WorldWideScience

Sample records for exoelectron emission processes

  1. Optically stimulated exoelectron emission processes in quartz: comparison of experiment and theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagonis, V.; Ankjærgaard, Christina; Murray, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that it is possible to measure optically stimulated exoelectron emission (OSE) signals simultaneously with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from quartz samples. These experiments provide valuable information on the charge movement in quartz grains. Two...... specific experiments measured the temperature dependence of the OSL and OSE signals on preheat and stimulation temperature. This paper provides a quantitative description of these experiments by using a previously published theoretical model for photostimulated exoelectron emission (PSEE). The experimental...... data yield a value of χ1.2 eV for the work function of quartz. The experimental temperature dependence of the OSE signals is interpreted on the basis of a photo-thermostimulated (PTSEE) process involving the main OSL trap at 320 °C; this process takes place with a thermal assistance energy estimated...

  2. Features of exoelectron emission in amorphous metallic alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Veksler, A S; Morozov, I L; Semenov, A L

    2001-01-01

    The peculiarities of the photothermostimulated exoelectron emission in amorphous metallic alloys of the Fe sub 6 sub 4 Co sub 2 sub 1 B sub 1 sub 5 composition are studied. It is established that the temperature dependences of the exoelectron emission spectrum adequately reflect the two-stage character of the amorphous alloy transition into the crystalline state. The exoelectron emission spectrum is sensitive to the variations in the modes of the studied sample thermal treatment. The thermal treatment of the amorphous metallic alloy leads to growth in the intensity of the exoelectrons yield. The highest growth in the intensify of the exoelectron emission was observed in the alloys at the initial stage of their crystallization

  3. Observations of exoelectron emission associated with heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenig, S. A.; Utter, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    It is suggested that the exoelectron emission from the catalyst may be used to monitor the rate of oxidation of CO and CH4 over palladium catalysts. Indirect heating of the catalyst and atmospheric pressure have no effect upon this monitoring system. Although the mechanism relating catalysis to exoelectron emission is not clear, it is considered possible that electron emission is triggered by the adsorption-desorption cycle.

  4. Charge recombination processes in minerals studied using optically stimulated luminescence and time-resolved exo-electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsukamoto, Sumiko; Murray, Andrew; Ankjærgaard, Christina

    2010-01-01

    on the probability of (1) escape of electrons into the detector gas from the conduction band by overcoming the work function of the material and (2) thermalization of electrons in the conduction band, and subsequent re-trapping/recombination. Thus, we expect the exo-electron signal to reflect the instantaneous...

  5. Exploring gamma radiation effect on exoelectron emission properties of bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakaria, M.; Dekhtyar, Y.; Bogucharska, T.; Noskov, V. [Riga Technical Univ., Biomedical Engineering and Nanotechnology Institute (Latvia)

    2006-07-01

    Gamma radiation is used for radiation therapy to treat carcinogenic diseases including bone cancer. Ionising radiation kills carcinogenic calls. However, there are side effects of the gamma radiation on the bone surface electron structure. One of the effects is in the form of altering electron density of states of bone that, with time, influences biomedical reactions on bone life condition. (authors)

  6. Electron and ion induced electron emission from metals and insulators

    CERN Document Server

    Steinbatz, M

    2001-01-01

    gradually exposed to oxygen as an experimental probe. The experimental data are fitted with an analytical model, that is able to describe the observed kinetics. The fit parameters give absolute values of sticking probabilities and of surface reaction rates. During oxidation of aluminum and magnesium also spontaneous emission of electrons (exoelectrons) is observed. This effect is quantitatively studied for different oxygen partial pressures. The experimental data also indicate a significant influence of the surface morphology on the exoemission process. An important consequence of atomic collisions in solids is ionization leading to electron ejection from the target atoms with subsequent migration through the solid. A certain fraction of these electrons finally reaches the surface and is ejected into vacuum. A standard measurement of this phenomenon is the observation of the particle (electron, ion) induced electron emission yield g, defined as the average number of ejected electrons per incoming projectile. ...

  7. Charge movement in grains of quartz studied using exo-electron emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Christina; Denby, Phil M.; Murray, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    movement in luminescence phosphors. Here we show that OSE from natural quartz grains gives an easily detectable, reproducible and light sensitive signal, although it is not as intense as OSL. A single sample of natural quartz grains extracted from a sediment is used to investigate the thermal stability...

  8. Dust emission from wet, low-emission coke quenching process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komosiński, Bogusław; Bobik, Bartłomiej; Konieczny, Tomasz; Cieślik, Ewelina

    2018-01-01

    Coke plants, which produce various types of coke (metallurgical, foundry or heating), at temperatures between 600 and 1200°C, with limited access to oxygen, are major emitters of particulates and gaseous pollutants to air, water and soils. Primarily, the process of wet quenching should be mentioned, as one of the most cumbersome. Atmospheric pollutants include particulates, tar substances, organic pollutants including B(a)P and many others. Pollutants are also formed from the decomposition of water used to quench coke (CO, phenol, HCN, H2S, NH3, cresol) and decomposition of hot coke in the first phase of quenching (CO, H2S, SO2) [1]. The development of the coke oven technology has resulted in the changes made to different types of technological installations, such as the use of baffles in quench towers, the removal of nitrogen oxides by selective NOx reduction, and the introduction of fabric filters for particulates removal. The BAT conclusions for coke plants [2] provide a methodology for the measurement of particulate emission from a wet, low-emission technology using Mohrhauer probes. The conclusions define the emission level for wet quenching process as 25 g/Mgcoke. The conducted research was aimed at verification of the presented method. For two of three quench towers (A and C) the requirements included in the BAT conclusions are not met and emissions amount to 87.34 and 61.35 g/Mgcoke respectively. The lowest particulates emission was recorded on the quench tower B and amounted to 22.5 g/Mgcoke, therefore not exceeding the requirements.

  9. PLASMA EMISSION BY NONLINEAR ELECTROMAGNETIC PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziebell, L. F.; Petruzzellis, L. T.; Gaelzer, R. [Instituto de Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Yoon, P. H. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park (United States); Pavan, J., E-mail: luiz.ziebell@ufrgs.br, E-mail: laripetruzzellis@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: rudi.gaelzer@ufrgs.br, E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu, E-mail: joel.pavan@ufpel.edu.br [Instituto de Física e Matemática, UFPel, Pelotas, RS (Brazil)

    2015-06-20

    The plasma emission, or electromagnetic (EM) radiation at the plasma frequency and/or its harmonic(s), is generally accepted as the radiation mechanism responsible for solar type II and III radio bursts. Identification and characterization of these solar radio burst phenomena were done in the 1950s. Despite many decades of theoretical research since then, a rigorous demonstration of the plasma emission process based upon first principles was not available until recently, when, in a recent Letter, Ziebell et al. reported the first complete numerical solution of EM weak turbulence equations; thus, quantitatively analyzing the plasma emission process starting from the initial electron beam and the associated beam-plasma (or Langmuir wave) instability, as well as the subsequent nonlinear conversion of electrostatic Langmuir turbulence into EM radiation. In the present paper, the same problem is revisited in order to elucidate the detailed physical mechanisms that could not be reported in the brief Letter format. Findings from the present paper may be useful for interpreting observations and full-particle numerical simulations.

  10. Atmospheric process evaluation of mobile source emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    During the past two decades there has been a considerable effort in the US to develop and introduce an alternative to the use of gasoline and conventional diesel fuel for transportation. The primary motives for this effort have been twofold: energy security and improvement in air quality, most notably ozone, or smog. The anticipated improvement in air quality is associated with a decrease in the atmospheric reactivity, and sometimes a decrease in the mass emission rate, of the organic gas and NO{sub x} emissions from alternative fuels when compared to conventional transportation fuels. Quantification of these air quality impacts is a prerequisite to decisions on adopting alternative fuels. The purpose of this report is to present a critical review of the procedures and data base used to assess the impact on ambient air quality of mobile source emissions from alternative and conventional transportation fuels and to make recommendations as to how this process can be improved. Alternative transportation fuels are defined as methanol, ethanol, CNG, LPG, and reformulated gasoline. Most of the discussion centers on light-duty AFVs operating on these fuels. Other advanced transportation technologies and fuels such as hydrogen, electric vehicles, and fuel cells, will not be discussed. However, the issues raised herein can also be applied to these technologies and other classes of vehicles, such as heavy-duty diesels (HDDs). An evaluation of the overall impact of AFVs on society requires consideration of a number of complex issues. It involves the development of new vehicle technology associated with engines, fuel systems, and emission control technology; the implementation of the necessary fuel infrastructure; and an appropriate understanding of the economic, health, safety, and environmental impacts associated with the use of these fuels. This report addresses the steps necessary to properly evaluate the impact of AFVs on ozone air quality.

  11. The emission of atoms and molecules accompanying fracture of single-crystal MgO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, J. T.; Jensen, L. C.; Mckay, M. R.; Freund, F.

    1986-01-01

    The emission of particles due to deformation and fracture of materials has been investigated. The emission of electrons (exoelectron emission), ions, neutral species, photons (triboluminescence), as well as long wavelength electromagnetic radiation was observed; collectively these emissions are referred to as fractoemission. This paper describes measurements of the neutral emission accompanying the fracture of single-crystal MgO. Masses detected are tentatively assigned to the emission of H2, CH4, H2O, CO, O2, CO2, and atomic Mg. Other hydrocarbons are also observed. The time dependencies of some of these emissions relative to fracture are presented for two different loading conditions.

  12. Air toxics emissions from an IGCC process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mojtahedi, W.; Norrbacka, P. [Enviropower Inc., Espoo (Finland); Hinderson, A. [Vattenfall (Sweden); Rosenberg, R.; Zilliacus, R.; Kurkela, E.; Nieminen, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Hoffren, H. [IVO International Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    The so-called simplified coal gasification combined cycle process, incorporating air gasification and hot gas cleanup, promises high power generation efficiency in an environmentally acceptable manner. Increasingly more stringent environmental regulations have focused attention on the emissions of not only SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} but also on the so-called air toxics which include a number of toxic trace elements. As result of recent amendments to the United States Clean Air Act, IGCC emissions of eleven trace elements: antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, manganese, mercury, nickel, selenium - as well as the radionuclides uranium and thorium may be regulated. Similarly, air missions standards in Europe include a limit of 0.05 mg Nm{sup 3} for mercury and cadmium and 1.0 3/Nm{sup 3} for other class I trace elements. A suitable sampling/measuring system has been developed in this project (in cooperation with Imatran Voima Oy, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Radian Cooperation) which will be used in the pressurized gasification tests. This will enable an accurate measurement of the volatilized trace element species, at high temperature and pressure, which may be found in the vapour phase. Models are being developed that can be used to determine not only the chemical equilibrium composition of gaseous, liquid and solid phases, but also possible interactions of the gaseous species with aerosol particles and surfaces, These should be used to more accurately assess the impact of the toxic trace metals emitted from the simplified IGCC system

  13. Processing of materials for uniform field emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pam, L.S.; Felter, T.E.; Talin, A.; Ohlberg, D.; Fox, C.; Han, S.

    1999-01-12

    This method produces a field emitter material having a uniform electron emitting surface and a low turn-on voltage. Field emitter materials having uniform electron emitting surfaces as large as 1 square meter and turn-on voltages as low as 16V/{micro}m can be produced from films of electron emitting materials such as polycrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon, graphite and amorphous carbon by the method of the present invention. The process involves conditioning the surface of a field emitter material by applying an electric field to the surface, preferably by scanning the surface of the field emitter material with an electrode maintained at a fixed distance of at least 3 {micro}m above the surface of the field emitter material and at a voltage of at least 500V. In order to enhance the uniformity of electron emission the step of conditioning can be preceded by ion implanting carbon, nitrogen, argon, oxygen or hydrogen into the surface layers of the field emitter material. 2 figs.

  14. Spectral Components Analysis of Diffuse Emission Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyshev, Dmitry; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2012-09-14

    We develop a novel method to separate the components of a diffuse emission process based on an association with the energy spectra. Most of the existing methods use some information about the spatial distribution of components, e.g., closeness to an external template, independence of components etc., in order to separate them. In this paper we propose a method where one puts conditions on the spectra only. The advantages of our method are: 1) it is internal: the maps of the components are constructed as combinations of data in different energy bins, 2) the components may be correlated among each other, 3) the method is semi-blind: in many cases, it is sufficient to assume a functional form of the spectra and determine the parameters from a maximization of a likelihood function. As an example, we derive the CMB map and the foreground maps for seven yeas of WMAP data. In an Appendix, we present a generalization of the method, where one can also add a number of external templates.

  15. Nitrous oxide emissions from wastewater treatment processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Yingyu; Ye, Liu; Pan, Yuting; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from wastewater treatment plants vary substantially between plants, ranging from negligible to substantial (a few per cent of the total nitrogen load), probably because of different designs and operational conditions. In general, plants that achieve high levels of nitrogen removal emit less N2O, indicating that no compromise is required between high water quality and lower N2O emissions. N2O emissions primarily occur in aerated zones/compartments/periods owing to active stripping, and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, rather than heterotrophic denitrifiers, are the main contributors. However, the detailed mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated, despite strong evidence suggesting that both nitrifier denitrification and the chemical breakdown of intermediates of hydroxylamine oxidation are probably involved. With increased understanding of the fundamental reactions responsible for N2O production in wastewater treatment systems and the conditions that stimulate their occurrence, reduction of N2O emissions from wastewater treatment systems through improved plant design and operation will be achieved in the near future. PMID:22451112

  16. Air toxics emission from an IGCC process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mojtahedi, W.; Hovath, A. [Carbona Inc, Helsinki (Finland); Hinderson, A. [Vattenfall Utveckling (Sweden); Nykaenen, J.; Hoffren, H. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland); Nieminen, M.; Kurkela, E. [VTT, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    The emissions of 12 toxic trace element from a coal-fired IGCC plant were calculated based on thermodynamic equilibrium in the gas phase and some of the results published. The theoretical calculations were extended to include some other fuels as well as mixture of some of these fuels. The combustion of the product gas in the gas turbine is also considered. These simulations correspond to gasification of the fuel at 850-1050 deg C (depending on the fuel) and 1823 bar pressure. The gas composition was taken from the measured data as far as possible. In the absence of experimental data, a computer code developed for the U-Gas gasifier was used to determine the fuel gas composition. The gas was then cooled to 550 deg C in the gas cooler and filtered at this same temperature and burned in the gas turbine with an air ratio of 3.2. The results of these simulations are compared with the measured data of an experimental program designed to measure the emissions of a few selected trace elements from a 15 MW,h pressurized fluidized bed gasification pilot plant. The pilot plant was equipped with an advanced hot gas cleanup train which includes a two fluidized-bed reactor system for high-temperature, high-pressure external sulfur removal and a filtration unit housing porous, rigid ceramic candle filters. The trace element concentrations in the fuel, bottom ash, and filter ash are determined and the results compared with EPA regulatory levels

  17. Emissions of fluorides from welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyńska, Małgorzata; Pągowska, Emilia; Pyrzyńska, Krystyna

    2015-11-01

    The levels of fluoride airborne particulates emitted from welding processes were investigated. They were sampled with the patented IOM Sampler, developed by J. H. Vincent and D. Mark at the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM), personal inhalable sampler for simultaneous collection of the inhalable and respirable size fractions. Ion chromatography with conductometric detection was used for quantitative analysis. The efficiency of fluoride extraction from the cellulose filter of the IOM sampler was examined using the standard sample of urban air particle matter SRM-1648a. The best results for extraction were obtained when water and the anionic surfactant N-Cetyl-N-N-N-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were used in an ultrasonic bath. The limits of detection and quantification for the whole procedure were 8μg/L and 24μg/L, respectively. The linear range of calibration was 0.01-10mg/L, which corresponds to 0.0001-0.1mg of fluorides per m(3) in collection of a 20L air sample. The concentration of fluorides in the respirable fraction of collected air samples was in the range of 0.20-1.82mg/m(3), while the inhalable fraction contained 0.23-1.96mg/m(3) of fluorides during an eight-hour working day in the welding room. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Thermal effects on arsenic emissions during coal combustion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiqiang; Sun, Qiang; Yang, Xiuyuan

    2018-01-15

    In this study, the rate of emission of arsenic during the burning process of different kinds of coal is examined in order to study the volatile characteristics of arsenic during coal combustion which have negative effects on the ecological environment and human health. The results show that the emission rate of arsenic gradually increases with increased burning temperature, with a threshold of approximately 700°C to 800°C in the process of temperature increase. Then, the relationships among the arsenic emission rate and combustion environment, original arsenic content, combustion time, burning temperature, air flow and amount of arsenic fixing agent are discussed, and it is found that except for the original arsenic content, the rest of the factors have a nonlinear relationship with the emission rate of arsenic. That is, up to a certain level, they all contribute to the release of arsenic, and then their impact is minimal. The original arsenic content in coal is proportional to the arsenic emission rate. Therefore, taking into consideration the nonlinear relationships between factors that affect the arsenic emission rate can reduce contamination from arsenic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of process air emissions in automotive production plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, J B; Dasch, J M; Gundrum, A B; Rivera, J L; Johnson, J H; Carlson, D H; Sutherland, J W

    2016-01-01

    During manufacturing, particles produced from industrial processes become airborne. These airborne emissions represent a challenge from an industrial hygiene and environmental standpoint. A study was undertaken to characterize the particles associated with a variety of manufacturing processes found in the auto industry. Air particulates were collected in five automotive plants covering ten manufacturing processes in the areas of casting, machining, heat treatment and assembly. Collection procedures provided information on air concentration, size distribution, and chemical composition of the airborne particulate matter for each process and insight into the physical and chemical processes that created those particles.

  20. Emissions of volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) throughout wastewater biosolids processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, R M; Le-Minh, N; Alvarez-Gaitan, J P; Moore, S J; Stuetz, R M

    2017-11-02

    Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) are important contributors to nuisance odours from the processing of wastewater sludge and biosolids. However, emission characteristics are difficult to predict as they vary between sites and are likely to be affected by biosolids processing configuration and operation. VSC emissions from biosolids throughout 6 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Sydney, Australia were examined in this study. H2S was the VSC found at the highest concentrations throughout the WWTPs, with concentrations ranging from 7 to 39,000μg/m(3). Based on odour activity values (OAVs), H2S was typically also the most dominant odorant. However, methyl mercaptan (MeSH) was also found to be sensorially important in the biosolids storage areas given its low odour detection threshold (ODT). High concentrations of VOSCs such as MeSH in the storage areas were shown to potentially interfere with H2S measurements using the Jerome 631-X H2S sensor and these interferences should be investigated in more detail. The VSC composition of emissions varied throughout biosolids processing as well as between the different WWTPs. The primary sludge and biosolids after dewatering and during storage, were key stages producing nuisance odours as judged by the determination of OAVs. Cluster analysis was used to group sampling locations according to VSC emissions. These groups were typically the dewatered and stored biosolids, primary and thickened primary sludge, and waste activated sludge (WAS), thickened WAS, digested sludge and centrate. Effects of biosolids composition and process operation on VSC emissions were evaluated using best subset regression. Emissions from the primary sludge were dominated by H2S and appeared to be affected by the presence of organic matter, pH and Fe content. While volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs) emitted from the produced biosolids were shown to be correlated with upstream factors such as Fe and Al salt dosing, anaerobic digestion and

  1. High Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission, Integrated Process Heater System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, Howard; Boral, Anindya; Chhotray, San; Martin, Matthew

    2006-06-19

    The team of TIAX LLC, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, and Callidus Technologies, LLC conducted a six-year program to develop an ultra-low emission process heater burner and an advanced high efficiency heater design. This project addresses the critical need of process heater operators for reliable, economical emission reduction technologies to comply with stringent emission regulations, and for heater design alternatives that reduce process heater energy requirements without significant cost increase. The key project targets were NOx emissions of 10 ppm (@ 3% O2), and a heater thermal efficiency of 95 percent. The ultra low NOx burner was developed through a series of pilot-scale and field tests combined with computational fluid dynamic modeling to arrive at simultaneous low emissions and suitable flame shape and stability. Pilot scale tests were run at TIAX, at the 2 MMBtu/hr scale, and at Callidus at 8 MMBtu/hr. The full scale burner was installed on a 14 burner atmospheric pipestill furnace at an ExxonMobil refinery. A variety of burner configurations, gas tips and flame stabilizers were tested to determine the lowest emissions with acceptable flame shape and stability. The resulting NOx emissions were 22 ppm on average. Starting in 2001, Callidus commercialized the original ultra low NOx burner and made subsequent design improvements in a series of commercial burners evolving from the original concept and/or development. Emissions in the field with the ultra low-NOx burner over a broad spectrum of heater applications have varied from 5 ppm to 30 ppm depending on heater geometry, heater service, fuel and firing capacity. To date, 1550 of the original burners, and 2500 of subsequent generation burners have been sold by Callidus. The advanced heater design was developed by parametric evaluations of a variety of furnace and combustion air preheater configurations and technologies for enhancing convective and radiative heat transfer. The design evolution

  2. A process based model for methane emission predictions from flooded rice paddies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodegom, van P.M.; Wassmann, R.; Metra-Corton, T.M.

    2001-01-01

    Estimation and prediction of methane emission from flooded rice paddies is impaired by the large spatial and temporal variability in methane emissions and by the dynamic nonlinear relations between processes underlying methane emissions. This paper describes a process-based model on methane emission

  3. Computer simulation of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and process economics of the fluid milk process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasula, P M; Yee, W C F; McAloon, A J; Nutter, D W; Bonnaillie, L M

    2013-05-01

    Energy-savings measures have been implemented in fluid milk plants to lower energy costs and the energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Although these measures have resulted in reductions in steam, electricity, compressed air, and refrigeration use of up to 30%, a benchmarking framework is necessary to examine the implementation of process-specific measures that would lower energy use, costs, and CO2 emissions even further. In this study, using information provided by the dairy industry and equipment vendors, a customizable model of the fluid milk process was developed for use in process design software to benchmark the electrical and fuel energy consumption and CO2 emissions of current processes. It may also be used to test the feasibility of new processing concepts to lower energy and CO2 emissions with calculation of new capital and operating costs. The accuracy of the model in predicting total energy usage of the entire fluid milk process and the pasteurization step was validated using available literature and industry energy data. Computer simulation of small (40.0 million L/yr), medium (113.6 million L/yr), and large (227.1 million L/yr) processing plants predicted the carbon footprint of milk, defined as grams of CO2 equivalents (CO2e) per kilogram of packaged milk, to within 5% of the value of 96 g of CO 2e/kg of packaged milk obtained in an industry-conducted life cycle assessment and also showed, in agreement with the same study, that plant size had no effect on the carbon footprint of milk but that larger plants were more cost effective in producing milk. Analysis of the pasteurization step showed that increasing the percentage regeneration of the pasteurizer from 90 to 96% would lower its thermal energy use by almost 60% and that implementation of partial homogenization would lower electrical energy use and CO2e emissions of homogenization by 82 and 5.4%, respectively. It was also demonstrated that implementation of steps to lower non-process

  4. Optical sensors for process control and emissions monitoring in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. W. Alendorf; D. K. Ottensen; D. W. Hahn; T. J. Kulp; U. B. Goers

    1999-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has a number of ongoing projects developing optical sensors for industrial environments. Laser-based sensors can be attractive for relatively harsh environments where extractive sampling is difficult, inaccurate, or impractical. Tools developed primarily for laboratory research can often be adapted for the real world and applied to problems far from their original uses. Spectroscopic techniques, appropriately selected, have the potential to impact the bottom line of a number of industries and industrial processes. In this paper the authors discuss three such applications: a laser-based instrument for process control in steelmaking, a laser-induced breakdown method for hazardous metal detection in process streams, and a laser-based imaging sensor for evaluating surface cleanliness. Each has the potential to provide critical, process-related information in a real-time, continuous manner. These sensor techniques encompass process control applications and emissions monitoring for pollution prevention. They also span the range from a field-tested pre-commercial prototype to laboratory instrumentation. Finally, these sensors employ a wide range of sophistication in both the laser source and associated analytical spectroscopy. In the ultimate applications, however, many attributes of the sensors are in common, such as the need for robust operation and hardening for harsh industrial environments.

  5. Dust emission: small-scale processes with global consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okin, Gregory S.; Bullard, Joanna E.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Ballantine, John-Andrew C.; Schepanski, Kerstin; Todd, Martin C.; Belnap, Jayne; Baddock, Matthew C.; Gill, Thomas E.; Miller, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Desert dust, both modern and ancient, is a critical component of the Earth system. Atmospheric dust has important effects on climate by changing the atmospheric radiation budget, while deposited dust influences biogeochemical cycles in the oceans and on land. Dust deposited on snow and ice decreases its albedo, allowing more light to be trapped at the surface, thus increasing the rate of melt and influencing energy budgets and river discharge. In the human realm, dust contributes to the transport of allergens and pathogens and when inhaled can cause or aggravate respiratory diseases. Dust storms also represent a significant hazard to road and air travel. Because it affects so many Earth processes, dust is studied from a variety of perspectives and at multiple scales, with various disciplines examining emissions for different purposes using disparate strategies. Thus, the range of objectives in studying dust, as well as experimental approaches and results, has not yet been systematically integrated. Key research questions surrounding the production and sources of dust could benefit from improved collaboration among different research communities. These questions involve the origins of dust, factors that influence dust production and emission, and methods through which dust can be monitored.

  6. Development of an Evaluating Method for Carbon Emissions of Manufacturing Process Plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon intensity reduction and energy utilization enhancement in manufacturing industry are becoming a timely topic. In a manufacturing system, the process planning is the combination of all production factors which influences the entail carbon emissions during manufacturing. In order to meet the current low carbon manufacturing requirements, a carbon emission evaluation method for the manufacturing process planning is highly desirable to be developed. This work presents a method to evaluate the carbon emissions of a process plan by aggregating the unit process to form a combined model for evaluating carbon emissions. The evaluating results can be used to decrease the resource and energy consumption and pinpoint detailed breakdown of the influences between manufacturing process plan and carbon emissions. Finally, the carbon emission analysis method is applied to a process plan of an axis to examine its feasibility and validity.

  7. Profiling stainless steel welding processes to reduce fume emissions, hexavalent chromium emissions and operating costs in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael; Siert, Arlen; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T

    2016-01-01

    Nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for stainless steel were assessed for fume generation rates, fume generation rates per g of electrode consumed, and emission rates for hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)). Elemental manganese, nickel, chromium, iron emissions per unit length of weld, and labor plus consumables costs were similarly measured. Flux-cored arc welding and shielded metal arc (SMAW) processes were also studied. The objective was to identify the best welding processes for reducing workplace exposures, and estimate costs for all processes. Using a conical chamber, fumes were collected, weighed, recovered, and analyzed by inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for metals, and by ion chromatography for Cr(6+). GMAW processes used were Surface Tension Transfer, Regulated Metal Deposition, Cold Metal Transfer, short-circuit, axial spray, and pulsed spray modes. Flux-cored welding used gas shielding; SMAW used E308 rods. Costs were estimated as dollars per m length of a ¼ in (6.3 mm) thick horizontal butt weld; equipment costs were estimated as ratios of new equipment costs to a 250 ampere capacity SMAW welding machine. Results indicate a broad range of fume emission factors for the processes studied. Fume emission rates per g of electrode were lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed-spray mode (0.2 mg/g), and highest for SMAW (8 mg fume/g electrode). Emission rates of Cr(6+) ranged from 50-7800 µg/min, and Cr(6+) generation rates per g electrode ranged from 1-270 µg/g. Elemental Cr generation rates spanned 13-330 µg/g. Manganese emission rates ranged from 50-300 µg/g. Nickel emission rates ranged from 4-140 µg/g. Labor and consumables costs ranged from $3.15 (GMAW pulsed spray) to $7.40 (SMAW) per meter of finished weld, and were measured or estimated for all 11 processes tested. Equipment costs for some processes may be as much as five times the cost of a typical SMAW welding machine. The results show that all of the GMAW processes in this

  8. Characterizing Dominant Processes in Landfills to Quantify the Emission Potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Turnhout, A.G.

    2017-01-01

    Our ever-growing amount of solid waste puts a burden on future generations and the environment due to emissions of contaminants such as CO2, CH4, Cl- and heavy-metals for hundreds of years. It is therefore essential that landfill after-care methods are developed that reduce the emission potential of

  9. New and Revised Emissions Factors for Flares and New Emissions Factors for Certain Refinery Process Units and Determination for No Changes to VOC Emissions Factors for Tanks and Wastewater Treatment Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    New and Revised Emission Factors for Flares and New Emission Factors for Certain Refinery Process Units and Determination for No Changes to VOC Emission Factors for Tanks and Wastewater Treatment Systems

  10. Secondary electron emission from plasma processed accelerating cavity grade niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basovic, Milos

    Advances in the particle accelerator technology have enabled numerous fundamental discoveries in 20th century physics. Extensive interdisciplinary research has always supported further development of accelerator technology in efforts of reaching each new energy frontier. Accelerating cavities, which are used to transfer energy to accelerated charged particles, have been one of the main focuses of research and development in the particle accelerator field. Over the last fifty years, in the race to break energy barriers, there has been constant improvement of the maximum stable accelerating field achieved in accelerating cavities. Every increase in the maximum attainable accelerating fields allowed for higher energy upgrades of existing accelerators and more compact designs of new accelerators. Each new and improved technology was faced with ever emerging limiting factors. With the standard high accelerating gradients of more than 25 MV/m, free electrons inside the cavities get accelerated by the field, gaining enough energy to produce more electrons in their interactions with the walls of the cavity. The electron production is exponential and the electron energy transfer to the walls of a cavity can trigger detrimental processes, limiting the performance of the cavity. The root cause of the free electron number gain is a phenomenon called Secondary Electron Emission (SEE). Even though the phenomenon has been known and studied over a century, there are still no effective means of controlling it. The ratio between the electrons emitted from the surface and the impacting electrons is defined as the Secondary Electron Yield (SEY). A SEY ratio larger than 1 designates an increase in the total number of electrons. In the design of accelerator cavities, the goal is to reduce the SEY to be as low as possible using any form of surface manipulation. In this dissertation, an experimental setup was developed and used to study the SEY of various sample surfaces that were treated

  11. Secondary Electron Emission from Plasma Processed Accelerating Cavity Grade Niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basovic, Milos [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Advances in the particle accelerator technology have enabled numerous fundamental discoveries in 20th century physics. Extensive interdisciplinary research has always supported further development of accelerator technology in efforts of reaching each new energy frontier. Accelerating cavities, which are used to transfer energy to accelerated charged particles, have been one of the main focuses of research and development in the particle accelerator field. Over the last fifty years, in the race to break energy barriers, there has been constant improvement of the maximum stable accelerating field achieved in accelerating cavities. Every increase in the maximum attainable accelerating fields allowed for higher energy upgrades of existing accelerators and more compact designs of new accelerators. Each new and improved technology was faced with ever emerging limiting factors. With the standard high accelerating gradients of more than 25 MV/m, free electrons inside the cavities get accelerated by the field, gaining enough energy to produce more electrons in their interactions with the walls of the cavity. The electron production is exponential and the electron energy transfer to the walls of a cavity can trigger detrimental processes, limiting the performance of the cavity. The root cause of the free electron number gain is a phenomenon called Secondary Electron Emission (SEE). Even though the phenomenon has been known and studied over a century, there are still no effective means of controlling it. The ratio between the electrons emitted from the surface and the impacting electrons is defined as the Secondary Electron Yield (SEY). A SEY ratio larger than 1 designates an increase in the total number of electrons. In the design of accelerator cavities, the goal is to reduce the SEY to be as low as possible using any form of surface manipulation. In this dissertation, an experimental setup was developed and used to study the SEY of various sample surfaces that were treated

  12. Correlation between optical emission spectra and the process ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Many researchers have studied H2 and H2-CH4 mixed plasma in different types of reactors such as hot filament ... and microwave power for H2–CH4 gas mixture inside a 2.45 GHz microwave plasma reactor. Tan & Grotjohn .... Optical emission spectrometer consists of sub-components like optical fibre, slit, optical filter,.

  13. Development of sustainable coal to liquid processes: Minimising process CO2 emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kauchali

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditional coal-to-liquid (CTL plants are synonymous with the production of carbon dioxide. Coal may be gasified in the presence of steam and oxygen to produce gas comprising carbon dioxide (CO2, carbon monoxide (CO, methane (CH4, hydrogen (H2 and steam (H2O. The gases can be reacted to a myriad of chemicals and fuels via the Fischer-Tropsch (FT reaction. However, excess carbon dioxide is generated via the Water-Gas-Shift reaction during preparation of CO:H2 ratios for FT. Here, a process development is represented on a CHO phase diagram, where unique regions are identified for autothermal operations for coal conversion. Considerations are given to develop idealised processes for the production of liquid chemicals from coal which emit minimal process CO2, require minimal energy input and do not require steam. This is achieved by co-feeding coal with methane and identifying endothermic-exothermic process pairs for methane-coal dry reforming. Furthermore, it is shown that a preferred method to produce liquid fuels from coal is by first creating dimethyl ether (DME as an intermediate, followed by the dehydration of DME to liquid fuels (gasoline range. For this route, via DME, the CO2 emission was found to be four times less than idealised CTL processes. Keywords: Gasification, Reforming, Coal to liquid, Carbon dioxide, Autothermal, Fischer tropsch

  14. 76 FR 70833 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions for Primary Lead Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    ... purposes, all reference to lead emissions in this preamble means ``lead compounds'' (which is a hazardous... editorial corrections in the rule. Responding to the January 2009 petition for rulemaking from the Natural... were changes to our cancer, acute, and PB-HAP multipathway screening analyses for non-lead HAP as a...

  15. Emission processes and dynamics of hot gases in astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Roger A.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed model was developed for Kepler's supernova remnant (SNR). Observations of the SNR revealed a strong interaction with the surrounding circumstellar medium, which was studied through both analytical and numerical calculations. Effects were studied of electron thermal conduction on the structure of radiative interstellar shock waves. An explanation is sought for the observed line emission from metal rich ejecta in SNR, incorporating atomic data. Light echoes around SN 1987A was also studied. Analysis of infrared and scattered circumstellar light echoes was accomplished with early observations to set limits on the mass of circumstellar dust. Work was completed on the emission from heavy element gas ejected in the supernova explosion of massive stars. It was assumed that a radioactive energy source was present and calculated the detailed heating and ionization of the gas. The evolution was studied of SNR in the very high pressure environment of a starburst galaxy.

  16. The Kilometric Radio Emission Spectrum: Relationship to Auroral Acceleration Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-31

    direct in situ maeasure- ments of aurora at any of these planets in the near future, any advances which can be made in understanding the relationship of...monochromatic emissions sweeping through a large range of frequencies is a common fea- ture of solar radio bursts [Kundu, 1965] and Jovian decametric radio...above the aurora , J. Geophys. Res., 75, 7140, 1970. Chiu, Y. T., and M. Schlulz, Self-consistent particle and parallel electrostatic field

  17. Morphological Processing of Ultraviolet Emissions of Electrical Corona Discharge for Analysis and Diagnostic Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Matthew R.; Moore, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Electron cascades from electrical discharge produce secondary emissions from atmospheric plasma in the ultraviolet band. For a single point of discharge, these emissions exhibit a stereotypical discharge morphology, with latent information about the discharge location. Morphological processing can uncover the location and therefore can have diagnostic utility.

  18. Emission of pollutants from the combustion of composite fuels by metallurgical processes

    OpenAIRE

    J. Łabaj; M. Jodkowski

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the study on emission characteristics of pollutants resulting from combustion process of composite alternative fuels for use in the processes of pyrometallurgy of copper as an alternative fuel to currently used coke breeze. These fuels are mainly based on waste carrier of “C” element, and the composition of the fuel is modelled in order to obtain the appropriate energy and emission parameters as well as strength parameters. These studies confirmed the possib...

  19. Emission inventory of primary air pollutants in 2010 from industrial processes in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyuz, Ummugulsum; Alp, Kadir

    2014-08-01

    The broad objective of this study was to develop CO2, PM, SOx, CO, NOx, VOC, NH3 and N2O emission inventory of organic and inorganic chemicals, mineral products, metallurgical, petroleum refining, wood products, food industries of Turkey for 2010 for both co]ntrolled and uncontrolled conditions. In this study, industries were investigated in 7 main categories and 53 sub-sectors and a representative number of pollutants per sub-sector were considered. Each industry was evaluated in terms of emitted emissions only from industrial processes, and fuel combustion activities were excluded (except cement industry). The study employed an approach designed in four stages; identification of key categories; activity data & emission factor search; emission factor analyzing; calculation of emissions. Emission factor analyzing required aggregate and firm analysis of sectors and sub-sectors and deeper insights into underlying specific production methods used in the industry to decide on the most representative emission factor. Industry specific abatement technologies were considered by using open-source documents and industry specific reports. Regarding results of this study, mineral industry and iron & steel industry were determined as important contributors of industrial emissions in Turkey in 2010. Respectively, organic chemicals, petroleum refining, and pulp & paper industries had serious contributions to Turkey's air pollutant emission inventory from industrial processes. The results showed that calculated CO2 emissions for year 2010 was 55,124,263 t, also other emissions were 48,853 t PM, 24,533 t SOx, 79,943 t NOx, 31,908 t VOC, 454 t NH3 and 2264 t N2O under controlled conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of emission factors related to source activity for trichloroethylene degreasing and chrome plating processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadden, R A; Hawkins, J L; Scheff, P A; Franke, J E

    1991-09-01

    A study at an automotive parts fabrication plant evaluated four metal surface treatment processes during production conditions. The evaluation provides examples of how to estimate process emission factors from activity and air concentration data. The processes were open tank and enclosed tank degreasing with trichloroethylene (TCE), chromium conversion coating, and chromium electroplating. Area concentrations of TCE and chromium (Cr) were monitored for 1-hr periods at three distances from each process. Source activities at each process were recorded during each sampling interval. Emission rates were determined by applying appropriate mass balance models to the concentration patterns around each source. The emission factors obtained from regression analysis of the emission rate and activity data were 16.9 g TCE/basket of parts for the open-top degreaser; 1.0 g TCE/1000 parts for the enclosed degreaser; 1.48-1.64 mg Cr/1000 parts processed in the hot CrO3/HNO3 tank for the chrome conversion coating; and 5.35-9.17 mg Cr/rack of parts for chrome electroplating. The factors were also used to determine the efficiency of collection for the local exhaust systems serving each process. Although the number of observations were limited, these factors may be useful for providing initial estimates of emissions from similar processes in other settings.

  1. Effect of Electric Field in the Stabilized Premixed Flame on Combustion Process Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Krickis

    2017-10-01

    The effect of the AC and DC electrical field on combustion processes has been investigated by various researchers. The results of these experiments do not always correlate, due to different experiment conditions and experiment equipment variations. The observed effects of the electrical field impact on the combustion process depends on the applied voltage polarity, flame speed and combustion physics. During the experiment was defined that starting from 1000 V the ionic wind takes the effect on emissions in flue gases, flame shape and combustion instabilities. Simulation combustion process in hermetically sealed chamber with excess oxygen amount 3 % in flue gases showed that the positive effect of electrical field on emissions lies in region from 30 to 400 V. In aforementioned voltage range carbon monoxide emissions were reduced by 6 % and at the same time the nitrogen oxide emissions were increased by 3.5 %.

  2. Effects of Injection Rate Profile on Combustion Process and Emissions in a Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqiang Bai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When multi-injection is implemented in diesel engine via high pressure common rail injection system, changed interval between injection pulses can induce variation of injection rate profile for sequential injection pulse, though other control parameters are the same. Variations of injection rate shape which influence the air-fuel mixing and combustion process will be important for designing injection strategy. In this research, CFD numerical simulations using KIVA-3V were conducted for examining the effects of injection rate shape on diesel combustion and emissions. After the model was validated by experimental results, five different shapes (including rectangle, slope, triangle, trapezoid, and wedge of injection rate profiles were investigated. Modeling results demonstrate that injection rate shape can have obvious influence on heat release process and heat release traces which cause different combustion process and emissions. It is observed that the baseline, rectangle (flat, shape of injection rate can have better balance between NOx and soot emissions than the other investigated shapes. As wedge shape brings about the lowest NOx emissions due to retarded heat release, it produces the highest soot emissions among the five shapes. Trapezoid shape has the lowest soot emissions, while its NOx is not the highest one. The highest NOx emissions were produced by triangle shape due to higher peak injection rate.

  3. Profiling Mild Steel Welding Processes to Reduce Fume Emissions and Costs in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael J.; Siert, Arlen; Chen, Bean T.; Stone, Samuel G.

    2015-01-01

    To provide quantitative information to choose the best welding processes for minimizing workplace emissions, nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for mild steel were assessed for fume generation rates, normalized fume generation rates (milligram fume per gram of electrode consumed), and normalized generation rates for elemental manganese, nickel, and iron. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and flux-cored arc-welding (FCAW) processes were also profiled. The fumes were collected quantitatively in an American Welding Society-type fume chamber and weighed, recovered, homogenized, and analyzed by inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for total metals. The processes included GMAW with short circuit, globular transfer, axial spray, pulsed spray, Surface Tension Transfer™, Regulated Metal Deposition™, and Cold Metal Transfer™ (CMT) modes. Flux-cored welding was gas shielded, and SMAW was a single rod type. Results indicate a wide range of fume emission factors for the process variations studied. Fume emission rates per gram of electrode consumed were highest for SMAW (~13 mg fume g−1 electrode) and lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed spray (~1.5 mg g−1) and CMT (~1 mg g−1). Manganese emission rates per gram of electrode consumed ranged from 0.45 mg g−1 (SMAW) to 0.08 mg g−1 (CMT). Nickel emission rates were generally low and ranged from ~0.09 (GMAW short circuit) to 0.004 mg g−1 (CMT). Iron emission rates ranged from 3.7 (spray-mode GMAW) to 0.49 mg g−1 (CMT). The processes studied have significantly different costs, and cost factors are presented based on a case study to allow comparisons between processes in specific cost categories. Costs per linear meter of weld were $31.07 (SMAW), $12.37 (GMAW short circuit), and $10.89 (FCAW). Although no single process is the best for minimizing fume emissions and costs while satisfying the weld requirements, there are several processes that can minimize emissions. This study provides

  4. Profiling mild steel welding processes to reduce fume emissions and costs in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael J; Siert, Arlen; Chen, Bean T; Stone, Samuel G

    2014-05-01

    To provide quantitative information to choose the best welding processes for minimizing workplace emissions, nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for mild steel were assessed for fume generation rates, normalized fume generation rates (milligram fume per gram of electrode consumed), and normalized generation rates for elemental manganese, nickel, and iron. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and flux-cored arc-welding (FCAW) processes were also profiled. The fumes were collected quantitatively in an American Welding Society-type fume chamber and weighed, recovered, homogenized, and analyzed by inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for total metals. The processes included GMAW with short circuit, globular transfer, axial spray, pulsed spray, Surface Tension Transfer™, Regulated Metal Deposition™, and Cold Metal Transfer™ (CMT) modes. Flux-cored welding was gas shielded, and SMAW was a single rod type. Results indicate a wide range of fume emission factors for the process variations studied. Fume emission rates per gram of electrode consumed were highest for SMAW (~13 mg fume g(-1) electrode) and lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed spray (~1.5mg g(-1)) and CMT (~1mg g(-1)). Manganese emission rates per gram of electrode consumed ranged from 0.45 mg g(-1) (SMAW) to 0.08 mg g(-1) (CMT). Nickel emission rates were generally low and ranged from ~0.09 (GMAW short circuit) to 0.004 mg g(-1) (CMT). Iron emission rates ranged from 3.7 (spray-mode GMAW) to 0.49 mg g(-1) (CMT). The processes studied have significantly different costs, and cost factors are presented based on a case study to allow comparisons between processes in specific cost categories. Costs per linear meter of weld were $31.07 (SMAW), $12.37 (GMAW short circuit), and $10.89 (FCAW). Although no single process is the best for minimizing fume emissions and costs while satisfying the weld requirements, there are several processes that can minimize emissions. This study provides

  5. Comparative assessments of VOC emission rates and associated health risks from wastewater treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Ben; Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Yang, Jun-Chen; Zhao, Qing-Liang

    2012-09-01

    With the growing concern regarding emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), the relationship between the VOC emission rates and the associated public health risks has been rarely discussed. The objective of this study was to examine and compare the VOC emission rates and cancer and non-cancer risks by inhalation intake, using a municipal WWTP in China as an example, with respect to the effects of treatment technologies, VOC species, and seasonal variation. Given the treatment technology considered, the emission rates of VOCs in this study were estimated by means of mass balance or calculated on the molecular level. From the viewpoints of both emission rates and cancer and non-cancer risks, sedimentation was the treatment technology with the highest health risks to the workers. Slightly lower VOC emission rates and health risks than those for sedimentation were observed in anaerobic treatment. Although the aeration significantly enhanced the VOC emission rates in the aerobic treatment process, the associated health risks were limited due to the low VOC concentrations in the gas phase, which were likely attributed to the strong mixing and dilution with fresh air by aeration. Amongst the VOCs investigated, benzene was the VOC with both a relatively high emission rate and health risk, while trichloroethylene possessed a high emission rate but the lowest health risk. Without strong interfacial aeration and turbulence between the water and atmosphere, the effects of treatment technology and seasonal variation on the health risks might be connected to the VOC emission rates, while the effect of VOC species depended considerably on the respective cancer slope factors and reference concentrations; the employment of aeration provided a different conclusion in which the emission rates were enhanced without a significant increase in the related cancer risks. These findings can provide insight into future health risk management and

  6. Flash post-discharge emission in a reactive HiPIMS process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loquai, S.; Zabeida, O.; Klemberg-Sapieha, J. E.; Martinu, L.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, time-, space- and species-resolved optical emission spectroscopy has been applied to investigate post-pulse behavior of the reactive High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) process with a partially poisoned target. Following each pulse, at a high O2/Ar ratio, a well-defined post-discharge emission zone detaches from the target during the first few microseconds of the electron cool-down; this zone exhibits high emission intensity in the near-surface region, and it moves toward the substrate holder. We link this behavior to a localized high density of metastable molecular oxygen, and to the electron attachment dissociation of oxygen.

  7. Emission of pollutants from the combustion of composite fuels by metallurgical processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Łabaj

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the study on emission characteristics of pollutants resulting from combustion process of composite alternative fuels for use in the processes of pyrometallurgy of copper as an alternative fuel to currently used coke breeze. These fuels are mainly based on waste carrier of “C” element, and the composition of the fuel is modelled in order to obtain the appropriate energy and emission parameters as well as strength parameters. These studies confirmed the possibility of using composite fuels as an alternative reducing agent as well as an energy carrier in the processes of pyrometallurgy of copper.

  8. Similarity ratio analysis for early stage fault detection with optical emission spectrometer in plasma etching process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, Jie; McArdle, Conor; Daniels, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    ...) in plasma etching processes using real-time Optical Emission Spectrometer (OES) data as input. The SRA method can help to realise a highly precise control system by detecting abnormal etch-rate faults in real-time during an etching process...

  9. Pulsed plasma processing for control of diesel engine emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogtlin, G. E.; Freytag, E. K.; Bardsley, J. N.; Wallman, H.

    1993-02-01

    Electrical discharges can be used as an after treatment for diesel exhaust. We are presently involved in research to determine the feasibility of this process. These discharges have been shown to remove nitric oxide, sulfur dioxide, particulates, and many organic compounds. A key issue is the efficiency of this removal since it effects both capital and operating costs. These discharges must be of short duration, less than one microsecond, to avoid energy losses due to heating of bulk gas molecules. The voltage must be kept below the voltage breakdown limit where ion heating creates an arc discharge. The basic process is the acceleration of electrons which then collide with gas molecules to form radicals such as O and OH. These radicals then react with and eliminate pollutants. Two basic electrode geometries are used to generate these discharges. The barrier discharge is when one or both of the electrodes is insulated and the pulse length is limited by charging of the insulator. This discharge must be driven by alternating current to permit alternating charging of the insulator. The other geometry is when one electrode has a peak voltage stress five or more times the average stress. We have been investigating the high stress geometry which uses a small wire inside a pipe. The principal experimental apparatus utilized by this effort uses a closed loop gas system. This system permits the production of various gas combinations prior to testing. Analysis can be conducted during or after these tests. The recirculated gas can be heated up to 400 F. This system can measure the energy used and the pollutant removal to determine efficiency. Our primary goal is the simultaneous removal of nitric oxide and particulates typical of diesel exhaust.

  10. Air pollutant emissions from the development, production, and processing of Marcellus Shale natural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anirban A; Adams, Peter J; Robinson, Allen L

    2014-01-01

    The Marcellus Shale is one of the largest natural gas reserves in the United States; it has recently been the focus of intense drilling and leasing activity. This paper describes an air emissions inventory for the development, production, and processing of natural gas in the Marcellus Shale region for 2009 and 2020. It includes estimates of the emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and primary fine particulate matter (Gas Rule. These regulations significantly reduce the Marcellus VOC and NOx emissions, but there are significant opportunities for further reduction in these emissions using existing technologies. The Marcellus Shale is one of the largest natural gas reserves in United States. The development and production of this gas may emit substantial amounts of oxides of nitrogen and volatile organic compounds. These emissions may have special significance because Marcellus development is occurring close to areas that have been designated nonattainment for the ozone standard. Control technologies exist to substantially reduce these impacts. PM2.5 emissions are predicted to be negligible in a regional context, but elemental carbon emissions from diesel powered equipment may be important.

  11. Relationship between respiratory quotient, nitrification, and nitrous oxide emissions in a forced aerated composting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsutsui, Hirofumi, E-mail: jm-tsutsuih@kochi-u.ac.jp [Research and Education Faculty, Natural Sciences Cluster, Agriculture Unit, Kochi University, B200 Monobe, Nankoku, Kochi (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST (Japan); Fujiwara, Taku [Research and Education Faculty, Natural Sciences Cluster, Agriculture Unit, Kochi University, B200 Monobe, Nankoku, Kochi (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST (Japan); Inoue, Daisuke [Department of Health Science, School of Allied Health Sciences, Kitasato University, 1-15-1 Kitasato, Sagamihara-Minami, Kanagawa (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST (Japan); Ito, Ryusei [Department of Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST (Japan); Matsukawa, Kazutsugu [Research and Education Faculty, Multidisciplinary Science Cluster, Life and Environmental Medicine Science Unit, Kochi University, B200 Monobe, Nankoku, Kochi (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST (Japan); Funamizu, Naoyuki [Department of Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • RQ can be an indicator of N{sub 2}O emission in forced aerated composting process. • Emission of N{sub 2}O with nitrification was observed with RQ decrease. • Mass balances demonstrated the RQ decrease was caused by nitrification. • Conversion ratio of oxidized ammonia and total N to N{sub 2}O were ∼2.7%. - Abstract: We assessed the relationship between respiratory quotient (RQ) and nitrification and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emission in forced aerated composting using lab-scale reactors. Relatively high RQ values from degradation of readily degradable organics initially occurred. RQ then stabilized at slightly lower values, then decreased. Continuous emission of N{sub 2}O was observed during the RQ decrease. Correlation between nitrification and N{sub 2}O emission shows that the latter was triggered by nitrification. Mass balances demonstrated that the O{sub 2} consumption of nitrification (∼24.8 mmol) was slightly higher than that of CO{sub 2} emission (∼20.0 mmol), indicating that the RQ decrease was caused by the occurrence of nitrification. Results indicate that RQ is a useful index, which not only reflects the bioavailability of organics but also predicts the occurrence of nitrification and N{sub 2}O emission in forced aerated composting.

  12. Decoupling absorption and emission processes in super-resolution localization of emitters in a plasmonic hotspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, David L.; Cortés, Emiliano; Giannini, Vincenzo; Török, Peter; Roschuk, Tyler; Maier, Stefan A.

    2017-01-01

    The absorption process of an emitter close to a plasmonic antenna is enhanced due to strong local electromagnetic (EM) fields. The emission, if resonant with the plasmonic system, re-radiates to the far-field by coupling with the antenna via plasmonic states, whose presence increases the local density of states. Far-field collection of the emission of single molecules close to plasmonic antennas, therefore, provides mixed information of both the local EM field strength and the local density of states. Moreover, super-resolution localizations from these emission-coupled events do not report the real position of the molecules. Here we propose using a fluorescent molecule with a large Stokes shift in order to spectrally decouple the emission from the plasmonic system, leaving the absorption strongly resonant with the antenna's enhanced EM fields. We demonstrate that this technique provides an effective way of mapping the EM field or the local density of states with nanometre spatial resolution. PMID:28211479

  13. Evaluating Acoustic Emission Signals as an in situ process monitoring technique for Selective Laser Melting (SLM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Karl A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Candy, Jim V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Guss, Gabe [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mathews, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-14

    In situ real-time monitoring of the Selective Laser Melting (SLM) process has significant implications for the AM community. The ability to adjust the SLM process parameters during a build (in real-time) can save time, money and eliminate expensive material waste. Having a feedback loop in the process would allow the system to potentially ‘fix’ problem regions before a next powder layer is added. In this study we have investigated acoustic emission (AE) phenomena generated during the SLM process, and evaluated the results in terms of a single process parameter, of an in situ process monitoring technique.

  14. Greenhouse gas emissions from alternative water supply processes in southern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, A.; Townsend-Small, A.

    2012-12-01

    Burgeoning population centers and declining hydrological resources have encouraged the development of alternative water treatment systems, including desalination and wastewater recycling. These processes currently provide potable water for millions of people and assist in satisfying agricultural and landscaping irrigation demands. There are a variety of alternative water production methods in place, and while they help to reduce the demands placed on aquifers, during their operation they are also significant sources of greenhouse gases. The environmental advantages of these alternative water production methods need to be carefully weighed against their energy footprints and greenhouse gas emissions profiles. This study measured the greenhouse gas emissions of a wastewater treatment and recycling facility in Orange County, California to get a more complete picture of the carbon footprint of the plant. We measured atmospheric emissions of CO2, CH4, and N2O throughout the water recycling process and at various times of the day and week. This allowed us to assemble a thorough, cross-sectional profile of greenhouse gas emissions from the facility. We then compared the measured emissions of the treatment plant to the modeled emissions of desalination plants in order to assess the relative carbon footprints of the two water production methods. Other water supply alternatives, including regional water importation, were also included in the comparison in order to provide a more complete understanding of the potential greenhouse gas emissions. Finally, we assessed the significance of wastewater treatment as an urban greenhouse gas source when compared to other known emissions in the region. This research offers a valuable tool for sustainable urban and regional development by providing planners with a quantified comparison of the carbon footprints of several water production options.

  15. Discussion of Carbon Emissions for Charging Hot Metal in EAF Steelmaking Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ling-zhi; Jiang, Tao; Li, Guang-hui; Guo, Yu-feng

    2017-07-01

    As the cost of hot metal is reduced for iron ore prices are falling in the international market, more and more electric arc furnace (EAF) steelmaking enterprises use partial hot metal instead of scrap as raw materials to reduce costs and the power consumption. In this paper, carbon emissions based on 1,000 kg molten steel by charging hot metal in EAF steelmaking is studied. Based on the analysis of material and energy balance calculation in EAF, the results show that 146.9, 142.2, 137.0, and 130.8 kg/t of carbon emissions are produced at a hot metal ratio of 0 %, 30 %, 50 %, and 70 %, while 143.4, 98.5, 65.81, and 31.5 kg/t of carbon emissions are produced at a hot metal ratio of 0 %, 30 %, 50 %, and 70 % by using gas waste heat utilization (coal gas production) for EAF steelmaking unit process. However, carbon emissions are increased by charging hot metal for the whole blast furnace-electric arc furnace (BF-EAF) steelmaking process. In the condition that the hot metal produced by BF is surplus, as carbon monoxide in gas increased by charging hot metal, the way of coal gas production can be used for waste heat utilization, which reduces carbon emissions in EAF steelmaking unit process.

  16. Aggregate emissions and evaluation of process combinations; Aggregierte Emissionen und Bewertung der Verfahrenskombinationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwing, E.; Jager, J. [Institut WAR, Darmstadt (Germany). Fachgruppe Abfalltechnik

    1998-12-31

    Within the framework of the R and D project ``Mechanical-biological waste conditoning in combination with thermal processing of partial waste fractions``, numerous measurements to determine gaseous and liquid emissions were carried out. These measurements reveal the environmental impact of different treatments and different inputs. They further permit to verify the quality of a treatment. Particularly interesting for the purpose of the project were the total emissions of the considered process combinations. The paper reports the outcome of emission measurements and indicates the variants of process combinations for which the emissions were aggregated. First results of the evaluation of gaseous and liquid emissions are given for these variants. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im Zuge des Forschungs- und Entwicklungsvorhabens `Mechanisch-biologische Restmuellbehandlung unter Einbindung thermischer Verfahren fuer Teilfraktionen` sind zahlreiche Emissionsmessungen bezueglich der luft- und wasserseitigen Emissionen durchgefuehrt worden. Die Ergebnisse dieser Messungen geben Aufschluss ueber die Umweltauswirkungen der verschiedenen Behandlungsverfahren bei unterschiedlichem Input. Des weiteren kann durch sie die Guete des Prozesses ueberprueft werden. Im Projekt interessant sind aber insbesondere die Gesamtemissionen der betrachteten Verfahrenskombinationen. Im folgenden werden die durchgefuehrten Emissionsmessungen und die Varianten der Verfahrenskombinationen, fuer die die Emissionen aggregiert wurden, dargestellt. Dnach werden erste Ergebnisse der Bewertung der luft- und wasserseitigen Emissionen fuer diese Varianten praesentiert. (orig.)

  17. Estimation of CO2-Equivalent Emission under the Copper Fire Refining Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnokov, Yu N.; Lisienko, V. G.; Holod, S. I.; Anufriev, V. P.; Lapteva, A. V.

    2017-06-01

    Non-ferrous metallurgy is one of the most energy-consuming and carbon-emissive sectors of industry. This is due to the fact that the volume of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is stipulated by energy consumption. Uralelectromed is a city-forming enterprise of the Verkhnyaya Pyshma. The situation is similar other cities of the old industrial regions of the Russian Federation (Krasnouralsk, Verkhnaya Salda, Karabash, etc.) Verkhnyaya Pyshma has many characteristics of “a clever city”. It can be compared to Hamburg where blister copper is being produced at the center of the city at a copper smelting plant Aurubis. Following the example of such ecologically clean country as Germany and in order to assess how modern energy-efficient low-carbon technologies can provide a favorable habitat, and an acceptable level of carbon footprint, the authors estimated the level of greenhouse gas, i.e., carbon dioxide emission produced by the Uralelectromed. The emission of greenhouse gas -carbon dioxide in the process of fire refining of blister copper has been calculated. The anode melting process consists of several stages where the most important ones are melting of charge, oxidation, and copper melt reduction. Calculations are based on taking into account the mass of burnt carbon of natural gas and the thermal dissociation of fuel oil. It implies that a complete combustion of carbon takes place. The specific value of carbon dioxide emission of the copper refining process is averaged 181 kg CO2 per 1 ton of anode copper.

  18. Alkali and heavy metal emissions of the PCFB-process; Alkalipaeaestoet PCFB-prosessissa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuivalainen, R.; Eriksson, T.; Lehtonen, P. [Foster Wheeler Energia Oy, Karhula (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) combustion technology has been developed in Karhula R and D Center since 1986. As a part of the development, 10 MW PCFB Test Facility was built in 1989. The Test Facility has been used for performance testing with different coal types through the years 1990-1995 in order to gain data for design and commercialization of the high-efficiency low-emission PCFB combustion technology. The project Y44 `Alkali and heavy metal emissions of the PCFB-process` was part of national LIEKKI 2 research program. The main object of the project was to measure vapor phase Na and K concentrations in the PCFB flue gas after hot gas filter and investigate the effects of process conditions and sorbents on alkali release. The measurements were performed using plasma assisted method by TUT Laboratory of Plasma Technology and wet absorption method of VTT Energy. The measured Na concentrations were below 30 ppb(w) in all measured data points. The results of K were below 10 ppb(w). The accuracies of the both methods are about + 50 % at this concentration range. The scatter of the data covers the effects of different process variables on the alkali emission. The measured emissions are at the same order of magnitude as the guideline emission limits estimated by gas turbine manufacturers. The measurements and development of the analyses methods are planned to be continued during PCFB test runs in spring 1996 for example within Joule II research program. (author)

  19. Monitoring and analysis of air emissions based on condition models derived from process history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Liukkonen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of online information on operating conditions is necessary when reducing air emissions in energy plants. In this respect, automated monitoring and control are of primary concern, particularly in biomass combustion. As monitoring of emissions in power plants is ever more challenging because of low-grade fuels and fuel mixtures, new monitoring applications are needed to extract essential information from the large amount of measurement data. The management of emissions in energy boilers lacks economically efficient, fast, and competent computational systems that could support decision-making regarding the improvement of emission efficiency. In this paper, a novel emission monitoring platform based on the self-organizing map method is presented. The system is capable, not only of visualizing the prevailing status of the process and detecting problem situations (i.e. increased emission release rates, but also of analyzing these situations automatically and presenting factors potentially affecting them. The system is demonstrated using measurement data from an industrial circulating fluidized bed boiler fired by forest residue as the primary fuel and coal as the supporting fuel.

  20. [Exploring the Severe Haze in Beijing During December, 2015: Pollution Process and Emissions Variation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yi-feng; Zhou, Zhen; Nie, Teng; Pan, Tao; Qi, Jun; Nie, Lei; Wang, Zhan-shan; Li, Yun-ting; Li, Xue-feng; Tian, He-zhong

    2016-05-15

    Severe haze episodes shrouded Beijing and its surrounding regions again during December, 2015, causing major environmental and health problems. Beijing authorities had launched two red alerts for atmospheric heavy pollution in this period, adopted a series of emergency control measures to reduce the emissions from major pollution sources. To better understand the pollution process and emissions variation during these extreme pollution events, we performed a model-assisted analysis of the hourly observation data of PM₂.₅, and meteorological parameters combined with the emissions variation of pollution sources. The synthetic analysis indicated that: (1) Compared with the same period of last year, the emissions of atmospheric pollution sources decreased in December 2015. However, the emission levels of primary pollutants were still rather high, which were the main intrinsic causes for haze episodes, and the unfavorable diffusion conditions represented the important external factor. High source emissions and meteorological factors together led to this heavy air pollution process. (2) Emergency control measures taken by the red alert for heavy air pollution could decrease the pollutants emission by about 36% and the PM₂.₅ concentrations by 11% to 21%. Though the implementation of red alert could not reverse the evolution trend of heavier pollution, it indeed played an active role in mitigation of PM₂.₅ pollution aggravating. (3) Under the heavy pollution weather conditions, air pollutants continued to accumulate in the atmosphere, and the maximum effect by taking emergency measures occurred 48-72 hours after starting the implementation; therefore, the best time for executing emergency measures should be 36-48 hours before the rapid rise of PM₂.₅ concentration, which requires a more powerful demand on the accuracy of air quality forecast.

  1. Future energy-efficient and low-emissions glass melting processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerkens, R.G.C.; Limpt, J.A.C. van; Lankhorst, A.M.; Santen, P.J. van

    2012-01-01

    All over the world, there is an increasing drive to develop new technologies or concepts for industrial glass melting furnaces, with the main aim to increase the energy efficiency, tabilize production and reduce emissions. The application of new process sensors, improved furnace design, intelligent

  2. 76 FR 9449 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Gold Mine Ore Processing and Production...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ...: Examples of Category NAICS code \\1\\ regulated entities Industry: Gold Ore Mining 212221 Establishments... that EPA does not have the authority to list gold mining processing and production as a source category... emissions, and that gold mining was not included on that list in 1998. In addition, the commenters said that...

  3. Emission inventory in the Netherlands. Process, application and verification; Emissie-inventarisatie in Nederland. Proces, toepassing en verificatie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Gerwen, Olav-Jan [Bureau voor Milieu- en Natuurverkenning, RIVM, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Noordijk, E. [Laboratorium voor Luchtonderzoek, RIVM, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Wesselink, B. [Laboratorium voor Afvalstoffen en Emissies, RIVM (Netherlands)

    1998-12-01

    The emission inventory process in the Netherlands is relatively complex, expensive and time consuming. The largest added value of this process is the consensus on a complete set of emissions reached by the parties concerned. Policymakers can be sure that this set of emissions is the best to be had at this time. They can then put primary focus on the consequences of these emission calculations for environmental policy in the coming years. Emission calculations must be accurate since evaluation of environmental policy based on these emissions can lead to intensification of the policy, which in turn will usually lead to extra costs for target groups. Consensus does not necessarily guarantee the scientific quality of the emission calculations. Comparing these calculations with data from monitoring networks, e.g. the National Air Quality Monitoring Network (LMI, abbreviated in Dutch), can improve insight into the scientific quality of the emission calculations. 10 refs.

  4. Influence of the charge changing processes on proton induced electron emission from polycrystalline aluminium

    CERN Document Server

    Pauly, N; Rösler, M

    2003-01-01

    Charge changing processes are known to have a strong influence on ion-induced electron emission characteristics. However, up to now, only a few theoretical models incorporate electron capture and loss cross-sections. For protons with velocities around 1 a.u., a correct theoretical model of the various charge changing processes undergone by the proton is necessary. In particular, all the electrons excited in the different processes have to be taken into account. It is precisely the aim of the present paper to give a description of all the possible charge changing processes and to incorporate these processes in a Monte Carlo simulation of proton induced electron emission from polycrystalline aluminium. The influence of charge changing processes on backward electron emission yield is evaluated. The contributions of H sup + , H sup 0 , H sup - fractions as well as of electrons excited by the charge changing processes for incident H sup + (1

  5. A process-based emission model of volatile organic compounds from silage sources on farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifacio, H. F.; Rotz, C. A.; Hafner, S. D.; Montes, F.; Cohen, M.; Mitloehner, F. M.

    2017-03-01

    Silage on dairy farms can emit large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), a precursor in the formation of tropospheric ozone. Because of the challenges associated with direct measurements, process-based modeling is another approach for estimating emissions of air pollutants from sources such as those from dairy farms. A process-based model for predicting VOC emissions from silage was developed and incorporated into the Integrated Farm System Model (IFSM, v. 4.3), a whole-farm simulation of crop, dairy, and beef production systems. The performance of the IFSM silage VOC emission model was evaluated using ethanol and methanol emissions measured from conventional silage piles (CSP), silage bags (SB), total mixed rations (TMR), and loose corn silage (LCS) at a commercial dairy farm in central California. With transport coefficients for ethanol refined using experimental data from our previous studies, the model performed well in simulating ethanol emission from CSP, TMR, and LCS; its lower performance for SB could be attributed to possible changes in face conditions of SB after silage removal that are not represented in the current model. For methanol emission, lack of experimental data for refinement likely caused the underprediction for CSP and SB whereas the overprediction observed for TMR can be explained as uncertainty in measurements. Despite these limitations, the model is a valuable tool for comparing silage management options and evaluating their relative effects on the overall performance, economics, and environmental impacts of farm production. As a component of IFSM, the silage VOC emission model was used to simulate a representative dairy farm in central California. The simulation showed most silage VOC emissions were from feed lying in feed lanes and not from the exposed face of silage storages. This suggests that mitigation efforts, particularly in areas prone to ozone non-attainment status, should focus on reducing emissions during feeding. For

  6. High-resolution mapping of combustion processes and implications for CO2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Tao, S.; Ciais, P.; Shen, H. Z.; Huang, Y.; Chen, H.; Shen, G. F.; Wang, B.; Li, W.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Lu, Y.; Zhu, D.; Chen, Y. C.; Liu, X. P.; Wang, W. T.; Wang, X. L.; Liu, W. X.; Li, B. G.; Piao, S. L.

    2013-05-01

    High-resolution mapping of fuel combustion and CO2 emission provides valuable information for modeling pollutant transport, developing mitigation policy, and for inverse modeling of CO2 fluxes. Previous global emission maps included only few fuel types, and emissions were estimated on a grid by distributing national fuel data on an equal per capita basis, using population density maps. This process distorts the geographical distribution of emissions within countries. In this study, a sub-national disaggregation method (SDM) of fuel data is applied to establish a global 0.1° × 0.1° geo-referenced inventory of fuel combustion (PKU-FUEL) and corresponding CO2 emissions (PKU-CO2) based upon 64 fuel sub-types for the year 2007. Uncertainties of the emission maps are evaluated using a Monte Carlo method. It is estimated that CO2 emission from combustion sources including fossil fuel, biomass, and solid wastes in 2007 was 11.2 Pg C yr-1 (9.1 Pg C yr-1 and 13.3 Pg C yr-1 as 5th and 95th percentiles). Of this, emission from fossil fuel combustion is 7.83 Pg C yr-1, which is very close to the estimate of the International Energy Agency (7.87 Pg C yr-1). By replacing national data disaggregation with sub-national data in this study, the average 95th minus 5th percentile ranges of CO2 emission for all grid points can be reduced from 417 to 68.2 Mg km-2 yr-1. The spread is reduced because the uneven distribution of per capita fuel consumptions within countries is better taken into account by using sub-national fuel consumption data directly. Significant difference in per capita CO2 emissions between urban and rural areas was found in developing countries (2.08 vs. 0.598 Mg C/(cap. × yr)), but not in developed countries (3.55 vs. 3.41 Mg C/(cap. × yr)). This implies that rapid urbanization of developing countries is very likely to drive up their emissions in the future.

  7. Process analysis of the modelled 3-D mesoscale impact of aircraft emissions on the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendricks, J.; Ebel, A.; Lippert, E.; Petry, H. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geophysik und Meterorologie

    1997-12-31

    A mesoscale chemistry transport model is applied to study the impact of aircraft emissions on the atmospheric trace gas composition. A special analysis of the simulations is conducted to separate the effects of chemistry, transport, diffusion and cloud processes on the transformation of the exhausts of a subsonic fleet cruising over the North Atlantic. The aircraft induced ozone production strongly depends on the tropopause height and the cruise altitude. Aircraft emissions may undergo an effective downward transport under the influence of stratosphere-troposphere exchange activity. (author) 12 refs.

  8. Dimension Reduction of Multivariable Optical Emission Spectrometer Datasets for Industrial Plasma Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A new data dimension-reduction method, called Internal Information Redundancy Reduction (IIRR, is proposed for application to Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES datasets obtained from industrial plasma processes. For example in a semiconductor manufacturing environment, real-time spectral emission data is potentially very useful for inferring information about critical process parameters such as wafer etch rates, however, the relationship between the spectral sensor data gathered over the duration of an etching process step and the target process output parameters is complex. OES sensor data has high dimensionality (fine wavelength resolution is required in spectral emission measurements in order to capture data on all chemical species involved in plasma reactions and full spectrum samples are taken at frequent time points, so that dynamic process changes can be captured. To maximise the utility of the gathered dataset, it is essential that information redundancy is minimised, but with the important requirement that the resulting reduced dataset remains in a form that is amenable to direct interpretation of the physical process. To meet this requirement and to achieve a high reduction in dimension with little information loss, the IIRR method proposed in this paper operates directly in the original variable space, identifying peak wavelength emissions and the correlative relationships between them. A new statistic, Mean Determination Ratio (MDR, is proposed to quantify the information loss after dimension reduction and the effectiveness of IIRR is demonstrated using an actual semiconductor manufacturing dataset. As an example of the application of IIRR in process monitoring/control, we also show how etch rates can be accurately predicted from IIRR dimension-reduced spectral data.

  9. Nitrous oxide emissions from one-step partial nitritation/anammox processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingjing; Trela, Jozef; Plaza, Elzbieta

    2016-12-01

    Measurements of nitrous oxide were made at pilot- and full-scale plants to evaluate greenhouse gas emissions from one-step partial nitritation/anammox processes applied in moving bed biofilm reactors treating reject water. It was found that 0.51-1.29% and 0.35-1.33% of the total nitrogen loads in the pilot- and full-scale reactor, respectively, were emitted as nitrous oxide. Between 80 and 90% of nitrous oxide emissions were in gaseous form and the rest amount was found in the reactor effluent; over 90% of nitrous oxide emissions occurred in the aerated period and less than 8% in the non-aerated period in the full-scale study. Nitrous oxide productions/consumptions were closely related to aeration and the nitrogen loads applied in the system.

  10. Impacts of High-Pressure Diecasting Process Parameters on Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasegaram, D. R.; Tharumarajah, A.

    2009-08-01

    The impacts of some high-pressure diecasting (HPDC) process parameters on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are quantified using life cycle analysis (LCA) for both aluminum and magnesium alloys. The study was conducted according to ISO 14040 standards and was based on an automotive component made on cold-chamber HPDC machines operating in typical mass production environments. The aluminum alloy foundry was located in Australia; the magnesium alloy foundry was located in the United States. In both cases, emissions were found to reduce with an increasing HPDC process yield. However, yield variations had only a modest impact on GHG emissions in the aluminum alloy HPDC, due to the excellent in-plant recycling of the alloy and the relatively low emissions from primary aluminum production compared with primary magnesium production. In contrast, for the magnesium alloy, significant reductions in emissions were recorded as the yield increased. This outcome was attributed to the considerable savings achieved in raw material quantities sourced from high-emitting primary production and the use of lower amounts of SF6, a GHG with a very high global warming potential (GWP). These results were found to hold irrespective of changes to the ratio between the primary and secondary alloys in the raw material mix, although the magnitude of the impact was reduced considerably with reductions in the primary alloy component. In the case of the magnesium alloy HPDC, decreases in quality assurance (QA) rejects and cycle times were also found to contribute toward reduced emissions, although their influences were an order of magnitude lower than that of the yield improvements.

  11. Atmospheric Mercury in the Barnett Shale Area, Texas: Implications for Emissions from Oil and Gas Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xin; Talbot, Robert; Laine, Patrick; Torres, Azucena; Lefer, Barry; Flynn, James

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric mercury emissions in the Barnett Shale area were studied by employing both stationary measurements and mobile laboratory surveys. Stationary measurements near the Engle Mountain Lake showed that the median mixing ratio of total gaseous mercury (THg) was 138 ppqv (140 ± 29 ppqv for mean ± S.D.) during the June 2011 study period. A distinct diurnal variation pattern was observed in which the highest THg levels appeared near midnight, followed by a monotonic decrease until midafternoon. The influence of oil and gas (ONG) emissions was substantial in this area, as inferred from the i-pentane/n-pentane ratio (1.17). However, few THg plumes were captured by our mobile laboratory during a ∼3700 km survey with detailed downwind measurements from 50 ONG facilities. One compressor station and one natural gas condensate processing facility were found to have significant THg emissions, with maximum THg levels of 963 and 392 ppqv, respectively, and the emissions rates were estimated to be 7.9 kg/yr and 0.3 kg/yr, respectively. Our results suggest that the majority of ONG facilities in this area are not significant sources of THg; however, it is highly likely that a small number of these facilities contribute a relatively large amount of emissions in the ONG sector.

  12. Analysis of aerosol emission and hazard evaluation of electrical discharge machining (EDM) process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Mathew; Sivapirakasam, S P; Surianarayanan, M

    2010-01-01

    The safety and environmental aspects of a manufacturing process are important due to increased environmental regulations and life quality. In this paper, the concentration of aerosols in the breathing zone of the operator of Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM), a commonly used non traditional manufacturing process is presented. The pattern of aerosol emissions from this process with varying process parameters such as peak current, pulse duration, dielectric flushing pressure and the level of dielectric was evaluated. Further, the HAZOP technique was employed to identify the inherent safety aspects and fire risk of the EDM process under different working conditions. The analysis of aerosol exposure showed that the concentration of aerosol was increased with increase in the peak current, pulse duration and dielectric level and was decreased with increase in the flushing pressure. It was also found that at higher values of peak current (7A) and pulse duration (520 micros), the concentration of aerosols at breathing zone of the operator was above the permissible exposure limit value for respirable particulates (5 mg/m(3)). HAZOP study of the EDM process showed that this process is vulnerable to fire and explosion hazards. A detailed discussion on preventing the fire and explosion hazard is presented in this paper. The emission and risk of fire of the EDM process can be minimized by selecting proper process parameters and employing appropriate control strategy.

  13. TIR Emissivity Spectra of Thermally Processed Sulfates, Carbonates and Phyllosilicates as Analog Materials for Asteroid Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; D'Amore, M.; Ferrari, S.

    2013-12-01

    At the Planetary Emissivity Laboratory (PEL) of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Berlin we are building a database of spectral measurements of several meteorites and other analogs for asteroid surfaces. Bi-directional reflectance of samples in the 1 to 100 μm spectral range, are measured by using an evacuated (10-4 bar) Bruker Vertex 80V FTIR spectrometer and a Bruker A513 reflection unit, allowing phase angles between 26° and 170°. Emissivity in the 1 to 100 μm spectral range is measured with the same instrument coupled with an external emissivity chamber, for sample temperatures ranging from low (50° C) to very high (above 800° C). We present here new measurements on sulfates, carbonates, and phyllosilicates in various grain size ranges. The setup was configured to simulate the thermal history of surface minerals on the asteroid 2008 EV5 during its revolution around the Sun. This asteroid is the scientific target of the ESA Marco Polo-R mission. The samples in vacuum (< 0.8 mbar) are measured at surface temperature around 70° C, then the same samples are heated to 220° C, and maintained at this temperature for one hour. Slowly the sample temperature is reduced back again to 70° C and a second measurement is taken. Emissivity spectra before and after thermal processing of the samples are complemented with reflectance measurements on samples fresh and after thermal processing. This comparison show us that for some minerals no spectral/structural changes appear, while others show signs of dehydration and among them some species show structural changes. We conclude that a proper spectral library of emissivity spectra for asteroid analogue materials must include thermally processed samples, reproducing the thermal evolution for the asteroid that is target of the actual investigation.

  14. An information processing method for acoustic emission signal inspired from musical staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Wu, Chunxian

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a musical-staff-inspired signal processing method for standard description expressions for discrete signals and describing the integrated characteristics of acoustic emission (AE) signals. The method maps various AE signals with complex environments into the normalized musical space. Four new indexes are proposed to comprehensively describe the signal. Several key features, such as contour, amplitude, and signal changing rate, are quantitatively expressed in a normalized musical space. The processed information requires only a small storage space to maintain high fidelity. The method is illustrated by using experiments on sandstones and computed tomography (CT) scanning to determine its validity for AE signal processing.

  15. Acoustic emission-based in-process monitoring of surface generation in robot-assisted polishing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Bissacco, Giuliano; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    The applicability of acoustic emission (AE) measurements for in-process monitoring of surface generation in the robot-assisted polishing (RAP) was investigated. Surface roughness measurements require interruption of the process, proper surface cleaning and measurements that sometimes necessitate...... removal of the part from the machine tool. In this study, stabilisation of surface roughness during polishing rotational symmetric surfaces by the RAP process was monitored by AE measurements. An AE sensor was placed on a polishing arm in direct contact with a bonded abrasive polishing tool...

  16. Energy and emission scenarios and the production structure of Finnish wood processing industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsstroem, J.; Tamminen, E. (Laboratory of Electrical and Automation Engineering, Technical Research Centre of Finland (FI))

    1991-01-01

    The possibilities of wood processing industry to adapt itself to emission and energy use restrictions are studied. Only structural change as a means of adaptation is taken into account - the possibilities of process technology development are not a subject of this study. Main tool in the analysis is a linear programming model of wood processing industry. Optimal production structure in 1995 serves as a reference point in the study. It is determined on the basis of expected market conditions of raw wood, energy, pulp and paper. Results of CO2 reduction scenario are presented. (author).

  17. Estimating global nitrous oxide emissions by lichens and bryophytes with a process-based productivity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porada, Philipp; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kleidon, Axel; Beer, Christian; Weber, Bettina

    2017-04-01

    Lichens and bryophytes have been shown to release significant amounts of nitrous oxide (N2O), which is a strong greenhouse gas and atmospheric ozone - depleting agent. Relative contributions of lichens and bryophytes to nitrous oxide emissions are largest in dryland and tundra regions, with potential implications for the nitrogen balance of these ecosystems. So far, this estimate is based on large-scale values of net primary productivity of lichens and bryophytes, which are derived from empirical upscaling of field measurements. Productivity is then converted to nitrous oxide emissions by empirical relationships between productivity and respiration, as well as respiration and nitrous oxide release. Alternatively, we quantify nitrous oxide emissions using a global process-based non-vascular vegetation model of lichens and bryophytes. The model simulates photosynthesis and respiration of lichens and bryophytes directly as a function of climatic conditions, such as light and temperature. Nitrous oxide emissions are then derived from simulated respiration, assuming a fixed relationship between the two fluxes, which is based on laboratory experiments under varying environmental conditions. Our approach yields a global estimate of 0.27 (0.19 - 0.35) Tg N2O yr-1 released by lichens and bryophytes. This is at the lower end of the range of a previous, empirical estimate, but corresponds to about 50 % of the atmospheric deposition of nitrous oxide into the oceans or 25 % of the atmospheric deposition on land. We conclude that, while productivity of lichens and bryophytes at large scale is relatively well constrained, improved estimates of their respiration may help to reduce uncertainty of predicted N2O emissions. This is particularly important for quantifying the spatial distribution of N2O emissions by lichens and bryophytes, since simulated respiration shows a different global pattern than productivity. We find that both physiological variation among species as well as

  18. Modeling of fugitive dust emission for construction sand and gravel processing plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C H; Tang, L W; Chang, C T

    2001-05-15

    Due to rapid economic development in Taiwan, a large quantity of construction sand and gravel is needed to support domestic civil construction projects. However, a construction sand and gravel processing plant is often a major source of air pollution, due to its associated fugitive dust emission. To predict the amount of fugitive dust emitted from this kind of processing plant, a semiempirical model was developed in this study. This model was developed on the basis of the actual dust emission data (i.e., total suspended particulate, TSP) and four on-site operating parameters (i.e., wind speed (u), soil moisture (M), soil silt content (s), and number (N) of trucks) measured at a construction sand and gravel processing plant. On the basis of the on-site measured data and an SAS nonlinear regression program, the expression of this model is E = 0.011.u2.653.M-1.875.s0.060.N0.896, where E is the amount (kg/ton) of dust emitted during the production of each ton of gravel and sand. This model can serve as a facile tool for predicting the fugitive dust emission from a construction sand and gravel processing plant.

  19. Effects of Catalysts on Emissions of Pollutants from Combustion Processes of Liquid Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bok Agnieszka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic growth of the use of non-renewable fuels for energy purposes results in demand for catalysts to improve their combustion process. The paper describes catalysts used mainly in the processes of combustion of motor fuels and fuel oils. These catalysts make it possible to raise the efficiency of oxidation processes simultanously reducing the emission of pollutants. The key to success is the selection of catalyst compounds that will reduce harmful emissions of combustion products into the atmosphere. Catalysts are introduced into the combustion zone in form of solutions miscible with fuel or with air supplied to the combustion process. The following compounds soluble in fuel are inclused in the composition of the described catalysts: organometallic complexes, manganese compounds, salts originated from organic acids, ferrocen and its derivatives and sodium chloride and magnesium chloride responsible for burning the soot (chlorides. The priority is to minimize emissions of volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides, and carbon monoxide, as well as particulate matter.

  20. Effects of Catalysts on Emissions of Pollutants from Combustion Processes of Liquid Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Agnieszka; Guziałowska-Tic, Joanna; Tic, Wilhelm Jan

    2014-12-01

    The dynamic growth of the use of non-renewable fuels for energy purposes results in demand for catalysts to improve their combustion process. The paper describes catalysts used mainly in the processes of combustion of motor fuels and fuel oils. These catalysts make it possible to raise the efficiency of oxidation processes simultanously reducing the emission of pollutants. The key to success is the selection of catalyst compounds that will reduce harmful emissions of combustion products into the atmosphere. Catalysts are introduced into the combustion zone in form of solutions miscible with fuel or with air supplied to the combustion process. The following compounds soluble in fuel are inclused in the composition of the described catalysts: organometallic complexes, manganese compounds, salts originated from organic acids, ferrocen and its derivatives and sodium chloride and magnesium chloride responsible for burning the soot (chlorides). The priority is to minimize emissions of volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides, and carbon monoxide, as well as particulate matter.

  1. How are particle production, nucleon emission and target fragment evaporation processes interrelated in hadron-nucleus collisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Relations between particle production, nucleon emission, and fragment evaporation processes were searched for in hadron-nucleus collisions. It was stated that: (1) the nucleon emission and target fragment evaporation proceed independently of the particle production process; and (2) relation between multiplicities of the emitted protons and of the evaporated charged fragments is expressed by simple formula.

  2. Acoustic Emission Based In-process Monitoring in Robot Assisted Polishing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Bissacco, Giuliano; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    The applicability of acoustic emission (AE) measurements for in-process monitoring in the Robot Assisted Polishing (RAP) process was investigated. Surface roughness measurements require interruption of the process, proper surface cleaning and measurements that sometimes necessitate removal...... improving the efficiency of the process. It also allows for intelligent process control and generally enhances the robustness and reliability of the automated RAP system in industrial applications....... of the part from the machine tool. In this study, development of surface roughness during polishing rotational symmetric surfaces by the RAP process was inferred from AE measurements. An AE sensor was placed on a polishing tool, and a cylindrical rod of Vanadis 4E steel having an initial turned surface...

  3. S O{sub 2} emission reduction through the use of the humid oxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, Jurgen [TIBRAS, Titanio do Brasil S.A., Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    1993-12-31

    The SO{sub 2} emission reduction unit to be installed in TIBRAS consists of six reactors supplied with activates carbon beds which will remove the SO{sub 2} (0.11 volume percent) contained in the residual gas (150.000 cubic meters per hour) produced in three rotary calciner kilns. The SO{sub 2} reacts with the water in the carbon pores forming diluted sulfuric acid. The activated carbon is fabricated from coke from peat. The weak H{sub 2} SO{sub 4} is reused in the titanium dioxide pigment process. This process is supposed to reduce TIBRAS SO{sub 2} emissions by 50 to 85 percent in addition to eliminating two stacks. 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Method for taking into account hard-photon emission in four-fermion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksejevs, A. G., E-mail: aaleksejevs@swgc.mun.ca [Grenfell Campus of the Memorial University of Newfoundland (Canada); Barkanova, S. G., E-mail: svetlana.barkanova@acadiau.ca [Acadia University (Canada); Zykunov, V. A., E-mail: vladimir.zykunov@cern.ch [Belarusian State University of Transport (Belarus)

    2016-01-15

    A method for taking into account hard-photon emission in four-fermion processes proceeding in the s channel is described. The application of this method is exemplified by numerically estimating one-loop electroweak corrections to observables (cross sections and asymmetries) of the reaction e{sup −}e{sup +} → μ{sup −}μ{sup +}(γ) involving longitudinally polarized electrons and proceeding at energies below the Z-resonance energy.

  5. The reduction of dioxin emissions from the processes of heat and power generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielgosiński, Grzegorz

    2011-05-01

    The first reports that it is possible to emit dioxins from the heat and power generation sector are from the beginning of the 1980s. Detailed research proved that the emission of dioxins might occur during combustion of hard coal, brown coal, and furnace oil as well as coke-oven gas. The emission of dioxins occurs in wood incineration; wood that is clean and understood as biomass; or, in particular, wood waste (polluted). This paper thoroughly discusses the mechanism of dioxin formation in thermal processes, first and foremost in combustion processes. The parameters influencing the quantity of dioxins formed and the dependence of their quantity on the conditions of combustion are highlighted. Furthermore, the methods of reducing dioxin emissions from combustion processes (primary and secondary) are discussed. The most efficacious methods that may find application in the heat and power generation sector are proposed; this is relevant from the point of view of the implementation of the Stockholm Convention resolutions in Poland with regard to persistent organic pollutants.

  6. Gas phase emissions from cooking processes and their secondary aerosol production potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Felix; Platt, Stephen; Bruns, Emily; Termime-roussel, Brice; Detournay, Anais; Mohr, Claudia; Crippa, Monica; Slowik, Jay; Marchand, Nicolas; Baltensperger, Urs; Prevot, Andre; El Haddad, Imad

    2014-05-01

    Long before the industrial evolution and the era of fossil fuels, high concentrations of aerosol particles were alluded to in heavily populated areas, including ancient Rome and medieval London. Recent radiocarbon measurements (14C) conducted in modern megacities came as a surprise: carbonaceous aerosol (mainly organic aerosol, OA), a predominant fraction of particulate matter (PM), remains overwhelmingly non-fossil despite extensive fossil fuel combustion. Such particles are directly emitted (primary OA, POA) or formed in-situ in the atmosphere (secondary OA, SOA) via photochemical reactions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Urban levels of non-fossil OA greatly exceed the levels measured in pristine environments strongly impacted by biogenic emissions, suggesting a contribution from unidentified anthropogenic non-fossil sources to urban OA. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) techniques applied to ambient aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS, Aerodyne) data identify primary cooking emissions (COA) as one of the main sources of primary non-fossil OA in major cities like London (Allan et al., 2010), New York (Sun et al., 2011) and Beijing (Huang et al., 2010). Cooking processes can also emit VOCs that can act as SOA precursors, potentially explaining in part the high levels of oxygenated OA (OOA) identified by the AMS in urban areas. However, at present, the chemical nature of these VOCs and their secondary aerosol production potential (SAPP) remain virtually unknown. The approach adopted here involves laboratory quantification of PM and VOC emission factors from the main primary COA emitting processes and their SAPP. Primary emissions from deep-fat frying, vegetable boiling, vegetable frying and meat cooking for different oils, meats and vegetables were analysed under controlled conditions after ~100 times dilution. A high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a high resolution proton transfer time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR

  7. Water-processed carbon nanotube/graphene hybrids with enhanced field emission properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Song

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Integrating carbon nanotubes (CNTs and graphene into hybrid structures provides a novel approach to three dimensional (3D materials with advantageous properties. Here we present a water-processing method to create integrated CNT/graphene hybrids and test their field emission properties. With an optimized mass ratio of CNTs to graphene, the hybrid shows a significantly enhanced field emission performance, such as turn-on electric field of 0.79 V/μm, threshold electric field of 1.05 V/μm, maximum current density of 0.1 mA/cm2, and field enhancement factor of ∼1.3 × 104. The optimized mass ratio for field emission emphasizes the importance of both CNTs and graphene in the hybrid. We also hypothesize a possible mechanism for this enhanced field emission performance from the CNT/graphene hybrid. During the solution treatment, graphene oxide behaves as surfactant sheets for CNTs to form a well dispersed solution, which leads to a better organized 3D structure with more conducting channels for electron transport.

  8. Study on the Combustion Process and Emissions of a Turbocharged Diesel Engine with EGR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Deqing

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A high pressure EGR system was adopted to a turbocharged inter-cooled diesel engine, to analyze its combustion and emission characteristics under the condition of different loads and constant speed. Under the same steady operating mode, with the increase of EGR rate, the temperature of compressed gas ascended, the ignition delay was shortened, the pressure and temperature of the burned gas descended, and the combustion process was prolonged. According to the experimental data, it was found that, at the same EGR rate, lower the load of engine was, lower the temperature in cylinder, and higher the increase rate of CO was. However, the increase rate of HC present a falling trend. The decrease rate of the specific emission of NOx linearly varied with EGR rate with a slope of 1.651. The increase rate of smoke opacity behaved a second-order polynomial uprising trend, and the higher the load was, the sharpener the smoke opacity deteriorated, with the increase of EGR rate. From the point of emission view, the engine with EGR system can achieve the lesser exhaust emissions in some operations by adjusting the engine parameters.

  9. GHG emission quantification for pavement construction projects using a process-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charinee Limsawasd

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Climate change and greenhouse gas (GHG emissions have attracted much attention for their impacts upon the global environment. Initiating of new legislation and regulations for control of GHG emissions from the industrial sectors has been applied to address this problem. The transportation industries, which include operation of road pavement and pavement construction equipment, are the highest GHG-emitting sectors. This study presents a novel quantification model of GHG emissions of pavement construction using process-based analysis. The model is composed of five modules that evaluate GHG emissions. These are: material production and acquisition, (2 material transport to a project site, (3 heavy equipment use, (4 on-site machinery use, and, (5 on-site electricity use. The model was applied to a hypothetical pavement project to compare the environmental impacts of flexible and rigid pavement types during construction. The resulting model can be used for evaluation of environmental impacts, as well as for designing and planning highway pavement construction.

  10. Grain boundary traction signatures: Quantifying the asymmetrical dislocation emission processes under tension and compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruizhi; Chew, Huck Beng

    2017-06-01

    The disruption in crystallographic arrangement of atoms across a grain boundary interface generates local stress fields in the vicinity. Here, we reconstruct the continuum-equivalent grain boundary tractions from local atomic stresses near symmetrical-tilt Ni grain boundaries. We show that the resolved shear stress contribution from the grain boundary tractions, τGB, along active slip-systems either assists or prevents the emission of dislocations, depending on its direction with respect to the resolved shear stress contribution from external loading, τext. When τGB acts in the same direction as τext, Shockley partial dislocations are readily emitted from the boundary once | τGB +τext | exceeds the critical barrier stress for shear-slip. When τGB opposes τext, the higher sustainable stresses in the grain boundary structure instead triggers: (a) emission of dislocations from the bulk, or (b) reconfiguration of the grain boundary atomic structure and subsequent emission of non-Schmid dislocations or formation of extrinsic stacking faults. Our results quantitatively explain the asymmetrical grain boundary dislocation emission processes observed in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations under applied tensile and compressive loads. The relationship between the traction signatures and periodic structural units along the grain boundary is discussed.

  11. Water-processed carbon nanotube/graphene hybrids with enhanced field emission properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Meng; Xu, Peng; Song, Yenan; Wang, Xu; Li, Zhenhua; Shang, Xuefu; Wu, Huizhen; Zhao, Pei; Wang, Miao

    2015-09-01

    Integrating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene into hybrid structures provides a novel approach to three dimensional (3D) materials with advantageous properties. Here we present a water-processing method to create integrated CNT/graphene hybrids and test their field emission properties. With an optimized mass ratio of CNTs to graphene, the hybrid shows a significantly enhanced field emission performance, such as turn-on electric field of 0.79 V/μm, threshold electric field of 1.05 V/μm, maximum current density of 0.1 mA/cm2, and field enhancement factor of ˜1.3 × 104. The optimized mass ratio for field emission emphasizes the importance of both CNTs and graphene in the hybrid. We also hypothesize a possible mechanism for this enhanced field emission performance from the CNT/graphene hybrid. During the solution treatment, graphene oxide behaves as surfactant sheets for CNTs to form a well dispersed solution, which leads to a better organized 3D structure with more conducting channels for electron transport.

  12. Speech processing system demonstrated by positron emission tomography (PET). A review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Shigeru; Naito, Yasushi; Kojima, Hisayoshi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    We review the literature on speech processing in the central nervous system as demonstrated by positron emission tomography (PET). Activation study using PET has been proved to be a useful and non-invasive method of investigating the speech processing system in normal subjects. In speech recognition, the auditory association areas and lexico-semantic areas called Wernicke`s area play important roles. Broca`s area, motor areas, supplementary motor cortices and the prefrontal area have been proved to be related to speech output. Visual speech stimulation activates not only the visual association areas but also the temporal region and prefrontal area, especially in lexico-semantic processing. Higher level speech processing, such as conversation which includes auditory processing, vocalization and thinking, activates broad areas in both hemispheres. This paper also discusses problems to be resolved in the future. (author) 42 refs.

  13. Soft-photon emission effects and radiative corrections for electromagnetic processes at very high energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Higher-order electromagnetic processes involving particles at ultrahigh energies are discussed, with particular attention given to Compton scattering with the emission of an additional photon (double Compton scattering). Double Compton scattering may have significance in the interaction of a high-energy electron with the cosmic blackbody photon gas. At high energies the cross section for double Compton scattering is large, though this effect is largely canceled by the effects of radiative corrections to ordinary Compton scattering. A similar cancellation takes place for radiative pair production and the associated radiative corrections to the radiationless process. This cancellation is related to the well-known cancellation of the infrared divergence in electrodynamics.

  14. Phenomenological Description of Acoustic Emission Processes Occurring During High-Pressure Sand Compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Martín, Jordi; Muñoz-Ibáñez, Andrea; Grande-García, Elisa; Rodríguez-Cedrún, Borja

    2016-04-01

    Compaction, pore collapse and grain crushing have a significant impact over the hydrodynamic properties of sand formations. The assessment of the crushing stress threshold constitutes valuable information in order to assess the behavior of these formations provided that it can be conveniently identified. Because of the inherent complexities of the direct observation of sand crushing, different authors have developed several indirect methods, being acoustic emission a promising one. However, previous researches have evidenced that there are different processes triggering acoustic emissions which need to be carefully accounted. Worth mentioning among them are grain bearing, grain to container friction, intergranular friction and crushing. The work presented here addresses this purpose. A broadband acoustic emission sensor (PA MicroHF200) connected to a high-speed data acquisition system and control software (AeWIN for PCI1 2.10) has been attached to a steel ram and used to monitor the different processes occurring during the oedometric compaction of uniform quartz sand up to an axial load of about 110 MPa and constant temperature. Load was stepwise applied using a servocontrolled hydraulic press acting at a constant load rate. Axial strain was simultaneously measured with the aid of a LDT device. Counts, energy, event duration, rise time and amplitude were recorded along each experiment and after completion selected waveforms were transformed from the time to the frequency domain via FFT transform. Additional simplified tests were performed in order to isolate the frequency characteristics of the dominant processes occurring during sand compaction. Our results show that, from simple tests, it is possible to determine process-dependent frequency components. When considering more complex experiments, many of the studied processes overlap but it is still possible to identify when a particular one dominates as well as the likely onset of crushing.

  15. Angle-resolved 2D imaging of electron emission processes in atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukk, E.; Wills, A.A.; Langer, B.; Bozek, J.D.; Berrah, N.

    2004-09-02

    A variety of electron emission processes have been studied in detail for both atomic and molecular systems, using a highly efficient experimental system comprising two time-of-flight (TOF) rotatable electron energy analyzers and a 3rd generation synchrotron light source. Two examples are used here to illustrate the obtained results. Firstly, electron emissions in the HCL molecule have been mapped over a 14 eV wide photon energy range over the Cl 2p ionization threshold. Particular attention is paid to the dissociative core-excited states, for which the Auger electron emission shows photon energy dependent features. Also, the evolution of resonant Auger to the normal Auger decay distorted by post-collision interaction has been observed and the resonating behavior of the valence photoelectron lines studied. Secondly, an atomic system, neon, in which excitation of doubly excited states and their subsequent decay to various accessible ionic states has been studied. Since these processes only occurs via inter-electron correlations, the many body dynamics of an atom can be probed, revealing relativistic effects, surprising in such a light atom. Angular distribution of the decay of the resonances to the parity unfavored continuum exhibits significant deviation from the LS coupling predictions.

  16. National carbon emissions from the industry process: Production of glass, soda ash, ammonia, calcium carbide and alumina

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    China has become the world’s largest carbon emitter. Its total carbon emission output from fossil fuel combustion and cement production was approximately 10 Gt CO_2 in 2013. However, less is known about carbon emissions from the production of industrial materials, such as mineral products (e.g., lime, soda ash, asphalt roofing), chemical products (e.g., ammonia, nitric acid) and metal products (e.g., iron, steel and aluminum). Carbon emissions from the production processes of these industrial...

  17. Airborne emissions of carcinogens and respiratory sensitizers during thermal processing of plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, John; Coldwell, Matthew R; Keen, Chris; McAlinden, John J

    2013-04-01

    Thermoplastics may contain a wide range of additives and free monomers, which themselves may be hazardous substances. Laboratory studies have shown that the thermal decomposition products of common plastics can include a number of carcinogens and respiratory sensitizers, but very little information exists on the airborne contaminants generated during actual industrial processing. The aim of this work was to identify airborne emissions during thermal processing of plastics in real-life, practical applications. Static air sampling was conducted at 10 industrial premises carrying out compounding or a range of processes such as extrusion, blown film manufacture, vacuum thermoforming, injection moulding, blow moulding, and hot wire cutting. Plastics being processed included polyvinyl chloride, polythene, polypropylene, polyethylene terephthalate, and acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene. At each site, static sampling for a wide range of contaminants was carried out at locations immediately adjacent to the prominent fume-generating processes. The monitoring data indicated the presence of few carcinogens at extremely low concentrations, all less than 1% of their respective WEL (Workplace Exposure Limit). No respiratory sensitizers were detected at any sites. The low levels of process-related fume detected show that the control strategies, which employed mainly forced mechanical general ventilation and good process temperature control, were adequate to control the risks associated with exposure to process-related fume. This substantiates the advice given in the Health and Safety Executive's information sheet No 13, 'Controlling Fume During Plastics Processing', and its broad applicability in plastics processing in general.

  18. Quantifying nitrous oxide emissions from Chinese grasslands with a process-based model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zhang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available As one of the largest land cover types, grassland can potentially play an important role in the ecosystem services of natural resources in China. Nitrous oxide (N2O is a major greenhouse gas emitted from grasslands. Current N2O inventory at a regional or national level in China relies on the emission factor method, which is based on limited measurements. To improve the accuracy of the inventory by capturing the spatial variability of N2O emissions under the diverse climate, soil and management conditions across China, we adopted an approach by utilizing a process-based biogeochemical model, DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC, to quantify N2O emissions from Chinese grasslands. In the present study, DNDC was tested against datasets of N2O fluxes measured at eight grassland sites in China with encouraging results. The validated DNDC was then linked to a GIS database holding spatially differentiated information of climate, soil, vegetation and management at county-level for all the grasslands in the country. Daily weather data for 2000–2007 from 670 meteorological stations across the entire domain were employed to serve the simulations. The modelled results on a national scale showed a clear geographic pattern of N2O emissions. A high-emission strip showed up stretching from northeast to central China, which is consistent with the eastern boundary between the temperate grassland region and the major agricultural regions of China. The grasslands in the western mountain regions, however, emitted much less N2O. The regionally averaged rates of N2O emissions were 0.26, 0.14 and 0.38 kg nitrogen (N ha−1 y−1 for the temperate, montane and tropical/subtropical grasslands, respectively. The annual mean N2O emission from the total 337 million ha of grasslands in China was 76.5 ± 12.8 Gg N for the simulated years.

  19. Energy use and greenhouse gas emissions from an algae fractionation process for producing renewable diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegallapati, Ambica K.; Frank, Edward D.

    2016-09-01

    In one approach to algal biofuel production, lipids are extracted and converted to renewable diesel and non-lipid remnants are converted to biogas, which is used for renewable heat and power to support the process. Since biofuel economics benefit from increased fuel yield, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory analyzed an alternative pathway that extracts lipids and also makes ethanol from carbohydrates in the biomass. In this paper, we examine the environmental sustainability of this "fractionation pathway" through life-cycle analysis (LCA) of greenhouse gas emissions and energy use. When the feedstock productivity was 30 (18) g/m(2)/d, this pathway emitted 31 (36) gCO(2)e/MJ of total fuel, which is less than the emissions associated with conventional low sulfur petroleum diesel (96 gCO(2)e/MJ). The fractionation pathway performed well in this model despite the diversion of carbon to the ethanol fuel.

  20. CH4 emission and conversion from A2O and SBR processes in full-scale wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Cheng, Xiang; Lun, Xiaoxiu; Sun, Dezhi

    2014-01-01

    Wastewater treatment systems are important anthropogenic sources of CH4 emission. A full-scale experiment was carried out to monitor the CH4 emission from anoxic/anaerobic/oxic process (A20) and sequencing batch reactor (SBR) wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) for one year from May 2011 to April 2012. The main emission unit of the A2O process was an oxic tank, accounting for 76.2% of CH4 emissions; the main emission unit of the SBR process was the feeding and aeration phase, accounting for 99.5% of CH4 emissions. CH4 can be produced in the anaerobic condition, such as in the primary settling tank and anaerobic tank of the A2O process. While CH4 can be consumed in anoxic denitrification or the aeration condition, such as in the anoxic tank and oxic tank of the A2O process and the feeding and aeration phase of the SBR process. The CH4 emission flux and the dissolved CH4 concentration rapidly decreased in the oxic tank of the A2O process. These metrics increased during the first half of the phase and then decreased during the latter half of the phase in the feeding and aeration phase of the SBR process. The CH4 oxidation rate ranged from 32.47% to 89.52% (mean: 67.96%) in the A2O process and from 12.65% to 88.31% (mean: 47.62%) in the SBR process. The mean CH4 emission factors were 0.182 g/ton of wastewater and 24.75 g CH4/(person x year) for the A2O process, and 0.457 g/ton of wastewater and 36.55 g CH4/(person x year) for the SBR process.

  1. Punch stretching process monitoring using acoustic emission signal analysis. II - Application of frequency domain deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Steven Y.; Dornfeld, David A.; Nickerson, Jackson A.

    1987-01-01

    The coloring effect on the acoustic emission signal due to the frequency response of the data acquisition/processing instrumentation may bias the interpretation of AE signal characteristics. In this paper, a frequency domain deconvolution technique, which involves the identification of the instrumentation transfer functions and multiplication of the AE signal spectrum by the inverse of these system functions, has been carried out. In this way, the change in AE signal characteristics can be better interpreted as the result of the change in only the states of the process. Punch stretching process was used as an example to demonstrate the application of the technique. Results showed that, through the deconvolution, the frequency characteristics of AE signals generated during the stretching became more distinctive and can be more effectively used as tools for process monitoring.

  2. Alkali and heavy metal emissions of the PCFB-process; Alkali- ja raskasmetallipaeaestoet PCFB-prosessista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuivalainen, R.; Eriksson, T.; Lehtonen, P. [Foster Wheeler Energia Oy, Karhula (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) combustion technology has been developed in Karhula R and D Center since 1986. As part of the development, 10 MW PCFB test facility was built in 1989. The test facility has been used for performance testing with different coal types through the years 1990-1995 in order to gain data for design and commercialization of the high-efficiency low-emission PCFB combustion technology. The main object of the project was to measure vapor phase Na and K concentrations in the PCFB flue gas after hot gas filter and investigate the effects of process conditions and sorbents on alkali release. The measurements were performed using plasma assisted method of TUT Laboratory of Plasma Technology and wet absorption method of VTT Energy. The measurements were carried out during three test campaigns at PCFB Test Facility in Karhula. In autumn 1995 both VTT and TUT methods were used. The measurements of the following test period in spring 1996 were performed by VTT, and during the last test segment in autumn 1996 TUT method was in use. During the last test period, the TUT instrument was used as semi-continuous (3 values/minute) alkali analyzer for part of the time. The measured Na concentrations were below 30 ppb(w) in all measured data points. The results of K were below 10 ppb(w). The accuracies of the both methods are about +50 % at this concentration range. The scatter of the data covers the effects of different process variables on the alkali emission. The measured emissions are at the same order of magnitude as the guideline emission limits estimated by gas turbine manufacturers

  3. Acoustic emission analysis for the detection of appropriate cutting operations in honing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buj-Corral, Irene; Álvarez-Flórez, Jesús; Domínguez-Fernández, Alejandro

    2018-01-01

    In the present paper, acoustic emission was studied in honing experiments obtained with different abrasive densities, 15, 30, 45 and 60. In addition, 2D and 3D roughness, material removal rate and tool wear were determined. In order to treat the sound signal emitted during the machining process, two methods of analysis were compared: Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Hilbert Huang Transform (HHT). When density 15 is used, the number of cutting grains is insufficient to provide correct cutting, while clogging appears with densities 45 and 60. The results were confirmed by means of treatment of the sound signal. In addition, a new parameter S was defined as the relationship between energy in low and high frequencies contained within the emitted sound. The selected density of 30 corresponds to S values between 0.1 and 1. Correct cutting operations in honing processes are dependent on the density of the abrasive employed. The density value to be used can be selected by means of measurement and analysis of acoustic emissions during the honing operation. Thus, honing processes can be monitored without needing to stop the process.

  4. Nitrous oxide emissions from soils: how well do we understand the processes and their controls?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Baggs, Elizabeth M.; Dannenmann, Michael; Kiese, Ralf; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Although it is well established that soils are the dominating source for atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O), we are still struggling to fully understand the complexity of the underlying microbial production and consumption processes and the links to biotic (e.g. inter- and intraspecies competition, food webs, plant–microbe interaction) and abiotic (e.g. soil climate, physics and chemistry) factors. Recent work shows that a better understanding of the composition and diversity of the microbial community across a variety of soils in different climates and under different land use, as well as plant–microbe interactions in the rhizosphere, may provide a key to better understand the variability of N2O fluxes at the soil–atmosphere interface. Moreover, recent insights into the regulation of the reduction of N2O to dinitrogen (N2) have increased our understanding of N2O exchange. This improved process understanding, building on the increased use of isotope tracing techniques and metagenomics, needs to go along with improvements in measurement techniques for N2O (and N2) emission in order to obtain robust field and laboratory datasets for different ecosystem types. Advances in both fields are currently used to improve process descriptions in biogeochemical models, which may eventually be used not only to test our current process understanding from the microsite to the field level, but also used as tools for up-scaling emissions to landscapes and regions and to explore feedbacks of soil N2O emissions to changes in environmental conditions, land management and land use. PMID:23713120

  5. Low Emissions Burner Technology for Metal Processing Industry using Byproducts and Biomass Derived Liquid Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, Ajay; Taylor, Robert

    2013-09-30

    path forward to utilize both fossil and alternative liquid fuels in the same combustion system. In particular, experiments show that straight VO can be cleanly combusted without the need for chemical processing or preheating steps, which can result in significant economic and environmental benefits. Next, low-emission combustion of glycerol/methane was achieved by utilizing FB injector to yield fine droplets of highly viscous glycerol. Heat released from methane combustion further improves glycerol pre-vaporization and thus its clean combustion. Methane addition results in an intensified reaction zone with locally high temperatures near the injector exit. Reduction in methane flow rate elongates the reaction zone, which leads to higher CO emissions and lower NOx emissions. Similarly, higher air to liquid (ALR) mass ratio improves atomization and fuel pre-vaporization and shifts the flame closer to the injector exit. In spite of these internal variations, all fuel mixes of glycerol with methane produced similar CO and NOx emissions at the combustor exit. Results show that FB concept provides low emissions with the flexibility to utilize gaseous and highly viscous liquid fuels, straight VO and glycerol, without preheating or preprocessing the fuels. Following these initial experiments in quartz combustor, we demonstrated that glycerol combustion can be stably sustained in a metal combustor. Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) measurements in glycerol/methane flames resulted in flow-weighted Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) of 35 to 40 μm, depending upon the methane percentage. This study verified that lab-scale dual-fuel burner using FB injector can successfully atomize and combust glycerol and presumably other highly viscous liquid fuels at relatively low HRR (<10 kW). For industrial applications, a scaled-up glycerol burner design thus seemed feasible.

  6. Process-based modelling of ammonia emission over a urine patch - Towards developing a field scale emission model for regional use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moring, Andrea; Vieno, Massimo; Doherty, Ruth; Sutton, Mark A.

    2014-05-01

    This work investigates the influence of meteorological factors on ammonia related atmospheric processes, with a special focus on emission from grazing. For this purpose we are developing a process-based model (GAG: Generation of Ammonia from Grazing) driven by meteorology that can simulate the ammonia emission from a field covered by urine patches. The aim of this work is to implement the GAG model into the EMEP atmospheric chemical transport model (ACTM), and examine the changes of surface ammonia concentrations under future climate scenarios. The research is carried out within the framework of the ECLAIRE project (Effects of Climate Change on Air Pollution and Response Strategies for European Ecosystems). To estimate the sensitivity of surface concentrations of ammonia to a temperature dependent emission approach, we applied a temperature function in the EMEP model for the agricultural ammonia emissions from the UK. With the original emissions the resulting surface ammonia concentration has a bimodal seasonal tendency, with a peak in the beginning of the spring when agricultural management starts and with a second maximum during the autumn when fertilizer is typically spread. With our new temperature dependent approach the seasonal cycle became unimodal with a peak in June. This significant difference supports the need for a dynamic emission approach in ACTMs. The GAG model currently works for a single urine patch. Before it calculates the ammonia emission flux over the urine patch the model simulates the ammoniacal nitrogen budget and the water budget under the patch. The preliminary results for emission fluxes are in good agreement with the measurements. However, the differences highlight that further improvements are necessary.

  7. Predicting Aerosol Based Emissions in a Post Combustion CO2 Capture Process Using an Aspen Plus Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khakharia, P.M.; Mertens, J.; Vlugt, T.J.H.; Goetheer, E.

    2014-01-01

    Industrial scale implementation of post combustion CO2 capture (PCCC) can be hindered by solvent emissions due to its impact on the environment and the operating costs. The issue of aerosol based emissions has only been recently reported for a PCCC process and very little fundamental knowledge is

  8. Greenhouse gas emissions from the mineralisation process in a Sludge Treatment Reed Bed system: Seasonal variation and environmental impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Julie Dam; Nielsen, Steen; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    the annual greenhouse gas emission rate of the mineralisation process. The full-scale STRB at Helsinge wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Denmark was chosen as the study site. Gas emission rates were measured using static surface flux chambers. The measurements were carried out in October/November 2014...

  9. EVALUATION OF POLLUTION PREVENTION OPTIONS TO REDUCE STYRENE EMISSIONS FROM FIBER-REINFORCED PLASTIC OPEN MOLDING PROCESSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollution prevention (P2) options to reduce styrene emissions, such as new materials, and application equipment, are commercially available to the operators of open molding processes. However, information is lacking on the emissions reduction that these options can achieve. To me...

  10. Evaluating the emissions from the gasification processing of municipal solid waste followed by combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Evandro José; Queiroz, Neide; Yamamoto, Carlos Itsuo; da Costa Neto, Pedro Ramos

    2018-03-01

    In this study, we evaluated the emissions of pollutants generated from the combustion of syngas in the gasification of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) in Brazil using a mobile grille gasifier fed with domestic waste without any previous separation or grinding. The basic syngas composition (H 2 , CH 4 and CO) was analyzed by gas chromatography and the Lower Calorific Value was calculated, which ranged from 1.9 to 10.2 MJ/kg. In the monitoring of combustion gases (CO 2 , CO, NO , NO 2 , SO 2 and Total Hydrocarbon Content), values were found for these pollutants that were lower than the values established by the Brazilian legislation, except for SO 2 . Regarding the determination of the emission of metals, values lower than those permissible in the legislation were found for the most toxic metals grouped as class I (Cd, Hg, Tl). Therefore, it was evident that gasification followed by the combustion of syngas from MSW without prior segregation at source has the advantages of having fewer process steps, allowing the low emission of pollutants into the environment and it avoids that the residues are deposited in landfills, which are generators of leachate and greenhouse gas (methane). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Excellent Field Emission Properties of Short Conical Carbon Nanotubes Prepared by Microwave Plasma Enhanced CVD Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vankar Vasant

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractRandomly oriented short and low density conical carbon nanotubes (CNTs were prepared on Si substrates by tubular microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at relatively low temperature (350–550 °C by judiciously controlling the microwave power and growth time in C2H2 + NH3gas composition and Fe catalyst. Both length as well as density of the CNTs increased with increasing microwave power. CNTs consisted of regular conical compartments stacked in such a way that their outer diameter remained constant. Majority of the nanotubes had a sharp conical tip (5–20 nm while its other side was either open or had a cone/pear-shaped catalyst particle. The CNTs were highly crystalline and had many open edges on the outer surface, particularly near the joints of the two compartments. These films showed excellent field emission characteristics. The best emission was observed for a medium density film with the lowest turn-on and threshold fields of 1.0 and 2.10 V/μm, respectively. It is suggested that not only CNT tip but open edges on the body also act as active emission sites in the randomly oriented geometry of such periodic structures.

  12. Investigating deformation processes in AM60 magnesium alloy using the acoustic emission technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathis, K. [Department of Metal Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 5, 121 16 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Chmelik, F. [Department of Metal Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 5, 121 16 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: chmelik@met.mff.cuni.cz; Janecek, M. [Department of Metal Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 5, 121 16 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Hadzima, B. [Department of Materials Engineering, University of Zilina, Vel' ky diel, 010 26 Zilina (Slovakia); Trojanova, Z. [Department of Metal Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 5, 121 16 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Lukac, P. [Department of Metal Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 5, 121 16 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)

    2006-12-15

    Microstructure changes in an AM60 magnesium alloy were monitored using the acoustic emission (AE) technique during tensile tests in the temperature range from 20 to 300 deg. C. The correlation of the AE signal and the deformation processes is discussed. It is shown, using transmission electron and light microscopy, that the character of the AE response is associated with various modes of mechanical twinning at lower temperatures, whereas at higher temperatures also the influence of non-basal dislocations on the AE response must be taken into account.

  13. Studies for γ-ray emission in the fission process with LICORNE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebois M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, neutron production with LICORNE is described. The development of a gascell target and the extension of the energy range up to 7 MeV with the p(11B,n11C are presented. An overview of the major research fields studied with LICORNE is given and two types of experiment are presented. The first one dedicated to prompt fission γ-ray emission in fission, as a function of incident neutron energy, is described. Some preliminary results are shown. The second, in the context of the MINORCA campaign, is detailed. The most recent outcomes in the data analysis process are also presented.

  14. Ultra fast atomic process in X-ray emission by inner-shell ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment; Tajima, T.

    1998-03-01

    An ultra-fast atomic process together with X-ray emission by inner-shell ionization using high intensity (10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) short pulse (20fs) X-ray is studied. A new class of experiment is proposed and a useful pumping source is suggested. In this method, it is found that the gain value of X-ray laser amounts to larger than 1000(1/cm) with use of the density of 10{sup 22}/cm{sup 3} of carbon atom. Electron impact ionization effect and initial density effect as well as intensity of pumping source effect are also discussed. (author)

  15. Mechanisms of dust grain charging in plasma with allowance for electron emission processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol’kov, S. I.; Savin, V. N., E-mail: moped@onego.ru [Petrozavodsk State University (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The process of dust grain charging is described with allowance for secondary, ion-induced, photoelectric, and thermal electron emission from the grain surface. The roughness of the grain surface is taken into account. An intermediate charging regime involving ion–atom collisions and electron ionization in the perturbed plasma region is analyzed using the moment equations and Poisson’s equation. A calculation method is proposed that allows one to take into account the influence of all the above effects and determine the radius of the plasma region perturbed by the dust grain.

  16. Mechanisms of dust grain charging in plasma with allowance for electron emission processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol'kov, S. I.; Savin, V. N.

    2017-02-01

    The process of dust grain charging is described with allowance for secondary, ion-induced, photoelectric, and thermal electron emission from the grain surface. The roughness of the grain surface is taken into account. An intermediate charging regime involving ion-atom collisions and electron ionization in the perturbed plasma region is analyzed using the moment equations and Poisson's equation. A calculation method is proposed that allows one to take into account the influence of all the above effects and determine the radius of the plasma region perturbed by the dust grain.

  17. Study of the Light Emission Process from the Double Chooz Photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Crespo, J. I.; Gil-Botella, I.; Jimenez, S.; Lopez, M.; Novella, P.; Palomares, C.; Santorelli, R.; Verdugo, A.

    2012-09-13

    In this document we present a study of the light emitted by the base of a Hamamatsu R7081MOD-ASSY photomultiplier (PMT) of the same type used in the Double Chooz experiment. Several characteristic features of the light signal have been found in terms of amplitude, length and pulse shape. Additional investigations on the properties of the epoxy used to cover the photomultiplier base have been carried out. A possible explanation of the light emission process is discussed at the end of the study. (Author) 1 ref.

  18. Similarity ratio analysis for early stage fault detection with optical emission spectrometer in plasma etching process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    Full Text Available A Similarity Ratio Analysis (SRA method is proposed for early-stage Fault Detection (FD in plasma etching processes using real-time Optical Emission Spectrometer (OES data as input. The SRA method can help to realise a highly precise control system by detecting abnormal etch-rate faults in real-time during an etching process. The method processes spectrum scans at successive time points and uses a windowing mechanism over the time series to alleviate problems with timing uncertainties due to process shift from one process run to another. A SRA library is first built to capture features of a healthy etching process. By comparing with the SRA library, a Similarity Ratio (SR statistic is then calculated for each spectrum scan as the monitored process progresses. A fault detection mechanism, named 3-Warning-1-Alarm (3W1A, takes the SR values as inputs and triggers a system alarm when certain conditions are satisfied. This design reduces the chance of false alarm, and provides a reliable fault reporting service. The SRA method is demonstrated on a real semiconductor manufacturing dataset. The effectiveness of SRA-based fault detection is evaluated using a time-series SR test and also using a post-process SR test. The time-series SR provides an early-stage fault detection service, so less energy and materials will be wasted by faulty processing. The post-process SR provides a fault detection service with higher reliability than the time-series SR, but with fault testing conducted only after each process run completes.

  19. Comet Wild 2 dust coma: conservation relationships between nucleus emission and dust fragmentation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, J.; Green, S.

    NASA's STARDUST spacecraft flew by the nucleus of comet Wild 2 on 2 January 2004 at a miss distance of 236 km. The spatial and mass distributions of dust were measured by the Dust Flux Monitor Instrument (DFMI) developed by the University of Chicago with acoustic sensors developed by the authors. DFMI detected particles ranging in mass from 10^-14 kg to >10^-7 kg between 1630 km from the comet inbound to 5650 km post encounter. The particles were detected by depolarisation of sensitive PVDF films of two different thicknesses on dedicated small area detectors and using piezo-electric sensors mounted on the Whipple dust shield as a sensing diaphragm. The largest impactors result in perforations of the shield and detection by a second sensor on the surface behind. We examine aspects of the spatial and mass distributions of dust detected throughout encounter. In-situ detection has led to the opportunity to detect dust very close to the comet, and the discovery that fragmentation is an active, and extensive, process within the coma. The flux-time profiles exhibit structure on scales as small as a km as far as 4000 km from the nucleus. Jets, produced by a venturi effect at the surface, and supported by optical image data, have been proposed to explain some of these structures, but are insufficient to account for the more distant spatial distributions and for the changing form of the mass distributions at different distances from the comet. Comets are a major contributor to the interplanetary dust complex and an understanding of how the measured flux-time encounter profile relates to the overall emission is required, in addition to the cometary emission process, to determine the overall mass efflux. Four factors determine the evolution of the size distribution: 1. The surface emission size/mass distribution (characterised by a cumulative mass index, alpha); 2. The levitation velocity imparted by the gas emission (a function of mass); 3. The size/mass distribution of the

  20. Dynamics of biocide emissions from buildings in a suburban stormwater catchment - concentrations, mass loads and emission processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollmann, Ulla E; Vollertsen, Jes; Carmeliet, Jan; Bester, Kai

    2014-06-01

    Biocides such as isothiazolinones, carbamates, triazines, phenylureas, azoles and others are used to protect the surfaces of buildings, e.g. painted or unpainted render or wood. These biocides can be mobilized from the materials if rainwater gets into contact with these buildings. Hence, these biocides will be found in rainwater runoff (stormwater) from buildings that is traditionally managed as "clean water" in stormwater sewer systems and often directly discharged into surface waters without further treatment. By means of a 9 month event-based high resolution sampling campaign the biocide emissions in a small suburban stormwater catchment were analysed and the emission dynamics throughout the single rain events were investigated. Five out of twelve of the rain events (peak events) proved significantly higher concentrations than the rest (average) for at least one compound. Highest median concentrations of 0.045 and 0.052 μg L(-1) were found for terbutryn and carbendazim, while the concentrations for isoproturon, diuron, N-octylisothiazolinone, benzoisothiazolinone, cybutryn, propiconazole, tebuconazole, and mecoprop were one order of magnitude lower. However, during the peak events the concentrations reached up to 1.8 and 0.3 μg L(-1) for terbutryn and carbendazim, respectively. Emissions of an averaged single family house into the stormwater sewer turned out to be 59 and 50 μg event(-1) house(-1) terbutryn and carbendazim, respectively. Emissions for the other biocides ranged from 0.1 to 11 μg event(-1) house(-1). Mass load analysis revealed that peak events contributed in single events as much to the emissions as 11 average events. However, the mass loads were highly dependent on the amounts of rainwater, i.e. the hydraulic flow in the receiving sewer pipe. The analysis of the emission dynamics showed first flush emissions only for single parameters in three events out of twelve. Generally biocides seemed to be introduced into the stormwater system

  1. Estimations of isoprenoid emission capacity from enclosure studies: measurements, data processing, quality and standardized measurement protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ü. Niinemets

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The capacity for volatile isoprenoid production under standardized environmental conditions at a certain time (ES, the emission factor is a key characteristic in constructing isoprenoid emission inventories. However, there is large variation in published ES estimates for any given species partly driven by dynamic modifications in ES due to acclimation and stress responses. Here we review additional sources of variation in ES estimates that are due to measurement and analytical techniques and calculation and averaging procedures, and demonstrate that estimations of ES critically depend on applied experimental protocols and on data processing and reporting. A great variety of experimental setups has been used in the past, contributing to study-to-study variations in ES estimates. We suggest that past experimental data should be distributed into broad quality classes depending on whether the data can or cannot be considered quantitative based on rigorous experimental standards. Apart from analytical issues, the accuracy of ES values is strongly driven by extrapolation and integration errors introduced during data processing. Additional sources of error, especially in meta-database construction, can further arise from inconsistent use of units and expression bases of ES. We propose a standardized experimental protocol for BVOC estimations and highlight basic meta-information that we strongly recommend to report with any ES measurement. We conclude that standardization of experimental and calculation protocols and critical examination of past reports is essential for development of accurate emission factor databases.

  2. Emission characteristics of PBDEs during flame-retardant plastics extruding process: field investigation and laboratorial simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chao; Li, Ying; Li, Jinhui; Chen, Yuan; Li, Huafen

    2017-10-01

    Though mechanical recycling of WEEE plastics is supposed to be a promising method, PBDEs release and the resulting contamination during its processing remain unclear yet. The distribution of PBDEs pollution in production lines was investigated from two flame-retardant plastic modification plants in Southern China. This was followed by laboratory simulation experiments to characterize the emission processes. PBDEs concentrations ranged from 37 to 31,305 ng/L in cooling water and from 40,043 to 216,653 ng/g dry wt in solid samples taken during the field investigation. In the laboratory simulation, concentrations ranged from 146 to 433 ng/L in cooling water and from 411,436 to 747,516 ng/Nm3 in flue gas. All samples were dominated by BDE-209 among the congeners. Temperatures and impurities in plastic substrate can significantly affect PBDEs release. Special attention should be paid to the risks of water directly discharge from the cooling system, especially for the biological sludge and sediments, as well as flue gas emissions to the environment.

  3. Influence of duration time of CVD process on emissive properties of carbon nanotubes films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stępinska Izabela

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper various types of films made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are presented. These films were prepared on different substrates (Al2O3, Si n-type by the two-step method. The two-step method consists of physical vapor deposition step, followed by chemical vapor deposition step (PVD/CVD. Parameters of PVD process were the same for all initial films, while the duration times of the second step - the CVD process, were different (15, 30 min.. Prepared films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and field emission (FE measurements. The I-E and F-N characteristics of electron emission were discussed in terms of various forms of CNT films. The value of threshold electric field ranged from few V/μm (for CNT dispersed rarely on the surface of the film deposited on Si up to ~20 V/μm (for Al2O3 substrate.

  4. Stochastic and Deterministic Models for the Metastatic Emission Process: Formalisms and Crosslinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Christophe; Hartung, Niklas

    2018-01-01

    Although the detection of metastases radically changes prognosis of and treatment decisions for a cancer patient, clinically undetectable micrometastases hamper a consistent classification into localized or metastatic disease. This chapter discusses mathematical modeling efforts that could help to estimate the metastatic risk in such a situation. We focus on two approaches: (1) a stochastic framework describing metastatic emission events at random times, formalized via Poisson processes, and (2) a deterministic framework describing the micrometastatic state through a size-structured density function in a partial differential equation model. Three aspects are addressed in this chapter. First, a motivation for the Poisson process framework is presented and modeling hypotheses and mechanisms are introduced. Second, we extend the Poisson model to account for secondary metastatic emission. Third, we highlight an inherent crosslink between the stochastic and deterministic frameworks and discuss its implications. For increased accessibility the chapter is split into an informal presentation of the results using a minimum of mathematical formalism and a rigorous mathematical treatment for more theoretically interested readers.

  5. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Vvvvvv... - Emission Limits and Compliance Requirements for Metal HAP Process Vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Requirements for Metal HAP Process Vents 4 Table 4 to Subpart VVVVVV of Part 63 Protection of Environment... of Part 63—Emission Limits and Compliance Requirements for Metal HAP Process Vents As required in § 63.11496(f), you must comply with the requirements for metal HAP process vents as shown in the...

  6. β-delayed neutron emission measurements around the third r-process abundance peak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Folch, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Taín, J. L.; Cortés, G.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ameil, F.; Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Bowry, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Davinson, T.; Dillmann, I.; Estrade, A.; Evdokimov, A.; Faestermann, T.; Farinon, F.; Galaviz, D.; García-Rios, A.; Geissel, H.; Gelletly, W.; Gernhäuser, R.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Guerrero, C.; Heil, M.; Hinke, C.; Knöbel, R.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurcewicz, J.; Kurz, N.; Litvinov, Y.; Maier, L.; Marganiec, J.; Marta, M.; Martínez, T.; Montes, F.; Mukha, I.; Napoli, D. R.; Nociforo, C.; Paradela, C.; Pietri, S.; Podolyák, Zs.; Prochazka, A.; Rice, S.; Riego, A.; Rubio, B.; Schaffner, H.; Scheidenberger, C.; Smith, K.; Sokol, E.; Steiger, K.; Sun, B.; Takechi, M.; Testov, D.; Weick, H.; Wilson, E.; Winfield, J. S.; Wood, R.; Woods, P.; Yeremin, A.

    2013-06-01

    This contribution summarizes an experiment performed at GSI (Germany) in the neutron-rich region beyond N=126. The aim of this measurement is to provide the nuclear physics input of relevance for r-process model calculations, aiming at a better understanding of the third r-process abundance peak. Many exotic nuclei were measured around 211Hg and 215Tl. Final ion identification diagrams are given in this contribution. For most of them, we expect to derive halflives and and β-delayed neutron emission probabilities. The detectors used in this experiment were the Silicon IMplantation and Beta Absorber (SIMBA) detector, based on an array of highly segmented silicon detectors, and the BEta deLayEd Neutron (BELEN) detector, which consisted of 30 3He counters embedded in a polyethylene matrix.

  7. {beta}-delayed neutron emission measurements around the third r-process abundance peak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caballero-Folch, R.; Cortes, G.; Calvino, F.; Gomez-Hornillos, M. B.; Riego, A. [INTE-DFEN, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Domingo-Pardo, C.; Tain, J. L.; Agramunt, J.; Rubio, B. [IFIC, CSIC-University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Algora, A. [IFIC, CSIC-University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain) and Inst. Nucl. Research, Debrecen (Hungary); Ameil, F.; Farinon, F.; Heil, M.; Knoebel, R.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurcewicz, J.; Kurz, N.; Litvinov, Y.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2013-06-10

    This contribution summarizes an experiment performed at GSI (Germany) in the neutron-rich region beyond N=126. The aim of this measurement is to provide the nuclear physics input of relevance for r-process model calculations, aiming at a better understanding of the third r-process abundance peak. Many exotic nuclei were measured around {sup 211}Hg and {sup 215}Tl. Final ion identification diagrams are given in this contribution. For most of them, we expect to derive halflives and and {beta}-delayed neutron emission probabilities. The detectors used in this experiment were the Silicon IMplantation and Beta Absorber (SIMBA) detector, based on an array of highly segmented silicon detectors, and the BEta deLayEd Neutron (BELEN) detector, which consisted of 30 3He counters embedded in a polyethylene matrix.

  8. Feasibility of using acoustic emission to determine in-process tool wear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarus, L.J.

    1996-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) was evaluated for its ability to predict and recognize failure of cutting tools during machining processes when the cutting tool rotates and the workpiece is stationary. AE output was evaluated with a simple algorithm. AE was able to detect drill failure when the transducer was mounted on the workpiece holding fixture. Drill failure was recognized as size was reduced to 0.0003 in. diameter. The ability to predict failure was reduced with drill size, drill material elasticity, and tool coating. AE output for the turning process on a lathe was compared to turning tool insert wear. The turning tool must have sufficient wear to produce a detectable change in AE output to predict insert failure.

  9. Preseismic electromagnetic emissions: demystifying the features of the last stages of fracture process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftaxias, Konstantinos; Potirakis, Stelios M.; Peratzakis, Athanasios; Nomicos, Constantinos

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, the wind prevailing in the scientific community does not appear to be favorable for earthquake (EQ) prediction research, in particular for the research of short term prediction. Sometimes the arguments were extended to the extreme claim that any precursory activity is impossible. Importantly, negative views originate from certain systematically observed features, currently considered as "paradoxes". Fracture-induced electromagnetic emissions (EME) in a wide range of frequency bands are sensitive to the micro-structural chances. Thus, their study constitutes a nondestructive method for the monitoring of the evolution of damage process at the laboratory scale. It has been suggested that fracture induced MHz-kHz electromagnetic (EM) emissions, which emerge from a few days up to a few hours before the main seismic shock occurrence permit a real time monitoring of the damage process during the last stages of earthquake preparation, as it happens at the laboratory scale. Despite fairly abundant evidence, EM precursors have not been adequately accepted as credible physical quantities. These negative views are enhanced by the fact that certain "puzzling features" are consistently observed in candidate pre-seismic EM emissions. More precisely: (i) EM silence in all frequency bands appears before the main seismic shock occurrence, as well as during the aftershock period. (ii) Absence of strong strain changes is observed during the emergence of EM precursors. We argue that experiments by means of EME at the large, geophysical, scale would probably reveal features of the last stages of failure process not clearly observable at the small, laboratory, scale, allowing thus the monitoring in real-time and step-by-step of the EQ generation. The observed EM precursors have been interpreted through a shift in thinking towards the basic science. Strict criteria have been established for the definition of an emerged EM anomaly as a pre-seismic one by means of a

  10. Odorous gaseous emissions as influence by process condition for the forced aeration composting of pig slaughterhouse sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazy, V., E-mail: vincent.blazy@irstea.fr [Irstea, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucillé, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Guardia, A. de, E-mail: amaury.de-guardia@irstea.fr [Irstea, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucillé, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Benoist, J.C; Daumoin, M. [Irstea, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucillé, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Lemasle, M.; Wolbert, D. [Laboratoire Sciences Chimiques de Rennes - équipe Chimie et Ingénierie des Procédés, UMR 6226 CNRS, ENSCR, Avenue du Général Leclerc, 35700 Rennes (France); Barrington, S., E-mail: suzellebarrington@sympatico.ca [Irstea, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucillé, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Concordia University, Department of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1455 de Maisonneuve, Montréal, QC H3G 1M8 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • The gaseous emissions produced by various composting process conditions were characterized and quantified. • Nine compounds were potentially odorous: TMA, NH{sub 3}, 2-pentanone, 1-propanol-2-methyl, acetophenone and sulphur forms. • The tested composting process conditions reduced odour emissions by a factor of 5–10. • A reduction of 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 6} is required to reach an odour threshold limit at peak event emissions. • Both aeration rate and bulking agent had the most impact on reducing odour emissions. - Abstract: Compost sustainability requires a better control of its gaseous emissions responsible for several impacts including odours. Indeed, composting odours have stopped the operation of many platforms and prevented the installation of others. Accordingly, present technologies collecting and treating gases emitted from composting are not satisfactory and alternative solutions must be found. Thus, the aim of this paper was to study the influence of composting process conditions on gaseous emissions. Pig slaughterhouse sludge mixed with wood chips was composted under forced aeration in 300 L laboratory reactors. The process conditions studied were: aeration rate of 1.68, 4.03, 6.22, 9.80 and 13.44 L/h/kg of wet sludge; incorporation ratio of 0.55, 0.83 and 1.1 (kg of wet wood chips/kg of wet sludge), and; bulking agent particles size of <10, 10 < 20 and 20 < 30 mm. Out-going gases were sampled every 2 days and their composition was analysed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC–MS). Fifty-nine compounds were identified and quantified. Dividing the cumulated mass production over 30 days of composting, by odour threshold, 9 compounds were identified as main potential odour contributors: hydrogen sulphide, trimethylamine, ammonia, 2-pentanone, 1-propanol-2-methyl, dimethyl sulphide, dimethyl disulphide, dimethyl trisulphide and acetophenone. Five gaseous compounds were correlated with both aeration rate and

  11. Contribution of electric energy to the process of elimination of low emission sources in Cracow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lach, J.; Mejer, T.; Wybranski, A. [Power Distribution Plant, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    At present energy supply belongs to the most important global problems. A significant part of energy is consumed for residential heating purposes. Depending on climatic conditions, fuel distribution and the level of technological development, the contribution of these purposes ranges between ca. 50% (Poland) and ca. 12% (Spain). The power engineering structure in Poland is based almost exclusively upon solid fuels, i.e. hard and brown coal. Chemical compounds (carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides) produced in combustion process influence negatively the natural environment. The contribution of residential heating in this negative effect is rather significant. Because of the fact, that the resources of fossil fuels (the most important source of energy at present) are limited and their influence on natural environment is negative, efforts are made to find out more effective ways of energy consumption and to reduce the pollutant emission from heating sources. This problem is a topical issue in Cracow, especially during the heating season because the coal-fired stoves situated in the central part of the town remain the most important source of pollutant emission. These sources cause serious menace to the health of inhabitants; furthermore the pollutants destroy Cracow monuments entered in the UNESCO world list of human heritage.

  12. A novel approach for reducing toxic emissions during high temperature processing of electronic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, R; Khanna, R; Dutta, R K; Cayumil, R; Ikram-Ul-Haq, M; Agarwala, V; Ellamparuthy, G; Jayasankar, K; Mukherjee, P S; Sahajwalla, V

    2017-06-01

    A novel approach is presented to capture some of the potentially toxic elements (PTEs), other particulates and emissions during the heat treatment of e-waste using alumina adsorbents. Waste PCBs from mobile phones were mechanically crushed to sizes less than 1mm; their thermal degradation was investigated using thermo-gravimetric analysis. Observed weight loss was attributed to the degradation of polymers and the vaporization of organic constituents and volatile metals. The sample assembly containing PCB powder and adsorbent was heat treated at 600°C for times ranging between 10 and 30min with air, nitrogen and argon as carrier gases. Weight gains up to ∼17% were recorded in the adsorbent thereby indicating the capture of significant amounts of particulates. The highest level of adsorption was observed in N 2 atmosphere for small particle sizes of alumina. SEM/EDS results on the adsorbent indicated the presence of Cu, Pb, Si, Mg and C. These studies were supplemented with ICP-OES analysis to determine the extent of various species captured as a function of operating parameters. This innovative, low-cost approach has the potential for utilization in the informal sector and/or developing countries, and could play a significant role in reducing toxic emissions from e-waste processing towards environmentally safe limits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Acoustic emission characteristics of instability process of a rock plate under concentrated loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.R. Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It can facilitate the understanding of the mechanical properties and failure laws of rocks to research on the rock failure mechanism and evolution characteristics of Acoustic Emission (AE. Under the concentrated loading condition, the fracture and instability test of a rock plate was conducted by using the rock Mechanics Testing System (MTS, meanwhile, these AE events were recorded through the AE recording system. Based on the laboratory test, the numerical simulation was completed by using FLAC3D technique under the criterion that the rupture of a cell or several adjacent cells was regarded as an AE event. The results show that the process of the fracture and instability of the rock plate can be divided into four stages, such as the stress adjusting stage, the brittle fracture stage, the rock-arch bearing load stage and the rock-arch instability stage. And the acoustic emissions display the different characteristics in each one of the four stages. The temporal and spatial distribution characteristics of the AE events with large magnitudes are very similar to those of the natural earthquakes.

  14. Reduction of nitrous oxide emissions from partial nitrification process by using innovative carbon source (mannitol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinwen; Wang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jian; Huang, Xiaoyu; Wei, Dong; Lan, Wei; Hu, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of mannitol as carbon source on nitrogen removal and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission during partial nitrification (PN) process. Laboratory-scale PN sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were operated with mannitol and sodium acetate as carbon sources, respectively. Results showed that mannitol could remarkably reduce N2O-N emission by 41.03%, without influencing the removal efficiency of NH4(+)-N. However, it has a significant influence on nitrite accumulation ratio (NAR) and TN removal, which were 19.97% and 13.59% lower than that in PN with sodium acetate, respectively. Microbial analysis showed that the introduction of mannitol could increase the abundance of bacteria encoding nosZ genes. In addition, anti-oxidant enzymes (T-SOD, POD and CAT) activities were significantly reduced and the dehydrogenase activity had an obvious increase in mannitol system, indicating that mannitol could alleviate the inhibition of N2O reductase (N2OR) activities caused by high NO2(-)-N concentration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Non-adiabatic processes in the charge transfer reaction of O{sub 2} molecules with potassium surfaces without dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krix, David; Nienhaus, Hermann, E-mail: hermann.nienhaus@uni-due.de [Faculty of Physics, University of Duisburg-Essen and Center of Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), Lotharstr. 1, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)

    2014-08-21

    Thin potassium films grown on Si(001) substrates are used to measure internal chemicurrents and the external emission of exoelectrons simultaneously during adsorption of molecular oxygen on K surfaces at 120 K. The experiments clarify the dynamics of electronic excitations at a simple metal with a narrow valence band. X-ray photoemission reveals that for exposures below 5 L almost exclusively peroxide K{sub 2}O{sub 2} is formed, i.e., no dissociation of the molecule occurs during interaction. Still a significant chemicurrent and a delayed exoelectron emission are detected due to a rapid injection of unoccupied molecular levels below the Fermi level. Since the valence band width of potassium is approximately equal to the potassium work function (2.4 eV) the underlying mechanism of exoemission is an Auger relaxation whereas chemicurrents are detected after resonant charge transfer from the metal valence band into the injected level. The change of the chemicurrent and exoemission efficiencies with oxygen coverage can be deduced from the kinetics of the reaction and the recorded internal and external emission currents traces. It is shown that the non-adiabaticity of the reaction increases with coverage due to a reduction of the electronic density of states at the surface while the work function does not vary significantly. Therefore, the peroxide formation is one of the first reaction systems which exhibits varying non-adiabaticity and efficiencies during the reaction. Non-adiabatic calculations based on model Hamiltonians and density functional theory support the picture of chemicurrent generation and explain the rapid injection of hot hole states by an intramolecular motion, i.e., the expansion of the oxygen molecule on the timescale of a quarter of a vibrational period.

  16. Hydrogen sulphide, odor, and VOC air emission control systems for heavy oil storage, transport, and processing operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tandon, H.P. [APC Technologies, Inc. (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In the heavy oil industry, companies have to control their air emissions in compliance with regulatory and process improvement objectives. The industry therefore operates air emission control systems to eliminate odor complaints, reduce personnel exposure to H2S and remove BTEX and VOC emissions. This paper studies different cases of companies which have chosen to use a fixed activated carbon adsorption unit. The study was conducted on three cases of heavy oil industries which installed the CarbonPure adsorption system and describes their objectives, processes, emissions, technology options and performances. Results showed an elimination of odor complaints, a reduction of personnel exposure to harmful air contaminants and a reduction of VOC concentrations in a reliable, low maintenance and economic manner. This study presents the greater benefits of the CarbonPure adsorption system combined with an ultra high efficiency unit over those of other adsorption systems.

  17. 40 CFR Table 1 of Subpart Aaaaaaa... - Emission Limits for Asphalt Processing (Refining) Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (Refining) Operations 1 Table 1 of Subpart AAAAAAA of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for...

  18. AN APPROACH TO A UNIFIED PROCESS-BASED REGIONAL EMISSION FLUX MODELING PLATFORM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The trend towards episodic modeling of environmentally-dependent emissions is increasing, with models available or under development for dust, ammonia, biogenic volatile organic compounds, soil nitrous oxide, pesticides, sea salt, and chloride, mercury, and wildfire emissions. T...

  19. Preparation of tourmaline nano-particles through a hydrothermal process and its infrared emission properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Gang; Han, Chao; Liang, Jinsheng; Wang, Saifei; Zhao, Chaoyue

    2014-05-01

    Tourmaline nano-particles were successfully prepared via a hydrothermal process using HCl as an additive. The reaction temperature (T) and the concentration of HCI (C(HCl)) had effects on the size and morphology of the tourmaline nano-particles. The optimum reaction condition was that: T = 180 degrees C and C(HCl) = 0.1 mol/l. The obtained nano-particles were spherical with the diameter of 48 nm. The far-infrared emissivity of the product was 0.923. The formation mechnism of the tourmaline nano-particles might come from the corrosion of grain boundary between the tourmaline crystals in acidic hydrothermal conditions and then the asymmetric contraction of the crystals.

  20. Data acquisition and processing system of the electron cyclotron emission imaging system of the KSTAR tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J B; Lee, W; Yun, G S; Park, H K; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C

    2010-10-01

    A new innovative electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) diagnostic system for the Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) produces a large amount of data. The design of the data acquisition and processing system of the ECEI diagnostic system should consider covering the large data production and flow. The system design is based on the layered structure scalable to the future extension to accommodate increasing data demands. Software architecture that allows a web-based monitoring of the operation status, remote experiment, and data analysis is discussed. The operating software will help machine operators and users validate the acquired data promptly, prepare next discharge, and enhance the experiment performance and data analysis in a distributed environment.

  1. CFD simulation of the combustion process of the low-emission vortex boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, A. A.; Maryandyshev, P. A.; Pankratov, E. V.; Lubov, V. K.

    2017-11-01

    Domestic heat and power engineering needs means and methods for optimizing the existing boiler plants in order to increase their technical, economic and environmental work. The development of modern computer technology, methods of numerical modeling and specialized software greatly facilitates the solution of many emerging problems. CFD simulation allows to obtaine precise results of thermochemical and aerodynamic processes taking place in the furnace of boilers in order to optimize their operation modes and develop directions for their modernization. The paper presents the results of simulation of the combustion process of a low-emission vortex coal boiler of the model E-220/100 using the software package Ansys Fluent. A hexahedral grid with a number of 2 million cells was constructed for the chosen boiler model. A stationary problem with a two-phase flow was solved. The gaseous components are air, combustion products and volatile substances. The solid phase is coal particles at different burnup stages. The Euler-Lagrange approach was taken as a basis. Calculation of the coal particles trajectories was carried out using the Discrete Phase Model which distribution of the size particle of coal dust was accounted for using the Rosin-Rammler equation. Partially Premixed combustion model was used as the combustion model which take into account elemental composition of the fuel and heat analysis. To take turbulence into account, a two-parameter k-ε model with a standard wall function was chosen. Heat transfer by radiation was calculated using the P1-approximation of the method of spherical harmonics. The system of spatial equations was numerically solved by the control volume method using the SIMPLE algorithm of Patankar and Spaulding. Comparison of data obtained during the industrial-operational tests of low-emission vortex boilers with the results of mathematical modeling showed acceptable convergence of the tasks of this level, which confirms the adequacy of the

  2. Similarity Ratio Analysis for Early Stage Fault Detection with Optical Emission Spectrometer in Plasma Etching Process: e95679

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jie Yang; Conor McArdle; Stephen Daniels

    2014-01-01

    ...) in plasma etching processes using real-time Optical Emission Spectrometer (OES) data as input. The SRA method can help to realise a highly precise control system by detecting abnormal etch-rate faults in real-time during an etching process...

  3. Wastewater treatment in the pulp-and-paper industry: A review of treatment processes and the associated greenhouse gas emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Omid; Yerushalmi, Laleh; Haghighat, Fariborz

    2015-08-01

    Pulp-and-paper mills produce various types of contaminants and a significant amount of wastewater depending on the type of processes used in the plant. Since the generated wastewaters can be potentially polluting and very dangerous, they should be treated in wastewater treatment plants before being released to the environment. This paper reviews different wastewater treatment processes used in the pulp-and-paper industry and compares them with respect to their contaminant removal efficiencies and the extent of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission. It also evaluates the impact of operating parameters on the performance of different treatment processes. Two mathematical models were used to estimate GHG emission in common biological treatment processes used in the pulp-and-paper industry. Nutrient removal processes and sludge treatment are discussed and their associated GHG emissions are calculated. Although both aerobic and anaerobic biological processes are appropriate for wastewater treatment, their combination known as hybrid processes showed a better contaminant removal capacity at higher efficiencies under optimized operating conditions with reduced GHG emission and energy costs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Acoustic Emission Characteristics of Gas-Containing Coal during Loading Dilation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Q. Yin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Raw coal was used as the study object in this paper to identify the evolution characteristics of acoustic emission (AE during the dilation process of gas-containing coal. The coal specimens were stored in gas seal devices filled with gas at different pressures (0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 MPa for 24 h prior to testing. Then, the specimens were tested in a rock-testing machine, and the deformation and crack fracture patterns were recorded by using strain gauges and an AE system. The axial and volumetric strains–stress curves were analyzed in relation to the AE and the failure mode. Results show that as gas pressure increases, the uniaxial compression strength and elasticity modulus of gas-containing coal decreases, whereas the Poisson’s ratio increases. In all the coal specimens, the dilation initiation stress decreases, and the dilation degree increases. During the dilation process, before the loaded coal specimens reach peak stress, and as the load increases, the changes in the specimens and in the AE energy parameter of specimens can be divided into four phases: crack closure deformation, elastic deformation, stable crack propagation, and unstable crack propagation (dilation process. Across the four phases, the AE energy increases evidently during crack closure and elastic deformation but decreases during stable crack propagation. As the gas pressure increases, the AE signal frequency increases from 4.5 KHz to 8.1 KHz during the dilation process. Thus, the gas presence in coal specimens exerts a significant influence on the closure of sample cracks and dilation damage.

  5. [Emission characteristics and safety evaluation of volatile organic compounds in manufacturing processes of automotive coatings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Pei-Yuan; Li, Jian-Jun; Liao, Dong-Qi; Tu, Xiang; Xu, Mei-Ying; Sun, Guo-Ping

    2013-12-01

    Emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were investigated in an automotive coating manufacturing enterprise. Air samples were taken from eight different manufacturing areas in three workshops, and the species of VOCs and their concentrations were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Safety evaluation was also conducted by comparing the concentration of VOCs with the permissible concentration-short term exposure limit (PC-STEL) regulated by the Ministry of Health. The results showed that fifteen VOCs were detected in the indoor air of the automotive coatings workshop, including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, ethyl acetate, butyl acetate, methyl isobutyl ketone, propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate, trimethylbenzene and ethylene glycol monobutyl ether, Their concentrations widely ranged from 0.51 to 593.14 mg x m(-3). The concentrations of TVOCs were significantly different among different manufacturing processes. Even in the same manufacturing process, the concentrations of each component measured at different times were also greatly different. The predominant VOCs of indoor air in the workshop were identified to be ethylbenzene and butyl acetate. The concentrations of most VOCs exceeded the occupational exposure limits, so the corresponding control measures should be taken to protect the health of the workers.

  6. Evaluation of process conditions triggering emissions of green-house gases from a biological wastewater treatment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Caballero, A.; Aymerich, I. [Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA), Emili Grahit Street, 101, H_2O Building, Scientific and Technological Park of the University of Girona, 17003 Girona (Spain); Poch, M. [Laboratory of Chemical and Environmental Engineering (LEQUIA-UdG), Institute of the Environment, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi s/n, E-17071 Girona (Spain); Pijuan, M., E-mail: mpijuan@icra.cat [Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA), Emili Grahit Street, 101, H_2O Building, Scientific and Technological Park of the University of Girona, 17003 Girona (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    In this study, methane (CH{sub 4}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emission dynamics of a plug–flow bioreactor located in a municipal full-scale wastewater treatment plant were monitored during a period of 10 weeks. In general, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O gas emissions from the bioreactor accounted for 0.016% of the influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 0.116% of the influent total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) respectively. In order to identify the emission patterns in the different zones, the bioreactor was divided in six different sampling sites and the gas collection hood was placed for a period of 2–3 days in each of these sites. This sampling strategy also allowed the identification of different process perturbations leading to CH{sub 4} or N{sub 2}O peak emissions. CH{sub 4} emissions mainly occurred in the first aerated site, and were mostly related with the influent and reject wastewater flows entering the bioreactor. On the other hand, N{sub 2}O emissions were given along all the aerated parts of the bioreactor and were strongly dependant on the occurrence of process disturbances such as periods of no aeration or nitrification instability. Dissolved CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O concentrations were monitored in the bioreactor and in other parts of the plant, as a contribution for the better understanding of the transport of these greenhouse gases across the different stages of the treatment system. - Highlights: • Monitoring of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions from a full-scale activated sludge bioreactor • Process perturbations leading to CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O peak emissions were identified. • Peak emissions increased severely the overall emission account of the bioreactor. • CH{sub 4} emissions were related with the inflow of influent and reject wastewater. • N{sub 2}O was generated as consequence of nitrification imbalances.

  7. Emission characteristics in solution-processed asymmetric white alternating current field-induced polymer electroluminescent devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yonghua; Xia, Yingdong; Smith, Gregory M.; Gu, Yu; Yang, Chuluo; Carroll, David L.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the emission characteristics of a blue fluorophor poly(9, 9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) combined with a red emitting dye: Bis(2-methyl-dibenzo[f,h]quinoxaline)(acetylacetonate)iridium (III) [Ir(MDQ)2(acac)], are examined in two different asymmetric white alternating current field-induced polymer electroluminescent (FIPEL) device structures. The first is a top-contact device in which the triplet transfer is observed resulting in the concentration-dependence of the emission similar to the standard organic light-emitting diode (OLED) structure. The second is a bottom-contact device which, however, exhibits concentration-independence of emission. Specifically, both dye emission and polymer emission are found for the concentrations as high as 10% by weight of the dye in the emitter. We attribute this to the significant different carrier injection characteristics of the two FIPEL devices. Our results suggest a simple and easy way to realize high-quality white emission.

  8. Influence of Coke Breeze Combustion Conditions on the Emission of NOx in Sintering Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bo; Wu, Sheng-li; Zhang, Guo-liang; Que, Zhi-gang; Hou, Chao-gang

    NOx released during fuel combustion is one of the major air pollutants, such as acid rain and photochemical smog. At present, still not have an economical and effective method of inhibiting NOx emission for sintering flue gas. Therefore, controlling conditions of fuel combustions to enhance the reduction of NOx is important for decreased the emission. In this study, micro-sintering furnace has been performed to investigate the effects of NOx emission from char-N during coke breeze combustion. The results show that the emission concentration of NOx decreased with increasing temperature when it is sinter bed temperature higher than 1000°C. The lower emission concentration of NOx was obtained when the concentration of oxygen was decreased. And the maximum concentration of NOx will be reduced with the enhanced of heating rate. If heating preservation time was prolonged, it would promote to NOx reduction with reduction substances resulted in lower NOx emissions in the combustion of coke breezes.

  9. Mathematical Modeling and a Hybrid NSGA-II Algorithm for Process Planning Problem Considering Machining Cost and Carbon Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Huang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Process planning is an important function in a manufacturing system; it specifies the manufacturing requirements and details for the shop floor to convert a part from raw material to the finished form. However, considering only economical criterion with technological constraints is not enough in sustainable manufacturing practice; formerly, criteria about low carbon emission awareness have seldom been taken into account in process planning optimization. In this paper, a mathematical model that considers both machining costs reduction as well as carbon emission reduction is established for the process planning problem. However, due to various flexibilities together with complex precedence constraints between operations, the process planning problem is a non-deterministic polynomial-time (NP hard problem. Aiming at the distinctive feature of the multi-objectives process planning optimization, we then developed a hybrid non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II to tackle this problem. A local search method that considers both the total cost criterion and the carbon emission criterion are introduced into the proposed algorithm to avoid being trapped into local optima. Moreover, the technique for order preference by similarity to an ideal solution (TOPSIS method is also adopted to determine the best solution from the Pareto front. Experiments have been conducted using Kim’s benchmark. Computational results show that process plan schemes with low carbon emission can be captured, and, more importantly, the proposed hybrid NSGA-II algorithm can obtain more promising optimal Pareto front than the plain NSGA-II algorithm. Meanwhile, according to the computational results of Kim’s benchmark, we find that both of the total machining cost and carbon emission are roughly proportional to the number of operations, and a process plan with less operation may be more satisfactory. This study will draw references for the further research on green

  10. Physical Processes and Nitrous Oxide Emissions Pre and Post-Freezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R. L.; Giltrap, D.; Kirschbaum, M.; Mcmillan, A. M.; Savage, K. E.; Davidson, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    Soil nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes may be moderated by physical and biological processes, particularly when soils freeze and then thaw. There is a need to understand how physical processes affect above- canopy fluxes of N2O. There is also a need to understand the magnitude and duration of N2O emission peaks for agricultural fields, particularly the nitrogen-fixing legumes, which can produce and consume N2O in the plant root symbiosome. There are multiple potential sources of N2O, including bacteria and fungi in soil and in root symbiosomes. Further, N2O can be released when trapped in ice or dissolved in solution. These physical and biological processes can contribute to N2O fluxes measured above the canopy. In 2012-2013, we evaluated canopy, surface and belowground N2O data for a field seeded to lucerne (Medicago sativa). We used high-frequency data to determine above-canopy N2O fluxes using an Aerodyne Quantum Cascade Laser integrated with an eddy covariance system, and compared these with low-frequency flux and concentration data collected at the surface and belowground. Belowground moisture, temperature and soil data were used to partition measured N2O and CH4 into gaseous and dissolved phases. Pre and post-freeze data indicated the proportion of post-freeze flux previously trapped in ice. Nitrous oxide fluxes following a thaw event were compared with the amount of N2O trapped during freezing to determine the proportion of the flux resulting from previously trapped gases versus de novo N2O production.

  11. Emission of volatile organic compounds from domestic coal stove with the actual alternation of flaming and smoldering combustion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengtang; Zhang, Chenglong; Mu, Yujing; Liu, Junfeng; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2017-02-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions from the chimney of a prevailing domestic stove fuelled with raw bituminous coal were measured under flaming and smoldering combustion processes in a farmer's house. The results indicated that the concentrations of VOCs quickly increased after the coal loading and achieved their peak values in a few minutes. The peak concentrations of the VOCs under the smoldering combustion process were significantly higher than those under the flaming combustion process. Alkanes accounted for the largest proportion (43.05%) under the smoldering combustion, followed by aromatics (28.86%), alkenes (21.91%), carbonyls (5.81%) and acetylene (0.37%). The emission factors of the total VOCs under the smoldering combustion processes (5402.9 ± 2031.8 mg kg-1) were nearly one order of magnitude greater than those under the flaming combustion processes (559.2 ± 385.9 mg kg-1). Based on the VOCs emission factors obtained in this study and the regional domestic coal consumption, the total VOCs emissions from domestic coal stoves was roughly estimated to be 1.25 × 108 kg a-1 in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamics of Nitric Oxide and Nitrous Oxide Emission during Nitrogen Conversion Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampschreur, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions can be a serious threat to the environment. Rising levels of N2O in the atmosphere contribute to global warming and destruction of the ozone layer. This thesis describes an investigation on the emission of NO and N2O during nitrogen conversion

  13. Transition process leading to microbubble emission boiling on horizontal circular heated surface in subcooled pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Ichiro; Ando, Jun; Horiuchi, Kazuna; Saiki, Takahito; Kaneko, Toshihiro

    2016-11-01

    Microbubble emission boiling (MEB) produces a higher heat flux than critical heat flux (CHF) and therefore has been investigated in terms of its heat transfer characteristics as well as the conditions under which MEB occurs. Its physical mechanism, however, is not yet clearly understood. We carried out a series of experiments to examine boiling on horizontal circular heated surfaces of 5 mm and of 10 mm in diameter, in a subcooled pool, paying close attention to the transition process to MEB. High-speed observation results show that, in the MEB regime, the growth, condensation, and collapse of the vapor bubbles occur within a very short time. In addition, a number of fine bubbles are emitted from the collapse of the vapor bubbles. By tracking these tiny bubbles, we clearly visualize that the collapse of the vapor bubbles drives the liquid near the bubbles towards the heated surface, such that the convection field around the vapor bubbles under MEB significantly differs from that under nucleate boiling. Moreover, the axial temperature gradient in a heated block (quasi-heat flux) indicates a clear difference between nucleate boiling and MEB. A combination of quasi-heat flux and the measurement of the behavior of the vapor bubbles allows us to discuss the transition to MEB. This work was financially supported by the 45th Research Grant in Natural Sciences from The Mitsubishi Foundation (2014 - 2015), and by Research Grant for Boiler and Pressurized Vessels from The Japan Boiler Association (2016).

  14. Spectral analysis of the process emission during laser welding of AISI 304 stainless steel with disk and Nd:YAG laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konuk, A.R.; Aarts, R.G.K.M.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Optical emissions from the laser welding process can be obtained relatively easy in real-time. Such emissions come from the melt pool, keyhole, or plume during welding. Therefore it is very beneficial to establish a clear relation between characteristics of these emissions and the resulting weld

  15. Relationship between respiratory quotient, nitrification, and nitrous oxide emissions in a forced aerated composting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Hirofumi; Fujiwara, Taku; Inoue, Daisuke; Ito, Ryusei; Matsukawa, Kazutsugu; Funamizu, Naoyuki

    2015-08-01

    We assessed the relationship between respiratory quotient (RQ) and nitrification and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission in forced aerated composting using lab-scale reactors. Relatively high RQ values from degradation of readily degradable organics initially occurred. RQ then stabilized at slightly lower values, then decreased. Continuous emission of N2O was observed during the RQ decrease. Correlation between nitrification and N2O emission shows that the latter was triggered by nitrification. Mass balances demonstrated that the O2 consumption of nitrification (∼24.8mmol) was slightly higher than that of CO2 emission (∼20.0mmol), indicating that the RQ decrease was caused by the occurrence of nitrification. Results indicate that RQ is a useful index, which not only reflects the bioavailability of organics but also predicts the occurrence of nitrification and N2O emission in forced aerated composting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Speech perception and otoacoustic emissions by pre-processing sound in the inner ear].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plinkert, P K; Zenner, H P

    1992-04-01

    Direct observations of the basilar membrane movements show that sound perception can no longer be regarded as a passive process: vulnerable, energy-consuming amplification processes are required in the cochlea. The outer hair cells (OHC) fulfil this demand morphologically and functionally. These sensory cells have a double role: they perceive sound and thus modulate the cochlear biomechanics through their motile activity. The key event of sound transduction is performed by the inner hair cells (IHC) after active sound amplification in the OHC. The control of the OHC is assured by the efferent olivocochlear fibres which release acetylcholine (ACh) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) into the synaptic cleft at the basal pole of the OHC. Nicotinergic acetylcholine and GABA receptors within the outer cell membrane of OHC were identified and characterised. The application of the neurotransmitter GABA to the basal pole of vital OHC leads to a reversible elongation of the cylindrical cell body while ACh induces a reversible, slow contraction of the sensory cells. These two neurotransmitters are supposed to counteract in the control of the cochlear amplifier. The reciprocal distribution of ACh and GABA receptors and their counteracting function (contraction vs elongation) has an additional impact on the modulation of OHC function. The result is an even more diversified control of the cochlear amplifier. The energy-consuming cochlear amplifications are reflected by an epiphenomenon, i.e. the otoacoustic emissions (OAE). These are emitted by the cochlea and can be divided into "spontaneous OAE", "transitory evoked OAE" (TEOAE), "stimulus frequency OAE" and "distortion product OAE". The TEOAE are now an integrated part of audiological diagnosis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Emissions of PAHs derived from sugarcane burning and processing in Chiapas and Morelos México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugica-Alvarez, Violeta; Santiago-de la Rosa, Naxieli; Figueroa-Lara, Jesús; Flores-Rodríguez, Julio; Torres-Rodríguez, Miguel; Magaña-Reyes, Miguel

    2015-09-15

    Sugarcane burning is an agricultural practice implemented to ease farm worker duties; nevertheless, as a consequence, tons of particles are emitted to the atmosphere. Additionally, during harvesting the sugar-mills operate the whole day emitting hundreds of tons of pollutants. Therefore, health risks to neighboring population should be a major governmental concern, leading first to identification and quantification of toxic compounds, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In order to establish the magnitude of the problem, four sampling campaigns of PM10 and PM2.5 were carried out in this study, during harvesting and no-harvesting seasons in two municipalities of México, with different climatic and social conditions. Concentrations of PM10, PM2.5, and organic compounds were determined daily, followed by extraction, identification and quantification of the 17 EPA-established PAHs from all samples. The results showed that during harvest, the PM10 mass increased lightly in Chiapas, but approximately twice in Morelos, whereas total PAH concentrations increased twice and six times, respectively. The most abundant PAHs, namely: indene [1,2,3cd] pyrene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene and dibenzo [a,h] anthracene are composed of 5 or more aromatic rings. Of the total PAHs quantified, 44% to 52% corresponded to carcinogenic compounds, consequently, the overall carcinogenic potential increased twice or three times. Principal component analysis with varimax rotation was applied to source apportionment at each site, suggesting three different sources during harvesting: the combustion process in the sugar mill, sugarcane burning and vehicular emissions. The combustion markers for sugar mill are, BAA, BBF, BKF, BAP, IND and BGP, whereas for sugarcane burning were ANT, PHE, FLT and PYR. The results obtained indicate that processing and burning sugarcane are the main sources of the PAH levels measured, proving that the health risks are boosted during harvesting

  18. Assessment of Energy Performance and Emission Control Using Alternative Fuels in Cement Industry through a Process Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Rahman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cement manufacturing is one of the most energy intensive processes and is accountable for substantial pollutant emissions. Increasing energy costs compel stakeholders and researchers to search for alternative options to improve energy performance and reduce CO2 emissions. Alternative fuels offer a realistic solution towards the reduction of the usage of fossil fuels and the mitigation of pollutant emissions. This paper developed a process model of a precalciner kiln system in the cement industry using Aspen Plus software to simulate the effect of five alternative fuels on pollutant emissions and energy performance. The alternatives fuels used were tyre, municipal solid waste (MSW, meat and bone meal (MBM, plastic waste and sugarcane bagasse. The model was developed on the basis of energy and mass balance of the system and was validated against data from a reference cement plant. This study also investigated the effect of these alternative fuels on the quality of the clinker. The results indicated that up to a 4.4% reduction in CO2 emissions and up to a 6.4% reduction in thermal energy requirement could be achieved using these alternative fuels with 20% mix in coal. It was also found that the alternative fuels had minimum influence on the clinker quality except in the case of MSW. Overall, MBM was found to be a better option as it is capable on reducing energy requirement and CO2 emissions more than others. The outcomes of the study offer better understanding of the effects of solid alternative fuels to achieve higher energy performance and on mitigating pollutant emissions in cement industry.

  19. Auger Processes Mediating the Nonresonant Optical Emission from a Semiconductor Quantum Dot Embedded Inside an Optical Cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Settnes, Mikkel; Nielsen, Per Kær; Lund, Anders Mølbjerg

    2013-01-01

    We show that Auger processes involving wetting layer transitions mediate emission from a cavity that is detuned from a quantum dot by even tens of meV. The wetting layer thus acts as a reservoir, which by Coulomb scattering can supply or absorb the energy difference between emitter and cavity. We...

  20. Effects of ammonium-based fertilisation on microbial processes involved in methane emission from soils planted with rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodelier, P.L.E.; Hahn, A.P.; Arth, I.R.; Frenzel, P.

    2000-01-01

    The emission of the greenhouse gas CH4 from rice paddies is strongly influenced by management practices such as the input of ammonium-based fertilisers. We assessed the impact of different levels (200 and 400 kgN.ha(-1)) of urea and (NH4)(2)HPO4 on the microbial processes involved in production and

  1. [Emissions of greenhouse gas and ammonia from the full process of sewage sludge composting and land application of compost].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jia; Wei, Yuan-Song; Zhao, Zhen-Feng; Ying, Mei-Juan; Zhou, Guo-Sheng; Xiong, Jian-Jun; Liu, Pei-Cai; Ge, Zhen; Ding, Gang-Qiang

    2013-11-01

    There is a great uncertainty of greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction and nitrogen conservation from the full process of sludge composting and land application of compost in China due to the lack of emission data of GHG such as N2O and CH4 and ammonia (NH3). The purpose of this study is to get emission characteristics of GHGs and NH3 from the full process with on-site observation. Results showed that the total GHG emission factor from full process of the turning windrow (TW) system (eCO2/dry sludge, 196.21 kg x t(-1)) was 1.61 times higher of that from the ATP system. Among the full process, N2O was mostly from the land application of compost, whereas CH4 mainly resulted from the sludge composting. In the sludge composting of ATP, the GHG emission equivalence of the ATP (eCO2/dry sludge, 12.47 kg x t(-1) was much lower than that of the TW (eCO2/dry sludge, 86.84 kg x t(-1)). The total NH3 emission factor of the TW (NH3/dry sludge, 6.86 kg x t(-1)) was slightly higher than that of the ATP (NH3/dry sludge, 6.63 kg x t(-1)). NH3 was the major contributor of nitrogen loss in the full process. During the composting, the nitrogen loss as NH3 from both TW and ATP was nearly the same as 30% of TN loss from raw materials, and the N and C loss caused by N2O and CH4 were negligible. These results clearly showed that the ATP was a kind of environmentally friendly composting technology.

  2. The neutron long counter NERO for studies of beta-delayed neutron emission in the r-process

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, J; Lorusso, G; Santi, P; Couture, A; Daly, J; Del Santo, M; Elliot, T; Goerres, J; Herlitzius, C; Kratz, K -L; Lamm, L O; Lee, H Y; Montes, F; Ouellette, M; Pellegrini, E; Reeder, P; Schatz, H; Schertz, F; Schnorrenberger, L; Smith, K; Stech, E; Strandberg, E; Ugalde, C; Wiescher, M; Woehr, A; 10.1016/j.nima.2010.02.262

    2010-01-01

    The neutron long counter NERO was built at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University, for measuring beta-delayed neutron-emission probabilities. The detector was designed to work in conjunction with a beta-decay implantation station, so that beta decays and beta-delayed neutrons emitted from implanted nuclei can be measured simultaneously. The high efficiency of about 40%, for the range of energies of interest, along with the small background, are crucial for measuring beta-delayed neutron emission branchings for neutron-rich r-process nuclei produced as low intensity fragmentation beams in in-flight separator facilities.

  3. The National Shipbuilding Research Program. Emission Factors for Flux Core Rod Used in Gas Shielded Processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    ...), shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), and submerged arc welding (SAW). There are presently some emission factors for welding operations that have been developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA...

  4. Abatement of mercury emissions in the coal combustion process equipped with a Fabric Filter Baghouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Cao; Chin-Min Cheng; Chien-Wei Chen; Mingchong Liu; Chiawei Wang; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University (WKU), Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology (ICSET)

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the dependence of mercury emissions on coal ranks and electric utility boilers equipped with Fabric Filter Baghouses (FF). A comparison of mercury emission rates and fly ash properties was made between a circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor (CFBC) with FF and a Pulverized Coal (PC) combustor with FF during the burning of all three ranks of American coals. The data were collected from the Environmental Protection Agency Information Collection Request (EPA ICR) and WKU ICSET's mercury testing program. A statistical stepwise regression procedure was used to determine significant factors such as coal rank and types of boilers equipped with FF on mercury emissions during coal combustion. The higher mercury emission rates were generally found in both CFB and PC units when lignite was burned. The lower mercury emission rates were generally found in both CFB equipped with FF and PC units equipped with FF when bituminous coal was burned. There was a statistically significant lower mercury emission in the CFBC equipped with FF than that in the PC units when sub-bituminous coal was burned. Lower mercury emission rates in electric utility boilers equipped with FF are due to the active fly ash generated with a larger specific surface area and pore volume. Higher mercury emission rates observed during lignite-fired boilers may be due to their lower specific area of fly ash, which results from lower LOI, as well as the pore blockage by selenium (Se) for Texas lignite; and sodium (Na) and potassium (K) for North Dakota lignite. There is no significant mutual benefit for the mercury captured by the addition of Spray Dry Absorber (SDA) or selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) in the CFBC system. 25 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Effect of Algae-Derived Biodiesel on Ignition Delay, Combustion Process and Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaran, Mahendran; Khalid, Amir; Salleh, Hamidon; Razali, Azahari; Sapit, Azwan; Jaat, Norrizam; Sunar, Norshuhaila

    2016-11-01

    Algae oil methyl esters produced from algae oil were blended with diesel at various volumetric percentages to evaluate the variations in the fuel properties. Microalgae biodiesel production has received much interest in an effort for sustainable development as the microalgae seem to be an attractive way to produce the biodiesel due to their ability to accumulate lipids and their very high actual photosynthetic yields. Correlations between fuel properties, including the calorific heat, density, kinematic viscosity, and oxidation stability of the Algae oil-diesel blends, and the blending ratio of the algae biodiesel have been established. As a result, low blending ratio of the Algae oil with diesel was recommended up to 2vol % in comparison with other type of biodiesel-diesel blends. The objective of this research is to investigate effect of biodiesel blending ratio on ignition delay, combustion process and emission for different type of biodiesel. The combustion tests of the Algae-Derived biodiesel blends were performed in a Rapid Compression Machine (RCM). The combustion tests were carried out at injection pressure of 130 MPa and ambient temperature were varied between 750 K and 1100 K. The result from the experiment is compared with Palm-Oil biodiesel which are varied in biodiesel percentage from 5vol% to 15vol% and jatropha biodiesel. Higher ignition delay period were clearly observed with higher blending ratio. It seems that increasing blending ratio exhibits relatively weakens in fuel ignitibility and therefore prolongs the ignition delay of algae biodiesel. A2 had the lowest ignition delay period when compared with J2, B5, B10 and B15 due to lower density that present in A2 molecules.The concentration of carbon dioxide and nitrogen monoxide in the exhaust gas increased with higher blending ratio while the concentration of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon decreased.

  6. Control of formaldehyde and TVOC emission from wood-based flooring composites at various manufacturing processes by surface finishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sumin

    2010-04-15

    This paper assesses the reproducibility of testing formaldehyde and TVOC emission behavior from wood flooring composites bonded by urea-formaldehyde resin at various manufacturing steps for surface finishing materials. The surface adhesion step of laminate flooring for this research was divided into two steps; HDF only and HDF with LPMs. In the case of engineered flooring, the manufacturing steps were divided into three steps; plywood only, fancy veneer bonded on plywood and UV coated on fancy veneer with plywood. Formaldehyde and VOCs emission decreased at the process of final surface finishing materials; LPMs were applied on the surface of HDF for laminate flooring. Although emissions increased when fancy veneer was bonded onto plywood in the case of engineered flooring, emission was dramatically reduced up to similar level with plywood only when final surface finishing; UV-curable coating was applied on fancy veneer. This study suggests that formaldehyde and VOCs emission from floorings can be controlled at manufacturing steps for surface finishing. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. High Resolution CH4 Emissions and Dissolved CH4 Measurements Elucidate Surface Gas Exchange Processes in Toolik Lake, Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sontro, T.; Sollberger, S.; Kling, G. W.; Shaver, G. R.; Eugster, W.

    2013-12-01

    Approximately 14% of the Alaskan North Slope is covered in lakes of various sizes and depths. Diffusive carbon emissions (CH4 and CO2) from these lakes offset the tundra sink by ~20 %, but the offset would substantially increase if ebullitive CH4 emissions were also considered. Ultimately, arctic lake CH4 emissions are not insignificant in the global CH4 budget and their contribution is bound to increase due to impacts from climate change. Here we present high resolution CH4 emission data as measured via eddy covariance and a Los Gatos gas analyzer during the ice free period from Toolik Lake, a deep (20 m) Arctic lake located on the Alaskan North Slope, over the last few summers. Emissions are relatively low (Gatos gas analyzer. Thus, having both the flux and the CH4 gradient across the air-water interface measured directly, we can calculate k and investigate the processes influencing CH4 gas exchange in this lake. Preliminary results indicate that there are two regimes in wind speed that impact k - one at low wind speeds up to ~5 m s-1 and another at higher wind speeds (max ~10 m s-1). The differential wind speeds during night and day may compound the effect of convective mixing and cause the diurnal variation in observed fluxes.

  8. An emission processing system for air quality modelling in the Mexico City metropolitan area: Evaluation and comparison of the MOBILE6.2-Mexico and MOVES-Mexico traffic emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, M; Tena, C; Soret, A; Serradell, K; Guzmán, D; Retama, A; Camacho, P; Jaimes-Palomera, M; Mediavilla, A

    2017-04-15

    This article describes the High-Elective Resolution Modelling Emission System for Mexico (HERMES-Mex) model, an emission processing tool developed to transform the official Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) emission inventory into hourly, gridded (up to 1km2) and speciated emissions used to drive mesoscale air quality simulations with the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. The methods and ancillary information used for the spatial and temporal disaggregation and speciation of the emissions are presented and discussed. The resulting emission system is evaluated, and a case study on CO, NO2, O3, VOC and PM2.5 concentrations is conducted to demonstrate its applicability. Moreover, resulting traffic emissions from the Mobile Source Emission Factor Model for Mexico (MOBILE6.2-Mexico) and the MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator for Mexico (MOVES-Mexico) models are integrated in the tool to assess and compare their performance. NOx and VOC total emissions modelled are reduced by 37% and 26% in the MCMA when replacing MOBILE6.2-Mexico for MOVES-Mexico traffic emissions. In terms of air quality, the system composed by the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) coupled with the HERMES-Mex and CMAQ models properly reproduces the pollutant levels and patterns measured in the MCMA. The system's performance clearly improves in urban stations with a strong influence of traffic sources when applying MOVES-Mexico emissions. Despite reducing estimations of modelled precursor emissions, O3 peak averages are increased in the MCMA core urban area (up to 30ppb) when using MOVES-Mexico mobile emissions due to its VOC-limited regime, while concentrations in the surrounding suburban/rural areas decrease or increase depending on the meteorological conditions of the day. The results obtained suggest that the HERMES-Mex model can be used to provide model-ready emissions for air quality modelling in the MCMA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Life cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions for an ethanol production process based on blue-green algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dexin; Hu, Zushou; Choi, Dong Gu; Thomas, Valerie M; Realff, Matthew J; Chance, Ronald R

    2010-11-15

    Ethanol can be produced via an intracellular photosynthetic process in cyanobacteria (blue-green algae), excreted through the cell walls, collected from closed photobioreactors as a dilute ethanol-in-water solution, and purified to fuel grade ethanol. This sequence forms the basis for a biofuel production process that is currently being examined for its commercial potential. In this paper, we calculate the life cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions for three different system scenarios for this proposed ethanol production process, using process simulations and thermodynamic calculations. The energy required for ethanol separation increases rapidly for low initial concentrations of ethanol, and, unlike other biofuel systems, there is little waste biomass available to provide process heat and electricity to offset those energy requirements. The ethanol purification process is a major consumer of energy and a significant contributor to the carbon footprint. With a lead scenario based on a natural-gas-fueled combined heat and power system to provide process electricity and extra heat and conservative assumptions around the ethanol separation process, the net life cycle energy consumption, excluding photosynthesis, ranges from 0.55 MJ/MJ(EtOH) down to 0.20 MJ/ MJ(EtOH), and the net life cycle greenhouse gas emissions range from 29.8 g CO₂e/MJ(EtOH) down to 12.3 g CO₂e/MJ(EtOH) for initial ethanol concentrations from 0.5 wt % to 5 wt %. In comparison to gasoline, these predicted values represent 67% and 87% reductions in the carbon footprint for this ethanol fuel on a energy equivalent basis. Energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions can be further reduced via employment of higher efficiency heat exchangers in ethanol purification and/ or with use of solar thermal for some of the process heat.

  10. Thermionic and Photo-excited Electron Emission for Energy Conversion Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick T. McCarthy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes advances in thermionic and photoemission materials and applications dating back to the work on thermionic emission by Guthrie in 1873 and the photoelectric effect by Hertz in 1887. Thermionic emission has been employed for electron beam generation from Edison’s work with the light bulb to modern day technologies such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The photoelectric effect has been utilized in common devices such as cameras and photocopiers while photovoltaic cells continue to be widely successful and further researched. Limitations in device efficiency and materials have thus far restricted large-scale energy generation sources based on thermionic and photoemission. However, recent advances in the fabrication of nanoscale emitters suggest promising routes for improving both thermionic and photo-enhanced electron emission along with newly developed research concepts, e.g., photonically enhanced thermionic emission. However, the abundance of new emitter materials and reduced dimensions of some nanoscale emitters increases the complexity of electron emission theory and engender new questions related to the dimensionality of the emitter. This work presents derivations of basic two and three-dimensional thermionic and photoemission theory along with comparisons to experimentally acquired data. The resulting theory can be applied to many different material types regardless of composition, bulk and surface structure.

  11. Computer simulation of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and costs for alternative methods of processing fluid milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasula, P M; Datta, N; Yee, W C F; McAloon, A J; Nutter, D W; Sampedro, F; Bonnaillie, L M

    2014-07-01

    Computer simulation is a useful tool for benchmarking electrical and fuel energy consumption and water use in a fluid milk plant. In this study, a computer simulation model of the fluid milk process based on high temperature, short time (HTST) pasteurization was extended to include models for processes for shelf-stable milk and extended shelf-life milk that may help prevent the loss or waste of milk that leads to increases in the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for fluid milk. The models were for UHT processing, crossflow microfiltration (MF) without HTST pasteurization, crossflow MF followed by HTST pasteurization (MF/HTST), crossflow MF/HTST with partial homogenization, and pulsed electric field (PEF) processing, and were incorporated into the existing model for the fluid milk process. Simulation trials were conducted assuming a production rate for the plants of 113.6 million liters of milk per year to produce only whole milk (3.25%) and 40% cream. Results showed that GHG emissions in the form of process-related CO₂ emissions, defined as CO₂ equivalents (e)/kg of raw milk processed (RMP), and specific energy consumptions (SEC) for electricity and natural gas use for the HTST process alone were 37.6g of CO₂e/kg of RMP, 0.14 MJ/kg of RMP, and 0.13 MJ/kg of RMP, respectively. Emissions of CO2 and SEC for electricity and natural gas use were highest for the PEF process, with values of 99.1g of CO₂e/kg of RMP, 0.44 MJ/kg of RMP, and 0.10 MJ/kg of RMP, respectively, and lowest for the UHT process at 31.4 g of CO₂e/kg of RMP, 0.10 MJ/kg of RMP, and 0.17 MJ/kg of RMP. Estimated unit production costs associated with the various processes were lowest for the HTST process and MF/HTST with partial homogenization at $0.507/L and highest for the UHT process at $0.60/L. The increase in shelf life associated with the UHT and MF processes may eliminate some of the supply chain product and consumer losses and waste of milk and compensate for the small increases in GHG

  12. Experimental characterization of nanoparticles emissions during Laser Shock Processing of AA6061, AISI304 and Ti6Al4V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João F. Gomes

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an experimental study on the emission of nanometric size particles during laser shock processing of metallic materials: stainless steel, aluminum and titanium alloys which are the most common ones processed by this technique. The emission of nanometric size particles was confirmed to consist of aggregates composed of smaller spherical particles in the range of 10-20 nm, covered by a small concentric “layer” probably of metal oxides. The analysis of the nanoparticles showed the presence of the main elements present in the tested alloys as well as high oxygen content, which is another indication of the presence of oxides of Fe, Al and Ti. The amount of emitted nanoparticles, showed considerable increases over the baseline measured for the working environment, and these increases correspond to the more intense pulses of the laser beam. The material density was seen to highly affect the quantity of emitted nanoparticles. During LSP of aluminium alloy (the lighter material a large quantity of nanoparticles was measured, while in LSP of stainless steel few nanoparticles were observed, and this is the denser material, among the three tested. Titanium alloy results in intermediate values. The study of these emissions is innovative and relevant for industrial environments where the manufacturing process is in use.

  13. The improvement of the field emission properties from graphene films: Ti transition layer and annealing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical-reduced graphene oxide (rGO films were deposited on titanium (Ti-coated silicon substrates by a simple electrophoretic deposition. The rGO films were annealed under argon atmosphere at different temperatures. The morphology and microstructure of the rGO films before and after annealing were characterized using scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscope. The field emission behaviors from these rGO films were investigated. The results show that, Ti-based transition layer can improve the stability of field emission from the rGO film, and the annealing at appropriate temperature is in favor of the field emission. Particularly, the rGO film displays an unexpected vacuum breakdown phenomenon at a relatively high current density. In addition, it is found that the field emission property of the rGO film is dependent on anode-sample distance and the film exhibits lower turn on field at larger anode-sample distance.

  14. Control of H2S emissions using an ozone oxidation process: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defaveri, D.; Ferrando, B.; Ferraiolo, G.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of eliminating industrial emission odors does not have a simple solution, and consequently has not been researched extensively. Therefore, an experimental research program regarding oxidation of H2S through ozone was undertaken to verify the applicable limits of the procedure and, in addition, was designed to supply a useful analytical means of rationalizing the design of reactors employed in the sector.

  15. Methane emission from natural wetlands: interplay between emergent macrophytes and soil microbial processes. A mini review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laanbroek, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 2007, natural wetlands contribute 20–39 % to the global emission of methane. The range in the estimated percentage of the contribution of these systems to the total release of this greenhouse gas is large due to

  16. Allowable CO2 emissions based on regional and impact-related climate targets: The role of land processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, S. I.; Donat, M.; Pitman, A.; Knutti, R.; Wilby, R.; Vogel, M.; Orth, R.

    2016-12-01

    Global temperature targets, such as the widely accepted "2° and 1.5° targets", may fail to communicate the urgency of reducing CO2 emissions because they are disconnected from their implications. The translation of CO2 emissions into regional- and impact-related climate targets is more powerful because such targets are more directly aligned with individual national interests. A recent publication (Seneviratne et al. 2016, Nature) reveals that regional changes in extreme temperatures and precipitation scale robustly with global temperature across scenarios, and thus with cumulative CO2 emissions. They thus allow a better communication of implied regional impacts associated with global targets for CO2 emissions. However, the regional responses are very varied and display strong differences in regional temperature and hydrological sensitivity. Process-based based analyses explain these divergences and highlight avenues for reducing uncertainties in regional projections of extremes, in particular related to the role of land-atmosphere feedbacks. These results have important implications for the design of regional mitigation and climate adaptation policies, for instance related to land use changes. Reference: Seneviratne, S.I., M.G. Donat, A.J. Pitman, R. Knutti, and R. Wilby, 2016, Nature, 529, 477-483, doi:10.1038/nature16542

  17. Systematic framework for carbon dioxide capture and utilization processes to reduce the global carbon dioxide emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frauzem, Rebecca; Plaza, Cristina Calvera; Gani, Rafiqul

    the two approaches that are currently being investigated, carbon capture and storage (CCS) and carbon capture and utilization (CCU) [1] to address this issue, the later approach is more promising as it reuses captured carbon dioxide, as a fuel, reactant, solvent, and others, to produce valuable products......In the year 2013, 9.5 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide gas was emitted into the air, and each year this amount is increasing [1]. Carbon dioxide emissions are of particular concern as they represent 80% of greenhouse gas emissions and therefore are a large contributor to global warming. Among....... There is not only a need for technologies for capture and utilization, via conversion, but also there are numerous questions that need to be resolved. For example, which higher value chemicals can be produced, what are their current demands and costs of production, and, how much of the captured carbon dioxide would...

  18. Control of Air Pollution from Aviation: The Emission Standard Setting Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    CONCEPTS FOR THC, CO, AND SMOKE CONTROL .... 145 A-4-5 REVERSE FLOW AND PRECHAMBER COMBUSTOR CONCEPT FOR THC AND CO CONTROL...Rudy, 1976) PRIMARY ZONE ENRICHMENT, DELAYED DILUTION, AND AIRBLAST CONCEPTS FOR THC AND CO AND SMOKE CONTROL . Illustration (a) uses increased com...temperatures when sufficient oxygen is available and Conventional combustor emission coro ichnology is typically "quenched" from decom- (HC, CO. and smoke

  19. Determination of Methane Emissions by Region and Generating Process Using Inverse Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinn, P. G.

    2004-12-01

    Methane is a chemically and radiatively important trace gas with a wide range of geographically and temporally varying biogenic and anthropogenic sources and sinks. A powerful method for determining the net methane fluxes due to these sources and sinks involves solution of an inverse problem in which the observed concentrations are effectively lagrangian line integrals and the unknown fluxes are contained in the integrands. The general method calculates optimal estimates in the Bayesian sense using an eulerian or lagrangian atmospheric transport model and global atmospheric methane measurements. We review the results of previous studies of regional and global methane fluxes using these methods. We also present the results of a recently completed study using a Kalman filter and the global 3D Model for Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry (MATCH) driven by NCEP analysed observed meteorology at T62 (1.8o x 1.8o) resolution. Monthly fluxes are optimally estimated for three large wetland/bog regions, rice agriculture (globally aggregated), and three large biomass burning regions. The study uses AGAGE, CMDL and other methane observations for 1996-2001 and also estimates average annual emissions from coal, gas, animals and waste sites. Deduced seasonal cycles for the biogenic sources (including rice) are qualitatively similar to prior estimates from site measurements but show differences in peak amplitudes and phases and significant year-to-year variability. Emissions from rice-growing regions are greater than prior estimates, while emissions from fossil sources are less. Enhanced emissions from northern wetland/bog regions are inferred to be the dominant contributor to the large 1998 increases in methane.

  20. The improvement of the field emission properties from graphene films: Ti transition layer and annealing process

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Li; Jiangtao Chen; Baomin Luo; Xingbin Yan; Qunji Xue

    2012-01-01

    Chemical-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) films were deposited on titanium (Ti)-coated silicon substrates by a simple electrophoretic deposition. The rGO films were annealed under argon atmosphere at different temperatures. The morphology and microstructure of the rGO films before and after annealing were characterized using scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscope. The field emission behaviors from these rGO films were investigated. The results show that, Ti-based t...

  1. Exhaust constituent emission factors of printed circuit board pyrolysis processes and its exhaust control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Hung-Lung, E-mail: hlchiang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Health Risk Management, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Kuo-Hsiung [Department of Environmental Engineering and Science, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Recycling of waste printed circuit boards is an important issue. • Pyrolysis is an emerging technology for PCB treatment. • Emission factors of VOCs are determined for PCB pyrolysis exhaust. • Iron-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was employed for the exhaust control. -- Abstract: The printed circuit board (PCB) is an important part of electrical and electronic equipment, and its disposal and the recovery of useful materials from waste PCBs (WPCBs) are key issues for waste electrical and electronic equipment. Waste PCB compositions and their pyrolysis characteristics were analyzed in this study. In addition, the volatile organic compound (VOC) exhaust was controlled by an iron-impregnated alumina oxide catalyst. Results indicated that carbon and oxygen were the dominant components (hundreds mg/g) of the raw materials, and other elements such as nitrogen, bromine, and copper were several decades mg/g. Exhaust constituents of CO, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, and NOx, were 60–115, 0.4–4.0, 1.1–10, 30–95, and 0–0.7 mg/g, corresponding to temperatures ranging from 200 to 500 °C. When the pyrolysis temperature was lower than 300 °C, aromatics and paraffins were the major species, contributing 90% of ozone precursor VOCs, and an increase in the pyrolysis temperature corresponded to a decrease in the fraction of aromatic emission factors. Methanol, ethylacetate, acetone, dichloromethane, tetrachloromethane and acrylonitrile were the main species of oxygenated and chlorinated VOCs. The emission factors of some brominated compounds, i.e., bromoform, bromophenol, and dibromophenol, were higher at temperatures over 400 °C. When VOC exhaust was flowed through the bed of Fe-impregnated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the emission of ozone precursor VOCs could be reduced by 70–80%.

  2. Effect of different rates of spent coffee grounds (SCG) on composting process, gaseous emissions and quality of end-product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Cátia; Fonseca, João; Aires, Alfredo; Coutinho, João; Trindade, Henrique

    2017-01-01

    The use of spent coffee grounds (SCG) in composting for organic farming is a viable way of valorising these agro-industrial residues. In the present study, four treatments with different amounts of spent coffee grounds (SCG) were established, namely, C0 (Control), C10, C20 and C40, containing 0, 10, 20 and 40% of SCG (DM), respectively; and their effects on the composting process and the end-product quality characteristics were evaluated. The mixtures were completed with Acacia dealbata L. shoots and wheat straw. At different time intervals during composting, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions were measured and selected physicochemical characteristics of the composts were evaluated. During the composting process, all treatments showed a substantial decrease in total phenolics and total tannins, and an important increase in gallic acid. Emissions of greenhouse gases were very low and no significant difference between the treatments was registered. The results indicated that SCG may be successfully composted in all proportions. However C40, was the treatment which combined better conditions of composting, lower GHG emissions and better quality of end product. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Recent advances in mathematical modeling of nitrous oxides emissions from wastewater treatment processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-12-15

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) can be emitted from wastewater treatment contributing to its greenhouse gas footprint significantly. Mathematical modeling of N2O emissions is of great importance toward the understanding and reduction of the environmental impact of wastewater treatment systems. This article reviews the current status of the modeling of N2O emissions from wastewater treatment. The existing mathematical models describing all the known microbial pathways for N2O production are reviewed and discussed. These included N2O production by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) through the hydroxylamine oxidation pathway and the AOB denitrification pathway, N2O production by heterotrophic denitrifiers through the denitrification pathway, and the integration of these pathways in single N2O models. The calibration and validation of these models using lab-scale and full-scale experimental data is also reviewed. We conclude that the mathematical modeling of N2O production, while is still being enhanced supported by new knowledge development, has reached a maturity that facilitates the estimation of site-specific N2O emissions and the development of mitigation strategies for a wastewater treatment plant taking into the specific design and operational conditions of the plant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Visible light emission and energy transfer processes in Sm-doped nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, A. R.

    2012-06-01

    Even though the great interest in studying the near-infrared light emission due to Er3+ ions for telecommunication purposes, efficient visible radiation can be achieved from many different rare-earth (RE) ions. In fact, visible and/or near-infrared light emission takes place in RE-doped wide bandgap semiconductors following either photon or electron excitation, suggesting their technological potential in devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED's) and flat-panel displays, for example. Taking into consideration these aspects, the present contribution reports on the investigation of AlN, BeN, GeN, and SiN thin films doped with samarium. The samples were prepared by sputtering and as a result of the deposition method and conditions they present an amorphous structure and Sm concentrations in the low 0.5 at. %. After deposition, the samples were submitted to thermal annealing treatments and investigated by different spectroscopic techniques. A detailed examination of the experimental data allowed to identify optical transitions due to Sm3+ and Sm2+ ions as well as differences in their mechanisms of photon excitation and recombination. Moreover, it is shown that the Sm-related spectral features and emission intensity are susceptible, respectively, to the atomic environment the Sm3+/Sm2+ ions experience and to the presence of non-radiative recombination centers.

  5. Increased single-photon emission computed tomography image processing speed achieved in personal computers with memory-intensive algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, J P; Lear, J L

    1993-11-01

    Recent dramatic reductions in the cost of computer random access memory (RAM) and the ability of newer microprocessors and associated personal computer operating systems to address large amounts of memory make novel strategies for high-speed image processing possible. We developed image processing algorithms that use this newly available memory to achieve increases in effective processing speed. These algorithms rely on the use of precomputed lookup tables to avoid repeated use of relatively expensive machine instructions, such as multiplications and divisions. Programs using this strategy to perform single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) analysis were written in C and assembly language and tested on a Macintosh Quadra 950 (Apple Computer, Cupertino, CA) having 64 megabytes of RAM. The measured processing times are competitive with most dedicated nuclear medicine computers. A general implementation of such programs will allow personal computers to compete with dedicated imaging systems, at a substantial reduction in cost.

  6. Process-based estimates of terrestrial ecosystem isoprene emissions: incorporating the effects of a direct CO2-isoprene interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arneth

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years evidence has emerged that the amount of isoprene emitted from a leaf is affected by the CO2 growth environment. Many – though not all – laboratory experiments indicate that emissions increase significantly at below-ambient CO2 concentrations and decrease when concentrations are raised to above-ambient. A small number of process-based leaf isoprene emission models can reproduce this CO2 stimulation and inhibition. These models are briefly reviewed, and their performance in standard conditions compared with each other and to an empirical algorithm. One of the models was judged particularly useful for incorporation into a dynamic vegetation model framework, LPJ-GUESS, yielding a tool that allows the interactive effects of climate and increasing CO2 concentration on vegetation distribution, productivity, and leaf and ecosystem isoprene emissions to be explored. The coupled vegetation dynamics-isoprene model is described and used here in a mode particularly suited for the ecosystem scale, but it can be employed at the global level as well. Annual and/or daily isoprene emissions simulated by the model were evaluated against flux measurements (or model estimates that had previously been evaluated with flux data from a wide range of environments, and agreement between modelled and simulated values was generally good. By using a dynamic vegetation model, effects of canopy composition, disturbance history, or trends in CO2 concentration can be assessed. We show here for five model test sites that the suggested CO2-inhibition of leaf-isoprene metabolism can be large enough to offset increases in emissions due to CO2-stimulation of vegetation productivity and leaf area growth. When effects of climate change are considered atop the effects of atmospheric composition the interactions between the relevant processes will become even more complex. The CO2-isoprene inhibition may have the potential to significantly dampen the expected steep

  7. Nitrogen soil emissions and belowground plant processes in Mediterranean annual pastures are altered by ozone exposure and N-inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martín, L.; Bermejo-Bermejo, V.; García-Torres, L.; Alonso, R.; de la Cruz, A.; Calvete-Sogo, H.; Vallejo, A.

    2017-09-01

    Increasing tropospheric ozone (O3) and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition alter the structure and composition of pastures. These changes could affect N and C compounds in the soil that in turn can influence soil microbial activity and processes involved in the emission of N oxides, methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2), but these effects have been scarcely studied. Through an open top chamber (OTC) field experiment, the combined effects of both pollutants on soil gas emissions from an annual experimental Mediterranean community were assessed. Four O3 treatments and three different N input levels were considered. Fluxes of nitric (NO) and nitrous (N2O) oxide, CH4 and CO2 were analysed as well as soil mineral N and dissolved organic carbon. Belowground plant parameters like root biomass and root C and N content were also sampled. Ozone strongly increased soil N2O emissions, doubling the cumulative emission through the growing cycle in the highest O3 treatment, while N-inputs enhanced more slightly NO; CH4 and CO2 where not affected. Both N-gases had a clear seasonality, peaking at the start and at the end of the season when pasture physiological activity is minimal; thus, higher microorganism activity occurred when pasture had a low nutrient demand. The O3-induced peak of N2O under low N availability at the end of the growing season was counterbalanced by the high N inputs. These effects were related to the O3 x N significant interaction found for the root-N content in the grass and the enhanced senescence of the community. Results indicate the importance of the belowground processes, where competition between plants and microorganisms for the available soil N is a key factor, for understanding the ecosystem responses to O3 and N.

  8. 40 CFR 63.1015 - Closed vent systems and control devices; or emissions routed to a fuel gas system or process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Closed vent systems and control devices; or emissions routed to a fuel gas system or process. 63.1015 Section 63.1015 Protection of... Equipment Leaks-Control Level 1 § 63.1015 Closed vent systems and control devices; or emissions routed to a...

  9. 40 CFR 63.1034 - Closed vent systems and control devices; or emissions routed to a fuel gas system or process...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Closed vent systems and control devices; or emissions routed to a fuel gas system or process standards. 63.1034 Section 63.1034 Protection... Equipment Leaks-Control Level 2 Standards § 63.1034 Closed vent systems and control devices; or emissions...

  10. Emission or atmospheric processes? An attempt to attribute the source of large bias of aerosols in eastern China simulated by global climate models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Tianyi; Liu, Xiaohong; Ma, Po Lun; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Zhanqing; Jiang, Yiquan; Zhang, Fang; Zhao, C.; Yang, Xin; Wu, Fang; Wang, Yuying

    2018-02-01

    Global climate models often underestimate aerosol loadings in China and these biases can have significant implications for anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing and climate effects. The biases may be caused either by the emission inventory or the treatment of aerosol processes in the models, or both, but so far no consensus has been reached. In this study, a relatively new emission inventory based on energy-statistics and technology, Multi-resolution Emission Inventory for China (MEIC), is used to drive the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) to evaluate aerosol distribution and radiative effects against observations in China. The model results are compared with the model simulations with the widely used IPCC AR5 emission inventory. We find that the new MEIC emission improves the aerosol optical depth (AOD) simulations in eastern China and explains 22%-28% of the AOD low bias simulated with the AR5 emission. However, AOD is still low biased in eastern China. Seasonal variation of the MEIC emission leads to a better agreement with the observed seasonal variation of primary aerosols than the AR5 emission, but the concentrations are still underestimated. This implies that the atmospheric loadings of primary aerosols are closely related to the emission, which may still be underestimated over eastern China. In contrast, the seasonal variations of secondary aerosols depend more on aerosol processes (e.g., gas and aqueous phase production from precursor gases) that are associated with meteorological conditions and to a less extent on the emission. It indicates that the emissions of precursor gases for the secondary aerosols alone cannot explain the low bias in the model. Aerosol secondary production processes in CAM5 should also be revisited. The simulation using MEIC estimates the annual averaged aerosol direct radiative effects (ADREs) at the top of atmosphere (TOA), surface, and atmosphere to be -5.02, -18.47, and 13.45 W m-2 respectively over eastern China

  11. Diets in methane emissions during rumination process in cattle production systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Elena Santacoloma Varón

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The population of ruminants in the world is increasing, since its products constitute a source of protein of high nutritional value for the human population; nevertheless, this increase, will contribute in great proportion to the global warming and to the deterioration of the ozone layer, since between the subproducts of the ruminal fermentation, carbonic gas and methane are found. &e last one is produced by the anaerobic bacteria present in the rumen that di'erent types of substrata use, principally H2 and CO2. &e action of the bacteria producers of methane depends to a great extent on the type of substrata presented in the diet, and of the chemical and physical characteristics of the same one. &erefore, it is possible to diminish the e'ects that the productive systems of ruminants have on the environment, o'ering the animals nutritional alternatives that besides reducing the emission of methane to the atmosphere, will also reduce the energetic losses that for this concept it presents in the ruminants. In the present review the idea of using forages of the tropic that contain secondary metabolics that could concern the population of protozoan’s combined with forages of high nutritional value is presented and the idea of obtaining very good proved productive results is possible to simultaneously diminishes the gas emission of methane to the atmosphere

  12. Analysis the ECFM-3Z Combustion Model for Simulating the Combustion Process and Emission Characteristics in a HSDI Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raouf Mobasheri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An advanced CFD simulation has been performed to analyze the ECFM-3Z (Extended Coherent Flame Model-3Z combustion model for simulating the combustion process and emission characteristics in a high speed direct injection (HSDI diesel engine. A four cylinders, HSDI diesel engine based on a Ford production engine with a 2nd generation Delphi common rail fuel injection system has been modeled in this research. 3D CFD simulation was carried out from intake valve closing (IVC to exhaust valve opening (EVO. A good agreement of calculated and measured in-cylinder pressure trace as well as pollutant formation trends could be observed for all investigated operating points. Based on the confidence gained from validation, the study is extended to evaluate the effect of fuel injection timing on engine performance and emissions. For this purpose, a comprehensive study of the effect of injection timing with respect to performance and emissions has been considered. Three main injection timing, (1 2.65 BTDC, (2 0.65 BTDC and (3 1.35 ATDC, all with 30 crank angle pilot separations has been used to investigate the effect of the injection timing. The results show that the current methodology can be applied as a beneficial tool for analyzing the parameters of the diesel combustion under HSDI operating condition.

  13. Half-lives for proton emission, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity, and cold fission processes calculated in a unified theoretical framework

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, S B; Guzmán, F; Di Marco, A; García, F; Rodríguez, O; Gonçalves, M

    2002-01-01

    Half-life values of spontaneous nuclear decay processes are presented in the framework of the effective liquid drop model (ELDM) using the combination of varying mass asymmetry shape description for the mass transfer (VMAS) and Werner-Wheeler's inertia coefficient (WW). The calculated half lives of ground-state to ground-state transitions for proton emission, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity, and cold fission processes are compared with experimental data. These comparisons show that the ELDM is a very efficient model to describe these different decay processes in a same, unified, theoretical framework. A table listing the predicted half-life values, tau sub c , is presented for all possible cases of spontaneous nuclear breakup such that -7.30 -17.0, where tau is the total half life of the parent nucleus.

  14. Impact of High Resolution Emissions Processing on Neighborhood Scale Air Quality Modeling: A case study over the Konkuk University Complex Testbed, Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    YU, J.; Woo, J.; Kim, Y.; Quan, S.; Kim, J.; Park, S.

    2013-12-01

    As a city is urbanized, landscapes are getting more complex due to the construction of high-rise buildings and emission patterns are changing more quickly due to variable activities. Micro-scale air pollution management over complex megacities is getting more important to protect human health effectively. A Computation Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model is useful tool to design and assess complex micro-scale air quality management schemes. The conventional modeling emission inventories, however, are not detail enough to support such a fine-scale modeling. In this study, we developed a micro-scale emission processing scheme in support of micro-scale air quality modeling, which includes sub-kilometer grid spatial allocation, sub-hour temporal allocation, and vertical emissions gridding. For horizontal gridding, 3D building files over the testbed was used to allocate emission to 20m grid. The traffic monitoring-based temporal allocation of emissions and vertical emissions allocation by different heating types (i.e. central vs. individual heating) were conducted in support of air quality modeling. CFD based air quality modeling experiment with and without fine scale emissions processing were conducted to understand the influences. Impact of the new micro-scale modeling emissions on the performance of CFD-based air quality modeling will be presented.

  15. 40 CFR 63.1427 - Process vent requirements for processes using extended cookout as an epoxide emission reduction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... measuring the concentration of the unreacted epoxide, or by using process knowledge, reaction kinetics, and... at the beginning of the time period, weight percent. k = Reaction rate constant, 1/hr. t = Time, hours. Note: This equation assumes a first order reaction with respect to epoxide concentration. where...

  16. List of Potentially Affected Sources for the Asphalt Processing and Roofing Manufacturing National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) November 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a November 2001 list of sources identified by EPA as potentially affected by the Asphalt Processing and Roofing Manufacturing National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP).

  17. Process systems engineering issues and applications towards reducing carbon dioxide emissions through conversion technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roh, Kosan; Frauzem, Rebecca; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews issues and applications for design of sustainable carbon dioxide conversion processes, specifically through chemical conversion, and the integration of the conversion processes with other systems from a process systems engineering (PSE) view-point. Systematic and computer......-aided methods and tools for reaction network generation, processing route generation, process design/optimization, and sustainability analysis are reviewed with respect to carbon dioxide conversion. Also, the relevant gaps and opportunities are highlighted. In addition, the integration of carbon dioxide...... conversion processes with other systems including coexisting infrastructure and carbon dioxide sources is described.Then, the importance of PSE based studies for such application is discussed. Finally, some perspectives on the status and future directions of carbon dioxide conversion technology...

  18. Photon assisted processes: Probability amplitudes for the absorption and emission of photons and dc-photocurrents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micu, C.; Racolta, D. [North University of Baia Mare, Str. V. Babes, Nr. 62A, RO-430122 Baia Mare (Romania); Papp, E., E-mail: gerhardt-1916@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, West University of Timisoara, Bld. V.Parvan nr.4, RO-300223 Timisoara (Romania)

    2014-11-24

    In this paper one deals with the derivation of probability amplitudes characterizing the photon assisted injection of electrons in a two-terminal quantum conductor. For this purpose one accounts for spatially constant but time dependent periodic voltages applied on an Ohmic contact. Resorting to the discrete Fourier transform provides the probability amplitudes for the emission and absorption of photons in terms of squared Bessel functions of the first kind and integer order. Several kinds of ac-pulses like sinusoidal and dc+sinusoidal are assumed. Mean square values concerning photon numbers have been discussed in some more detail. Time averages of squared time dependent classical currents and leading corrections to the rescaled dc-photocurrent have also been accounted for.

  19. Solution Processable Electrochemiluminescent Ion Gels for Flexible, Low Voltage, Emissive Displays on Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hong Chul; Lodge, Timothy P.; Frisbie, C. Daniel

    2014-03-01

    We have expanded the functionality of ion gels and successfully demonstrated low voltage, flexible electrochemiluminescent (ECL) devices using patterned ECL gels. An ECL device composed of only an emissive gel and two electrodes was fabricated on an ITO-coated substrate by solution casting the ECL gel and brush-painting the top silver electrode. The device turned on at an AC voltage as low as 2.6 V (-1.3 V ~ +1.3 V) and showed a relatively rapid response (sub-ms). Also, we varied the mechanical properties of the ECL gel simply by substituting polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate)-block-polystyrene (SMS) with commercially available poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (P(VDF-co-HFP)), enabling the fabrication of flexible ECL devices on any target substrate by the ``cut-and-stick'' strategy. This simple, rubbery ECL gel should be attractive for flexible electronics applications such as displays on packaging.

  20. Analysis of the embodied energy and the CO2 emission in construction process of a bridge structure from the aspect of sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čokić Miloš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative analysis of embodied energy and CO2 emission, in the construction process of three bridge structures. Analyzed structures are prestressed concrete bridges with different structural systems and a total length of 88 meters. The correlation of structural system, construction method, material quantities and embodied energy and CO2 emission were considered. Influence of the selected solutions in main steps of design and construction on the energy consumption and the emission of CO2 is presented. The results should provide a better understanding of the effects of certain factors, in the bridge construction process, and their impact on the environment.

  1. A guidance manual for estimating greenhouse gas emissions from fuel combustion and process-related sources for primary magnesium production and casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-03-01

    This technical guidance manual is a useful resource for helping the magnesium industry compile inventories of its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The guidance is consistent with Canada's national GHG accounting methodologies. It provides information to facilities in the magnesium sector, including both primary magnesium smelters and casting facilities, on how to estimate their GHG emissions from fuel combustion and specific process-related activities. Fuel combustion includes all stationary combustion activities for generating heat or work, and includes waste incineration if the waste heat is used for energy. It also includes mobile fuel combustion activities such as on-site transportation of raw materials from one process to another. Guidance is provided for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). Process-related activities include specific industrial processes that contribute to GHG emissions. For magnesium smelters, these include CO{sub 2} emissions from calcination of dolomite, dissolution of magnesite and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) emissions from use as a cover gas and in electrical equipment. It also includes hydrofluorocarbons (HFC) emissions from use in refrigeration systems. This document also included sections on quality assurance; aspects of uncertainty assessment; verification; and, reporting of emissions information. refs., tabs., figs.

  2. Development of a Highly Efficient Hybrid White Organic-Light-Emitting Diode with a Single Emission Layer by Solution Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun-Yi; Chen, Show-An

    2018-02-07

    We use a mixed host, 2,6-bis[3-(carbazol-9-yl)phenyl]pyridine blended with 20 wt % tris(4-carbazoyl-9-ylphenyl)amine, to lower the hole-injection barrier, along with the bipolar and high-photoluminescence-quantum-yield (Φp= 84%), blue thermally activated delay fluorescence (TADF) material of 9,9-dimethyl-9,10-dihydroacridine-2,4,6-triphenyl-1,3,5-triazine (DMAC-TRZ) as a blue dopant to compose the emission layer for the fabrication of a TADF blue organic-light-emitting diode (BOLED). The device is highly efficient with the following performance parameters: maximum brightness (Bmax) = 57586 cd/m2, maximum current efficiency (CEmax) = 35.3 cd/A, maximum power efficiency (PEmax) = 21.4 lm/W, maximum external quantum efficiency (EQEmax) = 14.1%, and CIE coordinates (0.18, 0.42). This device has the best performance recorded among the reported solution-processed TADF BOLEDs and has a low efficiency roll-off: at brightness values of 1000 and 5000 cd/m2, its CEs are close, being 35.1 and 30.1 cd/A, respectively. Upon further doping of the red phosphor Ir(dpm)PQ2 (emission peak λmax = 595 nm) into the blue emission layer, we obtained a TADF-phosphor hybrid white organic-light-emitting diode (T-P hybrid WOLED) with high performance: Bmax = 43594 cd/m2, CEmax = 28.8 cd/A, PEmax = 18.1 lm/W, and CIE coordinates (0.38, 0.44). This Bmax = 43594 cd/m2 is better than that of the vacuum-deposited WOLED with a blue TADF emitter, 10000 cd/m2. This is also the first report on a T-P hybrid WOLED with a solution-processed emitting layer.

  3. Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Plume rise, atmospheric transport, and chemistry processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren Heilman; Yongqiang Liu; Shawn Urbanski; Vladimir Kovalev; Robert Mickler

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an overview and summary of the current state of knowledge regarding critical atmospheric processes that affect the distribution and concentrations of greenhouse gases and aerosols emitted from wildland fires or produced through subsequent chemical reactions in the atmosphere. These critical atmospheric processes include the dynamics of plume rise,...

  4. Aerobic composting of digested residue eluted from dry methane fermentation to develop a zero-emission process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Lian; Sun, Zhao-Yong; Zhong, Xiao-Zhong; Wang, Ting-Ting; Tan, Li; Tang, Yue-Qin; Kida, Kenji

    2017-03-01

    Digested residue remained at the end of a process for the production of fuel ethanol and methane from kitchen garbage. To develop a zero-emission process, the compostability of the digested residue was assessed to obtain an added-value fertilizer. Composting of the digested residue by adding matured compost and a bulking agent was performed using a lab-scale composting reactor. The composting process showed that volatile total solid (VTS) degradation mainly occurred during the first 13days, and the highest VTS degradation efficiency was about 27% at the end. The raw material was not suitable as a fertilizer due to its high NH4(+) and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) concentration. However, the composting process produced remarkable results; the physicochemical properties indicated that highly matured compost was obtained within 62days of the composting process, and the final N concentration, NO3(-) concentration, and the germination index (GI) at the end of the composting process was 16.4gkg(-1)-TS, 9.7gkg(-1)-TS, and 151%, respectively. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis of ammonia oxidizers indicated that the occurrence of nitrification during the composting of digested residue was attributed to the activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of Sludge Retention Times on Nutrient Removal and Nitrous Oxide Emission in Biological Nutrient Removal Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sludge retention time (SRT is an important factor affecting not only the performance of the nutrient removal and sludge characteristics, but also the production of secondary pollutants such as nitrous oxide (N2O in biological nutrient removal (BNR processes. Four laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs, namely, SBR5, SBR10, SBR20 and SBR40 with the SRT of 5 d, 10 d, 20 d and 40 d, respectively, were operated to examine effects of SRT on nutrient removal, activated sludge characteristics and N2O emissions. The removal of chemical oxygen demand or total phosphorus was similar under SRTs of 5–40 d, SRT mainly affected the nitrogen removal and the optimal SRT for BNR was 20 d. The molecular weight distribution of the effluent organic matters was in the range of 500–3,000 Da under SRTs of 5–40 d. The lowest concentration of the effluent soluble microbial products concentration was obtained at the SRT of 5 d. Nitrifier growth was limited at a short SRT and nitrite existed in the effluent of SBR5. With increasing SRTs, mixed liquor suspended solids concentration increased while the excess sludge production was reduced due to the high endogenous decay rate at high SRTs. Endogenous decay coefficients were 0.020 d−1, 0.036 d−1, 0.037 d−1 and 0.039 d−1 under SRTs of 5–40 d, respectively. In BNR, the N2O emission occurred mainly during the aerobic phase and its emission ratio decreased with increasing SRTs. The ratio between the N2O-N emission and the removed ammonium nitrogen in the aerobic phase was 5%, 3%, 1.8% and 0.8% at the SRT of 5 d, 10 d, 20 d and 40 d, respectively. With low concentrations of dissolved oxygen and high concentrations of oxidized nitrogen, the N2O emission was significantly accelerated due to heterotrophic denitrification activities.

  6. Exciplex emission and Auger process assistant green organic electrophosphorescence devices with very low doped level of iridium complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Dongyu; Li Wenlian; Chu Bei; Li Xiao; Su Zisheng; Han Liangliang; Li Tianle; Chen Yiren; Yan Fei; Wu Shuanghong [Key Laboratory of Excited State Processes, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Zhang Zhiqiang; Hu Zhizhi [Organic Photoelectronic Materials and Technology Development Center, Liaoning University of Science and Technology, Anshan (China)], E-mail: wllioel@yahoo.com.cn, E-mail: beichu@163.com

    2008-12-21

    We demonstrate efficient and simple structure phosphorescence organic light-emitting diodes, in which 4, 4', 4''-tris[3-methyl-pheny(phenyl)-amino]triphenyl -amine (m-MTDATA) and 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen) are used as hole transport and electron transport layers, respectively, accompanied by 3 wt% fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium doped in 1,3,5-tris(N-phenylbenzimidazol-2-yl)-benzene (Ir : TPBi) as the emitting layer. As a result, a 29 lm W{sup -1} peak power efficiency and 2.2 V turn-on voltage are achieved, respectively. The achievement of excellent electroluminescence (EL) properties was attributed to the contribution of exciplex formation at the interface of m-MTDATA/Ir : TPBi and the Auger-type two-step process of charge carrier injection. The competition between the interfacial exciplex and Ir-complex emissions in the EL processes was also discussed.

  7. 75 FR 28227 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Gold Mine Ore Processing and Production...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Mine Ore Processing and Production Area Source Category and Addition to Source Category List for Standards AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Extension of public comment period. SUMMARY...

  8. Application of Near-Field Emission Processing for Microwave Circuits under Ultra-Short Duration Perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Liu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is dealing with a time-frequency modeling method of electromagnetic (EM near-field (NF radiated by electronic devices excited by transient pulse signals. The model developed enables to calculate the EM NF maps at different distances from the given device and also the synthesis of radiation sources enabling to reproduce the field maps. The method proposed is based on the ultra wide band (UWB frequency model of EM NF maps. The number of EM NF maps can be reduced by considering an innovative algorithm in order to establish simply the dipole model. Then, the transient model can be realized by considering the convolution between the transient excitation signals and the dipole-array model. The method proposed was validated by a standard 3D EM tool with a planar microstrip device excited by microwave signal modulating 1.25-GHz-carrier with 0.5-GHz-bandwidth. As expected, good correlation is found between results from simulation and the investigated modelling method.  The method introduced in this paper is particularly useful for the investigation of time-domain emissions for EMC applications by considering transient EM interferences (EMIs.

  9. Reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions from global dairy processing facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Tengfang, E-mail: ttxu@lbl.go [International Energy Studies Group, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Flapper, Joris [International Energy Studies Group, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Centre for Energy and Environmental Studies, University of Groningen, IVEM, Nijenborgh 4, 9747, AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    Global butter, concentrated milk, and milk powder products use approximately 15% of annual raw milk production. Similar to cheese and fluid milk, dairy processing of these products can be energy intensive. In this paper, we analyzed production and energy data compiled through extensive literature reviews on butter, concentrated milk, milk and whey powder processing across various countries and plants. Magnitudes of national final and primary specific energy consumption (SEC) exhibited large variations across dairy products; in addition, the final SEC of individual plants and products exhibited significant variations within a country and between countries. Furthermore, we quantified national energy intensity indicators (EIIs) accounting for dairy product mixes and technological advancement. The significant variations of SEC and EII values indicate a high degree of likelihood that there is significant potential for energy savings in the global dairy processing industry. Based upon the study samples, we estimate potential energy savings for dairy processing industry in selected countries, and estimates annual reduction of 9-14 million metric-ton carbon-equivalent could be achieved if measures are implemented to lower SEC values by 50-80% in half of global dairy plants. The paper calls for publication of more energy data from the dairy processing industry. - Research highlights: {yields} The specific energy consumption exhibited large variations across dairy products, plants, and countries. {yields} National energy intensity indicators also exhibited significant variations. {yields} There is a large global potential for energy savings and carbon reduction in dairy processing plants. {yields} The paper calls for publication of more energy data from the dairy processing industry.

  10. A Process-based, Climate-Sensitive Model to Derive Methane Emissions from Natural Wetlands: Application to 5 Wetland Sites, Sensitivity to Model Parameters and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Bernadette P.; Heimann, Martin

    1999-01-01

    Methane emissions from natural wetlands constitutes the largest methane source at present and depends highly on the climate. In order to investigate the response of methane emissions from natural wetlands to climate variations, a 1-dimensional process-based climate-sensitive model to derive methane emissions from natural wetlands is developed. In the model the processes leading to methane emission are simulated within a 1-dimensional soil column and the three different transport mechanisms diffusion, plant-mediated transport and ebullition are modeled explicitly. The model forcing consists of daily values of soil temperature, water table and Net Primary Productivity, and at permafrost sites the thaw depth is included. The methane model is tested using observational data obtained at 5 wetland sites located in North America, Europe and Central America, representing a large variety of environmental conditions. It can be shown that in most cases seasonal variations in methane emissions can be explained by the combined effect of changes in soil temperature and the position of the water table. Our results also show that a process-based approach is needed, because there is no simple relationship between these controlling factors and methane emissions that applies to a variety of wetland sites. The sensitivity of the model to the choice of key model parameters is tested and further sensitivity tests are performed to demonstrate how methane emissions from wetlands respond to climate variations.

  11. Reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions from global dairy processing facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tengfang [International Energy Studies Group, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Flapper, Joris [International Energy Studies Group, Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Centre for Energy and Environmental Studies, University of Groningen, IVEM, Nijenborgh 4, 9747, AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    Global butter, concentrated milk, and milk powder products use approximately 15% of annual raw milk production. Similar to cheese and fluid milk, dairy processing of these products can be energy intensive. In this paper, we analyzed production and energy data compiled through extensive literature reviews on butter, concentrated milk, milk and whey powder processing across various countries and plants. Magnitudes of national final and primary specific energy consumption (SEC) exhibited large variations across dairy products; in addition, the final SEC of individual plants and products exhibited significant variations within a country and between countries. Furthermore, we quantified national energy intensity indicators (EIIs) accounting for dairy product mixes and technological advancement. The significant variations of SEC and EII values indicate a high degree of likelihood that there is significant potential for energy savings in the global dairy processing industry. Based upon the study samples, we estimate potential energy savings for dairy processing industry in selected countries, and estimates annual reduction of 9-14 million metric-ton carbon-equivalent could be achieved if measures are implemented to lower SEC values by 50-80% in half of global dairy plants. The paper calls for publication of more energy data from the dairy processing industry. (author)

  12. Emission reduction in thermal processes for sewage sludge disposal; Emissionsreduzierung bei thermischen Verfahren zur Klaerschlammentsorgung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nethe, L.P. [Maerker Umwelttechnik GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    Owing to the intensification of treatment processes and the construction of new sewage plants sewage arisings are due to rise considerably. The thermal treatment of sewage sludge which it has not been possible to avoid or utilise is an important and indispensable part of any sewage sludge disposal concept. If equipped with a state-of-the-art flue gas purification process that uses carbonaceous adsorbents (Sorbalit trademark), thermal treatment of sewage sludge can be regarded as an environmentally safe process technique. [Deutsch] Die anfallenden Klaerschlammengen werden durch die Intensivierung der Klaerprozesse und der Bau neuer Klaeranlagen deutlich zunehmen. Die thermische Behandlung nicht vermiedener oder verwerteter Klaerschlaemme stellt einen bedeutenden und unverzichtbaren Teil der Klaerschlamm-Entsorgungskonzepte dar. Bei Installation einer - dem Stand der Technik - entsprechenden Rauchgasreinigung mit dem Einsatz kohlenstoffhaltiger Adsorbentien (Sorbalit {sup trademark}) ist die thermische Behandlung von Klaerschlamm eine umweltsichere Verfahrenstechnik. (orig.)

  13. The role of oxygen-induced processes on the emission characteristics of single molecule emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nothaft, Maximilian; Wrachtrup, Joerg [3rd Physics Institute and Research Center SCoPE, University of Stuttgart (Germany); Hoehla, Steffen [Institute for Large Area Microelectronics and Research Center SCoPE, University of Stuttgart (Germany); Jelezko, Fedor [Institute for Quantum Optics, University of Ulm (Germany); Pflaum, Jens [Experimental Physics VI, University of Wuerzburg and ZAE Bayern, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    Single molecule studies are limited to a defined class of organic dye molecules inserted into respective host materials. Basic requirements for suited material combinations include high photon emission rates and long term photostability. A majority of known aromatic host-guest systems employ crystalline organic matrices to prevent dye molecules from uncontrolled reactions with contaminants. However, in terms of device fabrication and technological potentials it is often desirable to use polymers as room temperature host matrices. Unfortunately, single dye molecule investigations in polymers at room temperature usually report orders of magnitude lower photostabilities compared to their crystalline molecular counterparts, leading to a reduced interest in organic thin film applications. In this report, we exemplary demonstrate the feasibility of engineering a host-guest system based on dibenzoterrylene dye molecules which were diluted into the polymer poly-(p-phenylene-vinylene) (PPV) possessing very low photobleaching probabilities at room temperature. By controlling the oxygen exposure during manufacturing the number of emitted photons prior to photobleaching was significantly increased from 10{sup 6} up to 10{sup 11} photons. Employing suited encapsulation techniques to prevent oxygen penetration after host-guest preparation, photostable devices over prolonged time periods on the order of months to years could be achieved. Therefore, this approach grants access to a variety of new polymer based combinations of host-guest systems for studying single molecular quantum emitters inside organic electronic devices and nanostructured polymer films with sufficient count rates and long-term stability at room temperature. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Characterizing and modeling dynamic processes in the cochlea using otoacoustic emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhulst, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    , or time-dependent, properties of cochlear gain. A time scale from 0 to 10 ms is considered to ensure that cochlear processing is investigated without including influences from higher stages in the brain. The results are expected to provide insight into how e.g. onsets of sounds are processed by the intact......An important characteristic of human hearing is that it amplifies weak sounds while attenuating louder ones. This gain transformation takes place in the inner ear (i.e., cochlea), and is responsible for a compressive relation between the level of the presented and perceived sound. The cochlear gain...

  15. Tracking nitrous oxide emission processes at a suburban site with semicontinuous, in situ measurements of isotopic composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Eliza; Henne, Stephan; Hüglin, Christoph; Zellweger, Christoph; Tuzson, Béla; Ibraim, Erkan; Emmenegger, Lukas; Mohn, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    The isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) was measured semicontinuously, at ˜35 min frequency in intermittent periods of 1-6 days over one and a half years, using preconcentration coupled to a quantum cascade laser spectrometer at the suburban site of Dübendorf, Switzerland. The achieved measurement repeatability was 0.08‰, 0.11‰, and 0.10‰ for δ18O, site preference, and δ15Nbulk respectively, which is better than or equal to standard flask sampling-based isotope ratio mass spectrometry performance. The observed mean diurnal cycle reflected the buildup of N2O from isotopically light sources on an isotopically heavy tropospheric background. The measurements were used to determine the source isotopic composition, which varied significantly compared to chemical and meteorological parameters monitored at the site. FLEXPART-COSMO transport modeling in combination with modified Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research inventory emissions was used to model N2O mole fractions at the site. Additionally, isotopic signatures were estimated for different source categories using literature data and used to simulate N2O isotopic composition over the measurement period. The model was able to capture variability in N2O mole fraction well, but simulations of isotopic composition showed little agreement with observations. In particular, measured source isotopic composition exhibited one magnitude larger variability than simulated, clearly indicating that the range of isotopic source signatures estimated from literature significantly underestimates true variability of source signatures. Source δ18O signature was found to be the most sensitive tracer for urban/industry versus agricultural N2O. δ15Nbulk and site preference may provide more insight into microbial and chemical emission processes than partitioning of anthropogenic source categories.

  16. Evidence for Atmospheric Cold-trap Processes in the Noninverted Emission Spectrum of Kepler-13Ab Using HST /WFC3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beatty, Thomas G.; Zhao, Ming; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Wright, Jason T. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Madhusudhan, Nikku [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Tsiaras, Angelos [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E6BT London (United Kingdom); Knutson, Heather A.; Shporer, Avi, E-mail: tbeatty@psu.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2017-10-01

    We observed two eclipses of the Kepler-13A planetary system, on UT 2014 April 28 and UT 2014 October 13, in the near-infrared using Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope . By using the nearby binary stars Kepler-13BC as a reference, we were able to create a differential light curve for Kepler-13A that had little of the systematics typically present in HST /WFC3 spectrophotometry. We measure a broadband (1.1–1.65 μ m) eclipse depth of 734 ± 28 ppm and are able to measure the emission spectrum of the planet at R  ≈ 50 with an average precision of 70 ppm. We find that Kepler-13Ab possesses a noninverted, monotonically decreasing vertical temperature profile. We exclude an isothermal profile and an inverted profile at more than 3 σ . We also find that the dayside emission of Kepler-13Ab appears generally similar to an isolated M7 brown dwarf at a similar effective temperature. Due to the relatively high mass and surface gravity of Kepler-13Ab, we suggest that the apparent lack of an inversion is due to cold-trap processes in the planet’s atmosphere. Using a toy model for where cold traps should inhibit inversions, as well as observations of other planets in this temperature range with measured emission spectra, we argue that with more detailed modeling and more observations we may be able to place useful constraints on the size of condensates on the daysides of hot Jupiters.

  17. Sensoring Fusion Data from the Optic and Acoustic Emissions of Electric Arcs in the GMAW-S Process for Welding Quality Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eber Huanca Cayo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study shows the relationship between welding quality and optical-acoustic emissions from electric arcs, during welding runs, in the GMAW-S process. Bead on plate welding tests was carried out with pre-set parameters chosen from manufacturing standards. During the welding runs interferences were induced on the welding path using paint, grease or gas faults. In each welding run arc voltage, welding current, infrared and acoustic emission values were acquired and parameters such as arc power, acoustic peaks rate and infrared radiation rate computed. Data fusion algorithms were developed by assessing known welding quality parameters from arc emissions. These algorithms have showed better responses when they are based on more than just one sensor. Finally, it was concluded that there is a close relation between arc emissions and quality in welding and it can be measured from arc emissions sensing and data fusion algorithms.

  18. Microbial Methane Oxidation Processes and Technologies for Mitigation of Landfill Gas Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this paper is to review the present knowledge regarding the microbial methane oxidation in natural or engineered landfill environments with focus on process understanding, engineering experiences and modeling. This review includes seven sections. First, the methane oxidation is put in con...

  19. Reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions from global dairy processing facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Tengfang; Flapper, Joris

    Global butter, concentrated milk, and milk powder products use approximately 15% of annual raw milk production. Similar to cheese and fluid milk, dairy processing of these products can be energy intensive. In this paper, we analyzed production and energy data compiled through extensive literature

  20. Acoustic Emission Signal Processing Technique to Characterize Reactor In-Pile Phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivek Agarwal; Magdy Samy Tawfik; James A Smith

    2014-07-01

    Existing and developing advanced sensor technologies and instrumentation will allow non-intrusive in-pile measurement of temperature, extension, and fission gases when coupled with advanced signal processing algorithms. The transmitted measured sensor signals from inside to the outside of containment structure are corrupted by noise and are attenuated, thereby reducing the signal strength and signal-to-noise ratio. Identification and extraction of actual signal (representative of an in-pile phenomenon) is a challenging and complicated process. In this paper, empirical mode decomposition technique is proposed to reconstruct actual sensor signal by partially combining intrinsic mode functions. Reconstructed signal corresponds to phenomena and/or failure modes occurring inside the reactor. In addition, it allows accurate non-intrusive monitoring and trending of in-pile phenomena.

  1. Evaluation of concepts for controlling exhaust emissions from minimally processed petroleum and synthetic fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, P. L.; Beal, G. W.; Sederquist, R. A.; Shultz, D.

    1981-01-01

    Rich-lean combustor concepts designed to enhance rich combustion chemistry and increase combustor flexibility for NO(x) reduction with minimally processed fuels are examined. Processes such as rich product recirculation in the rich chamber, rich-lean annihilation, and graduated air addition or staged rich combustion to release bound nitrogen in steps of reduced equivalence ratio are discussed. Variations to the baseline rapid quench section are considered, and the effect of residence time in the rich zone is investigated. The feasibility of using uncooled non-metallic materials for the rich zone combustion construction is also addressed. The preliminary results indicate that rich primary zone staged combustion provides environmentally acceptable operation with residual and/or synthetic coal-derived liquid fuels

  2. An integrated Gaussian process regression for prediction of remaining useful life of slow speed bearings based on acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, S. A.; Heyns, P. S.

    2017-02-01

    This paper proposes an optimal Gaussian process regression (GPR) for the prediction of remaining useful life (RUL) of slow speed bearings based on a novel degradation assessment index obtained from acoustic emission signal. The optimal GPR is obtained from an integration or combination of existing simple mean and covariance functions in order to capture the observed trend of the bearing degradation as well the irregularities in the data. The resulting integrated GPR model provides an excellent fit to the data and improves over the simple GPR models that are based on simple mean and covariance functions. In addition, it achieves a low percentage error prediction of the remaining useful life of slow speed bearings. These findings are robust under varying operating conditions such as loading and speed and can be applied to nonlinear and nonstationary machine response signals useful for effective preventive machine maintenance purposes.

  3. Effect of covering composting piles with mature compost on ammonia emission and microbial community structure of composting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Koki; Morioka, Riki; Osada, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    To control ammonia (NH(3)) volatilization from the dairy cattle (Bos taurus) manure composting process, a compost pile was covered with mature compost and the gas emissions evaluated using the dynamic chamber system. The peak of NH(3) volatilization observed immediately after piling up of the compost was reduced from 196 to 62 mg/m(3) by covering the compost pile with mature compost. The accumulation of NH(4)-N to the covered mature compost was also observed. Covering and mixing the compost with mature compost had no effect on the microbial community structure. However, over time the microbial community structure changed because of a decrease in easily degradable organic compounds in the compost piles. The availability of volatile fatty acids (VFA) was considered to be important for microbial community structure in the compost. After the VFA had disappeared, the NO(3)-N concentration increased and the cellulose degrading bacteria such as Cytophaga increased in number.

  4. A process-based model for ammonia emission from urine patches, GAG (Generation of Ammonia from Grazing): description and sensitivity analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Móring, Andrea; Vieno, Massimo; M. Doherty, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a new process-based, weather-driven model for ammonia (NH3) emission from a urine patch has been developed and its sensitivity to various factors assessed. The GAG model (Generation of Ammonia from Grazing) is capable of simulating the TAN (total ammoniacal nitrogen) and the water c...... application, serving as a tool for further investigation of the effects of climate change on ammonia emissions and deposition....

  5. Use of a Chamber to Comprehensively Characterise Emissions and Subsequent Processes from a Light-Duty Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, J. D.; Alfarra, M. R. R.; Whitehead, J.; McFiggans, G.; Kong, S.; Harrison, R. M.; Alam, M. S.; Hamilton, J. F.; Pereira, K. L.; Holmes, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    Around 1 in 3 light duty vehicles in the UK use diesel engines, meaning that on-road emissions of particulates, NOx and VOCs and subsequent chemical processes are substantially different to countries where gasoline engines dominate. As part of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Com-Part project, emissions from a diesel engine dynamometer rig representative of the EURO 4 standard were studied. The exhaust was passed to the Manchester aerosol chamber, which consists of an 18 m3 teflon bag and by injecting a sample of exhaust fumes into filtered and chemically scrubbed air, a controllable dilution can be performed and the sample held in situ for analysis by a suite of instruments. The system also allows the injection of other chemicals (e.g. ozone, additional VOCs) and the initiation of photochemistry using a bank of halogen bulbs and a filtered Xe arc lamp to simulate solar light. Because a large volume of dilute emissions can be held for a period of hours, this permits a wide range of instrumentation to be used and relatively slow processes studied. Furthermore, because the bag is collapsible, the entire particulate contents can be collected on a filter for offline analysis. Aerosol microphysical properties are studied using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and Centrifugal Particle Mass Analyser (CPMA); aerosol composition using a Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS), Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), Sunset Laboratories OC EC analyser and offline gas- and high performance liquid chromatography (employing advanced mass spectrometry such as ion trap and fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance); VOCs using comprehensive 2D gas chromatography; aerosol optical properties using a Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift Single Scattering Albedo monitor (CAPS-PMSSA), 3 wavelength Photoacoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS-3) and Multi Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP); particle hygroscopcity using a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility

  6. Site specific diel methane emission mechanisms in landfills: A field validated process based on vegetation and climate factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Danhui; Hao, Yongxia; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Nakayama, Hirofumi; Chai, Xiaoli

    2016-11-01

    Diel methane emission fluxes from a landfill that was covered by vegetation were investigated to reveal the methane emission mechanisms based on the interaction of vegetation characteristics and climate factors. The methane emissions showed large variation between daytime and nighttime, and the trend of methane emissions exhibited clear bimodal patterns from both Setaria viridis- and Neyraudia reynaudiana-covered areas. Plants play an important role in methane transportation as well as methane oxidation. The notable decrease in methane emissions after plants were cut suggests that methane transportation via plants is the primary way of methane emissions in the vegetated areas of landfill. Within plants, the methane emission fluxes were enhanced due to a convection mechanism. Given that the methane emission flux is highly correlated with the solar radiation during daytime, the convection mechanism could be attributed to the increase in solar radiation. Whereas the methane emission flux is affected by a combined impact of the wind speed and pedosphere characteristics during nighttime. An improved understanding of the methane emission mechanisms in vegetated landfills is expected to develop a reliable model for landfill methane emissions and to attenuate greenhouse gas emissions from landfills. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of a Simple Image Processing Application that Makes Abdominopelvic Tumor Visible on Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Saroha, Kartik; Sharma, Param Dev; Patel, Chetan; Bal, Chandrashekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we have developed a simple image processing application in MATLAB that uses suprathreshold stochastic resonance (SSR) and helps the user to visualize abdominopelvic tumor on the exported prediuretic positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images. A brainstorming session was conducted for requirement analysis for the program. It was decided that program should load the screen captured PET/CT images and then produces output images in a window with a slider control that should enable the user to view the best image that visualizes the tumor, if present. The program was implemented on personal computer using Microsoft Windows and MATLAB R2013b. The program has option for the user to select the input image. For the selected image, it displays output images generated using SSR in a separate window having a slider control. The slider control enables the user to view images and select one which seems to provide the best visualization of the area(s) of interest. The developed application enables the user to select, process, and view output images in the process of utilizing SSR to detect the presence of abdominopelvic tumor on prediuretic PET/CT image.

  8. Reduction of VOC emissions by a membrane-based gas absorption process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Xu, Jun; Wang, Lianjun; Li, Jiansheng; Sun, Xiuyun

    2009-01-01

    A membrane-based gas absorption (MGA) process was evaluated for the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) based on C6H6/N2 mixture. The absorption of C6H6 from a C6H6/N2 mixture was investigated using a hydrophobic polypropylene hollow fiber membrane contactor and the aqueous solution of N-formyl morpholine (NFM) as absorbent. The effects of various factors on the overall mass transfer coefficient was investigated. The experimental results showed that the removal efficiency of C6H6 could reach 99.5% in present studied system. A mathematical model based on resistance-in-series concept was presented to predict the value of overall mass transfer coefficient. The average error between the predicted and experimental values is 7.9%. In addition, conventional packed columns for VOCs removal was also evaluated for comparison.

  9. Life Cycle Assessment in Building: A Case Study on the Energy and Emissions Impact Related to the Choice of Housing Typologies and Construction Process in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Ángel Rodríguez Serrano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available While there exists an international trend to develop zero or near zero emissions building solutions by 2020, and European governments continuously update their building regulations to optimize the building envelope and energy systems to achieve this during the building use stage, at least in Spain the building regulations do not take into account the impact of emissions resulting from urbanization and construction activities prior to building use. This research studies in detail the entire emissions balance (and how it may be related to energy efficiency in a newly built residential cluster project in Mancha Real (Jaén, Spain, and influences due to the choice of different urban typologies. For comparison, terraced housing and low-density, four-floor, multi-family housing alternatives have been studied. The present work assessed the life cycle of the building with the help of commercial software (CYPE, and the energy efficiency and emissions according to the legal regulations in Spain with the official software LIDER and CALENER VYP. After a careful choice of building and systems alternatives and their comparison, the study concludes that the major emissions impact and energy costs of urbanization and building activity occurs during construction, while later savings due to reductions in building use emissions are very modest in comparison. Therefore, deeper analysis is suggested to improve the efficiency of the construction process for a significantly reduced emission footprint on the urban environment.

  10. Evaluation of the efficiency face to the NO{sub x} emissions from European gas-fired heat process equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourniguet, M.J.; Quinqueneau, A. [Gaz de France, Saint-Denis la Plaine (France); Karll, B. [Dansk Gasteknisk Center, Hoersholm (Denmark); Breithaupt, P. Gasunie [Gasunie, Groningue (Netherlands); Jonsson, O. [Svensk Gastekniskt Center AB, Malmoe (Sweden); Navarri, P. [CETIAT, Villeurbanne (France)

    1999-10-01

    In the frame of the project, tests have been performed by Gaz de France, CETIAT, DGC, GASUNIE and SGC on 35 European industrial sites in order to depict what the European industry using natural gas as an energy source actually looks like in 1997, the levels of efficiency and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions currently being achieved. These 35 industrial sites were chosen among the three following sectors: steam or water boilers, engines or turbines and industrial processes (food processing industry, metallurgy, ceramic, paper and textile industries). The partners focused on relatively new installations or newly retrofitted which were equipped with low NOx technologies. To create an open database between the Partners, a common EXCEL sheet has been defined and used to report the results for the three sectors concerned including principally the following items: General background on the site: it includes the description of the installation, technical characteristics of the furnace, the boiler or the engine, operating scenarios, gas total rating, and depending of the type of installation power density, rated electric power or production rate; Description of the equipment: it includes, if available, the control system of the heating equipment and the low NOx techniques identified; Description of the measurement techniques: In order to compensate for the lack of international standard, this part has been particularly detailed. It includes the description of flue gas analysers (CO, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, NOx, CH{sub 4}, UHC, N{sub 2}O, VOC), metering and pressure and temperature probes in terms of measurement principle, supplier, measurement rang and accuracy and gas calibration. It precise the position of the sampling points and the type of the sampling line; Results: The operating conditions (atmospheric data, type of natural gas burnt during the test and measurement period) are given before the results themselves (complete flue gas analysis and determination of combustion

  11. Cerebral interregional correlations of associative language processing: a positron emission tomography activation study using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreckenberger, M.; Sabri, O.; Arning, C.; Schulz, G.; Tuttass, T.; Wagenknecht, G.; Kaiser, H.J.; Buell, U. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen University of Technology, Aachen (Germany); Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, E.; Sass, H. [Department of Psychiatry, Aachen University of Technology, Aachen (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    Even though there have been numerous positron emission tomography (PET) activation studies on the perfusional and metabolic bases of language processing, little is known about the intracerebral functional network of language and cognitive processes. It was the aim of this study to investigate the cerebral interregional correlations during voluntary word association versus word repetition in healthy subjects to gain insight into the functional connectivity of associative speech processing. Due to individual variability in functional anatomy, the study protocol was designed as an averaged single-subject study. Eight healthy volunteers performed a verbal association task during fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) PET scanning. Two different tasks were performed in randomized order: (a) word repetition (after auditory presentation of nouns) as a control condition, and (b) word association (after auditory presentation of nouns) as a specific semantic activation. The regional metabolic rate of glucose (rMRGlu) was calculated after brain regionalization [112 regions of interest on individual 3D flash magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] and PET/MRI realignment. Statistical analysis was performed for comparison of association and repetition and for calculation of interregional correlation coefficients during both tasks. Compared with word repetition, word association was associated with significant increases in rMRGlu in the left prefrontal cortex, the left frontal operculum (Broca`s area) and the left insula, indicating involvement of these areas in associative language processing. Decreased rMRGlu was found in the left posterior cingulum during word association. During word repetition, highly significant negative correlations were found between the left prefrontal cortex, the contralateral cortex areas and the ipsilateral posterior cingulum. These negative correlations were almost completely eliminated during the association task, suggesting a functional

  12. [NH3, N2O, CH4 and CO2 emissions from growing process of caged broilers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhong-Kai; Zhu, Zhi-Ping; Dong, Hong-Min; Chen, Yong-Xing; Shang, Bin

    2013-06-01

    To obtain Ammonia and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission factors of caged broilers, ammonia (NH3), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions of broilers aged 0 d to 42 days were monitored in caged broilers production systems located in Shandong province. Gas concentrations of incoming and exhaust air streams were measured by using INNOVA 1312 multi-gas monitor with multi-channel samplers. Building ventilation rates were determined by on site FANS (Fan Assessment Numeration System) measurement systems. The NH3 emission factors showed a trend of increase at the beginning and then decreased with the broiler ages. The NH3 emission rates were 8.5 to 342.1 mg x (d x bird)(-1) and the average daily emission rate was 137.9 mg x (d x bird)(-1) [48.6 g x (d x AU)(-1)] over the 42-d period. The GHGs emission rates were 19.5-351.9 mg x (d x bird)(-1) with an average of 154.5 mg x (d x bird)(-1) [54.4 g x (d x AU)(-1)] for CH4, and 2.2- 152.9 g x (d x bird)(-10 with an average of 65.9 g x (d x bird)(-1) [23.2 kg x (d x AU)(-1)] for CO2. No emission of N2O was observed. The CH4 and CO2 emission rates increased with the increase of broilers ages. The total NH3 emission over the 42 d growing period averaged (5.65 +/- 1.02) g x (bird x life cycle)(-1). The NH3 emission contribution in different growth phase to the total emission were 33.6% in growth phase 1 (0-17 day, GP1), 36.4% in GP2 (18-27 days), and 29.9% in GP3 (28-42 days), respectively. The NH3 emission in GP2 was significantly higher than emission in GP1 and GP3. CH4 and CO2 cumulative emission rates were (6.30 +/- 0.16) g x (bird(-1) x life cycle)(-1) and (2.68 +/- 0.18) kg x (bird x life cycle)(-1), respectively. The cumulative emission rates of CH4 and CO2 in GP3 were significantly higher than emission rates in GP2 and in GP1, accounting for 50% of total emissions. The results of this study could provide the data support for mitigation of gas emission from broilers production.

  13. Arguments for fundamental emission by the parametric process L yields T + S in interplanetary type III bursts. [langmuir, electromagnetic, ion acoustic waves (L, T, S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, I. H.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of low frequency ion acoustic-like waves associated with Langmuir waves present during interplanetary Type 3 bursts are used to study plasma emission mechanisms and wave processes involving ion acoustic waves. It is shown that the observed wave frequency characteristics are consistent with the processes L yields T + S (where L = Langmuir waves, T = electromagnetic waves, S = ion acoustic waves) and L yields L' + S proceeding. The usual incoherent (random phase) version of the process L yields T + S cannot explain the observed wave production time scale. The clumpy nature of the observed Langmuir waves is vital to the theory of IP Type 3 bursts. The incoherent process L yields T + S may encounter difficulties explaining the observed Type 3 brightness temperatures when Langmuir wave clumps are incorporated into the theory. The parametric process L yields T + S may be the important emission process for the fundamental radiation of interplanetary Type 3 bursts.

  14. β-delayed proton emission of 69Kr and the 68Se rp-process waiting point

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Del Santo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The slow β-decay of the 68Se waiting point in the astrophysical rp-process can in principle be bypassed by a sequential two proton capture. The rate of this reaction sequence depends exponentially on the 69Br proton separation energy. We studied β-delayed proton emission of 69Kr and extracted a proton separation energy of −641(42 keV. In addition, we determined a 69Kr β-decay half-life of T1/2=28(1 ms and an excitation energy of 3153(55 keV of the 69Kr isobaric analog state in 69Br. X-ray burst model calculations show that regardless of the values of other uncertain masses in the region, the new Sp(Br69 allows for a reaction flow via Se68(2p,γ of at most 20%. Uncertainties are sufficiently reduced to conclude that Se68(2p,γ has at best a very small effect on burst light curve and composition, and that 68Se is a strong rp-process waiting point. Our results also exclude the possibility of a suggested longer lived, so far unobserved, 69Br ground state.

  15. Modeling of secondary emission processes in the negative ion based electrostatic accelerator of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Fubiani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The negative ion electrostatic accelerator for the neutral beam injector of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER is designed to deliver a negative deuterium current of 40 A at 1 MeV. Inside the accelerator there are several types of interactions that may create secondary particles. The dominating process originates from the single and double stripping of the accelerated negative ion by collision with the residual molecular deuterium gas (≃29% losses. The resulting secondary particles (positive ions, neutrals, and electrons are accelerated and deflected by the electric and magnetic fields inside the accelerator and may induce more secondaries after a likely impact with the accelerator grids. This chain of reactions is responsible for a non-negligible heat load on the grids and must be understood in detail. In this paper, we will provide a comprehensive summary of the physics involved in the process of secondary emission in a typical ITER-like negative ion electrostatic accelerator together with a precise description of the numerical method and approximations involved. As an example, the multiaperture-multigrid accelerator concept will be discussed.

  16. Reduction of greenhouse gases emissions during anoxic wastewater treatment by strengthening nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ru; Hu, Zhen; Zhang, Jian; Ma, Hao; Jiang, Liping; Ru, Dongyun

    2017-07-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) is a recently discovered process performed by NC10 phylum, which plays an important role in greenhouse gases (GHG) reduction. In this study, co-existence of n-damo bacteria and methanogens was successfully achieved by using upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. Reactor with inorganic carbon source (CO 2 /H 2 ) showed the highest abundance of n-damo bacteria and the highest n-damo potential activity, resulted in its highest nitrogen removal rate. Significant reduction in GHG was obtained after introduction of n-damo process, especially for N 2 O. Furthermore, GHG emissions decreased with the increase of n-damo bacteria abundance. Community structure analysis found carbon source could influence the diversity of n-damo bacteria indirectly. And phylogenetic analysis showed that all the obtained sequences were assigned to group B, mainly due to in situ production and consumption of CH 4 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Odor assessment tools and odor emissions in industrial processes = Ferramentas para avaliação de emissões odorantes em processos industriais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gersina Nobre da Rocha Carmo Junior

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Environmental odors are an inherent part of any given process and can frequently be a cause of public environmental discomfort. Brazilian regulations are now characterizing odors as a form of air pollution and state that odor discomfort on surrounding populations must be avoided by industries. No olfactometry-related technology is standardized or even recognized. This makes it vital to create a federal reference, at least methodological, on the subject. Thus, thepresent work had the objective to apply, adjust, and evaluate the results of different olfactometric techniques in three types of industries which are known as odorous. The points of most significant odor emission to wastewater treatment plants were located at the system inputs. The techniques that were used are based on international standards and regulations. In all case studies, the applied odor assessment methods (odor intensity, quality, hedonic character and concentration were found to be satisfactory for representing the odor situation. The method presented in this paper for evaluating the hedonic tone proved to be very convenient. Thesemethodologies allowed for the results to be presented in a numerical form, providing with objective results from subjective analyses.Os odores ambientais sempre fazem parte de uma situação ou processo, provocando as mais diversas reações, e por vezes caracterizam situações de desconforto ambiental em uma toda população. A legislação brasileira, em âmbito nacional (alguns Estados, apresenta os odores como uma forma de poluição ambiental, onde o desconforto à população vizinha de potenciais emissores deve ser evitado. Atualmente, no Brasil, nenhuma metodologia relacionada à Olfatometria (medida da resposta de um júri a um estímulo olfativo é padronizada ou mesmo reconhecida. Nesse sentido, o presente trabalho tem como objetivos aplicar, adequar e avaliar resultados de diferentes metodologias olfatométricas (baseadas em normas

  18. Trade-off between carbon emission and effluent quality of activated sludge processes under seasonal variations of wastewater temperature and mean cell retention time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jingbo; Fu, Xin; Andrés Baquero, G; Sobhani, Reza; Nolasco, Daniel A; Rosso, Diego

    2016-03-15

    Over the seasonal cycles, the mean cell retention time (MCRT) of the activated sludge process is varied to compensate the wastewater temperature variations. The effects of these variations on the carbon footprint (CFP) and effluent quality index (EQI) of a conventional activated sludge (CAS) process and a nitrification/denitrification (NDN) process were quantified. The carbon emission included both biogenic and non-biogenic carbon. Carbon emissions of wasted biosolids management were also addressed. Our results confirmed that the effluent quality indicated by EQI was not necessarily improved by increasing MCRT. Higher MCRT increased the carbon emission and reduced excess sludge production, which decreased the potential for biogas energy recovery. The NDN process was preferable to the CAS process from the perspective of effluent quality. This consideration extended to the whole plant CFP if the N2O emitted during NDN was limited ([N2O]intensity (γ) derived from CFP and EQI, our work provides a quantitative tool for decision makers evaluating process alternatives when there is a trade-off between carbon emission and effluent quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Methane emission from natural wetlands: interplay between emergent macrophytes and soil microbial processes. A mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2010-01-01

    According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 2007, natural wetlands contribute 20-39 % to the global emission of methane. The range in the estimated percentage of the contribution of these systems to the total release of this greenhouse gas is large due to differences in the nature of the emitting vegetation including the soil microbiota that interfere with the production and consumption of methane. Methane is a dominant end-product of anaerobic mineralization processes. When all electron acceptors except carbon dioxide are used by the microbial community, methanogenesis is the ultimate pathway to mineralize organic carbon compounds. Emergent wetland plants play an important role in the emission of methane to the atmosphere. They produce the carbon necessary for the production of methane, but also facilitate the release of methane by the possession of a system of interconnected internal gas lacunas. Aquatic macrophytes are commonly adapted to oxygen-limited conditions as they prevail in flooded or waterlogged soils. By this system, oxygen is transported to the underground parts of the plants. Part of the oxygen transported downwards is released in the root zone, where it sustains a number of beneficial oxidation processes. Through the pores from which oxygen escapes from the plant into the root zone, methane can enter the plant aerenchyma system and subsequently be emitted into the atmosphere. Part of the oxygen released into the root zone can be used to oxidize methane before it enters the atmosphere. However, the oxygen can also be used to regenerate alternative electron acceptors. The continuous supply of alternative electron acceptors will diminish the role of methanogenesis in the anaerobic mineralization processes in the root zone and therefore repress the production and emission of methane. The role of alternative element cycles in the inhibition of methanogenesis is discussed. The role of the nitrogen cycle in repression of methane

  20. 40 CFR 63.8050 - How do I comply with emissions averaging for stationary process vessels at existing sources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... using the values that result in the highest emissions, and you must document the operating parameters... shall be assumed to be 25 percent of the saturated value if the purge flow rate is greater than 100 scfm...=saturation factor for individual condensable compounds in the emission stream Pi=partial pressure of...

  1. Composting municipal biosolids in polyethylene sleeves with forced aeration: Process control, air emissions, sanitary and agronomic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avidov, R; Saadi, I; Krassnovsky, A; Hanan, A; Medina, Sh; Raviv, M; Chen, Y; Laor, Y

    2017-09-01

    Composting in polyethylene sleeves with forced aeration may minimize odor emissions, vectors attraction and leachates associated with open windrows. A disadvantage of this technology is the lack of mixing during composting, potentially leading to non-uniform products. In two pilot experiments using biosolids and green waste (1:1; v:v), thermophilic conditions (>45°C) were maintained for two months, with successful control of oxygen levels and sufficient moisture. Emitted odors declined from 1.5-3.8×10 5 to 5.9×10 3 -2.3×10 4 odor units m -3 -air in the first 3weeks of the process, emphasizing the need of odor control primarily during this period. Therefore, composting might be managed in two phases: (i) a closed sleeve for 6-8weeks during which the odor is treated; (ii) an open pile (odor control is not necessary). Reduction of salmonella, E. coli and coliforms was effective initially, meeting the standards of "Class A" biosolids; however, total and fecal coliforms density increased after opening the second sleeve and exceeded the standard of 1000 most probable number (MPN) per g dry matter. Compost maturity was achieved in the open piles following the two sleeves and the final compost was non-phytotoxic and beneficial as a soil additive. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of low temperature graphene synthesis in inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition process with optical emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yifei; Kim, Daekyoung; Jang, Haegyu; Cho, Sung Min; Chae, Heeyeop

    2014-12-01

    Low-temperature graphene was synthesized at 400 degrees C with inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. The effects of plasma power and flow rate of various carbon containing precursors and hydrogen on graphene properties were investigated with optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Various radicals monitored by OES were correlated with graphene film properties such as sheet resistance, I(D)/I(G) ratio of Raman spectra and transparency. C2H2 was used as a main precursor and the increase of plasma power enhanced intensity of carbon (C2) radical OES intensity in plasma, reduced sheet resistance and increased transparency of graphene films. The reduced flow rate of C2H2 decreased sheet resistance and increased transparency of graphene films in the range of this study. H2 addition was found to increase sheet resistance, transparency and attributed to reduction of graphene grain and etching graphene layers. OES analysis showed that C2 radicals contribute to graphite networking and sheet resistance reduction. TEM and AFM were applied to provide credible information that graphene had been successfully grown at low temperature.

  3. Investigation on the relationship between the fine particle emission and crystallization characteristics of gypsum during wet flue gas desulfurization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Danping; Wu, Hao; Yang, Linjun

    2017-05-01

    The relationship between the fine particles emitted after desulfurization and gypsum crystals in the desulfurization slurry was investigated, and the crystallization characteristics varying with the operation parameters and compositions of the desulfurization slurry were discussed. The results showed that the fine particles generated during the desulfurization process were closely related to the crystal characteristics in the desulfurization slurry by comparison of their morphology and elements. With the higher proportion of fine crystals in the desulfurization slurry, the number concentration of fine particles after desulfurization was increased and their particle sizes were smaller, indicating that the optimization of gypsum crystallization was beneficial for the reduction of the fine particle emission. The lower pH value and an optimal temperature of the desulfurization slurry were beneficial to restrain the generation of fine crystals in the desulfurization slurry. In addition, the higher concentrations of the Fe(3+) ions and the F(-) ions in the desulfurization slurry both promoted the generation of fine crystals with corresponding change of the morphology and the effect of the Fe(3+) ions was more obvious. With the application of the desulfurization synergist additive, it was beneficial for the inhibition of fine crystals while the thinner crystals were generated. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Influence of surface emission processes on a fast-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in air at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechereau, François; Bonaventura, Zdeněk; Bourdon, Anne

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents simulations of an atmospheric pressure air discharge in a point-to-plane geometry with a dielectric layer parallel to the cathode plane. Experimentally, a discharge reignition in the air gap below the dielectrics has been observed. With a 2D fluid model, it is shown that due to the fast rise of the high voltage applied and the sharp point used, a first positive spherical discharge forms around the point. Then this discharge propagates axially and impacts the dielectrics. As the first discharge starts spreading on the upper dielectric surface, in the second air gap with a low preionization density of {{10}4}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , the 2D fluid model predicts a rapid reignition of a positive discharge. As in experiments, the discharge reignition is much slower, a discussion on physical processes to be considered in the model to increase the reignition delay is presented. The limit case with no initial seed charges in the second air gap has been studied. First, we have calculated the time to release an electron from the cathode surface by thermionic and field emission processes for a work function φ \\in ≤ft[3,4\\right] eV and an amplification factor β \\in ≤ft[100,220\\right] . Then a 3D Monte Carlo model has been used to follow the dynamics of formation of an avalanche starting from a single electron emitted at the cathode. Due to the high electric field in the second air gap, we have shown that in a few nanoseconds, a Gaussian cloud of seed charges is formed at a small distance from the cathode plane. This Gaussian cloud has been used as the initial condition of the 2D fluid model in the second air gap. In this case, the propagation of a double headed discharge in the second air gap has been observed and the reignition delay is in rather good agreement with experiments.

  5. Electron-emission processes in highly charged Ar and Xe ions impinging on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite at energies just above the kinetic threshold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, E.; Hoekstra, R.; Dobes, K.; Aumayr, F.

    2014-01-01

    At keV energies, many electronic processes contribute to the emission of secondary electrons in the interaction of highly charged ions on surfaces. To unravel contributions resulting from isolated hollow atoms in front of the surface or embedded in the electron gas of the target, heavy highly

  6. Consideration of Life Cycle Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Road Infrastructure Planning Processes: Examples of Sweden, Norway, Denmark and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miliutenko, Sofiia; Kluts, Ingeborg; Lundberg, Kristina; Toller, Susanna; Brattebø, Helge; Birgisdóttir, Harpa; Potting, José

    2014-01-01

    Energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with life cycle stages of road infrastructure are currently rarely assessed during road infrastructure planning. This study examines the road infrastructure planning process, with emphasis on its use of Environmental Assessments (EA), and

  7. Deformation processes and emissions of acoustic impulses at the uniaxial loading of selected rocks from the Czech part of the Upper Silesian Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konečný Petr

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The deformation and induced acoustic emission during uniaxial loading were studied. Three main phases were distinguished during the whole deformation process: the initial one, in which the adjustment of rock specimen to the loading frame occurred, the middle one, preliminary with an elastic deformation manifestation, and the final one, in which a rapid development of cracks resulting in the fracture was observed. The comparison of the volumetric deformation of the sample with its acoustic emission enables us to distinguish between different behaviour of particular types of rock material.

  8. Influence of movement regime of stick-slip process on the size distribution of accompanying acoustic emission characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matcharashvili, Teimuraz; Chelidze, Tamaz; Zhukova, Natalia; Mepharidze, Ekaterine; Sborshchikov, Alexander

    2010-05-01

    Many scientific works on dynamics of earthquake generation are devoted to qualitative and quantitative reproduction of behavior of seismic faults. Number of theoretical, numerical or physical models are already designed for this purpose. Main assumption of these works is that the correct model must be capable to reproduce power law type relation for event sizes with magnitudes greater than or equal to a some threshold value, similar to Gutenberg-Richter (GR) law for the size distribution of earthquakes. To model behavior of a seismic faults in laboratory conditions spring-block experimental systems are often used. They enable to generate stick-slip movement, intermittent behavior occurring when two solids in contact slide relative to each other driven at a constant velocity. Wide interest to such spring-block models is caused by the fact that stick-slip is recognized as a basic process underlying earthquakes generation along pre-existing faults. It is worth to mention, that in stick slip experiments reproduction of power law, in slip events size distribution, with b values close or equal to the one found for natural seismicity is possible. Stick-slip process observed in these experimental models is accompanied by a transient elastic waves propagation generated during the rapid release of stress energy in spring-block system. Oscillations of stress energy can be detected as a characteristic acoustic emission (AE). Accompanying stick slip AE is the subject of intense investigation, but many aspects of this process are still unclear. In the present research we aimed to investigate dynamics of stick slip AE in order to find whether its distributional properties obey power law. Experiments have been carried out on spring-block system consisting of fixed and sliding plates of roughly finished basalt samples. The sliding block was driven with a constant velocity. Experiments have been carried out for five different stiffness of pulling spring. Thus five different regimes

  9. Methane emission from natural wetlands: interplay between emergent macrophytes and soil microbial processes. A mini-review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hendrikus J. Laanbroek

    2010-01-01

    ... % to the global emission of methane. The range in the estimated percentage of the contribution of these systems to the total release of this greenhouse gas is large due to differences in the nature of the emitting vegetation including...

  10. Fine particle and trace element emission characterization from energy production and process industry; Energiantuotannon ja prosessiteollisuuden pienhiukkas- ja raskasmetallipaeaestoejen karakterisointi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hokkinen, J.; Jokiniemi, J. [VTT Processes, Espoo (Finland); Aurela, M.; Hillamo, R. [Finnish Meteorological Inst. (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    ashes, bottom ashes and fly ash particles collected with BLPI and filters were analyzed with ICP-MS (Ion Coupled Plasma- Mass Spectroscopy) and IC (Ion Chromatography) or XRF (X-Ray fluorescence). For fluidized bed combustion the filter collection efficiency was 98.0% to 99.9% of the total particulate mass. In the fine particle mode (particle diameter 0.1-1.0 p.m) ESP had lower efficiency 90% to 99%, while fabric filter had better than 99% efficiency also for fine particles. The solid fuel combustion-generated particle emissions typically consist of two types of particles: fine particles approximately 0.1-1.0 im in diameter that are formed from the ash-forming species that are volatilized during combustion and residual ash particles larger than 1 im in diameter that are formed from mineral impurities in the fuels. In fluidized-bed combustion, also a third particle type is found that consists of fragmented bed material. The relative abundance of the different particle types depends on the fuel and combustion system as well as combustion conditions. Typically, for example, higher combustion temperature increases the amount of fine particles. Also, biomass combustion generally produces more fine particles than, for example, coal combustion due to the different mode of occurrence of the ash-forming compounds in the fuels. Many trace elements are relatively volatile during combustion and are consequently enriched in the fine particle fraction. In black liquor combustion the fine particle mode is at larger particles i.e. 1-3 im due to larger amount of volatilized material and hence mass concentration. In black liquor combustion the ESP efficiency is good also for fine particles. The measurements showed, that there is a relation between the fine particle mass concentration, the process temperature and Cl, S, K, Na, Pb, Cd, Cu and As concentrations in fuel. Higher process temperature and higher Chlorine content in fuel increase the concentration of these elements in submicron

  11. Managing Air Quality - Emissions Inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page describes the role of emission inventories in the air quality management process, a description of how emission inventories are developed, and where U.S. emission inventory information can be found.

  12. Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zohner, Steven K

    2000-05-01

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  13. Mechanistic modeling of thermo-hydrological processes and microbial interactions at pore to profile scales resolve methane emission dynamics from permafrost soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2017-04-01

    The sensitivity of the Earth's polar regions to raising global temperatures is reflected in rapidly changing hydrological processes with pronounced seasonal thawing of permafrost soil and increased biological activity. Of particular concern is the potential release of large amounts of soil carbon and the stimulation of other soil-borne GHG emissions such as methane. Soil methanotrophic and methanogenic microbial communities rapidly adjust their activity and spatial organization in response to permafrost thawing and a host of other environmental factors. Soil structural elements such as aggregates and layering and hydration status affect oxygen and nutrient diffusion processes thereby contributing to methanogenic activity within temporal anoxic niches (hotspots or hot-layers). We developed a mechanistic individual based model to quantify microbial activity dynamics within soil pore networks considering, hydration, temperature, transport processes and enzymatic activity associated with methane production in soil. The model was the upscaled from single aggregates (or hotspots) to quantifying emissions from soil profiles in which freezing/thawing processes provide macroscopic boundary conditions for microbial activity at different soil depths. The model distinguishes microbial activity in aerate bulk soil from aggregates (or submerged parts of the profile) for resolving methane production and oxidation rates. Methane transport pathways through soil by diffusion and ebullition of bubbles vary with hydration dynamics and affect emission patterns. The model links seasonal thermal and hydrologic dynamics with evolution of microbial community composition and function affecting net methane emissions in good agreement with experimental data. The mechanistic model enables systematic evaluation of key controlling factors in thawing permafrost and microbial response (e.g., nutrient availability, enzyme activity, PH) on long term methane emissions and carbon decomposition rates

  14. N2O Emission and Hydroxylamine Oxidase (HAO) Activity in a Nitrogen Removal Process Based on Activated Sludge with Three COD/NH4(+) Ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhi-Xian; Yuan, Lin-Jiang; Wei, Yi-Ni; Nan, Ya-Ping

    2017-05-01

      This study dealt with nitrous oxide (N2O) emission and hydroxylamine oxidase (HAO) activity of waste sludge in a nitrification and denitrification process employing three carbon nitrogen (C/N) ratios in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The experimental results indicated that N2O emission increased dramatically after the C/N ratio in the sludge increased from 6.5 to 9.3, which was greater than the N2O emission at two other C/N ratios (3.5, 6.5). The HAO activity in the anoxic period was higher with all three C/N ratios than in the aerobic period. The results suggest that N2O was produced primarily in the aerobic period and the main source of the N2O emission resulted from denitrification by nitrifying bacteria and aerobic hydroxylamine oxidation. When a relatively deficient carbon source existed, the N2O emission under anoxic conditions was affected by the HAO activity and vice versa. When the HAO activity was relatively high, it was found that more N2O was released.

  15. Electron emission yield and charging process of alkali-silicate glass submitted to an electron beam under the varying temperature condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belhaj, M., E-mail: Mohamed.Belhaj@onera.fr [ONERA - French Aerospace Lab, F-31055 Toulouse (France); Tondu, T.; Inguimbert, V. [ONERA - French Aerospace Lab, F-31055 Toulouse (France); Elsafi, B.; Fakhfakh, S. [LaMaCop, Faculte des Sciences de SFAX, Route Soukra Km 3, BP 1171, C.P 3000 Sfax (Tunisia); Jbara, O., E-mail: omar.jbara@univ-reims.fr [GRESPI/Materiaux Fonctionnels, UFR Sciences, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France)

    2012-01-01

    The electron emission due to electron impact of alkali-silicate glasses is measured with a technique based on the use of a Kelvin probe (KP method) and a pulsed electron beam. The KP method, allows a clear discrimination between the external and internal effects of charging process. The effect of the incident charge fluence, incident charge fluency and the temperature on the yield curve is investigated. It was found that, at room temperature as well as at 80 Degree-Sign C, electron emission varies with charge fluence. The effects of the temperature on charging mechanisms and charge transport characteristics of alkali-silicate glasses where also studied using the measurement of displacement and leakage currents under continuous electron irradiation in scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results clearly establish a correlation between charge carriers mobility and secondary electron emission yield. The enhancement of charge carrier mobility with increasing the temperature prevents the formation of a positive space charge (i.e. creation of positive ions and/or holes) that internally reduces the secondary electron (SE) emission. The higher is the temperature and the higher is the electron emission yield (EEY).

  16. Impact of direct greenhouse gas emissions on the carbon footprint of water reclamation processes employing nitrification–denitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Andrew G., E-mail: andrew.schneider@yale.edu [University of Cincinnati, Department of Geology, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Townsend-Small, Amy [University of Cincinnati, Department of Geology, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); University of Cincinnati, Department of Geography, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Rosso, Diego [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-2175 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Water reclamation has the potential to reduce water supply demands from aquifers and more energy-intensive water production methods (e.g., seawater desalination). However, water reclamation via biological nitrification–denitrification is also associated with the direct emission of the greenhouse gases (GHGs) CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and CH{sub 4}. We quantified these direct emissions from the nitrification–denitrification reactors of a water reclamation plant in Southern California, and measured the {sup 14}C content of the CO{sub 2} to distinguish between short- and long-lived carbon. The total emissions were 1.5 (± 0.2) g-fossil CO{sub 2} m{sup −3} of wastewater treated, 0.5 (± 0.1) g-CO{sub 2}-eq of CH{sub 4} m{sup −3}, and 1.8 (± 0.5) g-CO{sub 2}-eq of N{sub 2}O m{sup −3}, for a total of 3.9 (± 0.5) g-CO{sub 2}-eq m{sup −3}. This demonstrated that water reclamation can be a source of GHGs from long lived carbon, and thus a candidate for GHG reduction credit. From the {sup 14}C measurements, we found that between 11.4% and 15.1% of the CO{sub 2} directly emitted was derived from fossil sources, which challenges past assumptions that the direct CO{sub 2} emissions from water reclamation contain only modern carbon. A comparison of our direct emission measurements with estimates of indirect emissions from several water production methods, however, showed that the direct emissions from water reclamation constitute only a small fraction of the plant's total GHG footprint. - Highlights: • Direct greenhouse gas emissions were measured at a wastewater reclamation plant. • These greenhouse gas emissions amounted to 3.9 (± 0.5) g-CO{sub 2}-eq m{sup −3} of wastewater. • {sup 14}C analysis of the CO{sub 2} emissions was conducted to determine the fossil component. • 11.4% to 15.1% of the emitted CO{sub 2} was derived from fossil sources.

  17. Impact of direct greenhouse gas emissions on the carbon footprint of water reclamation processes employing nitrification-denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Andrew G; Townsend-Small, Amy; Rosso, Diego

    2015-02-01

    Water reclamation has the potential to reduce water supply demands from aquifers and more energy-intensive water production methods (e.g., seawater desalination). However, water reclamation via biological nitrification-denitrification is also associated with the direct emission of the greenhouse gases (GHGs) CO₂, N₂O, and CH₄. We quantified these direct emissions from the nitrification-denitrification reactors of a water reclamation plant in Southern California, and measured the (14)C content of the CO₂ to distinguish between short- and long-lived carbon. The total emissions were 1.5 (±0.2) g-fossil CO₂ m(-3) of wastewater treated, 0.5 (±0.1) g-CO₂-eq of CH₄ m(-3), and 1.8 (±0.5) g-CO₂-eq of N₂O m(-3), for a total of 3.9 (±0.5) g-CO₂-eqm(-3). This demonstrated that water reclamation can be a source of GHGs from long lived carbon, and thus a candidate for GHG reduction credit. From the (14)C measurements, we found that between 11.4% and 15.1% of the CO₂ directly emitted was derived from fossil sources, which challenges past assumptions that the direct CO₂ emissions from water reclamation contain only modern carbon. A comparison of our direct emission measurements with estimates of indirect emissions from several water production methods, however, showed that the direct emissions from water reclamation constitute only a small fraction of the plant's total GHG footprint. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Volatile organic compounds concentrations during the construction process in newly-built timber-frame houses: source identification and emission kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisance, H; Vignau-Laulhere, J; Mocho, P; Sauvat, N; Raulin, K; Desauziers, V

    2017-05-24

    Building and furniture materials are known to be major sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) indoors. During the construction process, an introduced material can have a more or less long-term impact on the indoor air quality according to the building characteristics. In this study, field measurements were carried out at six construction stages in three energy-efficient timber-frame houses. Data analysis focused on the ten most abundant compounds found among an initial list of fifteen target VOCs, namely formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, hexanal, toluene, m/p-xylenes, ethylbenzene, styrene, α-pinene, 3-carene and d-limonene. The chemical compositions and concentration variation patterns were recorded. The results showed a high pollution count, with m/p-xylenes and ethylbenzene concentrations ranging from 1900 to 5100 μg m-3 occurring at the time of the structural work (representing more than 88% of the sum of the target VOCs). Emission tests done on a large number of materials used in the construction revealed that this pollution is due to the emissions from the polyurethane adhesive mastic used as a sealing material. The emission kinetics of polyurethane adhesive mastic was assessed alone and also within a material assembly reconstituting a room wall. The results showed that the superposition of materials led to a slowing down of the VOC emission process from polyurethane adhesive mastic, which explains the concentration decays recorded in houses during the construction process. At the final construction stage, the concentration levels were low for all compounds (the sums of the target VOCs were between 18 and 32 μg m-3), with the aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and hexanal) now becoming the major fraction in the chemical composition in the last stages of construction (representing 50-70% of the sum of the target VOCs). This is in agreement with the fact that the sources of aldehydes are the most numerous among the materials and have rather slow emission

  19. To Facilitate or Curb? The Role of Financial Development in China’s Carbon Emissions Reduction Process: A Novel Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiancai Xing

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available With the Paris Agreement coming into effect, China, as the largest CO2 emitter in the world, will be facing greater pressure to reduce its carbon emissions. This paper discusses how to solve this issue from the perspective of financial development in China. Although many studies have analyzed its impact on carbon emissions, the conclusions are contradictory. A major criticism of the existing studies is the reasonability of the selection of appropriate indicators and panel estimation techniques. Almost all studies use only one or limited indicators to represent the financial development and ignore the cross-sectional dependence. To fulfil the gaps mentioned above, a financial development index system is built, and with the framework of the STIRPAT (Stochastic impacts by regression on population, affluence, and technology model, this paper applies an ARDL approach to investigating the long-run relationship between financial development and carbon emissions and a dynamic panel error-corrected model to capture the short-run impact. The empirical results show that financial development can improve carbon emissions, and such impact not only shows a regional difference but also reflects the features of stage differences. Additionally, based on the discussion on seven specific aspects of financial development, our findings can be helpful for policy makers to enact corresponding policies to realize the goal of reducing carbon emissions in China.

  20. Characterization of secondary ion emission processes of sub-MeV C60ion impacts via analysis of statistical distributions of the emitted ion number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, K; Yamada, K; Chiba, A; Narumi, K; Saitoh, Y

    2016-12-21

    We report probability distributions of the number of secondary ions (SIs) emitted by sub-MeV C 60 ion impacts on an organic polymer target and the characterization of their emission processes through the analysis of the distributions. The probability distributions were obtained by analyzing experimental SI counting data obtained by a time-of-flight SI mass spectrometer combined with pulsed primary ion beams, using an analytical model developed to derive the distributions from the experimental data. A series of probability distribution functions was investigated for ion impacts of C 60 with sub-MeV energies (0.12-0.54 MeV), which can provide sufficient SIs per impact to determine the functions. Their complicated and undefined SI emission processes were characterized based on the determined functions.

  1. Impact of a reduced red and processed meat dietary pattern on disease risks and greenhouse gas emissions in the UK: a modelling study

    OpenAIRE

    Aston, Louise M; Smith, James N; Powles, John W

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Consumption of red and processed meat (RPM) is a leading contributor to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and high intakes of these foods increase the risks of several leading chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to use newly derived estimates of habitual meat intakes in UK adults to assess potential co-benefits to health and the environment from reduced RPM consumption. Design Modelling study using dietary intake data from the National Diet and Nutrition Survey of British Adu...

  2. Methane emissions from floodplains in the Amazon Basin : Challenges in developing a process-based model for global applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ringeval, B.; Houweling, S.; Van Bodegom, P. M.; Spahni, R.; Van Beek, R.; Joos, F.; Röckmann, T.

    2014-01-01

    Tropical wetlands are estimated to represent about 50% of the natural wetland methane (CH4) emissions and explain a large fraction of the observed CH4 variability on timescales ranging from glacial-interglacial cycles to the currently observed year-to-year variability. Despite their importance,

  3. Emission and distribution of PCDD/Fs and CBzs from two co-processing RDF cement plants in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tong; Zhan, Ming-Xiu; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Li, Ye-Qing; Zhang, Jiang; Li, Xiao-Dong; Yan, Jian-Hua; Buekens, Alfons

    2016-06-01

    An analysis of the emission and distribution characteristics of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and chlorobenzenes (CBzs) from two cement kilns (CK1 and CK2) is done. Six measurements in CK1 showed an increase of PCDD/F emission from 76 to 97 pg I-TEQ/Nm(3) after feeding 10 ton/h RDF (refuse derived fuel). For CK2, the effect of increasing the RDF substitution rates from 0 to 21 t/h on the emission of PCDD/Fs was investigated. The correlation analysis indicated that replacing parts of the conventional fuel with RDF could not increase the emission of PCDD/Fs. Furthermore, the gas/particle partitions of PCDD/Fs and CBzs in stack gas were investigated, indicating that PCDD/Fs and CBzs were more associated in gas phase, especially for the lower chlorinated ones. Moreover, the bag filter fly ash was characterized by its particle distribution, XRD- and EDS-analysis. Additionally, the level of PCDD/Fs in outflowing fly ash escalates for smaller particle size. In order to evaluate the environmental effect on inhabitants, the levels of PCDD/Fs were also determined in samples of ambient air collected in the vicinity of CK2 (~200 m).

  4. An Investigation into the Processes and Quantity of Dust Emissions over Gravel and Sand Deserts in North-Western China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengcai; Dong, Zhibao; Qian, Guangqian; Wu, Guoxi; Cui, Xujia

    2017-06-01

    Year-long field observations have shown that there are spatial and temporal variations in the quantity of dust emissions for particulate matter {deserts, we found that gravel deserts and sandy deserts are both major sources of dust for dust storms in this region.

  5. Emissão de óxido nitroso nos processos de remoção biológica de nitrogênio de efluentes Nitrous oxide emission in the biological nitrogen removal process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Bortoli

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available O óxido nitroso (N2O é altamente impactante ao meio ambiente por ser um dos três gases mais importantes quando considerado o alto potencial de efeito estufa e a baixa quantidade emitida para a atmosfera. A preocupação com a geração de N2O no tratamento de efluentes tem crescido nas duas últimas décadas. Muitos estudos vêm sendo realizados com o objetivo de avaliar as condições de geração e emissão de N2O em etapas de remoção de nitrogênio no tratamento, tanto em escala laboratorial quanto em estações de tratamento de efluentes. Essas pesquisas demonstram que, sob certas condições, ambos os processos podem produzir e emitir grandes quantidades de N2O para a atmosfera, o que remete à importância de mais investigações para determinar as condições específicas que minimizem a produção e a emissão de N2O nesse caso.The nitrous oxide (N2O has a high striking power in environmental. It's one of the three most important greenhouse gases, when considered the greenhouse potential and emissions to the atmosphere. The concern in the two last decades with the N2O generation in wastewater treatment has grown. Many studies have been conducted with the objective of evaluate the conditions of N2O generation and emission in the nitrification and denitrification process, in biological nitrogen removal of wastewater treatment, both lab scale and wastewater treatment plants (WWTP. These studies show that under certain conditions, both processes can generate and emit large amounts of N2O to the atmosphere, what demonstrates the importance of conducting further investigations to determine specific conditions that minimize N2O production and emission.

  6. Impact of the Test Device on the Behavior of the Acoustic Emission Signals: Contribution of the Numerical Modeling to Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issiaka Traore, Oumar; Cristini, Paul; Favretto-Cristini, Nathalie; Pantera, Laurent; Viguier-Pla, Sylvie

    2018-01-01

    In a context of nuclear safety experiment monitoring with the non destructive testing method of acoustic emission, we study the impact of the test device on the interpretation of the recorded physical signals by using spectral finite element modeling. The numerical results are validated by comparison with real acoustic emission data obtained from previous experiments. The results show that several parameters can have significant impacts on acoustic wave propagation and then on the interpretation of the physical signals. The potential position of the source mechanism, the positions of the receivers and the nature of the coolant fluid have to be taken into account in the definition a pre-processing strategy of the real acoustic emission signals. In order to show the relevance of such an approach, we use the results to propose an optimization of the positions of the acoustic emission sensors in order to reduce the estimation bias of the time-delay and then improve the localization of the source mechanisms.

  7. Process control by optical emission spectroscopy during growth of a-C:H from a CH4 plasma by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barholm-Hansen, C; Bentzon, MD; Vigild, Martin Etchells

    1994-01-01

    of the gas flow. Above a certain flow rate the intensity saturates, since the deposition process is limited by the power input. At low flow rates a large fraction of the feed gas is dissociated and the deposition is limited by the supply of feed gas. A relationship was found for the intensity of the CH 431...... in the process gas. The initial OH intensity was dependent on the ultimate vacuum prior to the plasma cleaning. A correlation was found between the vanishing of the OH line and the appearance of characteristic emission lines From sputtered electrode material....

  8. Increases in terrestrially derived carbon stimulate organic carbon processing and CO2 emissions in boreal aquatic ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, Jean-François; Guillemette, François; Berggren, Martin; Del Giorgio, Paul A.

    2013-12-01

    The concentrations of terrestrially derived dissolved organic carbon have been increasing throughout northern aquatic ecosystems in recent decades, but whether these shifts have an impact on aquatic carbon emissions at the continental scale depends on the potential for this terrestrial carbon to be converted into carbon dioxide. Here, via the analysis of hundreds of boreal lakes, rivers and wetlands in Canada, we show that, contrary to conventional assumptions, the proportion of biologically degradable dissolved organic carbon remains constant and the photochemical degradability increases with terrestrial influence. Thus, degradation potential increases with increasing amounts of terrestrial carbon. Our results provide empirical evidence of a strong causal link between dissolved organic carbon concentrations and aquatic fluxes of carbon dioxide, mediated by the degradation of land-derived organic carbon in aquatic ecosystems. Future shifts in the patterns of terrestrial dissolved organic carbon in inland waters thus have the potential to significantly increase aquatic carbon emissions across northern landscapes.

  9. Environmental life cycle assessment of the Elkem Solar Metallurgical process route to solar grade silicon with focus on energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glockner, R.; Odden, J-O.; Halvorsen, G.; Tronstad, R. [Elkem Solar AS, P.O. Box 8040 Vaagsbygd, N-4675 Kristiansand (Norway); De Wild-Scholten, M.J. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2008-10-15

    Today more than 95% of solar grade silicon feedstock is produced by decomposition of (chloro)silanes using Siemens, Komatsu or FBR (Fluidised Bed Reactor)-technology. Metallurgical refined silicon of solar grade quality will in the coming years become increasingly available to the solar market and may reach a market share of 20-30% by 2011. Energy consumption and life cycle CO2-emission are important competitive factors. The industry will be faced with complete life cycle assessment (LCA) studies to compare solar energy with other sustainable energy sources. The present paper reports on an environmental LCA study performed on Elkem Solar Silicon (ESS) as the single source of solar grade silicon (SoG-Si) used in the production of a rooftop multicrystalline photovoltaic system. Life cycle green house gas (GHG) emissions and cumulative energy demand (CED) are estimated for feedstock plants located in Norway. A sensitivity analysis is done using Norwegian and European electricity mixes. Energy pay-back times (EPBT) are calculated for PV-systems mounted in Southern and North Western Europe. The results show that the EPBT applying ESS produced in Norway is 1.1 and 1.9 years for a system installed in Southern and North Western Europe, respectively. Life cycle emissions of GHG are estimated to be circa 14 g CO2-eq / kg ESS produced. The total life cycle GHG emissions for a rooftop PV system installed in Southern Europe is estimated to be approximately 23 g CO2-eq / kWh. For both EPBT and GHG emissions, the contribution from production of ESS is comparable in size to contributions from production of wafer, cell, laminate and inverter and more than 3 times lower than for conventional gas route processes.

  10. Inhibiting Mercury Re-emission and Enhancing Magnesia Recovery by Cobalt-Loaded Carbon Nanotubes in a Novel Magnesia Desulfurization Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lidong; Qi, Tieyue; Hu, Mengxuan; Zhang, Shihan; Xu, Peiyao; Qi, Dan; Wu, Siyu; Xiao, Huining

    2017-10-03

    Mercury re-emission, because of the reduction of Hg(2+) to form Hg(0) by sulfite, has become a great concern in the desulfurization process. Lowering the concentrations of Hg(2+) and sulfite in the desulfurization slurry can retard the Hg(0) formation and, thus, mitigate mercury re-emission. To that end, cobalt-based carbon nanotubes (Co-CNTs) were developed for the simultaneous Hg(2+) removal and sulfite oxidation in this work. Furthermore, the thermodynamics and kinetics of the Hg(2+) adsorption and effect of Hg(2+) adsorption on catalytic activity of Co-CNTs were investigated. Experimental results revealed that the Co-CNTs not only accelerated sulfite oxidation to enable the recovery of desulfurization by-products but also acted as an effective adsorbent of Hg(2+) removal. The Hg(2+) adsorption rate mainly depended on the structure of the adsorption material regardless of the cobalt loading and morphological distribution. The catalytic activity of the Co-CNTs for sulfite oxidation was not significantly affected due to the Hg(2+) adsorption. Additionally, the isothermal adsorption behavior was well-fitted to the Langmuir model with an adsorption capacity of 166.7 mg/g. The mercury mass balance analysis revealed that the Hg(0) re-emission was decreased by 156% by adding 2.0 g/L of Co-CNTs. These results can be used as a reference for the simultaneous removal of multiple pollutants in the wet-desulfurization process.

  11. Oxidative potential of gas phase combustion emissions - An underestimated and potentially harmful component of air pollution from combustion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanovic, S.; Vaughan, A.; Hedayat, F.; Salimi, F.; Rahman, M. M.; Zare, A.; Brown, R. A.; Brown, R. J.; Wang, H.; Zhang, Z.; Wang, X.; Bottle, S. E.; Yang, I. A.; Ristovski, Z. D.

    2017-06-01

    The oxidative potential (OP) of the gas phase is an important and neglected aspect of environmental toxicity. Whilst prolonged exposure to particulate matter (PM) associated reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to lead to negative health effects, the potential for compounds in gas phase to cause similar effects is yet to be understood. In this study we describe: the significance of the gas phase OP generated through vehicle emissions; discuss the origin and evolution of species contributing to measured OP; and report on the impact of gas phase OP on human lung cells. The model aerosol for this study was exhaust emitted from a Euro III Common-rail diesel engine fuelled with different blends of diesel and biodiesel. The gas phase of these emissions was found to be potentially as hazardous as the particle phase. Fuel oxygen content was found to negatively correlate with the gas phase OP, and positively correlate with particle phase OP. This signifies a complex interaction between reactive species present in gas and particle phase. Furthermore, this interaction has an overarching effect on the OP of both particle and gas phase, and therefore the toxicity of combustion emissions.

  12. Self-assembled InAs quantum dots. Properties, modification and emission processes; Selbstorganisierte InAs-Quantenpunkte. Eigenschaften, Modifizierung und Emissionsprozesse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, A.

    2007-09-06

    In this thesis, structural, optical as well as electronic properties of self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QD) were studied by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM), photoluminescence (PL), capacitance spectroscopy (CV) and capacitance transient spectroscopy (DLTS). The quantum dots were grown with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and embedded in Schottky diodes for electrical characterization. In this work growth aspects as well as the electronic structures of QD were discussed. By varying the QD growth parameters it is possible to control the structural, and thus the optical and electronic properties of QD. Two methods are presented. Adjusting the QD growth temperature leads either to small QD with a high areal density or to high QDs with a low density. The structural changes of the QD are reflected in the changes of the optical and electronic properties. The second method is to introduce a growth interruption after capping the QD with thin cap layers. It was shown that capping with AlAs leads to a well-developed alternative to control the QD height and thus the ground-state energies of the QD. A post-growth method modifying the QD properties ist rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Raising the RTA temperature causes a lifting of the QD energy states with respect to the GaAs band edge energy due to In/Ga intermixing processes. A further main part of this work covers the emission processes of charge carriers in QD. Thermal emission, thermally assisted tunneling, and pure tunneling emission are studied by capacitance transient spectroscopy techniques. In DLTS experiments a strong impact of the electric field on the activation energies of electrons was found interfering the correct determination of the QD level energies. This behaviour can be explained by a thermally assisted tunneling model. A modified model taking the Coulomb interaction of occupied QD into account describes the emission rates of the electrons. In order to avoid several emission pathes in the experiments

  13. 40 CFR 63.1037 - Alternative means of emission limitation: Enclosed-vented process units or affected facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... limitation: Enclosed-vented process units or affected facilities. 63.1037 Section 63.1037 Protection of...-vented process units or affected facilities. (a) Use of closed vent system and control device. Process units or affected facilities or portions of process units at affected facilities enclosed in such a...

  14. Estudo da emissão de raios infravermelho próximo em processos de soldagem a arco Study of near-infrared emission on processes of arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Pimenta Mota

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available O estudo de boa parte dos fenômenos envolvidos no processo de soldagem necessita de auxílio visual e a luminosidade emitida pelo arco pode representar uma grande barreira. Uma das formas utilizadas atualmente para se obter a visualização do processo, sem a interferência do arco, consiste em iluminar o processo com o infravermelho próximo e utilizar filtros durante a aquisição das imagens. Assim, é importante investigar o comportamento do arco de soldagem em relação à sua emissão luminosa no espectro infravermelho. Desta forma, a proposta deste trabalho foi a realização de um estudo comparativo entre a emissão do arco de soldagem de radiação infravermelha próxima em dois processos largamente utilizados, TIG e MIG/MAG, focando também sua influência por parâmetros como a corrente de soldagem e a proteção gasosa utilizada. Com o uso de um sensor de luminosidade e a utilização de um sistema de lentes ópticas, foram realizados experimentos, adquirindo o espectro luminoso emitido pelo arco voltaico. Através dos resultados obtidos, ou seja, do valor numérico de energia luminosa do arco de soldagem (integração do espectro é possível se obter, com a utilização desta mesma metodologia, a energia luminosa no infravermelho próximo e, consequentemente, a intensidade luminosa, necessária para a sobreposição do arco durante a aquisição de imagens.Most of the phenomenon studied in the welding processes needs a vision system and the arc light emission can create a great barrier. Nowadays, one of the techniques used for visualizing the process, without arc interference, is the illumination of the process with near-infrared laser and the use of optic filters during the image acquisition. Thus, it is important to investigate the welding arc behavior in respect to its light emission within the near-infrared spectrum. Therefore, this work aims to perform a comparative study of the arc near infrared emission in one of the two

  15. Mulifunctional Dendritic Emitter: Aggregation-Induced Emission Enhanced, Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescent Material for Solution-Processed Multilayered Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Kenichi; Albrecht, Ken; Yamamoto, Kimihisa; Fujita, Katsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials emerged as promising light sources in third generation organic light-emitting diodes (OLED). Much effort has been invested for the development of small molecular TADF materials and vacuum process-based efficient TADF-OLEDs. In contrast, a limited number of solution processable high-molecular weight TADF materials toward low cost, large area, and scalable manufacturing of solution processed TADF-OLEDs have been reported so far. In this context, we report benzophenone-core carbazole dendrimers (GnB, n = generation) showing TADF and aggregation-induced emission enhancement (AIEE) properties along with alcohol resistance enabling further solution-based lamination of organic materials. The dendritic structure was found to play an important role for both TADF and AIEE activities in the neat films. By using these multifunctional dendritic emitters as non-doped emissive layers, OLED devices with fully solution processed organic multilayers were successfully fabricated and achieved maximum external quantum efficiency of 5.7%.

  16. Multiple visible emissions by means of up-conversion process in a microstructured tellurite glass optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boetti, Nadia G; Lousteau, Joris; Negro, Davide; Mura, Emanuele; Scarpignato, Gerardo; Abrate, Silvio; Milanese, Daniel

    2012-02-27

    We present a microstructured fiber whose 9 µm diameter core consists in three concentric rings made of three active glasses having different rare earth oxide dopants, Yb3+/Er3+, Yb3+/Tm3+ and Yb3+/Pr3+, respectively. Morphological and optical characterization of the optical fiber are presented. The photoluminescence spectrum is investigated for different pumping conditions using a commercial 980 nm laser diode. Tuning of the RGB (or white light) emission is demonstrated not only by adjusting the pump power but also by using an optical iris as spatial filter which, thanks to the microstructured core, also acts as a spectral filter.

  17. Methodology for systematic analysis and improvement of manufacturing unit process life cycle inventory (UPLCI) CO2PE! initiative (cooperative effort on process emissions in manufacturing). Part 2: case studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kellens, Karel; Dewulf, Wim; Overcash, Michael

    2012-01-01

    ! template, is illustrated by means of a case study of a laser cutting process.The CO2PE! methodology aims to provide high-quality LCI data for the machine tool use phase of manufacturing unit processes, to be used in life cycle inventory databases and libraries, as well as to identify potential...... developed in the framework of the CO2PE! collaborative research programme (CO2PE! 2011) and is described in part 1 of this paper (Kellens et al. 2011).The screening approach, which provides a first insight into the unit process and results in a set of approximate LCI data, relies on representative...... of the manufacturing unit processes, is subdivided into four modules, including a time study, a power consumption study, a consumables study and an emissions study, in which all relevant process in- and outputs are measured and analysed in detail. The procedure of this approach, together with the proposed CO2PE...

  18. Estimating the potential of energy saving and carbon emission mitigation of cassava-based fuel ethanol using life cycle assessment coupled with a biogeochemical process model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dong; Hao, Mengmeng; Fu, Jingying; Tian, Guangjin; Ding, Fangyu

    2017-09-14

    Global warming and increasing concentration of atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) have prompted considerable interest in the potential role of energy plant biomass. Cassava-based fuel ethanol is one of the most important bioenergy and has attracted much attention in both developed and developing countries. However, the development of cassava-based fuel ethanol is still faced with many uncertainties, including raw material supply, net energy potential, and carbon emission mitigation potential. Thus, an accurate estimation of these issues is urgently needed. This study provides an approach to estimate energy saving and carbon emission mitigation potentials of cassava-based fuel ethanol through LCA (life cycle assessment) coupled with a biogeochemical process model-GEPIC (GIS-based environmental policy integrated climate) model. The results indicate that the total potential of cassava yield on marginal land in China is 52.51 million t; the energy ratio value varies from 0.07 to 1.44, and the net energy surplus of cassava-based fuel ethanol in China is 92,920.58 million MJ. The total carbon emission mitigation from cassava-based fuel ethanol in China is 4593.89 million kgC. Guangxi, Guangdong, and Fujian are identified as target regions for large-scale development of cassava-based fuel ethanol industry. These results can provide an operational approach and fundamental data for scientific research and energy planning.

  19. Estimating the potential of energy saving and carbon emission mitigation of cassava-based fuel ethanol using life cycle assessment coupled with a biogeochemical process model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dong; Hao, Mengmeng; Fu, Jingying; Tian, Guangjin; Ding, Fangyu

    2017-09-01

    Global warming and increasing concentration of atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) have prompted considerable interest in the potential role of energy plant biomass. Cassava-based fuel ethanol is one of the most important bioenergy and has attracted much attention in both developed and developing countries. However, the development of cassava-based fuel ethanol is still faced with many uncertainties, including raw material supply, net energy potential, and carbon emission mitigation potential. Thus, an accurate estimation of these issues is urgently needed. This study provides an approach to estimate energy saving and carbon emission mitigation potentials of cassava-based fuel ethanol through LCA (life cycle assessment) coupled with a biogeochemical process model—GEPIC (GIS-based environmental policy integrated climate) model. The results indicate that the total potential of cassava yield on marginal land in China is 52.51 million t; the energy ratio value varies from 0.07 to 1.44, and the net energy surplus of cassava-based fuel ethanol in China is 92,920.58 million MJ. The total carbon emission mitigation from cassava-based fuel ethanol in China is 4593.89 million kgC. Guangxi, Guangdong, and Fujian are identified as target regions for large-scale development of cassava-based fuel ethanol industry. These results can provide an operational approach and fundamental data for scientific research and energy planning.

  20. A process-based model for ammonia emission from urine patches, GAG (Generation of Ammonia from Grazing): description, validation and sensitivity analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Móring, A; Vieno, M.; Doherty, R M

    2015-01-01

    models, as a necessary basis for assessing the effects of climate change on NH3 related atmospheric processes. GAG is capable of simulating the TAN (Total Ammoniacal Nitrogen) content, pH and the water content of the soil under a urine patch. To calculate the TAN budget, GAG takes into account urea...... hydrolysis as a TAN input and NH3 volatilization as a loss. In the water budget, in addition to the water content of urine, precipitation and evaporation are also considered. In the pH module we assumed that the main regulating processes are the dissociation and dissolution equilibria related to the two......In this paper a new process-based, weather-driven model for ammonia (NH3) emission from a urine patch has been developed and its sensitivity to various factors assessed. This model, the GAG model (Generation of Ammonia from Grazing) was developed as a part of a suite of weather-driven NH3 exchange...

  1. Determination of the {sup 121}Te gamma emission probabilities associated with the production process of radiopharmaceutical NaI[{sup 123}I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, M.T.F.; Lopes, R.T., E-mail: maraujo@con.ufrj.br, E-mail: miriamtaina@hotmail.com [Coordenacao dos Cursos de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (LIN/PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear. Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Poledna, R.; Delgado, J.U.; Almeida, M.C.M. de; Silva, R.L. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ/LNMRI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes

    2015-07-01

    The {sup 123}I is widely used in radiodiagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine. According to Pharmacopoeia care should be taken during its production process, since radionuclidic impurities may be generated. The {sup 121}Te is an impurity that arises during the {sup 123}I production and determining their gamma emission probabilities (Pγ) is important in order to obtain more information about its decay. Activities were also obtained by absolute standardization using the sum-peak method and these values were compared to the efficiency curve method. (author)

  2. Study of combustion and emission characteristics of fuel derived from waste plastics by various waste to energy (W-t-E) conversion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazrat, M. A.; Rasul, M. G.; Khan, M. M. K.

    2016-07-01

    Reduction of plastic wastes by means of producing energy can be treated as a good investment in the waste management and recycling sectors. In this article, conversion of plastics into liquid fuel by two thermo-chemical processes, pyrolysis and gasification, are reviewed. The study showed that the catalytic pyrolysis of homogenous waste plastics produces better quality and higher quantity of liquefied fuel than that of non-catalytic pyrolysis process at a lower operating temperature. The syngas produced from gasification process, which occurs at higher temperature than the pyrolysis process, can be converted into diesel by the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reaction process. Conducive bed material like Olivine in the gasification conversion process can remarkably reduce the production of tar. The waste plastics pyrolysis oil showed brake thermal efficiency (BTE) of about 27.75%, brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) of 0.292 kg/kWh, unburned hydrocarbon emission (uHC) of 91 ppm and NOx emission of 904 ppm in comparison with the diesel for BTE of 28%, BSFC of 0.276 kg/kWh, uHC of 57 ppm and NOx of 855 ppm. Dissolution of Polystyrene (PS) into biodiesel also showed the potential of producing alternative transport fuel. It has been found from the literature that at higher engine speed, increased EPS (Expanded Polystyrene) quantity based biodiesel blends reduces CO, CO2, NOx and smoke emission. EPS-biodiesel fuel blend increases the brake thermal efficiency by 7.8%, specific fuel consumption (SFC) by 7.2% and reduces brake power (Pb) by 3.2%. More study using PS and EPS with other thermoplastics is needed to produce liquid fuel by dissolving them into biodiesel and to assess their suitability as a transport fuel. Furthermore, investigation to find out most suitable W-t-E process for effective recycling of the waste plastics as fuel for internal combustion engines is necessary to reduce environmental pollution and generate revenue which will be addressed in this article.

  3. Louisiana SIP: LAC 33:III Ch 2147. Limiting Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Reactor Processes and Distillation Operations in Synthetic Organic Chemical manufacturing Industry (SOCMI); SIP effective 2011-08-04 (LAd34) to 2017-09-27

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana SIP: LAC 33:III Ch 2147. Limiting Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Reactor Processes and Distillation Operations in Synthetic Organic Chemical manufacturing Industry (SOCMI); SIP effective 2011-08-04 (LAd34) to 2017-09-27

  4. Louisiana SIP: LAC 33:III Ch 21 Subchap J, 2147--Limiting Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Reactor Processes and Distillation Operations in Synthetic Organic Chemical manufacturing Industry (SOCMI); SIP effective 1998-02-02 (LAc74) to more..

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana SIP: LAC 33:III Ch 21 Subchap J, 2147--Limiting Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions from Reactor Processes and Distillation Operations in Synthetic Organic Chemical manufacturing Industry (SOCMI); SIP effective 1998-02-02 (LAc74) more...

  5. Influence of the Hardener on the Emission of Harmful Substances from Moulding Sands with Furan Resin in the Pyrolysis Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holtzer M.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The furan resin offers advantages such as high intensity, low viscosity, good humidity resistance and is suitable for cast different casting alloys: steel, cast iron and non-ferrous metal casting. For hardening furan resins are used different hardeners (acid catalysts. The acid catalysts have significant effects on the properties of the cured binder (e,g. binding strength and thermal stability [1 - 3]. Investigations of the gases emission in the test foundry plant were performed according to the original method developed in the Faculty of Foundry Engineering, AGH UST. The analysis is carried out by the gas chromatography method with the application of the flame-ionising detector (FID (TRACE GC Ultra THERMO SCIENTIFIC.

  6. Structural modification of nanocrystalline diamond films via positive/negative bias enhanced nucleation and growth processes for improving their electron field emission properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saravanan, A.; Huang, B. R. [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Sankaran, K. J.; Tai, N. H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Keiser, G. [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering and Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Kurian, J.; Lin, I. N., E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-07

    Electron field emission (EFE) properties of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films synthesized by the bias-enhanced growth (beg) process under different bias voltages were investigated. The induction of the nanographitic phases is presumed to be the prime factor in enhancing the EFE properties of negative biased NCD films. Transmission electron microscopic investigations reveal that a negative bias voltage of −300 V increases the rate of growth for NCD films with the size of the grains changing from nano to ultranano size. This effect also is accompanied by the induction of nanographitic filaments in the grain boundaries of the films. The turn-on field (E{sub 0}) for the EFE process then effectively gets reduced. The EFE process of the beg-NCD{sub −300V} films can be turned on at E{sub 0} = 3.86 V/μm, and the EFE current density achieved is 1.49 mA/cm{sup 2} at an applied field of 7.85 V/μm. On the other hand, though a positive-bias beg process (+200 V) results in the reduction of grain size, it does not induce sufficient nanographitic phases to lower the E{sub 0} value of the EFE process. Moreover, the optical emission spectroscopic investigation indicates that one of the primary causes that changes the granular structure of the NCD films is the increase in the proportion of C{sub 2} and CH species induced in the growing plasma. The polarity of the bias voltage is of less importance in the microstructural evolution of the films.

  7. Fine-Tuned Search for Kilonova Emission in a Short Gamma-Ray Burst: Implications for the Progenitors, Advanced LIGO, and r-Process Nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Edo

    2017-08-01

    Short-duration gamma-ray bursts have long been suspected to result from the catastrophic mergers of binaries composed of two neutron stars (NS-NS) and/or a neutron star and a black hole (NS-BH). This possible association is of fundamental importance since these binaries are also strong gravitational wave emitters, and the short GRB connection can therefore guide electromagnetic follow-up of Advanced LIGO gravitational wave sources. An important direct signature of NS-NS/NS-BH progenitors is near-infrared emission powered by radioactive r-process material synthesized by the ejection of neutron-rich matter during the merger, a so-called kilonova. HST observations of the short GRB130603B provided the first tantalizing evidence for such an emission component, but unfortunately lacked detailed spectral and temporal information. Here, we propose fine-tuned TOO observations of a future short GRB that will definitively establish the presence of a kilonova and will also allow us to distinguish an NS-NS from an NS-BH merger, based on the ejecta mass ( 0.01 vs. 0.1 Msun, respectively). The results will not only serve as a smoking gun for compact object merger progenitors, but they will also guide our plans for optical/infrared follow-up of Advanced LIGO sources, and establish whether compact object mergers are the primary site for cosmic r-process nucleosynthesis. To support and interpret the proposed HST observations, and to rule out alternative explanations for any detected emission, we will obtain a wide range of observations spanning radio to X-rays using active programs at Gemini, Magellan, MMT, VLA, Chandra, and XMM.

  8. Noble metal recycling. Project 2: Optimization of discontinuous thermal processes (emission reduction). Final report; Edelmetallrecycling. Teilvorhaben 2: Weiterentwicklung der Verfahrenstechnik bei diskontinuierlichen thermischen Prozessen (Emissionsminderung). Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumbach, G.; Berger, R.

    2000-10-01

    A batch operated incineration process, used for the recycling of precious metals is described in the report. The development of a new combined pyrolysis/oxidation Process is the main focus of the work. This new process has several remarkable advantages compared to traditionally used techniques. The optimisation of the process with a modern fuzzy based control technique is described in detail. The emissions of the process were reduced considerably applying the new process and the innovative control technique. Furthermore the layout of several components of the new process can be reduced in the future. The developed techniques can also be applied in other thermal processes, especially batch processes. Additionally the application of catalysts for PCDD/PCDF reduction in the flue gas upstream and downstream of the filter was investigated. Whereas the catalyst performed well, as expected, downstream of the filter, no acceptable operation was possible upstream of the filter. As the reheating downstream the filter is economically not feasible the application of catalysts is not applicable for the describe process. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeit beschreibt einen diskontinuierlichen thermischen Prozess, der zur Rueckgewinnung von Edelmetallen eingesetzt wird. Der Schwerpunkt der Arbeit liegt auf der Entwicklung eines neuartigen kombinierten Pyrolyse/Oxidations-Prozesses, der gegenueber den traditionell eingesetzten Anlagen grosse Vorteile aufweist. Die Optimierung dieses Prozesses mit Hilfe modernster Fuzzy-Regelungstechnik wird detailliert beschrieben. Mit dem neuen Verfahren und den innovativen Regelungstechniken konnten die Emissionen des Prozesses merklich gesenkt werden, ohne den Energiebedarf negativ zu beeinflussen. Ausserdem koennen zukuenftige Anlagen kleiner ausgelegt werden. Die entwickelten Verfahren koennen auch auf andere thermische Prozesse uebertragen werden. Weiterhin wurde der Einsatz von Katalysatoren zur PCDD/PCDF-Minderung im Rein- und Rohgas untersucht

  9. Effects of aeration and internal recycle flow on nitrous oxide emissions from a modified Ludzak-Ettinger process fed with glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kang; Suenaga, Toshikazu; Harper, Willie F; Hori, Tomoyuki; Riya, Shohei; Hosomi, Masaaki; Terada, Akihiko

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is emitted from a modified Ludzak-Ettinger (MLE) process, as a primary activated sludge system, which requires mitigation. The effects of aeration rates and internal recycle flow (IRF) ratios on N2O emission were investigated in an MLE process fed with glycerol. Reducing the aeration rate from 1.5 to 0.5 L/min increased gaseous the N2O concentration from the aerobic tank and the dissolved N2O concentration in the anoxic tank by 54.4 and 53.4 %, respectively. During the period of higher aeration, the N2O-N conversion ratio was 0.9 % and the potential N2O reducers were predominantly Rhodobacter, which accounted for 21.8 % of the total population. Increasing the IRF ratio from 3.6 to 7.2 decreased the N2O emission rate from the aerobic tank and the dissolved N2O concentration in the anoxic tank by 56 and 48 %, respectively. This study suggests effective N2O mitigation strategies for MLE systems.

  10. Combining urban scale inversions and process-based information from sectors of economic activity in the Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX) to monitor CO2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvaux, Thomas; Calahan, Bill; Cambaliza, Maria; Davis, Kenneth; Deng, Aijun; Hardesty, Robert; Iraci, Laura; Gurney, Kevin; Karion, Anna; McGowan, Laura; Possolo, Antonio; Razlivanov, Igor; Sarmiento, Daniel; Shepson, Paul; Sweeney, Colm; Turnbull, Jocelyn; Whetstone, James

    2013-04-01

    The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX) aims at quantifying emissions of anthropogenic carbon using top-down methods and process-based information (Hestia) at very high resolution over the city of Indianapolis (IN). At present, 9 sensors measuring continuously atmospheric mixing ratios of GHG have been deployed, with additional flask samples of isotopic ratios, one eddy-flux site measuring the surface energy and CO2 fluxes, frequent aircraft flight measurements of GHG, and a column-integrated surface based sensor (FTS-TCCON). Additional meteorological instruments were deployed to assess the accuracy of the modeling system by measuring vertical profiles of several meteorological variables (wind, turbulent mixing height, temperature), from both ground-based and airborne instruments. The inverse modeling system combines the atmospheric transport model WRF in Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation mode with a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model to simulate the local atmospheric dynamics over the area. The system was coupled to the high resolution emissions from the Hestia product at the hourly time scale for each individual economic activity sector. We present here the contribution from the different activity sectors as observed by the current atmospheric observation network. The capability of the system to detect and constrain seasonal and spatial signals in the emissions is inferred from sensitivity experiments. Whereas several sectors are widely distributed in space and observed by the whole GHG sensors network, we show that large point sources from industrial and utility sectors are less frequently observed and difficult to simulate correctly in our initial WRF simulations. However, these sectors represent a large fraction of the total emissions in the area. Consequently, seasonal changes in the atmospheric circulation and the sector emissions impact directly the distribution of the final error reduction of the inverse system. We finally estimate the potential of

  11. Estimation of errors caused by spherical approximation of earth shape in coordinates determination process of radio emission source using bearings

    OpenAIRE

    Kochergin, Anatoliy; Chebotov, Olexandr; Chebotov, Volodymyr

    2012-01-01

    Estimation of errors in the process of coordinates’ determination of radio source with spherical approximation is conducted. It is demonstrated that for increasing of coordinates’ determination accuracy on spreading paths ellepsoidity of earth shape should be taken into consideration.

  12. Solution-processed multilayer small-molecule light-emitting devices with high-efficiency white-light emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Naoya; Pu, Yong-Jin; Watanabe, Michitake; Chiba, Takayuki; Ideta, Kazushige; Toyota, Naoki; Igarashi, Masahiro; Suzuri, Yoshiyuki; Sasabe, Hisahiro; Kido, Junji

    2014-12-01

    Recent developments in the field of π-conjugated polymers have led to considerable improvements in the performance of solution-processed organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs). However, further improving efficiency is still required to compete with other traditional light sources. Here we demonstrate efficient solution-processed multilayer OLEDs using small molecules. On the basis of estimates from a solvent resistance test of small host molecules, we demonstrate that covalent dimerization or trimerization instead of polymerization can afford conventional small host molecules sufficient resistance to alcohols used for processing upper layers. This allows us to construct multilayer OLEDs through subsequent solution-processing steps, achieving record-high power efficiencies of 36, 52 and 34 lm W-1 at 100 cd m-2 for solution-processed blue, green and white OLEDs, respectively, with stable electroluminescence spectra under varying current density. We also show that the composition at the resulting interface of solution-processed layers is a critical factor in determining device performance.

  13. Investigation of absorptance and emissivity of thermal control coatings on Mg–Li alloys and OES analysis during PEO process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhongping; Xia, Qixing; Ju, Pengfei; Wang, Jiankang; Su, Peibo; Li, Dongqi; Jiang, Zhaohua

    2016-01-01

    Thermal control ceramic coatings on Mg–Li alloys have been successfully prepared in silicate electrolyte system by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) method. The PEO coatings are mainly composed of crystallized Mg2SiO4 and MgO, which have typical porous structure with some bulges on the surface; OES analysis shows that the plasma temperature, which is influenced by the technique parameters, determines the formation of the coatings with different crystalline phases and morphologies, combined with “quick cooling effect” by the electrolyte; and the electron concentration is constant, which is related to the electric spark breakdown, determined by the nature of the coating and the interface of coating/electrolyte. Technique parameters influence the coating thickness, roughness and surface morphology, but do not change the coating composition in the specific PEO regime, and therefore the absorptance (αS) and emissivity (ε) of the coatings can be adjusted by the technique parameters through changing thickness and roughness in a certain degree. The coating prepared at 10 A/dm2, 50 Hz, 30 min and 14 g/L Na2SiO3 has the minimum value of αS (0.35) and the maximum value of ε (0.82), with the balance temperature of 320 K. PMID:27383569

  14. Impact of a reduced red and processed meat dietary pattern on disease risks and greenhouse gas emissions in the UK: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, Louise M; Smith, James N; Powles, John W

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of red and processed meat (RPM) is a leading contributor to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and high intakes of these foods increase the risks of several leading chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to use newly derived estimates of habitual meat intakes in UK adults to assess potential co-benefits to health and the environment from reduced RPM consumption. Modelling study using dietary intake data from the National Diet and Nutrition Survey of British Adults. British general population. Respondents were divided into fifths by energy-adjusted RPM intakes, with vegetarians constituting a sixth stratum. GHG emitted in supplying the diets of each stratum was estimated using data from life-cycle analyses. A feasible counterfactual UK population was specified, in which the proportion of vegetarians measured in the survey population doubled, and the remainder adopted the dietary pattern of the lowest fifth of RPM consumers. Reductions in risks of coronary heart disease, diabetes and colorectal cancer, and GHG emissions, under the counterfactual. Habitual RPM intakes were 2.5 times higher in the top compared with the bottom fifth of consumers. Under the counterfactual, statistically significant reductions in population aggregate risks ranged from 3.2% (95% CI 1.9 to 4.7) for diabetes in women to 12.2% (6.4 to 18.0) for colorectal cancer in men, with those moving from the highest to lowest consumption levels gaining about twice these averages. The expected reduction in GHG emissions was 0.45 tonnes CO(2) equivalent/person/year, about 3% of the current total, giving a reduction across the UK population of 27.8 million tonnes/year. Reduced consumption of RPM would bring multiple benefits to health and environment.

  15. Strongly reduced fragmentation and soft emission processes in sputtered ion formation from amino acid films under large Ar(n)+ (n ≤ 2200) cluster ion bombardment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnaser, Hubert; Ichiki, Kazuya; Matsuo, Jiro

    2012-01-15

    The analysis of organic and biological substances by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has greatly benefited from the use of cluster ions as primary bombarding species. Thereby, depth profiling and three-dimensional (3D) imaging of such systems became feasible. Large Ar(n)(+) cluster ions may constitute a further improvement in this direction. To explore this option, size-selected Ar(n)(+) cluster ions with 300 ≤ n ≤ 2200 (bombarding energies 5.5 and 11 keV) were used to investigate the emission of positive secondary ions from four amino acid specimens (arginine, glycine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine) by time-of-flight SIMS. For all cluster sizes, the protonated molecule of the respective amino acid is observed in the mass spectra. With increasing cluster size the number of fragment ions decreases strongly in relation to the intact molecules, to the extent that the fraction of fragment ions amounts to less than 10% in some cases. Such 'soft' emission processes also lead the ejection of dimers and even multimers of the amino acid molecules. In the case of the phenylalanine, secondary ion species composed of up to at least seven phenylalanine moieties were observed. Tentatively, the ionization probability of the emitted molecules is envisaged to depend on the presence of free protons in the emission zone. Their number can be expected to decrease concurrently with the decreasing amount of fragmentation for large Ar(n)(+) cluster ions (i.e. for low energies per cluster atom). Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Opportunities to integrate solar technologies into the Chilean lithium mining industry - reducing process related GHG emissions of a strategic storage resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telsnig, Thomas; Potz, Christian; Haas, Jannik; Eltrop, Ludger; Palma-Behnke, Rodrigo

    2017-06-01

    The arid northern regions of Chile are characterized by an intensive mineral mining industry and high solar irradiance levels. Besides Chile's main mining products, copper, molybdenum and iron, the production of lithium carbonate from lithium containing brines has become strategically important due to the rising demand for battery technologies worldwide. Its energy-intensive production may affect the ecological footprint of the product and the country's climate targets. Thus, the use of solar technologies for electricity and heat production might constitute an interesting option for CO2 mitigation. This study aims to quantify the impacts of the lithium carbonate production processes in Chile on climate change, and to identify site-specific integration options of solar energy technologies to reduce GHG life-cycle emissions. The considered solar integration options include a parabolic trough power plant with a molten salt storage, a solar tower power plant with molten salt receiver and molten salt storage, a one-axis tracking photovoltaic energy system for electricity, and two solar thermal power plants with Ruths storage (steam accumulator) for thermal heat production. CSP plants were identified as measures with the highest GHG mitigation potential reducing the CO2 emissions for the entire production chain and the lithium production between 16% and 33%. In a scenario that combines solar technologies for electricity and thermal energy generation, up to 59% of the CO2 emissions at the lithium production sites in Chile can be avoided. A comparison of the GHG abatement costs of the proposed solar integration options indicates that the photovoltaic system, the solar thermal plant with limited storage and the solar tower power plant are the most cost effective options.

  17. Coupling Computer-Aided Process Simulation and Estimations of Emissions and Land Use for Rapid Life Cycle Inventory Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    A methodology is described for developing a gate-to-gate life cycle inventory (LCI) of a chemical manufacturing process to support the application of life cycle assessment in the design and regulation of sustainable chemicals. The inventories were derived by first applying proces...

  18. Uncertainties in emission inventories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aardenne, van J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Emission inventories provide information about the amount of a pollutant that is emitted to the atmosphere as a result of a specific anthropogenic or natural process at a given time or place. Emission inventories can be used for either policy or scientific purposes. For

  19. Pathways of N removal and N2O emission from a one-stage autotrophic N removal process under anaerobic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Fang, Fang; Wang, Han; Wang, Chao; Chen, Youpeng; Guo, Jinsong; Wang, Xixi; Jiang, Fuyang

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the pathways of nitrogen (N) removal and N2O emission in a one-stage autotrophic N removal process during the non-aeration phase, biofilm from an intermittent aeration sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) and organic carbon-free synthetic wastewater were applied to two groups of lab-scale batch experiments in anaerobic conditions using a 15N isotopic tracer and specific inhibitors, respectively. Then, the microbial composition of the biofilm was analysed using high-throughput sequencing. The results of the 15N isotopic experiments showed that anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) was the main pathway of N transformation under anaerobic conditions and was responsible for 83-92% of N2 production within 24 h. Furthermore, experiments using specific inhibitors revealed that when nitrite was the main N source under anaerobic conditions, N2O emissions from heterotrophic denitrification (HD) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) denitrification were 64% and 36%, respectively. Finally, analysing the microbial composition demonstrated that Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Nitrospirae were the dominant microbes, corresponding to 21%, 13%, and 7% of the microbial community, respectively, and were probably responsible for HD, Anammox, and AOB denitrification, respectively.

  20. Ammonia emissions in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.

    2012-01-01

    The NEC (National Emission Ceiling) directive has set targets for the 2010 ammonia emissions from a number of European countries. The target will be reached by most EU-countries and the total emission for EU-27 has been reduced by 22% from 1990 to 2007. Denmark is one of the countries...... technology is adopted quicker and that the farm has the right location. It is concluded that the new application process so far has not lived up to the high expectations at the outset. Despite this, the paper concludes that Denmark is likely to reduce emission by 50% from 1990 to 2020 and reach the likely...

  1. The radiation defect accumulation in scintillative crystals of caesium halides under intense electron beam irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Galiy, P V

    1999-01-01

    The characteristics of defect accumulation and radiolysis at CsI crystals under mean energies of electron irradiation at wide dose rates and ranges of doses have been investigated by such methods: thermostimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and optical absorption spectroscopy (OAS). The limit dose rates and absorbed doses of electron irradiation that lead to defects accumulation at room temperature in crystals volume and also surface stoichiometry violation have been evaluated. The doses of electron irradiation that lead to CsI radiolysis, with caesium coagulation in metallic phase have been determined. Some quasi periodic connection of such process with irradiation dose was observed.

  2. Using semi-continuous, in-situ measurements of nitrous oxide isotopic composition at a suburban site to track emission processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Eliza; Henne, Stephan; Christoph, Hüglin; Christoph, Zellweger; Béla, Tuzson; Erkan, Ibraim; Lukas, Emmenegger; Joachim, Mohn

    2017-04-01

    , δ15Nbulk and particularly SP appear to vary too strongly in response to other factors affecting emission processes to provide a useful distinction between source categories on a regional scale - these isotopocules may however be useful to distinguish emission pathways on a local scale. For comparison, FLEXPART-COSMO transport simulations [4] were combined with emissions from the EDGAR inventory and estimates of source isotopic composition from literature, to simulate N2O isotopic composition at the sampling site. The model was able to capture variability in N2O mole fraction adequately (R2 = 0.34; p Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, doi:10.5194/amt-5-1601-2012 [2] Harris et al. (2014) Analytical Chemistry, doi: 10.1021/ac403606u. [3] Röckmann et al. (2016) Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, doi:10.5194/acp-16-10469-2016. [4] Henne et al. (2016) Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, doi:10.5194/acp-16-3683-2016.

  3. Characterization and inventory of PBDD/F emissions from deca-BDE, polyethylene (PE) and metal blends during the pyrolysis process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Jun; Wang, Xiuji; Xiao, Xiao; Cai, Ying; Tang, Yuhui; Chen, Pei

    2017-04-01

    The thermal treatment of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) is regarded as the largest potential contributor to the environmental release of polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs). Herein, the pyrolysis of decabromodiphenyl ether (deca-BDE), polyethylene (PE) and metal blends was conducted to investigate the emission characteristics of PBDD/Fs at different thermal treatment conditions. The total yield of polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PBDDs) was less than that of polybrominated dibenzofurans (PBDFs) during the pyrolysis of the PE matrix and metal blends. 2,3,7,8-TBDF and 1,2,3,7,8-PBDF were the dominant congeners emitted from the pyrolysis. Temperature, presence of oxygen and type of added metal were the critical influencing factors for the PBDD/F formation rates and speciation in the pyrolysis process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Exposure assessment and engineering control strategies for airborne nanoparticles: an application to emissions from nanocomposite compounding processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Candace S.-J., E-mail: candace.umass@gmail.com [University of Massachusetts Lowell, NSF Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing (CHN) (United States); White, David [University of Massachusetts Lowell, Department of Plastics Engineering (United States); Rodriguez, Henoc; Munoz, Christian E. [University of Puerto Rico Mayagueez, Industrial Microbiology Department (Puerto Rico); Huang, Cheng-Yu; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn [National Chiao Tung University, Institute of Environmental Engineering, Taiwan (China); Barry, Carol [University of Massachusetts Lowell, Department of Plastics Engineering (United States); Ellenbecker, Michael J. [University of Massachusetts Lowell, NSF Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing (CHN) (United States)

    2012-07-15

    In this study, nanoalumina and nanoclay particles were compounded separately with ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) polymer to produce nanocomposites using a twin-screw extruder to investigate exposure and effective controls. Nanoparticle exposures from compounding processes were elevated under some circumstances and were affected by many factors including inadequate ventilation, surrounding air flow, feeder type, feeding method, and nanoparticle type. Engineering controls such as improved ventilation and enclosure of releasing sources were applied to the process equipment to evaluate the effectiveness of control. The nanoparticle loading device was modified by installing a ventilated enclosure surrounding the loading chamber. Exposures were studied using designed controls for comparison which include three scenarios: (1) no isolation; (2) enclosed sources; and (3) enclosed sources and improved ventilation. Particle number concentrations for diameters from 5 to 20,000 nm measured by the Fast Mobility Particle Sizer and aerodynamic particle sizer were studied. Aerosol particles were sampled on transmission electron microscope grids to characterize particle composition and morphology. Measurements and samples were taken at the near- and far-field areas relative to releasing sources. Airborne particle concentrations were reduced significantly when using the feeder enclosure, and the concentrations were below the baseline when two sources were enclosed, and the ventilation was improved when using either nanoalumina or nanoclay as fillers.

  5. Investigation of aerosol based emission of MEA due to sulphuric acid aerosol and soot in a post combustion CO2 capture process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khakharia, P.M.; Brachert, L.; Mertens, J.; Huizinga, A.; Schallert, B.; Schaber, K.; Vlugt, T.J.H.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2013-01-01

    The prevention of emissions of amine species is of high importance for the overall sustainability and performance of Post Combustion CO2 Capture facilities. There is a clear understanding of amine emissions based on volatility in the treated flue gas. Emission via aerosols from Post Combustion CO2

  6. Development of a technical-economic model for dynamic calculation of COE, energy demand and CO2 emissions of an integrated UCG-CCS process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaten, N.; Kempka, T.; Green, M.; Preshelkova, A.; Merachev, D.; Schlüter, R.; Azzam, R.

    2012-04-01

    World-wide coal reserves can provide energy supply for several hundred years. Underground coal gasification (UCG) offers an economic and sustainable approach to convert these coal reserves into syngas. As combustion of fossil fuels releases CO2 emissions into the atmosphere, the present study considers a coupling of UCG with CO2 capture and its subsequent storage (CCS) in the previously converted seams, thereby offering a low carbon solution to coal fired power generation. The aim of the present study is to develop a technical-economic model in order to evaluate costeffectiveness, energy demand and CO2 emissions for a coupled UCG-CCS process. The model consists of five dynamic submodels which take into account the processes of air separation (ASU), UCG, syngas processing, electricity production and CCS. Capital (CAPEX) and operational expenditure (OPEX) of these process stages are combined to establish the overall levelised costs of electricity generation (COE). Therefore, the modeling approach developed within the present study allows for a comparison of the COE of the coupled processes with different technologies for electricity production. The influence of parameters relevant for COE (e.g. seam thickness and depth as well as syngas quality) and CO2 emissions (e.g. quality of coal, plant efficiency) were analysed in the context of a sensitivity analysis. Within the UCG&CO2STORAGE project, funded by the EU Research Fund for Coal and Steel (RFCS), a theoretical UCG-CCS feasibility study is being performed for the Dobrudzha coal basin, the selected study area in northeast of Bulgaria. The concealed coalfield is of carboniferous age with high rank bituminous coals. The tectonic conditions in the area are complicated and some of the faults determine coal formation distribution. Explored are four coal formations, but only three of them (Krupen, Gurkovo, Makedonka) are of interest for the project. Investigated for the Dobrudzha coal deposit were 120 geological sections

  7. Magma genesis, storage and eruption processes at Aluto volcano, Ethiopia: lessons from remote sensing, gas emissions and geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, William; Biggs, Juliet; Mather, Tamsin; Pyle, David; Gleeson, Matthew; Lewi, Elias; Yirgu, Gezahgen; Caliro, Stefano; Chiodini, Giovanni; Fischer, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    One of the most intriguing aspects of magmatism during the transition from continental rifting to sea-floor spreading is that large silicic magmatic systems develop within the rift zone. In the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) these silicic volcanoes not only pose a significant hazard to local populations but they also sustain major geothermal resources. Understanding the journey magma takes from source to surface beneath these volcanoes is vital for determining its eruption style and for better evaluating the geothermal resources that these complexes host. We investigate Aluto, a restless silicic volcano in the MER, and combine a wide range of geochemical and geophysical techniques to constrain magma genesis, storage and eruption processes and shed light on magmatic-hydrothermal-tectonic interactions. Magma genesis and storage processes at Aluto were evaluated using new whole-rock geochemical data from recent eruptive products. Geochemical modelling confirms that Aluto's peralkaline rhyolites, that constitute the bulk of recent erupted products, are generated from protracted fractionation (>80 %) of basalt that is compositionally similar to rift-related basalts found on the margins of the complex. Crustal melting did not play a significant role in rhyolite genesis and melt storage depths of ~5 km can reproduce almost all aspects of their geochemistry. InSAR methods were then used to investigate magma storage and fluid movement at Aluto during an episode of ground deformation that took place between 2008 and 2010. Combining new SAR imagery from different viewing geometries we identified an accelerating uplift pulse and found that source models support depths of magmatic and/or fluid intrusion at ~5 km for the uplift and shallower depths of ~4 km for the subsidence. Finally, gas samples collected on Aluto in 2014 were used to evaluate magma and fluid transport processes. Our results show that gases are predominantly emanating from major fault zones on Aluto and that they

  8. Emissions Trading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woerdman, Edwin; Backhaus, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Emissions trading is a market-based instrument to achieve environmental targets in a cost-effective way by allowing legal entities to buy and sell emission rights. The current international dissemination and intended linking of emissions trading schemes underlines the growing relevance of this

  9. Simulation of Working Processes in the Water-Tube Boiler Furnace with the Purpose of Reducing Emissions of Nitrogen Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redko A.A.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A significant number of domestic and industrial boilers are in operation in Ukraine. Nitrogen oxides are the most dangerous among all combustion products that pollute the atmosphere, therefore, one should take some measures for decreasing the formation of nitrogen oxides during combustion. The studies were carried out at the boilers of low power (100 kW with a tubular radiator and an open end. The studies in the furnaces of industrial steam boilers having a tubular radiator with a closed end have not been done. The numerical study results of the gaseous fuel combustion processes in the furnace of a DE-10/14 steam water-tube boiler are presented. The fuel-air mixture is formed by premixing the 15% part of the air with a primary burner twist factor n=2.4 and a secondary burner twist factor n=1.6, and an air excess factor αв=10. As a result of the studies, the temperature and velocity distributions of gases in the combustion chamber, the density of heat flows on the screen tubular surfaces, and the concentrations of the combustion components were determined. Flue gas recirculation in the volume of 80-100% is provided, and the reversible movement of combustion products towards the combustion front provides a reduction in the concentration of nitrogen oxides up to 123-125 mg/m3 at the furnace outlet. Disadvantages are the following: the formation of stagnant zones near the end of the secondary radiator. The optimum diameter of the tubular radiator equals to two burners diameters and tubular radiator is located at a distance of one meter from the burner cutoff.

  10. Potentials and chances of the technology of the carbon capture and storage for industrial process emissions; Potenziale und Chancen der Technologie zur CO{sub 2}-Abtrennung und -Ablagerung (CCS) fuer industrielle Prozessemissionen. Kurzstudie fuer die Umweltstiftung WWF Deutschland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, Hauke; Matthes, Felix C. [Oeko-Institut e.V. - Institut fuer Angewandte Oekologie, Berlin (Germany); Athmann, Uwe [dezentec ingenieurgesellschaft mbH, Essen (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    Climate and energy policy currently faces great challenges. The latest research findings show that the complete decarbonisation of industrialised countries by 2050 will be necessary in order to limit global warming to a level below 2 degrees Celsius. The Blueprint Germany study showed for the first time how such structural decarbonisation - i.e. an emission reduction of -95% by 2050 compared to 1990 - could actually be realised by an industrialised country like Germany. In 2008 emissions from industrial processes amounted to approx. 90 M t CO{sub 2}, which corresponds to a share of 9 % of total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Germany. As a result long-term decarbonisation strategies for Germany must focus significantly on reducing carbon emissions in industrial processes (i.e. non-energy-related emissions). In terms of volume, the largest share of process-related CO{sub 2} emissions in Germany in 2008 came from iron and steel production (5% of GHG emissions), followed by cement production (2% of GHG emissions). These two segments cover approx. 80 % of process-related emissions in Germany. An analysis of the industrial processes most relevant in terms of emissions - iron, steel, cement and lime - shows that other abatement options (with a potential of 20% to 40%) are available; however, with high probability, there will be no alternative to using carbon capture and storage (CCS) if far-reaching emission reductions are to be realised in these segments in Germany. Furthermore the capture of carbon dioxide from bio-energy sources - bio-energy CCS (BECCS) - will also need to play important role in an ambitious climate policy. Technology-specific analyses show that compared to its use in coal-fired power plants CCS is environmentally and economically advantageous in the case of industrial processes. For all process-related emissions the energy efficiency of carbon capture is higher than in the case of coal-fired power plants. With the exception of lime production the

  11. Emission Facilities - Air Emission Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Represents the Primary Facility type Air Emission Plant (AEP) point features. Air Emissions Plant is a DEP primary facility type related to the Air Quality Program....

  12. Emission inventory; Inventaire des emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontelle, J.P. [CITEPA, Centre Interprofessionnel Technique d`Etudes de la Pollution Atmospherique, 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-12-31

    Statistics on air pollutant (sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and ammonium) emissions, acid equivalent emissions and their evolution since 1990 in the various countries of Europe and the USA, are presented. Emission data from the industrial, agricultural, transportation and power sectors are given, and comparisons are carried out between countries based on Gnp and population, pollution import/export fluxes and compliance to the previous emission reduction objectives

  13. Pilot-scale Limestone Emission Control (LEC) process: A development project. Volume 1, Main report and appendices A, B, C, and D: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prudich, M.E. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States); Appell, K.W.; McKenna, J.D. [ETS, Inc., Roanoke, VA (United States)

    1994-03-01

    ETS, Inc., a pollution consulting firm with headquarters in Roanoke, Virginia, has developed a dry, limestone-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. This SO{sub 2} removal system, called Limestone Emission Control (LEC), can be designed for installation on either new or existing coal-fired boilers. In the LEC process, the SO{sub 2} in the flue gas reacts with wetted granular limestone that is contained in a moving bed. A surface layer of principally calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) is formed on the limestone. Periodic removal of this surface layer by mechanical agitation allows high utilization of the limestone granules. A nominal 5,000 acfm LEC pilot plant has been designed, fabricated and installed on the slipstream of a 70,000 pph stoker boiler providing steam to Ohio University`s Athens, Ohio campus. A total of over 90 experimental trials have been performed using the pilot-scale moving-bed LEC dry scrubber as a part of this research project with run times ranging up to a high of 125 hours. SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies as high as 99.9% were achievable for all experimental conditions studied during which sufficient humidification was added to the LEC bed. The LEC process and conventional limestone scrubbing have been compared on an equatable basis using flue gas conditions that would be expected at the outlet of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) of a 500 MW coal-fired power plant. The LEC was found to have a definite economic advantage in both direct capital costs and operating costs. Based on the success and findings of the present project, the next step in LEC process development will be a full-scale commercial demonstration unit.

  14. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1998 Emissions Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. K. Zohner

    1999-10-01

    This report presents the 1998 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradiological emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  15. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1999 Emission Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zohner, S.K.

    2000-05-30

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  16. Potential odour emission measurement in organic fraction of municipal solid waste during anaerobic digestion: relationship with process and biological stability parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzi, V; Cadena, E; D'Imporzano, G; Artola, A; Davoli, E; Crivelli, M; Adani, F

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the correlation between microbial activity, i.e., biological stability measured by aerobic (OD20 test) and anaerobic tests (ABP test), and odour emissions of organic fraction of municipal solid waste during anaerobic digestion in a full-scale treatment plant considering the three stages of the process (input, digested and post-digested waste). The results obtained indicated that the stabilization of the treated material reduces the odour impact measured by the olfactometric approach. Successive application of gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and electronic nose (EN) allowed the characterization of the different groups of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) responsible of odour impacts determining, also, their concentration. Principal component and partial least squares analyses applied to the EN and GC-MS data sets gave good regression for the OD20 vs the EN and OD20 vs the GC-MS data. Therefore, OD20 reduction could be used as an odour depletion indicator. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The influence of vegetation, fire spread and fire behaviour on biomass burning and trace gas emissions: results from a process-based model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Thonicke

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A process-based fire regime model (SPITFIRE has been developed, coupled with ecosystem dynamics in the LPJ Dynamic Global Vegetation Model, and used to explore fire regimes and the current impact of fire on the terrestrial carbon cycle and associated emissions of trace atmospheric constituents. The model estimates an average release of 2.24 Pg C yr−1 as CO2 from biomass burning during the 1980s and 1990s. Comparison with observed active fire counts shows that the model reproduces where fire occurs and can mimic broad geographic patterns in the peak fire season, although the predicted peak is 1–2 months late in some regions. Modelled fire season length is generally overestimated by about one month, but shows a realistic pattern of differences among biomes. Comparisons with remotely sensed burnt-area products indicate that the model reproduces broad geographic patterns of annual fractional burnt area over most regions, including the boreal forest, although interannual variability in the boreal zone is underestimated.

  18. Application of excitation and emission matrix fluorescence (EEM) and UV-vis absorption to monitor the characteristics of Alizarin Red S (ARS) during electro-Fenton degradation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Bo; Zhou, Yuexi; Wang, Juling; Yang, Zhishan; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2013-11-01

    Oxidative degradation of Alizarin Red S (ARS) in aqueous solutions by using electro-Fenton was studied. At first, effect of operating parameters such as current density, aeration rate and initial pH on the degradation of ARS were studied by using UV-vis spectrum, respectively. Then, under the optimal operating conditions (current density: 10.0mAcm(-2), aeration rate: 1000mLmin(-1), initial pH: 2.8), the identification of degradation products of ARS was carried out by using GC-MS and HPLC, meanwhile its degradation pathway was proposed according to the intermediates. Considering the location, intensity and intensity ratio of fluorescence center peak of the ARS in aqueous solution, a convenient and quick monitoring method by using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectrum technology was developed to monitor the degradation degree of ARS through electro-Fenton process. Furthermore, it is suggested that the developed method would be promising for the quick analysis and evaluation of the degradation degree of the pollutants with π-conjugated system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Identifying fouling events in a membrane-based drinking water treatment process using principal component analysis of fluorescence excitation-emission matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, Ramila H; Hallé, Cynthia; Budman, Hector; Moresoli, Christine; Peldszus, Sigrid; Huck, Peter M; Legge, Raymond L

    2010-01-01

    The identification of key foulants and the provision of early warning of high fouling events for drinking water treatment membrane processes is crucial for the development of effective countermeasures to membrane fouling, such as pretreatment. Principal foulants include organic, colloidal and particulate matter present in the membrane feed water. In this research, principal component analysis (PCA) of fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) was identified as a viable tool for monitoring the performance of pre-treatment stages (in this case biological filtration), as well as ultrafiltration (UF) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane systems. In addition, fluorescence EEM-based principal component (PC) score plots, generated using the fluorescence EEMs obtained after just 1hour of UF or NF operation, could be related to high fouling events likely caused by elevated levels of particulate/colloid-like material in the biofilter effluents. The fluorescence EEM-based PCA approach presented here is sensitive enough to be used at low organic carbon levels and has potential as an early detection method to identify high fouling events, allowing appropriate operational countermeasures to be taken.

  20. Pilot-scale limestone emission control (LEC) process: A development project. Volume 1: Main report and appendices A, B, C, and D. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    ETS, Inc., a pollution consulting firm with headquarters in Roanoke, Virginia, has developed a dry, limestone-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. This SO{sub 2} removal system, called Limestone Emission Control (LEC), can be designed for installation on either new or existing coal-fired boilers. In the LEC process, the SO{sub 2} in the flue gas reacts with wetted granular limestone that is contained in a moving bed. A surface layer of principally calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) is formed on the limestone. Periodic removal of this surface layer by mechanical agitation allows high utilization of the limestone granules. The primary goal of the current study is the demonstration of the techno/economic capability of the LEC system as a post-combustion FGD process capable of use in both existing and future coal-fired boiler facilities burning high-sulfur coal. A nominal 5,000 acfm LEC pilot plant has been designed, fabricated and installed on the slipstream of a 70,000 pph stoker boiler providing steam to Ohio University`s Athens, Ohio campus. The pilot plant was normally operated on the slipstream of the Ohio Univ. boiler plant flue gas, but also had the capability of operating at higher inlet SO{sub 2} concentrations (typically equivalent to 3-1/2% sulfur coal) than those normally available from the flue gas slipstream. This was accomplished by injecting SO{sub 2} gas into the slipstream inlet. The pilot plant was instrumented to provide around-the-clock operation and was fully outfitted with temperature, SO{sub 2}, gas flow and pressure drop monitors.

  1. Influence of time, surface-to-volume ratio, and heating process (continuous or intermittent) on the emission rates of selected carbonyl compounds during thermal oxidation of palm and soybean oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Thalita Oliveira; Pereira, Pedro Afonso de Paula

    2008-05-14

    The aim of this work was to compare the emission rates of selected carbonyl compounds (CC) produced by palm and soybean oils when heated at 180 degrees C in the presence of air, through different time intervals and at different surface-to-volume ratios ( S/ V), in continuous and intermittent processes. The CC were collected and derivatized onto silica C18 cartridges impregnated with an acid 2,4-dinitrophenylhidrazine solution, followed by extraction with acetonitrile and analysis by HPLC-UV and, in some cases, HPLC-MS with electrospray ionization. Among the CC quantified, namely, acetaldehyde, acrolein, propanal, butanal, hexanal, 2-heptenal, and 2-octenal, acrolein was the main emission in both oils and all S/ V ratios, followed by hexanal and 2-heptenal. The soybean oil has presented greater emission rates of acrolein than palm oil. When different S/ V ratios used during the heating process of the oil were compared, the emission rates, in general, were directly related to them, although saturated and nonsaturated CC have had different behaviors toward oxidation reactions. During intermittent heating, there was a trend of increasing emission rates of saturated aldehydes, whereas the opposite was observed with unsaturated aldehydes, probably due to the reactivity of the double bond present in these compounds.

  2. Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities-Organic Air Emission Standards for Process Vents and Equipment Leaks - Technical Amendment - Federal Register Notice, April 26, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document corrects typographical errors in the regulatory text of the final standards that would limit organic air emissions as a class at hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDF) that are subject to regulation under subtitle

  3. Carbon emissions in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhu [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Sustainability Science Program

    2016-07-01

    This study analyzes the spatial-temporal pattern and processes of China's energy-related carbon emissions. Based on extensive quantitative analysis, it outlines the character and trajectory of China's energy-related carbon emissions during the period 1995-2010, examining the distribution pattern of China's carbon emissions from regional and sectoral perspectives and revealing the driving factors of China's soaring emission increase. Further, the book investigates the supply chain carbon emissions (the carbon footprints) of China's industrial sectors. Anthropogenic climate change is one of the most serious challenges currently facing humankind. China is the world's largest developing country, top primary energy consumer and carbon emitter. Achieving both economic growth and environmental conservation is the country's twofold challenge. Understanding the status, features and driving forces of China's energy-related carbon emissions is a critical aspect of attaining global sustainability. This work, for the first time, presents both key findings on and a systematic evaluation of China's carbon emissions from energy consumption. The results have important implications for global carbon budgets and burden-sharing with regard to climate change mitigation. The book will be of great interest to readers around the world, as it addresses a topic of truly global significance.

  4. Optical Analysis of the Oils Obtained from Acrocomia aculeata (Jacq. Lodd: Mapping Absorption-Emission Profiles in an Induced Oxidation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan P. de Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acrocomia aculeata is a palm tree typical of the Brazilian savanna. Oils extracted from the pulp and kernel of Acrocomia aculeata fruits have gained considerable attention mainly due to their nutritional and medicinal features. Despite their potential applications, a detailed analysis of their oxidative stability is still needed. The present study shows a close analysis of the oxidative stability of the oils obtained from the kernel and pulp of Acrocomia aculeata fruits, evaluating the influence of the intrinsic antioxidants and the fatty acid composition on the oil’s thermal stability. A complete characterization of the physical-chemical and optical properties of the oils was performed. The results showed that 66% of the fatty acids present in the pulp oil are unsaturated, while 75% are saturated in the kernel oil. A higher content of intrinsic antioxidants was obtained in the pulp oil, and an induction period (at 110 °C of 65 and 43 h was determined for the pulp and kernel oil, respectively. Additionally, oil absorption increases due to the formation of degradation products, and a new fluorescent compound was formed during the oil oxidation process at 110 °C. Even though the pulp presented a high content of unsaturated fatty acids, the pulp oil was more stable than the kernel oil due to its higher content of intrinsic antioxidant, especially carotenoids. The results also demonstrated that oil oxidation can be optically determined by analyzing the absorption at 232 and 270 nm, as well as the emission at 424 nm.

  5. Rapid total sulphur reduction in coal samples using various dilute alkaline leaching reagents under microwave heating: preventing sulphur emissions during coal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mketo, Nomvano; Nomngongo, Philiswa Nosizo; Ngila, Jane Catherine

    2017-08-01

    Currently in South Africa, online flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) is being utilized as one of the most effective methods for total sulphur reduction in coal samples during the combustion process. However, the main disadvantage associated with FGD is the formation of its by-products (FGD gypsum). The latter is mostly formed in low grade quality, thereby bringing secondary pollution problems and extra disposal costs. Therefore, the current study describes the development of total sulphur extraction in coal under microwave heating using different dilute alkaline solutions such as NaOH, NaOH-H2O2, NH4OH, and NH4OH-H2O2. The experimental conditions were as follows: 150 °C, 5 min and 10% (m/v or v/v) for temperature, extraction time and reagent concentration, respectively. The most effective alkaline reagent for coal desulphurisation was observed to be NaOH-H2O2 with total sulphur reduction of 55% (from the inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) results). The NaOH-H2O2 reagent also showed significant morphological changes in coal as observed from the SEM images and effective demineralisation as revealed by the powder X-ray diffractometer (P-XRD) results. Additionally, desulphurisation results obtained from the developed microwave-assisted dilute alkaline extraction (MW-ADAE) method were quite comparable with the published work. The proposed total sulphur reduction method is advantageous as compared to some of the literature reported coal desulphurisation methods as it requires a short period (5 min) of time to reach its completion. Additionally, the proposed method shows excellent reproducibility (% RSD from 0.5 to 1); therefore, it can be utilized for routine analysis. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  6. Značaj emisije polikloriranih dibenzo-p-dioksina i dibenzofurana iz procesa proizvodnje željeza i čelika (Importance of Polychlorinated Dibenzo-p-dioxins and Dibenzofurans Emissions from Iron and Steel Production Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šmit, Z.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Metals and metallic products are fundamental to a large number of modern industries and steel is certainly one of the most significant metallurgical products. Steel and steel castings as universal production material, that provided the grounds for the contemporary industrialization process,will have a continuously irreplaceable role in the future, regardless of the fact that nowadays steel materials are often replaced by other materials (ceramics, polymers, etc., whenever it is technically required and cost-justified.The development of metallurgy and metallurgical processes is accompanied by pollution of the environment that directly or indirectly endangered the health of humans, certain animal and plant species, water resources systems, and soil. It also lead to increased erosion of material goodsand caused many other adverse social and economy-related effects.The integral steelworks concept has, for example, set off a significant increase in the number of emission sources and the increase of harmful substances concentration in the environment. The largest polluters have always been coking plants, iron ore agglomeration facilities, blast furnaces, steel mills, foundries and thermal energy plants.Numerous fundamental scientific research works have proven a series of adverse effects caused by uncontrolled emissions of harmful substances from these plants. Beside the considerable quantities of usual and well-known polluting substances such as sulfur and carbon oxides, fluorides,ammonia, benzene, heavy metals, phenols, cyanides, oil and grease, slag, used refractory material, metallic scrapings, sludge, dust, and scale, there are also relatively small pollutions with long-lasting effects that are hazardous even in their low concentrations and they rarely receivedue attention.This polluting substance group consists of persistent organic pollutions represented by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, polychlorinated

  7. Emission detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bolozdynya, Alexander I

    2010-01-01

    After decades of research and development, emission detectors have recently become the most successful instrumentation used in modern fundamental experiments searching for cold dark matter, and are also considered for neutrino coherent scattering and magnetic momentum neutrino measurement. This book is the first monograph exclusively dedicated to emission detectors. Properties of two-phase working media based on noble gases, saturated hydrocarbon, ion crystals and semiconductors are reviewed.

  8. MAVEN/IUVS observations of dayglow emissions on Mars: indicator of dynamics, energetics, physical processes, and coupling between lower and upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sonal; Deighan, Justin; Stewart, A. Ian; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Evans, J. Scott; Stevens, Michael H.; Chaffin, Michael S.; Crismani, Matteo; Mayyasi-Matta, Majd A.; Eparvier, Frank; Thiemann, Ed; Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2017-10-01

    The dayglow emissions are a common feature of any planetary atmosphere. These emissions provide basic information about the atmospheric composition and structure, and can be used to study energy deposition, dynamics, and chemistry. The Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) aboard the MAVEN spacecraft has been observing mid and far ultraviolet emissions from the Martian upper atmosphere for over one Martian year and have provided the first long term observations of Martian dayglow. These observations have been used to characterize Martian thermospheric temperatures, densities, and their variations with solar activity, seasons, and dust activities. This data set has enabled us to track short and long term seasonal and spatial variations and their relationship with both solar forcing from top of the atmosphere and coupling from lower atmosphere (via tides/waves/dust storms). The scale heights retrieved from CO2+ Ultraviolet Doublet band emission shows 25% reduction from Ls = 218 degree (near perihelion; Mars year 32) to Ls = 60 degree (at aphelion; MY 33), indicating effect of both decline in solar activity as well as increase in Mars-Sun distance. At the onset of a regional dust storm at Ls = 219 (during MY 33), we noticed about 16% increase in the altitude of maximum intensities of major UV emission (indicating increase in neutral column density), however, we did not notice any significant warming in thermosphere associate with this dust storm.The results presented herein will help us better understand properties of the Martian thermosphere.

  9. Site Specific Landfill CH4 Emissions: Shortcomings of National GHG Inventory Guidelines and a New Process-Based Approach Linked to Climate and Soil Microclimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogner, J. E.; Spokas, K.; Corcoran, M.

    2012-12-01

    Current (2006) IPCC national GHG inventory guidelines for landfill CH4, which estimate CH4 generation from the mass of waste in place, have high uncertainties, cannot be reliably related to measured emissions at specific sites, and lack comprehensive field validation. Moreover, measured landfill CH4 emissions vary over a wide range from >1000 g/m2/d down to negative values (uptake of atmospheric CH4). Literature over the last decade has emphasized that the major factors controlling emissions in these highly managed soil systems are gaseous transport rates as affected by the thickness and physical properties of cover soils, methanotrophic CH4 oxidation in cover materials as a function of seasonal soil microclimate. and the presence or absence of engineered gas extraction. Thus we developed and field validated a new site specific annual inventory model that incorporates specific soil profile properties and soil microclimate modeling coupled to 0.5° scale global climatic models. Based on 1D diffusion, CALMIM (California Landfill Methane Inventory Model) is a freely available JAVA tool which models a typical annual cycle for CH4 emissions from site specific daily, intermediate, and final landfill cover designs. This new approach, which is compliant with IPCC Tier III criteria, was originally field validated at two California sites (Monterey County; Los Angeles County), with limited field validation at three additional California sites. In addition to regional defaults for inventory purposes, CALMIM permits user selectable parameters and boundary conditions for more rigorous site specific applications where detailed CH4 emissions, meteorological, and soil microclimate data exist. We report here on improvements and expanded international field validation for CALMIM 5.2 in collaboration with research groups in the U.S., Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia.odeled and measured annual cycle of landfill CH4 emissions for Austrian site. Cover consists of 50 cm sand & gravel

  10. Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geenen, P.V.; Bennis, J.

    1989-04-04

    A process is described for minimizing the cracking tendency and uncontrolled dimensional change, and improving the strength of a rammed plastic refractory reactor liner comprising phosphate-bonded silicon carbide or phosphate-bonded alumina. It consists of heating the reactor liner placed or mounted in a reactor, prior to its first use, from ambient temperature up to a temperature of from about 490/sup 0/C to about 510/sup 0/C, the heating being carried out by heating the liner at a rate to produce a temperature increase of the liner not greater than about 6/sup 0/C per hour.

  11. Aircraft specific exhaust emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecht, M.; Deidewig, F.; Doepelheuer, A. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Koeln (Germany). Inst. fuer Antriebstechnik

    1997-12-01

    The objective of this work to calculate essential species of aircraft emissions has been approached by a combination of different tasks. First of all engine performance and emission correlation has been modelled taking sea level static measurements from the engine certification process as a reference. At second a flight simulation program has been modified to couple aircraft and engine performance along a flight mission profile. By this for a selected number of aircraft/engine combinations the emissions of NO{sub x}, CO and HC as well as fuel burn for short, medium and long haul flights have been calculated and finally adapted to a specified format of flight distance and altitude increments. Sensitivity studies of the change of emissions along the cruise section showed a 30% decrease of the NO{sub x} emission rate until the end of cruise. Differences of ambient air temperature from ISA conditions will have a substantial impact on NO{sub x}, CO and HC emissions rather than on mission fuel. (orig.) 144 figs., 42 tabs., 497 refs.

  12. Industrial emissions of 1,3-butadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, J A

    1990-06-01

    Sources of industrial emissions of 1,3-butadiene are discussed both by process (production, consumers) and type (equipment leaks, point sources). Quantification of the emissions are presented, as reported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1986. The reported emissions attributed to equipment leaks (also known as fugitive emissions) range from about 50 to 95% of the total, depending on the specific production process used. The methods by which these emissions were estimated are discussed, with particular emphasis on the fugitive sources. Industry studies to better quantify the fugitive emissions are described.

  13. Application of the emission inventory model TEAM: Uncertainties in dioxin emission estimates for central Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulles, M.P.J.; Kok, H.; Quass, U.

    2006-01-01

    This study uses an improved emission inventory model to assess the uncertainties in emissions of dioxins and furans associated with both knowledge on the exact technologies and processes used, and with the uncertainties of both activity data and emission factors. The annual total emissions for the

  14. Analysis on energy transfer process of Ho3+ doped fluoroaluminate glass sensitized by Yb3+ for mid-infrared 2.85 μm emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Beier; Wei, Tao; Cai, Muzhi; Tian, Ying; Zhou, Jiajia; Deng, Degang; Xu, Shiqing; Zhang, Junjie

    2014-12-01

    This work reports the mid-infrared emission properties around 2.85 μm in a Yb3+/Ho3+ codoped fluoroaluminate glass. This fluoroaluminate glass shows a good thermal stability and high transmittance around 3 μm. The mid-infrared emission characteristics and energy transfer mechanism upon the excitation of the conventional 980 nm laser diode have been investigated. The prepared glass possesses higher spontaneous transition probability (31.77 s-1) along with the larger calculated emission cross section (1.91×10-20 cm2) corresponding to the laser transition of Ho3+:5I6→5I7. Besides, the upconversion, 1.2 μm and 2 μm fluorescence spectra were measured to understand mid-infrared emission behavior together with decay curves of Ho3+:5I6 level. Moreover, energy transfer microparameters between Yb3+ and Ho3+ were calculated and discussed based on Dexter's model. Hence, the advantageous spectroscopic characteristics of Yb3+/Ho3+ codoped fluoroaluminate glass as well as the good thermal property indicate that this kind of glass is an attractive host for developing mid-infrared solid state laser.

  15. Mitigation of N2O Emission from Aquaponics by Optimizing the Nitrogen Transformation Process: Aeration Management and Exogenous Carbon (PLA) Addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yina; Hu, Zhen; Zhang, Jian; Fang, Yingke; Li, Minying; Zhang, Jianda

    2017-10-11

    N 2 O production in aquaponics is an inevitable concern when aquaponics is developed as a future production system. In the present study, two attempts were applied to mitigate N 2 O emission from aquaponics, i.e., aeration in hydroponic bed (HA) and addition of polylactic acid (PLA) into fillers (PA). Results showed that N 2 O emission from HA and PA was decreased by 47.1-58.1% and 43.2-74.9% respectively compared with that in control. Denitrification was proved to be the main emission pathway in all treatments, representing 62.4%, 86.4%, and 75.8% of the total N 2 O emission in HA, PA, and control, respectively. However, production of plants in HA was severely impaired, which was only 3.04 ± 0.39 kg/m 2 , while in PA and control, plants yields were 4.87 ± 0.56 kg/m 2 and 4.33 ± 0.58 kg/m 2 . Combining the environmental and economic benefits, adding PLA in aquaponics may have a better future when developing and applying aquaponics systems.

  16. Global standardization of the calculation of CO2 emissions along transport chains-gaps, approaches, perspectives of the global alignment process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehrler, V.; Engel, A. van den; Davydenko, I.; Diekmann, D.; Kiel, J.; Lewis, A.; Seidel, S.

    2015-01-01

    The transport industry, consumers, shippers and political bodies are all pressing for a global standard for the calculation of emissions along supply chains. Comparability of the chains’ efficiency, reduction of energy consumption, transparency of the carbon footprint of products and identification

  17. Toward Efficient and Metal-Free Emissive Devices: A Solution-Processed Host-Guest Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cell Featuring Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Petter; Lindh, E Mattias; Tang, Shi; Edman, Ludvig

    2017-08-30

    The next generation of emissive devices should preferably be efficient, low-cost, and environmentally sustainable, and as such utilize all electrically generated excitons (both singlets and triplets) for the light emission, while being free from rare metals such as iridium. Here, we report on a step toward this vision through the design, fabrication, and operation of a host-guest light-emitting electrochemical cell (LEC) featuring an organic thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) guest that harvests both singlet and triplet excitons for the emission. The rare-metal-free active material also consists of a polymeric electrolyte and a polymeric compatibilizer for the facilitation of a cost-efficient and scalable solution-based fabrication, and for the use of air-stable electrodes. We report that such TADF-LEC devices can deliver uniform green light emission with a maximum luminance of 228 cd m-2 when driven by a constant-current density of 770 A m-2, and 760 cd m-2 during a voltage ramp, which represents a one-order-of-magnitude improvement in comparison to previous TADF-emitting LECs.

  18. Evaluating management effects on nitrous oxide emissions from grasslands using the process-based DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Rashad; Peichl, Matthias; Hennessy, Deirdre; Kiely, Gerard

    2011-10-01

    The development of agricultural mitigation strategies to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is urgent in the context of climate change - land use interactions. In this study the DNDC biogeochemical model was used to study nitrous oxide (N 2O) emissions from grazed grasslands in southern Ireland. The objectives of this study were: (1) to evaluate the DNDC model using a two year (2008-2009) data set of chamber measured N 2O fluxes at eight grassland sites and (2) to investigate the impact of different management scenarios on N 2O emissions including changes in i) inorganic nitrogen (N) fertilizer application rates ii) slurry application rates; and iii) animal density (livestock unit per hectare LU ha -1). The comparison of modeled daily DNDC fluxes (using a combination of measured and default soil parameters) and measured fluxes resulted in an r (coefficient correlation) = 0.48. To improve the model performance, the fluxes for 2008 were used in a calibration exercise during which the soil properties were optimized to obtain the best fit of N 2O fluxes. This resulted in an improved model performance, with an r = 0.62. In a validation exercise using 2009 data, we used the model parameters set (e.g. soils) from the calibration exercise and this resulted in a model performance with an r = 0.57. The annual N 2O fluxes (measured and modeled) were appreciably higher than those estimated using the IPCC emissions factor of 1.25%. In scenario analysis, the modeled N 2O fluxes only increased/decreased on average ±6% and ±7% following a 50% increase/decrease of inorganic N and slurry N applications respectively. These modeled scenario % changes are much lower than the IPCC emission factor % changes of a 50% increase in N 2O emissions for a 50% increase in nitrogen applied. An absolute change scenario (±50 kg) in inorganic N and slurry N resulted in greater change in N 2O fluxes (±9% inorganic N and ±17% slurry N) as compared to the relative change scenario (above

  19. CONCEPTUAL DESIGNS FOR A NEW HIGHWAY VEHICLE EMISSIONS ESTIMATION METHODOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses six conceptual designs for a new highway vehicle emissions estimation methodology and summarizes the recommendations of each design for improving the emissions and activity factors in the emissions estimation process. he complete design reports are included a...

  20. Evaluation of Economic, Social and Environmental Effects of Low-Emission Energy Technologies Development in Poland: A Multi-Criteria Analysis with Application of a Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process (FAHP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Ligus

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The European Commission as well as the Polish government are promoting sustainable use of energy sources as a part of the dominating sustainable development paradigm. The development of low-emission energy sources engages the challenges of gradual depletion of coal, oil and natural gas reserves, as well as the intensification of the greenhouse effect. The energy policy should take into account development of low-emission energy technologies that contribute mostly to meeting the goals of sustainable development in three dimensions: economic, social and environmental. This study aims to assess the extent to which five low-emission energy technologies contribute to social welfare in the scope of the concept of sustainable development. Heuristic methods, including fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (FAHP are used to resolve the multi-goal problem in order to achieve the aim of this research. Research results show that economic goal is still the most important to the development of various low-emission energy technologies in Poland, followed by the social and environmental goals. Secondly, renewable energy technologies should be utilized instead of nuclear energy to meet sustainable development policy goals. Photovoltaics, followed by biomass and biogas are perceived as the most suitable renewable energy sources. Wind on-shore and wind of-shore are on third and fourth place, respectively.

  1. β-decay and β-delayed Neutron Emission Measurements at GSI-FRS Beyond N=126, for r-process Nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caballero-Folch, R., E-mail: roger.caballero@upc.edu [Deptartament de Física i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Domingo-Pardo, C. [Institut de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46071 València (Spain); Cortès, G. [Deptartament de Física i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Taín, J.L.; Agramunt, J. [Institut de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46071 València (Spain); Algora, A. [Institut de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46071 València (Spain); Institute of Nuclear Research of Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary); Ameil, F. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, D-64291, Darmstadt (Germany); Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Bowry, M. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Calviño, F. [Deptartament de Física i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Cano-Ott, D. [Centro de Investigaciones energéticas Medioambientales y Tecnológicas, Madrid (Spain); Davinson, T. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ United Kingdom (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-06-15

    New measurements of very exotic nuclei in the neutron-rich region beyond N=126 have been performed at the GSI facility with the fragment separator (FRS). The aim of the experiment is to determine half-lives and β-delayed neutron emission branching ratios of isotopes of Hg, Tl and Pb in this region. This contribution summarizes final counting statistics for identification and for implantation, as well as the present status of the data analysis of the half-lives. In summary, isotopes of Pt, Au, Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi, Po, At, Rn and Fr were clearly identified and several of them ({sup 208-211}Hg, {sup 211-215}Tl, {sup 214-218}Pb) were implanted with enough statistics to determine their half-lives. About half of them are expected to be neutron emitters, in such cases it will become possible to obtain the neutron emission probabilities, Pn.

  2. $\\beta$-decay and $\\beta$-delayed Neutron Emission Measurements at GSI-FRS Beyond N=126, for r-process Nucleosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero-Folch, R; Cortès, G; Taín, J L; Agramunt, J; Algora, A; Ameil, F; Ayyad, Y; Benlliure, J; Bowry, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Davinson, T; Dillmann, I; Estrade, A; Evdokimov, A; Faestermann, T; Farinon, F; Galaviz, D; García-Ríos, A; Geissel, H; Gelletly, W; Gernhäuser, R; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Guerrero, C; Heil, M; Hinke, C; Knöbel, R; Kojouharov, I; Kurcewicz, J; Kurz, N; Litvinov, Y; Maier, L; Marganiec, J; Marta, M; Martínez, T; Montes, F; Mukha, I; Napoli, D R; Nociforo, C; Paradela, C; Pietri, S; Podolyák, Zs; Prochazka, A; Rice, S; Riego, A; Rubio, B; Schaffner, H; Scheidenberger, C; Smith, K; Sokol, E; Steiger, K; Sun, B; Takechi, M; Testov, D; Weick, H; Wilson, E; Winfield, J S; Wood, R; Woods, P J; Yeremin, A

    2014-01-01

    New measurements of very exotic nuclei in the neutron-rich region beyond N=126 have been performed at the GSI facility with the fragment separator (FRS). The aim of the experiment is to determine half-lives and beta-delayed neutron emission branching ratios of isotopes of Hg, Tl and Pb in this region. This contribution summarizes final counting statistics for identification and for implantation, as well as the present status of the data analysis of the half-lives. In summary, isotopes of Pt, Au, Hg, Ti, Pb, Bi, Po, At, Rn and Fr were clearly identified and several of them (Hg208-211, Tl211-215, Pb214-218) were implanted with enough statistics to determine their half-lives. About half of them are expected to be neutron emitters, in such cases it will become possible to obtain the neutron emission probabilities, P-n.

  3. β-decay and β-delayed Neutron Emission Measurements at GSI-FRS Beyond N = 126, for r-process Nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Folch, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Cortès, G.; Taín, J. L.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ameil, F.; Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Bowry, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Davinson, T.; Dillmann, I.; Estrade, A.; Evdokimov, A.; Faestermann, T.; Farinon, F.; Galaviz, D.; García-Ríos, A.; Geissel, H.; Gelletly, W.; Gernhäuser, R.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Guerrero, C.; Heil, M.; Hinke, C.; Knöbel, R.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurcewicz, J.; Kurz, N.; Litvinov, Y.; Maier, L.; Marganiec, J.; Marta, M.; Martínez, T.; Montes, F.; Mukha, I.; Napoli, D. R.; Nociforo, C.; Paradela, C.; Pietri, S.; Podolyák, Zs.; Prochazka, A.; Rice, S.; Riego, A.; Rubio, B.; Schaffner, H.; Scheidenberger, C.; Smith, K.; Sokol, E.; Steiger, K.; Sun, B.; Takechi, M.; Testov, D.; Weick, H.; Wilson, E.; Winfield, J. S.; Wood, R.; Woods, P. J.; Yeremin, A.

    2014-06-01

    New measurements of very exotic nuclei in the neutron-rich region beyond N=126 have been performed at the GSI facility with the fragment separator (FRS). The aim of the experiment is to determine half-lives and β-delayed neutron emission branching ratios of isotopes of Hg, Tl and Pb in this region. This contribution summarizes final counting statistics for identification and for implantation, as well as the present status of the data analysis of the half-lives. In summary, isotopes of Pt, Au, Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi, Po, At, Rn and Fr were clearly identified and several of them (208-211Hg, 211-215Tl, 214-218Pb) were implanted with enough statistics to determine their half-lives. About half of them are expected to be neutron emitters, in such cases it will become possible to obtain the neutron emission probabilities, Pn.

  4. Picture processing of weak ion-tail emission of H2O in comets P/Crommelin and IRAS-Araki-Alcock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinrad, H.; Strauss, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    Two-dimensional CCD spectra of P/Crommelin at radius about 0.8 AU and of IRAS-Araki-Alcock at radius of 1.0 AU were obtained at the Kitt Peak National Observatory and Lick Observatory, and the results are discussed. The spectra revealed moderate H2O(+) emission from P/Crommelin predominantly in the antisolar direction, but extending about 6000 km sunward of the nucleus. The H2O(+) emission from IRAS-Araki-Alcock is very weak, appearing only on the antisolar side of the comet's nucleus and extending for at least 2000 km in the tailward direction. The data are interpreted briefly in terms of cometary ionospheric models and are compared with data in the literature.

  5. Controlling Methane Emissions in the Natural Gas Sector. A Review of Federal and State Regulatory Frameworks Governing Production, Gathering, Processing, Transmission, and Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paranhos, Elizabeth [Energy Innovation Partners, Seoul (South Korea); Kozak, Tracy G. [Energy Innovation Partners, Seoul (South Korea); Boyd, William [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Bradbury, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Steinberg, D. C. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Arent, D. J. [Joint Inst. for Strategic Energy Alaysis, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-04-23

    This report provides an overview of the regulatory frameworks governing natural gas supply chain infrastructure siting, construction, operation, and maintenance. Information was drawn from a number of sources, including published analyses, government reports, in addition to relevant statutes, court decisions and regulatory language, as needed. The scope includes all onshore facilities that contribute to methane emissions from the natural gas sector, focusing on three areas of state and federal regulations: (1) natural gas pipeline infrastructure siting and transportation service (including gathering, transmission, and distribution pipelines), (2) natural gas pipeline safety, and (3) air emissions associated with the natural gas supply chain. In addition, the report identifies the incentives under current regulatory frameworks to invest in measures to reduce leakage, as well as the barriers facing investment in infrastructure improvement to reduce leakage. Policy recommendations regarding how federal or state authorities could regulate methane emissions are not provided; rather, existing frameworks are identified and some of the options for modifying existing regulations or adopting new regulations to reduce methane leakage are discussed.

  6. Strong blue emission from Pr3+ ions through energy transfer process from Nd3+ to Pr3+ via Yb3+ in tellurite glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kaushal; Rai, S B; Rai, Anita

    2008-11-15

    Energy transfer excited upconversion emission in Nd3+/Pr3+-codped tellurite glass have been studied on pumping with 800 nm wavelength. The upconversion emission bands from Pr3+ ion are observed at the 488, 524, 546, 612, 647, 672, 708 and 723 nm due to the (3P0 + 3P1)-->3H4, 3P1-->3H5, 3P0-->3H5, 3P0-->3H6, 3P0-->3F2, 3P1-->3F3, 3P0-->3F3 and 3P0-->3F4 transitions, respectively. The addition of ytterbium ions (Yb3+) on the upconversion emission intensity is also studied and result shows an eight times enhancement in the upconversion intensity at 488 nm from Pr3+ ions. The pump power and concentration dependence studies are also made. It is found that Yb3+ ions transfer its excitation energy to Nd3+ from which it goes to Pr3+. No direct transfer to Pr3+ is seen. This is verified by codoping Nd3+ and Pr3+ into the host.

  7. Practical acoustic emission testing

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book is intended for non-destructive testing (NDT) technicians who want to learn practical acoustic emission testing based on level 1 of ISO 9712 (Non-destructive testing – Qualification and certification of personnel) criteria. The essential aspects of ISO/DIS 18436-6 (Condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines – Requirements for training and certification of personnel, Part 6: Acoustic Emission) are explained, and readers can deepen their understanding with the help of practice exercises. This work presents the guiding principles of acoustic emission measurement, signal processing, algorithms for source location, measurement devices, applicability of testing methods, and measurement cases to support not only researchers in this field but also and especially NDT technicians.

  8. Air emissions inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory -- 1995 emissions report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the 1995 update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources. The air contaminants reported include nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, particulates, and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs).

  9. Emissão de óxido nitroso de estação de tratamento de esgoto de lodos ativados por aeração prolongada - estudo preliminar Nitrous oxide emissions from an activated sludge wastewater treatment plant with prolonged aeration process - a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Coelho Brotto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide emissions from an activated sludge plant which serves a research institute in Rio de Janeiro city were estimated from six unit processes (grit tank, sand trap, aeration tank, secondary settling tank, sludge recirculation line and aerobic digester sludge tank and also from the plant effluent. Total estimated annual flux was 3.2 x 10(4 g N2O yr-1 of which about 90% was from the aeration tank. Emission factors estimated from population served, wastewater flow and nitrogen load (conversion ratio were 13 g N2O person-1 yr-1, 9.0 x 10-5 g N2O Lwastewater-1 and 0.14%.

  10. Comparative study and implementation of images re processing methods for the tomography by positrons emission: interest of taking into account a priori information; Etude comparative et implementation de methodes de reconstruction d`images pour la tomographie par emission de positons: interet de la prise en compte d`informations a priori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchet, F.

    1996-09-25

    The tomography by positron emission has for aim to explore an organ by injection of a radiotracer and bidimensional representation with processing techniques. The most used in routine is the filtered retro projection that gives smoothed images. this work realizes a comparative study of new techniques. The methods of preservations of contours are studied here, the idea is to use NMR imaging as a priori information. Two techniques of images construction are viewed more particularly: the resolution by pseudo inverse and the Bayesian method. (N.C.).

  11. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ffff of... - Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and Halogen HAP Emissions or HAP Metals Emissions From...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Emission Limits for Hydrogen Halide and Halogen HAP Emissions or HAP Metals Emissions From Process Vents 3 Table 3 to Subpart FFFF of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR...

  12. Zero emission coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziock, H.; Lackner, K.

    2000-08-01

    We discuss a novel, emission-free process for producing hydrogen or electricity from coal. Even though we focus on coal, the basic design is compatible with any carbonaceous fuel. The process uses cyclical carbonation of calcium oxide to promote the production of hydrogen from carbon and water. The carbonation of the calcium oxide removes carbon dioxide from the reaction products and provides the additional energy necessary to complete hydrogen production without additional combustion of carbon. The calcination of the resulting calcium carbonate is accomplished using the high temperature waste heat from solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), which generate electricity from hydrogen fuel. Converting waste heat back to useful chemical energy allows the process to achieve very high conversion efficiency from fuel energy to electrical energy. As the process is essentially closed-loop, the process is able to achieve zero emissions if the concentrated exhaust stream of CO{sub 2} is sequestered. Carbon dioxide disposal is accomplished by the production of magnesium carbonate from ultramafic rock. The end products of the sequestration process are stable naturally occurring minerals. Sufficient rich ultramafic deposits exist to easily handle all the world's coal.

  13. Positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Paans, A M J

    2006-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a method for measuring biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way by using radiopharmaceuticals labelled with positron emitting radionuclides such as 11C, 13N, 15O and 18F and by measuring the annihilation radiation using a coincidence technique. This includes also the measurement of the pharmacokinetics of labelled drugs and the measurement of the effects of drugs on metabolism. Also deviations of normal metabolism can be measured and insight into biological processes responsible for diseases can be obtained. At present the combined PET/CT scanner is the most frequently used scanner for whole-body scanning in the field of oncology.

  14. Jovian X-ray emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, J. H.; Lewis, W. S.; Gladstone, G. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Brandt, W. N.

    1996-01-01

    The Einstein and Rosat observations of X-ray emissions from Jupiter are summarized. Jupiter's soft X-ray emission is observed to originate from the planet's auroral zones, and specifically, from its equatorial region. The processes responsible for these emissions are not established. The brightness distribution of the Jovian X-rays is characterized by the dependence on central meridian longitude and by north-south and morning-afternoon asymmetries. The X-rays observed during the impact of the comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 are believed to be impact-induced brightenings of the X-ray aurora.

  15. PARAFAC and MCR-ALS applied to the quantitative monitoring of the photodegradation process of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using three-dimensional excitation emission fluorescent spectra Comparative results with HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Marta V; Larrechi, M Soledad

    2007-03-15

    Two methods were developed for the simultaneous quantitative monitoring of photodegradation process of dibenz[a,h]anthracene (DibA), benz[a]anthracene (BaA), benz[a]pyrene (BaP) and benz[k]fluorantene (BkF) using excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) were satisfactory applied to the data obtained during this process. The results achieved were statistically compared by means of the joint interval test of slope and intercept, with the data obtained using the reference methodology, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. There are not significant differences between the methodologies proposed and the standard one, and may be a good alternative to the traditional methods of analysis for monitoring the degradation of these pollutants.

  16. Probing the radio emission from air showers with polarization measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bardenet, R.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Foerster, N.; Fox, B. D.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; PeÂķala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Preda, T.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Straub, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcǎu, O.; Thao, N. T.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration, [No Value; Martin, L.

    2014-01-01

    The emission of radio waves from air showers has been attributed to the so-called geomagnetic emission process. At frequencies around 50 MHz this process leads to coherent radiation which can be observed with rather simple setups. The direction of the electric field induced by this emission process

  17. Organic matter humification in vermifiltration process for domestic sewage sludge treatment by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaowei; Xing, Meiyan; Yang, Jian; Zhao, Limin; Dai, Xiaohu

    2013-10-15

    Performance of a conventional biofilter (BF) and two vermifilters (VFs, different heights) containing earthworms was investigated for domestic sewage sludge (DWS) treatment. Humic-acid like (HAL) fraction isolated from the influent sludge (IS) and effluent sludge of BF (ESBF) and VFs (ESVFs) were determined the elemental and functional composition, and structural characteristics using various analytical approaches. Results showed that performance of DWS treatment in the VFs was preferable to that in the BF. With respect to IS-HAL and ESBF-HAL, ESVFs-HAL had low C, H and N contents and C/O ratio, and high O, carboxyl and phenolic OH group contents, and C/N, C/H and E4/E6 ratios, and large molecular weight. The excitation-emission (Ex/Em) matrix spectra revealed that an additional peak was found at Ex/Em wavelength pairs of 345/435 nm in ESVFs-HAL. Further, Fourier transform infrared spectra showed that vermifiltration led to the loss of aliphatic materials and carbohydrates, and the enrichment of carbonyl and phenolic OH groups in HAL fractions. Additionally, the increase in VF height seemed to accelerate humification degree of organic matter in the effluent sludge. In summary, vermifiltration is alternate technology for transformation of organic matter into humic substances, and thus improves quality of DWS as soil organic fertilizer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigation on the erosion/deposition processes in the ITER-like wall divertor at JET using glow discharge optical emission spectrometry technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruset, C.; Grigore, E.; Luculescu, C.; Tiseanu, I.; Likonen, J.; Mayer, M.; Rubel, M.; Matthews, G. F.; contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    As a complementary method to Rutherford back scattering (RBS), glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES) was used to investigate the depth profiles of W, Mo, Be, O and C concentrations into marker coatings (CFC/Mo/W/Mo/W) and the substrate of divertor tiles up to a depth of about 100 μm. A number of 10 samples cored from particular areas of the divertor tiles were analyzed. The results presented in this paper are valid only for those areas and they cannot be extrapolated to the entire tile. Significant deposition of Be was measured on Tile 3 (near to the top), Tile 6 (at about 40 mm from the innermost edge) and especially on Tile 0 (HFGC). Preliminary experiments seem to indicate a penetration of Be through the pores and imperfections of CFC material up to a depth of 100 μm in some cases. No erosion and a thin layer of Be (<1 μm) was detected on Tiles 4, 7 and 8. On Tile 1 no erosion was found at about 1/3 from bottom.

  19. Methodology for systematic analysis and improvement of manufacturing unit process life-cycle inventory (UPLCI)—CO2PE! initiative (cooperative effort on process emissions in manufacturing). Part 1: Methodology description

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kellens, Karel; Dewulf, Wim; Overcash, Michael

    2012-01-01

    the provision of high-quality data for LCA studies of products using these unit process datasets for the manufacturing processes, as well as the in-depth analysis of individual manufacturing unit processes.In addition, the accruing availability of data for a range of similar machines (same process, different......This report proposes a life-cycle analysis (LCA)-oriented methodology for systematic inventory analysis of the use phase of manufacturing unit processes providing unit process datasets to be used in life-cycle inventory (LCI) databases and libraries. The methodology has been developed...... and resource efficiency improvements of the manufacturing unit process. To ensure optimal reproducibility and applicability, documentation guidelines for data and metadata are included in both approaches. Guidance on definition of functional unit and reference flow as well as on determination of system...

  20. Aplicabilidad del monitoreo de emisiones del arco eléctrico para el control de calidad en el proceso MAG-S Applicability of monitoring of electric arc emissions for quality control in MAG-S process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eber Huanca Cayo

    2011-12-01

    TIG welding processes. During welding, the arc produces acoustic and electromagnetic emissions that occur as sound and light. The aim of this paper is to show that the emissions of the welding arc can be used to monitoring the quality of welding in MAG-S process. Multiple welding experiments were performed in flat position; in each experiment were induced perturbations by grease on plate and shielding gas absence. Current and voltage signals and arc emission signals were acquired simultaneously. The short circuit frequency was measured from acoustic and electromagnetic emission in the ultraviolet band. The welding stability was measured from infrared emission. The results show that the emissions of welding arc can be used for monitoring and detecting of disturbances in welding and with the understanding of the variations of each disturbance could be possible to identify certain types of disturbances.

  1. Radiation detector with spodumene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Amorim, Raquel Aline P.O.; Lima, Hestia Raissa B.R.; Souza, Susana O. [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Sasaki, Jose M., E-mail: sasaki@fisica.ufc.b [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In this work, {beta}-spodumene potentiality as a radiation detector was evaluated by making use of thermoluminescence (TL) and thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) techniques. The pellets were obtained from the {beta}-spodumene powder mixed with Teflon followed by a sintering process of thermal treatments of 300 deg/30 min and 400 deg/1.5 h. The samples were irradiated in standard gamma radiation beams with doses between 5 Gy and 10 kGy. The TL emission curve showed a prominent peak at 160 deg and in the case of TSEE a prominent peak at 145 Celsius approximately. Initial results show that the material is promising for high-dose dosimetry. (author)

  2. Analysis of acoustic emission signals of fatigue crack growth and corrosion processes. Investigation of the possibilities for continuous condition monitoring of transport containers by acoustic emission testing; Analyse der Schallemissionssignale aus Ermuedungsrisswachstum und Korrosionsprozessen. Untersuchung der Moeglichkeiten fuer die kontinuierliche Zustandsueberwachung von Transportbehaeltern mittels Schallemissionspruefung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachsmuth, Janne

    2016-05-01

    Fatigue crack growth and active corrosion processes are the main causes of structural failures of transport products like road tankers, railway tank cars and ships. To prevent those failures, preventive, time-based maintenance is performed. However, preventive inspections are costly and include the risk of not detecting a defect, which could lead to a failure within the next service period. An alternative is the idea of continuous monitoring of the whole structure by means of acoustic emission testing (AT). With AT, defects within the material shall be detected and repaired directly after their appearance. Acoustic emission testing is an online non-destructive testing method. Acoustic emission (AE) arises from changes within the material and is transported by elastic waves through the material. If the AE event generates enough energy, the elastic wave propagates to the boundaries of the component, produces a displacement in the picometre scale and can be detected by a piezoelectric sensor. The sensor produces an electrical signal. From this AE signal, AE features such as the maximum amplitude or the frequency can be extracted. Methods of signal analysis are used to investigate the time and frequency dependency of signal groups. The purpose of the signal analysis is to connect the AE signal with the originating AE source. If predefined damage mechanisms are identified, referencing the damage condition of the structure is possible. Acoustic emission from events of the actual crack propagation process can for example lead to the crack growth rate or the stress intensity factor, both specific values from fracture mechanics. A new development in the domain of acoustic emission testing is the pattern recognition of AE signals. Specific features are extracted from the AE signals to assign them to their damage mechanisms. In this thesis the AE signals from the damage mechanisms corrosion and fatigue crack growth are compared and analysed. The damage mechanisms were

  3. Tuning of multiple luminescence outputs and white-light emission from a single gelator molecule through an ESIPT coupled AIEE process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Arunava; Ali, Firoj; Agarwalla, Hridesh; Anothumakkool, Bihag; Das, Amitava

    2015-02-07

    A unique example of an ESIPT coupled AIEE process, associated with a single molecule (1), is utilized for generating multiple luminescent colors (blue-green-white-yellow). The J-aggregated state of 1 forms a luminescent gel in THF and this luminescent property is retained even in the solid state.

  4. Emission Inventory for Fugitive Emissions in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt; Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Nielsen, Malene

    This report presents the methodology and data used in the Danish inventory of fugitive emissions from fuels for the years until 2007. The inventory of fugitive emissions includes CO2, CH4, N2O, NOx, CO, NMVOC, SO2, dioxin, PAH and particulate matter. In 2007 the total Danish emission of greenhouse...

  5. Emissivity modulating electrochromic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiryont, Hulya; Shannon, Kenneth C., III; Sheets, Judd

    2009-05-01

    The IR-ECDTM (Infra-Red ElectroChromic Device) variable emitance device (VED) is an all-solid-state monolithic vacuum deposited thin film system with a unique metamaterial IR transparent-electrode system which functions as an electrically controlled dimmable mirror in the IR region. The maximum reflectance corresponding to the bleached condition of the system is around 90% (low-e condition, e=0.1). The minimum reflectance reaches nearly zero in the colored condition of the system (high emittance, e=1). The average emissivity modulation of the IRECDTM is 0.7 in the 8-12 micron region, and at 9.7 micron (room temperature) it reaches a value of 0.9. Half and full emissivity modulations occur within 2 and10 minutes respectively. Because of its light weight (5g/m2), low voltage requirement (+/- 1 Volts), extremely good emissivity control properties (from 0 to 0.9 at 300K) and highly repeatable deposition process, the IR-ECDTM technology is very attractive for satellite thermal control applications. The IR-ECDTM has been under evaluation in a real space environment since March 8, 2007. This paper presents recent achievements of the IR-ECDTM including space test results.

  6. 40 CFR 63.483 - Emission standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...; (2) Section 63.485 for continuous front-end process vents; (3) Sections 63.486 through 63.492 for batch front-end process vents; (4) Sections 63.493 through 63.500 for back-end process operations; (5....e., emissions from continuous front-end process vents, batch front-end process vents, aggregate...

  7. Elastic emission polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

  8. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  9. Covering the different steps of the coffee processing: Can headspace VOC emissions be exploited to successfully distinguish between Arabica and Robusta?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colzi, Ilaria; Taiti, Cosimo; Marone, Elettra; Magnelli, Susanna; Gonnelli, Cristina; Mancuso, Stefano

    2017-12-15

    This work was performed to evaluate the possible application of PTR-ToF-MS technique in distinguishing between Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora var. robusta (Robusta) commercial stocks in each step of the processing chain (green beans, roasted beans, ground coffee, brews). volatile organic compounds (VOC) spectra from coffee samples of 7 Arabica and 6 Robusta commercial stocks were recorded and submitted to multivariate statistical analysis. Results clearly showed that, in each stage of the coffee processing, the volatile composition of coffee is highly influenced by the species. Actually, with the exception of green beans, PTR-ToF-MS technique was able to correctly recognize Arabica and Robusta samples. Particularly, among 134 tentatively identified VOCs, some masses (16 for roasted coffee, 12 for ground coffee and 12 for brewed coffee) were found to significantly discriminate the two species. Therefore, headspace VOC analyses was showed to represent a valuable tool to distinguish between Arabica and Robusta. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Experimental exposure of healthy subjects with emissions from a gas metal arc welding process--part II: biomonitoring of chromium and nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gube, Monika; Brand, Peter; Schettgen, Thomas; Bertram, Jens; Gerards, Kerstin; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether there is a relationship between the external exposure dose of chromium and nickel caused by a metal active gas welding process with a solid high-alloyed steel welding wire and inner exposure of subjects. In order to perform welding fume exposure under controlled and standardized conditions, the investigations were conducted in the "Aachen Workplace Simulation Laboratory". To perform biological monitoring of chromium and nickel, blood and urine samples of 12 healthy male non-smokers who never worked as welders were collected before and after a 6-h exposure to ambient air (0 mg/m(3)) and to welding fumes of a metal active gas welding process once with a concentration of the welding fume of 1 mg/m(3) and once with a concentration of 2.5 mg/m(3). Although the internal exposure to chromium and nickel in this study was comparatively low, the subjects showed significantly increased concentrations of these metals in urine after exposure to welding fume compared to the values at baseline. Moreover, the observed increase was significantly dose dependent for both of the substances. For the biological monitoring of chromium and nickel in urine of subjects exposed to welding fumes, a dependency on exposure dose was seen under standardized conditions after a single exposure over a period of 6 h. Thus, this study contributes to a better understanding of the relationship between ambient and biological exposures from welding fumes and provides a good basis for evaluating future biological threshold values for these metals in welding occupation.

  11. Zero emission city. Preliminary study; Null-Emissions-Stadt. Sondierungsstudie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diefenbach, N.; Enseling, A.; Werner, P.; Flade, A.; Greiff, R.; Hennings, D.; Muehlich, E.; Wullkopf, U.; Sturm, P.; Kieslich, W.; Born, R.; Grossklos, M.; Hatteh, R.; Mueller, K.; Ratschow, A.; Valouch-Fornoff, C.

    2002-10-01

    The idea of a 'zero emission city' is investigated by the Institut Wohnen und Umwelt on behalf of the Federal Minister of Education and Research. After describing the current situation and defining the key parameters of a 'zero emission city', settlement structures, power supply, production processes and transportation are analyzed and linked with the communal action level to obtain a framework for research, activities and actions. The study ends with recommendations for a research programme 'zero emission city'. (orig.) [German] Die von den Staedten der Industrielaender ausgehenden Emissionen stellen im Hinblick auf die globalen Belastungen wie z.B. Treibhauseffekt, Ozonabbau und Versauerung das Hauptproblem dar. Aus diesem Grunde bietet es sich an, den Gedanken der 'Null-Emissions-Stadt', der Vision einer moeglichst emissionsfreien Stadt, aufzugreifen und auf seine Tragfaehigkeit fuer innovative Handlungsmodelle forschungsstrategisch zu ueberpruefen. Das Bundesministerium fuer Bildung und Forschung hat das Institut Wohnen und Umwelt beauftragt, in einer Sondierungsstudie dieser Fragestellung nachzugehen. Nach der Festlegung der Ausgangsbedingungen und Eckpunkte der Vision 'Null-Emissions-Stadt' und der Analyse der vier Handlungsfelder Siedlungsstrukturen, Energieversorgung, Produktionsprozesse (Kreislaufwirtschaft) und Verkehr werden diese aufgegriffen und mit der kommunalen Handlungsebene verknuepft und zu einem Forschungs-, Handlungs- und moeglichen Aktionsrahmen zusammengefuegt. Die Studie schliesst mit Hinweisen fuer die Gestaltung eines Forschungsprogramms 'Null-Emissions-Stadt'. (orig.)

  12. Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

  13. Emissions trading under market imperfections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lappi, P.

    2013-08-15

    In this thesis we consider emissions trading under various market imperfections such as uncertainty over permit price, imperfect competition and noncompliance. First, we study the effects of uncertain permit price on the firms choice of emission intensive and clean inputs in an multi-input production process. We also assess the risk aversion factors of some Finnish heat and power producers. Second, we study imperfect competition in output and permit markets with a two-stage model, where output decision is made before permit trades. The emphasis is on the strategic interaction between firms and on the efficiency increasing regulation. Third, we turn back to uncertainty and analyse the welfare difference between emissions trading and emission tax, when some of the firms may be noncompliant. The main finding is that welfare is greater with emission tax than with emissions trading, when at least one firm is noncompliant. Finally, we extend some existing models of permit banking and borrowing to encompass also noncompliant behavior of firms. Here, we analyse the incentives of compliant firms to become noncompliant at some point in time and also the time paths of the choice variables. (orig.)

  14. Diffusion-based process for carbon dioxide uptake and isoprene emission in gaseous/aqueous two-phase photobioreactors by photosynthetic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Fiona K; Melis, Anastasios

    2012-01-01

    Photosynthesis for the generation of fuels and chemicals from cyanobacteria and microalgae offers the promise of a single host organism acting both as photocatalyst and processor, performing sunlight absorption and utilization, as well as CO(2) assimilation and conversion into product. However, there is a need to develop methods for generating, sequestering, and trapping such bio-products in an efficient and cost-effective manner that is suitable for industrial scale-up and exploitation. A sealed gaseous/aqueous two-phase photobioreactor was designed and applied for the photosynthetic generation of volatile isoprene (C(5)H(8)) hydrocarbons, which operates on the principle of spontaneous diffusion of CO(2) from the gaseous headspace into the microalgal or cyanobacterial-containing aqueous phase, followed by photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation and isoprene production by the transgenic microorganisms. Volatile isoprene hydrocarbons were emitted from the aqueous phase and were sequestered into the gaseous headspace. Periodic replacement (flushing) of the isoprene (C(5)H(8)) and oxygen (O(2)) content of the gaseous headspace with CO(2) allowed for the simultaneous harvesting of the photoproducts and replenishment of the CO(2) supply in the gaseous headspace. Reduction in practice of the gaseous/aqueous two-phase photobioreactor is offered in this work with a fed-batch and a semi-continuous culturing system using Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 heterologously expressing the Pueraria montana (kudzu) isoprene synthase (IspS) gene. Constitutive isoprene production was observed over 192 h of experimentation, coupled with cyanobacterial biomass accumulation. The diffusion-based process in gaseous/aqueous two-phase photobioreactors has the potential to be applied to other high-value photosynthetically derived volatile molecules, emanating from a variety of photosynthetic microorganisms. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Abatement of emissions of nitrogen compounds from biomass-based IGCC: Phase 5; Minskning av emissionen av kvaevefoereningar fraan biobraenslebaserade IGCC-processer: Etapp 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Magnus; Espenaes, Bengt-Goeran [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-04-01

    This report summarises the experimental results achieved within the fifth phase of a project with the aim to reduce the amount of nitrogen compounds produced in gasification of biomass. In the previous first phases of the project the work has focused on laboratory scale experiments with the aim to improve the understanding of the nitrogen chemistry that takes place in the pyrolysis and gasification steps in the gasifier. During the fourth phase the work was redirected towards measurements in a small biomass-fuelled fluidized bed gasifier, which provides conditions that resemble the conditions in a full-scale gasifier. The work was concerned with the effect on fuel nitrogen conversion by shifts of the primary-to-secondary air ratio in the gasifier, the influence of fuel nitrogen content and the effect of a new bed material. The fuel nitrogen content was varied using one single biomass fuel. This was achieved by using the fuel in the form of pellets, and by addition of two different carriers of nitrogen during the manufacturing process of the pelletised fuel. The new bed material used is based on iron, which previously have been shown to be active for conversion of NH{sub 3} in a synthetic fuel gas. A minor influence from the secondary-to-primary fuel ratio on the conversion of fuel nitrogen to ammonia was shown. The yield of bound nitrogen as ammonia was about 30% for fuel with low nitrogen content (0.13%), and about 60% for fuel with artificially increased nitrogen content (0.82%). Unfortunately no clear effect was obtained on the yield of bound nitrogen obtained using the new bed material, in spite of a clear effect that was obtained in previous laboratory tests. On the other hand, a quite positive effect was obtained for low yield of tars.

  16. Moderate emissions grandfathering

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Emissions grandfathering holds that a history of emissions strengthens an agent’s claim for future emission entitlements. Though grandfathering appears to have been influential in actual emission control frameworks, it is rarely taken seriously by philosophers. This article presents an argument for thinking this an oversight. The core of the argument is that members of countries with higher historical emissions are typically burdened with higher costs when transitioning to a given lower level...

  17. Particulate Matter Emissions Factors for Dust from Unique Military Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    understanding of the dust emission process and strength of these emissions for artillery backblast on improved gun-sites ( surface treated with dust...dust emission process and strength of these emissions for artillery backblast on improved gun-sites ( surface treated with dust palliatives), tracked... montmorillonite , kaolinite, and palygorskite. The CCSEM provides measurements of surface coatings, but the coatings result in an underestimation of the

  18. Ion cyclotron emission by spontaneous emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Costa, O. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Gresillon, D. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises

    1994-07-01

    The goal of the study is to examine whether the spontaneous emission can account for ICE (ion cyclotron emission) experimental results, or part of them. A straightforward approach to plasma emission is chosen, investigating the near equilibrium wave radiation by gyrating ions, and thus building from the majority and fast fusion ions the plasma fluctuations and emission on the fast magnetoacoustic or compressional Alfven wave mode in the IC frequency range. Similarities with the ICE experiments are shown: the emission temperature in the presence of fast ions (even in a very small amount), the strong fast ion emission increase with the harmonic, the fine double-line splitting of each peak, the linear but not proportional increase of the peak width with the harmonic. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Spontaneous emission in nanoscopic dielectric particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogobete, Lavinia; Schniepp, Hannes; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Henkel, Carsten

    2003-10-01

    We report on theoretical studies of the inhibition of the spontaneous emission process in subwavelength dielectric media. We discuss the modification of the spontaneous emission rate as a function of the size and shape of the medium as well as the position of the emitter in it.

  20. Experiments on Evaporative Emissions in Ventilated Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Claus; Nielsen, Peter V.; Heiselberg, Per

    In many new buildings the indoor air quality is affected by emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from building materials. The emission process may be controlled either by diffusion inside the material or evaporation from the surface but it always involves mass transfer across the boundary...

  1. Modeling of pesticide emissions from agricultural ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong

    2012-04-01

    Pesticides are applied to crops and soils to improve agricultural yields, but the use of pesticides has become highly regulated because of concerns about their adverse effects on human health and environment. Estimating pesticide emission rates from soils and crops is a key component for risk assessment for pesticide registration, identification of pesticide sources to the contamination of sensitive ecosystems, and appreciation of transport and fate of pesticides in the environment. Pesticide emission rates involve processes occurring in the soil, in the atmosphere, and on vegetation surfaces and are highly dependent on soil texture, agricultural practices, and meteorology, which vary significantly with location and/or time. To take all these factors into account for simulating pesticide emissions from large agricultural ecosystems, this study coupled a comprehensive meteorological model with a dynamic pesticide emission model. The combined model calculates hourly emission rates from both emission sources: current applications and soil residues resulting from historical use. The coupled modeling system is used to compute a gridded (36 × 36 km) hourly toxaphene emission inventory for North America for the year 2000 using a published U.S. toxaphene residue inventory and a Mexican toxaphene residue inventory developed using its historical application rates and a cropland inventory. To my knowledge, this is the first such hourly toxaphene emission inventory for North America. Results show that modeled emission rates have strong diurnal and seasonal variations at a given location and over the entire domain. The simulated total toxaphene emission from contaminated agricultural soils in North America in 2000 was about 255 t, which compares reasonably well to a published annual estimate. Most emissions occur in spring and summer, with domain-wide emission rates in April, May and, June of 36, 51, and 35 t/month, respectively. The spatial distribution of emissions depends

  2. Synthesis and development of processes for the recovery of sulfur from acid gases. Part 1, Development of a high-temperature process for removal of H2S from coal gas using limestone -- thermodynamic and kinetic considerations; Part 2, Development of a zero-emissions process for recovery of sulfur from acid gas streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Towler, Gavin P. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Limestone can be used more effectively as a sorbent for H2S in high-temperature gas-cleaning applications if it is prevented from undergoing calcination. Sorption of H2S by limestone is impeded by sintering of the product CaS layer. Sintering of CaS is catalyzed by CO2, but is not affected by N2 or H2. The kinetics of CaS sintering was determined for the temperature range 750--900°C. When hydrogen sulfide is heated above 600°C in the presence of carbon dioxide elemental sulfur is formed. The rate-limiting step of elemental sulfur formation is thermal decomposition of H2S. Part of the hydrogen thereby produced reacts with CO2, forming CO via the water-gas-shift reaction. The equilibrium of H2S decomposition is therefore shifted to favor the formation of elemental sulfur. The main byproduct is COS, formed by a reaction between CO2 and H2S that is analogous to the water-gas-shift reaction. Smaller amounts of SO2 and CS2 also form. Molybdenum disulfide is a strong catalyst for H2S decomposition in the presence of CO2. A process for recovery of sulfur from H2S using this chemistry is as follows: Hydrogen sulfide is heated in a high-temperature reactor in the presence of CO2 and a suitable catalyst. The primary products of the overall reaction are S2, CO, H2 and H2O. Rapid quenching of the reaction mixture to roughly 600°C prevents loss Of S2 during cooling. Carbonyl sulfide is removed from the product gas by hydrolysis back to CO2 and H2S. Unreacted CO2 and H2S are removed from the product gas and recycled to the reactor, leaving a gas consisting chiefly of H2 and CO, which recovers the hydrogen value from the H2S. This process is economically favorable compared to the existing sulfur

  3. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer and Airborne Emission Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavich, T.; Beer, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is an instrument being developed for the NASA Earth Observing System Chemistry Platform. TES will measure the distribution of ozone and its precursors in the lower atmosphere. The Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES) is an aircraft precursor to TES. Applicable descriptions are given of instrument design, technology challenges, implementation and operations for both.

  4. Processes regulating nitric oxide emissions from soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive gas that plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the production and destruction of ozone and thereby the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. NO also contributes by its oxidation products to the formation of acid rain. The major sources...

  5. World Conference on Acoustic Emission 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zhanwen; Zhang, Junjiao

    2015-01-01

    This volume collects the papers from the 2013 World Conference on Acoustic Emission in Shanghai. The latest research and applications of Acoustic Emission (AE) are explored, with particular emphasis on detecting and processing of AE signals, development of AE instrument and testing standards, AE of materials, engineering structures and systems, including the processing of collected data and analytical techniques as well as experimental case studies.

  6. World Conference on Acoustic Emission 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zhanwen; Zhang, Junjiao

    2017-01-01

    This volume collects the papers from the World Conference on Acoustic Emission 2015 (WCAE-2015) in Hawaii. The latest research and applications of Acoustic Emission (AE) are explored, with particular emphasis on detecting and processing of AE signals, development of AE instrument and testing standards, AE of materials, engineering structures and systems, including the processing of collected data and analytical techniques as well as experimental case studies.

  7. What Is Emissions Trading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn the basics about how emissions trading uses a market-based policy tool used to control large amounts of pollution emissions from a group of sources in order to protect human health and the environment.

  8. World Emission RETRO ANTHRO

    Data.gov (United States)

    Washington University St Louis — Anthropogenic and vegetation fire emissions data were generated monthly covering a period of 1960 to 2000. Anthropogenic emissions in the RETRO inventory are derived...

  9. National Emission Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Emission Inventory contains measured, modeled, and estimated data for emissions of all known source categories in the US (stationary sources, fires,...

  10. Emissions Modeling Clearinghouse

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Emissions Modeling Clearinghouse (EMCH) supports and promotes emissions modeling activities both internal and external to the EPA. Through this site, the EPA...

  11. Control of Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor); Chung, Landy (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods and apparatus utilizing chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide are useful to reduce NOx emissions, as well as SOx and mercury (or other heavy metal) emissions, from combustion flue gas streams.

  12. Biodiesel Emissions Analysis Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using existing data, the EPA's biodiesel emissions analysis program sought to quantify the air pollution emission effects of biodiesel for diesel engines that have not been specifically modified to operate on biodiesel.

  13. One sensor acoustic emission localization in plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, R; Zwimpfer, F; Dual, J

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic emissions are elastic waves accompanying damage processes and are therefore used for monitoring the health state of structures. Most of the traditional acoustic emission techniques use a trilateration approach requiring at least three sensors on a 2D domain in order to localize sources of acoustic emission events. In this paper, we present a new approach which requires only a single sensor to identify and localize the source of acoustic emissions in a finite plate. The method proposed makes use of the time reversal principle and the dispersive nature of the flexural wave mode in a suitable frequency band. The signal shape of the transverse velocity response contains information about the propagated paths of the incoming elastic waves. This information is made accessible by a numerical time reversal simulation. The effect of dispersion is reversed and the original shape of the flexural wave is restored at the origin of the acoustic emission. The time reversal process is analyzed first for an infinite Mindlin plate, then by a 3D FEM simulation which in combination results in a novel acoustic emission localization process. The process is experimentally verified for different aluminum plates for artificially generated acoustic emissions (Hsu-Nielsen source). Good and reliable localization was achieved for a homogeneous quadratic aluminum plate with only one measurement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Galactic Diffuse Polarized Emission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Diffuse polarized emission by synchrotron is a key tool to investigate magnetic fields in the Milky Way, particularly the ordered component of the large scale structure. Key observables are the synchrotron emission itself and the RM is by Faraday rotation. In this paper the main properties of the radio polarized diffuse emission ...

  15. Bridging the Emissions Gap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, K.

    2012-01-01

    The analyses in Chapters 2 and 3 of this report concluded that the emissions gap in 2020 will likely be between 8 and 13 GtCO2e. The chapters also estimated the difference between BaU emissions in 2020 and the emissions level consistent with a “likely” chance of staying within the 2°C target to

  16. Gaseous emissions from waste combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werther, Joachim

    2007-06-18

    An overview is given on methods and technologies for limiting the gaseous emissions from waste combustion. With the guideline 2000/76/EC recent European legislation has set stringent limits not only for the mono-combustion of waste in specialized incineration plants but also for co-combustion in coal-fired power plants. With increased awareness of environmental issues and stepwise decrease of emission limits and inclusion of more and more substances into the network of regulations a multitude of emission abatement methods and technologies have been developed over the last decades. The result is the state-of-the-art waste incinerator with a number of specialized process steps for the individual components in the flue gas. The present work highlights some new developments which can be summarized under the common goal of reducing the costs of flue gas treatment by applying systems which combine the treatment of several noxious substances in one reactor or by taking new, simpler routes instead of the previously used complicated ones or - in the case of flue gas desulphurisation - by reducing the amount of limestone consumption. Cost reduction is also the driving force for new processes of conditioning of nonhomogenous waste before combustion. Pyrolysis or gasification is used for chemical conditioning whereas physical conditioning means comminution, classification and sorting processes. Conditioning yields a fuel which can be used in power plants either as a co-fuel or a mono-fuel and which will burn there under much better controlled conditions and therefore with less emissions than the nonhomogeneous waste in a conventional waste incinerator. Also for cost reasons, co-combustion of wastes in coal-fired power stations is strongly pressing into the market. Recent investigations reveal that the co-firing of waste can also have beneficial effects on the operating behavior of the boiler and on the gaseous emissions.

  17. Modelling of ammonia emissions from dairy cow houses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monteny, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    Dairy cow husbandry contributes to environmental acidification through the emission of ammonia. In-depth knowledge on the processes and variable factors that play a role in the emission of ammonia from dairy cow houses benefits the production of emission data, the development of low

  18. Global CO2 emissions from cement production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Robbie M.

    2018-01-01

    The global production of cement has grown very rapidly in recent years, and after fossil fuels and land-use change, it is the third-largest source of anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide. The required data for estimating emissions from global cement production are poor, and it has been recognised that some global estimates are significantly inflated. Here we assemble a large variety of available datasets and prioritise official data and emission factors, including estimates submitted to the UNFCCC plus new estimates for China and India, to present a new analysis of global process emissions from cement production. We show that global process emissions in 2016 were 1.45±0.20 Gt CO2, equivalent to about 4 % of emissions from fossil fuels. Cumulative emissions from 1928 to 2016 were 39.3±2.4 Gt CO2, 66 % of which have occurred since 1990. Emissions in 2015 were 30 % lower than those recently reported by the Global Carbon Project. The data associated with this article can be found at https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.831455" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.831455.

  19. AIRFORCE. Aircraft emissions and radiative forcing from emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meijer, E.W.; Kelder, H.; Velthoven, P.F.J. van; Wauben, W.M.F. [Royal Netherlands Meteorological Inst., De Bilt (Netherlands); Beck, J.P.; Velders, G.J.M. [National Inst. of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Lelieveld, J.; Scheeren, B.A. [Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Research Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1997-12-31

    The Dutch AIRFORCE project focuses on the effects of subsonic aircraft emissions on the chemical composition of the atmosphere and subsequent radiative forcing. It includes measurements in the tropopause region and the modelling of exhaust plumes and large-scale effects. An aircraft exhaust plume model has been developed to study plume processes. The results of the plume model are used in the global transport chemistry model CTMK to determine large-scale effects of plume processes. Due to the efficient conversion of NO{sub x} into HNO{sub 3} inside aircraft exhaust plumes, a decrease of about 25% of the O{sub 3} perturbation was found in the NAFC at 200 hPa in July. Measurements of hydrocarbons revealed a dominant role of the anthropogenic continental emissions of light hydrocarbons in the tropopause region. (author) 20 refs.

  20. Reducing GHG emissions in agricultural production process for production of biofuels by growing legumes and production-technical measures; Senkung der THG-Emissionen in landwirtschaftlichen Produktionsverfahren zur Erzeugung von Biokraftstoffen durch Leguminosenanbau und produktionstechnische Massnahmen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurgel, Andreas [Landesforschungsanstalt fuer Landwirtschaft und Fischerei Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Guelzow-Pruezen (Germany). Sachgebiet Nachwachsende Rohstoffe; Schiemenz, Katja

    2017-08-01

    The reduction of greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions in the supply chain for biofuels is a big challenge especially for the German and European cultivation of energy crops. The production of nitrogen fertilizers and field emissions are the main factors of GHG emissions. The amount of field emissions depends very strongly on the nitrogen effort and the intensity of tillage. The main objective is to reduce GHG emissions in field cropping systems within the biofuel production chains. An inclusion of legumes into crop rotations is particularly important because their cultivation does not require nitrogen fertilizer. Data base for the project is a complex field experiment with the biofuel crops winter rape and winter wheat. Previous crops are winter wheat, peas and lupins. ln each case tilling systems are compared with non-tilling. The first results of the field experiments are nitrogen functions depending on previous crops, sites and tilling system. Calculation models for GHG reduction models were developed on the bases of these results. By growing legumes as previous crops before wheat and rape it is possible to reduce GHG emissions from 2 to 10 g CO{sub 2eq} per MJ. The best reduction of GHG emissions is possible by combining legumes as previous crops with a reduced nitrogen effort.

  1. Continental anthropogenic primary particle number emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasonen, Pauli; Kupiainen, Kaarle; Klimont, Zbigniew; Visschedijk, Antoon; Denier van der Gon, Hugo A. C.; Amann, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particle number concentrations impact our climate and health in ways different from those of aerosol mass concentrations. However, the global, current and future anthropogenic particle number emissions and their size distributions are so far poorly known. In this article, we present the implementation of particle number emission factors and the related size distributions in the GAINS (Greenhouse Gas-Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies) model. This implementation allows for global estimates of particle number emissions under different future scenarios, consistent with emissions of other pollutants and greenhouse gases. In addition to determining the general particulate number emissions, we also describe a method to estimate the number size distributions of the emitted black carbon particles. The first results show that the sources dominating the particle number emissions are different to those dominating the mass emissions. The major global number source is road traffic, followed by residential combustion of biofuels and coal (especially in China, India and Africa), coke production (Russia and China), and industrial combustion and processes. The size distributions of emitted particles differ across the world, depending on the main sources: in regions dominated by traffic and industry, the number size distribution of emissions peaks in diameters range from 20 to 50 nm, whereas in regions with intensive biofuel combustion and/or agricultural waste burning, the emissions of particles with diameters around 100 nm are dominant. In the baseline (current legislation) scenario, the particle number emissions in Europe, Northern and Southern Americas, Australia, and China decrease until 2030, whereas especially for India, a strong increase is estimated. The results of this study provide input for modelling of the future changes in aerosol-cloud interactions as well as particle number related adverse health effects, e.g. in response to tightening

  2. Continental anthropogenic primary particle number emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Paasonen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosol particle number concentrations impact our climate and health in ways different from those of aerosol mass concentrations. However, the global, current and future anthropogenic particle number emissions and their size distributions are so far poorly known. In this article, we present the implementation of particle number emission factors and the related size distributions in the GAINS (Greenhouse Gas–Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies model. This implementation allows for global estimates of particle number emissions under different future scenarios, consistent with emissions of other pollutants and greenhouse gases. In addition to determining the general particulate number emissions, we also describe a method to estimate the number size distributions of the emitted black carbon particles. The first results show that the sources dominating the particle number emissions are different to those dominating the mass emissions. The major global number source is road traffic, followed by residential combustion of biofuels and coal (especially in China, India and Africa, coke production (Russia and China, and industrial combustion and processes. The size distributions of emitted particles differ across the world, depending on the main sources: in regions dominated by traffic and industry, the number size distribution of emissions peaks in diameters range from 20 to 50 nm, whereas in regions with intensive biofuel combustion and/or agricultural waste burning, the emissions of particles with diameters around 100 nm are dominant. In the baseline (current legislation scenario, the particle number emissions in Europe, Northern and Southern Americas, Australia, and China decrease until 2030, whereas especially for India, a strong increase is estimated. The results of this study provide input for modelling of the future changes in aerosol–cloud interactions as well as particle number related adverse health effects, e.g. in response

  3. Shipping emissions in ports

    OpenAIRE

    Merk, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Shipping emissions in ports are substantial, accounting for 18 million tonnes of CO2 emissions, 0.4 million tonnes of NOx, 0.2 million of SOx and 0.03 million tonnes of PM10 in 2011. Around 85% of emissions come from containerships and tankers. Containerships have short port stays, but high emissions during these stays. Most of CO2 emissions in ports from shipping are in Asia and Europe (58%), but this share is low compared to their share of port calls (70%). European ports have much less emi...

  4. International emissions trading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boom, Jan Tjeerd

    This thesis discusses the design and political acceptability of international emissions trading. It is shown that there are several designs options for emissions trading at the national level that have a different impact on output and thereby related factors such as employment and consumer prices....... The differences in impact of the design make that governments may prefer different designs of emissions trading in different situations. The thesis furthermore establishes that international emissions trading may lead to higher overall emissions, which may make it a less attractive instrument....

  5. COAL DUST EMISSION PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Biliaiev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article aims to develop 2D numerical models for the prediction of atmospheric pollution during transportation of coal in the railway car, as well as the ways to protect the environment and the areas near to the mainline from the dust emission due to the air injection installation. Methodology. To solve this problem there were developed numerical models based on the use of the equations of motion of an inviscid incompressible fluid and mass transfer. For the numerical integration of the transport equation of the pollutant the implicit alternating-triangular difference scheme was used. For numerical integration of the 2D equation for the velocity potential the method of total approximation was used. The developed numerical models are the basis of established software package. On the basis of the constructed numerical models it was carried out a computational experiment to assess the level of air pollution when transporting bulk cargo by rail when the railway car has the air injection. Findings. 2D numerical models that belong to the class «diagnostic models» were developed. These models take into account the main physical factors affecting the process of dispersion of dust pollution in the atmosphere during transportation of bulk cargo. The developed numerical models make it possible to calculate the dust loss process, taking into account the use of the air injection of the car. They require a small cost of the computer time during practical realization at the low and medium power machines. There were submitted computational calculations to determine pollutant concentrations and the formation of the zone of pollution near the train with bulk cargo in «microscale» scale taking into account the air curtains. Originality. 2D numerical models taking into account the relevant factors influencing the process of dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere, and the formation of the zone of pollution during transportation of bulk cargo by

  6. Opportunities, potentials, obstacles and instruments in the reduction of the energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions of industry technologies by means of process optimization and implementation of process engineering; Moeglichkeiten, Potenziale, Hemmnisse und Instrumente zur Senkung des Energieverbrauchs und der CO{sub 2}-Emissionen von industriellen Branchentechnologien durch Prozessoptimierung und Einfuehrung neuer Verfahrenstechniken. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlomann, Barbara; Fleiter, Tobias; Hirzel, Simon [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer System- und Innovationsforschung, Karlsruhe (Germany)] [and others

    2011-02-15

    This research project aims to analyse the future energy demand of main processes in energy-intensive industries. One focus is the detailed assessment of energy-efficient technologies and their saving potentials. This involves identifying promising technologies and then calculating their energy saving potentials, costs and impacts on both final energy demand and greenhouse gas emissions in Germany up to the year 2035. The analysis is based on the calculation of conservation supply curves as well as four alternative scenarios using a bottom-up energy demand model. In addition, barriers and other factors influencing the market diffusion of energy-efficient technologies are analysed. Finally, policy implications are developed and discussed based on the previous technology assessment.

  7. Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Aslam K. Khalil

    2009-07-16

    This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small

  8. OVOC Emissions and Atmospheric Transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokelson, R. J.; Christian, T. J.; Bertschi, I. T.; Ward, D. E.; Field, R. J.; Hobbs, P. V.; Goode, J.; Mason, S.; Susott, R.; Babbitt, R.; Hao, W. M.

    2002-12-01

    We quantified the main emissions from a few vegetation samples and many biomass fires using ground-based, open-path FTIR and airborne, closed-cell FTIR. The two instruments have been rigorously compared to each other and to PTR-MS and canister sampling. OVOC are major emissions from plants. OVOC account for about 70 percent of NMOC from savanna fires (the largest type of biomass burning) and 70-80 percent of NMOC from production and use of domestic biofuels (the second largest type of biomass burning). A table of average biofuel emissions is presented. Data from laboratory and free-burning fires, obtained from Alaska to South Africa, is used to develop equations that predict OVOC emissions from a wide variety of global fires. The impact of OVOC on smoke plume chemistry and the post-emission transformations of OVOC were investigated with two models. Addition of HCHO alone to the simple chemistry used in some global models dramatically reduces NOx lifetime and speeds up O3 formation rates in plumes. A detailed model verifies these effects and shows that OVOC profoundly affect formation of HOx, peroxide, and nitrogen reservoir species. The modeled photochemical transformations of OVOC are diverse, but some key pathways are unknown. We observed rapid production of both O3 and additional OVOC and OH of 1.7E7 in smoke plumes in Alaska and Africa; all reasonably consistent with model predictions. In addition, we found that cloud processing caused large post-emission changes in smoke trace gases including removal of nearly all methanol, a decrease in acetic acid, and a large increase in HCHO. These observations suggest that OVOC could react in cloud droplets and lead to production of modified aerosol. In addition, transport of OVOC by deep convection may be associated with large effects not explained by solubility alone.

  9. Air Emissions Factors and Quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emissions factors are used in developing air emissions inventories for air quality management decisions and in developing emissions control strategies. This area provides technical information on and support for the use of emissions factors.

  10. Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-05-27

    Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a five-year Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction (LEADER) program under a DOE project entitled: ''Research and Development for Compression-Ignition Direct-Injection Engines (CIDI) and Aftertreatment Sub-Systems''. The objectives of the LEADER Program were to: Demonstrate technologies that will achieve future federal Tier 2 emissions targets; and Demonstrate production-viable technical targets for engine out emissions, efficiency, power density, noise, durability, production cost, aftertreatment volume and weight. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the LEADER program The most noteworthy achievements in this program are listed below: (1) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a PNGV-mule Neon passenger car, utilizing a CSF + SCR system These aggressive emissions were obtained with no ammonia (NH{sub 3}) slip and a combined fuel economy of 63 miles per gallon, integrating FTP75 and highway fuel economy transient cycle test results. Demonstrated feasibility to achieve Tier 2 Bin 8 emissions levels without active NOx aftertreatment. (2) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a light-duty truck utilizing a CSF + SCR system, synergizing efforts with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. This aggressive reduction in tailpipe out emissions was achieved with no ammonia slip and a 41% fuel economy improvement, compared to the equivalent gasoline engine-equipped vehicle. (3) Demonstrated Tier 2 near-Bin 9 emissions compliance on a light-duty truck, without active NOx aftertreatment devices, in synergy with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. (4) Developed and applied advanced combustion technologies such as ''CLEAN Combustion{copyright}'', which yields simultaneous reduction in engine out NOx and PM emissions while also improving engine and aftertreatment integration by providing favorable

  11. Evaluation of Economic, Social and Environmental Effects of Low-Emission Energy Technologies Development in Poland: A Multi-Criteria Analysis with Application of a Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process (FAHP)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Magdalena Ligus

    2017-01-01

    ...: economic, social and environmental. This study aims to assess the extent to which five low-emission energy technologies contribute to social welfare in the scope of the concept of sustainable development...

  12. Tree-mediated methane emissions along a tropical peat dome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangala, Sunitha; Hoyt, Alison; Cobb, Alex; Harvey, Charles; Gauci, Vincent

    2017-04-01

    Methane production and transport processes in peatlands are fairly well understood, but growing evidence for emission of methane through trees has highlighted the need to revisit methane transport processes. We examined methane emissions from all pathways including stem and leaf emissions in one of the last remaining pristine tropical peatlands in Southeast Asia: Belait peat swamp forests, Brunei Darussalam. Methane emissions along with a range of biotic and abiotic factors were measured within three 20 x 30 m plots along transects from the edge to the center of the peat done which is dominated by Shorea albida. Tree-mediated methane emissions were the dominant means of methane emissions from all three plots, with soil emissions equating to less than 30% of the total ecosystem methane flux. Both tree and soil emissions varied between and within the three plots, with soil emissions decreasing from the edge to the center of the peat dome with increasing peat depth and decreasing water table depths and tree emissions following an opposite trend. Within each plot, tree-mediated methane emissions displayed large variability with fluxes ranging between 0.2 - 9.4 mg m-2 hr-1. Relationships between tree-mediated methane emissions and pore-water methane concentrations point towards the possibility of some of these trees transporting methane produced in the deeper layers of the peat profile to the atmosphere. Taken together, these observations highlight that methane emissions through tree stems play a more central role in methane cycling in tropical peatlands.

  13. Sonification of acoustic emission data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raith, Manuel; Große, Christian

    2014-05-01

    purposes (students, co-workers). On goal is to establish a real-time frequency transformation into the audio range to avoid time consuming visual data processing during the experiments. It is also the intention to analyze the signals using psycho-acoustic methods with the help of specialists from electrical engineering. Reference: Raith, Manuel (2013). "Schallemissionsanalyse bei Pulloutexperimenten an Verbunddübeln" Masterarbeit. Technische Universität München, Lehrstuhl für Zerstörungsfreie Prüfung. Malm, Fabian (2012). "Schallemissionsanalyse am humanen Femur" Masterarbeit. Technische Universität München, Lehrstuhl für Zerstörungsfreie Prüfung. Richter R. (2009): Einsatz der Schallemissionsanalyse zur Detektion des Riss und Abplatzungsverhaltens von Beton unter Brandeinwirkung. Diplomarbeit. Materialprüfungsanstalt Universität Stuttgart Keywords: Acoustic emission, bonded anchors, femur, pullout test, fire-spalling

  14. Cryptic Methane Emissions from Upland Forest Ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megonigal, Patrick [Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (United States); Pitz, Scott [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-04-19

    This exploratory research on Cryptic Methane Emissions from Upland Forest Ecosystems was motivated by evidence that upland ecosystems emit 36% as much methane to the atmosphere as global wetlands, yet we knew almost nothing about this source. The long-term objective was to refine Earth system models by quantifying methane emissions from upland forests, and elucidate the biogeochemical processes that govern upland methane emissions. The immediate objectives of the grant were to: (i) test the emerging paradigm that upland trees unexpectedly transpire methane, (ii) test the basic biogeochemical assumptions of an existing global model of upland methane emissions, and (iii) develop the suite of biogeochemical approaches that will be needed to advance research on upland methane emissions. We instrumented a temperate forest system in order to explore the processes that govern upland methane emissions. We demonstrated that methane is emitted from the stems of dominant tree species in temperate upland forests. Tree emissions occurred throughout the growing season, while soils adjacent to the trees consumed methane simultaneously, challenging the concept that forests are uniform sinks of methane. High frequency measurements revealed diurnal cycling in the rate of methane emissions, pointing to soils as the methane source and transpiration as the most likely pathway for methane transport. We propose the forests are smaller methane sinks than previously estimated due to stem emissions. Stem emissions may be particularly important in upland tropical forests characterized by high rainfall and transpiration, resolving differences between models and measurements. The methods we used can be effectively implemented in order to determine if the phenomenon is widespread.

  15. Selection of emission factor standards for estimating emissions from diesel construction equipment in building construction in the Australian context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guomin; Sandanayake, Malindu; Setunge, Sujeeva; Li, Chunqing; Fang, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Emissions from equipment usage and transportation at the construction stage are classified as the direct emissions which include both greenhouse gas (GHG) and non-GHG emissions due to partial combustion of fuel. Unavailability of a reliable and complete inventory restricts an accurate emission evaluation on construction work. The study attempts to review emission factor standards readily available worldwide for estimating emissions from construction equipment. Emission factors published by United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), Australian National Greenhouse Accounts (AUS NGA), Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and European Environmental Agency (EEA) are critically reviewed to identify their strengths and weaknesses. A selection process based on the availability and applicability is then developed to help identify the most suitable emission factor standards for estimating emissions from construction equipment in the Australian context. A case study indicates that a fuel based emission factor is more suitable for GHG emission estimation and a time based emission factor is more appropriate for estimation of non-GHG emissions. However, the selection of emission factor standards also depends on factors like the place of analysis (country of origin), data availability and the scope of analysis. Therefore, suitable modifications and assumptions should be incorporated in order to represent these factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Secondary emissions during fiber laser cutting of nuclear material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, A., E-mail: beatriz.mendes.lopez@gmail.com [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Assunção, E. [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); European Federation for Welding, Joining and Cutting, Porto Salvo 2740-120 (Portugal); Pires, I. [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Quintino, L. [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); European Federation for Welding, Joining and Cutting, Porto Salvo 2740-120 (Portugal)

    2017-04-15

    The laser process has been studied for dismantling work for more than 10 years, however there is almost no data available concerning secondary emissions generated during the process. These emissions are inevitable during the laser cutting process and can have detrimental effects in human health and in the equipment. In terms of safety, for nuclear decommissioning, is crucial to point out ways of controlling the emissions of the process. This paper gives indications about the parameters to be used in order to reduce these secondary emissions and about the influence of these parameters on the particles size distribution. In general, for producing minimal dross and fume emissions the beam focus should be placed on the surface of the material. The higher percentage of secondary emissions which present higher diameter, increases approximately linearly with the stand-off distance and with the use of low air pressure.

  17. Resolving Emissions Dynamics via Mass Spectrometry: Time Resolved Measurements of Emission Transients by Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partridge, William P.

    2000-08-20

    Transient emissions occur throughout normal engine operation and can significantly contribute to overall system emissions. Such transient emissions may originate from various sources including cold start, varying load and exhaust-gas recirculation (EGR) rates; all of which are dynamic processes in the majority of engine operation applications (1). Alternatively, there are systems which are inherently dynamic even at steady-state engine-operation conditions. Such systems include catalytic exhaust-emissions treatment devices with self-initiated and sustained oscillations (2) and NOX adsorber systems (3,4,5). High-speed diagnostics, capable of temporally resolving such emissions transients, are required to characterize the process, verify calculated system inputs, and optimize the system.

  18. Study of luminous emissions associated to electron emissions in radiofrequency cavities; Etude des emissions lumineuses associees aux emissions electroniques dans les cavites hyperfrequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maissa, S

    1996-11-26

    This study investigates luminous emissions simultaneously to electron emissions and examines their features in order to better understand the field electron emission phenomenon. A RF cavity, operating at room temperature and in pulsed mode, joined to a sophisticated experimental apparatus has been especially developed. The electron and luminous emissions are investigated on cleaned or with metallic, graphitic and dielectric particles contaminated RF surfaces in order to study their influence on these phenomena. During the surface processing, unstable luminous spots glowing during one RF pulse are detected. Their apparition is promoted in the vicinity of the metallic particles or scratches. Two hypotheses could explain their origin: the presence of micro-plasmas associated to electronic explosive emission during processing or the thermal radiation of the melted metal during this emission. Stable luminous spots glowing during several RF pulses are also detected and appear to increase on RF surfaces contaminated with dielectric particles, leading to strong and explosive luminous emissions. Two interpretations are considered: the initiation of surface breakdowns on the dielectric particles or the heating by the RF field at temperatures sufficiently intense to provoke their thermal radiation then their explosion. Finally a superconducting cavity has been adapted to observe luminous spots, which differ from the former ones bu their star shape and could be associated to micro-plasmas, revealed by the starbursts observed on superconducting cavity walls. (author) 102 refs.

  19. Global Seabird Ammonia Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddick, S. N.; Blackall, T. D.; Dragosits, U.; Daunt, F. H.; Braban, C. F.; Tang, Y. S.; Trathan, P.; Wanless, S.; Sutton, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Seabird colonies represent a major source of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) in remote coastal and marine systems in temperate, tropical and polar regions. Previous studies have shown that NH3 emissions from Scottish seabird colonies were substantial - of similar magnitude to the most intensive agricultural point source emissions. The UK data were used to model global seabird NH3 emissions and suggested that penguins are a major source of emissions on and around the Antarctic continent. The largest seabird colonies are in the order of millions of seabirds. Due to the isolation of these colonies from anthropogenic nitrogen sources, they may play a major role in the nitrogen cycle within these ecosystems. A global seabird database was constructed and used in conjunction with a species-specific seabird bioenergetics model to map the locations of NH3 emissions from seabird colonies. The accuracy of the modelled emissions was validated with field data of NH3 emissions measured at key seabird colonies in different climatic regions of the world: temperate (Isle of May, Scotland), tropical (Ascension Island) and polar (Signy Island, South Georgia). The field data indicated good agreement between modelled and measured NH3 emissions. The measured NH3 emissions also showed the variability of emission with climate. Climate dependence of seabird NH3 emissions may have further implications under a changing global climate. Seabird colonies represent NH3 emission ‘hotspots’, often far from anthropogenic sources, and are likely to be the major source of nitrogen input to these remote coastal ecosystems. The direct manuring by seabirds at colony locations may strongly influence species richness and biodiversity. The subsequent volatilisation and deposition of NH3 increases the spatial extent of seabird influence on nitrogen cycling in their local ecosystem. As many seabird populations are fluctuating due to changing food supply, climate change or anthropogenic pressures, these factors

  20. Enteric methane emissions from German pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dämmgen, Ulrich; Schulz, Joachim; Klausing, Heinrich Kleine

    2012-01-01

    . Meanwhile numerous experimental data on methane emissions from enteric fermentation is available in Germany and abroad; the results are compiled in this work. These results also allow for a description of transformation processes in the hind gut and a subsequent establishment of models that relate emissions...... to feed and performance data. The model by Kirchgeßner et al. (1995) is based on German experimental data and reflects typical national diet compositions. It is used to quantify typical emissions and methane conversion ratios. The results agree with other experimental findings at home and abroad...

  1. Economic growth and carbon emission control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenyu

    The question about whether environmental improvement is compatible with continued economic growth remains unclear and requires further study in a specific context. This study intends to provide insight on the potential for carbon emissions control in the absence of international agreement, and connect the empirical analysis with theoretical framework. The Chinese electricity generation sector is used as a case study to demonstrate the problem. Both social planner and private problems are examined to derive the conditions that define the optimal level of production and pollution. The private problem will be demonstrated under the emission regulation using an emission tax, an input tax and an abatement subsidy respectively. The social optimal emission flow is imposed into the private problem. To provide tractable analytical results, a Cobb-Douglas type production function is used to describe the joint production process of the desired output and undesired output (i.e., electricity and emissions). A modified Hamiltonian approach is employed to solve the system and the steady state solutions are examined for policy implications. The theoretical analysis suggests that the ratio of emissions to desired output (refer to 'emission factor'), is a function of productive capital and other parameters. The finding of non-constant emission factor shows that reducing emissions without further cutting back the production of desired outputs is feasible under some circumstances. Rather than an ad hoc specification, the optimal conditions derived from our theoretical framework are used to examine the relationship between desired output and emission level. Data comes from the China Statistical Yearbook and China Electric Power Yearbook and provincial information of electricity generation for the year of 1993-2003 are used to estimate the Cobb-Douglas type joint production by the full information maximum likelihood (FIML) method. The empirical analysis shed light on the optimal

  2. VOC emissions chambers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In order to support the development of test methods and reference materials for volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions from building materials and furnishings,...

  3. Bridging the Emissions Gap

    OpenAIRE

    Blok, K.

    2012-01-01

    The analyses in Chapters 2 and 3 of this report concluded that the emissions gap in 2020 will likely be between 8 and 13 GtCO2e. The chapters also estimated the difference between BaU emissions in 2020 and the emissions level consistent with a “likely” chance of staying within the 2°C target to be 14 GtCO2e. This chapter explores the potential for bridging this gap using a sector policy approach. Firstly, the chapter provides a summary and update of the estimated emission reduction potential ...

  4. Modeling natural emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Model-I: building an emissions data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. N.; Mueller, S. F.

    2010-05-01

    A natural emissions inventory for the continental United States and surrounding territories is needed in order to use the US Environmental Protection Agency Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Model for simulating natural air quality. The CMAQ air modeling system (including the Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) emissions processing system) currently estimates non-methane volatile organic compound (NMVOC) emissions from biogenic sources, nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from soils, ammonia from animals, several types of particulate and reactive gas emissions from fires, as well as sea salt emissions. However, there are several emission categories that are not commonly treated by the standard CMAQ Model system. Most notable among these are nitrogen oxide emissions from lightning, reduced sulfur emissions from oceans, geothermal features and other continental sources, windblown dust particulate, and reactive chlorine gas emissions linked with sea salt chloride. A review of past emissions modeling work and existing global emissions data bases provides information and data necessary for preparing a more complete natural emissions data base for CMAQ applications. A model-ready natural emissions data base is developed to complement the anthropogenic emissions inventory used by the VISTAS Regional Planning Organization in its work analyzing regional haze based on the year 2002. This new data base covers a modeling domain that includes the continental United States plus large portions of Canada, Mexico and surrounding oceans. Comparing July 2002 source data reveals that natural emissions account for 16% of total gaseous sulfur (sulfur dioxide, dimethylsulfide and hydrogen sulfide), 44% of total NOx, 80% of reactive carbonaceous gases (NMVOCs and carbon monoxide), 28% of ammonia, 96% of total chlorine (hydrochloric acid, nitryl chloride and sea salt chloride), and 84% of fine particles (i.e., those smaller than 2.5 μm in size) released into the atmosphere

  5. Modeling natural emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model - Part 1: Building an emissions data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. N.; Mueller, S. F.

    2010-01-01

    A natural emissions inventory for the continental United States and surrounding territories is needed in order to use the US Environmental Protection Agency Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Model for simulating natural air quality. The CMAQ air modeling system (including the Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) emissions processing system) currently estimates volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from biogenic sources, nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from soils, ammonia from animals, several types of particulate and reactive gas emissions from fires, as well as windblown dust and sea salt emissions. However, there are several emission categories that are not commonly treated by the standard CMAQ Model system. Most notable among these are nitrogen oxide emissions from lightning, reduced sulfur emissions from oceans, geothermal features and other continental sources, and reactive chlorine gas emissions linked with sea salt chloride. A review of past emissions modeling work and existing global emissions data bases provides information and data necessary for preparing a more complete natural emissions data base for CMAQ applications. A model-ready natural emissions data base is developed to complement the anthropogenic emissions inventory used by the VISTAS Regional Planning Organization in its work analyzing regional haze based on the year 2002. This new data base covers a modeling domain that includes the continental United States plus large portions of Canada, Mexico and surrounding oceans. Comparing July 2002 source data reveals that natural emissions account for 16% of total gaseous sulfur (sulfur dioxide, dimethylsulfide and hydrogen sulfide), 44% of total NOx, 80% of reactive carbonaceous gases (VOCs and carbon monoxide), 28% of ammonia, 96% of total chlorine (hydrochloric acid, nitryl chloride and sea salt chloride), and 84% of fine particles (i.e., those smaller than 2.5 μm in size) released into the atmosphere. The seasonality and

  6. Modeling natural emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ Model–I: building an emissions data base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. F. Mueller

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A natural emissions inventory for the continental United States and surrounding territories is needed in order to use the US Environmental Protection Agency Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ Model for simulating natural air quality. The CMAQ air modeling system (including the Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE emissions processing system currently estimates non-methane volatile organic compound (NMVOC emissions from biogenic sources, nitrogen oxide (NOx emissions from soils, ammonia from animals, several types of particulate and reactive gas emissions from fires, as well as sea salt emissions. However, there are several emission categories that are not commonly treated by the standard CMAQ Model system. Most notable among these are nitrogen oxide emissions from lightning, reduced sulfur emissions from oceans, geothermal features and other continental sources, windblown dust particulate, and reactive chlorine gas emissions linked with sea salt chloride. A review of past emissions modeling work and existing global emissions data bases provides information and data necessary for preparing a more complete natural emissions data base for CMAQ applications. A model-ready natural emissions data base is developed to complement the anthropogenic emissions inventory used by the VISTAS Regional Planning Organization in its work analyzing regional haze based on the year 2002. This new data base covers a modeling domain that includes the continental United States plus large portions of Canada, Mexico and surrounding oceans. Comparing July 2002 source data reveals that natural emissions account for 16% of total gaseous sulfur (sulfur dioxide, dimethylsulfide and hydrogen sulfide, 44% of total NOx, 80% of reactive carbonaceous gases (NMVOCs and carbon monoxide, 28% of ammonia, 96% of total chlorine (hydrochloric acid, nitryl chloride and sea salt chloride, and 84% of fine particles (i.e., those smaller than 2.5 μm in size released into the

  7. Outsourcing CO2 Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S. J.; Caldeira, K. G.

    2009-12-01

    CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels are the primary cause of global warming. Much attention has been focused on the CO2 directly emitted by each country, but relatively little attention has been paid to the amount of emissions associated with consumption of goods and services in each country. This consumption-based emissions inventory differs from the production-based inventory because of imports and exports of goods and services that, either directly or indirectly, involved CO2 emissions. Using the latest available data and reasonable assumptions regarding trans-shipment of embodied carbon through third-party countries, we developed a global consumption-based CO2 emissions inventory and have calculated associated consumption-based energy and carbon intensities. We find that, in 2004, 24% of CO2 emissions are effectively outsourced to other countries, with much of the developed world outsourcing CO2 emissions to emerging markets, principally China. Some wealthy countries, including Switzerland and Sweden, outsource over half of their consumption-based emissions, with many northern Europeans outsourcing more than three tons of emissions per person per year. The United States is both a big importer and exporter of emissions embodied in trade, outsourcing >2.6 tons of CO2 per person and at the same time as >2.0 tons of CO2 per person are outsourced to the United States. These large flows indicate that CO2 emissions embodied in trade must be taken into consideration when considering responsibility for increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations.

  8. Fugitive Mercury Emissions From Nevada Gold Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. B.; Eckley, C. S.; Gustin, M.; Marsik, F.

    2008-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) can be released from point sources at gold mines (e.g. stacks associated with ore processing facilities) as well as from diffuse fugitive sources (e.g. waste rock dumps, heap leaches, etc). Fugitive Hg emissions have not been quantified for active gold mines and as such a large knowledge gap exists concerning the magnitude of total emissions from this source type. This study measured fugitive Hg emissions from two active gold mines in Northern Nevada. To contextualize the magnitude of the mine emissions with respect to those associated with natural surfaces, data were collected from undisturbed areas near the mines that are of similar geologic character. The initial results from this project have shown that there is a large range in surface Hg concentrations and associated emissions to the atmosphere from different surface types within a mine as well as between the two mines. At both mines, the lowest surface Hg concentrations and emissions were associated with the alluvium/overburden waste rock dumps. Surface Hg concentrations and emissions at nearby undisturbed sites were of similar magnitude. Surface concentrations and emissions were substantially higher from active heap leaches. In addition to the difference in fluxes for specific materials, measured emissions must be put within the context of material spatial extent and temporal variability. Here we compare Hg emission contributions from mining and undisturbed materials as a function of space and time (diel and seasonal), and illustrate the need for collection of these types of data in order to reduce uncertainties in understanding air-surface Hg exchange.

  9. Database of emission lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binette, L.; Ortiz, P.; Joguet, B.; Rola, C.

    1998-11-01

    A widely accessible data bank (available through Netscape) and consiting of all (or most) of the emission lines reported in the litterature is being built. It will comprise objects as diverse as HII regions, PN, AGN, HHO. One of its use will be to define/refine existing diagnostic emission line diagrams.

  10. Diesel Emissions Quantifier (DEQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    .The Diesel Emissions Quantifier (Quantifier) is an interactive tool to estimate emission reductions and cost effectiveness. Publications EPA-420-F-13-008a (420f13008a), EPA-420-B-10-035 (420b10023), EPA-420-B-10-034 (420b10034)

  11. Controlling spontaneous emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodahl, Peter

    Control over spontaneous emission of light is of great importance in quantum optics. It is essential for diverse applications such as miniature lasers, light-emitting diodes, and single-photon sources for quantum information. We present experimental studies on spontaneous emission of CdSe quantum...

  12. Air emissions in France overseas substances involved in the acidification, eutrophication, photochemical and greenhouse effect processes; Emissions dans l'air en France Outre-mer substances impliquees dans les phenomenes d'acidification, de photochimie et d'effet de serre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-06-01

    The concerned substances are SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} for the DOM (overseas departments); the six direct greenhouse gases (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, HFC, PFC and SF{sub 6}) and non direct gases (VOC, CO, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2}) for the overseas departments and territories; the NH{sub 3} emissions for the eutrophication. Emissions are presented by the mean of charts. (A.L.B.)

  13. Total greenhouse gas emissions related to the Dutch crop production system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, K.J.; Moll, H.C.; Nonhebel, S.

    1999-01-01

    This article discusses the greenhouse gas emissions (CO2, CH4, N2O) related to Dutch agricultural crop production. Emissions occur during agricultural processes (direct emissions) as well as in the life cycle of the required inputs (indirect emissions). An integrated approach assesses the total

  14. Observed Barium Emission Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Hallinan, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The barium releases from the CRRES satellite have provided an opportunity for verifying theoretically calculated barium ion and neutral emission rates. Spectra of the five Caribbean releases in the summer of 1991 were taken with a spectrograph on board a U.S. Air Force jet aircraft. Because the line of sight release densities are not known, only relative rates could be obtained. The observed relative rates agree well with the theoretically calculated rates and, together with other observations, confirm the earlier detailed theoretical emission rates. The calculated emission rates can thus with good accuracy be used with photometric observations. It has been postulated that charge exchange between neutral barium and oxygen ions represents a significant source for ionization. If so. it should be associated with emissions at 4957.15 A and 5013.00 A, but these emissions were not detected.

  15. Probing the radio emission from air showers with polarization measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bardenet, R.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Foerster, N.; Fox, B. D.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; PeÂķala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Preda, T.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Straub, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcǎu, O.; Thao, N. T.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    The emission of radio waves from air showers has been attributed to the so-called geomagnetic emission process. At frequencies around 50 MHz this process leads to coherent radiation which can be observed with rather simple setups. The direction of the electric field induced by this emission process depends only on the local magnetic field vector and on the incoming direction of the air shower. We report on measurements of the electric field vector where, in addition to this geomagnetic component, another component has been observed that cannot be described by the geomagnetic emission process. The data provide strong evidence that the other electric field component is polarized radially with respect to the shower axis, in agreement with predictions made by Askaryan who described radio emission from particle showers due to a negative charge excess in the front of the shower. Our results are compared to calculations which include the radiation mechanism induced by this charge-excess process.

  16. Assessment of real driving emissions via portable emission measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clenci, A.; Sălan, V.; Niculescu, R.; Iorga-Simăn, V.; Zaharia, C.

    2017-10-01

    The European Commission approved a so-called Real Driving Emission (RDE) test in response to the criticisms to the current driving cycle used at chassis dyno for homologation purpose (NEDC): it is considered outdated and misleading since air pollutants in real driving conditions are considerably higher than the certification thresholds. So, what’s at stake is the air quality which degraded continuously despite the ever-increasing severity of the regulations during the last almost three decades. Thus, from September 2017, the RDE test will become part of the type approval process for all cars sold in Europe. As its name points out, it will include “real world driving” using a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS). The paper presents the RDE features (PEMS mounting, testing environment, boundary conditions, driving dynamics) and presents a case study on the influence of the driving style upon the tail-pipe emissions under the RDE testing. The results presented in the paper issued from the existing cooperation on this topic between University of Pitesti and Renault Technologie Roumanie

  17. Modeling of greenhouse gas emission from livestock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjo eJose

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of climate change on humans and other living ecosystems is an area of on-going research. The ruminant livestock sector is considered to be one of the most significant contributors to the existing greenhouse gas (GHG pool. However the there are opportunities to combat climate change by reducing the emission of GHGs from ruminants. Methane (CH4 and nitrous oxide (N2O are emitted by ruminants via anaerobic digestion of organic matter in the rumen and manure, and by denitrification and nitrification processes which occur in manure. The quantification of these emissions by experimental methods is difficult and takes considerable time for analysis of the implications of the outputs from empirical studies, and for adaptation and mitigation strategies to be developed. To overcome these problems computer simulation models offer substantial scope for predicting GHG emissions. These models often include all farm activities while accurately predicting the GHG emissions including both direct as well as indirect sources. The models are fast and efficient in predicting emissions and provide valuable information on implementing the appropriate GHG mitigation strategies on farms. Further, these models help in testing the efficacy of various mitigation strategies that are employed to reduce GHG emissions. These models can be used to determine future adaptation and mitigation strategies, to reduce GHG emissions thereby combating livestock induced climate change.

  18. Methane emission during municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daelman, Matthijs R J; van Voorthuizen, Ellen M; van Dongen, Udo G J M; Volcke, Eveline I P; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2012-07-01

    Municipal wastewater treatment plants emit methane. Since methane is a potent greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change, the abatement of the emission is necessary to achieve a more sustainable urban water management. This requires thorough knowledge of the amount of methane that is emitted from a plant, but also of the possible sources and sinks of methane on the plant. In this study, the methane emission from a full-scale municipal wastewater facility with sludge digestion was evaluated during one year. At this plant the contribution of methane emissions to the greenhouse gas footprint were slightly higher than the CO₂ emissions related to direct and indirect fossil fuel consumption for energy requirements. By setting up mass balances over the different unit processes, it could be established that three quarters of the total methane emission originated from the anaerobic digestion of primary and secondary sludge. This amount exceeded the carbon dioxide emission that was avoided by utilizing the biogas. About 80% of the methane entering the activated sludge reactor was biologically oxidized. This knowledge led to the identification of possible measures for the abatement of the methane emission. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. CO2 Emission Factors for Coals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Orlović-Leko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Emission factors are used in greenhouse gas inventories to estimate emissions from coal combustion. In the absence of direct measures, emissions factors are frequently used as a quick, low cost way to estimate emissions values. Coal combustion has been a major contributor to the CO2 flux into the atmosphere. Nearly all of the fuel carbon (99 % in coal is converted to CO2 during the combustion process. The carbon content is the most important coal parameter which is the measure of the degree of coalification (coal rank. Coalification is the alteration of vegetation to form peat, succeeded by the transformation of peat through lignite, sub-bituminous, bituminous to anthracite coal. During the geochemical or metamorphic stage, the progressive changes that occur within the coal are an increase in the carbon content and a decrease in the hydrogen and oxygen content resulting in a loss of volatiles. Heterogeneous composition of coal causes variation in CO2 emission from different coals. The IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has produced guidelines on how to produce emission inventories which includes emission factors. Although 2006 IPCC Guidelines provided the default values specified according to the rank of the coal, the application of country-specific emission factors was recommended when estimating the national greenhouse gas emissions. This paper discusses the differences between country-specific emission factors and default IPCC CO2 emission factors, EF(CO2, for coals. Also, this study estimated EF(CO2 for two different types of coals and peat from B&H, on the basis fuel analyses. Carbon emission factors for coal mainly depend on the carbon content of the fuel and vary with both rank and geographic origin, which supports the idea of provincial variation of carbon emission factors. Also, various other factors, such as content of sulphur, minerals and macerals play an important role and influence EF(CO2 from coal. Carbonate minerals

  20. Deliberating emission reduction options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowd, A.M.; Rodriguez, M.; Jeanneret, T. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation CSIRO, 37 Graham Rd, Highett VIC 3190 (Australia); De Best-Waldhober, M.; Straver, K.; Mastop, J.; Paukovic, M. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Policy Studies, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-06-15

    For more than 20 years there has been a concerted international effort toward addressing climate change. International conventions, such as the United Nations Foreign Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC; ratified in 1994), have been established by committed nations seeking to address global climate change through the reduction of greenhouse gases emitted into the Earth's atmosphere (Global CCS Institute, 2011). Long recognised as the most crucial of the greenhouse gases to impact global warming, the majority of carbon dioxide's anthropogenic global emissions are directly related to fuel combustion of which both Australia and the Netherlands' energy production is significantly reliant. Both these nations will need to consider many opinions and make hard decisions if alternative energy options are to be implemented at the scale that is required to meet international emission targets. The decisions that are required not only need to consider the many options available but also their consequences. Along with politicians, policy developers and industry, the general public also need to be active participants in deciding which energy options, and their subsequent consequences, are acceptable for implementation at the national level. Access to balanced and factual information is essential in establishing informed opinions on the many policy options available. Past research has used several methods to measure public perceptions and opinions yet for complex issues, such as emission reduction, some of these methods have shown to be problematic. For example, semi structured interviews can provide data that is flexible and context rich yet is does also come with the limitations such as it seldom provides a practical assessment that can be utilised from researcher to researcher, across disciplines and public participation techniques. Surveys on the other hand usually address these limitations but surveys that do not encourage comparison of information or ask

  1. National Greenhouse Gas Emission Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Greenhouse Gas Emission Inventory contains information on direct emissions of greenhouse gases as well as indirect or potential emissions of greenhouse...

  2. SO2 Emissions in China - Their Network and Hierarchical Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shaomin; Wu, Guang

    2017-04-01

    SO2 emissions lead to various harmful effects on environment and human health. The SO2 emission in China has significant contribution to the global SO2 emission, so it is necessary to employ various methods to study SO2 emissions in China with great details in order to lay the foundation for policymaking to improve environmental conditions in China. Network analysis is used to analyze the SO2 emissions from power generation, industrial, residential and transportation sectors in China for 2008 and 2010, which are recently available from 1744 ground surface monitoring stations. The results show that the SO2 emissions from power generation sector were highly individualized as small-sized clusters, the SO2 emissions from industrial sector underwent an integration process with a large cluster contained 1674 places covering all industrial areas in China, the SO2 emissions from residential sector was not impacted by time, and the SO2 emissions from transportation sector underwent significant integration. Hierarchical structure is obtained by further combining SO2 emissions from all four sectors and is potentially useful to find out similar patterns of SO2 emissions, which can provide information on understanding the mechanisms of SO2 pollution and on designing different environmental measure to combat SO2 emissions.

  3. Self-reduction process and enhanced blue emission in SrAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}: Eu, Tb via electron transfer from Tb{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 3+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hongwei; Wang, Lili; Li, Minhong; Ran, Weiguang; Deng, Zhihan; Houzong, Ruizhi; Shi, Jinsheng [Department of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Science, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao 266109, Shandong, (China)

    2017-06-15

    Eu, Tb co-doped SrAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} luminescent materials were synthesized via a high-temperature solid-state reaction. Excitation spectra of SrAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}: Eu{sup 2+} gives two broad excitation bands maximizing at 270 and 330 nm, resulting from splitting Eu{sup 2+} energy levels in octahedral crystal field. Eu single doped SrAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} luminescent material exhibits two emission bands at about 406 and 616 nm. Intensity of the blue emission from Eu{sup 2+} is always strong, compared with that of the red emission band of Eu{sup 3+}. Reduction from Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} can be explained with the model of charge compensation. Blue emission in SrAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}: xEu was strengthened after incorporation of Tb, which can be explained by electron transfer from Tb{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 3+} (Tb{sup 3+} + Eu{sup 3+} → Tb{sup 4+} + Eu{sup 2+}). Under 230 nm excitation, intensity of Tb{sup 3+} emission was nearly unchanged and that of Eu{sup 2+} was increased, obviously due to the delivery of more electrons to Eu{sup 3+}. The strongest emission of Eu{sup 2+} in 0.09Eu/0.06Tb co-doped SrAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} and excited at 270 and 330 nm was remarkably enhanced by about four times compared to that of 0.15Eu Single doped SrAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}. All of the results indicate that SrAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8}:xEu, yTb are potential blue emitting luminescent materials for UV-LEDs. More importantly, this research may provide a new perspective in designing broad band blue luminescent materials. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Comparing emission inventories and model-ready emission datasets between Europe and North America for the AQMEII project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliot, George; Pierce, Thomas; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; Schaap, Martijn; Moran, Michael; Nopmongcol, Uarporn

    2012-06-01

    This paper highlights the similarities and differences in how emission inventories and datasets were developed and processed across North America and Europe for the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) project and then characterizes the emissions for the two domains. We focus specifically on the creation of “model-ready” gridded emission datasets for 2006 across the two continental study domains. The practice of creating and processing the two inventories is discussed with a focus on emission factors, spatial allocation, temporal variability, speciation of PM and VOCs, and the mechanics of distributing the data and supporting emission algorithms to the modeling community. The spatial and temporal distribution on common scales is compared for the pollutants of primary concern: NOx, VOCs, SO2, PM2.5, CO, and NH3. Because of differences of population distribution, emissions across North America tend to be more heterogeneous in spatial coverage than in Europe. The temporal patterns in the estimated emissions are largely the result of assumptions used to characterize human activity, with the exception of “natural” emissions, which are modulated by meteorological variability, and emissions from large electric generating units in the U.S., which have the benefit of continuous emission monitors that provide hourly resolved profiles. Emission estimates in both study domains are challenged by several important but poorly characterized emission source sectors, notably road dust, agricultural operations, biomass burning, and road transport. Finally, this paper provides insight on the strengths and weaknesses of emission inventory preparation practices on both continents. One important outcome of this comparison of 2006 emissions between Europe and North America is the greater understanding provided into how the emission estimates developed for the AQMEII project impact regional air quality model performance.

  5. Measurement of muonium emission from silica aerogel

    CERN Document Server

    Bakule, P; Contreras, D; Esashi, M; Fujiwara, Y; Fukao, Y; Hirota, S; Iinuma, H; Ishida, K; Iwasaki, M; Kakurai, T; Kanda, S; Kawai, H; Kawamura, N; Marshall, G M; Masuda, H; Matsuda, Y; Mibe, T; Miyake, Y; Okada, S; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Onishi, H; Saito, N; Shimomura, K; Strasser, P; Tabata, M; Tomono, D; Ueno, K; Yokoyama, K; Yoshida, S

    2013-01-01

    Emission of muonium ($\\mu^{+}e^{-}$) atoms from silica aerogel into vacuum was observed. Characteristics of muonium emission were established from silica aerogel samples with densities in the range from 29 mg cm$^{-3}$ to 178 mg cm$^{-3}$. Spectra of muonium decay times correlated with distances from the aerogel surfaces, which are sensitive to the speed distributions, follow general features expected from a diffusion process, while small deviations from a simple room-temperature thermal diffusion model are identified. The parameters of the diffusion process are deduced from the observed yields.

  6. CO and PAH emissions from engines operating on producer gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenfeldt, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    are mainly due to the high content of CO in the fuel and can – in origin – be compared with the emission of unburned hydrocarbons (UHC), like the UHC emissions from natural gas engines, CO emissions producer gas engines are a measure of fuel passing unburned through the combustion. Measurements of the slip...... of the producer gas fuel components CO and CH4 showed that these are similar, the slip is a measure for the amount of a fuel component that passes unburned through the combustion process. The measurements show that the emission of CO from the engine is an emission of unburned fuel similar to the emission of UHC....... When the environmental effect of the emissions is discussed, unburned hydrocarbons in the form of methane is a strong greenhouse gas (21 times higher than CO2) will CO only indirectly through photochemical reactions is involved in the production of the greenhouse gas ozone. The destruction of CO...

  7. 2011 NATA - Emissions Sources

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset includes all emissions sources that were modeled in the 2011 National Air Toxics Assessment (NATA), inlcluding point, nonpoint, and mobile sources, and...

  8. National Emission Inventory (NEI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data exchange allows states to submit data to the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Emissions Inventory (NEI). NEI is a national database of air...

  9. Air Emissions Inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    This site provides access to emissions data, regulations and guidance, electronic system access, resources and tools to support trends analysis, regional, and local scale air quality modeling, regulatory impact assessments.

  10. Photon enhanced thermionic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwede, Jared; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhixun

    2014-10-07

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is exploited to provide improved efficiency for radiant energy conversion. A hot (greater than 200.degree. C.) semiconductor cathode is illuminated such that it emits electrons. Because the cathode is hot, significantly more electrons are emitted than would be emitted from a room temperature (or colder) cathode under the same illumination conditions. As a result of this increased electron emission, the energy conversion efficiency can be significantly increased relative to a conventional photovoltaic device. In PETE, the cathode electrons can be (and typically are) thermalized with respect to the cathode. As a result, PETE does not rely on emission of non-thermalized electrons, and is significantly easier to implement than hot-carrier emission approaches.

  11. Decreasing of emissions and word protection during the cleaning process of crude oil tanks (including calculation examples). Follow up; Immissionsschutz und Arbeitsschutz bei der Reinigung von Rohoeltanks (mit Berechnungsbeispielen). Fortschreibung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Heuser, G. [Ministerium fuer Umwelt, Raumordnung und Landwirtschaft des Landes Nordrhein-Westfalen, Duesseldorf (Germany); Altmann, B.R. [Deutsche Wissenschaftliche Gesellschaft fuer Erdoel, Erdgas und Kohle e.V., Hamburg (Germany); Arp, J. [Staatliches Umweltamt, Itzehoe (Germany); Schoenwald, H. [Landesamt fuer Gesundheit und Arbeitssicherheit des Landes Schleswig-Holstein, Itzehoe (Germany)

    2000-09-01

    Since the publication of DGMK Research Report 499 in October 1977 the knowledge of the technology for cleaning cruide oil tanks has improved, so that it appears possible that emissions of hydrocarbons less than 0,5 kg/m2 tank bottom area, according to the attached calculation examples, can be achieved. Secondary measures for cleaning crude oil tanks are currently under development so that further emission reductions of hydrocarbons up to 90% of the remaining emissions from working and evaporating can be expected. By increasing installation of double bottoms and time extension with regard to the inside inspections the number of the annual crude oil tank cleaning procedures is decreasing. The follow up of DGMK-Research Report 499 extensively describes the questions of work protection. An additional important item is the information of relevant authorities with a special paper for instructions. (orig.) [German] Seit dem Erscheinen der Erstausgabe des DGMK-Forschungsberichtes 499 im Oktober 1997 hat sich der Stand der Rohoeltankreinigungstechnik fortentwickelt, so dass Emissionen an Kohlenwasserstoffen {<=}0,5 kg je m{sup 2} Tankbodenflaeche nach den anliegenden Berechnungsbeispielen sicher einhaltbar erscheinen. Sekundaermassnahmen bei der Rohoeltankreinigung befinden sich gegenwaertig in der Entwicklung und lassen eine weitere Minderung der Kohlenwasserstoffemissionen bis zu 90% der verbleibenden Emission aus Verdraengung und Belueftung erwarten. Durch den zunehmenden Einbau von Doppelboeden sowie Fristverlaengerung in Bezug auf die Innenbesichtigungspflichten sinkt die Zahl der jaehrlichen Rohoeltankreinigungen. In der Fortschreibung des DGMK-Forschungsberichtes 499 wird auf die Belange des Arbeitsschutzes ausfuehrlich eingegangen. Ein weiterer wesentlicher Punkt ist die Mitteilung an die zustaendigen Behoerden, fuer die ein Formblatt mit Hinweisen erarbeitet worden ist. (orig.)

  12. Transportation Emissions: some basics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontovas, Christos A.; Psaraftis, Harilaos N.

    2016-01-01

    . The main purpose of this chapter is to introduce some basic concepts that are relevant in the quest of green transportation logistics. First, we present the basics of estimating emissions from transportation activities, the current statistics and future trends, as well as the total impact of air emissions...... of the energy efficiency gap and examines why governments and companies may forego cost-effective investments in energy efficiency, even though they could significantly reduce energy consumption at a lower cost....

  13. Nanoscale Terahertz Emission Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Kim, Hyewon; Colvin, Vicki L.

    By utilizing plasmonic coupling to an AFM probe, we demonstrate Laser Terahertz Emission Nanoscopy (LTEN) with sub-20 nm resolution. We demonstrate the resolution by imaging a single gold nanorod on an InAs substrate.......By utilizing plasmonic coupling to an AFM probe, we demonstrate Laser Terahertz Emission Nanoscopy (LTEN) with sub-20 nm resolution. We demonstrate the resolution by imaging a single gold nanorod on an InAs substrate....

  14. Emissions gazeuses en élevage porcin et mode de réduction : revue bibliographique

    OpenAIRE

    Degre A.; Verheve D.; Debouche C.

    2001-01-01

    Gaseous emissions in pig husbandry and measures of reduction : a review. Atmospheric emissions of pig husbandry are studied at the level of the farm building, storage area and land used for spreading. The process leading to formation of NH3,N2O, CH4 and various smelling gases, the parameters controlling their level of emission, and their effects are described. Emission of molecular nitrogen is also addressed. Measures for reducing atmospheric emissions are detailed. They rely on animal feedin...

  15. Emission factors of the iron and steel sector for the emission reporting; Emissionsfaktoren zur Eisen- und Stahlindustrie fuer die Emissionsberichterstattung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hensmann, Michael; Haardt, Sebastian; Ebert, Dominik [Betriebsforschungsinstitut VDEh-Institut fuer Angewandte Forschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    considering the various emission sources of the process stages, it appeared that the emissions of the iron- and steelmaking industry are to be assigned to process-related emissions completely. The determination of energy-related emission factors is not possible because the equipment in the different companies, according to the available cabin gases, is operated with different fuel mixes. Consequently, the pollutants cannot definitely be assigned to the different fuels. Based on the availability and quality of emissions data, a choice for calculating the emission factors has been made. To determine the emission factors, an appropriate methodology has been developed, considering both the different production output and the various plant designs of the supporting companies. While there is sufficient knowledge and measurement data of channelled emissions, the individual emission data concerning diffuse sources are usually based on estimations. Due to the very different local conditions, statements on the emissions of individual diffuse sources are generally not transferable to other plants. Therefore, it is not possible to provide uncertainties of emission factors of diffuse sources, which were averaged over different plants. For emissions factors for point sources, a methodology for calculating the uncertainty has been developed. For the ZSE database of the UBA, up-to-date emission factors for all major process stages of the iron- and steelmaking industry are provided, based on the reports of emissions 2008. Additionally, statements about the uncertainty of emission factors of point sources are provided. To produce consistent time series, it is recommended, that the determination of emission factors, based on the methodology developed in this project, is carried out every four years in parallel to the creation of the reports of emissions.

  16. Measurement and prediction of enteric methane emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejian, Veerasamy; Lal, Rattan; Lakritz, Jeffrey; Ezeji, Thaddeus

    2011-01-01

    The greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the agricultural sector account for about 25.5% of total global anthropogenic emission. While CO2 receives the most attention as a factor relative to global warming, CH4, N2O and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) also cause significant radiative forcing. With the relative global warming potential of 25 compared with CO2, CH4 is one of the most important GHGs. This article reviews the prediction models, estimation methodology and strategies for reducing enteric CH4 emissions. Emission of CH4 in ruminants differs among developed and developing countries, depending on factors like animal species, breed, pH of rumen fluid, ratio of acetate:propionate, methanogen population, composition of diet and amount of concentrate fed. Among the ruminant animals, cattle contribute the most towards the greenhouse effect through methane emission followed by sheep, goats and buffalos, respectively. The estimated CH4 emission rate per cattle, buffaloe, sheep and goat in developed countries are 150.7, 137, 21.9 and 13.7 (g/animal/day) respectively. However, the estimated rates in developing countries are significantly lower at 95.9 and 13.7 (g/animal/day) per cattle and sheep, respectively. There exists a strong interest in developing new and improving the existing CH4 prediction models to identify mitigation strategies for reducing the overall CH4 emissions. A synthesis of the available literature suggests that the mechanistic models are superior to empirical models in accurately predicting the CH4 emission from dairy farms. The latest development in prediction model is the integrated farm system model which is a process-based whole-farm simulation technique. Several techniques are used to quantify enteric CH4 emissions starting from whole animal chambers to sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer techniques. The latest technology developed to estimate CH4 more accurately is the micrometeorological mass difference technique. Because the conditions under which

  17. Ferroelectric emission studies for electron emission lithography applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, In K; Ryu, Sang O; Suchicital, Carlos T A; Lee, June K; Kim, Byong M; Chung, Chee W

    2003-10-01

    Ferroelectric switching emission, dielectric switching emission, and pyroelectric emission were studied by patterning images on electron resist for electron emission lithography applications. It was observed that the pyroelectric emission is most acceptable for a high throughput 1:1 electron projection lithography application. A 1:1 electron projection lithography was demonstrated by patterning images with line widths of 30 microm and using pyroelectric emission. A degradation of the pyroelectric emission property of the material was observed during repeated heating cycles below the phase-transition temperature of the ferroelectric material. Annealing excursions above the phase transition temperature prevented the degradation of the pyroelectric emitter.

  18. Methane emissions from rice paddies : experiments and modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Bodegom, van, P.M.

    2000-01-01

    This thesis describes model development and experimentation on the comprehension and prediction of methane (CH 4 ) emissions from rice paddies. The large spatial and temporal variability in CH 4 emissions and the dynamic non-linear relationships between processes underlying CH 4 emissions impairs the applicability of empirical relations. Mechanistic concepts are therefore starting point of analysis throughout the th...

  19. Emissions trading: principles and practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tietenberg, Thomas H

    2006-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 The Evolution of Emissions Trading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 The Evolution of Design Features...

  20. 78 FR 11758 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Missouri; Restriction of Emission of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... of Emission of Particulate Matter From Industrial Processes AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... rule restricting emissions of particulate matter from industrial sources by providing an alternative... disclosure is restricted by statute. Certain other material, such as copyrighted material, will be publicly...

  1. Locally Resolved Electron Emission Area and Unified View of Field Emission from Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubenko, Oksana [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, 725 21st Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20052, United States; Euclid TechLabs, 365 Remington Boulevard, Bolingbrook, Illinois 60440, United States; Baturin, Stanislav S. [PSD Enrico; Kovi, Kiran K. [Euclid TechLabs, 365 Remington Boulevard, Bolingbrook, Illinois 60440, United States; Sumant, Anirudha V. [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Baryshev, Sergey V. [Euclid TechLabs, 365 Remington Boulevard, Bolingbrook, Illinois 60440, United States

    2017-09-13

    One of the common problems in case of field emission from polycrystalline diamond films, which typically have uniform surface morphology, is uncertainty in determining exact location of electron emission sites across the surface. Although several studies have suggested that grain boundaries are the main electron emission source, it is not particularly clear what makes some sites emit more than the others. It is also practically unclear how one could quantify the actual electron emission area and therefore field emission current per unit area. In this paper we study the effect of actual, locally resolved, field emission (FE) area on electron emission characteristics of uniform planar highly conductive nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond ((N)UNCD) field emitters. It was routinely found that field emission from as-grown planar (N)UNCD films is always confined to a counted number of discrete emitting centers across the surface which varied in size and electron emissivity. It was established that the actual FE area critically depends on the applied electric field, as well as that the actual FE area and the overall electron emissivity improve with sp2 fraction present in the film irrespectively of the original substrate roughness and morphology. To quantify the actual FE area and its dependence on the applied electric field, imaging experiments were carried out in a vacuum system in a parallel-plate configuration with a specialty anode phosphor screen. Electron emission micrographs were taken concurrently with I-V characteristics measurements. In addition, a novel automated image processing algorithm was developed to process extensive imaging datasets and calculate emission area per image. By doing so, it was determined that the emitting area was always significantly smaller than the FE cathode surface area. Namely, the actual FE area would change from 5×10-3 % to 1.5 % of the total cathode area with the applied electric field increased. Finally and most

  2. Particulate emissions from diesel engines: correlation between engine technology and emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebig, Michael; Wiartalla, Andreas; Holderbaum, Bastian; Kiesow, Sebastian

    2014-03-07

    In the last 30 years, diesel engines have made rapid progress to increased efficiency, environmental protection and comfort for both light- and heavy-duty applications. The technical developments include all issues from fuel to combustion process to exhaust gas aftertreatment. This paper provides a comprehensive summary of the available literature regarding technical developments and their impact on the reduction of pollutant emission. This includes emission legislation, fuel quality, diesel engine- and exhaust gas aftertreatment technologies, as well as particulate composition, with a focus on the mass-related particulate emission of on-road vehicle applications. Diesel engine technologies representative of real-world on-road applications will be highlighted.Internal engine modifications now make it possible to minimize particulate and nitrogen oxide emissions with nearly no reduction in power. Among these modifications are cooled exhaust gas recirculation, optimized injections systems, adapted charging systems and optimized combustion processes with high turbulence. With introduction and optimization of exhaust gas aftertreatment systems, such as the diesel oxidation catalyst and the diesel particulate trap, as well as NOx-reduction systems, pollutant emissions have been significantly decreased. Today, sulfur poisoning of diesel oxidation catalysts is no longer considered a problem due to the low-sulfur fuel used in Europe. In the future, there will be an increased use of bio-fuels, which generally have a positive impact on the particulate emissions and do not increase the particle number emissions.Since the introduction of the EU emissions legislation, all emission limits have been reduced by over 90%. Further steps can be expected in the future. Retrospectively, the particulate emissions of modern diesel engines with respect to quality and quantity cannot be compared with those of older engines. Internal engine modifications lead to a clear reduction of the

  3. Methane emissions from MBT landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyer, K-U; Hupe, K; Stegmann, R

    2013-09-01

    Within the scope of an investigation for the German Federal Environment Agency ("Umweltbundesamt"), the basics for the estimation of the methane emissions from the landfilling of mechanically and biologically treated waste (MBT) were developed. For this purpose, topical research including monitoring results regarding the gas balance at MBT landfills was evaluated. For waste treated to the required German standards, a methane formation potential of approximately 18-24 m(3)CH(4)/t of total dry solids may be expected. Monitoring results from MBT landfills show that a three-phase model with differentiated half-lives describes the degradation kinetics in the best way. This is due to the fact that during the first years of disposal, the anaerobic degradation processes still proceed relatively intensively. In addition in the long term (decades), a residual gas production at a low level is still to be expected. Most of the soils used in recultivation layer systems at German landfills show a relatively high methane oxidation capacity up to 5 l CH(4)/(m(2)h). However, measurements at MBT disposal sites indicate that the majority of the landfill gas (in particular at non-covered areas), leaves the landfill body via preferred gas emission zones (hot spots) without significant methane oxidation. Therefore, rather low methane oxidation factors are recommended for open and temporarily covered MBT landfills. Higher methane oxidation rates can be achieved when the soil/recultivation layer is adequately designed and operated. Based on the elaborated default values, the First Order Decay (FOD) model of the IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories, 2006, was used to estimate the methane emissions from MBT landfills. Due to the calculation made by the authors emissions in the range of 60,000-135,000 t CO(2-eq.)/a for all German MBT landfills can be expected. This wide range shows the uncertainties when the here used procedure and the limited available data are applied

  4. Alternative industrial carbon emissions benchmark based on input-output analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mengyao; Ji, Xi

    2016-12-01

    Some problems exist in the current carbon emissions benchmark setting systems. The primary consideration for industrial carbon emissions standards highly relate to direct carbon emissions (power-related emissions) and only a portion of indirect emissions are considered in the current carbon emissions accounting processes. This practice is insufficient and may cause double counting to some extent due to mixed emission sources. To better integrate and quantify direct and indirect carbon emissions, an embodied industrial carbon emissions benchmark setting method is proposed to guide the establishment of carbon emissions benchmarks based on input-output analysis. This method attempts to link direct carbon emissions with inter-industrial economic exchanges and systematically quantifies carbon emissions embodied in total product delivery chains. The purpose of this study is to design a practical new set of embodied intensity-based benchmarks for both direct and indirect carbon emissions. Beijing, at the first level of carbon emissions trading pilot schemes in China, plays a significant role in the establishment of these schemes and is chosen as an example in this study. The newly proposed method tends to relate emissions directly to each responsibility in a practical way through the measurement of complex production and supply chains and reduce carbon emissions from their original sources. This method is expected to be developed under uncertain internal and external contexts and is further expected to be generalized to guide the establishment of industrial benchmarks for carbon emissions trading schemes in China and other countries.

  5. Impact Assessment of Atmospheric Pollutants Emissions from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    2016-12-02

    Dec 2, 2016 ... Pollutants Emissions from Mining Operations at Ghana Managanese Company Ltd.”, Ghana Mining Journal,. Vol. 16, No. 2, pp. 65 - 72. Abstract ... processing whilst waste materials from the pit will be hauled directly to the Pit C ... Management of GMC is required to show that the. 400 m buffer zone from the ...

  6. 40 CFR 63.1382 - Emission standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... all affected control equipment and processes according to the following requirements. (1)(i) The owner... to control formaldehyde emissions from forming or curing such that any 3-hour block average... average pressure drop, liquid flow rate, or chemical feed rate for any 3-hour block period is outside the...

  7. Acoustic emission health monitoring of steel bridges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pahlavan, P.L.; Paulissen, J.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Hakkesteegt, H.C.; Jansen, T.H.

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive developments in the field of Acoustic Emission (AE) for monitoring fatigue cracks in steel structures, the implementation of AE systems for large-scale bridges is hindered by limitations associated with instrumentation costs and signal processing complexities. This paper sheds

  8. Advanced Instrumentation for Positron Emission Tomography [PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

    1985-04-01

    This paper summarizes the physical processes and medical science goals that underlay modern instrumentation design for Positron Emission Tomography. The paper discusses design factors such as detector material, crystalphototube coupling, shielding geometry, sampling motion, electronics design, time-of-flight, and the interrelationships with quantitative accuracy, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, maximum data rates, and cost.

  9. Modeling nonthermal emission from stellar bow shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, V.; López-Santiago, J.; Miceli, M.; Bonito, R.; de Castro, E.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Runaway O- and early B-type stars passing through the interstellar medium at supersonic velocities and characterized by strong stellar winds may produce bow shocks that can serve as particle acceleration sites. Previous theoretical models predict the production of high-energy photons by nonthermal radiative processes, but their efficiency is still debated. Aims: We aim to test and explain the possibility of emission from the bow shocks formed by runaway stars traveling through the interstellar medium by using previous theoretical models. Methods: We applied our model to AE Aurigae, the first reported star with an X-ray detected bow shock, to BD+43 3654, in which the observations failed in detecting high-energy emission, and to the transition phase of a supergiant star in the late stages of its life. Results: From our analysis, we confirm that the X-ray emission from the bow shock produced by AE Aurigae can be explained by inverse Compton processes involving the infrared photons of the heated dust. We also predict low high-energy flux emission from the bow shock produced by BD+43 3654, and the possibility of high-energy emission from the bow shock formed by a supergiant star during the transition phase from blue to red supergiant. Conclusions: Bow shocks formed by different types of runaway stars are revealed as a new possible source of high-energy photons in our neighborhood.

  10. Productivity gains and greenhouse gas emissions intensity in dairy systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerber, P.; Vellinga, Th.V.; Opio, C.; Steinfeld, H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between productivity of dairy production and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on a global scale. A Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology was used to assess GHG emissions from dairy production and processing chains. Milk yield expressed as kg fat and protein

  11. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Lllll of... - Emission Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... efficiency of 99.5 percent; c. Route the emissions to a combustion device that does not use auxiliary fuel... boiler or process heater with a design heat input capacity of 44 megawatts (MW) or greater; e. Introduce... from the asphalt storage tank are ducted to the saturator control device, the combined emissions from...

  12. 40 CFR 98.183 - Calculating GHG emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Lead Production § 98.183 Calculating GHG emissions. You must... = Annual process CO2 emissions from smelting furnaces at facility used for lead production (metric tons... section (metric tons/year). k = Total number of smelting furnaces at facility used for lead production...

  13. Field emission electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Egorov, Nikolay

    2017-01-01

    This book is dedicated to field emission electronics, a promising field at the interface between “classic” vacuum electronics and nanotechnology. In addition to theoretical models, it includes detailed descriptions of experimental and research techniques and production technologies for different types of field emitters based on various construction principles. It particularly focuses on research into and production of field cathodes and electron guns using recently developed nanomaterials and carbon nanotubes. Further, it discusses the applications of field emission cathodes in new technologies such as light sources, flat screens, microwave and X-ray devices.

  14. Fundamental plasma emission involving ion sound waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1987-01-01

    The theory for fundamental plasma emission by the three-wave processes L + or - S to T (where L, S and T denote Langmuir, ion sound and transverse waves, respectively) is developed. Kinematic constraints on the characteristics and growth lengths of waves participating in the wave processes are identified. In addition the rates, path-integrated wave temperatures, and limits on the brightness temperature of the radiation are derived.

  15. Source Attribution of Methane Emissions in Northeastern Colorado Using Ammonia to Methane Emission Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilerman, S. J.; Neuman, J. A.; Peischl, J.; Aikin, K. C.; Ryerson, T. B.; Perring, A. E.; Robinson, E. S.; Holloway, M.; Trainer, M.

    2015-12-01

    Due to recent advances in extraction technology, oil and natural gas extraction and processing in the Denver-Julesburg basin has increased substantially in the past decade. Northeastern Colorado is also home to over 250 concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), capable of hosting over 2 million head of ruminant livestock (cattle and sheep). Because of methane's high Global Warming Potential, quantification and attribution of methane emissions from oil and gas development and agricultural activity are important for guiding greenhouse gas emission policy. However, due to the co-location of these different sources, top-down measurements of methane are often unable to attribute emissions to a specific source or sector. In this work, we evaluate the ammonia:methane emission ratio directly downwind of CAFOs using a mobile laboratory. Several CAFOs were chosen for periodic study over a 12-month period to identify diurnal and seasonal variation in the emission ratio as well as differences due to livestock type. Using this knowledge of the agricultural ammonia:methane emission ratio, aircraft measurements of ammonia and methane over oil and gas basins in the western US during the Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus (SONGNEX) field campaign in March and April 2015 can be used for source attribution of methane emissions.

  16. Research on aircraft emissions. Need for future work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, A. [German Aerospace Establishment, Cologne (Germany). Transport Research Div.

    1997-12-31

    Reflecting the present status of the research on aircraft emissions and their impacts upon the atmosphere, task-fields for a work programme for the research on aircraft emissions can be derived. Most important measures are to support the efforts to define adequate reduction measures, and (with highest priority) scenario-writing for the long-term development in aircraft emissions, to be able to include into the decision making process the aspect of in-time-reaction against unwanted future. Besides that, a steady monitoring of global aircraft emissions will be necessary. (author) 5 refs.

  17. Comparing emission inventories and model-ready emission datasets between Europe and North America for the AQMEII project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouliot, G.; Pierce, T.; Denier van der Gon, H.; Schaap, M.; Moran, M.; Nopmongcol, U.

    2012-01-01

    This paper highlights the similarities and differences in how emission inventories and datasets were developed and processed across North America and Europe for the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) project and then characterizes the emissions for the two domains. We

  18. Spectral emissivity of surface blackbody calibrators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Sønnik

    2007-01-01

    The normal spectral emissivity of commercial infrared calibrators is compared with measurements of anodized aluminum samples and grooved aluminum surfaces coated with Pyromark. Measurements performed by FTIR spectroscopy in the wavelength interval from 2 to 20 mu m and at temperatures between 5...... in emissivity using similar materials can be reduced to 0.5-1% by optimizing the coating process and the surface geometry. Results are discussed and an equation for calculation of the equivalent blackbody surface temperature from FTIR spectra is presented, including reflected ambient radiation. It is in most...

  19. Vandenberg Air Force Base Emission Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    generated are lower through use of a vapor condenser. 2. Paint Stripping Process uses methylene chloride and phenol in a 3 ft x 3 ft x 8 ft bath to clean...Cleaning Facilit Operations at Component Cleaning that generate TOG emissions are a vapor degreaser and a paint stripper . Contact: Mr. Carpenter. 1... methylene chloride : 50% of total - 11.14 lb/gal Density of phenol: 50% of total - 8.93 lb/gal Average density: 10.04 lb/gal Emission rate: (30 gal/refill) (6

  20. Estimates of global terrestrial isoprene emissions using MEGAN (Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guenther

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive gases and aerosols are produced by terrestrial ecosystems, processed within plant canopies, and can then be emitted into the above-canopy atmosphere. Estimates of the above-canopy fluxes are needed for quantitative earth system studies and assessments of past, present and future air quality and climate. The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN is described and used to quantify net terrestrial biosphere emission of isoprene into the atmosphere. MEGAN is designed for both global and regional emission modeling and has global coverage with ~1 km2 spatial resolution. Field and laboratory investigations of the processes controlling isoprene emission are described and data available for model development and evaluation are summarized. The factors controlling isoprene emissions include biological, physical and chemical driving variables. MEGAN driving variables are derived from models and satellite and ground observations. Tropical broadleaf trees contribute almost half of the estimated global annual isoprene emission due to their relatively high emission factors and because they are often exposed to conditions that are conducive for isoprene emission. The remaining flux is primarily from shrubs which have a widespread distribution. The annual global isoprene emission estimated with MEGAN ranges from about 500 to 750 Tg isoprene (440 to 660 Tg carbon depending on the driving variables which include temperature, solar radiation, Leaf Area Index, and plant functional type. The global annual isoprene emission estimated using the standard driving variables is ~600 Tg isoprene. Differences in driving variables result in emission estimates that differ by more than a factor of three for specific times and locations. It is difficult to evaluate isoprene emission estimates using the concentration distributions simulated using chemistry and transport models, due to the substantial uncertainties in other model components, but at

  1. An attempt to make an inventory of dust emissions in France; Tentative d`inventaire des emissions de poussieres en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouscaren, R. [CITEPA, Centre Interprofessionnel Technique d`Etudes de la Pollution Atmospherique, 75 - Paris (France)

    1996-12-31

    The various dust emissions due to combustion and industrial processes, have been quantified; data and diagrams are presented for France from 1960 to 1995: the emission contributions from the residential and commercial sectors, industrial sector, power plants and road transportation are detailed and their evolutions are compared; emission charts are also presented, according to fuel type and dust granulometry. The importance of road transportation emissions is pointed out

  2. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...

  3. Methane emissions from ruminants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-02-21

    Feb 21, 2011 ... Livestock account for 35-40% of global anthropogenic emissions of methane, via enteric fermentation and manure, ... on the climate; the global warming potential of methane is. 21-times that of CO2 over 100 years ... cell wall structure from true rumen bacteria (Woese et al.1990). METHANE MITIGATION ...

  4. Reaching peak emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Robert B.; Canadell, Josep G.; Le Quere, Corinne; Andrew, Robbie; Korsbakken, Jan Ivar; Peters, Glen P; Nakicenovic, Nebojsa

    2016-01-01

    Rapid growth in global CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and industry ceased in the past two years, despite continued economic growth. Decreased coal use in China was largely responsible, coupled with slower global growth in petroleum and faster growth in renewables.

  5. Methane emission by camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Marie T; Runge, Ullrich; Lang, Richard A; Moser, Dario; Galeffi, Cordula; Kreuzer, Michael; Clauss, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Methane emissions from ruminant livestock have been intensively studied in order to reduce contribution to the greenhouse effect. Ruminants were found to produce more enteric methane than other mammalian herbivores. As camelids share some features of their digestive anatomy and physiology with ruminants, it has been proposed that they produce similar amounts of methane per unit of body mass. This is of special relevance for countrywide greenhouse gas budgets of countries that harbor large populations of camelids like Australia. However, hardly any quantitative methane emission measurements have been performed in camelids. In order to fill this gap, we carried out respiration chamber measurements with three camelid species (Vicugna pacos, Lama glama, Camelus bactrianus; n = 16 in total), all kept on a diet consisting of food produced from alfalfa only. The camelids produced less methane expressed on the basis of body mass (0.32±0.11 L kg⁻¹ d⁻¹) when compared to literature data on domestic ruminants fed on roughage diets (0.58±0.16 L kg⁻¹ d⁻¹). However, there was no significant difference between the two suborders when methane emission was expressed on the basis of digestible neutral detergent fiber intake (92.7±33.9 L kg⁻¹ in camelids vs. 86.2±12.1 L kg⁻¹ in ruminants). This implies that the pathways of methanogenesis forming part of the microbial digestion of fiber in the foregut are similar between the groups, and that the lower methane emission of camelids can be explained by their generally lower relative food intake. Our results suggest that the methane emission of Australia's feral camels corresponds only to 1 to 2% of the methane amount produced by the countries' domestic ruminants and that calculations of greenhouse gas budgets of countries with large camelid populations based on equations developed for ruminants are generally overestimating the actual levels.

  6. Methane emission by camelids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie T Dittmann

    Full Text Available Methane emissions from ruminant livestock have been intensively studied in order to reduce contribution to the greenhouse effect. Ruminants were found to produce more enteric methane than other mammalian herbivores. As camelids share some features of their digestive anatomy and physiology with ruminants, it has been proposed that they produce similar amounts of methane per unit of body mass. This is of special relevance for countrywide greenhouse gas budgets of countries that harbor large populations of camelids like Australia. However, hardly any quantitative methane emission measurements have been performed in camelids. In order to fill this gap, we carried out respiration chamber measurements with three camelid species (Vicugna pacos, Lama glama, Camelus bactrianus; n = 16 in total, all kept on a diet consisting of food produced from alfalfa only. The camelids produced less methane expressed on the basis of body mass (0.32±0.11 L kg⁻¹ d⁻¹ when compared to literature data on domestic ruminants fed on roughage diets (0.58±0.16 L kg⁻¹ d⁻¹. However, there was no significant difference between the two suborders when methane emission was expressed on the basis of digestible neutral detergent fiber intake (92.7±33.9 L kg⁻¹ in camelids vs. 86.2±12.1 L kg⁻¹ in ruminants. This implies that the pathways of methanogenesis forming part of the microbial digestion of fiber in the foregut are similar between the groups, and that the lower methane emission of camelids can be explained by their generally lower relative food intake. Our results suggest that the methane emission of Australia's feral camels corresponds only to 1 to 2% of the methane amount produced by the countries' domestic ruminants and that calculations of greenhouse gas budgets of countries with large camelid populations based on equations developed for ruminants are generally overestimating the actual levels.

  7. Methane Emission by Camelids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Marie T.; Runge, Ullrich; Lang, Richard A.; Moser, Dario; Galeffi, Cordula; Kreuzer, Michael; Clauss, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Methane emissions from ruminant livestock have been intensively studied in order to reduce contribution to the greenhouse effect. Ruminants were found to produce more enteric methane than other mammalian herbivores. As camelids share some features of their digestive anatomy and physiology with ruminants, it has been proposed that they produce similar amounts of methane per unit of body mass. This is of special relevance for countrywide greenhouse gas budgets of countries that harbor large populations of camelids like Australia. However, hardly any quantitative methane emission measurements have been performed in camelids. In order to fill this gap, we carried out respiration chamber measurements with three camelid species (Vicugna pacos, Lama glama, Camelus bactrianus; n = 16 in total), all kept on a diet consisting of food produced from alfalfa only. The camelids produced less methane expressed on the basis of body mass (0.32±0.11 L kg−1 d−1) when compared to literature data on domestic ruminants fed on roughage diets (0.58±0.16 L kg−1 d−1). However, there was no significant difference between the two suborders when methane emission was expressed on the basis of digestible neutral detergent fiber intake (92.7±33.9 L kg−1 in camelids vs. 86.2±12.1 L kg−1 in ruminants). This implies that the pathways of methanogenesis forming part of the microbial digestion of fiber in the foregut are similar between the groups, and that the lower methane emission of camelids can be explained by their generally lower relative food intake. Our results suggest that the methane emission of Australia's feral camels corresponds only to 1 to 2% of the methane amount produced by the countries' domestic ruminants and that calculations of greenhouse gas budgets of countries with large camelid populations based on equations developed for ruminants are generally overestimating the actual levels. PMID:24718604

  8. Toward an Empirical Theory of Pulsar Emission. XII. Exploring the Physical Conditions in Millisecond Pulsar Emission Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Joanna M.; Archibald, Anne; Hessels, Jason; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Mitra, Dipanjan; Ransom, Scott; Stairs, Ingrid; van Straten, Willem; Weisberg, Joel M.

    2017-08-01

    The five-component profile of the 2.7 ms pulsar J0337+1715 appears to exhibit the best example to date of a core/double-cone emission-beam structure in a millisecond pulsar (MSP). Moreover, three other MSPs, the binary pulsars B1913+16, B1953+29, and J1022+1001, seem to exhibit core/single-cone profiles. These configurations are remarkable and important because it has not been clear whether MSPs and slow pulsars exhibit similar emission-beam configurations, given that they have considerably smaller magnetospheric sizes and magnetic field strengths. MSPs thus provide an extreme context for studying pulsar radio emission. Particle currents along the magnetic polar flux tube connect processes just above the polar cap through the radio-emission region to the light-cylinder and the external environment. In slow pulsars, radio-emission heights are typically about 500 km around where the magnetic field is nearly dipolar, and estimates of the physical conditions there point to radiation below the plasma frequency and emission from charged solitons by the curvature process. We are able to estimate emission heights for the four MSPs and carry out a similar estimation of physical conditions in their much lower emission regions. We find strong evidence that MSPs also radiate by curvature emission from charged solitons.

  9. Toward an Empirical Theory of Pulsar Emission. XII. Exploring the Physical Conditions in Millisecond Pulsar Emission Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rankin, Joanna M.; Mitra, Dipanjan [Physics Department, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States); Archibald, Anne; Hessels, Jason; Leeuwen, Joeri van [Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Ransom, Scott [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 29201 (United States); Stairs, Ingrid [Physics Department, University of British Columbia, V6T 1Z4, BC (Canada); Straten, Willem van [Institute for Radio Astronomy and Space Research, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Weisberg, Joel M., E-mail: Joanna.Rankin@uvm.edu [Physics and Astronomy Department, Carleton College, Northfield, MN 55057 (United States)

    2017-08-10

    The five-component profile of the 2.7 ms pulsar J0337+1715 appears to exhibit the best example to date of a core/double-cone emission-beam structure in a millisecond pulsar (MSP). Moreover, three other MSPs, the binary pulsars B1913+16, B1953+29, and J1022+1001, seem to exhibit core/single-cone profiles. These configurations are remarkable and important because it has not been clear whether MSPs and slow pulsars exhibit similar emission-beam configurations, given that they have considerably smaller magnetospheric sizes and magnetic field strengths. MSPs thus provide an extreme context for studying pulsar radio emission. Particle currents along the magnetic polar flux tube connect processes just above the polar cap through the radio-emission region to the light-cylinder and the external environment. In slow pulsars, radio-emission heights are typically about 500 km around where the magnetic field is nearly dipolar, and estimates of the physical conditions there point to radiation below the plasma frequency and emission from charged solitons by the curvature process. We are able to estimate emission heights for the four MSPs and carry out a similar estimation of physical conditions in their much lower emission regions. We find strong evidence that MSPs also radiate by curvature emission from charged solitons.

  10. Greenhouse Gas Emissions From Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podkówka Zbigniew

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cattle produce greenhouse gases (GHG which lead to changes in the chemical composition of the atmosphere. These gases which cause greenhouse effect include: methane (CH4, nitrous oxide (N2O, nitrogen oxides (NOx, sulphur dioxide (SO2, ammonia (NH3, dust particles and non-methane volatile organic compounds, commonly described as other than methane hydrocarbons. Fermentation processes taking place in the digestive tract produce ‘digestive gases’, distinguished from gases which are emitted during the decomposition of manure. Among these digestive gases methane and non-methane volatile organic compounds are of particular relevance importance. The amount of gases produced by cows can be reduced by choosing to rear animals with an improved genetically based performance. A dairy cow with higher production efficiency, producing milk with higher protein content and at the same time reduced fat content emits less GHG into the environment. Increasing the ratio of feed mixtures in a feed ration also reduces GHG emissions, especially of methane. By selection of dairy cows with higher production efficiency and appropriate nutrition, the farm's expected milk production target can be achieved while at the same time, the size of the herd is reduced, leading to a reduction of GHG emissions.

  11. Stable field emission from nanoporous silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Myung-Gyu; Lezec, Henri J.; Sharifi, Fred

    2013-02-01

    We report on a new type of stable field emitter capable of electron emission at levels comparable to thermal sources. Such an emitter potentially enables significant advances in several important technologies which currently use thermal electron sources. These include communications through microwave electronics, and more notably imaging for medicine and security where new modalities of detection may arise due to variable-geometry x-ray sources. Stable emission of 6 A cm-2 is demonstrated in a macroscopic array, and lifetime measurements indicate these new emitters are sufficiently robust to be considered for realistic implementation. The emitter is a monolithic structure, and is made in a room-temperature process. It is fabricated from a silicon carbide wafer, which is formed into a highly porous structure resembling an aerogel, and further patterned into an array. The emission properties may be tuned both through control of the nanoscale morphology and the macroscopic shape of the emitter array.

  12. Reducing Supply Chain GHG Emissions from LCD Panel Manufacturing Webinar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs) are among the most potent and persistent greenhouse gases contributing to global climate change. Learn about the manufacturing processes which release F-GHGs, and how LCD suppliers are working to reduce emissions.

  13. Methane, nitrous oxide emissions and mitigation strategies for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GHGs) that are emitted into the atmosphere by livestock during the process of enteric fermentation and manure management. Developing countries produce a large quantity of those emissions, caused mainly by inefficient animal rearing systems, ...

  14. Methane and nitrous oxide emissions of monogastric livestock in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lindeque

    This places agriculture third after the energy sector (79%) and industrial processes ... Non-ruminants also contribute to methane emissions through enteric .... N2O through the metabolism of urine and faeces deposited directly on pastures or.

  15. Anthropogenic mercury emission inventory with emission factors and total emission in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Hun; Park, Jung-Min; Lee, Sang-Bo; Pudasainee, Deepak; Seo, Yong-Chil

    2010-07-01

    Mercury emissions concentrations, emission factors, and the total national emission from major anthropogenic sources in Korea for the year 2007 were estimated. Uncontrolled and controlled mercury emission factors and the total emission from each source types are presented. The annual national mercury emission from major anthropogenic sources for the year 2007, on average was 12.8 ton which ranged from 6.5 to 20.2 ton. Averaged emissions of elemental, oxidized, and particulate mercury were estimated at 8.25 ton, 3.69 ton, and 0.87 ton, respectively. Due to the removal of a major portion of particulate and oxidized mercury species, elemental mercury was dominant in stack emission. About 54.8% of mercury emission was contributed by industrial sources, 45.0% by stationary combustion sources and 0.02% by mobile sources. Thermal power plants, oil refineries, cement kilns and incinerators (municipal, industrial, medical, sewage sludge) were the major mercury emitters, contributing about 26%, 25%, 21% and 20%, respectively to the total mercury emission. Other sources (crematory, pulp and paper manufacturing, nonferrous metals manufacturing, glass manufacturing) contributed about 8% of the total emission. Priority should be given in controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants, oil refineries, cement kilns and waste incinerators. More measurements including natural and re-emission sources are to be carried out in the future in order to have a clear scenario of mercury emission from the country and to apply effective control measures.

  16. Shipping emissions and their impacts on air quality in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Yang, Xin; Brown, Richard; Yang, Liping; Morawska, Lidia; Ristovski, Zoran; Fu, Qingyan; Huang, Cheng

    2017-03-01

    China has >400 ports, is home to 7 of 10 biggest ports in the world and its waterway infrastructure construction has been accelerating over the past years. But the increasing number of ports and ships means increasing emissions, and in turn, increasing impact on local and regional air pollution. This paper presents an overview of the broad field of ship emissions in China and their atmospheric impacts, including topics of ship engine emissions and control, ship emission factors and their measurements, developing of ship emission inventories, shipping and port emissions of the main shipping areas in China, and quantitative contribution of shipping emissions to the local and regional air pollution. There have been an increasing number of studies published on all the above aspects, yet, this review identified some critical research gaps, filling of which is necessary for better control of ship emissions, and for lowering their impacts. In particular, there are very few studies on inland ports and river ships, and there are few national scale ship emission inventories available for China. While advanced method to estimate ship emission based on ship AIS activities makes it now possible to develop high spatial- and temporal-resolution emission inventories, the ship emission factors used in Chinese studies have been based mainly on foreign measurements. Further, the contribution of ship emissions to air pollution in coastal cities, the dispersion of pollution plumes emitted by ships, or the chemical