins or low-dose aspirin) may be advised in diabetic women with CHD risk factors who require HRT. However, their prescription is currently not recommended solely for the possible prevention of cardiovascular disease. HRT may also protect women from osteoporosis in diabetes, especially in type 1 diabetes mellitus. It is recommended that the lowest possible effective dose is used. In postmenopausal diabetic women in whom HRT is not suitable, alternatives such as bisphosphonates may be employed. In these women, vasomotor symptoms can also be improved using drugs such as venlafaxine or gabapentin. Based on current data, we have proposed a regimen that could be used for women with diabetes.

  4. Assessing osteoporosis risk factors in Spanish menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Pérez, José Antonio; Palacios, Santiago; García, Felipe Chavida; Pérez, Maite

    2011-10-01

    (1) To assess the prevalence of osteoporosis risk factors in Spanish menopausal women; (2) to detect medical and lifestyle risk factor differences between perimenopausal and postmenopausal women; (3) and to identify the main factors responsible for osteoporosis. Cross-sectional descriptive study encompassing women aged 45-65 across Spain. The study population sample was collected through random sampling and a total of 10,514 women were included. Socio-demographic, medical history, and lifestyle data were assessed. The prevalence of osteoporosis risk factors was 67.6%. The most common risk factors were physical inactivity (53.6%), use of medication related to osteoporosis risk (45.9%), and low calcium intake (30.1%). There were statistically significant differences between peri- and postmenopausal women in terms of smoking status, alcohol intake, personal history, poor dairy product intake, and medication use that could increase risk. Logistic regression analysis showed that osteoporosis was significantly associated with age, family history, age at onset of menopause, Kupperman Index, prolonged immobilization, weight loss, and other diseases that increase the probability of developing osteoporosis. A high prevalence of women taking osteoporosis risk-related medication was observed in our study. There was correlation between the menopausal symptoms' degree of severity and the risk of suffering from osteoporosis.

  5. OVERWEIGHT OBESITY AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK IN MENOPAUSAL TRANSITION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde Gutiérrez, Carmen; Ramírez Rodrigo, Jesús; Olmedo Alguacil, Maria Milagrosa; Sánchez Caravaca, Maria Angeles; Argente del Castillo Lechuga, Maria Josefa; Ruiz Villaverde, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    the hormonal decline that is characteristic of the menopause, in conjunction with the associated weight gain, is considered a determinant factor of cardiovascular risk. to examine weight status in relation to clinical symptoms during the menopausal transition, in women referred from primary care to an endocrinology specialist, to determine potential cardiovascular risk profiles. observational analytic cross-sectional study, conducted with data from medical records created at time of referral. 805 women aged 40 years or older, a sufficient number of subjects and medical records for cardiovascular risk to be estimated. hierarchic cluster analysis distinguished four clusters. The prevalence of obesity in each one exceeded 60%. The highest mean cardiovascular risk was observed in women who were older and presented obesity and hypertension. In younger age groups, the risk was low, rising to levels similar to those of the older women by the age of 65 years. these results suggest that preventive and therapeutic monitoring of obesity and modifiable risk factors should be conducted during the menopausal transition, to reduce the risk attributable to these factors, a risk that increases with time. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  6. From menarche to menopause: A population-based assessment of water, sanitation, and hygiene risk factors for reproductive tract infection symptoms over life stages in rural girls and women in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kelly K; Padhi, Bijaya; Torondel, Belen; Das, Padmalaya; Dutta, Ambarish; Sahoo, Krushna Chandra; Das, Bhabani; Dreibelbis, Robert; Caruso, Bethany; Freeman, Matthew C; Sager, Lauren; Panigrahi, Pinaki

    2017-01-01

    Women face greater challenges than men in accessing water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) resources to address their daily needs, and may respond to these challenges by adopting unsafe practices that increase the risk of reproductive tract infections (RTIs). WASH practices may change as women transition through socially-defined life stage experiences, like marriage and pregnancy. Thus, the relationship between WASH practices and RTIs might vary across female reproductive life stages. This cross-sectional study assessed the relationship between WASH exposures and self-reported RTI symptoms in 3,952 girls and women from two rural districts in India, and tested whether social exposures represented by reproductive life stage was an effect modifier of associations. In fully adjusted models, RTI symptoms were less common in women using a latrine without water for defecation versus open defecation (Odds Ratio (OR) = 0.69; Confidence Interval (CI) = 0.48, 0.98) and those walking shorter distances to a bathing location (OR = 0.79, CI = 0.63, 0.99), but there was no association between using a latrine with a water source and RTIs versus open defecation (OR = 1.09; CI = 0.69, 1.72). Unexpectedly, RTI symptoms were more common for women bathing daily with soap (OR = 6.55, CI = 3.60, 11.94) and for women washing their hands after defecation with soap (OR = 10.27; CI = 5.53, 19.08) or ash/soil/mud (OR = 6.02; CI = 3.07, 11.77) versus water only or no hand washing. WASH practices of girls and women varied across reproductive life stages, but the associations between WASH practices and RTI symptoms were not moderated by or confounded by life stage status. This study provides new evidence that WASH access and practices are associated with self-reported reproductive tract infection symptoms in rural Indian girls and women from different reproductive life stages. However, the counterintuitive directions of effect for soap use highlights that causality and mechanisms of effect cannot

  7. From menarche to menopause: A population-based assessment of water, sanitation, and hygiene risk factors for reproductive tract infection symptoms over life stages in rural girls and women in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly K Baker

    Full Text Available Women face greater challenges than men in accessing water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH resources to address their daily needs, and may respond to these challenges by adopting unsafe practices that increase the risk of reproductive tract infections (RTIs. WASH practices may change as women transition through socially-defined life stage experiences, like marriage and pregnancy. Thus, the relationship between WASH practices and RTIs might vary across female reproductive life stages. This cross-sectional study assessed the relationship between WASH exposures and self-reported RTI symptoms in 3,952 girls and women from two rural districts in India, and tested whether social exposures represented by reproductive life stage was an effect modifier of associations. In fully adjusted models, RTI symptoms were less common in women using a latrine without water for defecation versus open defecation (Odds Ratio (OR = 0.69; Confidence Interval (CI = 0.48, 0.98 and those walking shorter distances to a bathing location (OR = 0.79, CI = 0.63, 0.99, but there was no association between using a latrine with a water source and RTIs versus open defecation (OR = 1.09; CI = 0.69, 1.72. Unexpectedly, RTI symptoms were more common for women bathing daily with soap (OR = 6.55, CI = 3.60, 11.94 and for women washing their hands after defecation with soap (OR = 10.27; CI = 5.53, 19.08 or ash/soil/mud (OR = 6.02; CI = 3.07, 11.77 versus water only or no hand washing. WASH practices of girls and women varied across reproductive life stages, but the associations between WASH practices and RTI symptoms were not moderated by or confounded by life stage status. This study provides new evidence that WASH access and practices are associated with self-reported reproductive tract infection symptoms in rural Indian girls and women from different reproductive life stages. However, the counterintuitive directions of effect for soap use highlights that causality and mechanisms of

  8. Intensity of climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaiene Rodrigues dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the characteristics and intensity of climacteric symptoms in postmenopausal women. Methods: a cross-sectional, descriptive study with systematic sampling, consisting of 247 women in post menopause, who answered the Questionnaire of Women’s Health. To evaluate the intensity of climacteric symptoms the Menopausal Index of Blatt and Kupperman was used. Statistical analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences software version 17, a significance level of 5% and 95% confidence intervals for all analyzes were adopted. Results: 36.8% of women had mild climacteric symptoms, 56.3% moderate and 6.9% severe. In descending order hot flushes, irritability and sleep disorders reached the highest intensity ratios. Conclusion: the Menopausal index of Blatt and Kupperman (25.34 showed symptoms of moderate intensity. Hot flushes showed to be the symptom of highest intensity of discomfort.

  9. Food matrix and isoflavones bioavailability in early post menopausal women: A European clinical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chanteranne, B.; Branca, F.; Kardinaal, A.; Wahala, K.; Braesco, V.; Ladroite, P.; Brouns, F.; Coxam, V.

    2008-01-01

    The estrogenic effects of soy isoflavones (IF) on symptoms of menopause are of particular interest. The aim of the present study was to improve compliance of IF in two IF-enriched foods providing the same IF circulating levels in postmenopausal women. Forty-two healthy postmenopausal women (mean

  10. Psychosocial Adjustment Needs of Menopausal Women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    , religion and socio-economic level ... women's psychosocial adjustment needs on the basis of marital status. (Cal.t=0.42; P>0.05), .... psychological health and sexual satisfaction using 32 post menopausal and 13 non-menopausal women and ...

  11. Relationship between sleep quality and cardiovascular disease risk in Chinese post-menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chair, Sek Ying; Wang, Qun; Cheng, Ho Yu; Lo, Sally Wai-Sze; Li, Xiao Mei; Wong, Eliza Mi-Ling; Sit, Janet Wing-Hung

    2017-09-11

    Menopause is an inevitable stage affecting every middle-aged woman. China has a large and increasing group of post-menopausal women. Most post-menopausal women suffer from increased risks for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and sleep problems. Previous studies have demonstrated the associations between sleep disorders and increased CVD risks in general population. The current study is to examine the relationship between sleep quality and CVD risks among Chinese post-menopausal women. This study was a sub-study nested in a cross-sectional study that investigated the sleep quality of community-dwelling adults in Xian, Shaanxi Province, China. The Chinese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Framingham 10-year risk score (FRS) were used to measure sleep quality and CVD risk among 154 Chinese post-menopausal women. Multivariate regression and logistic regression were used to determine the association between sleep quality and CVD risk. The participants (age: 63.65 ± 4.47 years) experienced poor sleep quality (mean score of global PSQI = 8.58) and a 10-year risk of CVD of 12.54%. The CVD risk was significantly associated with sleep duration (β = - 0.18, p = 0.04) and sleep disturbance (β = 0.33, p  10%) (odds ratio = 0.51, p = 0.04). Poor sleep quality might increase the CVD risk in post-menopausal women. Interventions to promote the cardiovascular health of Chinese post-menopausal women may need to include sleep promotion strategies.

  12. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by women transitioning through menopause in Germany: results of a survey of women aged 45-60 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhling, K J; Daniels, B V; Studnitz, F S G V; Eulenburg, C; Mueck, A O

    2014-02-01

    To describe prevalence rates of complementary and alternative medicine therapies (CAM) for the relief of menopausal complaints among German women. Furthermore, to investigate the perceived effectiveness of these therapies. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to 9785 randomly selected women in Germany aged between 45 and 60 years. A total of 1893 (19.3%) questionnaires have been sent back. The mean age of all participants was 52.6±4.3 years. 81% (n=1517) of the responding women stated that they had experienced menopausal complaints at least once. Symptoms ranged from vasomotor symptoms, including hot flushes and night sweats, in 71.2% of cases, to bladder problems in 42.7%. The average symptom score (MRS II total score, range 1-44) among the respondents was 12.76±9.6. More than half (56%; n=1049/1872) of the responding women had used some form of therapy to alleviate their symptoms at least once. The majority of women undertaking a therapy (64.8%; n=679/1049) had used only CAM interventions (either one or more type of CAM), 14.2% (n=149) had used hormone replacement therapy (HRT) only, while 21.1% (n=221/1049) had tried both CAM and HRT. Popular CAM interventions by the respondents were an alteration of lifestyle (28.7%), St. John's wort (18.3%) and homoeopathy (14.9%). An alteration in lifestyle was rated as the most effective CAM treatment with 84.9% (n=457). Other treatments like hormone yoga (79.2%; n=42), homoeopathy (73.7%; n=205) and TCM (59.1%; n=94) were also perceived to be effective. Phytoestrogens were rated as the most ineffective (45.5%; n=50). CAM interventions to alleviate menopausal complaints are popular among German women, with 48.2% (n=900/1872) of respondents reporting having used CAM either alone or in combination with HRT. However, the users rated the effects of CAM differently, with some reporting CAM to be highly effective, while others indicate lower effectiveness. Nevertheless, women with a significantly higher symptom scoring

  13. Use of alternatives to estrogen for treatment of menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, J V; Santen, R

    2002-03-01

    Women frequently chose alternatives to hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for treatment of menopause even though medical indications for estrogens may be present. Prior breast cancer or fear of breast cancer is a major consideration. This review of alternatives to estrogen discusses the evidence linking breast cancer to HRTs and compares potential risks and benefits of HRT to nonHRT alternatives for relief of vasomotor symptoms, vaginal atrophy, neurocognitive changes and prevention of heart disease and osteoporosis. Practical guidelines are suggested for use of alternatives for each problem.

  14. Low back pain in women before and after menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Kozinoga, Mateusz; Majchrzycki, Marian; Piotrowska, Sylwia

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain is a massive problem in modern population, both in social and economic terms. It affects large numbers of women, especially those aged 45-60. Going through a perimenopausal period is associated with many symptoms, including low back pain. This paper is a review of published research on the association between the perimenopausal age and low back pain. PubMed databases were investigated. After the search was narrowed to “menopausal status, back pain”, 35 studies were found. Se...

  15. Body mass index and stroke mortality by smoking and age at menopause among Korean postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sang-Wook; Odongua, Nemekhee; Nam, Chung Mo; Sull, Jae Woong; Ohrr, Heechoul

    2009-11-01

    The association between body mass index and mortality caused by subtypes of stroke among postmenopausal women in terms of smoking status and age at menopause remains controversial. The data were derived from a cohort study of 3321 with 17.8 years of follow-up (1985 to 2002). Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs for strokes as related to body mass index were estimated by Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for age, hypertension, smoking, drinking, occupation, education, self-reported health, and age at menopause. A stratified analysis was conducted by age at menopause and smoking status. The obese group (body mass index >or=27.5 kg/m(2)) had higher risks of total stroke mortality (HR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.05 to 2.42) and hemorrhagic stroke mortality (HR, 2.91; 95% CI, 1.37 to 6.19) than the normal weight group (18.5or=50. For the obese group of the former, the HR of total stroke was 2.04 (95% CI, 1.25 to 3.34) and that of hemorrhagic stroke 6.46 (95% CI, 2.42 to 17.25). In this prospective study, obesity raised the risks of total stroke mortality and hemorrhagic stroke mortality among Korean menopausal women. It was more evident with women who experienced menopause at age <50. The obese group of ever smokers was at an increased risk of ischemic stroke mortality.

  16. Critical review of health effects of soyabean phyto-oestrogens in post-menopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cassidy, A.; Albertazzi, P.; Nielsen, I. L.

    2006-01-01

    to reach conclusions on the effects of isoflavones on breast cancer, colon cancer, diabetes or cognitive function. The health benefits of soyabean phyto-oestrogens in healthy post-menopausal women are subtle and even some well-designed studies do not show protective effects. Future studies should focus...... improve endothelial function. For menopausal symptoms there is currently limited evidence that soyabean-protein isolates, soyabean foods or red-clover (Trifolium pratense L.) extract are effective but soyabean isoflavone extracts may be effective in reducing hot flushes. There are too few RCT studies...

  17. Migraine Management During Menstruation and Menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, E Anne

    2015-08-01

    Migraine is most prevalent in women during their reproductive years. An understanding of the effects of menstruation and menopause on migraine can enable neurologists to provide targeted and appropriate medical and hormonal strategies, enabling their patients to achieve better control of migraine and reduced disability. This article reviews the effects of hormonal events on migraine and summarizes the evidence-based options available for management. Estrogen "withdrawal" during the late luteal phase of the natural menstrual cycle and the hormone-free interval of combined hormonal contraceptives has long been implicated in the pathophysiology of menstrual migraine. However, more recent research suggests that other independent mechanisms may be relevant. Prostaglandin inhibitors used for management of dysmenorrhea are effective for associated menstrual migraine, suggesting a common pathophysiology. The interplay between serotonin and estrogen also deserves further research. Menstrual and perimenopausal migraine can be managed effectively using a variety of strategies, the choice of which depends on the efficacy of acute treatment, predictability and regularity of menstruation, use of contraception, and presence of menstrual disorders or perimenopausal vasomotor symptoms.

  18. Grape flavonoids and menopausal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, A L

    2007-12-01

    Grape flavonoids are members of a larger group of plant compounds called polyphenols. Epidemiological evidence relating to the traditional Mediterranean diet, which is high in polyphenols, derived from vegetables and red wine, suggests that dietary polyphenols are of benefit to health and reduce the incidence of cardiovascular disease. Overall, the evidence is promising for the benefit of grape flavonoids in the form of red wine, red grape juice and related preparations for cardiovascular risk factors. There are data to suggest a reduction in platelet activation, inflammation and low-density lipoprotein oxidation, and improvement of endothelial function with grape flavonoids. The evidence for grape flavonoids and renal function, cognition and cancer is less clear. However, it is important to note that much of this research has been carried out in animal and cell models; relatively little work has been done in humans and specifically on the health of menopausal women. There are no general safety concerns with ingestion of grape products. Obviously, consumption of red wine should be within recommended limits and it should be noted that grape juice has high sugar content. Grape flavonoids are also available as a supplement. In conclusion, it is likely that grape flavonoids do benefit the menopausal women. Further research is needed on the mode and dosage of application to maximize these benefits.

  19. Do SSRIs and SNRIs reduce the frequency and/or severity of hot flashes in menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Chris; Mattingly, Lisa; Crawford, Steven A; Wickersham, Elizabeth A; Brockhaus, Jessica L; McCarthy, Laine H

    2017-05-01

    In menopausal women who experience regular hot flashes, does treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) reduce the frequency and/or severity of hot flashes? Yes. Review of the literature suggests that treatment with SSRIs or SNRIs reduces the frequency and severity of hot flashes in menopausal and post-menopausal women. Studies demonstrated that paroxetine (Paxil), citalopram (Celexa) and escitolapram (Lexapro) were the most effective SSRIs, and venlafaxine (Effexor) was the most effective first line SNRI, with desvenlafaxine as a second option. The most common side effects reported for both SSRIs and SNRIs are nausea and constipation, with most resolving within the first week of treatment. SNRIs have been associated with increased blood pressure in some patients and should be used with caution in women with hypertension. Women with a history of breast cancer and taking tamoxifen should avoid SSRIs, which have been shown to interfere with tamoxifen metabolism. SNRIs are the safest drugs for this population. Treatment choice should be patient-specific and begin with the lowest dose available. A. SSRI, SNRI, hot flashes, vasomotor symptoms, menopause. August 2014, February 2016 and August 2016. menopausal, perimenopausal or postmenopausal women 18 years of age or older with frequent and/or severe vasomotor symptoms, meta-analyses, systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, cohort studies. pre-menopause, anxiety, depression, panic disorder, bipolar disorder, co-morbid conditions.

  20. Endometrial, breast and liver safety of soy isoflavones plus Lactobacillus sporogenes in post-menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colacurci, Nicola; De Franciscis, Pasquale; Atlante, Marco; Mancino, Pasquale; Monti, Marco; Volpini, Giuseppe; Benvenuti, Claudio

    2013-03-01

    To assess the safety of a nutraceutical compound containing soy isoflavones and Lactobacillus sporogenes on endometrium, breast and liver function. Outpatient Menopausal Clinic. 130 healthy postmenopausal women suffering from menopausal symptoms were randomized to receive soy isoflavones 60 mg and Lactobacillus sporogenes 1 billion spores (group E: 65 women) or calcium and vitamin D₃ (group C: 65 women). Safety of the treatment was assessed at baseline and after 1 year taking into account endometrial thickness, mammographic density, serum levels of transaminases, γ-GT and bilirubin. Efficacy of the treatment was evaluated rating the score of menopausal symptoms at baseline and every 3 months. The statistical analysis was carried out with χ², Fisher exact's test and ANOVA. After 12 months of treatment mammographic density, endometrial thickness and hepatic function did not show significant differences between groups, while menopausal symptoms were progressively and significantly reduced in severity and frequency during treatment with soy isoflavones plus Lactobacillus sporogenes versus calcium plus vitamin D₃. A 12 months treatment with a nutraceutical compound based on isoflavones and Lactobacillus sporogenes at the recommended doses is safe for endometrium, mammary glands and liver function in postmenopausal women.

  1. Night sweats, sleep disturbance, and depression associated with diminished libido in late menopausal transition and early postmenopause: baseline data from the Herbal Alternatives for Menopause Trial (HALT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Susan D; Newton, Katherine M; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Grothaus, Lou C; Ehrlich, Kelly

    2007-06-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the association of depression, sleep disturbance, and menopausal symptoms with diminished libido. Data from a 2001-2002 baseline survey of 341 peri- and postmenopausal women, aged 45-55 years, participating in a randomized trial, was analyzed. Eligibility included at least 2 hot flashes and/or night sweats per day and no hormone therapy for at least the prior 3 months. The survey evaluated sexual function, depression, sleep, and vasomotor symptoms. We examined the association between these factors, using multivariate regression models. Of 341 women, 64% had diminished libido, 18% had moderate to severe depression, and 43% had poor sleep quality. Women averaged 4.6 hot flashes and 1.9 night sweats per day. Depressive symptoms (P = .003), poor sleep (P = .02), and night sweats (P = .04) were significantly associated with diminished libido. Factors associated with diminished libido in midlife are complex but include depression, disturbed sleep, and night sweats, all common symptoms of the menopausal transition and early menopause.

  2. Climaterio y menopausia Climateric and menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Isabel Capote Bueno

    2011-12-01

    better performance and on the expression of completeness of physical, psychic and social possibilities of the woman during this stage. In present paper authors deepen in the historical and conceptual features of climateric and the menopause, the essential elements related to the main symptoms and signs of climateric, the risk factors present in this stage, as well as the therapeutical behavior to take into account for its appropriate management in the integral care by the health professionals.

  3. [Alternatives to hormone replacement therapy for menopause: an epidemiological evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringa, V

    2004-05-01

    Recent results put into question the risks/benefits ratio of hormone replacement therapy and emphasize the importance of precise knowledge of the effects of other treatments that exist for postmenopausal symptoms or diseases. Our aim is to analyze their effect. A review of randomized trials or epidemiological studies was undertaken. Bisphophonates, calcitonin, parathormone, strontium ranelate, calcium and vitamin D have specific effects on bone. The efficacy of bisphophonates for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis has been proven and parathormone and strontium ranelate seem promising. These treatments are useful for women at high risk of osteoporosis who do not suffer from menopausal symptoms. Tibolone, SERMs and phytoestrogens exert effects on various tissues. SERMs are very promising, but they do not improve climacteric symptoms and their long term effects are still unknown. Tibolone has beneficial effects on climacteric symptoms and on bone loss, but recent results concerning its effects on the risk of breast cancer call into question its interest. The beneficial effects of phytoestrogens on bone and on vasomotor symptoms need to be confirmed. At this time, none of the existing treatments for postmenopausal symptoms or diseases is ideal. The existence of several options for treatments of symptoms or diseases of the postmenopause is helpful as it affords several choices for physicians and for women who sometimes need to be treated for many years. However several questions remain unanswered concerning the long term effects of these treatments.

  4. Lower urinary tract symptoms after subtotal versus total abdominal hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lea Laird; Møller, Lars Mikael Alling; Gimbel, Helga

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common after hysterectomy and increase after menopause. We aimed to compare subtotal with total abdominal hysterectomy regarding LUTS, including urinary incontinence (UI) subtypes, 14 years after hysterectomy. Main results from ...

  5. Female hormones affect symptom severity in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vulink, Nienke C. C.; Denys, Damiaan; Bus, Léonie; Westenberg, Herman G. M.

    2006-01-01

    There is circumstantial evidence that reproductive events can influence symptom severity of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). We sent self-report questionnaires to 350 female outpatients with OCD to examine the relationship between the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, menopause, hormonal

  6. Acupuncture for menopausal hot flashes: clinical evidence update and its relevance to decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ee, Carolyn; French, Simon D; Xue, Charlie C; Pirotta, Marie; Teede, Helena

    2017-08-01

    There is conflicting evidence on the efficacy and effectiveness of acupuncture for menopausal hot flashes. This article synthesizes the best available evidence for when women are considering whether acupuncture might be useful for menopausal hot flashes. We searched electronic databases to identify randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews of acupuncture for menopausal hot flushes. The overall evidence demonstrates that acupuncture is effective when compared with no treatment, but not efficacious compared with sham. Methodological challenges such as the complex nature of acupuncture treatment, the physiological effects from sham, and the significant efficacy of placebo therapy generally in treating hot flashes all impact on these considerations. Acupuncture improves menopausal hot flashes compared with no treatment; however, not compared with sham acupuncture. This is also consistent with the evidence that a range of placebo interventions improve menopausal symptoms. As clinicians play a vital role in assisting evidence-informed decisions, we need to ensure women understand the evidence and can integrate it with personal preferences. Some women may choose acupuncture for hot flashes, a potentially disabling condition without long-term adverse health consequences. Yet, women should do so understanding the evidence, and its strengths and weaknesses, around both effective medical therapies and acupuncture. Likewise, cost to the individual and the health system needs to be considered in the context of value-based health care.

  7. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Menopause: A Review of Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chueh Chang

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Hormone replacement therapy (HRT is frequently prescribed to healthy women to ameliorate menopausal symptoms. HRT is used long term (≥ 1 year to prevent chronic disease in older women. The objective of this study was to review the benefits and risks of HRT and studies of menopause or HRT in Taiwan via a MEDLINE search. Recommendations are provided for future HRT research in Taiwan. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials are considered the gold standard of scientific evidence. A MEDLINE literature search (January 1966-July 2002 identified 23 papers on trials (≥ 1 year that met the inclusion criteria. The results showed that various HRT regimens used for more than 1 year caused more harm than good in healthy menopausal women and that there was no benefit for women with coronary artery disease, Alzheimer's disease, hysterectomy, hysterosalpingooophorectomy, and ischemic stroke. None of this research was conducted in Taiwan. A MEDLINE search using the key words “estrogen replacement therapy and menopause in Taiwan” identified 16 studies. There was only one, short-term, HRT trial. No evidence suggested benefits from long-term HRT in menopausal women in Taiwan.

  8. Sexuality and Menopause, a Belgian Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zdanowicz, Nicolas; Jacques, Denis; Tordeurs, David; Schepens, Pierre; Reynaert, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Until the 1980s, due largely to prejudice, post-menopausal women were believed to experience significantly less sexual desire and thus to have sexual intercourse less often than before menopause. Since the 1990s, this type of prejudices seems to have decreased. The aim of our study is to examine the sexuality of post-menopausal women by comparing it to same aged men’s sexual behaviour and the importance of sexuality in their life. Methods: A sample of 1,526 women and 1,151 men aged 55 an...

  9. Incorporating bazedoxifene/conjugated estrogens into the current paradigm of menopausal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komm BS

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Barry S Komm, Sebastian MirkinPfizer Inc, Collegeville, PA, USAAbstract: Many women experience bothersome vasomotor and vaginal symptoms during the menopausal transition. Decreasing levels of estrogens during menopause are also associated with reduced bone density and an increased risk of osteoporosis. Combined estrogen/progestin therapy (hormone therapy effectively treats menopausal symptoms and prevents bone loss, but has been associated with some safety and tolerability concerns. A novel menopausal therapy is the tissue selective estrogen complex, which pairs a selective estrogen receptor modulator with one or more estrogens. In preclinical studies, the tissue selective estrogen complex partnering bazedoxifene (BZA with conjugated estrogens (CE antagonized stimulation of breast and endometrial tissue, reduced vasomotor instability, and preserved bone mass in rat and mouse models. The specific attributes seen with BZA/CE were different from those observed with other selective estrogen receptor modulator/estrogen pairings. BZA/CE has undergone clinical evaluation in the Phase III Selective estrogens, Menopause, And Response to Therapy (SMART trials in postmenopausal women with an intact uterus. Of the various doses of BZA/CE evaluated, BZA 20 mg/CE 0.45 mg and 0.625 mg were associated with a low incidence of endometrial hyperplasia (<1% similar to placebo, and showed significant improvements in hot flushes and vulvar/vaginal symptoms and increases in bone mineral density. BZA 20 mg/CE 0.45 mg and 0.625 mg were associated with a low incidence of breast-related adverse events and demonstrated no difference from placebo in age-related changes in mammographic breast density. Both BZA/CE doses showed a favorable tolerability profile, with no increases in uterine bleeding or breast tenderness, and had positive effects on metabolic parameters and quality of life. BZA/CE may be a promising alternative to hormone therapy for the treatment of menopausal

  10. Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Funding Opportunities & Notices Contract Opportunities Grants Process, Policies & Strategies Peer Review Small Business Programs Training & Career Development For Applicants Sample Applications ...

  11. Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone Abuse Peer ... Endocrinologist Clinical Trials Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone Abuse Peer ...

  12. Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone Abuse Peer ... About Clinical Trials Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone Abuse Peer ...

  13. Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... begins. Try taking 6 breaths a minute. Try yoga, tai chi, or meditation. Other tips: Dress lightly ... been linked to some long-term effects, including: Bone loss and osteoporosis in some women Changes in ...

  14. Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human Services En Español Call the OWH HELPLINE: 800- ... Pregnancy Popular topics Bacterial vaginosis Birth control methods Human papillomavirus (HPV) Infertility Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) Sexually ...

  15. Hubungan Antara Stadium Menopause Dengan Perubahan Seksual Wanita Menopause Di Posyandu Lansia Srikandi Kelurahan Sumbersari Kota Malang

    OpenAIRE

    Purwo Nugroho, Yuyus

    2013-01-01

    Hubungan Antara Stadium Menopause Dengan Perubahan Seksual Wanita Menopause Di Posyandu Lansia Srikandi Kelurahan Sumbersari Kota MalangCorrelation between Stadium of Menopause with the Alteration of Menopause Women'ssexuality in Posyandu of Srikandi's Elderly Sumbersari MalangYuyus Purwo NugrohoPerawat Rumah Sakit Port Health Center (PHC)Jl. Prapat Kurung Selatan No. 1 Tanjung Perak Surabaya 60165Email : Menopause memilki 4 stadium atau tahapan dalam perkembanga...

  16. The Acupuncture on Hot Flashes Among Menopausal Women study: observational follow-up results at 6 and 12 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borud, Einar Kristian; Alraek, Terje; White, Adrian; Grimsgaard, Sameline

    2010-03-01

    The previously published Acupuncture on Hot Flashes Among Menopausal Women study compared the effectiveness of individualized acupuncture treatment plus self-care versus self-care alone on hot flashes and health-related quality of life in postmenopausal women. This article reports on the observational follow-up results at 6 and 12 months. The Acupuncture on Hot Flashes Among Menopausal Women study was a pragmatic, multicenter randomized controlled trial with two parallel arms, conducted in 2006 to 2007. The 267 participants were postmenopausal women experiencing, on average, 12.6 hot flashes per 24 h. The acupuncture group received 10 individualized acupuncture treatments during 12 weeks and advice on self-care, whereas the control group received only advice on self-care. Hot flash frequency and intensity (0-10 scale) and hours of sleep per night were registered in a diary. Health-related quality of life was assessed by the Women's Health Questionnaire. From baseline to 6 months, the mean reduction in hot flash frequency per 24 hours was 5.3 in the acupuncture group and 5.0 in the control group, a nonsignificant difference of 0.3. At 12 months, the mean reduction in hot flash frequency was 6.0 in the acupuncture group and 5.8 in the control group, a nonsignificant difference of 0.2. Differences in quality-of-life scores were not statistically significant at 6 and 12 months. The statistically significant differences between the study groups found at 12 weeks were no longer present at 6 and 12 months. Acupuncture can contribute to a more rapid reduction in vasomotor symptoms and increase in health-related quality of life in postmenopausal women but probably has no long-term effects.

  17. Advances in hormone replacement therapy: making the menopause manageable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palacios Santiago

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The importance of the results of some large, randomized controlled trials (RCTs on Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT has modified the risk/benefit perception of HRT. Recent literature review supports a different management. The differences in age at initiation and the duration of HRT are key points. HRT appears to decrease coronary disease in younger women, near menopause; yet, in older women, HRT increases risk of a coronary event. Although HRT is a recognized method in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, it is not licensed for the prevention of osteoporosis as a first-line treatment. The effectiveness of low and ultra-low estrogen doses has been demonstrated for the treatment of vasomotor symptoms, genital atrophy and the prevention of bone loss, with fewer side-effects than the standard dose therapy. Further research, however, is needed to determine the effect both on fractures, as well as on cardiovascular and breast diseases. Newer progestins show effects that are remarkably different from those of other assays. The effectiveness of testosterone at improving both sexual desire and response in surgically and naturally postmenopausal women is shown by the testosterone patch. The intention, dose and regimen of HRT need to be individualized, based on the principle of choosing the lowest appropriate dose in relation to the severity of symptoms and the time and menopause age.

  18. Experienced and physiological fatigue in neuromuscular disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillings, M.L.; Kalkman, J.S.; Janssen, H.M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Bleijenberg, G.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fatigue has been described as a typical symptom of neurological diseases. It might be caused both by changes at the peripheral and at the central level. This study measured the level of experienced fatigue and physiological correlates of fatigue in three genetically defined neuromuscular

  19. Obesity and weight management at menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietto, Joseph

    2017-06-01

    Many women report gaining weight as they transition through menopause. For most, the weight gain is modest and can be reduced with a conscious effort to limit energy intake and increase energy expenditure. However, many women who are already overweight and obese will gain more weight as they approach menopause. The aims of this paper are to explain the reasons for menopausal weight gain and to detail a method for achieving and sustaining a substantial weight loss. Weight gain during menopause is predominantly due to a reduction in spontaneous activity. For women who are lean, advice about controlling energy intake and increasing physical activity may be all that is required to prevent weight gain. For women who are overweight and obese rapid weight loss is best achieved with the help of a very low energy diet. This must be followed by lifelong behaviour modification with or without the help of hunger-suppressing pharmacotherapy.

  20. MENOPAUSE AND HORMONAL REPLACEMENT THERAPY – HISTORICALREVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Meden Vrtovec

    2008-12-01

    Last decade in the field of menopausal medicine is characterized by discussions aboutbenefits and risks of HRT. The experts reached consensual position statement that benefitsovercome risks of HRT when introduced in early postmenopause

  1. [Hot flashes resistant to hormone replacement in menopausal women: panic disorder?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Feltz-Cornelis, C M

    1999-02-06

    Of two women aged 52 and 49, the first one was treated with increasingly high doses of oestrogens to reduce menopausal complaints and the second suffered from menopausal complaints while receiving antiepileptic treatment following surgical removal of a meningioma. The women had hot flushes refractive to hormone supplementation. The first one even developed addictive symptoms, demanding more and more hormone supplementation from her gynaecologist as her symptoms would not subside. Ultimately a panic disorder was diagnosed in both women. Symptoms of panic disorder can be disguised as or comorbid with menopausal complaints such as hot flushes. As patients with these complaints present themselves generally to their general practitioner or gynaecologist, the panic disorder may easily be overlooked. Both women reacted well to reattribution of their complaints, explanation that they had developed a panic disorder, behaviour therapy and treatment with clomipramine. Clues for diagnosis are lack of reaction to hormonal supplementation, worsening of symptoms after hormonal supplementation, as well as a positive history for anxiety symptoms and somatizing behaviour.

  2. Midlife Women’s Symptom Cluster Heuristics: Evaluation of An iPad Application for Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Nancy Fugate; Ismail, Rita; Linder, Lauri A.; Macpherson, Catherine Fiona

    2015-01-01

    Objective To elicit midlife women’s heuristics about symptom clusters they were experiencing as identified by the Computerized Symptom Capture Tool for menopause (C-SCAT M). Methods Women aged 40–60 years experiencing symptoms they associated with menopause were recruited through flyers posted on campus and in clinics. Women completed the C-SCAT M app using an iPad by identifying and drawing the symptom clusters they experienced during the last 24 hours, indicating relationships among symptoms, prioritizing the clusters and symptoms within them, and describing their causal attributions, and exacerbating and ameliorating factors. They were asked to prioritize the clusters and a symptom within each cluster. While completing the app, women were asked to “think aloud” about their experience using the app. Data generated from the C-SCAT M application were transmitted securely to an Amazon Web Services account and saved as screen images and Excel files to preserve both the graphical images and text elicited from the application. Qualitative data were saved in verbatim phrases. Conventional content analysis was used to analyze qualitative data. Results Thirty women completed the application. Most women (77%) stated that the final diagrams were very/extremely accurate in depicting their symptoms and their connections. Women reported between 1 and 22 symptoms (median 11). Hot flashes, waking up during the night, night sweats, and early morning awakening were the most commonly reported symptoms. Women rated hot flashes as their most bothersome symptom, followed by waking up during the night and fatigue. They reported over 300 different bivariate relationships between their symptoms and over 150 unique causal paths. They believed that hot flashes caused several symptoms, especially sleep disruption, and most could describe the time order of their symptoms. Women reported clusters consisting of 2 to 18 symptoms. Women also named each cluster based on their response to

  3. Lurasidone in post-menopausal females with major depressive disorder with mixed features: Post-hoc analysis of a placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sramek, John; Loebel, Antony; Murphy, Michael; Mao, Yongcai; Pikalov, Andrei; Cutler, Neal R

    2017-08-01

    Several studies have found that depressed, post-menopausal females may respond differently to antidepressants compared to pre-menopausal females. The atypical antipsychotic lurasidone, whose mechanism of action differs from SSRIs and other standard antidepressants, was shown in a 6-week randomized, flexible-dose, placebo-controlled study (n=209), to be effective in treating major depressive disorder (MDD) with mixed features (subthreshold hypomanic symptoms). This post-hoc analysis assessed the efficacy of lurasidone in this study by menopausal status. The main outcome measure for this post-hoc analysis was change in MADRS score from baseline to week 6 endpoint for two lurasidone-treated subgroups: presumptive pre-menopausal (women (ages 45-51years) to allow for clearer definition of pre- and post-menopausal status. A total of 56 lurasidone-treated and 47 placebo-treated pre-menopausal females, and 17 lurasidone-treated and 25 placebo-treated post-menopausal females were available from the larger study for comparison on key outcome measures. The pre- and post-menopausal subgroups had similar demographic and clinical characteristics at study baseline (other than age), including number of past major depressive episodes as well as depressive and manic symptom severity. Mean daily lurasidone dose was similar for each subgroup during the study. Both the primary and exploratory analyses showed that both lurasidone-treated post-menopausal and pre-menopausal females responded significantly compared to placebo (p=0.016 or less) on the MADRS, and that post-menopausal patients had a numerically larger response (effect size=0.96) than pre-menopausal patients (effect size=0.64). All other secondary outcome measures for lurasidone compared with placebo treatment were significant (p=0.045 or less) for both subgroups. In this post-hoc analysis, lurasidone was found to be effective in treating post-menopausal MDD patients with mixed features (subthreshold hypomanic symptoms

  4. [Menopause in women in Novi Sad].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokin, S; Bjelajac, P; Dobrić, V

    2001-01-01

    This study deals with the occurrence of menopause in women of Novi Sad during 1996 and 1997 in ambulatory-care services for women of the Health Center Novi Sad. This retrospective study included 640 women, 42-82 years of age. The mean age at menopause is 49.05 +/- 3.51 years, and median 50.05 +/- 0.17. Menopause in women under the age of 40 has been referred to as premature and it occurred in 16 women (2.49%). In regard to a longer time interval, in 585 women (91.41%) menopause occurred between 45-55 years of age. In our previous study of menarche in Novi Sad, we found that the mean age was 13.07 +/- 1.1 whereas the average reproductive period lasted 35.98 years. In order to perform relevant comparison of data in regard to menopause, it is necessary to establish a unified methodology. Foundation of Counseling Centers for menopausal women is desirable in the aim of better understanding their numerous problems during premenopausal and postmenopausal periods.

  5. Evolutionary medicine and its implications for endocrinological issues (e.g. menopause).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchengast, Sylvia; Rühli, Frank

    2013-06-01

    Evolutionary medicine, which was formalized in the early 1990s, investigates evolutionary causes of recent human disease, disorders and malfunctions but also the influence of changing living conditions and modernization on health and disease. Evolutionary medicine can also provide insights into endocrinological disorders and in particular in the process of female reproductive senescence. Female reproductive senescence, i.e. menopausal transition is physiologically caused by the decline of estrogen secretion, which is associated with various somatic and psychic discomforts making this stage of life extremely uncomfortable. From the viewpoint of evolutionary medicine, these menopausal symptoms are the result from the sudden decrease of very high lifetime estrogen levels to zero during postmenopause, a situation which is quite new in our evolution and history. While women in recent developed countries experience menarche early, menopause late, few pregnancies, short periods of lactation and consequently low life time estrogen levels. The opposite is true of women living in traditional societies, whose living conditions may be interpreted as a mirror of the situation in our history. From this viewpoint we can conclude that menopausal symptoms may are the result of a mismatch between female reproductive physiology and recent living conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Knowledge, experience and behavior at climacteric and menopause stages among family medicine female users at IMSS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-Murillo, Vitelio; Fernández-Gárate, Irma H; Ojeda-Mijares, Rosalba I; Padilla-Vallejo, Isabel; de la Cruz-Mejía, Leticia

    2007-01-01

    To identify knowledge, experiences and behaviors of climacteric and menopause women users of family medicine services of Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS). A descriptive study that included a 37 questions survey about climacteric and menopause was conducted in a national representative sample of 4162 women aged 45 to 59 years between September 2004 and January 2005. The analysis was made by using descriptive statistics and chi2. 82.9 % Of women knew about menopause or its significance; 82.1 % identified hot flushes as a climacteric symptom; 46.1 % knew about pharmacologic treatment and 25.6 % knew about postmenopausal complications such as osteoporosis. Only 26.6 % mentioned preventive measures as physical exercise or consumption of food with high calcium content. Their main information sources were media communication. Mean age at menopause was 46.8 years old; 57.7 % had symptoms at interview and 18.4 % were taking pharmacologic treatment, mainly (53.3 %) hormones. 11.1 % of treated women had had side effects. 10.7 % had received pharmacologic treatment and 39.4 % had withdrawn from medication either for medical indications or for side effects (23 %). Knowledge about climacteric was scarce and obtained from non-medical sources; use of pharmacological treatment and preventive behavior was low. We recommended reinforcing the information and education about treatment and favorable life styles by health personal.