WorldWideScience

Sample records for expanded safety experience

  1. Long-term safety and outcome of a temporary self-expanding metallic stent for achalasia: a prospective study with a 13-year single-center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Jun-Gong; Li, Yong-Dong; Li, Ming-Hua; Shang, Ke-Zhong; Cheng, Ying-Sheng; Chen, Ni-Wei; Chen, Wei-Xiong

    2009-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the long-term clinical safety and efficacy of a newly designed self-expanding metallic stent (SEMS) in the treatment of patients with achalasia. Seventy-five patients with achalasia were treated with a temporary SEMS with a 30-mm diameter. The SEMSs were placed under fluoroscopic guidance and removed by gastroscopy 4-5 days after stent placement. Follow-up data focused on dysphagia score, technique and clinical success, clinical remissions and failures, and complications and was performed at 6 months, 1 year, and within 3 to 5 years, 5 to 8 years, 8 to 10 years, and >10 years postoperatively. Stent placement was technically successful in all patients. Complications included stent migration (n=4, 5.33%), chest pain (n=28, 38.7%), reflux (n=15, 20%), and bleeding (n=9, 12%). No perforation or 30-day mortality occurred. Clinical success was achieved in all patients 1 month after stent removal. The overall remission rates at 6 months, 1, 1-3, 3-5, 5-8, 8-10, and >10 year follow-up periods were 100%, 96%, 93.9%, 90.9%, 100%, 100%, and 83.3%, respectively. Stent treatment failed in six patients, and the overall remission rate in our series was 92%. The median and mean primary patencies were 2.8 ± 0.28 years (95% CI: 2.25-3.35) and 4.28 ± 0.40 years (95% CI: 3.51-5.05), respectively. The use of temporary SEMSs with 30-mm diameter proved to be a safe and effective approach for managing achalasia with a long-term satisfactory clinical remission rate. (orig.)

  2. Long-term safety and outcome of a temporary self-expanding metallic stent for achalasia: a prospective study with a 13-year single-center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jun-Gong; Li, Yong-Dong; Li, Ming-Hua; Shang, Ke-Zhong [Shanghai Tong Ji University, Department of Radiology, Tenth Affiliated People' s Hospital, Shanghai (China); Cheng, Ying-Sheng [Shanghai Tong Ji University, Department of Radiology, Tenth Affiliated People' s Hospital, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Radiology, Sixth Affiliated People' s Hospital, Shanghai (China); Chen, Ni-Wei; Chen, Wei-Xiong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Gastroenterology, Sixth Affiliated People' s Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2009-08-15

    To prospectively evaluate the long-term clinical safety and efficacy of a newly designed self-expanding metallic stent (SEMS) in the treatment of patients with achalasia. Seventy-five patients with achalasia were treated with a temporary SEMS with a 30-mm diameter. The SEMSs were placed under fluoroscopic guidance and removed by gastroscopy 4-5 days after stent placement. Follow-up data focused on dysphagia score, technique and clinical success, clinical remissions and failures, and complications and was performed at 6 months, 1 year, and within 3 to 5 years, 5 to 8 years, 8 to 10 years, and >10 years postoperatively. Stent placement was technically successful in all patients. Complications included stent migration (n=4, 5.33%), chest pain (n=28, 38.7%), reflux (n=15, 20%), and bleeding (n=9, 12%). No perforation or 30-day mortality occurred. Clinical success was achieved in all patients 1 month after stent removal. The overall remission rates at 6 months, 1, 1-3, 3-5, 5-8, 8-10, and >10 year follow-up periods were 100%, 96%, 93.9%, 90.9%, 100%, 100%, and 83.3%, respectively. Stent treatment failed in six patients, and the overall remission rate in our series was 92%. The median and mean primary patencies were 2.8 {+-} 0.28 years (95% CI: 2.25-3.35) and 4.28 {+-} 0.40 years (95% CI: 3.51-5.05), respectively. The use of temporary SEMSs with 30-mm diameter proved to be a safe and effective approach for managing achalasia with a long-term satisfactory clinical remission rate. (orig.)

  3. Operating experience: safety perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piplani, Vivek; Krishnamurthy, P.R.; Kumar, Neeraj; Upadhyay, Devendra

    2015-01-01

    Operating Experience (OE) provides valuable information for improving NPP safety. This may include events, precursors, deviations, deficiencies, problems, new insights to safety, good practices, lessons and corrective actions. As per INSAG-10, an OE program caters as a fundamental means for enhancing the defence-in-depth at NPPs and hence should be viewed as ‘Continuous Safety Performance Improvement Tool’. The ‘Convention on Nuclear Safety’ also recognizes the OE as a tool of high importance for enhancing the NPP safety and its Article 19 mandates each contracting party to establish an effective OE program at operating NPPs. The lessons drawn from major accidents at Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima Daiichi NPPs had prompted nuclear stalwarts to change their safety perspective towards NPPs and to frame sound policies on issues like safety culture, severe accident prevention and mitigation. An effective OE program, besides correcting current/potential problems, help in proactively improving the NPP design, operating and maintenance procedures, practices, training, etc., and thus plays vital role in ensuring safe and efficient operation of NPPs. Further it enhances knowledge with regard to equipment operating characteristics, system performance trends and provides data for quantitative and qualitative safety analysis. Besides all above, an OE program inculcates a learning culture in the organisation and thus helps in continuously enhancing the expertise, technical competency and knowledge base of its staff. Nuclear and Radiation Facilities in India are regulated by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB). Operating Plants Safety Division (OPSD) of AERB is involved in managing operating experience activities. This paper provides insights about the operating experience program of OPSD, AERB (including its on-line data base namely OPSD STAR) and its utilisation in improving the regulations and safety at Indian NPPs/projects. (author)

  4. Expanding Music Listening Experience through Drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yo-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Drawing while listening to music provides an opportunity for students to imagine and associate, leading to holistic listening experience. The personal qualitative listening experience triggered by music can be revealed in their drawings. In the process of representing of the listening experience through drawing, students can also increase their…

  5. Glovebox and Experiment Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Gerard

    2005-12-01

    Human spaceflight hardware and operations must comply with NSTS 1700.7. This paper discusses how a glovebox can help.A short layout is given on the process according NSTS/ISS 13830, explaining the responsibility of the payload organization, the approval authority of the PSRP and the defined review phases (0 till III).Amongst others, the following requirement has to be met:"200.1 Design to Tolerate Failures. Failure tolerance is the basic safety requirement that shall be used to control most payload hazards. The payload must tolerate a minimum number of credible failures and/or operator errors determined by the hazard level. This criterion applies when the loss of a function or the inadvertent occurrence of a function results in a hazardous event.200.1a Critical Hazards. Critical hazards shall be controlled such that no single failure or operator error can result in damage to STS/ISS equipment, a nondisabling personnel injury, or the use of unscheduled safing procedures that affect operations of the Orbiter/ISS or another payload.200.1b Catastrophic Hazards. Catastrophic hazards shall be controlled such that no combination of two failures or operator errors can result in the potential for a disabling or fatal personnel injury or loss of the Orbiter/ISS, ground facilities or STS/ISS equipment."For experiments in material science, biological science and life science that require real time operator manipulation, the above requirement may be hard or impossible to meet. Especially if the experiment contains substances that are considered hazardous when released into the habitable environment. In this case operation of the experiment in a glovebox can help to comply.A glovebox provides containment of the experiment and at the same time allows manipulation and visibility to the experiment.The containment inside the glovebox provides failure tolerance because the glovebox uses a negative pressure inside the working volume (WV). The level of failure tolerance is dependent of

  6. The spent fuel safety experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmms, G.A.; Davis, F.J.; Ford, J.T.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy is conducting an ongoing investigation of the consequences of taking fuel burnup into account in the design of spent fuel transportation packages. A series of experiments, collectively called the Spent Fuel Safety Experiment (SFSX), has been devised to provide integral benchmarks for testing computer-generated predictions of spent fuel behavior. A set of experiments is planned in which sections of unirradiated fuel rods are interchanged with similar sections of spent PWR fuel rods in a critical assembly. By determining the critical size of the arrays, one can obtain benchmark data for comparison with criticality safety calculations. The integral reactivity worth of the spent fuel can be assessed by comparing the measured delayed critical fuel loading with and without spent fuel. An analytical effort to model the experiments and anticipate the core loadings required to yield the delayed critical conditions runs in parallel with the experimental effort

  7. Safety of endoscopic removal of self-expandable stents after treatment of benign esophageal diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Halsema, Emo E.; Wong Kee Song, Louis M.; Baron, Todd H.; Siersema, Peter D.; Vleggaar, Frank P.; Ginsberg, Gregory G.; Shah, Pari M.; Fleischer, David E.; Ratuapli, Shiva K.; Fockens, Paul; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Rando, Giacomo; Repici, Alessandro; van Hooft, Jeanin E.

    2013-01-01

    Temporary placement of self-expandable stents has been increasingly used for the management of benign esophageal diseases. To evaluate the safety of endoscopic removal of esophageal self-expandable stents placed for the treatment of benign esophageal diseases. Multicenter retrospective study. Six

  8. Dynamics of a radially expanding liquid sheet: Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Nayanika; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh

    2017-11-01

    A recent theory predicts that sinuous waves generated at the center of a radially expanding liquid sheet grow spatially even in absence of a surrounding gas phase. Unlike flat liquid sheets, the thickness of a radially expanding liquid sheet varies inversely with distance from the center of the sheet. To test the predictions of the theory, experiments were carried out on a horizontal, radially expanding liquid sheet formed by collision of a single jet on a solid impactor. The latter was placed on a speaker-vibrator with controlled amplitude and frequency. The growth of sinuous waves was determined by measuring the wave surface inclination angle using reflected laser light under both atmospheric and sub-atmospheric pressure conditions. It is shown that the measured growth rate matches with the predictions of the theory over a large range of Weber numbers for both pressure conditions suggesting that the thinning of the liquid sheet plays a dominant role in setting the growth rate of sinuous waves with minimal influence of the surrounding gas phase on its dynamics. IIT Bombay.

  9. Safety experience on EDF's PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.

    1986-01-01

    The french nuclear programme has been widely publicized. In 1985, the total nuclear electricity generated was around 216 GWh, i. e. 70% of the electricity produced by electricity de France (EDF). If we consider only pressurized water reactors, at the end of 1985, 37 units were in operation (32 900 MWe and 5 1300 MWe) and 18 were under construction. I intend to review our experience with the safety of PWR's, but I will first present briefly some aspects related to the safety organization in France and the standardization policy. (author) [pt

  10. Safety engineering experiments of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Noboru

    1987-07-24

    The outline of large scale experiments carried out every year since 1969 to obtain fundamental data and then establish the safety engineering standards concerning the manufacturing, storage and transportation, etc. of all explosives was described. Because it becomes recently difficult to ensure the safety distance in powder magazines and powder plants, the sandwich structure with sand is thought to be suitable as the neighboring barrier walls. The special vertical structure for embankments to provide against a emergency explosion is effective to absorb the blast. Explosion behaviors such as initiating sensitivity, detonation, sympathetic detonation, and shock occurence of the ANFO explosives in place of dynamite and the slurry explosives were studied. The safety engineering standards for the manufacturing and application of explosives were studied to establish because accidents by tabacco fire are not still distinguished. Much data concerning early stage fire fighting, a large quantity of flooding and shock occurence from a assumption of ignition during machining in the propellants manufacturing plant, could be obtained. Basic studies were made to prevent pollution in blasting sites. Collected data are utilized for the safety administration after sufficient discussion. (4 figs, 2 tabs, 3 photos, 17 refs)

  11. Large Scale Experiments on Spacecraft Fire Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, David; Ruff, Gary A.; Minster, Olivier; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; Tien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Legros, Guillaume; Eigenbrod, Christian; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita, Osamu; hide

    2012-01-01

    Full scale fire testing complemented by computer modelling has provided significant knowhow about the risk, prevention and suppression of fire in terrestrial systems (cars, ships, planes, buildings, mines, and tunnels). In comparison, no such testing has been carried out for manned spacecraft due to the complexity, cost and risk associated with operating a long duration fire safety experiment of a relevant size in microgravity. Therefore, there is currently a gap in knowledge of fire behaviour in spacecraft. The entire body of low-gravity fire research has either been conducted in short duration ground-based microgravity facilities or has been limited to very small fuel samples. Still, the work conducted to date has shown that fire behaviour in low-gravity is very different from that in normal gravity, with differences observed for flammability limits, ignition delay, flame spread behaviour, flame colour and flame structure. As a result, the prediction of the behaviour of fires in reduced gravity is at present not validated. To address this gap in knowledge, a collaborative international project, Spacecraft Fire Safety, has been established with its cornerstone being the development of an experiment (Fire Safety 1) to be conducted on an ISS resupply vehicle, such as the Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) or Orbital Cygnus after it leaves the ISS and before it enters the atmosphere. A computer modelling effort will complement the experimental effort. Although the experiment will need to meet rigorous safety requirements to ensure the carrier vehicle does not sustain damage, the absence of a crew removes the need for strict containment of combustion products. This will facilitate the possibility of examining fire behaviour on a scale that is relevant to spacecraft fire safety and will provide unique data for fire model validation. This unprecedented opportunity will expand the understanding of the fundamentals of fire behaviour in spacecraft. The experiment is being

  12. Leadership for safety: industrial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flin, R; Yule, S

    2004-12-01

    The importance of leadership for effective safety management has been the focus of research attention in industry for a number of years, especially in energy and manufacturing sectors. In contrast, very little research into leadership and safety has been carried out in medical settings. A selective review of the industrial safety literature for leadership research with possible application in health care was undertaken. Emerging findings show the importance of participative, transformational styles for safety performance at all levels of management. Transactional styles with attention to monitoring and reinforcement of workers' safety behaviours have been shown to be effective at the supervisory level. Middle managers need to be involved in safety and foster open communication, while ensuring compliance with safety systems. They should allow supervisors a degree of autonomy for safety initiatives. Senior managers have a prime influence on the organisation's safety culture. They need to continuously demonstrate a visible commitment to safety, best indicated by the time they devote to safety matters.

  13. Expanding access to naloxone for family members: The Massachusetts experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Sarah M; Forman, Leah S; Ruiz, Sarah; Cranston, Kevin; Walley, Alexander Y

    2018-05-01

    The Massachusetts Department of Public Health Overdose Education and Naloxone Distribution Program provides overdose education and naloxone rescue kits to people at risk for overdose and bystanders, including family members. Using Massachusetts Department of Public Health data, the aims are to: (i) describe characteristics of family members who receive naloxone; (ii) identify where family members obtain naloxone; and (iii) describe characteristics of rescues by family members. We conducted a retrospective review using program enrollee information collected on a standardised form between 2008 and 2015. We calculated descriptive statistics, including demographics, current substance use, enrolment location, history of witnessed overdoses and rescue attempt characteristics. We conducted a stratified analysis comparing family members who used drugs with those who did not. Family members were 27% of total program enrollees (n = 10 883/40 801). Family members who reported substance use (n = 4679) were 35.6 years (mean), 50.6% female, 76.3% non-Hispanic white, 75.6% had witnessed an overdose, and they obtained naloxone most frequently at HIV prevention programs. Family members who did not report substance use (n = 6148) were 49.2 years (mean), 73.8% female, 87.9% non-Hispanic white, 35.3% had witnessed an overdose, and they obtained naloxone most frequently at community meetings. Family members were responsible for 20% (n = 860/4373) of the total rescue attempts. The Massachusetts experience demonstrates that family members can be active participants in responding to the overdose epidemic by rescuing family members and others. Targeted intervention strategies for families should be included in efforts to expand overdose education and naloxone in Massachusetts. © 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  14. Experiences in assessing safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitalnik, J.

    2002-01-01

    Based on several Safety Culture self-assessment applications in nuclear organisations, the paper stresses relevant aspects to be considered when programming an assessment of this type. Reasons for assessing Safety Culture, basic principles to take into account, necessary resources, the importance of proper statistical analyses, the feed-back of results, and the setting up of action plans to enhance Safety Culture are discussed. (author)

  15. AST-500 safety analysis experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falikov, A A; Bakhmetiev, A M; Kuul, V S; Samoilov, O B [OKBM, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    1997-09-01

    Characteristic AST-type NHR safety features and requirements are described briefly. The main approaches and results of design and beyond-design accidents analyses for the AST-500 NHR, and the results of probabilistic safety assessments are considered. It is concluded that the AST-500 possesses a high safety level in virtue of the development and realization in the design of self-protection, passivity and defence-in-depth principles. (author). 9 refs, 2 figs.

  16. Experiment to evaluate software safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soubies, B.; Henry, J.Y.

    1994-01-01

    The process of licensing nuclear power plants for operation consists of mandatory steps featuring detailed examination of the instrumentation and control system by the safety authorities, including softwares. The criticality of these softwares obliges the manufacturer to develop in accordance with the IEC 880 standard 'Computer software in nuclear power plant safety systems' issued by the International Electronic Commission. The evaluation approach, a two-stage assessment is described in detail. In this context, the IPSN (Institute of Protection and Nuclear Safety), the technical support body of the safety authority uses the MALPAS tool to analyse the quality of the programs. (R.P.). 4 refs

  17. USE OF COVERED SELF-EXPANDABLE NITINOL STENT FOR ANASTOMOTIC BILIARY STRUCTURE MANAGEMENT AFTER LIVER TRANSPLANTATION: THE FIRST EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Kornilov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study focuses on the first experience with self-expandable stents, analysis of its efficacy and safety in the treatment of anastomotic strictures after liver transplantation. Materials and methods. There’re 136 liver transplantations performed from 2004 till 2012. To correct anastomotic strictures we’ve used only the self-expandable coated nitinol stent. We performed stenting in 7 recipient. Result. In 131 liver transplant recipients incidence of biliary strictures has been 5.3%. All of 5 patients have been managed by retrograde or antegrade way. Conclusion. Our first experience demonstrate efficacy and safety of the used tecniques up to 24 months. The analysis of more long-term results is required. 

  18. Expandable metallic stent: experimental and clinical experience in tracheobronchial tree

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ho Young; Lee, Sang Young; Chung, Jin Young; Han, Young Min; Kim, Jong Soo; Choi, Ki Chul; Hong, Ki Whan; Rhee, Yang Kun [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-05-15

    To maintain or reestablish an adequate airway in a patient with tracheobronchial narrowing coming from various causes, we constructed self-expanding metallic stents the same way Gianturco did, using them in 2 patients after an experimental study with rabbits. Twenty stents (10mm in diameter fully expanded and 20mm in length) were introduced into the trachea or bronchi of 10 Newzealand rabbits (weight, 2.5-3.0kg) through a 8.5 French Teflon sheath. No difficulties were encountered in the placement of the stents. At follow-up (4-12 weeks), no stent showed migration. Three rabbits died of pneumonia or bronchial perforation. Histologically, mucosal inflammation was noted at the sites of stent placement, and stent wires were covered by proliferated epithelium with intact cilia. During the last 4 months, 2 stents were used in 2 patients, one in a patient with endobronchial tuberculosis (3.0cm in length and 1.0cm in diameter fully expanded) and the other (3.0cm in length and 1.5cm in diameter) in a patient with a subglottic mass. In both patients the stents were successfully placed. Just after the placement of the stents dyspnea subsided in both patients, and there was no mortality or morbidity. These stents seem to be effective in the treatment of tracheobronchial stenosis, tracheomalacia, and airway collapse following tracheal reconstruction.

  19. Expandable metallic stent: experimental and clinical experience in tracheobronchial tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ho Young; Lee, Sang Young; Chung, Jin Young; Han, Young Min; Kim, Jong Soo; Choi, Ki Chul; Hong, Ki Whan; Rhee, Yang Kun

    1991-01-01

    To maintain or reestablish an adequate airway in a patient with tracheobronchial narrowing coming from various causes, we constructed self-expanding metallic stents the same way Gianturco did, using them in 2 patients after an experimental study with rabbits. Twenty stents (10mm in diameter fully expanded and 20mm in length) were introduced into the trachea or bronchi of 10 Newzealand rabbits (weight, 2.5-3.0kg) through a 8.5 French Teflon sheath. No difficulties were encountered in the placement of the stents. At follow-up (4-12 weeks), no stent showed migration. Three rabbits died of pneumonia or bronchial perforation. Histologically, mucosal inflammation was noted at the sites of stent placement, and stent wires were covered by proliferated epithelium with intact cilia. During the last 4 months, 2 stents were used in 2 patients, one in a patient with endobronchial tuberculosis (3.0cm in length and 1.0cm in diameter fully expanded) and the other (3.0cm in length and 1.5cm in diameter) in a patient with a subglottic mass. In both patients the stents were successfully placed. Just after the placement of the stents dyspnea subsided in both patients, and there was no mortality or morbidity. These stents seem to be effective in the treatment of tracheobronchial stenosis, tracheomalacia, and airway collapse following tracheal reconstruction

  20. The expanding shell test: Numerical simulation of the experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buy, Francois; Llorca, Fabrice

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of materials at very high strain rates is a broad field of investigation. One of the major problem is to impose a well known velocity and stress loading. The expanding shell, because of its ability to impose a sudden loading with no ulterior stress, has been retained to analyze the mechanical behavior of several metals through the free flight of a deforming structure. We perform several simulations on various metals in order to evaluate the strain rates and velocity in the sample. A second step consists in interpreting experimental data obtained on these metals

  1. Can the United States Expand Apprenticeship? Lessons from Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Lerman, Robert I.

    2012-01-01

    Can expanded apprenticeship reduce the concerns about the U.S. workforce? The U.S. labor market faces a rise in unemployment rates, sharp declines in the employed share of U.S. adults, extremely high youth unemployment, high wage inequality, and low or stagnant wage growth for workers below the BA degree. Currently, the primary solution advanced by policymakers – helping more people go to college – is both expensive and of limited effectiveness. Unfortunately, the U.S. policy debate is rarely...

  2. Status of Occupational Health and Safety and Related Challenges in Expanding Economy of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrema, Ezra J; Ngowi, Aiwerasia V; Mamuya, Simon H D

    2015-01-01

    Occupational health and safety is related with economic activities undertaken in the country. As the economic activities grow and expand, occupational injuries and diseases are more likely to increase among workers in different sectors of economy such as agriculture, mining, transport, and manufacture. This may result in high occupational health and safety services demand, which might be difficult to meet by developing countries that are prioritizing economic expansion without regard to their impact on occupational health and safety. To describe the status of occupational health and safety in Tanzania and outline the challenges in provision of occupational health services under the state of an expanding economy. Tanzania's economy is growing steadily, with growth being driven by communications, transport, financial intermediation, construction, mining, agriculture, and manufacturing. Along with this growth, hazards emanating from work in all sectors of the economy have increased and varied. The workers exposed to these hazards suffer from illness and injuries and yet they are not provided with adequate occupational health services. Services are scanty and limited to a few enterprises that can afford it. Existing laws and regulations are not comprehensive enough to cover the entire population. Implementation of legislation is weak and does not protect the workers. Most Tanzanians are not covered by the occupational health and safety law and do not access occupational health services. Thus an occupational health and safety services strategy, backed by legislations and provided with the necessary resources (competent experts, financial and technological resources), is a necessity in Tanzania. The existing legal provisions require major modifications to meet international requirements and standards. OHS regulations and legislations need refocusing, revision, and strengthening to cover all working population. Capacities should be improved through training and research

  3. Safety of endoscopic removal of self-expandable stents after treatment of benign esophageal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Halsema, Emo E; Wong Kee Song, Louis M; Baron, Todd H; Siersema, Peter D; Vleggaar, Frank P; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Shah, Pari M; Fleischer, David E; Ratuapli, Shiva K; Fockens, Paul; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W; Rando, Giacomo; Repici, Alessandro; van Hooft, Jeanin E

    2013-01-01

    Temporary placement of self-expandable stents has been increasingly used for the management of benign esophageal diseases. To evaluate the safety of endoscopic removal of esophageal self-expandable stents placed for the treatment of benign esophageal diseases. Multicenter retrospective study. Six tertiary care centers in the United States and Europe. A total of 214 patients with benign esophageal diseases undergoing endoscopic stent removal. Endoscopic stent removal. Endoscopic techniques for stent removal, time to stent removal, and adverse events related to stent removal. A total of 214 patients underwent a total of 329 stent extractions. Stents were mainly placed for refractory strictures (49.2%) and fistulae (49.8%). Of the removed stents, 52% were fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FCSEMSs), 28.6% were partially covered self-expandable metal stents (PCSEMSs), and 19.5% were self-expandable plastic stents. A total of 35 (10.6%) procedure-related adverse events were reported, including 7 (2.1%) major adverse events. Multivariate analysis revealed that use of PCSEMSs (P stent removal. Favorable factors for successful stent removal were FCSEMSs (P ≤ .012) and stent migration (P = .010). No significant associations were found for stent indwelling time (P = .145) and stent embedding (P = .194). Retrospective analysis, only tertiary care centers. With an acceptable major adverse event rate of 2.1%, esophageal stent removal in the setting of benign disease was found to be a safe and feasible procedure. FCSEMSs were more successfully removed than self-expandable plastic stents and PCSEMSs. Adverse events caused by stent removal were not time dependent. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Experiment on safety software evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soubies, B.; Henry, J.Y.

    1994-06-01

    The licensing procedures process of nuclear plants includes compulsory steps which bring about a thorough exam of the commands control system. In this context the IPSN uses a tool called MALPAS to carry out an analysis of the quality of the software involved in safety control. The IPSN also try to obtain the automation of the generation of test games necessary for dynamical analysis. The MALPAS tool puts forward the particularities of programing which can influence the testability and the upholding of the studied software. (TEC). 4 refs

  5. SCALE Validation Experience Using an Expanded Isotopic Assay Database for Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauld, Ian C.; Radulescu, Georgeta; Ilas, Germina

    2009-01-01

    The availability of measured isotopic assay data to validate computer code predictions of spent fuel compositions applied in burnup-credit criticality calculations is an essential component for bias and uncertainty determination in safety and licensing analyses. In recent years, as many countries move closer to implementing or expanding the use of burnup credit in criticality safety for licensing, there has been growing interest in acquiring additional high-quality assay data. The well-known open sources of assay data are viewed as potentially limiting for validating depletion calculations for burnup credit due to the relatively small number of isotopes measured (primarily actinides with relatively few fission products), sometimes large measurement uncertainties, incomplete documentation, and the limited burnup and enrichment range of the fuel samples. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) recently initiated an extensive isotopic validation study that includes most of the public data archived in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) electronic database, SFCOMPO, and new datasets obtained through participation in commercial experimental programs. To date, ORNL has analyzed approximately 120 different spent fuel samples from pressurized-water reactors that span a wide enrichment and burnup range and represent a broad class of assembly designs. The validation studies, completed using SCALE 5.1, are being used to support a technical basis for expanded implementation of burnup credit for spent fuel storage facilities, and other spent fuel analyses including radiation source term, dose assessment, decay heat, and waste repository safety analyses. This paper summarizes the isotopic assay data selected for this study, presents validation results obtained with SCALE 5.1, and discusses some of the challenges and experience associated with evaluating the results. Preliminary results obtained using SCALE 6 and ENDF

  6. US nuclear safety. Review and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanauer, S.H.

    1977-01-01

    The paper deals with the evolution of reactor safety principles, design bases, regulatory requirements, and experience in the United States. Safety concerns have evolved over the years, from reactivity transients and shut-down systems, to blowdowns and containment, to severe design basis accidents and mitigating systems, to the performance of actual materials, systems and humans. The primary safety concerns of one epoch have been superseded in considerable measure by those of later times. Successive plateaus of technical understanding are achieved by solutions being found to earlier problems. Design studies, research, operating experience and regulatory imperatives all contribute to the increased understanding and thus to the safety improvements adopted and accepted. The improvement of safety with time, and the ability of existing reactors to operate safely in the face of new concerns, has confirmed the correctness and usefulness of the defence-in-depth approach and safety margins used in safety design in the United States of America. A regulatory programme such as the one in the United States justifies its great cost by its important contributions to safety. Yet only the designers, constructors and operators of nuclear power plants can actually achieve public safety. The regulatory programme audits, assesses and spot-checks the actual work. Since neither materials nor human beings are flawless, mistakes will be made; that is why defence-in-depth and safety margins are provided. The regulatory programme should enhance safety by decreasing the frequency of uncorrected mistakes. Maintenance of public safety also requires technical and managerial competence and attention in the organizations responsible for nuclear plants as well as regulatory organizations. (author)

  7. US nuclear safety review and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilinsky, V.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear safety review of commercial nuclear power reactors has changed over the years from the relatively simple review of Dresden 1 in 1955 to the highly complex and sophisticated regulatory process which characterizes today's reviews. Four factors have influenced this evolution: (1) maturing of the technology and industry; (2) development of the regulatory process and associated staff; (3) feedback of operating experience; and (4) public awareness and participation. The NRC's safety review responsibilities start before an application is tendered and end when the plant is decommissioned. The safety review for reactor licensing is a comprehensive, two-phase process designed to assure that all the established conservative acceptance criteria are satisfied. Operational safety is assured through a strong inspection and enforcement program which includes shutting down operating facilities when necessary to protect the health and safety of the public. The safety of operating reactors is further insured through close regulation of license changes and selective backfitting of new regulatory requirements. An effective NRC standards development program has been implemented and coordinates closely with the national standards program. A confirmatory safety research program has been developed. Both of these efforts are invaluable to the nuclear safety review because they provide the staff with key tools needed to carry out its regulatory responsibilities. Both have been given increased emphasis since the formation of the NRC in 1975. The safety review process will continue to evolve, but changes will be slower and more deliberate. It will be influenced by standardization, early site reviews and development of advanced reactor concepts. New legislation may make possible changes which will simplify and shorten the regulatory process. Certainly the experience provided by the increasing number and types of operating plants will have a very strong impact on future trends in the

  8. 77 FR 5472 - Pipeline Safety: Expanding the Use of Excess Flow Valves in Gas Distribution Systems to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ..., Regulatory Certainty, and Job Creation Act of 2011 (PL112-90), have imposed additional demands on their... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 192 [Docket ID PHMSA-2011-0009] RIN 2137-AE71 Pipeline Safety: Expanding the Use of Excess Flow Valves...

  9. Using the Tritium Plasma Experiment to evaluate ITER PFC safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Bartlit, J.R.; Causey, R.A.; Haines, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Tritium Plasma Experiment was assembled at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore to investigate interactions between dense plasmas at low energies and plasma-facing component materials. This apparatus has the unique capability of replicating plasma conditions in a tokamak divertor with particle flux densities of 2 x 10 19 ions/cm 2 · s and a plasma temperature of about 15 eV using a plasma that includes tritium. With the closure of the Tritium Research Laboratory at Livermore, the experiment was moved to the Tritium Systems Test Assembly facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. An experimental program has been initiated there using the Tritium Plasma Experiment to examine safety issues related to tritium in plasma-facing components, particularly the ITER divertor. Those issues include tritium retention and release characteristics, tritium permeation rates and transient times to coolant streams, surface modification and erosion by the plasma, the effects of thermal loads and cycling, and particulate production. A considerable lack of data exists in these areas for many of the materials, especially beryllium, being considered for use in ITER. Not only will basic material behavior with respect to safety issues in the divertor environment be examined, but innovative techniques for optimizing performance with respect to tritium safety by material modification and process control will be investigated. Supplementary experiments will be carried out at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory to expand and clarify results obtained on the Tritium Plasma Experiment

  10. Review of Occupational Health and Safety Organization in Expanding Economies: The Case of Southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, Dingani; Zungu, Muzimkhulu; Kgalamono, Spoponki; Mwila, Chimba D

    2015-01-01

    Globally, access to occupational health and safety (OHS) by workers has remained at very low levels. The organization and implementation of OHS in South Africa, Zimbabwe, Zambia, and Botswana has remained at suboptimal levels. Inadequacy of human resource capital, training, and education in the field of OHS has had a major negative impact on the improvement of worker access to such services in expanding economies. South Africa, Zimbabwe, Zambia, and Botswana have expanding economies with active mining and agricultural activities that pose health and safety risks to the working population. A literature review and country systems inquiry on the organization of OHS services in the 4 countries was carried out. Because of the infancy and underdevelopment of OHS in southern Africa, literature on the status of this topic is limited. In the 4 countries under review, OHS services are a function shared either wholly or partially by 3 ministries, namely Health, Labor, and Mining. Other ministries, such as Environment and Agriculture, carry small fragments of OHS function. The 4 countries are at different stages of OHS legislative frameworks that guide the practice of health and safety in the workplace. Inadequacies in human resource capital and expertise in occupational health and safety are noted major constraints in the implementation and compliance to health and safety initiatives in the work place. South Africa has a more mature system than Zimbabwe, Zambia, and Botswana. Lack of specialized training in occupational health services, such as occupational medicine specialization for physicians, has been a major drawback in Zimbabwe, Zambia, and Botswana. The full adoption and success of OHS systems in Southern Africa remains constrained. Training and education in OHS, especially in occupational medicine, will enhance the development and maturation of occupational health in southern Africa. Capacitating primary health services with basic occupational health knowledge would

  11. LMFBR safety experiment facility planning and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, M.G.; Scott, J.H.

    1976-01-01

    In the past two years considerable effort has been placed on the planning and design of new facilities for the resolution of LMFBR safety issues. The paper reviews the key issues, the experiments needed to resolve them, and the design aspects of proposed new facilities. In addition, it presents a decision theory approach to selecting an optimal combination of modified and new facilities

  12. Direct transcatheter aortic valve implantation with self-expandable bioprosthesis: Feasibility and safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorina, Claudia, E-mail: clafiorina@yahoo.it [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Maffeo, Diego; Curello, Salvatore [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Lipartiti, Felicia [Division of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Chizzola, Giuliano [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); D' Aloia, Antonio [Division of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Adamo, Marianna [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Mastropierro, Rosy [Division of Cardiothoracic Anestesiology, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Gavazzi, Emanuele [Department of Radiology, University of Brescia, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Ciccarese, Camilla; Chiari, Ermanna [Division of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Ettori, Federica [Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Cardiothoracic Department, Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy)

    2014-06-15

    Background: Balloon valvuloplasty has been considered a mandatory step of the transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), although it is not without risk. The aim of this work was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of TAVI performed without pre-dilation (direct TAVI) of the stenosed aortic valve. Material and Methods: Between June 2012 and June 2013, 55 consecutive TAVI performed without pre-dilation at our institution using the self-expandable CoreValve prosthesis (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) were analyzed and compared with 45 pre-dilated TAVI performed the previous year. Inclusion criteria were a symptomatic and severe aortic stenosis. Exclusion criteria were defined as presence of pure aortic regurgitation, degenerated surgical bioprosthesis or bicuspid aortic valve and prior procedure of balloon aortic valvuloplasty performed as a bridge to TAVI. Results: High-burden calcification in the device landing zone, assessed by CT scan, was found in most of the patients. The valve size implanted was similar in both groups. Device success was higher in direct TAVI (85% vs. 64%, p = 0.014), mostly driven by a significant lower incidence of paravalvular leak (PVL ≥2; 9% vs. 33%, p = 0.02). Safety combined end point at 30 days was similar in both groups. Conclusion: Compared to TAVI with pre-dilation, direct TAVI is feasible regardless of the presence of bulky calcified aortic valve and the valve size implanted. Device success was higher in direct TAVI, mostly driven by a lower incidence of paravalvular leak. Safety at 30 days was similar in two groups.

  13. Return on experience. Building tomorrow's safety rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2013-01-01

    Based on some experiments and witnesses, this set of articles outlines the importance of the return on experience in the evolution of process for improving the safety of nuclear installations. As an example, an article notably addresses the failures of Diesel engines which are used as spare generators in nuclear power stations: failures have been analysed and attributed to bearings, and more specifically to the degradation of their surface, and a third generation of bearings has been designed and produced. An article outlines that different industrials belonging to the nuclear sector as well as to other sectors share their returns on experience

  14. Benchmarking criticality safety calculations with subcritical experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    1984-06-01

    Calculation of the neutron multiplication factor at delayed criticality may be necessary for benchmarking calculations but it may not be sufficient. The use of subcritical experiments to benchmark criticality safety calculations could result in substantial savings in fuel material costs for experiments. In some cases subcritical configurations could be used to benchmark calculations where sufficient fuel to achieve delayed criticality is not available. By performing a variety of measurements with subcritical configurations, much detailed information can be obtained which can be compared directly with calculations. This paper discusses several measurements that can be performed with subcritical assemblies and presents examples that include comparisons between calculation and experiment where possible. Where not, examples from critical experiments have been used but the measurement methods could also be used for subcritical experiments

  15. Successful range-expanding plants experience less above-ground and below-ground enemy impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelkes, Tim; Morriën, Elly; Verhoeven, Koen J F; Bezemer, T Martijn; Biere, Arjen; Harvey, Jeffrey A; McIntyre, Lauren M; Tamis, Wil L M; van der Putten, Wim H

    2008-12-18

    Many species are currently moving to higher latitudes and altitudes. However, little is known about the factors that influence the future performance of range-expanding species in their new habitats. Here we show that range-expanding plant species from a riverine area were better defended against shoot and root enemies than were related native plant species growing in the same area. We grew fifteen plant species with and without non-coevolved polyphagous locusts and cosmopolitan, polyphagous aphids. Contrary to our expectations, the locusts performed more poorly on the range-expanding plant species than on the congeneric native plant species, whereas the aphids showed no difference. The shoot herbivores reduced the biomass of the native plants more than they did that of the congeneric range expanders. Also, the range-expanding plants developed fewer pathogenic effects in their root-zone soil than did the related native species. Current predictions forecast biodiversity loss due to limitations in the ability of species to adjust to climate warming conditions in their range. Our results strongly suggest that the plants that shift ranges towards higher latitudes and altitudes may include potential invaders, as the successful range expanders may experience less control by above-ground or below-ground enemies than the natives.

  16. Safety and Efficacy of a Fully Covered Self-Expandable Metallic Stent in Benign Airway Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Marc; Lacasse, Yves; Elharrar, Xavier; Tazi-Mezalek, Rachid; Laroumagne, Sophie; Guinde, Julien; Astoul, Philippe; Dutau, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    The use of self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) in benign airway disease was the object of a boxed warning from the United States Food and Drug Administration in 2005 due to the risk of stent-related complications and difficulties associated with their removal. Third-generation fully covered SEMS have been commercialized since this warning and theoretically should not present the same difficulties associated with removal as they cannot become embedded in the airway mucosa. We aimed to examine the safety and efficacy of a specific third-generation SEMS, the Silmet stent. We reviewed the records of all patients treated for benign airway stenosis with third-generation Silmet SEMS from January 2011 to December 2015 at the North Hospital of Marseilles, France. Forty SEMS were inserted in 30 patients over this period. Twenty (50.0%) stents were removed because of stent-related complications after a median of 77.0 ± 96.6 days (migration 32.5%, granulation tissue formation 7.5%, subjective intolerance 5.0%, mucus plugging 2.5%, laryngeal edema 2.5%). There were no cases of stent-related mortality. All complications were managed successfully endoscopically. Thirty-six stents (90.0%) were removed successfully after a median of 122.0 ± 113.2 days without any complications. The clinical success rate of stent treatment was 40.7%. Third-generation SEMS are a safe treatment option for complex benign airway stenosis, but complications requiring stent removal are frequent. Further studies are needed to compare the performance of third-generation SEMS and silicone stents in benign airway stenosis. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Safety and benefits of self-expandable metallic stents with chemotherapy for malignant gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyabe, Katsuyuki; Hayashi, Kazuki; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Sano, Hitoshi; Yamada, Tomonori; Takada, Hiroki; Naitoh, Itaru; Shimizu, Shuya; Kondo, Hiromu; Nishi, Yuji; Yoshida, Michihiro; Umemura, Shuichiro; Hori, Yasuki; Kato, Akihisa; Ohara, Hirotaka; Joh, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    The influence of chemotherapy on placement of self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (MGOO) has not been evaluated extensively. We investigated the influence of chemotherapy on the clinical outcomes of SEMS placement for MGOO. A total of 152 cancer patients with MGOO from a university hospital and affiliate hospitals were included. The patients were classified according to chemotherapy status and evaluated for palliative efficacy and safety of SEMS placement. Technical success rate, time to oral intake, and parameters indicating improvement of physical condition did not differ between the with- and without-chemotherapy groups after stent placement. Re-intervention and stent migration were significantly more frequent in the with-chemotherapy group than in the without-chemotherapy group after stent placement (re-intervention, 32.4% vs 7.8%, P = 0.0005; stent migration, 13.5% vs 1.7%, P = 0.0097). The frequency of adverse events did not differ between the with- and without-chemotherapy groups. Although chemotherapy after stent placement was an independent predictive factor for shortening the stent patency period (hazard ratio [HR], 3.10; P = 0.0264), the use of additional stents facilitated uneventful recovery and further prolonged survival time (HR, 0.60; P = 0.0132). Various cancer patients with MGOO can undergo SEMS placement safely regardless of chemotherapy, and concurrent chemotherapy after stent placement can prolong survival time, although re-intervention and stent migration may be increased. © 2015 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2015 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  18. Safety Assurance for Irradiating Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. A. Tomberlin; S. B. Grover

    2004-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), was specifically designed to provide a high neutron flux test environment for conducting a variety of experiments. This paper addresses the safety assurance process for two general types of experiments conducted in the ATR facility and how the safety analyses for experiments are related to the ATR safety basis. One type of experiment is more routine and generally represents greater risks; therefore, this type of experiment is addressed in more detail in the ATR safety basis. This allows the individual safety analysis for this type of experiment to be more standardized. The second type of experiment is defined in more general terms in the ATR safety basis and is permitted under more general controls. Therefore, the individual safety analysis for the second type of experiment tends to be more unique and is tailored to each experiment.

  19. Safety Assurance for Irradiating Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. A. Tomberlin; S. B. Grover

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), was specifically designed to provide a high neutron flux test environment for conducting a variety of experiments. This paper addresses the safety assurance process for two general types of experiments conducted in the ATR facility and how the safety analyses for experiments are related to the ATR safety basis. One type of experiment is more routine and generally represents greater risks; therefore, this type of experiment is addressed in more detail in the ATR safety basis. This allows the individual safety analysis for this type of experiment to be more standardized. The second type of experiment is defined in more general terms in the ATR safety basis and is permitted under more general controls. Therefore, the individual safety analysis for the second type of experiment tends to be more unique and is tailored to each experiment

  20. Passive safety injection experiments and analyses (PAHKO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuunanen, J.

    1998-01-01

    PAHKO project involved experiments on the PACTEL facility and computer simulations of selected experiments. The experiments focused on the performance of Passive Safety Injection Systems (PSIS) of Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) in Small Break Loss-Of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) conditions. The PSIS consisted of a Core Make-up Tank (CMT) and two pipelines (Pressure Balancing Line, PBL, and Injection Line, IL). The examined PSIS worked efficiently in SBLOCAs although the flow through the PSIS stopped temporarily if the break was very small and the hot water filled the CMT. The experiments demonstrated the importance of the flow distributor in the CMT to limit rapid condensation. The project included validation of three thermal-hydraulic computer codes (APROS, CATHARE and RELAP5). The analyses showed the codes are capable to simulate the overall behaviour of the transients. The detailed analyses of the results showed some models in the codes still need improvements. Especially, further development of models for thermal stratification, condensation and natural circulation flow with small driving forces would be necessary for accurate simulation of the PSIS phenomena. (orig.)

  1. Use of safety experience feedback to design new nuclear units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, D.; Crochon, J.P.

    1985-06-01

    For the designer, and about safety, the experience feedback can take place in 3 fields: the operating experience feedback (incidents analysis), the ''study'' experience feedback (improvement of justification and evolution of safety considerations), and the fabrication experience feedback. Some examples are presented for each field [fr

  2. The detector safety system for LHC experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Schmeling, Sascha; Lüders, S; Morpurgo, Giulio

    2004-01-01

    The Detector Safety System (DSS), currently being developed at CERN under the auspices of the Joint Controls Project (JCOP), will be responsible for assuring the protection of equipment for the four Large Hadron Collider (LHC)**1 experiments. Thus, the DSS will require a high degree of both availability and reliability. After evaluation of various possible solutions, a prototype is being built based on a redundant Siemens PLC**2 front-end, to which the safety- critical part of the DSS task is delegated. This is then supervised by a PVSS**3 SCADA**4 system via an OPC**5 server. The PLC front-end is capable of running autonomously and of automatically taking predefined protective actions whenever required. The supervisory layer provides the operator with a status display and with limited online reconfiguration capabilities. Configuration of the code running in the PLCs will be completely data driven via the contents of a "configuration database." Thus, the DSS can easily adapt to the different and constantly ev...

  3. Large Scale Experiments on Spacecraft Fire Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urban, David L.; Ruff, Gary A.; Minster, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    -based microgravity facilities or has been limited to very small fuel samples. Still, the work conducted to date has shown that fire behaviour in low-gravity is very different from that in normal-gravity, with differences observed for flammability limits, ignition delay, flame spread behaviour, flame colour and flame......Full scale fire testing complemented by computer modelling has provided significant knowhow about the risk, prevention and suppression of fire in terrestrial systems (cars, ships, planes, buildings, mines, and tunnels). In comparison, no such testing has been carried out for manned spacecraft due...... to the complexity, cost and risk associ-ated with operating a long duration fire safety experiment of a relevant size in microgravity. Therefore, there is currently a gap in knowledge of fire behaviour in spacecraft. The entire body of low-gravity fire research has either been conducted in short duration ground...

  4. Readmissions for Selected Infections Due to Medical Care: Expanding the Definition of a Patient Safety Indicator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gallagher, Brian; Cen, Liyi; Hannan, Edward L

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's Patient Safety Indicator that identifies patients with selected infections that result from medical care during hospital inpatient treatment...

  5. Expanded activity of schools in Serbia: Legal framework and practical experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ognjenović Kosovka Đ.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Expanded activities of schools and activities of student cooperatives are important components of the educational process in schools, which are contributing to the improvement of the quality of education and better social inclusion of students. The main objective of this article is to focus on opportunities enabled by the legal framework that supports the realization of expanded activities and activities of student cooperatives in Serbian schools and to compare relevant experiences in Serbia with the practice in neighbouring countries and the old EU Member States. In particular, in this article it is examined to what extent the adoption of entrepreneurial competences through different entrepreneurship development programs contributes to the probability of implementation of additional activities in Serbian schools. For this purpose, the data of the Survey on practising, types and usefulness of expanded activities and activities of student cooperatives are used. This survey was conducted in 2010 at the samples of public primary and secondary schools that executed some sort of additional activities, as well as of schools that did not practice extended activities.

  6. Beyond Decision Making for Outdoor Leaders: Expanding the Safety Behavior Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jeff S.

    2016-01-01

    The study of safety behaviour of designated outdoor leaders primarily revolves around their decision making and judgement. The last ten years, however, have seen relatively little peer-reviewed research regarding guide or instructor safety cognition and behaviour. The narrow decision making focus of modern work makes for a field of study…

  7. Safety and efficacy of self-expandable metal stents for obstructive proximal and distal large bowel cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, V; Hu, M; Majumdar, D; Krishnan, V; Chaudhury, B; Hancock, J; Dwarakanath, D

    2017-03-01

    Self-expandable metal stents are often used to treat obstructive large bowel cancers. This study assessed the safety and efficacy of colonic stent insertion carried out in a district general hospital. Methods A retrospective review was carried out between 1 January 2007 and 28 February 2014 to identify patients who underwent stent insertion for malignant colorectal obstruction. Results Seventy-five patients (median age 75.2 years, 70.6% male) with primary colorectal cancer underwent stent insertion - 53 underwent semi-elective self-expanded metal stent insertion (for subacute bowel obstruction) and 22 had emergency stent inserted (for acute bowel obstruction). The majority (88%) had self-expanded metal stents inserted for palliation. Technical and clinical success rates were 98.7% and 91.2%, respectively. One patient had stent-related perforation; there was no procedure-related mortality. Conclusion This study shows that self-expanded metal stent insertion in malignant colorectal obstruction is safe and effective and can be successfully delivered in a district general hospital with high technical and clinical success rates.

  8. [Operating Room Nurses' Experiences of Securing for Patient Safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwang Ok; Kim, Jong Kyung; Kim, Myoung Sook

    2015-10-01

    This study was done to evaluate the experience of securing patient safety in hospital operating rooms. Experiential data were collected from 15 operating room nurses through in-depth interviews. The main question was "Could you describe your experience with patient safety in the operating room?". Qualitative data from the field and transcribed notes were analyzed using Strauss and Corbin's grounded theory methodology. The core category of experience with patient safety in the operating room was 'trying to maintain principles of patient safety during high-risk surgical procedures'. The participants used two interactional strategies: 'attempt continuous improvement', 'immersion in operation with sharing issues of patient safety'. The results indicate that the important factors for ensuring the safety of patients in the operating room are manpower, education, and a system for patient safety. Successful and safe surgery requires communication, teamwork and recognition of the importance of patient safety by the surgical team.

  9. Providing Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis Education through Benchmark Experiment Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, John D.; Briggs, J. Blair; Nigg, David W.

    2009-01-01

    One of the challenges that today's new workforce of nuclear criticality safety engineers face is the opportunity to provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines without having received significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and/or the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) provides students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills.

  10. Radiological safety design considerations for fusion research experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crase, K.W.; Singh, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    A wide variety of fusion research experiments are in the planning or construction stages. Two such experiments, the Nova Laser Fusion Facility and the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), are currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Although the plasma chamber vault for MFTF and the Nova target room will have thick concrete walls and roofs, the radiation safety problems are made complex by the numerous requirements for shield wall penetrations. This paper addresses radiation safety considerations for the MFTF and Nova experiments, and the need for integrated safety considerations and safety technology development during the planning stages of fusion experiments

  11. Virtual Road Safety Audits: Recommended Procedures for Using Driving Simulation and Technology to Expand Existing Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-02

    One approach that has been proposed to address the limitations of the current reactive safetymonitoring approaches is the use of road safety audits (RSAs). As part of an RSA, the existing or expected characteristics and traffic conditions of a locati...

  12. Expanding the scope of practice for radiology managers: radiation safety duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orders, Amy B; Wright, Donna

    2003-01-01

    In addition to financial responsibilities and patient care duties, many medical facilities also expect radiology department managers to wear "safety" hats and complete fundamental quality control/quality assurance, conduct routine safety surveillance in the department, and to meet regulatory demands in the workplace. All managers influence continuous quality improvement initiatives, from effective utilization of resource and staffing allocations, to efficacy of patient scheduling tactics. It is critically important to understand continuous quality improvement (CQI) and its relationship with the radiology manager, specifically quality assurance/quality control in routine work, as these are the fundamentals of institutional safety, including radiation safety. When an institution applies for a registration for radiation-producing devices or a license for the use of radioactive materials, the permit granting body has specific requirements, policies and procedures that must be satisfied in order to be granted a permit and to maintain it continuously. In the 32 U.S. Agreement states, which are states that have radiation safety programs equivalent to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs, individual facilities apply for permits through the local governing body of radiation protection. Other states are directly licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and associated regulatory entities. These regulatory agencies grant permits, set conditions for use in accordance with state and federal laws, monitor and enforce radiation safety activities, and audit facilities for compliance with their regulations. Every radiology department and associated areas of radiation use are subject to inspection and enforcement policies in order to ensure safety of equipment and personnel. In today's business practice, department managers or chief technologists may actively participate in the duties associated with institutional radiation safety, especially in smaller institutions, while

  13. Evaluation of operating experience with safety values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bung, W.; Hoemke, P.; Oberender, W.; Paul, H.; Rueter, W.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes statistical investigations of 2076 functional tests carried out on power operated safety valves in conventional power plants in 1972 until 1983 with special regard to Common Mode-Failures. The results clearly show that Common Mode-Failures play an important part of non-availability for the controlled safety valves, especially in the control system. The 'Deutsche Risikostudie' does not consider any Common Mode-Failures of the primary safety valves. However there is no significant increase of the risk resulted by the primary safety valves in the 'Referenzanlage' if the calculated Common Mode-Failures probabilities are considered. (orig.) [de

  14. Safety and efficacy results of the advanced renal cell carcinoma sorafenib expanded access program in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Walter M; Figlin, Robert A; McDermott, David F; Dutcher, Janice P; Knox, Jennifer J; Miller, Wilson H; Hainsworth, John D; Henderson, Charles A; George, Jeffrey R; Hajdenberg, Julio; Kindwall-Keller, Tamila L; Ernstoff, Marc S; Drabkin, Harry A; Curti, Brendan D; Chu, Luis; Ryan, Christopher W; Hotte, Sebastien J; Xia, Chenghua; Cupit, Lisa; Bukowski, Ronald M

    2010-03-01

    The Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Sorafenib (ARCCS) program made sorafenib available to patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) before regulatory approval. In this nonrandomized, open-label expanded access program, 2504 patients from the United States and Canada were treated with oral sorafenib 400 mg twice daily. Safety and efficacy were explored overall and in subgroups of patients including those with no prior therapy, nonclear cell (nonclear cell) RCC, brain metastases, prior bevacizumab treatment, and elderly patients. Sorafenib was approved for RCC 6 months after study initiation, at which time patients with no prior therapy or with nonclear cell RCC could enroll in an extension protocol for continued assessment for a period of 6 months. The most common grade > or =2 drug-related adverse events were hand-foot skin reaction (18%), rash (14%), hypertension (12%), and fatigue (11%). In the 1891 patients evaluable for response, complete response was observed in 1 patient, partial response in 67 patients (4%), and stable disease for at least 8 weeks in 1511 patients (80%). Median progression-free survival in the extension population was 36 weeks (95% confidence interval [CI], 33-45 weeks; censorship rate, 56%); median overall survival in the entire population was 50 weeks (95% CI, 46-52 weeks; censorship rate, 63%). The efficacy and safety results were similar across the subgroups. Sorafenib 400 mg twice daily demonstrated activity and a clinically acceptable toxicity profile in all patient subsets enrolled in the ARCCS expanded access program (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00111020).

  15. Safety review of experiments at Albuquerque Operations Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, K.

    1984-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office is responsible for the safety overview of nuclear reactor and critical assembly facilities at Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the Rocky Flats Plant. The important safety concerns with these facilities involve the complex experiments that are performed, and that is the area emphasized. A determination is made by the Albuquerque Office (AL) with assistance from DOE/OMA whether or not a proposed experiment is an unreviewed safety question. Meetings are held with the contractor to resolve and clarify questions that are generated during the review of the proposed experiment. The AL safety evaluation report is completed and any recommendations are discussed. Prior to the experiment a preoperational appraisal is performed to assure that personnel, procedures, and equipment are in readiness for operations. During the experiment, any abnormal condition is reviewed in detail to determine any safety concerns

  16. Improving road safety: Experiences from the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Hagenzieker, M.P.

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Hagenzieker's research and education activities focus on the road safety effects of the transport system, with particular interest in road user behaviour aspects. Her PhD-research was on the effects of rewards on road user behaviour.

  17. Removal of retrievable self-expandable urethral stents: experience in 58 stents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Ko, Heung-Kyu; Kim, Yong Jae; Woo, Chul-Woong; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Ko, Gi-Young; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Sung, Kyu-Bo; Park, Hyungkeun

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the safety and efficacy of removing retrievable self-expandable urethral stents using a retrieval hook wire. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the removal of 58 polyurethane or PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene)-covered stents was attempted in 33 patients using a retrieval hook wire. Indications for removal were elective removal (n=21), stent migration (n=19), formation of tissue hyperplasia around or inside of the stent (n=14), stent deformity (n=3), and severe pain (n=1). The mean time the stents remained in place was 64.8±42.9 days (range, 1-177 days). Fifty-six (97%) of the 58 stents were successfully removed using the retrieval hook wire despite the following difficulties; hook wire disconnection (n=2), untied drawstrings (n=3), and polyurethane membrane disruption/separation (n=4). The removal procedure using a retrieval hook wire failed in two stents (3%) which had migrated into the urinary bladder. One of the two stents with migration into the urinary bladder was removed using a snare through the cystostomy route. The overall complication rate was 14% (seven hematuria cases and one urethral tear case), and all were minor and spontaneously resolved without further treatment. In conclusion, removal of retrievable urethral stents using a retrieval hook wire was safe and effective despite some technical difficulties. It is a useful method for allowing temporary stent placement and solving various complications of stent use. (orig.)

  18. Removal of retrievable self-expandable urethral stents: experience in 58 stents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Ko, Heung-Kyu; Kim, Yong Jae; Woo, Chul-Woong; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Ko, Gi-Young; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Sung, Kyu-Bo [Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Park, Hyungkeun [Asan Medical Center, Department of Urology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2006-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the safety and efficacy of removing retrievable self-expandable urethral stents using a retrieval hook wire. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the removal of 58 polyurethane or PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene)-covered stents was attempted in 33 patients using a retrieval hook wire. Indications for removal were elective removal (n=21), stent migration (n=19), formation of tissue hyperplasia around or inside of the stent (n=14), stent deformity (n=3), and severe pain (n=1). The mean time the stents remained in place was 64.8{+-}42.9 days (range, 1-177 days). Fifty-six (97%) of the 58 stents were successfully removed using the retrieval hook wire despite the following difficulties; hook wire disconnection (n=2), untied drawstrings (n=3), and polyurethane membrane disruption/separation (n=4). The removal procedure using a retrieval hook wire failed in two stents (3%) which had migrated into the urinary bladder. One of the two stents with migration into the urinary bladder was removed using a snare through the cystostomy route. The overall complication rate was 14% (seven hematuria cases and one urethral tear case), and all were minor and spontaneously resolved without further treatment. In conclusion, removal of retrievable urethral stents using a retrieval hook wire was safe and effective despite some technical difficulties. It is a useful method for allowing temporary stent placement and solving various complications of stent use. (orig.)

  19. Gating the holes in the Swiss cheese (part I): Expanding professor Reason's model for patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshia, Shashi S; Bryan Young, G; Makhinson, Michael; Smith, Preston A; Stobart, Kent; Croskerry, Pat

    2018-02-01

    Although patient safety has improved steadily, harm remains a substantial global challenge. Additionally, safety needs to be ensured not only in hospitals but also across the continuum of care. Better understanding of the complex cognitive factors influencing health care-related decisions and organizational cultures could lead to more rational approaches, and thereby to further improvement. A model integrating the concepts underlying Reason's Swiss cheese theory and the cognitive-affective biases plus cascade could advance the understanding of cognitive-affective processes that underlie decisions and organizational cultures across the continuum of care. Thematic analysis, qualitative information from several sources being used to support argumentation. Complex covert cognitive phenomena underlie decisions influencing health care. In the integrated model, the Swiss cheese slices represent dynamic cognitive-affective (mental) gates: Reason's successive layers of defence. Like firewalls and antivirus programs, cognitive-affective gates normally allow the passage of rational decisions but block or counter unsounds ones. Gates can be breached (ie, holes created) at one or more levels of organizations, teams, and individuals, by (1) any element of cognitive-affective biases plus (conflicts of interest and cognitive biases being the best studied) and (2) other potential error-provoking factors. Conversely, flawed decisions can be blocked and consequences minimized; for example, by addressing cognitive biases plus and error-provoking factors, and being constantly mindful. Informed shared decision making is a neglected but critical layer of defence (cognitive-affective gate). The integrated model can be custom tailored to specific situations, and the underlying principles applied to all methods for improving safety. The model may also provide a framework for developing and evaluating strategies to optimize organizational cultures and decisions. The concept is abstract, the

  20. Gating the holes in the Swiss cheese (part I): Expanding professor Reason's model for patient safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan Young, G.; Makhinson, Michael; Smith, Preston A.; Stobart, Kent; Croskerry, Pat

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Although patient safety has improved steadily, harm remains a substantial global challenge. Additionally, safety needs to be ensured not only in hospitals but also across the continuum of care. Better understanding of the complex cognitive factors influencing health care–related decisions and organizational cultures could lead to more rational approaches, and thereby to further improvement. Hypothesis A model integrating the concepts underlying Reason's Swiss cheese theory and the cognitive‐affective biases plus cascade could advance the understanding of cognitive‐affective processes that underlie decisions and organizational cultures across the continuum of care. Methods Thematic analysis, qualitative information from several sources being used to support argumentation. Discussion Complex covert cognitive phenomena underlie decisions influencing health care. In the integrated model, the Swiss cheese slices represent dynamic cognitive‐affective (mental) gates: Reason's successive layers of defence. Like firewalls and antivirus programs, cognitive‐affective gates normally allow the passage of rational decisions but block or counter unsounds ones. Gates can be breached (ie, holes created) at one or more levels of organizations, teams, and individuals, by (1) any element of cognitive‐affective biases plus (conflicts of interest and cognitive biases being the best studied) and (2) other potential error‐provoking factors. Conversely, flawed decisions can be blocked and consequences minimized; for example, by addressing cognitive biases plus and error‐provoking factors, and being constantly mindful. Informed shared decision making is a neglected but critical layer of defence (cognitive‐affective gate). The integrated model can be custom tailored to specific situations, and the underlying principles applied to all methods for improving safety. The model may also provide a framework for developing and evaluating strategies to

  1. Program of nuclear criticality safety experiment at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Iwao; Tachimori, Shoichi; Takeshita, Isao; Suzaki, Takenori; Ohnishi, Nobuaki

    1983-11-01

    JAERI is promoting the nuclear criticality safety research program, in which a new facility for criticality safety experiments (Criticality Safety Experimental Facility : CSEF) is to be built for the experiments with solution fuel. One of the experimental researches is to measure, collect and evaluate the experimental data needed for evaluation of criticality safety of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Another research area is a study of the phenomena themselves which are incidental to postulated critical accidents. Investigation of the scale and characteristics of the influences caused by the accident is also included in this research. The result of the conceptual design of CSEF is summarized in this report. (author)

  2. EURISOL MERCURY TARGET EXPERIMENT: CERN SAFETY REPORT

    CERN Document Server

    J. Gulley (CERN SC/GS)

    Report on a visit to the mercury-handling lab at IPUL. The aim was to provide recommendations to IPUL on general health and safety issues relatring to the handling of mercury, the objective being to reduce exposure to acceptable levels, so far as is reasonably practical.

  3. Microgravity Flammability Experiments for Spacecraft Fire Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legros, Guillaume; Minster, Olivier; Tóth, Balazs

    2012-01-01

    As fire behaviour in manned spacecraft still remains poorly understood, an international topical team has been created to design a validation experiment that has an unprecedented large scale for a microgravity flammability experiment. While the validation experiment is being designed for a re-sup...

  4. In the Ethos of the Safety Net: An Expanded Role for Clinical Ethics Mediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreevy, Jolion

    2015-01-01

    Clinical ethics mediation is invaluable for resolving intractable disputes in the hospital. But it is also a critical day-to-day skill for clinicians, especially those who serve a disproportionate number of vulnerable patients. While mediation is typically reserved for intractable cases, there are two important opportunities to expand its use. First is preventative mediation, in which clinicians incorporate clinical ethics mediation into their daily routine in order to address value-laden conflicts before they reach the point at which outside consultation becomes necessary. Second is guided mediation, in which clinical teams resolve conflicts with patients or surrogates with guidance from an ethics consultant, who operates at some distance from the conflict and, rather than recommending a single action, counsels clinicians on the process they can use to resolve the conflict on their own. These approaches build the capacity of all clinicians to use clinical ethics mediation to improve the care of vulnerable patients. Copyright 2015 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  5. Introduction to 'International Handbook of Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komuro, Yuichi

    1998-01-01

    The Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (CSBEP) was initiated in 1992 by the United States Department of Energy. The project quickly became an international effort as scientists from other interested countries became involved. The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) is now an official activity of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development-Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA). 'International Handbook of Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments' was prepared and is updated year by year by the working group of the project. This handbook contains criticality safety benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments that were performed at various nuclear critical facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by criticality safety engineers to validate calculation techniques used. The author briefly introduces the informative handbook and would like to encourage Japanese engineers who are in charge of nuclear criticality safety to use the handbook. (author)

  6. LMFBR operational safety: the EBR-II experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.; Allen, N.L.; Dean, E.M.; Fryer, R.M.; Larson, H.A.; Lehto, W.K.

    1978-01-01

    The mission of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) has evolved from that of a small LMFBR demonstration plant to a major irradiation-test facility. Because of that evolution, many operational-safety issues have been encountered. The paper describes the EBR-II operational-safety experience in four areas: protection-system design, safety-document preparation, tests of off-normal reactor conditions, and tests of elements with breached cladding

  7. Thermal hydraulic reactor safety analyses and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmstroem, H.; Eerikaeinen, L.; Kervinen, T.; Kilpi, K.; Mattila, L.; Miettinen, J.; Yrjoelae, V.

    1989-04-01

    The report introduces the results of the thermal hydraulic reactor safety research performed in the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory of the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) during the years 1972-1987. Also practical applications i.e. analyses for the safety authorities and power companies are presented. The emphasis is on description of the state-of-the-art know how. The report describes VTT's most important computer codes, both those of foreign origin and those developed at VTT, and their assessment work, VTT's own experimental research, as well as international experimental projects and other forms of cooperation VTT has participated in. Appendix 8 contains a comprehensive list of the most important publications and technical reports produced. They present the content and results of the research in detail.(orig.)

  8. Experience related to the safety of advanced LMFBR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1975-07-01

    Experiments and experience relative to the safety of advanced fuel elements for the liquid metal fast breeder reactor are reviewed. The design and operating parameters and some of the unique features of advanced fuel elements are discussed breifly. Transient and steady state overpower operation and loss of sodium bond tests and experience are discussed in detail. Areas where information is lacking are also mentioned

  9. PNRA Process for Utilizing Experience Feedback for Enhancing Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Z.H.

    2016-01-01

    One of the elements essential for any organization to become a learning organization is to learn from its own and others experience. The importance of utilizing experience feedback for enhancing operational safety is highlighted in nuclear industry again and again and this has resulted in establishment of several national and international forums. In addition, IAEA action plan on nuclear safety issued after Fukushima accident further highlighted the importance of experience sharing among nuclear community to enhance global nuclear safety regime. PNRA utilizes operating experience feedback gathered through different sources in order to improve its regulatory processes. During the review of licensing submissions, special emphasis is given to utilize the lessons learnt from experience feedback relating to nuclear industry within and outside the country. This emphasis has gradually resulted in various safety improvements in the facilities and processes. Accordingly, PNRA has developed a systematic process of evaluation of international operating experience feedback with the aim to create safety conscious approach. This process includes collecting information from different international forums such as IAEA, regulatory bodies of other countries and useful feedback of past accidents followed by its screening, evaluation and suggesting recommendations both for PNRA and its licensees. As a result of this process, several improvements concerning regulatory inspection plans of PNRA as well as in regulatory decision making and operational practices of licensees have been highlighted. This paper will present PNRA approach for utilizing experience feedback in its regulatory processes for enhancing / improving nuclear safety. (author)

  10. Survey highlights the need to expand offerings of introductory pharmacy practice experiences in psychiatry and neurology: Benefits and example experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, Jolene R; Leung, Gillian P; Smith, Tawny L; Ahmed, Uzma; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn L; Peyronnet, Jean-Xavier

    2018-01-01

    Introductory pharmacy practice experiences (IPPEs) are 1 requirement schools and colleges of pharmacy must fulfill to meet accreditation standards. The purpose of this manuscript is to report existing IPPEs in psychiatry and neurology across the United States. Two separate electronic surveys were administered to individual College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists members with board certification in psychiatric pharmacy with an academic affiliation and academic institutions in the 2014-15 academic year to assess the neuropsychiatric curriculum in pharmacy programs. Results focusing on IPPEs were summarized using descriptive statistics. Academic institutional data reveal only 37.3% offered IPPEs in psychiatry, and 6.7% offered neurology. The number of available IPPEs is low even if a program offered an available rotation. The majority of College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists member respondents (69.9%) did not offer IPPEs in psychiatry in the 2014-15 academic year, and none offered an IPPE in neurology. More than half of individual respondents feel their institution should increase IPPEs in psychiatry and neurology in order to enhance their curriculum. To expand IPPE availability, pharmacy programs should increase early exposure of pharmacy students to patients with psychiatric and neurologic conditions. Longitudinal experiences may allow students to engage in hands-on experiences, which may impact future career aspirations and reduce stigma. Current example IPPEs at the authors' institutions are included to stimulate discussion and action among readers on how IPPEs in these practice areas may be developed. Implementation of IPPEs in psychiatry and neurology is needed for students to gain experience working with these patients.

  11. Feedback of safety - related operational experience: Lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, D [Commonwealth Edison Co. (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The presentation considers the following aspects of feedback of safety-related operational experience: lessons learned program, objectives, personnel characteristics; three types of documents for transmitting lessons learned issues.

  12. Feedback of safety - related operational experience: Lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, D.

    1997-01-01

    The presentation considers the following aspects of feedback of safety-related operational experience: lessons learned program, objectives, personnel characteristics; three types of documents for transmitting lessons learned issues

  13. Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motloch, C.G.; Bonney, R.F.; Levine, J.D.; Masson, L.S.; Commander, J.C.

    1995-04-01

    This Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR), includes an indication of the magnitude of facility hazards, complexity of facility operations, and the stage of the facility life-cycle. It presents the results of safety analyses, safety assurance programs, identified vulnerabilities, compensatory measures, and, in general, the rationale describing why the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) can be safely operated. It discusses application of the graded approach to the TPX safety analysis, including the basis for using Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 and DOE-STD-3009-94 in the development of the PSAR

  14. Experience of safety and performance improvement for fuel handling equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyoon Chang, Sang; Hee Lee, Dae

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide experience of safety and performance improvement of fuel handling equipment for nuclear power plants in Korea. The fuel handling equipment, which is used as an important part of critical processes during the refueling outage, has been improved to enhance safety and to optimize fuel handling procedures. Results of data measured during the fuel reloading are incorporated into design changes. The safety and performance improvement for fuel handling equipment could be achieved by simply modifying the components and improving the interlock system. The experience provided in this study can be useful lessons for further improvement of the fuel handling equipment. (authors)

  15. Second Generation Self-Inflating Tissue Expanders: A Two-Year Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Omran Al Madani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tissue expansion is a well-established surgical technique that produces an additional amount of normal skin to cover a defect. This technique is appealing because the skin quality and color are from the patient’s own. The widely used injectable expanders are of great reliability but carry the disadvantage of being painful during injection and most of the time require multiple clinic visits. So the idea of self-inflation became attractive and hydrogel expanders were developed and became widely known for being painless during clinic visit and decrease number of visits. The first generation expanders were modified by adding an enclosing plastic shell to decrease the unopposed expansion that occurred in the first generation expanders, which lead to pressure necrosis of the skin flaps. This made it an attractive option for tissue expansion in children and some adult patients. Patients, Materials, and Methods. Charts of 17 patients were retrospectively reviewed, all of them had second generation self-inflating expanders implanted over a 2-year period for one of two purposes, the treatment of giant nevi or burn scars. Results. Fifteen patients were females and 2 were males. The indication was large burn scar in 14 cases (14/17, in which 47/55 expanders were implanted, and giant nevus in 3/17 cases in which 8/55 expanders were implanted. Extrusion of the expander occurred in 8/55 expanders (14.5%, which occurred in 6/14 patients. The highest percentage of extrusion occurred in the neck in which two out of three expanders extruded; otherwise this complication does not seem to be related to the indication, gender, nor age of the patients. It seems to be that it is technical in nature. The patients did not have to get any injections to fill the tissue expanders, which made the expansion process less painful and more convenient. Conclusion. This seems to be currently the largest published review in which second generation expanders were used

  16. Implications of passive safety based on historical industrial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1988-01-01

    In the past decade, there have been multiple proposals for applying different technologies to achieve passively safe light water reactors (LWRs). A key question for all such concepts is, ''What are the gains in safety, costs, and reliability for passive safety systems.'' Using several types of historical data, estimates have been made of gains from passive safety and operating systems, which are independent of technology. Proposals for passive safety in reactors usually have three characteristics: (1) Passive systems with no moving mechanical parts, (2) systems with far fewer components and (3) more stringent design criteria for safety-related and process systems. Each characteristic reduces the potential for an accident and may increase plant reliability. This paper addresses gains from items (1) and (2). Passive systems often allow adoption of more rigorous design criteria which would be either impossible or economically unfeasible for active systems. This important characteristic of passive safety systems cannot be easily addressed using historical industrial experience

  17. Main lessons for FBR safety study from the CABRI experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Ikken

    2006-01-01

    CABRI project has been carried out FBR safety study with international cooperation of five nations since 1978. The project consists of four periods such as CABRI-1, CABRI-2, CABRI-FAST and CABRI-RAFT. The objects and the main information for hypothetical core decay accident and safety study of fuel are described. The behavior of core decay accident was studied in the first period (CABRI-1), the safety study of fuel was investigated after the second period (CABRI-2). Change of phenomena at the initial process of core decay accident, comparison between analysis and data of fuel diffusion behavior of neutron horoscope by CABRI-2 experiment, representative in-core experiment under slow TOP conditions, the damaged and undamaged pin under slow TOP conditions, the exterior of CABRI and TREAT and the upper part of CABRI and TREAT reactor are shown. CABRI experiments changed to LWR safety study and a part of TREAT is stated. (S.Y.)

  18. New safety experiments in decommissioned superheated steam reactor at Karlstein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerting, K.

    1986-01-01

    This article gives a concise summary of the Status Report of the Superheated Steam Reactor Safety Program (PHDR) Project, held at KfK on Dec. 5, 1985. The results discussed dealt with fire experiments, shock tests simulating airplane crashes, temperature shocks in the reactor pressure vessel, studies of crack detection in pressure vessels and blasting experiments associated with nuclear plant decommissioning

  19. The experiences of research reactor accident to safety improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiranto, S.

    1999-01-01

    The safety of reactor operation is the main factor in order that the nuclear technology development program can be held according the expected target. Several experience with research reactor incidents must be learned and understood by the nuclear program personnel, especially for operators and supervisors of RSG-GA. Siwabessy. From the incident experience of research reactor in the world, which mentioned in the book 'Experience with research reactor incidents' by IAEA, 1995, was concluded that the main cause of research reactor accidents is understandless about the safety culture by the nuclear installation personnel. With learn, understand and compare between this experiences and the condition of RSG GA Siwabessy is expended the operators and supervisors more attention about the safety culture, so that RSG GA Siwabessy can be operated successfull, safely according the expected target

  20. [Arsenic removal by coagulation process and the field expanding experiments for Yangzonghai Lake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Zhang, Shu; Yang, Xiang-jun; Huang, Zhang-jie; Wang, Shi-xiong; Wang, Chong; Wei, Qun-yan; Zhang, Gen-lin; Xiao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Yangzonghai Lake is the third largest plateau lake in Yunnan province. In June 2008, arsenic contamination was detected in Yangzonghai Lake and the water quality worsens dramatically from standard grade II to worse than grade V. Since Yongzonghai Lake is so large with the area of 31 km2 and the storage capacity of 6.04 x 10(8) m3, those pretreatment operations of the traditional arsenic removal methods, such as pre oxidation, adjusting pH value, are not applicable. In this study, a facile remediation strategy for arsenic removal by coagulation process, in which ferric chloride was directly sprayed into the contaminated water without any pretreatment, was reported. The results showed that the arsenic removal percentage was up to 95.1%-96.7% for 50 L raw water with reagent dosage of 1.62-3.20 mg x L(-1). Furthermore, the pH value of the lake kept constant in the coagulation process, which was beneficial for fish survival. Re-dissolved arsenic from precipitation was not detected in 954 days. The strategy of ferric chloride coagulation were applied to field experiments for lake water with volumes of 1 x 10(4) m3 and 25 x 10(4) m3, in which arsenic was also removed effectively. The reported strategy was of great advantage for simple operation, low cost and ecological safety, therefore it provides a representative example for arsenic contamination treatment of large lake.

  1. Operational safety experience feedback by means of unusual event reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    Operational experience of nuclear power plants can be used to great advantage to enhance safety performance provided adequate measures are in place to collect and analyse it and to ensure that the conclusions drawn are acted upon. Feedback of operating experience is thus an extremely important tool to ensure high standards of safety in operational nuclear power plants and to improve the capability to prevent serious accidents and to learn from minor deviations and equipment failures - which can serve as early warnings -to prevent even minor events from occurring. Mechanisms also need to be developed to ensure that operating experience is shared both nationally as well as internationally. The operating experience feedback process needs to be fully and effectively established within the nuclear power plant, the utility, the regulatory organization as well as in other institutions such as technical support organizations and designers. The main purpose of this publication is to reflect the international consensus as to the general principles and practices in the operational safety experience feedback process. The examples of national practices for the whole or for particular parts of the process are given in annexes. The publication complements the IAEA Safety Series No.93 ''Systems for Reporting Unusual Events in Nuclear Power Plants'' (1989) and may also give a general guidance for Member States in fulfilling their obligations stipulated in the Nuclear Safety Convention. Figs, tabs

  2. Operational safety experience feedback by means of unusual event reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    Operational experience of nuclear power plants can be used to great advantage to enhance safety performance provided adequate measures are in place to collect and analyse it and to ensure that the conclusions drawn are acted upon. Feedback of operating experience is thus an extremely important tool to ensure high standards of safety in operational nuclear power plants and to improve the capability to prevent serious accidents and to learn from minor deviations and equipment failures - which can serve as early warnings -to prevent even minor events from occurring. Mechanisms also need to be developed to ensure that operating experience is shared both nationally as well as internationally. The operating experience feedback process needs to be fully and effectively established within the nuclear power plant, the utility, the regulatory organization as well as in other institutions such as technical support organizations and designers. The main purpose of this publication is to reflect the international consensus as to the general principles and practices in the operational safety experience feedback process. The examples of national practices for the whole or for particular parts of the process are given in annexes. The publication complements the IAEA Safety Series No.93 ``Systems for Reporting Unusual Events in Nuclear Power Plants`` (1989) and may also give a general guidance for Member States in fulfilling their obligations stipulated in the Nuclear Safety Convention. Figs, tabs.

  3. Operating experience feedback from safety significant events at research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokr, A.M. [Atomic Energy Authority, Abouzabal (Egypt). Egypt Second Research Reactor; Rao, D. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2015-05-15

    Operating experience feedback is an effective mechanism to provide lessons learned from the events and the associated corrective actions to prevent recurrence of events, resulting in improving safety in the nuclear installations. This paper analyzes the events of safety significance that have been occurred at research reactors and discusses the root causes and lessons learned from these events. Insights from literature on events at research reactors and feedback from events at nuclear power plants that are relevant to research reactors are also presented along with discussions. The results of the analysis showed the importance of communication of safety information and exchange of operating experience are vital to prevent reoccurrences of events. The analysis showed also the need for continued attention to human factors and training of operating personnel, and the need for establishing systematic ageing management programmes of reactor facilities, and programmes for safety management of handling of nuclear fuel, core components, and experimental devices.

  4. Safety aspects and operating experience of LWR plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, S.; Yoshioka, T.; Toyota, M.; Hinoki, M.

    1977-01-01

    To develop nuclear power generation for the future, it is necessary to put further emphasis on safety assurance and to endeavour to devise measures to improve plant availability, based on the careful analysis of causes that reduce plant availability. The paper discusses the results of studies on the following items from such viewpoints: (1) Safety and operating experience of LWR nuclear power plants in Japan: operating experience with LWRs; improvements in LWR design during the past ten years; analysis of the factors affecting plant availability; (2) Assurance of safety and measures to increase availability: measures for safety and environmental protection; measures to reduce radiation exposure of employees; appropriateness of maintenance and inspection work; measures to increase plant availability; measures to improve reliability of equipment and components; (3) Future technical problems. (author)

  5. Operating experience feedback from safety significant events at research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokr, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Operating experience feedback is an effective mechanism to provide lessons learned from the events and the associated corrective actions to prevent recurrence of events, resulting in improving safety in the nuclear installations. This paper analyzes the events of safety significance that have been occurred at research reactors and discusses the root causes and lessons learned from these events. Insights from literature on events at research reactors and feedback from events at nuclear power plants that are relevant to research reactors are also presented along with discussions. The results of the analysis showed the importance of communication of safety information and exchange of operating experience are vital to prevent reoccurrences of events. The analysis showed also the need for continued attention to human factors and training of operating personnel, and the need for establishing systematic ageing management programmes of reactor facilities, and programmes for safety management of handling of nuclear fuel, core components, and experimental devices.

  6. Unmanned Aircraft Systems: Federal Actions Needed to Ensure Safety and Expand Their Potential Uses Within the National Airspace System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dillingham, Gerald L; Spisak, Teresa; Fallon, Colin; Giebel, Jim; Gilman, Evan; Hooper, David; Khanna, Jamie; Lentini, Patty; Ormond, Josh; Panwar, Manhav

    2008-01-01

    .... Many factors support the potential for expanded use of UASs. For example, the nation's industrial base has expanded to support military operations and the number of trained UAS operators is increasing as personnel return from overseas duty...

  7. ICSBEP-2007, International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiment Handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair Briggs, J.

    2007-01-01

    1 - Description: The Critically Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (CSBEP) was initiated in October of 1992 by the United Sates Department of Energy. The project quickly became an international effort as scientist from other interested countries became involved. The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) is now an official activity of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development - Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA). This handbook contains criticality safety benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments that were performed at various nuclear critical facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by criticality safety engineers to validate calculational techniques used to establish minimum subcritical margins for operations with fissile material. The example calculations presented do not constitute a validation of the codes or cross section data. The work of the ICSBEP is documented as an International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. Currently, the handbook spans over 42,000 pages and contains 464 evaluations representing 4,092 critical, near-critical, or subcritical configurations and 21 criticality alarm placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each and 46 configurations that have been categorized as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications. The handbook is intended for use by criticality safety analysts to perform necessary validations of their calculational techniques and is expected to be a valuable tool for decades to come. The ICSBEP Handbook is available on DVD. You may request a DVD by completing the DVD Request Form on the internet. Access to the Handbook on the Internet requires a password. You may request a password by completing the Password Request Form. The Web address is: http://icsbep.inel.gov/handbook.shtml 2 - Method of solution: Experiments that are found

  8. Effectiveness and Safety of Endoscopic Treatment of Benign Biliary Strictures Using a New Fully Covered Self Expandable Metal Stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihir S. Wagh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In patients with benign biliary strictures, the use of fully covered self-expandable metal stents (SEMS has been proposed as an alternative to plastic stenting, but high quality prospective data are sparse. This study was performed to evaluate the long-term effectiveness and safety of a new fully covered SEMS for benign biliary strictures. Methods. All consecutive patients with benign biliary strictures were treated with placement of a fully covered SEMS (WallFlex for 6 months. Short- and long-term stricture resolution, adverse events, and ease of stent removal were recorded. Results. 23 patients were enrolled. Stricture etiology was chronic pancreatitis (14, postorthotopic liver transplant (4, idiopathic (4, and biliary stones (1. All ERCPs were technically successful. All stents were successfully removed. Short-term stricture resolution was seen in 22/23 (96% patients. Long-term success was 15/18 (83.3%. All 3 failures were patients with biliary strictures in the setting of chronic calcific pancreatitis. Conclusions. The use of the new SEMS for the treatment of benign biliary strictures led to short-term stricture resolution in the vast majority of patients. Over a long-term followup the success rate appears favorable compared to historical results achieved with multiple plastic stenting, particularly in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01238900.

  9. HTR-PM Safety requirement and Licensing experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fu; Zhang Zuoyi; Dong Yujie; Wu Zongxin; Sun Yuliang

    2014-01-01

    HTR-PM is a 200MWe modular pebble bed high temperature reactor demonstration plant which is being built in Shidao Bay, Weihai, Shandong, China. The main design parameters of HTR-PM were fixed in 2006, the basic design was completed in 2008. The review of Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) of HTR-PM was started in April 2008, completed in September 2009. In general, HTR- PM design complies with the current safety requirement for nuclear power plant in China, no special standards are developed for modular HTR. Anyway, Chinese Nuclear Safety Authority, together with the designers, developed some dedicated design criteria for key systems and components and published the guideline for the review of safety analysis report of HTR-PM, based on the experiences from licensing of HTR-10 and new development of nuclear safety. The probabilistic safety goal for HTR-PM was also defined by the safety authority. The review of HTR-PM PSAR lasted for one and a half years, with 3 dialogues meetings and 8 topics meetings, with more than 2000 worksheets and answer sheets. The heavily discussed topics during the PSAR review process included: the requirement for the sub-atmospheric ventilation system, the utilization of PSA in design process, the scope of beyond design basis accidents, the requirement for the qualification of TRISO coating particle fuel, and etc. Because of the characteristics of first of a kind for the demonstration plant, the safety authority emphasized the requirement for the experiment and validation, the PSAR was licensed with certain licensing conditions. The whole licensing process was under control, and was re-evaluated again after Fukushima accident to be shown that the design of HTR-PM complies with current safety requirement. This is a good example for how to license a new reactor. (author)

  10. Development of Large-Scale Spacecraft Fire Safety Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruff, Gary A.; Urban, David L.; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos

    2013-01-01

    exploration missions outside of low-earth orbit and accordingly, more complex in terms of operations, logistics, and safety. This will increase the challenge of ensuring a fire-safe environment for the crew throughout the mission. Based on our fundamental uncertainty of the behavior of fires in low...... of the spacecraft fire safety risk. The activity of this project is supported by an international topical team of fire experts from other space agencies who conduct research that is integrated into the overall experiment design. The large-scale space flight experiment will be conducted in an Orbital Sciences...

  11. Teachers' Experiences Collaborating in Expanded School Mental Health: Implications for Practice, Policy and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellin, Elizabeth A.; Ball, Annahita; Iachini, Aidyn; Togno, Nicole; Rodriguez, Ana Maria

    2017-01-01

    Teachers are critical partners in expanded school mental health (ESMH) collaborations that aim to bring educators, community mental health professionals and families together to leverage expertise and resources for addressing non-academic barriers to learning. Although teachers are in a unique position to observe the day-to-day mental health needs…

  12. Measuring negative and positive caregiving experiences: A psychometric analysis of the Caregiver Strain Index Expanded

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruithof, WJ; Post, MWM; Meily, JMA

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the psychometric properties of the Caregiver Strain Index Expanded with those of the original Caregiver Strain Index among partners of stroke patients. Design and subjects: Cross-sectional validation study among 173 caregivers of stroke patients six months post-stroke. Main

  13. The natural history of Becker expandable breast implants: a single-center 10-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindali, Katia; Davis, Marcus; Mughal, Maleeha; Orkar, Kusu S

    2013-09-01

    Use of Becker expandable breast implants in single-stage breast surgery is a well-established technique; however, replacement with fixed-volume implants is common. The authors sought to analyze the long-term natural history of these implants over a wide range of surgical indications. A retrospective review of 330 consecutive patients who underwent 384 Becker expander breast reconstructions over a 10-year period in a dedicated plastic surgery unit was undertaken. Implant indication, Becker type, volume and site, complications, expander lifespan, and explant reasons were assessed. Two hundred twenty-eight patients (267 implants) and 102 patients (117 implants) underwent implantation for congenital deformities and breast cancer reconstruction, respectively. One hundred eighty-seven (48 percent) were explanted at a median period of 13.0 months (range, 9.0 to 26.0 months), 149 (39 percent) for aesthetic reasons and 38 (10 percent) for complications. Complication rates were higher in breast cancer reconstruction compared with congenital patients (19.6 percent versus 7.9 percent; p = 0.002), driven by an increased rate of wound complications (13.7 percent versus 4.4 percent; p = 0.003). Cancer-related surgery and advancing age were the only predictors of complication risk. The overall Becker expander retention rate was 24.9 percent and 46.8 percent at 150 months in the cancer reconstruction and congenital groups, respectively. Forty-seven percent of Becker implants were retained long term after congenital corrective surgery; only 25 percent were retained after postmastectomy reconstruction. Poor aesthetics was driving the exchange for fixed-volume implants, indicating that after breast cancer reconstruction, Becker expanders were being used as part of a two-stage reconstructive strategy.

  14. Access safety systems - New concepts from the LHC experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladzinski, T.; Delamare, C.; Luca, S. di; Hakulinen, T.; Hammouti, L.; Havart, F.; Juget, J.F.; Ninin, P.; Nunes, R.; Riesco, T.; Sanchez-Corral Mena, E.; Valentini, F.

    2012-01-01

    The LHC Access Safety System has introduced a number of new concepts into the domain of personnel protection at CERN. These can be grouped into several categories: organisational, architectural and concerning the end-user experience. By anchoring the project on the solid foundations of the IEC 61508/61511 methodology, the CERN team and its contractors managed to design, develop, test and commission on time a SIL3 safety system. The system uses a successful combination of the latest Siemens redundant safety programmable logic controllers with a traditional relay logic hard wired loop. The external envelope barriers used in the LHC include personnel and material access devices, which are interlocked door-booths introducing increased automation of individual access control, thus removing the strain from the operators. These devices ensure the inviolability of the controlled zones by users not holding the required credentials. To this end they are equipped with personnel presence detectors and the access control includes a state of the art bio-metry check. Building on the LHC experience, new projects targeting the refurbishment of the existing access safety infrastructure in the injector chain have started. This paper summarises the new concepts introduced in the LHC access control and safety systems, discusses the return of experience and outlines the main guiding principles for the renewal stage of the personnel protection systems in the LHC injector chain in a homogeneous manner. (authors)

  15. The experience of WNTI with Safety and Security Worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neau, Henry-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    This paper gives an industrial perspective on safety and security issues based on the experience of WNTI members. It describes how safety is invested primarily in the package; not how the package is transported. Transport safety is therefore an engineering challenge, and all necessary technical information is available to enable this to be met. Security in transport involves various measures to guard against intentional malicious acts. The paper describes the international instruments relevant to security in the transport of nuclear fuel cycle materials and how both safety and security regulations must be coordinated and simplified to avoid conflicts. It considers potential risks, which must not be underestimated. However, the assessment of risks must be realistic and quantified, and the requirements placed on the industry appropriate. It is important to dispel exaggerated perceptions of danger in the minds of the public, politicians and regulators. (author)

  16. Proceedings of 2nd PHWR operating safety experience meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-04-01

    Papers presented during the eight sessions of the meeting were devoted to the impact of PHWR operating experience on design of civil structures (reactor building integrity); operating experiences related to pressure tubes, nuclear steam supply system, plant stability; reactor maintenance and control systems, reactor operational safety. Some events concerned with reactor shutdown due to power failures are described, as well as action undertaken to prevent major damage.

  17. Proceedings of 2nd PHWR operating safety experience meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    Papers presented during the eight sessions of the meeting were devoted to the impact of PHWR operating experience on design of civil structures (reactor building integrity); operating experiences related to pressure tubes, nuclear steam supply system, plant stability; reactor maintenance and control systems, reactor operational safety. Some events concerned with reactor shutdown due to power failures are described, as well as action undertaken to prevent major damage

  18. Lessons from feedback of safety operating experience for reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchomel, J.; Rapavy, S.

    1999-01-01

    Analyses of events in WWER operations as a part of safety experience feedback provide a valuable source of lessons for reactor physics. Examples of events from Bohunice operation will be shown such as events with inadequate approach to criticality, positive reactivity insertions, expulsion of a control rod from shut-down reactor, problems with reactor protection system and control rods. (Authors)

  19. Patients' experiences of safety during haemodialysis treatment - a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lovink, M.H.; Kars, M.C.; Man-van Ginkel, J.M. de; Schoonhoven, L.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To explore the experiences of safety of adult patients during their haemodialysis treatment. BACKGROUND: Haemodialysis is a complex treatment with a risk for harm that causes anxiety among many patients. To date, no in-depth study of haemodialysis patients' emotional responses to conditions of

  20. Expanded Flaps in Surgical Treatment of Pressure Sores: Our Experience for 25 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Caprio, Giovanni; Serra-Mestre, José Maria; Ziccardi, Pasquale; Scioli, Michelina; Larocca, Fabio; Nunziata, Vincenzo; Grella, Roberto; D'Andrea, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    Because the ischial region is the main weight-bearing area in sitting, it is one of the areas most frequently affected by pressure ulcers in paraplegic patients resuming the sitting position during the subacute and chronic stages. The techniques described to date have not been able to reduce the high rates of recurrence and flap dehiscence. Other groups have described successful tissue expansion in the treatment of pressure ulcers, but to date, the long-term results of the procedure have not been reported. The long-term follow-up of 138 reconstructions of the ischial region in patients with pressure ulcers types III to IV treated with posterior thigh expanded rotation flaps is reported. All patients achieved complete resolution, with adequate coverage of deeper layers, although 15.94% presented minor complications. None of these complications impeded full repair of the lesion. The 28 lesions that recurred were all reconstructed with the re-expansion of the same flap. There were no cases of flap dehiscence. The use of tissue expanders to treat ischial pressure ulcers, especially in patients with long life expectancy, offers important advantages over other approaches. The procedure provides abundant, high-quality tissue and may be repeated many times without creating new scars. With the use of tissue expanders, other reconstructive options can be reserved for the future.

  1. Efficacy and safety of a new fully covered self-expandable non-foreshortening metal esophageal stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dua, Kulwinder S; Latif, Sahibzada U; Yang, Juliana F; Fang, Tom C; Khan, Abdul; Oh, Young

    2014-10-01

    Fully covered esophageal self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) are potentially removable but can be associated with high migration rates. For precise positioning, non-foreshortening SEMSs are preferred. Recently, a new fully covered non-foreshortening SEMS with anti-migration features was introduced. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of this new esophageal SEMS. Retrospective study. Single, tertiary-care center. Consecutive patients with malignant and benign strictures with dysphagia grade of ≥3 and patients with fistulas/leaks were studied. Stent placement and removal. Technical success in stent deployment/removal, efficacy in relieving dysphagia and sealing fistulas/leaks, and adverse events. Forty-three stents were placed in 35 patients (mean [± standard deviation] age 65 ± 11 years; 31 male), 24 for malignant and 11 for benign (5 strictures, 6 leaks) indications. Technical success in precise SEMS placement was 100%. The after-stent dysphagia grade improved significantly (at 1 week: 1.5 ± 0.7; at 4 weeks: 1.2 ± 0.4; baseline: 3.8 ± 0.4; P stents were removed for clinical indications, with technical success of 100%. All leaks sealed after SEMS placement and did not recur after stent removal. All benign strictures recurred after stent removal. Adverse events included migration (14%), chest pain (11%), and dysphagia from tissue hyperplasia (6%). There was no stent-related mortality. Nonrandomized, single-center study. The new esophageal SEMS was effective in relieving malignant dysphagia, allowed for precise placement, and was easily removable. It was effective in treating benign esophageal fistulas and leaks. Stent-related adverse events were acceptable. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Efficacy and safety of limited endoscopic sphincterotomy before self-expandable metal stent insertion for malignant biliary obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyeong Seok; Kang, Dae Hwan; Kim, Hyung Wook; Choi, Cheol Woong; Park, Su Bum; Kim, Su Jin; Ryu, Dae Gon

    2017-03-07

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of limited endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) before placement of self-expandable metal stent (SEMS). This was a retrospective analysis of 244 consecutive patients with unresectable malignant biliary obstruction, who underwent placement of SEMSs following limited ES from December 2008 to February 2015. The diagnosis of malignant biliary obstruction and assessment of patient eligibility for the study was established by a combination of clinical findings, laboratory investigations, imaging and pathological results. All patients were monitored in the hospital for at least 24 h following endoscopic retrograde cholangio pancreatography (ERCP). The incidence of immediate or early post-ERCP complications such as post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) and bleeding related to limited ES were considered as primary outcomes. Also, characteristics and complications according to the cancer type were classified. Among the 244 patients included, the underlying diagnosis was cholangiocarcinoma in 118 patients, pancreatic cancer in 79, and non-pancreatic or non-biliary malignancies in the remaining 47 patients. Early post-ERCP complications occurred in 9 patients (3.7%), with PEP in 7 patients (2.9%; mild, 6; moderate, 1) and mild bleeding in 2 patients (0.8%). There was no significant association between the incidence of post-ERCP complications and the type of malignancy (cholangiocarcinoma vs pancreatic cancer vs others, P = 0.696) or the type of SEMS used (uncovered vs covered, P = 1.000). Patients who had more than one SEMS placed at the first instance were at a significantly higher risk of post-ERCP complications (one SEMS vs two SEMS, P = 0.031). No other factors were predictive of post-ERCP complications. Limited ES is feasible and safe, and effectively facilitates the placement of SEMS, without any significant risk of PEP or severe bleeding.

  3. Safety aspects and operating experience of LWR plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, S.; Hinoki, M.

    1977-01-01

    From the outset of nuclear power development in Japan, major emphasis has been placed on the safety of the nuclear power plants. There are now twelve nuclear power plants in operation with a total output of 6600 MWe. Their operating records were generally satisfactory, but in the 1974 to 1975 period, they experienced somewhat declined availability due to the repair work under the specific circumstances. After investigation of causes of troubles and the countermeasures thereof were made to ensure safety, they are now keeping good performance. In Japan, nuclear power plants are strictly subject to sufficient and careful inspection in compliance with the safety regulation, and are placed under stringent radiation control of employees. Under the various circumstances, however, the period of annual inspection tends to be prolonged more than originally planned, and this consequently is considered to be one of the causes of reduced availability. In order to develop nuclear power generation for the future, it is necessary to put further emphasis on the assurance of safety and to endeavor to devise measures to improve availability of the plants, based on the careful analysis of causes which reduce plant availability. This paper discusses the results of studies made for the following items from such viewpoints: (1) Safety and Operating Experience of LWR Nuclear Power Plants in Japan; a) Operating experience with light water reactors b) Improvements in design of light water reactors during the past ten years c) Analysis of the factors which affect plant availability; 2) Assurance of Safety and Measures to Increase Availability a) Measures for safety and environmental protection b) Measures to reduce radiation exposure of employees c) Appropriateness of maintenance and inspection work d) Measures to increase plant availability e) Measures to improve reliability of equipments and components; and 3) Future Technical Problems

  4. Experience with performance based training of nuclear criticality safety engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.

    1993-01-01

    Historically, new entrants to the practice of nuclear criticality safety have learned their job primarily by on-the-job training (OJT) often by association with an experienced nuclear criticality safety engineer who probably also learned their job by OJT. Typically, the new entrant learned what he/she needed to know to solve a particular problem and accumulated experience as more problems were solved. It is likely that more formalism will be required in the future. Current US Department of Energy requirements for those positions which have to demonstrate qualification indicate that it should be achieved by using a systematic approach such as performance based training (PBT). Assuming that PBT would be an acceptable mechanism for nuclear criticality safety engineer training in a more formal environment, a site-specific analysis of the nuclear criticality safety engineer job was performed. Based on this analysis, classes are being developed and delivered to a target audience of newer nuclear criticality safety engineers. Because current interest is in developing training for selected aspects of the nuclear criticality safety engineer job, the analysis i's incompletely developed in some areas. Details of this analysis are provided in this report

  5. The safety experience of New Zealand adventure tourism operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Tim A; Page, Stephen; Walker, Linda

    2004-01-01

    This survey examined parameters of the New Zealand adventure tourism industry client injury risk. The research also sought to establish priorities for intervention to reduce adventure tourism risk, and identify client injury control measures currently in place (or absent) in the New Zealand adventure tourism industry, with a view to establishing guidelines for the development of effective adventure tourism safety management systems. This 2003 survey builds upon an exploratory study of New Zealand adventure tourism safety conducted by us during 1999. A postal questionnaire was used to survey all identifiable New Zealand adventure tourism operators. The questionnaire asked respondents about their recorded client injury experience, perceptions of client injury risk factors, safety management practices, and barriers to safety. Some 27 adventure tourism activities were represented among the responding sample (n=96). The highest client injury risk was reported in the snow sports, bungee jumping and horse riding sectors, although serious underreporting of minor injuries was evident across the industry. Slips, trips and falls (STF) were the major client injury mechanisms, and a range of risk factors for client injuries were identified. Safety management measures were inconsistently applied across the industry. The industry should consider the implications of poor injury reporting standards and safety management practices generally. Specifically, the industry should consider risk management that focuses on minor (e.g., STF) as well as catastrophic events.

  6. GROWTH OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY AND REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess; Jim Gulliford

    2011-09-01

    Since the International Conference on Nuclear Criticality Safety (ICNC) 2007, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) have continued to expand their efforts and broaden their scope. Eighteen countries participated on the ICSBEP in 2007. Now, there are 20, with recent contributions from Sweden and Argentina. The IRPhEP has also expanded from eight contributing countries in 2007 to 16 in 2011. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments1' have increased from 442 evaluations (38000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 3955 critical or subcritical configurations to 516 evaluations (nearly 55000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 4405 critical or subcritical configurations in the 2010 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. The contents of the Handbook have also increased from 21 to 24 criticality-alarm-placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and from 20 to 200 configurations categorized as fundamental physics measurements relevant to criticality safety applications. Approximately 25 new evaluations and 150 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments2' have increased from 16 different experimental series that were performed at 12 different reactor facilities to 53 experimental series that were performed at 30 different reactor facilities in the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Considerable effort has also been made to improve the functionality of the searchable database, DICE (Database for the International Criticality Benchmark Evaluation Project) and verify the accuracy of the data contained therein. DICE will be discussed in separate papers at ICNC 2011. The status of the

  7. Treatment of malignant gastroduodenal obstruction with using a newly designed complex expandable nitinol stent: initial experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Mi Hee; Ko, Ji Ho; Lee, Eun Jung; Oh, Kyeng Seung; Huh, Jin Do; Cho, Young Duk; Park, Seun Ja; Jung, Gyoo Sik

    2005-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of a new type of a complex expandable nitinol stent that was designed to reduce the stent's propensity to migration during the treatment of malignant gastroduodenal obstructions. Two types of expandable nitinol stent were constructed by weaving a single thread of 0.2mm nitinol wire in a tubular configuration: an uncovered stent 18mm in diameter and a covered stent 16mm in diameter. Both ends of the covered stent were fabricated by coaxially inserting the covered stent into the tubular uncovered stent and then attaching the two stents together with using nylon monofilament. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the stent was placed in 29 consecutive patients (20 men and 9 women, mean age: 65 years) who were suffering with malignant gastric outlet obstruction (n=20), duodenal obstruction (n=6) or combined obstruction (n=3). Clinical improvement was assessed by comparing the food intake capacity before and after the procedure. The complications were investigated during the follow up period. Stent placement was successful in all the patients. After stent placement, the symptoms improved in all but one patient. During the follow up, stent migration occurred in one patient (3%) at 34 days after the procedure. Despite the stent migration, the patient was able to resume a soft diet. Six patients developed recurrent symptoms of obstruction with tumor overgrowth at a mean of 145 days after the procedure; all the patients underwent coaxial placement of an additional stent with good results. One patient showed recurrence of obstruction due to tumor in-growth, and this was treated by placement of a second stent. Two patients with stent placement in the duodenum suffered from jaundice 26 days and 65 days, respectively, after their procedures. Placement of the newly designed complex expandable nitinol stent seems to be effective for the palliative treatment of malignant gastroduodenal obstructions. The new stent also seems to help overcome the

  8. Treatment of malignant gastroduodenal obstruction with using a newly designed complex expandable nitinol stent: initial experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Mi Hee; Ko, Ji Ho; Lee, Eun Jung; Oh, Kyeng Seung; Huh, Jin Do; Cho, Young Duk; Park, Seun Ja [College of Medicine, Kosin University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Gyoo Sik [Ulsan Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-12-15

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of a new type of a complex expandable nitinol stent that was designed to reduce the stent's propensity to migration during the treatment of malignant gastroduodenal obstructions. Two types of expandable nitinol stent were constructed by weaving a single thread of 0.2mm nitinol wire in a tubular configuration: an uncovered stent 18mm in diameter and a covered stent 16mm in diameter. Both ends of the covered stent were fabricated by coaxially inserting the covered stent into the tubular uncovered stent and then attaching the two stents together with using nylon monofilament. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the stent was placed in 29 consecutive patients (20 men and 9 women, mean age: 65 years) who were suffering with malignant gastric outlet obstruction (n=20), duodenal obstruction (n=6) or combined obstruction (n=3). Clinical improvement was assessed by comparing the food intake capacity before and after the procedure. The complications were investigated during the follow up period. Stent placement was successful in all the patients. After stent placement, the symptoms improved in all but one patient. During the follow up, stent migration occurred in one patient (3%) at 34 days after the procedure. Despite the stent migration, the patient was able to resume a soft diet. Six patients developed recurrent symptoms of obstruction with tumor overgrowth at a mean of 145 days after the procedure; all the patients underwent coaxial placement of an additional stent with good results. One patient showed recurrence of obstruction due to tumor in-growth, and this was treated by placement of a second stent. Two patients with stent placement in the duodenum suffered from jaundice 26 days and 65 days, respectively, after their procedures. Placement of the newly designed complex expandable nitinol stent seems to be effective for the palliative treatment of malignant gastroduodenal obstructions. The new stent also seems to help overcome the

  9. Review of irradiation experiments for water reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobioka, Toshiaki

    1977-02-01

    A review is made of irradiation experiments for water reactor safety research under way in both commercial power plants and test reactors. Such experiments are grouped in two; first, LWR fuel performance under normal and abnormal operating conditions, and second, irradiation effects on fracture toughness in LWR vessels. In the former are fuel densification, swelling, and the influence of power ramp and cycling on fuel rod, and also fuel rod behavior under accident conditions in in-reactor experiment. In the latter are the effects of neutron exposure level on the ferritic steel of pressure vessels, etc.. (auth.)

  10. UK experience of safety requirements for thermal reactor stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, R.R.; Dale, G.C.; Tweedy, J.N.

    1977-01-01

    The paper summarises the development of safety requirements since the first of the Generating Boards' Magnox reactors commenced operation in 1962 and includes A.G.R. safety together with the preparation of S.G.H.W.R. design safety criteria. It outlines the basic principles originally adopted and shows how safety assessment is a continuing process throughout the life of a reactor. Some description is given of the continuous effort over the years to obtain increased safety margins for existing and new reactors, taking into account the construction and operating experience, experimental information, and more sophisticated computer-aided design techniques which have become available. The main safeguards against risks arising from the Generating Boards' reactors are the achievement of high standards of design, construction and operation, in conjunction with comprehensive fault analyses to ensure that adequate protective equipment is provided. The most important analyses refer to faults which can lead to excessive fuel element temperatures arising from an increase in power or a reduction in cooling capacity. They include the possibility of unintended control rod withdrawal at power or at start-up, coolant flow failure, pressure circuit failure, loss of boiler feed water, and failure of electric power. The paper reviews the protective equipment, and the policy for reactor safety assessments which include application of maximum credible accident philosophy and later the limited use of reliability and probability methods. Some of the Generating Boards' reactors are now more than half way through their planned working lives and during this time safety protective equipment has occasionally been brought into operation, often for spurious reasons. The general performance, of safety equipment is reviewed particularly for incidents such as main turbo-alternator trip, circulator failure, fuel element failures and other similar events, and some problems which have given rise to

  11. Safety requirements and safety experience of nuclear facilities in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnurer, H.L.

    1977-01-01

    Peaceful use of nuclear energy within the F.R.G. is rapidly growing. The Energy Programme of the Federal Government forecasts a capacity of up to 50.000 MW in 1985. Whereas most of this capacity will be of the LWR-Type, other activities are related to LMFBR - and HTGR - development, nuclear ships, and facilities of the nuclear fuel cycle. Safety of nuclear energy is the pacemaker for the realization of nuclear programmes and projects. Due to a very high population - and industrialisation density, safety has the priority before economical aspects. Safety requirements are therefore extremely stringent, which will be shown for the legal, the technical as well as for the organizational area. They apply for each nuclear facility, its site and the nuclear energy system as a whole. Regulatory procedures differ from many other countries, assigning executive power to state authorities, which are supervised by the Federal Government. Another particularity of the regulatory process is the large scope of involvement of independent experts within the licensing procedures. The developement of national safety requirements in different countries generates a necessity to collaborate and harmonize safety and radiation protection measures, at least for facilities in border areas, to adopt international standards and to assist nuclear developing countries. However, different nationally, regional or local situations might raise problems. Safety experience with nuclear facilities can be concluded from the positive construction and operation experience, including also a few accidents and incidents and the conclusions, which have been drawn for the respective factilities and others of similar design. Another tool for safety assessments will be risk analyses, which are under development by German experts. Final, a scope of future problems and developments shows, that safety of nuclear installations - which has reached a high performance - nevertheless imposes further tasks to be solved

  12. International handbook of evaluated criticality safety benchmark experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (CSBEP) was initiated in October of 1992 by the United States Department of Energy. The project quickly became an international effort as scientists from other interested countries became involved. The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) became an official activity of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development - Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA) in 1995. This handbook contains criticality safety benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments performed at various nuclear critical facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by criticality safety engineers to validate calculational techniques used to establish minimum subcritical margins for operations with fissile material and to determine criticality alarm requirement and placement. Many of the specifications are also useful for nuclear data testing. Example calculations are presented; however, these calculations do not constitute a validation of the codes or cross section data. The evaluated criticality safety benchmark data are given in nine volumes. These volumes span over 55,000 pages and contain 516 evaluations with benchmark specifications for 4,405 critical, near critical, or subcritical configurations, 24 criticality alarm placement / shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 200 configurations that have been categorized as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications. Experiments that are found unacceptable for use as criticality safety benchmark experiments are discussed in these evaluations; however, benchmark specifications are not derived for such experiments (in some cases models are provided in an appendix). Approximately 770 experimental configurations are categorized as unacceptable for use as criticality safety benchmark experiments. Additional evaluations are in progress and will be

  13. Access Safety Systems – New Concepts from the LHC Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Ladzinski, T; di Luca, S; Hakulinen, T; Hammouti, L; Riesco, T; Nunes, R; Ninin, P; Juget, J-F; Havart, F; Valentini, F; Sanchez-Corral Mena, E

    2011-01-01

    The LHC Access Safety System has introduced a number of new concepts into the domain of personnel protection at CERN. These can be grouped into several categories: organisational, architectural and concerning the end-user experience. By anchoring the project on the solid foundations of the IEC 61508/61511 methodology, the CERN team and its contractors managed to design, develop, test and commission on time a SIL3 safety system. The system uses a successful combination of the latest Siemens redundant safety programmable logic controllers with a traditional relay logic hardwired loop. The external envelope barriers used in the LHC include personnel and material access devices, which are interlocked door-booths introducing increased automation of individual access control, thus removing the strain from the operators. These devices ensure the inviolability of the controlled zones by users not holding the required credentials. To this end they are equipped with personnel presence detectors and th...

  14. The French nuclear safety authority's experience with radioactive transport inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, E.; Aguilar, J.

    2004-01-01

    About 300,000 radioactive material packages are transported annually in France. Most consist of radioisotopes for medical, pharmaceutical or industrial use. On the other hand, the nuclear industry deals with the transport of fuel cycle materials (uranium, fuel assemblies, etc.) and waste from power plants, reprocessing plants and research centers. France is also a transit country for shipments such as spent fuel packages from Switzerland or Germany, which are bound for Sellafield in Great Britain. The French nuclear safety authority (DGSNR: Directorate General for Nuclear Safety and Radioprotection) has been responsible since 1997 for the safety of radioactive material transport. This paper presents DGNSR's experience with transport inspection: a feedback of key points based on 300 inspections achieved during the past five years is given

  15. Expanded Occupational Safety and Health Administration 300 log as metric for bariatric patient-handling staff injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Stephen B; Pories, Walter J; Pearson, Amy; Drake, Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    Mobilization of morbidly obese patients poses significant physical challenges to healthcare providers. The purpose of this study was to examine the staff injuries associated with the patient handling of the obese, to describe a process for identifying injuries associated with their mobilization, and to report on the need for safer bariatric patient handling. We performed our study at a 761-bed, level 1 trauma center affiliated with a U.S. medical school. The hospital's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 300 log was expanded to the "E-OSHA 300 log" to specifically identify injuries the staff attributed to bariatric patient handling. The 2007 E-OSHA 300 log was analyzed to identify and describe the frequency, severity, and nature of bariatric versus nonbariatric patient handling injuries. The analyses revealed that during 2007, although patients with a body mass index of > or =35 kg/m(2) constituted patient population, 29.8% of staff injuries related to patient handling were linked to working with a bariatric patient. Bariatric patient handling accounted for 27.9% of all lost workdays and 37.2% of all restricted workdays associated with patient handling. Registered nurses and nursing assistants accounted for 80% of the injuries related to bariatric patient handling. Turning and repositioning the patient in bed accounted for 31% of the injuries incurred. The E-OSHA 300 log narratives revealed that staff injuries associated with obese and nonobese patient handling were usually performed using biomechanics and not equipment. Manual mobilization of morbidly obese patients increases the risk of caregiver injury. A tracking indicator on the OSHA 300 logs for staff injury linked to a bariatric patient would provide the ability to compare obese and nonobese patient handling injuries. The E-OSHA 300 log provides a method to identify the frequency, severity, and nature of caregiver injury during mobilization of the obese. Understanding the heightened risk of

  16. Experience With Laser Safety In The USA--A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, David H.

    1986-10-01

    Following several research programs in the 1960's aimed at studying the adverse biological effects of lasers and other optical radiation sources, laser occupational exposure limits were set and general safety standards were developed. Today, the experience from laser accidents and the development of new lasers and new applications have altered the format of the exposure limits and the safety procedures. It is critically important to distinguish between different biological injury mechanisms. The biological effects of ultraviolet radiation upon the skin and eye are additive over a period of at least one workday, and require different safety procedures. The scattered UV irradiance from excimer lasers may be quite hazardous, depending upon wavelength and action spectra. Since laser technology is young, the exposure of an individual in natural sunlight must be studied to evaluate the potential for chronic effects. The safety measures necessary in the use of lasers depend upon a hazard evaluation. The appropriate control measures and alternate means of enclosure, baffling, and operational control measures are presented. Present laser safety standards are explained briefly. Eye protective techniques and eyewear are considered for a variety of sources. The optical properties of enclosure materials are also discussed.

  17. Critical experiments facility and criticality safety programs at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Iwao; Tachimori, Shoichi; Takeshita, Isao; Suzaki, Takenori; Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Nomura, Yasushi

    1985-10-01

    The nuclear criticality safety is becoming a key point in Japan in the safety considerations for nuclear installations outside reactors such as spent fuel reprocessing facilities, plutonium fuel fabrication facilities, large scale hot alboratories, and so on. Especially a large scale spent fuel reprocessing facility is being designed and would be constructed in near future, therefore extensive experimental studies are needed for compilation of our own technical standards and also for verification of safety in a potential criticality accident to obtain public acceptance. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is proceeding a construction program of a new criticality safety experimental facility where criticality data can be obtained for such solution fuels as mainly handled in a reprocessing facility and also chemical process experiments can be performed to investigate abnormal phenomena, e.g. plutonium behavior in solvent extraction process by using pulsed colums. In FY 1985 detail design of the facility will be completed and licensing review by the government would start in FY 1986. Experiments would start in FY 1990. Research subjects and main specifications of the facility are described. (author)

  18. EXPERIENCE NETWORKING UNIVERSITY OF EDUCATION TRAINING MASTERS SAFETY OF LIFE

    OpenAIRE

    Elvira Mikhailovna Rebko

    2016-01-01

    The article discloses experience networking of universities (Herzen State Pedagogical University and Sakhalin State University) in the development and implementation of joint training programs for master’s education in the field of life safety «Social security in the urban environment». The novelty of the work is to create a schematic design of basic educational training program for master’s education in the mode of networking, and to identify effective instructional techniques and conditions...

  19. To improve nuclear plant safety by learning from accident's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hidezo; Kida, Masanori; Kato, Hiroyuki; Hara, Shin-ichi

    1994-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this study is to produce an expert system that enables the experience (records and information) gained from accidents to be put to use towards improving nuclear plant safety. A number of examples have been investigated, both domestic and overseas, in which experience gained from accidents was utilized by utilities in managing and operating their nuclear power stations to improve safety. The result of investigation has been used to create a general 'basic flow' to make the best use of experience. The ultimate goal is achieved by carrying out this 'basic flow' with artificial intelligence (AI). To do this, it is necessary (1) to apply language analysis to process the source information (primary data base; domestic and overseas accident's reports) into the secondary data base, and (2) to establish an expert system for selecting (screening) significant events from the secondary data base. In the processing described in item (1), a multi-lingual thesaurus for nuclear-related terms become necessary because the source information (primary data bases) itself is multi-lingual. In the work described in item (2), the utilization of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), for example, is a candidate method for judging the significance of events. Achieving the goal thus requires developing various new techniques. As the first step of the above long-term study project, this report proposes the 'basic flow' and presents the concept of how the nuclear-related AI can be used to carry out this 'basic flow'. (author)

  20. The Detector Safety System of the ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltramello, O; Burckhart, H J; Franz, S; Jaekel, M; Jeckel, M; Lueders, S; Morpurgo, G; Santos Pedrosa, F dos; Pommes, K; Sandaker, H

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN is one of the most advanced detectors for High Energy Physics experiments ever built. It consists of the order of ten functionally independent sub-detectors, which all have dedicated services like power, cooling, gas supply. A Detector Safety System has been built to detect possible operational problems and abnormal and potentially dangerous situations at an early stage and, if needed, to bring the relevant part of ATLAS automatically into a safe state. The procedures and the configuration specific to ATLAS are described in detail and first operational experience is given.

  1. Use of Self-Expanding Stents for the Treatment of Vertebral Artery Ostial Stenosis: a Single Center Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Sun Young; Lee, Deok Hee; Choi, Jin Woo; Choi, Byung Se; In, Hyun Sin; Kim, Sun Mi; Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, Sang Joon; Suh, Dae Chul

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate our early experience using self-expanding stents to treat atherosclerotic vertebral artery ostial stenosis (VAOS), with respect to technical feasibility and clinical and imaging follow-up results. A total of 20 lesions in 20 patients underwent stenting of the VAOS using a self-expanding stent (Precise RX; Cordis Neurovascular, Miami Lakes, FL). Two patients were asymptomatic. We analyzed the technical success rate, causes of technical failure, occurrence of any vascular or neurological event, and the occurrence of any neurological abnormality or in-stent restenosis (ISR) seen on follow-up. The imaging follow-up was performed with Doppler ultrasound (DUS) as a primary screening modality. One instance of technical failure was caused by failure of the guidewire passage. The stent diameter was 5 mm, and post-stenting balloon dilatations were necessary in all cases. Stent misplacement requiring placement of an additional stent occurred in four cases. Following a 14.8 month average clinical follow-up time, two patients showed anterior circulation ischemia, which was not attributed to the VAOS we treated. Following a 13.7 month average DUS follow-up, five patients showed a mild degree of diffuse or focal intimal thickening in the stent lumen; however, none of the stenosis showed luminal loss of more than 50% and no stent fracture was noted. The use of self-expanding stents for treating VAOS was technically feasible and helped to improve artery patency during our limited follow-up interval

  2. Experience gained in enhancing operational safety at ComEd`s nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, D [Commonwealth Edison Co. (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The following aspects of experience gained in enhancing operational safety at Comed`s nuclear power plants are discussed: nuclear safety policy; centralization/decentralization; typical nuclear operating organization; safety review boards; human performance enhancement; elements of effective nuclear oversight.

  3. Experience gained in enhancing operational safety at ComEd's nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, D.

    1997-01-01

    The following aspects of experience gained in enhancing operational safety at Comed's nuclear power plants are discussed: nuclear safety policy; centralization/decentralization; typical nuclear operating organization; safety review boards; human performance enhancement; elements of effective nuclear oversight

  4. New safety performance indicators for safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal facilities. Cuban experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peralta Vital, J.L.; Castillo, R.G.; Olivera, J.

    2002-01-01

    The paper shows the Cuban experience on implementing geological disposal of radioactive waste and the necessity for identifying new safety performance indicators for the safety assessment (SA) of radioactive waste disposal facilities. The selected indicator was the concentration of natural radioactive elements (U, Ra, Th, K) in the Cuban geologic environment. We have carried out a group of investigations, which have allowed characterising the concentration for the whole Country, creating a wide database where this indicator is associated with the lithology. The main lithologies in Cuba are: the sedimentary rocks (70 percent of national occurrence), which are present in the three regions (limestone and lutite), and finally the igneous and metamorphic rocks. The results show the concentrations ranges of the natural radionuclides associated fundamentally to the variation in the lithology and geographical area of the Country. In Cuba, the higher concentration (ppm) of Uranium and Radium are referenced to the Central region associated to Skarn, while for Thorium (ppm) and Potassium (%), in the East region the concentration peaks in Tuffs have been found. The concentrations ranges obtained are preliminary, they characterise the behaviour of this parameter for the Cuban geology, but they do not represent limits for safety assessment purposes yet. Also other factors should be taken into account as the assessment context, time scales and others assumptions before establishing the final concentration limits for the natural radionuclides as a radiological and nuclear safety performance indicator complementary to dose and risk for safety assessment for radiological and nuclear facilities. (author)

  5. Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes - Romanian experience: Master - Nuclear Materials and Technologies Educational Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeca, S.; Valeca, M.

    2012-01-01

    The main objectives of the Master Nuclear Materials and Technologies Educational Plan are: 1. To deliver higher education and training in the following specific domains, such as: Powders Technology and Ceramic Materials, Techniques of Structural Analysis, Composite Materials, Semiconductor Materials and Components, Metals and Metallic Alloys, Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, Nuclear Materials, The Engineering of Special Nuclear Materials, 2. To train managers of the Nuclear Waste Products and Nuclear Safety, 3. To qualify in ICT Systems for Nuclear Process Guidance, 4. To qualify in Environmental Protection System at the Level of Nuclear Power Stations, 5. To train managers for Quality Assurance of Nuclear Energetic Processes, 6. To deliver higher education and training regarding the International Treatises, Conventions and Settlements in force in the field of nuclear related activities. (author)

  6. Deceased donor organ transplantation with expanded criteria donors: a single-center experience from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goplani, K R; Firoz, A; Ramakrishana, P; Shah, P R; Gumber, M R; Patel, H V; Vanikar, A V; Trivedi, H L

    2010-01-01

    Deceased donor organ transplantation (DDOT) accounts for DKT) and 19 single (SKT). Fourteen donors had hypertension, a cerebrovascular accident as the cause of death, 9 had both, and 4 had diabetes. Mean donor age was 70.3 +/- 8.9 years. Decisions on the procedure were based upon frozen section biopsy in 13 of 21 donors. Mean DKT donor age was 76 +/- 9.7 years versu 64 +/- 5.7 years of SKT donors. The native kidney diseases were chronic glomerulonephritis (n = 14), diabetic nephropathy (n = 7), tubulointerstitial nephritis (n = 4) and polycystic kidney disease, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, lupus nephritis and patchy cortical necrosis, (n = 1 each). Mean recipient age of DKT versus SKT was 43.5 versus 42.3 years. All recipients received rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin, followed by steroid, mycophenolate mofetil/calcinueurin inhibitor. Over a mean follow-up of 341 days, the mean serum creatinine (SCr) of 25/29 patients was 1.60 mg/dL (range, 1.0-2.6). The mean SCr of SKT patients was 1.59 +/- 0.63 mg/dL and of DKT, 1.62 +/- 0.48 mg/dL. Ten patients had delayed graft function and 11 had biopsy proven acute tubular necrosis. Seven (24%) patients had rejection (grade 3 Banff update '05, type IA; 4, type 2A); 6 responded to antirejection; 1 graft was lost at 7 months due to chronic rejection. Three (10.3%) patients were lost, 1 each due to AMI, sepsis, and CMV disease. In the circumstances of organ shortage, DDOT with expanded criteria donor is a feasible option.

  7. Expanding the Graduate Education Experience at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, C. L.; Kilb, D. L.; Zmarzly, D.; Abeyta, E.

    2016-02-01

    Emerging career pathways for graduate students in earth, ocean and climate sciences increasingly require skills in teaching and communication. This is true of academic careers, in which demonstrated teaching skills make applicants for faculty positions far more competitive, and traditionally less conventional careers outside of academia that require cross-disciplinary collaboration and/or communication to audiences not directly involved in science research (e.g. policy makers, educators, the public). Yet most graduate education programs provide little to no opportunity or incentive for young investigators to develop and hone these skills, and graduate students are often discouraged from deviating from the traditional "research apprenticeship" model during their graduate education. At Scripps, the Birch Aquarium at Scripps, and UC San Diego Extension, we are developing new ways to integrate teaching, communication, and outreach into our graduate education program, thus broadening the scope of graduate training and better serving the needs and evolving career aspirations of our graduate students. This effort is an integral part of our overall outreach strategy a Scripps in which we seek to combine high quality STEM outreach and teaching with opportunities for Scripps graduate students to put their teaching and communications training into practice. The overall effort is a "win-win" both for our students and for the highly diverse K-16 community in San Diego County. In this talk we will summarize the programmatic efforts currently underway at Scripps, our strategic collaboration with UCSD Extension, which is expanding the capacity and reach of our integrated program, and our plans for sustaining these efforts for the long term.

  8. The Student Experience of Learning Using Networked Technologies: An Emergent Progression of Expanding Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutajar, Maria

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on phenomenographic research which explored the qualitative differences in post-secondary students' accounts of their networked learning experiences. Data was generated using semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of participants. Phenomenographic analysis led to a configuration of variation in students' accounts…

  9. Expanding Protection Motivation Theory: The Role of Individual Experience in Information Security Policy Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutchler, Leigh Ann

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to make contributions to the area of behavioral information security in the field of Information Systems and to assist in the improved development of Information Security Policy instructional programs to increase the policy compliance of individuals. The role of an individual's experience in the context of…

  10. Comparing the Affordable Care Act's Financial Impact on Safety-Net Hospitals in States That Expanded Medicaid and Those That Did Not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Allen; DaVanzo, Joan E; Haught, Randy; Phap-Hoa, Luu

    2017-11-01

    Safety-net hospitals play a vital role in delivering health care to Medicaid enrollees, the uninsured, and other vulnerable patients. By reducing the number of uninsured Americans, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was also expected to lower these hospitals’ significant uncompensated care costs and shore up their financial stability. To examine how the ACA’s Medicaid expansion affected the financial status of safety-net hospitals in states that expanded Medicaid and in states that did not. Using Medicare hospital cost reports for federal fiscal years 2012 and 2015, the authors compared changes in Medicaid inpatient days as a percentage of total inpatient days, Medicaid revenues as a percentage of total net patient revenues, uncompensated care costs as a percentage of total operating costs, and hospital operating margins. Medicaid expansion had a significant, favorable financial impact on safety-net hospitals. From 2012 to 2015, safety-net hospitals in expansion states, compared to those in nonexpansion states, experienced larger increases in Medicaid inpatient days and Medicaid revenues as well as reduced uncompensated care costs. These changes improved operating margins for safety-net hospitals in expansion states. Margins for safety-net hospitals in nonexpansion states, meanwhile, declined.

  11. Safety concerns for superconducting magnets of upcoming fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.

    1983-01-01

    -Several fusion experiments being constructed (Tore Supra) or contemplated (DCT 8, Alcator DCT) feature superconducting coils. These coils introduce the following safety concerns: 1. Internally Cooled Conductor (ICC). ICC's are found to be highly stable against short heat pulses, even when the coolant is stagnant or moving at low steady-state velocity. However, a large heat pulse is certain to quench the conductor. Thus, determining the stability limits is vital. 2. Helium II Cooling. Helium II has both unique advantages as a coolant and unique safety problems. 3. Shorted Turns. In magnets with shorts from operational accidents, the current can switch back and forth between the short and the shorted turns, as those alternatively go normal and superconducting. 4. Hybrid Superconducting-Normal Conducting Coil System. The possibility of unequal currents in the different magnets and thus of unexpected forces on the superconducting magnets is much greater than for an all-superconducting system. Analysis of these problems are presented

  12. Expanding hegemonic masculinity: the use of irony in young men's stories about romantic experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobov, Neill

    2009-12-01

    This study examines the use of irony in young men's stories about romantic and sexual experiences. Because romantic experiences are central in the constitution of a heterosexual self, and because they are increasingly formulated in relation to traditional masculine norms and the simultaneous avowal and disavowal of effeminacy, they reveal an oscillation between complicity and resistance to hegemonic masculine norms. This oscillation is explored in stories about promiscuity, seduction, and vulnerability. Critical discursive analyses reveal how young men discursively pivot between complicity and resistance to traditional masculine norms, how this oscillation functions in the accomplishment of their romantic identities, how a sense of conventional masculinity is reclaimed, and what these processes reveal about the shifting nature of hegemonic masculinity in contemporary culture.

  13. Expanding on the Experiences of Transgender Nonreligious People: An Exploratory Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lain A.B. Mathers

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Building on research that points out the specific forms of marginalization that transgender and nonreligious people face in contemporary U.S. society, this exploratory analysis focuses on the experiences of transgender nonreligious people who were raised in religious households. Utilizing interviews with eleven formerly religious, now nonreligious, transgender people I draw out some of the future pathways scholars of nonreligion should take to better account for the lives of transgender nonreligious people in scholarship on nonreligion. Specifically, scholars of nonreligion should begin analyzing transgender nonreligious people’s experiences in religious settings, with family, and with organizations and networks outside of religion. I conclude by discussing the ways this study can shed light on the broader processes by which inequality is reproduced and make suggestions for nonreligious leaders to make room for and listen to transgender people in nonreligious spaces.

  14. Expanding the Horizon: A Journey to Explore and Share Effective Geoscience Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolman, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Indian Natural Resource Science and Engineering Program (INRSEP) has worked diligently over the past 40 + years to ensure the success of Tribal, Indigenous and Underrepresented undergraduate and graduate students in geoscience and natural resources fields of study. Central to this success has been the development of cultural relevant research opportunities directed by Tribal people. The research experiences have been initiated to address culturally relevant challenges on Tribal and non-Tribal lands. It has become critically important to ensure students have multiple research experiences across North America as well as throughout the continent. The INRSEP community has found creating and maintaining relationships with organizations like the Geoscience Alliance, Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MSPHD's) and the Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP) program has greatly improved the success of students matriculating to graduate STEM programs. These relationships also serve an immense capacity in tracking students, promoting best practices in research development and assessing outcomes. The presentation will highlight lessons learned on how to 1) Develop a diverse cohort or 'community' of student researchers; 2) Evolve intergenerational mentoring processes and outcomes; 3) Tether to related research and programs; and Foster the broader impact of geoscience research and outcomes.

  15. EXPERIENCE NETWORKING UNIVERSITY OF EDUCATION TRAINING MASTERS SAFETY OF LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Mikhailovna Rebko

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article discloses experience networking of universities (Herzen State Pedagogical University and Sakhalin State University in the development and implementation of joint training programs for master’s education in the field of life safety «Social security in the urban environment». The novelty of the work is to create a schematic design of basic educational training program for master’s education in the mode of networking, and to identify effective instructional techniques and conditions of networking.Purpose – present the results of the joint development of a network of the basic educational program (BEP, to identify the stages of networking, to design a generalized scheme of development and implementation of a network of educational training program for master’s education in the field of life safety.Results generalized model of networking partner institutions to develop and implement the basic educational program master.Practical implications: the education process for Master of Education in the field of health and safety in Herzen State Pedagogical University and Sakhalin State University.

  16. Disentangling Fun and Enjoyment in Exergames Using an Expanded Design, Play, Experience Framework: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellecker, Robin; Lyons, Elizabeth J; Baranowski, Tom

    2013-06-01

    With exergames (as with physical activity in general), more intense and longer-duration game play should accrue more health benefits. Exergames, however, appear to be played for relatively short durations, often at medium or lower intensities. Ostensibly games are played for fun or enjoyment. Enhancing the fun or enjoyment experienced during exergame play should enhance the intensity and duration of physical activity, and thereby the health benefits. Research, reviewed herein, indicates fun and/or enjoyment in games are inherently laden with psychosocial, physiological, and embodiment substrates. Physical activity may also have separate or closely related psychosocial, physiological, and embodiment enjoyment substrates. Research is needed to integrate these levels of experience and to identify the game mechanics that enhance, and even maximize, the fun or enjoyment experienced in exergames, to thereby increase the health benefit.

  17. The limits of extremophilic life expanded under extraterrestrial environment-simulated experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lage, C.; Dalmaso, G.; Teixeira, L.; Bendia, A.; Rosado, A.

    2012-09-01

    Astrobiology is a brand new area of science that seeks to understand the origin and dynamics of life in the universe. Several hypotheses to explain life in the cosmic context have been developed throughout human history, but only now technology has allowed many of them to be tested. Laboratory experiments have been able to show how chemical elements essential to life, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen combine in biologically important compounds. Interestingly, these compounds are found universally. As these compounds were combined to the point of originating cells and complex organisms is still a challenge to be unveiled by science. However, our 4.5 billion years-old solar system was born within a 10-billion years-old universe. Thus, simple cells like microorganisms may have had time to form in planets older than ours or other suitable molecular places in the universe. One hypothesis to explain the origin of life on Earth is called panspermia, which predicts that microbial life could have been formed in the universe billions of years ago, traveling between planets, and inseminating units of life that could have become more complex in habitable planets like ours. A project designed to test the viability of extremophile microorganisms exposed to simulated extraterrestrial environments is ongoing at the Carlos Chagas Filho Institute of Biophysics to test whether microbial life could withstand those inhospitable environments. Ultra-resistant (known or novel ones) microorganisms collected from terrestrial extreme environments, extremophiles, have been exposed to intense radiation sources simulating solar radiation (at synchrotron accelerators), capable of emitting in a few hours radiation equivalent of million years accumulated doses. The results obtained in these experiments reveal the interesting possibility of the existence of microbial life beyond Earth.

  18. Treatment of Benign and Malignant Tracheobronchial Obstruction with Metal Wire Stents: Experience with a Balloon-Expandable and a Self-Expandable Stent Type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieger, Johannes; Hautmann, Hubert; Linsenmaier, Ulrich; Weber, Cristoph; Treitl, Markus; Huber, R.M.; Pfeifer, Klaus-Juergen

    2004-01-01

    Over the last few years various types of metal wire stents have been increasingly employed in the treatment of both malignant and benign tracheobronchial obstruction. To date, however, few studies have investigated the in vivo properties of different stent types. We implanted 26 balloon-expandable tantalum Strecker stents (18 patients) and 18 self-expandable Wallstents (16 patients) into the tracheobronchial system of 30 patients with combined stenting in 4 patients. Mean age was 51 years (range: 0.5-79 years). Malignant disease was present in 23 patients, benign disease in seven patients. Both patients and individual stents were monitored clinically and radiographically. The probability of stents remaining within the tracheobronchial system, and of their remaining undislocated and uncompressed was calculated using Kaplan-Meier analysis for both stent types. Average stent follow-up time was 112 days until explantation and 115 days until patients' death or discharge. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a higher probability for the Wallstent to remain within the tracheobronchial system. Dislocation and compression occurred more rarely. Explantation, however, if desired, was more difficult compared to the Strecker stent. The Wallstent also led to the formation of granulation tissue, especially at the proximal stent end, frequently requiring reintervention. Both stent types proved to be effective therapeutic options in the management of obstructive tracheobronchial disease. The mechanical properties of the Strecker stent seem to be less favorable compared to the Wallstent but removal is easy. For benign disease, however, the Wallstent reveals limitations due to significant side effects

  19. Treatment of symptomatic high-grade intracranial stenoses with the balloon-expandable Pharos stent: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurre, W.; Berkefeld, J.; Mesnil de Rochemont, R. du; Sitzer, M.; Neumann-Haefelin, T.

    2008-01-01

    We report our first clinical experience with a CE-marked flexible monorail balloon-expandable stent for treatment of high-grade intracranial stenoses. Between April 2006 and November 2007 21 patients with symptomatic intracranial stenoses (>70%) were treated with the PHAROS stent. In seven patients, the procedure was performed during acute stroke intervention. Procedural success, clinical complication rates and mid-term follow-up data were prospectively recorded. During a median follow-up period of 7.3 months one additional patient died of an unknown cause 3 months after the intervention. A patient with a significant residual stenosis presented with a new stroke after further progression of the residual stenosis. None of the successfully treated patients experienced ipsilateral stroke. Recanalization of intracranial stenoses with the balloon-expandable Pharos stent is technically feasible. The periprocedural complication rate and mid-term follow-up results were in the range of previously reported case series. This pilot study was limited by the small sample size and severe morbidity of the included patients. Final evaluation of the efficacy of Pharos stent treatment demands further investigation. (orig.)

  20. Using the Tritium Plasma Experiment to evaluate ITER PFC safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Bartlit, J.R.; Causey, R.A.; Haines, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Tritium Plasma Experiment was assembled at Sandia National Labs., Livermore and is being moved to the Tritium Systems Test Assembly facility at Los Alamos National Lab. to investigate interactions between dense plasmas at low energies and plasma-facing component materials. This apparatus has the unique capability of replicating plasma conditions in a tokamak divertor with particle flux densities of 2 x 10 23 ions/m 2 .s and a plasma temperature of about 15 eV using a plasma that includes tritium. An experimental program has been initiated using the Tritium Plasma Experiment to examine safety issues related to tritium in plasma-facing components, particularly the ITER divertor. Those issues include tritium retention and release characteristics, tritium permeation rates and transient times to coolant streams, surface modification and erosion by the plasma, the effects of thermal loads and cycling, and particulate production. An industrial consortium led by McDonnell Douglas will design and fabricate the test fixtures

  1. [Experience feedback committee: a method for patient safety improvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, P; Sellier, E; Imburchia, F; Mallaret, M-R

    2013-04-01

    An experience feedback committee (CREX, Comité de Retour d'EXpérience) is a method which contributes to the management of safety of care in a medical unit. Originally used for security systems of civil aviation, the method has been adapted to health care facilities and successfully implemented in radiotherapy units and in other specialties. We performed a brief review of the literature for studies reporting data on CREX established in hospitals. The review was performed using the main bibliographic databases and Google search results. The CREX is designed to analyse incidents reported by professionals. The method includes monthly meetings of a multi-professional committee that reviews the reported incidents, chooses a priority incident and designates a "pilot" responsible for investigating the incident. The investigation of the incident involves a systemic analysis method and a written synthesis presented at the next meeting of the committee. The committee agrees on actions for improvement that are suggested by the analysis and follows their implementation. Systems for the management of health care, including reporting systems, are organized into three levels: the medical unit, the hospital and the country as a triple loop learning process. The CREX is located in the base level, short loop of risk management and allows direct involvement of care professionals in patient safety. Safety of care has become a priority of health systems. In this context, the CREX can be a useful vehicle for the implementation of a safety culture in medical units. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. JET-ISX-B beryllium limiter experiment safety analysis report and operational safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmonds, P.H.

    1985-09-01

    An experiment to evaluate the suitability of beryllium as a limiter material has been completed on the ISX-B tokamak. The experiment consisted of two phases: (1) the initial operation and characterization in the ISX experiment, and a period of continued operation to the specified surface fluence (10 22 atoms/cm 2 ) of hydrogen ions; and (2) the disassembly, decontamination, or disposal of the ISX facility. During these two phases of the project, the possibility existed for beryllium and/or beryllium oxide powder to be produced inside the vacuum vessel. Beryllium dust is a highly toxic material, and extensive precautions are required to prevent the release of the beryllium into the experimental work area and to prevent the contamination of personnel working on the device. Details of the health hazards associated with beryllium and the appropriate precautions are presented. Also described in appendixes to this report are the various operational safety requirements for the project

  3. Electron cooling and recombination experiments with an adiabatically expanded electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastuszka, S.; Heidelberg Univ.; Schramm, U.; Heidelberg Univ.; Grieser, M.; Heidelberg Univ.; Broude, C.; Heidelberg Univ.; Grimm, R.; Heidelberg Univ.; Habs, D.; Heidelberg Univ.; Kenntner, J.; Heidelberg Univ.; Miesner, H.J.; Heidelberg Univ.; Schuessler, T.; Heidelberg Univ.; Schwalm, D.; Heidelberg Univ.; Wolf, A.; Heidelberg Univ.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetically guided electron beams with transverse temperatures reduced with respect to the cathode temperature by a factor of more than 7 were realized in the electron cooling device of the heavy-ion storage ring TSR and the effect of the reduced transverse temperature in recombination and electron cooling experiments was studied. Measured dielectronic recombination resonances at low relative energy and spectra of laser-stimulated recombination indicate that transverse electron temperatures of about 17 meV have been obtained at cathode temperatures of about 110 meV. The temperature dependence of the spontaneous electron-ion recombination rate during electron cooling was investigated and found to follow the inverse square-root law expected from the theory of radiative recombination, although the measured absolute rates are higher than predicted. A new method based on analyzing the intensity of the fluorescence light emitted during simultaneous laser and electron cooling is used to measure the longitudinal electron cooling force in a range of relative velocities extending over two orders of magnitude (10 5 -10 7 cm/s). The results confirm the occurrence of 'magnetized electron cooling' also at the reduced transverse temperature and show that, compared to earlier measurements at the high transverse temperature, the cooling force increases by about a factor of 2; a considerably larger increase by a factor of ∼5 would be expected if 'magnetized electron cooling' would not exist. (orig.)

  4. The CERN Detector Safety System for LHC Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Lüders, S; Morpurgo, G; Schmeling, S M

    2003-01-01

    The Detector Safety System (DSS), developed at CERN in common for the four LHC experiments under the auspices of the Joint Controls Project (JCOP), will be responsible for assuring the equipment protection for these experiments. Therefore, the DSS requires a high degree of both availability and reliability. It is composed of a Front-end and a Back-end part. The Front-end is based on a redundant Siemens PLC, to which the safety-critical part of the DSS task is delegated. The PLC Front-end is capable of running autonomously and of automati-cally taking predefined protective actions whenever re-quired. It is supervised and configured by the CERN-cho-sen PVSS SCADA system via a Siemens OPC server. The supervisory layer provides the operator with a status display and with limited online reconfiguration capabili-ties. Configuration of the code running in the PLCs is completely data driven via the contents of a ?Configura-tion Database?. Thus, the DSS can easily adapt to the different and constantly evolving require...

  5. Section 4. Further expanding the criteria for HCC in living donor liver transplantation: the Tokyo University experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Sumihito; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2014-04-27

    In Asia, evidence-based guidelines for the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have evolved, including the option of liver transplantation. Because of the continuing serious organ shortage, however, living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) remains the mainstream in Japan. Unlike deceased donor transplantation, living donor transplantation is not always limited by the restrictions imposed by the nationwide organ allocation system. The decision for transplantation may depend on institutional or case-by-case considerations, balancing the will of the donor, the operative risk, and the overall survival benefit. Cumulative data from the Japanese national multicenter registry analysis as well as individual center experiences suggest further expanding the criteria for LDLT for HCC from the Milan criteria is feasible with acceptable outcomes.

  6. Self-expandable stent loaded with {sup 125}I seeds: Feasibility and safety in a rabbit model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Jinhe [Department of Radiology, Zhong-Da Hospital, Southeast University, 87 Dingjiaqiao Road, Nanjing 210009 (China); Teng Gaojun [Department of Radiology, Zhong-Da Hospital, Southeast University, 87 Dingjiaqiao Road, Nanjing 210009 (China)]. E-mail: gjteng@vip.sina.com; Zhu Guangyu [Department of Radiology, Zhong-Da Hospital, Southeast University, 87 Dingjiaqiao Road, Nanjing 210009 (China); He Shicheng [Department of Radiology, Zhong-Da Hospital, Southeast University, 87 Dingjiaqiao Road, Nanjing 210009 (China); Deng Gang [Department of Radiology, Zhong-Da Hospital, Southeast University, 87 Dingjiaqiao Road, Nanjing 210009 (China); He Jie [Department of Radiology, Zhong-Da Hospital, Southeast University, 87 Dingjiaqiao Road, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2007-02-15

    Objective: To evaluate technical feasibility and acute and subacute radiotolerance of a self-expandable stent loaded with {sup 125}I seeds in the rabbit esophagus. Methods: A self-expandable stent designed for esophageal application was made of 0.16 mm nitinol wire and loaded with {sup 125}I seeds (CIAE-6711). Twenty-seven stents with three different radioactive dosages (n = 9 in each dosage group) were implanted in the esophagus of healthy rabbits, while nine stents alone were used as controls. The stents were perorally deployed into the esophagus under fluoroscopic guidance. Radiological follow-up included plain chest film, CT scan, and barium esophagography which were undertaken in all rabbits of each group at 2, 4, and 8 weeks, respectively, which were correlated to histopathological findings. The stented esophageal segments along with their adjacent tissues were harvested for histopathological examinations. Results: The stent was successfully deployed into the targeted esophageal segment in all rabbits. Neither {sup 125}I seeds dislodged from the stent during the deployment, nor they did during the follow-up period. The greatest (16.2 Gy) absorbed dose was found in the tissue 10 mm from {sup 125}I seeds at 8 weeks. Slight epithelial hyperplasia on the stent surface and submucosal inflammatory process developed at 2 weeks, which reached the peak at 8 weeks after the procedure. Significant thickness of the esophageal muscular layer was found at 8 weeks only in the groups with {sup 125}I seeds. On radiologic follow-up, moderate strictures on both ends of the stents developed at 4 weeks and became severe at 8 weeks after the procedure in all groups. Conclusion: Deployment of a self-expandable stent loaded with {sup 125}I seeds is technically feasible and safe within the first 8 weeks. Acute and subacute radiotolerance of the treated esophagus and its adjacent tissues by {sup 125}I seeds is well preserved in a healthy rabbit model.

  7. 76 FR 72666 - Pipeline Safety: Expanding the Use of Excess Flow Valves in Gas Distribution Systems to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-25

    ... technical feasibility and cost of the installation of such valves; (D) The public safety benefits of the... public comment regarding the technical challenges, and the potential costs and the potential benefits of... a cost-benefit perspective. DATES: Persons interested in submitting written comments on this ANPRM...

  8. Regulatory Oversight of Safety Culture — Korea’s Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, S.J.; Choi, Y.S.; Kim, J.T.

    2016-01-01

    In Korea, a regulatory oversight program of safety culture was launched in 2012 to establish regulatory measures against several events caused by weak safety culture in the nuclear industry. This paper is intended to introduce the preliminary regulatory oversight framework, development and validation of safety culture components, pilot safety culture inspection results and lessons learned. The safety culture model should be based on a sound understanding of the national culture and industry characteristics where the model will be applied. The nuclear safety culture oversight model is being developed and built on the Korean regulatory system to independently assess the nuclear power operating organizations’ safety culture.

  9. The CERN Detector Safety System for the LHC Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Lüders, S; Morpurgo, G; Schmeling, S

    2003-01-01

    The Detector Safety System (DSS), currently being developed at CERN under the auspices of the Joint Controls Project (JCOP), will be responsible for assuring the protection of equipment for the four LHC experiments. Thus, the DSS will require a high degree of both availability and reliability. After evaluation of various possible solutions, a prototype is being built based on a redundant Siemens PLC front-end, to which the safety-critical part of the DSS task is delegated. This is then supervised by a PVSS SCADA system via an OPC server. The PLC front-end is capable of running autonomously and of automatically taking predefined protective actions whenever required. The supervisory layer provides the operator with a status display and with limited online reconfiguration capabilities. Configuration of the code running in the PLCs will be completely data driven via the contents of a "Configuration Database". Thus, the DSS can easily adapt to the different and constantly evolving requirements of the LHC experimen...

  10. Contextualized perceptions of movement as a source of expanded insight: People with multiple sclerosis' experience with physiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normann, Britt; Sørgaard, Knut W; Salvesen, Rolf; Moe, Siri

    2013-01-01

    The hospitals' outpatient clinics for people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) are important in the health care. Research regarding physiotherapy in such clinics is limited. The purpose was to investigate how PwMS perceive movement during single sessions of physiotherapy in a hospital's outpatient clinic, and what do these experiences mean for the patient's insight into their movement disturbances? Qualitative research interviews were performed with a purposive sample of 12 PwMS and supplemented with seven videotaped sessions. Content analysis was performed. The results indicate that contextualized perceptions of movement appear to be an essential source for PwMS to gain expanded insight with regard to their individual movement disturbances regardless of their ambulatory status. The contextualization implies that perceptions of movement are integrated with the physiotherapist's explanations regarding optimizing gait and balance or other activities of daily life. Perceptions of improvement in body part movement and/or functional activities are vital to enhancing their understanding of their individual movement disorders, and they may provide expanded insight regarding future possibilities and limitations involving everyday tasks. The implementation of movements, which transforms the perceived improvement into self-assisted exercises, appeared to be meaningful. Contextualized perceptions of improvements in movement may strengthen the person's sense of ownership and sense of agency and thus promote autonomy and self-encouragement. The findings underpin the importance of contextualized perceptions of movement based on exploration of potential for change, as an integrated part of information and communication in the health care for PwMS. Further investigations are necessary to deepen our knowledge.

  11. Healthcare professionals' and parents' experiences of the confirmatory testing period: a qualitative study of the UK expanded newborn screening pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Louise; Atkinson, Lou; Kehal, Isher; Bonham, James R

    2017-05-08

    With further expansion of the number of conditions for which newborn screening can be undertaken, it is timely to consider the impact of positive screening results and the confirmatory testing period on the families involved. This study was undertaken as part of a larger programme of work to evaluate the Expanded Newborn Screening (ENBS) programme in the United Kingdom (UK). It was aimed to determine the views and experiences of healthcare professionals (HCPs) and parents on communication and interaction during the period of confirmatory testing following a positive screening result. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with parents of children who had received a positive ENBS result and HCPs who had been involved with the diagnosis and support of parents. Ten parents and 11 healthcare professionals took part in the in-depth interviews. Questions considered the journey from the positive screening result through confirmatory testing to a confirmed diagnosis and the communication and interaction between the parents and HCPs that they had been experienced. Key themes were identified through thematic analysis. The results point to a number of elements within the path through confirmatory testing that are difficult for parents and could be further developed to improve the experience. These include the way in which the results are communicated to parents, rapid turnaround of results, offering a consistent approach, exploring interventions to support family relationships and reviewing the workload and scheduling implications for healthcare professionals. As technology enables newborn screening of a larger number of conditions, there is an increasing need to consider and mediate the potentially negative effects on families. The findings from this study point to a number of elements within the path through confirmatory testing that are difficult for parents and could be further developed to benefit the family experience.

  12. Halden fuel and material experiments beyond operational and safety limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, Boris; Wiesenack, Wolfgang; McGrath, M.; Tverberg, T.

    2014-01-01

    One of the main tasks of any research reactor is to investigate the behavior of nuclear fuel and materials prior to their introduction into the market. For commercial NPPs, it is important both to test nuclear fuels at a fuel burn-up exceeding current limits and to investigate reactor materials for higher irradiation dose. For fuel vendors such tests enable verification of fuel reliability or for the safety limits to be found under different operational conditions and accident situations. For the latter, in-pile experiments have to be performed beyond some normal limits. The program of fuel tests performed in the Halden reactor is aimed mainly at determining: The thermal FGR threshold, which may limit fuel operational power with burn-up increase, the “lift-off effect” when rod internal pressure exceeds coolant pressure, the effects of high burn-up on fuel behavior under power ramps, fuel relocation under LOCA simulation at higher burn-up, the effect of dry-out on high burn-up fuel rod integrity. This paper reviews some of the experiments performed in the Halden reactor for understanding some of the limits for standard fuel utilization with the aim of contributing to the development of innovative fuels and cladding materials that could be used beyond these limits. (author)

  13. Organic reactivity analysis in Hanford single-shell tanks: Experimental and modeling basis for an expanded safety criterion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauske, H.; Grigsby, J.M.; Turner, D.A.; Babad, H.; Meacham, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    De-spite demonstrated safe storage in terms of chemical stability of the Hanford high level waste for many decades, including decreasing waste temperatures and continuing aging of chemicals to less energetic states, concerns continue relative to assurance of long-term safe storage. Review of potential chemical safety hazards has been of particular recent interest in response to serious incidents within the Nuclear Weapons Complexes in the former Soviet Union (the 1957 Kyshtym and the 1993 Tomsk-7 incidents). Based upon an evaluation of the extensive new information and understanding that have developed over the last few years, it is concluded that the Hanford waste is stored safely and that concerns related to potential chemical safety hazards are not warranted. Spontaneous bulk runaway reactions of the Kyshtym incident type and other potential condensed-phase propagating reactions can be ruled out by assuring appropriate tank operating controls are in place and by limiting tank intrusive activities. This paper summarizes the technical basis for this position

  14. Biochemical screening of 504,049 newborns in Denmark, the Faroe Islands and Greenland--experience and development of a routine program for expanded newborn screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Allan Meldgaard; Hougaard, David Michael; Simonsen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Expanded newborn screening for selected inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) in Denmark, the Faroe Islands and Greenland was introduced in 2002. We now present clinical, biochemical, and statistical results of expanded screening (excluding PKU) of 504,049 newborns during nine years as well as diagno......Expanded newborn screening for selected inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) in Denmark, the Faroe Islands and Greenland was introduced in 2002. We now present clinical, biochemical, and statistical results of expanded screening (excluding PKU) of 504,049 newborns during nine years as well...... as a pilot study during the first seven years, and the experience obtained during these years was used in the development of the routine neonatal screening program introduced in 2009. Methods for screening included tandem mass spectrometry and an assay for determination of biotinidase activity. A total...

  15. Moving your sons to safety: galls containing male fig wasps expand into the centre of figs, away from enemies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Yu

    Full Text Available Figs are the inflorescences of fig trees (Ficus spp., Moraceae. They are shaped like a hollow ball, lined on their inner surface by numerous tiny female flowers. Pollination is carried out by host-specific fig wasps (Agaonidae. Female pollinators enter the figs through a narrow entrance gate and once inside can walk around on a platform generated by the stigmas of the flowers. They lay their eggs into the ovules, via the stigmas and styles, and also gall the flowers, causing the ovules to expand and their pedicels to elongate. A single pollinator larva develops in each galled ovule. Numerous species of non-pollinating fig wasps (NPFW, belonging to other families of Chalcidoidea also make use of galled ovules in the figs. Some initiate galls, others make use of pollinator-generated galls, killing pollinator larvae. Most NPFW oviposit from the outside of figs, making peripherally-located pollinator larvae more prone to attack. Style length variation is high among monoecious Ficus spp. and pollinators mainly oviposit into more centrally-located ovules, with shorter styles. Style length variation is lower in male (wasp-producing figs of dioecious Ficus spp., making ovules equally vulnerable to attack by NPFW at the time that pollinators oviposit. We recorded the spatial distributions of galled ovules in mature male figs of the dioecious Ficus hirta in Southern China. The galls contained pollinators and three NPFW that kill them. Pollinators were concentrated in galls located towards the centre of the figs, NPFW towards the periphery. Due to greater pedicel elongation by male galls, male pollinators became located in more central galls than their females, and so were less likely to be attacked. This helps ensure that sufficient males survive, despite strongly female-biased sex ratios, and may be a consequence of the pollinator females laying mostly male eggs at the start of oviposition sequences.

  16. A Novel Self-Expandable, Radioactive Airway Stent Loaded with 125I Seeds: A Feasibility and Safety Study in Healthy Beagle Dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Guo, Jin-He; Zhu, Guang-Yu; Zhu, Hai-Dong; Chen, Li; Lu, Jian; Wang, Chao; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2017-07-01

    Airway stent placement is an effective treatment for the immediate palliation of malignant airway obstruction. However, restenosis caused by tumor ingrowth and/or overgrowth after stenting is common. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of a novel self-expandable stent loaded with 125 I seeds in healthy beagle dog. Under fluoroscopic guidance, forty-eight self-expandable airway stents loaded with 125 I seeds were perorally placed in the main trachea of 48 healthy beagle dogs, who were randomly divided into four groups (Group A: 0.3 mCi; Group B: 0.6 mCi; Group C: 0.9 mCi; Control group: 0 mCi). The estimated radiation dose was calculated using the isotropic point source approximation. Radiological follow-up examinations and histopathological examinations of stented tracheal segments and their adjacent organs and tissues were performed at 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks following the stenting. All stents were successfully deployed in the targeted tracheal segment in the beagle dogs without procedure-related complications. Tracheal stenosis became severe gradually in all the four groups, which was not associated with the radioactivity of 125 I seeds (p > 0.05). The tracheal injury scores increased along with the higher dose of radioactive seeds which reached peak at 8 weeks and then turned back slightly at 16 weeks. The adjacent tissue did not show pathohistological changes under microscope, while mild and reversible ultrastructure changes were showed under electronic microscope. This study demonstrates that it is feasible and safe to insert this novel self-expandable airway stent loaded with 125 I seeds in healthy beagle dog.

  17. A pilot study about the oncologic safety of colonic self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) in obstructive colon cancer: is occlusion always better than "silent" perforation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanghì, A; Piccolo, G; Cavallaro, A; Pulvirenti, E; Lo Menzo, E; Cardì, F; Di Vita, M; Cappellani, A

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the oncologic safety of colonic self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) in obstructive colon cancer. We retrospectively reviewed all the patients who were treated with endoscopic placement of a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) at our institution. A total of 26 patients were identified during the study period, of which 24 patients (92.30%) were treated with SEMS as a bridge-to-surgery and 2 (7.69%) as palliation. In 22 cases (80.76%), the stenosis was localized to the left side. Clinical success with resolution of bowel obstructions was achieved in 22 (84.61%) patients within a short period of time. Among patients treated successfully with SEMS insertion as bridge to surgery (n = 22), 20 (90.9%) underwent one-stage surgery with primary anastomosis while 2 patients (9.09%) underwent colostomy due to intraoperative evidence of a covered perforation by cancer tissue in the pelvis. Patients with subclinical perforation developed an early peritoneal carcinomatosis, 10 patients treated with curative intent subsequently developed liver metastasis after 24 months. We reported an overall poor outcome among patients treated with the insertion of SEMS. This led us to think that, in some cases, occlusion may be better than a "silent" perforation.

  18. The Safety of Aesthetic Labiaplasty: A Plastic Surgery Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lista, Frank; Mistry, Bhavik D; Singh, Yashoda; Ahmad, Jamil

    2015-08-01

    The demand for female aesthetic labiaplasty surgery continues to rapidly increase. Several questions have been raised regarding the safety and effectiveness of female aesthetic genital surgery. The purpose of this study is to review our experience with aesthetic labiaplasty and describe the type and frequency of complications that have been experienced. A retrospective chart review was performed on all patients who had primary aesthetic labia minora reduction surgery from August 2007 to April 2014. A chart review of the electronic medical record was performed to examine demographic, procedural, and outcome data. In the study period, 113 patients underwent aesthetic labiaplasty. Of these, 29 patients (25.6%) had labiaplasty performed in combination with another procedure. A total of 15 patients (13.3%) reported transient symptoms, including swelling, bruising, and pain. There was one patient (0.8%) that experienced bleeding. Four patients (3.5%) required revision surgery. All revisions were performed to excise further tissue to address persistent redundancy or asymmetry. No major complications were reported. In our experience, aesthetic surgery of the labia minora using an edge excision technique has a very low complication rate and provides satisfactory aesthetic outcomes for our patients. More studies examining the impact of labiaplasty on a woman's self-image and quality of life would add to our understanding of the motivations and expectations of women undergoing this aesthetic surgery. This information will allow us to help our patients make well-informed decisions when considering this aesthetic genital surgery. 4 Risk. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Expanding pedestrian injury risk to the body region level: how to model passive safety systems in pedestrian injury risk functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebuhr, Tobias; Junge, Mirko; Achmus, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    decomposable into the 3 body regions and so are the risk functions as body region-specific risk functions. The risk functions for each body region are stated explicitly for different injury severity levels and compared to the real-world accident data. The body region-specific risk functions can then be used to model the effect of improved passive safety systems. These modified body region-specific injury risk functions are aggregated to a new pedestrian injury risk function. Passive safety systems can therefore be modeled in injury risk functions for the first time. A short example on how the results can be used for assessing the effectiveness of new driver assistance systems concludes the article.

  20. Experience and lessons learned in the assessment of safety justifications for experiments mounted in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Some experiments in research reactors are arguably a risky undertaking due to their uncertain outcome. The justifications for such experiments require careful assessment to validate their undertaking. The public, the operators and the installation itself must be safeguarded. Assessment of the potential risk is an acquired skill but in doing so the route can be eased by learning from the lessons experience can teach. This paper, essentially for the usage of safety managers, sets out some of the issues relating to the assessment process gained from our experience over a few tens of years in the assessment of experiments. Many of the conclusions reached may appear all too obvious viewed in retrospect, but they were not necessarily clear at the time. Those organizations setting up assessment teams may find some of the conclusions of value such that their proposed management system can embrace methodologies for assessment that can avoid or lessen the impact of some of the pitfalls we have tried to identify. Failure to recognise some of these points may run the risk of delayed clearances, dilated timescales and cost overruns. It is in the hope of reducing all these penalties that we offer our experiences

  1. Safety climate and the distracted driving experiences of truck drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedler, David I; Pollack, Keshia M; Agnew, Jacqueline

    2015-07-01

    For truck drivers, distracted driving is a workplace behavior that increases occupational injury risk. We propose safety climate as an appropriate lens through which researchers can examine occupational distracted driving. Using a mixed methods study design, we surveyed truck drivers using the Safety Climate Questionnaire (SCQ) complemented by semi-structured interviews of experts on distracted driving and truck safety. Safety climate was assessed by using the entire SCQ as an overall climate score, followed by factor analysis that identified the following safety climate factors: Communications and Procedures; Management Commitment; and Work Pressure. In multivariate regression, the overall safety climate scale was associated with having ever experienced a crash and/or distraction-involved swerving. Interview participants described how these SCQ constructs could affect occupational distracted driving. To reduce distraction-related crashes in their organizations, management can adhere to safe policies and procedures, invest in engineering controls, and develop safer communication procedures. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Conducting organizational safety reviews - requirements, methods and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiman, T.; Oedewald, P.; Wahlstroem, B.; Rollenhagen, C.; Kahlbom, U.

    2008-03-01

    Organizational safety reviews are part of the safety management process of power plants. They are typically performed after major reorganizations, significant incidents or according to specified review programs. Organizational reviews can also be a part of a benchmarking between organizations that aims to improve work practices. Thus, they are important instruments in proactive safety management and safety culture. Most methods that have been used for organizational reviews are based more on practical considerations than a sound scientific theory of how various organizational or technical issues influence safety. Review practices and methods also vary considerably. The objective of this research is to promote understanding on approaches used in organizational safety reviews as well as to initiate discussion on criteria and methods of organizational assessment. The research identified a set of issues that need to be taken into account when planning and conducting organizational safety reviews. Examples of the issues are definition of appropriate criteria for evaluation, the expertise needed in the assessment and the organizational motivation for conducting the assessment. The study indicates that organizational safety assessments involve plenty of issues and situations where choices have to be made regarding what is considered valid information and a balance has to be struck between focus on various organizational phenomena. It is very important that these choices are based on a sound theoretical framework and that these choices can later be evaluated together with the assessment findings. The research concludes that at its best, the organizational safety reviews can be utilised as a source of information concerning the changing vulnerabilities and the actual safety performance of the organization. In order to do this, certain basic organizational phenomena and assessment issues have to be acknowledged and considered. The research concludes with recommendations on

  3. Conducting organizational safety reviews - requirements, methods and experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiman, T.; Oedewald, P.; Wahlstroem, B. [Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland); Rollenhagen, C. [Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, (Sweden); Kahlbom, U. [RiskPilot (Sweden)

    2008-03-15

    Organizational safety reviews are part of the safety management process of power plants. They are typically performed after major reorganizations, significant incidents or according to specified review programs. Organizational reviews can also be a part of a benchmarking between organizations that aims to improve work practices. Thus, they are important instruments in proactive safety management and safety culture. Most methods that have been used for organizational reviews are based more on practical considerations than a sound scientific theory of how various organizational or technical issues influence safety. Review practices and methods also vary considerably. The objective of this research is to promote understanding on approaches used in organizational safety reviews as well as to initiate discussion on criteria and methods of organizational assessment. The research identified a set of issues that need to be taken into account when planning and conducting organizational safety reviews. Examples of the issues are definition of appropriate criteria for evaluation, the expertise needed in the assessment and the organizational motivation for conducting the assessment. The study indicates that organizational safety assessments involve plenty of issues and situations where choices have to be made regarding what is considered valid information and a balance has to be struck between focus on various organizational phenomena. It is very important that these choices are based on a sound theoretical framework and that these choices can later be evaluated together with the assessment findings. The research concludes that at its best, the organizational safety reviews can be utilised as a source of information concerning the changing vulnerabilities and the actual safety performance of the organization. In order to do this, certain basic organizational phenomena and assessment issues have to be acknowledged and considered. The research concludes with recommendations on

  4. ABWR (K-6/7) construction experience (computer-based safety system)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokomura, T.

    1998-01-01

    TEPCO applied a digital safety system to Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station Unit Nos. 6 and 7, the world's first ABWR plant. Although this was the first time to apply a digital safety logic system in Japan, we were able to complete construction of K-6/7 very successfully and without any delay. TEPCO took a approach of developing a substantial amount of experience in digital non- safety systems before undertaking the design of the safety protection system. This paper describes the history, techniques and experience behind achieving a highly reliable digital safety system. (author)

  5. Experience with performance based training of nuclear criticality safety engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.

    1993-01-01

    For non-reactor nuclear facilities, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) does not require that nuclear criticality safety engineers demonstrate qualification for their job. It is likely, however, that more formalism will be required in the future. Current DOE requirements for those positions which do have to demonstrate qualification indicate that qualification should be achieved by using a systematic approach such as performance based training (PBT). Assuming that PBT would be an acceptable mechanism for nuclear criticality safety engineer training in a more formal environment, a site-specific analysis of the nuclear criticality safety engineer job was performed. Based on this analysis, classes are being developed and delivered to a target audience of newer nuclear criticality safety engineers. Because current interest is in developing training for selected aspects of the nuclear criticality safety engineer job, the analysis is incompletely developed in some areas

  6. Nurses' experiences and perspectives on medication safety practices: an explorative qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeulers, Marian; Onderwater, Astrid T.; van Zwieten, Myra C. B.; Vermeulen, Hester

    2014-01-01

    To explore nurses' experiences with and perspectives on preventing medication administration errors. Insight into nurses' experiences with and perspectives on preventing medication administration errors is important and can be utilised to tailor and implement safety practices. A qualitative

  7. Expanding subjectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard Andersen, Linda; Soldz, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A major theme in recent psychoanalytic thinking concerns the use of therapist subjectivity, especially “countertransference,” in understanding patients. This thinking converges with and expands developments in qualitative research regarding the use of researcher subjectivity as a tool......-Saxon and continental traditions, this special issue provides examples of the use of researcher subjectivity, informed by psychoanalytic thinking, in expanding research understanding....

  8. Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Facility 10CFR830 Safety Basis Related to Facility Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomberlin, T.A.

    2002-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), a DOE Category A reactor, was designed to provide an irradiation test environment for conducting a variety of experiments. The ATR Safety Analysis Report, determined by DOE to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, provides versatility in types of experiments that may be conducted. This paper addresses two general types of experiments in the ATR facility and how safety analyses for experiments are related to the ATR safety basis. One type of experiment is more routine and generally represents greater risks; therefore this type of experiment is addressed with more detail in the safety basis. This allows individual safety analyses for these experiments to be more routine and repetitive. The second type of experiment is less defined and is permitted under more general controls. Therefore, individual safety analyses for the second type of experiment tend to be more unique from experiment to experiment. Experiments are also discussed relative to ''major modifications'' and DOE-STD-1027-92. Application of the USQ process to ATR experiments is also discussed

  9. Presurized water reactor safety approach and analysis. From conception to experience feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libmann, J.

    1987-04-01

    This report deals in ten chapters, with the following subjects: 1. Safety approach methods; 2. Study of accidents; 3. Safety analysis; 4. Study of internal aggressions or those involved by the site; 5. Consideration of complementary situations; 6. Three Mile Island accident; 7. Safety during operation and experience feedback; 8. An example of analysis: steam generator closure plug; 9. Probabilistic safety evaluation; 10. Chernobyl accident. 30 refs [fr

  10. COUNTERCURRENT FLOW LIMITATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING FOR IMPROVED REACTOR SAFETY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vierow, Karen

    2008-01-01

    This project is investigating countercurrent flow and 'flooding' phenomena in light water reactor systems to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. To better understand the occurrence of flooding in the surge line geometry of a PWR, two experimental programs were performed. In the first, a test facility with an acrylic test section provided visual data on flooding for air-water systems in large diameter tubes. This test section also allowed for development of techniques to form an annular liquid film along the inner surface of the 'surge line' and other techniques which would be difficult to verify in an opaque test section. Based on experiences in the air-water testing and the improved understanding of flooding phenomena, two series of tests were conducted in a large-diameter, stainless steel test section. Air-water test results and steam-water test results were directly compared to note the effect of condensation. Results indicate that, as for smaller diameter tubes, the flooding phenomena is predominantly driven by the hydrodynamics. Tests with the test sections inclined were attempted but the annular film was easily disrupted. A theoretical model for steam venting from inclined tubes is proposed herein and validated against air-water data. Empirical correlations were proposed for air-water and steam-water data. Methods for developing analytical models of the air-water and steam-water systems are discussed, as is the applicability of the current data to the surge line conditions. This report documents the project results from July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2008

  11. Safety experiences in using cryogenic liquid in IGCAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senthilkumar, B.; Singh, Dharmendra S.; Kandasamy, S.

    2009-01-01

    Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research is engaged in large-scale development work in the field of Fast Reactor Technology associated fuel cycle facilities metallurgy and material science. To meet the growing demands of these activities, the cryogenic are manufactured, stored, and handled in the Centre. Lot of precautionary measures are taken during the plant operations. However, the safety of the men and machine can be ensured only by systematic safety studies. So this study was taken up to identify the hazards of cryogenic, unsafe acts/unsafe conditions and to improve the safety standards in the Centre

  12. Regulatory supervision of safety indicators; experience with radiation safety indicators in Dukovany nuclear power plant performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbancik, L.; Kulich, V.

    2004-01-01

    The State Office for Nuclear Safety uses three sets of indicators describing the following aspects of a favourable nuclear power plant operation: smooth operation in normal circumstances, low risk to the population, and operation with a positive safety attitude. These are three safety-related areas for assessment. Each area has its own set of indicators. Overall operational safety performance indicators were identified for each attribute. From this point, a level of strategic indicators was developed, and finally, a set of specific indicators was set up. While neither the overall indicators nor the strategic indicators are directly measurable, the specific indicators are directly measurable and are targeted during inspection. (author)

  13. Improving safety through quality management system: SINAGAMA experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad Lebai Juri

    2000-01-01

    This paper discussed critically the policies and measures adopted during preoperational and operational stages to improve safety of workers, public, the environment as well as the products treated at SINAGAMA. (author)

  14. The development of safety cases for healthcare services: Practical experiences, opportunities and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujan, Mark; Spurgeon, Peter; Cooke, Matthew; Weale, Andy; Debenham, Philip; Cross, Steve

    2015-01-01

    There has been growing interest in the concept of safety cases for medical devices and health information technology, but questions remain about how safety cases can be developed and used meaningfully in the safety management of healthcare services and processes. The paper presents two examples of the development and use of safety cases at a service level in healthcare. These first practical experiences at the service level suggest that safety cases might be a useful tool to support service improvement and communication of safety in healthcare. The paper argues that safety cases might be helpful in supporting healthcare organisations with the adoption of proactive and rigorous safety management practices. However, it is also important to consider the different level of maturity of safety management and regulatory oversight in healthcare. Adaptations to the purpose and use of safety cases might be required, complemented by the provision of education to both practitioners and regulators. - Highlights: • Empirical description of safety case development at service level in healthcare. • Safety cases can support adoption of proactive and rigorous safety management. • Adaptation to purpose and use of safety cases might be required in healthcare. • Education should be provided to practitioners and regulators

  15. Periodic Safety Review of Nuclear Power Plants: Experience of Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-04-01

    Routine reviews of nuclear power plant operation (including modifications to hardware and procedures, operating experience, plant management and personnel competence) and special reviews following major events of safety significance are the primary means of safety verification. In addition, many Member States of the IAEA have initiated systematic safety reassessments, termed periodic safety reviews, of nuclear power plants, to assess the cumulative effects of plant ageing and plant modifications, operating experience, technical developments and siting aspects. The reviews include an assessment of plant design and operation against current safety standards and practices, and they have the objective of ensuring a high level of safety throughout the plant's operating lifetime. They are complementary to the routine and special safety reviews and do not replace them. Periodic safety reviews of nuclear power plants are considered an effective way to obtain an overall view of actual plant safety, and to determine reasonable and practical modifications that should be made in order to maintain a high level of safety. They can be used as a means of identifying time limiting features of the plant in order to determine nuclear power plant operation beyond the designed lifetime. The periodic safety review process can be used to support the decision making process for long term operation or licence renewal. Since 1994, the use of periodic safety reviews by Member States has substantially broadened and confirmed its benefits. Periodic safety review results have, for example, been used by some Member States to help provide a basis for continued operation beyond the current licence term, to communicate more effectively with stakeholders regarding nuclear power plant safety, and to help identify changes to plant operation that enhance safety. This IAEA-TECDOC is intended to assist Member States in the implementation of a periodic safety review. This publication complements the

  16. National Nuclear Safety Department Experience of Supervision over Safety Culture of BNPP-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepanloo, K.; Ardeshir, A.T.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the past major NPPs accidents, TMI, Chernobyl and Fukushima Daiichi shows that causes of these accidents can be explained by a complex combination of human, technological and organizational factors. One of the findings of accident investigations and risk assessments is the growing recognition of the impact of cultural context of work practices on safety. The assumed link between culture and safety, epitomized through the concept of safety culture, has been the subject of extensive research in recent years. The term “safety culture” was first introduced into the nuclear industry by the IAEA in INSAG-1 to underline the role and importance of the organizational factors. The objective of this paper is to conduct an assessment of some safety culture indicators of Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP-1).

  17. Reactor safety instrumentation of Paks NPP (experience and perspective)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elo, S.; Hamar, K.

    1993-01-01

    The majority of the existing control and protection systems in nuclear power plants use old analog technology and design philosophy. Maintenance and the procurement of spare parts is becoming increasingly difficult. In general there is an age degradation concern. Aging degradation in nuclear power plants must be effectively managed to avoid a loss of vital safety function, shutdown of the station, a reduced power generation, or any failure leading to expensive repair. Even with the best efforts in developing reliable and long life instrumentation and control systems for nuclear power plants it is expected that these systems for most plants will require replacements during the life of the plants. The instrumentation and control system of the nuclear power plants designed during the 70's and constructed in the 80's went out-of-date since nuclear safety is not a static concept and the digital computer technology has undergone rapid improvements during the 70's and 80's. Simultaneously the operation and the maintenance of the I ampersand C system of those plants described above becomes more and more difficult and expensive. In this context the pure quality of the former Soviet designed process instrumentation system increases the needs of upgrading this system. The author reviews the main design characteristics of the reactor safety instrumentation of the Paks NPP. Further he attempts to convey the perspective on upgrading the reactor safety instrumentation as seen by the HAEC and its Nuclear Safety Inspectorate

  18. The Qualification Experiences for Safety-critical Software of POSAFE-Q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jang Yeol; Son, Kwang Seop; Cheon, Se Woo; Lee, Jang Soo; Kwon, Kee Choon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) have been applied to the Reactor Protection System (RPS) and the Engineered Safety Feature (ESF)-Component Control System (CCS) as the major safety system components of nuclear power plants. This paper describes experiences on the qualification of the safety-critical software including the pCOS kernel and system tasks related to a safety-grade PLC, i.e. the works done for the Software Verification and Validation, Software Safety Analysis, Software Quality Assurance, and Software Configuration Management etc.

  19. Safety related experience in FFTF startup and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, R.E.; Halverson, T.G.; Daughtry, J.W.

    1982-06-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a 400 MW(t) sodium cooled fast reactor operating at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, Richland, Washington, to conduct fuels and materials testing in support of the US LMFBR program. Startup and initial power ascension testing of the facility involved a comprehensive series of readiness reviews and acceptance tests, many of which relate to the inherent safety of the plant. Included are physics measurements, natural circulation, integrated containment leakage, shielding effectiveness, fuel failure detection, and plant protection system tests. Described are the measurements taken to confirm the design safety margins upon which the operating authorization of the plant was based. These measurements demonstrate that large margins of safety are available in the FFTF design

  20. Self-expandable metal stents for relieving malignant colorectal obstruction: short-term safety and efficacy within 30 days of stent procedure in 447 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meisner, Søren; González-Huix, Ferran; Vandervoort, Jo G

    2011-01-01

    The self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) can alleviate malignant colonic obstruction and avoid emergency decompressive surgery.......The self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) can alleviate malignant colonic obstruction and avoid emergency decompressive surgery....

  1. Supervisor's experiments on radiation safety trainings in school of engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Kiyoshi

    2005-01-01

    Radiation safety training courses in School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, were introduced. The number of radiation workers and the usage of radiation and radioisotopes have been surveyed for past 14 years. The number of radiation workers in School of Engineering has increased due to the treatment of X-ray analysis of materials, recently. It is important for workers to understand the present situation of School of Engineering before the treatment of radiation and radioisotopes. What the supervisor should tell to radiation workers were presented herewith. The basic questionnaires after the lecture are effective for radiation safety trainings. (author)

  2. Bohunice V-1. Review of safety upgrading and operating experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korec, J.; Kuschel, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Bohunice site in the Slovak Republic has two Russian-designed twin-unit nuclear power plants, one equipped with reactors of the WWER 440/230 type, the other with type WWER 440/213 reactors. Two older units (V-1) started commercial operation in late 1978 and 1980 respectively and have been supplying electricity to the national grid since that time without any events that could have degraded plant safety level. In the period prior to 1990 the utility Slovenske Elektrarne (S.E.) performed extensive modifications and upgrades to the original design of the two older units V-1 NPP. Furthermore, significant steps in safety improvement for Bohunice NPP V-1 have been made since 1990. Following the political restructuring of the former Czechoslovakia and the country's new open-door policy towards western organizations, several international expert missions were focused on evaluation of Bohunice NPP safety status level and operational reliability, particularly targeting the two older units. Based on recommendations of individual expert missions and complementary deterministic and probabilistic safety analyses performed by S.E., the Czechoslovak Nuclear Regulatory Authority issued the Resolution No. 5/91 defining 81 measures concerning further safety and reliability improvement of Bohunice V1 .A range of short-term and long-term upgrades was prioritised in terms of importance to plant safety and work to implement these measures commenced in the early nineties. During the 'Small Reconstruction' from 1991 to 1993 some of the short term upgrading measures were realized to eliminate the most serious safety deficits, thus to achieve a significant reduction in core damage frequency and a major improvement in confinement integrity. In this paper and presentation the goals of the gradual reconstruction project, basic engineering, detailed engineering and realization, last major stage of Unit 2 upgrade, as well as final stage of Unit 1 upgrade in early 2000 are presented

  3. Assessment of safety and efficacy of an indigenous self-expandable fully covered esophageal metal stent for palliation of esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhan, R K; Nongthombam, S K; Venuthurimilli, A; Dhingra, R; Sahni, P; Garg, P K

    2016-01-01

    Patients with unresectable esophageal cancer require palliation for dysphagia. Placement of a self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) is the procedure of choice for palliation of dysphagia. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of an indigenous fully-covered SEMS in patients with esophageal cancer. Eligible patients with unresectable esophageal cancer requiring palliation for dysphagia were included in the study. An indigenous fully covered SEMS of appropriate length was placed under endoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance. Outcome measures assessed were adverse events and improvement in dysphagia. Twenty one patients (mean age 57.71±13.14 years; 17 males) were included. After stenting, dysphagia score decreased from 3.2+0.4 to 0.35+0.74 at 4 weeks. Adverse events included retrosternal pain, respiratory distress and aspiration pneumonia in 12, 2 and 1 patients respectively. Five patients required repeat stenting due to stent migration in 4 (following radiotherapy in 3) and tumour ingrowth in 1. There was primary stent malfunction in one patient. The median survival of patients was 140 (76-199) days, which was higher in those who received radiotherapy. The stent was reasonably safe and effective to relieve dysphagia due to unresectable esophageal cancer.

  4. The Danish patient safety experience: the Act on Patient Safety in the Danish Health care system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard, Mette; Rabøl, Louise; Jensen, Elisabeth Agnete Brøgger

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the process that lead to the passing of the Act for Patient Safety in the Danisk health care sytem, the contents of the act and how the act is used in the Danish health care system. The act obligates frontline health care personnel to report adverse events, hospital owners...... to act on the reports and the National Board of Health to commuicate the learning nationally. The act protects health care providers from sanctions as a result of reporting. In January 2004, the Act on Patient Safety in the Danish health care system was put into force. In the first twelve months 5740...... adverse events were reported. the reports were analyzed locally (hospital and region), anonymized ad then sent to the National Board af Health. The Act on Patient Safety has driven the work with patient safety forward but there is room for improvement. Continuous and improved feedback from all parts...

  5. Safety climate mapping in a nuclear power plant - an experience sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincy, M.U.; Varshney, Aloke; Khot, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the author discusses the experience gained in safety climate measurement of an Indian nuclear power plant. Safety performance is increasingly part of an organisation's sustainable development. Nuclear power stations are falling under the category 'high reliability' industries in the world as far as work safety is concerned. Both the research and the practical experience continually point to two underlying factors that drive safety outcomes: the quality of an organisation's leadership and the resulting culture. After years of development in safety technology and safety management system in the industry, management of nuclear industry world over has come to recognize that safety culture has to be addressed if high standards of health and safety are to be maintained. Therefore, nuclear industries in India have been carrying out measurement of safety climate for more than ten years. The objectives of the study are to examine people's values, attitude, perception, competencies, and patterns of behaviour that determine the commitment to, and effectiveness of health and safety management in the industry based on questionnaires survey and their analysis. A questionnaire, consists of 66 statements with 11 attributes, was designed to seek the views of managers, supervisors and front line workers on key aspects of the safety culture. Each of the discrete group was also classified according to their role in the organisation

  6. Whistleblowing on health, welfare and safety: the UK experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinten, Gerald; Gavin, Thomas A

    2005-01-01

    This article takes a look at how whistleblowing has changed over the last 25 years highlighting some well-known cases and focusing on the areas of health and safety, health services and social services. The article also covers government legislation and the lead taken by professional bodies to encourage and support whistleblowers.

  7. Integrated vehicle's lateral safety: the LATERAL SAFE experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amditis, A.; Floudas, N.; Kaiser-Dieckhoff, U.; Hackbarth, T.; Broek, S.P. van den; Miglietta, M.; Danielson, L.; Gemou, M.; Bekiaris, E.

    2008-01-01

    The applications developed and the evaluation results of the EU funded automotive safety PReVENT IP subproject LATERAL SAFE are described. The data synthesis algorithms that aim at achieving a reliable representation of the objects and their kinematics, in the lateral and rear fields of the host

  8. Integrated vehicle’s lateral safety: the LATERAL SAFE experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amditis, A.; Floudas, N.; Kaiser-Dieckhoff, U.; Hackbarth, T.; Broek, S.P. van den; Miglietta, M.; Danielson, L.; Gemou, M.; Bekiaris, E.

    2008-01-01

    The applications developed and the evaluation results of the EU funded automotive safety PReVENT IP subproject LATERAL SAFE are described. The data synthesis algorithms that aim at achieving a reliable representation of the objects and their kinematics, in the lateral and rear fields of the host

  9. Expandable stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, J C; Carrasco, H

    1996-05-01

    Expandable metallic stents are effective in selected patients with malignant or benign airway stenoses. When used for malignant lesions, the primary purpose of the stent is to improve the quality of life; stents are usually chosen for palliation of symptoms in recognition of the low likelihood of success for other therapy. For patients with benign stenoses, the stents provide a permanent source of structural support to alleviate the narrowed segment. The advantages of the expandable metallic stents are as follows: (1) they can be inserted through an endotracheal tube or under local anesthesia with relative simplicity under fluoroscopic guidance; (2) they do not impair the drainage of sputum because ciliary movement is not interrupted; (3) over a period of a few weeks, the meshwork is gradually covered with mucosa as the stent becomes incorporated into the airway wall; (4) ventilation usually is not impaired if the metallic mesh stent covers another nonstenosed bronchus, because the interstices of the stent are nonobstructive; and (5) they are dynamic and continue to expand over time, particularly if concurrent treatment achieves an effect on the lesion that caused stenosis. Disadvantages of the expandable stent include (1) they often are only temporarily effective for tracheobronchial stenosis due to intraluminal tumor or granulation tissue, both of which can grow between the wires; (2) they are considered permanent stents because removal is difficult; and (3) they can be poorly positioned during placement or can become displaced by progressive migration after placement, and they cannot be repositioned. A relative contraindication to insertion is an inflammatory process or infection that can predispose to granulation formation, particularly at the points of maximal contact pressure of the stent to the airway mucosa. In the presence of inflammation, it may be better to use a silicone prosthesis until the inflammatory process subsides and fibrosis occurs. Granulation

  10. Safety culture aspects of managing for safety. Experience of a large nuclear reprocessing site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rycraft, H.S.

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclear Industry is going through turbulent times both in terms of public acceptance and business issues. Safety is one area which impacts on whether the business is allowed to continue, and how an organisation organizes itself. The need to cut costs to make nuclear power a viable energy resource, has forced the nuclear utilities to review manning policies, and management style, and in particular how to maintain safety standards during a period of change, and ultimately support continuing improvement of standards. The shrinking workforce requires a new style of management, one that depends more on the people of the organisation taking responsibility for safety at all levels of the organisation. Not only personal safety but the safety of their colleagues, general public and the environment. The safety culture of an organisation is indivisible from the company culture, each aspect of a culture influences the whole and so the balance between business, safety and quality, has to be managed. BNFL provides a full fuel cycle service to nuclear power plants, and associated services to many national and international organisations. The following notes are taken from the work carried out in the company, and mostly at the Nuclear Reprocessing and Waste storage Site at Sellafield, based in the North West of England. Following the recent re-organisation, the site now employs 6200 people and has a further 1500 contractors working on construction activities on the site. Activities on the site range from remote handling to hands on tasks, involving highly active materials to low level waste. (author)

  11. Safety analysis of the Los Alamos critical experiments facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paxton, H.C.

    1975-10-01

    The safety of Pajarito Site critical assembly operations depends upon protection built into the facility, upon knowledgeable personnel, and upon good practice as defined by operating procedures and experimental plans. Distance, supplemented by shielding in some cases, would protect personnel against an extreme accident generating 10 19 fissions. During the facility's 28-year history, the direct cost of criticality accidents has translated to a risk of less than $200 per year

  12. Experience on the demonstration of safety for older reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facer, R.

    2001-01-01

    The UK's oldest reactors are still operating. Built during the 1950's and commissioned between 1956 and 1960, eight reactors continue to provide electricity and process steam. It is still economically justified to keep them running. In addition to the economic considerations it is also necessary to justify that they can still continue to operate safely. This paper provides a brief review of how the Operator of these stations has justified the safety of operation to date and how they expect to continue to justify their operation for several more years. It is appropriate to consider why the Operator wishes to keep the plant operating. Among the most important reasons are that: The plant is built and paid for, Running costs are relatively low process steam is available for the adjacent sites It is a commercially viable electricity producer It is a reliable electricity source The operators have developed programmes for safety review of the plant and introduced a Continuing Operation Programme which had two main requirements which were, the demonstration of continuing acceptable safety the ensurance of commercial viability. (author)

  13. Measuring safety climate in a nuclear power plant - an experience sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincy, M.U.; Varshney, Aloke; Khot, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the author discusses the experience gained in safety climate measurement of an Indian nuclear power plant. Safety performance is increasingly part of an organization's sustainable development. Nuclear power stations are falling under the category 'high reliability' industries in the world as far as work safety is concerned. Both the research and the practical experience continually point to two underlying factors that drive safety outcomes: the quality of an organisation's leadership and the resulting culture. After years of development in safety technology and safety management system in the industry, management of nuclear industry world over has come to recognize that safety culture has to be addressed if high standards of health and safety are to be maintained. Therefore, nuclear industries in India have been carrying out measurement of safety climate for more than ten years. The objectives of the study are to examine people's values, attitude, perception, competencies, and patterns of behaviour that determine the commitment to, and effectiveness of health and safety management in the industry based on a questionnaires survey and their analysis

  14. Safety evaluation by living probabilistic safety assessment. Procedures and applications for planning of operational activities and analysis of operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johanson, Gunnar; Holmberg, J.

    1994-01-01

    Living Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is a daily safety management system and it is based on a plant-specific PSA and supporting information systems. In the living use of PSA, plant status knowledge is used to represent actual plant safety status in monitoring or follow-up perspective. The PSA model must be able to express the risk at a given time and plant configuration. The process, to update the PSA model to represent the current or planned configuration and to use the model to evaluate and direct the changes in the configuration, is called living PSA programme. The main purposes to develop and increase the usefulness of living PSA are: Long term safety planning: To continue the risk assessment process started with the basic PSA by extending and improving the basic models and data to provide a general risk evaluation tool for analyzing the safety effects of changes in plant design and procedures. Risk planning of operational activities: To support the operational management by providing means for searching optimal operational maintenance and testing strategies from the safety point of view. The results provide support for risk decision making in the short term or in a planning mode. The operational limits and conditions given by technical specifications can be analyzed by evaluating the risk effects of alternative requirements in order to balance the requirements with respect to operational flexibility and plant economy. Risk analysis of operating experience: To provide a general risk evaluation tool for analyzing the safety effects of incidents and plant status changes. The analyses are used to: identify possible high risk situations, rank the occurred events from safety point of view, and get feedback from operational events for the identification of risk contributors. This report describes the methods, models and applications required to continue the process towards a living use of PSA. 19 tabs, 20 figs

  15. Expander Codes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 1. Expander Codes - The Sipser–Spielman Construction. Priti Shankar. General Article Volume 10 ... Author Affiliations. Priti Shankar1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science Bangalore 560 012, India.

  16. Manufacturing and testing experience for FFTF major safety related components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peckinpaugh, C.L.

    1976-01-01

    Experience with FFTF Heat Transport System components during design, manufacturing, and prototype testing is dscussed. Specifically the special design features and the results of the testing performed to assure that the designs provide for safe operation are outlined. Particular emphasis is placed on the full size prototype testing programs and the valuable experience gained

  17. In-pile experiments and test facilities proposed for fast reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grolmes, M.A.; Avery, R.; Goldman, A.J.; Fauske, H.K.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Rose, D.; Wright, A.E.

    1976-01-01

    The role of in-pile experiments in support of the resolution of fast breeder reactor safety and licensing issues has been re-examined, with emphasis on key safety issues. Experiment needs have been related to the specific characteristics of these safety issues and to realistic requirements for additional test facility capabilities which can be achieved and utilized within the next ten years. It is found that those safety issues related to the energetics of core disruptive accidents have the largest impact on new facility requirements. However, utilization of existing facilities with modifications can provide for a continuing increase in experiment capability and experiment results on a timely bases. Emphasis has been placed upon maximum utilization of existing facilities and minimum requirements for new facilities. This evaluation has concluded that a new Safety Test Facility, STF, along with major modifications to the EBR II facility, improvement in TREAT capabilities, the existing Sodium Loop Safety Facility and corresponding Support Facilities provide the essential elements of the Safety Research Experiment Facilities (SAREF) required for resolution of key issues

  18. Communicating food safety, authenticity and consumer choice. Field experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syntesa, Heiner Lehr

    2013-04-01

    The paper reviews patented and non-patented technologies, methods and solutions in the area of food traceability. It pays special attention to the communication of food safety, authenticity and consumer choice. Twenty eight recent patents are reviewed in the areas of (secure) identification, product freshness indicators, meat traceability, (secure) transport of information along the supply chain, country/region/place of origin, automated authentication, supply chain management systems, consumer interaction systems. In addition, solutions and pilot projects are described in the areas of Halal traceability, traceability of bird's nests, cold chain management, general food traceability and other areas.

  19. A novel self-expanding fully retrievable intracranial stent (SOLO): experience in nine procedures of stent-assisted aneurysm coil occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebig, Thomas; Henkes, Hans; Reinartz, Joerg; Miloslavski, Elina; Kuehne, Dietmar

    2006-01-01

    The endovascular treatment of large and broad-necked aneurysms may require the use of a remodelling balloon or a stent system to achieve proper occlusion while maintaining the patency of the parent vessel. With the advent of self-expanding stents that can be delivered through a microcatheter, this kind of treatment has improved and problems with the previously used balloon expandable stents have largely been overcome. However, rigidity, insufficient trackability, and limited or non-existent retrievability may still restrict the application of self-expanding stents in some situations. Recently, a stent system with a new and different design has been introduced. This stent is highly flexible, fully retrievable, and can be delivered through a standard 0.021-inch microcatheter without a wire. We describe the first nine cases of stent-assisted coil occlusion of intracranial aneurysms with the use of this stent system. Between May and June of 2004, nine patients with large or broad-necked aneurysms were treated in two endovascular centres. The anatomy of the aneurysms and parent vessels, technical details of the procedure, performance of the stent system, and follow-up results were evaluated. In all procedures, the SOLO stent could be introduced without difficulty, in one procedure after positioning of a different self-expanding stent system had failed due to vessel tortuosity. Overlapping stents were placed in one patient and stent retrieval or repositioning was successfully performed in two procedures. There was no interference or limitation of subsequent coil occlusion after stenting. With regard to the stent, immediate postprocedure and follow-up angiograms were unremarkable in terms of thromboembolic events and signs of intimal hyperplasia. From our experience, we conclude that the SOLO stent shows satisfactory performance overall. Its unique design gives the stent properties that may help overcome some of the difficulties experienced with other self-expanding

  20. Self-expandable metal stents for relieving malignant colorectal obstruction: short-term safety and efficacy within 30 days of stent procedure in 447 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Søren; González-Huix, Ferran; Vandervoort, Jo G; Goldberg, Paul; Casellas, Juan A; Roncero, Oscar; Grund, Karl E; Alvarez, Alberto; García-Cano, Jesús; Vázquez-Astray, Enrique; Jiménez-Pérez, Javier

    2011-10-01

    The self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) can alleviate malignant colonic obstruction and avoid emergency decompressive surgery. To document performance, safety, and effectiveness of colorectal stents used per local standards of practice in patients with malignant large-bowel obstruction to avoid palliative stoma surgery in incurable patients (PAL) and facilitate bowel decompression as a bridge to surgery for curable patients (BTS). Prospective clinical cohort study. Two global registries with 39 academic and community centers. This study involved 447 patients with malignant colonic obstruction who received stents (255 PAL, 182 BTS, 10 no indication specified). Colorectal through-the-scope SEMS placement. The primary endpoint was clinical success at 30 days, defined as the patient's ability to maintain bowel function without adverse events related to the procedure or stent. Secondary endpoints were procedural success, defined as successful stent placement in the correct position, symptoms of persistent or recurrent colonic obstruction, and complications. The procedural success rate was 94.8% (439/463), and the clinical success rates were 90.5% (313/346) as assessed on a per protocol basis and 71.6% (313/437) as assessed on an intent-to-treat basis. Complications included 15 (3.9%) perforations, 3 resulting in death, 7 (1.8%) migrations, 7 (1.8%) cases of pain, and 2 (0.5%) cases of bleeding. No control group. No primary endpoint analysis data for 25% of patients. This largest multicenter, prospective study of colonic SEMS placement demonstrates that colonic SEMSs are safe and highly effective for the short-term treatment of malignant colorectal obstruction, allowing most curable patients to have 1-step resection without stoma and providing most incurable patients minimally invasive palliation instead of surgery. The risk of complications, including perforation, was low. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All

  1. A prospective multicenter study on self-expandable metallic stents as a bridge to surgery for malignant colorectal obstruction in Japan: efficacy and safety in 312 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shuji; Yoshida, Shuntaro; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Matsuzawa, Takeaki; Kuwai, Toshio; Maetani, Iruru; Shimada, Mamoru; Yamada, Tomonori; Tomita, Masafumi; Koizumi, Koichi; Hirata, Nobuto; Kanazawa, Hideki; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Sekido, Hitoshi; Saida, Yoshihisa

    2016-09-01

    Endoscopic stenting with a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) is a widely accepted procedure for malignant colonic obstruction. The Colonic Stent Safe Procedure Research Group conducted the present prospective feasibility study. Our objectives were to estimate the safety and feasibility of SEMS placement as a bridge to surgery (BTS) for malignant colorectal obstruction. We conducted a prospective, observational, single-arm, multicenter clinical trial from March 2012 to October 2013. Each patient was treated with an uncovered WallFlex enteral colonic stent. Patients were followed up until discharge after surgery. A total of 518 consecutive patients were enrolled in this study. The cohort intended for BTS consisted of 312 patients (61 %), and the stent could be released in 305 patients. Technical and clinical success rates were 98 and 92 %, respectively. Elective surgery was performed in 297 patients, and emergency surgery was performed in eight patients for the treatment of complications. The overall preoperative complication rate was 7.2 %. Major complications, including perforation, occurred in 1.6 %, persistent colonic obstruction occurred in 1.0 %, and stent migration occurred in 1.3 % patients. The median time from SEMS to surgery was 16 days. Silent perforations were observed in 1.3 %. Open and laparoscopic surgery was performed in 121 and 184 patients, respectively. The tumor could be resected in 297 patients. The primary anastomosis rate was 92 %. The rate of anastomotic leakage was 4 %, and the overall stoma creation rate was 10 %. The median duration of hospitalization following surgery was 12 days. Overall postoperative morbidity and mortality rates were 16 and 0.7 %, respectively. This largest, multicenter, prospective study demonstrates the feasibility of SEMS placement as a BTS for malignant colorectal obstruction. SEMS serves as a safe and effective BTS with acceptable stoma creation and complication rates in patients with acute

  2. A US Multicenter Study of Safety and Efficacy of Fully Covered Self-Expandable Metallic Stents in Benign Extrahepatic Biliary Strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Payal; Diehl, David L; Kumbhari, Vivek; Shieh, Frederick; Buscaglia, Jonathan M; Sze, Wilson; Kapoor, Sumit; Komanduri, Srinadh; Nasr, John; Shin, Eun Ji; Singh, Vikesh; Lennon, Anne Marie; Kalloo, Anthony N; Khashab, Mouen A

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic therapy is considered first line for management of benign biliary strictures (BBSs). Placement of plastic stents has been effective but limited by their short-term patency and need for repeated procedures. Fully covered self-expandable metallic stents (FCSEMSs) offer longer-lasting biliary drainage without the need for frequent exchanges. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of FCSEMS in patients with BBS. A retrospective review of all patients who underwent ERCP and FCSEMS placement at five tertiary referral US hospitals was performed. Stricture resolution and adverse events related to ERCP and/or stenting were recorded. A total of 123 patients underwent FCSEMS placement for BBS and 112 underwent a subsequent follow-up ERCP. The mean age was 62 years (±15.6), and 57% were males. Stricture resolution occurred in 81% of patients after a mean of 1.2 stenting procedures (mean stent dwell time 24.4 ± 2.3 weeks), with a mean follow-up of 18.5 months. Stricture recurrence occurred in 5 patients, and 3 patients required surgery for treatment of refractory strictures. Stent migration (9.7%) was the most common complication, followed by stent occlusion (4.9%), cholangitis (4.1%), and pancreatitis (3.3%). There was one case of stent fracture during removal, and one stent could not be removed. There was one death due to cholangitis. Majority of BBS can be successfully managed with 1-2 consecutive FCSEMS with stent dwell time of 6 months.

  3. Activity of safety review for the facilities using nuclear material (2). Safety review results and maintenance experiences for hot laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amagai, Tomio; Fujishima, Tadatsune; Mizukoshi, Yasutaka; Sakamoto, Naoki; Ohmori, Tsuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    In the site of O-arai Research and Development Center of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), five hot laboratories for post-irradiation examination and development of plutonium fuels are operated more than 30 years. A safety review method for preventive maintenance on these hot laboratories includes test facilities and devices are established in 2003. After that, the safety review of these facilities and devices are done and taken the necessary maintenance based on the results in each year. In 2008, 372 test facilities and devices in these hot laboratories were checked and reviewed by this method. As a results of the safety review, repair issues of 38 facilities of above 372 facilities were resolved. This report shows the review results and maintenance experiences based on the results. (author)

  4. Use of operational experience in fire safety assessment of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    collection of data related to fire safety occurrences in NPPs, the so called operational experience and the use of such operational experience in NPPs. This report provides good practice information on data needs, data reporting requirements and some advice on database features. In addition, this publication provides information on the applications of fire related operational experience, highlighting their benefits. This publication has been developed to complement other IAEA publications related to fire safety analysis within the framework of the IAEA programme of fire safety

  5. Modular safety interlock system for high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieffer, J.; Golceff, B.V.

    1980-10-01

    A frequent problem in electronics systems for high energy physics experiments is to provide protection for personnel and equipment. Interlock systems are typically designed as an afterthought and as a result, the working environment around complex experiments with many independent high voltages or hazardous gas subsystems, and many different kinds of people involved, can be particularly dangerous. A set of modular hardware has been designed which makes possible a standardized, intergrated, hierarchical system's approach and which can be easily tailored to custom requirements

  6. The importance for nuclear safety of efficient feedback of operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    Experience of practical operation is a valuable source of information for improving and optimizing the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants. Therefore it is essential to collect information on abnormal events occurring at plants during operation and on all deviations from normal performance by systems and personnel that could be precursors of accidents. For this purpose it is necessary to establish hierarchical systems to feedback operational safety experience at utility, national and international levels and to make these systems as effective as possible. The present report attempts to identify the safety objectives of these systems, to analyse the difficulties presently encountered and to suggest possible improvements

  7. Flooding Experiments and Modeling for Improved Reactor Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solmos, M.; Hogan, K.J.; VIerow, K.

    2008-01-01

    Countercurrent two-phase flow and 'flooding' phenomena in light water reactor systems are being investigated experimentally and analytically to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. The aspects that will be better clarified are the effects of condensation and tube inclination on flooding in large diameter tubes. The current project aims to improve the level of understanding of flooding mechanisms and to develop an analysis model for more accurate evaluations of flooding in the pressurizer surge line of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Interest in flooding has recently increased because Countercurrent Flow Limitation (CCFL) in the AP600 pressurizer surge line can affect the vessel refill rate following a small break LOCA and because analysis of hypothetical severe accidents with the current flooding models in reactor safety codes shows that these models represent the largest uncertainty in analysis of steam generator tube creep rupture. During a hypothetical station blackout without auxiliary feedwater recovery, should the hot leg become voided, the pressurizer liquid will drain to the hot leg and flooding may occur in the surge line. The flooding model heavily influences the pressurizer emptying rate and the potential for surge line structural failure due to overheating and creep rupture. The air-water test results in vertical tubes are presented in this paper along with a semi-empirical correlation for the onset of flooding. The unique aspects of the study include careful experimentation on large-diameter tubes and an integrated program in which air-water testing provides benchmark knowledge and visualization data from which to conduct steam-water testing

  8. MR cholangiopancreatography in children: feasibility, safety, and initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaney, Lisa; Karmazyn, Boaz; Akisik, M.F.; Jennings, S.G.; Applegate, Kimberly E.

    2008-01-01

    The indications for MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) in children, and its safety and findings, might differ from those in adults and are not well described. To investigate the safety, feasibility, and accuracy of MRCP in children. We reviewed all prospective MRCP reports, noting the indication, the use of secretin, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) findings, and patient outcomes. Two readers reviewed each MRCP study by consensus to rate duct visualization and compare pancreatic duct sizes before and after secretin administration (paired t-test). The likelihood of a normal versus an abnormal MRCP study was compared by gender, pancreatitis as the primary indication, secretin use, and whether ERCP was performed (Fisher's exact test), as well as age (t-test). A total of 85 MRCP studies were performed in children (mean age 10.3 years), most commonly for evaluation of pancreatitis (n=47, 55%); 41 (48%) used secretin and 39 (46%) used a negative oral contrast agent. Of the 85 studies, 72 (85%) had excellent image quality and 43 were normal. ERCP was performed after 16 of the 85 MRCP studies (19%); the diagnoses were concordant with those of MRCP in 13 (81%). There were 42 abnormal MRCP studies, and these were more likely to be in girls (P=0.03) and in children who had undergone ERCP (P<0.01). Secretin and the negative oral contrast agent were well-tolerated. Secretin improved duct visualization (P<0.001). MRCP safely and accurately depicted pancreaticobiliary anatomy in children. The use of secretin improved visualization of the pancreatic duct. (orig.)

  9. Operational safety experience reporting in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartfield, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    Licensees of nuclear power plants in the United States have many reporting requirements included in their technical specifications and the code of federal regulations, title 10. The Nuclear Regulatory Commisson receives these reports and utilizes them in its regulatory program. Part of this usage includes collecting and publishing this operating experience data in various reports and storing information in various data systems. This paper will discuss the data systems and reports on operating experience published and used by the NRC. In addition, some observations on operating experience will be made. Subjects included will be the Licensee Event Report (LER) Data File, the Operating Unit Status Report (Gray Book), Radiation Exposure Reports, Effluents Reports, the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, Current Events, Bulletin Wrapups and Annual Summaries. Some of the uses of the reports and systems will be discussed. The Abnormal Occurence Report to the US Congress will also be described and discussed. (author)

  10. Successful technical and clinical outcome using a second generation balloon expandable coronary stent for transplant renal artery stenosis: Our experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsamendi, Jason; Pereira, Keith; Baker, Reginald; Bhatia, Shivank S; Narayanan, Govindarajan

    2015-10-01

    Transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) is a vascular complication frequently seen because of increase in the number of renal transplantations. Early diagnosis and management is essential to optimize a proper graft function. Currently, the endovascular treatment of TRAS using angioplasty and/or stenting is considered the treatment of choice with the advantage that it does not preclude subsequent surgical correction. Treatment of TRAS with the use of stents, particularly in tortuous transplant renal anatomy presents a unique challenge to an interventional radiologist. In this study, we present three cases from our practice highlighting the use of a balloon-expandable Multi-Link RX Ultra coronary stent system (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Illinois, USA) for treating high grade focal stenosis along very tortuous renal arterial segments. Cobalt-Chromium alloy stent scaffold provides excellent radial force, whereas the flexible stent design conforms to the vessel course allowing for optimal stent alignment.

  11. Exploring the Lived Experiences and Intersectionalities of Mexican Community College Transfer Students: Qualitative Insights toward Expanding a Transfer Receptive Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Erin L.; Cortez, Edén

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the experiences of six Mexican community college transfer students attending a research-intensive institution in the Pacific Northwest. Using semi-structured interviews, the objectives of this study were to 1) understand how Mexican students made meaning of their transfer experiences and 2) how those experiences…

  12. How to design the optimal self-expandable oesophageal metallic stents: 22 years of experience in 645 patients with malignant strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Han Kyu; Song, Ho-Young; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Park, Jung-Hoon; Kang, Min Kyoung; Lee, Jongjin; Oh, Se Jin

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) placement for malignant oesophageal strictures and their relationship with stent designs. Seven generations of SEMS were used to treat 645 consecutive patients with oesophageal strictures. Logistic regression models were constructed to identify predictive factors associated with complications. Stent placement was technically successful in 641 of 645 patients (99.4%). The clinical success rate was 95.5%. There were 260 (40.3%) complications after stent placement. Due to complications, 68 stents were removed; 66 of 68 stents (97.1%) were removed successfully. Stainless steel (SS) stents (odds ratio [OR] 4.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.10, 8.32) and radiation therapy (RT) before stent placement (OR 4.23; CI 2.02, 8.83) were significantly associated with severe pain. Flared ends (OR 9.63; CI 3.38, 27.43), stricture length stent diameter stent migration. Polyurethane membranes were associated with more frequent tumour ingrowth than polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membranes (P = 0.002). Despite the relatively high complication rate, retrievable self-expandable PTFE-covered nitinol stents equipped with a head and a tail appeared to be an effective treatment for malignant oesophageal strictures.

  13. Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear power plants Jaslovske Bohunice in 1997 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Nuclear safety; (2) Industrial and health safety; (3) Radiation safety; and Fire protection

  14. Romanian experience on safety and security of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botgros, Madalina; Coroianu, Anton; Negreanu, Mircea

    2008-01-01

    Romania has established the first administrative structure for controlling the deployment of the nuclear activities in 1961 and the first Romanian nuclear law was published in 1974. In the present, it is in force the Law no. 111, published in 1996 and republished in 2003. Moreover, there are available facilities and services to the persons authorized to manage radioactive sources. The regulation for safety and security of radioactive sources was amended two times in order to implement the international recommendations for setting up the national system for accounting and control of radiation sources and to coordinate the recovery activities. As part of national control programme, the national inventory of sources and devices is updated permanently, when issuing a new authorization, when modifying an existing one, or when renewing an authorization system and records in the database. The government responsibility for the orphan sources is stated in the law on radioactive waste management and decommissioning fund. There is a protocol between CNCAN, Ministry of Internal and Ministry of Health and Family regarding the co-operation in the case of finding orphan sources. When a radiation source is spent, it becomes radioactive waste that has to be disposed off properly. Depending on the case, the holder of a spent source has the possibility either to return the radioactive source to its manufacturer for regeneration or to transfer it to the Radioactive Waste Treatment Facility. (author)

  15. Risk-Based Fire Safety Experiment Definition for Manned Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolakis, G. E.; Ho, V. S.; Marcus, E.; Perry, A. T.; Thompson, S. L.

    1989-01-01

    Risk methodology is used to define experiments to be conducted in space which will help to construct and test the models required for accident sequence identification. The development of accident scenarios is based on the realization that whether damage occurs depends on the time competition of two processes: the ignition and creation of an adverse environment, and the detection and suppression activities. If the fire grows and causes damage faster than it is detected and suppressed, then an accident occurred. The proposed integrated experiments will provide information on individual models that apply to each of the above processes, as well as previously unidentified interactions and processes, if any. Initially, models that are used in terrestrial fire risk assessments are considered. These include heat and smoke release models, detection and suppression models, as well as damage models. In cases where the absence of gravity substantially invalidates a model, alternate models will be developed. Models that depend on buoyancy effects, such as the multizone compartment fire models, are included in these cases. The experiments will be performed in a variety of geometries simulating habitable areas, racks, and other spaces. These simulations will necessitate theoretical studies of scaling effects. Sensitivity studies will also be carried out including the effects of varying oxygen concentrations, pressures, fuel orientation and geometry, and air flow rates. The experimental apparatus described herein includes three major modules: the combustion, the fluids, and the command and power modules.

  16. Safety Research Experiment Facility Project. Conceptual design report. Volume II. Building and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-12-01

    The conceptual design of Safety Research Experiment Facility (SAREF) site system includes a review and evaluation of previous geotechnical reports for the area where SAREF will be constructed and the conceptual design of access and in-plant roads, parking, experiment-transport-vehicle maneuvering areas, security fencing, drainage, borrow area development and restoration, and landscaping

  17. Application of the Dragon reactor experiment to the safety evaluation of current HTR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashworth, F.P.O.; Faircloth, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    An important component of the confidence required for the safety assessment of high-temperature reactors is the experimental proof of phenomena such as fission product release or core corrosion. The most convincing experiments are those carried out in a reactor. This paper outlines the scope of experiments relevant to safety which can be done in the Dragon Reactor Experiment and describes as an example the experimental campaign and the current outcome of the work on validating the predictions of caesium release and migration. (author)

  18. Partition expanders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gavinsky, Dmitry; Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 3 (2017), s. 378-395 ISSN 1432-4350 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP202/12/G061 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : expanders * pseudorandomness * communication complexity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 0.645, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00224-016-9738-5

  19. Experience on environmental qualification of safety-related components for Darlington Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, A.S.; Kukreti, B.M.

    1987-01-01

    The proliferation of Nuclear Power Plant safety concerns has lead to increasing attention over the Environmental Qualification (EQ) of Nuclear Power Plant Safety-Related Components to provide the assurance that the safety related equipment will meet their intended functions during normal operation and postulated accident conditions. The environmental qualification of these components is also a Licensing requirement for Darlington Nuclear Generating Station. This paper provides an overview of EQ and the experience of a pilot project, in the qualification of the Main Moderator System safety-related functions for the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station currently under construction. It addresses the various phases of qualification from the identification of the EQ Safety-Related Components List, definition of location specific service conditions (normal, adbnormal and accident), safety-related functions, Environmental Qualification Assessments and finally, an EQ system summary report for the Main Moderator System. The results of the pilot project are discussed and the methodology reviewed. The paper concludes that the EQ Program developed for Darlington Nuclear Generating Station, as applied to the qualification of the Main Moderator System, contained all the elements necessary in the qualification of safety-related equipment. The approach taken in the qualification of the Moderator safety-related equipment proves to provide a sound framework for the qualification of other safety-related components in the station

  20. Patient safety: the experience of an Italian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Marchetti

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Introduction The risk management project of The University Hospital “A. Gemelli” aims to define the necessary procedures to manage clinical risk, by identifying the structures involved within this process, so that all of the personnel can contribute to a measurable improvement in the safety of both patients and staff.

    Methods The Risk Management Program is comprised of 5 long-term phases: Phase 1 - Strategy Definition and Communication: a clear and shared Risk Management Strategy is indispensable to guarantee a coordinated action plan, in order to focus all of the interventions towards the achievement of common and measurable results. Phase 2 - Risk Management System Governance: all of the organisational structures have been activated in order to effectively manage the Risk Management System. The system has been introduced to interact within all areas of the hospital and to transfer information. Phase 3 - Promotion within the Organisation: this phase fosters the aims of the project within the whole organisation, by stressing the concept of “learning from errors”. This is crucial if organisational and healthcare workers are to understand the true aims of risk prevention and protection and offer to contribute to the process. Phase 4 - Risk Assessment: a data survey system was created and institutionalized. This phase begins with an analysis of the information flow, in order to estimate the probabilities that certain risks occur, and ends with defining the interventions to undertake. Risk assessment makes it possible to forecast the consequences of certain risks and thus prioritise those for prevention. Phase 5 - Risk Management: this consists of planning and implementing all of the actions necessary to prevent risks, protect and finance (in terms of prevention A. Gemelli University Hospital.

    Results The results achieved are remarkable especially when one

  1. Eighteen years experience of granulocyte donations-acceptable donor safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axdorph Nygell, Ulla; Sollén-Nilsson, Agneta; Lundahl, Joachim

    2015-10-01

    Granulocyte transfusions are given to patients with life-threatening infections, refractory to treatment. The donors are stimulated with corticosteroids ± granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). However, data regarding the donors' safety is sparse. The objective was therefore to evaluate short- and long-term adverse events (AE) in G-CSF stimulated donors. All consecutive granulocyte donors from 1994 to 2012 were identified through our registry. From the donation records, the number of aphereses, stimulation therapy, AE, blood values post donation, and recent status were evaluated. One hundred fifty-four volunteer donors were mobilized for 359 collections. Age at first granulocyte donation was 43 years (median; range 19-64 years). Follow-up was 60 months (median; range 0-229 months). The dose of G-CSF per collection was 3.8 ug/kg body weight (median; range 1.6-6.0 ug/kg). Sedimentation agent was HES. Short-term AE were mild. Blood values 4 weeks post donation with minor reductions/elevations mostly resolved in later donations. Fourteen donors were excluded from the registry due to hypertension (4), diabetes (2), atrial flutter (1), breast carcinoma (1), urethral carcinoma in situ (1), MGUS (1), thrombosis (1), anaphylaxis (1), primary biliary cirrhosis (1), and unknown (1). Three donors are deceased due to diabetes, acute myocardial infarction, and unknown cause. All excluded/deceased donors except one were excluded/died at least 6 months after first granulocyte donation. No serious short-term AE were observed. Due to the variability of diagnoses among excluded/deceased donors, we propose that it is less likely that granulocyte donations have a causative impact on these donors' exclusion or death. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Self-Expanding Nitinol Renal Artery Stents: Comparison of Safety and Efficacy of Bare Versus Polyzene-F Nanocoated Stents in a Porcine Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurz, P.; Stampfl, U.; Christoph, P.; Henn, C.; Satzl, S.; Radeleff, B.; Berger, I.; Richter, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the safety and efficacy of a Polyzene-F nanocoat on new low-profile self-expandable nitinol stents in minipig renal arteries. Materials and Methods: Ten bare nitinol stents (BNS) and 10 stents coated with a 50 nm-thin Polyzene-F coating were randomly implanted into renal arteries of 10 minipigs (4- and 12-week follow-up, 5 animals/group). Thrombogenicity, on-stent surface endothelialization, vessel wall injury, late in-stent stenosis, and peristrut vessel wall inflammation were determined by quantitative angiography and postmortem histomorphometry. Results: In 6 of 10 BNS, >50% stenosis was found, but no stenosis was found in stents with a nanothin Polyzene-F coating. Histomorphometry showed a statistically significant (p < 0.05) different average maximum luminal loss of 55.16% ± 8.43% at 12 weeks in BNS versus 39.77% ± 7.41% in stents with a nanothin Polyzene-F coating. Stents with a nanothin Polyzene-F coating had a significantly (p < 0.05) lower inflammation score after 12 weeks, 1.31 ± 1.17 versus 2.17 ± 0.85 in BNS. The results for vessel wall injury (0.6 ± 0.58 for Polyzene-F-coated stents; 0.72 ± 0.98 for BNS) and re-endothelialization, (1.16 ± 0.43 and 1.23 ± 0.54, respectively) were not statistically significant at 12-week follow-up. No thrombus deposition was observed on the stents at either follow-up time point. Conclusion: Nitinol stents with a nanothin Polyzene-F coating successfully decreased in-stent stenosis and vessel wall inflammation compared with BNS. Endothelialization and vessel wall injury were found to be equal. These studies warrant long-term pig studies (≥120 days) because 12 weeks may not be sufficient time for complete healing; thereafter, human studies may be warranted.

  3. Sodium experiments in support of PFBR design safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajan, M.; Meikandamurthy, C.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Rajan, K.K.; Kale, R.D.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The pool type PFBR uses sodium as coolant. It has a roof slab of about 16 metres in diameter with large rotating plug, small rotating plug and control plug. The plugs rotate to orient. the fuel handling canal above the core and the operating and control instruments are supported in the control plug. The roof slab is maintained at 120 degC. The sodium temperature is 550 degC when the reactor is in operation. The axial temperature difference between the sodium and roof slab leads to intense convection of argon cover gas in the annular space of the rotating plugs causing large circumferential temperature difference and unwanted thermal stresses in the plugs and other components supported on roof slab. Experiments were carried out simulating reactor conditions in sodium facilities to control the circumferential temperature difference. The argon cover gas above sodium (550 degC) is at a temperature of about 350 degC. The sodium vapour generated, condenses as sodium mist in the cover gas. Due to convection currents the sodium mist is carried and deposited in cooler areas. The process creates problem for components like CSRDM which has long vertical annular gaps with a large axial temperature gradient. Experiments were carried out to reduce the convection currents inside the CSRDM annular space. A multiple sleeve was developed which reduces convection and hence the sodium deposition in the annular space

  4. Feasibility and safety of treating non-unions in tibia, femur and humerus with autologous, expanded, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells associated with biphasic calcium phosphate biomaterials in a multicentric, non-comparative trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Rosset, Philippe; Gebhard, Florian; Hernigou, Philippe; Baldini, Nicola; Rouard, Helène; Sensebé, Luc; Gonzalo-Daganzo, Rosa M; Giordano, Rosaria; Padilla-Eguiluz, Norma; García-Rey, Eduardo; Cordero-Ampuero, José; Rubio-Suárez, Juan Carlos; Stanovici, Julien; Ehrnthaller, Christian; Huber-Lang, Markus; Flouzat-Lachaniette, Charles Henri; Chevallier, Nathalie; Donati, Davide Maria; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Fleury, Sandrine; Fernandez, Manuel-Nicolás; Cabrera, José-Rafael; Avendaño-Solá, Cristina; Montemurro, Tiziana; Panaitescu, Carmen; Veronesi, Elena; Rojewski, Markus Thomas; Lotfi, Ramin; Dominici, Massimo; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Layrolle, Pierre

    2018-03-19

    ORTHO-1 is a European, multicentric, first in human clinical trial to prove safety and feasibility after surgical implantation of commercially available biphasic calcium phosphate bioceramic granules associated during surgery with autologous mesenchymal stromal cells expanded from bone marrow (BM-hMSC) under good manufacturing practices, in patients with long bone pseudarthrosis. Twenty-eight patients with femur, tibia or humerus diaphyseal or metaphyso-diaphyseal non-unions were recruited and surgically treated in France, Germany, Italy and Spain with 100 or 200 million BM-hMSC/mL associated with 5-10 cc of bioceramic granules. Patients were followed up during one year. The investigational advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP) was expanded under the same protocol in all four countries, and approved by each National Competent Authority. With safety as primary end-point, no severe adverse event was reported as related to the BM-hMSC. With feasibility as secondary end-point, the participating production centres manufactured the BM-hMSC as planned. The ATMP combined to the bioceramic was surgically delivered to the non-unions, and 26/28 treated patients were found radiologically healed at one year (3 out of 4 cortices with bone bridging). Safety and feasibility were clinically proven for surgical implantation of expanded autologous BM-hMSC with bioceramic. EU-FP7-HEALTH-2009, REBORNE Project (GA: 241876). Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. The Belgian experience on the backfitting and safety upgrading of old operating nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brognon, T.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes the methodology for backfitting and safety upgrading during the reevaluation of the Belgian NPP's: first generation (Doel-1, Doel-2, Tihange-1) and second generation plants (Doel-3, Doel-4, Tihange-2 and Tihange-3). A list of essential safety subjects and topics is given. The experience has proved the feasibility of a safety upgrading of operating NPP without injury to its availability, the benefit of a close cooperation between owner, engineering company and safety authorities throughout the project. A global approach to solving numerous specific deficiencies along with the optimization of the investments regarding the safety improvement of the NPP is suggested. Further increase of the know-how will be achieved through the present Belgian programme along with similar activities abroad. (R.I.)

  6. Understanding the experience of place: expanding methods to conceptualize and measure community integration of persons with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Greg; Kloos, Bret; Wright, Patricia A

    2009-06-01

    Community integration research explores community contexts and factors that encourage or hinder individuals with serious mental illness (SMI) from actively participating in community life. This research agenda can be advanced by using mixed-methods that better document the relationships between contextual factors and individual experience. Two such methods were applied to a mixed-methods study of 40 adults with SMI living in independent housing in the Southeastern United States. Their contextualized experiences of community integration were measured by applying innovative participatory mapping and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping techniques. Use of these methods in conjunction with one another facilitated the creation of activity spaces, which can measure geographic accessibility and help to represent an individual's experience of place and degree of mobility. The utility of these newly applied methods for better understanding community integration for persons with SMI is explored and implications for using these measures in research and practice are discussed.

  7. INTEGRAL BENCHMARKS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE INTERNATIONAL REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECT AND THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY BENCHMARK EVALUATION PROJECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Enrico Sartori; Yolanda Rugama

    2008-01-01

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) continue to expand their efforts and broaden their scope to identify, evaluate, and provide integral benchmark data for method and data validation. Benchmark model specifications provided by these two projects are used heavily by the international reactor physics, nuclear data, and criticality safety communities. Thus far, 14 countries have contributed to the IRPhEP, and 20 have contributed to the ICSBEP. The status of the IRPhEP and ICSBEP is discussed in this paper, and the future of the two projects is outlined and discussed. Selected benchmarks that have been added to the IRPhEP and ICSBEP handbooks since PHYSOR-06 are highlighted, and the future of the two projects is discussed

  8. INTEGRAL BENCHMARKS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE INTERNATIONAL REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECT AND THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY BENCHMARK EVALUATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Enrico Sartori; Yolanda Rugama

    2008-09-01

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) continue to expand their efforts and broaden their scope to identify, evaluate, and provide integral benchmark data for method and data validation. Benchmark model specifications provided by these two projects are used heavily by the international reactor physics, nuclear data, and criticality safety communities. Thus far, 14 countries have contributed to the IRPhEP, and 20 have contributed to the ICSBEP. The status of the IRPhEP and ICSBEP is discussed in this paper, and the future of the two projects is outlined and discussed. Selected benchmarks that have been added to the IRPhEP and ICSBEP handbooks since PHYSOR’06 are highlighted, and the future of the two projects is discussed.

  9. Removal of Retrievable Self-Expandable Metallic Tracheobronchial Stents: An 18-Year Experience in a Single Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Pyeong Hwa; Shin, Ji Hoon; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Kim, Min Tae; Cho, Young Chul; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Song, Ho-Young

    2016-01-01

    PurposeThe purpose of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the technical outcomes of removal of retrievable self-expandable metallic stents (REMSs) and identify predictors of technical failure in 81 patients with benign and malignant tracheobronchial strictures.Materials and MethodsA total of 98 REMSs were removed under fluoroscopic guidance in 81 patients with benign (n = 48) or malignant (n = 33) tracheobronchial strictures. Primary and secondary technical success rates and complication rate were evaluated. Technical outcomes with regard to underlying diseases were also evaluated. Logistic regression models were constructed to identify predictors of primary technical success.ResultsPrimary and secondary technical success rates were 86.7 and 94.9 %, respectively. Stent removal-related complication rate was 7.1 % (7/98) and all were bleeding after stent removal. All bleeding complications were minor and managed conservatively. Primary technical success rate for benign strictures was significantly lower compared with that for malignant strictures (80.9 vs. 97.1 %, P = 0.029), but secondary technical success rate (93.7 vs. 97.1 %, P = 0.652) did not differ between the two groups. Granulation tissue formation was identified as an independent predictor of primary technical success (odds ratio 0.249, 95 % CI 0.071–0.874, P = 0.030).ConclusionRemoval of REMSs in patients with benign and malignant tracheobronchial strictures is safe and technically feasible. Bronchoscopic guidance may be required when the removal using a hook wire fails. The presence of granulation tissue was the negative predictor of primary technical success.

  10. Removal of Retrievable Self-Expandable Metallic Tracheobronchial Stents: An 18-Year Experience in a Single Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Pyeong Hwa; Shin, Ji Hoon, E-mail: jhshin@amc.seoul.kr; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Kim, Min Tae; Cho, Young Chul; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Song, Ho-Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Departments of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    PurposeThe purpose of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the technical outcomes of removal of retrievable self-expandable metallic stents (REMSs) and identify predictors of technical failure in 81 patients with benign and malignant tracheobronchial strictures.Materials and MethodsA total of 98 REMSs were removed under fluoroscopic guidance in 81 patients with benign (n = 48) or malignant (n = 33) tracheobronchial strictures. Primary and secondary technical success rates and complication rate were evaluated. Technical outcomes with regard to underlying diseases were also evaluated. Logistic regression models were constructed to identify predictors of primary technical success.ResultsPrimary and secondary technical success rates were 86.7 and 94.9 %, respectively. Stent removal-related complication rate was 7.1 % (7/98) and all were bleeding after stent removal. All bleeding complications were minor and managed conservatively. Primary technical success rate for benign strictures was significantly lower compared with that for malignant strictures (80.9 vs. 97.1 %, P = 0.029), but secondary technical success rate (93.7 vs. 97.1 %, P = 0.652) did not differ between the two groups. Granulation tissue formation was identified as an independent predictor of primary technical success (odds ratio 0.249, 95 % CI 0.071–0.874, P = 0.030).ConclusionRemoval of REMSs in patients with benign and malignant tracheobronchial strictures is safe and technically feasible. Bronchoscopic guidance may be required when the removal using a hook wire fails. The presence of granulation tissue was the negative predictor of primary technical success.

  11. Removal of Retrievable Self-Expandable Metallic Tracheobronchial Stents: An 18-Year Experience in a Single Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Pyeong Hwa; Shin, Ji Hoon; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Kim, Min Tae; Cho, Young Chul; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Song, Ho-Young

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the technical outcomes of removal of retrievable self-expandable metallic stents (REMSs) and identify predictors of technical failure in 81 patients with benign and malignant tracheobronchial strictures. A total of 98 REMSs were removed under fluoroscopic guidance in 81 patients with benign (n = 48) or malignant (n = 33) tracheobronchial strictures. Primary and secondary technical success rates and complication rate were evaluated. Technical outcomes with regard to underlying diseases were also evaluated. Logistic regression models were constructed to identify predictors of primary technical success. Primary and secondary technical success rates were 86.7 and 94.9 %, respectively. Stent removal-related complication rate was 7.1 % (7/98) and all were bleeding after stent removal. All bleeding complications were minor and managed conservatively. Primary technical success rate for benign strictures was significantly lower compared with that for malignant strictures (80.9 vs. 97.1 %, P = 0.029), but secondary technical success rate (93.7 vs. 97.1 %, P = 0.652) did not differ between the two groups. Granulation tissue formation was identified as an independent predictor of primary technical success (odds ratio 0.249, 95 % CI 0.071-0.874, P = 0.030). Removal of REMSs in patients with benign and malignant tracheobronchial strictures is safe and technically feasible. Bronchoscopic guidance may be required when the removal using a hook wire fails. The presence of granulation tissue was the negative predictor of primary technical success.

  12. Experience in the development and practical use of working control levels for radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epishin, A.V.

    1981-01-01

    The experience of development and practical use of working control levels (WCL) of radiation safety in the Gorky region, is discussed. WCL are introduced by ''Radiation Safety Guides'' (RSG-76) and have great practical importance. Regional control levels of radiation safety are determined for certain types of operations implying radioactive hazard and differentiated according to the types of sources applied and types of operation. Dose rates, radioactive contamination of operating surfaces, skin, air and waste water are subject to normalization. Limits of individual radiation doses specified according to operation categories are included. 10 tables of regional WCL indices are developed [ru

  13. Applying the results of probablistic safety analysis of nuclear power plants: a survey of experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, W.B.; Herttrich, M.; Koeberlein, K.; Schwager.

    1985-01-01

    To date, discussions of the many different types of potential applications of PRA/PSA results and insights to safety-decision-making have been mainly theoretical. Various safety goals have been proposed as decision criteria. However, the discussion on the role of PRA/PSA and Safety Goals in safety-decision-making, especially in licensing, is controversial. A Working Group of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency is completing a compilation and evaluation of real examples of past and present practical experience with the application of probabilistic methods in reactor safety decision-making, with the idea of developing a common understanding in this area. More than fifty different cases where PRA has influenced decision-making have been surveyed. These include, for example, regulatory changes, fixing of licensing requirements, plant specific modifications of design of operation, prioritization of safety issues and emergency planning. This feedback of experience - both positive and negative - with PRA/PSA applications is considered to provide guidance on how probabilistic approaches can be introduced into current safety practices, and on desirable future developments in probabilistic methods and specific PSA/PRA studies. Generic insights from the survey are given

  14. Drug research methodology. Volume 1, The alcohol-highway safety experience and its applicability to other drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    This report presents the findings of a workshop concerning the alcohol and highway safety experience, which includes research efforts to define the drinking-driving problem and societal responses to reduce the increased highway safety risk attributab...

  15. Review of studies on criticality safety evaluation and criticality experiment methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Yoshitaka; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamane, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 1960s, many studies on criticality safety evaluation have been conducted in Japan. Computer code systems were developed initially by employing finite difference methods, and more recently by using Monte Carlo methods. Criticality experiments have also been carried out in many laboratories in Japan as well as overseas. By effectively using these study results, the Japanese Criticality Safety Handbook was published in 1988, almost the intermediate point of the last 50 years. An increased interest has been shown in criticality safety studies, and a Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety (WPNCS) was set up by the Nuclear Science Committee of Organisation Economic Co-operation and Development in 1997. WPNCS has several task forces in charge of each of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Program (ICSBEP), Subcritical Measurement, Experimental Needs, Burn-up Credit Studies and Minimum Critical Values. Criticality safety studies in Japan have been carried out in cooperation with WPNCS. This paper describes criticality safety study activities in Japan along with the contents of the Japanese Criticality Safety Handbook and the tasks of WPNCS. (author)

  16. Safety research experiment facilities, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. Final environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liverman, J.L.

    1977-09-01

    This environmental statement was prepared for the Safety Research Experiment Facilities (SAREF) Project. The purpose of the proposed project is to modify some existing facilities and provide a new test facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for conducting fast breeder reactor (FBR) safety experiments. The SAREF Project proposal has been developed after an extensive study which identified the FBR safety research needs requiring in-reactor experiments and which evaluated the capability of various existing and new facilities to meet these needs. The proposed facilities provide for the in-reactor testing of large bundles of prototypical FBR fuel elements under a wide variety of conditions, ranging from those abnormal operating conditions which might be expected to occur during the life of an FBR power plant to the extremely low probability, hypothetical accidents used in the evaluation of some design options and in the assessment of the long-term potential risk associated with wide-acale deployment of the FBR

  17. W-1 Sodium Loop Safety Facility experiment centerline fuel thermocouple performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, S.C.; Henderson, J.M.

    1980-05-01

    The W-1 Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) experiment is the fifth in a series of experiments sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the National Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) Safety Assurance Program. The experiments are being conducted under the direction of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). The irradiation phase of the W-1 SLSF experiment was conducted between May 27 and July 20, 1979, and terminated with incipient fuel pin cladding failure during the final boiling transient. Experimental hardware and facility performed as designed, allowing completion of all planned tests and test objectives. This paper focuses on high temperature in-fuel thermocouples and discusses their development, fabrication, and performance in the W-1 experiment

  18. Part I. Fuel-motion diagnostics in support of fast-reactor safety experiments. Part II. Fission product detection system in support of fast reactor safety experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devolpi, A.; Doerner, R.C.; Fink, C.L.; Regis, J.P.; Rhodes, E.A.; Stanford, G.S.; Braid, T.H.; Boyar, R.E.

    1986-05-01

    In all destructive fast-reactor safety experiments at TREAT, fuel motion and cladding failure have been monitored by the fast-neutron/gamma-ray hodoscope, providing experimental results that are directly applicable to design, modeling, and validation in fast-reactor safety. Hodoscope contributions to the safety program can be considered to fall into several groupings: pre-failure fuel motion, cladding failure, post-failure fuel motion, steel blockages, pretest and posttest radiography, axial-power-profile variations, and power-coupling monitoring. High-quality results in fuel motion have been achieved, and motion sequences have been reconstructed in qualitative and quantitative visual forms. A collimated detection system has been used to observe fission products in the upper regions of a test loop in the TREAT reactor. Particular regions of the loop are targeted through any of five channels in a rotatable assembly in a horizontal hole through the biological shield. A well-type neutron detector, optimized for delayed neutrons, and two GeLi gamma ray spectrometers have been used in several experiments. Data are presented showing a time history of the transport of Dn emitters, of gamma spectra identifying volatile fission products deposited as aerosols, and of fission gas isotopes released from the coolant

  19. An expandable prosthesis with dual cage-and-plate function in a single device for vertebral body replacement: the clinical experience on 14 consecutive cases with vertebral tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, J J; Ramírez, J J; Chiquete, E; Gómez-Limón, E

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this paper was to test the hypothesis that an expandable prosthesis with dual cage-and-plate function can provide immediate and durable spine stabilization after corpectomy. We designed an expandable vertebral body prosthesis with dual cage-and-plate function in a single device (JR-prosthesis). Anatomical studies were performed to design a titanium-made prosthesis. Cadaver assays were done with a stainless steal device to test fixation and adequacy to the human spine anatomy. Then, 14 patients with vertebral tumors (8 metastatic) underwent corpectomy and vertebral body replacement with the JR-prosthesis. All patients had neurological deficit, severe pain and spine instability (mean follow-up: 25.4 months). Mean pain score before surgery in a visual analog scale improved from 7.6 to 3.0 points after operation (P=0.002). All patients achieved at least one grade of improvement in the Frankel score (P=0.003), excepting the 3 patients with Frankel grade A presurgery. Two patients with renal cell carcinoma died during the following 4 days after surgery (renal failure and massive bleeding), the rest attained a painless and stable spine immediately and maintained for long periods. No significant infections or implant failures were registered. A non-fatal case of inferior vena cava surgical injury was observed (repaired during surgery without further complications). The JR-prosthesis stabilizes the spine immediately after surgery and for the rest of the patients' life. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the clinical experience of any expandable vertebral body prosthesis with dual cage-and-plate function in a single device. These observations await confirmation in different scenarios.

  20. Probabilistic safety goals. Phase 1 - Status and experiences in Sweden and Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmberg, J.E.; Knochenhauer, M.

    2007-03-01

    The outcome of a probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for a nuclear power plant is a combination of qualitative and quantitative results. Quantitative results are typically presented as the Core Damage Frequency (CDF) and as the frequency of an unacceptable radioactive release. In order to judge the acceptability of PSA results, criteria for the interpretation of results and the assessment of their acceptability need to be defined. Ultimately, the goals are intended to define an acceptable level of risk from the operation of a nuclear facility. However, safety goals usually have a dual function, i.e., they define an acceptable safety level, but they also have a wider and more general use as decision criteria. The exact levels of the safety goals differ between organisations and between different countries. There are also differences in the definition of the safety goal, and in the formal status of the goals, i.e., whether they are mandatory or not. In this first phase of the project, the aim has been on providing a clear description of the issue of probabilistic safety goals for nuclear power plants, to define and describe important concepts related to the definition and application of safety goals, and to describe experiences in Finland and Sweden. Based on a series of interviews and on literature reviews as well as on a limited international over-view, the project has described the history and current status of safety goals in Sweden and Finland, and elaborated on a number of issues, including the following: 1) The status of the safety goals in view of the fact that they have been exceeded for much of the time they have been in use, as well as the possible implications of these exceedances. 2) Safety goals as informal or mandatory limits. 3) Strategies for handling violations of safety goals, including various graded approaches, such as ALARP (As Low As Reasonably Practicable). 4) Relation between safety goals defined on different levels, e.g., for core damage

  1. Probabilistic Safety Goals. Phase 1 Status and Experiences in Sweden and Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, Jan-Erik (VTT, FI-02044 VTT (Finland)); Knochenhauer, Michael (Relcon Scandpower AB, SE-172 25 Sundbyberg (Sweden))

    2007-02-15

    The outcome of a probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for a nuclear power plant is a combination of qualitative and quantitative results. Quantitative results are typically presented as the Core Damage Frequency (CDF) and as the frequency of an unacceptable radioactive release. In order to judge the acceptability of PSA results, criteria for the interpretation of results and the assessment of their acceptability need to be defined. Ultimately, the goals are intended to define an acceptable level of risk from the operation of a nuclear facility. However, safety goals usually have a dual function, i.e., they define an acceptable safety level, but they also have a wider and more general use as decision criteria. The exact levels of the safety goals differ between organisations and between different countries. There are also differences in the definition of the safety goal, and in the formal status of the goals, i.e., whether they are mandatory or not. In this first phase of the project, the aim has been on providing a clear description of the issue of probabilistic safety goals for nuclear power plants, to define and describe important concepts related to the definition and application of safety goals, and to describe experiences in Finland and Sweden. Based on a series of interviews and on literature reviews as well as on a limited international over-view, the project has described the history and current status of safety goals in Sweden and Finland, and elaborated on a number of issues, including the following: The status of the safety goals in view of the fact that they have been exceeded for much of the time they have been in use, as well as the possible implications of these exceedances. Safety goals as informal or mandatory limits. Strategies for handling violations of safety goals, including various graded approaches, such as ALARP (As Low As Reasonably Practicable). Relation between safety goals defined on different levels, e.g., for core damage and for

  2. Probabilistic Safety Goals. Phase 1 Status and Experiences in Sweden and Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmberg, Jan-Erik; Knochenhauer, Michael

    2007-02-01

    The outcome of a probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for a nuclear power plant is a combination of qualitative and quantitative results. Quantitative results are typically presented as the Core Damage Frequency (CDF) and as the frequency of an unacceptable radioactive release. In order to judge the acceptability of PSA results, criteria for the interpretation of results and the assessment of their acceptability need to be defined. Ultimately, the goals are intended to define an acceptable level of risk from the operation of a nuclear facility. However, safety goals usually have a dual function, i.e., they define an acceptable safety level, but they also have a wider and more general use as decision criteria. The exact levels of the safety goals differ between organisations and between different countries. There are also differences in the definition of the safety goal, and in the formal status of the goals, i.e., whether they are mandatory or not. In this first phase of the project, the aim has been on providing a clear description of the issue of probabilistic safety goals for nuclear power plants, to define and describe important concepts related to the definition and application of safety goals, and to describe experiences in Finland and Sweden. Based on a series of interviews and on literature reviews as well as on a limited international over-view, the project has described the history and current status of safety goals in Sweden and Finland, and elaborated on a number of issues, including the following: The status of the safety goals in view of the fact that they have been exceeded for much of the time they have been in use, as well as the possible implications of these exceedances. Safety goals as informal or mandatory limits. Strategies for handling violations of safety goals, including various graded approaches, such as ALARP (As Low As Reasonably Practicable). Relation between safety goals defined on different levels, e.g., for core damage and for

  3. Probabilistic safety goals. Phase 1 - Status and experiences in Sweden and Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, J.E. [VTT (Finland); Knochenhauer, M. [Relcon Scandpower AB (Sweden)

    2007-03-15

    The outcome of a probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for a nuclear power plant is a combination of qualitative and quantitative results. Quantitative results are typically presented as the Core Damage Frequency (CDF) and as the frequency of an unacceptable radioactive release. In order to judge the acceptability of PSA results, criteria for the interpretation of results and the assessment of their acceptability need to be defined. Ultimately, the goals are intended to define an acceptable level of risk from the operation of a nuclear facility. However, safety goals usually have a dual function, i.e., they define an acceptable safety level, but they also have a wider and more general use as decision criteria. The exact levels of the safety goals differ between organisations and between different countries. There are also differences in the definition of the safety goal, and in the formal status of the goals, i.e., whether they are mandatory or not. In this first phase of the project, the aim has been on providing a clear description of the issue of probabilistic safety goals for nuclear power plants, to define and describe important concepts related to the definition and application of safety goals, and to describe experiences in Finland and Sweden. Based on a series of interviews and on literature reviews as well as on a limited international over-view, the project has described the history and current status of safety goals in Sweden and Finland, and elaborated on a number of issues, including the following: 1) The status of the safety goals in view of the fact that they have been exceeded for much of the time they have been in use, as well as the possible implications of these exceedances. 2) Safety goals as informal or mandatory limits. 3) Strategies for handling violations of safety goals, including various graded approaches, such as ALARP (As Low As Reasonably Practicable). 4) Relation between safety goals defined on different levels, e.g., for core damage

  4. Developing and Strengthening of Safety Culture at Ukrainian NPPs: Experience of NNEGC “Energoatom”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheyko, Y.; Kotin, P.

    2016-01-01

    , including: • Self evaluation of safety culture; • Questioning the staff; • Independent audits of safety culture. NAEC “Energoatom” seeks to take into account international experience, and to participate in conferences (such as this one), seminars and workshops held under the auspices of the IAEA, as well as to follow the guidelines and standards of the IAEA in the organization of activities to improve the safety culture. Other sources of international experience in this field are the EU-funded projects of “soft” assistance and guidance of other authorised international nuclear industry organizations such as WANO. In this regard, it should be mentioned WANO guidance document GL 2002-02 “Principles of effective personnel organization” that identifies five fundamental principles relating to human factors, and important for the development of a sustainable safety culture in the organization: • Even the best experts make mistakes; • A situation fraught with errors is predictable, manageable and preventable; • Human behavior is determined by organizational processes and values; • Highest efficiency operation is achieved through the promotion and support; • Violations can be avoided by understanding the causes of errors and implementing lessons learned. Within the framework of the international programs of EC “soft” aid in recent years, the projects that contribute to the development of a safety culture in the NAEC “Energoatom” have been either carried out or are ongoing. These projects include the solution of certain problems (for example, in the area of human factor—the task of “no punishment for error” approach establishment), as well as more common tasks of improving overall safety culture, such as: • Implementation of programs to inform senior staff and management, including the essential features needed to create a strong culture of safety; creating conditions for the improvement of the organizational and managerial impact on the

  5. The Kaleidoscope of Culture: expanding the museum experience and the museum narrative by inviting visitors into the curatorial process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Jensen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditional art museum exhibitions are planned according to art-historical elements. At Trapholt – a museum of modern Danish art, design and applied art in Denmark, we are interested in exploring what happens when ordinary visitors are invited to curate personal exhibitions in the museum space. This paper analyses the project The Kaleidoscope of Culture, where people with no art historical background were invited to curate exhibitions based on the Trapholt collection of art and their own cultural backgrounds and experiences. The main argument is that, by allowing these personal voices in the museum space, new museum narratives are established. But to make the museum a truly transformative space the art- historical knowledge and methods must also be activate.

  6. Nurses' experiences and perspectives on medication safety practices: an explorative qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeulers, Marian; Onderwater, Astrid T; van Zwieten, Myra C B; Vermeulen, Hester

    2014-04-01

    To explore nurses' experiences with and perspectives on preventing medication administration errors. Insight into nurses' experiences with and perspectives on preventing medication administration errors is important and can be utilised to tailor and implement safety practices. A qualitative interview study of 20 nurses in an academic medical centre was conducted between March and December of 2011. Three themes emerged from this study: (1) nurses' roles and responsibilities in medication safety: aside from safe preparation and administration, the clinical reasoning of nurses is essential for medication safety; (2) nurses' ability to work safely: knowledge of risks and nurses' work circumstances influence their ability to work safely; and (3) nurses' acceptance of safety practices: advantages, feasibility and appropriateness are important incentives for acceptance of a safety practice. Nurses' experiences coincide with the assumption that they are in a pre-eminent position to enable safe medication management; however, their ability to adequately perform this role depends on sufficient knowledge to assess the risks of medication administration and on the circumstances in which they work. Safe medication management requires a learning climate and professional practice environment that enables further development of professional nursing skills and knowledge. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Planning the Unplanned Experiment: Assessing the Efficacy of Standards for Safety Critical Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graydon, Patrick J.; Holloway, C. Michael

    2015-01-01

    We need well-founded means of determining whether software is t for use in safety-critical applications. While software in industries such as aviation has an excellent safety record, the fact that software aws have contributed to deaths illustrates the need for justi ably high con dence in software. It is often argued that software is t for safety-critical use because it conforms to a standard for software in safety-critical systems. But little is known about whether such standards `work.' Reliance upon a standard without knowing whether it works is an experiment; without collecting data to assess the standard, this experiment is unplanned. This paper reports on a workshop intended to explore how standards could practicably be assessed. Planning the Unplanned Experiment: Assessing the Ecacy of Standards for Safety Critical Software (AESSCS) was held on 13 May 2014 in conjunction with the European Dependable Computing Conference (EDCC). We summarize and elaborate on the workshop's discussion of the topic, including both the presented positions and the dialogue that ensued.

  8. Planning the Unplanned Experiment: Towards Assessing the Efficacy of Standards for Safety-Critical Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graydon, Patrick J.; Holloway, C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Safe use of software in safety-critical applications requires well-founded means of determining whether software is fit for such use. While software in industries such as aviation has a good safety record, little is known about whether standards for software in safety-critical applications 'work' (or even what that means). It is often (implicitly) argued that software is fit for safety-critical use because it conforms to an appropriate standard. Without knowing whether a standard works, such reliance is an experiment; without carefully collecting assessment data, that experiment is unplanned. To help plan the experiment, we organized a workshop to develop practical ideas for assessing software safety standards. In this paper, we relate and elaborate on the workshop discussion, which revealed subtle but important study design considerations and practical barriers to collecting appropriate historical data and recruiting appropriate experimental subjects. We discuss assessing standards as written and as applied, several candidate definitions for what it means for a standard to 'work,' and key assessment strategies and study techniques and the pros and cons of each. Finally, we conclude with thoughts about the kinds of research that will be required and how academia, industry, and regulators might collaborate to overcome the noted barriers.

  9. Evaluation of operating experience for early recognition of deteriorating safety performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmerhagen, I.A.; Berg, H.P.

    2004-01-01

    One of the most difficult challenges facing nuclear power plants is to recognize the early signs of degrading safety performance before regulatory requirements are imposed or serious incidents or accidents occur. Today, the nuclear industry is striving for collecting more information on occurrences that could improve the operational safety performance. To achieve this, the reporting threshold has been lowered from incidents to anomalies with minor or no impact to safety. Industry experience (also outside nuclear industry) has shown that these are typical issues which should be considered when looking for such early warning signs. Therefore, it is important that nuclear power plant operators have the capability to trend, analyse and recognize early warning signs of deteriorating performance. It is necessary that plant operators are sensitive to these warning signs which may not be immediately evident. Reviewing operating experience is one of the main tasks for plant operators in their daily activities. Therefore, self assessment should be at the centre of any operational safety performance programme. One way of applying a self assessment program is through the following four basic elements: operational data, events, safety basis, and related experience. This approach will be described in the paper in more details. (authors)

  10. The role of the regulator in promoting and evaluating safety culture. Operating experience feedback programme approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, S.

    2002-01-01

    Promoting and Evaluating Safety Culture (S.C.) in Operating Organizations must be one of the main Nuclear Regulator goals to achieve. This can be possible only if each and every one of the regulatory activities inherently involves S.C. It can be seen throughout attitudes, values, uses and practices in both individuals and the whole regulatory organization. One among all the regulatory tools commonly used by regulators to promote and evaluate the commitment of the licensees with safety culture as a whole involves organizational factors and particular attention is directed to the operating organization. This entailed a wide range of activities, including all those related with management of safety performance. Operating Experience Feedback Programme as a tool to enhance safety operation is particularly useful for regulators in the evaluation of the role of S.C. in operating organization. Safety Culture is recognized as a subset of the wider Organizational Culture. Practices that improve organizational effectiveness can also contribute to enhance safety. An effective event investigation methodology is a specific practice, which contributes to a healthy Safety Culture. (author)

  11. The role of quality management in safety case development - Nagra's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Juerg W.; Zuidema, Piet

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of quality management (QM) in safety case development based on Nagra's experience from a broad range of projects. These include Project Gewahr (L/ILW and HLW, Nagra, 1985), the Wellenberg Project (L/ILW, Nagra, 1994), Project Opalinus Clay (HLW, Nagra, 2002a, 2002b), and recent project work needed in the context of the Swiss site selection process (L/ILW and HLW, Nagra, 2008a, 2008b, 2008c, 2010). Broadly speaking, Nagra's Quality Management policy is focused on ensuring: i) the quality of the disposal system (siting, design and implementation); ii) the quality of the underlying scientific understanding, which are seen as key elements of a credible safety case, along with the quality of the safety calculations themselves and of compiling the safety case, including the drawing of conclusions (Nagra, 2002a). All aspects of QM discussed in this paper should be seen in this context. (authors)

  12. Operational safety performance indicator system at the Dukovany Nuclear Power Plant - Experience with indicator aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandula, J.

    2001-01-01

    The operational safety performance indicators serve as an important tool of performance monitoring and management at the Dukovany NPP. A software-supported system has been developed, which has included: data collection, central data storage, graphic output production and periodical report generation. Analyses of performance indicator trends together with evaluation in respect of annually updated target values and acceptance criteria are used for operational safety reviews forming an integral part of continual self-assessment process. This contribution has been focused on experience obtained during development of the operational safety assessment model using indicator aggregation. It summarises problems that had to be paid specific attention in the development process. Thanks to their solution, the model has become a synoptic monitor and a useful tool for operational safety assessment. (author)

  13. Proceedings of the workshop on integral experiment covariance data for critical safety validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuke, Maik (ed.)

    2016-04-15

    For some time, attempts to quantify the statistical dependencies of critical experiments and to account for them properly in validation procedures were discussed in the literature by various groups. Besides the development of suitable methods especially the quality and modeling issues of the freely available experimental data are in the focus of current discussions, carried out for example in the Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment (UACSA) of the OECD-NEA Nuclear Science Committee. The same committee compiles and publishes also the freely available experimental data in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. Most of these experiments were performed as series and might share parts of experimental setups leading to correlated results. The quality of the determination of these correlations and the underlying covariance data depend strongly on the quality of the documentation of experiments.

  14. Proceedings of the workshop on integral experiment covariance data for critical safety validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuke, Maik

    2016-04-01

    For some time, attempts to quantify the statistical dependencies of critical experiments and to account for them properly in validation procedures were discussed in the literature by various groups. Besides the development of suitable methods especially the quality and modeling issues of the freely available experimental data are in the focus of current discussions, carried out for example in the Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment (UACSA) of the OECD-NEA Nuclear Science Committee. The same committee compiles and publishes also the freely available experimental data in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. Most of these experiments were performed as series and might share parts of experimental setups leading to correlated results. The quality of the determination of these correlations and the underlying covariance data depend strongly on the quality of the documentation of experiments.

  15. Experience of Tecnatom in Developing a Strong Leadership for Safety and Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González, F.; Villadóniga, J. I.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents experience and insights of Tecnatom in the support of internal and external clients to develop a strong Leadership for Safety. Several cases are presented briefly: (a) The leadership and culture change activities for a utility, a radwaste company, and for Tecnatom itself. One important characteristic of the work performed is the detailed consideration of the underlying organizational culture that underpins the safety culture. Measurable improvements have been achieved and some of the key insights are shared in this paper. (b) The development and implementation of a leadership model with 17 competencies, including safety explicitly. One benefit of this model is that allows to perform a quantitative assessment of leadership effectiveness, something vital to be able to ensure that leadership development actions are truly supporting safety. The model uses an approach to development oriented to strengths and the use of companion competencies to further develop leadership. Moreover it aims to produce significant improvements on safety but also on performance, since both are not competing goals when the proper leadership model is selected. The training material prepared was shortlisted in the 2014 Nuclear Training Awards. (c) The design and implementation of a training development program on Safety Culture, and required competencies of Leadership, for Top Managers of the nuclear industry, as part of the project NUSHARE of the European Commission’s 7th research framework program. The program is sensible to the reduced time availability of Top Managers and uses a combination of learning approaches (webinars, micro-elearnings, web meetings) that provide higher flexibility for the learner, but complemented with other proven methods (group dialog, journaling, mentoring, etc.) to ensure that the program is effective. All these experiences reveal that to improve the organizational Safety Culture we need to enhance Leadership for Safety and Performance

  16. Modelling and simulation in nuclear safety and the role of experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, W-P.

    2015-01-01

    'Full text:' Modeling and simulation (M&S) technology is a key element in assuring and enhancing the safety of nuclear installations. The M&S technology has been progressed continuously with the introduction of new designs, improved understanding on relevant physical processes, and the improvement of computing environment. This presentation covers the role, progresses and prospect of M&S technology relevant to nuclear safety. Special attention is given to the effective interaction between M&S and experiment. The expected role of experiment to motivate the advancement of M&S technology is emphasized with some typical examples. Finally, relevant R&D activities of Korea are introduced for thermal-hydraulics and severe accident safety. (author)

  17. Safety and efficacy of a fully covered large-diameter self-expanding metal stent for the treatment of upper gastrointestinal perforations, anastomotic leaks, and fistula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, M. W.; Kerbert, A. C.; van Soest, E. J.; Schwartz, M. P.; Bakker, C. M.; Gilissen, L. P. L.; van Hooft, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal perforations, fistula, and anastomotic leaks are severe conditions with high mortality. Temporary endoscopic placement of fully covered self-expanding metal stent (fSEMS) has emerged as treatment option. Stent migration is a major drawback of currently used stents. Migration

  18. Reconstrucción mamaria con expansor tisular e implante: Indicaciones y experiencia en 24 casos Breast reconstruction with tissue expander: Indications and experience in 24 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gutiérrez Gómez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available En la actualidad, la reconstrucción mamaria forma parte integral del tratamiento del cáncer de mama; la selección de la paciente es crítica para obtener resultados satisfactorios. El presente trabajo recoge nuestra experiencia en reconstrucción mamaria con expansión tisular e implantes, haciendo hincapié en la selección de las pacientes candidatas a este método reconstructivo. Revisamos las reconstrucciones mamarias realizadas en un período comprendido entre los años 1998 y 2008 por la misma cirujana, analizando factores como tipo de mastectomía, edad, tiempo de la reconstrucción (inmediata o diferida, causa de la mastectomía, tipo de expansor y prótesis utilizados, complicaciones y satisfacción de las pacientes. En todas excepto en una, la reconstrucción se realizó en dos tiempos operatorios; durante el primero se hizo la colocación del expansor tisular y en el segundo, el cambio por la prótesis mamaria definitiva. Se realizaron un total de 24 reconstrucciones mamarias en 19 pacientes en el período de 10 años revisado, 14 unilaterales y 5 bilaterales. Las complicaciones presentadas en este grupo de pacientes fueron del 16,6 %. El seguimiento de las pacientes fue de 2 a 10 años. Solamente en 1 caso de cuadrantectomía, se realizó la reconstrucción de forma diferida por antecedente de radioterapia (4,1 %. En nuestra opinión, la reconstrucción mamaria con expansor tisular e implante es un procedimiento seguro, reproducible y con bajo índice de complicaciones, sin el inconveniente añadido de ocasionar morbilidad en el a área donante.Nowadays, breast reconstruction is part of breast carcinoma treatment; patient's selection plays an important role in satisfactory results. The present paper reports our experience in breast reconstruction with tissue expander/implant and emphasizes the importance of choosing the candidates for this method of reconstruction. We review the breast reconstructions realized in a 10 year period

  19. Patients' experiences of safety during haemodialysis treatment--a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lovink, Marleen H; Kars, Marijke C; de Man-van Ginkel, Janneke M; Schoonhoven, Lisette

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To explore the experiences of safety of adult patients during their haemodialysis treatment. BACKGROUND: Haemodialysis is a complex treatment with a risk for harm that causes anxiety among many patients. To date, no in-depth study of haemodialysis patients' emotional responses to conditions of

  20. The application of MVC design pattern in Daya bay reactor neutrino experiments online safety training system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guanchuan; Chu Yuanping

    2011-01-01

    The article made an introduction to MVC, which is an architectural pattern used in software engineering. It specified the advantages and disadvantages of MVC and also the application of MVC in Daya Bay nuclear reactor neutrino experiment online safety training system. (authors)

  1. High-voltage safety fuses for the transition-radiation tracking detector in the ATLAS experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voronov, SA; Voronov, YA; Onishchenko, EM; Simakov, AB; Sosnovtsev, VV; Suchkov, SI; Sugrobova, TA

    2004-01-01

    A safety fuse has been designed for the electrical protection of gas-filled detectors in the ATLAS experiment at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland). The fuse is a polished lithium niobate plate with a titanium strip of 91-kOmega resistance deposited by the photolithographic technique. The forced blow-out

  2. Specific experiments carried out in Germany in order to demonstrate the safety of existing structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krutzik, Norbert

    2002-01-01

    Specific experiments are carried out in Germany in order to demonstrate the safety of existing NPPs. HDR research program includes operational loads testing (pressure test, pressure and temperature test, thermal shock, fatigue); extreme loads (earthquake, aircraft crash, external explosion); internal emergency loads (blowdown, hydrogen combustion, fire, thermal shock, water hammer, condensation loads)

  3. Enforcement of radiation safety standards and experience in the regulatory control of exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamurthi, T N [Health and Safety Div., Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Mumbai (India)

    1997-11-01

    Regulatory provisions for radiation protection and their enforcement in India are discussed in this paper. The rules and regulations framed for radiation safety cover all the nuclear fuel cycle activities as well as the application of radiation sources in industrial, medical and research institutions. The enforcement aspects and experience in the control of exposures are presented. (author). 3 refs, 2 tabs.

  4. Enforcement of radiation safety standards and experience in the regulatory control of exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthi, T.N.

    1997-01-01

    Regulatory provisions for radiation protection and their enforcement in India are discussed in this paper. The rules and regulations framed for radiation safety cover all the nuclear fuel cycle activities as well as the application of radiation sources in industrial, medical and research institutions. The enforcement aspects and experience in the control of exposures are presented. (author)

  5. Safety analysis report for the Hanford Critical Mass Laboratory: Supplement No. 2. Experiments with heterogeneous assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gore, B.F.; Davenport, L.C.

    1981-04-01

    Factors affecting the safety of criticality experiments using heterogeneous assemblies are described and assessed. It is concluded that there is no substantial change in safety from experiments already being routinely performed at the Critical Mass Laboratory (CML), and that laboratory and personnel safety are adequately provided by the combination of engineered and administrative safety limits enforced at the CML. This conclusion is based on the analysis of operational controls, potential hazards, and the consequences of accidents. Contingencies considered that could affect nuclear criticality include manual changes in fuel loadings, water flooding, fire, explosion, loss of services, earthquake, windstorm, and flood. Other potential hazards considered include radiation exposure to personnel, and potential releases within the Assembly Room and outside to the environment. It is concluded that the Maximum Credible Nuclear Burst of 3 x 10 18 fissions (which served as the design basis for the CML) is valid for heterogeneous assemblies as well as homogeneous assemblies. This is based upon examination of the results of reactor destructive tests and the results of the SL-1 reactor destructive accident. The production of blast effects which might jeopardize the CML critical assembly room (of thick reinforced concrete) is not considered credible due to the extreme circumstances required to produce blast effects in reactor destructive tests. Consequently, it is concluded that, for experiments with heterogeneous assemblies, the consequences of the Maximum Credible Burst are unchanged from those previously estimated for experiments with homogeneous systems

  6. Current MitraClip experience, safety and feasibility in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahhab, Z.; Kortlandt, F. A.; Velu, J. F.; Schurer, R. A. J.; Delgado, V.; Tonino, P.; Boven, A. J.; van den Branden, B. J. L.; Kraaijeveld, A. O.; Voskuil, M.; Hoorntje, J.; van Wely, M. [=Marleen; van Houwelingen, K.; Bleeker, G. B.; Rensing, B.; Kardys, I.; Baan, J.; van der Heyden, J. A. S.; van Mieghem, N. M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Data on MitraClip procedural safety and efficacy in the Netherlands are scarce. We aim to provide an overview of the Dutch MitraClip experience. Methods We pooled anonymised demographic and procedural data of 1151 consecutive MitraClip patients, from 13 Dutch hospitals. Data was collected by

  7. Safety Research Experiment Facility project. Conceptual design report. Volume IX. Experiment handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Information on the SAREF Reactor experiment handling system is presented concerning functions and design requirements, design description, operation, casualty events and recovery procedures, and maintenance

  8. Food safety in Vietnam: where we are at and what we can learn from international experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Viet, Hung; Tuyet-Hanh, Tran Thi; Unger, Fred; Dang-Xuan, Sinh; Grace, Delia

    2017-02-16

    Food-borne diseases are attracting a lot of attention in Vietnam as a result of repeated episodes of adulterated and unsafe food. In this paper, we provide some perspectives on food safety in Vietnam from the point of view of an international research institution working on food safety with partners in the country. We argue that one of the key issues of food safety in Vietnam is that certain food value chain stakeholders lack ethics, which leads to the production and trading of unsafe foods in order to make profits irrespective of adverse health effects on consumers. In turn, the shortfall in ethical behaviours around food can be attributed to a lack of incentives or motivating factors.Although food safety causes panic in the population, it is unclear how much contaminated food contributes to the burden of food-borne diseases and food poisonings in Vietnam. However, globally, the biggest health problem associated with food are infections from consuming food contaminated with viruses, bacteria or parasites. A major food safety challenge is the inappropriate way of communicating food risks to the public. Another key constraint is the inherent difficulty in managing food in wet markets and from smallholder production. On the other hand, local foods, and local food production and processing are an important cultural asset as well as being essential to food safety, and these aspects can be put at risk if food safety concerns motivate consumers to purchase more imported foods.In this paper, we also discuss good experiences in food safety management from other countries and draw lessons learnt for Vietnam on how to better deal with the current food safety situation.

  9. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    Niels Dupont

    2013-01-01

    CERN Safety rules and Radiation Protection at CMS The CERN Safety rules are defined by the Occupational Health & Safety and Environmental Protection Unit (HSE Unit), CERN’s institutional authority and central Safety organ attached to the Director General. In particular the Radiation Protection group (DGS-RP1) ensures that personnel on the CERN sites and the public are protected from potentially harmful effects of ionising radiation linked to CERN activities. The RP Group fulfils its mandate in collaboration with the CERN departments owning or operating sources of ionising radiation and having the responsibility for Radiation Safety of these sources. The specific responsibilities concerning "Radiation Safety" and "Radiation Protection" are delegated as follows: Radiation Safety is the responsibility of every CERN Department owning radiation sources or using radiation sources put at its disposition. These Departments are in charge of implementing the requi...

  10. Modeling the hospital safety partnership preferences of patients and their families: a discrete choice conjoint experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunningham CE

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Charles E Cunningham,1 Tracy Hutchings,2 Jennifer Henderson,2 Heather Rimas,1 Yvonne Chen1 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Michael G DeGroote School of Medicine, McMaster University, 2Department of Quality and Performance, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, ON, Canada Background: Patients and their families play an important role in efforts to improve health service safety. Objective: The objective of this study is to understand the safety partnership preferences of patients and their families. Method: We used a discrete choice conjoint experiment to model the safety partnership preferences of 1,084 patients or those such as parents acting on their behalf. Participants made choices between hypothetical safety partnerships composed by experimentally varying 15 four-level partnership design attributes. Results: Participants preferred an approach to safety based on partnerships between patients and staff rather than a model delegating responsibility for safety to hospital staff. They valued the opportunity to participate in point of service safety partnerships, such as identity and medication double checks, that might afford an immediate risk reduction. Latent class analysis yielded two segments. Actively engaged participants (73.3% comprised outpatients with higher education, who anticipated more benefits to safety partnerships, were more confident in their ability to contribute, and were more intent on participating. They were more likely to prefer a personal engagement strategy, valued scientific evidence, preferred a more active approach to safety education, and advocated disclosure of errors. The passively engaged segment (26.7% anticipated fewer benefits, were less confident in their ability to contribute, and were less intent on participating. They were more likely to prefer an engagement strategy based on signage. They preferred that staff explain why they thought patients should help

  11. Management of malignant biliary obstruction: Technical and clinical results using an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene fluorinated ethylene propylene (ePTFE/FEP)-covered metallic stent after 6-year experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanelli, Fabrizio; Orgera, Gianluigi; Bezzi, Mario; Rossi, Plinio; Allegritti, Massimiliano; Passariello, Roberto [University of Rome, Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene-fluorinated ethylene-propylene (ePTFE/FEP)-covered metallic stent in the management of malignant biliary obstruction. Eighty consecutive patients with malignant common bile duct strictures were treated by placement of 83 covered metallic stents. The stent-graft consists of an inner ePTFE/FEP lining and an outer supporting structure of nitinol wire. Clinical evaluation, assessment of serum bilirubin and liver enzyme levels were analyzed before biliary drainage, before stent-graft placement and during the follow-up period at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Technical success was obtained in all cases. After a mean follow-up of 6.9{+-}4.63 months, the 30-day mortality rate was 14.2%. Survival rates were 40% and 20.2% at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Stent-graft patency rates were 95.5%, 92.6% and 85.7% at 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively. Complications occurred in five patients (6.4%); among these, acute cholecystitis was observed in three patients (3.8%). A stent-graft occlusion rate of 9% was observed. The percentage of patients undergoing lifetime palliation (91%) and the midterm patency rate suggest that placement of this ePTFE/FEP-covered stent-graft is safe and highly effective in achieving biliary drainage in patients with malignant strictures of the common bile duct. (orig.)

  12. Safety concept of high-temperature reactors based on the experience with AVR and THTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachholz, Winfried; Kroeger, Wolfgang

    1990-01-01

    In the Federal Republic of Germany a reactor is considered safe if verification has been furnished that the requirements contained in paragraph 7 of the Federal German Atomic Energy Act are met for this reactor: demonstration of sufficient precautions against damage required according to the actual state of the art, and especially compliance with the dose rate limits for normal operation and accidental conditions. These requirements result in a deterministic multi-stage safety concept with specified requirements for the engineered safety systems. In recent years, proposals for enhanced safety of nuclear power reactors or a radical change in safety philosophy have been made. This is characterised by 'inherently safe', 'super safe' and similar slogans. A quantitative definition of these requirements has not yet been established, but it is clear as a common objective that the event of beyond design basis accidents evacuation, relocation, and large scale contamination of ground should not occur. As a consequence of the Chernobyl accident the safety of all the NPPs in Germany has been reviewed. This analysis was completed for the THTR reactor in 1988. The same has been done for AVR reactor. The final evaluation of the HTR specific safety features have been fully confirmed. The HTR concepts under development are based on this experience. The HTR-Modul unit is currently being designed

  13. International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments - ICSBEP (DVD), Version 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (CSBEP) was initiated in October of 1992 by the United States Department of Energy. The project quickly became an international effort as scientists from other interested countries became involved. The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) became an official activity of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in 1995. This handbook contains criticality safety benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments performed at various nuclear critical experiment facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by criticality safety engineers to validate calculational techniques used to establish minimum subcritical margins for operations with fissile material and to determine criticality alarm requirement and placement. Many of the specifications are also useful for nuclear data testing. Example calculations are presented; however, these calculations do not constitute a validation of the codes or cross section data. The evaluated criticality safety benchmark data are given in nine volumes. These volumes span nearly 66,000 pages and contain 558 evaluations with benchmark specifications for 4,798 critical, near critical or subcritical configurations, 24 criticality alarm placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each and 200 configurations that have been categorised as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications. New to the Handbook are benchmark specifications for Critical, Bare, HEU(93.2)- Metal Sphere experiments referred to as ORSphere that were performed by a team of experimenters at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the early 1970's. A photograph of this assembly is shown on the front cover

  14. DASHBOARDS AND CONTROL CHARTS. EXPERIENCES IN IMPROVING SAFETY AT HANFORD WASHINGTON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PREVETTE, S.S.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the integration of safety methodology, quality tools, leadership, and teamwork at Hanford and their significant positive impact on safe performance of work. Dashboards, Leading Indicators, Control charts, Pareto Charts, Dr. W. Edward Deming's Red Bead Experiment, and Dr. Deming's System of Profound Knowledge have been the principal tools and theory of an integrated management system. Coupled with involved leadership and teamwork, they have led to significant improvements in worker safety and protection, and environmental restoration at one of the nation's largest nuclear cleanup sites

  15. Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This annual report of the Senior Inspector for the Nuclear Safety, analyses the nuclear safety at EDF for the year 1999 and proposes twelve subjects of consideration to progress. Five technical documents are also provided and discussed concerning the nuclear power plants maintenance and safety (thermal fatigue, vibration fatigue, assisted control and instrumentation of the N4 bearing, 1300 MW reactors containment and time of life of power plants). (A.L.B.)

  16. Radiofrequency ablation of small hepatocellular carcinoma : early experience of efficacy and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Dongil; Lim, Hyo Keun; Kim, Seung Hoon; And Others

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the treatment of small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Forty-four patients with 51 HCCs underwent ultrasound guided RF ablation using expandable needle electrodes and monopolar RF generator. The patients were not considered suitable candidates for surgery or declined this option, and had no history of previous treatment. Mean tumor diameter was 2.5 cm (range, 1.0-4.0 cm). Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by means of three-phase helical computed tomography (CT) performed at least one month after the completion of ablation. The recurrence rate was also evaluated by follow-up CT at least four months after treatment. Using RF ablation, complete necrosis was achieved in 48 of 51 tumors (94%). Among 20 patients in whom follow-up CT was performed at least four months after ablation, one (5%) showed marginal recurrence and in another (5%) there was recurrence in remote liver parenchyma. We experienced neither procedure-related mortality nor major complications which required specific treatment. Three minor complications (one small pneumothorax and two cases of intraperitoneal bleeding) occurred, but these disappeared without specific treatment. RF ablation using an expandable needle electrode showed a high rate of complete necrosis and a low rate of complications. The technique is therefore considered effective and safe for the local control of small HCCs. (author)

  17. Midterm to long-term safety and efficacy of self-expandable nitinol stent implantation for coarctation of aorta in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji Zeinali, Ali Mohammad; Sadeghian, Mohammad; Qureshi, Shakeel A; Ghazi, Payam

    2017-09-01

    Endovascular treatment of coarctation of aorta (CoA) by self-expandable Nitinol stents is one of the recognized treatment methods and may be an alternative to surgery or balloon-expandable stent implantation for CoA but there is little information about midterm to long term results of self-expandable stents. Sixty-two patients with CoA (40 men), with a mean age of 30.7 ± 11 years, (range 17-63 years) underwent stent implantation with Optimed self-expandable Nitinol stents between 2005 and 2014. Successful outcome was defined as peak systolic pressure gradient ≤20 mmHg after stent implantation. The patients were followed-up clinically and by echocardiography and in patients, in whom there was suspicion of recoarctation, CT angiography or recatheterization was performed. 65 stents were successfully implanted in all 62 patients. Peak systolic pressure gradient decreased from mean 62.4 ± 18 mmHg (range 35-100 mmHg) to mean 2.8 ± 5 mmHg (range 0-15 mmHg; P Stent displacement occurred in 3 patients during the procedure. These were managed successfully by an overlapping second stent. None of the patients had major complications such as aortic dissection, rupture, or vascular access problems. In follow up, only three patients had recoarctation, and two of these were managed successfully by balloon redilation or further stenting 16 and 18 months after the first procedure and one patient refused reintervention. There were two deaths, unrelated to the procedure, 12 and 78 months after the initial intervention. Follow-up of a mean of 45.5 ± 17 months (range 12-105 months) demonstrated no evidence of aneurysm formation or stent fracture. Self-expandable nitinol stents for the treatment of native and recurrent CoA is safe and has good efficacy with acceptable midterm to long-term outcome. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Expanding cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Lasse

    A number of cities in Africa experience very rapid spatial growth without the benefit of a systematic process of planning and implementation of planning decisions. This process has challenged the road and transport system, created high levels of congestion, and hampered mobility and accessibility...... to both central and new peripheral areas. This paper reports on studies carried out in Accra and Dar es Salaam to address and link 1) mobility practices of residents, 2) local strategies for ‘post-settlement’ network extension, and 3) the city-wide performance of the transport system. The studies draw...... in advance. However, such solutions are often impeded by costly and cumbersome land-acquisition processes, and because of the reactive and often piecemeal approach to infrastructure extensions, the development will often be more costly. Moreover, the lack of compliance to a city-wide development plan...

  19. Recent performance experience with US light water reactor self-actuating safety and relief valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, C.G.

    1996-12-01

    Over the past several years, there have been a number of operating reactor events involving performance of primary and secondary safety and relief valves in U.S. Light Water Reactors. There are several different types of safety and relief valves installed for overpressure protection of various safety systems throughout a typical nuclear power plant. The following discussion is limited to those valves in the reactor coolant systems (RCS) and main steam systems of pressurized water reactors (PWR) and in the RCS of boiling water reactors (BWR), all of which are self-actuating having a setpoint controlled by a spring-loaded disk acting against system fluid pressure. The following discussion relates some of the significant recent experience involving operating reactor events or various testing data. Some of the more unusual and interesting operating events or test data involving some of these designs are included, in addition to some involving a number of similar events and those which have generic applicability.

  20. Safety and operating experience at EBR-II: lessons for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.; Golden, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    EBR-II is a small LMFBR power plant that has performed safely and reliably for 16 years. Much has been learned from operating it to facilitate the design, licensing, and operation of large commercial LMFBR power plants in the US. EBR-II has been found relatively easy to keep in conformity with evolving safety requirements, largely because of inherent safety features of the plant. Such features reduce dependence on active safety systems to protect against accidents. EBR-II has experienced a number of plant-transient incidents, some planned, others inadvertent; none has resulted in any significant plant damage. The operating experience with EBR-II has led to the formulation of an Operational Reliability Test Program (ORTP), aimed at showing inherently safe performance of fuel and plant systems

  1. HACCP and water safety plans in Icelandic water supply: preliminary evaluation of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsdóttir, María J; Gissurarson, Loftur R

    2008-09-01

    Icelandic waterworks first began implementing hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP) as a preventive approach for water safety management in 1997. Since then implementation has been ongoing and currently about 68% of the Icelandic population enjoy drinking water from waterworks with a water safety plan based on HACCP. Preliminary evaluation of the success of HACCP implementation was undertaken in association with some of the waterworks that had implemented HACCP. The evaluation revealed that compliance with drinking water quality standards improved considerably following the implementation of HACCP. In response to their findings, waterworks implemented a large number of corrective actions to improve water safety. The study revealed some limitations for some, but not all, waterworks in relation to inadequate external and internal auditing and a lack of oversight by health authorities. Future studies should entail a more comprehensive study of the experience with the use of HACCP with the purpose of developing tools to promote continuing success.

  2. Expanding horizons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dear Friends, The debate of whether Stem Cell Therapy is a hype or hope has been raging for quite some time and has been rekindled in the current year. Stem Cell Scientists have been particularly enthused by the bold standard taken by Barack Obama in passing an Executive Order that lifted the ban on federal funding of Research on Embryonic Stem Cell (ESC lines created after August 9, 2001. With the lifting of the ban more money is expected to be poured into ESC and Stem Cell Research in general and this augurs well for this emerging science. This is hope. Amariglio et al have reported the occurrence of a multifocal brain tumor in a boy with ataxia telengectasia four years after he was treated with intracerebella and intrathecal injection of human fetal neural stem cells. Molecular and Cytogenetic studies showed that the tumor was of non host origin raising the possibility of it being derived from transplanted neural stem cell. This is the first report of a donor-derived brain tumor in neural stem cell therapy and opens a Pandora’s Box of questions about the safety of such therapies. This signifies the hype surrounding the therapy. However controversies are a part of any emerging science. Our goals should be to march forward conducting our research under strict ethical principles and rigorous oversight, ironing out even minor flaws, always being on the lookout for adverse events and identifying ways and means of preventing their occurrence in future. JSRM has been in receipt of six articles, which speaks well for the interest people have for stem cell science in general and our journal in particular. The articles we have received for this edition of JSRM cover all aspects necessary for a science. Rosen et al have described the percentage variation of adipose stromal cells isolated from two different inbred mouse strains and Bhonde et al have reported the existence of multipotent stem cells in human fallopian tube. If cells can be identified

  3. "Nursing Students Assaulted": Considering Student Safety in Community-Focused Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneval, Rhonda E; Kurz, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Community nursing experiences for undergraduate students have progressed beyond community-based home visits to a wide array of community-focused experiences in neighborhood-based centers, clinics, shelters, and schools. Our Bachelor of Science in Nursing program chose to use sites situated within neighborhoods close to campus in order to promote student and faculty engagement in the local community. These neighborhood sites provide opportunities for students to deliver nursing services to underserved and vulnerable populations experiencing poverty and health disparities. Some of these neighborhoods are designated as high crime areas that may potentially increase the risk of harm to students and faculty. There is a need to acknowledge the risk to personal safety and to proactively create policies and guidelines to reduce potential harm to students engaged in community-focused experiences. When a group of baccalaureate nursing students was assaulted while walking to a neighborhood clinic, the faculty was challenged as how to respond given the lack of policies and guidelines. Through our experience, we share strategies to promote personal safety for students and recommend transparency by administrators regarding potential safety risks to students engaged in community-focused fieldwork activities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Recommended nuclear criticality safety experiments in support of the safe transportation of fissile material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tollefson, D.A.; Elliott, E.P.; Dyer, H.R.; Thompson, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    Validation of computer codes and nuclear data (cross-section) libraries using benchmark quality critical (or certain subcritical) experiments is an essential part of a nuclear criticality safety evaluation. The validation results establish the credibility of the calculational tools for use in evaluating a particular application. Validation of the calculational tools is addressed in several American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society (ANSI/ANS) standards, with ANSI/ANS-8.1 being the most relevant. Documentation of the validation is a required part of all safety analyses involving significant quantities of fissile materials. In the case of transportation of fissile materials, the safety analysis report for packaging (SARP) must contain a thorough discussion of benchmark experiments, detailing how the experiments relate to the significant packaging and contents materials (fissile, moderating, neutron absorbing) within the package. The experiments recommended in this paper are needed to address certain areas related to transportation of unirradiated fissile materials in drum-type containers (packagings) for which current data are inadequate or are lacking

  5. "My World Has Expanded Even Though I'm Stuck at Home": Experiences of Individuals With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication and Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Jessica; Light, Janice

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to expand the current understanding of how persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (pALS) use augmentative and alternative communication and social media to address their communication needs. An online focus group was used to investigate the experiences of 9 pALS who use augmentative and alternative communication and social media. Questions posed to the group related to (a) current use of social media, (b) advantages of social media, (c) barriers to independent use, (d) supports to independent use, and (e) recommendations for developers, policy makers, and other pALS. Participants primarily reported that use of social media was a beneficial tool that provided increased communication opportunities, connections to communication partners, and networks of support. Specific results are discussed with reference to the research as well as implications for practice and recommendations for future research. As individuals with ALS experience loss of function, some communication modes may no longer be viable. Providing access to different modes of communication, including social media, can allow independence, participation and better quality of life.

  6. Playing it safe: Patron safety strategies and experience of violence in night-time entertainment districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Droste, Nicolas; Curtis, Ashlee; Zinkiewicz, Lucy; Miller, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Incidences of violence are elevated in night-time entertainment districts. Research suggests that safety-related behavioural strategies adopted while drinking can reduce negative alcohol-related outcomes. The current study investigates the use of safety strategies and its association with experiences of violence among patrons from the general population. Patron interviews (N = 3949) were conducted in and around licenced venues in Newcastle (New South Wales) and Geelong (Victoria) during peak trading hours (Friday and Saturday, 21:00-01:00 h). Participants (mean age = 24.3, SD = 5.8; male 54.4%) were asked to report what measures, if any, they used to keep safe when drinking and whether they had been involved in a violent incident in the last 12 months. After controlling for patron demographics and location, the use of multiple (more than one) safety strategies was significantly associated with reduced odds of involvement in a violent incident (odds ratio = 0.64, 95% confidence interval 0.49-0.85, P = 0.002). Significant gender differences were observed in the number and type of safety strategies reported. Increasing the number of safety-related behaviours during drinking occasions is associated with a small but significant reduction in experiencing alcohol-related harms, such as violence. [Zhou J, Droste N, Curtis A, Zinkiewicz L, Miller P. Playing it safe: Patron safety strategies and experience of violence in night-time entertainment districts. © 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  7. Regulatory Experience on Safety Smart Transmitter's CCF of SKN 3 and 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. M.; Jeong, C. H. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Smart transmitters are digital I and C equipment which can replace analog transmitters. Non safety grade smart transmitters have been used for I and C systems of NPP(Nuclear Power Plant).. But, recently, smart transmitters have been used for safety grade I and C systems as well as non-safety grade I and C system for SKN 3 and 4. Smart transmitters execute measuring sensor values, generating output signals and adjusting range using software. Also, smart transmitters are basically capable of remote calibration through digital communication. The operating capability is more reliable and effective with remote calibration of smart transmitters, but there is potential vulnerability that causes the result no one wanted such as cyber attacks or software CCF. This paper addresses our regulatory experiences how to evaluate safety smart transmitter's CCF of SKN 3 and 4. Nuclear I and C equipment have increased the use on digital technology in safety system. According that, interest in a postulated software CCF is increasing. The software may be firmware or operating system of digital equipment. During SKN 3 and 4 operating license process, safety grade smart transmitter's adequacy was reviewed such as software V and V processes and equipment qualification. Also, it was analyzed that effect of the software CCFs of smart transmitters under DBA condition. Main concern was whether the postulated smart transmitter's software CCF may lead to an adverse safety consequence. We have future research plan to execute proof tests about our concerns and develop regulatory guide for smart transmitters.

  8. Dry critical experiments and analyses performed in support of the Topaz-2 Safety Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelowitz, D.B.; Sapir, J.; Glushkov, E.S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Bubelev, V.G.; Kompanietz, G.B.; Krutov, A.M.; Polyakov, D.N.; Loynstev, V.A.

    1994-01-01

    In December 1991, the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization decided to investigate the possibility of launching a Russian Topaz-2 space nuclear power system. Functional safety requirements developed for the Topaz mission mandated that the reactor remain subcritical when flooded and immersed in water. Initial experiments and analyses performed in Russia and the United States indicated that the reactor could potentially become supercritical in several water- or sand-immersion scenarios. Consequently, a series of critical experiments was performed on the Narciss M-II facility at the Kurchatov Institute to measure the reactivity effects of water and sand immersion, to quantify the effectiveness of reactor modifications proposed to preclude criticality, and to benchmark the calculational methods and nuclear data used in the Topaz-2 safety analyses. In this paper we describe the Narciss M-II experimental configurations along with the associated calculational models and methods. We also present and compare the measured and calculated results for the dry experimental configurations

  9. Integrated, digital experiment transient control and safety protection of an in-pile test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.W.; Whitacre, R.F.; Klingler, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    The Sodium Loop Safety Facility experimental program has demonstrated that in-pile loop fuel failure transient tests can be digitally controlled and protected with reliability and precision. This was done in four nuclear experiments conducted in the Engineering Test Reactor operated by EG and G Idaho, Inc., at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Loop sodium flow and reactor power transients can be programmed to sponsor requirements and verified prior to the test. Each controller has redundancy, which reduces the effect of single failures occurring during test transients. Feedback and reject criteria are included in the reactor power control. Timed sequencing integrates the initiation of the controllers, programmed safety set-points, and other experiment actions (e.g., planned scram). Off-line and on-line testing is included. Loss-of-flow, loss-of-piping-integrity, boiling-window, transient-overpower, and local fault tests have been successfully run using this system

  10. The use of SIPA 2 simulator for safety studies experience feedbacks and future developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumas, J.M.; Leteinturier, D.

    1999-01-01

    SIPA 2 experience feedbacks from the beginning of its use at IPSN in 1991 and trends for the next five years are presented. The simulator has been used for three applications: training of engineers working in safety analysis, preparation of national crisis drills, safety studies. In each application, experience feedbacks are analysed to show encountered advantages and difficulties. Trends for the next five years are: extension of the engineer training program (new training courses about normal operating conditions or about beyond design basis accidents), improvements in the validation of simulation configurations (in particular comparison with Cathare 2 new version results) increase of the simulation scope in connection with the SCAR project (taking into account the current power plant datapackage, the improvement of thermalhydraulic models, the extent of the system representation, new neutronic models and description of severe accident conditions). For each trend above, a detail of the planned actions is given. (author)

  11. PReSaFe: A model of barriers and facilitators to patients providing feedback on experiences of safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Brún, Aoife; Heavey, Emily; Waring, Justin; Dawson, Pamela; Scott, Jason

    2017-08-01

    The importance of involving patients in reporting on safety is increasingly recognized. Whilst studies have identified barriers to clinician incident reporting, few have explored barriers and facilitators to patient reporting of safety experiences. This paper explores patient perspectives on providing feedback on safety experiences. Patients (n=28) were invited to take part in semi-structured interviews when given a survey about their experiences of safety following hospital discharge. Transcripts were thematically analysed using NVivo10. Patients were recruited from four hospitals in the UK. Three themes were identified as barriers and facilitators to patient involvement in providing feedback on their safety experiences. The first, cognitive-cultural, found that whilst safety was a priority for most, some felt the term was not relevant to them because safety was the "default" position, and/or because safety could not be disentangled from the overall experience of care. The structural-procedural theme indicated that reporting was facilitated when patients saw the process as straightforward, but that disinclination or perceived inability to provide feedback was a barrier. Finally, learning and change illustrated that perception of the impact of feedback could facilitate or inhibit reporting. When collecting patient feedback on experiences of safety, it is important to consider what may help or hinder this process, beyond the process alone. We present a staged model of prerequisite barriers and facilitators and hypothesize that each stage needs to be achieved for patients to provide feedback on safety experiences. Implications for collecting meaningful data on patients' safety experiences are considered. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Simulation experiments concerning functioning tests of technical safety devices with process computers. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawickhorst, W.

    1976-12-01

    Computerized inspection techniques of engineered safety systems improve the diagnosis capability, relative to the presently used techniques, even if anticipated system disturbances can only be qualitatively predicted. To achieve this, the system to be inspected must be partitioned into small subsystems, which can be treated independently from each other. This report contains the formulation of a standardized inspection concept based on system decomposition. Its performance is discussed by means of simulation experiments. (orig.) [de

  13. Current MitraClip experience, safety and feasibility in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Rahhab, Z.; Kortlandt, F.A.; Velu, J.F.; Schurer, R.A.J.; Delgado, V.; Tonino, P.; Boven, A.J. van; Branden, B.J.L. Van den; Kraaijeveld, A.O.; Voskuil, M.; Hoorntje, J.; Wely, M.H. van; Houwelingen, K. van; Bleeker, G.B.; Rensing, B.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Data on MitraClip procedural safety and efficacy in the Netherlands are scarce. We aim to provide an overview of the Dutch MitraClip experience. METHODS: We pooled anonymised demographic and procedural data of 1151 consecutive MitraClip patients, from 13 Dutch hospitals. Data was collected by product specialists in collaboration with local operators. Effect on mitral regurgitation was intra-procedurally assessed by transoesophageal echocardiography. Technical success and device succe...

  14. Safety Research Experiment Facilities, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. Draft environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This environmental statement was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) in support of the Energy Research and Development Administration's (ERDA) proposal for legislative authorization and appropriations for the Safety Research Experiment Facilities (SAREF) Project. The purpose of the proposed project is to modify some existing facilities and provide a new test facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for conducting fast breeder reactor (FBR) safety experiments. The SAREF Project proposal has been developed after an extensive study which identified the FBR safety research needs requiring in-reactor experiments and which evaluated the capability of various existing and new facilities to meet these needs. The proposed facilities provide for the in-reactor testing of large bundles of prototypical FBR fuel elements under a wide variety of conditions, ranging from those abnormal operating conditions which might be expected to occur during the life of an FBR power plant to the extremely low probability, hypothetical accidents used in the evalution of some design options and in the assessment of the long-term potential risk associated with wide-scale deployment of the FBR

  15. Fusion integral experiments and analysis and the determination of design safety factors - I: Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssef, M.Z.; Kumar, A.; Abdou, M.A.; Oyama, Y.; Maekawa, H.

    1995-01-01

    The role of the neutronics experimentation and analysis in fusion neutronics research and development programs is discussed. A new methodology was developed to arrive at estimates to design safety factors based on the experimental and analytical results from design-oriented integral experiments. In this methodology, and for a particular nuclear response, R, a normalized density function (NDF) is constructed from the prediction uncertainties, and their associated standard deviations, as found in the various integral experiments where that response, R, is measured. Important statistical parameters are derived from the NDF, such as the global mean prediction uncertainty, and the possible spread around it. The method of deriving safety factors from many possible NDFs based on various calculational and measuring methods (among other variants) is also described. Associated with each safety factor is a confidence level, designers may choose to have, that the calculated response, R, will not exceed (or will not fall below) the actual measured value. An illustrative example is given on how to construct the NDFs. The methodology is applied in two areas, namely the line-integrated tritium production rate and bulk shielding integral experiments. Conditions under which these factors could be derived and the validity of the method are discussed. 72 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs

  16. First start-up of nuclear criticality safety experiment facility for uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Qingfu; Shi Yongqian; Shen Leisheng; Hu Dingsheng; Zhao Shouzhi; He Tao; Sun Zheng; Lin Shenghuo; Yao Shigui

    2005-01-01

    The uranyl nitrate solution experiment facility for the research on nuclear criticality safety is described. The nuclear fuel loading steps in the first start-up for water-reflected core are presented. During the experiments, the critical volume of uranyl nitrate solution was determined as 20479.62 mL with count rate inverse extrapolation method, reactivity interpolation method, and steady power method. By calculation, critical mass of 235 U was derived as 1579.184 g from experimental data. The worth of control rods was also calibrated in the first start-up of the facility. (authors)

  17. Food Safety and Sustainable Nutrition Workshops: Educational Experiences for Primary School Children in Turin, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traversa, Amaranta; Adriano, Daniela; Bellio, Alberto; Bianchi, Daniela Manila; Gallina, Silvia; Ippolito, Clara; Romano, Angelo; Durelli, Paola; Pezzana, Andrea; Decastelli, Lucia

    2017-01-24

    European control and prevention policies are focused to guarantee a high level of protection of consumers' health. Food-borne diseases as obesity, diabetes, food allergy, and food-borne outbreaks are increasing. To prevent food-borne diseases, it is fundamental to involve consumers, in particular children, in educational experiences aimed to learn the proper behaviours to be applied. In this context, we designed and performed 5 educational workshops about food safety, hidden allergens in food and nutrition aimed to involve children attending primary and summer school. These experiences let us collect observations about children knowledge and behaviours. From May to October 2015, a total of 1708 children aged 6 to 11 years joined our workshops. Children were involved in listening activities, laboratory experiments, handling games and sensory experiences. All participants were familiar with food allergy and were interested to know how to behave with allergic people. Children showed great curiosity in discovering that many foods normally contain live bacteria. Less than 25% of children reported to skip breakfast, to have it watching TV or to spend few minutes for it. Many of them (>75%) thought that fruits and vegetables are all year-round available and are not related to a specific period. Very few participants (food safety and nutrition educational experiences have the opportunity to increase their awareness about the correct behaviours to prevent food-borne diseases and to improve their own critical thinking about food consumption.

  18. Ultrasonic thermometry system for measuring very high temperatures in reactor safety experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Sullivan, W.H.; Plein, H.G.; Kerley, T.M.

    1979-06-01

    Ultrasonic thermometry has many potential applications in reactor safety experiments, where extremely high temperatures and lack of visual access may preclude the use of conventional diagnostics. This report details ultrasonic thermometry requirements for one such experiment, the molten fuel pool experiment. Sensors, transducers, and signal processing electronics are described in detail. Axial heat transfer in the sensors is modelled and found acceptably small. Measurement errors, calculations of their effect, and ways to minimize them are given. A rotating sensor concept is discussed which holds promise of alleviating sticking problems at high temperature. Applications of ultrasonic thermometry to three in-core experiments are described. In them, five 10-mm-length sensor elements were used to measure axial temperatures in a UO 2 or UO 2 -steel system fission-heated to about 2860 0 C

  19. [Towards a safety culture in the neonatal unit: Six years experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esqué Ruiz, M T; Moretones Suñol, M G; Rodríguez Miguélez, J M; Parés Tercero, S; Cortés Albuixech, R; Varón Ramírez, E M; Figueras Aloy, J

    2015-10-01

    A safety culture is the collective effort of an institution to direct its resources toward the goal of safety. An analysis is performed on the six years of experience of the Committee on the Safety of Neonatal Patient. A mailbox was created for the declaration of adverse events, and measures for their correction were devised, such as case studies, continuous education, prevention of nosocomial infections, as well as information on the work done and its assessment. A total of 1287 reports of adverse events were received during the six years, of which 600 (50.8%) occurred in the neonatal ICU, with 15 (1.2%) contributing to death, and 1282 (99.6%) considered preventable. Simple corrective measures (notification, security alerts, etc.) were applied in 559 (43.4%), intermediate measures (protocols, monthly newsletter, etc.) in 692 (53.8%), and more complex measures (causal analysis, scripts, continuous education seminars, prospective studies, etc.) in 66 (5.1%). As regards nosocomial infections, the prevention strategies implemented (hand washing, insertion and maintenance of catheters) directly affected their improvement. Two surveys were conducted to determine the level of satisfaction with the Committee on the Safety of Neonatal Patient. A rating 7.5/10 was obtained in the local survey, while using the Spanish version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture the rate was 7.26/10. A path to a culture of safety has been successfully started and carried out. Reporting the adverse events is the key to obtaining information on their nature, etiology and evolution, and to undertake possible prevention strategies. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. The New Nitinol Conformable Self-Expandable Metal Stents for Malignant Colonic Obstruction: A Pilot Experience as Bridge to Surgery Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Di Mitri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Self-expandable metal stents (SEMS are a nonsurgical option for treatment of malignant colorectal obstruction also as a bridge to surgery approach. The new nitinol conformable stent has improved clinical outcomes in these kinds of patients. We report a pilot experience with nitinol conformable SEMS placement as bridge to surgery treatment in patients with colorectal obstruction. Materials and Methods. Between April and August 2012, we collected data on colonic nitinol conformable SEMS placement in a cohort of consecutive symptomatic patients, with malignant colorectal obstruction, who were treated as a bridge to surgery. Technical success, clinical success, and adverse events were recorded. Results. Ten patients (7 male (70%, with a mean age of 69.2 ± 10.1, were evaluated. The mean length of the stenosis was 3.6 ± 0.6 cm. Five patients (50% were treated on an emergency basis. The median time from stent placement to surgery was 16 days (interquartile range 7–21. Technical and clinical success was achieved in all patients with a significant early improvement of symptoms. No adverse events due to the SEMS placement were observed. Conclusion. This pilot study confirmed the important role of nitinol conformable SEMS as a bridge to surgery option in the treatment of symptomatic malignant colorectal obstruction.

  1. Percutaneous implantation of self-expandable aortic valve in high risk patients with severe aortic stenosis: The first experiences in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedeljković Milan A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Aortic stenosis (AS is the most common valvular heart disease in elderly people, with rather poor prognosis in symptomatic patients. Surgical valve replacement is the therapy of choice, but a significant number of patients cannot undergo surgical procedure. We presented initial experience of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI performed in Catheterization Laboratory of the Clinic for Cardiology, Clinical Center of Serbia. Methods. The procedures were performed in 5 patients (mean age 76 ± 6 years, 2 males, 3 female with severe and symptomatic AS with contraindication to surgery or high surgical risk. The decision to perform TAVI was made by the heart team. Pre-procedure screening included detailed clinical and echocardiographic evaluation, coronary angiography and computed tomography scan. In all the patients we implanted a self-expandable aortic valve (Core Valve, Medtronic, USA. Six months follow-up was available for all the patients. Results. All interventions were successfully performed without significant periprocedural complications. Immediate hemodynamic improvement was obtained in all the patients (peak gradient 94.2 ± 27.6 to 17.6 ± 5.2 mmHg, p < 0.001, mean pressure gradient 52.8 ± 14.5 to 8.0 ± 2.1 mmHg, p < 0.001. None of the patients developed heart block, stroke, vascular complication or significant aortic regurgitation. After 6 months, the survival was 100% with New York Heart Association (NYHA functional improvement in all the patients. Conclusion. This successful initial experience provides a solid basis to treat larger number of patients with symptomatic AS and high surgical risk who are left untreated. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON 175 020

  2. Large-Scale Spacecraft Fire Safety Experiments in ISS Resupply Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Gary A.; Urban, David

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the fire safety risk in manned spacecraft has been limited by the small scale of the testing we have been able to conduct in low-gravity. Fire growth and spread cannot be expected to scale linearly with sample size so we cannot make accurate predictions of the behavior of realistic scale fires in spacecraft based on the limited low-g testing to date. As a result, spacecraft fire safety protocols are necessarily very conservative and costly. Future crewed missions are expected to be longer in duration than previous exploration missions outside of low-earth orbit and accordingly, more complex in terms of operations, logistics, and safety. This will increase the challenge of ensuring a fire-safe environment for the crew throughout the mission. Based on our fundamental uncertainty of the behavior of fires in low-gravity, the need for realistic scale testing at reduced gravity has been demonstrated. To address this concern, a spacecraft fire safety research project is underway to reduce the uncertainty and risk in the design of spacecraft fire safety systems by testing at nearly full scale in low-gravity. This project is supported by the NASA Advanced Exploration Systems Program Office in the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. The activity of this project is supported by an international topical team of fire experts from other space agencies to maximize the utility of the data and to ensure the widest possible scrutiny of the concept. The large-scale space flight experiment will be conducted on three missions; each in an Orbital Sciences Corporation Cygnus vehicle after it has deberthed from the ISS. Although the experiment will need to meet rigorous safety requirements to ensure the carrier vehicle does not sustain damage, the absence of a crew allows the fire products to be released into the cabin. The tests will be fully automated with the data downlinked at the conclusion of the test before the Cygnus vehicle reenters the

  3. AREVA advanced safety IC solutions and licensing experience for new nuclear builds and modernization projects - 15545

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourestie, B.; Pickelmann, J.; Richter, S.; Hilsenkopf, P.; Paris, P.

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory requirements for the Instrumentation and Control (IC) for Nuclear Power Plants have become significantly more stringent during the last 10 years in the areas of software development and qualification, traceability, diversity, or seismic requirements for instance, and with the introduction of new standards (such as the IEC 62566, or the IEC 62003). Based on a large and comprehensive experience gained from projects in several regulatory environments and different plant types (including non-OEM plants), AREVA has developed and adapted its processes and products to provide state-of-the-art IC solutions in full compliance with the regulatory demands and requirements in terms of robustness (independence, defense-in-depth, diversity and cyber-security). In this paper we present the safety IC platforms developed by AREVA. These platforms include TELEPERM XS as the computerized safety IC platform for class 1 system implementation, the Qualified Display System (QDS) for safety classified screen-based interface, and UNICORN as fully diverse analog safety IC platform for backup systems

  4. [Patient safety culture in hospitals: experiences in planning, organising and conducting a survey among hospital staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vegten, Amanda; Pfeiffer, Yvonne; Giuliani, Francesca; Manser, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the first hospital-wide survey on patient safety climate, involving all staff (medical and non-medical), in the German-speaking area. Its aim is to share our experiences with planning, organising and conducting this survey. The study was performed at the university hospital in Zurich and had a response rate of 46.8% (2,897 valid questionnaires). The survey instrument ("Patientensicherheitsklimainventar") was based on the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (AHRQ). Primarily it allowed for assessing the current patient safety climate as well as identifying specific areas for improvement and creating a hospital-wide awareness and acceptance for patient safety issues and interventions (e.g., the introduction of a Critical Incident Reporting System [CIRS]). We discuss the basic principles and the feedback concept guiding the organisation of the overall project. Critical to the success of this project were the guaranteed anonymity of the respondents, adequate communication through well-established channels within the organisation and the commitment of the management across all project phases. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  5. Performance improvement of the Annular Core Pulse Reactor for reactor safety experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuscher, J.A.; Pickard, P.S.

    1976-01-01

    The Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR) is a TRIGA type reactor which has been in operation at Sandia Laboratories since 1967. The reactor is utilized in a wide variety of experimental programs which include radiation effects, neutron radiography, activation analysis, and fast reactor safety. During the past several years, the ACPR has become an important experimental facility for the United States Fast Reactor Safety Research Program and questions of interest to the safety of the LMFBR are being addressed. In order to enhance the capabilities of the ACPR for reactor safety experiments, a project to improve the performance of the reactor was initiated. It is anticipated that the pulse fluence can be increased by a factor of 2.0 to 2.5 utilizing a two-region core concept with high heat capacity fuel elements around the central irradiation cavity. In addition, the steady-state power of the reactor will be increased by about a factor of two. The new features of the improvements are described

  6. Health and safety concerns os migrant workers: the experience of tunisian workers in modena, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faïçal Daly

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the relatively under-researched field of healthand safety of migrant workers, with special reference to Tunisian construction workers in the city of Modena in the Italian region of Emilia-Romagna. The empirical material comes from questionnaires and interviews with Tunisian migrants, plus smaller numbers of interviews with employers and trade union representatives in Modena. The paper starts by critically reviewing the scattered literature onthe health and safety of minority workers, most of which refers to the United States and the United Kingdom. The discussion then moves to a consideration of migrant health and safety questions in the contexts of racism, discrimination, social class, working conditions, labour market segmentation and (non- regulation. Specialattention is given to the failed role of trade unions in defending the rights of minority workers, in advanced countries generally and in Italy in particular. A case study is then made of the construction sector in Italy, enriched by personal accounts of the experiences of Tunisian migrant workers in Modena. Employer and tradeunion interviews reveal a lack of concern and ability to tackle the relevant issues. Barriers to health and safety awareness training are outlined. In the conclusion, recommendations are made for policy initiatives in this area.

  7. Experience relevant to safety obtained from reactor decommissioning operations in the French Atomic Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraudel, B.; Langlois, G.

    1979-01-01

    From among the nuclear facilities constructed in France the authors cite eight large reactors, ranging from critical assemblies to power reactors, that have been finally shut-down since 1965. A brief account is given of the way in which the various operations were carried out after the final control rod drop, a distinction being drawn between the shut-down proper and the containment and dismantling work. A description is also given, from the technical and regulatory standpoint, of the final stage attained, and mention is made of French safety arrangements and of the part played by the safety services during decommissioning operations. Among the lessons derived from French experience, the authors mention the completion of operations without any serious safety problems, and with guarantees for the protection of personnel and the population as a whole, by conventional techniques; the advantage of planning decommissioning operations from the very beginning of construction of the facilities; and the importance of filing descriptive documents. In view of the experience gained, the French Atomic Energy Commission has devised internal procedures for facilitating the application of regulations governing the shut-down and decommissioning phases, which are aimed at preserving surveillance procedures similar to those in force during normal operation. (author)

  8. Nuclear criticality safety experiments, calculations, and analyses: 1958 to 1982. Volume 1. Lookup tables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1982-01-01

    This compilation contains 688 complete summaries of papers on nuclear criticality safety as presented at meetings of the American Nuclear Society (ANS). The selected papers contain criticality parameters for fissile materials derived from experiments and calculations, as well as criticality safety analyses for fissile material processing, transport, and storage. The compilation was developed as a component of the Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) now under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The compilation is presented in two volumes: Volume 1 contains a directory to the ANS Transaction volume and page number where each summary was originally published, the author concordance, and the subject concordance derived from the keyphrases in titles. Volume 2 contains - in chronological order - the full-text summaries, reproduced here by permission of the American Nuclear Society from their Transactions, volumes 1-41

  9. Steam--water mixing in nuclear reactor safety loss-of-coolant experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naff, S.A.; Schwarz, W.F.

    1978-01-01

    Computer models used to predict the response of reactors to hypothesized accidents necessarily incorporate approximating assumptions. To verify the models by comparing predicted and measured responses in test facilities, these assumptions must be confirmed to be realistic. Recent experiments in facilities capable of repeatedly duplicating the transient behavior of a pressurized water reactor undergoing a pipe rupture show that the assumption of complete water-steam mixing during the transient results in the predicted decompression being faster than that observed. Water reactor safety studies currently in progress include programs aimed at the verification of computer models or ''codes'' used to predict reactor system responses to various hypothesized accidents. The approach is to compare code predictions of transients with the actual test transients in experimental facilities. The purpose of this paper is to explain an important instance in which predictions and data are not in complete agreement and to indicate the significance to water reactor safety studies

  10. Operational-safety advantages of LMFBR's: the EBR-II experience and testing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.; Lindsay, R.W.; Golden, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    LMFBR's contain many inherent characteristics that simplify control and improve operating safety and reliability. The EBR-II design is such that good advantage was taken of these characteristics, resulting in a vary favorable operating history and allowing for a program of off-normal testing to further demonstrate the safe response of LMFBR's to upsets. The experience already gained, and that expected from the future testing program, will contribute to further development of design and safety criteria for LMFBR's. Inherently safe characteristics are emphasized and include natural convective flow for decay heat removal, minimal need for emergency power and a large negative reactivity feedback coefficient. These characteristics at EBR-II allow for ready application of computer diagnosis and control to demonstrate their effectiveness in response to simulated plant accidents. This latter testing objective is an important part in improvements in the man-machine interface

  11. Safety of dual kidney transplantation compared to single kidney transplantation from expanded criteria donors: a single center cohort study of 39 recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, Lionel; Albano, Laetitia; Bentellis, Imad; Yandza, Thierry; Bernardi, Caroline; Quintens, Herve; Tibi, Brannwel; Jourdan, Jacques; Durand, Matthieu; Amiel, Jean; Chevallier, Daniel

    2018-05-17

    Our objective was to compare the outcomes of dual kidney transplanataion (DKT) to single kidney transplantation (SKT) performed with grafts from expanded criteria donors (ECD) in recipients ≥65 years, focusing on surgical complications. All kidney transplantations (KT) performed between 2006 and 2014 in our institution were analysed. DKT was indicated according to the criteria of the French national Agence de la Biomedecine. Thirty-nine DKT and 155 SKT were included, with a median follow-up of 36 and 26.5 months, respectively. The rate of early surgical revisions was not significantly higher after DKT (23.1% vs 15.5% (P = 0.2593)) but more venous graft thromboses (12.8% vs 3.2% (P = 0.02)) were reported. The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) 24 months after KT was significantly higher after DKT (45.0 ± 16.3 vs 39.8 ± 13.8 ml/min/1.73m 2 ; P = 0.04) and allowed shorter waiting time without a significant increased risk of surgical revision, excepted for venous graft thrombosis, more frequent after DKT. Graft survivals were not significantly different and GFR was higher after DKT. DKT seems to remain an appropriate strategy to address the growing graft shortage in elderly patients. © 2018 Steunstichting ESOT.

  12. Experience with nuclear safety standards development in non-governmental international organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, K.

    1985-01-01

    Besides the IAEA as a 'governmental' organization dealing with basic safety recommendations addressed primarily to the national regulatory bodies in developing countries, two closely related non-governmental international standards organizations have gained extensive experience in the field of nuclear standardization. Over more than 25 years since their formation, both (a) the International Organization for Standardization's (ISO) Technical Committee 85 'Nuclear Energy', in particular in its Sub-Committee 3 'Reactor Technology and Safety' and (b) the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) Technical Committee 45 'Nuclear Instrumentation' have published numerous standards. A brief review is given of these, draft standards, and other documents planned to become international standards. Many of them deal with rather specialized topics typical for 'industrial' standards such as standardized procedures, instruments, methods, materials, test methods, terminology, and signs and symbols, but others are directly related to more basic safety issues. In some areas such as quality assurance, seismic aspects of siting and terminology, there has been in the past occasional overlap in the activities of the NUSS programme, IEC and ISO. Letters of Understanding have since 1981 contributed to clarifying the borderlines and to avoiding redundant efforts. Also, some experiences and problems are described arising, for example, from the harmonization of different national safety philosophies and traditions into universally accepted international standards, and the transfer of international standards into national standards systems. Finally, based on a recent comprehensive compilation of some 3300 nuclear standards and standards projects, an attempt is made to present a cost/benefit analysis and an outlook on future developments. (author)

  13. Investigating the experiences of New Zealand MRI technologists: Exploring intra-orbital metallic foreign body safety practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, Philippa K; Henwood, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Qualitative research is lacking regarding the experiences of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologists and their involvement in workplace safety practices. This article provides a gateway to explore, describe and document experiences of MRI technologists in New Zealand (NZ) pertaining to intra-orbital metallic foreign body (IMFB) safety practices. This phenomenological study describes the experiences of seven MRI technologists all with a minimum of 5 years' NZ work experience in MRI. The MRI technologists were interviewed face-to-face regarding their professional IMFB workplace experiences in order to explore historical, current and potential issues. Findings demonstrated that aspects of organization and administration are fundamentally important to MRI technologists. Varying levels of education and knowledge, as well as experience and skills gained, have significantly impacted on MRI technologists’ level of confidence and control in IMFB practices. Participants’ descriptions of their experiences in practice regarding decision-making capabilities further highlight the complexity of these themes. A model was developed to demonstrate the interrelated nature of the themes and the complexity of the situation in totality. Findings of this study have provided insight into the experiences of MRI technologists pertaining to IMFB safety practices and highlighted inconsistencies. It is hoped that these findings will contribute to and improve the level of understanding of MRI technologists and the practices and protocols involved in IMFB safety screening. The scarcity of available literature regarding IMFB safety practices highlights that more research is required to investigate additional aspects that could improve MRI technologists’ experiences

  14. Investigating the experiences of New Zealand MRI technologists: Exploring intra-orbital metallic foreign body safety practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Philippa K [River Radiology, Victoria Clinic, 750 Victoria Street, Hamilton, Waikato (New Zealand); Henwood, Suzanne [Unitec - Medical Imaging, Unitec Ratanui Street Henderson, Auckland (New Zealand); River Radiology, Victoria Clinic, 750 Victoria Street, Hamilton, Waikato (New Zealand)

    2013-12-15

    Qualitative research is lacking regarding the experiences of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologists and their involvement in workplace safety practices. This article provides a gateway to explore, describe and document experiences of MRI technologists in New Zealand (NZ) pertaining to intra-orbital metallic foreign body (IMFB) safety practices. This phenomenological study describes the experiences of seven MRI technologists all with a minimum of 5 years' NZ work experience in MRI. The MRI technologists were interviewed face-to-face regarding their professional IMFB workplace experiences in order to explore historical, current and potential issues. Findings demonstrated that aspects of organization and administration are fundamentally important to MRI technologists. Varying levels of education and knowledge, as well as experience and skills gained, have significantly impacted on MRI technologists’ level of confidence and control in IMFB practices. Participants’ descriptions of their experiences in practice regarding decision-making capabilities further highlight the complexity of these themes. A model was developed to demonstrate the interrelated nature of the themes and the complexity of the situation in totality. Findings of this study have provided insight into the experiences of MRI technologists pertaining to IMFB safety practices and highlighted inconsistencies. It is hoped that these findings will contribute to and improve the level of understanding of MRI technologists and the practices and protocols involved in IMFB safety screening. The scarcity of available literature regarding IMFB safety practices highlights that more research is required to investigate additional aspects that could improve MRI technologists’ experiences.

  15. Safety Culture Assessment at Regulatory Body - PNRA Experience of Implementing IAEA Methodology for Safety Culture Self Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatti, S.A.N.; Arshad, N.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of a good safety culture is equally important for all kind of organizations involved in nuclear business including operating organizations, designers, regulator, etc., and this should be reflected through all the processes and activities of these organizations. The need for inculcating safety culture into regulatory processes and practices is gradually increasing since the major accident at Fukushima. Accordingly, several international fora in last few years repeatedly highlighted the importance of prevalence of safety culture in regulatory bodies as well. The utilisation of concept of safety culture always remained applicable in regulatory activities of PNRA in the form of core values. After the Fukushima accident, PNRA considered it important to check the extent of utilisation of safety culture concept in organizational activities and decided to conduct its “Safety Culture Self-Assessment (SCSA)” for presenting itself as a role model in-order to endorse the fact that safety culture at regulatory authority plays an important role to influence safety culture at licenced facilities.

  16. Management of pancreatic collections with a novel endoscopically placed fully covered self-expandable metal stent: a national experience (with videos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Sujievvan; Efthymiou, Marios; Kaffes, Arthur; Chen, John Wei; Kwan, Vu; Murray, Michael; Williams, David; Nguyen, Nam Quoc; Tam, William; Welch, Christine; Chong, Andre; Gupta, Saurabh; Devereaux, Ben; Tagkalidis, Peter; Parker, Frank; Vaughan, Rhys

    2015-01-01

    Recent medical literature on novel lumen-apposing stents for the treatment of pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) is limited by small numbers, solo operators, and single-center experience. To evaluate a recently developed lumen-apposing, fully covered self-expandable metal stent (FCSEMS) in the management of PFCs. Retrospective case series. Thirteen tertiary and private health care centers across Australia. Forty-seven patients (median age 51 years) who underwent endoscopic management of PFCs. Insertion of FCSEMS after PFC puncture under EUS guidance. A subgroup of 9 patients underwent direct endoscopic necrosectomy. Technical and clinical success rate, adverse event rate. The technical success rate was 53 of 54 patients (98.1%), and the initial clinical success rate was 36 of 47 (76.6%), which was sustained for more than 6 months in 34 of 36 (94.4%). Early adverse events included 4 cases (7.4%) of stent migration during direct endoscopic necrosectomy, 4 cases (7.4%) of sepsis, 1 case (1.9%) of bleeding, and 1 case (1.9%) of stent migration into the fistula tract. Late adverse events were 6 (11.1%) spontaneous stent migrations, 3 (5.6%) recurrent stent occlusions, 3 (5.6%) tissue ingrowth/overgrowth, and 2 (3.7%) bleeding into PFC. The majority of stents inserted (48 of 54, 88.9%) and removed (31 of 35, 88.6%) in our study were described by the operator as superior to pigtail stents with regard to ease of use. Retrospective study. Although FCSEMSs are technically easier to insert and remove compared with traditional pigtail stents, there are significant limitations to the widespread use of FCSEMSs in the management of PFCs. These include cost, adverse events, and lower-than-expected resolution rates. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A sanctuary of safety: A study of how patients with dual diagnosis experience caring conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priebe, Åsa; Wiklund Gustin, Lena; Fredriksson, Lennart

    2018-04-01

    The prevalence of dual diagnosis, that is, the combination of psychiatric illnesses and substance use disorders, is high. As a vast majority of previous research in this context focusses on the effects of different treatment methods, rather than interpersonal issues, the purpose of the present study was to explore and illuminate in what way patients with a dual diagnosis experience conversations with nurses in an outpatient clinic to be caring. Five patients were interviewed regarding their experiences of caring conversations. The analysis and interpretation were inspired by a previously-used hermeneutical process. These yielded three themes: (i) reciprocity creates safety and communion; (ii) suffering is made visible and understandable; and (iii) self-esteem is restored. When synthesized, these themes gave rise to a main theme - a sanctuary of safety - where suffering is alleviated and dignity and self-esteem are restored. It is concluded that the caring conversation contributes to experiences of safeness. In this specific context, safety appears to be more fundamental than trust for patients' recoveries. The caring conversation also contributes to recovery, as it supports the individual's learning and understanding as a way to cope with problems, which also enables patients to make informed decisions about their own care. The caring conversation contributes to the alleviation of suffering and restoration of dignity and self-esteem for patients with a dual diagnosis. However, there is a need for further research focussing on how the caring conversation can contribute to psychiatric nurses' caring expertise. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  18. The usability of ventilators: a comparative evaluation of use safety and user experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Plinio P; Weinstein, Peter B; Flewwelling, Christopher J; Bañez, Carleene A; Chiu, Tabitha A; Iannuzzi, Mario; Patel, Aastha H; Shier, Ashleigh P; Cafazzo, Joseph A

    2016-08-20

    The design complexity of critical care ventilators (CCVs) can lead to use errors and patient harm. In this study, we present the results of a comparison of four CCVs from market leaders, using a rigorous methodology for the evaluation of use safety and user experience of medical devices. We carried out a comparative usability study of four CCVs: Hamilton G5, Puritan Bennett 980, Maquet SERVO-U, and Dräger Evita V500. Forty-eight critical care respiratory therapists participated in this fully counterbalanced, repeated measures study. Participants completed seven clinical scenarios composed of 16 tasks on each ventilator. Use safety was measured by percentage of tasks with use errors or close calls (UE/CCs). User experience was measured by system usability and workload metrics, using the Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire (PSSUQ) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index (NASA-TLX). Nine of 18 post hoc contrasts between pairs of ventilators were significant after Bonferroni correction, with effect sizes between 0.4 and 1.09 (Cohen's d). There were significantly fewer UE/CCs with SERVO-U when compared to G5 (p = 0.044) and V500 (p = 0.020). Participants reported higher system usability for G5 when compared to PB980 (p = 0.035) and higher system usability for SERVO-U when compared to G5 (p ventilators from market leaders compare and highlights the importance of medical technology design. Within the boundaries of this study, we can infer that SERVO-U demonstrated the highest levels of use safety and user experience, followed by G5. Based on qualitative data, differences in outcomes could be explained by interaction design, quality of hardware components used in manufacturing, and influence of consumer product technology on users' expectations.

  19. Example of predictive rather than responsive safety research for fusion energy experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvares, N.J.; Hasegawa, H.K.

    1979-01-01

    A fault tree analysis (FTA) was used to study the fire-management systems of two LLL fusion experiments (2XIIB and SHIVA). This technique identified failure modes of existing system components and indicated what the effects of component failure might be in the event of fire in the protected spaces. This paper describes the results of the initial analytical phase of the project and indicates critical unknown parameters required for further analysis. Moreover, the analytical procedures developed are applicable to most, if not all, safety disciplines and could serve as a basis for the logical reestablishment of the FL/SCC by DOE

  20. Safety Research Experiment Facility Project. Conceptual design report. Volume VII. Reactor cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-12-01

    The Reactor Cooling System (RCS) will provide the required cooling during test operations of the Safety Research Experiment Facility (SAREF) reactor. The RCS transfers the reactor energy generated in the core to a closed-loop water storage system located completely inside the reactor containment building. After the reactor core has cooled to a safe level, the stored heat is rejected through intermediate heat exchangers to a common forced-draft evaporative cooling tower. The RCS is comprised of three independent cooling loops of which any two can remove sufficient heat from the core to prevent structural damage to the system components

  1. Operational experience review and methods to enhance safety and reliability in the NPP-Leibstadt (KKL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeusermann, R [Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt AG, Leibstadt (Switzerland)

    1997-10-01

    In the nuclear community it became clear that an integrated feedback system of operating experience must also include the unsuccessful results. The deviations, expected to achieved performance are analysed to the failure mode and its effect. KKL has lowered the number of safety significant events since commercial operation started. The thoroughness of the review/analysis of the events has increased with high priority set to human factor induced events in operation and maintenance. Since the participation of the author in the ASSET-Mission in Smolensk in 1993, KKL introduced the ASSET-Root-Cause method and has supplemented it by the HPES (Human Performance Enhancement System). 4 refs, 6 figs.

  2. Operational experience review and methods to enhance safety and reliability in the NPP-Leibstadt (KKL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusermann, R.

    1997-01-01

    In the nuclear community it became clear that an integrated feedback system of operating experience must also include the unsuccessful results. The deviations, expected to achieved performance are analysed to the failure mode and its effect. KKL has lowered the number of safety significant events since commercial operation started. The thoroughness of the review/analysis of the events has increased with high priority set to human factor induced events in operation and maintenance. Since the participation of the author in the ASSET-Mission in Smolensk in 1993, KKL introduced the ASSET-Root-Cause method and has supplemented it by the HPES (Human Performance Enhancement System). 4 refs, 6 figs

  3. Preferences for food safety and animal welare - a choice experiment study comparing organic and conventional consumers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove; Mørkbak, Morten; Denver, Sigrid

    Food quality attributes such as food safety and animal welfare are increasingly influencing consumers' choices of food products. These attributes are not readily traded in the markets. Hence, stated preference methods have proven to be valuable tools for eliciting preferences for such non......-traded attributes. A discrete choice experiment is employed, and the results indicate that consumers in general are willing to pay a premium for campylobacter-free chicken and for improved animal welfare; and they are willing to pay an additional premium for a product containing both attributes. Further, we find...

  4. Food safety and sustainable nutrition workshops: educational experiences for primary school children in Turin, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaranta Traversa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available European control and prevention policies are focused to guarantee a high level of protection of consumers’ health. Foodborne diseases as obesity, diabetes, food allergy, and food-borne outbreaks are increasing. To prevent food-borne diseases, it is fundamental to involve consumers, in particular children, in educational experiences aimed to learn the proper behaviours to be applied. In this context, we designed and performed 5 educational workshops about food safety, hidden allergens in food and nutrition aimed to involve children attending primary and summer school. These experiences let us collect observations about children knowledge and behaviours. From May to October 2015, a total of 1708 children aged 6 to 11 years joined our workshops. Children were involved in listening activities, laboratory experiments, handling games and sensory experiences. All participants were familiar with food allergy and were interested to know how to behave with allergic people. Children showed great curiosity in discovering that many foods normally contain live bacteria. Less than 25% of children reported to skip breakfast, to have it watching TV or to spend few minutes for it. Many of them (>75% thought that fruits and vegetables are all year-round available and are not related to a specific period. Very few participants (<25% knew that freezing is the treatment to be applied to make fresh fish safe from parasites. Children involved in food safety and nutrition educational experiences have the opportunity to increase their awareness about the correct behaviours to prevent food-borne diseases and to improve their own critical thinking about food consumption.

  5. Herpes zoster vaccine live: A 10 year review of post-marketing safety experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, English D; Woodward, Meredith; Brown, Elizabeth; Popmihajlov, Zoran; Saddier, Patricia; Annunziato, Paula W; Halsey, Neal A; Gershon, Anne A

    2017-12-19

    Zoster vaccine is a single dose live, attenuated vaccine (ZVL) indicated for individuals ≥50 years-old for the prevention of herpes zoster (HZ). Safety data from clinical trials and post-licensure studies provided reassurance that ZVL is generally safe and well tolerated. The objective of this review was to provide worldwide post-marketing safety information following 10 years of use and >34 million doses distributed. All post-marketing adverse experience (AE) reports received worldwide between 02-May-2006 and 01-May-2016 from healthcare professionals following vaccination with ZVL and submitted to the MSD AE global safety database, were analyzed. A total of 23,556 AE reports, 93% non-serious, were reported. Local injection site reactions (ISRs), with a median time-to-onset of 2 days, were the most frequently reported AEs followed by HZ. The majority of HZ reports were reported within 2 weeks of vaccination and considered, based on time-to-onset, pathogenesis of HZ, and data from clinical trials, to be caused by wild-type varicella-zoster virus (VZV). HZ confirmed by PCR analysis to be VZV Oka/Merck vaccine-strain was identified in an immunocompetent individual 8 months postvaccination and in 4 immunocompromised individuals. Disseminated HZ was reported very rarely (marketing use, was favorable and consistent with that observed in clinical trials and post-licensure studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Experiences in the promotion of the safety culture in radiological activities in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro, Ruben; Guillen, Alba; Ilizastigui, Fidel

    2001-01-01

    During the last decade, the need to promote and achieve high safety culture levels has been one of the priorities in the nuclear sector around the world, although it has been focused basically on nuclear power. Nevertheless, it is an important and current topic for any risk related activity, since it results in a greater involvement and commitment of managers and personnel to safety, thereby reducing the so called 'organizational failures', one of the most frequent contributors to several of the major industrial disasters in the recent years. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has also pointed that out and in some of its recent publications and meetings has recognized the need for extending this concept to the area of radioactive source. In Cuba, the Regulatory Body has been working in this direction during several years, promoting national research and studies in this field, issuing documents and organizing events and other activities. With this it is expected to introduce new work methods and practices to be applied by management and personnel involved in the use of radioactive sources, reflecting a higher safety culture level. This paper summarizes the experience of Cuban Regulatory Body in this field. (author)

  7. Health facilities safety in natural disasters: experiences and challenges from South East Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovic, Vesela; Vitale, Ksenija; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2012-05-01

    The United Nations named 2010 as a year of natural disasters, and launched a worldwide campaign to improve the safety of schools and hospitals from natural disasters. In the region of South East Europe, Croatia and Serbia have suffered the greatest impacts of natural disasters on their communities and health facilities. In this paper the disaster management approaches of the two countries are compared, with a special emphasis on the existing technological and legislative systems for safety and protection of health facilities and people. Strategic measures that should be taken in future to provide better safety for health facilities and populations, based on the best practices and positive experiences in other countries are recommended. Due to the expected consequences of global climate change in the region and the increased different environmental risks both countries need to refine their disaster preparedness strategies. Also, in the South East Europe, the effects of a natural disaster are amplified in the health sector due to its critical medical infrastructure. Therefore, the principles of environmental security should be implemented in public health policies in the described region, along with principles of disaster management through regional collaborations.

  8. Health Facilities Safety in Natural Disasters: Experiences and Challenges from South East Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesela Radovic

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The United Nations named 2010 as a year of natural disasters, and launched a worldwide campaign to improve the safety of schools and hospitals from natural disasters. In the region of South East Europe, Croatia and Serbia have suffered the greatest impacts of natural disasters on their communities and health facilities. In this paper the disaster management approaches of the two countries are compared, with a special emphasis on the existing technological and legislative systems for safety and protection of health facilities and people. Strategic measures that should be taken in future to provide better safety for health facilities and populations, based on the best practices and positive experiences in other countries are recommended. Due to the expected consequences of global climate change in the region and the increased different environmental risks both countries need to refine their disaster preparedness strategies. Also, in the South East Europe, the effects of a natural disaster are amplified in the health sector due to its critical medical infrastructure. Therefore, the principles of environmental security should be implemented in public health policies in the described region, along with principles of disaster management through regional collaborations.

  9. Dalfampridine extended release tablets: 1 year of postmarketing safety experience in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jara M

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Michele Jara,1 Graham Barker,2 Herbert R Henney 3rd1 1Acorda Therapeutics, Inc, Ardsley, NY, USA; 2Biogen Idec, Inc, Maidenhead, Berkshire, UK Background: Dalfampridine extended release tablets (dalfampridine-ER; prolonged-, modified, or sustained-release fampridine in some countries were approved in the US to improve walking in patients with multiple sclerosis, as demonstrated by improvement in walking speed. Postmarketing safety experience is available from exposure of approximately 46,000 patients in the US from product approval through March 2011. Objective: To provide a descriptive analysis of all spontaneously reported postmarketing adverse events (AEs for dalfampridine-ER since product launch. Methods: AE data were extracted from the safety database from product launch through March 31, 2011; AEs were classified using the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities. Seizure cases were reviewed for patient demographics, time to event from treatment onset, and presence of additional risk factors. Results: The most frequently reported postmarketing AEs were similar to those reported during clinical development: dizziness, insomnia, balance disorder, headache, nausea, urinary tract infection, asthenia, and back pain (all included in US product labeling. New clinically significant findings are related to lack of efficacy and inappropriate dosing. Of the approximately 46,000 patients exposed, 85 seizures were reported (~5.4/1000 patient-years, of which 82 were reported or confirmed by a health care practitioner (~5.2/1000 patient-years. Beyond the intrinsic multiple sclerosis-related seizure risk, more than half of the 85 cases (62% had an additional potential risk factor for seizure including a previous history of convulsions, renal impairment, incorrect dosing, or use of concurrent medications with a labeled seizure risk. Duration of treatment prior to the seizure ranged from one dose to 365 days; 26/85 (31% patients suffered a seizure

  10. Safety Research Experiment Facility Project. Conceptual design report. Volume V. Reactor vessel and closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-12-01

    The Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessel (PCRV) will serve as the primary pressure retaining structure for the Safety Research Experiment Facility (SAREF) reactor. The reactor core, control rod drive room, primary heat exchangers, and gas circulators will be located in cavities within the PCRV. The orientation of these cavities, except for the control rod drive room, will be similar to the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) designs that are currently proposed or under design. Due to the nature of this type of structure, all biological and radiological shielding requirements are incorporated into the basic vessel design. At the midcore plane there are three radially oriented slots that will extend from the outside surface of the PCRV to the reactor core liner. These slots will accommodate each of the fuel motion monitoring systems which will be part of the observation apparatus used with the loop experiments

  11. Sodium Loop Safety Facility W-2 experiment fuel pin rupture detection system. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, M.A.; Kirchner, T.L.; Meyers, S.C.

    1980-05-01

    The objective of the Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) W-2 experiment is to characterize the combined effects of a preconditioned full-length fuel column and slow transient overpower (TOP) conditions on breeder reactor (BR) fuel pin cladding failures. The W-2 experiment will meet this objective by providing data in two technological areas: (1) time and location of cladding failure, and (2) early post-failure test fuel behavior. The test involves a seven pin, prototypic full-length fast test reactor (FTR) fuel pin bundle which will be subjected to a simulated unprotected 5 cents/s reactivity transient overpower event. The outer six pins will provide the necessary prototypic thermal-hydraulic environment for the center pin.

  12. Experience with the use of programmable logic controllers in nuclear safety applications. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, E.M.; Stofko, M.J.

    1995-03-01

    This report describes the implementation and experience with Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) for nuclear safety applications. Two applications are described. The first is an Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) mitigation system provided as a Diverse Auxiliary Feedwater Actuation System (DAFAS). It was implemented at Arizona Public Service's Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station and has been in commercial operation since early 1992. The second system described is an Emergency Diesel Generator Bus Load Sequencer installed at Florida Power and Light's Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant. This system was installed as part of an upgrade to the emergency power system in 1988. The experience gained in the design, development, implementation and qualification of these systems will be beneficial to utilities that are considering the utilization of PLCs for their plant applications

  13. Sodium Loop Safety Facility W-2 experiment fuel pin rupture detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.A.; Kirchner, T.L.; Meyers, S.C.

    1980-05-01

    The objective of the Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) W-2 experiment is to characterize the combined effects of a preconditioned full-length fuel column and slow transient overpower (TOP) conditions on breeder reactor (BR) fuel pin cladding failures. The W-2 experiment will meet this objective by providing data in two technological areas: (1) time and location of cladding failure, and (2) early post-failure test fuel behavior. The test involves a seven pin, prototypic full-length fast test reactor (FTR) fuel pin bundle which will be subjected to a simulated unprotected 5 cents/s reactivity transient overpower event. The outer six pins will provide the necessary prototypic thermal-hydraulic environment for the center pin

  14. Neonatal Nurses Experience Unintended Consequences and Risks to Patient Safety With Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudding, Katherine M; Gephart, Sheila M; Carrington, Jane M

    2018-04-01

    In this article, we examine the unintended consequences of nurses' use of electronic health records. We define these as unforeseen events, change in workflow, or an unanticipated result of implementation and use of electronic health records. Unintended consequences experienced by nurses while using electronic health records have been well researched. However, few studies have focused on neonatal nurses, and it is unclear to what extent unintended consequences threaten patient safety. A new instrument called the Carrington-Gephart Unintended Consequences of Electronic Health Record Questionnaire has been validated, and secondary analysis using the tool explored the phenomena among neonatal nurses (N = 40). The purposes of this study were to describe unintended consequences of use of electronic health records for neonatal nurses and to explore relationships between the phenomena and characteristics of the nurse and the electronic health record. The most frequent unintended consequences of electronic health record use were due to interruptions, followed by a heavier workload due to the electronic health record, changes to the workflow, and altered communication patterns. Neonatal nurses used workarounds most often with motivation to better assist patients. Teamwork was moderately related to higher unintended consequences including patient safety risks (r = 0.427, P = .007), system design (r = 0.419, P = .009), and technology barriers (r = 0.431, P = .007). Communication about patients was reduced when patient safety risks were high (r = -0.437, P = .003). By determining the frequency with which neonatal nurses experience unintended consequences of electronic health record use, future research can be targeted to improve electronic health record design through customization, integration, and refinement to support patient safety and better outcomes.

  15. The effect of leadership behaviours on followers’ experiences and expectations in a safety-critical industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiaan G. Joubert

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Motivation for this study was found in concern expressed by civil aviation organisations that specialists in the air navigation services provider sector require appropriate and beneficial organisational leadership to encourage, enable and manage transformation within this highly structured setting. Also, academic research puts emphasis on a need for investigations of the roles, expectations and requirements of followers in the leadership–followership relationship. Followers’ experiences and expectations of leadership behaviours in an air navigation service provider (ANSP organisation were investigated and served as orientation and setting applicable to this study. Aim: The aim of the research was to identify and understand how follower experiences and expectations of leadership behaviours in a safety-critical commercial environment can affect leadership training and growth. The above-mentioned motivated this investigation of leadership traits and behaviours within an explicit context and from a follower’s viewpoint. Setting: The setting for the study was twenty two Air Traffic and Navigation Services Company sites where followers’ experiences and expectations of leadership behaviours in an air navigation service provider (ANSP organisation were investigated and served as orientation and setting applicable to this study. Methods: An ethnographic case study research style was adopted and followed because it allowed for an all-inclusive, holistic narrative report and interpretation. The samples for the quantitative and qualitative components of this study were parallel and methods employed addressed different aspects of the phenomenon, which allowed for a mixed methods research design. A one-way causality in the research design was observed because traits of followers that might influence leaders’ behaviours were excluded. Data were collected by means of a Leader Trait and Behaviour Questionnaire completed by participants

  16. Industry use of operating experience to achieve improved nuclear plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zebroski, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    A principal lesson drawn from the accident at Three Mile Island was the need for a comprehensive and rigorous system for analysis and feedback of operating experience to reactor operators. Chief executives of US utilities directed in mid-1979 that an intensive and rigorous system of analysis and feedback of operating experience be established. This system is commonly referred to as the ''Significant Events Program''. Since April 1980, the Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) has been joined by the Institute for Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) in the field investigation of significant operating events. NSAC has responsibility for analysis of the design and physical events aspects, while INPO has primary responsibility for the operators' aspects, including procedures and training. The process of screening, analysis and feedback of operating experience is now functioning as a seven-step process. A variety of data sources is used, including License Event Reports and outage and major maintenance reports. These are compiled and indexed in convenient form. However, such data bases are used only as incidental tools for the basic investigations and analytical efforts. Rapid dissemination of results is provided by a computer-aided conferencing system, which links 70 operating LWR reactors in the USA, and which has now been extended to four utilities outside the USA, representing several dozen more reactors. Major safety and economic incentives are evident for the rigorous use of such operating experience and for participation in a comprehensive system. Traditional habits of secrecy are recognized as obstacles to timely communication. A principal responsibility of top management of reactor-operating organizations is to overcome such habits where they are counter to the public interest, as well as to the health and survival interest of the utility itself

  17. Dry critical experiments and analyses performed in support of the TOPAZ-2 safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelowitz, D.B.; Sapir, J.; Glushkov, E.S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Bubelev, V.G.; Kompanietz, G.B.; Krutov, A.M.; Polyakov, D.N.; Lobynstev, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    In December 1991, the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization decided to investigate the possibility of launching a Russian Topaz-2 space nuclear power system. Functional safety requirements developed for the Topaz mission mandated that the reactor remain subcritical when flooded and immersed in water. Initial experiments and analyses performed in Russia and the United States indicated that the reactor could potentially become supercritical in several water- or sand-immersion scenarios. Consequently, a series of critical experiments was performed on the Narciss M-II facility at the Kurchatov Institute to measure the reactivity effects of water and sand immersion, to quantify the effectiveness of reactor modifications proposed to preclude criticality, and to benchmark the calculational methods and nuclear data used in the Topaz-2 safety analyses. In this paper we describe the Narciss M-II experimental configurations along with the associated calculational models and methods. We also present and compare the measured and calculated results for the dry experimental configurations. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  18. Overview of Experiments for Physics of Fast Reactors from the International Handbooks of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bess, J. D.; Briggs, J. B.; Gulliford, J.; Ivanova, T.; Rozhikhin, E. V.; Semenov, M. Yu.; Tsibulya, A. M.; Koscheev, V. N.

    2017-07-01

    is the critical experiments with fast reactor fuel rods in water, interesting in terms of justification of nuclear safety during transportation and storage of fresh and spent fuel. These reports provide a detailed review of the experiment, designate the area of their application and include results of calculations on modern systems of constants in comparison with the estimated experimental data.

  19. The Effectiveness of Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Insertion in Treating Right-Sided Colonic Obstruction: A Comparison between SEMS and Decompression Tube Placement and an Investigation of the Safety and Difficulties of SEMS Insertion in Right Colons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rintaro Moroi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS is widely used to treat malignant colonic obstruction. However, most reports about SEMS insertion have concentrated on the left colon. This study aimed to (1 investigate the effectiveness of SEMS insertion compared with conventional decompression tube for right-sided colonic obstruction and (2 compare the safety and technical success of SEMS insertion between left- and right-sided colonic obstructions. Methods. The data from thirty-seven patients who underwent SEMS or conventional decompression tube placement for malignant colonic obstruction in our hospital were analyzed retrospectively. Technical and clinical success, complications, and technical difficulties were analyzed. We compared the results between SEMS insertion and decompression tube placement in right colons and the outcomes of SEMS insertion between right- and left-sided colonic obstructions. Results. For right colons, the clinical success rate of SEMS insertion (100% was significantly higher than that of decompression tube placement (55.9%. Concerning SEMS insertion, the technical difficulty and safety of SEMS insertion were similar between right- and left-sided colonic obstructions. Conclusion. SEMS insertion for right-sided colon is significantly more effective than conventional decompression tube placement, and this procedure was safer and less technically challenging than expected. SEMS insertion should be considered for treating right-sided malignant colonic obstruction.

  20. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Plagge, C. Schaefer and N. Dupont

    2013-01-01

    Fire Safety – Essential for a particle detector The CMS detector is a marvel of high technology, one of the most precise particle measurement devices we have built until now. Of course it has to be protected from external and internal incidents like the ones that can occur from fires. Due to the fire load, the permanent availability of oxygen and the presence of various ignition sources mostly based on electricity this has to be addressed. Starting from the beam pipe towards the magnet coil, the detector is protected by flooding it with pure gaseous nitrogen during operation. The outer shell of CMS, namely the yoke and the muon chambers are then covered by an emergency inertion system also based on nitrogen. To ensure maximum fire safety, all materials used comply with the CERN regulations IS 23 and IS 41 with only a few exceptions. Every piece of the 30-tonne polyethylene shielding is high-density material, borated, boxed within steel and coated with intumescent (a paint that creates a thick co...

  1. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Schaefer and N. Dupont

    2013-01-01

      “Safety is the highest priority”: this statement from CERN is endorsed by the CMS management. An interpretation of this statement may bring you to the conclusion that you should stop working in order to avoid risks. If the safety is the priority, work is not! This would be a misunderstanding and misinterpretation. One should understand that “working safely” or “operating safely” is the priority at CERN. CERN personnel are exposed to different hazards on many levels on a daily basis. However, risk analyses and assessments are done in order to limit the number and the gravity of accidents. For example, this process takes place each time you cross the road. The hazard is the moving vehicle, the stake is you and the risk might be the risk of collision between both. The same principle has to be applied during our daily work. In particular, keeping in mind the general principles of prevention defined in the late 1980s. These principles wer...

  2. Safety, safety case and society - Lessons from the experience of the Forum on Stakeholder Confidence and other NEA initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescatore, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    A vast amount of literature on radioactive waste management (RWM) and its governance is available on the web page of the Radioactive Waste Management Committee of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), in particular on the pages of the Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC), the Reversibility and Retrievability (R and R) Project and the Project on Records, Knowledge and Memory (RK and M) Preservation across Generations. The FSC literature alone likely represents the largest collection of literature on RWM governance presently available on any single site. The safety case developed for any deep geological repository project deals with technical safety. A license is to be granted based on the repository being, after closure, safe 'by itself', i.e. without the need to watch it, independent of the existence of the implementer, regulator and others. The main legal requirement of the safety case is that it needs to show convincingly that the technical regulatory criteria are met. The latter are both qualitative and quantitative. Qualitative criteria are technical, but not in a strong sense, e.g. one requirement may simply be the use of 'sound technical and managerial principles'. The safety case also needs to argue robustness upon human intrusion. The human intrusion analyses, however, are only used to make a qualitative judgement on the robustness of the system. The international guidance suggests that their results need not be tested, by the authorities, for compliance against a numerical yardstick. The technical regulator will have an important role in decision making, but others aside from the technical regulator will also play a decision-making role in the development of a repository project and with regard to its safety. For instance, the technical regulator is largely removed from the initial choice of site. Safety nowadays is brought about by a system of actors comprising the implementer, technical regulators, specialist groups in various advisory roles and the

  3. Generation of integral experiment covariance data and their impact on criticality safety validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuke, Maik; Peters, Elisabeth; Sommer, Fabian

    2016-11-15

    The quantification of statistical dependencies in data of critical experiments and how to account for them properly in validation procedures has been discussed in the literature by various groups. However, these subjects are still an active topic in the Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment (UACSA) of the OECDNEA Nuclear Science Committee. The latter compiles and publishes the freely available experimental data collection, the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments, ICSBEP. Most of the experiments were performed as series and share parts of experimental setups, consequently leading to correlation effects in the results. The correct consideration of correlated data seems to be inevitable if the experimental data in a validation procedure is limited or one cannot rely on a sufficient number of uncorrelated data sets, e.g. from different laboratories using different setups. The general determination of correlations and the underlying covariance data as well as the consideration of them in a validation procedure is the focus of the following work. We discuss and demonstrate possible effects on calculated k{sub eff}'s, their uncertainties, and the corresponding covariance matrices due to interpretation of evaluated experimental data and its translation into calculation models. The work shows effects of various modeling approaches, varying distribution functions of parameters and compares and discusses results from the applied Monte-Carlo sampling method with available data on correlations. Our findings indicate that for the reliable determination of integral experimental covariance matrices or the correlation coefficients a detailed study of the underlying experimental data, the modeling approach and assumptions made, and the resulting sensitivity analysis seems to be inevitable. Further, a Bayesian method is discussed to include integral experimental covariance data when estimating an

  4. Generation of integral experiment covariance data and their impact on criticality safety validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuke, Maik; Peters, Elisabeth; Sommer, Fabian

    2016-11-01

    The quantification of statistical dependencies in data of critical experiments and how to account for them properly in validation procedures has been discussed in the literature by various groups. However, these subjects are still an active topic in the Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment (UACSA) of the OECDNEA Nuclear Science Committee. The latter compiles and publishes the freely available experimental data collection, the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments, ICSBEP. Most of the experiments were performed as series and share parts of experimental setups, consequently leading to correlation effects in the results. The correct consideration of correlated data seems to be inevitable if the experimental data in a validation procedure is limited or one cannot rely on a sufficient number of uncorrelated data sets, e.g. from different laboratories using different setups. The general determination of correlations and the underlying covariance data as well as the consideration of them in a validation procedure is the focus of the following work. We discuss and demonstrate possible effects on calculated k eff 's, their uncertainties, and the corresponding covariance matrices due to interpretation of evaluated experimental data and its translation into calculation models. The work shows effects of various modeling approaches, varying distribution functions of parameters and compares and discusses results from the applied Monte-Carlo sampling method with available data on correlations. Our findings indicate that for the reliable determination of integral experimental covariance matrices or the correlation coefficients a detailed study of the underlying experimental data, the modeling approach and assumptions made, and the resulting sensitivity analysis seems to be inevitable. Further, a Bayesian method is discussed to include integral experimental covariance data when estimating an application

  5. Type B liquid package technical issues -- Experience with LR-56 safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.C.; Alstine, M.N. van; Gromada, R.J.; Hensel, S.J.; Gupta, N.K.

    1997-01-01

    In the course of the development of nuclear industry in France, shipment of Type B quantities (i.e., quantities having significant radiological consequences) of radioactive liquids between different, sites became necessary. Based on the experience acquired at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) nuclear centers, a series of tanker trailers has been developed to meet this need. Similarly, as part of the ongoing program to process wastes to stable end forms, a need exists to move radioactive liquids at several DOE sites. The LR-56, developed by CEA to transport liquids of medium to high activity, was selected for these US applications, based on its design features and successful operating experience in France. No comparable Type B liquid packages are certified in the US Packages employed in transport of Type B quantities of liquids are either only suitable for small volumes, or are used within site boundaries with extensive administrative controls employed to insure that an adequate level of safety is maintained. The requirement is to provide safety equivalent to the level established by federal regulations in 10 CFR 71. Type B radioactive materials packages (RAM packages) are typically simple, rugged containers which are designed and fabricated in accordance with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code to provide containment under the normal conditions of transport (NCT) and hypothetical accident conditions (HAC) established by the regulations. Packages designed for liquid contents must address a number of technical issues which are not common to packages for solid contents. This paper reviews the technical issues associated with Type B liquid packages from the perspective of the experience gained from the evaluation of the LR-56 for use at DOE sites

  6. Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1987-01-01

    Aspects of fission reactors are considered - control, heat removal and containment. Brief descriptions of the reactor accidents at the SL-1 reactor (1961), Windscale (1957), Browns Ferry (1975), Three Mile Island (1979) and Chernobyl (1986) are given. The idea of inherently safe reactor designs is discussed. Safety assessment is considered under the headings of preliminary hazard analysis, failure mode analysis, event trees, fault trees, common mode failure and probabalistic risk assessments. These latter can result in a series of risk distributions linked to specific groups of fault sequences and specific consequences. A frequency-consequence diagram is shown. Fatal accident incidence rates in different countries including the United Kingdom for various industries are quoted. The incidence of fatal cancers from occupational exposure to chemicals is tabulated. Human factors and the acceptability of risk are considered. (U.K.)

  7. Safety of Early Carotid Artery Stenting after Systemic Thrombolysis: A Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Sallustio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Patients with acute ischemic stroke due to internal carotid artery (ICA disease are at high risk of early stroke recurrence. A combination of IV thrombolysis and early carotid artery stenting (CAS may result in more effective secondary stroke prevention. Objective. We tested safety and durability of early CAS following IV thrombolysis in stroke patients with residual stenosis in the symptomatic ICA. Methods. Of consecutive patients treated with IV rtPA, those with residual ICA stenosis ≥70% or 24 hours. The protocol included pre-rtPA MRI and MR angiography, and post-rtPA carotid ultrasound and CT angiography. Stroke severity was assessed by the NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS. Three- and twelve-month stent patency was assessed by ultrasound. Twelve-month functional outcome was assessed by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS. Results. Of 145 consecutive IV rtPA-treated patients, 6 (4% underwent early CAS. Median age was 76 (range 67–78 years, median NIHSS at stroke onset was 12 (range 9–16 and 7 (range 7-8 before CAS. Median onset-to-CAS time was 48 (range 30–94 hours. A single self-expandable stent was implanted to cover the entire lesion in all patients. The procedure was uneventful in all patients. After 12 months, all patients had stent patency, and the functional outcome was favourable (mRS ≤ 2 in all but 1 patient experiencing a recurrent stroke for new-onset atrial fibrillation. Conclusion. This small case series of a single centre suggests that early CAS may be considered a safe alternative to CEA after IV rtPA administration in selected patients at high risk of stroke recurrence.

  8. Palliation of patients with esophagogastric neoplasms by insertion of a covered expandable modified Gianturco-Z endoprosthesis: experiences in 153 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartelsman, J. F.; Bruno, M. J.; Jensema, A. J.; Haringsma, J.; Reeders, J. W.; Tytgat, G. N.

    2000-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the short- and long-term outcomes of treatment by insertion of a covered expandable modified Gianturco-Z endoprosthesis (Song stent) in patients with esophagogastric malignancies. Consecutive patients with esophagogastric malignancies in whom a Song stent was inserted were

  9. Experiments with preirradiated fuel rods in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiki, O.; Kobayashi, S.; Takariko, I.; Ishijima, K.

    1992-01-01

    In the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) owned and operated by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), extensive experimental studies on the fuel behavior under reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions have been continued since the start of the test program in 1975. Accumulated experimental data were used as the fundamental data base of the Japanese safety evaluation guideline for reactivity initiated events in light water cooled nuclear power plants established by the nuclear safety commission in 1984. All of the data used to establish the guideline were, however, limited to those derived from the tests with fresh fuel rods as test samples because of the lack of experimental facility to handle highly radioactive materials.The guideline, therefore, introduces the peak fuel enthalpy of 85 cal/g which was adopted from the SPERT-CDC data as a provisional failure threshold of preirradiated fuel rod and, says that this value should be revised based on the NSRR experiments in the future. According to the above requirement, new NSRR experimental program with the preirradiated fuel rods as test samples was started in 1989. Test fuel rods are prepared by refabrication of the long-sized fuel rods preirradiated in commercial PWRs and BWRs into short segments and by preirradiation of short-sized test fuel rods in the Japan Material Testing Reactor(JMTR). For the tests with preirradiated fuel rods as test samples, the special experimental capsules, the automatic instrumentation fitting device, the automatic capsule assembling device and the capsule loading device were newly developed. In addition, the existing hot cave was modified to mount the capsule assembling device and the other inspection tools and, a new small iron cell was established adjacent to the cave to store the instrumentation fitting device. (author)

  10. National young-driver survey: teen perspective and experience with factors that affect driving safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Kenneth R; Winston, Flaura K; Senserrick, Teresa M; García-España, Felipe; Kinsman, Sara; Quistberg, D Alex; Ross, James G; Elliott, Michael R

    2008-05-01

    Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of fatality and acquired disability in adolescents. Young, inexperienced drivers are overrepresented in crashes. Our goal was to explore the adolescent perspective on driving safety to provide a better understanding of factors that influence safety and teenagers' exposure to driving hazards. Adolescents generated, prioritized, and explained their viewpoint by using the teen-centered method. These viewpoints were obtained from a school-based nationally representative survey of 9th-, 10th-, and 11th-graders (N = 5665) from 68 high schools, conducted in spring 2006, that included teen-generated items. The main outcome measures were rating of risk and prevalence of witnessing driving hazards. Drinking while driving was ranked as the greatest hazard (87% of the respondents reported that it made a lot of difference), although only 12% witnessed it often. Ranked next as dangers while driving were text-messaging, racing, impairment from marijuana, and road rage. Sixty percent viewed inexperience as a significant hazard, although only 15% reported seeing it often. Cell phone use was viewed as a significant hazard by 28%, although 57% witnessed it frequently. Only 10% viewed peer passengers as hazardous, but 64% frequently observed them. Distracting peer behaviors, among other distractions, were viewed as more dangerous. Subpopulations varied in the degree they perceived hazards. For example, black and Hispanic adolescents viewed substance use while driving as less hazardous than did white adolescents but witnessed it more frequently. Adolescents generally understand the danger of intoxicated driving. However, some groups need to better recognize this hazard. Distractions take teenagers' focus off the road, but not all are viewed as hazardous. Although inexperience is the key factor that interacts with other conditions to cause crashes, adolescents do not recognize what merits experience. Future research is needed to explore how to

  11. Improving safety climate and behavior through a multifaceted intervention : Results from a field experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronkhorst, B.A.C.; Tummers, L.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341028274; Steijn, B.

    Interventions aimed at increasing priority for employee safety could lead to better safety climate and safety behavior of employees. However, current studies reporting on safety climate interventions lack diversity in contexts and settings, they focus mainly on supervisors and do not take into

  12. Improving safety climate and behavior through a multifaceted intervention: Results from a field experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A.C. Bronkhorst (Babette); L.G. Tummers (Lars); A.J. Steijn (Bram)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractInterventions aimed at increasing priority for employee safety could lead to better safety climate and safety behavior of employees. However, current studies reporting on safety climate interventions lack diversity in contexts and settings, they focus mainly on supervisors and do not

  13. The influence of experience and knowledge on reactor safety in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bointner, Raphael; Schubert, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    After five decades of nuclear power generation in Germany, the government decided to phase out nuclear power plants until 2022 as a consequence of the Fukushima disaster in 2011. Electricity generation is accompanied by human and technical errors, which questions if the nuclear phase-out has an influence on reactor safety. Past errors, available as so-called reportable events of nuclear power plants, can be approximated with experience measured in cumulated electricity generation by applying the Duffey-Saull method with a high coefficient of determination (R"2 = 0.84). Errors are declining with growing experience, which means the reportable events per TWh are declining over time. Today, approximately 0.9 reportable events per generated TWh occur and, given unchanging operational conditions, it is expected to remain at this magnitude in the near future. Moreover, knowledge induced by public Research and Development expenditures may supplement experience in reducing reportable events. Thus, the cumulative fission knowledge stock of Germany was added to the Duffey-Saull method for the first time. By adjusting the knowledge depreciation rate within this extended method, the prediction of reportable events is more accurate. Best results were obtained with 10.8% depreciation rate, which is also in line with the literature. (author)

  14. Implications of recent implantation-driven permeation experiments for fusion reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Struttmann, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Metal structures exposed to the plasma in tritium-burning fusion reactors will be subject to implantation-driven permeation (IDP) of tritium. Permeation rates for IDP in fusion structural materials are usually high because the tritium atoms enter the material without having to go through the dissociation and solution steps required of tritium-bearing gas molecules. These surface processes, which may be rate limiting in PDP, actually enhance permeation in IDP by inhibiting the return of tritium to the plasma side of the structure. Experiments have been conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to investigate the nature of IDP by simulating conditions experienced by structures exposed to the plasma. These experiments have shown that surface conditions are important to tritium permeation in materials endothermic to hydrogen solution such as austenitic and ferritic steels. In reactive metals such as vanadium, surface processes appear to totally control the permeation. The purpose of this paper is to review the progress of those experiments and to discuss the implications that the results have regarding the tritium-related safety concerns of fusion reactors

  15. The French Experience Regarding Peer Reviews to Improve the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachaume, J.-L.; Bélot, G.

    2015-01-01

    France has a 50 year history of control over radioactive sources. Convinced that peer reviews may be helpful to improve any regulatory system, France decided to experience a ‘full scope’ Integrated Regulatory Review Service mission in 2006 and its follow-up mission in 2009, including a review of the implementation of the Code of Conduct. The reviews, interviews and observations performed during these missions enabled the experts to have a thorough knowledge of the French system and to highlight its strengths and ways for improvements. Following these reviews, France decided to rely on its good practices, extend them as much as possible and to define, implement and address an action plan to improve its regulatory control over radioactive sources, while maintaining the prime responsibility on the operators. While good practices in the tracking of sources were maintained and slight evolutions were conducted in the safety regulations, licensing process, and inspection and enforcement actions, the major outcome of these reviews will obviously consist of the entrustment of the French Nuclear Safety Authority with the role of the regulatory authority for the security of radioactive sources and the implementation of dedicated provisions. (author)

  16. ADASIR system: a Cuban learning experience from accidents and promotion of radiation safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro Fernandez, Ruben; Ilizastigui Perez, Fidel; Fuente Puch, Andres de la

    2010-01-01

    The Cuban Regulatory Authority is carrying out a National Program for fostering and development of Safety Culture taking into account the wide recognition of the Human factors contribution to radiological events. The program includes the introduction of new regulatory practices and initiatives in order to increase the safety culture in Cuban facilities. The most recent of those initiatives is the System for Radiological Event Analysis, Dissemination and Learning, called ADASIR (Initials of the System's name in Spanish). The main purpose of this system is to provide a better understanding and knowledge of any radiological event reported both in the country and abroad reducing, this way, the possibility of a new occurrence of a similar event in our facilities. A team of regulatory and external experts make together a detailed review of all available information about the event and identify possible root causes, failed barriers and other important data of national interest. The results of such review are documented and sent to any Cuban facility or organization with potential for similar occurrence according to the equipment and practices they have. The document includes an specific checklist which could be used by the facilities to make a self-assessment and evaluate theirs strength and weakness in regards to a similar event. This paper presents the main characteristics and results of this new experience of Cuban Regulatory Authority. (author)

  17. Ontario Hydro experience in the identification and mitigation of potential failures in safety critical software systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huget, R.G.; Viola, M.; Froebel, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    Ontario Hydro has had experience in designing and qualifying safety critical software used in the reactor shutdown systems of its nuclear generating stations. During software design, an analysis of system level hazards and potential hardware failure effects provide input to determining what safeguards will be needed. One form of safeguard, called software self checks, continually monitor the health of the computer on line. The design of self checks usually is a trade off between the amount of computing resources required, the software complexity, and the level of safeguarding provided. As part of the software verification activity, a software hazards analysis is performed, which identifiers any failure modes that could lead to the software causing an unsafe state, and which recommends changes to mitigate that potential. These recommendations may involve a re-structuring of the software to be more resistant to failure, or the introduction of other safeguarding measures. This paper discusses how Ontario Hydro has implemented these aspects of software design and verification into safety critical software used in reactor shutdown systems

  18. Periprocedural safety of aneurysm embolization with the Medina Coil System: the early human experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Aquilla S; Maia, Orlando; Ferreira, Christian Candido; Freitas, Diogo; Mocco, J; Hanel, Ricardo

    2016-02-01

    Intracranial saccular aneurysms, if untreated, carry a high risk of morbidity and mortality from intracranial bleeding. Embolization coils are the most common treatment. We describe the periprocedural safety and performance of the initial human experience with the next generation Medina Coil System. The Medina Coil System is a layered three-dimensional coil made from a radiopaque, shape set core wire, and shape memory alloy outer coil filaments. Nine aneurysms in five patients were selected for treatment with the Medina Coil System. Nine aneurysms in five patients, ranging from 5 to 17 mm in size in various locations, were treated with the Medina Coil System. No procedural or periprocedural complications were encountered. Procedure times, number of coils used to treat the aneurysm, and use of adjunctive devices were much less than anticipated if conventional coil technology had been used. The Medina Coil System is a next generation coil that combines all of the familiar and expected procedural safety and technique concepts associated with conventional coils. We found improved circumferential aneurysm filling, which may lead to improved long term outcomes, with fewer devices and faster operating times. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Data acquisition for the Sodium Loop Safety Facility experiment P4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, R.D.; Kraimer, M.R.; Wilson, R.E.; Gilbert, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    Data acquisition for the Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) experiment P4 used three computers for the continuous collection of data and two computers for the routing and displaying of data. Four of these computer systems were located at the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) site, in Idaho, to access sensor signals from the analog to digital interfaces. The fifth system was located at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in Illinois, and was used mainly for display and storage of data. All display computers were connected together using the DECNET software package. The transmission of data was managed over a dedicated phone line using 9600 baud long distance modems. A stand-alone high speed data acquisition system was also used to record data during planned reactor transients

  20. Maintaining and improving the control and safety systems for the Electromagnetic Calorimeter of the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Di Calafiori, Diogo Raphael; Dissertori, Günther; Holme, Oliver; Jovanovic, Dragoslav; Lustermann, Werner; Zelepoukine, Serguei

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the current architecture of the control and safety systems designed and implemented for the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). An evaluation of system performance during all CMS physics data taking periods is reported, with emphasis on how software and hardware solutions are used to overcome limitations, whilst maintaining and improving reliability and robustness. The outcomes of the CMS ECAL Detector Control System (DCS) Software Analysis Project were a fundamental step towards the integration of all control system applications and the consequent piece-by-piece software improvements allowed a smooth transition to the latest revision of the system. The ongoing task of keeping the system in-line with new hardware technologies and software platforms specified by the CMS DCS Group is discussed. The structure of the comprehensive support service with detailed incident logging is presented in addition to a complet...

  1. Energy deposition measurements in fast reactor safety experiments with fission thermocouple detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, S.A.; Scott, H.L.

    1979-01-01

    The investigation of phenomena occurring in in-pile fast reactor safety experiments requires an accurate measurement of the time dependent energy depositions within the fissile material. At Sandia Laboratories thin-film fission thermocouples are being developed for this purpose. These detectors have high temperature capabilities (400 to 500 0 C), are sodium compatible, and have milli-second time response. A significant advantage of these detectors for use as energy deposition monitors is that they produce an output voltage which is directly dependent on the temperature of a small chip of fissile material within the detectors. However, heat losses within the detector make it necessary to correct the response of the detector to determine the energy deposition. A method of correcting the detector response which uses an inverse convolution procedure has been developed and successfully tested with experimental data obtained in the Sandia Pulse Reactor (SPR-II) and in the Annular Core Research Reactor

  2. 10 Years of operating experience of the valves in the safety systems on Caorso plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curcuruto, S.; Pasquini, M.

    1990-01-01

    The Operating Experience (O.E.) of the valves in the safety related systems on Caorso plant has been analysed. The valves have been grouped according to system, type and manufacturer. All the data on the failures have been respectively drawn out by the O.E. data bank and, in some cases, they have been integrated by informations collected directly on the plant. The events and the relevant causes have been analysed, particularly taking into account the repetitive events. Most of the failures were discovered during the surveillance tests, giving a positive indication of the effectiveness of the periodic test program. It was also that concluded hardware problems caused more failures than human errors both during operation and maintenance. Abnormal distributions of failures on the valves and on their components have been found out. Weak components both mechanical and electrical and pertinent corrective measures have been identified, aimed to eliminate the recurring failure modes

  3. Status, experience and future prospects for the development of probabilistic safety criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    During 27-31 January 1986 the IAEA held a Technical Committee Meeting on ''Status, Experience, and Future Prospects for the Development of Probabilistic Safety Criteria''. Participation included representation of essentially all countries with major developments in the area as well as the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD and CEC. Though it has to be recognized that in such a short time period it is impossible to resolve or even analyse all aspects of this complex issue, the present situation, the main problems and the directions for future work clearly emerged. This report was prepared by the members of the Technical Committee based on the opinions expressed and on the information available at the time of the meeting. The report also contains 20 papers presented at the meeting by participants. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 20 papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Experience of NS disposal at the Enterprise ''Zvezdochka'', in Severodvinsk. Problems of ecological safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, Yuri

    1999-01-01

    According to this presentation, decommissioning and disposal of nuclear submarines is a problem of great concern in Russia. So far more than 150 nuclear submarines have been removed from the Fleet and will be disposed of. Future disposals were not taken into consideration when the shipyards were constructed. Nuclear vessels with loaded cores stay afloat waiting for their turn to be disposed of, often with damaged safety assurance systems and a potential for causing major ecological catastrophes. The presentation deals briefly with some international programmes in progress at Nerpa in Murmansk, Zvezda in Primorye and Zvezdochka in Arkhangelsk and then discusses in more detail the experience of disposal at the Zvezdochka, which under the Start-2 agreement is defined as one of the enterprises dealing with the disposal of strategic nuclear submarines. There they have the qualified staff and the equipment needed. Spent nuclear fuel unloading and removal is the most acute problem

  5. Radiological safety experience in nuclear fuel cycle operations at Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushparaja; Gopalakrishnan, R.K.; Subramaniam, G.

    2000-01-01

    Activities at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai, cover nuclear fuel cycle operations based on natural uranium as the fuel. The facilities include: plant for purification and production of nuclear grade uranium metal, fuel fabrication, research reactor operation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive waste management in each stage. Comprehensive radiation protection programmes for assessment and monitoring of radiological impact of these operations, both in occupational and public environment, have been operating in BARC since beginning. These programmes, based on the 1990 ICRP Recommendations as prescribed by national regulatory body, the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB), are being successfully implemented by the Health, Safety and Environment Group, BARC. Radiation Hazards Control Units attached to the nuclear fuel cycle facilities provide radiation safety surveillance to the various operations. The radiation monitoring programme consists of measurement and control of external exposures by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), hand-held and installed instruments, and internal exposures by bioassay and direct whole body counting using shadow shield counter for beta gamma emitters and phoswich detector based system for plutonium. In addition, an environmental monitoring programme is in place to assess public exposures resulting from the operation of these facilities. The programme involves analysis of various matrices in the environment such as bay water, salt, fish, sediment and computation of resulting public exposures. Based on the operating experience in these plants, improved educating and training programmes for plant operators, have been designed. This, together with the application of new technologies have brought down individual as well as average doses of occupational workers. The environmental releases remain a small fraction of the authorised limits. The operating health physics experience in some of these facilities is discussed in this paper

  6. Links between operating experience feedback of industrial accidents and nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eury, S.P.

    2012-01-01

    Since 1992, the bureau for analysis of industrial risks and pollutions (BARPI) collects, analyzes and publishes information on industrial accidents. The ARIA database lists over 40.000 accidents or incidents, most of which occurred in French classified facilities (ICPE). Events occurring in nuclear facilities are rarely reported in ARIA because they are reported in other databases. This paper describes the process of selection, characterization and review of these accidents, as well as the following consultation with industry trade groups. It is essential to publicize widely the lessons learned from analyzing industrial accidents. To this end, a web site (www.aria.developpement-durable.gouv.fr) gives free access to the accidents summaries, detailed sheets, studies, etc. to professionals and the general public. In addition, the accidents descriptions and characteristics serve as inputs to new regulation projects or risk analyses. Finally, the question of the links between operating experience feedback of industrial accidents and nuclear safety is explored: if the rigorous and well-documented methods of experience feedback in the nuclear field certainly set an example for other activities, nuclear safety can also benefit from inputs coming from the vast diversity of accidents arisen into industrial facilities because of common grounds. Among these common grounds we can find: -) the fuel cycle facilities use many chemicals and chemical processes that are also used by chemical industries; -) the problems resulting from the ageing of equipment affect both heavy and nuclear industries; -) the risk of hydrogen explosion; -) the risk of ammonia, ammonia is a gas used by nuclear power plants as an ingredient in the onsite production of mono-chloramine and ammonia is involved in numerous accidents in the industry: at least 900 entries can be found in the ARIA database. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation

  7. 'In situ' expanded graphite extinguishant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qixin; Shou Yuemei; He Bangrong

    1987-01-01

    This report is concerning the development of the extinguishant for sodium fire and the investigation of its extinguishing property. The experiment result shows that 'in situ' expanded graphite developed by the authors is a kind of extinguishant which extinguishes sodium fire quickly and effectively and has no environment pollution during use and the amount of usage is little

  8. Outline of the presentation on experiences with safety culture from an EDF viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.Y.

    1994-01-01

    Safe operation must draw on an industrial culture based professionalism and strict enforcement. Experience, from abroad and in France, shows that this is not enough to reach the degree of quality we are aiming at. In addition we need an attitude from both men an organizations that questions, when necessary, ways of thinking and working, to give safety the attention it deserves according to its importance. Before TMI, the nuclear community was convinced that the safety approach that has been progressively built up, on the basis of the research performed in various countries, and with the assistance of multiple committees directing their attention to safety matters, has reached the point where the prevention was so effective that a major accident has become 'incredible'. The enquiry commissions that were convened after the accident identified a common mindset: the 'beyond design accident' will not occur. Today we all know that the TMI accident was 'due to happen' some day or another, in some western nuclear power plant. Before Chernobyl, the nuclear community did not think possible a single accident in a nuclear power plant could have socioeconomical consequences 1500 kilometres away from the site, where people would throw away food products because of their radioactivity content. The first independent Soviet enquiry commission on Chernobyl, under the chairmanship of Dr. Steinberg, published its report in Moscow in June 1991, and concluded that the Chernobyl accident was due to happen some time in some RBMK plant. Today we have no excuse if we pretend that, since all measures have been taken to prevent severe accidents in LWR's, we don't have to worry any more about them. We have to be prepared to face them ,and to protect efficiently the plant personnel, the site environment and the public if such a severe accident does occur in an unpredictable way. But we should not consider that such accident is as sure as fate. We know the way to prevent it. The answer is

  9. Experience of implementation of systems of management of professional health and production safety at the Russian entities

    OpenAIRE

    Shmeleva E.; Bylinkina A.

    2016-01-01

    This article is devoted to the study of experience in implementation of management systems, occupational health and safety at Russian enterprises. Concretized the benefits and advantages that the company obtained through the implementation of OHSAS methodology. Authors specify that system approach to management of professional safety on modern industrial enterprise can significantly reduce the probability of emergence of risks of occupational accidents, accidents, and emergencies. In the conc...

  10. Self-expandable metal stent for palliation of malignant dysphagia & quality of life improvement in advanced cancer esophagus: Upper Egypt experience

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Abdelshafy; Mohammed A. Omar; Mohamed Abdel Bary; Mohamed Mostafa Wahaman; Rafaat Abd elaal Bakheet

    2017-01-01

    Background: In advanced cancer esophagus patients, self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) are utilized to relieve malignant difficulty in swallowing and improve their quality of the life. Retrospectively, we evaluated the efficacy, feasibility, and outcomes of SEMS in palliation of malignant dysphagia in advanced cancer esophagus and its' complications. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data of 350 patients with malignant dysphagia due to advanced cancer esophagus from December 2012 to ...

  11. Experience in the implementation of quality assurance program and safety culture assessment of research reactor operation and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syarip; Suryopratomo, K.

    2001-01-01

    The implementation of quality assurance program and safety culture for research reactor operation are of importance to assure its safety status. It comprises an assessment of the quality of both technical and organizational aspects involved in safety. The method for the assessment is based on judging the quality of fulfillment of a number of essential issues for safety i.e. through audit, interview and/or discussions with personnel and management in plant. However, special consideration should be given to the data processing regarding the fuzzy nature of the data i.e. in answering the questionnaire. To accommodate this situation, the SCAP, a computer program based on fuzzy logic for assessing plant safety status, has been developed. As a case study, the experience in the assessment of Kartini research reactor safety status shows that it is strongly related to the implementation of quality assurance program in reactor operation and awareness of reactor operation staffs to safety culture practice. It is also shown that the application of the fuzzy rule in assessing reactor safety status gives a more realistic result than the traditional approach. (author)

  12. Analysis of the impact of correlated benchmark experiments on the validation of codes for criticality safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bock, M.; Stuke, M.; Behler, M.

    2013-01-01

    The validation of a code for criticality safety analysis requires the recalculation of benchmark experiments. The selected benchmark experiments are chosen such that they have properties similar to the application case that has to be assessed. A common source of benchmark experiments is the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments' (ICSBEP Handbook) compiled by the 'International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project' (ICSBEP). In order to take full advantage of the information provided by the individual benchmark descriptions for the application case, the recommended procedure is to perform an uncertainty analysis. The latter is based on the uncertainties of experimental results included in most of the benchmark descriptions. They can be performed by means of the Monte Carlo sampling technique. The consideration of uncertainties is also being introduced in the supplementary sheet of DIN 25478 'Application of computer codes in the assessment of criticality safety'. However, for a correct treatment of uncertainties taking into account the individual uncertainties of the benchmark experiments is insufficient. In addition, correlations between benchmark experiments have to be handled correctly. For example, these correlations can arise due to different cases of a benchmark experiment sharing the same components like fuel pins or fissile solutions. Thus, manufacturing tolerances of these components (e.g. diameter of the fuel pellets) have to be considered in a consistent manner in all cases of the benchmark experiment. At the 2012 meeting of the Expert Group on 'Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment' (UACSA) of the OECD/NEA a benchmark proposal was outlined that aimed for the determination of the impact on benchmark correlations on the estimation of the computational bias of the neutron multiplication factor (k eff ). The analysis presented here is based on this proposal. (orig.)

  13. GTM (Guangdong ten year modifications): the Chinese experience in plant safety alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louvat, J.-P.; Chauvin, T.

    2005-01-01

    The present article introduces the recent experience by Framatome-ANP of developing a large scale engineering project in China. The so-called GTM project deals with the studies and the site implementation of a dozen of major design improvements at the Guangdong Nuclear Power Station on Daya Bay site, stemming from the Periodic Safety Reassessment (PSR) carried-out by the Utility. This article focuses on the benefits of sharing with the Chinese utility the long experience of the study of the modification batches 'lot93' and 'VD2' implemented on the French CPY 900 MWe series units and on the confidence gained throughout years of continuous sinofrench technical cooperation that was established by the plant owner in Framatome- ANP's capabilities to carry-out the successful development of the project. Indeed Framatome-ANP involved its Chinese partners Beijing Institute of Nuclear Engineering, China Nuclear Industry 23rd Company and Shenzhen Nuclear Engineering Company to localize design and erection activities. The successful achievement of the GTM studies proved the maturity of the Chinese engineering competencies to set-up a sustainable industrial scheme devoted to the further development of nuclear engineering services in China. (authors)

  14. Development of a harmonized approach to safety assessment of decommissioning: Lessons learned from international experience (DeSa project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percival, K.; Nokhamzon, J.-G.; Ferch, R.; Batandjieva, B.

    2006-01-01

    The number of nuclear facilities being or planned to be shutdown as they reach the end of their design life, due to accidents or other political and social factors has been increasing worldwide. This has led to an increase in the awareness of regulators and operators of the importance of development and implementation of adequate safety requirements and criteria for decommissioning of these facilities. A general requirement at international and national levels, even for new facilities to be commissioned, is the development of a decommissioning plan, which includes evaluation of potential radiological consequences to public and workers during planned and accidental decommissioning activities. Experience has been gained in the safety assessment of decommissioning at various sites with different complexities and hazard potentials. This experience shows that various approaches have been used in conducting safety assessments and that there is a need for harmonisation of these approaches and for transferring the good practice and lessons learned to other countries, in particular developing countries with limited financial and human resources. The IAEA launched an international project on Evaluation and Demonstration of Safety during Decommissioning (DeSa) in 2004 to provide a forum for exchange of lessons learned between site operators, regulators, safety assessors and other specialists in safety assessment of decommissioning of nuclear power plants, research reactors, laboratories, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, etc. This paper presents the lessons learned through the project up to date, i.e.; (i) a common approach to safety assessment is being applied worldwide with the following steps - establishment of assessment framework; description of the facility; definition of decommissioning activities; hazard identification and analysis; calculation of consequences; and analysis of results; (ii) a deterministic approach to safety assessment is most commonly applied; (iii) a

  15. Development of reliability database for safety-related I and C component based on operating experience of KSNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, S. C.; Han, S. H.; Min, K. R.

    2001-01-01

    Reliability database for safety-related I and C components has been developed, based on domestic operating experience of total 8.63 years from four units-Yonggwang Units 3 and 4, and Ulchin Units 3 and 4. This plant-specific data of safety-related I and C components has compared with operating experience for CE-supplied plants in U.S.A. As a results, we found that on the whole the domestic reliability data was similar to CE-supplied plants in USA, through lots of failures occurred early in the commercial operation were included in our analyses without percolation

  16. What Expands in an Expanding Universe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ A. DE FREITAS PACHECO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the present investigation, the possible effects of the expansion of the Universe on systems bonded either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces, are reconsidered. It will be shown that the acceleration (positive or negative of the expanding background, is the determinant factor affecting planetary orbits and atomic sizes. In the presently accepted cosmology (ΛCDM all bonded systems are expanding at a decreasing rate that tends to be zero as the universe enters in a de Sitter phase. It is worth mentioning that the estimated expansion rates are rather small and they can be neglected for all practical purposes.

  17. What Expands in an Expanding Universe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, José A De Freitas

    2015-01-01

    In the present investigation, the possible effects of the expansion of the Universe on systems bonded either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces, are reconsidered. It will be shown that the acceleration (positive or negative) of the expanding background, is the determinant factor affecting planetary orbits and atomic sizes. In the presently accepted cosmology (ΛCDM) all bonded systems are expanding at a decreasing rate that tends to be zero as the universe enters in a de Sitter phase. It is worth mentioning that the estimated expansion rates are rather small and they can be neglected for all practical purposes.

  18. Improving Safety, Quality and Efficiency through the Management of Emerging Processes: The TenarisDalmine Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonometti, Patrizia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this contribution is to describe a new complexity-science-based approach for improving safety, quality and efficiency and the way it was implemented by TenarisDalmine. Design/methodology/approach: This methodology is called "a safety-building community". It consists of a safety-behaviour social self-construction…

  19. National and foreign research of Anaferon Kid: efficacy, safety and experience of application (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Lobzin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest in acute respiratory viral infections (ARVI in children does not tend to decrease and is determined by their high prevalence, relatedness to «uncontrollable infections» in most cases and presence of age limits in the use of antiviral drugs. Presently, focus on the use of national drugs is made in the RF clinical practice. An innovative drug Anaferon for children was developed by the Russian pharmaceutical company OOO «NPF «Materia Medica Holding» and registered in Russia in 2002.The summary purpose is to classify and analyze national and international publications on the results of non-clinical and clinical investigation of Anaferon for children efficacy and safety in ARVI and other viral infections.Study method: exploratory and analytical.Results: the summary presents the data of non-clinical studies justifying the drug mechanism of action at molecular level ensuring its combined antiviral and immunomodulating efficacy. The results obtained in the experiment were verified by clinical studies and are reflected in numerous scientific publications including international ones. The summary contains analysis of the results of clinical studies of the drug in children with ARVI including influenza. Anaferon for children was found to reduce duration of the main clinical symptoms of ARVI and influenza, incidence of bacterial complications, it is well-tolerated and has high safety profile. The open-label randomized comparative study of Anaferon for children efficacy and safety vs. Oseltamivir in influenza demonstrated clinical efficacy of these drugs. Numerous publications evidence that Anaferon for children exerts antiviral effect against most viruses causing acute respiratory viral infections as well as herpes viruses, viruses causing intestinal infections and tick-borne encephalitis. The list of scientific publications on the drug consists of approximately 800 references including more than 50 articles in

  20. Regulatory Experience of the Embedded Digital Devices for Safety I and C Systems on Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. M.; Lee, H. K.; Park, H. S. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Conventional I and C(Instrumentation and Control) systems are tend to becoming unavailable and being replaced by smart equipment. These smart equipment is usually called embedded digital devices (EDDs) or industrial digital devices of limited functionality. Usually, some of these devices are found embedded in plant equipment such as sensing instrumentation, motors, pumps, actuators and breakers. They typically have a micro-processor, RAM, communication interface, a power source, etc. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) is concerning that these EDDs might exist in procured equipment used in safety systems without the devices having been explicitly identified in procurement documentation. This paper addresses the regulatory experiences of KINS of the EDDs for safety I and C systems and the future works for them. In this paper, we showed regulatory experiences of EDDs which used for safety grade equipment. EDDs might exist in safety grade procured equipment without explicit identification. Undetected defects of EDDs might be the potential safety concerns. EDDs should meet certain specific requirements in order to be selected and used in safety I and C system. We have plan to develop technical positions for identification and qualifying them. The technical position will address, but may not be limited to, quality and reliability, CCFs via software errors, EMC, and CGID for EDDs.

  1. The effects of risk perception and flight experience on airline pilots' locus of control with regard to safety operation behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Xuqun; Ji, Ming; Han, Haiyan

    2013-08-01

    The primary objective of this paper was to integrate two research traditions, social cognition approach and individual state approach, and to understand the relationships between locus of control (LOC), risk perception, flight time, and safety operation behavior (SOB) among Chinese airline pilots. The study sample consisted of 193 commercial airline pilots from China Southern Airlines Ltd. The results showed that internal locus of control directly affected pilot safety operation behavior. Risk perception seemed to mediate the relationship between locus of control and safety operation behaviors, and total flight time moderated internal locus of control. Thus, locus of control primarily influences safety operation behavior indirectly by affecting risk perception. The total effect of internal locus of control on safety behaviors is larger than that of external locus of control. Furthermore, the safety benefit of flight experience is more pronounced among pilots with high internal loci of control in the early and middle flight building stages. Practical implications for aviation safety and directions for future research are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lessons learned from the Galileo and Ulysses flight safety review experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Gary L.

    1998-01-01

    In preparation for the launches of the Galileo and Ulysses spacecraft, a very comprehensive aerospace nuclear safety program and flight safety review were conducted. A review of this work has highlighted a number of important lessons which should be considered in the safety analysis and review of future space nuclear systems. These lessons have been grouped into six general categories: (1) establishment of the purpose, objectives and scope of the safety process; (2) establishment of charters defining the roles of the various participants; (3) provision of adequate resources; (4) provision of timely peer-reviewed information to support the safety program; (5) establishment of general ground rules for the safety review; and (6) agreement on the kinds of information to be provided from the safety review process

  3. [The application of Y-shaped self-expandable covered metal stents in the thoracostomach-airway fistula: a single center, 11 years experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yi; Li, Tengfei; Han, Xinwei; Wu, Gang; Ren, Jianzhuang; Ren, Kewei; Lu, Huibin; Zhang, Quanhui; Li, Zongming

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the clinical feasibility and efficacy of Y-shaped self-expandable covered metal stents (Y-stents) in the management of thoracostomach-airway fistula. Retrospective analysis was performed for 108 patients treated for thoracostomach-airway fistula with Y-shaped self-expandable coated metal stents between April 2003 and October 2014. Y-stents were designed based on the dimensions of trachea and bronchus and sites of the fistula and then were inserted under DSA monitoring. There were 65 cases with single big Y-stent placement, 26 cases with single small Y-stent placement, 23 cases with double Y-stents placement, and 1 case with 3 Y-stents placement. Stent implantation was successfully accomplished with single manipulation in all patients. Complete occlusion of the fistula was obtained in 104 patients after the primary manipulation, and 4 patients required a secondary manipulation where a double Y-stents was inserted because of failure of primary manipulate. Ninety-two patients completed the follow-up , while 16 were lost. Fifty-nine patients died while 33 were alive with marked improvement in their quality of life. The placement of Y-stents can effectively occlude the thoracostomach-airway fistula in patients who had had the esophageal tumors resected. The technique is not only feasible but reliable to improve the quality of life of the patients.

  4. Nuclear safety: operational aspects. 5. Data Communication in a Nuclear Digital I and C System-The Korean Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Tae-Wook; Byun, Jae-Youb; Jhun, James S.

    2001-01-01

    Full-scale use of a microprocessor-based digital instrumentation and control (I and C) system for the control of nuclear power plants (NPPs) in Korea has spanned >14 yr and has covered eight plants. Experience gained from these applications is substantial. In this paper, the discussion centers on the design experience of the data communication portion of the digital I and C system along with the associated nuclear licensing issues. The data communication designs of the eight plants (four operating and four under construction) have changed from project to project and from supplier to supplier. The first two of the eight plants, Yonggwang NPP (YGN) Units 3 and 4 (YGN-3 and 4) included only the on/off (binary) controls in the digital I and C system. The subsequent six plants had a fully expanded scope of plant controls including both on/off controls as well as continuous (analog) controls. These latter six plants are Ulchin NPP (UCN) Units 3 and 4 (UCN 3 and 4), YGN Units 5 and 6 (YGN 5 and 6), and UCN Units 5 and 6 (UCN 5 and 6) in the order of their construction start dates. The digital system suppliers are Forney for YGN 3 and 4 and UCN 5 and 6; and Eaton for UCN 3 and 4 and YGN 5 and 6. The Forney system uses bus network architecture, while the Eaton system is based on a ring network configuration. The design differences, advantages, disadvantages, and specific licensing issues of these two configurations unique to the NPP operating environment are discussed in the abstract. The discussions are organized into two parts: the Forney system of YGN 3 and 4 and the Eaton system of YGN 5 and 6. The Forney system of UCN 5 and 6 is still in its early stage of design and manufacture, and it is basically similar to the design of YGN 3 and 4 except for the system upgrade from a 16- to a 32-bit system and the addition of an analog plant monitoring and control function. The Eaton system of UCN 3 and 4 is essentially identical to that of YGN 5 and 6 except that the YGN 5 and 6

  5. Full scale reactor safety experiments performed in the Marviken Power Station Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoren, H.G.; Ericson, L.

    1977-01-01

    Since 1972 experiments oriented towards increasing the understanding of reactor safety processes have been performed at the Marviken Power Station. This was originally built as a direct cycle BHWR but was never taken into nuclear operation. In addition to Sweden, the countries represented in these experiments are Denmark, the Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, Norway, the United States, the Netherlands, France and Japan. The first series of sixteen experiments included studies of the response of the PS-containment to simulated ruptures in the pipe systems that are connected to the pressure vessel. These tests were completed in 1973 and also included experimental studies of iodine transport, containment leakage, the behaviour of auxiliary components under accident conditions and pressure fluctuations in the wetwell water pool. One of the more essential findings of the tests was that the containment performance was in accordance with the pre-test calculations. A second series of eight blowdown tests was begun in February 1976. The main purpose of these tests is to provide additional information as to the characteristics of the pressure oscillations inside the containment and primarily in the wetwell water pool under different conditions. These oscillations were observed in the first series of blowdowns but only low frequencies could then be detected due to limitations in the measurement system. The measurement system was therefore substantially extended for this second series of experiments. A summary of the results from these two sets of blowdown tests are given in the paper. In 1976 preparations for a new test program were initiated. The objective of these tests is to improve the understanding of critical flow in the low quality and subcooled flow regions through short length, large diameter pipes. Extensive modifications of the test facility will be necessary in order to allow a discharge flow through openings which are up to 500 mm in diameter. Advanced plans

  6. Promoting individual learning for trainees with perceived high helplessness: experiences of a safety training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Fariba; Khodabakhsh, Mohamad Reza

    2014-01-01

    The article arises from a research project investigating the effectiveness of safety training on changing attitudes toward safety issues. Followed by the training intervention was observed that employees' helplessness decreased. The researchers have come to the idea of investigating how safety training can reduce perceived helplessness. Thus, this research examined the effectiveness of safety training on reducing employees' helplessness with attention to the mediating role of attitude toward safety issues. The current study was an experimental study with the control group. A total of 204 (101 experimental group and 103 control group) completed safety attitude questionnaire and perceived helplessness before a safety training course including four 90-min sessions over 4 consecutive days in Esfahan Steel Company in 2012 between October and December. Only members of the experimental group participated in this course. These questionnaires, approximately 30 days later, again were run on members of both groups. Data were analyzed using descriptive indexes, t-, and F-test. RESULTS by comparing the two groups showed that safety training was effective only on individuals with perceived low helplessness (p = 0.02). In individuals with perceived high helplessness, safety training only with changing safety attitudes can reduce the perceived helplessness.

  7. Acoustic detection of boiling in the Sodium Loop Safety Facility in-reactor experiment P1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, W.M.; Anderson, T.T.; Bobis, J.P.

    1976-06-01

    Acoustic data were obtained from two high-temperature lithium niobate microphones on the loop background noise and transient pressure pulses during the Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) P1 in-reactor experiment. This experiment simulated an LMFBR loss-of-piping-integrity (LOPI) transient on a nineteen element, end-of-life, enriched-UO 2 fuel assembly. The microphones were exposed to liquid sodium at a distance 4.85 meters above the reactor core at temperatures between 315 0 and 590 0 C. The distance and location of the microphones in the P1 Test Train provided an attenuative transmission path which was undesirable for optimum acoustic detection of sodium boiling and fuel failure. The data gathered on the loop background noise was observed to be dominated by pump and electrical noise at frequencies below 1.5 KHz and appeared to be dominated by flow induced local turbulence noise at higher frequencies. During the period of time that the sodium in the fuel assembly was at its saturation temperature 943 0 C (1730 0 F), as indicated by the wire wrap thermocouples, several discrete pulses were observed with peak-to-peak pressure between 3.3 kPa and 7.9 kPa and center frequencies between 360 and 550 Hz. The pulses occurred at two separate gradually increasing repetition rates. These observations appear to be consistent with the result of an impulsive forcing function interacting with a band passed Helmholtz resonator. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that sodium boiling occurred in the P1 fuel assembly, resulting in the formation of individual voids that collapsed upon reaching the subcooled sodium. These data provide pertinent information regarding the feasibility of sodium boiling detection and may provide additional insight into the dynamics of the void behavior

  8. Safety significance of component ageing, exemplary for MOV, based on French and German operating experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morlent, O. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire; Michel, F. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Garching (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    An outline is given of how IPSN and GRS assess the effects of physical ageing on the safety of French and German Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) on the basis of the available knowledge and how investigations are carried out. The presentation is focused exemplary on a preliminary study illustrating approaches for the evaluation of the ageing behaviour of active components, the motor-operated valves (MOV). The results so far seems to demonstrate that the developed methodological approaches are suitable to obtain qualitative evidence with regard to the ageing behaviour of technical facilities such as MOV. The evaluation of the operating experience with French 900 MWe plants seems to reveal, for MOV of one system, a trend similar to some international findings about ageing-related events with increasing operating time; this trend will have to be confirmed. For the German NPPs so far, there appears to be no significant increase of ageing-related events concerning MOV as the plants get older. Future work on ageing scheduled at IPSN and GRS includes further cooperation on this issue, too; a deep analysis is necessary to explain the reasons of such apparent differences before any conclusion. (authors)

  9. Safety significance of component ageing, exemplary for MOV, based on French and German operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morlent, O.

    2001-01-01

    An outline is given of how IPSN and GRS assess the effects of physical ageing on the safety of French and German Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) on the basis of the available knowledge and how investigations are carried out. The presentation is focused exemplary on a preliminary study illustrating approaches for the evaluation of the ageing behaviour of active components, the motor-operated valves (MOV). The results so far seems to demonstrate that the developed methodological approaches are suitable to obtain qualitative evidence with regard to the ageing behaviour of technical facilities such as MOV. The evaluation of the operating experience with French 900 MWe plants seems to reveal, for MOV of one system, a trend similar to some international findings about ageing-related events with increasing operating time; this trend will have to be confirmed. For the German NPPs so far, there appears to be no significant increase of ageing-related events concerning MOV as the plants get older. Future work on ageing scheduled at IPSN and GRS includes further cooperation on this issue, too; a deep analysis is necessary to explain the reasons of such apparent differences before any conclusion. (authors)

  10. Safety of Percutaneous Patent Ductus Arteriosus Closure: An Unselected Multicenter Population Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    El‐Said, Howaida G.; Bratincsak, Andras; Foerster, Susan R.; Murphy, Joshua J.; Vincent, Julie; Holzer, Ralf; Porras, Diego; Moore, John; Bergersen, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Background The technique and safety of transcatheter patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) closure have evolved during the past 20 years. We sought to report a multicenter experience of PDA closure with a focus on the rate of adverse events (AE) and a review of institutional practice differences. Methods and Results Outcome data on transcatheter PDA closure were collected at 8 centers prospectively using a multicenter registry (Congenital Cardiac Catheterization Project on Outcome Registry). Between February 2007 and June 2010, 496 PDA closures were recorded using a device in 338 (68%) or coils in 158 (32%). Most patients had an isolated PDA (90%). Fifty percent of patients were between 6 months and 3 years old, with only 40 patients (8%) closure and 1 mm (range 0.5 to 6 mm; IQR 1 to 2 mm) for coil closure (P2 mm (all P1.5 mm. In 9% of cases (n=46), an AE occurred; however, only 11 (2%) were classified as high severity. Younger age was associated with a higher AE rate. Coil‐related AEs were more common than device‐related AEs (10% versus 2%, Pclosure in the present era has a very low rate of complications, although these are higher in younger children. Technical intervention‐related events were more common in coil procedures compared with device procedures. For PDAs ≤2.5 mm in diameter, institutional differences in preference for device versus coil exist. PMID:24284214

  11. Safety assessment document (SAD) for the Princeton Beta Experiment Modification (PBX-M)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stencel, J.R.; Parsells, R.F.

    1988-04-01

    The Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M) is an experimental device of the tokamak type. A tokamak is characterized by a strong toroidal magnetic field composed of an externally driven component parallel to the torus centerline modified by the field produced by a transformer-driven current (OH) in the confined plasma. A second magnetic field parallel to the major toroidal axis is added to provide radial equilibrium for the plasma. As an advanced tokamak, PBX-M will have additional magnetic fields to reshape the plasma cross section from a circle into a kidney bean shape; it will also be equipped with 6MW or more of auxiliary heating power provided by four neutral beam injectors, with RF systems, and with an extensive set of diagnostics. Potential hazards associated with PBX-M, which are analyzed in this report, result from energy stored in the magnetic fields, high voltages necessary for the operation of some of the equipment and diagnostics, neutron radiation when the neutral beams are run with deuterium and x-rays, especially those emitted as a result of plasma-wall interaction. This report satisfies the requirements set forth in the PPPL Health and Safety Directives, specifically HSD-5003, and in DOE Order 5481.1B and its Chicago operations supplement (DOE86, DOE82)

  12. [Drug supply chain safety in hospitals: current data and experience of the Grenoble university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedouch, P; Baudrant, M; Detavernier, M; Rey, C; Brudieu, E; Foroni, L; Allenet, B; Calop, J

    2009-01-01

    Drug supply chain safety has become a priority for public health which implies a collective process. This process associates all health professionals including the pharmacist who plays a major role. The objective of this present paper is to describe the several approaches proven effective in the reduction of drug-related problem in hospital, illustrated by the Grenoble University Hospital experience. The pharmacist gets involved first in the general strategy of hospital drug supply chain, second by his direct implication in clinical activities. The general strategy of drug supply chain combines risk management, coordination of the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee, selection and purchase of drugs and organisation of drug supply chain. Computer management of drug supply chain is a major evolution. Nominative drug delivering has to be a prior objective and its implementation modalities have to be defined: centralized or decentralized in wards, manual or automated. Also, new technologies allow the automation of overall drug distribution from central pharmacy and the implementation of automated drug dispensing systems into wards. The development of centralised drug preparation allows a safe compounding of high risk drugs, like cytotoxic drugs. The pharmacist should develop his clinical activities with patients and other health care professionals in order to optimise clinical decisions (medication review, drug order analysis) and patients follow-up (therapeutic monitoring, patient education, discharge consultation).

  13. Facing new safety-challenges in a large particle accelerator experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Reiner

    1999-01-01

    An upgraded safety concept for CMS has been adapted to the size of the project and its organisational challenges under today's budgetary constraints, as well as to the increasing levels of risk. Strong magnetic fields and high radiation levels, including neutrons, pose additional hazards to materials, to operators, to maintenance and to ultimate deposit of activated materials. CMS also fits the insurer's risk-description for modern facilities, i.e. characterised by "higher energy density, more combustible materials and unattended operation". The regulatory environment, consisting essentially of CERN's autonomous regulations as well as of those of its host countries, also need to be satisfied with much attention. To face this challenge, seven distinct safety management tools have been identified, which are described in some detail, namely clear safety objectives, documented safety requirements, open items list, safety ( and design)reviews, safety risk analysis, enforcement of compliance and quality management....

  14. The integrated place of tracheobronchial stents in the multidisciplinary management of large post-pneumonectomy fistulas: our experience using a novel customised conical self-expandable metallic stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutau, Hervé; Breen, David Patrick; Gomez, Carine; Thomas, Pascal Alexandre; Vergnon, Jean-Michel

    2011-02-01

    Stump dehiscence after pneumonectomy is a cause of morbidity and mortality in patients treated for non-small-cell lung carcinoma. Surgical repair remains the treatment of choice but can be postponed or contraindicated. Bronchoscopic techniques may be an option with curative intent or as a bridge towards definitive surgery. The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy and the outcome of a new customised covered conical self-expandable metallic stent in the management of large bronchopleural fistulas complicating pneumonectomies. A case series using chart review of non-operable patients presenting with large bronchopleural fistulas (>6mm) post-pneumonectomies as a definitive treatment with curative intent for non-small-cell lung carcinomas and requiring the use of a dedicated conical shaped stent in two tertiary referral centres. Seven patients presenting large post-pneumonectomy fistulas (between 6 and 12 mm) were included. Cessation of the air leak and clinical improvement was achieved in all the patients after stent placement. Stent-related complications (two migrations and one stent rupture) were successfully managed using bronchoscopic techniques in two patients and surgery in one. Mortality, mainly related to overwhelming sepsis, was 57%. Delayed definitive surgery was achieved successfully in three patients (43%). This case series assesses the short-term clinical efficacy of a new customised covered conical self-expandable metallic stent in the multidisciplinary management of large bronchopleural fistulas complicating pneumonectomies in patients deemed non-operable. Long-term benefits are jeopardised by infectious complications. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessing risks and regulating safety standards in the oil and gas industry: the Peruvian experience.

    OpenAIRE

    Arturo Leonardo Vásquez Cordano; Julio Salvador Jácome; Raúl Lizardo García Carpio; Victor Fernández Guzman

    2013-01-01

    Environmental regulation has usually focused on controlling continuous sources of pollution such as CO2 emissions through carbon taxes. However, the 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has shown that accidents associated to safety failures can also generate bursts of pollution with serious environmental consequences. Regulating safety conditions to prevent accidents in the oil and gas industry is challenging because public regulators cannot perfectly observe whether firms comply with safety ...

  16. Safety and reliability in the 90s: will past experience or prediction meet our needs?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, M.H.; Cox, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-six papers are presented in the proceedings of the 1990 Safety and Reliability Society Symposium. The papers selected provide current thinking on improved methods for identification, quantification and management of risks based on the safety culture developed across a range of industries during the last decade. In particular organizational and management factors feature in a large number of the papers. Two papers on the safety of all the operating plants at Sellafield's irradiated nuclear fuel handling and reprocessing site and the selection of field component reliability data for use in nuclear safety studies are selected and indexed separately. (author)

  17. Experience with safety assessment of digital upgrading of IandC in VVER type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wach, D.; Mulka, B.; Schnuerer, G.

    1997-01-01

    The digital upgrading of IandC systems important to safety in WWER type reactors requires a broad expertise in various knowledge fields. The approach of the Institute for safety Technology to the qualification and categorization of safety-critical software systems is highlighted. The role of the Institute in the qualification of the Teleperm XS and the type testing of its components is described. The aspects of the safety assessment of digital IandC systems in WWER type reactors is discussed in some detail. (A.K.)

  18. Efficacy and safety of tenofovir in chronic hepatitis B: Australian real world experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovett, Grace C; Nguyen, Tin; Iser, David M; Holmes, Jacinta A; Chen, Robert; Demediuk, Barbara; Shaw, Gideon; Bell, Sally J; Desmond, Paul V; Thompson, Alexander J

    2017-01-08

    To evaluate the long-term treatment outcomes of tenofovir therapy in patients in a real world Australian tertiary care setting. We performed a retrospective analysis of treatment outcomes among treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced patients receiving a minimum 3 mo tenofovir therapy through St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne, Australia. We included patients receiving tenofovir [tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)] monotherapy, as well as patients treated with TDF in combination with a second antiviral agent. Patients were excluded if they demonstrated human immune-deficiency virus/hepatitis C virus/hepatitis delta virus coinfection or were less than 18 years of age. We considered virological and biochemical response, as well as safety outcomes. Virological response was determined by measurement of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA using sensitive assays; biochemical response was determined via serum liver function tests; histological response was determined from liver biopsy and fibroscan; safety analysis focused on glomerular renal function and bone mineral density. The primary efficacy endpoint was complete virological suppression over time, defined by HBV DNA < 20 IU/mL. Secondary efficacy endpoints included rates of biochemical response, and HB e antigen (HBeAg)/HB surface antigen loss and seroconversion over time. Ninety-two patients were identified who fulfilled the enrolment criteria. Median follow-up was 26 mo (range 3-114). Mean age was 46 (24-78) years, 64 (70%) were male and 77 (84%) were of Asian origin. 55 (60%) patients were treatment-naïve and 62 patients (67%) were HBeAg-negative. Complete virological suppression was achieved by 45/65 (71%) patients at 12 mo, 37/46 (80%) at 24 mo and 25/28 (89%) at 36 mo. Partial virological response (HBV DNA 20-2000 IU/mL) was achieved by 89/92 (96.7%) of patients. Multivariate analysis showed a significant relationship between virological suppression at end of follow-up and baseline HBV DNA level (OR = 0.897, 95%CI

  19. Improving the international system for operating experience feedback. INSAG-23. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The operational safety performance of nuclear facilities has, in general, improved notably over time throughout the world. This has been achieved, in part, through operating experience feedback (OEF) and the introduction of new technology. While the continued strong safety performance by operators is encouraging, safety significant events continue to recur in nuclear installations. This indicates that operators are not learning and applying the lessons that experience can teach us. This report focuses on systems that are operated by intergovernmental organizations with close contacts to national regulatory authorities. These systems provide an alternative network to the worldwide system employed by the operators of nuclear facilities known as the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO). The WANO system is restricted to its members, who have concluded that keeping the information exchanged confidential improves its usefulness. INSAG recognizes the merits of this approach, particularly in light of the primary responsibility of licensed operators for the safety of their facilities. Nevertheless, INSAG encourages WANO to share key safety lessons with national regulatory authorities and intergovernmental organization

  20. Evaluation of the short- and long-term effectiveness and safety of fully covered self-expandable metal stents for drainage of pancreatic fluid collections: results of a Spanish nationwide registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Sequeiros, Enrique; Baron, Todd H; Pérez-Miranda, Manuel; Sánchez-Yagüe, Andres; Gornals, Joan; Gonzalez-Huix, Ferran; de la Serna, Carlos; Gonzalez Martin, Juan Angel; Gimeno-Garcia, Antonio Z; Marra-Lopez, Carlos; Castellot, Ana; Alberca, Fernando; Fernandez-Urien, Ignacio; Aparicio, Jose Ramon; Legaz, Maria Luisa; Sendino, Oriol; Loras, Carmen; Subtil, Jose Carlos; Nerin, Juan; Perez-Carreras, Mercedes; Diaz-Tasende, Jose; Perez, Gustavo; Repiso, Alejandro; Vilella, Angels; Dolz, Carlos; Alvarez, Alberto; Rodriguez, Santiago; Esteban, Jose Miguel; Juzgado, Diego; Albillos, Agustin

    2016-09-01

    Initial reports suggest that fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FCSEMSs) may be better suited for drainage of dense pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs), such as walled-off pancreatic necrosis. The primary aim was to analyze the effectiveness and safety of FCSEMSs for drainage of different types of PFCs in a large cohort. The secondary aim was to investigate which type of FCSEMS is superior. This was a retrospective, noncomparative review of a nationwide database involving all hospitals in Spain performing EUS-guided PFC drainage. From April 2008 to August 2013, all patients undergoing PFC drainage with an FCSEMS were included in a database. The main outcome measurements were technical success, short-term (2 weeks) and long-term (6 months) effectiveness, adverse events, and need for surgery. The study included 211 patients (pseudocyst/walled-off pancreatic necrosis, 53%/47%). The FCSEMSs used were straight biliary (66%) or lumen-apposing (34%). Technical success was achieved in 97% of patients (95% confidence interval [CI], 93%-99%). Short-term- and long-term clinical success was obtained in 94% (95% CI, 89%-97%) and 85% (95% CI, 79%-89%) of patients, respectively. Adverse events occurred in 21% of patients (95% CI, 16%-27%): infection (11%), bleeding (7%), and stent migration and/or perforation (3%). By multivariate analysis, patient age (>58 years) and previous failed drainage were the most important factors associated with negative outcome. An FCSEMS is effective and safe for PFC drainage. Older patients with a history of unsuccessful drainage are more likely to fail EUS-guided drainage. The type of FCSEMS does not seem to influence patient outcome. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [The experience of involvement of volunteers into maintenance of infection safety during period of implementation of mass activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamov, A A; Balabanova, L A; Zamalieva, M A

    2016-01-01

    The article presents experience of Rospotrebnadzor in the Republic of Tatarstan in the field of preventive medicine concerning training of volunteers on issues of infection safety with purpose of prevention of ictuses of infection diseases during mass activities with international participation in the period of XXVII World Summer Students Games. The model of hygienic training for volunteers provides two directions: training for volunteers ’ leaders on issues of infection safety and remote course for involved volunteers. During period of preparation for the Students Games-2013 hygienic training was organized for volunteers-leaders in the field of infection safety with following attestation. The modern training technologies were applied. The volunteers-leaders familiarized with groups of infection diseases including the most dangerous ones, investigated with expert algorithm of actions to be applied in case of suspicion on infection disease in gest or participant of the Games-2013 to secure one's health and health of immediate population. The active volunteers-leaders became trainers and coaches in the field of infection safety. The second stage of infection safety training organized by youth trainers' pool in number of 30 individuals the training technology "Equal trains equal" was applied for hygienic training of volunteers involved at epidemiologically significant objects (food objects, hotels, accompaniment of guests and sportsmen). The volunteers-leaders trained to infection safety 1400 volunteers. The format of electronic personal cabinet and remote course were selected as tools of post-training monitoring.

  2. Safety evaluation of the NSRR facility relevant to the modification for improved pulse operation and preirradiated fuel experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inabe, Teruo; Terakado, Yoshibumi; Tanzawa, Sadamitsu; Katagiri, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Hideo

    1988-11-01

    The Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) is a pulse reactor for the inpile experiments to study the fuel behavior under reactivity initiated accident conditions. The present operation modes of the NSRR consist of the steady state operation up to 300 kW and the natural pulse operation in which a sharp pulsed power is generated from substantially zero power level. In addition to these, two new modes of shaped pulse operation and combined pulse operation will be conducted in the near future as the improved pulse operations. A transient power up to 10 MW will be generated in the shaped pulse operation, and a combination of a transient power up to 10 MW and a sharp pulsed power will be generated in the combined pulse operation. Furthermore, preirradiated fuel rods will be employed in the future experiments whereas the present experiments are confined to the test specimens of unirradiated fuel rods. To provide for these programs, the fundamental design works relevant to the modification of the reactor facility including the reactor instrumentation and control systems and experimental provision were developed. The reactor safety evaluation is prerequisite for confirming the propriety of the fundamental design of the reactor facility from the safety point of view. The safety evaluation was therefore conducted postulating such events that would bring about abnormal conditions in the reactor facility. As a result of the safety evaluation, it has been confirmed as to the NSRR facility after modification that the anticipated transients, the postulated accidents, the major accident and the hypothetical accident do not result respectively in any serious safety problem and that the fundamental design principles and the reactor siting are adequate and acceptable. (author)

  3. NARCISS critical stand experiments for studying the nuclear safety in accident water immersion of highly enriched uranium dioxide fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoj, N.N.; Glushkov, E.S.; Bubelev, V.G.

    2005-01-01

    A brief description of the Topaz-2 SNPS designed under scientific supervision of RRC KI in Russia, and of the NARCISS critical facility, is given. At the NARCISS critical facility, neutronic peculiarities and nuclear safety issues of the Topaz-2 system reactor were studied experimentally. This work is devoted to a detailed description of experiments on investigation of criticality safety in accident water immersion og highly enriched uranium dioxide fuel elements, performed at the NARCISS facility. The experiments were carried out at water-moderated critical assemblies with varying height, number, and spacing of fuel elements. The results obtained in the critical experiments, computational models of the investigated critical configurations, and comparison of the computational and experimental results are given [ru

  4. Development of a health safety culture under different social and cultural conditions: lessons from the experiences of Japanese utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Taketoshi

    1998-01-01

    In anticipation of the steady expansion of nuclear power in Asia, all organizations involved in operating nuclear facilities are emphasizing the importance of regional cooperation in the development and enhancement of a safety culture. This paper, based on employees' attitudinal surveys, provides some lessons learned from the experiences of Japanese electric utilities in developing and enhancing a sound safety culture within the organizations which are operating nuclear power plants and related facilities, and discusses approaches for cooperation in Asia, taking into account the different socio-cultural environments. (author)

  5. Developing a driving Safety Index using a Delphi stated preference experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamson, Samantha; Wardman, Mark; Batley, Richard; Carsten, Oliver

    2008-03-01

    Whilst empirical evidence is available concerning the effect of some aspects of driving behaviour on safety (e.g. speed choice), there is scant knowledge about safety thresholds, i.e. the point at which behaviour can be considered unsafe. Furthermore, it is almost impossible to ascertain the interaction between various aspects of driving behaviour. For example, how might drivers' lateral control of a vehicle be mediated by their speed choice-are the effects additive or do they cancel each other out. Complex experimental or observational studies would need to be undertaken to establish the nature of such effects. As an alternative, a Delphi study was undertaken to use expert judgement as a way of deriving a first approximation of these threshold and combinatory effects. Using a stated preference technique, road safety professionals make judgements about drivers' safe or unsafe behaviour. The aim was to understand the relative weightings that are assigned to a number of driver behaviours and thereby to construct a Safety Index. As expected, experts were able to establish thresholds, above (or below) which changes to the behavioural parameters had minimal impact on safety. This provided us with a Safety Index, based on a model that had face validity and a convincing range of values. However, the experts found the task of combining these driver behaviours more difficult, reflecting the elusive nature of safety estimates. Suggestions for future validation of our Safety Index are provided.

  6. Safety Assessment in the AREVA Group: Operating Experience from a Self-Assessment Tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coye de Brunélis, T.; Mignot, E.; Sidaner, J.-F.

    2016-01-01

    The expression “safety culture” first appeared following analysis of the Chernobyl accident in 1986. It was first defined in INSAG-4 (International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group safety series) in 1991. Other events have occurred in nuclear facilities and during transportation since Chernobyl: Tokai Mura in 1999, Roissy Transport in 2002, Davis Besse in 2002, Thorp in 2005. These events show that the initial approach was too simplistic. Based on this observation, the definition of safety culture was supplemented by including concepts of cultural value (associated with the country and the company) and human and organizational factors, and was integrated in that form with the emergence and implementation of integrated management systems (IMS). Today, the concept of nuclear safety culture covers a wide set of factors such as safety, quality, corporate culture, defined processes and policies, organizations and related resources. Any assessment of people’s safety culture, particularly people directly involved in facility operations, is thus part of a comprehensive policy and contributes to a de facto demonstration of the priority which management assigns to safety.

  7. The role of parental risk judgements, transport safety attitudes, transport priorities and accident experiences on pupils' walking to school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh, Milad; Nordfjaern, Trond; Mamdoohi, Amir Reza; Shariat Mohaymany, Afshin

    2017-05-01

    Walking to school could improve pupils' health condition and might also reduce the use of motorized transport modes, which leads to both traffic congestion and air pollution. The current study aims to examine the role of parental risk judgements (i.e. risk perception and worry), transport safety attitudes, transport priorities and accident experiences on pupils' walking and mode choices on school trips in Iran, a country with poor road safety records. A total of 1078 questionnaires were randomly distributed among pupils at nine public and private schools in January 2014 in Rasht, Iran. Results from valid observations (n=711) showed that parents with high probability assessments of accidents and strong worry regarding pupils' accident risk while walking were less likely to let their children walk to school. Parents with high safety knowledge were also more likely to allow their pupils to walk to school. Parents who prioritized convenience and accessibility in transport had a stronger tendency to choose motorized modes over walking modes. Also, parents who prioritized safety and security in transport were less likely to allow pupils to walk to school. Elasticities results showed that a one percent increase in priorities of convenience and accessibility, priorities of safety and security, car ownership and walking time from home to school reduced walking among pupils by a probability of 0.62, 0.20, 0.86 and 0.57%, respectively. A one percent increase in parental safety knowledge increased the walking probability by around 0.25%. A 1 unit increase in parental probability assessment and worry towards pupils' walking, decreased the probability of choosing walking mode by 0.11 and 0.05, respectively. Policy-makers who aim to promote walking to schools should improve safety and security of the walking facilities and increase parental safety knowledge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Growth and Expansion of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project and the Newly Organized International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Yolanda Rugama; Enrico Satori

    2007-01-01

    Since ICNC 2003, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) has continued to expand its efforts and broaden its scope. Criticality-alarm/shielding type benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications are not only included in the scope of the project, but benchmark data are also included in the latest version of the handbook. A considerable number of improvements have been made to the searchable database, DICE and the criticality-alarm/shielding benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements have been included in the database. There were 12 countries participating on the ICSBEP in 2003. That number has increased to 18 with recent contributions of data and/or resources from Brazil, Czech Republic, Poland, India, Canada, and China. South Africa, Germany, Argentina, and Australia have been invited to participate. Since ICNC 2003, the contents of the ''International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments'' have increased from 350 evaluations (28,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3070 critical or subcritical configurations to 442 evaluations (over 38,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3957 critical or subcritical configurations, 23 criticality-alarm-placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 20 configurations that have been categorized as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications in the 2006 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. Approximately 30 new evaluations and 250 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2007 Edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2003, a reactor physics counterpart to the ICSBEP, The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated. Beginning in 1999, the IRPhEP was conducted as a pilot activity by the by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency

  9. Reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butz, H.P.; Heuser, F.W.; May, H.

    1985-01-01

    The paper comprises an introduction into nuclear physics bases, the safety concept generally speaking, safety devices of pwr type reactors, accident analysis, external influences, probabilistic safety assessment and risk studies. It further describes operational experience, licensing procedures under the Atomic Energy Law, research in reactor safety and the nuclear fuel cycle. (DG) [de

  10. Plasma fractionation, a useful means to improve national transfusion system and blood safety: Iran experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheraghali, A M; Abolghasemi, H

    2009-03-01

    In 1974, the government of Iran established Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization (IBTO) as national and centralized transfusion system. Since then donations of blood may not be remunerated and therapy with blood and its components are free of charges for all Iranian patients. Donations are meticulously screened through interviewing donors and lab testing the donations using serological methods. Currently, Iranian donors donate 1735 00 units of blood annually (donation index: 25/1000 population). Implementation of a highly efficient donor selection programme, including donors interview, establishment of confidential unit exclusion programme and laboratory screening of donated bloods by IBTO have led to seroprevalence rates of 0.41%, 0.12% and 0.004% for HBV, HCV and HIV in donated bloods respectively. Since 2004, IBTO has initiated a programme to enter into a contract fractionation agreement for the surplus of recovered plasma produced in its blood collecting centres. Although IBTO has used this project as a mean to improve national transfusion system through upgrading its quality assurance systems, IBTO fractionation project has played a major role in improving availability of plasma-derived medicines in Iran. During 2006-2007, this project furnished the Iran market with 44% and 14% of its needs to the intravenous immunoglobulin and albumin, respectively. Iranian experience showed that contract fractionation of plasma in countries with organized centralized transfusion system, which lack national plasma fractionation facility, in addition to substantial saving on national health resource and enhancing availability of plasma-derived medicines, could serve as a useful means to improve national blood safety profile.

  11. Safety of infliximab in Crohn's disease: a large single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzaoglu, H; Cooper, J; Alsahli, M; Falchuk, K R; Peppercorn, M A; Farrell, R J

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the short- and long-term safety experience of infliximab treatment in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) in clinical practice. The medical records of 297 consecutive patients with CD treated with infliximab at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center were reviewed for demographic features and adverse events. The 297 patients received a total of 1794 infusions. Patients received a median of four infusions and had a median follow-up of 14.3 months. Forty-four patients (15%) experienced a serious adverse event, requiring the infusion to be stopped in 33 patients (11%). Acute infusion reactions occurred in 18 patients (6%) including respiratory problems in 10 patients (3%) and an anaphylactoid reaction in 1 patient (0.3%). Serum sickness-like disease occurred in one patient (0.3%) and three patients (1%) developed drug-induced lupus. One patient developed a probable new demyelination disorder. Eight patients (2.7%), all of whom were on concurrent immunosuppressants, developed a serious infection, one resulting in fatal sepsis. Six patients (2%) developed malignancies including two lymphomas and two skin cancers. A total of four (1.3%) deaths were observed (median age 72.5 years); two due to gastrointestinal bleeding, one due to sepsis, and one due to malignancy. While short- and long-term infliximab therapy was generally well tolerated, serious adverse events occurred in 15% of patients including drug-induced lupus, fatal sepsis, and malignancy. Concomitant immunosuppressants were significantly associated with infections and deaths, particularly among elderly patients. Copyright © 2010 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  12. Safety in New Zealand's adventure tourism industry: the client accident experience of adventure tourism operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley , T A; Page, S J; Laird, I S

    2000-01-01

    Injuries and fatalities among participants of adventure tourism activities have the potential to seriously impact on New Zealand's tourism industry. However, the absence of statistics for tourist accidents in New Zealand, and the lack of detailed academic research into adventure tourism safety, means the extent of the problem is unknown. The aims of the present study were to determine the incidence of client injuries across a range of adventure tourism activity sectors, and to identify common accident events and contributory risk factors. A postal questionnaire survey of New Zealand adventure tourism operators was used. Operators were asked to provide information related to their business; the number of recorded client injuries during the preceding 12 month period, January to December 1998; common accident and injury events associated with their activity; and perceived risk factors for accidents in their sector of the adventure tourism industry. The survey was responded to by 142 New Zealand adventure tourism operators. The operators' reported client injury experience suggests the incidence of serious client injuries is very low. Highest client injury incidence rates were found for activities that involved the risk of falling from a moving vehicle or animal (e.g., cycle tours, quad biking, horse riding, and white-water rafting). Slips, trips, and falls on the level were common accident events across most sectors of the industry. Perceived accident/incident causes were most commonly related to the client, and in particular, failure to attend to and follow instructions. The prevalence of client injuries in activity sectors not presently covered by government regulation, suggests policy makers should look again at extending codes of practice to a wider range of adventure tourism activities. Further research considering adventure tourism involvement in overseas visitor hospitalized injuries in New Zealand, is currently in progress. This will provide supporting evidence

  13. Emergent intracranial balloon angioplasty and bailout self-expandable stent placement in acute large vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation: Experience of a single institution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Young Jin; Seo, Jung Hwa; Jeong, Hae Woong [Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the outcomes of angioplasty for recanalization after acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The study population was selected from 134 patients who underwent endovascular revascularization therapy (ERT) for AIS between October 2011 and May 2014. Of those 134 patients, 39 who underwent balloon angioplasty with or without stent insertion were included in this study. Balloon angioplasty was the primary treatment for nine patients and a rescue method for 30 patients. The revascularization rate at 7 days, procedure-related complications, and clinical outcomes at 3 months were analyzed. The occlusion sites were the middle cerebral artery (n = 26), intracranial internal carotid artery (n = 10), and middle cerebral artery branch (n = 3). Angioplasty achieved successful revascularization (Thrombolysis in Cerebral Ischemia grade 2b–3) in 76.9% of patients. Computed tomography angiography performed 7 days post-procedure revealed a maintained reperfusion in 82.8% of successful cases. Only two patients had symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage. At the 3-month follow-up, 18 (48.6%) and 10 (27.0%) patients showed good and poor functional outcomes, respectively (modified Rankin Scale scores, 0–2 and 5–6). Emergent balloon angioplasty and bailout self-expandable stent placement may be safe and effective for achieving successful revascularization in acute large vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation. It could be a feasible rescue method as well as a primary method for ERT.

  14. Emergent intracranial balloon angioplasty and bailout self-expandable stent placement in acute large vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation: Experience of a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Young Jin; Seo, Jung Hwa; Jeong, Hae Woong

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of angioplasty for recanalization after acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The study population was selected from 134 patients who underwent endovascular revascularization therapy (ERT) for AIS between October 2011 and May 2014. Of those 134 patients, 39 who underwent balloon angioplasty with or without stent insertion were included in this study. Balloon angioplasty was the primary treatment for nine patients and a rescue method for 30 patients. The revascularization rate at 7 days, procedure-related complications, and clinical outcomes at 3 months were analyzed. The occlusion sites were the middle cerebral artery (n = 26), intracranial internal carotid artery (n = 10), and middle cerebral artery branch (n = 3). Angioplasty achieved successful revascularization (Thrombolysis in Cerebral Ischemia grade 2b–3) in 76.9% of patients. Computed tomography angiography performed 7 days post-procedure revealed a maintained reperfusion in 82.8% of successful cases. Only two patients had symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage. At the 3-month follow-up, 18 (48.6%) and 10 (27.0%) patients showed good and poor functional outcomes, respectively (modified Rankin Scale scores, 0–2 and 5–6). Emergent balloon angioplasty and bailout self-expandable stent placement may be safe and effective for achieving successful revascularization in acute large vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation. It could be a feasible rescue method as well as a primary method for ERT

  15. Fluoroscopic removal of retrievable self-expandable metal stents in patients with malignant oesophageal strictures: Experience with a non-endoscopic removal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pyeong Hwa; Song, Ho-Young; Park, Jung-Hoon; Zhou, Wei-Zhong; Na, Han Kyu; Cho, Young Chul; Jun, Eun Jung; Kim, Jun Ki; Kim, Guk Bae

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate clinical outcomes of fluoroscopic removal of retrievable self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) for malignant oesophageal strictures, to compare clinical outcomes of three different removal techniques, and to identify predictive factors of successful removal by the standard technique (primary technical success). A total of 137 stents were removed from 128 patients with malignant oesophageal strictures. Primary overall technical success and removal-related complications were evaluated. Logistic regression models were constructed to identify predictive factors of primary technical success. Primary technical success rate was 78.8 % (108/137). Complications occurred in six (4.4 %) cases. Stent location in the upper oesophagus (P=0.004), stricture length over 8 cm (P=0.030), and proximal granulation tissue (Pstent location in the upper oesophagus, and stricture length over 8 cm were negative predictive factors for primary technical success by standard extraction and may require a modified removal technique. • Fluoroscopic retrievable SEMS removal is safe and effective. • Standard removal technique by traction is effective in the majority of patients. • Three negative predictive factors of primary technical success were identified. • Caution should be exercised during the removal in those situations. • Eversion technique is effective in cases of proximal granulation tissue.

  16. Expanding the Allowable TRUPACT-II Payload

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St Michel, W.; Lott, S.

    2002-01-01

    The partnership between the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the TRU and Mixed Waste Focus Area (TMFA) was rewarded when several long-term projects came to fruition. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) removed some of the conservatism in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) with their approval of Revision 19. The SARP strictly limits the payload constituents to ensure that hydrogen gas and other flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) don't build up to flammable/explosive levels while the transuranic (TRU) waste is sealed in the container during shipment. The CBFO/TMFA development program was based on laboratory experiments with surrogate waste materials, real waste experiments, and theoretical modeling that were used to justify payload expansion. Future work to expand the shipping envelope of the TRUPACT-II focuses on increasing the throughput through the waste certification process and reducing the waste operations costs by removing the need for a repack aging and/or treatment capability or reducing the size of the needed repackaging/treatment capability

  17. Measurable improvement in patient safety culture: A departmental experience with incident learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Aaron S; Nyflot, Matthew J; Zeng, Jing; Sponseller, Patricia A; Ermoian, Ralph; Jordan, Loucille; Carlson, Joshua; Novak, Avrey; Kane, Gabrielle; Ford, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    Rigorous use of departmental incident learning is integral to improving patient safety and quality of care. The goal of this study was to quantify the impact of a high-volume, departmental incident learning system on patient safety culture. A prospective, voluntary, electronic incident learning system was implemented in February 2012 with the intent of tracking near-miss/no-harm incidents. All incident reports were reviewed weekly by a multiprofessional team with regular department-wide feedback. Patient safety culture was measured at baseline with validated patient safety culture survey questions. A repeat survey was conducted after 1 and 2 years of departmental incident learning. Proportional changes were compared by χ(2) or Fisher exact test, where appropriate. Between 2012 and 2014, a total of 1897 error/near-miss incidents were reported, representing an average of 1 near-miss report per patient treated. Reports were filed by a cross section of staff, with the majority of incidents reported by therapists, dosimetrists, and physicists. Survey response rates at baseline and 1 and 2 years were 78%, 80%, and 80%, respectively. Statistically significant and sustained improvements were noted in several safety metrics, including belief that the department was openly discussing ways to improve safety, the sense that reports were being used for safety improvement, and the sense that changes were being evaluated for effectiveness. None of the surveyed dimensions of patient safety culture worsened. Fewer punitive concerns were noted, with statistically significant decreases in the worry of embarrassment in front of colleagues and fear of getting colleagues in trouble. A comprehensive incident learning system can identify many areas for improvement and is associated with significant and sustained improvements in patient safety culture. These data provide valuable guidance as incident learning systems become more widely used in radiation oncology. Copyright © 2015

  18. Proceedings of the specialist meeting on nuclear fuel and control rods: operating experience, design evolution and safety aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Design and management of nuclear fuel has undergone a strong evolution process during past years. The increase of the operating cycle length and of the discharge burnup has led to the use of more advanced fuel designs, as well as to the adoption of fuel efficient operational strategies. The analysis of recent operational experience highlighted a number of issues related to nuclear fuel and control rod events raising concerns about the safety aspects of these new designs and operational strategies, which led to the organisation of this Specialists Meeting on fuel and control rod issues. The meeting was intended to provide a forum for the exchange of information on lessons learned and safety concern related to operating experience with fuel and control rods (degradation, reliability, experience with high burnup fuel, and others). After an opening session 6 papers), this meeting was subdivided into four sessions: Operating experience and safety concern (technical session I - 6 papers), Fuel performance and operational issues (technical session II - 7 papers), Control rod issues (technical session III - 9 papers), Improvement of fuel design (technical session IV.A - 4 papers), Improvement on fuel fabrication and core management (technical session IV.B - 6 papers)

  19. Experience of creating a multifunctional safety system at the coal mining enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnikov, V. V.; Davkaev, K. S.; Korolkov, M. V.; Lyakhovets, M. V.

    2018-05-01

    The principles of creating multifunctional safety systems (MFSS) based on mathematical models with Markov properties are considered. The applicability of such models for the analysis of the safety of the created systems and their effectiveness is substantiated. The method of this analysis and the results of its testing are discussed. The variant of IFSB implementation in the conditions of the operating coal-mining enterprise is given. The functional scheme, data scheme and operating modes of the MFSS are given. The automated workplace of the industrial safety controller is described.

  20. Physics design of fast reactor safety test facilities for in-pile experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travelli, A.; Matos, J.E.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Shaftman, D.H.; Tzanos, C.P.; Lam, S.K.; Pennington, E.M.; Woodruff, W.L.

    1976-01-01

    A determined effort to identify and resolve current Fast Breeder Reactor safety testing needs has recently resulted in a number of conceptual designs for FBR safety test facilities which are very complex and diverse both in their features and in their purpose. The paper discusses the physics foundations common to most fast reactor safety test facilities and the constraints which they impose on the design. The logical evolution, features, and capabilities of several major conceptual designs are discussed on the basis of this common background

  1. Experiences with the implementation of measures and tools for road safety improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikusova, M.

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents an overview on the road safety measures implemented in the framework of the “SOL – Save our lives” project. It contains summarization of general knowledge regarding the efficiency of the measures applied and conclusions from the analyses of developed strategies and action plans, including common issues, strengths and weaknesses of developed tools and puts these in the context of wider European Road Safety strategies. The purpose of the paper is to provide recommendations for an effective professional development of road safety programs at community level in the context of sustainable mobility. (Author)

  2. Quality and safety in radiotherapy: precursor events and experience feedback;Qualite et securite en radiotherapie: evenements precurseurs et retour d'experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lartigau, E. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Oscar-Lambret, Dept. Universitaire de Radiotherapie, Lille-1 Univ., 59 - Lille (France)

    2009-12-15

    The safety in radiotherapy through a method using the experience feedback. It corresponds to a global process organised around a prospective and systematic statement of incidents occurring during the cure activity or around it. The events are registered, analyzed, treated by the committee of experience feedback in order to avoid their repetition and to eliminate the passage to accident. The analysis of the events enlightens the organisational dysfunction.Their correction and the communication following is an essential tool of management in the framework of the non-punishment, guarantee of confidence of personnel. (N.C.)

  3. Initial experience with the use of an expandable titanium cage as a vertebral body replacement in patients with tumors of the spinal column: a report of 95 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Ashwin; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad M; Doppenberg, Egon; Suki, Dima; Gokaslan, Ziya; Mendel, Ehud; Rao, Ganesh; Rhines, Laurence D

    2012-01-01

    Vertebral body resection to treat spine tumors necessitates reconstruction to maintain spinal stability. The durability of reconstruction may be a challenge in cancer patients as treatment with chemotherapy and/or radiation coupled with poor nutritional status may compromise bone quality. We present a series of patients who underwent implantation of an expandable titanium cage (ETC) for reconstruction after vertebral body resection for primary or metastatic spine tumors. We report the functional outcome, assess the durability of reconstruction, and describe complications associated with this procedure. A retrospective review of patients undergoing placement of ETC after vertebrectomy for spinal tumor at our institution was performed. From September 2001 to August 2006, 95 patients underwent implantation of an ETC for reconstruction of the anterior spinal column following vertebrectomy for tumor (75 one-level, 19 two-level, 1 three-level). All patients underwent spinal stabilization as well. The median survival after surgery was 13.7 months; 23 patients had primary spinal tumors and 72 had metastatic tumors. Numerical pain scores were significantly improved postoperatively indicating a palliative benefit. No new neurological deficits were noted postoperatively, except when intentional neurological sacrifice was performed for oncologic reasons. Median height correction of 14% (range 0-118%) and median improvement in sagittal alignment of 6° (range 0-28°) were demonstrated on immediate postoperative imaging. Three patients experienced hardware related complications, one of which had posterior migration of the ETC. On postoperative imaging, 12 patients demonstrated subsidence of greater than 1 mm, but none required operative revision. Use of an ETC for spinal reconstruction in patients with spinal tumors is safe, decreases pain associated with pathologic fracture, protects neurologic function, and is durable. We found a very low incidence of cage-related construct

  4. Incidence, feasibility and outcome of percutaneous coronary intervention after transcatheter aortic valve implantation with a self-expanding prosthesis. Results from a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allali, Abdelhakim; El-Mawardy, Mohamed; Schwarz, Bettina; Sato, Takao; Geist, Volker; Toelg, Ralph; Richardt, Gert; Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) can become technically challenging after implantation of the self-expanding Medtronic CoreValve (MCV) device, which completely covers the aortic root. The aim of this study was to report on the incidence, feasibility and outcome of PCI after TAVI with the MCV device. Between 2007 and 2014, all patients subjected to PCI after MCV implantation in a single-center institutional TAVI database were retrospectively identified. Clinical, angiographic and procedural characteristics were reviewed and analyzed. We identified a total of 17 patients (5.7%) treated with 24 PCI procedures for 29 lesions at a median of 17.7months (range 1-72) after MCV implantation. The mean age was 79.7±6.8years and the mean logistic EuroSCORE was 30.3%±18.9%. Nine procedures were performed for patients with acute coronary syndrome. 89.6% of the treated lesions were of type B2/C and 79.3% were de novo ones. A median of one guiding catheter was necessary to intubate the target coronary ostium (range 1-10) and 95% of the lesions on the left coronary artery were treated through a Judkins catheter. In one primary PCI for STEMI the intubation of the right coronary ostium was not successful. Final procedural success was obtained in 95.8%, and peri-procedural death occurred in one patient. The need for PCI after MCV is not uncommon and is mostly related to coronary artery disease progression. PCI after MCV is usually feasible and safe, but coronary intubation in an emergency setting can be challenging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Expanding Thurston maps

    CERN Document Server

    Bonk, Mario

    2017-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to the study of the dynamics of expanding Thurston maps under iteration. A Thurston map is a branched covering map on a two-dimensional topological sphere such that each critical point of the map has a finite orbit under iteration. It is called expanding if, roughly speaking, preimages of a fine open cover of the underlying sphere under iterates of the map become finer and finer as the order of the iterate increases. Every expanding Thurston map gives rise to a fractal space, called its visual sphere. Many dynamical properties of the map are encoded in the geometry of this visual sphere. For example, an expanding Thurston map is topologically conjugate to a rational map if and only if its visual sphere is quasisymmetrically equivalent to the Riemann sphere. This relation between dynamics and fractal geometry is the main focus for the investigations in this work.

  6. Creating a safety culture in the regulatory authority: The Cuban experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro Fernandez, R.; Guillen Campos, A.

    2002-01-01

    The Cuban regulatory authority has been working during several years for the fostering and development of a high Safety Culture level in nuclear activities in the country. As starting point to achieve this objective the assessment of the Safety Culture level in the regulatory authority performance was considered an important issue. For this purpose a preliminary diagnosis was carried out by means of a national survey that allowed identifying some areas of the regulatory activity that required improvements in order to achieve a higher Safety Culture and to immediately implement appropriate actions. Two of the most important actions undertaken were: the statement of the regulatory authority Safety Policy which governs and determines the performance of this organization and its staff and also the implementation of a new interaction practice at top level between the regulatory authority and the utilities of the nuclear sector through the Annual Regulatory Conference. The present paper summarizes these two introduced practices into the Cuban regulatory activity. (author)

  7. Safety Climate and Occupational Stress According to Occupational Accidents Experience and Employment Type in Shipbuilding Industry of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Woo; Park, Sung Jin; Lim, Hae Sun; Cho, Hm Hak

    2017-09-01

    Safety climate and occupational stress are related with occupational accident. The present study tried to identify the differences in safety climate and occupational stress according to occupational accidents experience and employment type (e.g., direct workers and subcontract workers). In this study, we conducted a survey using safety climate scale and Korean Occupational Stress Scale and classified the participants into four groups: direct workers working for accident-free departments, direct workers working for accident departments, subcontract workers working for accident-free departments, and subcontract workers working for accident departments for 2 years within the same workplace in the shipbuilding industry. The direct workers and subcontract workers showed diverse results in subscales of safety climate and occupational stress. This result is supported by existing studies; however, further study is necessary for more supporting evidence and elaborative methodological approach. The necessity of management for safety climate and psychosocial factor such as occupational stress for both direct workers and subcontract workers as a whole is suggested by this study.

  8. Expanding the test of counterfeit deviance: are sexual knowledge, experience and needs a factor in the sexualised challenging behaviour of adults with intellectual disability?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lockhart, Karen

    2010-01-01

    It is posited within the literature that the sexualised challenging behaviour of adults with intellectual disability may be influenced by low levels of sexual knowledge, lack of sexual experience and unmet sexual needs. In this study, individuals with sexualised challenging behaviour were identified and matched for gender, age and ability level with individuals recruited to the non-sexualised and no challenging behaviour groups. All (n=24) were interviewed using the Socio-Sexual Knowledge and Attitudes Tool - Revised (SSKAAT-R) and the Sexual Knowledge, Experience and Needs Scale for Intellectual Disability (Sex-Ken-ID) to assess their sexual knowledge, experience and needs. Adaptive behaviour was measured as a covariate. In the current study, contrary to expectations in the wider literature, the sexualised challenging behaviour group showed significantly higher levels of sexual knowledge in several areas when adaptive behaviour was controlled. Their needs in relation to Dating and Intimacy were also significantly higher but no differences were found between groups in relation to sexual experience. The implications of these findings for service provision are outlined along with the considerations of directions for future research.

  9. Experience in safety review of design solutions of the state-of-the-art WWER-type NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamaza, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    The experience of the Federal Budget Institution of the Scientific and Technical Center for Nuclear and Radiation Safety in the field of expertise of the safety rationales for nuclear power plants with WWER-type reactors of new projects is disclosed. In determining the priority, in addition to the necessary time and financial resources, it also took into account the extent to which these activities significantly affect the completeness of the implementation of levels of defense in depth related to the management of beyond-design-basis accidents, including severe ones. And also, what impact does this or that measure have on reducing the likelihood of the onset of severe radiation effects. When examining the safety justification for new design solutions (including for nuclear power plants with a reactor type WWER), it is advisable to adhere to the following approach: during the examination it is necessary to study the experience in the country and the world related to the proposed new design solutions; It is preferable to take advantage of the differential approach to assessing various aspects related to nuclear and radiation safety. The result of the examination of the justification for new design solutions may be recommendations on the development of existing regulatory documents or development of the Regulatory Authority [ru

  10. The improvement of nuclear safety regulation : American, European, Japanese, and South Korean experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Byung Sun

    2005-01-01

    Key concepts in South Korean nuclear safety regulation are safety and risk. Nuclear regulation in South Korea has required reactor designs and safeguards that reduce the risk of a major accident to less than one in a million reactor-years-a risk supposedly low enough to be acceptable. To data, in South Korean nuclear safety regulation has involved the establishment of many technical standards to enable administration enforcement. In scientific lawsuits in which the legal issue is the validity of specialized technical standards that are used for judge whether a particular nuclear power plant is to be licensed, the concept of uncertainty law is often raised with regard to what extent the examination and judgement by the judicial power affects a discretion made by the administrative office. In other words, the safety standards for nuclear power plants has been adapted as a form of the scientific technical standards widely under the idea of uncertainty law. Thus, the improvement of nuclear safety regulation in South Korea seems to depend on the rational lawmaking and a reasonable, judicial examination of the scientific standards on nuclear safety

  11. Feedback of experience as a contribution to safety - an operator's duty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micklinghoff, M.; Pamme, H.; Raetzke, C.

    2007-01-01

    Exchanges of information about events and reliability problems make important contributions to nuclear power plant safety. In an article in the last but one issue of atw, journalist Timm Kraegenow proposed that the operators of nuclear power plants model their attitude towards this subject, and their flows of information, on the example of civil aviation. In particular, vendors should be made the nodes of information exchange. However, in-depth comparison shows that the two areas, civil aviation and nuclear power, have fundamentally different structures. The safety of aircraft designs continues to be the vendor's responsibility throughout the service life of that aircraft, and it is the vendor who holds the type certification. When a deficit becomes apparent, the vendor is the partner to be contacted by the competent authority, and it is the vendor's duty to elaborate solutions. In the case of nuclear power plants, however, responsibility for safety after plant commissioning rests with the operator, i.e. the licensee. The licensee initiates improvements in safety and is also the addressee of instructions by the authorities. This fundamental difference in responsibility for safety is in the nature of things. It is bound to affect also exchanges of information as a module of safety. Although comparison with civil aviation is interesting, it becomes apparent in the end that the way in which flows of information are designed cannot be transferred to the nuclear sector. (orig.)

  12. Growth and Expansion of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project and the Newly Organized International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Yolanda Rugama; Enrico Satori

    2007-05-01

    Since ICNC 2003, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) has continued to expand its efforts and broaden its scope. Criticality-alarm / shielding type benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications are not only included in the scope of the project, but benchmark data are also included in the latest version of the handbook. A considerable number of improvements have been made to the searchable database, DICE and the criticality-alarm / shielding benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements have been included in the database. There were 12 countries participating on the ICSBEP in 2003. That number has increased to 18 with recent contributions of data and/or resources from Brazil, Czech Republic, Poland, India, Canada, and China. South Africa, Germany, Argentina, and Australia have been invited to participate. Since ICNC 2003, the contents of the “International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments” have increased from 350 evaluations (28,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3070 critical or subcritical configurations to 442 evaluations (over 38,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3957 critical or subcritical configurations, 23 criticality-alarm-placement / shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 20 configurations that have been categorized as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications in the 2006 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. Approximately 30 new evaluations and 250 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2007 Edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2003, a reactor physics counterpart to the ICSBEP, The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated. Beginning in 1999, the IRPhEP was conducted as a pilot activity by the by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy

  13. Inventory of Safety-related Codes and Standards for Energy Storage Systems with some Experiences related to Approval and Acceptance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conover, David R.

    2014-09-11

    The purpose of this document is to identify laws, rules, model codes, codes, standards, regulations, specifications (CSR) related to safety that could apply to stationary energy storage systems (ESS) and experiences to date securing approval of ESS in relation to CSR. This information is intended to assist in securing approval of ESS under current CSR and to identification of new CRS or revisions to existing CRS and necessary supporting research and documentation that can foster the deployment of safe ESS.

  14. Refining the Results of a Classical SELEX Experiment by Expanding the Sequence Data Set of an Aptamer Pool Selected for Protein A

    OpenAIRE

    Regina Stoltenburg; Beate Strehlitz

    2018-01-01

    New, as yet undiscovered aptamers for Protein A were identified by applying next generation sequencing (NGS) to a previously selected aptamer pool. This pool was obtained in a classical SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) experiment using the FluMag-SELEX procedure followed by cloning and Sanger sequencing. PA#2/8 was identified as the only Protein A-binding aptamer from the Sanger sequence pool, and was shown to be able to bind intact cells of Staphylococcus aur...

  15. Evaluation of experience and trends in international co-operation in nuclear safety and licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadie, K.B.; Strohl, P.

    1977-01-01

    The paper traces the development of co-operation in nuclear safety technology between the OECD Member countries which began as early as 1965 and is now organised under the auspices of the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. The principal objective is to exchange and evaluate information on relevant R and D and hence broaden the technical basis for decision-making by licensing authorities in the different countries. The membership of the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations combines expertise in nuclear safety R and D and in licensing questions so that licensing procedures in the different countries may be exposed continuously to the influence of overall technological progress. The Committee actively seeks to narrow the differences between administrative procedures and traditional legal practices in Member countries as these affect the licensing of nuclear installations, primarily by assessing and comparing the methods employed. The paper shows how the Committee's working arrangements provide for maximum flexibility: the various co-ordinated programmes are selected after in-depth evaluation of potential areas of priority and are implemented through ad hoc Working Groups, specialist meetings or task forces, or in the form of special studies involving all interested countries. The results, conclusions and recommendations emerging from each programme are reviewed by the Committee before dissemination. Hitherto the greater part of the Committee's activities has been concerned with the safety of light water reactors and related subjects, but more attention is now being given to other topics such as LMFBR safety technology and the safety of fuel cycle facilities, particularly those at the end of the process, the so-called ''back-end'' plants. The paper discusses certain problems and constraints encountered in implementing the programme, some of which stem from Member countries' different degrees of penetration

  16. Water/sand flooded and immersed critical experiment and analysis performed in support of the TOPAZ-II Safety Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glushkov, E.S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Bubelev, V.G.; Garin, V.P.; Gomin, E.A.; Kompanietz, G.V.; Krutoy, A.M.; Lobynstev, V.A.; Maiorov, L.V.; Polyakov, D.N.

    1994-01-01

    Presented is a brief description of the Narciss-M2 critical assemblies, which simulate accidental water/wet-sand immersion of the TOPAZ-II reactor as well as water-flooding of core cavities. Experimental results obtained from these critical assemblies, including experiments with several fuel elements removed from the core, are shown. These configurations with several extracted fuel elements simulate a proposed fuel-out anticriticality-device modification to the TOPAZ-II reactor. Preliminary computational analysis of these experiments using the Monte Carlo neutron-transport method is outlined. Nuclear criticality safety of the TOPAZ-II reactor with an incorporated anticriticality unit is demonstrated

  17. IGSC Experience: Links Between RD and D and Stakeholder Confidence: The Aspect of Long-Term Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroemberg, Bo

    2008-01-01

    Bo Stroemberg from the IGSC Core Group (SKI, Sweden) reported on the International Symposium on the Safety Case organised in 2007 by IGSC. Participants of a session focusing on the role of the safety case in societal dialogue pointed out that in the technical community there is a shared understanding of the issues of long-term safety, which the SC should address. They observed, however, that public concerns may be quite different from these issues. For example, the extremely long timescales are not easily understood by the broader public. Also, technical experts' focus on quantitative indicators is incompatible with the perceptions of non-experts, who tend to give heavier weight to qualitative characteristics of risks. Therefore, conducting a dialogue with the public in which their safety concerns are explored is of key importance. It is not only the technical content but also the presentation of the SC which should be adapted to stakeholders' concerns. At the same time, stakeholder input can improve both the technical basis and the presentation of the SC. Mr Stroemberg went on to present IGSC Core Group answers to questions addressed to them by the FSC: 1. What are the questions about safety and the safety case you feel the public is asking? What kind of reply? Or approach to replying? Do they require? What weight should they be given? 2. How has dialogue with stakeholders improved your safety case? What lessons may be drawn for the technical community to improve on its capability to respond to questions from the general public and other stakeholders? 3. What is the role of RD and D when arguing safety or confidence in safety? Anecdotal experience was received from Europe, Japan and the United States. Common concerns expressed by the public focus on how scientists can 'know they are right' when making safety predictions for the long term, and whether unexpected events can be addressed. Because some concerns fall beyond the topics typically covered by a safety case

  18. Increasing compliance with the World Health Organization Surgical Safety Checklist-A regional health system's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitelis, Matthew E; Kaczynski, Adelaide; Shear, Torin; Deshur, Mark; Beig, Mohammad; Sefa, Meredith; Silverstein, Jonathan; Ujiki, Michael

    2017-07-01

    In 2009, NorthShore University HealthSystem adapted the World Health Organization Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC) at each of its 4 hospitals. Despite evidence that SSC reduces intraoperative mistakes and increase patient safety, compliance was found to be low with the paper form. In November 2013, NorthShore integrated the SSC into the electronic health record (EHR). The aim was to increase communication between operating room (OR) personnel and to encourage best practices during the natural workflow of surgeons, anesthesiologists, and nurses. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of an electronic SSC on compliance and patient safety. An anonymous OR observer selected cases at random and evaluated the compliance rate before the rollout of the electronic SSC. In June 2014, an electronic audit was performed to assess the compliance rate. Random OR observations were also performed throughout the summer in 2014. Perioperative risk events, such as consent issues, incorrect counts, wrong site, and wrong procedure were compared before and after the electronic SSC rollout. A perception survey was also administered to NorthShore OR personnel. Compliance increased from 48% (n = 167) to 92% (n = 1,037; P World Health Organization SSC is a validated tool to increase patient safety and reduce intraoperative complications. The electronic SSC has demonstrated an increased compliance rate, a reduced number of risk events, and most OR personnel believe it will have a positive impact on patient safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Experience in the review of utility control room design review and safety parameter display system programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, V.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Detailed Control Room Design Review (DCRDR) and the Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS) had their origins in the studies and investigations conducted as the result of the TMI-2 accident. The President's Commission (Kemeny Commission) critized NRC for not examining the man-machine interface, over-emphasizing equipment, ignoring human beings, and tolerating outdated technology in control rooms. The Commission's Special Inquiry Group (Rogovin Report) recommended greater application of human factors engineering including better instrumentation displays and improved control room design. The NRC Lessons Learned Task Force concluded that licensees should review and improve control rooms using NRC Human engineering guidelines, and install safety parameter display systems (then called the safety staff vector). The TMI Action Plan Item I.D.1 and I.D.2 were based on these recommendations

  20. Police Tweets and Public Perceptions of Safety and Police Performance: An Experiment on Framing and Other Tweet Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imke Smulders

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of new media as a means of communication by the police triggers interesting questions about the impact of such new developments, such as the effect on people’s safety perceptions. Since communication is mostly overlooked as a possible determinant of safety perception, this led to a research project into the relationship between Twitter use by community policing officers and citizen’s perceptions of safety. This article reports on a part of this study, an experiment on framing and other linguistic effects of tweets by police officers. To assess the aforementioned relationship, it is important to examine how the precise content of a community policing officer’s tweet is perceived by the public. In an experimental setting the effects of gain versus loss frames, implicit versus explicit advice and style of addressing have been tested, with regard to safety perceptions and several related factors. The results show that gain framed tweets yield significantly more positive responses concerning opinion about police performance, perceived risk of burglary or assault, safety perception and marginally for perceived crime level in the neighbourhood. Including an explicitly or implicitly formulated piece of advice in the tweets doesn’t make a difference in any of the queried variables and style of addressing has only small effects: formal address leads to slightly more positive opinions about police performance than impersonal address.  The results show that formulation aspects – specifically framing – are worth taking into account in safety communications and that this type of research is beneficial for studying effects of social media.

  1. Some considerations for assurance of reactor safety from experiences in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Sunao; Nishihara, Hideaki; Shibata, Toshikazu

    1981-01-01

    For the purpose of assuring reactor safety and strengthening research in the related fields, a multi-disciplinary group was formed among university researchers, including social scientists, with a special allocation of the Grant-in-Aid from the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture. An excerpt from the first year's report (1979 -- 1980) is edited here, which contains an interpretation of Murphy's reliability engineering law, a scope of reactor diagnostic studies to be pursued at universities, and safety measures already implemented or suggested to be implemented in university research reactors. (author)

  2. New trends in the evaluation and implementation of the safety-related operating experience associated with NRC-licensed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelson, C.; Heltemes, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    This article is an overview of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission program for the evaluation and dissemination of the safety-related operating experience associated with all NRC-licensed reactors. It discusses the historical background and past problems that led to the recent formation of NRC's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) and details its activities, organization, staffing, and proposed analysis and evaluation methodology. The programs of industry organizations and nuclear plant licensees and the integration of foreign operating experience are included in the overview. The problems and limitations of the Licensee Event Report (LER) program and the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data system program are discussed. The AEOD analysis and evaluation methodology program includes some new improvements in the assessment of safety-related operating experience. Of particular note is the sequence coding and search procedure being developed by AEOD under a contract with the Nuclear Safety Information Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This computer-based retrieval system will have markedly improved search strategy capability for such items as commoncause failures or complex system interactions involving various failure sequences and other relationships associated with an event. The system retrieves failure data and information on the principal LER occurrence and on related component and system responses. The computer-generated Power Reactor Watch List enables AEOD to monitor all critical or unusual situations warranting close attention because of potential public health and safety. This listing is supported by a preestablished computer search strategy of the historical data base permitting identification of all past events and statistical information that are applicable to the situation being watched

  3. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, A.; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed

  4. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, A.; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-01

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  5. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, A., E-mail: aliman@ppinang.uitm.edu.my; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Ain, M. F. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Seri Ampangan, 14300,Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  6. Radiation safety in the Moscow region: Experience of cooperation SUE SIA Radon with mass media and public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishin, O.; Rakov, S. [SUE SIA RADON, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    Radiation safety in the present period acquires complex character and closely corresponds with other elements of social and political process, with various spheres of public life. After earthquake in Japan in March 11, 2011 and emergency on the nuclear power plant Fukushima-1 the theme of radiating safety of megapolises has today become urgent, as never. Provision of radiation safety of the Moscow region, taking into account a number of factors, is an important problem in a context of modernization state. Today in sphere of radio ecological safety there are certain achievements: new monitoring systems are developed, technological processes are improved, new information-communicative channels of interaction with mass media and public are formed. Information policy of enterprises the functioning of which is connected with provision of safe ecological conditions and its monitoring is focused on constant and duly informing of public through mass-media. Experience and technologies of interaction with mass-media and public of Moscow State Unitary-Enterprise- united ecological, scientific and research centre of decontamination of radioactive waste and environmental protection (State Unitarian Enterprise, Scientific and Industrial Association Radon, SUE SIA RADON) is submitted in the article. (author)

  7. Radiation safety in the Moscow region: Experience of cooperation SUE SIA Radon with mass media and public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishin, O.; Rakov, S.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation safety in the present period acquires complex character and closely corresponds with other elements of social and political process, with various spheres of public life. After earthquake in Japan in March 11, 2011 and emergency on the nuclear power plant Fukushima-1 the theme of radiating safety of megapolises has today become urgent, as never. Provision of radiation safety of the Moscow region, taking into account a number of factors, is an important problem in a context of modernization state. Today in sphere of radio ecological safety there are certain achievements: new monitoring systems are developed, technological processes are improved, new information-communicative channels of interaction with mass media and public are formed. Information policy of enterprises the functioning of which is connected with provision of safe ecological conditions and its monitoring is focused on constant and duly informing of public through mass-media. Experience and technologies of interaction with mass-media and public of Moscow State Unitary-Enterprise- united ecological, scientific and research centre of decontamination of radioactive waste and environmental protection (State Unitarian Enterprise, Scientific and Industrial Association Radon, SUE SIA RADON) is submitted in the article. (author)

  8. Experience of Hungarian model project: 'Strengthening training for operational safety at Paks NPP'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, I.

    1998-01-01

    Training of Operational Safety at Paks NPP is described including all the features of the project including namely: description of Paks NPP, its properties and performances; reasons for establishing Hungarian Model Project, its main goals, mentioning Hungarian and IAEA experts involved in the Project, its organization, operation, budget, current status together with its short term and long term impact

  9. Problems and experience of ensuring nuclear safety in NPP spent fuel storage facilities in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vnukov, Victor S.; Ryazanov, Boris G.

    2003-01-01

    The amount of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) spent fuel in special storage facilities of Russia runs to more than 15000 tons and the annual growth is equal to about 850 tons. The storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel from the main nuclear reactors of Russia (RBMK-1000, VVER-1000, BN-600, EGP-6) were designed in the 60s - 70s. In the last years when the concept of closed fuel cycle and safety requirements had changed, the need was generated to have the nuclear storage facilities more crowded. First of all it is due to the necessity to increase the storage capacity because the RBMK-1000, VVER-1000, EGP-6 fuel is not reprocessed. So there comes the need for the facilities of a bigger capacity which meet the current safety requirements. The paper presents the results of studies of the most important nuclear safety issues, in particular: development of regulatory requirements; analysis of design-basis and beyond-the design-basis accidents (DBA and BDBA); computation code development and verification; justification of nuclear safety when water density goes down; the use of burn-up fraction values; the necessity and possibility to experimentally study the storage facility subcriticality; development of storage norms and rules for new types of fuel assemblies with mixed fuel and burnable poison. (author)

  10. KEOPS and other VENUS experiments dedicated to the criticality safety of a MOX fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lance, Benoit; Van Den Hende, Paul; Marloye, Daniel; Basselier, Jacques; Libon, Henri; De Vleeschhauwer, Marc; Moerenhout, Jeremie; Baeten, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The qualification scheme of criticality computer codes for Pu bearing powders lies upon databases which suffer from a lack of recent experimental results. As a MOX manufacture, BELGONUCLEAIRE is especially concerned by criticality safety and would like to address such an issue by launching with SCK-CEN an International Programme called KEOPS. (author)

  11. [Inclusion of patient safety into the Medical degree electives: Description of the experience and student perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladenheim, R; Macchiavello, D; Milberg, M

    One of the factors identified to reduce medical errors has been the organisational culture. Education is proposed as a tool for its modification, but this does not have a unique way of being achieved. This paper sought to describe a patient safety elective for medical students and to determine their perceptions on the subject. A descriptive study was performed in the Center of Medical Education and Clinical Investigations, in Argentina. Every student who participated in the elective was included, and there were no exclusion criteria. An online survey was conducted on all participants, and individual interviews were conducted on a convenience sample. The subject was chosen by 54 students out of a total of 274 students between 2011 and 2014. All (100%) of the students completed the course and passed the exam, and stated that they would recommend the elective. Most of the students (n=26) agreed that patient safety content should be mandatory, that its content was novel, and that the subject's structure seemed appropriate, with 21 saying that it was the first time they had been talked about these issues. From the individual interviews, students emphasised the novelty of the subject, and that their perception on patient safety issues had increased. The proposed elective had a good reception among students. The methodology planned for its teaching seemed appropriate. Inter-professional education in patient safety should be implemented to improve student competencies in the subject. Copyright © 2017 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Safety analysis of the Los Alamos critical experiments facility: burst operation of Skua

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orndoff, J.D.; Paxton, H.C.; Wimett, T.F.

    1979-05-01

    A detailed consideration of the Skua burst assembly is presented, thereby supplementing the facility safety analysis report covering the operation of other critical assemblies at Los Alamos. As with these assemblies the small fission-product inventory, ambient pressure, and moderate temperatures in Skua are amenable to straightforward measures to ensure the protection of the public

  13. Experience with Periodic Safety Review (PSR) at Kozloduy NPP after 20 years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, V.

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Measures in the long-term Programs for improving safety and radiation protection of unit 5&6, based on PSR outcome and addressed on the units’ operation licence renewal are under way. • NPP Kozloduy intends to fulfils requirements on modern nuclear power plants which occasionally exceeds limits of the effective national nuclear legislation

  14. Safety analysis of the Los Alamos critical experiments facility: burst operation of Skua

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orndoff, J.D.; Paxton, H.C.; Wimett, T.F.

    1980-12-01

    Detailed consideration of the Skua burst assembly is provided, thereby supplementing the facility Safety Analysis Report covering the operation of other critical assemblies at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. As with these assemblies the small fission-product inventory, ambient pressure, and moderate temperatures in Skua are amenable to straightforward measures to ensure the protection of the public

  15. Slovenian Experience as the EU Candidate Country in the Field of Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grlicarev, I.

    2002-01-01

    Slovenia was the first EU acceding country which has managed to successfully reach consensus with the European Commission (EC) on the chapters Energy, which comprises nuclear energy, and Environment, which comprises nuclear safety and radiation protection. This practically meant that the EU adopted the position that these two chapters did not, at that stage, require further negotiation. The EC will continue to monitor the progress in adoption and implementation of the EU legislation throughout the negotiations. The activities in relation to the accession of Slovenia to the EU in the area of nuclear energy and nuclear safety are reflected in the transposition of the legislation and establishing the institutions capable of implementing the EU legislation. The importance of regular reporting to the EC on the status is vital for monitoring the progress. The EC issues progress reports for all candidate countries on annual basis and the action plan has been devised by the EC to put some extra pressure on the candidate countries. The position of the EU in the area of nuclear legislation is reflected in the so called Non-binding EU acquis. The actual position of the EU towards each Candidate Country and to these countries as a whole is contained in the document Report on Nuclear Safety in the Context of the Enlargement. The Act on Nuclear and Radiation Safety had been drafted and is planned to be passed by the Parliament in the first half of 2002. The EC is willing to provide support in implementation of projects to strengthen nuclear safety in Slovenia (assistance to the regulatory authority, review of seismic studies, support with the periodic safety review, review and application of PSA studies). The recent status in the preparation of the position of Slovenia in negotiations in to the EU in the field of nuclear energy, nuclear safety and radiation protection shows that Slovenia has still some tasks to be done, but there are no pending issues which might hinder the

  16. WORLD EXPERIENCE OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION LAND USE AND PROTECTIONTAKING INTO ACCOUNT THE REQUIREMENTS OF ECOLOGICAL SAFETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    l. Sviridova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Studied global trends of public administration land use and protection. In particular, zemleohoronni measures in the developed world are implemented through rural development policy, based on the conduct of the common agricultural policy, the creation of funds to support farmers, provide technical assistance, development of national programs and future development plans. For the European Union development policy documents on the development of land areas for 5-10 years - the overall trend. Land management activities are conducted in foreign countries on the basis of approved design documentation for land management different direction. Found that the use of land and resource potential in the world is subject to the requirements of environmental safety. Agrarian relations in these countries are based on incentive levers, with direct execution of the rules of use and protection of land. By 2020, the strategy of the Common Agricultural Policy of the European Union provides funding for joint agricultural market, direct subsidies to farmers and stimulate agricultural development. Common Agricultural Policy of the European Union for its activities fully demonstrates the ability of European economies to maintain the same level of development. State administration of environmental impact on the economic interests of the tenure or land use in countries with market economies include: tax exemptions (to make environmentally oriented activities, soft loans (available on interest rates for environmental investments, subsidies (for the implementation of environmental programs and subsidies (for growing products without pesticides entities. It is proved that the system of economic instruments in environmental policy Ukraine needs to improve, because it is poorly developed. Experience in other countries shows that as we strengthen land management tools (instruments for land administration, and its supporting tools to succeed in the system of rational land use

  17. Radiation safety experience in upgrading 2-5% heavy water wastes at Heavy Water Plant, Nangal (Preprint No. SA-7)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadhukhan, H.K.; Behl, D.; Ramraj; Iyengar, T.S.; Sadarangani, S.H.; Vaze, P.K.; Soman, S.D.

    1989-04-01

    This paper describes the radiological safety experience in upgrading 2-5% heavy water wastes at Heavy Water Plant at Nangal at the third stage electrolysers. The feed water concentrations at the third stage electrolyer was determined after a safety analysis study and pilot plant experiment, which gave the optimal concentrations of 1 to 1.5 mCi (3.7 to 5.5 x 10 7 Bq) per litre per minute feed from a submerged SS tank containing 2-5% heavy water wastes. This process not only yielded an efficient recovery of reactor grade heavy water but contained the tritium activity in the third stage electrolysers and in the final product viz., heavy water. The tritium concentrations were continuously monitore d by liquid scintillation counting method at all the three stages of electrolysis plant, the distillation plant, the heavy water filling rooms, the drains, the ambient air, the product fertilizer (calcium ammonia nitrate) and the Sutlej River and found to be well within the safety limits set for general public at large. The HD and D 2 process streams in the palnt were monitored using fill-in type of ionization chambers designed for the purpose, which served a D 2 inventory check as well. There was no internal exposure to any personnel during the entire period of programme. (author). 2 tabs

  18. Covered Balloon-Expanding Stents in Airway Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Adnan; Kheir, Fayez; Chung, Jey; Alape, Daniel; Husta, Bryan; Oh, Scott; Folch, Erik

    2017-04-01

    The balloon-expanding stents are widely available but rarely described for use within the tracheobronchial tree. This report describes our experience with these stents in airway stenosis particularly as a lobar salvage therapy. This was a retrospective review of all records in which the balloon-expanding stents were used at a tertiary medical center. Ages, sex, location of stenosis, etiology of stenosis, stent size, duration of stent placement and associated interventions for airway stenosis were recorded. Patient's self-reported respiratory symptoms, dyspnea scale, and radiographic imaging at baseline and after stent placement were also reported. Twenty-one Atrium iCAST stents were inserted in 18 patients with malignant and benign airway disease. The median age was 69.5 years (interquartile range, 53.5 to 74). Most stents (n=20, 95%) were deployed in the lobar airways. There was a significant improvement in the modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale from median of 3 to 2 (Pstent placement was achieved in 15 patients (83%). No deaths were related to airway stenting complications. Adverse events related to stents included migration (n=2, 9.5%), granulation tissue formation (n=2, 9.5%) and mucus plugging (n=1, 4.8%). Lobar stenting with balloon-expanding metallic stents appears feasible, safe and improves symptoms as well as radiographic atelectasis in patients with lobar airway stenosis in this small case series. Larger studies are needed to confirm this observation and to address long-term safety.

  19. Tissue expander complications in plastic surgery: a 10-year experience Complicações de expansores teciduais em cirurgia plástica: dez anos de experiência

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Sacramento Cunha

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Tissue expanders have been of great value in plastic surgery. Tissue expansion was developed for a specific indication; however, within a very short time, the concept of tissue expansion found wide applicability. From 1990 to 1999, 315 expanders in 164 patients were utilized. A retrospective analysis of complications and prognostic factors for complications were done. METHODS: The indications for tissue expansion were burns (50%, trauma (32%, and sequelae of previous surgery (8.8%. The expanders were inserted most frequently in the scalp, trunk and neck. RESULTS: There were 22.2% of complications and the most common were expander exposure (50%, infection (24% and bad function of the expander (12.8%. The present study revealed an increased rate of minor complications in the group of 0 to 10 years of age and an increased rate of major complications for face and neck expansions compared to trunk expansion. There were no increased complication rates for the other age and anatomic site groups, previous expansion, concomitant expansion and type of expander used. CONCLUSIONS: The outcomes from tissue expansion procedures done in our hospital are similar to those reported in the literature. Tissue expansion is a good and safe technique.INTRODUÇÃO: A utilização de expansores teciduais tem sido de grande importância para a Cirurgia Plástica. Inicialmente descritos para correção de uma deformidade específica, logo tiveram sua utilização ampliada para deformidades congênitas e adquiridas. Foram utilizados 315 expansores em 164 pacientes no período de Janeiro de 1990 a Dezembro de 1999. Uma análise retrospectiva das complicações e fatores prognósticos para complicações foi realizada. MÉTODO: As deformidades tratadas mais freqüentes foram seqüelas de queimaduras (50%, seqüelas de traumas (32% e seqüelas de cirurgias prévias (8,8%. Os sítios anatômicos em que mais freqüentemente foram utilizados compreenderam face e

  20. Expanding the experience of using non-stationary waterflooding technology with changing direction of the filtration flow in the example of the Northern Buzachi field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.M. Almukhametova

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The last few years, work has been carried out to study the effectiveness of non-stationary exposure in the highly viscous oil field Northern Buzachi (Republic of Kazakhstan. It has been proved that this technology is quite effective in the development of highly viscous oil reservoirs, however, in order to constantly maintain high technological effect, a constant modification of this technology is required, since it has a characteristic feature of rapid «aging». Further search for the conditions of effective application of non-stationary exposure on highly-viscous oil deposits can be carried out in two directions: the implementation of non-stationary exposure in new areas with other reservoir parameters and the change in the parameters of non-stationary exposure technology (including combining with other technologies in areas where this technology is already in use. Both approaches are used on the Northern Buzachi field. Thus, the positive experience of using non-stationary waterflooding in combination with changing direction of the filtration flow in the section of the seventh block of the Northern Buzachi field allowed us to recommend new sites for the implementation of this technology. With the participation of the author of this work, a non-stationary waterflooding program was developed and implemented on the site of the sixth block (south of the first operational facility.

  1. Refining the Results of a Classical SELEX Experiment by Expanding the Sequence Data Set of an Aptamer Pool Selected for Protein A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Stoltenburg

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available New, as yet undiscovered aptamers for Protein A were identified by applying next generation sequencing (NGS to a previously selected aptamer pool. This pool was obtained in a classical SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment experiment using the FluMag-SELEX procedure followed by cloning and Sanger sequencing. PA#2/8 was identified as the only Protein A-binding aptamer from the Sanger sequence pool, and was shown to be able to bind intact cells of Staphylococcus aureus. In this study, we show the extension of the SELEX results by re-sequencing of the same aptamer pool using a medium throughput NGS approach and data analysis. Both data pools were compared. They confirm the selection of a highly complex and heterogeneous oligonucleotide pool and show consistently a high content of orphans as well as a similar relative frequency of certain sequence groups. But in contrast to the Sanger data pool, the NGS pool was clearly dominated by one sequence group containing the known Protein A-binding aptamer PA#2/8 as the most frequent sequence in this group. In addition, we found two new sequence groups in the NGS pool represented by PA-C10 and PA-C8, respectively, which also have high specificity for Protein A. Comparative affinity studies reveal differences between the aptamers and confirm that PA#2/8 remains the most potent sequence within the selected aptamer pool reaching affinities in the low nanomolar range of KD = 20 ± 1 nM.

  2. Refining the Results of a Classical SELEX Experiment by Expanding the Sequence Data Set of an Aptamer Pool Selected for Protein A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltenburg, Regina; Strehlitz, Beate

    2018-02-24

    New, as yet undiscovered aptamers for Protein A were identified by applying next generation sequencing (NGS) to a previously selected aptamer pool. This pool was obtained in a classical SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) experiment using the FluMag-SELEX procedure followed by cloning and Sanger sequencing. PA#2/8 was identified as the only Protein A-binding aptamer from the Sanger sequence pool, and was shown to be able to bind intact cells of Staphylococcus aureus . In this study, we show the extension of the SELEX results by re-sequencing of the same aptamer pool using a medium throughput NGS approach and data analysis. Both data pools were compared. They confirm the selection of a highly complex and heterogeneous oligonucleotide pool and show consistently a high content of orphans as well as a similar relative frequency of certain sequence groups. But in contrast to the Sanger data pool, the NGS pool was clearly dominated by one sequence group containing the known Protein A-binding aptamer PA#2/8 as the most frequent sequence in this group. In addition, we found two new sequence groups in the NGS pool represented by PA-C10 and PA-C8, respectively, which also have high specificity for Protein A. Comparative affinity studies reveal differences between the aptamers and confirm that PA#2/8 remains the most potent sequence within the selected aptamer pool reaching affinities in the low nanomolar range of K D = 20 ± 1 nM.

  3. Review of safety related control room function research based on experience from nuclear power plants in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juslin, K.; Wahlstroem, B.; Rinttilae, E.

    1985-01-01

    A comprehensive human engineering research programme was established in the second half of the 1970's at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). The research is performed in cooperation with the utility companies Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) and Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) and includes topics such as Handling of alarm information, Disturbance analysis systems, Assessment of control rooms and Validation of safety parameter display systems. Reference is also made to the Finnish contribution to the OECD Halden Reactor Project (Halden) and the Nordic Liaison Committee for Atomic Energy (NKA) research projects. In this paper feasible realization alternatives of safety related control room functions are discussed on the basis of experience from the nuclear power plants in Finland, which at present are equipped with extensive process computer systems. A proposal for future power plant information systems is described. It is intended that this proposal will serve as the basis for future computer systems at nuclear power plants in Finland. (author)

  4. Periodic Safety Review in Interim Storage Facilities - Current Regulation and Experiences in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neles, Julia Mareike; Schmidt, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Periodic safety reviews in nuclear power plants in Germany have been performed since the end of the 1980's as an indirect follow-up of the accident in Chernobyl and, in the meantime, are formally required by law. During this process the guidelines governing this review were developed in stages and reached their final form in 1996. Interim storage facilities and other nuclear facilities at that time were not included, so the guidelines were solely focused on the specific safety issues of nuclear power plants. Following IAEA's recommendations, the Western European Nuclear Regulator Association (WENRA) introduced PSRs in its safety reference levels for storage facilities (current version in WGWD report 2.1 as of Feb 2011: SRLs 59 - 61). Based on these formulations, Germany improved its regulation in 2010 with a recommendation of the Nuclear Waste Management Commission (Entsorgungskommission, ESK), an expert advisory commission for the federal regulatory body BMU. The ESK formulated these detailed requirements in the 'ESK recommendation for guides to the performance of periodic safety reviews for interim storage facilities for irradiated fuel elements and heat-generating radioactive waste'. Before finalization of the guideline a test phase was introduced, aimed to test the new regulation in practice and to later include the lessons learned in the final formulation of the guideline. The two-year test phase started in October 2011 in which the performance of a PSR will be tested at two selected interim storage facilities. Currently these recommendations are discussed with interested/concerned institutions. The results of the test phase shall be considered for improvements of the draft and during the final preparation of guidelines. Currently the PSR for the first ISF is in an advanced stage, the second facility just started the process. Preliminary conclusions from the test phase show that the implementation of the draft guideline requires interpretation. The aim of a

  5. ExpandED Options: Learning beyond High School Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ExpandED Schools, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Through ExpandED Options by TASC, New York City high school students get academic credit for learning career-related skills that lead to paid summer jobs. Too many high school students--including those most likely to drop out--are bored or see classroom learning as irrelevant. ExpandED Options students live the connection between mastering new…

  6. The Nigerian experience in health, safety, and environmental matters during oil and gas exploration and production operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyekan, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    Since crude oil was first discovered in commercial quantities in the Country, in 1956, Nigerian oil and gas exploration and production activities have steadily increased as petroleum assumed strategic importance in the nation's economy. However, just as occurs in many parts of the world, crude oil and gas are found and produced in Nigeria sometimes in very hostile and unfavorable environments. The search for oil and gas takes explorers to the hot regions of the Northern parts of the country, the swamp jungle location of the Niger Delta, as well as offshore locations in the Atlantic Ocean. Each terrain, whether land, swamp or offshore, in deep or shallow waters, present unique health, safety and environmental implications and challenges to the operators, as well as, to the Government regulators. From a background of existing Nigerian Laws and operational experience, this paper details the programmes that have been put in place to guarantee a healthy workforce, ensure the safety of personnel and equipment, and protect the Nigerian environment during oil and gas exploration and production operations, as well as their documented effectiveness. The paper discusses the performance of the Petroleum Industry by analyzing the health, safety and environmental records available from 1956 - 1990. The records of major incidents related to safety and environment over the period are discussed and evaluated. The paper notes that relatively speaking, in spite of the Bomu 2 and Funiwa V oil well blow-outs in 1970 and 1980 respectively which caused extensive environmental damages and the Anieze, Oniku and KC 1 gas well blow-out of 1972, 1975 and 1989 respectively, which resulted in the loss of the rigs drilling the locations concerned, the safety performance records in the Nigerian oil and gas exploration and production activities in the past thirty-five years have been satisfactory compared with the records of similar operations in most other parts of the world

  7. Role of Experience, Leadership and Individual Protection in the Cath Lab--A Multicenter Questionnaire and Workshop on Radiation Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuon, E; Weitmann, K; Hoffmann, W; Dörr, M; Hummel, A; Busch, M C; Felix, S B; Empen, K

    2015-10-01

    Radiation exposure in invasive cardiology remains considerable. We evaluated the acceptance of radiation protective devices and the role of operator experience, team leadership, and technical equipment in radiation safety efforts in the clinical routine. Cardiologists (115 from 27 centers) answered a questionnaire and documented radiation parameters for 10 coronary angiographies (CA), before and 3.1 months after a 90-min. mini-course in radiation-reducing techniques. Mini-course participants achieved significant median decreases in patient dose area products (DAP: from 26.6 to 13.0 Gy × cm(2)), number of radiographic frames (-29%) and runs (-8%), radiographic DAP/frame (-2%), fluoroscopic DAP/s (-39%), and fluoroscopy time (-16%). Multilevel analysis revealed lower DAPs with decreasing body mass index (-1.4 Gy × cm(2) per kg/m(2)), age (-1.2 Gy × cm(2)/decade), female sex (-5.9 Gy × cm(2)), participation of the team leader (-9.4 Gy × cm(2)), the mini-course itself (-16.1 Gy × cm(2)), experience (-0.7 Gy × cm(2)/1000 CAs throughout the interventionalist's professional life), and use of older catheterization systems (-6.6 Gy × cm(2)). Lead protection included apron (100%), glass sheet (95%), lengthwise (94%) and crosswise (69%) undercouch sheet, collar (89%), glasses (28%), cover around the patients' thighs (19%), foot switch shield (7%), gloves (3%), and cap (1%). Radiation-protection devices are employed less than optimally in the clinical routine. Cardiologists with a great variety of interventional experience profited from our radiation safety workshop - to an even greater extent if the interventional team leader also participated. Radiation protection devices are employed less than optimally in invasive cardiology. The presented radiation-safety mini-course was highly efficient. Cardiologists at all levels of experience profited from the mini-course - considerably more so if the team leader also took part. Interventional experience was less relevant for

  8. Expanding stroke telerehabilitation services to rural veterans: a qualitative study on patient experiences using the robotic stroke therapy delivery and monitoring system program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Colleen O'Brien; Chumbler, Neale R; Richards, Kimberly; Huff, Amber; Wu, David; Tilghman, Laura M; Butler, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    The present study reports on a robotic stroke therapy delivery and monitoring system intervention. The aims of this pilot implementation project were to determine participants' general impressions about the benefits and barriers of using robotic therapy devices for in-home rehabilitation. We used a qualitative study design employing ethnographic-based anthropological methods including direct observation of the in-home environment and in-depth semi-structured interviews with 10 users of the hand or foot robotic devices. Thematic analysis was conducted using an inductive approach. Participants reported positive experiences with the robotic stroke therapy delivery and monitoring system. Benefits included convenience, self-reported increased mobility, improved mood and an outlet for physical and mental tension and anxiety. Barriers to use were few and included difficulties with placing the device on the body, bulkiness of the monitor and modem connection problems. Telerehabilitation robotic devices can be used as a tool to extend effective, evidence-based and specialized rehabilitation services for upper and lower limb rehabilitation to rural Veterans with poor access to care. Implications for Rehabilitation Participants whose formal therapy services had ended either because they had exhausted their benefits or because traveling to outpatient therapy was too cumbersome due to distance were able to perform therapeutic activities in the home daily (or at least multiple times per week). Participants who were still receiving formal therapy services either in-home or in the clinic were able to perform therapeutic activities in the home on the days they were not attending/receiving formal therapy. Based on the feedback from these veterans and their caregivers, the manufacturing company is working on modifying the devices to be less cumbersome and more user-friendly (lighter-weight, more mobile, changing software, etc.), as well as more adaptable to participants' homes

  9. Experiences from the LNPP-P and DSA review. Lessons learned from RBMK safety studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mankamo, T.; Marttila, J.; Reponen, H.

    2000-09-01

    RBMK is the Russian acronym for 'Channelized Large Power Reactor'. The Soviet-designed RBMK plants deviate substantially from typical Western BWR or PWR plants. The safety of the RBMK plants has raised severe concerns since the major accident at Chernobyl Unit 4 in 1986. In addition, a fire destroyed the turbine hall of Chernobyl Unit 2 in 1991 resulting in a near-accident: the reactor cooling could only be maintained through improvised measures. Another well-known fire event is the control cable room fire at Ignalina Unit 2 in 1989, which led to a partial loss of the main control room functions. After the collapse of Soviet Union several multilateral safety programs were started to evaluate and improve the safety of the RBMK plants. A Probabilistic and Deterministic Safety Assessment (P and DSA) of the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (LNPP) Unit 2 was started in 1996. Phase 2 of the project was completed in January 1999. A Peer Review was performed by Russian and Western experts. This report describes the insights from the RBMK risk studies, especially from the LNPP P and DSA with emphasis on the deeper understanding of the risk-important design factors and identification of possible ways to increase safety. LNPP P and DSA has meant a significant progress in this respect. Despite of its certain limitations P and DSA Phase 2 could point out short-term measures, which substantially reduced the risk of identified weaknesses, mostly related to the reliability of the emergency feedwater function and its support systems. The findings of LNPP P and DSA and the review recommendations emphasise the extensions needed to the analysis scope. The spreading and other influences of fires and floods between connected spaces should be analysed because of incomplete separation and protection in these regards in the 16st generation RBMK plants. High priority should be given to the analysis of external hazards, which were found important at the Loviisa NPP on the Northern side of the

  10. Transports of radioactive materials. Legal regulations, safety and security concepts, experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, Guenther

    2012-01-01

    In Germany, approximately 650,000 to 750,000 units containing radioactive materials for scientific, medical and technical applications are shipped annually by surface, air and water transports. Legally speaking, radioactive materials are dangerous goods which can cause hazards to life, health, property and the environment as a result of faulty handling or accidents in transit. For protection against these hazards, their shipment therefore is regulated in extensive national and international rules of protection and safety. The article contains a topical review of the international and national transport regulations and codes pertaining to shipments of radioactive materials, and of the protection concepts underlying these codes so as to ensure an adequate standard of safety and security in shipping radioactive materials in national and international goods traffic. (orig.)

  11. Operational safety experience at 14 MW research reactor from Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocanescu, M.

    2007-01-01

    The main challenges identified in TRIGA Research Reactor operated in Institute for Nuclear Research in Pitesti, Romania, are in fact similar with challenges of many other research reactors in the world, those are: Ageing of work forces and knowledge management; Maintaining an enhanced technical and scientific competences; Ensuring adequate financial and human resources; Enhancing excellence in management; Ensuring confidence of stakeholders and public; Ageing of equipment and systems.To ensure safety availability of TRIGA Research Reactor in INR Pitesti, the financial resources were secured and a large refurbishment programme and modernization was undertaking by management of institute. This programme concern the modernization of reactor control and safety systems, primary cooling system instrumentation, radiation protection and releases monitoring with new spectrometric computerized abilities, ventilation filtering system and cooling towers. The expected life extension of the reactor will be about 15 years

  12. Experiences from the LNPP-P and DSA review. Lessons learned from RBMK safety studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mankamo, T. [Avaplan Oy (Finland); Marttila, J.; Reponen, H. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2000-09-01

    RBMK is the Russian acronym for 'Channelized Large Power Reactor'. The Soviet-designed RBMK plants deviate substantially from typical Western BWR or PWR plants. The safety of the RBMK plants has raised severe concerns since the major accident at Chernobyl Unit 4 in 1986. In addition, a fire destroyed the turbine hall of Chernobyl Unit 2 in 1991 resulting in a near-accident: the reactor cooling could only be maintained through improvised measures. Another well-known fire event is the control cable room fire at Ignalina Unit 2 in 1989, which led to a partial loss of the main control room functions. After the collapse of Soviet Union several multilateral safety programs were started to evaluate and improve the safety of the RBMK plants. A Probabilistic and Deterministic Safety Assessment (P and DSA) of the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (LNPP) Unit 2 was started in 1996. Phase 2 of the project was completed in January 1999. A Peer Review was performed by Russian and Western experts. This report describes the insights from the RBMK risk studies, especially from the LNPP P and DSA with emphasis on the deeper understanding of the risk-important design factors and identification of possible ways to increase safety. LNPP P and DSA has meant a significant progress in this respect. Despite of its certain limitations P and DSA Phase 2 could point out short-term measures, which substantially reduced the risk of identified weaknesses, mostly related to the reliability of the emergency feedwater function and its support systems. The findings of LNPP P and DSA and the review recommendations emphasise the extensions needed to the analysis scope. The spreading and other influences of fires and floods between connected spaces should be analysed because of incomplete separation and protection in these regards in the 16st generation RBMK plants. High priority should be given to the analysis of external hazards, which were found important at the Loviisa NPP on the Northern

  13. Radiation protection safety in Uganda -- Experience and prospects of the National Radiation Protection Service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisolo, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Uganda National Radiation Protection Service (NRPS) is a technical body under the Atomic Energy Control Board, established by Law - the Atomic Energy Decree of 1972, Decree No. 12, to oversee and enforce safety of radiation sources, practices and workers; and to protect the patients, members of the public and the environment from the dangers of ionizing radiation and radioactive wastes. The Ionizing Radiation Regulations (Standards) - Statutory Instruments Supplement No. 21 of 1996 -- back up the Law. The Law requires all users, importers and operators of radiation sources and radioactive materials to notify the NRPS for registration and licensing. The NRPS is responsible for licensing and for the regulatory enforcement of compliance to the requirements for the safety of radiation sources and practices. There are about 200 diagnostic X-ray units, two radiotherapy centres, one nuclear medicine unit, several neutron probes, about three level gauges and two non-destructive testing sources and a number of small sealed sources in teaching and research institutions. About 50% of these sources have been entered in our inventory using the RAIS software provided by the IAEA. There are about 500 radiation workers and 250 underground miners. The NRPS covers about 50% of the radiation workers. It is planned that by June 2001, all occupational workers will be monitored, bringing coverage to 100%. The Government of Uganda is making the necessary legal, administrative and technical arrangements aimed at establishing the National Radiation Protection Commission as an autonomous regulatory authority. The Atomic Energy Decree of 1972 and Regulations of 1996 are being revised to provide for the National Radiation Protection Commission and to make it comply with the requirements of the International Basic Safety Standards Safety Series No. 115. (author)

  14. The IRSN experience feedback for the transport package design safety appraisals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sert, G.

    2007-01-01

    The activity of transportation of radioactive materials is in constant evolution; air transport of radio elements for medical use is growing rapidly as well as transport of instruments equipped with radioactive sources for inspections of buildings (controls of presence of lead in paintings) and in industry (non destructive examination of welding by gammagraphy, controls of density on building sites). Transports associated with the recycling of plutonium for the production of electricity by nuclear energy are now accomplished in routine. Globally, 900.000 packages are shipped each year in France; among them, approximately 100.000 packages belong to the category for which design approval is required. To maintain a high level of safety for this activity by limiting the probability of occurrence, the severity and consequences of the incidents and accidents, strict rules are implemented by users under the control of the Safety Authority According to the systematic approach of defence in depth, which is defined by the three principles of safety in design, of operational reliability and of effectiveness of emergency response, the robustness of the design of the package is of primary importance. It is based on regulatory requirements relating to the functions of safety (containment of radioactivity, protection against radiation and prevention of the risks of criticality) that must be ensured by the package in conditions of transport as well as in accident conditions. These rules and the way of applying them evolve with time. Indeed, on the one hand the regulation is reexamined periodically; on the other hand, the technical knowledge on the behaviour of the packages subject to the above mentioned conditions and the means of evaluation of this behaviour progress permanently

  15. Socializing Young People to Ethics via Play Experience: Browser Games and Parental Concerns for Safety Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divina Meigs

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers an online game and its relation to safety and privacy, in order to examine social and ethical issues raised by parental concern over harmful content. To gain real insights on the responsibility of adults, it develops a hands-on approach that takes into account the major stakeholders, especially young people and the related circle of people around them. Therefore the research question that is raised is: how do browser games provide reassurance to parents about their children’s safety and privacy? The issue of safety online is explored in three parts, using an ethnographic research framework: it explores a specific online game, it provides a profile of participants, it analyses their types of actions in relation to safety and privacy, and discusses the results in terms of incidence of risk, peer-monitoring and community control. The findings show that there is a rather strong tendency to self-regulation, but that tendency is partly due to a strong presence of mediating adults and peers. The results are discussed in terms of incidence of risk, peer-monitoring and networked means of control on the one hand, and in terms of scientific contribution to socialization theory on the other hand. They lead to final considerations on the repertoire of ethical strategies set up online and its meaning for the concerns of adults towards online risk as well as the need for policies on regulation and self-regulation. They also lead to extensions on the socialization to norms and the appropriation of ethics by young people.

  16. Design, operation, and safety of single-room interventional MRI suites: practical experience from two centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mark J; Thornton, John S; Hawkes, David J; Hill, Derek L G; Kitchen, Neil; Mancini, Laura; McEvoy, Andrew W; Razavi, Reza; Wilson, Sally; Yousry, Tarek; Keevil, Stephen F

    2015-01-01

    The design and operation of a facility in which a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner is incorporated into a room used for surgical or endovascular cardiac interventions presents several challenges. MR safety must be maintained in the presence of a much wider variety of equipment than is found in a diagnostic unit, and of staff unfamiliar with the MRI environment, without compromising the safety and practicality of the interventional procedure. Both the MR-guided cardiac interventional unit at Kings College London and the intraoperative imaging suite at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery are single-room interventional facilities incorporating 1.5 T cylindrical-bore MRI scanners. The two units employ similar strategies to maintain MR safety, both in original design and day-to-day operational workflows, and between them over a decade of incident-free practice has been accumulated. This article outlines these strategies, highlighting both similarities and differences between the units, as well as some lessons learned and resulting procedural changes made in both units since installation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Experimental and design experience with passive safety features of liquid metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucoff, D.M.; Waltar, A.E.; Sackett, J.I.; Salvatores, M.; Aizawa, K.

    1992-10-01

    Liquid metal cooled reactors (LMRs) have already been demonstrated to be robust machines. Many reactor designers now believe that it is possible to include in this technology sufficient passive safety that LMRs would be able to survive loss of flow, loss of heat sink, and transient overpower events, even if the plant protective system fails completely and do so without damage to the core. Early whole-core testing in Rapsodie, EBR-II. and FFTF indicate such designs may be possible. The operational safety testing program in EBR-II is demonstrating benign response of the reactor to a full range of controls failures. But additional testing is needed if transient core structural response under major accident conditions is to be properly understood. The proposed international Phase IIB passive safety tests in FFTF, being designed with a particular emphasis on providing, data to understand core bowing extremes, and further tests planned in EBR-11 with processed IFR fuel should provide a substantial and unique database for validating the computer codes being used to simulate postulated accident conditions

  18. The significance of the human factor in the safety of nuclear reactors: the French experience and the lessons of Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houze, C.; Oury, J.M.

    1982-05-01

    The importance of the human factor to French nuclear safety policy and the application of human fallibility as a parameter of safety analysis are described. The impact of reactor operating experience on future theoretical and practical application considerations is discussed. Particular reference is given to the lessons of Three Mile Island

  19. Identifying patient-centred recommendations for improving patient safety in General Practices in England: a qualitative content analysis of free-text responses using the Patient Reported Experiences and Outcomes of Safety in Primary Care (PREOS-PC) questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci-Cabello, Ignacio; Saletti-Cuesta, Lorena; Slight, Sarah P; Valderas, Jose M

    2017-10-01

    There is a growing interest in identifying strategies to achieve safer primary health-care provision. However, most of the research conducted so far in this area relies on information supplied by health-care providers, and limited attention has been paid to patients' perspectives. To explore patients' experiences and perceptions of patient safety in English general practices with the aim of eliciting patient-centred recommendations for improving patient safety. The Patient Reported Experiences and Outcomes of Safety in Primary Care questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 6736 primary care users registered in 45 English practices. We conducted a qualitative content analysis of responses to seven open-ended items addressing patients' experiences of safety problems, lessons learnt as a result of such experiences and recommendations for safer health care. A total of 1244 (18.4%) participants returned completed questionnaires. Of those, 678 (54.5%) responded to at least one open-ended question. Two main themes emerged as follows: (i) experiences of safety problems and (ii) good practices and recommendations to improve patient safety in primary care. Most frequent experiences of safety problems were related to appointments, coordination between providers, tests, medication and diagnosis. Patients' responses to these problems included increased patient activation (eg speaking up about concerns with their health care) and avoidance of unnecessary health care. Recommendations for safer health care included improvements in patient-centred communication, continuity of care, timely appointments, technical quality of care, active monitoring, teamwork, health records and practice environment. This study identified a number of patient-centred recommendations for improving patient safety in English general practices. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in Nuclear Reactor Safety (NRS) - Proceedings of the workshop on Experiments and CFD Code Application to Nuclear Reactor Safety (XCFD4NRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is to an increasing extent being adopted in nuclear reactor safety analyses as a tool that enables specific safety relevant phenomena occurring in the reactor coolant system to be better described. The Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI), which is responsible for the activities of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency that support advancing the technical base of the safety of nuclear installations, has in recent years conducted an important activity in the CFD area. This activity has been carried out within the scope of the CSNI working group on the analysis and management of accidents (GAMA), and has mainly focused on the formulation of user guidelines and on the assessment and verification of CFD codes. It is in this GAMA framework that a first workshop CFD4NRS was organized and held in Garching, Germany in 2006. Following the CFD4NRS workshop, this XCFD4NRS Workshop was intended to extend the forum created for numerical analysts and experimentalists to exchange information in the field of Nuclear Reactor Safety (NRS) related activities relevant to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) validation, but this time with more emphasis placed on new experimental techniques and two-phase CFD applications. The purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum for numerical analysts and experimentalists to exchange information in the field of NRS-related activities relevant to CFD validation, with the objective of providing input to GAMA CFD experts to create a practical, state-of-the-art, web-based assessment matrix on the use of CFD for NRS applications. The scope of XCFD4NRS includes: - Single-phase and two-phase CFD simulations with an emphasis on validation in areas such as: boiling flows, free-surface flows, direct contact condensation and turbulent mixing. These applications should relate to NRS-relevant issues such as: pressurized thermal shocks, critical heat flux, pool heat exchangers, boron dilution, hydrogen

  1. Grazing incidence beam expander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  2. Nonfatal road traffic injuries: can road safety campaigns prevent hazardous behavior? An Italian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampetti, R; Messina, G; Quercioli, C; Vencia, F; Genco, L; Di Bartolomeo, L; Nante, N

    2013-01-01

    Road traffic injuries are a widespread problem and are very difficult to prevent. The purpose of this study was to verify whether intensive versus basic road safety education programs are associated with different incidence and severity of nonfatal road injuries. The study had an ecological design and involved Local Health Authority One (LHA1) in Salerno, Italy, which includes 20 municipalities. Data on nonfatal road injuries occurring in the periods June to August 2003 and June to August 2008 were obtained from trained operators through the information system of the emergency department. All 20 municipalities received a basic community road safety education program (publicity campaign using bill-posting, brochures, mass media communication with press conferences, articles in local papers, radio and television interviews, and a dedicated LHA1 web site), and 12 municipalities also received an intensive education campaign (in secondary schools, community conferences, and activities organized by police and firefighters). The incidence and severity of nonfatal road traffic injuries were compared between June to August 2003 (before the campaign) and June to August 2008. The total number of injuries in all 20 municipalities in 2003 and 2008 was 907 and 755, respectively. The incidence of injuries decreased in the study period both in the 8 municipalities where only the basic campaign was run (difference in incidence = -0.4; P = .053) and in the 12 municipalities where the intensive campaign was implemented (difference in incidence = -0.5; P road safety education. This does not mean that such campaigns are useless (they are important to raise awareness) but that they should be supplemented with complementary activities in order to be really effective.

  3. Airline Safety Improvement Through Experience with Near-Misses: A Cautionary Tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Peter; Dillon, Robin L; Tinsley, Catherine H

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the U.S. commercial airline industry has achieved unprecedented levels of safety, with the statistical risk associated with U.S. commercial aviation falling to 0.003 fatalities per 100 million passengers. But decades of research on organizational learning show that success often breeds complacency and failure inspires improvement. With accidents as rare events, can the airline industry continue safety advancements? This question is complicated by the complex system in which the industry operates where chance combinations of multiple factors contribute to what are largely probabilistic (rather than deterministic) outcomes. Thus, some apparent successes are realized because of good fortune rather than good processes, and this research intends to bring attention to these events, the near-misses. The processes that create these near-misses could pose a threat if multiple contributing factors combine in adverse ways without the intervention of good fortune. Yet, near-misses (if recognized as such) can, theoretically, offer a mechanism for continuing safety improvements, above and beyond learning gleaned from observable failure. We test whether or not this learning is apparent in the airline industry. Using data from 1990 to 2007, fixed effects Poisson regressions show that airlines learn from accidents (their own and others), and from one category of near-misses-those where the possible dangers are salient. Unfortunately, airlines do not improve following near-miss incidents when the focal event has no clear warnings of significant danger. Therefore, while airlines need to and can learn from certain near-misses, we conclude with recommendations for improving airline learning from all near-misses. © 2015 Society for Risk Analysis.

  4. Expanding the HAWC Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Johanna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-17

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory is expanding its current array of 300 water tanks to include 350 outrigger tanks to increase sensitivity to gamma rays above 10 TeV. This involves creating and testing hardware with which to build the new tanks, including photomultiplier tubes, high voltage supply units, and flash analog to digital converters. My responsibilities this summer included preparing, testing and calibrating that equipment.

  5. Sodium fire studies in France. Safety experiments applied to fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruchard, Y.; Colome, J.; Malet, J.C.; Berlin, M.; Duverger de Cuy, G.; Justin, J.; Duco, J.

    1976-01-01

    In fast reactors, the risk of sodium fires must be analyzed in detail and the consequences of an accidental fire must be known precisely. Beyond the search for prevention and detection means, techniques must be developed to set up a limit to damages created by an accidental fire: extinguishing, aerosol confinement, protection of the reactor structures. The program developed by the Nuclear Safety Department of the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique to solve these various problems is described. The main results and their applications to the Super-Phenix reactor are presented [fr

  6. Recent Experiences of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) GN and C Technical Discipline Team (TDT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC), initially formed in 2003, is an independently funded NASA Program whose dedicated team of technical experts provides objective engineering and safety assessments of critical, high risk projects. The GN&C Technical Discipline Team (TDT) is one of fifteen such discipline-focused teams within the NESC organization. The TDT membership is composed of GN&C specialists from across NASA and its partner organizations in other government agencies, industry, national laboratories, and universities. This paper will briefly define the vision, mission, and purpose of the NESC organization. The role of the GN&C TDT will then be described in detail along with an overview of how this team operates and engages in its objective engineering and safety assessments of critical NASA projects. This paper will then describe selected recent experiences, over the period 2007 to present, of the GN&C TDT in which they directly performed or supported a wide variety of NESC assessments and consultations.

  7. Safety Research Experiment Facility Project. Conceptual design report. Volume III. Utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-12-01

    The SAREF Electric Power System supplies and distributes power from the EBR-II switchgear for operation of all normal facilities on the site, from an on-site Experiment Diesel Generator for operation of all experiment related loads, and from an emergency engine generator and/or an uninterruptible power supply for operation of all essential and critical loads during a failure of both of the other two systems