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Sample records for exhaled human breath-a

  1. Human exhalation characterization with the aid of schlieren imaging technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chunwen; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Liu, Li

    2017-01-01

    Highlights •Noninvasive schlieren technique was applied to characterize human exhalation. •New methods were proposed to predict exhaled velocity um and up, respectively. •Potential infection risk depended on breathing patterns and spatial distribution of exhaled air. •New data was added to airflow...... dynamics of human breathing and CFD boundary settings....

  2. Impacts of exhalation flow on the microenvironment around the human body under different room temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mohammad Javad; Gharari, Noradin; Azari, Mansour Rezazade; Ashrafi, Khosro

    2018-04-01

    Exhalation flow and room temperature can have a considerable effect on the microenvironment in the vicinity of human body. In this study, impacts of exhalation flow and room temperature on the microenvironment around a human body were investigated using a numerical simulation. For this purpose, a computational fluid dynamic program was applied to study thermal plume around a sitting human body at different room temperatures of a calm indoor room by considering the exhalation flow. The simulation was supported by some experimental measurements. Six different room temperatures (18 to 28 °C) with two nose exhalation modes (exhalation and non-exhalation) were investigated. Overhead and breathing zone velocities and temperatures were simulated in different scenarios. This study finds out that the exhalation through the nose has a significant impact on both quantitative and qualitative features of the human microenvironment in different room temperatures. At a given temperature, the exhalation through the nose can change the location and size of maximum velocity at the top of the head. In the breathing zone, the effect of exhalation through the nose on velocity and temperature distribution was pronounced for the point close to mouth. Also, the exhalation through the nose strongly influences the thermal boundary layer on the breathing zone while it only minimally influences the convective boundary layer on the breathing zone. Overall results demonstrate that it is important to take the exhalation flow into consideration in all areas, especially at a quiescent flow condition with low temperature.

  3. Real time detection of exhaled human breath using quantum cascade laser based sensor technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittel, Frank K.; Lewicki, Rafal; Dong, Lei; Liu, Kun; Risby, Terence H.; Solga, Steven; Schwartz, Tim

    2012-02-01

    The development and performance of a cw, TE-cooled DFB quantum cascade laser based sensor for quantitative measurements of ammonia (NH3) and nitric oxide (NO) concentrations present in exhaled breath will be reported. Human breath contains ~ 500 different chemical species, usually at ultra low concentration levels, which can serve as biomarkers for the identification and monitoring of human diseases or wellness states. By monitoring NH3 concentration levels in exhaled breath a fast, non-invasive diagnostic method for treatment of patients with liver and kidney disorders, is feasible. The NH3 concentration measurements were performed with a 2f wavelength modulation quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) technique, which is suitable for real time breath measurements, due to the fast gas exchange inside a compact QEPAS gas cell. A Hamamatsu air-cooled high heat load (HHL) packaged CW DFB-QCL is operated at 17.5°C, targeting the optimum interference free NH3 absorption line at 967.35 cm-1 (λ~10.34 μm), with ~ 20 mW of optical power. The sensor architecture includes a reference cell, filled with a 2000 ppmv NH3 :N2 mixture at 130 Torr, which is used for absorption line-locking. A minimum detection limit (1σ) for the line locked NH3 sensor is ~ 6 ppbv (with a 1σ 1 sec time resolution of the control electronics). This NH3 sensor was installed in late 2010 and is being clinically tested at St. Luke's Hospital in Bethlehem, PA.

  4. CFD Analysis of the Human Exhalation Flow using Different Boundary Conditions and Ventilation Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villafruela, J.M.; Olmedo, Inés; Ruiz de Adana, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the dispersion of the exhaled contaminants by humans in indoor environments, with special attention to the exhalation jet and its interaction with the indoor airflow pattern in both mixing and displacement ventilation conditions. The way in which three different numerical...... different environmental conditions and to validate whether a steady boundary condition of the exhalation flow may simulate human breathing in an effective and accurate way. The results show a very good agreement of the numerical results obtained for Test a and the experimental data. This fact confirms...

  5. Human exhaled air energy harvesting with specific reference to PVDF film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Rajesh Mhetre

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Spirometer is a medical equipment used to measure lung capacity of a human being. It leads to diagnosis of several diseases. The researchers worked on harvesting energy from human exhalation while carrying out measurements using spirometer. A prototype has been developed using piezoelectric material i.e. PVDF (polyvinylidene fluoride film as sensor. This paper presents the methodology and experimentation carried out for exhaled air energy harvesting using PVDF film. Experimental results obtained are encouraging. Measurements are also carried out on various subjects having different height, weight, age and gender. Data analysis shows variation in the energy harvested with different physical parameters and gender. Experimentation shows that voltage generated due to exhaled air is promising for harvesting.

  6. An Experimental Study of Human Exhalation during Breathing and Coughing in a Mixing Ventilated Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Lia, Yuguo; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the characteristics of human exhalation during breathing and coughing. Experiments employing one breathing thermal manikin are conducted in a full-scale test room with a mixing ventilation system. Two artificial lungs are used to generate discontinuous airflows with specific...... flow rates and temperatures for breathing and coughing, respectively. Smoke visualizations are conducted to show the formation, movement and vanishing of the exhalation jets from nose and mouth separately. The transient velocity distribution generated by breathing and coughing in different places...

  7. Stable isotope and high precision concentration measurements confirm that all humans produce and exhale methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppler, Frank; Schiller, Amanda; Ehehalt, Robert; Greule, Markus; Hartmann, Jan; Polag, Daniela

    2016-01-29

    Mammalian formation of methane (methanogenesis) is widely considered to occur exclusively by anaerobic microbial activity in the gastrointestinal tract. Approximately one third of humans, depending on colonization of the gut by methanogenic archaea, are considered methane producers based on the classification terminology of high and low emitters. In this study laser absorption spectroscopy was used to precisely measure concentrations and stable carbon isotope signatures of exhaled methane in breath samples from 112 volunteers with an age range from 1 to 80 years. Here we provide analytical evidence that volunteers exhaled methane levels were significantly above background (inhaled) air. Furthermore, stable carbon isotope values of the exhaled methane unambiguously confirmed that this gas was produced by all of the human subjects studied. Based on the emission and stable carbon isotope patterns of various age groups we hypothesize that next to microbial sources in the gastrointestinal tracts there might be other, as yet unidentified, processes involved in methane formation supporting the idea that humans might also produce methane endogenously in cells. Finally we suggest that stable isotope measurements of volatile organic compounds such as methane might become a useful tool in future medical research diagnostic programs.

  8. Analysis of human exhaled breath in a population of young volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarić Božidarka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs in human breath can provide information about the current physiological state of an individual, such as clinical conditions and exposure to exogenous pollutants. The blood-borne VOCs present in exhaled breath offer the possibility of exploring physiological and pathological processes in a noninvasive way. However, the field of exhaled breath analysis is still in its infancy. We undertook this study in order to define interindividual variation and common compounds in breath VOCs of 48 young human volunteers. Alveolar breath samples were analyzed by automated thermal desorption, gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (FID and electron capture detector (ECD using SUPELCO standards with 66 compounds. Predominant compounds in the alveolar breath of analyzed subjects are ethylbenzene, 1-ethyl-4-methylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (over 50% of the subjects. Isopropyl alcohol, propylene, acetone, ethanol were found as well. We detected substituted compounds in exhaled breath. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172001

  9. The human volatilome: volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath, skin emanations, urine, feces and saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Anton; Costello, Ben de Lacy; Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen; Buszewski, Bogusław; Pleil, Joachim; Ratcliffe, Norman; Risby, Terence

    2014-09-01

    Breath analysis is a young field of research with its roots in antiquity. Antoine Lavoisier discovered carbon dioxide in exhaled breath during the period 1777-1783, Wilhelm (Vilém) Petters discovered acetone in breath in 1857 and Johannes Müller reported the first quantitative measurements of acetone in 1898. A recent review reported 1765 volatile compounds appearing in exhaled breath, skin emanations, urine, saliva, human breast milk, blood and feces. For a large number of compounds, real-time analysis of exhaled breath or skin emanations has been performed, e.g., during exertion of effort on a stationary bicycle or during sleep. Volatile compounds in exhaled breath, which record historical exposure, are called the 'exposome'. Changes in biogenic volatile organic compound concentrations can be used to mirror metabolic or (patho)physiological processes in the whole body or blood concentrations of drugs (e.g. propofol) in clinical settings-even during artificial ventilation or during surgery. Also compounds released by bacterial strains like Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Streptococcus pneumonia could be very interesting. Methyl methacrylate (CAS 80-62-6), for example, was observed in the headspace of Streptococcus pneumonia in concentrations up to 1420 ppb. Fecal volatiles have been implicated in differentiating certain infectious bowel diseases such as Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter, Salmonella and Cholera. They have also been used to differentiate other non-infectious conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, alterations in urine volatiles have been used to detect urinary tract infections, bladder, prostate and other cancers. Peroxidation of lipids and other biomolecules by reactive oxygen species produce volatile compounds like ethane and 1-pentane. Noninvasive detection and therapeutic monitoring of oxidative stress would be highly desirable in autoimmunological, neurological, inflammatory diseases and cancer

  10. Quantitative detection of nitric oxide in exhaled human breath by extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Susu; Tian, Yong; Li, Ming; Zhao, Jiuyan; Zhu, Lanlan; Zhang, Wei; Gu, Haiwei; Wang, Haidong; Shi, Jianbo; Fang, Xiang; Li, Penghui; Chen, Huanwen

    2015-03-01

    Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) is a useful biomarker of various physiological conditions, including asthma and other pulmonary diseases. Herein a fast and sensitive analytical method has been developed for the quantitative detection of eNO based on extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS). Exhaled NO molecules selectively reacted with 2-phenyl-4, 4, 5, 5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO) reagent, and eNO concentration was derived based on the EESI-MS response of 1-oxyl-2-phenyl-4, 4, 5, 5-tetramethylimidazoline (PTI) product. The method allowed quantification of eNO below ppb level (~0.02 ppbv) with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 11.6%. In addition, eNO levels of 20 volunteers were monitored by EESI-MS over the time period of 10 hrs. Long-term eNO response to smoking a cigarette was recorded, and the observed time-dependent profile was discussed. This work extends the application of EESI-MS to small molecules (mass spectrometers. Long-term quantitative profiling of eNO by EESI-MS opens new possibilities for the research of human metabolism and clinical diagnosis.

  11. Nitric oxide in exhaled and aspirated nasal air as an objective measure of human response to indoor air pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolarik, Barbara; Lagercrantz, L.; Sundell, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The concentration of nitric oxide (NO) in exhaled and aspirated nasal air was used to objectively assess human response to indoor air pollutants in a climate chamber exposure experiment. The concentration of NO was measured before exposure, after 2, and 4.5 h of exposure, using a chemiluminescence...... NO analyzer. Sixteen healthy female subjects were exposed to two indoor air pollutants and to a clean reference condition for 4.5 h. Subjective assessments of the environment were obtained by questionnaires. After exposure (4.5 h) to the two polluted conditions a small increase in NO concentration in exhaled...... by the exposures. The results may indicate an association between polluted indoor air and subclinical inflammation.Measurement of nitric oxide in exhaled air is a possible objective marker of subclinical inflammation in healthy adults....

  12. Exhaled breath analysis: physical methods, instruments, and medical diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaks, V L; Domracheva, E G; Sobakinskaya, E A; Chernyaeva, M B

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the analysis of exhaled breath, a rapidly growing field in noninvasive medical diagnostics that lies at the intersection of physics, chemistry, and medicine. Current data are presented on gas markers in human breath and their relation to human diseases. Various physical methods for breath analysis are described. It is shown how measurement precision and data volume requirements have stimulated technological developments and identified the problems that have to be solved to put this method into clinical practice. (instruments and methods of investigation)

  13. Indoor Airflow Patterns, Dispersion of Human Exhalation Flow and Risk of Airborne Cross-Infection between People in a Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olmedo, Inés

    In recent years, an interest in understanding the mechanisms of cross-infection between people in the same room has increased significantly. The SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) outbreak occurred in Asia in 2003 reopened the study of the airborne disease transmission as one of the most...... in the air. These tiny particles or droplet nuclei can follow the air flow pattern in the room and produce high contaminant concentration in different areas of the indoor environment. This fact can provoke a high exposure to exhaled contaminants and a risk of cross-infection to a susceptible person situated...... in the same room. Abundant evidence shows that the air flow distribution systems play a crucial role in the dispersion of these human exhaled contaminants. However, there are many parameters that influence the cross-infection risk between people situated close to each other in a ventilated room, such as...

  14. Indoor Airflow Patterns, Dispersion of Human Exhalation Flow and Risk of Airborne Cross-infection between People in a Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olmedo, Inés

    In recent years, an interest in understanding the mechanisms of cross-infection between people in the same room has increased significantly. The SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) outbreak occurred in Asia in 2003 reopened the study of the airborne disease transmission as one of the most...... in the air. These tiny particles or droplet nuclei can follow the air flow pattern in the room and produce high contaminant concentration in different areas of the indoor environment. This fact can provoke a high exposure to exhaled contaminants and a risk of cross-infection to a susceptible person situated...... in the same room. Abundant evidence shows that the air flow distribution systems play a crucial role in the dispersion of these human exhaled contaminants. However, there are many parameters that influence the cross-infection risk between people situated close to each other in a ventilated room, such as...

  15. An integrative clinical database and diagnostics platform for biomarker identification and analysis in ion mobility spectra of human exhaled air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Till; Hauschild, Anne-Christin; Baumbach, Jörg Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade the evaluation of odors and vapors in human breath has gained more and more attention, particularly in the diagnostics of pulmonary diseases. Ion mobility spectrometry coupled with multi-capillary columns (MCC/IMS), is a well known technology for detecting volatile organic...... compounds (VOCs) in air. It is a comparatively inexpensive, non-invasive, high-throughput method, which is able to handle the moisture that comes with human exhaled air, and allows for characterizing of VOCs in very low concentrations. To identify discriminating compounds as biomarkers, it is necessary...

  16. Comparison of Select Analytes in Exhaled Aerosol from E-Cigarettes with Exhaled Smoke from a Conventional Cigarette and Exhaled Breaths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald A. Long

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Exhaled aerosols were collected following the use of two leading U.S. commercial electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes and a conventional cigarette by human subjects and analyzed for phenolics, carbonyls, water, glycerin and nicotine using a vacuum-assisted filter pad capture system. Exhaled breath blanks were determined for each subject prior to each product use and aerosol collection session. Distribution and mass balance of exhaled e-cigarette aerosol composition was greater than 99.9% water and glycerin, and a small amount (<0.06% of nicotine. Total phenolic content in exhaled e-cigarette aerosol was not distinguishable from exhaled breath blanks, while total phenolics in exhaled cigarette smoke were significantly greater than in exhaled e-cigarette aerosol and exhaled breaths, averaging 66 µg/session (range 36 to 117 µg/session. The total carbonyls in exhaled e-cigarette aerosols were also not distinguishable from exhaled breaths or room air blanks. Total carbonyls in exhaled cigarette smoke was significantly greater than in exhaled e-cigarette aerosols, exhaled breath and room air blanks, averaging 242 µg/session (range 136 to 352 µg/session. These results indicate that exhaled e-cigarette aerosol does not increase bystander exposure for phenolics and carbonyls above the levels observed in exhaled breaths of air.

  17. Nitric oxide in exhaled and aspirated nasal air as an objective measure of human response to isopropanol oxidation products and pthtalate esters in indoor air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagercrantz, Love Per; Famula, Basia; Sundell, Jan

    2005-01-01

    The use of Nitric Oxide (NO) concentration in exhaled and aspirated nasal air to assess human response to indoor air pollution was tested in a climate chamber exposure experiment. The concentration of NO was measured using a chemiluminescence NO analyser. Sixteen healthy female subjects were...

  18. Exhaled breath condensate methods adapted from human studies using longitudinal metabolomics for predicting early health alterations in dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borras, Eva; Aksenov, Alexander A; Baird, Mark; Novick, Brittany; Schivo, Michael; Zamuruyev, Konstantin O; Pasamontes, Alberto; Parry, Celeste; Foutouhi, Soraya; Venn-Watson, Stephanie; Weimer, Bart C; Davis, Cristina E

    2017-11-01

    Monitoring health conditions is essential to detect early asymptomatic stages of a disease. To achieve this, blood, urine and breath samples are commonly used as a routine clinical diagnostic. These samples offer the opportunity to detect specific metabolites related to diseases and provide a better understanding of their development. Although blood samples are commonly used routinely to monitor health, the implementation of a relatively noninvasive technique, such as exhaled breath condensate (EBC) analysis, may further benefit the well-being of both humans and other animals. EBC analysis can be used to track possible physical or biochemical alterations caused by common diseases of the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), such as infections or inflammatory-mediated processes. We have used an untargeted metabolomic method with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of EBC samples to determine biomarkers related to disease development. In this study, five dolphins under human care were followed up for 1 year. We collected paired blood, physical examination information, and EBC samples. We then statistically correlated this information to predict specific health alterations. Three dolphins provided promising case study information about biomarkers related to cutaneous infections, respiratory infections, dental disease, or hormonal changes (pregnancy). The use of complementary liquid chromatography platforms, with hydrophilic interaction chromatography and reverse-phased columns, allowed us to detect a wide spectrum of EBC biomarker compounds that could be related to these health alterations. Moreover, these two analytical techniques not only provided complementary metabolite information but in both cases they also provided promising diagnostic information for these health conditions. Graphical abstract Collection of the exhaled condensed breath from a bottlenose dolphin from U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program (MMP).

  19. Investigation of the climatic extremes influence on the humane adaptive capacity by mass spectrometric analysis of exhaled breath condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabokon, Anna; Larina, Irina; Kononikhin, Alexey; Starodubtceva, Nataliia; Popov, Igor; Nikolaev, Eugene; Varfolomeev, Sergey

    Global climate change, which causes abnormal fluctuations in temperature and rainfall, has adverse effects on human health. Particularly people suffer with cardiovascular and respiratory system disease. Our research was concentrated on the changes in the regulation and adaptation systems of human organism related to hyperthermia and polluted air influence. Healthy individuals with the age from 22 to 45 years were isolated during 30 days in the ground based experimental facility located at Institute of medico-biological problems RAS (Moscow, Russia). In the ground based facility artificially climatic conditions of August, 2010 in Moscow were created. Exhaled breath condensate was collected before and after isolation by R-Tube collector, freeze dried, treated by trypsin and analyzed by nanoflow LC-MS/MS with a 7-Tesla LTQ-FT Ultra mass spectrometer (Thermo Electron, Bremen, Germany). Database search was performed using Mascot Server 2.2 software (Matrix Science, London, UK). Investigation of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) collected from participants of the 30 days isolation with hyper thermic and polluted air climate conditions was performed. After isolation reduction of the protein number was observed. Loss endothelial C receptor precursor - the main physiological anticoagulant - correlate with the clinical data of physicians to increase the propensity to thrombosis. Also COP9 signalosome protein, positive regulator of ubiquitin was identified in all EBC samples before isolation and was not detected for more than a half of donors after isolation. This phenomena may be due to violation of ubiquitin protection system of the cells from harmful proteins. During isolation the air was cleared from microdisperse particles.

  20. Submarines, Spacecraft, and Exhaled Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    The International Association of Breath Research (IABR) meetings are an eclectic gathering of researchers in the medical, environmental and instrumentation fields; our focus is on human health as assessed by the measurement and interpretation of trace chemicals in human exhaled b...

  1. Real time ammonia detection in exhaled human breath using a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser based sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, Rafał; Kosterev, Anatoliy A.; Thomazy, David M.; Risby, Terence H.; Solga, Steven; Schwartz, Timothy B.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2011-01-01

    A continuous wave, thermoelectrically cooled, distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB-QCL) based sensor platform for the quantitative detection of ammonia (NH3) concentrations present in exhaled human breath is reported. The NH3 concentration measurements are performed with a 2f wavelength modulation quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) technique, which is very well suited for real time breath analysis, due to the fast gas exchange inside a compact QEPAS gas cell. An air-cooled DFB-QCL was designed to target the interference-free NH3 absorption line located at 967.35 cm-1 (λ~10.34 μm). The laser is operated at 17.5 °C, emitting ~ 24 mW of optical power at the selected wavelength. A 1σ minimum detectable concentration of ammonia for the line-locked NH3 sensor is ~ 6 ppb with 1 sec time resolution. The NH3 sensor, packaged in a 12"x14"x10" housing, is currently installed at a medical breath research center in Bethlehem, PA and tested as an instrument for non-invasive verification of liver and kidney disorders based on human breath samples.

  2. An Integrative Clinical Database and Diagnostics Platform for Biomarker Identification and Analysis in Ion Mobility Spectra of Human Exhaled Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Till

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade the evaluation of odors and vapors in human breath has gained more and more attention, particularly in the diagnostics of pulmonary diseases. Ion mobility spectrometry coupled with multi-capillary columns (MCC/IMS, is a well known technology for detecting volatile organic compounds (VOCs in air. It is a comparatively inexpensive, non-invasive, high-throughput method, which is able to handle the moisture that comes with human exhaled air, and allows for characterizing of VOCs in very low concentrations. To identify discriminating compounds as biomarkers, it is necessary to have a clear understanding of the detailed composition of human breath. Therefore, in addition to the clinical studies, there is a need for a flexible and comprehensive centralized data repository, which is capable of gathering all kinds of related information. Moreover, there is a demand for automated data integration and semi-automated data analysis, in particular with regard to the rapid data accumulation, emerging from the high-throughput nature of the MCC/IMS technology. Here, we present a comprehensive database application and analysis platform, which combines metabolic maps with heterogeneous biomedical data in a well-structured manner. The design of the database is based on a hybrid of the entity-attribute- value (EAV model and the EAV-CR, which incorporates the concepts of classes and relationships. Additionally it offers an intuitive user interface that provides easy and quick access to the platform’s functionality: automated data integration and integrity validation, versioning and roll-back strategy, data retrieval as well as semi-automatic data mining and machine learning capabilities. The platform will support MCC/IMS-based biomarker identification and validation. The software, schemata, data sets and further information is publicly available at http://imsdb.mpi-inf.mpg.de.

  3. An Integrative Clinical Database and Diagnostics Platform for Biomarker Identification and Analysis in Ion Mobility Spectra of Human Exhaled Air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Till; Hauschild, Anne-Christin; Baumbach, Jörg Ingo; Baumbach, Jan

    2013-06-01

    Over the last decade the evaluation of odors and vapors in human breath has gained more and more attention, particularly in the diagnostics of pulmonary diseases. Ion mobility spectrometry coupled with multi-capillary columns (MCC/IMS), is a well known technology for detecting volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. It is a comparatively inexpensive, non-invasive, high-throughput method, which is able to handle the moisture that comes with human exhaled air, and allows for characterizing of VOCs in very low concentrations. To identify discriminating compounds as biomarkers, it is necessary to have a clear understanding of the detailed composition of human breath. Therefore, in addition to the clinical studies, there is a need for a flexible and comprehensive centralized data repository, which is capable of gathering all kinds of related information. Moreover, there is a demand for automated data integration and semi-automated data analysis, in particular with regard to the rapid data accumulation, emerging from the high-throughput nature of the MCC/IMS technology. Here, we present a comprehensive database application and analysis platform, which combines metabolic maps with heterogeneous biomedical data in a well-structured manner. The design of the database is based on a hybrid of the entity-attribute- value (EAV) model and the EAV-CR, which incorporates the concepts of classes and relationships. Additionally it offers an intuitive user interface that provides easy and quick access to the platform's functionality: automated data integration and integrity validation, versioning and roll-back strategy, data retrieval as well as semi-automatic data mining and machine learning capabilities. The platform will support MCC/IMS-based biomarker identification and validation. The software, schemata, data sets and further information is publicly available at http://imsdb.mpi-inf.mpg.de.

  4. Experimental setup and analytical methods for the non-invasive determination of volatile organic compounds, formaldehyde and NOx in exhaled human breath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riess, Ulrich; Tegtbur, Uwe; Fauck, Christian; Fuhrmann, Frank; Markewitz, Doreen; Salthammer, Tunga

    2010-01-01

    Different analytical devices were tested and evaluated for their suitability of breath gas analysis by examining the physiological parameters and chemical substances in the exhaled breath of ten healthy probands during light cycling in dependence of methanol-rich nutrition. The probands exercised under normal breathing conditions on a bicycle ergometer. Breath air was exhaled into a glass cylinder and collected under steady-state conditions. Non-invasively measured parameters were pulse rate, breath frequency, temperature, relative humidity, NO x , total volatile organic compounds (TVOC PAS ), carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), formaldehyde, methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, isoprene and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Methanol rich food and beverages strongly influenced the concentration of methanol and other organic substances in human breath. On the other hand, nutrition and smoking had no clear effect on the physical conditions of the probands. The proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) method was found to be very suitable for the analysis of breath gas but the m/z 31, if assigned to formaldehyde, is sensitive to interferences. The time vs. concentration curves of nitric oxide showed sudden peaks up to 120 ppb in most of the measurements. In one case a strong interference of the NO x signal was observed. The time resolved analysis of exhaled breath gas is of high capability and significance for different applications if reliable analytical techniques are used. Some compounds like nitric oxide (NO), methanol, different VOCs as well as sum parameters like TVOC PAS are especially suitable as markers. Formaldehyde, which is rapidly metabolized in the human body, could be measured reliably as a trace component by the acetylacetone (acac) method but not by PTR-MS.

  5. Experimental setup and analytical methods for the non-invasive determination of volatile organic compounds, formaldehyde and NO{sub x} in exhaled human breath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riess, Ulrich; Tegtbur, Uwe [Hannover Medical School, Sports Physiology and Sports Medicine, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Fauck, Christian; Fuhrmann, Frank; Markewitz, Doreen [Fraunhofer WKI, Department of Material Analysis and Indoor Chemistry, Bienroder Weg 54 E, 38108 Braunschweig (Germany); Salthammer, Tunga, E-mail: tunga.salthammer@wki.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer WKI, Department of Material Analysis and Indoor Chemistry, Bienroder Weg 54 E, 38108 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2010-06-11

    Different analytical devices were tested and evaluated for their suitability of breath gas analysis by examining the physiological parameters and chemical substances in the exhaled breath of ten healthy probands during light cycling in dependence of methanol-rich nutrition. The probands exercised under normal breathing conditions on a bicycle ergometer. Breath air was exhaled into a glass cylinder and collected under steady-state conditions. Non-invasively measured parameters were pulse rate, breath frequency, temperature, relative humidity, NO{sub x}, total volatile organic compounds (TVOC{sub PAS}), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), formaldehyde, methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, isoprene and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Methanol rich food and beverages strongly influenced the concentration of methanol and other organic substances in human breath. On the other hand, nutrition and smoking had no clear effect on the physical conditions of the probands. The proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) method was found to be very suitable for the analysis of breath gas but the m/z 31, if assigned to formaldehyde, is sensitive to interferences. The time vs. concentration curves of nitric oxide showed sudden peaks up to 120 ppb in most of the measurements. In one case a strong interference of the NO{sub x} signal was observed. The time resolved analysis of exhaled breath gas is of high capability and significance for different applications if reliable analytical techniques are used. Some compounds like nitric oxide (NO), methanol, different VOCs as well as sum parameters like TVOC{sub PAS} are especially suitable as markers. Formaldehyde, which is rapidly metabolized in the human body, could be measured reliably as a trace component by the acetylacetone (acac) method but not by PTR-MS.

  6. Time-frequency methods and voluntary ramped-frequency breathing: a powerful combination for exploration of human neurophysiological mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovski, Tomislav; Cooke, William H.; Rudas, László; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally altered the timing of respiratory motoneuron activity as a means to modulate and better understand otherwise hidden human central neural and hemodynamic oscillatory mechanisms. We recorded the electrocardiogram, finger photoplethysmographic arterial pressure, tidal carbon dioxide concentrations, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity in 13 healthy supine young men who gradually increased or decreased their breathing frequencies between 0.05 and 0.25 Hz over 9-min periods. We analyzed results with traditional time- and frequency-domain methods, and also with time-frequency methods (wavelet transform, wavelet phase coherence, and directional coupling). We determined statistical significance and identified frequency boundaries by comparing measurements with randomly generated surrogates. Our results support several major conclusions. First, respiration causally modulates both sympathetic (weakly) and vagal motoneuron (strongly) oscillations over a wide frequency range—one that extends well below the frequency of actual breaths. Second, breathing frequency broadly modulates vagal baroreflex gain, with peak gains registered in the low frequency range. Third, breathing frequency does not influence median levels of sympathetic or vagal activity over time. Fourth, phase relations between arterial pressure and sympathetic and vagal motoneurons are unaffected by breathing, and are therefore likely secondary to intrinsic responsiveness of these motoneurons to other synaptic inputs. Finally, breathing frequency does not affect phase coherence between diastolic pressure and muscle sympathetic oscillations, but it augments phase coherence between systolic pressure and R-R interval oscillations over a limited portion of the usual breathing frequency range. These results refine understanding of autonomic oscillatory processes and those physiological mechanisms known as the human respiratory gate. PMID:24114700

  7. A simple trapping method of exhaled water using an ice-cooled tube to monitor the tritium level in human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogawa, Norio; Makide, Yoshihiro

    1994-01-01

    A convenient and efficient method is developed for the trapping of water in exhaled air. A bent-V-shaped glass sampling tube was immersed in iced water and exhaled air was introduced into the tube through a plastic straw. The trapping efficiency of exhaled water was equivalent to those with more complex and troublesome methods. Using anywhere available ice, the water in exhaled air can be rapidly collected with this method and the tritium level in the body will be quickly obtained. (author)

  8. Development of a novel graphene/polyaniline electrodeposited coating for on-line in-tube solid phase microextraction of aldehydes in human exhaled breath condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Xu, Hui

    2015-05-22

    In this work, we introduced a novel graphene/polyaniline (G/PANI) electrodeposited coating for on-line in-tube solid phase microextraction (IT-SPME) for the first time. The G/PANI coating was prepared on the internal surface of stainless steel tube by a facile in-situ electrodeposition method. The morphology and formation of the composite coating were confirmed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Some important experimental parameters that could affect the extraction and separation such as the coating thickness, internal diameter of tube, sampling flow rate as well as sample volume were optimized. The extraction performance of the IT-SPME coating was evaluated systematically. The coating exhibited enhanced mechanical stability, long lifespan, large specific surface area and good biocompatibility compared with polyaniline coating. The on-line IT-SPME method showed higher enrichment efficiency, faster analysis speed and higher automation level than off-line manual mode. Six aldehydes were determined simultaneously with low limits of detection of 0.02-0.04nmolL(-1) and good linearity (R(2)≥0.9920). The method has been applied successfully for the determination of aldehydes in human exhaled breath condensates with good recovery (70-120%) and satisfied reproducibility (relative standard deviation: 1.1-11.9%). This on-line IT-SPME method provides a promising approach for the determination of trace aldehydes with approving sensitivity in human exhaled breath condensates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantification of volatile organic compounds in exhaled human breath. Acetonitrile as biomarker for passive smoking. Model for isoprene in human breath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prazeller, P.

    2000-03-01

    The topic of this thesis is the quantification of volatile organic compounds in human breath under various circumstances. The composition of exhaled breath reflects metabolic processes in the human body. Breath analysis is a non invasive technique which makes it most interesting especially for medical or toxicological applications. Measurements were done with Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass-Spectrometry (PTR-MS). This technique combines the advantage of small fragmentation of chemical ionization with highly time resolved mass spectrometry. A big part of this work is about investigations of exposition due to tobacco smoke. After smoking cigarettes the initial increase and time dependence of some compounds in the human breath are monitored . The calculated decrease resulting only from breathing out the compounds is presented and compared to the measured decline in the breath. This allows the distinction whether breathing is the dominant loss of a compound or a different metabolic process remover it more efficiently. Acetonitrile measured in human breath is presented as a biomarker for exposition to tobacco smoke. Especially its use for quantification of passive smoking, the exposition to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is shown. The reached accuracy and the fast way of measuring of acetonitrile in human breath using PTR-MS offer a good alternative to common used biomarkers. Numerous publications have described measurements of breath isoprene in humans, and there has been a hope that breath isoprene analyses could be a non-invasive diagnostic tool to assess serum cholesterol levels or cholesterol synthesis rate. However, significant analytical problems in breath isoprene analysis and variability in isoprene levels with age, exercise, diet, etc. have limited the usefulness of these measurements. Here, we have applied proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) to this problem, allowing on-line detection of breath isoprene. We show that breath isoprene

  10. Fuel Exhaling Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor Bhat, Zahid; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Shafi, Shahid Pottachola; Varhade, Swapnil; Gautam, Manu; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2018-01-18

    State-of-the-art proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) anodically inhale H 2 fuel and cathodically expel water molecules. We show an unprecedented fuel cell concept exhibiting cathodic fuel exhalation capability of anodically inhaled fuel, driven by the neutralization energy on decoupling the direct acid-base chemistry. The fuel exhaling fuel cell delivered a peak power density of 70 mW/cm 2 at a peak current density of 160 mA/cm 2 with a cathodic H 2 output of ∼80 mL in 1 h. We illustrate that the energy benefits from the same fuel stream can at least be doubled by directing it through proposed neutralization electrochemical cell prior to PEMFC in a tandem configuration.

  11. Impact of breathing on the thermal plume above a human body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukowska, Daria; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Popiolek, Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics of the thermal plume above a human body should be well-defined in order to properly design the indoor environment and allow correct simulation of the indoor conditions by CFD or experimentally. The objective of the presented study was to investigate the influence of breathing....... A thermal manikin with female body shape equipped with an artificial lung was used to simulate the dry heat loss and breathing process of a sitting occupant. Three cases were examined: non-breathing, exhalation through nose, and exhalation through mouth. Measurements of the air temperature and speed...

  12. Distribution of Exhaled Contaminants and Personal Exposure in a Room using Three Different Air Distribution Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olmedo, Inés; Nielsen, Peter V.; Adana, M. Ruiz de

    2012-01-01

    The level of exposure to human exhaled contaminants in a room depends not only on the air distribution system but also on people’s different positions, the distance between them, people’s activity level and height, direction of exhalation, and the surrounding temperature and temperature gradient....... Human exhalation is studied in detail for different distribution systems: displacement and mixing ventilation as well as a system without mechanical ventilation. Two thermal manikins breathing through the mouth are used to simulate the exposure to human exhaled contaminants. The position and distance...

  13. Molecular hydrogen in human breath: a new strategy for selectively diagnosing peptic ulcer disease, non-ulcerous dyspepsia and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Abhijit; Pal, Mithun; Maithani, Sanchi; Ghosh, Barnali; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Pradhan, Manik

    2016-07-22

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilizes molecular hydrogen (H2) as a respiratory substrate during colonization in the gastric mucosa. However, the link between molecular H2 and the pathogenesis of peptic-ulcer disease (PUD) and non-ulcerous dyspepsia (NUD) by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori still remains mostly unknown. Here we provide evidence that breath H2 excretion profiles are distinctly altered by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori for individuals with NUD and PUD. We subsequently unravelled the potential molecular mechanisms responsible for the alteration of H2 in exhaled breath in association with peptic ulcers, encompassing both gastric and duodenal ulcers, along with NUD. We also established that carbon-isotopic fractionations in the acid-mediated bacterial environment regulated by bacterial urease activity cannot discriminate the actual disease state i.e. whether it is peptic ulcer or NUD. However, our findings illuminate the unusual molecular H2 in breath that can track the precise evolution of PUD and NUD, even after the eradication of H. pylori infection. This deepens our understanding of the pathophysiology of PUD and NUD, reveals non-invasively the actual disease state in real-time and thus offers a novel and robust new-generation strategy for treating peptic-ulcer disease together with non-ulcer related complications even when the existing (13)C-urea breath test ((13)C-UBT) fails to diagnose.

  14. Submarines, spacecraft and exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleil, Joachim D; Hansel, Armin

    2012-03-01

    Foreword The International Association of Breath Research (IABR) meetings are an eclectic gathering of researchers in the medical, environmental and instrumentation fields; our focus is on human health as assessed by the measurement and interpretation of trace chemicals in human exhaled breath. What may have escaped our notice is a complementary field of research that explores the creation and maintenance of artificial atmospheres practised by the submarine air monitoring and air purification (SAMAP) community. SAMAP is comprised of manufacturers, researchers and medical professionals dealing with the engineering and instrumentation to support human life in submarines and spacecraft (including shuttlecraft and manned rockets, high-altitude aircraft, and the International Space Station (ISS)). Here, the immediate concerns are short-term survival and long-term health in fairly confined environments where one cannot simply 'open the window' for fresh air. As such, one of the main concerns is air monitoring and the main sources of contamination are CO(2) and other constituents of human exhaled breath. Since the inaugural meeting in 1994 in Adelaide, Australia, SAMAP meetings have been held every two or three years alternating between the North American and European continents. The meetings are organized by Dr Wally Mazurek (a member of IABR) of the Defense Systems Technology Organization (DSTO) of Australia, and individual meetings are co-hosted by the navies of the countries in which they are held. An overriding focus at SAMAP is life support (oxygen availability and carbon dioxide removal). Certainly, other air constituents are also important; for example, the closed environment of a submarine or the ISS can build up contaminants from consumer products, cooking, refrigeration, accidental fires, propulsion and atmosphere maintenance. However, the most immediate concern is sustaining human metabolism: removing exhaled CO(2) and replacing metabolized O(2). Another

  15. Analysis of Exhaled Breath for Disease Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Anton; Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen; Buszewski, Bogusław; Ligor, Tomasz; Jezierski, Tadeusz; Pleil, Joachim; Risby, Terence

    2014-06-01

    Breath analysis is a young field of research with great clinical potential. As a result of this interest, researchers have developed new analytical techniques that permit real-time analysis of exhaled breath with breath-to-breath resolution in addition to the conventional central laboratory methods using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Breath tests are based on endogenously produced volatiles, metabolites of ingested precursors, metabolites produced by bacteria in the gut or the airways, or volatiles appearing after environmental exposure. The composition of exhaled breath may contain valuable information for patients presenting with asthma, renal and liver diseases, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory lung disease, or metabolic disorders. In addition, oxidative stress status may be monitored via volatile products of lipid peroxidation. Measurement of enzyme activity provides phenotypic information important in personalized medicine, whereas breath measurements provide insight into perturbations of the human exposome and can be interpreted as preclinical signals of adverse outcome pathways.

  16. Determination of Hydroxybenzenes in Exhaled Cigarette Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moldoveanu S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the results regarding the evaluation of retention efficiency by humans of hydroxybenzenes (phenols from mainstream cigarette smoke. Over twenty phenols were evaluated in the exhaled smoke of a commercial cigarette with 10.6 mg ‘tar’ [U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC ‘tar’ is defined as the weight of total particulate matter minus nicotine and water]. The test was performed on ten human subjects. The exhaled smoke was collected using a vacuum assisted technique that avoids strain in exhaling the smoke. The study showed that the phenols were retained with high efficiency from cigarette smoke, typically above 80%. Only 4-ethylresorcinol, and C3-dihydroxybenzenes (C3 indicating any alkyl with three carbon atoms were retained less efficiently with retention values around 70%. The high retention of this class of compounds was expected since phenols are polar compounds with relatively low molecular weights between 94 (for phenol and 152 (for a propyl-dihydroxybenzene.

  17. Characterization of exhaled nitric oxide: introducing a new reproducible method for nasal nitric oxide measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, J P; Graf, P; Lundberg, J O; Alving, K

    2000-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is present in the human nasal airways and has been suggested to originate primarily from the paranasal sinuses. The aim of this study was to establish a new and reproducible method for measurement of nasal NO. Through repeated single-breath measurements the intra- and inter-individual variations of NO levels in nasally (into a tightly fitting mask covering the nose) and orally exhaled air were determined in healthy humans. Variations due to the methods used were investigated. The contribution of oral NO to the nasal exhalations by introducing a mouthwash procedure was also studied. This study shows distinct individual values of NO in nasally and orally exhaled air of healthy humans. Some diurnal variability was also found with a rise in NO in nasally and orally exhaled air over the day, but no, or little, day-to-day variability when comparing the results from separate mornings. There was no correlation between NO levels in nasally and orally exhaled air, whereas there was a strong correlation between NO levels in air exhaled through the left and right nostril. The levels of NO in air exhaled at 0.17 L x s(-1) through either nostril separately were higher than in air exhaled at the same flow rate through both nostrils simultaneously. After the introduction of a mouthwash procedure the level of NO in orally, but not nasally exhaled air was reduced. To conclude the method using nasal exhalation into a nose mask is highly reproducible. It is also suggested that subtracting the level of NO in orally exhaled air, after mouthwash, from that in nasally exhaled air, would adequately reflect nasal NO levels.

  18. Dispersal of Exhaled Air and Personal Exposure in Displacement Ventilated Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Erik; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2002-01-01

    The influence of the human exhalation on flow fields, contaminant distributions, and personal exposures in displacement ventilated rooms is studied together with the effects of physical movement. Experiments are conducted in full-scale test rooms with life-sized breathing thermal manikins....... Numerical simulations support the experiments. Air exhaled through the mouth can lock in a thermally stratified layer, if the vertical temperature gradient in breathing zone height is sufficiently large. With exhalation through the nose, exhaled air flows to the upper part of the room. The exhalation flow...... from both nose and mouth is able to penetrate the breathing zone of another person standing nearby. The stratification of exhaled air breaks down if there is physical movement in the room. As movement increases, the concentration distribution in the room will move towards a fully mixed situation...

  19. Medical diagnostics by laser-based analysis of exhaled breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giubileo, Gianfranco

    2002-08-01

    IMany trace gases can be found in the exhaled breath, some of them giving the possibility of a non invasive diagnosis of related diseases or allowing the monitoring of the disease in the course of its therapy. In the present lecture the principle of medical diagnosis based on the breath analysis will be introduced and the detection of trace gases in exhaled breath by high- resolution molecular spectroscopy in the IR spectral region will be discussed. A number of substrates and the optical systems for their laser detection will be reported. The following laser based experimental systems has been realised in the Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory in ENEA in Frascati for the analysis of specific substances in the exhaled breath. A tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) appartus for the measurement of 13C/12C isotopic ratio in carbon dioxide, a TDLAS apparatus for the detection of CH4 and a CO2 laser based photoacoustic system to detect trace ethylene at atmospheric pressure. The experimental set-up for each one of the a.m. optical systems will be shown and the related medical applications will be illustrated. The concluding remarks will be focuses on chemical species that are of major interest for medical people today and their diagnostic ability.

  20. Radon exhalation from granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Claro, Flávia; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Corrêa, Janine N.; Mazer, Wellington; Narloch, Danielle Cristine; Martin, Aline Cristina; Denyak, Valeriy

    2017-01-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides such as radon ( 222 Rn), its decay products and other elements from the radioactive series of uranium ( 238 U and 235 U) and thorium ( 232 Th) are an important source of human exposure to natural radioactivity. The worldwide evaluation of health radiobiological effects and risks from population exposure to natural radionuclides is a growing concern. About 50% of personal radiation annual dose is related to radionuclides such as radon ( 222 Rn), thoron ( 220 Rn), radium ( 226 Ra), thorium ( 232 Th) and potassium ( 40 K), which are present in modern materials commonly used in construction of dwellings and buildings. The radioactivity of marbles and granites is of big concern since under certain conditions the radioactivity levels of these materials can be hazardous to the population and require the implementation of mitigation procedures. Present survey of the 222 Rn and 220 Rn activity concentration liberated in the air was performed using commercialized Brazilian granite rocks at national market as well as exported to other countries. The 222 Rn and 220 Rn measurements were performed using the AlphaGUARD instant monitor and RAD7 detector, respectively. This study was performed at the Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the Federal University of Technology – Paraná (UTFPR). Obtained results of radon concentration activity in air exhaled studied samples of granites varied from 3±1 Bq/m 3 to 2087±19 Bq/m 3 , which shows that some samples of granitic rocks represent rather elevated health risk the population. (author)

  1. Influence of Sensory Stimulation on Exhaled Volatile Organic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzatenta, A; Pokorski, M; Di Tano, A; Cacchio, M; Di Giulio, C

    2016-01-01

    The real-time exhaled volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been suggested as a new biomarker to detect and monitor physiological processes in the respiratory system. The VOCs profile in exhaled breath reflects the biochemical alterations related to metabolic changes, organ failure, and neuronal activity, which are, at least in part, transmitted via the lungs to the alveolar exhaled breath. Breath analysis has been applied to investigate cancer, lung failure, and neurodegenerative diseases. There are by far no studies on the real-time monitoring of VOCs in sensory stimulation in healthy subjects. Therefore, in this study we investigated the breath parameters and exhaled VOCs in humans during sensory stimulation: smell, hearing, sight, and touch. Responses sensory stimulations were recorded in 12 volunteers using an iAQ-2000 sensor. We found significant effects of sensory stimulation. In particular, olfactory stimulation was the most effective stimulus that elicited the greatest VOCs variations in the exhaled breath. Since the olfactory pathway is distinctly driven by the hypothalamic and limbic circuitry, while other senses project first to the thalamic area and then re-project to other brain areas, the findings suggest the importance of olfaction and chemoreception in the regulation lung gas exchange. VOCs variations during sensory activation may become putative indicators of neural activity.

  2. Use of pump current modulation of diode laser for increased sensitivity of detection of 13СO2 in human exhaled breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kireev, S. V.; Kondrashov, A. A.; Shnyrev, S. L.; Safagaraev, A. P.

    2018-03-01

    This paper reports that the use of a lock-in detection technique, when the pump current modulation of a diode laser is operating near the wavelength of 2 µm, allows the improvement of the sensitivity of the online detection of 13СO2 in expired air by more than three orders of magnitude. The sensitivity of the 13СO2 detected in the paper is 60 ppb with an error of 13СO2 concentration measured in the exhaled breath at the level of 2.9% for an optical path length of 60 cm.

  3. Exhaled nitric oxide concentration in patients after heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadziakiewicz, P; Knapik, P; Zakliczyński, M; Zembala, M; Urbańska, E; Pacholewicz, J

    2007-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is present in exhaled air in humans and its level may decrease in heart diseases. In the present study we prospectively investigated how heart transplantation treated with oral immunosuppresive drugs based on ciclosporine A influences the exhaled NO concentration (exNO). The study was performed in 17 patients after heart transplantation in various time after procedure and 15 nonsmoking healthy volunteers as a control group. Patients after heart transplantation were free of clinical signs of rejection. End-tidal concentration of exNO was measured by the use of a chemiluminescence method. We found no statistically significant differences in the exNO level between patients after heart transplantation and healthy controls (6.81+/-2.70 part per billion (ppb) in the transplant group vs. 6.01+/-3.43 ppb in the control group). We conclude that heart transplantation and immunosuppresive therapy do not influence the exhaled NO concentration.

  4. Radon exhalation from granitic rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Claro, Flávia; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Corrêa, Janine N.; Mazer, Wellington; Narloch, Danielle Cristine; Martin, Aline Cristina [Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Denyak, Valeriy, E-mail: flaviadelclaro@gmail.com, E-mail: spaschuk@gmail.com, E-mail: janine_nicolosi@hotmail.com, E-mail: denyak@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisa Pelé Pequeno Príncipe (IPPP), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides such as radon ({sup 222}Rn), its decay products and other elements from the radioactive series of uranium ({sup 238}U and {sup 235}U) and thorium ({sup 232}Th) are an important source of human exposure to natural radioactivity. The worldwide evaluation of health radiobiological effects and risks from population exposure to natural radionuclides is a growing concern. About 50% of personal radiation annual dose is related to radionuclides such as radon ({sup 222}Rn), thoron ({sup 220}Rn), radium ({sup 226}Ra), thorium ({sup 232}Th) and potassium ({sup 40}K), which are present in modern materials commonly used in construction of dwellings and buildings. The radioactivity of marbles and granites is of big concern since under certain conditions the radioactivity levels of these materials can be hazardous to the population and require the implementation of mitigation procedures. Present survey of the {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn activity concentration liberated in the air was performed using commercialized Brazilian granite rocks at national market as well as exported to other countries. The {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn measurements were performed using the AlphaGUARD instant monitor and RAD7 detector, respectively. This study was performed at the Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the Federal University of Technology – Paraná (UTFPR). Obtained results of radon concentration activity in air exhaled studied samples of granites varied from 3±1 Bq/m{sup 3} to 2087±19 Bq/m{sup 3}, which shows that some samples of granitic rocks represent rather elevated health risk the population. (author)

  5. Fast and highly sensitive fiber-enhanced Raman spectroscopic monitoring of molecular H2 and CH4 for point-of-care diagnosis of malabsorption disorders in exhaled human breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanf, Stefan; Bögözi, Timea; Keiner, Robert; Frosch, Torsten; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-01-20

    Breath gas analysis is a novel powerful technique for noninvasive, early-stage diagnosis of metabolic disorders or diseases. Molecular hydrogen and methane are biomarkers for colonic fermentation, because of malabsorption of oligosaccharides (e.g., lactose or fructose) and for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Recently, the presence of these gases in exhaled breath was also correlated with obesity. Here, we report on the highly selective and sensitive detection of molecular hydrogen and methane within a complex gas mixture (consisting of H2, CH4, N2, O2, and CO2) by means of fiber-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (FERS). An elaborate FERS setup with a microstructured hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) provided a highly improved analytical sensitivity. The simultaneous monitoring of H2 with all other gases was achieved by a combination of rotational (H2) and vibrational (other gases) Raman spectroscopy within the limited spectral transmission range of the HCPCF. The HCPCF was combined with an adjustable image-plane aperture pinhole, in order to separate the H2 rotational Raman bands from the silica background signal and improve the sensitivity down to a limit of detection (LOD) of 4.7 ppm (for only 26 fmol H2). The ability to monitor the levels of H2 and CH4 in a positive hydrogen breath test (HBT) was demonstrated. The FERS sensor possesses a high dynamic range (∼5 orders of magnitude) with a fast response time of few seconds and provides great potential for miniaturization. We foresee that this technique will pave the way for fast, noninvasive, and painless point-of-care diagnosis of metabolic diseases in exhaled human breath.

  6. Exhaled breath and fecal volatile organic biomarkers of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinardi, Simone; Jin, Kyu-Bok; Barletta, Barbara; Blake, Donald R; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2013-03-01

    While much is known about the effect of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on composition of body fluids little is known regarding its impact on the gases found in exhaled breath or produced by intestinal microbiome. We have recently shown significant changes in the composition of intestinal microbiome in humans and animals with CKD. This study tested the hypothesis that uremia-induced changes in cellular metabolism and intestinal microbiome may modify the volatile organic metabolites found in the exhaled breath or generated by intestinal flora. SD rats were randomized to CKD (5/6 nephrectomy) or control (sham operation) groups. Exhaled breath was collected by enclosing each animal in a glass chamber flushed with clean air, then sealed for 45 min and the trapped air collected. Feces were collected, dissolved in pure water, incubated at 37 degrees C in glass reactors for 24 h and the trapped air collected. Collected gases were analyzed by gas chromatography. Over 50 gases were detected in the exhaled breath and 36 in cultured feces. Four gases in exhaled breath and 4 generated by cultured feces were significantly different in the two groups. The exhaled breath in CKD rats showed an early rise in isoprene and a late fall in linear aldehydes. The CKD animals' cultured feces released larger amounts of dimethyldisulfide, dimethyltrisulfide, and two thioesters. CKD significantly changes the composition of exhaled breath and gaseous products of intestinal flora. Analysis of breath and bowel gases may provide useful biomarkers for detection and progression of CKD and its complications.

  7. Exhaled methyl nitrate as a noninvasive marker of hyperglycemia in type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, B. J.; Blake, D. R.; Meinardi, S.; Rowland, F. S.; Pontello, A.; Cooper, D. M.; Galassetti, P. R.

    2007-01-01

    Recent technical advances allow detection of several hundred volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in human exhaled air, many of which reflect unidentified endogenous pathways. Our group has previously estimated plasma glucose levels in healthy adults during a standard oral glucose tolerance test via exhaled VOC analysis. As a result of the metabolic characteristics of hyperglycemia in the diabetic (low insulin and increased free fatty acids and ketones), we hypothesized that different exhaled VOC profiles may be present in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) during spontaneous hyperglycemia. Exhaled methyl nitrate strongly correlated specifically with the acute, spontaneous hyperglycemia of T1DM children. Eighteen experiments were conducted among 10 T1DM children. Plasma glucose and exhaled gases were monitored during either constant euglycemia (n = 5) or initial hyperglycemia with gradual correction (n = 13); all subjects received i.v. insulin and glucose as needed. Gas analysis was performed on 1.9-liter breath samples via gas chromatography using electron capture, flame ionization, and mass selective detection. Among the ≈100 measured exhaled gases, the kinetic profile of exhaled methyl nitrate, commonly present in room air in the range of 5–10 parts per trillion, was most strongly statistically correlated with that of plasma glucose (P = 0.003–0.001). Indeed, the kinetic profiles of the two variables paralleled each other in 16 of 18 experiments, including repeat subjects who at different times displayed either euglycemia or hyperglycemia. PMID:17895380

  8. The exhalant jet of mussels Mytilus edulis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgard, Hans Ulrik; Jørgensen, Bo Hoffmann; Lundgreen, Kim

    2011-01-01

    The exhalant jet flow of mussels in conjunction with currents and/or other mussels may strongly influence the mussels' grazing impact. Literature values of mussel exhalant jet velocity vary considerably and the detailed fluid mechanics of the near-mussel flow generated by the exhalant jet has...... hitherto been uncertain. Computational modelling of this phenomenon depends on knowledge of the velocity distribution near the exhalant siphon aperture of mussels to provide appropriate boundary conditions for numerical flow models. To be useful such information should be available for a range of mussel...... shell lengths. Here, we present results of a detailed study of fully open mussels Mytilus edulis in terms of filtration rate, exhalant siphon aperture area, jet velocity, gill area and body dry weight, all as a function of shell length (mean +/- SD) over the range 16.0 +/- 0.4 to 82.6 +/- 2.9 mm...

  9. 42 CFR 84.91 - Breathing resistance test; exhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; exhalation. 84.91...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.91 Breathing resistance test; exhalation. (a) Resistance to exhalation...-circuit apparatus with a breathing machine as described in § 84.88, and the exhalation resistance shall...

  10. "EXHALE"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quist, Morten; Langer, Seppo W; Rørth, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in North America and Western Europe. Patients with lung cancer in general have reduced physical capacity, functional capacity, poor quality of life and increased levels of anxiety and depression. Intervention studies indicate that physi...... with complex symptom burden and help them to maintain independent function for as long as possible. TRIAL REGISTRATION: http://ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01881906....

  11. Determination of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons In Exhaled Cigarette Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moldoveanu SC

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The retention by humans of 20 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs from mainstream cigarette smoke was evaluated. The analysis was done by a new technique using solid phase extraction (SPE for the cleanup and the concenration of PAHs. The new technique has excellent sensitivity and accuracy, which were necessary for the analysis of the very low levels of PAHs present in the exhaled cigarette smoke. The study was done on a common commercial cigarette with 10.6 mg ‘tar’ by U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC recommendation. The results were obtained from ten human subjects, each smoking three cigarettes. The exhaled smoke was collected using a vacuum assisted procedure that avoids strain in exhaling. The study showed that the PAHs with a molecular weight lower than about 170 Daltons are retained with high efficiency. The heavier molecules are less retained, but even compounds such as indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, dibenz[a, h]anthracene, and benzoperylene are retained with efficiencies around 50%. The dependence of retention efficiency for PAHs (in % on their octanol-water partition coefficient (LogPow was found to be nonlinear and showed considerable variability for several compounds that have very close LogPow values. Better correlation was obtained between the retention efficiency and PAHs vapor pressure (Log VP.

  12. Variation of radon exhalation on building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fudong; Liu Senlin; Wang Chunhong; Pan Ziqiang; Zhang Yonggui; Ji Dong

    2009-01-01

    The 19 samples from different building material factories were collected for four kinds of building materials. The activity concentration and radon exhalation of building materials were measured. The radon exhalations of building materials are not obviously different if the component is same and the processes of building materials are similar. However, the radon exhalations of same kind of building material are greatly different if the components are different and the processes of building material are varied even if the activity concentrations of building material are similar. (authors)

  13. Salivary contribution to exhaled nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetterquist, W; Pedroletti, C; Lundberg, J O; Alving, K

    1999-02-01

    Dietary and metabolic nitrate is distributed from the blood to the saliva by active uptake in the salivary glands, and is reduced to nitrite in the oral cavity by the action of certain bacteria. Since it has been reported that nitric oxide may be formed nonenzymatically from nitrite this study aimed to determine whether salivary nitrite could influence measurements of exhaled NO. Ten healthy subjects fasted overnight and ingested 400 mg potassium nitrate, equivalent to approximately 200 g spinach. Exhaled NO and nasal NO were regularly measured with a chemiluminescence technique up to 3 h after the ingestion. Measurements of exhaled NO were performed with a single-breath procedure, standardized to a 20-s exhalation, at a flow of 0.15 L x s(-1), and oral pressure of 8-10 cmH2O. Values of NO were registered as NO release rate (pmol x s(-1)) during the plateau of exhalation. Exhaled NO increased steadily over time after nitrate load and a maximum was seen at 120 min (77.0+/-15.2 versus 31.2+/-3.0 pmol x s(-1), pnitrite concentrations increased in parallel; at 120 min there was a four-fold increase compared with baseline (1.56+/-0.44 versus 0.37+/-0.09 mM, pnitrite-reducing conditions in the oral cavity were also manipulated by the use of different mouthwash procedures. The antibacterial agent chlorhexidine acetate (0.2%) decreased NO release by almost 50% (pnitrate loading and reduced the preload control levels by close to 30% (pnitric oxide formation contributes to nitric oxide in exhaled air and a large intake of nitrate-rich foods before the investigation might be misinterpreted as an elevated inflammatory activity in the airways. This potential source of error and the means for avoiding it should be considered in the development of a future standardized method for measurements of exhaled nitric oxide.

  14. AN ASSESSMENT OF INSITU RADON EXHALATION MEASUREMENTS, AND THE RELATION BETWEEN FREE AND BOUND EXHALATION RATES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ALDENKAMP, FJ; DEMEIJER, RJ; PUT, LW; STOOP, P

    1992-01-01

    By solving the diffusion equation for the axial-symmetric geometry of in situ radon exhalation measurements, the effect of the presence of the measuring device on the exhalation rate was determined. From analyses of the calculated growth curves of the radon concentration in the device it turned out

  15. Exhaled aerosol transmission of pandemic and seasonal H1N1 influenza viruses in the ferret.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Koster

    Full Text Available Person-to-person transmission of influenza viruses occurs by contact (direct and fomites and non-contact (droplet and small particle aerosol routes, but the quantitative dynamics and relative contributions of these routes are incompletely understood. The transmissibility of influenza strains estimated from secondary attack rates in closed human populations is confounded by large variations in population susceptibilities. An experimental method to phenotype strains for transmissibility in an animal model could provide relative efficiencies of transmission. We developed an experimental method to detect exhaled viral aerosol transmission between unanesthetized infected and susceptible ferrets, measured aerosol particle size and number, and quantified the viral genomic RNA in the exhaled aerosol. During brief 3-hour exposures to exhaled viral aerosols in airflow-controlled chambers, three strains of pandemic 2009 H1N1 strains were frequently transmitted to susceptible ferrets. In contrast one seasonal H1N1 strain was not transmitted in spite of higher levels of viral RNA in the exhaled aerosol. Among three pandemic strains, the two strains causing weight loss and illness in the intranasally infected 'donor' ferrets were transmitted less efficiently from the donor than the strain causing no detectable illness, suggesting that the mucosal inflammatory response may attenuate viable exhaled virus. Although exhaled viral RNA remained constant, transmission efficiency diminished from day 1 to day 5 after donor infection. Thus, aerosol transmission between ferrets may be dependent on at least four characteristics of virus-host relationships including the level of exhaled virus, infectious particle size, mucosal inflammation, and viral replication efficiency in susceptible mucosa.

  16. Thoron (RN-220) interference in the determination of RN-222 exhalation rate of soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, Déric S.; Farias, Emerson E.G.; Santos, Mariana L.O.; Silva, Karolayne E.M.; Hazin, Clovis A.; França, Elvis J., E-mail: emersonemiliano@yahoo.com [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Souza Neto, João A., E-mail: adauto@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Geologia

    2017-07-01

    The transport of Rn-222 from the soil to the atmosphere known as exhalation is influenced by meteorological conditions and soil geophysical parameters. In closed and poorly ventilated rooms, this radioactive gas can reach high activity concentrations, in which the energy of alpha particles released by this radionuclide and its progeny is the second leading cause of lung cancer. Soil exhalation rate is an important parameter for assessing human health risks associated with radon. For radon determination using an exhalation chamber, an ionization chamber detector is used to count the electrical pulses generated by the interaction between the alpha particles produced by Rn-222 and its progeny and the air inside the chamber. In this work, the interference of thoron (Rn-220) in the determination of soil exhalation rate of Rn-222 was studied. For this, the RadonBOX exhalation chamber and the AlphaGuard ionization chamber detector were utilized for analyzing the same soil during two hours on different days under similar meteorological conditions. From zero up to approximately 2,400 s, the radon activity concentrations decreased. After 40 minutes, the radon concentrations started to increase, thereby allowing the calculation of soil exhalation rate. This initial decreasing could be explained by a high Rn-220 than Rn-222 presence in the soil, in which, because of its short half-life, after 40 minutes, most thoron present in the chamber has undergone so that the main alpha emitter become Rn-222. In order to confirm this, Rn-220 activity was estimated by the Ra-228 concentration in the soil determined after 30 days using High Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometry with HPGe detectors. Therefore, the thoron interference in the determination of soil radon exhalation rate was considered negligible after 40 minutes of measurement time for the analyzed soil. (author)

  17. Hyperbaric oxygen diving affects exhaled molecular profiles in men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooij, P. J. A. M.; van Hulst, R. A.; Kulik, W.; Brinkman, P.; Houtkooper, A.; Sterk, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Exhaled breath contains volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are associated with respiratory pathophysiology. We hypothesized that hyperbaric oxygen exposure (hyperoxia) generates a distinguishable VOC pattern. This study aimed to test this hypothesis in oxygen-breathing divers. VOCs in exhaled

  18. Radon exhalation rates of some granites used in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Mladen D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to address concern about radon exhalation in building material, radon exhalation rate was determined for different granites available on Serbian market. Radon exhalation rate, along with mass exhalation rate and effective radium content were determined by closed chamber method and active continuous radon measurement technique. For this research, special chambers were made and tested for back diffusion and leakage, and the radon concentrations measured were included in the calculation of radon exhalation. The radon exhalation rate ranged from 0.161 Bq/m2h to 0.576 Bq/m2h, the mass exhalation rate from 0.167 Bq/kgh to 0.678 Bq/kgh, while the effective radium content was found to be from 12.37 Bq/kg to 50.23 Bq/kg. The results indicate that the granites used in Serbia have a low level of radon exhalation.

  19. Determination of Carbonyl Compounds in Exhaled Cigarette Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moldoveanu S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings on a quantitative evaluation of carbonyl levels in exhaled cigarette smoke from human subjects. The cigarettes evaluated include products with 5.0 mg ‘tar’, 10.6 mg ‘tar’ and 16.2 mg ‘tar’, where ‘tar’ is defined as the weight of total wet particulate matter (TPM minus the weight of nicotine and water, and the cigarettes are smoked following U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC recommendations. The measured levels of carbonyls in the exhaled smoke were compared with calculated yields of carbonyls in the inhaled smoke and a retention efficiency was obtained. The number of human subjects included a total of ten smokers for the 10.6 mg ‘tar’, five for the 16.2 mg ‘tar’, and five for the 5.0 mg ‘tar’ product, each subject smoking three cigarettes. The analyzed carbonyl compounds included several aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, propionaldehyde, crotonaldehyde and n-butyraldehyde, and two ketones (acetone and 2-butanone. The smoke collection from the human subjects was vacuum assisted. Exhaled smoke was collected on Cambridge pads pretreated with a solution of dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis of the dinitrophenylhydrazones of the carbonyl compounds. The cigarette butts from the smokers were collected and analyzed for nicotine. The nicotine levels for the cigarette butts from the smokers were used to calculate the level of carbonyls in the inhaled smoke, based on calibration curves. These were generated separately by analyzing the carbonyls in smoke and the nicotine in the cigarette butts obtained by machine smoking under different puffing regimes. The comparison of the level of carbonyl compounds in exhaled smoke with that from the inhaled smoke showed high retention of all the carbonyls. The retention of aldehydes was above 95% for all three different ‘tar’ levels cigarettes. The ketones were retained with a

  20. Cavity ring down spectrometry for disease diagnostics using exhaled air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revalde, G.; Grundšteins, K.; Alnis, J.; Skudra, A.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we report the current stage of the development of a cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS) system using exhaled human breath analysis for the diagnostics of different diseases like diabetes and later lung cancer. The portable CRDS system is made in ultraviolet spectral region using Nd:Yag laser 266 nm pulsed light. Calibration of the CRDS system was performed using generated samples by KinTek automated permeation tube system and self-prepared mixtures with known concentration of benzene and acetone in air. First experiments showed that the limits of detection for benzene and acetone are several tens of ppb.

  1. Exhaled CO, a predictor of lung function?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Peder; Scharling, Henrik; Løkke, Anders

    2007-01-01

    and whether CO could provide additional information to usual measures of smoking regarding prediction of present lung function and decline in lung function over an extended period of time. METHOD: Cigarette smokers from the Copenhagen City Heart Study with valid measures of lung function and exhaled CO.......001). Increasing CO levels were correlated to a lower FEV(1)%pred and to an accelerated decline in lung function. However, in multiple linear regression analyses these correlations were not significant. CONCLUSION: Inhalation and type of cigarette affects exhaled CO levels. CO measures have no predictive value...

  2. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Effect of Air Stability on Exhaled Air Dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chunwen; Gong, Guangcai; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2014-01-01

    As more and more investigations have reported the influence of thermal stratification indoors on contaminant dispersion, this paper focuses on investigating this phenomenon from the perspective of air stability which is defined in accordance with atmospheric stability. One breathing thermal manikin...... studies. As the thermal stratification under displacement ventilation blocks the vertical movement of exhaled air, the exhaled contaminant may be trapped between temperature stratifications. As the dispersion of contaminant is closely related to the health of human indoors, the temperature structure...... was used for experimental study, and a numerical person was built to simulate the manikin. The velocity, temperature and concentration of tracer gas in exhaled air are affected by air stability to different degrees. The similarity of this effect among these parameters can also be observed through numerical...

  3. Exhalation analysis as a method of monitoring the incorporation of thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheler, R.; Dettmann, K.

    1993-01-01

    The measurement techniques of whole body counting and analysis of excretion are little suited for the routine monitoring of Thorium body activity. From published data the suitability of exhalation analysis was examined. By using the most sensitiv Thoronmonitors it is possible to determine approximately 1 mBq/l Rn-220 in breath of humans. The relationship between exhaled Rn-220 and the Th-232 activity deposited in liver and spleen of Thorotrast patients was about 2-3 mBq/l Rn-220 per Bq Th-232. Corresponding to this data by exhalation analysis the estimation of 0.5 to 1 Bq Th-232 body burden (equivalent to 30% annual limit for intake of Th-232) is practicable. (orig.) [de

  4. Quantification of pentane in exhaled breath, a potential biomarker of bowel disease, using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dryahina, Kseniya; Španěl, Patrik; Pospíšilová, Veronika; Sovová, Kristýna; Hrdlička, L.; Machková, N.; Lukáš, M.; Smith, D.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 17 (2013), s. 1983-1992 ISSN 0951-4198 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : TRACE GAS-ANALYSIS * VOLATILE ORGANIC-COMPOUNDS * SIFT-MS Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.642, year: 2013

  5. CONTINUOUS EXHALED BREATH ANALYSIS ON THE ICU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, Lieuwe D. J.; Sterk, Peter J.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2011-01-01

    During admittance to the ICU, critically ill patients frequently develop secondary infections and/or multiple organ failure. Continuous monitoring of biological markers is very much needed. This study describes a new method to continuously monitor biomarkers in exhaled breath with an electronic nose.

  6. Carbon monoxide in exhaled breath testing and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K

    2013-03-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO), a low molecular weight gas, is a ubiquitous environmental product of organic combustion, which is also produced endogenously in the body, as the byproduct of heme metabolism. CO binds to hemoglobin, resulting in decreased oxygen delivery to bodily tissues at toxicological concentrations. At physiological concentrations, CO may have endogenous roles as a potential signaling mediator in vascular function and cellular homeostasis. Exhaled CO (eCO), similar to exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), has been evaluated as a candidate breath biomarker of pathophysiological states, including smoking status, and inflammatory diseases of the lung and other organs. eCO values have been evaluated as potential indicators of inflammation in asthma, stable COPD and exacerbations, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, or during surgery or critical care. The utility of eCO as a marker of inflammation and its potential diagnostic value remain incompletely characterized. Among other candidate 'medicinal gases' with therapeutic potential, (e.g., NO and H2S), CO has been shown to act as an effective anti-inflammatory agent in preclinical animal models of inflammatory disease, acute lung injury, sepsis, ischemia/reperfusion injury and organ graft rejection. Current and future clinical trials will evaluate the clinical applicability of this gas as a biomarker and/or therapeutic in human disease.

  7. Variability in the exhalation rate of radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundo, J.; Markun, F.; Sha, J.Y.; Cameron, P.

    1976-01-01

    In a day-long study, twenty-eight 10-min samples of breath were collected from a former radium dial painter and were analyzed for radon. The radon exhalation rate showed good short-term reproducibility, but there was a dramatic short-lived increase in the first samples collected after lunch and a slow but steady increase during the course of the day

  8. Postprandial changes in the exhalation of radon from the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundo, J.; Markun, F.; Plondke, N.J.

    1978-01-01

    The exhalation of radon originally inhaled from the home environment and dissolved in body fluids and tissues has been studied serially for periods of several hours in six persons. The observation of a pronounced postprandial peak in the rate of exhalation of radon shows that the similar peak observed in the exhalation of radon produced from radium in vivo results from the flushing of a reservoir in soft tissue and not from a change in the fraction lost from bone

  9. Volatile Organic Compounds in Exhaled Breath of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis for Discrimination from Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yu-Ichi; Yamada, Gen; Otsuka, Mitsuo; Nishikiori, Hirotaka; Ikeda, Kimiyuki; Umeda, Yasuaki; Ohnishi, Hirofumi; Kuronuma, Koji; Chiba, Hirofumi; Baumbach, Jörg Ingo; Takahashi, Hiroki

    2017-04-01

    Purpose Human breath analysis is proposed with increasing frequency as a useful tool in clinical application. We performed this study to find the characteristic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the exhaled breath of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) for discrimination from healthy subjects. Methods VOCs in the exhaled breath of 40 IPF patients and 55 healthy controls were measured using a multi-capillary column and ion mobility spectrometer. The patients were examined by pulmonary function tests, blood gas analysis, and serum biomarkers of interstitial pneumonia. Results We detected 85 VOC peaks in the exhaled breath of IPF patients and controls. IPF patients showed 5 significant VOC peaks; p-cymene, acetoin, isoprene, ethylbenzene, and an unknown compound. The VOC peak of p-cymene was significantly lower (p VOC peaks of acetoin, isoprene, ethylbenzene, and the unknown compound were significantly higher (p VOC peaks with clinical parameters, negative correlations with VC (r =-0.393, p = 0.013), %VC (r =-0.569, p VOCs in the exhaled breath of IPF patients. Among them, the VOC peaks of p-cymene were related to the clinical parameters of IPF. These VOCs may be useful biomarkers of IPF.

  10. Exhaled breath barbotage: A new method of pulmonary surfactant dysfunction assessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizev, Aleksey; Shmyrova, Anastasia; Mizeva, Irina; Pshenichnikova-Peleneva, Irina

    2018-01-01

    Exhaled air contains aerosol of submicron droplets of the alveolar lining fluid (ALF), which are generated in the small airways of a human lung. Since the exhaled particles are micro-samples of the ALF, their trapping opens up an opportunity to collect non-invasively a native material from respiratory tract. Recent studies of the particle characteristics (such as size distribution, concentration and composition) in healthy and diseased subjects performed under various conditions have demonstrated a high potential of the analysis of exhaled aerosol droplets for identifying and monitoring pathological processes in the ALF. In this paper we present a new method for sampling of aerosol particles during the exhaled breath barbotage (EBB) through liquid. The barbotage procedure results in accumulation of the pulmonary surfactant, being the main component of ALF, on the liquid surface, which makes possible the study its surface properties. We also propose a data processing algorithm to evaluate the surface pressure ($\\pi$) -- surface concentration ($\\Gamma$) isotherm from the raw data measured in a Langmuir trough. Finally, we analyze the $(\\pi-\\Gamma)$ isotherms obtained for the samples collected in the groups of healthy volunteers and patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and compare them with the isotherm measured for the artificial pulmonary surfactant.

  11. Viral kinetics and exhaled droplet size affect indoor transmission dynamics of influenza infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S C; Chio, C P; Jou, L J; Liao, C M

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the effects of viral kinetics and exhaled droplet size on indoor transmission dynamics of influenza infection. The target cell-limited model with delayed virus production was adopted to strengthen the inner mechanisms of virus infection on human epithelial cell. The particle number and volume involved in the viral kinetics were linked with Wells-Riley mathematical equation to quantify the infection risk. We investigated population dynamics in a specific elementary school by using the seasonal susceptible - exposed - infected - recovery (SEIR) model. We found that exhaled pulmonary bioaerosol of sneeze (particle diameter generation. By linking the viral kinetics and different exposure parameters and environmental factors in a proposed school setting with five age groups, the influenza infection risk can be estimated. On the other hand, we implicated a new simple means of inhaling to mitigate exhaled bioaerosols through an inhaled non-toxic aerosol. The proposed predictive model may serve as a tool for further investigation of specific control measure such as the personal protection masks to alter the particle size and number concentration characteristics and minimize the exhaled bioaerosol droplet to decrease the infection risk in indoor environment settings.

  12. Take a Breath (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-03-26

    Inhaling and exhaling is a daily struggle for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This podcast discusses how to manage COPD.  Created: 3/26/2015 by MMWR.   Date Released: 3/26/2015.

  13. Take a Breath (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-03-26

    Breathing is a natural bodily function that most take for granted. But for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, inhaling and exhaling is a daily struggle. In this podcast, Dr. Anne Wheaton discusses health problems associated with COPD.  Created: 3/26/2015 by MMWR.   Date Released: 3/26/2015.

  14. Immediate effects of breath holding maneuvers onto composition of exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukul, Pritam; Trefz, Phillip; Schubert, Jochen K; Miekisch, Wolfram

    2014-09-01

    Rapid concentration changes due to physiological or pathophysiological effects rather than appearance of unique disease biomarkers are important for clinical application of breath research. Simple maneuvers such as breath holding may significantly affect breath biomarker concentrations. In this study, exhaled volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations were assessed in real time before and after different breath holding maneuvers. Continuous breath-resolved measurements (PTR-ToF-MS-8000) were performed in 31 healthy human subjects in a side-stream sampling mode. After 1 min of tidal breathing participants held their breath for 10, 20, 40, 60 s and as long as possible. Afterwards they continued to breathe normally for another minute. VOC profiles could be monitored in real time by assigning online PTR-ToF-MS data to alveolar or inspired phases of breath. Sudden and profound changes of exhaled VOC concentrations were recorded after different breath holding maneuvers. VOC concentrations returned to base line levels 10-20 s after breath holding. Breath holding induced concentration changes depended on physico-chemical properties of the substances. When substance concentrations were normalized onto end-tidal CO2 content, variation of acetone concentrations decreased, whereas variations of isoprene concentrations were not affected. As the effects of breathing patterns on exhaled substance concentrations depend on individual substance properties, sampling procedures have to be validated for each compound by means of appropriate real-time analysis. Normalization of exhaled concentrations onto exhaled CO2 is only valid for substances having similar physico-chemical properties as CO2.

  15. Microbiota in Exhaled Breath Condensate and the Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendinning, Laura; Wright, Steven; Tennant, Peter; Gill, Andrew C; Collie, David; McLachlan, Gerry

    2017-06-15

    The lung microbiota is commonly sampled using relatively invasive bronchoscopic procedures. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) collection potentially offers a less invasive alternative for lung microbiota sampling. We compared lung microbiota samples retrieved by protected specimen brushings (PSB) and exhaled breath condensate collection. We also sought to assess whether aerosolized antibiotic treatment would influence the lung microbiota and whether this change could be detected in EBC. EBC was collected from 6 conscious sheep and then from the same anesthetized sheep during mechanical ventilation. Following the latter EBC collection, PSB samples were collected from separate sites within each sheep lung. On the subsequent day, each sheep was then treated with nebulized colistimethate sodium. Two days after nebulization, EBC and PSB samples were again collected. Bacterial DNA was quantified using 16S rRNA gene quantitative PCR. The V2-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR and sequenced using Illumina MiSeq. Quality control and operational taxonomic unit (OTU) clustering were performed with mothur. The EBC samples contained significantly less bacterial DNA than the PSB samples. The EBC samples from anesthetized animals clustered separately by their bacterial community compositions in comparison to the PSB samples, and 37 bacterial OTUs were identified as differentially abundant between the two sample types. Despite only low concentrations of colistin being detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, PSB samples were found to differ by their bacterial compositions before and after colistimethate sodium treatment. Our findings indicate that microbiota in EBC samples and PSB samples are not equivalent. IMPORTANCE Sampling of the lung microbiota usually necessitates performing bronchoscopic procedures that involve a hospital visit for human participants and the use of trained staff. The inconvenience and perceived discomfort of participating in this kind of

  16. Measurement of radon exhalation rate in various building materials ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, the measurement of radon exhalation rate in the soil and building material samples of Una and Hamirpur districts of Himachal Pradesh has been done with solid state alpha track detectors, LR-115 type-II plastic track detectors. The radon exhalation rate for the soil samples varies from 39.1 to 91.2 mBq ...

  17. Hydrogen peroxide in exhaled air of healthy children: reference values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Q. Jobsis (Quirijn); R.H. Raatgeep (Rolien); S.L. Schellekens; W.C.J. Hop (Wim); P.W.M. Hermans (Peter); J.C. de Jongste (Johan)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractAn increased content of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a marker of inflammation, has been described in the condensate of exhaled air from adults and children with inflammatory lung disorders, including asthma. However, the normal range of [H2O2] in the exhaled

  18. Exhaled Breath Condensate for Proteomic Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean W. Harshman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Exhaled breath condensate (EBC has been established as a potential source of respiratory biomarkers. Compared to the numerous small molecules identified, the protein content of EBC has remained relatively unstudied due to the methodological and technical difficulties surrounding EBC analysis. In this review, we discuss the proteins identified in EBC, by mass spectrometry, focusing on the significance of those proteins identified. We will also review the limitations surrounding mass spectral EBC protein analysis emphasizing recommendations to enhance EBC protein identifications by mass spectrometry. Finally, we will provide insight into the future directions of the EBC proteomics field.

  19. Study of the Human Breathing Flow Profile in a Room with three Different Ventilation Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olmedo, Ines; Nielsen, Peter V.; de Adana, Manuel Ruiz

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the characteristics of human exhalation through the mouth with three different ventilation strategies: displacement ventilation, mixing ventilation and without ventilation. Experiments were conducted with one breathing thermal manikin in a full scale test room where...... the exhalation airflow was analyzed. In order to simulate the gaseous exhaled substances in human breathing, N2O was used as a tracer gas. The concentration of N2O and the velocity of the exhaled flow were measured in the center line of the exhalation flow. The velocity decay of the exhalation flow versus...

  20. Assessing recent smoking status by measuring exhaled carbon monoxide levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnSofi Sandberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoke causes both acute and chronic changes of the immune system. Excluding recent smoking is therefore important in clinical studies with chronic inflammation as primary focus. In this context, it is common to ask the study subjects to refrain from smoking within a certain time frame prior to sampling. The duration of the smoking cessation is typically from midnight the evening before, i.e. 8 hours from sampling. As it has been shown that a proportion of current smokers underestimates or denies smoking, objective assessment of recent smoking status is of great importance. Our aim was to extend the use of exhaled carbon monoxide (CO(breath, a well-established method for separating smokers from non-smokers, to assessment of recent smoking status. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The time course of CO(breath decline was investigated by hourly measurements during one day on non-symptomatic smokers and non-smokers (6+7, as well as by measurements on three separate occasions on non-smokers (n = 29, smokers with normal lung function (n = 38 and smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 19 participating in a clinical study. We used regression analysis to model the decay, and receiver operator characteristics analysis for evaluation of model performance. The decline was described as a mono-exponential decay (r(2 = 0.7 with a half-life of 4.5 hours. CO decline rate depends on initial CO levels, and by necessity a generic cut-off is therefore crude as initial CO(breath varies a lot between individuals. However, a cut-off level of 12 ppm could classify recent smokers from smokers having refrained from smoking during the past 8 hours with a specificity of 94% and a sensitivity of 90%. CONCLUSIONS: We hereby describe a method for classifying recent smokers from smokers having refrained from smoking for >8 hours that is easy to implement in a clinical setting.

  1. Exhaled nitric oxide and urinary EPX levels in infants: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olin Anna-Carin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Objective markers of early airway inflammation in infants are not established but are of great interest in a scientific setting. Exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO and urinary eosinophilic protein X (uEPX are a two such interesting markers. Objective To investigate the feasibility of measuring FeNO and uEPX in infants and their mothers and to determine if any relations between these two variables and environmental factors can be seen in a small sample size. This was conducted as a pilot study for the ongoing Swedish Environmental Longitudinal Mother and child Asthma and allergy study (SELMA. Methods Consecutive infants between two and six months old and their mothers at children's health care centres were invited, and 110 mother-infant pairs participated. FeNO and uEPX were analysed in both mothers and infants. FeNO was analyzed in the mothers online by the use of the handheld Niox Mino device and in the infants offline from exhaled air sampled during tidal breathing. A 33-question multiple-choice questionnaire that dealt with symptoms of allergic disease, heredity, and housing characteristics was used. Results FeNO levels were reduced in infants with a history of upper respiratory symptoms during the previous two weeks (p Conclusion The use of uEPX as a marker of early inflammation was not supported. FeNO levels in infants were associated to windowpane condensation. Measuring FeNO by the present method may be an interesting way of evaluating early airway inflammation. In a major population study, however, the method is difficult to use, for practical reasons.

  2. A Pilot Study to Assess Solanesol Levels in Exhaled Cigarette Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moldoveanu SC

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the results obtained during the measurement of the level of solanesol in exhaled cigarette smoke from human subjects. The study was performed with three different cigarettes with U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC ‘tar’ values of 5.0 mg, 10.6 mg, and 16.2 mg. The number of human subjects was ten smokers for each of the evaluated products, each subject smoking three cigarettes within one hour. The exhaled smoke was collected using a vacuum assisted procedure that avoids strain in exhaling, and the solanesol was analyzed using an original high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC technique. The cigarette butts from the smokers were collected and also analyzed for solanesol. The results obtained for the cigarette butts from the smokers were used to calculate the level of solanesol delivered to the smoker, based on calibration curves. These curves were generated separately by analyzing the solanesol in smoke and in the cigarette butts obtained by machine smoking under different puffing regimes. Knowing the levels of solanesol delivered to the smoker and the exhaled levels it was possible to calculate the retention and retention % of this compound from mainstream smoke for different cigarettes types. The amount of retained solanesol is the lowest for the 5.0 mg ‘tar’ product, and the highest for the 16.2 mg ‘tar’ product, although there is not much difference between the 10.6 mg ‘tar’ product and the 16.2 mg ‘tar’ product. For the 10.6 mg ‘tar’ cigarettes the retention % was between 60% and 72%, for the 5.0 mg product the retention % was slightly lower ranging between 53% and 70%, while for the 16.2 mg ‘tar’ product, the retention % was slightly higher ranging between 62% and 82%.

  3. Effect of humidity on radon exhalation rate from concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Obayashi, Haruo; Tsuji, Naruhito; Nakayoshi, Hisao

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the present study is evaluation of seasonal humidity effect on radon exhalation rate from concrete. Three concrete pieces have been placed in three different fixed humidity circumstances for about a year. The three fixed humidities are selected 3, 10, 25 g m -3 in absolute humidity, those correspond to dry condition as control, winter and summer, respectively. Radon exhalation rate from each concrete piece is measured every one month during humidity exposure. Under the lower humidity, radon exhalation rate from concrete is small. On the contrary, radon exhalation rate is large in the higher humidity circumstance. This trend is consistent with the seasonal variation of indoor air radon concentration in low air-exchange-rate room. (author)

  4. Radon exhalation from some finishing materials frequently used in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shweikani, R.; Raja, G.

    2009-01-01

    Building materials are one of the main radon sources in dwellings. Therefore, the determination of radon exhalation from these materials will help in prediction the existence of dwelling with potential radon risk. Ceramic tiles and marble samples were collected from Syrian local market. The correlation between radon exhalation from these materials and radium-226 content was studied. Results showed that there is no clear relation between radium content and radon exhalation rate, and the exhalation of radon did not exceed the permissible limits of American Environment Protection Agency (EPA). In addition, the additional annual dose from radon and gamma of the natural radioactivity in ceramic and marble when used as finishing materials in houses was also estimated and found to be not exceeding 20 μSv and 35 μSv from radon and gamma respectively.

  5. Exhaled breath condensate metabolome clusters for endotype discovery in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinha, Anirban; Desiraju, Koundinya; Aggarwal, Kunal; Kutum, Rintu; Roy, Siddhartha; Lodha, Rakesh; Kabra, S. K.; Ghosh, Balaram; Sethi, Tavpritesh; Agrawal, Anurag

    2017-01-01

    Asthma is a complex, heterogeneous disorder with similar presenting symptoms but with varying underlying pathologies. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is a relatively unexplored matrix which reflects the signatures of respiratory epithelium, but is difficult to normalize for dilution. Here we

  6. Radon exhalation rate on the Sivrice (Elazig ) fault zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, S.; Kuluoeztuerk, M. F.; Dogru, M.

    2009-01-01

    Four radon monitoring stations were built on the Sivrice Fault Zone which is a part of the East Anatolian Fault System that one of the very important two fault systems which tends to produce earthquake in Turkey. Radon exhalation rate were analyzed in the soil and water samples which collected around the stations. Radon exhalation rate in the soil and water samples were determined by using CR-39 that it is plastic detector.

  7. Differences in the Chemical Composition of the Particulate Phase of Inhaled and Exhaled Cigarette Mainstream Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moldoveanu SC

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a comparison between the chemical composition of the particulate-phase of exhaled smoke and that of smoke generated with a smoking machine has been performed. For this purpose, eight human subjects smoked a common Lights (10.6 mg ‘tar’/cig commercial cigarette and the exhaled particulate-phase smoke from three cigarettes was collected on Cambridge pads for each smoker. The smoke collection from the human subjects was vacuum assisted. The cigarette butts from the smokers were collected and analyzed for nicotine. The machine smoking was performed with a Borgwaldt RM20 CSR smoking machine working under conditions recommended by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC. The nicotine levels for the cigarette butts from the smokers were used to normalize the level of exhaled smoke condensate to that of the FTC smoking conditions. The smoke condensates from exhaled smoke as well as that from the machine smoking were analyzed by a gas chromatographic technique with mass spectral peak identification. The retention efficiency for 160 compounds was calculated from the ratio of the compound peak areas in the exhaled smoke (normalized by the corresponding butt nicotine level vs. the areas of the corresponding peaks from the chromatogram of the smoke generated by the smoking machine. In the calculation of the results, it was assumed that the composition of mainstream smoke remains practically constant at different smoking regimes. All compounds found in the machine-generated smoke were also present in the exhaled smoke, but at different levels. About one third of the compounds were retained more than 66% by the smoker. Another third of the compounds were retained between 33% and 66%, and the rest of the compounds were retained very little from the mainstream particulate-phase of the cigarette smoke. The compounds retained more than 66% were in general compounds with lower molecular weight and with higher water solubility, which eluted first

  8. Online trapping and enrichment ultra performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry method for sensitive measurement of “arginine-asymmetric dimethylarginine cycle” biomarkers in human exhaled breath condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Gangi, Iole Maria; Pirillo, Paola; Carraro, Silvia; Gucciardi, Antonina; Naturale, Mauro; Baraldi, Eugenio; Giordano, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Simultaneous quantification of “arginine-ADMA cycle” metabolites developed in EBC. ► EBC is a non-invasive matrix highly useful in patients with respiratory diseases. ► Method, fast, precise and accurate, is suitable in the pediatric clinical studies. ► Sensitivity is increased using on-line trapping and enrichment-UPLC–MS/MS method. ► EBC measurements in asthmatic adolescents confirm that ADMA is increased in asthma. - Abstract: Background: Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is a biofluid collected non invasively that, enabling the measurement of several biomarkers, has proven useful in the study of airway inflammatory diseases, including asthma, COPD and cystic fibrosis. To the best of our knowledge, there is no previous report of any analytical method to detect ADMA in EBC. Objectives: Aim of this work was to develop an online sample trapping and enrichment system, coupled with an UPLC–MS/MS method, for simultaneous quantification of seven metabolites related to “Arginine-ADMA cycle”, using the isotopic dilution. Methods: Butylated EBC samples were trapped in an online cartridge, washed before and after each injection with cleanup solution to remove matrix components and switched inline into the high pressure analytical column. Multiple reaction monitoring in positive mode was used for analyte quantification by tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Validation studies were performed in EBC to examine accuracy, precision and robustness of the method. For each compound, the calibration curves showed a coefficient of correlation (r 2 ) greater than 0.992. Accuracy (%Bias) was −1 ), measured in EBC samples of asthmatic adolescents are significantly increased (p < 0.0001) than in normal controls (0.0040 ± 0.0021 vs. 0.0012 ± 0.0005 and 0.0020 ± 0.0015 vs. 0.0002 ± 0.0001, respectively), as well the ADMA/Tyr (0.34 ± 0.09 vs. 0.12 ± 0.02, p < 0.0001) and the SDMA/Tyr ratio (0.10 ± 0.04 vs. 0.015 ± 0.004, p < 0.0001). Conclusions

  9. Online trapping and enrichment ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for sensitive measurement of 'arginine-asymmetric dimethylarginine cycle' biomarkers in human exhaled breath condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Gangi, Iole Maria, E-mail: giordano@pediatria.unipd.it [Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Department of Women' s and Children' s Health, University of Padova (Italy); Pirillo, Paola [Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Department of Women' s and Children' s Health, University of Padova (Italy); Carraro, Silvia [Unit of Allergy and Respiratory Diseases, Department of Women' s and Children' s Health, University of Padova (Italy); Gucciardi, Antonina; Naturale, Mauro [Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Department of Women' s and Children' s Health, University of Padova (Italy); Baraldi, Eugenio [Unit of Allergy and Respiratory Diseases, Department of Women' s and Children' s Health, University of Padova (Italy); Giordano, Giuseppe [Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, Department of Women' s and Children' s Health, University of Padova (Italy)

    2012-11-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simultaneous quantification of 'arginine-ADMA cycle' metabolites developed in EBC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EBC is a non-invasive matrix highly useful in patients with respiratory diseases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Method, fast, precise and accurate, is suitable in the pediatric clinical studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sensitivity is increased using on-line trapping and enrichment-UPLC-MS/MS method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EBC measurements in asthmatic adolescents confirm that ADMA is increased in asthma. - Abstract: Background: Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is a biofluid collected non invasively that, enabling the measurement of several biomarkers, has proven useful in the study of airway inflammatory diseases, including asthma, COPD and cystic fibrosis. To the best of our knowledge, there is no previous report of any analytical method to detect ADMA in EBC. Objectives: Aim of this work was to develop an online sample trapping and enrichment system, coupled with an UPLC-MS/MS method, for simultaneous quantification of seven metabolites related to 'Arginine-ADMA cycle', using the isotopic dilution. Methods: Butylated EBC samples were trapped in an online cartridge, washed before and after each injection with cleanup solution to remove matrix components and switched inline into the high pressure analytical column. Multiple reaction monitoring in positive mode was used for analyte quantification by tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Validation studies were performed in EBC to examine accuracy, precision and robustness of the method. For each compound, the calibration curves showed a coefficient of correlation (r{sup 2}) greater than 0.992. Accuracy (%Bias) was <3% except for NMMA and H-Arg (<20%), intra- and inter-assay precision (expressed as CV%) were within {+-}20% and recovery ranged from 97.1 to 102.8% for all analytes. Inter-day variability analysis on 20 EBC of adult subjects did

  10. Modelling the risk of airborne infectious disease using exhaled air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issarow, Chacha M; Mulder, Nicola; Wood, Robin

    2015-05-07

    In this paper we develop and demonstrate a flexible mathematical model that predicts the risk of airborne infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis under steady state and non-steady state conditions by monitoring exhaled air by infectors in a confined space. In the development of this model, we used the rebreathed air accumulation rate concept to directly determine the average volume fraction of exhaled air in a given space. From a biological point of view, exhaled air by infectors contains airborne infectious particles that cause airborne infectious diseases such as tuberculosis in confined spaces. Since not all infectious particles can reach the target infection site, we took into account that the infectious particles that commence the infection are determined by respiratory deposition fraction, which is the probability of each infectious particle reaching the target infection site of the respiratory tracts and causing infection. Furthermore, we compute the quantity of carbon dioxide as a marker of exhaled air, which can be inhaled in the room with high likelihood of causing airborne infectious disease given the presence of infectors. We demonstrated mathematically and schematically the correlation between TB transmission probability and airborne infectious particle generation rate, ventilation rate, average volume fraction of exhaled air, TB prevalence and duration of exposure to infectors in a confined space. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Radon in the Exhaled Air of Patients in Radon Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettner, Herbert; Hubmer, Alexander; Hofmann, Werner; Landrichinger, Julia; Gaisberger, Martin; Winkler-Heil, Renate

    2017-11-01

    In the Gastein valley, numerous facilities use radon for the treatment of various diseases either by exposure to radon in air or in radon rich thermal water. In this study, six test persons were exposed to radon thermal water in a bathtub and the time-dependent radon activity concentration in the exhaled air was recorded. At temperatures between 38°C and 40°C, the radon activity concentration in the water was about 900 kBq/m3 in a total volume of 600 l, where the patients were exposed for 20 min, while continuously sampling the exhaled air during the bathing and 20 min thereafter. After entering the bath, the exhaled radon activity concentration rapidly increased, reaching some kind of saturation after 20 min exposure. The radon activity concentration in the exhaled air was about 8000 Bq/m3 at the maximum, with higher concentrations for male test persons. The total radon transfer from water to the exhaled air was between 480 and 1000 Bq, which is equivalent to 0.08% and 0.2% of the radon in the water. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. RADON EXHALATION FROM SOIL AND ITS DEPENDENCE FROM ENVIRONMENTAL PARAMETERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinmin; Buchsteiner, Maximilian; Salvamoser, Josef; Irlinger, Josef; Guo, Qiuju; Tschiersch, Jochen

    2017-11-01

    An automatic measuring apparatus called exhalometer for measurement of the radon exhalation rate from soil is introduced. It consists of a pneumatic driven accumulation chamber with an open bottom, a PC-based control system, six Lucas cells for radon measurement and sensors for environmental parameters. It allows moving the accumulation chamber and hereby opening or closing it. The exhalation rate is determined through the increase of radon in the accumulation chamber. For studying exhalation and the affecting factors, the exhalometer was placed at an undisturbed meadow for the entire year of 2015. The daily radon exhalation rate ranges from 2.5 to 50.7 Bq m-2 h-1 with an average of 25.3 Bq m-2 h-1. The exhalation rate shows daily and seasonal variations with its maximum in the afternoon and in spring. The dependence on several environmental parameters is discussed. The stable performance indicates the system's fitness for long-term measurements. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Exhaled air molecular profiling in relation to inflammatory subtype and activity in COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fens, N.; de Nijs, S. B.; Peters, S.; Dekker, T.; Knobel, H. H.; Vink, T. J.; Willard, N. P.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Krouwels, F. H.; Janssen, H.-G.; Lutter, R.; Sterk, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Eosinophilic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is predictive for responses to inhaled steroids. We hypothesised that the inflammatory subtype in mild and moderate COPD can be assessed by exhaled breath metabolomics. Exhaled compounds were analysed using gas chromatography

  14. 42 CFR 84.1150 - Exhalation valve leakage test; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1150 Exhalation valve leakage test; minimum requirements. (a) Dry exhalation valves...

  15. Relationships of online exhaled, offline exhaled, and ambient nitric oxide in an epidemiologic survey of schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, William S; Berhane, Kiros T; Rappaport, Edward B; Bastain, Tracy M; Avol, Edward L; Gilliland, Frank D

    2009-11-01

    Field measurements of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and ambient nitric oxide (NO) are useful to assess both respiratory health and short-term air pollution exposure. Online real-time measurement maximizes data quality and comparability with clinical studies, but offline delayed measurement may be more practical for large epidemiological studies. To facilitate cross-comparison in larger studies, we measured FeNO and concurrent ambient NO both online and offline in 362 children at 14 schools in 8 Southern California communities. Offline breath samples were collected in bags at 100 ml/s expiratory flow with deadspace discard; online FeNO was measured at 50 ml/s. Scrubbing of ambient NO from inhaled air appeared to be nearly 100% effective online, but 50-75% effective offline. Offline samples were stored at 2-8 degrees C and analyzed 2-26 h later at a central laboratory. Offline and online FeNO showed a nearly (but not completely) linear relationship (R(2)=0.90); unadjusted means (ranges) were 10 (4-94) and 15 (3-181) p.p.b., respectively. Ambient NO concentration range was 0-212 p.p.b. Offline FeNO was positively related to ambient NO (r=0.30, Ponline FeNO (r=0.09, P=0.08), indicating that ambient NO artifactually influenced offline measurements. Offline FeNO differed between schools (Ponline FeNO did not (P=0.26), suggesting artifacts related to offline bag storage and transport. Artifact effects were small in comparison with between-subject variance of FeNO. An empirical statistical model predicting individual online FeNO from offline FeNO, ambient NO, and lag time before offline analysis gave R(2)=0.94. Analyses of school or age differences yielded similar results from measured or model-predicted online FeNO. Either online or offline measurement of exhaled NO and concurrent ambient NO can be useful in field epidemiology. Influence of ambient NO on exhaled NO should be examined carefully, particularly for offline measurements.

  16. Seasonal Changes in Endotoxin Exposure and Its Relationship to Exhaled Nitric Oxide and Exhaled Breath Condensate pH Levels in Atopic and Healthy Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Gwo-Hwa; Yan, Dah-Chin; Tung, Tao-Hsin; Tang, Chin-Sheng; Liu, Chiu-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Endotoxin, a component of the cell walls of gram-negative bacteria, is a contaminant in organic dusts (house dust) and aerosols. In humans, small amounts of endotoxin may cause a local inflammatory response. Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) levels, an inflammation indicator, are associated with the pH values of exhaled breath condensate (EBC). This study evaluated seasonal changes on indoor endotoxin concentrations in homes and the relationships between endotoxin exposure and eNO/EBC pH levels for healthy children and children with allergy-related respiratory diseases. In total, 34 children with allergy-related respiratory diseases and 24 healthy children were enrolled. Indoor air quality measurements and dust sample analysis for endotoxin were conducted once each season inside 58 surveyed homes. The eNO, EBC pH levels, and pulmonary function of the children were also determined. The highest endotoxin concentrations were on kitchen floors of homes of children with allergy-related respiratory diseases and healthy children, and on bedroom floors of homes of asthmatic children and healthy children. Seasonal changes existed in endotoxin concentrations in dust samples from homes of children with allergic rhinitis, with or without asthma, and in EBC pH values among healthy children and those with allergy-related respiratory diseases. Strong relationships existed between endotoxin exposure and EBC pH values in children with allergic rhinitis.

  17. Reproducibility of exhaled nitric oxide measurements in overweight and obese adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, Willemien; de Mutsert, Renée; le Cessie, Saskia; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Middeldorp, Saskia; Rabe, Klaus F.

    2014-01-01

    Exhaled nitric oxide is a noninvasive measure of airway inflammation that can be detected by a handheld device. Obesity may influence the reproducibility of exhaled nitric oxide measurements, by - for instance - decreased expiratory reserve volume. We analyzed triple exhaled nitric oxide

  18. Ethane and n-pentane in exhaled breath are biomarkers of exposure not effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorham, Katrine A; Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbæk; Meinardi, Simone

    2009-01-01

    The relationship of exhaled ethane and n-pentane to exhaled NO, carbonylated proteins, and indoor/outdoor atmospheric pollutants were examined in order to evaluate ethane and n-pentane as potential markers of airway inflammation and/or oxidative stress. Exhaled NO and carbonylated proteins were f...

  19. Spirometry filters can be used to detect exhaled respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Alicia B; Mourad, Bassel; Tovey, Euan; Buddle, Lachlan; Peters, Matthew; Morgan, Lucy; Oliver, Brian G

    2016-09-26

    Respiratory viruses are very common in the community and contribute to the burden of illness for patients with chronic respiratory diseases, including acute exacerbations. Traditional sampling methods are invasive and problematic to repeat. Accordingly, we explored whether respiratory viruses could be isolated from disposable spirometry filters and whether detection of viruses in this context represented presence in the upper or lower respiratory tract. Discovery (n  =  53) and validation (n  =  49) cohorts were recruited from a hospital outpatient department during two different time periods. Spirometry mouthpiece filters were collected from all participants. Respiratory secretions were sampled from the upper and lower respiratory tract by nasal washing (NW), sputum, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). All samples were examined using RT-PCR to identify a panel of respiratory viruses (rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A, influenza B, parainfluenza virus 1, 2 & 3, and human metapneumovirus). Rhinovirus was quantified using qPCR. Paired filter-NW samples (n  =  29), filter-sputum samples (n  =  24), filter-BAL samples (n  =  39) and filter-NW-BAL samples (n  =  10) provided a range of comparisons. At least one virus was detected in any sample in 85% of participants in the discovery cohort versus 45% in the validation cohort. Overall, 72% of viruses identified in the paired comparator method matched those detected in spirometry filters. There was a high correlation between viruses identified in spirometry filters compared with viruses identified in both the upper and lower respiratory tract using traditional sampling methods. Our results suggest that examination of spirometry filters may be a novel and inexpensive sampling method for the presence of respiratory viruses in exhaled breath.

  20. Buffering airway acid decreases exhaled nitric oxide in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Benjamin; Kelly, Robin; Urban, Peter; Liu, Lei; Henderson, Edward M; Doctor, Allan; Teague, W Gerald; Fitzpatrick, Anne; Erzurum, Serpil; Hunt, John F

    2006-10-01

    The human airway is believed to be acidified in asthma. In an acidic environment nitrite is converted to nitric oxide (NO). We hypothesized that buffering airway lining fluid acid would decrease the fraction of exhaled NO (F(ENO)). We treated 28 adult nonsmoking subjects (9 healthy control subjects, 11 subjects with mild intermittent asthma, and 8 subjects with persistent asthma) with 3 mL of 10 mmol/L phosphate buffered saline (PBS) through a nebulizer and then serially measured F(ENO) levels. Six subjects also received PBS mouthwash alone. F(ENO) levels decreased after buffer inhalation. The maximal decrease occurred between 15 and 30 minutes after treatment; F(ENO) levels returned to pretreatment levels by 60 minutes. The decrease was greatest in subjects with persistent asthma (-7.1 +/- 1.0 ppb); this was more than in those with either mild asthma (-2.9 +/- 0.3 ppb) or healthy control subjects (-1.7 +/- 0.3 ppb, P mouthwash. Neutralizing airway acid decreases F(ENO) levels. The magnitude of this change is greatest in persistent asthma. These data suggest that airway pH is a determinant of F(ENO) levels downstream from NO synthase activation. Airway biochemistry modulates F(ENO) levels. For example, nitrite is converted to NO in the airway, particularly the inflamed airway, by means of acid-based chemistry. Thus airway pH should be considered in interpreting clinical F(ENO) values. In fact, PBS challenge testing integrates airway pH and F(ENO) analysis, potentially improving the utility of F(ENO) as a noninvasive test for the type and severity of asthmatic airway inflammation.

  1. Measurement of radon exhalation rate in various building materials ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and clay in varying proportions. 3. Materials and methods. For the measurement of radon exhalation rate in the soil and building material samples, Closed Can. Technique has been used. The soil samples are col- lected in clean, dry polyethylene bags from dif- ferent locations of Una and Hamirpur districts of. Himachal ...

  2. Radon exhalation studies in building materials using solid-state ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Building materials constitute the second most important source of radon in dwellings. The common building materials used in the construction of dwellings are studied for radon exhalation rate. The 'Can' technique using LR-115 type-II solid-state nuclear track detector has been used for these measurements. The radon ...

  3. Radon exhalation rates from some soil samples of Kharar, Punjab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Vimal [Deptt of Physics, M. M. University, Mullana (Ambala)-133 207 (India); Deptt of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala- 147 001 (India); Singh, Tejinder Pal, E-mail: tejinders03@gmail.com [Deptt of Physics, S.A. Jain (P.G.) College, Ambala City- 134 003 (India); Chauhan, R. P. [Deptt of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Kurukshetra- 136 119 (India); Mudahar, G. S. [Deptt of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala- 147 001 (India)

    2015-08-28

    Radon and its progeny are major contributors in the radiation dose received by general population of the world. Because radon is a noble gas, a large portion of it is free to migrate away from radium. The primary sources of radon in the houses are soils and rocks source emanations, emanation from building materials, and entry of radon into a structure from outdoor air. Keeping this in mind the study of radon exhalation rate from some soil samples of the Kharar, Punjab has been carried out using Can Technique. The equilibrium radon concentration in various soil samples of Kharar area of district Mohali varied from 12.7 Bqm{sup −3} to 82.9 Bqm{sup −3} with an average of 37.5 ± 27.0 Bqm{sup −3}. The radon mass exhalation rates from the soil samples varied from 0.45 to 2.9 mBq/kg/h with an average of 1.4 ± 0.9 mBq/kg/h and radon surface exhalation rates varied from 10.4 to 67.2 mBq/m{sup 2}/h with an average of 30.6 ± 21.8 mBq/m{sup 2}/h. The radon mass and surface exhalation rates of the soil samples of Kharar, Punjab were lower than that of the world wide average.

  4. A hydrogen peroxide sensor for exhaled breath measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, T.V.A.; Olthuis, Wouter; Bergveld, Piet

    2005-01-01

    An increase in hydrogen peroxide concentration in exhaled breath (EB) of patients, who suffer from some diseases related to the lung function, has been observed and considered as a reliable indicator of lung diseases. In the EB of these patients, hydrogen peroxide is present in the vapour phase

  5. A hydrogen peroxide sensor for exhaled breath measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, T.V.A.; Olthuis, Wouter; Bergveld, Piet; van den Berg, Albert

    2004-01-01

    An increase in produced hydrogen peroxide concentration in exhaled breath (EB) of patients, who suffer from some diseases related to lung function, has been observed and considered as a reliable indicator of lung diseases. In the EB of these patients, hydrogen peroxide is present in the vapour phase

  6. Methodological aspects of exhaled nitric oxide measurements in infants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabriele, C.; Wiel, E.C. van der; Nieuwhof, E.M.; Moll, H.A.; Merkus, P.J.F.M.; Jongste, J.C. de

    2007-01-01

    Guidelines for the measurement of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FE(NO)) recommend refraining from lung function tests (LFT) and certain foods and beverages before performing FE(NO) measurements, as they may lead to transiently altered FE(NO) levels. Little is known of such factors in infants. The

  7. Evaluation of oxidative stress using exhaled breath 8-isoprostane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There have been limited numbers of studies on patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to determine oxidative stress in exhaled breath condensate (EBC). Those two studies have been carried out on hemodialysis patients, and hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide have been studied in order to show ...

  8. Measurement of radon exhalation rate in various building materials ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indoor radon is considered as one of the potential dangerous radioactive elements. Common building materials and soil are the major source of this radon gas in the indoor environment. In the present study, the measurement of radon exhalation rate in the soil and building material samples of Una and Hamirpurdistricts of ...

  9. Toward a hydrogen peroxide sensor for exhaled breath analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiedemair, Justyna; van Dorp, Henriëtte; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert

    2011-01-01

    In this contribution a chip-integrated amperometric sensor for the detection of H2O2 in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is reported. The electrode chip is characterized, and detection of H2O2 in an aqueous phase is shown by means of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometry. Variation of conditions

  10. Glucose prediction by analysis of exhaled metabolites - a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leopold, Jan Hendrik; van Hooijdonk, Roosmarijn T. M.; Sterk, Peter J.; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Schultz, Marcus J.; Bos, Lieuwe D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In critically ill patients, glucose control with insulin mandates time-and blood-consuming glucose monitoring. Blood glucose level fluctuations are accompanied by metabolomic changes that alter the composition of volatile organic compounds (VOC), which are detectable in exhaled breath.

  11. Leukotrienes in Exhaled Breath Condensate and Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide in Workers Exposed to TiO2 Nanoparticles.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pelclová, D.; Ždímal, Vladimír; Kačer, P.; Felclová, Z.; Vlčková, Š.; Komarc, M.; Navrátil, Tomáš; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Zíková, Naděžda; Makeš, Otakar; Syslová, K.; Běláček, J.; Zakharov, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 3 (2016), s. 036004 ISSN 1752-7155 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : nanoparticles * TiO2 * exhaled breath condensate Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry; CG - Electrochemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 4.318, year: 2016

  12. Oral or nasal breathing? Real-time effects of switching sampling route onto exhaled VOC concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukul, Pritam; Oertel, Peter; Kamysek, Svend; Trefz, Phillip

    2017-03-21

    There is a need for standardisation in sampling and analysis of breath volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in order to minimise ubiquitous confounding effects. Physiological factors may mask concentration changes induced by pathophysiological effects. In humans, unconscious switching of oral and nasal breathing can occur during breath sampling, which may affect VOC patterns. Here, we investigated exhaled VOC concentrations in real-time while switching breathing routes. Breath from 15 healthy volunteers was analysed continuously by proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry during paced breathing (12 breaths min -1 ). Every two minutes breathing routes were switched (Setup-1: Oral → Nasal → Oral → Nasal; Setup-2: Oral in Nasal out  → Nasal in Oral out  → Oral in Nasal out  → Nasal in Oral out ). VOCs in inspiratory and alveolar air and respiratory and hemodynamic parameters were monitored quantitatively in parallel. Changing of the breathing routes and patterns immediately affected exhaled VOC concentrations. These changes were reproducible in both setups. In setup-1 cardiac output and acetone concentrations remained constant, while partial pressure of end-tidal CO 2 (pET-CO 2 ), isoprene and furan concentrations inversely mirrored tidal-volume and minute-ventilation. H 2 S (hydrogen-sulphide), C 4 H 8 S (allyl-methyl-sulphide), C 3 H 8 O (isopropanol) and C 3 H 6 O 2 increased during oral exhalation. C 4 H 10 S increased during nasal exhalations. CH 2 O 2 steadily decreased during the whole measurement. In setup-2 pET-CO 2 , C 2 H 6 S (dimethyl-sulphide), isopropanol, limonene and benzene concentrations decreased whereas, minute-ventilation, H 2 S and acetonitrile increased. Isoprene and furan remained unchanged. Breathing route and patterns induced VOC concentration changes depended on respiratory parameters, oral and nasal cavity exposure and physico-chemical characters of the compounds. Before using breath VOC concentrations

  13. Radon exhalation in some building construction materials and effect of plastering and paints on the radon exhalation rate using fired bricks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Anil; Mahur, A.K.; Rajendra Prasad; Sonkawade, R.G.; Sharma, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    The technological endeavors of human beings have modified the levels of radiation exposure slightly. The emanation of radon is primarily associated with radium and its ultimate precursor uranium. The radiation dose received by human beings from indoor radon and its progeny is the largest of all doses received either by natural or man-made sources. In order to investigate the effect of paints available in the market on the radon exhalation rate from building materials, several bricks were collected. These bricks were plastered with a mixture of cement and sand. Before measurements bricks were dried for 24 hours. These plastered bricks were then coated with white wash and again dried for 1- 2 hours. After drying the bricks were coated with different brands and colors of paints. Radon exhalation rates measurements were carried out for these painted bricks using 'Sealed can Technique' cylindrical plastic 'Can' of 7.5 cm height and 7.0 cm diameter was sealed to the individual samples by plastic can. In each 'Can' a LR-115 type II plastic detector (2 cm 2cm) was fixed at the top inside of the 'Can', such that the sensitive surface of the detector faces the material and is freely exposed to the emergent radon. Radon decays in the volume of the can record the alpha particles resulting from the 218 Po and 214 Po deposited on the inner wall of the 'Can'. Radon and its daughters will reach an equilibrium in concentration after one week or more. Hence the equilibrium activity of the emergent radon can be obtained from the geometry of the can and the time of exposure. The results will be discussed. (author)

  14. Comparison of metabolites in exhaled breath and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples in a mouse model of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Stephanie; Seifert, Luzia; Vautz, Wolfgang; Nolte, Jürgen; Bufe, Albrecht; Peters, Marcus

    2011-10-01

    A multi-capillary column ion mobility spectrometer (MCC/IMS) was developed to provide a method for the noninvasive diagnosis of lung diseases. The possibility of measuring the exhaled breath of mice was evaluated previously. The aim of the present study was to reveal whether mice affected by airway inflammation can be identified via MCC/IMS. Ten mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin to induce allergic airway inflammation. The breath and volatile compounds of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured by MCC/IMS. Furthermore, histamine, nitric oxide, and arachidonic acid were determined as inflammatory markers in vitro. Six volatile molecules were found in the BALF headspace at a significantly higher concentration in mice with airway inflammation compared with healthy animals. The concentration of substances correlated with the numbers of infiltrating eosinophilic granulocytes. However, substances showing a significantly different concentration in the BALF headspace were not found to be different in exhaled breath. Histamine and nitric oxide were identified by MCC/IMS in vitro but not in the BALF headspace or exhaled breath. Airway inflammation in mice is detectable by the analysis of the BALF headspace via MCC/IMS. Molecules detected in the BALF headspace of asthmatic mice at a higher concentration than in healthy animals may originate from oxidative stress induced by airway inflammation. As already described for humans, we found no correlation between the biomarker concentration in the BALF and the breath of mice. We suggest using the model described here to gain deeper insights into this discrepancy.

  15. Exhaled acetone as a new biomaker of heart failure severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcondes-Braga, Fabiana G; Gutz, Ivano G R; Batista, Guilherme L; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Ayub-Ferreira, Silvia M; Issa, Victor S; Mangini, Sandrigo; Bocchi, Edimar A; Bacal, Fernando

    2012-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with poor prognosis, and the identification of biomarkers of its severity could help in its treatment. In a pilot study, we observed high levels of acetone in the exhaled breath of patients with HF. The present study was designed to evaluate exhaled acetone as a biomarker of HF diagnosis and HF severity. Of 235 patients with systolic dysfunction evaluated between May 2009 and September 2010, 89 patients (HF group) fulfilled inclusion criteria and were compared with sex- and age-matched healthy subjects (control group, n = 20). Patients with HF were grouped according to clinical stability (acute decompensated HF [ADHF], n = 59; chronic HF, n = 30) and submitted to exhaled breath collection. Identification of chemical species was done by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and quantification by spectrophotometry. Patients with diabetes were excluded. The concentration of exhaled breath acetone (EBA) was higher in the HF group (median, 3.7 μg/L; interquartile range [IQR], 1.69-10.45 μg/L) than in the control group (median, 0.39 μg/L; IQR, 0.30-0.79 μg/L; P HF group (median, 1.22 μg/L; IQR, 0.68-2.19 μg/L; P HF and ADHF were about 85%, a value similar to that obtained with B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP). EBA levels differed significantly as a function of severity of HF (New York Heart Association classification, P HF with an accuracy equivalent to BNP but also a new biomarker of HF severity.

  16. A hydrogen peroxide sensor for exhaled breath measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Dam, T.V.A.; Olthuis, Wouter; Bergveld, Piet; van den Berg, Albert

    2004-01-01

    An increase in produced hydrogen peroxide concentration in exhaled breath (EB) of patients, who suffer from some diseases related to lung function, has been observed and considered as a reliable indicator of lung diseases. In the EB of these patients, hydrogen peroxide is present in the vapour phase together with water, thus one of the approaches of monitoring hydrogen peroxide in the EB is to condense it and then to perform the hydrogen peroxide measurement in the condensate. Earlier, a hydr...

  17. Optimization of sampling parameters for standardized exhaled breath sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Sophie; Romano, Andrea; Hanna, George B

    2017-09-05

    The lack of standardization of breath sampling is a major contributing factor to the poor repeatability of results and hence represents a barrier to the adoption of breath tests in clinical practice. On-line and bag breath sampling have advantages but do not suit multicentre clinical studies whereas storage and robust transport are essential for the conduct of wide-scale studies. Several devices have been developed to control sampling parameters and to concentrate volatile organic compounds (VOCs) onto thermal desorption (TD) tubes and subsequently transport those tubes for laboratory analysis. We conducted three experiments to investigate (i) the fraction of breath sampled (whole vs. lower expiratory exhaled breath); (ii) breath sample volume (125, 250, 500 and 1000ml) and (iii) breath sample flow rate (400, 200, 100 and 50 ml/min). The target VOCs were acetone and potential volatile biomarkers for oesophago-gastric cancer belonging to the aldehyde, fatty acids and phenol chemical classes. We also examined the collection execution time and the impact of environmental contamination. The experiments showed that the use of exhaled breath-sampling devices requires the selection of optimum sampling parameters. The increase in sample volume has improved the levels of VOCs detected. However, the influence of the fraction of exhaled breath and the flow rate depends on the target VOCs measured. The concentration of potential volatile biomarkers for oesophago-gastric cancer was not significantly different between the whole and lower airway exhaled breath. While the recovery of phenols and acetone from TD tubes was lower when breath sampling was performed at a higher flow rate, other VOCs were not affected. A dedicated 'clean air supply' overcomes the contamination from ambient air, but the breath collection device itself can be a source of contaminants. In clinical studies using VOCs to diagnose gastro-oesophageal cancer, the optimum parameters are 500mls sample volume

  18. Hydrogen cyanide in the headspace of oral fluid and in mouth-exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W; Metsälä, M; Vaittinen, O; Halonen, L

    2014-06-01

    Mouth-exhaled hydrogen cyanide (HCN) concentrations have previously been reported to originate from the oral cavity. However, a direct correlation between the HCN concentration in oral fluid and in mouth-exhaled breath has not been explicitly shown. In this study, we set up a new methodology to simultaneously measure HCN in the headspace of oral fluid and in mouth-exhaled breath. Our results show that there is a statistically significant correlation between stimulated oral fluid HCN and mouth-exhaled HCN (rs = 0.76, p oral fluid is the main contributor to mouth-exhaled HCN. Furthermore, we observe that after the application of an oral disinfectant, both the stimulated oral fluid and mouth-exhaled HCN concentrations decrease. This implies that HCN production in the oral cavity is related to the bacterial and/or enzymatic activity.

  19. Exhaled nitric oxide in children after accidental exposure to chlorine gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasemann, Hartmut; Tschiedel, Eva; Groch, Manuela; Klepper, Jörg; Ratjen, Felix

    2007-08-01

    Chronic exposure to chlorine gas has been shown to cause occupational asthma. Acute inhalation of chlorine is known to cause airway inflammation and induce airway nitric oxide formation. Exhaled nitric oxide may therefore be a marker of airway damage after chlorine gas exposure. After accidental chlorine gas exposure in a swimming pool, exhaled nitric oxide and pulmonary function were repeatedly measured in 18 children over a 1-mo period. Symptomatic children with impaired pulmonary function had higher nitric oxide levels on the day after the exposure compared to day 8 and day 28. Differences in exhaled nitric oxide were more pronounced at a higher exhalation flow compared to lower flow, suggesting peripheral rather than central airway damage. This was in accordance with the observed changes in pulmonary function. No changes in exhaled nitric oxide were seen in asymptomatic children. These data suggest that acute chlorine gas exposure results in a mild increase of exhaled nitric oxide in symptomatic children.

  20. Frequency content of forced exhalations of normal rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauderly, J.L.; Seiler, F.A.

    1986-03-01

    The frequency content of the flow-time relationship during forced exhalation determines the equipment response characteristics required for measurements of small animals. Flow-time data were collected by flow plethysmography at 1 msec intervals during single forced exhalations of 22 male and 22 female 14 wk old, healthy, anesthetized F344/N rats. Lungs of apneic rats were inflated to 30 cm H/sub 2/O transpulmonary pressure and deflated at -50 cm H/sub 2/O airway pressure. Similar data were collected from the testing system without a rat. Amplitudes and phases at 4 Hz intervals from 4 to 96 Hz Hz were calculated by LaPlace transform. Amplitudes were related to lung volume. Cumulative percentages of the total amplitude to 96 Hz were similar for males and females at each frequency. Of the total cumulative amplitude to 96 Hz, 50%, 95%, and 99% was contributed by frequencies lower than 12, 52, and 76 HZ, respectively. Amplitudes of rats exceeded those of the system alone between 20 and 40 Hz, due to lung elastic recoil. Thus, systems capable of measuring events of frequencies up to 50 Hz should be adequate for evaluating forced exhalations of rats.

  1. Influence of vegetation on radon exhalation rate on forests areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandija, F.; Rakaj, M.

    2012-04-01

    External radiation, radiation from radioactive materials on the ground and radon are the principal factors on atmospheric ion production on the lower part of the troposphere. While the first factor is quite constant over the time, the two others vary with the time and are closely related to meteorological conditions. Atmospheric ions in turn participate by ion induced nucleation on new particle formation processes, and so contributing on the balance of planetary radiation budged. Thus the radon concentrations are related to several atmospheric problems in local and global scales. In this paper we are focused on the illustration of the influence of vegetation on radon exhalation rate through uptake and transpiration of groundwater. Despite of direct radon exhalation from the ground, this is a secondary pathway of radon exhalation. Measurements of radon concentrations were carried out over two distinct sites; bared or grasslands and forests. In this paper investigated forests are composed by pine trees. Both these measurement sites there are located near Adriatic seashore, in Velipoja. Experimental measurement procedure was carried out under fair weather conditions. The evidence of these facts gives a better knowledge also on atmospheric problems under the influence of vegetation. This work can be followed by additional investigations on the forests composed by different trees and also different soil types.

  2. Exhaled nitric oxide in diagnosis and management of respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abba, Abdullah A

    2009-10-01

    The analysis of biomarkers in exhaled breath constituents has recently become of great interest in the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of many respiratory conditions. Of particular interest is the measurement of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) in breath. Its measurement is noninvasive, easy and reproducible. The technique has recently been standardized by both American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society. The availability of cheap, portable and reliable equipment has made the assay possible in clinics by general physicians and, in the near future, at home by patients. The concentration of exhaled nitric oxide is markedly elevated in bronchial asthma and is positively related to the degree of esinophilic inflammation. Its measurement can be used in the diagnosis of bronchial asthma and titration of dose of steroids as well as to identify steroid responsive patients in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In primary ciliary dyskinesia, nasal NO is diagnostically low and of considerable value in diagnosis. Among lung transplant recipients, FENO can be of great value in the early detection of infection, bronchioloitis obliterans syndrome and rejection. This review discusses the biology, factors affecting measurement, and clinical application of FENO in the diagnosis and management of respiratory diseases.

  3. Exhaled nitric oxide in diagnosis and management of respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abba Abdullah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of biomarkers in exhaled breath constituents has recently become of great interest in the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of many respiratory conditions. Of particular interest is the measurement of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO in breath. Its measurement is noninvasive, easy and reproducible. The technique has recently been standardized by both American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society. The availability of cheap, portable and reliable equipment has made the assay possible in clinics by general physicians and, in the near future, at home by patients. The concentration of exhaled nitric oxide is markedly elevated in bronchial asthma and is positively related to the degree of esinophilic inflammation. Its measurement can be used in the diagnosis of bronchial asthma and titration of dose of steroids as well as to identify steroid responsive patients in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In primary ciliary dyskinesia, nasal NO is diagnostically low and of considerable value in diagnosis. Among lung transplant recipients, FENO can be of great value in the early detection of infection, bronchioloitis obliterans syndrome and rejection. This review discusses the biology, factors affecting measurement, and clinical application of FENO in the diagnosis and management of respiratory diseases.

  4. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide-measuring devices: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maniscalco M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mauro Maniscalco,1 Carolina Vitale,2 Alessandro Vatrella,2 Antonio Molino,3 Andrea Bianco,4 Gennaro Mazzarella4 1Unit of Respiratory Diseases, Hospital “S Maria della Pietà” of Casoria, Naples, 2Unit of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, Salerno, 3Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Federico II, 4Department of Cardiothoracic and Respiratory Sciences, Second, University of Naples, Naples, Italy Abstract: The measurement of exhaled nitric oxide (NO has been employed in the diagnosis of specific types of airway inflammation, guiding treatment monitoring by predicting and assessing response to anti-inflammatory therapy and monitoring for compliance and detecting relapse. Various techniques are currently used to analyze exhaled NO concentrations under a range of conditions for both health and disease. These include chemiluminescence and electrochemical sensor devices. The cost effectiveness and ability to achieve adequate flexibility in sensitivity and selectivity of NO measurement for these methods are evaluated alongside the potential for use of laser-based technology. This review explores the technologies involved in the measurement of exhaled NO. Keywords: asthma, inflammation, nasal nitric oxide

  5. Exhaled methane concentration profiles during exercise on an ergometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, A; Ruzsanyi, V; Unterkofler, K; Mohácsi, Á; Tuboly, E; Boros, M; Szabó, G; Hinterhuber, H; Amann, A

    2016-01-01

    Exhaled methane concentration measurements are extensively used in medical investigation of certain gastrointestinal conditions. However, the dynamics of endogenous methane release is largely unknown. Breath methane profiles during ergometer tests were measured by means of a photoacoustic spectroscopy based sensor. Five methane-producing volunteers (with exhaled methane level being at least 1 ppm higher than room air) were measured. The experimental protocol consisted of 5 min rest—15 min pedalling (at a workload of 75 W)—5 min rest. In addition, hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were determined and compared to the estimated alveolar methane concentration. The alveolar breath methane level decreased considerably, by a factor of 3–4 within 1.5 min, while the estimated ventilation-perfusion ratio increased by a factor of 2–3. Mean pre-exercise and exercise methane concentrations were 11.4 ppm (SD:7.3) and 2.8 ppm (SD:1.9), respectively. The changes can be described by the high sensitivity of exhaled methane to ventilationperfusion ratio and are in line with the Farhi equation. PMID:25749807

  6. 13CO2/12CO2 isotope ratio analysis in human breath using a 2 μm diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingguo; Cao, Zhensong; Liu, Kun; Wang, Guishi; Tan, Tu; Gao, Xiaoming; Chen, Weidong; Yinbo, Huang; Ruizhong, Rao

    2015-04-01

    The bacterium H. pylori is believed to cause peptic ulcer. H. pylori infection in the human stomach can be diagnosed through a CO2 isotope ratio measure in exhaled breath. A laser spectrometer based on a distributed-feedback semiconductor diode laser at 2 μm is developed to measure the changes of 13CO2/12CO2 isotope ratio in exhaled breath sample with the CO2 concentration of ~4%. It is characterized by a simplified optical layout, in which a single detector and associated electronics are used to probe CO2 spectrum. A new type multi-passes cell with 12 cm long base length , 29 m optical path length in total and 280 cm3 volume is used in this work. The temperature and pressure are well controlled at 301.15 K and 6.66 kPa with fluctuation amplitude of 25 mK and 6.7 Pa, respectively. The best 13δ precision of 0.06o was achieved by using wavelet denoising and Kalman filter. The application of denoising and Kalman filter not only improved the signal to noise ratio, but also shorten the system response time.

  7. Investigation of Exhaled Breath Samples from Patients with Alzheimer's Disease Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and an Exhaled Breath Sensor System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Hui-Chong; Yu, Joon-Boo; Lee, Ho-Won; Huh, Jeung-Soo; Lim, Jeong-Ok

    2017-08-03

    Exhaled breath is a body secretion, and the sampling process of this is simple and cost effective. It can be non-invasively collected for diagnostic procedures. Variations in the chemical composition of exhaled breath resulting from gaseous exchange in the extensive capillary network of the body are proposed to be associated with pathophysiological changes. In light of the foreseeable potential of exhaled breath as a diagnostic specimen, we used gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to study the chemical compounds present in exhaled breath samples from patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and from healthy individuals as a control group. In addition, we also designed and developed a chemical-based exhaled breath sensor system to examine the distribution pattern in the patient and control groups. The results of our study showed that several chemical compounds, such as 1-phenantherol and ethyl 3-cyano-2,3-bis (2,5,-dimethyl-3-thienyl)-acrylate, had a higher percentage area in the AD group than in the PD and control groups. These results may indicate an association of these chemical components in exhaled breath with the progression of disease. In addition, in-house fabricated exhaled breath sensor systems, containing several types of gas sensors, showed significant differences in terms of the normalized response of the sensitivity characteristics between the patient and control groups. A subsequent clustering analysis was able to distinguish between the AD patients, PD patients, and healthy individuals using principal component analysis, Sammon's mapping, and a combination of both methods, in particular when using the exhaled breath sensor array system A consisting of eight sensors. With this in mind, the exhaled breath sensor system could provide alternative option for diagnosis and be applied as a useful, effective tool for the screening and diagnosis of AD in the near future.

  8. Off-line sampling of exhaled air for nitric oxide measurement in children: methodological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Q. Jobsis (Quirijn); S.L. Schellekens; A. Kroesbergen; W.C.J. Hop (Wim); J.C. de Jongste (Johan)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractMeasurement of nitric oxide in exhaled air is a noninvasive method to assess airway inflammation in asthma. This study was undertaken to establish the reference range of exhaled NO in healthy school-aged children and to determine the influence of ambient NO, noseclip

  9. Exhaled nitric oxide in healthy young children during tidal breathing through a facemask

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniel, Peter F; Klug, Bent; Valerius, Niels H

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish reference values and to examine day-to-day and within-day variations of exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) during tidal breathing in healthy children using a newly described method. Exhaled NO was measured on-line and off-line during tidal breathing through a facemask...... tidal breathing in young children....

  10. Interlaboratory comparison of three methods for the determination of the radon exhalation rate of building materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, P; van Dijk, W.; de Vries, W; van der Graaf, ER; Roelofs, LMM

    In this study three methods for the determination of the radon (Rn-222) exhalation rate of building materials are compared. All three are so-called purge-and-trap methods in which the sample is enclosed in a container from which the exhaled radon is continuously purged by a constant flow of nitrogen

  11. Exhaled particles as markers of small airway inflammation in subjects with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Per; Lärstad, Mona; Bake, Björn; Hammar, Oscar; Bredberg, Anna; Almstrand, Ann-Charlotte; Mirgorodskaya, Ekaterina; Olin, Anna-Carin

    2017-09-01

    Exhaled breath contains suspended particles of respiratory tract lining fluid from the small airways. The particles are formed when closed airways open during inhalation. We have developed a method called Particles in Exhaled air (PExA ® ) to measure and sample these particles in the exhaled aerosol. Here, we use the PExA ® method to study the effects of birch pollen exposure on the small airways of individuals with asthma and birch pollen allergy. We hypothesized that birch pollen-induced inflammation could change the concentrations of surfactant protein A and albumin in the respiratory tract lining fluid of the small airways and influence the amount of exhaled particles. The amount of exhaled particles was reduced after birch pollen exposure in subjects with asthma and birch pollen allergy, but no significant effect on the concentrations of surfactant protein A and albumin in exhaled particles was found. The reduction in the number of exhaled particles may be due to inflammation in the small airways, which would reduce their diameter and potentially reduce the number of small airways that open and close during inhalation and exhalation. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Transmission of exhaled air between occupants in rooms with personalized and underfloor ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cermak, Radim; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2004-01-01

    The exposure of occupants to exhaled air was examined at two different mixing zone heights of underfloor ventilation combined with two types of personalized ventilation by means of full-scale experiments. It is assumed that the air exhaled by people is one way of transmitting respiratory diseases...

  13. 42 CFR 84.1137 - Inhalation and exhalation valves; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1137 Inhalation and exhalation valves; minimum requirements. (a... designed and constructed and provided where necessary to prevent excessive exhaled air from adversely...

  14. Change of Exhaled Acetone Concentration in a Diabetic Patient with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokokawa, Tetsuro; Ichijo, Yasuhiro; Houtsuki, Yu; Matsumoto, Yoshiyuki; Oikawa, Masayoshi; Yoshihisa, Akiomi; Sugimoto, Koichi; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Shu-Ichi; Shimouchi, Akito; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2017-10-21

    In heart failure patients, exhaled acetone concentration, a noninvasive biomarker, is increased according to heart failure severity. Moreover, exhaled acetone concentration is also known to be affected by diabetes mellitus. However, there have been no reports on exhaled acetone concentration in heart failure patients with diabetes mellitus. A 77-year old man was admitted to our hospital with acute decompensated heart failure and atrioventricular block. He had controlled diabetes mellitus under insulin treatment with hemoglobin A1c of 6.5%. He underwent treatment of diuretics and permanent pacemaker implantation. His condition improved and he was discharged at Day 12. Due to the heart failure improvement, his levels of exhaled acetone concentration decreased from 1.623 ppm at admission to 0.664 ppm at discharge. This is the first report to reveal a change of exhaled acetone concentration in a diabetic patient with acute decompensated heart failure.

  15. Personal factors affecting thoron exhalation from occupationally acquired thorium body burdens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stebbings, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Thorium workers with thorium body burdens (primarily thoracic) above 0.7 nCi 224 Ra equivalent are shown to exhale about 15% of thoron produced in vivo, compared to 5% exhaled by subjects with body burdens in the range of 0.4 to 0.7 nCi 224 Ra. There was a false negative correlation between average adult daily cigarettes smoked and thoron exhalation. White blood cell counts that were about 85% of expected were observed in seven subjects exhaling greater than or equal to 100 pCi of thoron above predicted; no other variable examined showed a clear pattern of association. These differences in fractional thoron exhalation, and their consequences, are discussed. 3 references, 4 figures, 8 tables

  16. Study of effect of addition of fly ash on radon exhalation rate in cement samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj Kumari; Kant, Krishan; Garg, Maneesha

    2013-01-01

    Most of the building materials like cement and fly ash contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). Increased interest in measuring radon exhalation rate in building products is due to the concern about health hazards of NORM. This paper focuses on studying the effect of addition of fly ash on radon exhalation rate in cement samples. Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and coal fly ash were used for finding the exhalation rate of cement in this paper. To study the effect on exhalation rate of cement, fly ash is added in different proportions to cement samples. The measurement was conducted by CAN Technique using SSNTDs. A gradual increase has been observed in radon exhalation rate up to certain proportion and then start to decrease. (author)

  17. Measurement of the radon exhalation rate from the medium surface by tracing the radon concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanliang Tan; Detao Xiao

    2013-01-01

    The paper will present a method based on the accumulation chamber technique for measuring of radon exhalation from the medium surface. A radon monitor traces the change of radon concentration in the accumulation chamber, and then the radon exhalation can be obtained accurately through linear fit. Based on our recent experiments, the radon exhalation rate from the medium surface obtained from this method is in good agreement with the actual exhalation rate of our simulation facility. This method is superior to the competition method which obtains the radon exhalation through the exponential fit by an external PC-system. The calculation for the exponential fit is very easy by computer and related software. However, for portable instruments, the single chip microcomputer can't calculate the exponential fit rapidly. Thus, this method is usable for developing the new portable instrument to classify building materials, etc. (author)

  18. Determination of volatile organic compounds exhaled by cell lines derived from hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hongxia; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Lulu; Wu, Zhonghui; Hou, Xiaofang; Xia, Hailong

    2017-06-30

    Background : The gas human exhaled contains many volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which is related to the health status of body. Analysis of VOCs has been proposed as a noninvasive diagnostic tool for certain cancers. Detailed research on the VOCs in gas exhaled by cell can characterize cell type specific metabolites and may be helpful to detect the cancer markers in clinical practice.Methods : Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to detect VOCs in the headspace of tissue culture flask in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) cell line JEKO and acute mononuclear leukemia cell line SHI-1, to elaborate the characteristic gaseous biomarkers of hematological malignancies. While macrophage cells and lymphocytic cells were acted as control. The blank group was only the RPMI 1640 medium containing 10% fetal calf serum that without cells.Results : Comparing with control group, the concentration of dimethyl sulfide, 2,4-dimethylheptane, methylbenzene, o -xylene, dodecane, and 1,3-di-tert-butylbenzene in JEKO cells was relatively higher, while the concentration of ethanol, hexanal, and benzaldehyde was lower. In SHI-1 cells, the levels of 2,4-dimethylheptane, benzene, 4-methyldecane, chloroform, 3,7-dimethyl dodecane, and hexadecane were significantly elevated, but the levels of hexanol and cyclohexanol were distinctly reduced. This pilot study revealed that the malignant hematological cells could change the components of VOCs in the cell culture flask in a cell type-specific pattern. The traits of VOCs in our setting offered new strategy for hematological malignancies tracing, and would act as potential biomarkers in diagnosis of malignant hematological diseases. © 2017 The Author(s).

  19. Elevated carbon monoxide in the exhaled breath of mice during a systemic bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan G Barbour

    Full Text Available Blood is the specimen of choice for most laboratory tests for diagnosis and disease monitoring. Sampling exhaled breath is a noninvasive alternative to phlebotomy and has the potential for real-time monitoring at the bedside. Improved instrumentation has advanced breath analysis for several gaseous compounds from humans. However, application to small animal models of diseases and physiology has been limited. To extend breath analysis to mice, we crafted a means for collecting nose-only breath samples from groups and individual animals who were awake. Samples were subjected to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry procedures developed for highly sensitive analysis of trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs in the atmosphere. We evaluated the system with experimental systemic infections of severe combined immunodeficiency Mus musculus with the bacterium Borrelia hermsii. Infected mice developed bacterial densities of ∼10(7 per ml of blood by day 4 or 5 and in comparison to uninfected controls had hepatosplenomegaly and elevations of both inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. While 12 samples from individual infected mice on days 4 and 5 and 6 samples from uninfected mice did not significantly differ for 72 different VOCs, carbon monoxide (CO was elevated in samples from infected mice, with a mean (95% confidence limits effect size of 4.2 (2.8-5.6, when differences in CO2 in the breath were taken into account. Normalized CO values declined to the uninfected range after one day of treatment with the antibiotic ceftriaxone. Strongly correlated with CO in the breath were levels of heme oxygenase-1 protein in serum and HMOX1 transcripts in whole blood. These results (i provide further evidence of the informativeness of CO concentration in the exhaled breath during systemic infection and inflammation, and (ii encourage evaluation of this noninvasive analytic approach in other various other rodent models of infection and for utility in

  20. Studying radon exhalation rates variability from phosphogypsum piles in the SW of Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Coto, I., E-mail: israel.lopez@dfa.uhu.es [Dpto. Física Aplicada, Facultad CC. Experimentales, University of Huelva, Campus de El Carmen s/n, 21007 Huelva (Spain); Mas, J.L. [Dpto. Física Aplicada I. Escuela Politécnica Superior, University of Sevilla, C/Virgen de Africa 7, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Vargas, A. [Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Instituto de Técnicas Energéticas, Campus Sud Edificio ETSEIB, Planta 0, Pabellón C, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bolívar, J.P. [Dpto. Física Aplicada, Facultad CC. Experimentales, University of Huelva, Campus de El Carmen s/n, 21007 Huelva (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Variability of radon exhalation rates from PG piles has been studied using numerical simulation supported by experimental data. • Most relevant parameters controlling the exhalation rate are radon potential and moisture saturation. • Piling up the waste increasing the height instead of the surface allows the reduction of the exhalation rate. • A proposed cover here is expected to allow exhalation rates reductions up to 95%. - Abstract: Nearly 1.0 × 10{sup 8} tonnes of phosphogypsum were accumulated during last 50 years on a 1200 ha disposal site near Huelva town (SW of Spain). Previous measurements of exhalation rates offered very variable values, in such a way that a worst case scenario could not be established. Here, new experimental data coupled to numerical simulations show that increasing the moisture contents or the temperature reduces the exhalation rate whilst increasing the radon potential or porosity has the contrary effect. Once the relative effects are compared, it can be drawn that the most relevant parameters controlling the exhalation rate are radon potential (product of emanation factor by {sup 226}Ra concentration) and moisture saturation of PG. From wastes management point of view, it can be concluded that piling up the waste increasing the height instead of the surface allows the reduction of the exhalation rate. Furthermore, a proposed cover here is expected to allow exhalation rates reductions up to 95%. We established that the worst case scenario corresponds to a situation of extremely dry winter. Under these conditions, the radon exhalation rate (0.508 Bq m{sup −2} s{sup −1}) would be below though close to the upper limit established by U.S.E.P.A. for inactive phopsphogypsum piles (0.722 Bq m{sup −2} s{sup −1})

  1. Exhalation velocity of radon-222 of Dutch building materials and the influence of paint systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijk, W. van; Jong, P. de

    1989-02-01

    In order to achieve a better insight concerning the source terms of radon in the Dutch dwelling in the framework of the RENA-programme an investigation has been performed into the exhalation velocity of radon-222 from building materials. From this investigation it turned out that the ventilation factor does not have any influence upon the exhalation velocity, neither an influence of alteration of air pressure could be demonstrated. The influence of air humidity upon the exhalation velocity showed a twofold picture; for gypsum a linear increase of the exhalation velocity with vapour pressure was found, while for concrete a linear decrease with vapour pressure was observed. Further it has been investigated in how far paint systems diminish the exhalation velocity of the Rn-222 from gypsum and concrete. Acryl paints, mostly used in the Dutch dwelling, did not show a decrease of the exhalation velocity and structure paints did even cause an increase of the exhalation velocity. Other types of paint based on chlorous rubber, epoxy resins and poly-urethane, in contrast, showed a clear reduction. From these those based on poly-urethane showed the largest reduction (60-75%) at a double sided treatment of the wall. With the help of a mathematical modelling of the exhalation estimations have been made of the exhalation velocity of Rn-222 at single sided treatment of a wall and for the exhalation velocity of Rn-220. For the fore mentioned poly-urethane-paints this yelds, at an estimate, a reduction of respectively 90-95% and 100%. (author). 40 refs.; 15 figs.; 8 tabs

  2. Exhaled nitric oxide in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beg Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Objective : The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO is elevated in nonsmoking subjects with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and compare it with the results in patients with asthma and a control population. Design : Cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods : Pulmonology Clinic at a University Hospital. Twenty five control subjects, 25 steroid naοve asthmatics and 14 COPD patients were studied. All the patients were nonsmokers and stable at the time of the study. All subjects completed a questionnaire and underwent spirometry. Exhaled nitric oxide was measured online by chemiluminescence, using single-breath technique. Results : All the study subjects were males. Subjects with stable COPD had significantly higher values of FENO than controls (56.54±28.01 vs 22.00±6.69; P =0.0001 but lower than the subjects with asthma (56.54±28.01 vs 84.78±39.32 P = 0.0285.The FENO values in COPD subjects were inversely related to the FEV 1 /FVC ratio. There was a significant overlap between the FENO values in COPD and the control subjects. Conclusion : There is a significant elevation in FENO in patients with stable COPD, but the elevation is less than in asthmatic subjects. Its value in clinical practice may be limited by the significant overlap with control subjects.

  3. Exhaled nitric oxide in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg, Mohammed F. S.; Alzoghaibi, Mohammad A.; Abba, Abdullah A.; Habib, Syed S.

    2009-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) is elevated in nonsmoking subjects with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and compare it with the results in patients with asthma and a control population. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Pulmonology Clinic at a University Hospital. Twenty five control subjects, 25 steroid naïve asthmatics and 14 COPD patients were studied. All the patients were nonsmokers and stable at the time of the study. All subjects completed a questionnaire and underwent spirometry. Exhaled nitric oxide was measured online by chemiluminescence, using single-breath technique. RESULTS: All the study subjects were males. Subjects with stable COPD had significantly higher values of FENO than controls (56.54±28.01 vs 22.00±6.69; P=0.0001) but lower than the subjects with asthma (56.54±28.01 vs 84.78±39.32 P=0.0285).The FENO values in COPD subjects were inversely related to the FEV1/FVC ratio. There was a significant overlap between the FENO values in COPD and the control subjects. CONCLUSION: There is a significant elevation in FENO in patients with stable COPD, but the elevation is less than in asthmatic subjects. Its value in clinical practice may be limited by the significant overlap with control subjects. PMID:19561927

  4. Exhaled nitric oxide in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beg Mohammed F S; Alzoghaibi, Mohammad A; Habib, Syed S; Abba, Abdullah A

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) is elevated in nonsmoking subjects with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and compare it with the results in patients with asthma and a control population. Pulmonology Clinic at a University Hospital. Twenty five control subjects, 25 steroid naive asthmatics and 14 COPD patients were studied. All the patients were nonsmokers and stable at the time of the study. All subjects completed a questionnaire and underwent spirometry. Exhaled nitric oxide was measured online by chemiluminescence, using single-breath technique. All the study subjects were males. Subjects with stable COPD had significantly higher values of FENO than controls (56.54+ - 28.01 vs 22.00 + -6.69; P =0.0001) but lower than the subjects with asthma (56.54+ - 28.01 vs 84.78+ - 39.32 P 0.0285). The FENO values in COPD subjects were inversely related to the FEV 1 /FVC ratio. There was a significant overlap between the FENO values in COPD and the control subjects. There is a significant elevation in FENO in patients with stable COPD, but the elevation is less than in asthmatic subjects. Its value in clinical practice may be limited by the significant overlap with control subjects. (author)

  5. Natural radioactivity and radon specific exhalation rate of zircon sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Righi, S.; Verita, S.; Bruzzi, L.; Albertazzi, A.

    2006-01-01

    The study focuses on the radon emanation from zircon sands and their derivatives, which are widely used in many sectors of industry. In particular, the results obtained by experimental measurements on samples of zircon sands and zircon flours commonly used in Italian ceramic industries are reported. Zircon sands contain a significant concentration of natural radioactivity because Th and U may substitute zirconium in the zircon crystal lattice. The relevant routes of exposure of workers to T.E.N.O.R.M. from zircon materials are external radiation and internal exposure, either by inhalation of aerosols in dusty working conditions or by inhalation of radon in workplaces. The main objective of this investigation is to provide experimental data able to better calculate the internal exposure of workers due to radon inhalation. Zircon samples were surveyed for natural radioactivity, radon specific exhalation rate and emanation fraction. Measurements of radioactivity concentration were carried out using γ-spectrometry. Methods used for determining radon consisted in determining the 222 Rn activity accumulated in a vessel after a given accumulation build-up time. The average activity concentrations of 238 U and 232 Th in samples result about 2600 and 550 Bq kg-1, respectively; these concentrations are significantly higher than the world average noticed in soils, rocks and Earth crust. The 222 Rn specific exhalation rates result very low probably due to the low porosity of the material and the consequent difficulty for radon to be released from the zircon crystal lattice. (author)

  6. A mini review of dolphin carbohydrate metabolism and suggestions for future research using exhaled air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam eRidgway

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the 1960s, I explored some aspects of carbohydrate metabolism in healthy bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus. Their physiological picture resembled what had been described for hyperthyroid diabetics. Dolphins have elevated thyroid hormone turnover, and fasting dolphins maintain a relatively high level of plasma glucose. After dolphins ingest glucose, plasma levels remain high for many hours. Interestingly, plasma glucose must exceed 300 mg/dL (about twice as high as the human threshold before glucose appears in urine. Due to their diabetes-like states, trainability, and unique natural respiratory anatomy and physiology, dolphins may offer useful clues to metabolites in the breath that may be used to non-invasively monitor diabetes in humans. Dolphins take very rapid and deep breaths that are four or five times as deep as humans and other terrestrial mammals, making them ideal for physiological assessment using non-invasive exhaled air. Avenues for successfully identifying breath-based markers for metabolic disease and physiology in dolphins can be done with both modern technology and the evolutionarily advantageous canine nose. This review summarizes aspects of dolphin metabolism previously learned and offers new directions for diabetes research that may benefit both dolphin and human health.

  7. Fractal characters and hurst exponent of radon exhalation rate from uranium Tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Hanqiao; Tan Kaixuan; Li Chunguang; Lv Junwen; Liu Dong

    2010-01-01

    The uranium tailings radon exhalation is an important environmental problem. The change of the radon exhalation rate of uranium tailings with the time through laboratory experiments is measured, and the results show that the radon exhalation rate of the tailings change obviously with time in non-periodic oscillations. Applying fractal analysis to the radon exhalation rate time-series data by R/S method, the Hurst exponent of the entire time series data is 0.83, the fractal dimension is 1.17. Mobile Hurst exponent is between 0.5 and 0.8 in most cases. The Hurst exponent of the experiments in the later part are below 0.5. The exhalation rate of uranium tailings radon does not meet the long-term trend of random walk theory, the radon exhalation rate has long-term memory, but the short-term memory is not distinct. The radon exhalation from uranium tailings is a deterministic chaotic dynamics. (authors)

  8. Potential of Mass Spectrometry in Developing Clinical Laboratory Biomarkers of Nonvolatiles in Exhaled Breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Olof; Olin, Anna-Carin; Mirgorodskaya, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Exhaled breath contains nonvolatile substances that are part of aerosol particles of submicrometer size. These particles are formed and exhaled as a result of normal breathing and contain material from distal airways of the respiratory system. Exhaled breath can be used to monitor biomarkers of both endogenous and exogenous origin and constitutes an attractive specimen for medical investigations. This review summarizes the present status regarding potential biomarkers of nonvolatile compounds in exhaled breath. The field of exhaled breath condensate is briefly reviewed, together with more recent work on more selective collection procedures for exhaled particles. The relation of these particles to the surfactant in the terminal parts of the respiratory system is described. The literature on potential endogenous low molecular weight compounds as well as protein biomarkers is reviewed. The possibility to measure exposure to therapeutic and abused drugs is demonstrated. Finally, the potential future role and importance of mass spectrometry is discussed. Nonvolatile compounds exit the lung as aerosol particles that can be sampled easily and selectively. The clinical applications of potential biomarkers in exhaled breath comprise diagnosis of disease, monitoring of disease progress, monitoring of drug therapy, and toxicological investigations. © 2015 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  9. Hydrogen peroxide in exhaled breath condensate: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Nagaraja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study the ongoing inflammatory process of lung in healthy individuals with risk factors and comparing with that of a known diseased condition. To study the inflammatory response to treatment. Background: Morbidity and mortality of respiratory diseases are raising in trend due to increased smokers, urbanization and air pollution, the diagnosis of these conditions during early stage and management can improve patient′s lifestyle and morbidity. Materials and Methods: One hundred subjects were studied from July 2010 to September 2010; the level of hydrogen peroxide concentration in exhaled breath condensate was measured using Ecocheck. Results: Of the 100 subjects studied, 23 were healthy individuals with risk factors (smoking, exposure to air pollution, and urbanization; the values of hydrogen peroxide in smokers were 200-2220 nmol/l and in non-smokers 340-760 nmol/l. In people residing in rural areas values were 20-140 nmol/l in non-smokers and 180 nmol/l in smokers. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease cases, during acute exacerbations values were 540-3040 nmol/l and 240-480 nmol/l following treatment. In acute exacerbations of bronchial asthma, values were 400-1140 nmol/l and 100-320 nmol/l following treatment. In cases of bronchiectasis, values were 300-340 nmol/l and 200-280 nmol/l following treatment. In diagnosed pneumonia cases values were 1060-11800 nmol/l and 540-700 nmol/l following treatment. In interstitial lung diseases, values ranged from 220-720 nmol/l and 210-510 nmol/l following treatment. Conclusion: Exhaled breath condensate provides a non-invasive means of sampling the lower respiratory tract. Collection of exhaled breath condensate might be useful to detect the oxidative destruction of the lung as well as early inflammation of the airways in a healthy individual with risk factors and comparing the inflammatory response to treatment.

  10. Impact of structural parameters on the radon exhalation of building materials: Preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelofs, L.M.M.

    1993-01-01

    Samples of mortar and sand-lime pieces with different percentages of fly ash are hardened at different relative humidities. The porosity distribution, the moisture and the radon exhalation of these samples are determined. Based on the data of the above-mentioned analyses, the thickness of the adsorbed water layer in the water-filled pores is estimated. The correlation between the structural parameters and the radon exhalation is investigated. If the radon exhalation process can be modelled, the radiation risk of applying fly ash in building materials can be controlled or reduced. The results do not yet show a clear indication. The applied methods have to be considered in more detail

  11. Sensory evaluation and chemical analysis of exhaled and dermally emitted bioeffluents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsushima, S.; Wargocki, Pawel; Tanabe, S.

    2018-01-01

    air supply rate was the same in both chambers. The carbon dioxide concentration in the chamber with exhaled air was 2000 ppm. Chamber temperatures were 23°C or 28°C, and ozone was present or absent in the supply airflow. When dermally emitted bioeffluents were present, the perceived air quality (PAQ......) was less acceptable, and the odor intensity was higher than when only exhaled bioeffluents were present. The presence or absence of exhaled bioeffluents in the unoccupied chamber made no significant difference to sensory assessments. At 28°C and with ozone present, the odor intensity increased and the PAQ...

  12. Exhaled nitric oxide and spirometry in respiratory health surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohadana, A B; Hannhart, B; Ghezzo, H; Teculescu, D; Zmirou-Navier, D

    2011-03-01

    Exposure to pollutants in bakeries and hairdressing salons can cause airway syndromes varying from bronchial irritation to asthma. Workplace respiratory health surveillance aims to identify possible cases requiring further investigation. To compare the performance of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FE(NO)) and spirometry for health surveillance of apprentice bakers (ABs) and apprentice hairdressers (AHDs). Determinants of FE(NO) were also identified. Symptoms and physician-diagnosed asthma were evaluated by questionnaire. FE(NO) was measured and spirometry was carried out. Subjects with elevated FE(NO) (FE(NO) > upper limit normal), airway obstruction [forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1))/forced vital capacity (FVC) smokers compared with atopic smokers and non-atopic subjects (P spirometry were not overlapping dimensions in ABs and hairdressers, each test contributing unique information on the physiological status of the respiratory system. FE(NO) may provide added information on airway inflammation not provided by spirometry.

  13. Environmental Conditions Affect Exhalation of H3N2 Seasonal and Variant Influenza Viruses and Respiratory Droplet Transmission in Ferrets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kortney M Gustin

    Full Text Available The seasonality of influenza virus infections in temperate climates and the role of environmental conditions like temperature and humidity in the transmission of influenza virus through the air are not well understood. Using ferrets housed at four different environmental conditions, we evaluated the respiratory droplet transmission of two influenza viruses (a seasonal H3N2 virus and an H3N2 variant virus, the etiologic virus of a swine to human summertime infection and concurrently characterized the aerosol shedding profiles of infected animals. Comparisons were made among the different temperature and humidity conditions and between the two viruses to determine if the H3N2 variant virus exhibited enhanced capabilities that may have contributed to the infections occurring in the summer. We report here that although increased levels of H3N2 variant virus were found in ferret nasal wash and exhaled aerosol samples compared to the seasonal H3N2 virus, enhanced respiratory droplet transmission was not observed under any of the environmental settings. However, overall environmental conditions were shown to modulate the frequency of influenza virus transmission through the air. Transmission occurred most frequently at 23°C/30%RH, while the levels of infectious virus in aerosols exhaled by infected ferrets agree with these results. Improving our understanding of how environmental conditions affect influenza virus infectivity and transmission may reveal ways to better protect the public against influenza virus infections.

  14. Pressure optimization of an EC-QCL based cavity ring-down spectroscopy instrument for exhaled NO detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Sheng; Han, Yanling; Li, Bincheng

    2018-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) in exhaled breath has gained increasing interest in recent years mainly driven by the clinical need to monitor inflammatory status in respiratory disorders, such as asthma and other pulmonary conditions. Mid-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) using an external cavity, widely tunable continuous-wave quantum cascade laser operating at 5.3 µm was employed for NO detection. The detection pressure was reduced in steps to improve the sensitivity, and the optimal pressure was determined to be 15 kPa based on the fitting residual analysis of measured absorption spectra. A detection limit (1σ, or one time of standard deviation) of 0.41 ppb was experimentally achieved for NO detection in human breath under the optimized condition in a total of 60 s acquisition time (2 s per data point). Diurnal measurement session was conducted for exhaled NO. The experimental results indicated that mid-infrared CRDS technique has great potential for various applications in health diagnosis.

  15. Study of radon exhalation and radium content in different types of building materials in and around Tumkur, Karnataka, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayasheelan, A.; Manjunatha, S.; Sannappa, J.; Umeshareddy, K.

    2012-01-01

    Radon, the immediate daughter radium is a gas, which enters human body through breathing which may affect the health. In the present study, can technique is used to measure radon and radium activity concentrations in the building materials such as soil, marble, glazed tiles, white granite, pink granite, clay brick, cement brick, fly ash bricks, sand and mosaic samples collected from different locations of Tumkur district. The alpha tracks recorded were counted by a spark counter and the track densities were converted into radon and radium concentration. The radium content in glazed tiles samples is found be the lowest value 7.59 Bqkg -1 and highest for pink granite 17.77 Bqkg -1 . The radon concentration, mass and surface exhalation rates for glazed tiles were 463.8 Bqm -3 , 6.29 mBqkg -1 h -1 and 163.3 mBqm -2 h -1 for pink granites 1085.4 Bqm -3 , 14.72 mBqkg -1 h -1 and 382.1 mBqm -2 h -1 respectively. The radon concentration and exhalation rates for soil, sand, mosaic and pink granite with grain sizes were found to be -0.82, -0.85, -0.84 and -0.96 respectively. The concentration level of radon and radium in building materials in Tumkur is found to be low in comparison with data available in Indian and global average. (author)

  16. Markers of oxidative stress in exhaled breath of workers exposed to iron oxide nanoparticles are elevated

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pelclová, D.; Fenclová, Z.; Navrátil, Tomáš; Vlčková, Š.; Syslová, K.; Kuzma, Marek; Ždímal, Vladimír; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Pušman, Jan; Zíková, Naděžda; Zakharov, S.; Machajová, M.; Kačer, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 7, Suppl. 1 (2014), s. 69-70 ISSN 1337-6853 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:61388955 ; RVO:67985858 Keywords : oxidative stress * exhaled breath * nanoparticles Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  17. Standardization of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) collection using a feedback regulated breathing pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collection of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) fluid by cooling of expired breath is a potentially valuable approach for the detection of biomarkers associated with disease or exposure to xenobiotics. EBC is generally collected using unregulated breathing patterns, perceived to el...

  18. Determination of exhalation rate of radon from walls and indoor radon by CR-39 detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasidov, A.; Tillaev, T.S.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The knowledge of true value exhalation rate of radon gas from building materials represents scientific and practical interest in environmental radiation protection. This point of view in the paper exhalation rate of radon gas from building materials and a surface of walls with different constructions were determined by detectors CR-39. The values of the exhalation rate of radon per unit area of the granite, concrete, fired and unfired bricks, sand, cement, alabaster varied 0.091 - 0.1 Bq·m -2 ·h -1 . The surface of walls of dwellings constructed from different building materials the exhalation rate of radon are within in limits of 0.083-1.12 Bq·m -2 ·h -1 . Were measurements with CR-39 detectors a level of radon within 50-520 Bq/m 3 in air of rooms constructed of the different building materials

  19. The Validity of Exhaled Nitric Oxide (NO) in Breath Condensate in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Validity of Exhaled Nitric Oxide (NO) in Breath Condensate in the Evaluation of Controlled Asthma. Ahmed Elsayed Elhefny, Sahar Mohammad Mourad, Tamer Saeed Morsy, Maher Abdelnbi Kamel, Haydi Moustafa Mohamed ...

  20. Estimation of the radon dose in buildings by measuring the exhalation rate from building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, V.; Kovler, K.; Perevalov, A.; Kelm, H.

    2004-01-01

    We review the accumulator technique using active (CRM) and passive detectors (activated charcoal and electret). We describe the ERS2 detector, an electrostatic radon sampler followed by alpha spectrometry, with improved algorithm and adapted to measure the exhalation rate from walls. The technique produces accurate results over a broad range of materials: concrete, Pumice, ceramics, tiles, granite, etc. The measured exhalation rate is the same, within errors, as measured by the standard detectors

  1. AD-HOC INTERCOMPARISON OF FOUR DIFFERENT RADON EXHALATION MEASUREMENT METHODS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awhida, A; Ujic, P; Pantelic, G; Kolarž, P; Celikovic, I; Živanovic, M; Janicijevic, A; Loncar, B

    2018-01-01

    It is indicated that the exposure to radon originating from the building materials is not negligible and the radon exhalation measurement should get more attention in the future. The experience with four different methods of the exhalation measurement, established in our laboratory for the purpose of the intercomparison is reported. Additionally, a comparison of advantages and disadvantages of used methods is discussed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Measurement of 222Rn and 220Rn exhalation rate from soil samples of Kumaun Hills, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semwal, Poonam; Singh, Kuldeep; Agarwal, T. K.; Joshi, Manish; Pant, Preeti; Kandari, Tushar; Ramola, R. C.

    2018-03-01

    The source terms, i.e., exhalation and emanation from soil and building materials are the primary contributors to the radon (222Rn)/thoron (220Rn) concentration levels in the dwellings, while the ecological constraints like ventilation rate, temperature, pressure, humidity, etc., are the influencing factors. The present study is focused on Almora District of Kumaun, located in Himalayan belt of Uttarakhand, India. For the measurement of 222Rn and 220Rn exhalation rates, 24 soil samples were collected from different locations. Gamma radiation level was measured at each of these locations. Chamber technique associated with Smart Rn Duo portable monitor was employed for the estimation of 222Rn and 220Rn exhalation rates. Radionuclides (226Ra, 232Th and 40K) concentrations were also measured in soil samples using NaI(Tl) scintillation based gamma ray spectrometry. The mass exhalation rate for 222Rn was varying between 16 and 54 mBq/kg/h, while the 220Rn surface exhalation rate was in the range of 0.65-6.43 Bq/m2/s. Measured gamma dose rate for the same region varied from 0.10 to 0.31 µSv/h. Inter-correlation of exhalation rates and intra-correlation with background gamma levels were studied.

  3. Radon and Thoron Exhalation Rates from Surface Soil of Bangka - Belitung Islands, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syarbaini Syarbaini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available DOI:10.17014/ijog.2.1.35-42Radon and thoron exhalation rate from soil is one of the most important factors that can influence the radioactivity level in the environment. Radon and thoron gases are produced by the decay of the radioactive elements those are radium and thorium in the soil, where its concentration depends on the soil conditions and the local geological background. In this paper, the results of radon and thoron exhalation rate measurements from surface soil of Bangka Belitung Islands at thirty six measurement sites are presented. Exhalation rates of radon and thoron were measured by using an accumulation chamber equipped with a solid-state alpha particle detector. Furthermore, the correlations between radon and thoron exhalation rates with their parent nuclide (226Ra and 232Th concentrations in collected soil samples from the same locations were also evaluated. The result of the measurement shows that mostly the distribution of radon and thoron is similar to 226Ra and 232Th, eventhough it was not a good correlation between radon and thoron exhalation rate with their parent activity concentrations (226Ra and 232Th due to the environmental factors that can influence the radon and thoron mobilities in the soil. In comparison to a world average, Bangka Belitung Islands have the 222Rn and 220Rn exhalation rates higher than the world average value for the regions with normal background radiation.

  4. Are exhaled nitric oxide measurements using the portable NIOX MINO repeatable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raza Abid

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exhaled nitric oxide is a non-invasive marker of airway inflammation and a portable analyser, the NIOX MINO (Aerocrine AB, Solna, Sweden, is now available. This study aimed to assess the reproducibility of the NIOX MINO measurements across age, sex and lung function for both absolute and categorical exhaled nitric oxide values in two distinct groups of children and teenagers. Methods Paired exhaled nitric oxide readings were obtained from 494 teenagers, aged 16-18 years, enrolled in an unselected birth cohort and 65 young people, aged 6-17 years, with asthma enrolled in an interventional asthma management study. Results The birth cohort participants showed a high degree of variability between first and second exhaled nitric oxide readings (mean intra-participant difference 1.37 ppb, 95% limits of agreement -7.61 to 10.34 ppb, although there was very close agreement when values were categorised as low, normal, intermediate or high (kappa = 0.907, p Conclusions The reproducibility of exhaled nitric oxide is poor for absolute values but acceptable when values are categorised as low, normal, intermediate or high in children and teenagers. One measurement is therefore sufficient when using categorical exhaled nitric oxide values to direct asthma management but a mean of at least two measurements is required for absolute values.

  5. Studying radon exhalation rates variability from phosphogypsum piles in the SW of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Coto, I; Mas, J L; Vargas, A; Bolívar, J P

    2014-09-15

    Nearly 1.0 × 10(8) tonnes of phosphogypsum were accumulated during last 50 years on a 1,200 ha disposal site near Huelva town (SW of Spain). Previous measurements of exhalation rates offered very variable values, in such a way that a worst case scenario could not be established. Here, new experimental data coupled to numerical simulations show that increasing the moisture contents or the temperature reduces the exhalation rate whilst increasing the radon potential or porosity has the contrary effect. Once the relative effects are compared, it can be drawn that the most relevant parameters controlling the exhalation rate are radon potential (product of emanation factor by (226)Ra concentration) and moisture saturation of PG. From wastes management point of view, it can be concluded that piling up the waste increasing the height instead of the surface allows the reduction of the exhalation rate. Furthermore, a proposed cover here is expected to allow exhalation rates reductions up to 95%. We established that the worst case scenario corresponds to a situation of extremely dry winter. Under these conditions, the radon exhalation rate (0.508 Bqm(-2)s(-1)) would be below though close to the upper limit established by U.S.E.P.A. for inactive phopsphogypsum piles (0.722 Bqm(-2)s(-1)). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessment of regional ventilation and deformation using 4D-CT imaging for healthy human lungs during tidal breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahani, Nariman; Choi, Sanghun; Choi, Jiwoong; Iyer, Krishna; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2015-11-15

    This study aims to assess regional ventilation, nonlinearity, and hysteresis of human lungs during dynamic breathing via image registration of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scans. Six healthy adult humans were studied by spiral multidetector-row CT during controlled tidal breathing as well as during total lung capacity and functional residual capacity breath holds. Static images were utilized to contrast static vs. dynamic (deep vs. tidal) breathing. A rolling-seal piston system was employed to maintain consistent tidal breathing during 4D-CT spiral image acquisition, providing required between-breath consistency for physiologically meaningful reconstructed respiratory motion. Registration-derived variables including local air volume and anisotropic deformation index (ADI, an indicator of preferential deformation in response to local force) were employed to assess regional ventilation and lung deformation. Lobar distributions of air volume change during tidal breathing were correlated with those of deep breathing (R(2) ≈ 0.84). Small discrepancies between tidal and deep breathing were shown to be likely due to different distributions of air volume change in the left and the right lungs. We also demonstrated an asymmetric characteristic of flow rate between inhalation and exhalation. With ADI, we were able to quantify nonlinearity and hysteresis of lung deformation that can only be captured in dynamic images. Nonlinearity quantified by ADI is greater during inhalation, and it is stronger in the lower lobes (P < 0.05). Lung hysteresis estimated by the difference of ADI between inhalation and exhalation is more significant in the right lungs than that in the left lungs. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Analytical methodologies for broad metabolite coverage of exhaled breath condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, Alexander A; Zamuruyev, Konstantin O; Pasamontes, Alberto; Brown, Joshua F; Schivo, Michael; Foutouhi, Soraya; Weimer, Bart C; Kenyon, Nicholas J; Davis, Cristina E

    2017-09-01

    Breath analysis has been gaining popularity as a non-invasive technique that is amenable to a broad range of medical uses. One of the persistent problems hampering the wide application of the breath analysis method is measurement variability of metabolite abundances stemming from differences in both sampling and analysis methodologies used in various studies. Mass spectrometry has been a method of choice for comprehensive metabolomic analysis. For the first time in the present study, we juxtapose the most commonly employed mass spectrometry-based analysis methodologies and directly compare the resultant coverages of detected compounds in exhaled breath condensate in order to guide methodology choices for exhaled breath condensate analysis studies. Four methods were explored to broaden the range of measured compounds across both the volatile and non-volatile domain. Liquid phase sampling with polyacrylate Solid-Phase MicroExtraction fiber, liquid phase extraction with a polydimethylsiloxane patch, and headspace sampling using Carboxen/Polydimethylsiloxane Solid-Phase MicroExtraction (SPME) followed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry were tested for the analysis of volatile fraction. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography and reversed-phase chromatography high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry were used for analysis of non-volatile fraction. We found that liquid phase breath condensate extraction was notably superior compared to headspace extraction and differences in employed sorbents manifested altered metabolite coverages. The most pronounced effect was substantially enhanced metabolite capture for larger, higher-boiling compounds using polyacrylate SPME liquid phase sampling. The analysis of the non-volatile fraction of breath condensate by hydrophilic and reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry indicated orthogonal metabolite coverage by these chromatography modes. We found that the metabolite coverage

  8. Short-term effects of electronic and tobacco cigarettes on exhaled nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marini, Sara; Buonanno, Giorgio; Stabile, Luca; Ficco, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the short-term respiratory effects due to the inhalation of electronic and conventional tobacco cigarette-generated mainstream aerosols through the measurement of the exhaled nitric oxide (eNO). To this purpose, twenty-five smokers were asked to smoke a conventional cigarette and to vape an electronic cigarette (with and without nicotine), and an electronic cigarette without liquid (control session). Electronic and tobacco cigarette mainstream aerosols were characterized in terms of total particle number concentrations and size distributions. On the basis of the measured total particle number concentrations and size distributions, the average particle doses deposited in alveolar and tracheobronchial regions of the lungs for a single 2-s puff were also estimated considering a subject performing resting (sitting) activity. Total particle number concentrations in the mainstream resulted equal to 3.5 ± 0.4 × 10 9 , 5.1 ± 0.1 × 10 9 , and 3.1 ± 0.6 × 10 9 part. cm −3 for electronic cigarettes without nicotine, with nicotine, and for conventional cigarettes, respectively. The corresponding alveolar doses for a resting subject were estimated equal to 3.8 × 10 10 , 5.2 × 10 10 and 2.3 × 10 10 particles. The mean eNO variations measured after each smoking/vaping session were equal to 3.2 ppb, 2.7 ppb and 2.8 ppb for electronic cigarettes without nicotine, with nicotine, and for conventional cigarettes, respectively; whereas, negligible eNO changes were measured in the control session. Statistical tests performed on eNO data showed statistically significant differences between smoking/vaping sessions and the control session, thus confirming a similar effect on human airways whatever the cigarette smoked/vaped, the nicotine content, and the particle dose received. - Highlights: • Electronic cigarettes (with and without nicotine) mainstream aerosols were analyzed; • Particle number concentrations and size distributions

  9. Short-term effects of electronic and tobacco cigarettes on exhaled nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marini, Sara, E-mail: s.marini@unicas.it [Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, University of Cassino and Southern Lazio, Cassino (Italy); Buonanno, Giorgio [Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, University of Cassino and Southern Lazio, Cassino (Italy); Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia); Stabile, Luca; Ficco, Giorgio [Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, University of Cassino and Southern Lazio, Cassino (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the short-term respiratory effects due to the inhalation of electronic and conventional tobacco cigarette-generated mainstream aerosols through the measurement of the exhaled nitric oxide (eNO). To this purpose, twenty-five smokers were asked to smoke a conventional cigarette and to vape an electronic cigarette (with and without nicotine), and an electronic cigarette without liquid (control session). Electronic and tobacco cigarette mainstream aerosols were characterized in terms of total particle number concentrations and size distributions. On the basis of the measured total particle number concentrations and size distributions, the average particle doses deposited in alveolar and tracheobronchial regions of the lungs for a single 2-s puff were also estimated considering a subject performing resting (sitting) activity. Total particle number concentrations in the mainstream resulted equal to 3.5 ± 0.4 × 10{sup 9}, 5.1 ± 0.1 × 10{sup 9}, and 3.1 ± 0.6 × 10{sup 9} part. cm{sup −3} for electronic cigarettes without nicotine, with nicotine, and for conventional cigarettes, respectively. The corresponding alveolar doses for a resting subject were estimated equal to 3.8 × 10{sup 10}, 5.2 × 10{sup 10} and 2.3 × 10{sup 10} particles. The mean eNO variations measured after each smoking/vaping session were equal to 3.2 ppb, 2.7 ppb and 2.8 ppb for electronic cigarettes without nicotine, with nicotine, and for conventional cigarettes, respectively; whereas, negligible eNO changes were measured in the control session. Statistical tests performed on eNO data showed statistically significant differences between smoking/vaping sessions and the control session, thus confirming a similar effect on human airways whatever the cigarette smoked/vaped, the nicotine content, and the particle dose received. - Highlights: • Electronic cigarettes (with and without nicotine) mainstream aerosols were analyzed; • Particle number

  10. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Application of tunable diode lasers for a highly sensitive analysis of gaseous biomarkers in exhaled air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, E. V.; Milyaev, Varerii A.

    2002-11-01

    The application of tunable diode lasers for a highly sensitive analysis of gaseous biomarkers in exhaled air in biomedical diagnostics is discussed. The principle of operation and the design of a laser analyser for studying the composition of exhaled air are described. The results of detection of gaseous biomarkers in exhaled air, including clinical studies, which demonstrate the diagnostic possibilities of the method, are presented.

  11. Exhaled breath condensate cysteinyl leukotrienes and airway remodeling in childhood asthma: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharitonov Sergei A

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs play an important role in airway remodeling. Previous reports have indicated that cysLTs augment human airway smooth muscle cell proliferation. Recently, cysLTs have been measured in exhaled breath condensate (EBC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between cysLTs in EBC and another marker of airway remodeling, reticular basement membrane (RBM thickening, in endobronchial biopsies in children. Methods 29 children, aged 4–15 years, with moderate to severe persistent asthma, who underwent bronchoscopy as part of their clinical assessment, were included. Subjects underwent spirometry and EBC collection for cysLTs analysis, followed by bronchoscopy and endobronchial biopsy within 24 hours. Results EBC cysLTs were significantly lower in asthmatic children who were treated with montelukast than in those who were not (median (interquartile range 36.62 (22.60–101.05 versus 249.1 (74.21–526.36 pg/ml, p = 0.004. There was a significant relationship between EBC cysLTs and RBM thickness in the subgroup of children who were not treated with montelukast (n = 13, r = 0.75, p = 0.003. Conclusion EBC cysLTs appear to be associated with RBM thickening in asthma.

  12. Measurement of endogenous acetone and isoprene in exhaled breath during sleep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Julian; Kupferthaler, Alexander; Unterkofler, Karl; Amann, Anton; Frauscher, Birgit; Hackner, Heinz; Högl, Birgit; Teschl, Gerald; Hinterhuber, Hartmann

    2012-01-01

    This explorative study aims at characterizing the breath behavior of two prototypic volatile organic compounds, acetone and isoprene, during normal human sleep and to possibly relate changes in the respective concentration time courses to the underlying sleep architecture. For this purpose, six normal healthy volunteers (two females, four males, age 20–29 years) were monitored over two consecutive nights (the first one being an adaption night) by combining real-time proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry measurements from end-tidal exhalation segments with laboratory-based polysomnographic data. Breath acetone concentrations increased overnight in all measurements, with an average relative change by a factor of up to 4 (median 2.5). Nighttime concentration maxima were usually recorded 2–3 h before lights on. For breath isoprene, a nocturnal increase in baseline concentrations of about 74% was observed, with individual changes ranging from 36–110%. Isoprene profiles exhibited pronounced concentration peaks, which were highly specific for leg movements as scored by tibial electromyography. Furthermore, relative to a linear trend, baseline isoprene concentrations decreased during the transition from the NREM to the REM phase of a complete sleep cycle. (paper)

  13. Integrating exhaled breath diagnostics by disease-sniffing dogs with instrumental laboratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleil, Joachim; Giese, Roger

    2017-09-07

    Dogs have been studied for many years as a medical diagnostic tool to detect a pre-clinical disease state by sniffing emissions directly from a human or an in vitro biological sample. Some of the studies report high sensitivity and specificity in blinded case-control studies. However, in these studies it is completely unknown as to which suites of chemicals the dogs detect and how they ultimately interpret this information amidst confounding background odors. Herein, we consider the advantages and challenges of canine olfaction for early (meaningful) detection of cancer, and propose an experimental concept to narrow the molecular signals used by the dog for sample classification to laboratory-based instrumental analysis. This serves two purposes; first, in contrast to dogs, analytical methods could be quickly up-scaled for high throughput sampling. Second, the knowledge gained from identifying probative chemicals could be helpful in learning more about biochemical pathways and disease progression. We focus on exhaled breath aerosol, arguing that the semi-volatile fraction should be given more attention. Ultimately, we conclude that the interaction between dog-based and instrument-based research will be mutually beneficial and accelerate progress towards early detection of cancer by breath analysis.

  14. Exhaled nitric oxide - circadian variations in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antosova M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO has been suggested as a marker of airway inflammatory diseases. The level of eNO is influenced by many various factor including age, sex, menstrual cycle, exercise, food, drugs, etc. The aim of our study was to investigate a potential influence of circadian variation on eNO level in healthy subjects. Methods Measurements were performed in 44 women and 10 men, non-smokers, without respiratory tract infection in last 2 weeks. The eNO was detected at 4-hour intervals from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. using an NIOX analyzer. We followed the ATS/ERS guidelines for eNO measurement and analysis. Results Peak of eNO levels were observed at 10 a.m. (11.1 ± 7.2 ppb, the lowest value was detected at 10 p.m. (10.0 ± 5.8 ppb. The difference was statistically significant (paired t-test, P Conclusions The daily variations in eNO, with the peak in the morning hours, could be of importance in clinical practice regarding the choice of optimal time for monitoring eNO in patients with respiratory disease.

  15. Environmental Effects on Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide in Allergic Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania La Grutta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO is a non-invasive marker of airway inflammation in asthma and respiratory allergy. Environmental factors, especially indoor and outdoor air quality, may play an important role in triggering acute exacerbations of respiratory symptoms. The authors have reviewed the literature reporting effects of outdoor and indoor pollutants on FeNO in children. Although the findings are not consistent, urban and industrial pollution—mainly particles (PM2.5 and PM10, nitrogen dioxide (NO2, and sulfur dioxide (SO2—as well as formaldehyde and electric baseboard heating have been shown to increase FeNO, whilst ozone (O3 tends to decrease it. Among children exposed to Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS with a genetic polymorphisms in nitric oxide synthase genes (NOS, a higher nicotine exposure was associated with lower FeNO levels. Finally, although more studies are needed in order to better investigate the effect of gene and environment interactions which may affect the interpretation of FeNO values in the management of children with asthma, clinicians are recommended to consider environmental exposures when taking medical histories for asthma and respiratory allergy. Further research is also needed to assess the effects of remedial interventions aimed at reducing/abating environmental exposures in asthmatic/allergic patients.

  16. Exhaled RANTES and interleukin 4 levels after exercise challenge in children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Ozlem; Keskin, Mehmet; Kucukosmanoglu, Ercan; Ozkars, Mehmet Yasar; Gogebakan, Bulent; Kul, Seval; Bayram, Hasan; Coskun, Yavuz

    2012-11-01

    Despite the universality and clinical significance of exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB), the mechanisms responsible for it are incompletely understood. To investigate the role of exhaled RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted) and interleukin (IL) 4 in EIB in children with asthma. Fifty-six children with asthma were evaluated with exercise challenge and exhaled RANTES and IL-4 levels. Exhaled breath condensate was collected before and 30 minutes after exercise challenge. RANTES and IL-4 concentrations were determined using a specific immunoassay kit. A significant increase was found in RANTES levels after exercise challenge in the asthmatic children (Pchildren with EIB (n=25, P=.007) and in the non-EIB asthmatic group (n=31, P=.005). Our study revealed that exhaled RANTES level correlates significantly well with percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), exacerbation frequency, serum IgE, and body mass index. No statistically significant increase was found in IL-4 levels after exercise challenge. The maximal postexercise decrease in FEV1 strongly correlated with total eosinophil count (Pchildren with asthma. In addition, exhaled RANTES levels correlate well with serum IgE, severity of asthma, FEV1/FVC ratio, and body mass index. RANTES and IL-4 may not be independent predictors for EIB. Furthermore, eosinophil count and FEV1/FVC ratio may predict the presence and severity of EIB in asthmatic children. Copyright © 2012 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of some soil characteristics on soil radon concentration and radon exhalation from soil surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Kainan; Cheng, Jianping; Guo, Qiuju

    2004-01-01

    To find out the impacts of soil characters on radon concentration in soil and radon exhalation from soil, field measurements on soil radon concentrations (60 cm under the soil surface) and radon exhalation rate from soil surface were carried out in totally 31 points with different types of soil in three cities in both South and North China. Soil radium contents, water contents, soil porosity and grain size were concretely analyzed in our laboratory. The linear simulation was used to analyze the above data. The results showed that radon exhalation rate from soil and radon concentrations in soil have direct proportion to soil radium contents. Rather high radium content and radon exhalation rate were measured in Guiyang area, 67±28Bq/Kg and 40±59 mBq/m 2 ·s, however no high soil radon concentration was found due to the difficulties in the measurements on clay soils with high saturation. Compared with soil radium contents, radon exhalation rate from soil and soil radon concentrations are more easily impacted by soil characters and change in a rather large range. (author)

  18. The influence of thoron on measurement results of radon exhalation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao De Tao; Ling Qiu; Leung, J K C

    2002-01-01

    Because of thoron exhalation, the measurement results of radon exhalation rate using a local still method is usually larger than the true value of radon flux rate of the monitored material surface. The influence of sup 2 sup 1 sup 6 Po(ThA) on radon exhalation rate can be eliminated for sensitive radon monitors. Theoretical evaluations of the influence of sup 2 sup 1 sup 2 Bi(ThC) and sup 2 sup 1 sup 2 Po(ThC')on radon exhalation rate are carried out in a sampler with diameter of 188 mm, and height of 125 mm, and supplied electrostatic field inside (generated by high voltage and electret) under following conditions: the sampling time are 1, 2, 3 h, respectively, thoron exhalation rate is 100 times of radon's. The calculation results indicate that the measurement results of radon flux rate are possibly 35.5% larger than true value due to the influence of thoron for fast and multifunctional radon monitors with electret, high voltage, respectively and using CR-39 SSNTD as detector, but this influence is negligib...

  19. EXHALED AND PLASMA NITRITE: a comparative study among healthy, cirrhotic and liver transplant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane S AUGUSTO

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context There is a relative lack of studies about exhaled nitrite (NO2- concentrations in cirrhotic and transplanted patients. Objective Verify possible differences and correlations between the levels of NO2-, measured in plasma and exhaled breath condensate collected from patients with cirrhosis and liver transplant. Method Sixty adult male patients, aged between 27 and 67 years, were subdivided into three groups: a control group comprised of 15 healthy volunteers, a cirrhosis group composed of 15 volunteers, and a transplant group comprised of 30 volunteers. The NO2- concentrations were measured by chemiluminescence. Results 1 The analysis of plasma NO2- held among the three groups showed no statistical significance. 2 The comparison between cirrhotic and control groups, control and transplanted and cirrhotic and transplanted was not statistically significant. 3 The measurements performed on of NO2- exhaled breath condensate among the three groups showed no statistical difference. 4 When comparing the control group samples and cirrhotic, control and transplanted and cirrhotic and transplanted, there was no significant changes in the concentrations of NO2-. Conclusion No correlations were found between plasma and exhaled NO2-, suggesting that the exhaled NO2- is more reflective of local respiratory NO release than the systemic circulation.

  20. Influence of environmental concentrations of NO on the exhaled NO test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacentini, G L; Bodini, A; Vino, L; Zanolla, L; Costella, S; Vicentini, L; Boner, A L

    1998-10-01

    Measurement of levels of exhaled nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed as a noninvasive method for evaluating the degree of airway inflammation in asthmatic patients. Some concern in the interpretation of results of such measurement may arise from possible interference by high environmental concentrations of NO inhaled by these patients. The aim of this study was to verify whether environmental concentrations of NO in the range from 0 to 150 ppb can influence levels of exhaled NO. We tested two groups of subjects. The first group, consisting of 16 subjects, was tested when environmental levels of NO were from 0 to 3 ppb and from 20 to 60 ppb, and exhaled NO mean ppb (+/- SEM) levels were 9.81 +/- 1.43 and 9.78 +/- 1.47 (p = ns) (mean +/- SEM), respectively. The second group, consisting of 30 subjects, was tested at ambient NO concentrations of 0 to 3 ppm, 80 to 100 ppm, and 120 to 150 ppb, and for 18 of these subjects who underwent testing under all three conditions investigated, the mean levels of exhaled NO were 9.23 +/- 1.51, 7.78 +/- 1.19, and 9.33 +/- 1.55 ppb (p = ns), respectively. The results of this study suggest that significantly different ambient levels of NO have no effect on levels of exhaled NO.

  1. Exhaled carbon monoxide in asthmatics: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Mao

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The non-invasive assessment of airway inflammation is potentially advantageous in asthma management. Exhaled carbon monoxide (eCO measurement is cheap and has been proposed to reflect airway inflammation and oxidative stress but current data are conflicting. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to determine whether eCO is elevated in asthmatics, is regulated by steroid treatment and reflects disease severity and control. Methods A systematic search for English language articles published between 1997 and 2009 was performed using Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases. Observational studies comparing eCO in non-smoking asthmatics and healthy subjects or asthmatics before and after steroid treatment were included. Data were independently extracted by two investigators and analyzed to generate weighted mean differences using either a fixed or random effects meta-analysis depending upon the degree of heterogeneity. Results 18 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The eCO level was significantly higher in asthmatics as compared to healthy subjects and in intermittent asthma as compared to persistent asthma. However, eCO could not distinguish between steroid-treated asthmatics and steroid-free patients nor separate controlled and partly-controlled asthma from uncontrolled asthma in cross-sectional studies. In contrast, eCO was significantly reduced following a course of corticosteroid treatment. Conclusions eCO is elevated in asthmatics but levels only partially reflect disease severity and control. eCO might be a potentially useful non-invasive biomarker of airway inflammation and oxidative stress in nonsmoking asthmatics.

  2. Exhaled Nitric Oxide Decreases during Academic Examination Stress in Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, Thomas; Trueba, Ana F; Liu, Jiayan; Auchus, Richard J; Rosenfield, David

    2015-11-01

    Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) is known to vary with multiple endogenous and exogenous factors. Laboratory stress and depressive mood have been associated with altered FeNO levels, but little is known about the susceptibility of FeNO to longer-lasting states of psychological stress in asthma. We sought to study changes in FeNO, lung function, and endogenous cortisol levels in students in a low-stress period during the academic term and in high-stress periods of up to 5 days during final exams. One hundred nine participants (35 with asthma) enrolled in a final examination stress study were assessed during the academic term (low stress) and during final exams (high stress). FeNO, spirometric lung function (FEV1, peak flow), salivary cortisol, and negative affect were measured at three time points. Control variables were medication use, cold symptoms, sex, and age. FeNO decreased substantially from low-stress baseline to the high-stress examination periods, with more pronounced decreases occurring in subjects with asthma (-11.5 ppb) than control subjects (-1.2 ppb). FEV1 decreased in both groups. Negative affect and cortisol increased during final exams, but these increases were smaller in asthma. Greater initial depression and greater cortisol increases were related to larger FeNO decreases during the final exam period, the latter only in asthma. Inhaled corticosteroid use did not affect these changes. Psychological stress and depressive mood are accompanied by decreases in both FeNO and lung function in asthma. Fluctuations related to life stress and mood levels should be considered in FeNO monitoring for asthma.

  3. Nitric oxide production in the exhaled air of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in relation to HIV co-infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melese Endalkachew

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitric oxide (NO is essential for host defense in rodents, but the role of NO during tuberculosis (TB in man remains controversial. However, earlier observations that arginine supplementation facilitates anti-TB treatment, supports the hypothesis that NO is important in the host defense against TB. Local production of NO measured in fractional exhaled air (FeNO in TB patients with and without HIV co-infection has not been reported previously. Thus, our aim was to investigate levels of FeNO in relation to clinical symptoms and urinary NO metabolites (uNO. Methods In a cross sectional study, FeNO and uNO were measured and clinical symptoms, chest x-ray, together with serum levels of arginine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha and interleukin 12 (IL-12 were evaluated in sputum smear positive TB patients (HIV+/TB, n = 36, HIV-/TB, n = 59, their household contacts (n = 17 and blood donors (n = 46 from Gondar University Hospital, Ethiopia. Results The proportion of HIV-/TB patients with an increased FeNO level (> 25 ppb was significantly higher as compared to HIV+/TB patients, but HIV+/TB patients had significantly higher uNO than HIV-/TB patients. HIV+ and HIV-/TB patients both had lower levels of FeNO compared to blood donors and household contacts. The highest levels of both uNO and FeNO were found in household contacts. Less advanced findings on chest x-ray, as well as higher sedimentation rate were observed in HIV+/TB patients as compared to HIV-/TB patients. However, no significant correlation was found between FeNO and uNO, chest x-ray grading, clinical symptoms, TNF-alpha, IL-12, arginine levels or sedimentation rate. Conclusion In both HIV negative and HIV co infected TB patients, low levels of exhaled NO compared to blood donors and household were observed. Future studies are needed to confirm whether low levels of exhaled NO could be a risk factor in acquiring TB and the relative importance of NO in human TB.

  4. An acetone bio-sniffer (gas phase biosensor) enabling assessment of lipid metabolism from exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ming; Chien, Po-Jen; Toma, Koji; Arakawa, Takahiro; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2015-11-15

    Several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released from human breath or skin. Like chemical substances in blood or urine, some of these vapors can provide valuable information regarding the state of the human body. A highly sensitive acetone biochemical gas sensor (bio-sniffer) was developed and used to measure exhaled breath acetone concentration, and assess lipid metabolism based on breath acetone analysis. A fiber-optic biochemical gas sensing system was constructed by attaching a flow-cell with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (S-ADH) immobilized membrane onto a fiber-optic NADH measurement system. The NADH measurement system utilizes an ultraviolet-light emitting diode with peak emission of 335 nm as an excitation light source. NADH is consumed by the enzymatic reaction of S-ADH, and the consumption is proportional to the concentration of acetone vapor. Phosphate buffer which contained NADH was circulated into the flow-cell to rinse products and the excessive substrates from the optode. The change of fluorescent emitted from NADH is analyzed by the PMT. Hence, fluorescence intensity decreased as the acetone concentration increased. The relationship between fluorescence intensity and acetone concentration was identified from 20 ppb to 5300 ppb. This interval included the concentration of acetone vapor in the breath of healthy people and those suffering from disorders of carbohydrate metabolism. Finally, the acetone bio-sniffer was used to measure breath acetone during an exercise stress test on an ergometer after a period of fasting. The concentration of acetone in breath was shown to significantly increase after exercise. This biosensor allows rapid, highly sensitive and selective measurement of lipid metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A common variant in RAB27A gene is associated with fractional exhaled nitric oxide levels in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouzigon, E.; Nadif, R.; Thompson, E. E.; Concas, M. P.; Kuldanek, S.; Du, G.; Brossard, M.; Lavielle, N.; Sarnowski, C.; Vaysse, A.; Dessen, P.; van der Valk, R. J. P.; Duijts, L.; Henderson, A. J.; Jaddoe, V. W. V.; de Jongste, J. C.; Casula, S.; Biino, G.; Dizier, M. -H.; Pin, I.; Matran, R.; Lathrop, M.; Pirastu, M.; Demenais, F.; Ober, C.; Koppelman, G. H.; Kerkhof, Marjan

    BackgroundExhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) is a biomarker for eosinophilic inflammation in the airways and for responsiveness to corticosteroids in asthmatics. ObjectiveWe sought to identify in adults the genetic determinants of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) levels and to assess whether

  6. Exhalation of I-131 after radioiodine therapy: time dependence and chemical form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schomaecker, K.; Fischer, T.; Eschner, W.; Gaidouk, M.I.; Schicha, H.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: The change of both amount and chemical forms of radioiodine exhaled in the air of rooms with patients on the therapy ward should be investigated depending on radioactivity applied, time after application, and kind of thyroid disease. Methods: The air of ward-rooms of 62 patients with thyroid carcinoma, Graves' Disease, and autonomy which received different therapy doses, was investigated with an portable constant air flow sampler. Different chemical iodine species (organic, elemental, aerosol bound) were collected during 8 hr in various filters until 3 days after application of the radioiodine capsule, according to their chemical form. The radioactivity in the filters was measured with a well counter on defined time points after application. Results: The radioactivity exhaled was between 0,008 and 0,03% related to activity of radioiodine applied. The percentage of radioiodine exhaled related to the activity applied, differed significantly depending on disease and changed as follows: Grave's disease > autonomy > carcinoma. The exhalation of radioiodine became stronger with increasing applied activities and showed an exponential decrease with time. The most part of radioiodine was present in organic bound form. This organic portion decreased with time in favour of the other iodine species. Conclusion: The degree of accumulation of radioiodine orally applied within thyroid seems to be in direct proportion to the extend of its exhalation. Further measurements directly in the breathing air of RIT-patients are necessary, in order to clarify the relationship between degree of thyroid uptake and quantity as well as chemical form of radioiodine exhaled. (orig.) [de

  7. A model to predict radon exhalation from walls to indoor air based on the exhalation from building material samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, B K; Sapra, B K; Gaware, J J; Kanse, S D; Mayya, Y S

    2011-06-01

    In recognition of the fact that building materials are an important source of indoor radon, second only to soil, surface radon exhalation fluxes have been extensively measured from the samples of these materials. Based on this flux data, several researchers have attempted to predict the inhalation dose attributable to radon emitted from walls and ceilings made up of these materials. However, an important aspect not considered in this methodology is the enhancement of the radon flux from the wall or the ceiling constructed using the same building material. This enhancement occurs mainly because of the change in the radon diffusion process from the former to the latter configuration. To predict the true radon flux from the wall based on the flux data of building material samples, we now propose a semi-empirical model involving radon diffusion length and the physical dimensions of the samples as well as wall thickness as other input parameters. This model has been established by statistically fitting the ratio of the solution to radon diffusion equations for the cases of three-dimensional cuboidal shaped building materials (such as brick, concrete block) and one dimensional wall system to a simple mathematical function. The model predictions have been validated against the measurements made at a new construction site. This model provides an alternative tool (substitute to conventional 1-D model) to estimate radon flux from a wall without relying on ²²⁶Ra content, radon emanation factor and bulk density of the samples. Moreover, it may be very useful in the context of developing building codes for radon regulation in new buildings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Detection of nitric oxide in exhaled air using cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrzycki, R.; Wojtas, J.; Rutecka, B.; Bielecki, Z.

    2013-07-01

    The article describes an application one of the most sensitive optoelectronic method - Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy in investigation of nitric oxide in exhaled breath. Measurement of nitric oxide concentration in exhaled breath is a quantitative, non-invasive, simple, and safe method of respiratory inflammation and asthma diagnosis. For detection of nitric oxide by developed optoelectronic sensor the vibronic molecular transitions were used. The wavelength ranges of these transitions are situated in the infrared spectral region. A setup consists of the optoelectronic nitric oxide sensor integrated with sampling and sample conditioning unit. The constructed detection system provides to measure nitric oxide in a sample of 0-97% relative humidity.

  9. Radon mass exhalation rate in soil samples at South Bengaluru city, Karnataka, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poojitha, C.G.; Pranesha, T.S.; Ganesh, K.E.; Sahoo, B.K.; Sapra, B.K.

    2017-01-01

    Radon mass exhalation rate in soil samples collected from different locations of South Bengaluru city were measured using scintillation based Smart radon thoron monitor (RnDuo). It has been observed that the mass exhalation rate estimated due to presence of radon concentration in soil samples ranges from 39.18 - 265.58 mBq/kg/h with an average value of 115.64 mBq/kg/h. Finally we compare our results with similar investigation from different parts of India. (author)

  10. On Data Fit of Accumulation Method for Measuring Radon Exhalation Rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Yanliang; Xiao Detao; Zhao Guizhi; Zhou Qingzhi

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of data linear fit and non-linear fit of accumulation method for measuring radon exhalation rate by least squares method, we find that the two kind data fit methods are not equivalent, but the difference of calculation results is less. When the precision of repetitious measurement is equal, gained radon exhalation by non-linear fit from the radon concentration measured in equal time interval, it value of excellent value function is minimum. It indicated that the result by non-linear fit may be more approached the fact. (authors)

  11. Impacts of Modelling Simplifications on Predicted Dispersion of Human Expiratory Droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Xu, Chunwen

    2016-01-01

    simplifying the room air condition into isothermal condition, or neglecting the body plume of the manikin. It will also change the microenvironment completely by simplifying the shape of human grid in to a robot shape. The trajectories of both the exhalation airflows and droplet nuclei are significantly...... different from a detailed shape of human body and mouth........ The exhalation airflows are compared and validated by measurement results of human subjects. The flow field between two manikins are found significantly influenced by their exhalation airflows. Mono-dispersed droplets with an initial diameter of 10 μm are released from one breathe of a manikin. All droplets...

  12. The relationships among Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus exposure, exhaled nitric oxide, and exhaled breath condensate pH levels in atopic asthmatic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dah-Chin; Chung, Fen-Fang; Lin, Syh-Jae; Wan, Gwo-Hwa

    2016-09-01

    This study examined seasonal changes in indoor Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus 1 (Der p 1)/Blattella germanica 1 (Bla g 1) antigen concentrations in the homes of atopic asthmatic and atopic nonasthmatic children. Possible associations between environmental allergen exposure and levels of exhaled breath indices were also evaluated.A total of 38 atopic children were recruited for this cross-sectional study: 22 were asthmatic and 16 were nonasthmatic. Home visits were conducted for indoor air and dust sampling each season. Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO)/spirometric measurements were taken and exhaled breath condensate (EBC) was collected after sampling of the domestic environment.The highest Der p 1 concentrations were on the top of mattresses in the homes of recruited children. The floors of kitchens and living rooms had the highest Bla g 1 concentrations in the homes of atopic asthmatic children. A positive correlation was found between Der p 1 exposure of mattress, bedroom floor, and living room floor and eNO levels in the atopic asthmatic children. The Der p 1 concentrations on the surfaces of mattress and bedroom floor were positively related to high eNO levels in the atopic asthmatic children after adjusting for season. No association was found between Der p 1 exposure and EBC pH values in the recruited children.A positive correlation was found between Der p 1 exposure and high eNO levels in atopic asthmatic children, especially in Der p 1 exposure of mattress and bedroom floor.

  13. Determination of hexavalent chromium in exhaled breath condensate and environmental air among chrome plating workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldoni, Matteo [Laboratory of Industrial Toxicology, Department of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Health Sciences, University of Parma, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); National Institute of Occupational Safety and Prevention, Research Centre at University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Caglieri, Andrea [Laboratory of Industrial Toxicology, Department of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Health Sciences, University of Parma, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Poli, Diana [Laboratory of Industrial Toxicology, Department of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Health Sciences, University of Parma, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); National Institute of Occupational Safety and Prevention, Research Centre at University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Vettori, Maria Vittoria [Laboratory of Industrial Toxicology, Department of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Health Sciences, University of Parma, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); National Institute of Occupational Safety and Prevention, Research Centre at University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Corradi, Massimo [Laboratory of Industrial Toxicology, Department of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Health Sciences, University of Parma, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); National Institute of Occupational Safety and Prevention, Research Centre at University of Parma, Parma (Italy); Apostoli, Pietro [Laboratory of Industrial Hygiene, Department of Experimental and Applied Medicine, University of Brescia (Italy); Mutti, Antonio [Laboratory of Industrial Toxicology, Department of Clinical Medicine, Nephrology and Health Sciences, University of Parma, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy)]. E-mail: antonio.mutti@unipr.it

    2006-03-15

    Chromium speciation has attracted attention because of the different toxicity of Cr(III), which is considered relatively non-toxic, and Cr(VI), which can cross cell membranes mainly as a chromate anion and has been classified as a class I human carcinogen. The aims of the present study were to measure soluble Cr(VI) levels in environmental samples, to develop a simple method of quantifying Cr(VI) in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), and to follow the kinetics of EBC Cr(VI) in chrome plating workers. Personal air samples were collected from 10 chrome platers; EBC was collected from the same workers immediately after the work shift on Tuesday and before the work shift on the following Wednesday. Environmental and EBC Cr(VI) levels were determined by means of colorimetry and electrothermal absorption atomic spectrometry, respectively. The method of detecting Cr(VI) in environmental air was based on the extraction of the Cr(VI)-diphenylcarbazide (Cr(VI)-DPC) complex in 1-butanol, whereas EBC Cr(VI) was determined using a solvent extraction of Cr(VI) as an ion pair with tetrabutylammonium ion, and subsequent direct determination of the complex (Cr(VI)-DPC) in EBC. Kinetic data showed that airborne Cr(VI) was reduced by 50% in airway lining fluid sampled at the end of exposure and that there was a further 50% reduction after about 15 h. The persistence of Cr(VI) in EBC supports the use of EBC in assessing target tissue levels of Cr(VI)

  14. Short-term effects of electronic and tobacco cigarettes on exhaled nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Sara; Buonanno, Giorgio; Stabile, Luca; Ficco, Giorgio

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the short-term respiratory effects due to the inhalation of electronic and conventional tobacco cigarette-generated mainstream aerosols through the measurement of the exhaled nitric oxide (eNO). To this purpose, twenty-five smokers were asked to smoke a conventional cigarette and to vape an electronic cigarette (with and without nicotine), and an electronic cigarette without liquid (control session). Electronic and tobacco cigarette mainstream aerosols were characterized in terms of total particle number concentrations and size distributions. On the basis of the measured total particle number concentrations and size distributions, the average particle doses deposited in alveolar and tracheobronchial regions of the lungs for a single 2-s puff were also estimated considering a subject performing resting (sitting) activity. Total particle number concentrations in the mainstream resulted equal to 3.5±0.4×10(9), 5.1±0.1×10(9), and 3.1±0.6×10(9) part. cm(-3) for electronic cigarettes without nicotine, with nicotine, and for conventional cigarettes, respectively. The corresponding alveolar doses for a resting subject were estimated equal to 3.8×10(10), 5.2×10(10) and 2.3×10(10) particles. The mean eNO variations measured after each smoking/vaping session were equal to 3.2ppb, 2.7ppb and 2.8ppb for electronic cigarettes without nicotine, with nicotine, and for conventional cigarettes, respectively; whereas, negligible eNO changes were measured in the control session. Statistical tests performed on eNO data showed statistically significant differences between smoking/vaping sessions and the control session, thus confirming a similar effect on human airways whatever the cigarette smoked/vaped, the nicotine content, and the particle dose received. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Determination of hexavalent chromium in exhaled breath condensate and environmental air among chrome plating workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldoni, Matteo; Caglieri, Andrea; Poli, Diana; Vettori, Maria Vittoria; Corradi, Massimo; Apostoli, Pietro; Mutti, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Chromium speciation has attracted attention because of the different toxicity of Cr(III), which is considered relatively non-toxic, and Cr(VI), which can cross cell membranes mainly as a chromate anion and has been classified as a class I human carcinogen. The aims of the present study were to measure soluble Cr(VI) levels in environmental samples, to develop a simple method of quantifying Cr(VI) in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), and to follow the kinetics of EBC Cr(VI) in chrome plating workers. Personal air samples were collected from 10 chrome platers; EBC was collected from the same workers immediately after the work shift on Tuesday and before the work shift on the following Wednesday. Environmental and EBC Cr(VI) levels were determined by means of colorimetry and electrothermal absorption atomic spectrometry, respectively. The method of detecting Cr(VI) in environmental air was based on the extraction of the Cr(VI)-diphenylcarbazide (Cr(VI)-DPC) complex in 1-butanol, whereas EBC Cr(VI) was determined using a solvent extraction of Cr(VI) as an ion pair with tetrabutylammonium ion, and subsequent direct determination of the complex (Cr(VI)-DPC) in EBC. Kinetic data showed that airborne Cr(VI) was reduced by 50% in airway lining fluid sampled at the end of exposure and that there was a further 50% reduction after about 15 h. The persistence of Cr(VI) in EBC supports the use of EBC in assessing target tissue levels of Cr(VI)

  16. The use of the exhaled Thoron activity measurement system in the field of radiological labor hygiene of NORM and its future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Yong-e; Chen, Xing-an

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a brief description of the basic characteristics of an exhaled thoron measurement system and its use in the study of the health effects and its protection measures of the miners inhaled thorium dusts in the Bayun Obo Iron Mine in recent twenty years. The method we used is to measure the thorium lung burden of each miner by using an exhaled thoron activity measurement system. An epidemiological study of lung cancer mortality, physical examination (including peripheral blood counts, hepatic function test, X-ray radiograph, lung function test) of each miner were also carried out. Results showed that the relationship between the thorium lung burden and it health effects were obtained. It was the first time that we found if any miner.s thorium lung burden not higher than 11.11 Bq, his peripheral blood counts and hepatic functions will not be affected. It was also the first time that we found if any miners. thorium-containing lung burden reached a value of 755 mg, 0 + stage pneumoconiosis would be suffered. It is concluded that the exhaled thoron activity measurement system could be used in monitoring the thorium lung burden of the workers inhaling thorium-containing dusts at any thorium dust generating factories; in monitoring the thorium contamination of the inhabitants living around the thorium dust generating factories; in judging the efficiency of agents using in accelerating the excretion of thorium compounds from the human body; in preventing the thorium dust exposed miners suffered from the pneumoconiosis; in monitoring the thorium contamination in the lung of the staffs and workers working at the different spots of the cycle of thorium nuclear reactor development. (author)

  17. The effect of the composition and production process of concrete on the 222Rn exhalation rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, P. de; Dijk, W. van; Hulst, J.G.A. van; Heijningen, R.J.J. van

    1997-01-01

    In a series of 18 concrete samples, the influence of several parameters related to composition and production processes on the radon exhalation rate was studied. The investigated parameters were: amount and type of cement, water-cement ratio, curing conditions and curing time, type of aggregates,

  18. Effects of breath holding at low and high lung volumes on amount of exhaled particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Helene; Gerth, Emilie; Ljungström, Evert; Larsson, Per; Almstrand, Ann-Charlotte; Bake, Björn; Olin, Anna-Carin

    2013-01-15

    Exhaled breath contains particles originating from the respiratory tract lining fluid. The particles are thought to be generated during inhalation, by reopening of airways closed in the preceding expiration. The aim here was to explore processes that control exhaled particle concentrations. The results show that 5 and 10s breath holding at residual volume increased the median concentration of particles in exhaled air by 63% and 110%, respectively, averaged over 10 subjects. An increasing number of closed airways, developing on a timescale of seconds explains this behaviour. Breath holds of 5, 10 and 20s at total lung capacity decreased the concentration to 63%, 45% and 28% respectively, of the directly exhaled concentration. The decrease in particle concentration after breath holding at total lung capacity is caused by gravitational settling in the alveoli and associated bronchioles. The geometry employed here when modelling the deposition is however not satisfactory and ways of improving the description are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Exhaled nitric oxide in spray painters exposed to isocyanates : Effect modification by atopy and smoking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonaid, Badri Sadat; Pronk, Anjoeka; Doekes, Gert; Heederik, Dick

    2014-01-01

    Background: Isocyanate asthma is one of the most frequently identified forms of occupational asthma in industrialised countries. The underlying mechanisms have not been clarified. There is only limited information about the relationship between exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) and occupational exposure to

  20. Exhaled nitric oxide in spray painters exposed to isocyanates: Effect modification by atopy and smoking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonaid, B.S.; Pronk, A.; Doekes, G.; Heederik, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Isocyanate asthma is one of the most frequently identified forms of occupational asthma in industrialised countries. The underlying mechanisms have not been clarified. There is only limited information about the relationship between exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) and occupational exposure to

  1. Control of exposure to exhaled air from sick occupant with wearable personal exhaust unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Barova, Maria I.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure reduction to exhaled air from a sick doctor wearing personal exhaust unit incorporated in headset-microphone was studied. Experiments were performed in a full-scale test room furnished as a double-bed hospital room with overhead ventilation at 3, 6 and 12 ACH. Room air temperature was 22...

  2. Radon-222 exhalation from Danish building materials: H + H Industri A/S results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Erik

    1999-01-01

    rate measurements for 10 samples of Danish building materials are reported. Samples include ordinary concrete, lightweight aggregate concrete,autoclaved aerated concrete, bricks, and gypsum board. The maximum mass-specific exhalation rate is about 20 m Bq h"-"1 kg "-"1. Under consideration...

  3. The concentration distributions of some metabolites in the exhaled breath of young adults

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Španěl, Patrik; Dryahina, Kseniya; Smith, D.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 1, - (2007), 026001 ISSN 1752-7155 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/06/0776 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : metabolites * exhaled breath * concentration distributions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  4. Variations in exhaled nitric oxide concentration after three types of dives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooij, Pieter-Jan; Houtkooper, Antoinette; van Hulst, Rob

    2010-01-01

    An increase in exhaled nitric oxide concentration (FENO) occurs during an exacerbation of chronic obstructive lung disease or other inflammatory processes of the airway. Raised FENO levels are also observed during normobaric, mild hyperoxic exposures, whereas after hyperbaric hyperoxic exposure the

  5. Design and test of an artificial reference cow to simulate methane release through exhalation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Liansun; Groot Koerkamp, P.W.G.; Ogink, N.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    To mitigate methane emission from dairy cows, a technique is needed to evaluate individual methane emission from a large number of cows under practical conditions in barns. For developing such a measurement technique, a known reference source that can simulate cow exhalation of methane would be a

  6. SIFT-MS Analysis of Nose-Exhaled Breath; Mouth Contamination and the Influence of Exercise

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, D.; Chippendale, T. W. E.; Dryahina, Kseniya; Španěl, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2013 (2013), s. 565-575 ISSN 1573-4110 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry * breath analysis * nose exhalation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.194, year: 2013

  7. An efficient and reproducible method for measuring hydrogen peroxide in exhaled breath condensate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurden, W.J.C van; Harff, G.A.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Bosch, M.J. van den; Creemers, J.P.H.M.; Smeenk, F.J.M.W.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the sensitivity and reproducibility of a test procedure for measuring hydrogen peroxide (H202) in exhaled breath condensate and the effect of storage of the condensate on the H2O2 concentration, and compared the results to previous studies.Twenty stable COPD patients breathed into

  8. Can volatile compounds in exhaled breath be used to monitor control in diabetes mellitus?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, D.; Španěl, Patrik; Fryer, A. A.; Hanna, F.; Ferns, G. A. A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2011), 022001 ISSN 1752-7155 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : exhaled breath * diabetes mellitus * SIFT-MS Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.541, year: 2011

  9. New perspectives in monitoring lung inflammation: analysis of exhaled breath condensate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Montuschi, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    ... diseases might be relevant to differential diagnosis. Given its noninvasiveness, this method might be suitable for longitudinal studies in patients with lung disease, including children. This book provides an introduction to the analysis of exhaled breath condensate. To provide an overview of lung inflammation, basic and clinical pharmacology of leukotrie...

  10. NO in exhaled air of asthmatic children is reduced by the leukotriene receptor antagonist montelukast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Loland, L; Oj, J A

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide in exhaled air (FENO) is increased in asthmatic children, probably reflecting aspects of airway inflammation. We have studied the effect of the leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA) montelukast on FENO with a view to elucidate potential anti-inflammatory properties of LTRAs. Twenty-...

  11. Exhalation of radon and thoron from phosphogypsum uses as building material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanmarcke, H.

    1996-01-01

    The radioactive properties of two types of phosphogypsum, were determined. Gypsum plates with different thickness were produced. The 226 Ra and 232 Th concentrations were measured by means of high resolution gamma spectrometry. The results are for type 1 226 Ra: 75 Bq/kg and 232 Th 230 Bq/kg and for type 2 226 Ra: 155 Bq/kg and 232 Th: 160 Bq/kg. The radon ( 222 Rn) exhalation rate was evaluated by closing the plates in airtight barrels and measuring the radon concentration. The exhalation rate of type 1 is 1.2 10-5 Bq/(kg s) and type 2 4.7 10-5 Bq/(kg s). In combination with the 226 Ra concentration an emanating fraction of respectively 7.6% and 14% is obtained. The 222 Rn (thoron) exhalation of the plates was determined by measuring the concentration of the decay products in a chamber of 1 m 3 with normal aerosol concentrations. The exhalation rate was found to be independent of the thickness of the plates, as expected from the short half-life of 220 Rn. Covering the entire surface of the plates with two layers of a common Latex paint decreased the thoron exhalation by a factor of 10 to 20. The laboratory results for the radon and thoron exhalation were converted using realistic assumptions for a room. The contribution of phosphogypsum to the average radon concentration in a room is found to be about 1 Bq/m 3 for type 1 and 4 Bq/m 3 for type 2 resulting in an annual effective dose of the order of 0.1 mSv/year. The contribution to the effective dose from the thoron exhalation is much greater, namely, 1.8 mSv/year for type I and 0.9 mSv/year for type 2. Painting the gypsum lowers the thoron dose by a factor of 10 to 20 making the thoron dose comparable to that of radon. (author)

  12. Natural radioactivity content and radon exhalation from materials used for construction and decoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngachin, M.; Garavaglia, M.; Giovani, C.; Scruzzi, E.; Kwato Njock, M.G.; Nourreddine, A.

    2007-02-01

    The present work deals with the measurement of radioactivity and radon exhalation rate from geological samples manufactured in Douala city and used as building materials. Nine types of building materials were surveyed for their natural radioactivity content using a hyper purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The absorbed dose rate in the samples investigated ranged from 28.5 to 66.6 nGy h -1 for brick samples, from 32.4 to 63.1 nGy h -1 for roofing tiles and was 30.3 nGy h -1 for concrete. External and internal hazard indexes were also estimated as defined by the European Commission. The study of radon exhalation rate from building materials is important for well understanding the individual contribution of each material to the total indoor radon exposure. Solid state nuclear track detectors, CR-39 were used for measuring the radon concentration from different materials. Samples were hermetically closed in glass vessels and the radon growth was followed as a function of time. Exploring the one-dimension radon transport equation, we derived the radon exhalation rate from the experimental measurement of α-track densities. The radon exhalation varied from (5.77±0.06) x 10 -5 to (7.61±0.07) x 10 -5 Bq cm -2 h -1 in bricks, from (5.79±0.05) x 10 -5 to (11.6±0.12) x 10 -5 in tiles and was (6.95±0.03) x 10 -5 Bq cm -2 h -1 in concrete. A positive correlation was found between uranium concentration measured with HPGe detector radon exhalation rate and radium content obtained using nuclear track detectors. (author)

  13. Phosphogypsum recycling in the building materials industry: assessment of the radon exhalation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, M P; Costa, L J P; Nisti, M B; Mazzilli, B P

    2017-06-01

    Phosphogypsum can be classified as a Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) residue of the phosphate fertilizer industry. One of the main environmental concerns of its use as building material is the radon exhalation. The aim of this study is to measure the radon exhalation rate from plates and bricks manufactured with phosphogypsum from three installations of the main Brazilian producer, Vale Fertilizantes, in order to evaluate the additional health risk to dwellers. A simple and reliable accumulator method involving a PVC pipe sealed with a PVC pipe cover commercially available with CR-39 radon detector into a diffusion chamber was used for measuring radon exhalation rate from phosphogypsum made plates and bricks. The radon exhalation rate from plates varied from 0.19 ± 0.06 Bq m -2 h -1 , for phosphogypsum from Bunge Fertilizers, from 1.3 ± 0.3 Bq m -2 h -1 , for phosphogypsum from Ultrafertil. As for the bricks, the results ranged from 0.11 ± 0.01 Bq m -2 h -1 , for phosphogypsum from Bunge Fertilizers, to 1.2 ± 0.3 Bq m -2 h -1 , for phosphogypsum from Ultrafertil. The results obtained in this study for the radon exhalation rate from phosphogypsum plates and bricks are of the same order of magnitude than those from ordinary building materials. So, it can be concluded that the recycling of phosphogypsum as building material is a safe practice, since no additional health risk is expected from the radiological point of view. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Measurements of Dermal and Oral Emissions from Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsushima, Sayana; Bekö, Gabriel; Bossi, Rossana

    2016-01-01

    Human related pollutants (bioeffluents) emitted through skin and via exhaled breath were measured. Two climate chambers were connected via flexible ducts. The ducts were in one chamber attached to a breathing mask, through which five subjects exhaled on one occasion the air into the other chamber......: Human bioeffluents emitted orally were in this way isolated from those that were emitted dermally. On another occasion, the subjects exhaled the air into the chamber where they were sitting, thus exposure contained oral and dermal bioeffluents. Another twenty subjects assessed the air quality...... in the chambers. They judged the air quality in the chamber with dermal bioeffluents to be lower than in the one containing orally exhaled bioeffluents, and similar to the air quality in the chamber with all bioeffluents. The chemical compounds with slightly elevated concentrations differed between the two...

  15. Variability of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) volume and pH using a feedback regulated breathing pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is a valuable biological medium for non-invasively measuring biomarkers with the potential to reflect organ systems responses to environmental and dietary exposures and disease processes. Collection of EBC has typically been with spontaneous breat...

  16. Integration of electronic nose technology with spirometry: validation of a new approach for exhaled breath analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, R; Brinkman, P; van der Schee, M P; Fens, N; Dijkers, E; Bootsma, S K; de Jongh, F H C; Sterk, P J

    2015-10-15

    New 'omics'-technologies have the potential to better define airway disease in terms of pathophysiological and clinical phenotyping. The integration of electronic nose (eNose) technology with existing diagnostic tests, such as routine spirometry, can bring this technology to 'point-of-care'. We aimed to determine and optimize the technical performance and diagnostic accuracy of exhaled breath analysis linked to routine spirometry. Exhaled breath was collected in triplicate in healthy subjects by an eNose (SpiroNose) based on five identical metal oxide semiconductor sensor arrays (three arrays monitoring exhaled breath and two reference arrays monitoring ambient air) at the rear end of a pneumotachograph. First, the influence of flow, volume, humidity, temperature, environment, etc, was assessed. Secondly, a two-centre case-control study was performed using diagnostic and monitoring visits in day-to-day clinical care in patients with a (differential) diagnosis of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or lung cancer. Breathprint analysis involved signal processing, environment correction based on alveolar gradients and statistics based on principal component (PC) analysis, followed by discriminant analysis (Matlab2014/SPSS20). Expiratory flow showed a significant linear correlation with raw sensor deflections (R(2)  =  0.84) in 60 healthy subjects (age 43  ±  11 years). No correlation was found between sensor readings and exhaled volume, humidity and temperature. Exhaled data after environment correction were highly reproducible for each sensor array (Cohen's Kappa 0.81-0.94). Thirty-seven asthmatics (41  ±  14.2 years), 31 COPD patients (66  ±  8.4 years), 31 lung cancer patients (63  ±  10.8 years) and 45 healthy controls (41  ±  12.5 years) entered the cross-sectional study. SpiroNose could adequately distinguish between controls, asthma, COPD and lung cancer patients with cross-validation values

  17. Study of different factors which can explain the radon exhalation potential of soils; Recherche de differents parametres caracterisant le potentiel d`exhalation en radon des sols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demongeot, St

    1997-10-27

    Radon is a natural radioactive gas belonging to the Uranium-238 chain, which is present in the earth crust and produced by the disintegration of radium-226. It is considered as the major source of radiological exposure of man to natural radiation because it can accumulate in indoor atmosphere. So, this health risk must be take into account.The aim of this study is to find some tools in order to identify high radon level area. The first part of this study has consisted in measurement of radon emission from different not sufficient for the estimation of the radon exhalation potential in a given area. In the second part of this work, we have studied the variations of in situ radon concentration as a function of different geological and pedologic parameters of the site. With the results obtained, we have determined the data which have to be considered, and the methodology to be applied for the determination of the radon exhalation of a given area. Furthermore, by the mean of numerical simulations (TRACH Model), it was possible to know the scale of radon flux variation in a given point versus the hydric state of the ground and thus the permeability: these parameters are not easy to measure because of their variabilities with time. The methodology ESPERAS (EStimation du Potential d`Exhalation en Radon des Sols) developed during this work was applied first, at a local scale and then to greater area. The values estimated by this way are in a good agreement with the results of measurements. So, we can determine the areas which are affected by high radon levels. (author)

  18. The clinical use of exhaled nitric oxide in wheezing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Martins

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The body of published work on the role of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO in the study of bronchial inflammation allows it to be classed as a simple, non-invasive measurement that is very useful in evaluating asthmatic patients.During a prospective study into the effects of air pollution on the health of the population of Viseu (Saud’AR Project, children with a clinical history of wheezing were identified through using the International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood (ISAAC questionnaire. Children later filled in a new standardised questionnaire and underwent skin-prick-tests, spirometry and FENO measurement. Their mean age was 7.8 ± 1.1 years. Comparing those who wheezed in the 6 months before evaluation (n = 27 with those who didn’t, statistical differences for ΔFEV1 (8% median versus 4.5%, p = 0.0399 and for FENO (23 ppb median versus 12 ppb, p = 0.0195, respectively were observed. Concerning children who needed a bronchodilator in the six previous months (n = 19 and those who didn’t, there was also a statistically significant difference in FENO: 27 ppb median versus 11 ppb median, respectively; p < 0.0001. When comparing children who needed an unscheduled medical appointment in the six months previous to the evaluation (n = 9 and those who didn’t, there was also significant differences for FENO: 28 ppb median versus 13 ppb median, p = 0.0029. In conclusion, the existence of symptoms seems to be better related to FENO than spirometry. Resumo: Encontram-se publicados múltiplos trabalhos sobre o papel das determinações do óxido nítrico no ar exalado (FENO no âmbito do estudo da inflamação brônquica que nos permitem afirmar que se trata duma medição simples, não invasiva e de grande utilidade na avaliação do doente asmático.No decurso de um estudo prospectivo sobre o impacto da poluição do ar sobre a saúde da

  19. Investigation of the Radon exhalation potential in the PACA region. Phase II: case of high potential exhalation areas in Medium Champsaur (05) and South Esterel (83). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    After having recalled the results of the first phase of the study and the objectives of the second phase, the authors present the methodology: uranium and thorium analysis on rock, radon-222 activity measurement in soil gases, and gamma radiation measurement. They discuss the influence of rock uranium content on radon exhalation (natural contextual and physical phenomena governing radon transport, radon properties, uranium geochemistry). They report the results obtained in the two considered areas (meteorological conditions, radon 222 content in soils, uranium and thorium contents in geological formations, influence of geological formation type and distribution on radon activity)

  20. Effect of exhalation exercise on trunk muscle activity and oswestry disability index of patients with chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Jeong-Il; Jeong, Dae-Keun; Choi, Hyun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of exhalation exercises on trunk muscle activity and Oswestry Disability Index by inducing trunk muscle activity through increasing intra-abdominal pressure and activating muscles, contributing to spinal stability. [Subjects and Methods] This intervention program included 20 male patients with chronic low back pain. A total of 10 subjects each were randomly assigned to an exhalation exercise group as the experimental group and a spinal stabilizatio...

  1. Online Measurement of Exhaled NO Concentration and Its Production Sites by Fast Non-equilibrium Dilution Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Liying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Zhenxin; Liu, Jiwei; Li, Haiyang

    2016-03-01

    Exhaled nitric oxide (NO) is one of the most promising breath markers for respiratory diseases. Its profile for exhalation and the respiratory NO production sites can provide useful information for medical disease diagnosis and therapeutic procedures. However, the high-level moisture in exhaled gas always leads to the poor selectivity and sensitivity for ion spectrometric techniques. Herein, a method based on fast non-equilibrium dilution ion mobility spectrometry (NED-IMS) was firstly proposed to directly monitor the exhaled NO profile on line. The moisture interference was eliminated by turbulently diluting the original moisture to 21% of the original with the drift gas and dilution gas. Weak enhancement was observed for humid NO response and its limit of detection at 100% relative humidity was down to 0.58 ppb. The NO concentrations at multiple exhalation flow rates were measured, while its respiratory production sites were determined by using two-compartment model (2CM) and Högman and Meriläinen algorithm (HMA). Last but not the least, the NO production sites were analyzed hourly to tentatively investigate the daily physiological process of NO. The results demonstrated the capacity of NED-IMS in the real-time analysis of exhaled NO and its production sites for clinical diagnosis and assessment.

  2. Measurement of radon exhalation rate and soil gas radon concentration in areas of southern Punjab (Pakistan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujahid, S. A.; Hussain, S.; Ramzan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Plastic track detectors were used to measure the radon concentration and exhalation rate from the soil samples. The samples were collected from areas of southern Punjab (Pakistan). In a laboratory experiment, passive alpha dosemeters were installed inside cylindrical bottles containing the soil samples. The radon concentrations and the radon exhalation rate were found in the ranges of 34±7 to 260±42 Bq m -3 and 38±8 to 288±46 mBq m -2 h -1 , respectively. The on-site measurements of radon in the soil gas were also carried out in these areas using a scintillation alpha counter. The concentration of radon in the soil gas was found in the range of 423±82-3565±438 Bq m -3 . (authors)

  3. Determination of the exhalation rate of radon and thoron from building materials by detectors Cr-39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasidov, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The building materials (BM) such as granite, bricks, sand, cement etc., contain uranium and thorium in various amounts. Therefore the knowledge of true value exhalation rate of Rn and Tn from BM represents scientific and practical interest in environmental radiation protection. In present work, we have used calibrated plastic cups with two detectors Cr-39. The detected surface of the cup is situated in perpendicular position surface BM and were exposed for 20-30 days. The first detector fixed the bottom on distance from surface of BM and records alpha particles from Rn-222 only. The second detector records alpha particles of the thoron and radon. After exposition, the detectors chemically etched and analyzed. The values of the exhalation rate per unit area of the granite, concrete, fired and unfired bricks, sand, cement, alabaster varied 0.091 - 0.1 Bq m -2 h -1 for the radon, 200 - 5800 Bq m -2 h - 1 for the thoron, accordingly

  4. Modelling radiation exposure in homes from siporex blocks by using exhalation rates of radon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Mladen D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Building materials are the second major source of indoor radon, after soil. The contribution of building materials to indoor radon amount depends upon the radium content and exhalation rates, which can be used as a primary index for radon levels in the dwellings. This paper presents the results of using the experimentally determined exhalation rates of siporex blocks and concrete plates, to assess the radiation exposure in dwellings built of siporex blocks. The annual doses in rooms have been estimated depending on the established modes of ventilation. Realistic scenario was created to predict an annual effective dose for an old person, a housewife, a student, and an employed tenant, who live in the same apartment, spending different periods of time in it. The results indicate the crucial importance of good ventilation of the living space.

  5. Study of radon exhalation from phosphogypsum plates and blocks from different origins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Lucas Jose Pereira da

    2011-01-01

    Phosphogypsum is a waste of the fertilizer industry that concentrates radionuclides. In this work, the 222 Rn exhalation rate from phosphogypsum plates and blocks from different origins used at dwellings construction was studied. The 222 Rn exhalation rate was determined through the accumulation chamber technique with solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD). The effective dose for an individual living in a residence built with phosphogypsum based materials was evaluated. It also was calculated the 222 Rn exhalation rate through the UNSCEAR model, from the 226 Ra concentration in the materials, in order to compare the experimental results. It was evaluated the contribution of building component (paint) to the reduction of 222 Rn exhalation rate. The plates and blocks were manufactured with phosphogypsum from Bunge Fertilizantes, Ultrafertil and Fosfertil. Blocks manufactured with ordinary gypsum was also evaluated. The average results obtained were 0.19 ± 0.06 Bq m-2 h-1, 1.3 ± 0.3 Bq m -2 h -1 and 0.41 ± 0.07 Bq m -2 h -1 for plates manufactured with phosphogypsum from Bunge Fertilizer, Ultrafertil and Fosfertil, respectively. For the phosphogypsum blocks the values were 0.11 ± 0.01 Bq m -2 h-1, 1.2 ± 0.6 Bq m -2 h -1 , 0.47 ± 0.15 Bq m -2 h -1 , for Bunge, Ultrafertil and Fosfertil. The blocks manufactured with ordinary gypsum presented average value of 0.18 ± 0.08 Bq m -2 h'- 1 . All phosphogypsum plates and blocks evaluated in this study presented effective dose for radon inhalation lower than the recommended value of 1mSv y -1 , the annual effective dose limit for public exposure by International Commission on Radiological Protection. (author)

  6. Exhalation of volatile organic compounds during hemorrhagic shock and reperfusion in rats: an exploratory trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüppe, Tobias; Lorenz, Dominik; Maurer, Felix; Albrecht, Frederic W; Schnauber, Kristina; Wolf, Beate; Sessler, Daniel I; Volk, Thomas; Fink, Tobias; Kreuer, Sascha

    2016-03-14

    Ischemia and reperfusion alter metabolism. Multi-capillary column ion-mobility spectrometry (MCC-IMS) can identify volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled gas. We therefore used MCC-IMS to evaluate exhaled gas in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock with reperfusion. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n  =  10 in control group, n  =  15 in intervention group) were anaesthetized and ventilated via tracheostomy for 14 h or until death. Hemorrhagic shock was maintained for 90 min by removing blood from the femoral artery to a target of MAP 35  ±  5 mmHg, and then retransfusing the blood over 60 min in 15 rats; 10 control rats were evaluated without shock and reperfusion. Exhaled gas was analyzed with MCC-IMS, VOCs were identified using the BS-MCC/IMS analytes database (Version 1209). VOC intensities were analyzed at the end of shock, end of reperfusion, and after 9 h. All normotensive animals survived the observation period, whereas mean survival time was 11.2 h in shock and reperfusion animals. 16 VOCs differed significantly for at least one of the three analysis periods. Peak intensities of butanone, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, nonanal, and an unknown compound were higher in shocked than normotensive rats, and another unknown compound increased over the time. 1-butanol increased only during reperfusion. Acetone, butanal, 1.2-butandiol, isoprene, 3-methylbutanal, 3-pentanone, 2-propanol, and two unknown compounds were lower and decreased during shock and reperfusion. 1-pentanol and 1-propanol were significant greater in the hypotensive animals during shock, were comparable during reperfusion, and then decreased after resuscitation. VOCs differ during hemorrhagic shock, reperfusion, and after reperfusion. MCC-IMS of exhaled breath deserves additional study as a non-invasive approach for monitoring changes in metabolism during ischemia and reperfusion.

  7. Airway inflammation, exhaled nitric oxide, and severity of asthma in patients with western red cedar asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan-Yeung, M; Obata, H; Dittrick, M; Chan, H; Abboud, R

    1999-05-01

    Examination of induced sputum and measurement of exhaled NO have been advocated as noninvasive methods of assessing the degree of airway inflammation. In this study, we performed follow-up evaluation on 71 subjects with asthma caused by exposure to Western red cedar; 50 subjects had left exposure, whereas the rest continued to work in the same job. Spirometry, methacholine challenge tests, exhaled nitric oxide, and sputum induction were carried out. Of the 50 subjects who left exposure, 12 had no respiratory impairment according to the American Throacic Society guidelines for assessing respiratory impairment in patients with asthma, 17 belonged to Class 1, 12 to Class 2, five to Class 3, and four to Class 4. The percentage of eosinophils in induced sputum showed a significant inverse relationship with FEV1 (r = -0.46, p < 0.001), and a significant positive correlation with levels of exhaled NO (r = 0.42, p < 0.001) and with the class of respiratory impairment (r = 0.52, p < 0.001). Mean percent eosinophils were 1.5 for impairment Class 0, 2.2 for Class 1, 1.7 for Class 2, 6.8 for Class 3, and 16.3 for Class 4. No relationship was found between the levels of exhaled NO and the functional parameters as well as the impairment class. NO levels in ppb were 21 for impairment Class 0, 30 for Class 1, 22 for Class 2, 26 for Class 3, and 49 for Class 4. This study also provides objective evidence that airway inflammation, as indicated by induced sputum, corroborates the rating of respiratory impairment in patients with asthma.

  8. Spirometry effects on conventional and multiple flow exhaled nitric oxide in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Sandrah P; Linn, William S; Salam, Muhammad T; Bastain, Theresa M; Zhang, Yue; Rappaport, Edward B; Liu, Meng; Berhane, Kiros

    2015-03-01

    Clinical and research settings often require sequencing multiple respiratory tests in a brief visit. Guidelines recommend measuring the concentration of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) before spirometry, but evidence for a spirometry carryover effect on FeNO is mixed. Only one study has investigated spirometry carryover effects on multiple flow FeNO analysis. The objective of this study was to evaluate evidence for carryover effects of recent spirometry on three exhaled NO summary measures: FeNO at 50 ml/s, airway wall NO flux [J'awNO] and alveolar NO concentration [CANO] in a population-based sample of schoolchildren. Participants were 1146 children (191 with asthma), ages 12-15, from the Southern California Children's Health Study who performed spirometry and multiple flow FeNO on the same day. Approximately, half the children performed spirometry first. Multiple linear regression was used to estimate differences in exhaled NO summary measures associated with recent spirometry testing, adjusting for potential confounders. In the population-based sample, we found no evidence of spirometry carryover effects. However, for children with asthma, there was a suggestion that exhaled NO summary measures assessed ≤6 min after spirometry were lower (FeNO: 25.8% lower, 95% CI: -6.2%, 48.2%; J'awNO: 15.1% lower 95% CI: -26.5%, 43.0%; and CANO 0.43 parts per billion lower, 95% CI: -0.12, 0.98). In clinical settings, it is prudent to assess multiple flow FeNO before spirometry. In studies of healthy subjects, it may not be necessary to assess FeNO first.

  9. Open charcoal chamber method for mass measurements of radon exhalation rate from soil surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapalov, Andrey; Kovler, Konstantin; Miklyaev, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Radon exhalation rate from the soil surface can serve as an important criterion in the evaluation of radon hazard of the land. Recently published international standard ISO 11665-7 (2012) is based on the accumulation of radon gas in a closed container. At the same time since 1998 in Russia, as a part of engineering and environmental studies for the construction, radon flux measurements are made using an open charcoal chamber for a sampling duration of 3–5 h. This method has a well-defined metrological justification and was tested in both favorable and unfavorable conditions. The article describes the characteristics of the method, as well as the means of sampling and measurement of the activity of radon absorbed. The results of the metrological study suggest that regardless of the sampling conditions (weather, the mechanism and rate of radon transport in the soil, soil properties and conditions), uncertainty of method does not exceed 20%, while the combined standard uncertainty of radon exhalation rate measured from the soil surface does not exceed 30%. The results of the daily measurements of radon exhalation rate from the soil surface at the experimental site during one year are reported. - Highlights: • Radon exhalation rate from the soil surface area of 32 cm 2 can be measured at level of 10 mBq/(m 2 s) at the uncertainty ≤30%. • The method has a metrological justification. • No need to consider climate conditions, soil properties and conditions, mechanism and rate of radon transport in the soil.

  10. Assessment of radon and thoron exhalation from Indian cement samples using smart radon and thoron monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, B.K.; Sapra, B.K; Agarwal, T.K.; Babu, D.A.R.

    2015-01-01

    It has been established that primarily, there exist two important sources that contribute to indoor radon/thoron namely, the exhalation from ground and building materials. The contribution from ground, although significant, is treated as a case of existing exposure. Then, the only source that can be controlled during the construction is the choice of building materials. Cement is an important building material used in the construction of houses and buildings in India. The housing sector is the largest cement consumer with 53% of the total Indian cement demand followed by the infrastructure sector. India with a production capacity of 165 million tones (MT) (in 2007), was the second largest cement producer in the world after China. The industry produces various types of cement like ordinary portland cement (OPC), Portland pozzolana cement (PPC), portland slag cement (PSC), rapid hardening portland cement (RHPC), sulphate resistant cement (SRC) and white cement (WC). Several studies have been undertaken on cement in various countries because it is commonly used in bulk quantities in the construction of houses and other civil structures. However, detailed information regarding the radon and thoron exhalation into indoor air from various types of cements produced in India is scarce. In the present work, an attempt has been made to systematically determine the radon and thoron exhalation from 50 cement samples (17 OPC, 15 PPC, 04 PSC, 06 RHPC, 04 WC and 04 SRC). The data thus obtained is used to calculate the indoor radon and thoron source term and the contributed inhalation dose based on a model room structure. The measured values of radon and thoron exhalation from cement samples were comparable with the reported values in other countries. This study showed that the cement samples used in civil constructions do not pose any radiological hazard to the Indian population. (author)

  11. Drug Abuse Screening with Exhaled Breath and Oral Fluid in Adults with Substance Use Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, Michel; Ullah, Shahid; Franck, Johan; Dahl, Marja-Liisa; Beck, Olof

    2018-03-25

    In the treatment of substance use disorder regular laboratory-based testing has the dual purpose of monitoring compliance to the prescribed medication and the abstention from medically non-motivated substances (i.e. drug abuse screening). The principal specimen for testing is urine, but collection of urine has some disadvantages, e.g. being more time-consuming and more intrusive compared to other matrices, and there is also the risk of adulteration. This project aims to compare exhaled breath and oral fluid as alternative matrices for drug abuse screening in patients with substance use disorder. All 51 subjects included in the study were enrolled at the Drug Addiction Emergency Unit in Stockholm. Exhaled breath, oral fluid and urine samples were collected together with a self-report. Out of all 117 self-reported drug intakes during the previous week 72% were confirmed in urine, 73 % in oral fluid and 39 % in exhaled breath. In 31% of the subjects, additional substances other than those self-reported were detected analytically. For the purpose of substance abuse screening urine had the highest detection rate for buprenorphine, cannabis and benzodiazepines, while oral fluid had the highest detection rate for amphetamines and methadone. Exhaled breath showed the highest detection rate of all matrices for cocaine. To identify significant differences in detection rates between the matrices future studies with larger sampling sizes are needed. Both OF and EB are viable alternative specimens to urine depending on the circumstances and purpose of the testing. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Noninvasive measurement of plasma glucose from exhaled breath in healthy and type 1 diabetic subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Stacy R.; Ngo, Jerry; Flores, Rebecca; Midyett, Jason; Meinardi, Simone; Carlson, Matthew K.; Rowland, F. Sherwood; Blake, Donald R.; Galassetti, Pietro R.

    2011-01-01

    Effective management of diabetes mellitus, affecting tens of millions of patients, requires frequent assessment of plasma glucose. Patient compliance for sufficient testing is often reduced by the unpleasantness of current methodologies, which require blood samples and often cause pain and skin callusing. We propose that the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath can be used as a novel, alternative, noninvasive means to monitor glycemia in these patients. Seventeen healthy (9 females and 8 males, 28.0 ± 1.0 yr) and eight type 1 diabetic (T1DM) volunteers (5 females and 3 males, 25.8 ± 1.7 yr) were enrolled in a 240-min triphasic intravenous dextrose infusion protocol (baseline, hyperglycemia, euglycemia-hyperinsulinemia). In T1DM patients, insulin was also administered (using differing protocols on 2 repeated visits to separate the effects of insulinemia on breath composition). Exhaled breath and room air samples were collected at 12 time points, and concentrations of ∼100 VOCs were determined by gas chromatography and matched with direct plasma glucose measurements. Standard least squares regression was used on several subsets of exhaled gases to generate multilinear models to predict plasma glucose for each subject. Plasma glucose estimates based on two groups of four gases each (cluster A: acetone, methyl nitrate, ethanol, and ethyl benzene; cluster B: 2-pentyl nitrate, propane, methanol, and acetone) displayed very strong correlations with glucose concentrations (0.883 and 0.869 for clusters A and B, respectively) across nearly 300 measurements. Our study demonstrates the feasibility to accurately predict glycemia through exhaled breath analysis over a broad range of clinically relevant concentrations in both healthy and T1DM subjects. PMID:21467303

  13. Modeling of lung cancer risk due to radon exhalation of granite stone in dwelling houses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Abbasi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The estimated numbers of lung cancer deaths attributable to indoor radon due to granite stones in 2013 were 145 (3.33% and 103 (2.37% for poor and normal ventilation systems, respectively. According to our estimations, the values of 3.33% and 2.37% of lung cancer deaths in 2013 are attributed to radon exhalation of granite stones with poor and normal ventilation systems, respectively.

  14. Exhaled volatile substances mirror clinical conditions in pediatric chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Obermeier

    Full Text Available Monitoring metabolic adaptation to chronic kidney disease (CKD early in the time course of the disease is challenging. As a non-invasive technique, analysis of exhaled breath profiles is especially attractive in children. Up to now, no reports on breath profiles in this patient cohort are available. 116 pediatric subjects suffering from mild-to-moderate CKD (n = 48 or having a functional renal transplant KTx (n = 8 and healthy controls (n = 60 matched for age and sex were investigated. Non-invasive quantitative analysis of exhaled breath profiles by means of a highly sensitive online mass spectrometric technique (PTR-ToF was used. CKD stage, the underlying renal disease (HUS; glomerular diseases; abnormalities of kidney and urinary tract or polycystic kidney disease and the presence of a functional renal transplant were considered as classifiers. Exhaled volatile organic compound (VOC patterns differed between CKD/ KTx patients and healthy children. Amounts of ammonia, ethanol, isoprene, pentanal and heptanal were higher in patients compared to healthy controls (556, 146, 70.5, 9.3, and 5.4 ppbV vs. 284, 82.4, 49.6, 5.30, and 2.78 ppbV. Methylamine concentrations were lower in the patient group (6.5 vs 10.1 ppbV. These concentration differences were most pronounced in HUS and kidney transplanted patients. When patients were grouped with respect to degree of renal failure these differences could still be detected. Ammonia accumulated already in CKD stage 1, whereas alterations of isoprene (linked to cholesterol metabolism, pentanal and heptanal (linked to oxidative stress concentrations were detectable in the breath of patients with CKD stage 2 to 4. Only weak associations between serum creatinine and exhaled VOCs were noted. Non-invasive breath testing may help to understand basic mechanisms and metabolic adaptation accompanying progression of CKD. Our results support the current notion that metabolic adaptation occurs early during the time

  15. Effects of Bronchoconstriction, Minute Ventilation, and Deep Inspiration on the Composition of Exhaled Breath Condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debley, Jason S.; Ohanian, Arpy S.; Spiekerman, Charles F.; Aitken, Moira L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is composed of droplets of airway surface liquid (ASL) diluted by water vapor. The goal of this study was to determine if the composition of EBC is affected by changes in airway caliber, minute ventilation, or forceful exhalation, factors that may differ among subjects with asthma in cross-sectional studies. Methods: In a group of subjects with asthma, we measured the effects of the following: (1) a series of three deep-inspiration and forceful-exhalation maneuvers; (2) a doubling of minute ventilation; and (3) acute bronchoconstriction induced by methacholine on EBC volume, dilution of ASL, and concentration of cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs). Results: With the exception of an increase in EBC volume with increased minute ventilation, there were no significant changes in the volume, dilution, or levels of CysLTs in EBC introduced by each of these factors. The CIs surrounding the differences introduced by each factor showed that the maximum systematic errors due to these factors were modest. Conclusions: These results indicate that changes in airway caliber, minute ventilation, or breathing pattern among subjects with asthma do not significantly alter the measurements of mediator concentrations in EBC. PMID:20382713

  16. An increase in exhaled CO concentration in systemic inflammation/sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Toru; Matsusaki, Takashi; Hayashi, Masao; Matsumi, Jyunya; Shimizu, Hiroko; Matsumi, Masaki; Morita, Kiyoshi

    2010-12-01

    Despite recent progress in Critical Care Medicine, sepsis is still a major medical problem with a high rate of mortality and morbidity especially in intensive care units. Oxidative stress induced by inflammation associated with sepsis causes degradation of heme protein, increases microsomal free heme content, promotes further oxidative stress and results in cellular and organ damage. Heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a rate-limiting enzyme for heme breakdown. HO-1 breaks down heme to yield CO, iron and biliverdin. Measurement of CO in exhaled air may potentially be useful in monitoring changes in HO enzyme activity in vivo, which might reflect the degree of inflammation or oxidative stress in patients with systemic inflammation. The increased exhaled CO concentrations were observed after anesthesia/surgery, in critically ill patients and also in systemic inflammation/sepsis. Some reports also showed that exhaled CO concentration is related to mortality. Further studies are needed to elucidate whether increased endogenous CO production may predict a patient's morbidity and mortality. Techniques for monitoring CO are continuously being refined and this technique may find its way into the office of clinicians.

  17. Volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath in a healthy population: effect of tobacco smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jareño-Esteban, José Javier; Muñoz-Lucas, M Ángeles; Carrillo-Aranda, Belén; Maldonado-Sanz, José Ángel; de Granda-Orive, Ignacio; Aguilar-Ros, Antonio; Civera-Tejuca, Concepción; Gutiérrez-Ortega, Carlos; Callol-Sánchez, Luis Miguel

    2013-11-01

    Tobacco smoke is a source of free radicals and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which are the main causes of oxidative stress. The analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in exhaled breath is an indirect method of measuring the level of oxidative stress that occurs in the airways caused by tobacco consumption. The aim of this study was to determine whether smoking influences the production of VOC, in a clinically healthy population. Exhaled breath from 89 healthy volunteers, divided into three groups (non-smokers, ex-smokers and smokers) was analysed. Samples were collected using Bio-VOC® devices and transferred to universal desorption tubes. Chemical compounds were analysed by thermal desorption, gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. We analysed hexanal, heptanal, octanal, nonanal, nonanoic acid and propanoic acid, all identified by retention time and mass spectra referenced in the NIST 08 mass spectral library; confirmation was carried out using reference standards of the pure chemical compound. These VOC were found in very low concentrations. Only nonanal showed significant quantitative and qualitative statistical differences among the study groups. Nonanal concentration is dependent on smoking, but is independent of the amount of tobacco consumed, age and gender. Nonanal in exhaled breath is associated with tobacco consumption, current or previous. Nonanal is a sub-product of the destruction of the cell membrane, and its finding may be indicative of cell damage in smokers. This result appears in many farmers who smoke. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. A new portable monitor for measuring odorous compounds in oral, exhaled and nasal air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekuni Daisuke

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The B/B Checker®, a new portable device for detecting odorous compounds in oral, exhaled, and nasal air, is now available. As a single unit, this device is capable of detecting several kinds of gases mixed with volatile sulfur compounds (VSC in addition to other odorous gasses. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the B/B Checker® for detecting the malodor level of oral, exhaled, and nasal air. Methods A total of 30 healthy, non-smoking volunteers (16 males and 14 females participated in this study. The malodor levels in oral, exhaled, and nasal air were measured using the B/B Checker® and by organoleptic test (OT scores. The VSCs in each air were also measured by gas chromatography (GC. Associations among B/B Checker® measurements, OT scores and VSC levels were analyzed using Spearman correlation coefficients. In order to determine the appropriate B/B Checker® level for screening subjects with malodor, sensitivity and specificity were calculated using OT scores as an identifier for diagnosing oral malodor. Results In oral and nasal air, the total VSC levels measured by GC significantly correlated to that measured by the B/B Checker®. Significant correlation was observed between the results of OT scores and the B/B Checker® measurements in oral (r = 0.892, p ® was set to 50.0 for oral air, the sensitivity and specificity were 1.00 and 0.90, respectively. On the other hand, the screening level of the B/B Checker® was set to 60.0 for exhaled air, the sensitivity and specificity were 0.82 and 1.00, respectively. Conclusion The B/B Checker® is useful for objective evaluation of malodor in oral, exhaled and nasal air and for screening subjects with halitosis. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01139073

  19. Radon exhalation studies in building materials using solid-state ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indoor radon has been recognized as one of the health hazards for mankind. Building materials constitute the second most ... attached to aerosols present in ambient air, causes significant radiological hazard to human lungs. Radon appears mainly by .... from the safety point of view. From table 1 it is evident that the radon ...

  20. Radon-222 exhalation from open ground on and around a uranium mine in the wet-dry tropics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, Cameron E.; Akber, Riaz A.; Bollhoefer, Andreas; Martin, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Radon-222 exhalation from the ground surface depends upon a number of variables such as the 226 Ra activity concentration and its distribution in soil grains; soil grain size; soil porosity, temperature and moisture; atmospheric pressure, rainfall and temperature. In this study, 222 Rn exhalation flux density measurements within and around the Ranger uranium mine in northern Australia were performed to investigate the effect of these variables within a tropical region. Measurements were taken at the waste rock dumps, ore stockpiles, mine pits, and at sites where effluent water with elevated 226 Ra concentration has been spray irrigated over land, as well as at sites outside the mine. The sites selected represented a variety of geomorphic regions ranging from uranium-bearing rocks to ambient soils. Generally, wet season rains reduced 222 Rn exhalation but at a few sites the onset of rains caused a step rise in exhalation flux densities. The results show that parameters such as 226 Ra activity concentration, soil grain size and soil porosity have a marked effect on 222 Rn flux densities. For similar geomorphic sites, 226 Ra activity concentration is a dominant factor, but soil grain size and porosity also influence 222 Rn exhalation. Surfaces with vegetation showed higher exhalation flux densities than their barren counterparts, perhaps because the associated root structure increases soil porosity and moisture retention. Repeated measurements over one year at eight sites enabled an analysis of precipitation and soil moisture effects on 222 Rn exhalation. Soil moisture depth profiles varied both between seasons and at different times during the wet season, indicating that factors such as duration, intensity and time between precipitation events can influence 222 Rn flux densities considerably

  1. First results of cavity ring down signals from exhaled air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revalde, G.; Grundšteins, K.; Alnis, J.; Skudra, A.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we report first results from the developed cavity ring-down spectrometer for application in human breath analysis for the diagnostics of diabetes and later for early detection of lung cancer. Our cavity ring-down spectrometer works in UV region with pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm wavelength. First experiments allow us to determine acetone and benzene at the level bellow ppm. In our experiment, first results from breath samples from volunteers after doing different activities were collected and examined. Influence of the smoking on the breath signals also was examined.

  2. Laboratory research on tailings stabilization methods and their effectiveness in radiation containment. [Uranium, reduction of radon exhalation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macbeth, P.J.; Jensen, C.M.; Rogers, V.C.; Overmyer, R.F.

    1978-04-01

    This report describes a study of various methods, techniques, and materials for stabilizing uranium mill tailings to reduce radon exhalation. Radon emanation from tailings particles, radon exhalation from tailings, and methods that could be used to reduce radon exhalation from tailings piles are discussed. Surface radon flux and soil gas concentrations were measured in experiment chambers or columns consisting of uranium tailings and various types and thicknesses of cover materials. The applicability of diffusion theory was examined and effective diffusion coefficients were determined for clay, soil, and sand. The variation of radon flux with atmospheric effects and moisture also was investigated. The effectiveness of several types of chemical stabilizers for both volumetric and surface application in reducing radon exhalation is reported. Some volumetric stabilizers reduced radon flux by 90 percent or more. Radon flux was determined through the use of charcoal gas mask canisters, and flux accumulation chambers sampled by Lucas cells. Both of these techniques are described. Soil gas concentration was sampled with Lucas cells and counted with a sodium iodide scintillation spectrometer system. Emanating power of uranium tailings was measured for several particle sizes and found to be relatively constant at about 20 percent. Two types of grasses were found that would grow in tailings if sufficient water and fertilizer were provided. The effect of vegetation on radon exhalation was not determined.

  3. 222Rn CONCENTRATION LEVEL MEASUREMENTS AND EXHALATION RATES IN DIFFERENT TYPES OF BUILDING MATERIALS USED IN PALESTINIAN BUILDINGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DABAYNEH, K.M.

    2008-01-01

    The values of concentration levels, surface and mass exhalation rates of radon for various types of building materials used in Palestinian buildings were measured by using the passive techniques. Twelve fabricated building materials samples have been selected randomly in this study, each of which have different masses (25, 50, 75 and l00 g) and prepared in plastic cups sealed to passive integrated dosimeters containing CR-39 detectors. The average concentration levels of 222Rn in these samples were found to range from 66 Bq/m3 for limestone to 246 Bq/m3 for granite samples. The surface exhalation rates in the selected samples were found to vary from 37 to 146 mBq/m2.hr while the mass exhalation rate values varied from 1.8 to 7.2 mBq/kg.hr, respectively. The radon exhalation rate from the building materials was found to be smaller than that of soil. These calculated exhalation rates were found to be consistent with the measured data obtained for other countries

  4. Collecting Protein Biomarkers in Breath Using Electret Filters: A Preliminary Method on New Technical Model and Human Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Li

    Full Text Available Biomarkers in exhaled breath are useful for respiratory disease diagnosis in human volunteers. Conventional methods that collect non-volatile biomarkers, however, necessitate an extensive dilution and sanitation processes that lowers collection efficiencies and convenience of use. Electret filter emerged in recent decade to collect virus biomarkers in exhaled breath given its simplicity and effectiveness. To investigate the capability of electret filters to collect protein biomarkers, a model that consists of an atomizer that produces protein aerosol and an electret filter that collects albumin and carcinoembryonic antigen-a typical biomarker in lung cancer development- from the atomizer is developed. A device using electret filter as the collecting medium is designed to collect human albumin from exhaled breath of 6 volunteers. Comparison of the collecting ability between the electret filter method and other 2 reported methods is finally performed based on the amounts of albumin collected from human exhaled breath. In conclusion, a decreasing collection efficiency ranging from 17.6% to 2.3% for atomized albumin aerosol and 42% to 12.5% for atomized carcinoembryonic antigen particles is found; moreover, an optimum volume of sampling human exhaled breath ranging from 100 L to 200 L is also observed; finally, the self-designed collecting device shows a significantly better performance in collecting albumin from human exhaled breath than the exhaled breath condensate method (p0.05. In summary, electret filters are potential in collecting non-volatile biomarkers in human exhaled breath not only because it was simpler, cheaper and easier to use than traditional methods but also for its better collecting performance.

  5. Development of a predictive methodology for identifying high radon exhalation potential areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ielsch, G.

    2001-01-01

    Radon 222 is a radioactive natural gas originating from the decay of radium 226 which itself originates from the decay of uranium 23 8 naturally present in rocks and soil. Inhalation of radon gas and its decay products is a potential health risk for man. Radon can accumulate in confined environments such as buildings, and is responsible for one third of the total radiological exposure of the general public to radiation. The problem of how to manage this risk then arises. The main difficulty encountered is due to the large variability of exposure to radon across the country. A prediction needs to be made of areas with the highest density of buildings with high radon levels. Exposure to radon varies depending on the degree of confinement of the habitat, the lifestyle of the occupants and particularly emission of radon from the surface of the soil on which the building is built. The purpose of this thesis is to elaborate a methodology for determining areas presenting a high potential for radon exhalation at the surface of the soil. The methodology adopted is based on quantification of radon exhalation at the surface, starting from a precise characterization of the main local geological and pedological parameters that control the radon source and its transport to the ground/atmosphere interface. The methodology proposed is innovative in that it combines a cartographic analysis, parameters integrated into a Geographic Information system, and a simplified model for vertical transport of radon by diffusion through pores in the soil. This methodology has been validated on two typical areas, in different geological contexts, and gives forecasts that generally agree with field observations. This makes it possible to identify areas with a high exhalation potential within a range of a few square kilometers. (author)

  6. Study of different factors which can explain the radon exhalation potential of soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demongeot, St.

    1997-01-01

    Radon is a natural radioactive gas belonging to the Uranium-238 chain, which is present in the earth crust and produced by the disintegration of radium-226. It is considered as the major source of radiological exposure of man to natural radiation because it can accumulate in indoor atmosphere. So, this health risk must be take into account.The aim of this study is to find some tools in order to identify high radon level area. The first part of this study has consisted in measurement of radon emission from different not sufficient for the estimation of the radon exhalation potential in a given area. In the second part of this work, we have studied the variations of in situ radon concentration as a function of different geological and pedologic parameters of the site. With the results obtained, we have determined the data which have to be considered, and the methodology to be applied for the determination of the radon exhalation of a given area. Furthermore, by the mean of numerical simulations (TRACH Model), it was possible to know the scale of radon flux variation in a given point versus the hydric state of the ground and thus the permeability: these parameters are not easy to measure because of their variabilities with time. The methodology ESPERAS (EStimation du Potential d'Exhalation en Radon des Sols) developed during this work was applied first, at a local scale and then to greater area. The values estimated by this way are in a good agreement with the results of measurements. So, we can determine the areas which are affected by high radon levels. (author)

  7. Measurement of radon activity, exhalation rate and radiation dose in fly ash and coal samples from NTPC, Badarpur, Delhi, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Mamta; Verma, K.D.; Mahur, A.K.; Prasad, R.; Sonkawade, R.G.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study radon activities and exhalation rates from fly ash and coal samples from NTPC (National Thermal Power Corporation) situated at Badarpur, Delhi, India, have been measured. 'Sealed Can Technique' using LR-115 type II track detectors was employed. In fly ash samples, radon activity has been found to vary from 400.0 ± 34.7 to 483.9 ± 38.1Bqm -3 with an average value of 447.1 ± 36.6 Bqm -3 and in coal samples, radon activity has been found to vary from 504.0 ± 39.0 to 932.1 ± 52.9 Bqm -3 with an average value of 687.2 ± 45.2 Bqm -3 . Radon exhalation rate from coal is found to be higher than radon exhalation rate from its ash products, whereas the opposite is expected. Indoor inhalation exposure (radon) effective dose has also been estimated. (author)

  8. Drug-induced eosinophilic pneumonia in a patient with Crohn's disease: diagnosis and treatment using fraction of exhaled nitric oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jina Yeo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Oral 5-aminosalicylic acid agents (mesalazine and sulfasalazine and azathioprine are the mainstays of treatment for inflammatory bowel disease. Reports of pulmonary toxicity induced by oral 5-aminosalicylic acid agents or azathioprine in patients with inflammatory bowel disease are very rare; to date, only 38 cases have been reported worldwide. We, herein, report a case involving a 26-year-old man who was diagnosed with eosinophilic pneumonia after using mesalazine and azathioprine for the treatment of Crohn's disease and recovered after treatment. We also found that the fraction of exhaled nitric oxide level was elevated in this patient. After treatment, the fraction of exhaled nitric oxide level decreased and the symptoms improved. The present case shows that fraction of exhaled nitric oxide is related to the disease activity and treatment effectiveness of druginduced eosinophilic pneumonia.

  9. Diagnosis by Volatile Organic Compounds in Exhaled Breath from Lung Cancer Patients Using Support Vector Machine Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Sakumura

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring exhaled breath is a very attractive, noninvasive screening technique for early diagnosis of diseases, especially lung cancer. However, the technique provides insufficient accuracy because the exhaled air has many crucial volatile organic compounds (VOCs at very low concentrations (ppb level. We analyzed the breath exhaled by lung cancer patients and healthy subjects (controls using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS, and performed a subsequent statistical analysis to diagnose lung cancer based on the combination of multiple lung cancer-related VOCs. We detected 68 VOCs as marker species using GC/MS analysis. We reduced the number of VOCs and used support vector machine (SVM algorithm to classify the samples. We observed that a combination of five VOCs (CHN, methanol, CH3CN, isoprene, 1-propanol is sufficient for 89.0% screening accuracy, and hence, it can be used for the design and development of a desktop GC-sensor analysis system for lung cancer.

  10. Survey of Gamma Dose and Radon Exhalation Rate from Soil Surface of High Background Natural Radiation Areas in Ramsar, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouhollah Dehghani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radon is a radioactive gas and the second leading cause of death due to lung cancer after smoking. Ramsar is known for having the highest levels of natural background radiation on earth. Materials and Methods: In this research study, 50 stations of high radioactivity areas of Ramsar were selected in warm season of the year. Then gamma dose and radon exhalation rate were measured.Results: Results showed that gamma dose and radon exhalation rate were in the range of 51-7100 nSv/hr and 9-15370 mBq/m2s, respectively.Conclusion: Compare to the worldwide average 16 mBq/m2s, estimated average annual effective of Radon exhalation rate in the study area is too high.

  11. The application of additional respiration resistance on exhale for increasing special endurance of highly qualified rowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grechuha S.V.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of experimental training programs with the application of additional respiration resistance of exhale on the efficiency of covering competitive distances in rowing and canoeing was considered. Thirteen highly qualified rowers participated in the research. The investigation was held in preparatory period and before contest mesocycle. The improvement of the uniform course of the boat was found in the preparatory period. The period of super-restoration of functional state of respiration muscles was found at the end of the effect. The improvement of the results was determined at the distances of 500 and 1000 m in the competitive period

  12. Outdoor air pollution, exhaled 8-isoprostane and current asthma in adults: the EGEA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havet, Anaïs; Zerimech, Farid; Sanchez, Margaux; Siroux, Valérie; Le Moual, Nicole; Brunekreef, Bert; Stempfelet, Morgane; Künzli, Nino; Jacquemin, Bénédicte; Matran, Régis; Nadif, Rachel

    2018-04-01

    Associations between outdoor air pollution and asthma in adults are still scarce, and the underlying biological mechanisms are poorly understood. Our aim was to study the associations between 1) long-term exposure to outdoor air pollution and current asthma, 2) exhaled 8-isoprostane (8-iso; a biomarker related to oxidative stress) and current asthma, and 3) outdoor air pollution and exhaled 8-iso.Cross-sectional analyses were conducted in 608 adults (39% with current asthma) from the first follow-up of the French case-control and family study on asthma (EGEA; the Epidemiological study of the Genetic and Environmental factors of Asthma). Data on nitrogen dioxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter with a diameter ≤10 and ≤2.5 µm (PM 10 and PM 2.5 ), road traffic, and ozone (O 3 ) were from ESCAPE (European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects) and IFEN (French Institute for the Environment) assessments. Models took account of city and familial dependence.The risk of current asthma increased with traffic intensity (adjusted (a)OR 1.09 (95% CI 1.00-1.18) per 5000 vehicles per day), with O 3 exposure (aOR 2.04 (95% CI 1.27-3.29) per 10 µg·m -3 ) and with exhaled 8-iso concentration (aOR 1.50 (95% CI 1.06-2.12) per 1 pg·mL -1 ). Among participants without asthma, exhaled 8-iso concentration increased with PM 2.5 exposure (adjusted (a)β 0.23 (95% CI 0.005-0.46) per 5 µg·m -3 ), and decreased with O 3 and O 3-summer exposures (aβ -0.20 (95% CI -0.39- -0.01) and aβ -0.52 (95% CI -0.77- -0.26) per 10 µg·m -3 , respectively).Our results add new insights into a potential role of oxidative stress in the associations between outdoor air pollution and asthma in adults. Copyright ©ERS 2018.

  13. Feasibility and potential utility of multicomponent exhaled breath analysis for predicting development of radiation pneumonitis after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moré, Jayaji M; Eclov, Neville C W; Chung, Melody P; Wynne, Jacob F; Shorter, Joanne H; Nelson, David D; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Burmeister, Robert; Banos, Peter; Maxim, Peter G; Loo, Billy W; Diehn, Maximilian

    2014-07-01

    In this prospective pilot study, we evaluated the feasibility and potential utility of measuring multiple exhaled gases as biomarkers of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients receiving stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung tumors. Breath analysis was performed for 26 patients receiving SABR for lung tumors. Concentrations of exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), carbon monoxide (eCO), nitrous oxide (eN2O), and carbon dioxide (eCO2) were measured before and immediately after each fraction using real-time, infrared laser spectroscopy. RP development (CTCAE grade ≥2) was correlated with baseline gas concentrations, acute changes in gas concentrations after each SABR fraction, and dosimetric parameters. Exhaled breath analysis was successfully completed in 77% of patients. Five of 20 evaluable patients developed RP at a mean of 5.4 months after SABR. Acute changes in eNO and eCO concentrations, defined as percent changes between each pre-fraction and post-fraction measurement, were significantly smaller in RP versus non-RP cases (p = 0.022 and 0.015, respectively). In an exploratory analysis, a combined predictor of baseline eNO greater than 24 parts per billion and acute decrease in eCO less than 5.5% strongly correlated with RP incidence (p =0.0099). Neither eN2O nor eCO2 concentrations were significantly associated with RP development. Although generally higher in patients destined to develop RP, dosimetric parameters were not significantly associated with RP development. The majority of SABR patients in this pilot study were able to complete exhaled breath analysis. Baseline concentrations and acute changes in concentrations of exhaled breath components were associated with RP development after SABR. If our findings are validated, exhaled breath analysis may become a useful approach for noninvasive identification of patients at highest risk for developing RP after SABR.

  14. A Full-Scale Study of Exhaled Droplet Dispersion in the Microenvironment around one and two Persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Li, Yuguo; Khalegi, Farzad

    Airborne cross infection is based on transmission of microorganisms attached to exhaled droplets or particles. Traditionally two transmission routes are considered, namely via droplet nuclei ( 5-10 μm), and they correspond to two infection routes: droplet infection...... and airborne infection. A transition may take place from droplet-borne infection to airborne infection, because the exhaled droplets may evaporate in the air and droplets become droplet nuclei. Full-scale experiments on the movement of droplet nuclei (airborne infection) have been performed in a number...

  15. Study of the exhaled acetone in type 1 diabetes using quantum cascade laser spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Reyes, Adonis; Horsten, Roland C; Urbach, H Paul; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2015-01-06

    The acetone concentration exhaled in the breath of three type 1 diabetes patients (two minors and one adult) and one healthy volunteer is studied using a quantum cascade laser-based spectroscopic system. Using the acetone signature between 1150 and 1250 cm(-1) and a multiline fitting method, the concentration variations on the order of parts per billion by volume were measured. Blood glucose and ketone concentrations in blood measurements were performed simultaneously to study their relation with acetone in exhaled breath. We focus on personalized studies to better understand the role of acetone in diabetes. For each volunteer, we performed a series of measurements over a period of time, including overnight fastings of 11 ± 1 h and during ketosis-hyperglycemia events for the minors. Our results highlight the importance of performing personalized studies because the response of the minors to the presence of ketosis was consistent but unique for each individual. Also, our results emphasize the need for performing more studies with T1D minors, because the acetone concentration in the breath of the minors differs, with respect to those reported in the literature, which are based on adults.

  16. Dielectric barrier discharge micro-plasma emission spectrometry for the detection of acetone in exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting; Gao, Dong-Xue; Yu, Yong-Liang; Chen, Ming-Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Acetone is a predominant volatile organic compound (VOC) in the exhaled breath and a promising biomarker for diabetes and ketoacidosis. A non-thermal micro-plasma generated in a planar dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is used as a radiation source for the excitation of gaseous acetone followed by its quantification with optical emission spectrometry (OES). Gaseous acetone can be directly sampled, while liquid acetone is evaporated by heated tungsten coil and then introduced into the DBD micro-plasma by a helium carrier flow for performing optical emission and detection at a 519 nm emission line. In the present study, the exhaled breath is collected and transferred into aqueous medium for sampling. With a sampling volume of 7 μL in a micro-drop, a linear range of 40-1600 mg L(-1) is obtained along with a detection limit of 44 ng and a precision of 5.7% RSD. The present system is successfully applied to the determination of breath acetone for both diabetic patients and healthy volunteers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Alveolar-derived exhaled nitric oxide is reduced in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foresi, Antonio; Leone, Clementina; Olivieri, Dario; Cremona, George

    2007-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with cardiovascular diseases, in particular systemic arterial hypertension. We postulated that intermittent nocturnal hypoxia in OSAS may be associated to decreased fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) levels from distal airspaces. Multiple flow rate measurements have been used to fractionate nitric oxide (NO) from alveolar and bronchial sources in 34 patients with OSAS, in 29 healthy control subjects, and in 8 hypertensive non-OSAS patients. The effect of 2 days of treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) on FENO was examined in 18 patients with severe OSAS. We found that the mean [+/- SE] concentrations of exhaled NO at a rate of 50 mL/s was 21.8 +/- 1.9 parts per billion (ppb) in patients with OSAS, 25.1 +/- 3.3 ppb in healthy control subjects, and 15.4 +/- 1.7 ppb in hypertensive control patients. The mean fractional alveolar NO concentration (CANO) in OSAS patients was significantly lower than that in control subjects (2.96 +/- 0.48 vs 5.35 +/- 0.83 ppb, respectively; p bronchial FENO, is impaired in patients with OSAS and that this impairment is associated with an increased risk of hypertension. NO production within the alveolar space is modified by treatment with nCPAP.

  18. [John Snow (1813-1858): experimental studies on rebreathing of anesthetic gases in exhaled air].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, J

    1995-02-01

    As early as in 1850 (only 4 years after the first clinical performance of ether anaesthesia by W. T. G. Morton on 16 October 1846) John Snow recognised that ether and chloroform were exhaled unchanged with the expired air. To reuse these unchanged vapours in the following inspiration and thereby prolonging the narcotic effect of a given amount of anaesthetic vapour, he converted his ether inhaler into a To-and-Fro Rebreathing System: The apparatus was equipped with a facemask without an expiratory valve and a large reservoir bag containing pure oxygen; an aqueous solution of caustic potash was used as CO2 absorbent. In several experiments, performed on himself, Snow succeeded to demonstrate that rebreathing of the exhaled vapours was possible following carbon dioxide absorption, and that it resulted in a pronounced prolongation of the narcotic effects of the volatile anaesthetics. Furthermore, Snow performed experiments on animals using a closed system for evaluating the carbon dioxide production during anaesthesia. It is all the more worthwhile to introduce Snow's publications on these topics, as, despite their extraordinary theoretical and practical significance, they remained nearly unnoticed. Even in the fundamental articles by D. Jackson and R. Waters, both being the respected protagonists of the rebreathing technique in anaesthesia, the Snow papers remained uncited.

  19. Calibration and validation of a MCC/IMS prototype for exhaled propofol online measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Felix; Walter, Larissa; Geiger, Martin; Baumbach, Jörg Ingo; Sessler, Daniel I; Volk, Thomas; Kreuer, Sascha

    2017-10-25

    Propofol is a commonly used intravenous general anesthetic. Multi-capillary column (MCC) coupled Ion-mobility spectrometry (IMS) can be used to quantify exhaled propofol, and thus estimate plasma drug concentration. Here, we present results of the calibration and analytical validation of a MCC/IMS pre-market prototype for propofol quantification in exhaled air. Calibration with a reference gas generator yielded an R 2 ≥0.99 with a linear array for the calibration curve from 0 to 20 ppb v . The limit of quantification was 0.3 ppb v and the limit of detection was 0.1 ppb v . The device is able to distinguish concentration differences >0.5 ppb v for the concentration range between 2 and 4 ppb v and >0.9 ppb v for the range between 28 and 30 ppb v . The imprecision at 20 ppb v is 11.3% whereas it is 3.5% at a concentration of 40 ppb v . The carry-over duration is 3min. The MCC/IMS we tested provided online quantification of gaseous propofol over the clinically relevant range at measurement frequencies of one measurement each minute. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cost-benefit analysis of decreased ventilation rates and radon exhalation from building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericson, S.O.

    1984-01-01

    Decreased ventilation, achieved by weather stripping and other tightening measures, is the most cost effective way to energy conservation. A very low investment can result in a considerable decrease in ventilation rate. For a typical detached house in Sweden this can be equivalent to a decrease in oil consumption of 0.5 m 3 . At present price this corresponds to a saving of SEK 1200, 150 US dollars per annum. The contribution of the building materials to the concentration of radon in indoor air is approximately the inverse to air exchange rate. For a small change in ventilation rate and cost, in SEK/man Sv or US dollar/man Sv, is a function of ventilation rate, exhalation from building materials, the ratio between surface of walls, floor and ceiling to the volume of air. Thus, it is possible to find the specific ventilation rate where the marginal cost for a small increase in ventilation rate and the marginal reduction in radon concentration will give a specific amount of money for each man Sv. Examples are given. Conclusions are that for most building materials in a climate like the Swedish, there are other factors than exhalation of radon from building materials that sets the lower limit of recommendable ventilation rate. (Author)

  1. Exhaled breath condensate pH and hydrogen peroxide as non-invasive markers for asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Obaidy, Amina H.; Al-Samarai, Abdul-Gahni M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective was to estimate the predictive value of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration and pH as non-invasive markers in asthma. Fifty patients with unstable, steroid naive atopic asthma were included in this study, 25 with persistent asthma. Asthma diagnosis was according to the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma. Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was measured by computerized spirometry. The EBC H2O2 assay was carried out using the colorimetric assay. The study was conducted from January to December 2005 in the Asthma and Allergy Center, Tikrit, Iraq. The EBC H2O2 concentration was higher in the asthmatic group (0.91mol) as compared with the control (0.23 mol). There was inverse correlation between EBC H2O2 concentration and FEV1 predicted percent for asthmatic patients. The mean EBC pH was lower in the asthmatic than the control group. There was a positive correlation between EBC pH and FEV 1 predicted percent for asthmatic patients. There was an inverse correlation between EBC H2O2 concentration and pH for all asthmatic patients, intermittent, and persistent asthmatic group. Exhaled breath condensate hydrogen peroxide concentration and pH was a good non-invasive marker for asthma, whether it was with a persistent or intermittent course. (author)

  2. Characterizations of particle size distribution of the droplets exhaled by sneeze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Z Y; Weng, W G; Huang, Q Y

    2013-11-06

    This work focuses on the size distribution of sneeze droplets exhaled immediately at mouth. Twenty healthy subjects participated in the experiment and 44 sneezes were measured by using a laser particle size analyser. Two types of distributions are observed: unimodal and bimodal. For each sneeze, the droplets exhaled at different time in the sneeze duration have the same distribution characteristics with good time stability. The volume-based size distributions of sneeze droplets can be represented by a lognormal distribution function, and the relationship between the distribution parameters and the physiological characteristics of the subjects are studied by using linear regression analysis. The geometric mean of the droplet size of all the subjects is 360.1 µm for unimodal distribution and 74.4 µm for bimodal distribution with geometric standard deviations of 1.5 and 1.7, respectively. For the two peaks of the bimodal distribution, the geometric mean (the geometric standard deviation) is 386.2 µm (1.8) for peak 1 and 72.0 µm (1.5) for peak 2. The influences of the measurement method, the limitations of the instrument, the evaporation effects of the droplets, the differences of biological dynamic mechanism and characteristics between sneeze and other respiratory activities are also discussed.

  3. Study of Radon and Thoron exhalation from soil samples of different grain sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitra, N; Danalakshmi, B; Supriya, D; Vijayalakshmi, I; Sundar, S Bala; Sivasubramanian, K; Baskaran, R; Jose, M T

    2018-03-01

    The exhalation of radon ( 222 Rn) and thoron ( 220 Rn) from a porous matrix depends on the emanation of them from the grains by the recoil effect. The emanation factor is a quantitative estimate of the emanation phenomenon. The present study is to investigate the effect of grain size of the soil matrix on the emanation factor. Soil samples from three different locations were fractionated into different grain size categories ranging from <0.1 to 2mm. The emanation factors of each of the grain size range were estimated by measuring the mass exhalation rates of radon and thoron and the activity concentrations of 226 Ra and 232 Th. The emanation factor was found to increase with decrease in grain size. This effect was made evident by keeping the parent radium concentration constant for all grain size fractions. The governing factor is the specific surface area of the soil samples which increases with decrease in grain size. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Oral bacteria--the missing link to ambiguous findings of exhaled nitrogen oxides in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetterquist, Wilhelm; Marteus, Helena; Kalm-Stephens, Pia; Näs, Elisabeth; Nordvall, Lennart; Johannesson, Marie; Alving, Kjell

    2009-02-01

    Nitrite in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) has been shown to be elevated in cystic fibrosis (CF), while exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) is paradoxically low. This has been argued to reflect increased metabolism of NO while its diffusion is obstructed by mucus. However, we wanted to study the possible influence of salivary nitrite and bacterial nitrate reduction on these parameters in CF patients by the intervention of an anti-bacterial mouthwash. EBC and saliva were collected from 15 CF patients (10-43 years) and 15 controls (9-44 years) before and 5 min after a 30s chlorhexidine mouthwash, in parallel with measurements of FENO. Nitrite and nitrate concentrations were measured fluorometrically. EBC nitrite, but not nitrate, was significantly higher in the CF patients (median 3.6 vs 1.3 microM in controls, pmouthwash in both groups (3.6-1.4 microM, pnitrite correlated significantly to EBC nitrite (r=0.60, pnitrate increased. FENO was lower in CF and the difference between patients and controls was accentuated after mouthwash (5.4 vs 8.4 ppb in controls, pnitrite mainly originates in the pharyngo-oral tract and its increase in CF is possibly explained by a regional change in bacterial activity. The limited lower airway contribution supports the view of a genuinely impaired formation and metabolism of NO in CF, rather than poor diffusion of the molecule.

  5. The natural radionuclide concentration and radon exhalation rate of Turkish natural stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasar, O.; Yaprak, G.; Guer, F.

    2006-01-01

    Geological materials usually contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) have become a focus great attention. These NORM under certain conditions can reach hazardous contamination levels. Some contamination levels may be sufficiently severe that precautions must be taken. The Turkey has very important natural stones potential with over 5 billion m 3 marble reserves. According to 2002 giving data the number of Turkish stones export is 303 million US Dollars. In this regards, the present study deals with 120 Turkish natural stones. The studied samples were analyzed and the concentrations in Bq/kg dry weight of radioisotopes were determined by gamma-ray spectrometry using HPGe defector in Bq/kg dry weight. For the measurement of the radon exhalation rate, the 'can technique' using sensitive alpha sensitive LR-115 type II plastic defectors were used. The radium equivalent activity varied from 285 Bq/kg to 325 Bq/kg for granite samples and from 2 Bq/kg to 32 Bq/kg for marble samples. The value of radon exhalation rate ranged from 0.06 Bq/m 2 h - 1 to 0.46 Bq/m 2 h - 1 for garnite samples and from 0.006 Bq/m 2 h - 1 to 0.011 Bq/m 2 h - 1 for marble samples. According to the recommended values and the calculated external hazard index values the samples are acceptable for use as building materials and decoration

  6. Radon soil-gas concentration and exhalation from mine tailings dams in South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ongori, J.; Lindsay, R. [University of the Western Cape, Department of Physics, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Newman, R. [Stellenbosch University, Department of Physics, Private Bag X1 Matieland 7602 (South Africa); Maleka, P. [iThemba LABS, Department of Nuclear Physics, P. O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa)

    2014-07-01

    In Africa as well as in the world, South Africa plays an important role in the mining industry which dates back almost 120 years. Mining activities in South Africa mainly take place in Gauteng Province. Every year million of tons of rocks are taken from underground, milled and processed to extract gold. The uranium bearing tailings are disposed in dumpsites. These tailings dumps contain considerable amounts of radium ({sup 226}Ra) and have therefore been identified as large sources of radon ({sup 222}Rn). Radon is a noble gas formed by the decay of radium which in turn is derived from the radioactive decay of uranium ({sup 238}U). Radon release from these tailings dumps pose health concerns for the surrounding communities. Radon soil gas concentrations and exhalations from a non-operational mine dump (Kloof) which belongs to Carletonville Gold Field, Witwatersrand, South Africa have been investigated. The continuous radon monitor, the Durridge RAD7 was used to measure {sup 222}Rn soil gas concentration in the tailings dump at five different spots. The radon soil gas concentration levels were measured at depths starting from 30 cm below ground/air interface up to 110 cm at intervals of 20 cm. The concentrations recorded ranged from 26±1 to 472±23 kBq.m{sup -3}. Furthermore, thirty four soil samples were taken from the spots where radon soil gas measurements were measured for laboratory-based measurement using the low background Hyper Pure Germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray detector available at the Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory (ERL), iThemba LABS, Western Cape Province. The soil samples were collected in the depth range 0-30 cm. After analysis the weighted average activity concentrations in the soils samples were 308±7 Bq.kg{sup -1}, 255±5 Bq.kg{sup -1} and 18±1 Bq.kg{sup -1} for {sup 238}U, {sup 40}K and {sup 232}Th, respectively. A number of factors such as the radium activity concentration and its distribution in soil grains, soil grain size, soil porosity

  7. Using the Inflammacheck Device to Measure the Level of Exhaled Breath Condensate Hydrogen Peroxide in Patients With Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (The EXHALE Pilot Study): Protocol for a Cross-Sectional Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Daniel M; Fogg, Carole; Brown, Thomas P; Jones, Thomas L; Lanning, Eleanor; Bassett, Paul; Chauhan, Anoop J

    2018-01-30

    Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are common conditions that affect over 5 million people in the United Kingdom. These groups of patients suffer significantly from breathlessness and recurrent exacerbations that can be difficult to diagnose and go untreated. A common feature of COPD and asthma is airway inflammation that increases before and during exacerbations. Current methods of assessing airway inflammation can be invasive, difficult to perform, and are often inaccurate. In contrast, measurement of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) is performed during normal tidal breathing and is known to reflect the level of global inflammation in the airways. There is a need for novel tools to diagnose asthma and COPD earlier and to detect increased airway inflammation that precedes an exacerbation. The aim of this study was to explore the use of a new handheld device (called Inflammacheck) in measuring H 2 O 2 levels in EBC. We will study whether it can measure EBC H 2 O 2 levels consistently and whether it can be used to differentiate asthma and COPD from healthy controls. We will perform a cross-sectional, feasibility, pilot study of EBC H 2 O 2 levels, as measured by Inflammacheck, and other markers of disease severity and symptom control in patients with asthma and COPD and volunteers with no history of lung disease. Participants will be asked to provide an exhaled breath sample for measurement of their EBC H 2 O 2 using Inflammacheck. The result will be correlated with disease stage, spirometry, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), and symptom control scores. This study's recruitment is ongoing; it is anticipated that the results will be available in 2018. The EXhaled Hydrogen peroxide As a marker of Lung diseasE (EXHALE) pilot study will provide an evaluation of a new method of measuring EBC H 2 O 2 . It will assess the device's consistency and ability to distinguish airway inflammation in asthma and COPD compared

  8. Similar levels of nitric oxide in exhaled air in non-asthmatic rhinitis and asthma after bronchial allergen challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopuhaä, C. E.; Koopmans, J. G.; Jansen, H. M.; van der Zee, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Nitric oxide in exhaled air (eNO) is elevated in allergic asthma compared with healthy subjects and has been proposed as a marker of bronchial inflammation. However, eNO is elevated to a lesser extent in allergic non-asthmatic rhinitis as well. Considering the distinctive clinical

  9. Increased acetone exhalation induced by metabolites of halogenated C/sub 1/ and C/sub 2/ compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filser, J.G.; Jung, P.; Bolt, H.M.

    1982-01-01

    Rats were exposed, in a closed desiccator jar chamber, to concentrations of various halogenated C/sub 1/ and C/sub 2/ compounds at which the metabolizing capacities were saturated (Vsub(m)sub(a)sub(x) conditions). Within the exposure period of 50 h concentrations of the xenobiotic and of exhaled acetone were monitored in the gas phase of the system. The quantitative extent of acetone exhalation was dependent on the individual compound examined. Acetone exhalatio was stimulated in presence of vinyl chloride, vinyl bromide, vinyl fluoride, vinylidene fluoride, cis- and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, methylene chloride, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride and 1,1,2-trichloroethane. No stimulation of acetone exhalation occured with 1,1,1-trichloroethane and with the reference hydrocarbon n-hexane. Also, acetone exhalation was evoked by infusions of either fluoroacetate or chloroacetate, two anticipated or proven metabolites of some haloethylenes; the infusion rates of which were based on calculations of the metabolic rates of vinylidene fluoride and of vinyl chloride, respectively.

  10. National survey on the natural radioactivity and Rn-222 exhalation rate of building materials in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, P.; van Dijk, W.; van der Graaf, E.R.; de Groot, A.V.

    The present study reports on results of a nationwide survey on the natural radioactivity concentrations and Rn-222 exhalation rates of the prevailing building materials in the Netherlands. In total 100 samples were taken and analyzed for the activity concentrations of Ra-226, Ra-228, Th-228, and

  11. Oxidative Stress Markers Are Elevated in Exhaled Breath Condensate of Workers Exposed to Nanoparticles during Iron Oxide Pigment Production.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pelclová, D.; Ždímal, Vladimír; Kačer, P.; Fenclová, Z.; Vlčková, Š.; Syslová, K.; Navrátil, Tomáš; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Zíková, Naděžda; Barošová, H.; Turci, F.; Komarc, M.; Pelcl, T.; Běláček, J.; Kukutschová, J.; Zakharov, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2016), s. 016004 ISSN 1752-7155 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : nanoparticles * exhaled breath condensate * oxidative stress * urine * occupational exposure * Fe2O3 * Fe3O4 Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 4.318, year: 2016

  12. Wearable Personal Exhaust Ventilation, WPEV: Improved Indoor Air Quality and Reduced Exposure to Air Exhaled from a Sick Doctor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolashikov, Zhecho D.; Barova, Maria; Melikov, Arsen K.

    2015-01-01

    air temperature was 22◦C. A breathing thermal manikin with a body size and shape similar to the body of an average Scandinavian woman was used to mimic a “sick” doctor. The manikin was equipped with artificial lungs with a realistic breathing cycle (2.5-sec inhalation, 2.5-sec exhalation, and 1-sec...

  13. Determination of cysteinyl leukotrienes in exhaled breath condensate: Method combining immunoseparation with LC-ESI-MS/MS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syslová, K.; Kačer, P.; Vilhanová, B.; Kuzma, Marek; Lipovová, P.; Fenclová, Z.; Lebedová, J.; Pelclová, D.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 879, č. 23 (2011), s. 2220-2228 ISSN 1570-0232 R&D Projects: GA MZd NS10298 Keywords : Cysteinyl leukotriene * Exhaled breath condensate * Immunoseparation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.888, year: 2011

  14. Method for incorporation monitoring - Studies on measurement and interpretation of radionuclide excretion, particularly thorium decay products, via exhaled breath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    1998-01-01

    The development and application of a measuring method is described for thorium incorporation monitoring by way of measuring Rn-220 (thoron) in exhaled breath. The method is intended for application to monitoring the incorporation of thorium by occupationally exposed persons in compliance with the regulatory guide on health physics monitoring for determination of whole-body dose. (orig./CB) [de

  15. Profile of volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath changes as a result of gluten-free diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baranska, Agnieszka; Tigchelaar, Ettje; Smolinska, Agnieszka; Dallinga, Jan W.; Moonen, Edwin J. C.; Dekens, Jackie A. M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Zhernakova, Alexandra; van Schooten, Frederik J.

    In the present longitudinal study, we followed volatile organic compounds (VOCs) excreted in exhaled breath of 20 healthy individuals over time, while adhering to a gluten-free diet for 4 weeks prior to adherence to a normal diet. We used gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry

  16. Validation of a Human Exhalation Flow Simulation in a Room with Vertical Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olmedo, Inés; Nielsen, Peter V.; Adana, M. Ruiz de

    2012-01-01

    be designed to have high ventilation effectiveness. Furthermore, personalized ventilation may reduce the risk of cross-infection. Personalized ventilation can be used especially in hospital wards, aircraft cabins and, in general, where people are located at defined positions. Analyses of the flow...

  17. POTENTIALS OF RAMAN BASED SENSOR SYSTEM FOR AN ONLINE ANALYSIS OF HUMAN INHALE AND EXHALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Seeger

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A gas sensor based on spontaneous Raman scattering is proposed for the compositional analysis of single breath events. A description of the sensor as well as of the calibration procedure, which also allows the quantification of condensable gases, is presented. Moreover, a comprehensive characterization of the system is carried out in order to determine the measurement uncertainty. Finally, the sensor is applied to consecutive breath events and allowed measurements with 250 ms time resolution. The Raman sensor is able to detect all the major gas components, i.e. N2, O2, CO2, and H2O at ambient pressure with a high temporal resolution. Concentration fluctuations within a single breath event could be resolved.

  18. Evaluation of carbon dioxide rebreathing during exercise assisted by noninvasive ventilation with plateau exhalation valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ou YE

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Yong-er Ou,* Zhi-min Lin,* Dong-ming Hua, Ying Jiang, Ya-ting Huo, Qun Luo, Rong-Chang Chen State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, National Clinical Research Center for Respiratory Disease, Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Disease, First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Noninvasive ventilation with a plateau exhalation valve (PEV is often used as an adjunct to exercise to achieve a physiologic training effect in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients. However, during exercise, with the increase of exhalation flow and respiratory rate and limited capability of PEV to exhale gases out of the circuit, it is still unknown whether CO2 rebreathing occurs in COPD patients ventilated during exercise assisted by single-limb circuit with a PEV. A maximal symptom-limited cycle exercise test was performed while ventilated on pressure support (inspiratory:expiratory pressure 14:4 cmH2O in 18 male patients with stable severe COPD (mean ± standard deviation, forced expiratory volume in 1 s: 29.5%±6.9% predicted. At rest and during exercise, breathing pattern, mean expiratory flow, mean expiratory flow of PEV, and the mean inspiratory fraction of CO2 (tidal fractional concentration of inspired CO2 [FiCO2] reinsufflated from the circuit was measured for each breath. In comparison with rest, with the significant increase of mean expiratory flow (0.39±0.15 vs 0.82±0.27 L/s, fractional concentration of end-tidal CO2 (2.6%±0.7% vs 5.5%±0.6%, and the significant decrease of mean expiratory flow of PEV (0.41±0.02 vs 0.39±0.03 L/s, tidal FiCO2 significantly increased at peak exercise (0.48%±0.19% vs 1.8%±0.6% in patients with stable severe COPD. The inflection point of obvious CO2 rebreathing was 0.67±0.09 L/s (95% confidence interval 0.60–0.73 L/s. Ventilated by a single-limb tubing with PEV caused CO2

  19. Radon exhalation study from cement, cement slabs and concrete slabs with variation in fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Nisha; Singh, Jaspal

    2012-01-01

    Fly ash is a waste product from coal-fired power plants. Fly ash has become a subject of world-wide interest in recent years because of its diverse uses, e.g. in the manufacture of concrete for building purposes, for the filling of underground cavities, or as a component of building material. The fly ash may contain enhanced levels of the natural radionuclides in the uranium and thorium series and by using the fly ash in building materials, the radiation levels in houses may thus be technologically enhanced. Because of its relatively high radionuclide contents (including 226 Ra), fly ash may, however, present a potential hazard to the population through its radon emanation, which would be highly undesirable. Since fly ash is frequently used as a building material, the idea of the experiment was to mix fly ash in different proportions in the cement in the powder form, cemented slabs and concrete slabs to study the combined behaviors. Alpha sensitive LR-115 type II plastic track detector, commonly known as Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs), were used to measure the radon concentration. The alpha particles emitted from the radon causes the radiation damaged tracks. The chemical etching in NaOH at 60°C for about 90 minutes was done to reveal these latent tracks, which were then scanned and counted by an optical microscope of suitable magnification. By calculating the track density of registered tracks, the radon concentrations were determined. In case of cement in the powder form and in cemented slab, starting from the pure cement, fly ash was added up to 70% by weight. In this case the radon exhalation rate has increased by addition of fly ash in the cement and in case of concrete slabs by the addition of fly ash in the cement the radon exhalation increases up to 60% and then decreases. Therefore, on the basis of our investigations we concluded that in general radon exhalation rate increases with the addition of fly ash. (author)

  20. Quantifying Aerosol Delivery in Simulated Spontaneously Breathing Patients With Tracheostomy Using Different Humidification Systems With or Without Exhaled Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, Arzu; Harwood, Robert; Sheard, Meryl; Alquaimi, Maher Mubarak; Alhamad, Bshayer; Fink, James B

    2016-05-01

    Aerosol and humidification therapy are used in long-term airway management of critically ill patients with a tracheostomy. The purpose of this study was to determine delivery efficiency of jet and mesh nebulizers combined with different humidification systems in a model of a spontaneously breathing tracheotomized adult with or without exhaled heated humidity. An in vitro model was constructed to simulate a spontaneously breathing adult (tidal volume, 400 mL; breathing frequency, 20 breaths/min; inspiratory-expiratory ratio, 1:2) with a tracheostomy using a teaching manikin attached to a test lung through a collecting filter (Vital Signs Respirgard II). Exhaled heat and humidity were simulated using a cascade humidifier set to deliver 37°C and >95% relative humidity. Albuterol sulfate (2.5 mg/3 mL) was administered with a jet nebulizer (AirLife Misty Max) operated at 10 L/min and a mesh nebulizer (Aeroneb Solo) using a heated pass-over humidifier, unheated large volume humidifier both at 40 L/min output and heat-and-moisture exchanger. Inhaled drug eluted from the filter was analyzed via spectrophotometry (276 nm). Delivery efficiency of the jet nebulizer was less than that of the mesh nebulizer under all conditions (P humidity decreased drug delivery up to 44%. The jet nebulizer was less efficient than the mesh nebulizer in all conditions tested in this study. Aerosol deposition with each nebulizer was lowest with the heated humidifier with high flow. Exhaled humidity reduced inhaled dose of drug compared with a standard model with nonheated/nonhumidified exhalation. Further clinical research is warranted to understand the impact of exhaled humidity on aerosol drug delivery in spontaneously breathing patients with tracheostomy using different types of humidifiers. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  1. Sputum eosinophils and exhaled nitric oxide during late asthmatic reaction in patients with western red cedar asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, H; Dittrick, M; Chan, H; Chan-Yeung, M

    1999-03-01

    Examination of sputum for eosinophils and measurement of exhaled nitric oxide have been proposed as noninvasive methods of assessing airway inflammation in asthma. The use of these tests in the evaluation of patients with occupational asthma has not been reported. This study investigated the changes in sputum eosinophils and exhaled NO before and at intervals after inhalation challenge with plicatic acid in patients with suspected western red cedar asthma. Of 17 subjects who underwent challenge, nine had a positive bronchoconstrictor reaction (responders) and eight had a negative reaction (nonresponders). At 6 and 24 h after plicatic acid challenge, there was a significant increase in sputum eosinophils among responders, which was inversely related to the fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) at 6 h. An increase in sputum eosinophils was also found in three nonresponders. Levels of exhaled NO increased at 24 h after challenge with plicatic acid in both responders and nonresponders, being significant only in nonresponders. No correlation was found between the increase in nitric oxide and the magnitude of the functional changes in the airways. There were significant correlations between the degree of sputum eosinophilia and the level of exhaled NO before and after methacholine and plicatic acid challenge. In conclusion, the late asthmatic reaction induced by plicatic acid in patients with western red cedar asthma is associated with an increase in sputum eosinophils. The usefulness of measuring sputum eosinophils and exhaled nitric oxide in the clinical evaluation of patients with suspected occupational asthma caused by low molecular weight compounds has yet to be determined.

  2. Assessing temporal-dependent correlations in the 2000-2008 Popocatepetl exhalation sequence by using detrended fluctuation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose; Sosa, Eliceo; Rodriguez, Eduardo

    2009-10-01

    Large eruptions may represent a serious threat for the people dwelling near a volcano. The analysis of volcanic time-series can provide important insights for the assessment of risk and hazards and for the proposal of civil protection strategies. Different statistical methods have been used to characterize time-series associated with broadband measures of volcanic activity, suggesting that eruptive events may not be independent. While most analysis efforts have focused on traditional measures, such as seismic signals and duration and intensity of large eruptions, little attention has been devoted to the time-series of small-size daily eruptions known as exhalations. Some studies have indicated that exhalations, as part of the background activity monitoring, are correlated in time with long-period seismic events and tremors. Hence, the analysis of exhalation dynamics should yield some insights on the activity of a volcano. This work uses detrended fluctuation analysis, a statistical method from nonlinear analysis, for quantifying correlations in the 2000-2008 exhalation time-series of the Popocatepetl volcano, Mexico. The results indicated (1) the presence of long-term correlations, suggesting that the exhalation events are not independent but evolve according to a fractal persistent behavior, (2) the existence of two quasi-periodic cycles (with approximate periods of about 1.2 and 0.22 years) in the correlations temporal dependence, and (3) the action of nonlinear effects measured in terms of a multifractality index. The results are contrasted and discussed in terms of two recent largest eruptive phases of the Popocatepetl.

  3. Breathing with your belly: abdominal exhalation, loco-ventilatory integration and size constraints on locomotion in small mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Stephen M; White, Thomas D

    2009-01-01

    In mammals, diaphragmatic contractions control inhalation while contraction of some thoracic hypaxial muscles and the transversus abdominis muscle contribute to exhalation. Additional thoracic hypaxial muscles are recruited as accessory ventilatory muscles to improve inhalation and exhalation during locomotion. However, the contribution of abdominal hypaxial muscles to resting and locomotor ventilation is little understood in mammals and loco-ventilatory integration has not been studied in small basal mammals. We show for the first time that all of the abdominal hypaxial muscles actively contribute to both resting and locomotory ventilation in mammals but in a size-dependent manner. In large opossums (Didelphis), hypaxial muscles exhibit uniform mild tonus during resting ventilation (pressurizing the gut to aid in exhalation) and shift to phasic bursts of activity during each exhalation during locomotion. Smaller opossums (Monodelphis) actively exhale by firing the abdominal hypaxial muscles at approximately 10Hz at both rest and at preferred locomotor speeds. Furthermore, the large opossums entrained ventilation to limb cycling as speed increased while the small opossums entrained limb cycling to the resting ventilation rate during locomotion. Differences in these species are related to size effects on the natural frequency of the ventilatory system and increasing resting ventilation rates at small size. Large mammals, with lower resting ventilation rates, can increase ventilatory rates during locomotion, while the high resting ventilation rates of small mammals limits their ability to increase ventilation rates during locomotion. We propose that increase in mammalian body size during the Cenozoic may have been an adaptation or exaptation to overcome size effects on ventilation frequency.

  4. The fraction of NO in exhaled air and estimates of alveolar NO in adolescents with asthma: methodological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijkenskjöld-Rentzhog, Charlotte; Alving, Kjell; Kalm-Stephens, Pia; Lundberg, Jon O; Nordvall, Lennart; Malinovschi, Andrei

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the oral contribution to exhaled NO in young people with asthma and its potential effects on estimated alveolar NO (Calv(NO) ), a proposed marker of inflammation in peripheral airways. Secondary aims were to investigate the effects of various exhalation flow-rates and the feasibility of different proposed adjustments of (Calv(NO) ) for trumpet model and axial diffusion (TMAD). Exhaled NO at flow rates of 50-300 ml/sec, and salivary nitrite was measured before and after antibacterial mouthwash in 29 healthy young people (10-20 years) and 29 with asthma (10-19 years). Calv(NO) was calculated using the slope-intercept model with and without TMAD adjustment. Exhaled NO at 50 ml/sec decreased significantly after mouthwash, to a similar degree in asthmatic and healthy subjects (8.8% vs. 9.8%, P = 0.49). The two groups had similar salivary nitrite levels (56.4 vs. 78.4 µM, P = 0.25). Calv(NO) was not significantly decreased by mouthwash. Calv(NO) levels were similar when flow-rates between 50-200 or 100-300 ml/sec were used (P = 0.34 in asthmatics and P = 0.90 in healthy subjects). A positive association was found between bronchial and alveolar NO in asthmatic subjects and this disappeared after the TMAD-adjustment. Negative TMAD-adjusted Calv(NO) values were found in a minority of the subjects. Young people with and without asthma have similar salivary nitrite levels and oral contributions to exhaled NO and therefore no antibacterial mouthwash is necessary in routine use. TMAD corrections of alveolar NO could be successfully applied in young people with asthma and yielded negative results only in a minority of subjects. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. [Determining asthma treatment in children by monitoring fractional exhaled nitric oxide, sputum eosinophils and leukotriene B₄].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizmanos-Lamotte, G; Cruz, M J; Gómez-Ollés, S; Muñoz, X; de Mir Messa, I; Moreno-Galdó, A

    2015-01-01

    Sputum eosinophils and exhaled fractional nitric oxide (FENO) are markers of airway inflammation in asthma. Cytokines, cysteinyl-leukotrienes and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) are responsible for this inflammation. The aim of this study is to determine the usefulness of these markers in monitoring asthma treatment in children. FENO, sputum eosinophils, and LTB4 in induced sputum were performed in 10 children (9-15 years old). These determinations were repeated four months later, after the beginning or an increase in the treatment. FENO values tended to decrease (P=.15), pulmonary function tended to improve (P=.10), and sputum eosinophils decreased (P=.003) compared to the first determination. There were no differences in LTB4 concentrations (P=.88). Sputum eosinophils seem to be more precise than FENO in the monitoring of inflammation in asthmatic children. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide and multiple breath nitrogen washout in preschool healthy and asthmatic children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmann, Lea; Buchvald, Frederik; Green, Kent

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Objectively assessing pulmonary disease is challenging in preschool children with asthma. We evaluated the feasibility of measuring fractional exhaled nitrogen oxide (FeNO) and multiple breath nitrogen washout (N2MBW) in children. We compared their capacities for discriminating between...... children with asthma and healthy controls. Methods We measured FeNO and N2MBW-derived indices of lung clearance (LCI2.5) and conductive and acinar ventilation heterogeneity (Scond and Sacin) in 65 preschool children; 35 with physician-diagnosed asthma and 30 healthy. FeNO was measured with a portable.......023), but similar FeNO, LCI2.5 and Sacinvalues. Conclusion The feasibility of measuring FeNO was highly age-dependent and not applicable in children under age 4. N2MBW was feasible in the majority of preschool children. Scond, but not FeNO, could discriminate between children with asthma and healthy controls....

  7. Usefulness ofdetermining exhaled nitric oxide levels for theassessment ofasthma severity inchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Mierzejewska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a common disease, occurring increasingly among both children and adults. It is defined as a chronic inflammatory disease, characterized by hyperresponsiveness and reversible bronchial obstruction. The diagnosis of asthma in children is currently based mainly on clinical and spirometric evaluation as well as on the assessment of response to anti-inflammatory treatment. Currently there are ongoing discussions on the choice of optimal diagnostic and staging methods. Therefore, the measurement of the levels of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO is being seen as a viable option. The results of the measurement are obtained easily and non-invasively. High variability in the levels depending on both environmental factors and patient cooperation is a disadvantage of the test. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the levels of exhaled nitric oxide and the severity of asthma based on spirometric outcomes. A total of 141 children aged 5–17 years, including 35 patients diagnosed with asthma, among whom eight were in the stage of exacerbation, were qualified for the study. The control group consisted of 106 children admitted to the hospital for other reasons, with the exception of respiratory diseases. Spirometry and FeNO measurements were performed. No statistically significant differences were found between FeNO levels in patients with asthma or asthma exacerbations and the control group. The highest variation of FeNO levels was observed in the control group, indicating intersubject and factor variability of FeNO levels in exhaled gases. Although the utility of FeNO levels as an indicator of the severity of airway inflammation has been demonstrated in numerous studies, this study questions the usefulness of this parameter as a marker of asthma severity. This is probably due to the large intersubject variations in the concentration of exhaled NO, depending on patient

  8. Daily home measurements of exhaled nitric oxide in asthmatic children during natural birch pollen exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vahlkvist, Signe; Sinding, Marianne; Skamstrup, Kirsten

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) is a sensitive marker of eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthma. Available methods have restricted measurements to the clinic, giving only a snapshot of the disease, which by nature is highly variable. OBJECTIVES: We sought to investigate...... the feasibility, repeatability, accuracy, sensitivity, and biologic plausibility of new handheld equipment for FENO measurements. We studied day-to-day home measurements of FENO during the birch pollen season in children with allergy to birch pollen and a history of mild asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis during...... this season, as well as in nonatopic children. METHODS: Eleven children with mild asthma and allergy to birch pollen, performed daily home measurements of FENO for 6 weeks before and during the birch pollen season by using a handheld FENO monitor (NIOX MINO). Additionally, FENO (chemiluminescence equipment...

  9. Effect of Air Stability on the Dispersal of Exhaled Contaminant in Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chunwen; Gong, Guangcai; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2013-01-01

    -sized thermal manikin is locked and stratified at certain heights at stable condition while it mixes well with the ambient air and is diluted quickly through upper openings when the air is relatively unstable. The concentration of contaminant simulated by tracer gas (N2O) is measured both around and 0.35m from...... the manikin, indicating that the person who exhales the contaminant may not be polluted by himself as the protective effect of the thermal boundary layer around the body, especially in stable condition with two concentration zones and clean air drawn from the inlets. However, other persons facing...... the respiration some distance away may suffer higher contaminant exposure if the air in room is quite stable and contaminant from the mouth can penetrate a longer horizontal distance. In addition, the air stability slightly changes the velocity profiles, giving higher velocity decay and more turbulent mixing...

  10. Evaluation of color and radon exhalation rate in granite rocks between accelerated aging cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Francisco Diones Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Data used for the assessment of the analyzes performed on three types of dimension stone (Juparana Bordeaux, Branco Nevasca and Golden Artico), in natural state and after several cycles of accelerated aging are presented, correlating them with the gas exhalation rate radon issued by the analyzed lithologies. In the samples were conducted permeability, porosity, colorimetry, image analysis, petrographic and exhalation rate of radon, accompanied by aging tests on climate simulation chamber which simulates change situations of materials by weathering agents, accelerating wear and tear samples. The measurements were performed on samples in natural state, with 50 and 100 cycles of aging acceleration, where each cycle corresponds to variations in temperature and humidity in climatic simulation chamber, with the addition of an internal atmosphere of SO 2 with 25 concentration ppm. The results obtained during the tests were related to better analysis of the changes observed on the samples and the variation rate of exhalation radon emitted. The rocks have radon concentration values above the limits suggested by relevant international agencies (200-400 Bq/m³), with average values in the natural state, in 6149, 1619 and 866 Bq/m³ for Juparana Bordeaux, Branco Nevasca and Golden Arctic, respectively. The other aging cycles (50 and 100 cycles) showed an average increase of 0.8% for Juparana Bordeaux, 6.9% for White Blizzard and -23.87% for the Golden Arctic, with 50 cycles. From 50 to 100 cycles, there was reduction of 3.43% for Juparana Bordeaux and 22.15% for Branco Nevasca and an increase of 13.82% in the Golden Artico. The porosity results in the natural state obtained values an average of 0.696% for Juparana Bordeaux, 0.919% for Branco Nevasca and 0.830% for Golden Artico, and after 50 cycles of accelerated aging, obtained 0.621% to Juparana Bordeaux, 0.910% for Branco Nevasca and 0.840% for Golden Artico. The permeability of the samples showed values in the natural

  11. Association of indoor air pollution with rhinitis symptoms, atopy and nitric oxide levels in exhaled air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersoug, Lars-Georg; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) outdoors can induce airway inflammation and exacerbation of asthma in adults. However, there is limited knowledge about the effects of exposure to indoor PM. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of exposure to indoor sources of PM with rhini......Exposure to particulate matter (PM) outdoors can induce airway inflammation and exacerbation of asthma in adults. However, there is limited knowledge about the effects of exposure to indoor PM. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of exposure to indoor sources of PM...... with rhinitis symptoms, atopy and nitric oxide in exhaled air (FeNO) as a measure of airway inflammation....

  12. Exhaled breath condensate analysis from intubated newborns by nano-HPLC coupled to high resolution MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononikhin, A S; Starodubtseva, N L; Chagovets, V V; Ryndin, A Y; Burov, A A; Popov, I A; Bugrova, A E; Dautov, R A; Tokareva, A O; Podurovskaya, Y L; Ionov, O V; Frankevich, V E; Nikolaev, E N; Sukhikh, G T

    2017-03-15

    Invasiveness of examination and therapy methods is a serious problem for intensive care and nursing of premature infants. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is the most attractive biofluid for non-invasive methods development in neonatology for monitoring the status of intubated infants. The aim of the study was to propose an approach for EBC sampling and analysis from mechanically ventilated neonates. EBC collection system with good reproducibility of sampling was demonstrated. Discovery-based proteomic and metabolomic studies were performed using nano-HPLC coupled to high resolution MS. Label-free semi-quantitative data were compared for intubated neonates with congenital pneumonia (12 infants) and left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia (12 infants) in order to define disease-specific features. Totally 119 proteins and 164 metabolites were found. A number of proteins and metabolites that can act as potential biomarkers of respiratory diseases were proposed and require further validation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Real-time measurement of inhaled and exhaled cigarette smoke: Implications for dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, Conor; Warren, Nigel; Biggs, Philip; McAughey, John, E-mail: conor_mcgrath@bat.co [British American Tobacco, Group R and D Centre, Southampton, SO15 8TL (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-01

    Inhalation of tobacco smoke aerosol is a two-step process involving puffing followed by inhalation. Measured smoke deposition efficiencies in the lung (20-70%) are greater than expected for smoke particles of 150 -- 250 nm count median diameter (CMD). Various mechanisms have been put forward to explain this enhanced deposition pattern, including coagulation, hygroscopic growth, condensation and evaporation, changes in composition, or changes in inhalation behaviour. This paper represents one of a series of studies seeking to better quantify smoke chemistry, inhalation behaviour and cumulative particle growth. The studies have been conducted to better understand smoke dosimetry and links to disease as part of a wider programme defining risk and potential harm reduction. In this study, the average CMD of inhaled smoke was 160 nm while the average CMD of exhaled smoke was 239 nm with an average growth factor of 1.5.

  14. Determination of radon exhalation from construction materials using VOC emission test chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, M; Jann, O; Kemski, J; Schneider, U; Krocker, C; Hoffmann, B

    2013-10-01

    The inhalation of (222) Rn (radon) decay products is one of the most important reasons for lung cancer after smoking. Stony building materials are an important source of indoor radon. This article describes the determination of the exhalation rate of stony construction materials by the use of commercially available measuring devices in combination with VOC emission test chambers. Five materials - two types of clay brick, clinker brick, light-weight concrete brick, and honeycomb brick - generally used for wall constructions were used for the experiments. Their contribution to real room concentrations was estimated by applying room model parameters given in ISO 16000-9, RP 112, and AgBB. This knowledge can be relevant, if for instance indoor radon concentration is limited by law. The test set-up used here is well suited for application in test laboratories dealing with VOC emission testing. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Emission of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons from the Exhalation Zones of Thermally Active Mine Waste Dumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Kuna-Gwoździewicz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents results of research carried out on the occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH in gases of exhalation zones, created on the surface of a thermally active coal mine waste dump. The oxidation and self-heating of mine waste are accompanied with the intensive emission of flue gases, including PAH group compounds. Taking into consideration the fact the hydrocarbons show strong genotoxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic properties, research was conducted to establish their content in the examined gases. The research object was a gangue dump located in Rybnik. The research was performed in 2012. In total, 24 samples of gas were collected with PUF (polyurethane foam sampling cartridges with a quartz fibre filter and an aspirator. The collected samples were analysed with the use of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and a fluorescence detector (FLD to evaluate the amount of PAH present.

  16. Exhaled nitric oxide, nitrite/nitrate levels, allergy, rhinitis and asthma in the EGEA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadif, Rachel; Rava, Marta; Decoster, Brigitte; Huyvaert, Hélène; Le Moual, Nicole; Bousquet, Jean; Siroux, Valérie; Varraso, Raphaëlle; Pin, Isabelle; Zerimech, Farid; Matran, Régis

    2014-08-01

    Although interest in biomarkers in the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway has recently increased, associations between nitrite (NO2(-)) and nitrate (NO3(-)), and asthma, allergic sensitisation and rhinitis remain unclear. The study aimed to evaluate the associations between NO2(-)/NO3(-) and exhaled fraction of nitric oxide (FeNO) levels with asthma, allergic sensitisation and rhinitis. Plasma and exhaled breath condensate (EBC) NO2(-)/NO3(-) and FeNO levels were measured in 523 adults of the French Epidemiological study on Genetics and Environment of Asthma. Allergic sensitisation was defined by a positive skin prick test for at least one aeroallergen. Subjects were classified as non-sensitised, sensitised and as having allergic rhinitis. Plasma NO2 (-)/NO3(-) level was unrelated to any disease phenotypes. EBC NO2(-)/NO3(-) level was unrelated to any asthma phenotypes. EBC NO2(-)/NO3(-) and FeNO levels were correlated in sensitised subjects only (r = 0.21 ± 0.10, p=0.01). EBC NO2(-)/NO3(-) and FeNO levels were higher in sensitised than in non-sensitised subjects (adjusted geometric mean (95% CI): 2.36 (1.96-2.84) versus 1.72 (1.38-2.14) μmol per mg proteins, p=0.008; and 18.3 (16.7-20.0) versus 14.8 (13.3-16.5) ppb, p=0.0006, respectively), with gradual relationships from sensitised subjects to those with allergic rhinitis (p<0.0001). Results suggest that EBC NO2(-)/NO3(-) and FeNO levels may be considered as biological markers of intensity of allergic sensitisation and rhinitis. ©ERS 2014.

  17. Monitoring of exhaled carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide during lung cancer operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasag, Narmisheekh; Sakiyama, Shoji; Toba, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Mitsuteru; Nakagawa, Yasushi; Takizawa, Hiromitsu; Kawakami, Yukikiyo; Kenzaki, Koichiro; Ali, Abdellah Hamed Khalil; Kondo, Kazuya; Tangoku, Akira

    2014-03-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is expelled mainly via the lungs, so that exhaled carbon monoxide (Ex-CO) concentration reflects endogenous production. Recent reports have shown that Ex-CO levels are increased in critically ill patients and after anaesthesia and surgery. However, there has been no investigation of the changes in Ex-CO level during a lung operation. We continuously monitored Ex-CO and exhaled carbon dioxide (Ex-CO2) concentrations during surgery for lung cancer. Eighteen lung cancer patients who underwent elective lung cancer lobectomy were enrolled in this study. All patients were endotracheally intubated and ventilated under general anaesthesia. Ex-CO and Ex-CO2 concentrations were separately monitored and recorded continuously using two sets of Carbolyzer® breath analysers (Taiyo Inc., Osaka, Japan). Ex-CO concentration increased rapidly in response to changes in body position from supine to decubitus and was significantly decreased when patients were once again lying back (supine 2). Upon restarting bilateral ventilation, Ex-CO concentration in the operated lung was significantly higher than that in the breathing lung. In the lateral decubitus position, Ex-CO2 concentration showed the same pattern of increase as seen for Ex-CO. In the operated lung, the Ex-CO2 concentrations changed significantly at clamping, declamping and supine 2. In the re-ventilated, operated lung, the Ex-CO2 concentration was significantly lower than in the breathing lung. In the breathing lung, the Ex-CO2 concentration did not exhibit any significant changes over the course of the operation. When breathing was restarted, the Ex-CO level of the target lung was significantly higher than that of the breathing lung. The Ex-CO concentration was also affected by the surgical body position and this change was marked and transient.

  18. Exhaled volatile organic compounds for phenotyping chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basanta Maria

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-invasive phenotyping of chronic respiratory diseases would be highly beneficial in the personalised medicine of the future. Volatile organic compounds can be measured in the exhaled breath and may be produced or altered by disease processes. We investigated whether distinct patterns of these compounds were present in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and clinically relevant disease phenotypes. Methods Breath samples from 39 COPD subjects and 32 healthy controls were collected and analysed using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Subjects with COPD also underwent sputum induction. Discriminatory compounds were identified by univariate logistic regression followed by multivariate analysis: 1. principal component analysis; 2. multivariate logistic regression; 3. receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis. Results Comparing COPD versus healthy controls, principal component analysis clustered the 20 best-discriminating compounds into four components explaining 71% of the variance. Multivariate logistic regression constructed an optimised model using two components with an accuracy of 69%. The model had 85% sensitivity, 50% specificity and ROC area under the curve of 0.74. Analysis of COPD subgroups showed the method could classify COPD subjects with far greater accuracy. Models were constructed which classified subjects with ≥2% sputum eosinophilia with ROC area under the curve of 0.94 and those having frequent exacerbations 0.95. Potential biomarkers correlated to clinical variables were identified in each subgroup. Conclusion The exhaled breath volatile organic compound profile discriminated between COPD and healthy controls and identified clinically relevant COPD subgroups. If these findings are validated in prospective cohorts, they may have diagnostic and management value in this disease.

  19. The validity of tympanic and exhaled breath temperatures for core temperature measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flouris, Andreas D; Cheung, Stephen S

    2010-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of tympanic (T ty ) and exhaled breath (T X ) temperatures as indices of rectal temperature (T re ) by applying heat (condition A) and cold (condition B) in a dynamic A-B-A-B sequence. Fifteen healthy adults (8 men; 7 women; 24.9 ± 4.6 years) volunteered. Following a 15 min baseline period, participants entered a water tank maintained at 42 °C water temperature and passively rested until their T re increased by 0.5 °C above baseline. Thereafter, they entered a different water tank maintained at 12 °C water temperature until their T re decreased by 0.5 °C below baseline. This procedure was repeated twice (i.e. A-B-A-B). T ty demonstrated moderate response delays to the repetitive changes in thermal balance, whereas T X and T re responded relatively fast. Both T ty and T X correlated significantly with T re (P < 0.05). Linear regression models were used to predict T re based on T ty and T X . The predicted values from both models correlated significantly with T re (P < 0.05) and followed the changes in T re during the A-B-A-B thermal protocol. While some mean differences with T re were observed (P < 0.05), the 95% limits of agreement were acceptable for both models. It is concluded that the calculated models based on tympanic and exhaled breath temperature are valid indicators of core temperature. (note)

  20. Development and Performance Evaluation of an Exhaled-Breath Bioaerosol Collector for Influenza Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, James J; Koutrakis, Petros; Ferguson, Stephen T; Wolfson, Jack M; Fabian, M Patricia; Martins, Marco; Pantelic, Jovan; Milton, Donald K

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the aerosol mode for transmission of influenza is unknown. Understanding the role of aerosols is essential to developing public health interventions such as the use of surgical masks as a source control to prevent the release of infectious aerosols. Little information is available on the number and size of particles generated by infected persons, which is partly due to the limitations of conventional air samplers, which do not efficiently capture fine particles or maintain microorganism viability. We designed and built a new sampler, called the G-II, that collects exhaled breath particles that can be used in infectivity analyses. The G-II allows test subjects to perform various respiratory maneuvers (i.e. tidal breathing, coughing, and talking) and allows subjects to wear a mask or respirator during testing. A conventional slit impactor collects particles > 5.0 μm. Condensation of water vapor is used to grow remaining particles, including fine particles, to a size large enough to be efficiently collected by a 1.0 μm slit impactor and be deposited into a buffer-containing collector. We evaluated the G-II for fine particle collection efficiency with inert particle aerosols and evaluated infective virus collection using influenza A virus aerosols. Testing results showed greater than 85% collection efficiency for particles greater than 50nm and influenza virus collection comparable with a reference SKC BioSampler®. The new design will enable determination of exhaled infectious virus generation rate and evaluate control strategies such as wearing a surgical type mask to prevent the release of viruses from infected persons.

  1. Increase of methanol in exhaled breath quantified by SIFT-MS following aspartame ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Španěl, Patrik; Dryahina, Kseniya; Vicherková, Petra; Smith, David

    2015-11-19

    Aspartame, methyl-L-α-aspartyl-L-phenylalaninate, is used worldwide as a sweetener in foods and drinks and is considered to be safe at an acceptable daily intake (ADI) of 40 mg per kg of body weight. This compound is completely hydrolyzed in the gastrointestinal tract to aspartic acid, phenylalanine and methanol, each being toxic at high levels. The objective of the present study was to quantify the volatile methanol component in the exhaled breath of ten healthy volunteers following the ingestion of a single ADI dose of aspartame. Direct on-line measurements of methanol concentration were made in the mouth and nose breath exhalations using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, several times before aspartame ingestion in order to establish individual pre-dose (baseline) levels and then during two hours post-ingestion to track their initial increase and subsequent decrease. The results show that breath methanol concentrations increased in all volunteers by 1082   ±   205 parts-per-billion by volume (ppbv) from their pre-ingestion values, which ranged from 193 to 436 ppbv to peak values ranging from 981-1622 ppbv, from which they slowly decreased. These observations agree quantitatively with a predicted increase of 1030 ppbv estimated using a one-compartment model of uniform dilution of the methanol generated from a known amount of aspartame throughout the total body water (including blood). In summary, an ADI dose of aspartame leads to a 3-6 fold increase of blood methanol concentration above the individual baseline values.

  2. The identification of hypoxia biomarkers from exhaled breath under normobaric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshman, Sean W; Geier, Brian A; Fan, Maomian; Rinehardt, Sage; Watts, Brandy S; Drummond, Leslie A; Preti, George; Phillips, Jeffrey B; Ott, Darrin K; Grigsby, Claude C

    2015-10-27

    Pilots have reported experiencing in-flight hypoxic-like symptoms since the inception of high-altitude aviation. As a result, the need to monitor pilots, in-flight, for the onset of hypoxic conditions is of great interest to the aviation community. We propose that exhaled breath is an appropriate non-invasive medium for monitoring pilot hypoxic risk through volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis. To identify changes in the exhaled breath VOCs produced during periods of reduced O2 levels, volunteers were exposed to simulated flight profiles, i.e. sea level for 5 min, O2 levels found at elevated altitudes for 5 min or placebo and 5 min at 100% O2 recovery gas, using a modified flight mask interfaced with a reduced O2 breathing device. During the course of these test events, time series breath samples from the flight mask and pre/post bag samples were collected and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Seven compounds (pentanal, 4-butyrolactone, 2-pentanone, 2-hexanone, 2-cyclopenten-1-one, 3-methylheptane and 2-heptanone) were found to significantly change in response to hypoxic conditions. Additionally, the isoprene, 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene, was found to increase following the overall exposure profile. This study establishes an experimental means for monitoring changes in VOCs in response to hypoxic conditions, a computational workflow for compound analysis via the Metabolite Differentiation and Discovery Lab and MatLab(©) software and identifies potential volatile organic compound biomarkers of hypoxia exposure.

  3. Diagnosis and Classification of 17 Diseases from 1404 Subjects via Pattern Analysis of Exhaled Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhleh, Morad K; Amal, Haitham; Jeries, Raneen; Broza, Yoav Y; Aboud, Manal; Gharra, Alaa; Ivgi, Hodaya; Khatib, Salam; Badarneh, Shifaa; Har-Shai, Lior; Glass-Marmor, Lea; Lejbkowicz, Izabella; Miller, Ariel; Badarny, Samih; Winer, Raz; Finberg, John; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Perros, Frédéric; Montani, David; Girerd, Barbara; Garcia, Gilles; Simonneau, Gérald; Nakhoul, Farid; Baram, Shira; Salim, Raed; Hakim, Marwan; Gruber, Maayan; Ronen, Ohad; Marshak, Tal; Doweck, Ilana; Nativ, Ofer; Bahouth, Zaher; Shi, Da-You; Zhang, Wei; Hua, Qing-Ling; Pan, Yue-Yin; Tao, Li; Liu, Hu; Karban, Amir; Koifman, Eduard; Rainis, Tova; Skapars, Roberts; Sivins, Armands; Ancans, Guntis; Liepniece-Karele, Inta; Kikuste, Ilze; Lasina, Ieva; Tolmanis, Ivars; Johnson, Douglas; Millstone, Stuart Z; Fulton, Jennifer; Wells, John W; Wilf, Larry H; Humbert, Marc; Leja, Marcis; Peled, Nir; Haick, Hossam

    2017-01-24

    We report on an artificially intelligent nanoarray based on molecularly modified gold nanoparticles and a random network of single-walled carbon nanotubes for noninvasive diagnosis and classification of a number of diseases from exhaled breath. The performance of this artificially intelligent nanoarray was clinically assessed on breath samples collected from 1404 subjects having one of 17 different disease conditions included in the study or having no evidence of any disease (healthy controls). Blind experiments showed that 86% accuracy could be achieved with the artificially intelligent nanoarray, allowing both detection and discrimination between the different disease conditions examined. Analysis of the artificially intelligent nanoarray also showed that each disease has its own unique breathprint, and that the presence of one disease would not screen out others. Cluster analysis showed a reasonable classification power of diseases from the same categories. The effect of confounding clinical and environmental factors on the performance of the nanoarray did not significantly alter the obtained results. The diagnosis and classification power of the nanoarray was also validated by an independent analytical technique, i.e., gas chromatography linked with mass spectrometry. This analysis found that 13 exhaled chemical species, called volatile organic compounds, are associated with certain diseases, and the composition of this assembly of volatile organic compounds differs from one disease to another. Overall, these findings could contribute to one of the most important criteria for successful health intervention in the modern era, viz. easy-to-use, inexpensive (affordable), and miniaturized tools that could also be used for personalized screening, diagnosis, and follow-up of a number of diseases, which can clearly be extended by further development.

  4. Modeling of indoor radon concentration from radon exhalation rates of building materials and validation through measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Amit; Chauhan, R.P.; Joshi, Manish; Sahoo, B.K.

    2014-01-01

    Building materials are the second major source of indoor radon after soil. The contribution of building materials towards indoor radon depends upon the radium content and exhalation rates and can be used as a primary index for radon levels in the dwellings. The radon flux data from the building materials was used for calculation of the indoor radon concentrations and doses by many researchers using one and two dimensional model suggested by various researchers. In addition to radium content, the radon wall flux from a surface strongly depends upon the radon diffusion length (L) and thickness of the wall (2d). In the present work the indoor radon concentrations from the measured radon exhalation rate of building materials calculated using different models available in literature and validation of models was made through measurement. The variation in the predicted radon flux from different models was compared with d/L value for wall and roofs of different dwellings. The results showed that the radon concentrations predicted by models agree with experimental value. The applicability of different model with d/L ratio was discussed. The work aims to select a more appropriate and general model among available models in literature for the prediction of indoor radon. -- Highlights: • The measurement of indoor radon concentration was carried out by pin hole based dosimeter. • The indoor radon concentration was calculated from different model available in the literature. • A comparison of wall flux from two different approaches was carried out for different d/L ratio. • A more appropriate model for prediction of indoor radon concentration was validated

  5. Development of method for quantification of 222Rn exhalation ratio at radioactive waste dam and soil study as mitigator material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macacini, Jose Flavio

    2008-01-01

    The Brazilian uranium mining company (INB) processed 2.32 10 6 tons of uranium ore in its ore treatment unit (UTM - Caldas), located in the Pocos de Caldas plateau. During 16 years of operation, this unit discarded 2.39 10 6 tons of solid waste in a tailing dam, with an average activity concentration of 226 Ra of 7311 ± 184 Bq kg -1 . Most of the atoms of 222 Rn generated from the radioactive waste of the tailing dam remain bounded to the mineral structure. However, a fraction of these atoms can be released from the mineral structure and then emanate. Reaching the porous space of the waste piles, the 222 Rn moves towards the interface waste-atmosphere, exhaling into the atmosphere. The featuring properties of the 222 Rn transport and the biological damage caused by its progeny transform this small chain of radionuclides into a scourge of nature. Because of that, the dry area of the tailing dam was the scope of this work. A methodology was developed for quantifying the exhalation rate of 222 Rn. Moreover, the soil from its surroundings was experimentally evaluated as a cover material to reduce the exhalation of 222 Rn. A collector of 222 Rn was developed, being denominated 607. This collector was proved to be exact and precise after laboratory tests, when a standard for 222 Rn exhalation was prepared with caldasite, an uranium ore with high concentration of 226 Ra (26611 ± 581 Bq kg -1 ), crushed to the granulometric interval from 1.168 mm to 0.589 mm. The results of 222 Rn exhalation rate using the collector 607 were not influenced by the adsorption of water steam, considering sampling periods lower than 5 days and mass of water steam lower than 7 g. Sampling for measuring 222 Rn exhalation rates in the dry area of the tailing dam was carried out using the collector 607, following the experimental design established by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). The average exhalation rate in the west part of the tailing dam was 1.30 ± 1.24 Bq m

  6. Leukotrienes B4, C4, D4 and E4 in the Exhaled Breath Condensate (EBC), Blood and Urine in Patients with Pneumoconiosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pelclová, D.; Fenclová, Z.; Vlčková, Š.; Lebedová, J.; Syslová, K.; Pecha, O.; Běláček, J.; Navrátil, Tomáš; Kuzma, Marek; Kačer, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 4 (2012), s. 299-306 ISSN 0019-8366 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : leukotrienes * Lung fibrosis * exhaled breath condensate Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 0.870, year: 2012

  7. Detection of ethylene gas in exhaled breath of people living in landfill using CO{sub 2} laser photoacoustic spectroscopy with multicomponent analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oktafiani, Fitri, E-mail: fitri.oktafiani@mail.ugm.ac.id; Stiyabudi, Rizky; Amin, Mochamad Nurul; Mitrayana [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Sekip Utara BLS 21, Yogyakarta, 55281 Indonesia (Indonesia)

    2016-06-17

    The photoacoustic spectrometer (PAS) had been built and the performance had been determined. The research was based on the conversion of the absorbed middle infra red (IR) radiation by gas confined in a closed PAS cell into standing acoustic wave, which could be detected by a suitable electroacoustic transducer such as a microphone. The lowest detection limit for this setup was (57,1 ± 0,3) ppb and quality factor was (14,5 ± 0,6) for ethylene gas in 10P14 CO{sub 2} laser line. Then, this PAS was used to measure of ethylene gas concentration in breath sample of people living in near the Piyungan Bantul Yogyakarta landfill. The result from multicomponent analysis showed that PAS enable to measure the lowest concentration of volatile organic compound (VOC), such as ethylene, which occured on ambien air in Piyungan landfill. Variaty of distance area applied in this research. In the range of ±0,5 km from landfill, we obtained the concentration of ethylene gas concentration for human breath was (1,520 ± 0,002) ppm, while in the range of ±45 km, the ethylene gas concentration for human breath was (0,424 ± 0,002) ppm. Ethylene gas concentrations in exhaled gas decreased along with increasing distance variation of the landfill.

  8. Using of laser spectroscopy and chemometrics methods for identification of patients with lung cancer, patients with COPD and healthy people from absorption spectra of exhaled air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukreeva, Ekaterina B.; Bulanova, Anna A.; Kistenev, Yury V.; Kuzmin, Dmitry A.; Nikiforova, Olga Yu.; Ponomarev, Yurii N.; Tuzikov, Sergei A.; Yumov, Evgeny L.

    2014-11-01

    The results of application of the joint use of laser photoacoustic spectroscopy and chemometrics methods in gas analysis of exhaled air of patients with chronic respiratory diseases (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer) are presented. The absorption spectra of exhaled breath of representatives of the target groups and healthy volunteers were measured; the selection by chemometrics methods of the most informative absorption coefficients in scan spectra in terms of the separation investigated nosology was implemented.

  9. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Laser analysis of the 13C/12C isotope ratio in CO2 in exhaled air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, E. V.

    2002-11-01

    Tunable diode lasers (TDLs) are applied to the diagnostics of gastroenterological diseases using respiratory tests and preparations enriched with the stable 13C isotope. This method of the analysis of the 13C/12C isotope ratio in CO2 in exhaled air is based on the selective measurement of the resonance absorption at the vibrational — rotational structure of 12CO2 and 13CO2. The CO2 transmission spectra in the region of 4.35 μm were measured with a PbEuSe double-heterostructure TDL. The accuracy of carbon isotope ratio measurements in CO2 of exhaled air performed with the TDL was ~0.5%. The data of clinical tests of the developed laser-based analyser are presented.

  10. Exhaled breath analysis using electronic nose in cystic fibrosis and primary ciliary dyskinesia patients with chronic pulmonary infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, Odin; Paff, Tamara; Haarman, Eric G

    2014-01-01

    (CF) and primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) with or without various well characterized chronic pulmonary infections. We recruited 64 patients with CF and 21 with PCD based on known chronic infection status. 21 healthy volunteers served as controls. An electronic nose was employed to analyze exhaled......, this method significantly discriminates CF patients suffering from a chronic pulmonary P. aeruginosa (PA) infection from CF patients without a chronic pulmonary infection. Further studies are needed for verification and to investigate the role of electronic nose technology in the very early diagnostic workup......The current diagnostic work-up and monitoring of pulmonary infections may be perceived as invasive, is time consuming and expensive. In this explorative study, we investigated whether or not a non-invasive exhaled breath analysis using an electronic nose would discriminate between cystic fibrosis...

  11. Study of natural radioactivity and 222Rn exhalation rate in soil samples for the assessment of average effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangotra, P.; Mehra, R.; Jakhu, R.; Sahoo, B.K

    2016-01-01

    The natural radioactivity in soil is usually determined from the 226 Ra (Radium), 232 Th (Thorium) and 40 K (potassium). 222 Rn and 220 Rn are produced in soil as a result of the presence of these radionuclides. As 226 Ra decay, the newly created 222 Rn radionuclide recoil from the parent grain and then exhale through the soil. Since 98.5% of radiological effects of 238 U series are produced by 226 Ra and its daughter products. The assessment of gamma radiation dose from natural sources is of particular importance as natural radiation is the largest contributor to the external dose of the world population. Authors are advised to maximize the information content utilizing the full space available. The main objective of the present study is to measure the level of natural radioactivity 226 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K and 222 Rn exhalation rate in the soil samples for health risk assessment

  12. The value of exhaled nitric oxide to identify asthma in smoking patients with asthma-like symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinovschi, Andrei; Backer, Vibeke; Harving, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The fraction of nitric oxide in exhaled air (FeNO) is used in asthma diagnosis and management. Smoking reduces FeNO and 20-35% of asthmatics are smoking. However no guidelines exist on the diagnostic value of FeNO in smokers. Therefore we assessed the value of FeNO to diagnose asthma...... in a population of subjects with asthma-like symptoms and different smoking habits....

  13. Markers of Lipid Oxidative Damage in the Exhaled Breath Condensate of Nano TiO2 Production Workers.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pelclová, D.; Ždímal, Vladimír; Kačer, P.; Zíková, Naděžda; Komarc, M.; Fenclová, Z.; Vlčková, Š.; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Makeš, Otakar; Syslová, K.; Navrátil, Tomáš; Turci, F.; Corazzari, I.; Zakharov, S.; Bello, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2017), s. 52-63 ISSN 1743-5390 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP503/12/G147 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : exhaled breath condensate * aldehydes * oxidative stress * occupational exposure * monitoring Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) OBOR OECD: Public and environmental health ; Physical chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 6.428, year: 2016

  14. MicroRNA7 expression in exhaled breath condensate of smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A potential biomarker?

    OpenAIRE

    Nevine Abd Elfattah; R. Ali-Labib

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: The global burden of lung cancer is attributed to its poor outcome as it is usually discovered in an advanced stage therefore the constant search for screening protocols among the high risk groups like smokers and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Biomarker testing in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) samples is a simple inexpensive non invasive method. Many previous researches linked the dys-Regulation of microRNAs to the development of lung carcinogenesis. Consequently ...

  15. National survey on the natural radioactivity and 222Rn exhalation rate of building materials in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, P; van Dijk, W; van der Graaf, E R; de Groot, T J H

    2006-09-01

    The present study reports on results of a nation-wide survey on the natural radioactivity concentrations and Rn exhalation rates of the prevailing building materials in the Netherlands. In total 100 samples were taken and analyzed for the activity concentrations of Ra, Ra, Th, and K and for their Rn exhalation rate. The sampled materials consisted of gypsum products, aerated concrete, sand-lime and clay bricks, mortars and concrete, representing about 95% of the stony building materials used in the construction of Dutch homes. The laboratory analyses were performed according to two well-documented standard procedures, the interlaboratory reproducibility of which is found to be within 5% on average. The highest radionuclide concentrations were found in a porous inner wall brick to which fly ash was added. The second highest were clay bricks with average Ra and Ra levels around 40 Bq kg. Concrete and mortar show the highest exhalation rates with a fairly broad range of 1 to 13 microBq (kg s). Low natural radioactivity levels are associated with either natural gypsum (products) or gypsum from flue gas desulphurization units, and low exhalation rates with clay bricks. To evaluate the radiological impact the radioactivity concentrations in each sample were combined into a so-called dose factor, representing the absorbed dose rate in a room with a floor, walls and ceiling of 20 cm of the material in question. For that purpose, calculations with the computer codes MCNP, Marmer and MicroShield on the specific absorbed dose rates were incorporated in the paper. The results of these codes corresponded within 6% and average values were calculated at 0.90, 1.10, and 0.080 nGy h per Bq kg for the U series, the Th series, and K, respectively. Model calculations on the external dose rate, based on the incidence of the various building materials in 1,336 living rooms, are in accordance with measured data.

  16. Origin of nitrite and nitrate in nasal and exhaled breath condensate and relation to nitric oxide formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marteus, H; Törnberg, D C; Weitzberg, E; Schedin, U; Alving, K

    2005-03-01

    Raised concentrations of nitrate and nitrite have been found in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) in airway disease, and it has been postulated that this reflects increased nitric oxide (NO) metabolism. However, the chemical and anatomical origin of nitrate and nitrite in the airways has not yet been sufficiently studied. The fraction of exhaled NO at an exhalation flow rate of 50 ml/s (FE(NO)) and nitrite and nitrate in EBC, nasal condensate, and saliva were measured in 17 tracheostomised and 15 non-tracheostomised subjects, all of whom were non-smokers without respiratory disease. Tracheal and oral samples were taken from the tracheostomised subjects and nasal (during velum closure) and oral samples from the non-tracheostomised subjects. Measurements were performed before and after sodium nitrate ingestion (10 mg/kg) and use of antibacterial mouthwash (chlorhexidine 0.2%). In tracheostomised subjects oral FE(NO) increased by 90% (pnitrate ingestion. Oral EBC nitrite levels were increased 23-fold at 60 minutes (pnitrite levels in tracheal EBC showed only a minor increase (fourfold, pNitrate was increased the same amount in oral and tracheal EBC at 60 minutes (2.5-fold, pnitrite increased after nitrate ingestion and after chlorhexidine mouthwash they approached baseline levels again (pnitrate, and nitrite were not affected by nitrate intake or mouthwash. At baseline, mouthwash with deionised water did not affect nitrite in oral EBC or saliva, whereas significant reductions were seen after antibacterial mouthwash (pnitrate is taken up by the lower airways but not the nasal airways. Nitrate levels in EBC are thus influenced by dietary intake. Nitrate is reduced to nitrite by bacterial activity which takes place primarily in the oropharyngeal tract of healthy subjects. Only oropharyngeal nitrite seems to contribute to exhaled NO in non-inflamed airways, and there is also a substantial contribution of nitrite from the oropharyngeal tract during standard collection of EBC.

  17. A Real-time Method to Evaluate the Nasal Deposition and Clearance of Acetone in the Human Volunteer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thrall, Karla D.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Schwartz, Ronald E.(Otolaryngology, Head& amp; Neck Surgery); Weitz, Karl K.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Soelberg, Jolen J.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Foureman, Gary L.(US PA-NCEA); Prah, James D.(EPA-Human Studies Division); Timchalk, Charles (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2003-05-01

    Nasal dosimetry models have become increasingly quantitative as insights into tissue deposition/clearance and computational fluid dynamics have become available. Validation of these models requires sufficient experimental data. However, investigations into respiratory deposition, particularly in human volunteers, have been historically limited due to methodological limitations. To overcome this, a method for evaluating the nasal wash-in, wash-out phenomena of a highly water-soluble compound in human volunteers was developed and characterized. This methodology was assessed using controlled human inhalation exposures to uniformly labeled 13C-acetone at approximately 1 ppm concentration for 30 minutes under different breathing maneuvers (inhale nose/exhale nose; inhale nose/exhale mouth; inhale mouth/exhale nose). A small-diameter air-sampling probe inserted in the nasopharyngeal cavity of the volunteer was connected directly to an ion-trap mass spectrometer capable of sampling every 0.8 sec. A second ion-trap mass spectrometer simultaneously sampled from the volunteer?s exhaled breath stream via a breath-inlet device interface. Together, the two mass spectrometers provided real-time appraisal of the 13C-acetone concentrations in the nasopharyngeal region and in the exhaled breath stream before, during, and after the different breathing maneuvers. The breathing cycle (depth and frequency) and heart rate were concurrently monitored throughout the exposure using a heart rate monitor and a human plethysmograph to differentiate inhalation and exhalation. Graphical overlay of the plethysmography results with the mass spectrometer measurements show clear quantifiable differences in 13C-acetone levels at the nasal probe as a function of breathing maneuvers. Breath-by-breath analysis of 13C-acetone concentrations indicate that between 40-75% of the compound is absorbed upon inhalation and nearly all of that absorbed released back into the breath stream during exhalation.

  18. The correlations between Radon in soil gas and its exhalation and concentration in air in the southern part of Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shweikani, R.; Hushari, M.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work is to measure the concentration of the radon ( 222 Rn) in soil air, 222 Rn exhalation from soil and 222 Rn in outdoor air which may have great influence on 222 Rn levels in houses. 222 Ra activity concentrations were also determined in soil samples. The studied areas are located in southern part of Syria. The common bed rock of this area is black and massive granite which are poor in uranium content [Jubeli Y.M., 1990. Uranium exploration in Syria. Internal Technical Report, vol. 1 (in English), vol. 2 (in Arabic), SAEC, Damascus; Technoexport (USSR), 1966. In: Ponikarov (Ed.), The Geological Map of Syria Scale: 1:200.000, Ministry of Industry, Damascus, Syria]. Results showed that the maximum measurement in all areas was 32500Bqm -3 in soil air with an exhalation rate of 9Bqm -2 s -1 in Darra region and 66.43Bqm -3 of radon in open air, with 77Bqkg -1 of radium content in soil (Damascus suburb). In addition, correlations between Rn in soil and exhalation of Radon from soil and radon in houses were found in some areas (Sweda and Darra), while, no correlations were found in other studied areas. Moreover, no correlation between radon in houses and radon measurements in soil and in outdoors were found. This was attributed to the methodology used and the influence of building design and inhabitants behavior

  19. Exhaled breath analysis using electronic nose in cystic fibrosis and primary ciliary dyskinesia patients with chronic pulmonary infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odin Joensen

    Full Text Available The current diagnostic work-up and monitoring of pulmonary infections may be perceived as invasive, is time consuming and expensive. In this explorative study, we investigated whether or not a non-invasive exhaled breath analysis using an electronic nose would discriminate between cystic fibrosis (CF and primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD with or without various well characterized chronic pulmonary infections. We recruited 64 patients with CF and 21 with PCD based on known chronic infection status. 21 healthy volunteers served as controls. An electronic nose was employed to analyze exhaled breath samples. Principal component reduction and discriminant analysis were used to construct internally cross-validated receiver operator characteristic (ROC curves. Breath profiles of CF and PCD patients differed significantly from healthy controls p = 0.001 and p = 0.005, respectively. Profiles of CF patients having a chronic P. aeruginosa infection differed significantly from to non-chronically infected CF patients p = 0.044. We confirmed the previously established discriminative power of exhaled breath analysis in separation between healthy subjects and patients with CF or PCD. Furthermore, this method significantly discriminates CF patients suffering from a chronic pulmonary P. aeruginosa (PA infection from CF patients without a chronic pulmonary infection. Further studies are needed for verification and to investigate the role of electronic nose technology in the very early diagnostic workup of pulmonary infections before the establishment of a chronic infection.

  20. A study of indoor radon, thoron and their exhalation rates in the environment of Fazilka district, Punjab, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Saurabh; Kumar, Deepak; Sharma, Dinesh Kumar; Kumar, Ajay

    2018-02-01

    Over the last few decades, the study of radioactive radon gas has gained huge momentum due to its possible role in health related hazards. In the present work, pin-hole twin chamber single entrance dosimeters have been used for track measurements of radon and thoron. The annual average radon concentration varies from 50.3 to 204 Bq/m3 at all locations. Almost all the values are below the safe range provided by ICRP. Radon concentration is found to be higher in winter as compared to other seasons. Variation of radon with quality of dwellings is also discussed. The values of annual effective dose due to radon and thoron are also well within the range provided by ICRP and WHO. Radon and thoron exhalation rates are measured using SMART RnDuo monitor. The radon mass exhalation rates ranged from 11 to 71 mBq/kg/h while the thoron surface values ranged from 36 to 2048 Bq/m2/h. All the values are on the lower side. A weak correlation is found between radon and thoron concentrations and their exhalation rates. When compared with the values of other parts of northern India, the values of present investigation are on higher side.

  1. Natural radioactivity and radon exhalation rates in man-made tiles used as building materials in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaoka, K; Hosoda, M; Suwankot, N; Omori, Y; Ishikawa, T; Yonehara, H; Tokonami, S

    2015-11-01

    Man-made tiles frequently used in Japan were collected, and activity concentrations and radon ((222)Rn) exhalation rates in these tiles were measured. Dose estimations for inhabitants living in houses built using these tiles were also carried out. The activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (228)Ra and (40)K in the man-made tiles were 31-170, 35-110 and 260-980 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The (222)Rn exhalation rates in the tiles were 8.8-21 μBq m(-2) s(-1). The ranges of experimental activity concentrations and (222)Rn exhalation rates were almost identical to those of natural rocks used as typical building materials in Japan. The maximum value of effective dose to inhabitants living in houses built with the man-made tiles was 0.14 mSv y(-1), which is lower than the reference level range (1-20 mSv y(-1)) for abnormally high levels of natural background radiation published in the ICRP Publication 103. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Assessment of radionuclide concentration and exhalation studies in soil of lesser Himalayas of Jammu and Kashmir, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Vij, Raman; Sharma, Sumit; Sarin, Amit; Narang, Saurabh

    2018-02-01

    Because to extensive utilization of soil as a building/construction stuff, the activities of 238U, 40K, 232Th, and exhalation studies in solid samples have been measured using thallium activated sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) gamma detector and scintillation-based smart RnDuo monitor. The measured activity concentration of radionuclides lies in the range of 2.76-38.96, 12.47-65.70, and 199-450 Bq/kg for uranium (C U), thorium (C Th), and potassium (C K), respectively. The annual effective dose rate due to radionuclides is within the secure limit suggested by ICRP. The radium equivalent activity of all the samples is under 100 Bq/kg. The maximum outward and inside risk indices of all these samples are below the values of 0.37 and 0.43. No direct correlation has been seen between 238U and its mass exhalation rate as well as 232Th and its surface exhalation rate in soil samples.

  3. [Determining the alveolar component of nitric oxide in exhaled air: procedures and reference values for healthy persons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Ana María; Balleza, Marco; Calaf, Núria; González, Mercedes; Feixas, Teresa; Casan, Pere

    2009-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) production has been described using a 2-compartment model for the synthesis and movement of NO in both the alveoli and the airways. The alveolar concentration of NO (Ca(NO)), an indirect marker of the inflammatory state of the distal portions of the lung, can be deduced through exhalation at multiple flow rates. Our objective was to determine reference values for Ca(NO). The fraction of exhaled NO (Fe(NO)) was measured in 33 healthy individuals at a rate of 50mL/s; the subjects then exhaled at 10, 30, 100, and 200mL/s to calculate Ca(NO). A chemiluminescence analyzer (NIOX Aerocrine) was used to perform the measurements. The mean (SD) Fe(NO) was 15 (6)ppb. The mean Ca(NO) was 3.04 (1.30)ppb. These values of Ca(NO) measured in healthy individuals will allow us to analyze alveolar inflammatory behavior in respiratory and systemic processes.

  4. The analysis of volatile organic compounds biomarkers for lung cancer in exhaled breath, tissues and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yishan; Hu, Yanjie; Wang, Di; Yu, Kai; Wang, Ling; Zou, Yingchang; Zhao, Cong; Zhang, Xuanlang; Wang, Ping; Ying, Kejing

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) biomarkers in breath provide a novel, noninvasive and quick approach to diagnosis lung cancer. The aim of the proposed study was to investigate the VOCs biomarkers in exhaled breath for lung cancer. The VOCs in exhaled breath of 88 lung cancer patients, 70 lung benign disease and 85 healthy people were analyzed by Solid Phase Micro Extraction - Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (SPME-GCMS). Three types of lung cancer cells and 18 lung cancer patients' tissues were cultured in vitro. The VOCs in the headspace of these cultivations were analyzed as an evidence of production mechanism of the VOCs in breath. Three lung cancer diagnosis models were constructed respectively in exhaled breath samples using Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA). Leave one out cross validation was employed to evaluate these models. 23 VOCs, whose areas under curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) > 0.60 and p < 0.01, were confirmed as the VOCs biomarkers for lung cancer. Three diagnostic models based on 23 VOCs could easily discriminate lung cancer patients from controls with 96.47% sensitivity and 97.47% specificity. However, the discrimination between early stage and later stage lung cancer was not very obvious.

  5. Effect of allergen-specific immunotherapy with purified Alt a1 on AMP responsiveness, exhaled nitric oxide and exhaled breath condensate pH: a randomized double blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prieto Luis

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little information is available on the effect of allergen-specific immunotherapy on airway responsiveness and markers in exhaled air. The aims of this study were to assess the safety of immunotherapy with purified natural Alt a1 and its effect on airway responsiveness to direct and indirect bronchoconstrictor agents and markers in exhaled air. Methods This was a randomized double-blind trial. Subjects with allergic rhinitis with or without mild/moderate asthma sensitized to A alternata and who also had a positive skin prick test to Alt a1 were randomized to treatment with placebo (n = 18 or purified natural Alt a1 (n = 22 subcutaneously for 12 months. Bronchial responsiveness to adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP and methacholine, exhaled nitric oxide (ENO, exhaled breath condensate (EBC pH, and serum Alt a1-specific IgG4 antibodies were measured at baseline and after 6 and 12 months of treatment. Local and systemic adverse events were also registered. Results The mean (95% CI allergen-specific IgG4 value for the active treatment group increased from 0.07 μg/mL (0.03-0.11 at baseline to 1.21 μg/mL (0.69-1.73, P 4 value increased nonsignificantly from 0.09 μg/mL (0.06-0.12 at baseline to 0.13 μg/mL (0.07-0.18 at 6 months and to 0.11 μg/mL (0.07-0.15 at 12 months of treatment. Changes in the active treatment group were significantly higher than in the placebo group both at 6 months (P Conclusion Although allergen-specific immunotherapy with purified natural Alt a1 is well tolerated and induces an allergen-specific IgG4 response, treatment is not associated with changes in AMP or methacholine responsiveness or with significant improvements in markers of inflammation in exhaled air. These findings suggest dissociation between the immunotherapy-induced increase in IgG4 levels and its effect on airway responsiveness and inflammation.

  6. Ethylene, an early marker of systemic inflammation in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paardekooper, L.M.; Bogaart, G. van den; Kox, M.; Dingjan, I.; Neerincx, A.H.; Bendix, M.B.; Beest, M.T.; Harren, F.J.M; Risby, T.; Pickkers, P.; Marczin, N.; Cristescu, S.M.

    2017-01-01

    Ethylene is a major plant hormone mediating developmental processes and stress responses to stimuli such as infection. We show here that ethylene is also produced during systemic inflammation in humans and is released in exhaled breath. Traces of ethylene were detected by laser spectroscopy both in

  7. Effects of Heat and Moisture Exchangers and Exhaled Humidity on Aerosol Deposition in a Simulated Ventilator-Dependent Adult Lung Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, Arzu; Alwadeai, Khalid S; Fink, James B

    2017-05-01

    Many in vitro models report higher inhaled dose with dry versus heated humidity. Heat-and-moisture exchangers (HMEs) provide passive humidity in ventilator-dependent patients but act as a barrier to aerosol. The HMEs designed to allow aerosol delivery (HME-ADs) have not been well described. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact on aerosol deposition of HME-ADs with and without active exhaled humidity in a simulated ventilator-dependent adult model. We used an in vitro lung model consisting of an intubated teaching mannequin with an endotracheal tube of 8.0 mm inner diameter with bronchi directly attached to a collecting filter and passive rubber test lung to provide testing without active exhaled humidity. To simulate exhaled humidity, a Cascade humidifier (37°C and 100% relative humidity) was placed between the collecting filter and test lung, simulating body temperature and pressure saturated exhaled humidity at the bronchi. Albuterol sulfate (2.5 mg/3 mL) was administered with a mesh nebulizer (Aerogen Solo) placed in the inspiratory limb of the ventilator circuit at the Y-piece, with no HME in place (control) and with 3 HME-AD devices, including the CircuVent, Humid-Flo, and AirLife, with and without exhaled humidity. Drug was eluted from the collecting filter and analyzed with spectrophotometry. Student t tests and analysis of variance were used for data analysis ( P < .05). The percentage of drug dose delivered (mean ± SD) distal to the bronchi in the control experiments was greater than all of the HME-ADs without exhaled humidity 18 ± 0.7 and with active exhaled humidity 10.8 ± 0.2% ( P < .005). Without exhaled humidity, aerosol delivery with the CircuVent (12.6 ± 0.8), Humid-Flo (15.3 ± 0.8), and AirLife (12.0 ± 0.5) was less than control ( P < .001, P = .01 and P < .001, respectively). In contrast, with exhaled humidity, no difference was found between control and HME-ADs ( P = .89). Also, a greater variation between control and the 3

  8. Manganese in exhaled breath condensate: a new marker of exposure to welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulo, Sébastien; Chérot-Kornobis, Nathalie; Howsam, Mike; Crucq, Sébastien; de Broucker, Virginie; Sobaszek, Annie; Edme, Jean-Louis

    2014-04-07

    To evaluate manganese in exhaled breath condensate (Mn-EBC) as an indicator of exposure to fumes from metal inert gas welding process. We collected EBC and urine from 17 welders and 16 unexposed control subjects after 5 days exposure. Concentrations of manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), iron (Fe) and chromium (Cr) were measured in EBC and urine samples and correlated with cumulative exposure indices for the working week (CIW) and for the total welding years (WY), based on duration of welding activity and atmospheric metal measurements. Concentrations of Mn and Ni in EBC were significantly higher among welders than controls whereas this difference was not significant for Mn in urine. Levels of Mn and Ni in EBC were not correlated with their respective levels in urine. The linear regressions found significant positive coefficients between Mn-EBC, Ni-EBC, Ni-U and Cr-U concentrations and the cumulative exposure indices. Taking into account tobacco use, statistical analysis showed the same trends except for the relationship between Mn-U and CIW. This pilot study showed that Mn-EBC, as well as Ni-EBC, can serve as reliable indices of occupational exposure to welding fumes and provide complimentary toxicokinetic information to that provided by urine analyses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Inflammatory Subtypes in Asthma are Related to Airway Hyperresponsiveness to Mannitol and Exhaled NO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsbjerg, C.; Lund, T.K.; Pedersen, L.

    2009-01-01

    Asthma may be defined as eosinophilic or non-eosinophilic based on the presence of eosinophils in sputum. Recently a further classification into four inflammatory subtypes has been suggested. The aim of the present study was to describe the association between these inflammatory subtypes and mark......Asthma may be defined as eosinophilic or non-eosinophilic based on the presence of eosinophils in sputum. Recently a further classification into four inflammatory subtypes has been suggested. The aim of the present study was to describe the association between these inflammatory subtypes...... and markers of airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. In 62 adult non-smoking asthmatics, (18-65 yr) not taking inhaled steroids, sputum induction, bronchial challenge with mannitol and measurement of exhaled NO (eNO) were performed. Based on the eosinophil and neutrophil proportions in sputum, subjects...... were categorised into four inflammatory subtypes: Eosinophilic asthma: i.e., sputum eosinophils 1.0%. Neutrophilic asthma: i.e., sputum neutrophils 61%. Mixed granulocytic asthma: both increased eosinophils and neutrophils. Paucigranulocytic asthma: i.e., normal levels of both eosinophils...

  10. Exhaled Carbon Dioxide and Neonatal Breathing Patterns in Preterm Infants after Birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Jessica; Cheung, Po-Yin; Aziz, Khalid; Rajani, Vishaal; O'Reilly, Megan; Pichler, Gerhard; Schmölzer, Georg M

    2015-10-01

    To examine the amount of exhaled carbon dioxide (ECO2) with different breathing patterns in spontaneously breathing preterm infants after birth. Preterm infants had a facemask attached to a combined carbon dioxide/flow sensor placed over their mouth and nose to record ECO2 and gas flow. A breath-by-breath analysis of the first 5 minutes of the recording was performed. Thirty spontaneously breathing preterm infants, gestational age (mean ± SD) 30 ± 2 weeks and birth weight 1635 ± 499 g were studied. ECO2 from normal breaths and slow expirations was significantly larger than with other breathing patterns (P breath also increased with gestational age P breathing pattern both during the first minute of recording and overall. Breathing pattern proportions also varied by gestational age. Finally, ECO2 from the fifth minute of recording was significantly greater than that produced during the first 4 minutes of recording (P ≤ .029). ECO2 varies with different breathing patterns and increases with gestational age and over time. ECO2 may be an indicator of lung aeration and that postnatal ECO2 monitoring may be useful in preterm infants in the delivery room. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pro-oxidant iron in exhaled breath condensate: a potential excretory mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumby, S; Chung, K F; McCreanor, J E; Moloney, E D; Griffiths, M J D; Quinlan, G J

    2011-09-01

    Pro-oxidant iron provides a potential measure of iron-catalysed oxidative stress in biological fluids. This study aimed, to investigate if the Bleomycin technique for measurement of pro-oxidant iron in biological fluids could be utilised for determinations in exhaled breath condensate (EBC). Secondly, to measure levels of pro-oxidant iron in EBC from asthmatics after exposure to polluting city environments. Retrospective analysis of samples of EBC and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Pro-oxidant iron levels were determined by the Bleomycin method. Transferrin levels were determined by radial diffusion immunoassay and lactoferrin by ELISA. Patients undergoing surgery necessitating cardiopulmonary bypass, normal healthy controls, "healthy" smokers, and asthmatics (mild and moderate). Pro-oxidant iron was significantly decreased (ppro-oxidant iron in EBC were significantly (ppro-oxidant iron content post exposure to city environments (ppro-oxidant iron detectable in EBC and paired BALF from patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (pre and post surgery) suggest a potential for EBC determinations. Significantly elevated levels in EBC from smokers relative to control subjects provide further support for this technique. In asthma disease severity and environmental exposure influenced levels of pro-oxidant iron measured in EBC indicating a potential for enhanced iron-catalysed oxidative stress. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Exhaled nitric oxide is associated with acute mountain sickness susceptibility during exposure to normobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macinnis, M J; Carter, E A; Koehle, M S; Rupert, J L

    2012-01-15

    Nitric oxide is a gaseous signaling molecule that participates in a large variety of physiological functions and may have a role in the pathology of altitude illnesses, such as acute mountain sickness (AMS). The effect of normobaric hypoxia on the fraction of exhaled NO ( [Formula: see text] ) is a controversial area of high altitude physiology, with the effect varying widely across studies. We exposed 19 male subjects to normobaric hypoxia for 6h and measured [Formula: see text] and AMS (via Lake Louise Score) each hour. For data analysis, subjects were divided into AMS-positive and AMS-negative groups based on their Lake Louise Scores during exposure. Eighteen subjects completed the study, and the incidence of AMS was 50%. Mean [Formula: see text] was unchanged at hour 1 but was significantly elevated above baseline for the remainder of the normobaric hypoxia exposure (p<0.001). Subjects who developed AMS had a significantly lower mean [Formula: see text] at baseline compared to resistant subjects (p=0.013). Further investigations are warranted to confirm our results and to understand the physiological basis of this association. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Obesity disproportionately impacts lung volumes, airflow and exhaled nitric oxide in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Tsung-Chieh; Tsai, Hui-Ju; Chang, Su-Wei; Chung, Ren-Hua; Hsu, Jing-Ya; Tsai, Ming-Han; Liao, Sui-Ling; Hua, Man-Chin; Lai, Shen-Hao; Chen, Li-Chen; Yeh, Kuo-Wei; Tseng, Yu-Lun; Lin, Wan-Chen; Chang, Su-Ching; Huang, Jing-Long

    2017-01-01

    The current literature focusing on the effect of obesity and overweight on lung function and fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) in children, particularly among healthy children of non-European descent, remains controversial. Furthermore, whether the relationship of obesity and overweight with lung function and FeNO in children is modified by atopy is unclear. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of excess weight on lung function parameters and FeNO among Asian children, with a particular focus on exploring the potential effect modification by atopy. We investigated the effect of excess weight on lung function and FeNO in a population sample of 1,717 children aged 5 to 18 years and explored the potential modifying effect of atopy. There were positive associations of body mass index (BMI) z-score with forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), peak expiratory flow (PEF), and forced expiratory flow at 25-75% (FEF25-75) (all Pchildren from the general population, independent of atopic status. Excess weight inversely affects FeNO in atopic but not in non-atopic children.

  14. Comparative analysis of selected exhaled breath biomarkers obtained with two different temperature-controlled devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brüning Thomas

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The collection of exhaled breath condensate (EBC is a suitable and non-invasive method for evaluation of airway inflammation. Several studies indicate that the composition of the condensate and the recovery of biomarkers are affected by physical characteristics of the condensing device and collecting circumstances. Additionally, there is an apparent influence of the condensing temperature, and often the level of detection of the assay is a limiting factor. The ECoScreen2 device is a new, partly single-use disposable system designed for studying different lung compartments. Methods EBC samples were collected from 16 healthy non-smokers by using the two commercially available devices ECoScreen2 and ECoScreen at a controlled temperature of -20°C. EBC volume, pH, NOx, LTB4, PGE2, 8-isoprostane and cys-LTs were determined. Results EBC collected with ECoScreen2 was less acidic compared to ECoScreen. ECoScreen2 was superior concerning condensate volume and detection of biomarkers, as more samples were above the detection limit (LTB4 and PGE2 or showed higher concentrations (8-isoprostane. However, NOx was detected only in EBC sampled by ECoScreen. Conclusion ECoScreen2 in combination with mediator specific enzyme immunoassays may be suitable for measurement of different biomarkers. Using this equipment, patterns of markers can be assessed that are likely to reflect the complex pathophysiological processes in inflammatory respiratory disease.

  15. Moderate altitude but not additional endurance training increases markers of oxidative stress in exhaled breath condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinicke, Ilmar; Boehler, Annette; Rechsteiner, Thomas; Bogdanova, Anna; Jelkmann, Wolfgang; Hofer, Markus; Rawlings, Pablo; Araneda, Oscar F; Behn, Claus; Gassmann, Max; Heinicke, Katja

    2009-07-01

    Oxidative stress occurs at altitude, and physical exertion might enhance this stress. In the present study, we investigated the combined effects of exercise and moderate altitude on redox balance in ten endurance exercising biathletes, and five sedentary volunteers during a 6-week-stay at 2,800 m. As a marker for oxidative stress, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) was analyzed by the biosensor measuring system Ecocheck, and 8-iso prostaglandin F2alpha (8-iso PGF2alpha) was determined by enzyme immunoassay in exhaled breath condensate (EBC). To determine the whole blood antioxidative capacity, we measured reduced glutathione (GSH) enzymatically using Ellman's reagent. Exercising athletes and sedentary volunteers showed increased levels of oxidative markers at moderate altitude, contrary to our expectations; there was no difference between both groups. Therefore, all subjects' data were pooled to examine the oxidative stress response exclusively due to altitude exposure. H(2)O(2) levels increased at altitude and remained elevated for 3 days after returning to sea level (p altitude, but declined immediately after returning to sea level (p altitude resulted in elevated GSH levels (p altitude (p altitude for up to 6 weeks increases markers of oxidative stress in EBC independent of additional endurance training. Notably, this oxidative stress is still detectable 3 days upon return to sea level.

  16. Microbial content of household dust associated with exhaled NO in asthmatic children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Elisabet; Reponen, Tiina; Vesper, Stephen; Levin, Linda; Lockey, James; Ryan, Patrick; Bernstein, David I.; Villareal, Manuel; Hershey, Gurjit K. Khurana; Schaffer, Chris; LeMasters, Grace

    2013-01-01

    Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) is increasingly used as a non-invasive measure of airway inflammation. Despite this, little information exists regarding the potential effects of indoor microbial components on eNO. We determined the influence of microbial contaminants in house dust and other indoor environmental characteristics on eNO levels in seven-year-olds with and without a physician- diagnosis of asthma. The study included 158 children recruited from a birth cohort study, and 32 were physician-diagnosed as asthmatic. The relationship between eNO levels and exposures to home dust streptomycetes, endotoxin, and molds was investigated. Streptomycetes and endotoxin were analyzed both as loads and concentrations in separate models. Dog, cat, and dust mite allergens also were evaluated. In the multivariate exposure models high streptomycetes loads and concentrations were significantly associated with a decrease in eNO levels in asthmatic (p Dust endotoxin was not significant. The relationship between eNO and indoor exposure to common outdoor molds was u-shaped. In non-asthmatic children, none of the exposure variables were significantly associated with eNO levels. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating a significant association between microbial components in the indoor environment and eNO levels in asthmatic children. This study demonstrates the importance of simultaneously assessing multiple home exposures of asthmatic children to better understand opposing effects. Common components of the indoor Streptomyces community may beneficially influence airway inflammation. PMID:23807177

  17. Inhalation/Exhalation ratio modulates the effect of slow breathing on heart rate variability and relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Diest, Ilse; Verstappen, Karen; Aubert, André E; Widjaja, Devy; Vansteenwegen, Debora; Vlemincx, Elke

    2014-12-01

    Slow breathing is widely applied to improve symptoms of hyperarousal, but it is unknown whether its beneficial effects relate to the reduction in respiration rate per se, or, to a lower inhalation/exhalation (i/e) ratio. The present study examined the effects of four ventilatory patterns on heart rate variability and self-reported dimensions of relaxation. Thirty participants were instructed to breathe at 6 or 12 breaths/min, and with an i/e ratio of 0.42 or 2.33. Participants reported increased relaxation, stress reduction, mindfulness and positive energy when breathing with the low compared to the high i/e ratio. A lower compared to a higher respiration rate was associated only with an increased score on positive energy. A low i/e ratio was also associated with more power in the high frequency component of heart rate variability, but only for the slow breathing pattern. Our results show that i/e ratio is an important modulator for the autonomic and subjective effects of instructed ventilatory patterns.

  18. Relationship between serum arginase I and l-arginine or exhaled nitric oxide in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Keiki; Obase, Yasushi; Ito, Tatsuo; Fujimura, Masaki; Eguchi, Eri; Kubo, Masayuki; Nagaoka, Kenjiro; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between serum arginase I and serum l-arginine or fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) was evaluated cross-sectionally in asthmatic patients. No sex difference was observed in the serum mean levels of arginase I and l-arginine or FENO. Arginase I and FENO were higher in patients 60 or younger years than in those over 60 years. Asthmatic patients were divided into three groups: no steroid therapy, inhalation steroid therapy, and oral steroid therapy. Arginase I, FENO and high-sensitivity-C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were significantly lower in the inhalation steroid therapy group than in the no steroid therapy group. Correlations were observed between arginase I and FENO, l-arginine, hs-CRP, WBC, and age, and also between FENO and IgE, WBC, and age. A logistic regression analysis revealed the positive association of arginase I with FENO, and the negative association of l-arginine. FENO was positively associated with arginase I and IgE. These results indicated that serum arginase I might influence serum levels of l-arginine and FENO, and that IgE might influence FENO in asthmatic patients.

  19. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide for the management of asthma in adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essat, Munira; Harnan, Sue; Gomersall, Tim; Tappenden, Paul; Wong, Ruth; Pavord, Ian; Lawson, Rod; Everard, Mark L

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this review was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) measured in a clinical setting for the management of asthma in adults.13 electronic databases were searched and studies were selected against predefined inclusion criteria. Quality assessment was conducted using QUADAS-2. Class effect meta-analyses were performed.Six studies were included. Despite high levels of heterogeneity in multiple study characteristics, exploratory class effect meta-analyses were conducted. Four studies reported a wider definition of exacerbation rates (major or severe exacerbation) with a pooled rate ratio of 0.80 (95% CI 0.63-1.02). Two studies reported rates of severe exacerbations (requiring oral corticosteroid use) with a pooled rate ratio of 0.89 (95% CI 0.43-1.72). Inhaled corticosteroid use was reported by four studies, with a pooled standardised mean difference of -0.24 (95% CI -0.56-0.07). No statistically significant differences for health-related quality of life or asthma control were found.FeNO guided management showed no statistically significant benefit in terms of severe exacerbations or inhaled corticosteroid use, but showed a statistically significant reduction in exacerbations of any severity. However, further research is warranted to clearly define which management protocols (including cut-off points) offer best efficacy and which patient groups would benefit the most. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  20. Cutoff point for exhaled nitric oxide corresponding to 3% sputum eosinophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Puebla, M J; Olaguibel Rivera, J M; Almudevar, E; Echegoyen, A A; de Esteban Chocarro, B; Cambra, K

    2015-01-01

    The eosinophilic asthma phenotype (sputum eosinophils 3%) indicates a good response to corticosteroids and T(H)2 immunomodulators. Exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) is rapidly measured by portable devices, and although it is not a selective marker of eosinophilic inflammation, several studies have demonstrated a strong correlation with it. We investigated which FeNO value was the best fit with 3% sputum eosinophils in asthma patients. We included 129 consecutive, nonsmoking asthmatics who underwent skin tests, FeNO quantification (NIOX MINO), spirometry, and induced sputum analysis and completed the Asthma Control Test questionnaire. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed, and logistic regression analysis was performed. Symptoms were detected more frequently in the eosinophilic asthma group, as were higher airway obstruction and sensitivity to hypertonic saline. The FeNO cutoff point of 21 ppb was the best fit with 3% sputum eosinophilia. This value behaved better among corticosteroid-naïve patients (sensitivity, 97%; specificity, 58%; positive predictive value, 86%; negative predictive value, 88%) than among those receiving corticosteroids (sensitivity, 81%; specificity, 25%; positive predictive value, 74%; negative predictive value, 33%). FeNO ≥ 21 ppb is associated with airway eosinophilia. In corticosteroid-naïve patients, FeNO < 21 ppb enables us to rule out airway eosinophilia.

  1. Extra intestinal influences on exhaled breath hydrogen measurements during the investigation of gastrointestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D G; Binfield, P; De Belder, A; O'Brien, J; Warren, S; Wilson, M

    1985-12-01

    During the clinical investigation of patients with gastrointestinal disease by exhaled breath hydrogen measurement, the occurrence of inexplicable variations in recorded hydrogen values led to a search for extra intestinal factors which were capable of adversely influencing breath hydrogen concentration and impairing the diagnostic accuracy of the test. Serial breath samples were collected from normal subjects under a variety of conditions which might occur during routine clinical study, including, hyperventilation, exercise, cigarette smoking, and carbohydrate ingestion. Breath hydrogen concentrations were consistently reduced by hyperventilation (p less than 0.01) and exercise (p less than 0.05). Cigarette smoking, in contrast, caused a marked rise in measured breath hydrogen (p less than 0.01), as did oral carbohydrate (p less than 0.05). Prior bactericidal mouthwash abolished this carbohydrate associated rise, suggesting that the hydrogen was the result of fermentation by oropharyngeal bacteria. Because, in all instances, the changes in breath hydrogen were of sufficient magnitude to interfere with data interpretation, it is recommended that these factors are eliminated, whenever possible, from conditions of study.

  2. Detection of microorganisms in exhaled breath condensate during acute exacerbations of COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharkina, Tetyana; Koczulla, A-Rembert; Mardanova, Olga; Hattesohl, Akira; Bals, Robert

    2011-08-01

    One hallmark of COPD is colonization and infection of the lung. Acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) are acute deteriorations of the chronic disease and are associated with a change of the pulmonary microbial balance. The collection of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) can be used to non-invasively determine markers of lung disease. The aim of the present study was to compare the results of assays based on the detection of microbial nucleic acids from EBC and from spontaneous sputum in patients with AECOPD. EBC and sputa of 29 adults with AECOPD were obtained. Isolated DNA or RNA were used as starting material for the PCR assays to detect Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, influenza viruses (AH 1, AH 3) and respiratory syncytial virus. Bacterial or viral nucleic acids were identified in 14 EBC and 21 sputa from 29 patients. Results from EBC did not correlate well with those from sputum. Viral and S. pneumoniae nucleic acids were detected only in sputum, whereas L. pneumophila DNA was only found in EBC. In three EBC and 10 sputa nucleic acids of more than one microorganism was detected. Bacterial nucleic acids can be identified in EBC of COPD patients with exacerbations. The results obtained from EBC and sputum did not correlate well. © 2011 The Authors. Respirology © 2011 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  3. Ambient temperature impacts on pH of exhaled breath condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczulla, Andreas R; Noeske, Sarah; Herr, Christian; Dette, Frank; Pinkenburg, Olaf; Schmid, Severin; Jörres, Rudolf A; Vogelmeier, Claus; Bals, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH is a non-invasive method to study airway inflammation. Low pH is correlated with inflammatory diseases like asthma and COPD. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of measurement temperature on pH values of EBC. EBC was collected using the RTube in 10 healthy non-smoking controls, 10 smokers before and after cigarette smoking, 10 stable COPD patients and 10 patients with exacerbated COPD. pH was determined directly after degassing at temperatures of 23 degrees C and 37 degrees C. When comparing all groups pH was significantly (P = 0.0002) higher (mean +/- SD 7.88 +/- 0.92) at 37 degrees C as compared with 23 degrees C (7.44 +/- 0.90). Specifically, at 23 degrees C pH was significantly lower in the group of exacerbated COPD (6.78 +/- 1.27) and healthy non-smoking controls (8.04 +/- 0.39). In contrast, subgroup analysis of values assessed at 37 degrees C did not display significant differences. Our data indicate a considerable influence of temperature on pH values in EBC. Thus the temperature at which pH measurements in EBC studies are performed should be declared.

  4. Acute and chronic effects of smoking on inflammation markers in exhaled breath condensate in current smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczulla, A-Rembert; Noeske, Sarah; Herr, Christian; Jörres, Rudolf A; Römmelt, Horst; Vogelmeier, Claus; Bals, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Long-term cigarette smoking is associated with pulmonary inflammation, but the acute effects of smoking have been less well studied. Analysis of the exhaled breath condensate (EBC) can provide noninvasive markers that might be indicative of inflammation. The aim of the study was to determine whether the pH , electrical conductivity and the levels of ammonium and interleukin 8 (IL-8) of EBC were altered in smokers and whether they changed after smoking a single cigarette. We included 19 healthy nonsmokers (controls), 29 asymptomatic smokers, 10 patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) [Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages (GOLD) stages II-III], and 10 patients with exacerbated COPD. In 13 smokers, EBC was also analyzed before and after smoking. EBC was obtained during 10 min tidal breathing with a cooled RTube. pH was determined after deaeration with argon. Acute smoking did not alter the pH or ammonium and IL-8 levels, but raised conductivity. As in COPD patients, the pH was significantly decreased in chronic smokers with a history of at least 10 pack-years compared to controls. EBC can be used to detect the acute and chronic effects of smoking. The increased conductivity of EBC after smoking suggests acute inflammatory effects. The reduced pH in chronic smokers shows cigarette-induced inflammation. 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Utility of serum periostin in combination with exhaled nitric oxide in the management of asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadao Nagasaki

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Type-2/eosinophilic inflammation plays a pivotal role in asthma. The identification of severe type-2/eosinophilic asthma is important for improving the management of patients with asthma. Therefore, efforts to develop non-invasive biomarkers for type-2/eosinophilic airway inflammation have been made during this decade. Currently, fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO and serum periostin levels are considered markers of type-2/eosinophilic inflammation in asthma. However, a single-marker approach has limited the ability to diagnose severe type-2/eosinophilic asthma accurately and predict disease outcomes precisely. The present article reviews the utility of FeNO and serum periostin levels in a single-marker approach and in a multiple-marker approach in identifying patients with severe type-2/eosinophilic asthma. Furthermore, based on a sub-analysis of the Kinki Hokuriku Airway disease Conference (KiHAC, geno-endo-phenotypes of patients were stratified into four groups according to the FeNO and serum periostin levels.

  6. Development of a predictive methodology for identifying high radon exhalation potential areas; Mise au point d'une methodologie predictive des zones a fort potentiel d'exhalation du radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ielsch, G

    2001-07-01

    Radon 222 is a radioactive natural gas originating from the decay of radium 226 which itself originates from the decay of uranium 23 8 naturally present in rocks and soil. Inhalation of radon gas and its decay products is a potential health risk for man. Radon can accumulate in confined environments such as buildings, and is responsible for one third of the total radiological exposure of the general public to radiation. The problem of how to manage this risk then arises. The main difficulty encountered is due to the large variability of exposure to radon across the country. A prediction needs to be made of areas with the highest density of buildings with high radon levels. Exposure to radon varies depending on the degree of confinement of the habitat, the lifestyle of the occupants and particularly emission of radon from the surface of the soil on which the building is built. The purpose of this thesis is to elaborate a methodology for determining areas presenting a high potential for radon exhalation at the surface of the soil. The methodology adopted is based on quantification of radon exhalation at the surface, starting from a precise characterization of the main local geological and pedological parameters that control the radon source and its transport to the ground/atmosphere interface. The methodology proposed is innovative in that it combines a cartographic analysis, parameters integrated into a Geographic Information system, and a simplified model for vertical transport of radon by diffusion through pores in the soil. This methodology has been validated on two typical areas, in different geological contexts, and gives forecasts that generally agree with field observations. This makes it possible to identify areas with a high exhalation potential within a range of a few square kilometers. (author)

  7. Exhaled nitric oxide collected with two different mouthpieces: a study in asthmatic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Leme

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Techniques for collecting exhaled nitric oxide (ENO recommend the use of antibacterial filters of 0.3 µm. The aim of the present study was to compare the measurements of ENO obtained with two different filtering devices. Air samples from 17 asthmatic and 17 non-asthmatic subjects were collected by a recommended off-line technique using two different mouthpieces: 1 the Sievers disposable tool (A under a breathing pressure of 18 cmH2O, and 2 a mouthpiece containing a HEPA filter (B under a breathing pressure of 12 cmH2O. The nitric oxide samples were collected into an impermeable reservoir bag. Values for ENO were compared using two-way repeated measures ANOVA followed by the Tukey test. Agreement was assessed by Bland-Altman analysis. ENO values obtained with mouthpieces A and B were comparable for asthmatic (mean ± SEM, 42.9 ± 6.9 vs 43.3 ± 6.6 ppb and non-asthmatic (13.3 ± 1.3 vs 13.7 ± 1.1 ppb subjects. There was a significant difference in ENO between asthmatics and non-asthmatics using either mouthpiece A (P<0.001 or B (P<0.001. There was a positive correlation between mouthpiece A and mouthpiece B for both groups. The Bland-Altman limits of agreement were considered to be acceptable. Mouthpiece B was less expensive than A, and these data show that it can be used without compromising the result. Our data confirm reports of higher ENO values in the presence of airway inflammation.

  8. High levels and gender difference of exhaled nitric oxide in Chinese schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, G W K; Liu, E K H; Leung, T F; Yung, E; Ko, F W S; Hui, D S C; Fok, T F; Lai, C K W

    2005-07-01

    Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) may represent a useful noninvasive marker of airway inflammation, but data on the reference population values in schoolchildren are limited. No reference eNO study in Asian children has been published. Levels of eNO in a sample of 531 schoolchildren aged 11-18 years recruited from five schools (three international schools) in Hong Kong were measured online by a chemiluminescence analyser according to ERS/ATS standard. Each student also completed an International Study of Asthma and Allergic disease in Childhood questionnaire. Among the children without a physician's diagnosis of asthma or symptoms of wheeze, rhinitis and eczema, there were 258 Chinese and 33 Caucasians. In control Chinese children, the eNO level (median: interquantile range) was significantly higher (P<0.001) in males (17.0 parts per billion (p.p.b.); 10.7-36.6) than in females (10.8 p.p.b.; 7.8-17.6). When compared with Caucasian control males (11.6 p.p.b.; 8.2-19.3) and females (9.1 p.p.b.; 7.5-11.9), the Chinese children had significantly higher eNO levels for both males (P=0.011) and females (P=0.037). For Chinese asthmatic males, the median eNO (interquartile range) was 39.8 p.p.b. (12.5-73.8), and for asthmatic females, 18.0 (9.6-56.3). After controlling for sex in Chinese controls, eNO did not have any significant correlation with height, weight and body mass index or body surface area. This study demonstrates a gender difference of eNO level in healthy Chinese schoolchildren. When compared with Caucasians, Chinese children have significantly higher eNO levels.

  9. Exhaled nitric oxide levels in asthma: Personal best versus reference values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew D; Cowan, Jan O; Taylor, D Robin

    2009-10-01

    Factors affecting the fraction of nitric oxide in exhaled air (FE(NO)) are multiple. Interpreting values when assessing airways disease may be problematic. Clinically optimum levels have not been defined. We aimed to establish the relationship between predicted values for FE(NO) obtained from equations by Olin et al, Travers et al, and Dressel et al, and normalized levels after oral prednisone. We also compared postprednisone FE(NO) levels with those obtained during optimized treatment with inhaled fluticasone. Data were obtained before and after a trial of oral prednisone (30mg/d for 14 days), and also from a previously published study in which patients had their dose of inhaled corticosteroid adjusted using either FE(NO) or symptoms/lung function to optimize treatment. Seventy-three patients completed the study. The geometric mean FE(NO) after prednisone (17.7 parts per billion [ppb]; 95% CI, 15.5-20.2) was significantly lower than mean FE(NO) at the optimized fluticasone dose (20.2 ppb; 95% CI, 17.1-23.8; P=.04) and at loss of control (27.6 ppb; 95% CI, 22.8-33.4; P values of Olin et al (16.8 ppb, 95% CI, 16.0-17.5; P=.44), but were significantly lower than values of Travers et al (predicted, 21.5 ppb; 95% CI, 20.9-22.2; P=.005) and Dressel et al (predicted, 27.8 ppb; 95% CI, 26.7-28.9; P values from the reference equation by Olin et al. However, at optimized doses of inhaled corticosteroid, although FE(NO) levels were higher than predicted, asthma was well controlled. Targeting FE(NO) on reference values is not justified.

  10. Effect of drinking Arabian Qahwa on fractional exhaled nitric oxide levels in healthy nonsmoking Saudi adults

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    Syed Shahid Habib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO is an emerging marker of inflammation in respiratory diseases. However, it is affected by a number of confounding factors. We aimed to study the effect of drinking Arabian Qahwa on FENO in non-smoking Saudi healthy adults. Methods: We recruited 12 nonsmoker healthy male adults aged 36.6 ± 2.7 (21-50 years. All subjects were free from acute respiratory infections or allergies and had normal ventilatory functions and serum IgE levels. At 8 am in the morning, their baseline values of FENO were recorded. They had not taken tea or coffee in the morning and had taken similar light breakfast. They were given three cups of Arabian Qahwa to drink and then after every 30 minutes, serial levels of FENO were recorded. Results: Average FENO levels at baseline were 28.73 ± 9.33 (mean ± SD parts per billion (ppb. The mean FENO levels started to decrease significantly after 30 minutes of drinking Arabian Qahwa (P=0.002. This decrease in FENO level was further observed till two hours after Qahwa drinking and then it started to increase in next 90 minutes but still was significantly lower than the baseline (P=0.002. The mean FENO level recorded after 4 hours was 27.22 ± 10.22 (P=0.039. Conclusions: FENO levels were significantly lowered by intake of Arabian Qahwa and this effect remains for about 4 hours. Therefore, history of recent Qahwa intake and abstinence is essential before performance of FENO and its interpretation.

  11. Association between fractional exhaled nitric oxide and clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients with subacute cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mingming; Liu, Min; Wang, Ying; Xu, Lili; Bu, Xiaoning; An, Li; Zhang, Hong; Huang, Kewu

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the relationships between fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) and clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients with subacute cough. Patients with subacute cough (n = 189) after upper respiratory tract infection were enrolled in this single-center prospective study, and were divided into low-FENO (Empirical therapies (without inhaled or systemic corticosteroids) were prescribed based on clinical experience and follow-up until the disease course reached 8 weeks. FENO values, cough symptom scores (CSS), and Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ) scores were obtained, analyzed, and compared between two groups of patients. The low-FENO and high-FENO groups comprised 136 and 53 patients, respectively. The multiple regression analysis showed that blood eosinophil count and gender were independent factors for elevated FENO (β = 1.38, 0.25, respectively). LCQ scores, total CSS, and daytime CSS were comparable between the low-FENO and high-FENO groups. The nighttime CSS of the high-FENO group were significantly higher than that of the low-FENO group (P = .03). The CSS and LCQ score were improved in both groups but were comparable between groups after 10 days treatment. Patients with subacute cough and high-FENO levels have more severe nocturnal cough than those of patients with low-FENO levels. However, FENO levels do not appear to correlate with the clinical outcomes or treatment response. The significance of FENO in the management of subacute cough needs to be further evaluated, at least in the current empirical treatment without corticosteroids. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Exhaled nitric oxide: Not associated with asthma, symptoms, or spirometry in children with sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robyn T; Rodeghier, Mark; Kirkham, Fenella J; Rosen, Carol L; Kirkby, Jane; DeBaun, Michael R; Strunk, Robert C

    2016-11-01

    The significance of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (Feno) levels in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) is unclear, but increased levels can be associated with features of asthma and thus increased morbidity. We sought to determine factors associated with Feno and whether Feno levels are associated with increased rates of acute chest syndrome (ACS) and pain. All participants had SCA, were part of the prospective observational Sleep and Asthma Cohort study, and had the following assessments: Feno levels, spirometry, blood samples analyzed for hemoglobin, white blood cell counts, eosinophil counts and total serum IgE levels, questionnaires about child medical and family history, and review of medical records. The analytic sample included 131 children with SCA (median age, 11.2 years; age range, 6-18 years) followed for a mean of 16.2 years, including a mean of 5.1 years after baseline Feno data measurements. In multivariable analyses higher Feno levels were associated with ln(IgE) levels (P symptoms, baseline spirometric indices, or response to bronchodilator. Multivariable analyses identified that the incident rate of ACS was associated with ln(Feno) levels (P = .03), as well as male sex (P = .025), wheezing causing shortness of breath (P = .002), and ACS at less than 4 years of age (P symptoms, lung function measures, or prior sickle cell morbidity but were associated with markers of atopy and increased risk of future ACS events. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Exhaled breath analysis for lung cancer detection using ion mobility spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Handa

    Full Text Available Conventional methods for lung cancer detection including computed tomography (CT and bronchoscopy are expensive and invasive. Thus, there is still a need for an optimal lung cancer detection technique.The exhaled breath of 50 patients with lung cancer histologically proven by bronchoscopic biopsy samples (32 adenocarcinomas, 10 squamous cell carcinomas, 8 small cell carcinomas, were analyzed using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS and compared with 39 healthy volunteers. As a secondary assessment, we compared adenocarcinoma patients with and without epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation.A decision tree algorithm could separate patients with lung cancer including adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma. One hundred-fifteen separated volatile organic compound (VOC peaks were analyzed. Peak-2 noted as n-Dodecane using the IMS database was able to separate values with a sensitivity of 70.0% and a specificity of 89.7%. Incorporating a decision tree algorithm starting with n-Dodecane, a sensitivity of 76% and specificity of 100% was achieved. Comparing VOC peaks between adenocarcinoma and healthy subjects, n-Dodecane was able to separate values with a sensitivity of 81.3% and a specificity of 89.7%. Fourteen patients positive for EGFR mutation displayed a significantly higher n-Dodecane than for the 14 patients negative for EGFR (p<0.01, with a sensitivity of 85.7% and a specificity of 78.6%.In this prospective study, VOC peak patterns using a decision tree algorithm were useful in the detection of lung cancer. Moreover, n-Dodecane analysis from adenocarcinoma patients might be useful to discriminate the EGFR mutation.

  14. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide is a useful adjunctive modality for monitoring bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatnarayan Kavitha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: To evaluate the utility of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO in monitoring asthma control. Materials and Methods: Steroid naïve nonsmoking asthmatics were recruited and followed for 6–8 weeks on standard treatment. Serial measurements of FeNO, peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR variability, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1, bronchodilator reversibility (BDR, and asthma control test (ACT score were measured at baseline and after 6–8 weeks of treatment. Results: One hundred and fifty-one patients were recruited over an 18-month period. These comprised 79 males (52.3% with mean (standard deviation age of 34.2 (11.6. Mean (SD FeNO levels at baseline and after therapy were 45.4 (35.9 and 38.4 (23.7 ppb, respectively (P = 0.01. Baseline FeNO correlated strongly with FEV1 (r = −0.78, P < 0.001, ACT score (r = −0.76, P < 0.001, PEFR variability (r = −0.74, P < 0.001, and moderately with BDR (r = 0.50, P < 0.001. After treatment with inhaled steroids, the correlation remained strong with ACT score (r = −0.68, P < 0.001 but weakened with PEFR variability (r = −0.34, P = 0.01 and FEV1 (r = −0.36, P = 0.01. Conclusions: FeNO may be useful as an adjunctive noninvasive modality to assess asthma control in both steroid naïve asthmatics and asthmatics on treatment. However, the suboptimal sensitivity and specificity may limit its utility as a point-of-care single monitoring tool.

  15. Reference values of fractional excretion of exhaled nitric oxide among non-smokers and current smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torén, Kjell; Murgia, Nicola; Schiöler, Linus; Bake, Björn; Olin, Anna-Carin

    2017-08-25

    Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FE NO ) is used to assess of airway inflammation; diagnose asthma and monitor adherence to advised therapy. Reliable and accurate reference values for FE NO are needed for both non-smoking and current smoking adults in the clinical setting. The present study was performed to establish reference adult FE NO values among never-smokers, former smokers and current smokers. FE NO was measured in 5265 subjects aged 25-75 years in a general-population study, using a chemiluminescence (Niox ™) analyser according to the guidelines of the American Thoracic Society and the European Respiratory Society. Atopy was based on the presence of immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies to common inhalant allergens (measured using Phadiatop® test). Spirometry without bronchodilation was performed and forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expired volume in 1 s (FEV 1 ) and the ratio of FEV 1 to FVC values were obtained. After excluding subjects with asthma, chronic bronchitis, spirometric airway obstruction and current cold, 3378 subjects remained. Equations for predictions of FE NO values were modelled using nonparametric regression models. FE NO levels were similar in never-smokers and former smokers, and these two groups were therefore merged into a group termed "non-smokers". Reference equations, including the 5th and 95th percentiles, were generated for female and male non-smokers, based on age, height and atopy. Regression models for current smokers were unstable. Hence, the proposed reference values for current smokers are based on the univariate distribution of FE NO and fixed cut-off limits. Reference values for FE NO among respiratory healthy non-smokers should be outlined stratified for gender using individual reference values. For current smokers separate cut-off limits are proposed.

  16. Diagnostic utility of inflammatory biomarkers in asthma: exhaled nitric oxide and induced sputum eosinophil count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Ana Maria; Feixas, Teresa; González, Mercedes; Casan, Pere

    2007-11-01

    Even though an inflammatory process is known to be the underlying cause of asthma, diagnosis is based on clinical history, reversible airway obstruction and bronchial hyperresponsiveness according to international guidelines. The fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FE(NO)) and induced sputum eosinophil count (Eos%) have been used as non-invasive inflammatory biomarkers. The aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of FE(NO), Eos% and spirometry and to assess whether their combined use in clinical practice would improve diagnostic yield. In 50 patients with asthma symptoms we performed spirometry, a methacholine challenge test, FE(NO) measurement and assessment of Eos% in induced sputum. The standard diagnosis of asthma followed the guidelines of the Global Initiative for Asthma. Twenty-two of the 50 patients were diagnosed with asthma. The sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy were higher for FE(NO) measurement (77%; area under the receiver operating curve [AUC], 0.8) than for spirometry (22%; AUC, 0.63). The sensitivity and specificity of Eos% in induced sputum were 40% and 82%, respectively, and the diagnostic accuracy of Eos% was lower (AUC, 0.58). When both inflammatory biomarkers were used together specificity increased to 76%. The diagnostic accuracy of FE(NO) measurement was superior to that of the standard diagnostic spirometry in patients with symptoms suggestive of asthma. The use of FE(NO) measurement and induced sputum Eos% together to diagnose asthma in clinical practice is more accurate than spirometry or FE(NO) assessment alone and easier to perform.

  17. Fraction of exhaled nitric oxide measurements in the diagnoses of asthma in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godinho Netto AC

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antonio Carlos Maneira Godinho Netto,1,2 Túlio Gonçalves dos Reis,1,2 Cássia Franco Matheus,1,2 Beatriz Julião Vieira Aarestrup,3,4 Fernando Monteiro Aarestrup1,2,4 1School of Medical and Health Sciences – SUPREMA, 2Maternity Hospital Terezinha de Jesus, 3Morphology Department, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Institute of Biological Sciences, 4Laboratory of Immunopathology and Experimental Pathology, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Reproductive Biology Center (CBR, Juiz de Fora, Brazil Objective: To assess the value of fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO measurements in the diagnosis of asthma in elderly patients. Methods: The clinical symptoms of 202 elderly patients were assessed with the asthma module of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood test, which had been modified for the elderly patients, and the diagnostic routine for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, which was based on the Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease criteria. Of the 202 patients assessed, 43 were subjected to pulmonary function evaluations (spirometry and FeNO measurements. Results: Of the 202 elderly patients, 34 had asthma (23 definite and eleven probable, 20 met COPD criteria, 13 presented with an overlap of asthma and COPD, and 135 did not fit the criteria for obstructive pulmonary disease. Among the 43 elderly patients who were subjected to FeNO measurements, ten showed altered results (23.2% and 33 had normal results (76.7%. The average value of FeNO in patients with definite and probable asthma undergoing this procedure was 29.2 parts per billion whereas that in nonasthmatic patients was 17.5 parts per billion (P=0.0002. Conclusion: We show a clear relationship between FeNO levels and asthma symptoms and previous asthma diagnoses in elderly patients. Keywords: asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, elderly patients, nitric oxide

  18. Exhaled breath and oral cavity VOCs as potential biomarkers in oral cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouza, M; Gonzalez-Soto, J; Pereiro, R; de Vicente, J C; Sanz-Medel, A

    2017-03-01

    Corporal mechanisms attributed to cancer, such as oxidative stress or the action of cytochrome P450 enzymes, seem to be responsible for the generation of a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that could be used as non-invasive diagnosis biomarkers. The present work presents an attempt to use VOCs from exhaled breath and oral cavity air as biomarkers for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients. A total of 52 breath samples were collected (in 3 L Tedlar bags) from 26 OSCC patients and 26 cancer-free controls. The samples were analyzed using solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detection. Different statistical strategies (e.g., Icoshift, SIMCA, LDA, etc) were used to classify the analytical data. Results revealed that compounds such as undecane, dodecane, decanal, benzaldehyde, 3,7-dimethyl undecane, 4,5-dimethyl nonane, 1-octene, and hexadecane had relevance as possible biomarkers for OSCC. LDA classification with these compounds showed well-defined clusters for patients and controls (non-smokers and smokers). In addition to breath analysis, preliminary studies were carried out to evaluate the possibility of lesion-surrounded air (analyzed OSCC tumors are in the oral cavity) as a source of biomarkers. The oral cavity location of the squamous cell carcinoma tumors constitutes an opportunity to non-invasively collect the air surrounding the lesion. Small quantities (20 ml) of air collected in the oral cavity were analyzed using the above methodology. Results showed that aldehydes present in the oral cavity might constitute potential OSCC biomarkers.

  19. Increase in exhaled nitric oxide is associated with bronchial hyperresponsiveness among apprentices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tossa, Paul; Paris, Christophe; Zmirou-Navier, Denis; Demange, Valérie; Acouetey, Dovi-Stéphanie; Michaely, Jean-Pierre; Bohadana, Abraham

    2010-09-15

    Airway inflammation is a hallmark of asthma. Several studies have validated the use of the fractional concentration of exhaled nitric oxide (Fe(NO)) as a surrogate marker of airway inflammation in asthma. We examined how the change in Fe(NO) levels, since the beginning of occupational exposure, could be associated with the incidence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) among baker, pastry maker, and hairdresser apprentices during their 2-year training. A standardized questionnaire was administered; skin prick tests for common and specific occupational allergens were done; methacholine challenge and measurement of Fe(NO) were performed 6, 12, and 15 months after the first examination. Of 441 apprentices initially included, 351 completed the study. The increase in Fe(NO), since the beginning of exposure, was associated with the incidence of BHR (odds ratio, 2.00 [95% confidence interval, 1.21-3.32] per unit increase in log parts per billion) both in atopic and nonatopic subjects. The average increase in Fe(NO) was similar in atopic and nonatopic subjects and was unrelated to past or current smoking habits, sex, or training track. Atopy in bakers/pastry makers and sensitization to alkaline persulfates in hairdressers were also independently associated with the incidence of BHR. BHR occurred sooner among bakers/pastry makers than among hairdressers, but its incidence leveled off later. Our results suggest that measurement of Fe(NO), a simple and reproducible test, could be useful in the screening of BHR in workers newly exposed to agents known to cause occupational asthma.

  20. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is elevated in exhaled breath condensate and serum in exacerbated COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczulla, A Rembert; Noeske, Sarah; Herr, Christian; Koepke, Janine; Jörres, Rudolf A; Nell, Christoph; Schmid, Severin; Vogelmeier, Claus; Bals, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) significantly contribute to COPD-related morbidity. Diagnosis of COPD exacerbations may be improved by analyzing biomarkers such as alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT). AAT is an acute-phase protein and inhibitor of neutrophil elastase. Deficiency of AAT may result in early-onset respiratory symptoms. Measurement of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is a noninvasive method to investigate biomarkers present in the epithelial lining fluid, such as AAT. To investigate whether AAT can be detected and quantified in EBC and to compare AAT levels in the EBC of healthy controls, patients with COPD, and during exacerbations of COPD. EBC from 10 healthy controls, 17 subjects with COPD, and 18 subjects with exacerbations of COPD was collected with the RTube™ device. AAT from EBC and serum were quantified by ELISA. AAT in EBC was detectable in every individual. Patients with exacerbations of COPD had significantly increased AAT values (mean, 514.33 pg/mL, [SD 279.41 ]) compared with healthy controls (mean, 251.32 pg/mL, [SD 44.71]) and stable COPD patients (mean, 242.01 pg/mL [SD 65.74]) (P=0.0003; P=0.00003). EBC AAT showed only a correlation trend with serum AAT (r=0.3, P=0.054). AAT in EBC was detectable and quantifiable. AAT measured in EBC was significantly increased during exacerbations of COPD and can potentially be used as a biomarker in exacerbations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Abdominal organ motion during inhalation and exhalation breath-holds: pancreatic motion at different lung volumes compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lens, Eelco; Gurney-Champion, Oliver J; Tekelenburg, Daniël R; van Kesteren, Zdenko; Parkes, Michael J; van Tienhoven, Geertjan; Nederveen, Aart J; van der Horst, Astrid; Bel, Arjan

    2016-11-01

    Contrary to what is commonly assumed, organs continue to move during breath-holding. We investigated the influence of lung volume on motion magnitude during breath-holding and changes in velocity over the duration of breath-holding. Sixteen healthy subjects performed 60-second inhalation breath-holds in room-air, with lung volumes of ∼100% and ∼70% of the inspiratory capacity, and exhalation breath-holds, with lung volumes of ∼30% and ∼0% of the inspiratory capacity. During breath-holding, we obtained dynamic single-slice magnetic-resonance images with a time-resolution of 0.6s. We used 2-dimensional image correlation to obtain the diaphragmatic and pancreatic velocity and displacement during breath-holding. Organ velocity was largest in the inferior-superior direction and was greatest during the first 10s of breath-holding, with diaphragm velocities of 0.41mm/s, 0.29mm/s, 0.16mm/s and 0.15mm/s during BH 100% , BH 70% , BH 30% and BH 0% , respectively. Organ motion magnitudes were larger during inhalation breath-holds (diaphragm moved 9.8 and 9.0mm during BH 100% and BH 70% , respectively) than during exhalation breath-holds (5.6 and 4.3mm during BH 30% and BH 0% , respectively). Using exhalation breath-holds rather than inhalation breath-holds and delaying irradiation until after the first 10s of breath-holding may be advantageous for irradiation of abdominal tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Estimation of radon exhalation rate, natural radioactivity and radiation doses in fly ash samples from NTPC Dadri, (UP) India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Mamta; Verma, K.D.; Mahur, A.K.; Rajendra Prasad; Sonkawade, R.G.

    2010-01-01

    Fly ash produced by coal-burning in thermal power station has become a subject of world wide interest in recent years, because of its diverse uses in building materials such as bricks, sheets, cement and land filling etc. The knowledge of radio nuclides in fly ash plays an important role in health physics. Natural radioactivity and radon exhalation rate in fly ash samples collected from NTPC (National Thermal Power Corporation) Dadri, (UP.) India, have been studied. A high resolution gamma ray spectroscopic system has been used for the measurement of natural radioactivity. The activity concentration of natural radionuclides radium ( 226 Ra), thorium ( 232 Th) and potassium ( 40 K) were measured and radiological parameters were calculated. Radium concentration was found to vary from (81.01 ± 3.25) to (177.33 ±10.00) Bq kg -1 . Activity concentration of thorium was found to vary from (111.57 ± 3.21) to (178.50 ± 3.96) Bq kg -1 . Potassium activity was not significant in some samples, whereas, some other samples have shown potassium activity vary from (365.98 ± 4.85) to (495.95 ± 6.23) Bq kg -1 . Radon exhalation rates in these samples were also calculated by 'Sealed Can technique' using LR-115 type II detectors and found to vary from (80 ± 9) to (243 ± 16) mBqm -2 h -1 with an average value (155 ± 13) mBqm -2 h -1 . This study also presents the results of estimation of effective dose equivalent from exhalation rate, radium equivalent, absorbed gamma dose rates, external annual effective dose rate and values of external hazard index for the fly ash samples. (author)

  3. Diet-derived changes by sourdough-fermented rye bread in exhaled breath aspiration ion mobility spectrometry profiles in individuals with mild gastrointestinal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raninen, Kaisa; Lappi, Jenni; Kolehmainen, Mikko; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Mykkänen, Hannu; Poutanen, Kaisa; Raatikainen, Olavi

    2017-12-01

    The potential of utilising exhaled breath volatile organic compound (VOC) profiles in studying diet-derived metabolic changes was examined. After a four-week initial diet period with white wheat bread (WW), seven participants received in randomised order high-fibre diets containing sourdough whole grain rye bread (WGR) or white wheat bread enriched with bioprocessed rye bran (WW + BRB), both for 4 weeks. Alveolar exhaled breath samples were analysed with ChemPro ® 100i analyser (Environics OY, Mikkeli, Finland) at the end of each diet period in fasting state and after a standardised meal. The AIMS signal intensities in fasting state were different after the WGR diet as compared to other diets. The result suggests that WGR has metabolic effects not completely explained by the rye fibre content of the diet. This study encourages to utilise the exhaled breath VOC profile analysis as an early screening tool in studying physiological functionality of foods.

  4. Dispersion of exhaled droplet nuclei in a two-bed hospital ward with three different ventilation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, H.; Li, Y.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    2006-01-01

    hospital ward with three ventilation systems, i.e. mixing, downward and displacement ventilation. Two life-size breathing thermal manikins were used to simulate a source patient and a receiving patient. The exhalation jet from a bed-lying manikin was visualized using smoke. N2O was used as tracer gas...... with displacement ventilation. This work is useful for identifying an appropriate ventilation method that can remove droplet nuclei more effectively and minimize the risk of cross-infections in a hospital ward environment....

  5. pH in exhaled breath condensate and nasal lavage as a biomarker of air pollution-related inflammation in street traffic-controllers and office-workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamires Marques de Lima

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To utilize low-cost and simple methods to assess airway and lung inflammation biomarkers related to air pollution. METHODS: A total of 87 male, non-smoking, healthy subjects working as street traffic-controllers or office-workers were examined to determine carbon monoxide in exhaled breath and to measure the pH in nasal lavage fluid and exhaled breath condensate. Air pollution exposure was measured by particulate matter concentration, and data were obtained from fixed monitoring stations (8-h work intervals per day, during the 5 consecutive days prior to the study. RESULTS: Exhaled carbon monoxide was two-fold greater in traffic-controllers than in office-workers. The mean pH values were 8.12 in exhaled breath condensate and 7.99 in nasal lavage fluid in office-workers; these values were lower in traffic-controllers (7.80 and 7.30, respectively. Both groups presented similar cytokines concentrations in both substrates, however, IL-1β and IL-8 were elevated in nasal lavage fluid compared with exhaled breath condensate. The particulate matter concentration was greater at the workplace of traffic-controllers compared with that of office-workers. CONCLUSION: The pH values of nasal lavage fluid and exhaled breath condensate are important, robust, easy to measure and reproducible biomarkers that can be used to monitor occupational exposure to air pollution. Additionally, traffic-controllers are at an increased risk of airway and lung inflammation during their occupational activities compared with office-workers.

  6. Measurements of exhaled nitric oxide with the single-breath technique and positive expiratory pressure in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildhaber, J H; Hall, G L; Stick, S M

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to adapt the single-breath technique with positive expiratory pressure to measure exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) in infants. We hypothesized that exhaled eNO was greater in wheezy than in healthy infants. We studied 30 infants (16 wheezy and 14 healthy). The forced expiratory volume in 0.5 s (FEV0.5) was determined with the raised volume rapid thoracic compression technique, and eNO was measured during constant expiratory flow with a rapid-response chemiluminescence analyzer. After passive inflation to a preset pressure of 20 cm H2O, thoracic compression with an inflatable jacket caused forced expiration to occur through a face-mask with an expiratory flow resistor attached. During the forced expiration, the jacket pressure was increased to maintain a constant driving mouth pressure and hence a constant expiratory flow (50 ml/s). The mean level of eNO in the wheezy infants (31.8 ppb) was significantly higher than the level in healthy infants (18.8 ppb) (p = 0.03). A family history of atopy in parents was associated with increased eNO levels (p history of atopy.

  7. Effect of exhalation exercise on trunk muscle activity and oswestry disability index of patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong-Il; Jeong, Dae-Keun; Choi, Hyun

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of exhalation exercises on trunk muscle activity and Oswestry Disability Index by inducing trunk muscle activity through increasing intra-abdominal pressure and activating muscles, contributing to spinal stability. [Subjects and Methods] This intervention program included 20 male patients with chronic low back pain. A total of 10 subjects each were randomly assigned to an exhalation exercise group as the experimental group and a spinal stabilization exercise group as the control group. [Results] There were significant differences in the activities of the rectus abdominis, transverse abdominis, external oblique abdominal, and erector spinae muscles as well as in the Oswestry Disability Index within the experimental group. There were meaningful differences in the activities of the rectus abdominis, external oblique abdominal, and erector spinae muscles and in the Oswestry Disability Index within the control group. In addition, there was a meaningful intergroup difference in transverse abdominis muscle activity alone and in the Oswestry Disability Index. [Conclusion] The breathing exercise effectively increased muscle activity by training gross and fine motor muscles in the trunk. Moreover, it was verified as a very important element for strengthening body stability because it both released and prevented low back pain.

  8. Exhaled Eicosanoids following Bronchial Aspirin Challenge in Asthma Patients with and without Aspirin Hypersensitivity: The Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Mastalerz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Special regulatory role of eicosanoids has been postulated in aspirin-induced asthma. Objective. To investigate effects of aspirin on exhaled breath condensate (EBC levels of eicosanoids in patients with asthma. Methods. We determined EBC eicosanoid concentrations using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS2 or both. Determinations were performed at baseline and following bronchial aspirin challenge, in two well-defined phenotypes of asthma: aspirin-sensitive and aspirin-tolerant patients. Results. Aspirin precipitated bronchial reactions in all aspirin-sensitive, but in none of aspirin-tolerant patients (ATAs. At baseline, eicosanoids profile did not differ between both asthma groups except for lipoxygenation products: 5- and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-, 15-HETE which were higher in aspirin-induced asthma (AIA than inaspirin-tolerant subjects. Following aspirin challenge the total levels of cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LTs remained unchanged in both groups. The dose of aspirin had an effect on magnitude of the response of the exhaled cys-LTs and prostanoids levels only in AIA subjects. Conclusion. The high baseline eicosanoid profiling of lipoxygenation products 5- and 15-HETE in EBC makes it possible to detect alterations in aspirin-sensitive asthma. Cysteinyl-leukotrienes, and eoxins levels in EBC after bronchial aspirin administration in stable asthma patients cannot be used as a reliable diagnostic index for aspirin hypersensitivity.

  9. Can dogs smell lung cancer? First study using exhaled breath and urine screening in unselected patients with suspected lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, Tore; Sundstrøm, Stein; Buvik, Turid; Gederaas, Odrun Arna; Haaverstad, Rune

    2014-03-01

    On the basis of our own experience and literature search, we hypothesised that a canine olfactory test may be useful for detecting lung cancer in an unselected population of patients suspected to have lung cancer. We conducted a prospective study of 93 patients consecutively admitted to hospital with suspected lung cancer. Exhaled breath and urine were sampled before the patients underwent bronchoscopy. The canine olfactory test was performed in a double-blinded manner. Sensitivity and specificity were outcome measures. With 99% sensitivity, the olfactory test demonstrated that dogs have the ability to distinguish cancer patients from healthy individuals. With an intensified training procedure, the exhaled breath and urine tests showed sensitivity rates of 56-76% and specificity rates of 8.3-33.3%, respectively, in our heterogeneous study population. Although the olfactory test appears to be a promising tool for the detection of cancer, the main challenge is to determine whether the test can sufficiently discriminate between patients at risk, patients with benign disease, and patients with malignant disease. We need to gain a deeper understanding of this test and further refine it before applying it as a screening tool for lung cancer in clinical settings.

  10. Co-occupant's exposure to exhaled pollutants with two types of personalized ventilation strategies under mixing and displacement ventilation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Niu, J; Gao, N

    2013-04-01

    Personalized ventilation (PV) system in conjunction with total ventilation system can provide cleaner inhaled air for the user. Concerns still exist about whether the normally protecting PV device, on the other hand, facilitates the dispersion of infectious agents generated by its user. In this article, two types of PV systems with upward supplied fresh air, namely a chair-based PV and one kind of desk-mounted PV systems, when combined with mixing ventilation (MV) and displacement ventilation (DV) systems, are investigated using simulation method with regard to their impacts on co-occupant's exposure to the exhaled droplet nuclei generated by the infected PV user. Simulation results of tracer gas and particles with aerodynamic diameter of 1, 5, and 10 μm from exhaled air show that, when only the infected person uses a PV, the different PV air supplying directions present very different impacts on the co-occupant's intake under DV, while no apparent differences can be observed under MV. The findings demonstrate that better inhaled air quality can always be achieved under DV when the adopted PV system can deliver conditioned fresh air in the same direction with the mainly upward airflow patterns of DV. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Radon exhalation from phosphogypsum building boards: symmetry constraints, impermeable boundary conditions and numerical simulation of a test case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabi, J A; da Silva, Nivaldo C

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive understanding of (222)Rn exhalation from phosphogypsum-bearing building material and its accumulation in indoor air is likely to rely on numerical simulation, particularly if transient effects, three-dimensional domains and convection are to be included and investigated. Yet, experimental data and analytical results are helpful (if not crucial) as far as validation is concerned. Having in mind computational code simplicity and in the light of a recent experimental and theoretical report on (222)Rn release from phosphogypsum boards for housing panels, this paper presents and discusses an alternative testing set-up and the corresponding boundary conditions, namely one side of the panel bounded by impermeable wall. Although this is a new facility to be tested, the resultant steady-state one-dimensional diffusion-dominant analytical solution is shown to match the counterpart deduced in the aforementioned previous report, despite it relaxes the constraint of symmetry about the phosphogypsum board centerline, which is inferred in that prior experimental scenario. In addition, numerical results are conducted for a diffusion-dominant two-dimensional time-varying test case concerning (222)Rn accumulation in a closed chamber having an exhaling phosphogypsum board tightly placed at one wall.

  12. Respiratory symptoms, fractional exhaled nitric oxide & endotoxin exposure among female flower farm workers in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigatu, Amare W; Bråtveit, Magne; Deressa, Wakgari; Moen, Bente E

    2015-01-01

    Greenhouse workers are exposed to organic dusts, and they are thereby at risk of developing airway disorders. This study aims to measure personal endotoxin exposure, assess respiratory symptoms and measure fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) among female flower farm workers in Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study involving female workers (n = 248) from four flower farms was conducted. The workers were interviewed for respiratory symptoms using a standard questionnaire. Workers from two of these farms also participated in personal endotoxin sampling (46 workers, 75 measurements) on glass fiber filters (0.2 μm pore size) inside conductive 25 mm Millipore cassettes for sampling of the "total dust" fraction. They also participated in FeNO (n = 114) measurements with a portable electrochemistry-based sensor. Chi-square and independent t-tests were used to compare categorical and continuous variables respectively. A mixed-effects model was used to analyze exposure determinants. Endotoxin exposure had a geometric mean (GM) of 22.8 endotoxin units (EU)/m(3) with a maximum of 180 EU/m(3). Greenhouse workers had significantly higher endotoxin exposure than workers outside the greenhouses (GM = 26.7 vs. 19.3 EU/m(3) respectively; p farm was 21 months. Greenhouse workers had higher prevalence of self-reported respiratory symptoms than those outside greenhouses. However, after adjusting for education only blocked nose remained significant. The FeNO concentration ranged 5-166 ppb (GM = 14 ppb). Two workers had FeNO concentration above 50 ppb. FeNO levels differs significantly between the farms but there was no difference between workers inside and outside greenhouses. Greenhouse workers at flower farms had higher prevalence of blocked nose than workers outside, which may indicate the presence of rhinitis. Endotoxin exposure was low. There were few workers with objective signs of airway inflammation; this might be because the mean working time in the

  13. Acute exercise is associated with reduced exhaled nitric oxide in physically inactive adults with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Hayley A; Latham, Jennifer R; Callister, Robin; Pretto, Jeffrey J; Baines, Katherine; Saltos, Nick; Upham, John W; Wood, Lisa G

    2015-06-01

    Although exercise has multiple health benefits, relatively little attention has been paid to its potential therapeutic effects in those with asthma. To examine the effects of acute exercise on inflammation in physically inactive and active adults with asthma. Fourteen adults with asthma (n = 6 physically inactive, n = 8 physically active) completed (1) 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise on a treadmill and (2) 30 minutes of rest in random order, with 4 weeks between sessions. Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) was measured before and after the intervention (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 24 hours). Blood inflammatory mediators were measured before and after the intervention (0, 2, and 24 hours). Physically inactive participants had a significant decrease in eNO 4 hours after exercise (-4.8 ppb, -6.4 to -0.5 ppb, P = .028), which was not observed in physically active participants (P = .362). Interluekin-1 receptor antagonist increased in the physically inactive group 2 hours after exercise, with this increase strongly correlated with the decrease in eNO at 4 hours (R = -0.685, P = .007) and 24 hours (R = -0.659, P = .014) after exercise. Interleukin-6 was increased significantly 2 hours after exercise in physically inactive participants. Blood neutrophils and nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 gene expression were increased 2 hours after exercise in the overall cohort. This study demonstrates that acute moderate-intensity exercise is associated with decreased eNO in physically inactive adults with asthma and suggests that interluekin-1 receptor antagonist could have a role in mediating this effect. The attenuated response in physically active participants might be due to the sustained anti-inflammatory effects of exercise training. Future studies should investigate the impact of exercise intensity and exercise training on airway inflammation in those with asthma. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (http://www.anzctr.org.au), registration number ACTRN

  14. Non-invasive measurements of exhaled NO and CO associated with methacholine responses in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameredes Bill T

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO in exhaled breath are considered obtainable biomarkers of physiologic mechanisms. Therefore, obtaining their measures simply, non-invasively, and repeatedly, is of interest, and was the purpose of the current study. Methods Expired NO (ENO and CO (ECO were measured non-invasively using a gas micro-analyzer on several strains of mice (C57Bl6, IL-10-/-, A/J, MKK3-/-, JNK1-/-, NOS-2-/- and NOS-3-/- with and without allergic airway inflammation (AI induced by ovalbumin systemic sensitization and aerosol challenge, compared using independent-sample t-tests between groups, and repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA within groups over time of inflammation induction. ENO and ECO were also measured in C57Bl6 and IL-10-/- mice, ages 8–58 weeks old, the relationship of which was determined by regression analysis. S-methionyl-L-thiocitrulline (SMTC, and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP were used to inhibit neuronal/constitutive NOS-1 and heme-oxygenase, respectively, and alter NO and CO production, respectively, as assessed by paired t-tests. Methacholine-associated airway responses (AR were measured by the enhanced pause method, with comparisons by repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc testing. Results ENO was significantly elevated in naïve IL-10-/- (9–14 ppb and NOS-2-/- (16 ppb mice as compared to others (average: 5–8 ppb, whereas ECO was significantly higher in naïve A/J, NOS-3-/- (3–4 ppm, and MKK3-/- (4–5 ppm mice, as compared to others (average: 2.5 ppm. As compared to C57Bl6 mice, AR of IL-10-/-, JNK1-/-, NOS-2-/-, and NOS-3-/- mice were decreased, whereas they were greater for A/J and MKK3-/- mice. SMTC significantly decreased ENO by ~30%, but did not change AR in NOS-2-/- mice. SnPP reduced ECO in C57Bl6 and IL-10-/- mice, and increased AR in NOS-2-/- mice. ENO decreased as a function of age in IL-10-/- mice, remaining unchanged in C57Bl6 mice. Conclusion These results are

  15. Shining light on human breath analysis with quantum cascade laser spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyes Reyes, A.

    2017-01-01

    In the search for new non-invasive diagnostic methods, healthcare researchers have turned their attention to exhaled human breath. Breath consists of thousands of molecular compounds in very low concentrations, in the order of parts per million by volume (ppmv), parts per billion by

  16. Experimental study on human exposure to occupant generated pollutants in rooms with ductless personalized ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Lu, Pengfei

    2014-01-01

    thermal manikins were used to simulate occupants. Tracer gases were used to simulate human bioeffluents (feet, groins, armpits and exhaled air) released from one manikin, simulating polluting occupant. The second manikin simulated exposed occupant. Different combinations of supply flow rates and operation...

  17. Exhaled nitric oxide measures allergy not symptoms in children with allergic rhinitis in primary care: a prospective cross-sectional and longitudinal cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bot, C.M.A.; Moed, H.; Bindels, P.J.E.; van Wijk, R.G.; Berger, M.Y.; de Groot, H.; de Jongste, J.C.; van der Wouden, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma are both inflammatory diseases and are often associated. Relationships between fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and asthma, atopy, and quality of life have been shown. Aims: This study aimed to determine whether FeNO in children with AR (n=158) or

  18. Exhaled nitric oxide measures allergy not symptoms in children with allergic rhinitis in primary care : a prospective cross-sectional and longitudinal cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bot, Cindy M. A.; Moed, Heleen; Bindels, Patrick J. E.; van Wijk, Roy Gerth; Berger, Marjolein Y.; de Groot, Hans; de Jongste, Johannes C.; van der Wouden, Johannes C.

    Background: Allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma are both inflammatory diseases and are often associated. Relationships between fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and asthma, atopy, and quality of life have been shown. Aims: This study aimed to determine whether FeNO in children with AR (n=158) or

  19. Effect of Shisha (Waterpipe Smoking on Lung Functions and Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide (FeNO among Saudi Young Adult Shisha Smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Ayoub Meo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Shisha (waterpipe smoking is becoming a more prevalent form of tobacco consumption, and is growing worldwide, particularly among the young generation in the Middle East. This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the effects of shisha smoking on lung functions and Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide (FeNO among Saudi young adults. We recruited 146 apparently healthy male subjects (73 control and 73 shisha smokers. The exposed group consisted of male shisha smokers, with mean age 21.54 ± 0.41 (mean ± SEM range 17–33 years. The control group consisted of similar number (73 of non-smokers with mean age 21.36 ± 0.19 (mean ± SEM range 18–28 years. Between the groups we considered the factors like age, height, weight, gender, ethnicity and socioeconomic status to estimate the impact of shisha smoking on lung function and fractional exhaled nitric oxide. Lung function test was performed by using an Spirovit-SP-1 Electronic Spirometer. Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide (FeNO was measured by using Niox Mino. A significant decrease in lung function parameters FEV1, FEV1/FVC Ratio, FEF-25%, FEF-50%, FEF-75% and FEF-75–85% was found among shisha smokers relative to their control group. There was also a significant reduction in the Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide among Shisha smokers compared to control group.

  20. On the simultaneous indoor measurement of the exhalation rates of radon gas from open soil and the concentration of radon progeny in the surrounding air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, K.; Mochizuki, S.; Tanji, T.

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that the outdoor measurements of radon exhalation rates and of radon concentration in atmosphere are affected by the temperature, wind and atmospheric pressure. So far, no clear correlations have been found between these measurements. However, with indoor measurements, especially those recorded in a basement, the temperature is constant and the air now is minimal. This means that we can expect radon exhalation rates and the concentration of radon progeny to be affected by atmospheric pressure alone. Taking these environmental conditions into account, the simultaneous measurement of radon exhalation rates and radon concentrations was performed in the basement of SUT (Science University of Tokyo), Oshamanbe campus in order to clarify the nature of the relationship between radon exhalation rates and concentrations and changes in atmospheric pressure. Atmospheric pressure was also measured simultaneously with the above measurements. The present measurements were carried out during the winter, spring, summer and autumn of 1995. Measurements were made in a series of one week periods. (author)

  1. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide as a predictor of response to inhaled corticosteroids in patients with non-specific respiratory symptoms and insignificant bronchodilator reversibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, David B; Buhl, Roland; Chan, Adrian

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic non-specific respiratory symptoms are difficult to manage. This trial aimed to evaluate the association between baseline fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and the response to inhaled corticosteroids in patients with non-specific respiratory symptoms. METHODS: In this doub...

  2. A rapid method for the chromatographic analysis of volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath of tobacco cigarette and electronic cigarette smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Esther; Grimalt, Joan O

    2015-09-04

    A method for the rapid analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in smoke from tobacco and electronic cigarettes and in exhaled breath of users of these smoking systems has been developed. Both disposable and rechargeable e-cigarettes were considered. Smoke or breath were collected in Bio-VOCs. VOCs were then desorbed in Tenax cartridges which were subsequently analyzed by thermal desorption coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The method provides consistent results when comparing the VOC compositions from cigarette smoke and the equivalent exhaled breath of the smokers. The differences in composition of these two sample types are useful to ascertain which compounds are retained in the respiratory system after tobacco cigarette or e-cigarette smoking. Strong differences were observed in the VOC composition of tobacco cigarette smoke and exhaled breath when comparing with those of e-cigarette smoking. The former involved transfers of a much larger burden of organic compounds into smokers, including benzene, toluene, naphthalene and other pollutants of general concern. e-Cigarettes led to strong absorptions of propylene glycol and glycerin in the users of these systems. Tobacco cigarettes were also those showing highest concentration differences between nicotine concentrations in smoke and exhaled breath. The results from disposable e-cigarettes were very similar to those from rechargeable e-cigarettes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Trace Analysis in End-Exhaled Air Using Direct Solvent Extraction in Gas Sampling Tubes: Tetrachloroethene in Workers as an Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris-Elmo Ziener

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Simple and cost-effective analytical methods are required to overcome the barriers preventing the use of exhaled air in routine occupational biological monitoring. Against this background, a new method is proposed that simplifies the automation and calibration of the analytical measurements. End-exhaled air is sampled using valveless gas sampling tubes made of glass. Gaseous analytes are transferred to a liquid phase using a microscale solvent extraction performed directly inside the gas sampling tubes. The liquid extracts are analysed using a gas chromatograph equipped, as usual, with a liquid autosampler, and liquid standards are used for calibration. For demonstration purposes, the method’s concept was applied to the determination of tetrachloroethene in end-exhaled air, which is a biomarker for occupational tetrachloroethene exposure. The method’s performance was investigated in the concentration range 2 to 20 μg tetrachloroethene/L, which corresponds to today’s exposure levels. The calibration curve was linear, and the intra-assay repeatability and recovery rate were sufficient. Analysis of real samples from dry-cleaning workers occupationally exposed to tetrachloroethene and from nonexposed subjects demonstrated the method’s utility. In the case of tetrachloroethene, the method can be deployed quickly, requires no previous experiences in gas analysis, provides sufficient analytical reliability, and addresses typical end-exhaled air concentrations from exposed workers.

  4. Bioanalysis of underivatized amino acids in non-invasive exhaled breath condensate samples using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konieczna, Lucyna; Pyszka, Magdalena; Okońska, Magdalena; Niedźwiecki, Maciej; Bączek, Tomasz

    2018-03-23

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is receiving increased attention as a novel, entirely non-invasive technique for collecting biomarker samples. This increased attention is due to the fact that EBC is simple, effort independent, rapid, can be repeated frequently, and can be performed on young children and patients suffering from a variety of diseases. By having a subject breathe tidally through a cooling system for 15-20 min, a sufficient amount of condensate is collected for analysis of biomarkers in clinical studies. However, bioanalysis of EBC involves an unavoidable sample preparation step due to the low concentration of its components. Thus, there is a need for a new and more sensitive analytical method of assessing EBC samples. While researchers have considered analyses of single and small quantities of amino acids - for example, those connected with leukemia - no one has previously attempted to simultaneously analyze a panel of 23 amino acids. Moreover, the present study is well-justified, as prior studies focusing on single amino acids and leukemia at the moment of diagnosis and during chemotherapy (33 days of treatment) are inconsistent. In the present study, amino acids were separated using an XBridge Amide column (3 mm × 100 mm, 3.5 μm). The mobile phase consisted of 10 mM of ammonium buffer in water with a pH of 3 (Phase A) and 10 mM ammonium buffer in acetonitrile (Phase B) under gradient program elution. The analytes were detected in electrospray positive ionization mode. Under optimal conditions, the proposed method exhibited limits of quantification (LOQ) in the range of 0.05-0.5 ng/mL, and good linearity, with the determination coefficient (R 2 ) falling between 0.9904 and 0.9998. The accuracy in human exhaled breath condensate samples ranged between 93.3-113.3% for the 23 studied amino acids, with intra- and inter-day coefficient of variation (CVs) of 0.13-9.92% and 0.17-10.53%, respectively. To demonstrate the liquid

  5. Fiber-Optic Bio-sniffer (Biochemical Gas Sensor) Using Reverse Reaction of Alcohol Dehydrogenase for Exhaled Acetaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iitani, Kenta; Chien, Po-Jen; Suzuki, Takuma; Toma, Koji; Arakawa, Takahiro; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2018-02-23

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) exhaled in breath have huge potential as indicators of diseases and metabolisms. Application of breath analysis for disease screening and metabolism assessment is expected since breath samples can be noninvasively collected and measured. In this research, a highly sensitive and selective biochemical gas sensor (bio-sniffer) for gaseous acetaldehyde (AcH) was developed. In the AcH bio-sniffer, a reverse reaction of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was employed for reducing AcH to ethanol and simultaneously consuming a coenzyme, reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). The concentration of AcH can be quantified by fluorescence detection of NADH that was consumed by reverse reaction of ADH. The AcH bio-sniffer was composed of an ultraviolet light-emitting diode (UV-LED) as an excitation light source, a photomultiplier tube (PMT) as a fluorescence detector, and an optical fiber probe, and these three components were connected with a bifurcated optical fiber. A gas-sensing region of the fiber probe was developed with a flow-cell and an ADH-immobilized membrane. In the experiment, after optimization of the enzyme reaction conditions, the selectivity and dynamic range of the AcH bio-sniffer were investigated. The AcH bio-sniffer showed a short measurement time (within 2 min) and a broad dynamic range for determination of gaseous AcH, 0.02-10 ppm, which encompassed a typical AcH concentration in exhaled breath (1.2-6.0 ppm). Also, the AcH bio-sniffer exhibited a high selectivity to gaseous AcH based on the specificity of ADH. The sensor outputs were observed only from AcH-contained standard gaseous samples. Finally, the AcH bio-sniffer was applied to measure the concentration of AcH in exhaled breath from healthy subjects after ingestion of alcohol. As a result, a significant difference of AcH concentration between subjects with different aldehyde dehydrogenase type 2 (ALDH2) phenotypes was observed. The AcH bio-sniffer can be

  6. Storage conditions for stability of offline measurement of fractional exhaled nitric oxide after collection for epidemiologic research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoda Yoshiko

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The measurement of fractional concentration of nitric oxide in exhaled air (FeNO is valuable for the assessment of airway inflammation. Offline measurement of FeNO has been used in some epidemiologic studies. However, the time course of the changes in FeNO after collection has not been fully clarified. In this study, the effects of storage conditions on the stability of FeNO measurement in exhaled air after collection for epidemiologic research were examined. Methods Exhaled air samples were collected from 48 healthy adults (mean age 43.4 ± 12.1 years in Mylar bags. FeNO levels in the bags were measured immediately after collection. The bags were then stored at 4°C or room temperature to measure FeNO levels repeatedly for up to 168 hours. Results In the bags stored at room temperature after collection, FeNO levels were stable for 9 hours, but increased starting at 24 hours. FeNO levels remained stable for a long time at 4°C, and they were 99.7% ± 7.7% and 101.3% ± 15.0% relative to the baseline values at 24 and 96 hours, respectively. When the samples were stored at 4°C, FeNO levels gradually decreased with time among the subjects with FeNO ≥ 51 ppb immediately after collection, although there were almost no changes among the other subjects. FeNO levels among current smokers increased even at 4°C, although the values among ex-smokers decreased gradually, and those among nonsmokers remained stable. The rate of increase was significantly higher among current smokers than among nonsmokers and ex-smokers from 9 hours after collection onwards. Conclusions Storage at 4°C could prolong the stability of FeNO levels after collection. This result suggests that valid measurements can be performed within several days if the samples are stored at 4°C. However, the time course of the changes in FeNO levels differed in relation to initial FeNO values and cigarette smoking.

  7. Storage conditions for stability of offline measurement of fractional exhaled nitric oxide after collection for epidemiologic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Yoshiko; Otani, Naruhito; Hasunuma, Hideki; Kanegae, Hiroshi; Shima, Masayuki

    2012-11-02

    The measurement of fractional concentration of nitric oxide in exhaled air (FeNO) is valuable for the assessment of airway inflammation. Offline measurement of FeNO has been used in some epidemiologic studies. However, the time course of the changes in FeNO after collection has not been fully clarified. In this study, the effects of storage conditions on the stability of FeNO measurement in exhaled air after collection for epidemiologic research were examined. Exhaled air samples were collected from 48 healthy adults (mean age 43.4 ± 12.1 years) in Mylar bags. FeNO levels in the bags were measured immediately after collection. The bags were then stored at 4°C or room temperature to measure FeNO levels repeatedly for up to 168 hours. In the bags stored at room temperature after collection, FeNO levels were stable for 9 hours, but increased starting at 24 hours. FeNO levels remained stable for a long time at 4°C, and they were 99.7% ± 7.7% and 101.3% ± 15.0% relative to the baseline values at 24 and 96 hours, respectively. When the samples were stored at 4°C, FeNO levels gradually decreased with time among the subjects with FeNO ≥ 51 ppb immediately after collection, although there were almost no changes among the other subjects. FeNO levels among current smokers increased even at 4°C, although the values among ex-smokers decreased gradually, and those among nonsmokers remained stable. The rate of increase was significantly higher among current smokers than among nonsmokers and ex-smokers from 9 hours after collection onwards. Storage at 4°C could prolong the stability of FeNO levels after collection. This result suggests that valid measurements can be performed within several days if the samples are stored at 4°C. However, the time course of the changes in FeNO levels differed in relation to initial FeNO values and cigarette smoking.

  8. CFD Modeling and Image Analysis of Exhaled Aerosols due to a Growing Bronchial Tumor: towards Non-Invasive Diagnosis and Treatment of Respiratory Obstructive Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Wang, Shengyu

    2015-02-06

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure vari-ations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treat the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagran-gian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respira-tions of tracer aerosols of 1 µm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug de-livery protocol.

  9. CFD Modeling and Image Analysis of Exhaled Aerosols due to a Growing Bronchial Tumor: towards Non-Invasive Diagnosis and Treatment of Respiratory Obstructive Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Jinxiang [Central Michigan Univ., Mount Pleasant, MI (United States); Kim, JongWon [Central Michigan Univ., Mount Pleasant, MI (United States); Si, Xiuhua A. [California Baptist Univ., Riverside, CA (United States); Corley, Richard A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kabilan, Senthil [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Shengyu [First Affliliated Hospital of Xi' an Medical Univ., Shaanxi (China)

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure variations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treat the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 µm at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug de- livery protocol.

  10. Academic exam stress and depressive mood are associated with reductions in exhaled nitric oxide in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueba, Ana F; Smith, Noelle B; Auchus, Richard J; Ritz, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has beneficial effects on cardiovascular and immune health. Stress and depression have been linked to a reduction in serum NO. In this study, we examined the effect of academic exam stress on the fraction of NO in exhaled air (FeNO) and spirometric lung function in 41 healthy college students. Participants completed assessments at mid-semester as well as in the early and late phase of an academic exam period. Negative affect, depressive mood, and salivary cortisol were elevated during exams, whereas FeNO and lung function decreased. Higher depressive mood was associated with lower FeNO, whereas higher negative affect was associated higher FeNO across time. These findings provide initial evidence that depression and prolonged stress can alter FeNO and lung function in healthy individuals, which could have adverse consequences for cardiovascular, airway, and immune health. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Reduction in exhaled nitric oxide tracks improved patient inhaler compliance in difficult asthma-a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Eoin; Flynn, Deirdre; MacHale, Elaine; Costello, Richard W; Murphy, Desmond M

    2017-12-26

    Exhaled nitric oxide is believed be a useful surrogate for airways inflammation while non-adherence with therapy is known to be associated with worsening of asthma control. We present the case of a 49-year-old female with steroid-dependent asthma and an exacerbation rate of >20/year. She was enrolled in a 3-month-long prospective study using a validated diagnostic inhaler device that provided objective evidence of inhaler compliance. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), peak expiratory flow rates, asthma control questionnaires were measured throughout the study period. Peripheral eosinophil count was obtained prior to the study, during the study, and immediately afterwards. Improvement in compliance at the end of the study led to significant improvements in lung function peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), and objective scores of asthma. There was an observed improvement in PEFR after 4 weeks, with an associated decrease in FeNO from 92 to 9 ppb that plateaued over the remainder of the study. Her eosinophil count was 0.79 × 10 9 /litre prior to starting in the study, 0.37 × 10 9 /litre after 2 months, and 0.1 × 10 9 /litre at the end of the study. We believe that this is the first case study to objectively prove that improvements in compliance can lead to dramatic reductions in the overall inflammatory airway response and in particular that improvements in patient compliance are mirrored by marked reduction in FeNO levels. These changes occurred in tandem with an observed clinical improvement in our patient.

  12. The role of exhaled nitric oxide in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing laparotomy surgery - The noxious study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logotheti, Helena; Pourzitaki, Chryssa; Tsaousi, Georgia; Aidoni, Zoi; Vekrakou, Artemis; Ekaterini, Amaniti; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos

    2016-12-30

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) has been associated with major perioperative morbidities or mortalities, especially in surgical patients receiving general anesthesia. The severity of the COPD and the degree of bronchial hyperreactivity can determine the perioperative anesthetic risk; therefore they have to be assessed by a thorough preoperative evaluation in order to give the rationale on which to decide for optimum anesthetic management. Aim of the study was to assess the predictive applicability of exhaled Nitric Oxide (NO) in smoking surgical population with COPD, on the basis of morbidity and mortality. A prospective, observational study was undertaken in 70 smoking patients diagnosed with COPD scheduled for laparotomy surgery under general anesthesia COPD was evaluated with the GOLD Classification of Air Flow Limitation, the Modified MRC Dyspnoea Scale (mMRC), the BODE Index score and the 6 Minutes Walk Distance (6MWD) using spirometry parameters. All patients were observed for presenting perioperative and postoperative respiratory complications. A cut off value of 19 ppb was determined for fractional exhaled nitric oxide measured at expiratory flow of 50 mL/s (F E NO 50 ) to differentiate patients poor prognosis from those with favorable outcome. Patients with severe COPD had high BODE index score as well as F E NO 50 . Elevated F E NO 50 is significantly related to multiple complications (p = 0.004) and postoperative cough (p surgery can be predicted using not only ABCD GOLD 2011 classification but also the F E NO 50 as a preoperative marker. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of exhaled nitric oxide in exercise-induced bronchospasm: Systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A.S. Feitosa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The gold-standard method for the diagnosis of exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB is an exercise test combined with spirometry. However, this test is expensive, time consuming and requires specialized equipment and trained personnel. Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO is a fast, easy, noninvasive method for the diagnosis of EIB. The aim of the present study was to assess the accuracy of the measurement of eNO for the diagnosis of EIB through a systematic review of the literature. Methods: A search was carried out in the PubMed, Lilacs, SciELO and SCOPUS databases by two independent researchers. Results: Fifty-six papers were found. Following the application of the eligibility criteria to the title, abstract and text, six papers remained for analysis. There was a significant heterogeneity in sex (X2 = 56.44, p = 0.000 and clinical spectrum (X2 = 504.00, p = 0.000 between studies. In children between 3.8 and 7.8 years old a cutoff point >28 ppb EIB can be ruled in and in children between 5 and 16 years old at a cutoff point 12. Four papers reported negative predictive values above 88%. Conclusion: The measurement of eNO seems to be effective for ruling in and ruling out EIB in some specific groups. Therefore, the meansurement of eNO levels could be an important tool to safely avoid the need for an exercise test when the result is negative, reducing the individual and economic impact of this disease. Resumo: Introdução: O método padrão de ouro para o diagnóstico de broncoespasmos induzidos por exercício (BIE é a prova de esforço combinada com a espirometria. Contudo, esta prova é dispendiosa, demorada e requer equipamento específico e pessoal especializado. O óxido nítrico exalado (eNO é um método rápido, simples e não invasivo para o diagnóstico de BIE. O objectivo do presente estudo foi o de aferir a acurácia do eNO para o diagnóstico do BIE através da revisão sistemática da literatura. Métodos: Foi efectuada

  14. Study of Rn-222 exhalation in phosphogypsum through the adsorption technique in activated coal; Estudo da exalacao de Rn-222 em fosfogesso por meio da tecnica de adsorcao em carvao ativado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisti, Marcelo Bessa; Campos, Marcia Pires de, E-mail: mbnisti@ipen.b, E-mail: mpcampos@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    The radon exhalation was estimated through the adsorption in activated carbon technique. Classified as TENORM, the radon exhalation determination on the phosphogypsum piles was performed through the adsorption ratio of radon in activated carbon, from the concentration of descendants of {sup 222}Rn, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi obtained by gamma spectrometry. The results obtained in this work were compatibles with the values found in the literature

  15. Qualitative real-time schlieren and shadowgraph imaging of human exhaled airflows: an aid to aerosol infection control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian W Tang

    Full Text Available Using a newly constructed airflow imaging system, airflow patterns were visualized that were associated with common, everyday respiratory activities (e.g. breathing, talking, laughing, whistling. The effectiveness of various interventions (e.g. putting hands and tissues across the mouth and nose to reduce the potential transmission of airborne infection, whilst coughing and sneezing, were also investigated. From the digital video footage recorded, it was seen that both coughing and sneezing are relatively poorly contained by commonly used configurations of single-handed shielding maneuvers. Only some but not all of the forward momentum of the cough and sneeze puffs are curtailed with various hand techniques, and the remaining momentum is disseminated in a large puff in the immediate vicinity of the cougher, which may still act as a nearby source of infection. The use of a tissue (in this case, 4-ply, opened and ready in the hand proved to be surprisingly effective, though the effectiveness of this depends on the tissue remaining intact and not ripping apart. Interestingly, the use of a novel 'coughcatcher' device appears to be relatively effective in containing coughs and sneezes. One aspect that became evident during the experimental procedures was that the effectiveness of all of these barrier interventions is very much dependent on the speed with which the user can put them into position to cover the mouth and nose effectively.From these qualitative schlieren and shadowgraph imaging experiments, it is clear that making some effort to contain one's cough or sneeze puffs is worthwhile. Obviously, there will be a large amount of variation between individuals in the exact hand or tissue (the most common methods configuration used for this and other practical factors may hinder such maneuvers in daily life, for example, when carrying shopping bags or managing young children.

  16. Assessment of smoking behaviour in a dental setting: a 1-year follow-up study using self-reported questionnaire data and exhaled carbon monoxide levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brügger, Odette Engel; Frei, Marc; Sendi, Pedram; Reichart, Peter A; Ramseier, Christoph A; Bornstein, Michael M

    2014-04-01

    This study analyses the changes in smoking habits over the course of 1 year in a group of patients referred to an oral medicine unit. Smoking history and behaviour were analysed at baseline and after 1 year based on a self-reported questionnaire and on exhaled carbon monoxide levels [in parts per million (ppm)]. During the initial examination, all smokers underwent tobacco use prevention and cessation counselling. Of the initial group of 121 patients, 98 were examined at the follow-up visit. At the baseline examination, 33 patients (33.67 %) indicated that they were current smokers. One year later, 14 patients (42.24 % out of the 33 smokers of the initial examination) indicated that they had attempted to stop smoking at least once over the follow-up period and 15.15 % (5 patients) had quit smoking. The mean number of cigarettes smoked per day by current smokers decreased from 13.10 to 12.18 (p = 0.04). The exhaled CO level measurements showed very good correlation with a Spearman's coefficient 0.9880 for the initial visit, and 0.9909 for the follow-up examination. For current smokers, the consumption of one additional cigarette per day elevated the CO measurements by 0.77 ppm (p smoking cessation is an important aspect of the treatment strategy, the measurement of exhaled carbon monoxide shows a very good correlation with a self-reported smoking habit. Measurement of exhaled carbon monoxide is a non-invasive, simple and objective measurement technique for documenting and monitoring smoking cessation and reduction.

  17. Extensive radioactive characterization of a phosphogypsum stack in SW Spain: {sup 226}Ra, {sup 238}U, {sup 210}Po concentrations and {sup 222}Rn exhalation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abril, Jose-Maria, E-mail: jmabril@us.es [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada I, Universidad de Sevilla, EUITA, Ctra Utrera Km 1, 41013 Seville (Spain); Garcia-Tenorio, Rafael, E-mail: gtenorio@us.es [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada II, Universidad de Sevilla, ETSA, Avda. Reina Mercedes s/n, 41012 Seville (Spain); Manjon, Guillermo, E-mail: manjon@us.es [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada II, Universidad de Sevilla, ETSA, Avda. Reina Mercedes s/n, 41012 Seville (Spain)

    2009-05-30

    Phosphogypsum (PG) is a by-product of the phosphate fertilizer industries that contains relatively high concentrations of uranium series radionuclides. The US-EPA regulates the agriculture use of PG, attending to its {sup 226}Ra content and to the {sup 222}Rn exhalation rate from inactive stacks. Measurements of {sup 222}Rn exhalation rates in PG stacks typically show a large and still poorly understood spatial and temporal variability, and the published data are scarce. This work studies an inactive PG stack in SW Spain of about 0.5 km{sup 2} from where PG can be extracted for agriculture uses, and an agriculture soil 75 km apart, being representative of the farms to be amended with PG. Activity concentrations of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 238}U and {sup 210}Po have been measured in 30 PG samples (0-90 cm horizon) allowing for the construction of maps with spatial distributions in the PG stack and for the characterization of the associated PG inputs to agriculture soils. Averaged {sup 226}Ra concentrations for the stack were 730 {+-} 60 Bq kg{sup -1} (d.w.), over the US-EPA limit of 370 Bq kg{sup -1}. {sup 222}Rn exhalation rate has been measured by the charcoal canister method in 49 sampling points with 3 canisters per sampling point. Values in PG stack were under the US-EPA limit of 2600 Bq m{sup -2} h{sup -1}, but they were one order of magnitude higher than those found in the agriculture soil. Variability in radon emissions has been studied at different spatial scales. Radon exhalation rates were correlated with {sup 226}Ra concentrations and daily potential evapotranspiration (ETo). They increased with ETo in agriculture soils, but showed an opposite behaviour in the PG stack.

  18. Study of radon exhalation from phosphogypsum plates and blocks from different origins; Estudo da exalacao de radonio em placas e tijolos de fosfogesso de diferentes procedencias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Lucas Jose Pereira da

    2011-07-01

    Phosphogypsum is a waste of the fertilizer industry that concentrates radionuclides. In this work, the {sup 222}Rn exhalation rate from phosphogypsum plates and blocks from different origins used at dwellings construction was studied. The {sup 222}Rn exhalation rate was determined through the accumulation chamber technique with solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD). The effective dose for an individual living in a residence built with phosphogypsum based materials was evaluated. It also was calculated the {sup 222}Rn exhalation rate through the UNSCEAR model, from the {sup 226}Ra concentration in the materials, in order to compare the experimental results. It was evaluated the contribution of building component (paint) to the reduction of {sup 222}Rn exhalation rate. The plates and blocks were manufactured with phosphogypsum from Bunge Fertilizantes, Ultrafertil and Fosfertil. Blocks manufactured with ordinary gypsum was also evaluated. The average results obtained were 0.19 {+-} 0.06 Bq m-2 h-1, 1.3 {+-} 0.3 Bq m{sup -2} h{sup -1} and 0.41 {+-} 0.07 Bq m{sup -2} h{sup -1} for plates manufactured with phosphogypsum from Bunge Fertilizer, Ultrafertil and Fosfertil, respectively. For the phosphogypsum blocks the values were 0.11 {+-} 0.01 Bq m{sup -2} h-1, 1.2 {+-} 0.6 Bq m{sup -2} h{sup -1}, 0.47 {+-} 0.15 Bq m{sup -2} h{sup -1}, for Bunge, Ultrafertil and Fosfertil. The blocks manufactured with ordinary gypsum presented average value of 0.18 {+-} 0.08 Bq m{sup -2} h'-{sup 1}. All phosphogypsum plates and blocks evaluated in this study presented effective dose for radon inhalation lower than the recommended value of 1mSv y{sup -1}, the annual effective dose limit for public exposure by International Commission on Radiological Protection. (author)

  19. 13CO2/12CO2 ratio analysis in exhaled air by lead-salt tunable diode lasers for noninvasive diagnostics in gastroenterology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Eugene V.; Zyrianov, Pavel V.; Miliaev, Valerii A.; Selivanov, Yurii G.; Chizhevskii, Eugene G.; Os'kina, Svetlana; Ivashkin, Vladimir T.; Nikitina, Elena I.

    1999-07-01

    An analyzer of 13CO2/12CO2 ratio in exhaled air based on lead-salt tunable diode lasers is presented. High accuracy of the carbon isotope ratio detection in exhaled carbon dioxide was achieved with help of very simple optical schematics. It was based on the use of MBE laser diodes operating in pulse mode and on recording the resonance CO2 absorption at 4.2 micrometers . Special fast acquisition electronics and software were applied for spectral data collection and processing. Developed laser system was tested in a clinical train aimed to assessment eradication efficiency in therapy of gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. Data on the 13C-urea breath test used for P.pylori detection and obtained with tunable diode lasers in the course of the trail was compared with the results of Mass-Spectroscopy analysis and histology observations. The analyzer can be used also for 13CO2/12CO2 ratio detection in exhalation to perform gastroenterology breath test based on using other compounds labeled with stable isotopes.

  20. Diseño y evaluación de un equipo para obtener aire espirado condensado Design and evaluation of a device for collecting exhaled breath condensate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Florencio Araneda Valenzuela

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available El análisis de muestras de aire espirado condensado ha cobrado gran relevancia en los últimos años como método no invasivo de estudio de la fisiología y las enfermedades de origen pulmonar. En el presente trabajo se describe un equipo para tomar muestras de aire espirado condensado de bajo costo, fácil de fabricar, de transportar al terreno y que permite tomar muestras en forma simultánea. La concentración de metabolitos relativos a procesos inflamatorios y al daño oxidativo (pH, peróxido de hidrógeno y nitrito de muestras de aire espirado condensado obtenido con este equipo son comparables a los reportados con otros previamente.In recent years, the analysis of exhaled breath condensate samples has been given great weight as a noninvasive methodology of studying physiology and lung diseases. The present study describes a device for measuring exhaled breath condensate that is affordable, easily constructed, portable and suitable for use in the field, as well as allowing the collection of simultaneous samples. The results obtained with this device in terms of the concentrations of pH, peroxide oxide and nitrite, metabolites related to inflammatory and oxidative damage, in exhaled breath condensate samples are comparable to those obtained with other devices previously described.

  1. Leukotriene-B4 concentrations in exhaled breath condensate and lung function after thirty minutes of breathing technically dried compressed air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Birger; Struck, Niclas; Mutzbauer, Till S; Schotte, Ulrich; Langfeldt, Norbert; Tetzlaff, Kay

    2002-01-01

    In previous studies it had been shown that leukotriene-B4 [LTB4] concentrations in the exhaled breath mirror the inflammatory activity of the airways if the respiratory tract has been exposed to occupational hazards. In diving the respiratory tract is exposed to cold and dry air and the nasopharynx, as the site of breathing-gas warming and humidification, is bypassed. The aim of the present study was to obtain LTB4-concentrations in the exhaled breath and spirometric data of 17 healthy subjects before and after thirty minutes of technically dried air breathing at normobar ambient pressure. The exhaled breath was collected non-invasively, via a permanently cooled expiration tube. The condensate was measured by a standard enzyme immunoassay for LTB4. Lung function values (FVC, FEV1, MEF 25, MEF 50) were simultaneously obtained by spirometry. The measured pre- and post-exposure LTB4- concentrations as well as the lung function values were in the normal range. The present data gave no evidence for any inflammatory activity in the subjects' airways after thirty minutes breathing technically dried air.

  2. Preliminary assessment, by means of Radon exhalation rate measurements, of the bio-sustainability of microwave treatment to eliminate biodeteriogens infesting stone walls of monumental historical buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, S.; Caliendo, E.; Guida, M.; Bisceglia, B.

    2017-10-01

    The main purpose of the work described in this paper has been to establish the protocol for a new non-disruptive technique of intervention, based on microwave treatment, for cleaning operations on monumental historical buildings, to eliminate biodeteriogens infesting stones. Non-destructive methods in the cleaning operations, should not only preserve the physical integrity, the chemical-mineralogical and structural identity of materials, but, when the exhalation of pollutant agents (like for example Radon gas) from building materials is considered, also, make the indoor air quality (IAQ) levels healthy. Therefore, one of the main steps of the protocol proposed in this paper is concerned with the assessment of the Radon exhalation rate in order to verify that microwave treatments do not increase the Radon naturally exhalated by building materials. In this paper, the preliminary results of the Radon measurements performed on two different type of tuff samples (grey tuff and yellow tuff), typical of the Italian traditional construction heritage, with the E-PERM passive technique at the Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory (Amb.Ra.), University of Salerno, Italy, ISO 9001:2008 certified, are summarized.

  3. [Children and Adolescents with Asthma Differ in Lung Function Parameters and Exhaled NO from Children and Adolescents with Obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmauck-Gómez, J S; Menrath, I; Kaiser, M M; Herz, A; Kopp, M V

    2016-07-01

    The prevalence of asthma and overweight/obesity in children and adolescents is continuously increasing over the last decades. It remains unclear if overweight/obesity raises the risk of developing asthma or if an uncontrolled asthma increases the risk of developing overweight/obesity by restricting physical activity. We aimed to elucidate, if children and adolescents with overweight/obesity differ from normal-weight asthmatics in lung functions parameters (FEV1, FEV1/VC, MEF50 and SRtot) and in exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO). Totally, n=142 children and adolescents aged 6-18 years were included in this study: group 1 comprised n=44 with overweight/obesity defined as a Body-Mass-Index (BMI)>90th percentile; group 2 n=44 with a doctors diagnosed bronchial asthma according to the GINA-guidelines, and group 3 with n=36 pulmonary healthy controls. N=18 children with both asthma and overweight/obesity were excluded from further analysis. We collected data about socio-demographic variables from a standardized questionnaire, bodyplethysmography (FEV1, FEV1/VC, MEF50 and SRtot) and FeNO. Normal-weight children and adolescents with asthma had significantly lower FEV1/VC (Tiffenau-Index 90,9±12,8) and MEF50 (84.0% predicted±27.6) than children with overweight/obesity (97,6±12,4 p=0.001 respectively 99.1±20.9 p=0.001) and healthy controls (98±13,5 p=0,003; 96.7±19.3 p=0.011). Normal weight asthmatics had a significantly higher FeNO (38.3 ppb) than children and adolescents with overweight/obesity (14.0 ppb p=0.014). Normal-weight children and adolescents with asthma differ significantly both in their lung function parameters as well as in their exhaled nitric oxide concentration from children and adolescents with overweight/obesity. For clinical practice it is important to note that children and adolescents with overweight/obesity have no signs of an obstructive airway diseases and are as resilient as healthy children and adolescents with regard to their lung function. The

  4. Importance of fractional exhaled nitric oxide in the differentiation of asthma–COPD overlap syndrome, asthma, and COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen FJ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Feng-jia Chen,* Xin-yan Huang,* Yang-li Liu, Geng-peng Lin, Can-mao Xie Department of Respiratory Disease, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO is an easy, sensitive, reproducible, and noninvasive marker of eosinophilic airway inflammation. Accordingly, FeNO is extensively used to diagnose and manage asthma. Patients with COPD who share some of the features of asthma have a condition called asthma–COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS. The feasibility of using FeNO to differentiate ACOS patients from asthma and COPD patients remains unclear. Methods: From February 2013 to May 2016, patients suspected with asthma and COPD through physician’s opinion were subjected to FeNO measurement, pulmonary function test (PFT, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness or bronchodilator test. Patients were divided into asthma alone group, COPD alone group, and ACOS group according to a clinical history, PFT values, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness or bronchodilator test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves were obtained to elucidate the clinical functions of FeNO in diagnosing ACOS. The optimal operating point was also determined. Results: A total of 689 patients were enrolled in this study: 500 had asthma, 132 had COPD, and 57 had ACOS. The FeNO value in patients with ACOS was 27 (21.5 parts per billion (ppb; median [interquartile range], which was significantly higher than that in the COPD group (18 [11] ppb. The area under the ROC curve was estimated to be 0.783 for FeNO. Results also revealed an optimal cutoff value of >22.5 ppb FeNO for differentiating ACOS from COPD patients (sensitivity 70%, specificity 75%.Conclusion: FeNO measurement is an easy, noninvasive, and sensitive method for differentiating ACOS from COPD. This technique is a new perspective for the management of COPD patients. Keywords

  5. Breath-to-breath variability of exhaled CO2 as a marker of lung dysmaturity in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouzas, Sotirios; Theodorakopoulos, Ilias; Delgado-Eckert, Edgar; Latzin, Philipp; Frey, Urs

    2017-12-01

    The concept of diffusional screening implies that breath-to-breath variations in CO 2 clearance, when related to the variability of breathing, may contain information on the quality and utilization of the available alveolar surface. We explored the validity of the above hypothesis in a cohort of young infants of comparable postmenstrual age but born at different stages of lung maturity, namely, in term-born infants ( n = 128), preterm-born infants without chronic lung disease of infancy (CLDI; n = 53), and preterm infants with moderate/severe CLDI ( n = 87). Exhaled CO 2 volume (V E,CO2 ) and concentration (F E,CO2 ) were determined by volumetric capnography, whereas their variance was assessed by linear and nonlinear variability metrics. The relationship between relative breath-to-breath change of V E,CO2 (ΔV E,CO2 ) and the corresponding change of tidal volume (ΔV T ) was also analyzed. Nonlinear F E,CO2 variability was lower in CLDI compared with term and non-CLDI preterm group ( P variability was attributed to the variability of V T ( r 2 = 0.749), whereas in term and healthy preterm infants this relationship was weaker ( r 2 = 0.507 and 0.630, respectively). The ΔV E,CO2 - ΔV T slope was less steep in the CLDI group (1.06 ± 0.07) compared with non-CLDI preterm (1.16 ± 0.07; P variability that can be quantified by nonlinear variability metrics and may reflect the degree of lung dysmaturity. In infants with moderate/severe chronic lung disease of infancy (CLDI), the variability of the exhaled CO 2 is mainly driven by the variability of breathing, whereas in term-born and healthy preterm infants this relationship is less strong. The slope of the relative CO 2 -to-volume change is less steep in CLDI infants, suggesting that dysmature lungs are less efficient in eliminating CO 2 under tidal breathing conditions.

  6. Atopic sensitization to common allergens without symptoms or signs of airway disorders does not increase exhaled nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhos, Annamari; Kainu, Annette; Karjalainen, Jouko; Lindqvist, Ari; Piirilä, Päivi; Sarna, Seppo; Haahtela, Tari; Sovijärvi, Anssi R A

    2008-01-01

    Background Elevated fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) associates positively with symptomatic atopy among asthmatics and in the general population. It is, however, unclear whether sensitization to common allergens per se– as verified with positive skin prick tests – affects FENO in healthy individuals. Objective The aim of this study was to examine the association between FENO and sensitization to common allergens in healthy nonsmoking adults with no signs or symptoms of airway disorders. Methods FENO measurements (flow rate: 50 mL/s), skin prick tests to common inhalant allergens, structured interviews, spirometry, bronchodilatation tests and bronchial histamine challenges were performed on a randomly selected population of 248 subjects. Seventy-three of them (29%) were nonsmoking asymptomatic adults with no history of asthma, persistent or recurrent upper or lower airway symptoms and no signs of airway disorders in the tests listed above. Results FENO concentrations were similar in skin prick test positive (n = 32) and negative (n = 41) healthy subjects, with median values of 13.2 and 15.5 ppb, respectively (P = 0.304). No correlation appeared between FENO and the number of positive reactions (r = −0.138; P = 0.244), or the total sum of wheal diameters (r = −0.135; P = 0.254). The nonparametric one-tailed 95% upper limits of FENO among skin prick positive and negative healthy nonsmoking subjects were 29 and 31 ppb, respectively. Conclusions Atopic constitution defined as positive skin prick test results does not increase FENO in healthy nonsmoking adults with no signs or symptoms of airway disorders. This suggests that same reference ranges for FENO can be applied to both skin prick test positive and negative subjects. Please cite this paper as: Rouhos A, Kainu A, Karjalainen J, Lindqvist A, Piirilä P, Sarna S, Haahtela T and Sovijärvi ARA. Atopic sensitization to common allergens without symptoms or signs of airway disorders does not increase

  7. Variation of radon concentrations in soil and groundwater and its correlation with radon exhalation rate from soil in Budhakedar, Garhwal Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Ganesh; Prasad, Yogesh; Gusain, G. S.; Badoni, Manjari; Rana, J. M. S.; Ramola, R. C.

    2009-06-01

    Radon was measured in soil-gas and groundwater in the Budhakedar area of Tehri Garhwal, India in summer and winter to obtain the seasonal variation and its correlation with radon exhalation rate. The environmental surface gamma dose rate was also measured in the same area. The radon exhalation rate in the soil sample collected from different geological unit of Budhakedar area was measured using plastic track detector (LR-115 type II) technique. The variation in the radon concentration in soil-gas was found to vary from 1098 to 31,776 Bq.m-3 with an average of 7456 Bq.m-3 in summer season and 3501 to 42883 Bq.m-3 with an average of 17148 Bq.m-3 in winter season. In groundwater, it was found to vary from 8 to 3047 Bq.l-1 with an average value 510 Bq.l-1 in summer and 26 to 2311 Bq.l-1 with an average value 433 Bq.L-1 in winter. Surface gamma dose rate in the study area varied from 32.4 to 83.6 μR.h-1 with an overall mean of 58.7 μ-R.h-1 in summer and 34.6 to 79.3 μR.h-1 with an average value 58.2 μR.h-1 in winter. Radon exhalation rate from collected soil samples was found to vary from 0.1 × 10-5 to 5.7 × 10-5 Bq.kg-1.h-1 with an average of 1.5 × 10-5 Bq.kg-1.h-1 in summer season and 1.7 × 10-5 to 9.6 × 10-5 Bq.kg-1.h-1 with an average of 5.5 × 10-5 Bq.kg-1.h-1. A weak negative correlation was observed between radon exhalation rate from soil and radon concentration in the soil. Radon exhalation rate from the soil was also not found to be correlated with the gamma dose rate, while it shows a positive correlation with radon concentration in water in summer season. Inter-correlations among various parameters are discussed in detail.

  8. Integrating exhaled breath diagnostics by disease-sniffing dogs with instrumental laboratory analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogs have been studied for many years as a medical diagnostic tool to detect a pre-clinical disease state by sniffing emissions directly from a human or an in vitro biological sample. Some of the studies report high sensitivity and specificity in blinded case-control studies. How...

  9. Increases in exhaled nitric oxide after acute stress: association with measures of negative affect and depressive mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, Thomas; Trueba, Ana F; Simon, Erica; Auchus, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Increases in fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) have been observed after acute laboratory stress, which could indicate a strengthening of immune defenses in acute stress because of the quick onset of the response and the role of nitric oxide in airway-protective functions. In addition, because sustained psychological distress and depression are known to deteriorate immune defenses systems, they may dampen the FeNO response to acute stress. FeNO and negative affect were measured before and after a speech and mental arithmetic stressor. We examined the association of stress-induced FeNO changes with momentary negative affect and questionnaires of perceived stress, anxious mood, and depressive mood in 39 asthma patients and 41 healthy controls. FeNO increased from baseline to stress in participants with asthma (from 3.38 [0.102] to 3.46 [0.103] ln(ppb)) and controls (2.86 [0.098] to 2.92 [0.099]; F(4,141) = 3.26, p = .014), but the magnitude of the FeNO response did not differ between groups (F mood were associated with FeNO increases after stress (most pronounced at 0 minute poststress; t(76) = 3.87, p mood is associated with a reduced mobilization of airway nitric oxide in acute stress, whereas other indicators of negative affect are positively associated with overall FeNO levels and reactivity.

  10. Exhaled nitric oxide levels are elevated in persons with tetraplegia and comparable to that in mild asthmatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulovic, Miroslav; Schilero, Gregory J; Wecht, Jill M; La Fountaine, Michael; Rosado-Rivera, Dwindally; Bauman, William A

    2010-06-01

    The role of airway inflammation in mediating airflow obstruction in persons with chronic traumatic tetraplegia is unknown. Measurement of the fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) affords a validated noninvasive technique for gauging the airway inflammatory response in asthma, although it has never been assessed in persons with tetraplegia. This study was designed to determine the FeNO in individuals with chronic tetraplegia compared with that in patients with mild asthma and healthy able-bodied individuals. Nine subjects with chronic tetraplegia, seven subjects with mild asthma, and seven matched healthy able-bodied controls were included in this prospective, observational, pilot study. All subjects were nonsmokers and clinically stable at the time of study. Spirometry was performed on all participants at baseline. FENO was determined online by a commercially available closed circuit, chemiluminescence method, using a single-breath technique. Subjects with tetraplegia had significantly higher values of FeNO than controls (17.72 +/- 3.9 ppb vs. 10.37 +/- 4.9 ppb; P tetraplegia and those with asthma (17.72 +/- 3.9 ppb vs. 20.23 +/- 4.64 ppb, P tetraplegia have FeNO levels that are comparable to that seen in mild asthmatics and higher than that in healthy able-bodied controls. The clinical relevance of this observation has yet to be determined.

  11. Comparison of Ambient and Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources for Cystic Fibrosis Exhaled Breath Condensate Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xiaoling; Pérez, José J; Jones, Christina M; Monge, María Eugenia; McCarty, Nael A; Stecenko, Arlene A; Fernández, Facundo M

    2017-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The vast majority of the mortality is due to progressive lung disease. Targeted and untargeted CF breath metabolomics investigations via exhaled breath condensate (EBC) analyses have the potential to expose metabolic alterations associated with CF pathology and aid in assessing the effectiveness of CF therapies. Here, transmission-mode direct analysis in real time traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TM-DART-TWIMS-TOF MS) was tested as a high-throughput alternative to conventional direct infusion (DI) electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) methods, and a critical comparison of the three ionization methods was conducted. EBC was chosen as the noninvasive surrogate for airway sampling over expectorated sputum as EBC can be collected in all CF subjects regardless of age and lung disease severity. When using pooled EBC collected from a healthy control, ESI detected the most metabolites, APCI a log order less, and TM-DART the least. TM-DART-TWIMS-TOF MS was used to profile metabolites in EBC samples from five healthy controls and four CF patients, finding that a panel of three discriminant EBC metabolites, some of which had been previously detected by other methods, differentiated these two classes with excellent cross-validated accuracy. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. Dynamic profiles of volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath as determined by a coupled PTR-MS/GC-MS study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, J; Kupferthaler, A; Filipiak, W; Amann, A; Mochalski, P; Unterkofler, K; Koc, H; Hinterhuber, H; Teschl, S

    2010-01-01

    In this phenomenological study we focus on dynamic measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath under exercise conditions. An experimental setup efficiently combining breath-by-breath analyses using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) with data reflecting the behaviour of major hemodynamic and respiratory parameters is presented. Furthermore, a methodology for complementing continuous VOC profiles obtained by PTR-MS with simultaneous SPME/GC-MS measurements is outlined. These investigations aim at evaluating the impact of breathing patterns, cardiac output or blood pressure on the observed breath concentration and allow for the detection and identification of several VOCs revealing characteristic rest-to-work transitions in response to variations in ventilation or perfusion. Examples of such compounds include isoprene, methyl acetate, butane, DMS and 2-pentanone. In particular, both isoprene and methyl acetate exhibit a drastic rise in concentration shortly after the onset of exercise, usually by a factor of about 3–5 within approximately 1 min of pedalling. These specific VOCs might also be interpreted as potentially sensitive indicators for fluctuations of blood or respiratory flow and can therefore be viewed as candidate compounds for future assessments of hemodynamics, pulmonary function and gas exchange patterns via observed VOC behaviour

  13. Impact of different welding techniques on biological effect markers in exhaled breath condensate of 58 mild steel welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmeyer, Frank; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Lehnert, Martin; Kendzia, Benjamin; Bernard, Sabine; Berresheim, Hans; Düser, Maria; Henry, Jana; Weiss, Tobias; Koch, Holger M; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Total mass and composition of welding fumes are predominantly dependent on the welding technique and welding wire applied. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of welding techniques on biological effect markers in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) of 58 healthy welders. The welding techniques applied were gas metal arc welding with solid wire (GMAW) (n=29) or flux cored wire (FCAW) (n=29). Welding fume particles were collected with personal samplers in the breathing zone inside the helmets. Levels of leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), and 8-isoprostane (8-iso-PGF(2α)) were measured with immunoassay kits and the EBC pH was measured after deaeration. Significantly higher 8-iso-PGF(2α) concentrations and a less acid pH were detected in EBC of welders using the FCAW than in EBC of welders using the GMAW technique. The lowest LTB(4) concentrations were measured in nonsmoking welders applying a solid wire. No significant influences were found in EBC concentrations of PGE(2) based upon smoking status or type of welding technique. This study suggests an enhanced irritative effect in the lower airways of mild steel welders due to the application of FCAW compared to GMAW, most likely associated with a higher emission of welding fumes.

  14. Comparison of Ambient and Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources for Cystic Fibrosis Exhaled Breath Condensate Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xiaoling; Pérez, José J.; Jones, Christina M.; Monge, María Eugenia; McCarty, Nael A.; Stecenko, Arlene A.; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2017-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The vast majority of the mortality is due to progressive lung disease. Targeted and untargeted CF breath metabolomics investigations via exhaled breath condensate (EBC) analyses have the potential to expose metabolic alterations associated with CF pathology and aid in assessing the effectiveness of CF therapies. Here, transmission-mode direct analysis in real time traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TM-DART-TWIMS-TOF MS) was tested as a high-throughput alternative to conventional direct infusion (DI) electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) methods, and a critical comparison of the three ionization methods was conducted. EBC was chosen as the noninvasive surrogate for airway sampling over expectorated sputum as EBC can be collected in all CF subjects regardless of age and lung disease severity. When using pooled EBC collected from a healthy control, ESI detected the most metabolites, APCI a log order less, and TM-DART the least. TM-DART-TWIMS-TOF MS was used to profile metabolites in EBC samples from five healthy controls and four CF patients, finding that a panel of three discriminant EBC metabolites, some of which had been previously detected by other methods, differentiated these two classes with excellent cross-validated accuracy.

  15. Study of exhaled breath condensate sample preparation for metabolomics analysis by LC-MS/MS in high resolution mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Peralbo, M A; Calderón Santiago, M; Priego-Capote, F; Luque de Castro, M D

    2015-11-01

    Metabolomic analysis of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) requires an unavoidable sample preparation step because of the low concentration of its components, and potential cleanup for possible interferents. Sample preparation based on protein precipitation (PP), solid-phase extraction (SPE) by hydrophilic and lipophilic sorbents or lyophilization has demonstrated that the analytical sample from the last is largely the best because lyophilization allows reconstitution in a volume as small as required (preconcentration factors up to 80-times with respect to the original sample), thus doubling the number of detected compounds as compared with the other alternatives (47 versus 25). In addition, PP and/or SPE cleanup are unnecessary as no effect from the EBC components removed by these steps appears in the chromatograms. The total 49 EBC compounds tentatively identified and confirmed by MS/MS in this research include amino acids, fatty acids, fatty amides, fatty aldehydes, sphingoid bases, oxoanionic compounds, imidazoles, hydroxy acids and aliphatic acyclic acids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Specific Metabolome Profile of Exhaled Breath Condensate in Patients with Shock and Respiratory Failure: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brice Fermier

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shock includes different pathophysiological mechanisms not fully understood and remains a challenge to manage. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC may contain relevant biomarkers that could help us make an early diagnosis or better understand the metabolic perturbations resulting from this pathological situation. Objective: we aimed to establish the metabolomics signature of EBC from patients in shock with acute respiratory failure in a pilot study. Material and methods: We explored the metabolic signature of EBC in 12 patients with shock compared to 14 controls using LC-HRMS. We used a non-targeted approach, and we performed a multivariate analysis based on Orthogonal Partial Least Square-Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA to differentiate between the two groups of patients. Results: We optimized the procedure of EBC collection and LC-HRMS detected more than 1000 ions in this fluid. The optimization of multivariate models led to an excellent model of differentiation for both groups (Q2 > 0.4 after inclusion of only 6 ions. Discussion and conclusion: We validated the procedure of EBC collection and we showed that the metabolome profile of EBC may be relevant in characterizing patients with shock. We performed well in distinguishing these patients from controls, and the identification of relevant compounds may be promising for ICC patients.

  17. The influence of mechanical vibrations of railway and car traffics on the radon exhalation using track detector technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moharram, B.M.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of train and car traffic vibrations on the radon concentration (CRn) increase near the railway tracks and the heavy traffic roads. It was estimated along the railway road, and perpendicular directions using CR-39 detectors. The special radius of the influence is about 32 m, while the related value for car traffics is found to be about 25 m. The base line of radon concentration in soil gas and radon exhalation are estimated in the whole area, far from the center of traffic roads by a distance (> 100 m) in different different directions and found to be 0.6 Bq/L and 1.25 x 10 4 Bq m -2 respectively.It is easy to detect that the average ratio between the radon concentration at its higher level and its base line, which is regular concentration of radon in the ordinary positions far from the effect of traffics, is about 1.18 for railway traffics. While the related value to vehicle traffic is about 1.23, which is higher than that of railway traffic because the ground is stimulated per minutely

  18. Exhaled nitric oxide and screening for occupational asthma in two at-risk sectors: bakery and hairdressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florentin, A; Acouetey, D-S; Remen, T; Penven, E; Thaon, I; Zmirou-Navier, D; Paris, C

    2014-06-01

    Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) levels are increasingly being used in the diagnosis and management of asthma. However, this indicator has rarely been used to detect occupational asthma. To examine non-invasive methods to estimate airway inflammation. A nested case-control study was conducted among a retrospective cohort of young workers in the bakery, pastry-making and hairdressing industries. Subjects underwent a clinical examination during a medical visit. Blood samples were collected and FENO levels measured. Cases were subjects diagnosed as suffering from 'confirmed' or 'probable' occupational asthma. Of the 178 workers included in the study, 19 were cases. In univariate analysis, FENO was associated with case/control status, and height and smoking status. In a multiple linear regression model, case/control status (P 8.5 ppb and a positive clinical examination increases specificity without loss of sensitivity (to 80.5% and 79.0%, respectively). This study suggests that FENO measurements alone cannot be considered a useful screening test for occupational asthma. Further investigations are needed to investigate the use of combined FENO and questionnaire or repeated measures.

  19. Sensitivity of salivary hydrogen sulfide to psychological stress and its association with exhaled nitric oxide and affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Juliet L; Werchan, Chelsey A; Reeves, Audrey G; Bruemmer, Kevin J; Lippert, Alexander R; Ritz, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is the third gasotransmitter recently discovered after nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide. Both NO and H 2 S are involved in multiple physiological functions. Whereas NO has been shown to vary with psychological stress, the influence of stress on H 2 S and the relationship between H 2 S and NO are unknown. We therefore examined levels of salivary H 2 S and NO in response to a stressful final academic exam period. Measurements of stress, negative affect, and fraction of exhaled NO (FE NO ), were obtained from students (N=16) and saliva was collected at three time points: low-stress period in the semester, early exam period, and late exam period. Saliva was immediately analyzed for H 2 S with the fluorescent probe Sulfidefluor-4. H 2 S increased significantly during the early exam period and FE NO decreased gradually towards the late exam period. H 2 S, FE NO , negative affect, and stress ratings were positively associated with each other: as stress level and negative affect increased, values of H 2 S increased; in addition, as FE NO levels decreased, H 2 S also decreased. Asthma status did not modify these associations. Sustained academic stress increases H 2 S and these changes are correlated with NO and the experience of stress and negative affect. These findings motivate research with larger samples to further explore the interaction and function of H 2 S and FE NO during psychological stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. CEA, SCC and NSE levels in exhaled breath condensate--possible markers for early detection of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yingchang; Wang, Lin; Zhao, Cong; Hu, Yanjie; Xu, Shan; Ying, Kejing; Wang, Ping; Chen, Xing

    2013-12-01

    Lung cancer (LC) is the leading cause of cancer-related death. The sensitive and non-invasive diagnostic tools in the early stage are still poor. We present a pilot study on the early diagnosis of LC by detecting markers in exhaled breath condensate (EBC). EBC samples were collected from 105 patients with LC and 56 healthy controls. We applied chemiluminescence immunoassay to detect CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen), SCC (squamous cell carcinoma) antigen and NSE (neuron specific enolase) in EBC and serum. Concentrations of markers were compared between independent groups and subgroups. A significantly higher concentration level of each marker was found in patients with LC than healthy controls. The areas under curve of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were 0.800, 0.771, 0.659, 0.679, 0.636 and 0.626 for EBC-CEA, serum-CEA, EBC-SCC, serum-SCC, EBC-NSE and serum-NSE, respectively. Markers in EBC had a higher positive rate (PR) and were more specific to histologic types than markers in serum. In addition, multivariate analysis was performed to evaluate the association of presenting markers with the stages of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). EBC-CEA showed the best predictive characteristic (p tumor markers in EBC may have a better diagnostic performance for LC than those in serum. With further investigation on the combination of markers in EBC, detection of EBC could probably be a novel and non-invasive method to detect NSCLC earlier.

  1. Effects of nasal CPAP on exhaled SIRT1 and tumor necrosis factor-α in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Chi; Liaw, Shwu-Fang; Chiu, Chung-Hsin; Chen, Wei-Ji; Lin, Mei-Wei; Chang, Feng-Ting

    2016-07-01

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) has been used to examine airway inflammation and oxidative stress. This study aimed to evaluate if there were abnormal Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) protein and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels in EBC and to determine if these levels could be improved after nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. Thirty-five patients with moderately severe to severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) who wanted nasal CPAP treatment and 20 healthy controls were prospectively enrolled. The EBC SIRT1 protein levels and EBC TNF-α protein levels were assessed by ELISA. All patients underwent sleep studies that were repeated 3 months after nasal CPAP treatment in patients with OSAS. Results showed that in OSAS before nasal CPAP treatment, the EBC SIRT1 protein levels were lower than that in normal subjects, whereas the EBC TNF-α protein levels were higher. After nasal CPAP treatment, the EBC SIRT1 levels increased and EBC TNF-α levels decreased. In conclusion, successful treatment of OSAS by nasal CPAP can normalize the levels of EBC SIRT1 and EBC TNF-α. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Exhaled Breath Condensate Detects Baseline Reductions in Chloride and Increases in Response to Albuterol in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney M. Wheatley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired ion regulation and dehydration is the primary pathophysiology in cystic fibrosis (CF lung disease. A potential application of exhaled breath condensate (EBC collection is to assess airway surface liquid ionic composition at baseline and in response to pharmacological therapy in CF. Our aims were to determine if EBC could detect differences in ion regulation between CF and healthy and measure the effect of the albuterol on EBC ions in these populations. Baseline EBC Cl − , DLCO and SpO 2 were lower in CF (n = 16 compared to healthy participants (n = 16. EBC Cl − increased in CF subjects, while there was no change in DLCO or membrane conductance, but a decrease in pulmonary-capillary blood volume in both groups following albuterol. This resulted in an improvement in diffusion at the alveolar-capillary unit, and removal of the baseline difference in SpO 2 by 90-minutes in CF subjects. These results demonstrate that EBC detects differences in ion regulation between healthy and CF individuals, and that albuterol mediates increases in Cl − in CF, suggesting that the benefits of albuterol extend beyond simple bronchodilation.

  3. [Measurement of fraction of exhaled nitric oxide with the portable NIOX-MINO monitor in healthy adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Ana María; Feixas, Teresa; Casan, Pere

    2007-03-01

    Measurement of the fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) provides a noninvasive way to monitor asthma treatment in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to determine FENO reference values for measurements recorded with the portable NIOX MINO monitor in a group of healthy volunteers. We also assessed the association between values recorded by the portable monitor and the N-6008 chemiluminescence analyzer used in our pulmonary function laboratory. The FENO values obtained with the portable monitor were consistently higher than those recorded by the N-6008 analyzer; the cutoff value for the portable monitor was 34 ppb (mean + 2 SD). We detected a direct correlation (r=0.92) between the FENO measurements recorded by the 2 monitors (P=.001). The following equation expresses the relationship between measurements from the 2 devices: FENO(NIOX MINO) = 10 + [1.5 FENO(N-6008)]. We did not observe statistically significant correlations between FENO measurements and age, sex, body mass index, or spirometry.

  4. Exhaled breath condensate annexin A5 levels in exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in asthma: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahan, F; Akar, H H; Saraymen, B

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) in asthma is incompletely understood. The role of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) annexin A5, which is an anti-inflammatory mediator, has not been investigated. The purpose of this study is to evaluate EBC annexin A5 levels in EIB in asthmatic children. Two groups of children were enrolled in this study: asthmatic children with positive (n=11) and negative (n=7) responses to exercise. The levels of pre- and post-exercise EBC annexin A5 were determined with using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We observed significant higher pre-exercise EBC annexin A5 levels in the challenge test negative children than in the challenge test positive children (pexercise EBC annexin A5 levels between the groups (p>0.05). Also, no significant difference was observed between pre- and post-exercise EBC annexin A5 levels within each group (p>0.05). There was an inverse correlation between annexin A5 levels and a reduction in forced expiratory volume at one second percent (FEV1%) (p=0.009, r=-0.598). Our preliminary study showed that EBC annexin A5 may have a possible preventive role in EIB in asthma. Annexin A5 and related compounds may provide novel therapeutic approaches to the treatment of EIB in asthma. Copyright © 2014 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute Response to Cigarette Smoking Assessed in Exhaled Breath Condensate in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Healthy Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskey-Warzęchowska, M; Nejman-Gryz, P; Osinka, K; Lis, P; Malesa, K; Górska, K; Krenke, R

    2017-01-01

    The effect of acute exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) on the respiratory system has been less extensively studied than the long term effects of smoking. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the acute response to CS in smokers suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and in healthy smokers. Nineteen stable COPD patients and 19 young healthy smokers were enrolled. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-1β, and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) before and 60 min after smoking a cigarette. When pre- and post-CS levels of the evaluated biomarkers were compared, no differences were found in either group. However, the post-CS MDA was significantly greater in healthy smokers than that in COPD patients; 20.41 vs. 16.81 nmol/L, p = 0.01, respectively. Post-CS TNF-α correlated inversely with FEV 1 /FVC in healthy smokers. We conclude that CS does not acutely increase the EBC concentration of the inflammatory markers either in COPD patients or healthy smokers. The short term CS-induced oxidative stress is higher in young smokers than in COPD patients, which what may indicate a higher susceptibility to CS content of the former.

  6. Environmental exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, kitchen ventilation, fractional exhaled nitric oxide, and risk of diabetes among Chinese females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, J; Sun, H; Zhou, Y; Zhang, Y; Yin, W; Xu, T; Cheng, J; Chen, W; Yuan, J

    2018-05-01

    Diabetes is related to exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), inflammation in the body, and housing characters. However, associations of urinary monohydroxy-PAHs (OH-PAHs) or fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) with diabetes risk in relation to housing characters are unclear. In this study, 2645 individuals were drawn from the baseline survey of the Wuhan-Zhuhai Cohort Study. Associations of diabetes with urinary OH-PAHs or FeNO among cooking participants were estimated using logistic regression models. Among women with self-cooking meals, urinary OH-PAH levels were positively associated with diabetes risk (P kitchen exhaust fans/hoods had a 52% decrease in the risk of diabetes (OR: 0.48, 95% CI: 0.27, 0.84), compared with those with nonuse of kitchen exhaust fans/hoods. The results indicated that the cooking women had an elevated risk of diabetes, which may be partly explained by an increase in the PAH body burden and higher inflammatory responses. Use of kitchen exhaust fan/hood can be associated with a lower risk of diabetes. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. MODERN APPROACHES TO FRACTIONAL EXHALED NITRIC OXIDE AS A USEFUL BIOMARKER FOR ALLERGIC ASTHMA PHENOTYPING AND MANAGEMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mgaloblishvili, N; Gotua, M

    2017-12-01

    Asthma is a pathologically heterogeneous disease, consisting of several phenotypes. Different types of airway inflammation are the cornerstone feature of this condition. Fraction of nitric oxide in exhaled air (FENO) has been proposed as a noninvasive, specific biomarker for eosinophilic airway inflammation and has been shown to be elevated in patients with allergic asthma phenotype. More recent studies indicate that FeNO identifies T-helper cell type 2 (Th2)-mediated airway inflammation with a high predictive value for identifying inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) responsive airway inflammation. Taking into account the accumulated evidence,it is possible to consider, that FeNO testing has an important role in the assessment of patients with suspected asthma and in the management of established asthmadiagnosis. In conjunction with symptom scores and lung function tests, FeNO measurement could provide a more useful and effective approach for asthma in terms of: (1) detecting the presence of Th2-mediated airway inflammation, (2) determining the likelihood of ICS responsive (and lack of course), (3) monitoring of airway inflammation to determine risk for future impairment or loss of asthma control during reduction/cessation of ICS treatment, (4) unmasking (otherwise unsuspected) non-adherence to corticosteroid therapy and (5) in severe asthma cases tailoring treatment with biological drugs. However, more work is still needed to address outstanding questions about its exact role in guiding asthma management and better define the use of FENO in different clinical settings.

  8. Evaluation of the Dermal Bioavailability of Aqueous Xylene in F344 Rats and Human Volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thrall, Karla D.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Woodstock, Angie D.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2003-07-11

    Xylene is a clear, colorless liquid used as a solvent in the printing, rubber, and leather industries and is commonly found in paint thinners, paints, varnishes, and adhesives. Although humans are most likely to be exposed to xylene via inhalation, xylene is also found in well and surface water. Therefore, an assessment of the dermal contribution to total xylene uptake is useful for understanding human exposures. To evaluate the significance of these exposures, the dermal absorption of o-xylene was assessed in F344 male rats and human volunteers using a combination of real-time exhaled breath analysis and physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. Animals were exposed to o-xylene dermally. Immediately following the initiation of exposure, individual animals were placed in a glass off-gassing chamber and exhaled breath was monitored. Human volunteers participating in the study placed both legs into a stainless steel hydrotherapy tub containing an initial concentration of approximately 500 g/L o-xylene. Exhaled breath was continually analyzed from each volunteer before, during, and post-exposure to track absorption and subsequent elimination of the compound in real time. In both animal and human studies, a PBPK model was used to estimate the dermal permeability coefficient (Kp) to describe each set of exhaled breath data. Rat skin was found to be approximately 12 times more permeable to aqueous o-xylene than human skin. The estimated human and rat aqueous o-xylene Kp values were 0.005+/- 0.001 cm/hr and 0.058+/- 0.009 cm/hr, respectively.

  9. Collection of Aerosolized Human Cytokines Using Teflon® Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Jennifer H.; McDevitt, James J.; Fabian, M. Patricia; Hwang, Grace M.; Milton, Donald K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Collection of exhaled breath samples for the analysis of inflammatory biomarkers is an important area of research aimed at improving our ability to diagnose, treat and understand the mechanisms of chronic pulmonary disease. Current collection methods based on condensation of water vapor from exhaled breath yield biomarker levels at or near the detection limits of immunoassays contributing to problems with reproducibility and validity of biomarker measurements. In this study, we compare the collection efficiency of two aerosol-to-liquid sampling devices to a filter-based collection method for recovery of dilute laboratory generated aerosols of human cytokines so as to identify potential alternatives to exhaled breath condensate collection. Methodology/Principal Findings Two aerosol-to-liquid sampling devices, the SKC® Biosampler and Omni 3000™, as well as Teflon® filters were used to collect aerosols of human cytokines generated using a HEART nebulizer and single-pass aerosol chamber setup in order to compare the collection efficiencies of these sampling methods. Additionally, methods for the use of Teflon® filters to collect and measure cytokines recovered from aerosols were developed and evaluated through use of a high-sensitivity multiplex immunoassay. Our results show successful collection of cytokines from pg/m3 aerosol concentrations using Teflon® filters and measurement of cytokine levels in the sub-picogram/mL concentration range using a multiplex immunoassay with sampling times less than 30 minutes. Significant degradation of cytokines was observed due to storage of cytokines in concentrated filter extract solutions as compared to storage of dry filters. Conclusions Use of filter collection methods resulted in significantly higher efficiency of collection than the two aerosol-to-liquid samplers evaluated in our study. The results of this study provide the foundation for a potential new technique to evaluate biomarkers of inflammation in

  10. Fractionation of families of major, minor, and trace metals across the melt-vapor interface in volcanic exhalations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkley, T.K.; Le Cloarec, M.-F.; Lambert, G.

    1994-01-01

    volcanic plumes, and Cd and Tl are enriched relative to the others. Indium is much more abundant in the plume of the hotspot volcano Kilauea than in the Etna plume (probably non-hotspot in character). It may be a useful indicator of the tapping of deep mantle zones, or could aid in the interpretation of reports of Pt group metals in exhalations from hot spot volcanoes. Indium in old glacial ice strata could help assess magnitude and variability of exhalations from hotspot volcanoes in past time. Strong melt-vapor fractionation of the alkali and alkaline earth metals may only be observed in plumes during quiescent degassing of volcanoes; when large amounts of ash or spatter (undifferentiated lava) enter the plume, its alkali and alkaline earth metal composition may approach that of the melt. Ratios among the chalcophile metals may not be much changed by addition of ash, because their concentrations in melt are so small, and masses of them in any plume may remain dominated by transfer across the melt-vapor interface. Radon daughter nuclides give information about state of volcanic activity at time of sampling. The precisely known origins, ultratrace detectability, decay systematics, and wide variations in volatility of these species provide information about residence times, degassing and travel histories, and identities of melt bodies in volcanic systems. ?? 1994.

  11. Plasma and exhaled breath condensate nitrite-nitrate level in relation to environmental exposures in adults in the EGEA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rava, Marta; Varraso, Raphäelle; Decoster, Brigitte; Huyvaert, Hélène; Le Moual, Nicole; Jacquemin, Bénédicte; Künzli, Nino; Kauffmann, Francine; Zerimech, Farid; Matran, Régis; Nadif, Rachel

    2012-10-15

    This study evaluated the associations between biological markers in the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway and four environmental exposures among subjects examined in the second survey (2003-2007) of the French Epidemiological study on Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA). Total nitrite and nitrate (NO(2)(-) /NO(3)(-)) levels were measured both in plasma and in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) in 949 adults. Smoking, diet and exposure to chlorine products were assessed using standardized questionnaires. Exposure to air pollutants was estimated by using geostatistical models. All estimates were obtained with generalized estimating equations for linear regression models. Median levels of NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) were 36.3 μM (1st-3rd quartile: 25.7, 51.1) in plasma and 2.0 μmol/mg proteins (1st-3rd quartile 0.9, 3.9) in EBC. After adjustment for asthma, age, sex and menopausal status, plasma NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) level increased with leafy vegetable consumption (above versus below median=0.04 (95%CI: 0.001, 0.07)) and decreased in smokers (versus non/ex-smokers=-0.08 (95%CI: -0.11, -0.04). EBC NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) level decreased in smokers (-0.08 (95%CI: -0.16, -0.001)) and with exposure to ambient O(3) concentration (above versus below median=-0.10 (95%CI: -0.17, -0.03)). Cured meat, chlorine products, PM(10) and NO(2) concentrations were not associated with NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) levels. Results suggest that potential modifiable environmental and behavioral risk factors may modify NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) levels in plasma and EBC according to the route of exposure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Importance of fractional exhaled nitric oxide in the differentiation of asthma-COPD overlap syndrome, asthma, and COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng-Jia; Huang, Xin-Yan; Liu, Yang-Li; Lin, Geng-Peng; Xie, Can-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) is an easy, sensitive, reproducible, and noninvasive marker of eosinophilic airway inflammation. Accordingly, FeNO is extensively used to diagnose and manage asthma. Patients with COPD who share some of the features of asthma have a condition called asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). The feasibility of using FeNO to differentiate ACOS patients from asthma and COPD patients remains unclear. From February 2013 to May 2016, patients suspected with asthma and COPD through physician's opinion were subjected to FeNO measurement, pulmonary function test (PFT), and bronchial hyperresponsiveness or bronchodilator test. Patients were divided into asthma alone group, COPD alone group, and ACOS group according to a clinical history, PFT values, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness or bronchodilator test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were obtained to elucidate the clinical functions of FeNO in diagnosing ACOS. The optimal operating point was also determined. A total of 689 patients were enrolled in this study: 500 had asthma, 132 had COPD, and 57 had ACOS. The FeNO value in patients with ACOS was 27 (21.5) parts per billion (ppb; median [interquartile range]), which was significantly higher than that in the COPD group (18 [11] ppb). The area under the ROC curve was estimated to be 0.783 for FeNO. Results also revealed an optimal cutoff value of >22.5 ppb FeNO for differentiating ACOS from COPD patients (sensitivity 70%, specificity 75%). FeNO measurement is an easy, noninvasive, and sensitive method for differentiating ACOS from COPD. This technique is a new perspective for the management of COPD patients.

  13. Time spent in vigorous physical activity is associated with increased exhaled nitric oxide in non-asthmatic adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs-Olsen, Christine; Berntsen, Sveinung; Lødrup Carlsen, Karin Cecilie; Anderssen, Sigmund Alfred; Mowinckel, Petter; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is important in preventing disease, but endurance elite athletes have increased prevalence of asthma and airway inflammation. We aimed to determine if PA was associated with increased fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO ) in asthmatic and non-asthmatic adolescents. FENO was recorded (Niox Mino®, Aerocrine AB, Stockholm, Sweden) in 169 adolescents (13-14 years) in a nested case-control analysis from the Environment and Childhood Asthma study, Oslo, 92 adolescents with and 77 without asthma. They underwent clinical examination, lung function measurements and treadmill run measuring peak oxygen uptake, and objectively recorded PA for four consecutive days. PA was classified as moderate, vigorous and very vigorous, and total number of hours of each category was recorded for each subject. Associations between FENO and PA were tested using linear robust multiple regression analyses. In non-asthmatic adolescents, FENO was associated with daily hours of vigorous to very vigorous (r=0.27, P=0.02) and very vigorous PAs (r=0.25, P=0.036) in bivariate analyses. In multivariate analyses, FENO was associated with vigorous to very vigorous PA [regression coefficients (95% confidence interval) 1.9 (0.6, 3.1); P=0.004] and more strongly with very vigorous PA [3.9 (1.5, 6.4); P=0.002] in non-asthmatic but not in asthmatic adolescents. Total daily PA was not associated with FENO in either group. Thus, 1 h of very vigorous PA per day increased FENO by 3.9ppb. Vigorous to very vigorous PA, contrasting total daily PA, was significantly associated with increased FENO in non-asthmatic adolescents, suggesting that intensive PA may induce airway inflammation independent of asthma. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Could Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide Test be Useful in Predicting Inhaled Corticosteroid Responsiveness in Chronic Cough? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Woo-Jung; Won, Ha-Kyeong; Moon, Sung-Do; Chung, Soo-Jie; Kang, Sung-Yoon; Sohn, Kyoung-Hee; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Byung-Keun; Lim, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Mi-Yeong; Yang, Min-Suk; Park, Heung-Woo; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Lee, Byung-Jae; Morice, Alyn H; Cho, Sang-Heon

    Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (Feno) is a safe and convenient test for assessing T H 2 airway inflammation, which is potentially useful in the management of patients with chronic cough. To summarize the current evidence on the diagnostic usefulness of Feno for predicting inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) responsiveness in patients with chronic cough. A systematic literature review was conducted to identify articles published in peer-reviewed journals up to February 2015, without language restriction. We included studies that reported the usefulness of Feno (index test) for predicting ICS responsiveness (reference standard) in patients with chronic cough (target condition). The data were extracted to construct a 2 × 2 accuracy table. Study quality was assessed with Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies 2. We identified 5 original studies (2 prospective and 3 retrospective studies). We identified considerable heterogeneities in study design and outcome definitions, and thus were unable to perform a meta-analysis. The proportion of ICS responders ranged from 44% to 59%. Sensitivity and specificity ranged from 53% to 90%, and from 63% to 97%, respectively. The reported area under the curve ranged from about 0.60 to 0.87; however, studies with a prospective design and a lower prevalence of asthma had lower area under the curve values. None measured placebo effects or objective cough frequency. We did not find strong evidence to support the use of Feno tests for predicting ICS responsiveness in chronic cough. Further studies need to have a randomized, placebo-controlled design, and should use validated measurement tools for cough. Standardization would facilitate the development of clinical evidence. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Exercise-Induced Changes in Exhaled NO Differentiates Asthma With or Without Fixed Airway Obstruction From COPD With Dynamic Hyperinflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shu-Yi; Chou, Pai-Chien; Wang, Tsai-Yu; Lo, Yu-Lun; Joa, Wen-Ching; Chen, Li-Fei; Sheng, Te-Fang; Chung, Kian Fan; Wang, Chun-Hua; Kuo, Han-Pin

    2016-04-01

    Asthmatic patients with fixed airway obstruction (FAO) and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) share similarities in terms of irreversible pulmonary function impairment. Exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) has been documented as a marker of airway inflammation in asthma, but not in COPD. To examine whether the basal eNO level and the change after exercise may differentiate asthmatics with FAO from COPD, 27 normal subjects, 60 stable asthmatics, and 62 stable COPD patients were studied. Asthmatics with FAO (n = 29) were defined as showing a postbronchodilator FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) ≤70% and FEV1 less than 80% predicted after inhaled salbutamol (400 μg). COPD with dynamic hyperinflation (n = 31) was defined as a decrease in inspiratory capacity (ΔIC%) after a 6 minute walk test (6MWT). Basal levels of eNO were significantly higher in asthmatics and COPD patients compared to normal subjects. The changes in eNO after 6MWT were negatively correlated with the percent change in IC (r = -0.380, n = 29, P = 0.042) in asthmatics with FAO. Their levels of basal eNO correlated with the maximum mid-expiratory flow (MMEF % predicted) before and after 6MWT. In COPD patients with air-trapping, the percent change of eNO was positively correlated to ΔIC% (rs = 0.404, n = 31, P = 0.024). We conclude that asthma with FAO may represent residual inflammation in the airways, while dynamic hyperinflation in COPD may retain NO in the distal airspace. eNO changes after 6MWT may differentiate the subgroups of asthma or COPD patients and will help toward delivery of individualized therapy for airflow obstruction.

  16. Comparison of exhaled breath condensate pH using two commercially available devices in healthy controls, asthma and COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogelmeier Claus

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of exhaled breath condensate (EBC is a non-invasive method for studying the acidity (pH of airway secretions in patients with inflammatory lung diseases. Aim To assess the reproducibility of EBC pH for two commercially available devices (portable RTube and non-portable ECoScreen in healthy controls, patients with asthma or COPD, and subjects suffering from an acute cold with lower-airway symptoms. In addition, we assessed the repeatability in healthy controls. Methods EBC was collected from 40 subjects (n = 10 in each of the above groups using RTube and ECoScreen. EBC was collected from controls on two separate occasions within 5 days. pH in EBC was assessed after degasification with argon for 20 min. Results In controls, pH-measurements in EBC collected by RTube or ECoScreen showed no significant difference between devices (p = 0.754 or between days (repeatability coefficient RTube: 0.47; ECoScreen: 0.42 of collection. A comparison between EBC pH collected by the two devices in asthma, COPD and cold patients also showed good reproducibility. No differences in pH values were observed between controls (mean pH 8.27; RTube and patients with COPD (pH 7.97 or asthma (pH 8.20, but lower values were found using both devices in patients with a cold (pH 7.56; RTube, p Conclusion We conclude that pH measurements in EBC collected by RTube and ECoScreen are repeatable and reproducible in healthy controls, and are reproducible and comparable in healthy controls, COPD and asthma patients, and subjects with a common cold.

  17. Chemical characterization of exhaled breath to differentiate between patients with malignant plueral mesothelioma from subjects with similar professional asbestos exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gennaro, G. de; Longobardi, F.; Stallone, G.; Trizio, L.; Tutino, M. [University of Bari Aldo Moro, Department of Chemistry, Bari (Italy); Dragonieri, S. [University of Bari Aldo Moro, Department of Pulmonology, Bari (Italy); Musti, M. [University of Bari Aldo Moro, Department of Occupational Medicine, Bari (Italy)

    2010-12-15

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive tumour whose main aetiology is the long-term exposure to asbestos fibres. The diagnostic procedure of MPM is difficult and often requires invasive approaches; therefore, it is clinically important to find accurate markers for MPM by new noninvasive methods that may facilitate the diagnostic process and identify patients at an earlier stage. In the present study, the exhaled breath of 13 patients with histology-established diagnosis of MPM, 13 subjects with long-term certified professional exposure to asbestos (EXP) and 13 healthy subjects without exposure to asbestos (healthy controls, HC) were analysed. An analytical procedure to determine volatile organic compounds by sampling of air on a bed of solid sorbent and thermal desorption GC-MS analysis was developed in order to identify the compounds capable of discriminating among the three groups. The application of univariate (ANOVA) and multivariate statistical treatments (PCA, DFA and CP-ANN) showed that cyclopentane and cyclohexane were the dominant variables able to discriminate among the three groups. In particular, it was found that cyclohexane is the only compound able to differentiate the MPM group from the other two; therefore, it can be a possible marker of MPM. Cyclopentane is the dominant compound in the discrimination between EXP and the other groups (MPM and HC); then, it can be considered a good indicator for long-term asbestos exposure. This result suggests the need to perform frequent and thorough investigations on people exposed to asbestos in order to constantly monitor their state of health or possibly to study the evolution of disease over time. (orig.)

  18. [The value of fractionated exhaled nitric oxide in the diagnosis of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, D D; Zhou, A Y; Shuang, Q C; Chen, P

    2017-02-12

    Objective: To explore the diagnostic value of fractionated exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) measurement in patients with asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD) overlap syndrome (ACOS). Methods: Eighty-one patients with ACOS, 76 patients with asthma, 82 patients with COPD and 39 healthy non-smoking subjects were recruited in the study. Naku Lun breath analyzer was used to measure the level of FeNO in the 4 groups. Pulmonary function was also measured. The ROC curve was used to differentiate ACOS from patients with COPD. The correlation between FeNO and lung function was analyzed with Pearson correlation analysis. Results: The levels of FeNO in asthmatic group, COPD group, ACOS group and healthy group were (102.3±8.2)×10(9,) (23.7±0.6)×10(9,) (50.2±3.2)×10(9,) and (18.5±7.1)×10(9) respectively. Among the former 3 groups, the differences of FeNO were statistically significant ( P 29×10(9) was the best cutoff point to differentiate ACOS from COPD; the sensitivity was 80%, specificity was 73%, positive predictive value was 75%, and negative predictive value and accuracy was 79% and 77%. There was no correlation between FeNO and FEV(1)% or FEV(1)/FVC in ACOS, COPD and asthma groups ( r =0.12, 0.11, P >0.05; r =0.11, 0.03, P >0.05; r =0.06, 0.08, P >0.05). Conclusion: FeNO is a good marker to help clinicians differentiate ACOS from COPD. FeNO>29×10(9) was the best cutoff point for the identification of patients with ACOS from COPD.

  19. Compounds enhanced in a mass spectrometric profile of smokers' exhaled breath versus non-smokers as determined in a pilot study using PTR-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushch, Ievgeniia; Schwarz, Konrad; Schwentner, Lukas; Baumann, Bettina; Dzien, Alexander; Schmid, Alex; Unterkofler, Karl; Gastl, Günter; Spaněl, Patrik; Smith, David; Amann, Anton

    2008-06-01

    A pilot study has been carried out to define typical characteristics of the trace gas compounds in exhaled breath of non-smokers and smokers to assist interpretation of breath analysis data from patients who smoke with respiratory diseases and lung cancer. Exhaled breath was analyzed using proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) for 370 volunteers (81 smokers, 210 non-smokers, 79 ex-smokers). Volatile organic compounds corresponding to product ions at seven mass-to-charge ratios (m/z 28, 42, 69, 79, 93, 97, 123) in the PTR-MS spectra differentiated between smokers and non-smokers. The Youden index (= maximum of sensitivity + specificity - 1, YI) as a measure for differentiation between smokers and non-smokers was YI = 0.43 for ions at the m/z values 28 (tentatively identified as HCN), YI = 0.75 for m/z = 42 (tentatively identified as acetonitrile) and YI = 0.53 for m/z = 79 (tentatively identified as benzene). No statistically significant difference between smokers and non-smokers was observed for the product ions at m/z = 31 and 33 (compounds tentatively identified as formaldehyde and methanol). When interpreting the exhaled breath of lung cancer or COPD patients, who often smoke, compounds appearing at the above-mentioned seven mass-to-charge ratios should be considered with appropriate care to avoid misdiagnosis. Validation studies in larger numbers of patients with more precise delineation of their smoking behavior and using additional analytical techniques such as GC/MS and SIFT-MS should be carried out.

  20. Exhaled CO2 Parameters as a Tool to Assess Ventilation-Perfusion Mismatching during Neonatal Resuscitation in a Swine Model of Neonatal Asphyxia

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Elliott Shang-shun; Cheung, Po-Yin; O'Reilly, Megan; LaBossiere, Joseph; Lee, Tze-Fun; Cowan, Shaun; Bigam, David L.; Schm?lzer, Georg Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Background End-tidal CO2 (ETCO2), partial pressure of exhaled CO2 (PECO2), and volume of expired CO2 (VCO2) can be continuously monitored non-invasively to reflect pulmonary ventilation and perfusion status. Although ETCO2 ?14mmHg has been shown to be associated with return of an adequate heart rate in neonatal resuscitation and quantifying the PECO2 has the potential to serve as an indicator of resuscitation quality, there is little information regarding capnometric measurement of PECO2 and ...

  1. Raman microspectroscopy of exhaled breath condensate and urine in workers exposed to fine and nano TiO2 particles: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelclova, Daniela; Barosova, Hana; Kukutschova, Jana; Zdimal, Vladimir; Navratil, Tomas; Fenclova, Zdenka; Vlckova, Stepanka; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Zikova, Nadezda; Kacer, Petr; Komarc, Martin; Belacek, Jaroslav; Zakharov, Sergey

    2015-07-14

    The health effects of engineered nanoparticles in humans are not well-understood; however experimental data support the theory of oxidative stress promoting fibrogenesis and carcinogenicity. The aim of this study was to detect TiO2 particles in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) and urine samples to ascertain their presence and potential persistence and excretion in urine.EBC and urine samples were collected from 20 workers exposed to TiO2 aerosol; among them, 16 had a higher risk level of exposure (production workers) and four had medium risk level (research workers); in addition to 20 controls. Titanium levels in EBC and urine were analysed using the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method. A Raman microspectroscopic analysis was performed in EBC and urine to identify the phase composition of TiO2 particles observed. Aerosol exposure in the workplaces was measured using SMPS and APS spectrometers and P-TRAK and DustTRAK DRX monitors.The median concentration of TiO2 aerosol was 1.98 × 10(4) particles cm(-3), the interquartile range (IQR) was 1.50 × 10(4) - 3.01 × 10(4) particles cm(-3) and the median mass concentration was 0.65 mg m(-3) (IQR 0.46-.0.83 mg m(-3)); 70-82% of the particles were smaller than 100 nm in diameter. In any part of the plant, the median TiO2 air concentration did not exceed the national airborne exposure limit of 10 mg m(-3) for inert dust. Particles of rutile and/or anatase were found in the EBC of exposed workers in 8/20 (40%) of the pre-shift and 14/20 (70%) of the post-shift samples. In the urine of workers, TiO2 particles were detected in 2/20 post-shift urine samples only. The mean concentration of titanium in the EBC in production workers was 24.1 ± 1.8 µg/l. In the research workers the values were below the limit of quantitation; LOQ = 4.0 ± 0.2 µg/l), as well as in the controls. In the urine samples of all of the subjects, titanium was under the limit of detection (LOD = 1

  2. Investigations of the enterohepatic bile salt circulation using the 14C-glycol cholate/14CO2 exhalation test in persons with Billroth-II stomach resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raguse, G.

    1978-01-01

    A 14 C-glycol cholate/ 14 CO 2 exhalation test was carried out in 34 normal persons, 32 persons with a Billroth-II resection stomach, and 9 patients with a Billroth-II resection stomach and gastroenterological disorders. Persons with a normal stomach function after B-II resection and an objective lack of symptoms of a gastroenterological disease had normal test results in all cases. In 7 of the 9 B-II resected patients with various disorders or diseases of the intestinal tract of the liver gallbladder on pancreas, 14 CO 2 exhalation was pathologically increased. In agreement with the hypothesis that deconjugation of bile salts can only be caused by bacterial enzymes, a pathological finding can be explained by a pathological bacteria population in the upper intestinal tract or by a loss of bile salts. However, the clinical importance of pathological test results remains doubtful as 3 out of the 7 patients with pathological results presented with no clinical symptoms. (orig.) [de

  3. Effects of occupational exposure to poorly soluble forms of beryllium on biomarkers of pulmonary response in exhaled breath of workers in machining industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radauceanu, Anca; Grzebyk, Michel; Edmé, Jean-Louis; Chérot-Kornobis, Nathalie; Rousset, Davy; Dziurla, Mathieu; De Broucker, Virginie; Hédelin, Guy; Sobaszek, Annie; Hulo, Sébastien

    2016-11-30

    To analyze the effects of occupational exposure to poorly soluble forms of beryllium (Be) on biomarkers of pulmonary inflammation using exhaled breath condensate (EBC) in workers employed in machining industries. Twenty machining operators were compared to 16 controls. The individual exposure to Be was assessed from the work history with several indices of exposure calculated on the basis of task-exposures matrices developed for each plant using historical air measurements. Clinical evaluation consisted in a medical questionnaire, measurements of biomarkers in EBC (tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), total nitrogen oxides (NOx)), measurement of the fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and resting spirometry. Adjusted multiple linear regressions were used to study the effect of the exposure to Be on inflammatory biomarkers. Levels of TNF-α and NOx in EBC were not statistically different between exposed and controls. We found a statistically significant relationship between levels of TNF-α in EBC and both index of cumulative exposure and duration of exposure to Be. No other statistically significant relationships were found between exposure to Be and pulmonary response. Our results suggest that machining-related exposure to Be is related to pulmonary inflammation involving TNF-α. These findings must be confirmed by larger studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Radon exhalation rates corrected for leakage and back diffusion – Evaluation of radon chambers and radon sources with application to ceramic tile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abo-Elmagd

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The natural radon decay, leakage and back diffusion are the main removal processes of radon from its container. Ignoring these processes leads to underestimate the measured value of radon related parameters like exhalation rate and radium content. This work is aimed to evaluate two different radon chambers through determining their leakage rate λv and evaluation of radon source by determine its back diffusion rate λb inside the evaluated radon chambers as well as a small sealed cup. Two different methods are adapted for measuring both the leakage rate and the back diffusion rate. The leakage rate can be determined from the initial slope of the radon decay curve or from the exponential fitting of the whole decay curve. This can be achieved if a continuous monitoring of radon concentration inside the chamber is available. Also, the back diffusion rate is measured by sealing the radon source in the chamber and used the initial slope of the buildup curve to determine λb and therefore the exhalation rate of the source. This method was compared with simple equation for λb based on the ratio of the source to the chamber volume. The obtained results are applied to ceramic tile as an important radon source in homes. The measurement is targeted the ceramic glaze before and after firing as well as the obtained tile after adhere the glaze on the tile main body. Also, six different tile brands from Egyptian market are subjected to the study for comparison.

  5. Effects of air pollution on exhaled nitric oxide in children: results from the GINIplus and LISAplus studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuang; Flexeder, Claudia; Fuertes, Elaine; Cyrys, Josef; Bauer, Carl-Peter; Koletzko, Sibylle; Hoffmann, Barbara; von Berg, Andrea; Heinrich, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Most previous studies which have investigated the short-term effects of air pollution on airway inflammation, assessed by an increase of exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), have been conducted among asthmatic children. Few studies have considered this potential association among non-asthmatics. Furthermore, although both short- and long-term effects of air pollution on eNO had been reported separately, studies which include both are scarce. We explored associations between 24h NO2 and PM10 (particles with aerodynamic diameters below 10μm) mass with eNO in 1985 children (192 asthmatics and 1793 non-asthmatics) aged 10 years and accounted for the long-term effects of air pollution by adjusting for annual averages of NO2, PM10 mass, PM2.5 mass (particles with aerodynamic diameters below 2.5μm) and PM2.5 absorbance, using data from two German birth cohorts in Munich and Wesel. In total, robust associations between 24h NO2 and eNO were observed in both single-pollutant (percentage change: 18.30%, 95% confidence interval: 11.63-25.37) and two-pollutant models (14.62%, 6.71-23.11). The association between 24h PM10 mass and eNO was only significant in the single-pollutant model (9.59%, 4.80-14.61). The same significant associations were also observed in non-asthmatic children, while they did not reach significant levels in asthmatic children. Associations between annual averages of ambient air pollution (NO2, PM10 mass, PM2.5 mass and PM2.5 absorbance) and eNO were consistently null. In conclusion, significantly positive associations were observed between short-term ambient air pollution and eNO. No long-term effects of air pollution on eNO were found in this study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) may predict exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) in schoolchildren with atopic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzelewski, Tomasz; Grzelewska, Aleksandra; Majak, Paweł; Stelmach, Włodzimierz; Kowalska, Alina; Stelmach, Rafał; Janas, Anna; Stelmach, Iwona

    2012-08-15

    There is a need for the performance of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) tests in the monitoring of childhood asthma control. We aimed to evaluate whether in children with atopic asthma, EIB can be predicted by one or more of the following parameters or by their combination: fractional exhaled nitric-oxide (FeNO), allergy profile, asthma treatment, total IgE serum concentration and eosinophil blood count (EBC). It was a retrospective, cross-sectional study. We evaluated data from medical documentation of children with atopic asthma who had performed standardized spirometric exercise challenge test. One hundred and twenty six patients with atopic asthma, aged 5-18, were included in the analysis. There were two groups of patients: the EIB group (n=54) and the no-EIB group (n=72). The median FeNO level prior to exercise in the EIB group was 27.6 vs. 16.3 ppb in the no-EIB group (p=0.002). FeNO level higher than 16 ppb had the highest diagnostic value to confirm EIB. When using the FeNO level of >16 ppb, the sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive and positive predictive values for EIB were 83%, 46.9%, 74.2%, and 60%, respectively. In the EIB group, the degree of FeNO elevation did correlate positively with the absolute fall in FEV(1) (p=0.002; r=0.45). The FeNO value of >16 ppb, EBC value of >350 cell/mm(3) and allergy to house dust mites presented the highest odds ratios of EIB. However, the FeNO value of >16 ppb was the only independent odds ratio of EIB. Elevated FeNO level increased the odds of EIB in asthmatic schoolchildren, independently of other asthma severity markers and the intensity of anti-asthma therapy. It seems likely that FeNO measurement may act as a screening tool and help to prevent under-diagnosis and under-treatment of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in schoolchildren with atopic asthma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnosing asthma in general practice with portable exhaled nitric oxide measurement – results of a prospective diagnostic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laux Gunter

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO for the diagnosis of asthma in general practice. Methods Prospective diagnostic study with 160 patients attending 10 general practices for the first time with complaints suspicious of obstructive airway disease (OAD. Patients were referred to a lung function laboratory for diagnostic investigation. The index test was FENO measured with a portable FENO analyser based on electrochemical sensor. The reference standard was the Tiffeneau ratio (FEV1/VC as received by spirometric manoeuvre and/or results of bronchial provocation. Bronchial provocation with methacholine was performed to determine bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR in the event of inconclusive spirometric results. Results 88 (55% were female; their average age was 43.9 years. 75 (46.9% patients had asthma, 25 (15.6% had COPD, 8 (5.0% had an overlap of COPD and asthma, and 52 (32.5% had no OAD. At a cut-off level of 46 parts per billion (ppb (n = 30; 18.8%, sensitivity was 32% (95%CI 23–43%, specificity 93% (95%CI 85–97%, positive predictive value (PPV 80% (95%CI 63–91%, negative predictive value (NPV 61% (95%CI 52–69% when compared with a 20% fall in FEV1 from the baseline value (PC20 after inhaling methacholine concentration ≤ 16 mg/ml. At 76 ppb (n = 11; 6.9% specificity was 100% (95%CI 96–100% and PPV was 100% (95%CI 72–100. At a cut-off level of 12 ppb (n = 34; 21.3%, sensitivity was 90% (95%CI 79–95%, specificity 25% (95%CI 17–34%, PPV 40% (95%CI 32–50, NPV 81% (95%CI 64–91% when compared with a 20% fall of FEV1 after inhaling methacholine concentration ≤ 4 mg/ml. Three patients with unsuspicious spirometric results have to be tested with FENO to save one bronchial provocation test. Conclusion Asthma could be ruled in with FENO > 46 ppb. Mild and moderate to severe asthma could be ruled out with FENO ≤ 12 ppb. FENO measurement with

  8. Relation between biomarkers in exhaled breath condensate and internal exposure to metals from gas metal arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmeyer, Frank; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Weiss, Tobias; Lehnert, Martin; Gawrych, Katarzyna; Kendzia, Benjamin; Harth, Volker; Henry, Jana; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Concerning possible harmful components of welding fumes, besides gases and quantitative aspects of the respirable welding fumes, particle-inherent metal toxicity has to be considered.The objective of this study was to investigate the effect markers leukotriene B4 (LTB4),prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and 8-isoprostane (8-Iso PGF2α) as well as the acid–base balance(pH) in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) of 43 full-time gas metal arc welders (20 smokers) in relation to welding fume exposure. We observed different patterns of iron, chromium and nickel in respirable welding fumes and EBC. Welders with undetectable chromium in EBC(group A, n = 24) presented high iron and nickel concentrations. In this group, higher 8-isoPGF2α and LTB4 concentrations could be revealed compared to welders with detectable chromium and low levels of both iron and nickel in EBC (group B): 8-iso PGF2α443.3 pg mL−1 versus 247.2 pg mL−1; p = 0.001 and LTB4 30.5 pg mL−1 versus 17.3 pgmL−1; p = 0.016. EBC-pH was more acid in samples of group B (6.52 versus 6.82; p = 0.011).Overall, effect markers in welders were associated with iron concentrations in EBC according to smoking habits--non-smokers/smokers: LTB4 (rs = 0.48; p = 0.02/rs = 0.21; p = 0.37),PGE2 (rs = 0.15; p = 0.59/rs = 0.47; p = 0.07), 8-iso PGF2α (rs = 0.18; p = 0.54/rs = 0.59;p = 0.06). Sampling of EBC in occupational research provides a matrix for the simultaneous monitoring of metal exposure and effects on target level. Our results suggest irritative effects in the airways of healthy welders. Further studies are necessary to assess whether these individual results might be used to identify welders at elevated risk for developing a respiratory disease.

  9. Long-term effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on species composition and productivity of a southern African C4 dominated grassland in the vicinity of a CO2 exhalation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stock, W.D.; Ludwig, F.; Morrow, C.; Midgley, G.F.; Wand, S.J.E.; Allsopp, N.; Bell, T.L.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the long-term effects of a CO2 exhalation, created more than 70 years ago, on a natural C4 dominated sub-tropical grassland in terms of ecosystem structure and functioning. We tested whether long-term CO2 enrichment changes the competitive balance between plants with C3 and C4

  10. MO-FG-BRA-09: Towards an Optimal Breath-Holding Procedure for Radiotherapy: Differences in Organ Motion During Inhalation and Exhalation Breath-Holds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lens, E; Gurney-Champion, O; Horst, A van der; Tekelenburg, D; Kesteren, Z van; Tienhoven, G van; Nederveen, A; Bel, A [Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Noord-Holland (Netherlands); Parkes, M [University of Birmingham, Birmingham, West Midlands (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Breath-holding (BH) is often used to reduce organ motion during radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to determine the differences in pancreatic and diaphragmatic motion during BH between inhalation and exhalation BHs with variable lung volumes and to investigate whether motion increases/decreases during BH. Methods: Sixteen healthy volunteers were asked to perform four different 60-second BHs, from fully inflated to fully deflated lungs (i.e. lung volumes of: 100%, ∼70%, ∼30% and 0% of inspiratory capacity) three times (total of 192 BHs). During each BH, we obtained single-slice (coronal) magnetic-resonance scans with spatial resolution 0.93×0.93×8.0 mm3 and temporal resolution 0.6 s. We used 2-dimensional image correlation to obtain the motion of pancreatic head and diaphragm during BH. Motion magnitude in inferior-superior direction was obtained by determining the maximum displacement during BH. Results: Pancreatic and diaphragmatic drifts occurred during BH and were mostly in the superior direction. We observed significantly smaller pancreatic and diaphragmatic motion magnitudes in inferior-superior direction during exhalation BHs (BH{sub 30%} and BH{sub 0%}) compared to inhalation BHs (BH{sub 100%} and BH{sub 70%}). The mean motion magnitudes of the pancreatic head were 7.0, 6.5, 4.4 and 4.2 mm during BH{sub 100%}, BH{sub 70%}, BH{sub 30%} and BH{sub 0%}, respectively, and mean BH durations were 59.9, 59.1, 59.0 and 52.7 s. For the diaphragm, mean motion magnitudes were 9.8, 9.0, 5.6 and 4.3 mm, respectively. When considering 30-second BHs, as often used in the clinic, the motion was most pronounced during the first 10 s and excluding these from the analysis (yielding an effective BH period of 20 s) significantly reduced (P≤0.002) organ motion. Conclusion: Organ motion was significantly smaller during exhalation BHs compared to inhalation BHs. Also, motion was largest at the start of BH. Hence, waiting for 10 s may significantly decrease

  11. Dose-dependent relationship between prenatal exposure to fine particulates and exhaled carbon monoxide in non-asthmatic children. A population-based birth cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesław A. Jędrychowski

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The main goal of the study was to assess possible association between fetal exposure to fi ne particulate matter (PM2.5 and exhaled carbon monoxide (eCO measured in non-asthmatic children. Material and Methods: The subjects include 118 children taking part in an ongoing population-based birth cohort study in Kraków. Personal samplers of PM2.5 were used to measure fi ne particle mass in the fetal period and carbon monoxide (CO in exhaled breath from a single exhalation effort at the age of 7. In the statistical analysis of the effect of prenatal PM2.5 exposure on eCO, a set of potential confounders, such as environmental tobacco smoke (ETS, city residence area, sensitization to house dust allergens and the occurrence of respiratory symptoms monitored over the seven-year follow-up was considered. Results: The level of eCO did not correlate with the self-reported ETS exposure recorded over the follow-up, however, there was a positive signifi cant relationship with the prenatal PM2.5 exposure (non-parametric trend p = 0.042. The eCO mean level was higher in atopic children (geometric mean = 2.06 ppm, 95% CI: 1.58–2.66 ppm than in non-atopic ones (geometric mean = 1.57 ppm, 95% CI: 1.47–1.73 ppm and the difference was statistically signifi cant (p = 0.036. As for the respiratory symptoms, eCO values were associated positively only with the cough severity score recorded in the follow-up (nonparametric trend p = 0.057. In the nested multivariable linear regression model, only the effects of prenatal PM2.5 and cough severity recorded in the follow-up were related to eCO level. The prenatal PM2.5 exposure represented 5.1%, while children’s cough represented only 2.6% of the eCO variability. Conclusion: Our study suggests that elevated eCO in non-asthmatic children may result from oxidative stress experienced in the fetal period and that heme oxygenase (HO activity in body tissues may be programmed in the fetal period by the exposure to

  12. Fraction of exhaled nitric oxide values in childhood are associated with 17q11.2-q12 and 17q12-q21 variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Valk, Ralf J P; Duijts, Liesbeth; Timpson, Nicolas J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (Feno) value is a biomarker of eosinophilic airway inflammation and is associated with childhood asthma. Identification of common genetic variants associated with childhood Feno values might help to define biological mechanisms related to specific...... asthma phenotypes. OBJECTIVE: We sought to identify the genetic variants associated with childhood Feno values and their relation with asthma. METHODS: Feno values were measured in children age 5 to 15 years. In 14 genome-wide association studies (N = 8,858), we examined the associations of approximately...... 2.5 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with Feno values. Subsequently, we assessed whether significant SNPs were expression quantitative trait loci in genome-wide expression data sets of lymphoblastoid cell lines (n = 1,830) and were related to asthma in a previously published genome...

  13. Radon exhalation of cementitious materials made with coal fly ash: Part 1 - scientific background and testing of the cement and fly ash emanation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovler, K.; Perevalov, A.; Steiner, V.; Metzger, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Increased interest in measuring radionuclides and radon concentrations in fly ash, cement and other components of building products is due to the concern of health hazards of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). The current work focuses on studying the influence of fly ash (FA) on radon-exhalation rate (radon flux) from cementitious materials. The tests were carried out on cement paste specimens with different FA contents. The first part of the paper presents the scientific background and describes the experiments, which we designed for testing the radon emanation of the raw materials used in the preparation of the cement-FA pastes. It is found that despite the higher 226 Ra content in FA (more than 3 times, compared with Portland cement) the radon emanation is significantly lower in FA (7.65% for cement vs. 0.52% only for FA)

  14. Detection of drugs of abuse in exhaled breath using a device for rapid collection: comparison with plasma, urine and self-reporting in 47 drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Olof; Stephanson, Niclas; Sandqvist, Sören; Franck, Johan

    2013-06-01

    Exhaled breath has recently been identified as a matrix for the detection of drugs of abuse. This work aims to further document this application using a new and simple collection device in patients following recovery from acute intoxication. Breath, plasma and urine samples were collected from 47 patients (38 males, age range 25-74) together with interview data. Analysis of breath and plasma samples was done by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods. Urine was screened using immunochemical reagents and positive findings confirmed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods. The 12 analytes investigated were: methadone, amphetamine, methamphetamine, 6-acetylmorphine, morphine, benzoylecgonine, cocaine, diazepam, oxazepam, alprazolam, buprenorphine and tetrahydrocannabinol. In all 47 cases, recent intake of an abused substance prior to admission was reported, but in one case the substance (ketobemidone) was not investigated. In 40 of the remaining cases (87%) breath analysis gave a positive finding of any of the substances that were part of the analytical investigation. Identifications were based on correct chromatographic retention time and product ion ratios obtained in selected reaction monitoring mode. In general, data from breath, plasma, urine and self-reporting were in good agreement, but in 23% of the cases substances were detected that had not been self-reported. All substances covered were detected in a number of breath samples. Considering that breath sampling was often done about 24 h after intake, the detection rate was considered to be high for most substances. Analytes with low detection rates were benzodiazepines, and a further increase in analytical sensitivity is needed to overcome this. This study further supports use of exhaled breath as a new matrix in clinical toxicology.

  15. Maternal allergy as a potential source of variability of exhaled nitric oxide in children non-sensitized to common domestic allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrychowski, W; Maugeri, U; Zembala, M; Klimaszewska-Rembiasz, M; Mroz, E; Flak, E; Sowa, A; Jacek, R

    2012-06-01

    The goal of the study is to evaluate the importance of maternal atopy as a potential biological source of variability of exhaled FeNO values in healthy children who were non-asthmatic and non-sensitized to common domestic allergens. The study sample consisted of 61 seven-year old children. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) has been measured by NObreath (Bedfont portable device). Children with reported maternal atopy had significantly higher mean FeNO values (geometric mean =10.7 ppb; 95%CI: 6.7-17.1 ppb) than those who denied it (geometric mean =5.2 ppb 95%CI: 3.9-6.9 ppb) (p=0.010). Neither the correlation between FeNO values and gender, respiratory and eczema symptoms, nor ETS exposure in the prenatal and postnatal period or body mass of children were significant. We also found no significant association of FeNO values with the amount of common domestic allergens measured in the households. The results of the ROC analysis suggested 11 ppb as the cut-off point for FeNO to distinguish groups of healthy children with and without maternal atopy. In conclusion, our study provided some evidence suggesting that maternal atopy may affect FeNO level in children independently of asthma and sensitization status to common domestic allergens. The data should be considered in the interpretation of FeNO levels in clinical practice and setting up FeNO screening criteria for identification of eosinophilic airway inflammation.

  16. Immediate effects of cigar smoking on respiratory mechanics and exhaled biomarkers; differences between young smokers with mild asthma and otherwise healthy young smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappas, Andreas S; Konstantinidi, Efstathia M; Tzortzi, Anna S; Tzavara, Chara K; Behrakis, Panagiotis K

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the immediate respiratory effects of cigar smoking(CS), among young smokers with and without mild asthma. Forty-seven young smokers (18-31years old, 29 males, average pack-years = 3.6 ± 2.8) were enrolled. Twenty-two were mild asthmatics(MA-subgroup) and the remaining 25 were otherwise healthy smokers(HS-subgroup). Exhaled carbon monoxide(eCO), multi-frequency respiratory system impedance(Z), resistance(R), reactance(X), frequency-dependence of resistance(fdr = R5Hz - R20Hz), resonant frequency(fres), reactance area(AX) and exhaled nitric oxide(FENO) were measured at the aforementioned sequence, before and immediately after 30 min of CS, or equal session in the smoking area while using a sham cigar(control group). Chi-square, student's t-tests, mixed linear models and Pearson correlation tests were used for the statistical analysis; level of significance was defined as p < 0.05. Immediately after CS, Z5Hz, R5Hz, R10Hz, R20Hz and eCO increased significantly in both subgroups(MA and HS). A greater increase was found for R20 in HS-subgroup. Fdr, fres and AX increased in MA, while decreased in HS. On the contrary, X10 decreased in MA and increased in HS, while X20 showed a greater decrease in MA. Changes in fdr, fres and AX were significantly correlated in both subgroups. No significant FENO alterations were detected in both subgroups. CS has immediate effects on pulmonary function. Mild asthma predisposes to higher increase of peripheral resistance(increased fdr). In otherwise healthy smokers, central resistance(R20Hz) is more affected. FENO levels are not significantly affected by CS.

  17. Bench and mathematical modeling of the effects of breathing a helium/oxygen mixture on expiratory time constants in the presence of heterogeneous airway obstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Andrew R

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expiratory time constants are used to quantify emptying of the lung as a whole, and emptying of individual lung compartments. Breathing low-density helium/oxygen mixtures may modify regional time constants so as to redistribute ventilation, potentially reducing gas trapping and hyperinflation for patients with obstructive lung disease. In the present work, bench and mathematical models of the lung were used to study the influence of heterogeneous patterns of obstruction on compartmental and whole-lung time constants. Methods A two-compartment mechanical test lung was used with the resistance in one compartment held constant, and a series of increasing resistances placed in the opposite compartment. Measurements were made over a range of lung compliances during ventilation with air or with a 78/22% mixture of helium/oxygen. The resistance imposed by the breathing circuit was assessed for both gases. Experimental results were compared with predictions of a mathematical model applied to the test lung and breathing circuit. In addition, compartmental and whole-lung time constants were compared with those reported by the ventilator. Results Time constants were greater for larger minute ventilation, and were reduced by substituting helium/oxygen in place of air. Notably, where time constants were long due to high lung compliance (i.e. low elasticity, helium/oxygen improved expiratory flow even for a low level of resistance representative of healthy, adult airways. In such circumstances, the resistance imposed by the external breathing circuit was significant. Mathematical predictions were in agreement with experimental results. Time constants reported by the ventilator were well-correlated with those determined for the whole-lung and for the low-resistance compartment, but poorly correlated with time constants determined for the high-resistance compartment. Conclusions It was concluded that breathing a low-density gas mixture, such

  18. Bench and mathematical modeling of the effects of breathing a helium/oxygen mixture on expiratory time constants in the presence of heterogeneous airway obstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew R; Katz, Ira M; Terzibachi, Karine; Gouinaud, Laure; Caillibotte, Georges; Texereau, Joëlle

    2012-05-30

    Expiratory time constants are used to quantify emptying of the lung as a whole, and emptying of individual lung compartments. Breathing low-density helium/oxygen mixtures may modify regional time constants so as to redistribute ventilation, potentially reducing gas trapping and hyperinflation for patients with obstructive lung disease. In the present work, bench and mathematical models of the lung were used to study the influence of heterogeneous patterns of obstruction on compartmental and whole-lung time constants. A two-compartment mechanical test lung was used with the resistance in one compartment held constant, and a series of increasing resistances placed in the opposite compartment. Measurements were made over a range of lung compliances during ventilation with air or with a 78/22% mixture of helium/oxygen. The resistance imposed by the breathing circuit was assessed for both gases. Experimental results were compared with predictions of a mathematical model applied to the test lung and breathing circuit. In addition, compartmental and whole-lung time constants were compared with those reported by the ventilator. Time constants were greater for larger minute ventilation, and were reduced by substituting helium/oxygen in place of air. Notably, where time constants were long due to high lung compliance (i.e. low elasticity), helium/oxygen improved expiratory flow even for a low level of resistance representative of healthy, adult airways. In such circumstances, the resistance imposed by the external breathing circuit was significant. Mathematical predictions were in agreement with experimental results. Time constants reported by the ventilator were well-correlated with those determined for the whole-lung and for the low-resistance compartment, but poorly correlated with time constants determined for the high-resistance compartment. It was concluded that breathing a low-density gas mixture, such as helium/oxygen, can improve expiratory flow from an obstructed

  19. Shape of the human nasal cavity promotes retronasal smell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trastour, Sophie; Melchionna, Simone; Mishra, Shruti; Zwicker, David; Lieberman, Daniel E.; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Brenner, Michael P.

    2015-11-01

    Humans are exceptionally good at perceiving the flavor of food. Flavor includes sensory input from taste receptors but is dominated by olfactory (smell) receptors. To smell food while eating, odors must be transported to the nasal cavity during exhalation. Olfactory performance of this retronasal route depends, among other factors, on the position of the olfactory receptors and the shape of the nasal cavity. One biological hypothesis is that the derived configuration of the human nasal cavity has resulted in a greater capacity for retronasal smell, hence enhanced flavor perception. We here study the air flow and resulting odor deposition as a function of the nasal geometry and the parameters of exhalation. We perform computational fluid dynamics simulations in realistic geometries obtained from CT scans of humans. Using the resulting flow fields, we then study the deposition of tracer particles in the nasal cavity. Additionally, we derive scaling laws for the odor deposition rate as a function of flow parameters and geometry using boundary layer theory. These results allow us to assess which changes in the evolution of the human nose led to significant improvements of retronasal smell.

  20. Exhaled breath aerosol (EBA): the simplest non-invasive medium for public health and occupational exposure biomonitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood, breath and urine represent the three primary diagnostic fluids for assessing environmental exposures and human health state. Although there is overlap in biological media choice for many applications, each have their individual strategic and analytical advantages: Blood is...

  1. Aluminum gallium nitride (GaN)/GaN high electron mobility transistor-based sensors for glucose detection in exhaled breath condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Byung Hwan; Kang, Byoung Sam; Hung, Sheng Chun; Chen, Ke Hung; Ren, Fan; Sciullo, Andrew; Gila, Brent P; Pearton, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    Immobilized aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN)/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) have shown great potential in the areas of pH, chloride ion, and glucose detection in exhaled breath condensate (EBC). HEMT sensors can be integrated into a wireless data transmission system that allows for remote monitoring. This technology offers the possibility of using AlGaN/GaN HEMTs for extended investigations of airway pathology of detecting glucose in EBC without the need for clinical visits. HEMT structures, consisting of a 3-microm-thick undoped GaN buffer, 30-A-thick Al(0.3)Ga(0.7)N spacer, and 220-A-thick silicon-doped Al(0.3)Ga(0.7)N cap layer, were used for fabricating the HEMT sensors. The gate area of the pH, chloride ion, and glucose detection was immobilized with scandium oxide (Sc(2)O(3)), silver chloride (AgCl) thin film, and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods, respectively. The Sc(2)O(3)-gated sensor could detect the pH of solutions ranging from 3 to 10 with a resolution of approximately 0.1 pH. A chloride ion detection limit of 10(-8) M was achieved with a HEMT sensor immobilized with the AgCl thin film. The drain-source current of the ZnO nanorod-gated AlGaN/GaN HEMT sensor immobilized with glucose oxidase showed a rapid response of less than 5 seconds when the sensor was exposed to the target glucose in a buffer with a pH value of 7.4. The sensor could detect a wide range of concentrations from 0.5 nM to 125 microM. There is great promise for using HEMT-based sensors to enhance the detection sensitivity for glucose detection in EBC. Depending on the immobilized material, HEMT-based sensors can be used for sensing different materials. These electronic detection approaches with rapid response and good repeatability show potential for the investigation of airway pathology. The devices can also be integrated into a wireless data transmission system for remote monitoring applications. This sensor technology could use the exhaled breath condensate to measure the

  2. [The effect of short-term exposure to ambient NO(2) on lung function and fractional exhaled nitric oxide in 33 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, J; Ni, Y; Dong, W; Xu, J H; Pan, L; Li, H Y; Yang, X; Wu, S W; Chen, Y H; Deng, F R; Guo, X B

    2017-06-06

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of short-term exposure to ambient NO(2) has influence on lung function and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. Methods: A panel of doctor-diagnosed stable COPD patients ( n =33) were recruited and repeatedly measured for lung function and FeNO from December 2013 to October 2014. The patients who lived in Beijing for more than one year and aged between 60 and 85 years old were included in the study. We excluded patients with asthma, bronchial tensor, lung cancer and other respiratory disorders other than chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and occupational exposure and chest trauma surgery patients. Because the frequency of each subject visiting to the hospital was different, a total of 170 times of lung function measurements and 215 times of FeNO measurements were conducted. At the same time, the atmospheric NO(2) data of Beijing environmental monitoring station near the residence of each patient during the study period were collected from 1 day to 7 days lag before the measurement. Effects of short-term NO(2) exposure on lung function and FeNO in COPD patients were estimated by linear mixed-effects models. Results: The subjects' forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)), peak expiratory flow (PEF), and exhaled NO of subjects were (3.26±0.83) L, (1.66±0.61) L, (4.13±1.77) L/s, and (48.99±14.30) μg/m(3), respectively. The concentration of NO(2) was (70.3±34.2) μg/m(3) and the interquartile range (IQR) was 39.0 μg/m(3). Short-term exposure to NO(2) resulted in a significant decrease in FVC among COPD patients' which was most obvious in 2 days lag. Every quartile range increased in NO(2) (39 μg/m(3), 2 day) would cause a 1.84% (95 %CI : -3.20%- -0.48%) reduction in FVC. The effects of exposure to higher concentration of NO(2) (≥58.0 μg/m(3)) on FVC estimate was -2.32% (95 %CI : -4.15%- -0.48%)( P =0.02). No significant

  3. Determination of volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath of heart failure patients by needle trap micro-extraction coupled with gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagini, D; Lomonaco, T; Ghimenti, S; Bellagambi, F G; Onor, M; Scali, M C; Barletta, V; Marzilli, M; Salvo, P; Trivella, M G; Fuoco, R; Di Francesco, F

    2017-11-29

    The analytical performances of needle trap micro-extraction (NTME) coupled with gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry were evaluated by analyzing a mixture of twenty-two representative breath volatile organic compounds (VOCs) belonging to different chemical classes (i.e. hydrocarbons, ketones, aldehydes, aromatics and sulfurs). NTME is an emerging technique that guarantees detection limits in the pptv range by pre-concentrating low volumes of sample, and it is particularly suitable for breath analysis. For most VOCs, detection limits between 20 and 500 pptv were obtained by pre-concentrating 25 ml of a humidified standard gas mixture at a flow rate of 15 ml min -1 . For all compounds, inter- and intra-day precisions were always below 15%, confirming the reliability of the method. The procedure was successfully applied to the analysis of exhaled breath samples collected from forty heart failure (HF) patients during their stay in the University Hospital of Pisa. The majority of patients (about 80%) showed a significant decrease of breath acetone levels (a factor of 3 or higher) at discharge compared to admission (acute phase) in correspondence to the improved clinical conditions during hospitalization, thus making this compound eligible as a biomarker of HF exacerbation.

  4. Exhaled CO2 Parameters as a Tool to Assess Ventilation-Perfusion Mismatching during Neonatal Resuscitation in a Swine Model of Neonatal Asphyxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Elliott Shang-shun; Cheung, Po-Yin; O'Reilly, Megan; LaBossiere, Joseph; Lee, Tze-Fun; Cowan, Shaun; Bigam, David L.; Schmölzer, Georg Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Background End-tidal CO2 (ETCO2), partial pressure of exhaled CO2 (PECO2), and volume of expired CO2 (VCO2) can be continuously monitored non-invasively to reflect pulmonary ventilation and perfusion status. Although ETCO2 ≥14mmHg has been shown to be associated with return of an adequate heart rate in neonatal resuscitation and quantifying the PECO2 has the potential to serve as an indicator of resuscitation quality, there is little information regarding capnometric measurement of PECO2 and ETCO2 in detecting return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and survivability in asphyxiated neonates receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Methods Seventeen newborn piglets were anesthetized, intubated, instrumented, and exposed to 45-minute normocapnic hypoxia followed by apnea to induce asphyxia. Protocolized resuscitation was initiated when heart rate decreased to 25% of baseline. Respiratory and hemodynamic parameters including ETCO2, PECO2, VCO2, heart rate, cardiac output, and carotid artery flow were continuously measured and analyzed. Results There were no differences in respiratory and hemodynamic parameters between surviving and non-surviving piglets prior to CPR. Surviving piglets had significantly higher ETCO2, PECO2, VCO2, cardiac index, and carotid artery flow values during CPR compared to non-surviving piglets. Conclusion Surviving piglets had significantly better respiratory and hemodynamic parameters during resuscitation compared to non-surviving piglets. In addition to optimizing resuscitation efforts, capnometry can assist by predicting outcomes of newborns requiring chest compressions. PMID:26766424

  5. Exhaled CO2 Parameters as a Tool to Assess Ventilation-Perfusion Mismatching during Neonatal Resuscitation in a Swine Model of Neonatal Asphyxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott Shang-shun Li

    Full Text Available End-tidal CO2 (ETCO2, partial pressure of exhaled CO2 (PECO2, and volume of expired CO2 (VCO2 can be continuously monitored non-invasively to reflect pulmonary ventilation and perfusion status. Although ETCO2 ≥14 mmHg has been shown to be associated with return of an adequate heart rate in neonatal resuscitation and quantifying the PECO2 has the potential to serve as an indicator of resuscitation quality, there is little information regarding capnometric measurement of PECO2 and ETCO2 in detecting return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC and survivability in asphyxiated neonates receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR.Seventeen newborn piglets were anesthetized, intubated, instrumented, and exposed to 45-minute normocapnic hypoxia followed by apnea to induce asphyxia. Protocolized resuscitation was initiated when heart rate decreased to 25% of baseline. Respiratory and hemodynamic parameters including ETCO2, PECO2, VCO2, heart rate, cardiac output, and carotid artery flow were continuously measured and analyzed.There were no differences in respiratory and hemodynamic parameters between surviving and non-surviving piglets prior to CPR. Surviving piglets had significantly higher ETCO2, PECO2, VCO2, cardiac index, and carotid artery flow values during CPR compared to non-surviving piglets.Surviving piglets had significantly better respiratory and hemodynamic parameters during resuscitation compared to non-surviving piglets. In addition to optimizing resuscitation efforts, capnometry can assist by predicting outcomes of newborns requiring chest compressions.

  6. Cost-effectiveness and Budget Impact of Routine Use of Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide Monitoring for the Management of Adult Asthma Patients in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatelli, L; Seppälä, U; Sastre, J; Crater, G

    Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) is a marker for type 2 airway inflammation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and budget impact of FeNO monitoring for management of adult asthma in Spain. A cost-effectiveness analysis model was used to evaluate the effect on costs of adding FeNO monitoring to asthma management. Over a 1-year period, the model estimated the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year and incremental number of exacerbations avoided when FeNO monitoring was added to standard guideline-driven asthma care compared with standard care alone. Univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses were applied to explore uncertainty in the model. A budget impact model was used to examine the impact of FeNO monitoring on primary care costs across the Spanish health system. The results showed that adding FeNO to standard asthma care saved €62.53 per patient-year in the adult population and improved quality-adjusted life years by 0.026 per patient-year. The budget impact analysis revealed a potential net yearly saving of €129 million if FeNO monitoring had been used in primary care settings in Spain. The present economic model shows that adding FeNO to the treatment algorithm can considerably reduce costs and improve quality of life when used to manage asthma in combination with current treatment guidelines.

  7. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) among office workers in an academic institution, Malaysia--associations with asthma, allergies and office environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Fang Lee; Hashim, Zailina; Md Said, Salmiah; Than, Leslie Thian Lung; Hashim, Jamal Hisham; Norbäck, Dan

    2016-01-01

    There are few studies on fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and respiratory symptoms among adults in tropical areas. The aim was to study associations between FeNO and selected personal factors, respiratory symptoms, allergies, office characteristics and indoor office exposures among office workers (n = 460) from a university in Malaysia. Information on health was collected by a questionnaire, skin prick test and FeNO measurement. Temperature, relative air humidity, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide were measured in the offices. Settled dust was vacuumed in the offices and analyzed for endotoxin, (1,3)-β-glucan and house dust mites allergens, namely Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p 1) and Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f 1). Two-level linear mixed models and multiple logistic regression were used to analyze the associations. One-fourth (25.9%) of the office workers had elevated FeNO level (≥ 25 ppb) and 61.5% had HDM, cat, seafood or pollen allergy. Male gender (p smoking (p = 0.037), height (p smoking, height and atopy are important risk factors for elevated FeNO levels. A combination of allergy testing and FeNO measurement could be useful in respiratory illness epidemiology studies and patient investigations in tropical areas.

  8. Air temperature investigation in microenvironment around a human body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licina, Dusan; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Sekhar, Chandra

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the temperature boundary layer around a human body in a quiescent indoor environment. The air temperature, mean in time and standard deviation of the temperature fluctuations around a breathing thermal manikin are examined in relation to the room temperature......, body posture and human respiratory flow. To determine to what extent the experiments represent the realistic scenario, the additional experiments were performed with a real human subject. The results show that at a lower room air temperature (20°C), the fluctuations of air temperature increased close...... to the surface of the body. The large standard deviation of air temperature fluctuations, up to 1.2°C, was recorded in the region of the chest, and up to 2.9°C when the exhalation was applied. The manikin leaned backwards increased the air temperature in the breathing zone, which was opposite from the forward...

  9. Impact of Exhaled Breath Acetone in the Prognosis of Patients with Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction (HFrEF). One Year of Clinical Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldiva, Paulo H. N.; Mangini, Sandrigo; Issa, Victor S.; Ayub-Ferreira, Silvia M.; Bocchi, Edimar A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The identification of new biomarkers of heart failure (HF) could help in its treatment. Previously, our group studied 89 patients with HF and showed that exhaled breath acetone (EBA) is a new noninvasive biomarker of HF diagnosis. However, there is no data about the relevance of EBA as a biomarker of prognosis. Objectives To evaluate whether EBA could give prognostic information in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Methods After breath collection and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and by spectrophotometry, the 89 patients referred before were followed by one year. Study physicians, blind to the results of cardiac biomarker testing, ascertained vital status of each study participant at 12 months. Results The composite endpoint death and heart transplantation (HT) were observed in 35 patients (39.3%): 29 patients (32.6%) died and 6 (6.7%) were submitted to HT within 12 months after study enrollment. High levels of EBA (≥3.7μg/L, 50th percentile) were associated with a progressively worse prognosis in 12-month follow-up (log-rank = 11.06, p = 0.001). Concentrations of EBA above 3.7μg/L increased the risk of death or HT in 3.26 times (HR = 3.26, 95%CI = 1.56–6.80, p = 0.002) within 12 months. In a multivariable cox regression model, the independent predictors of all-cause mortality were systolic blood pressure, respiratory rate and EBA levels. Conclusions High EBA levels could be associated to poor prognosis in HFrEF patients. PMID:28030609

  10. Impact of Exhaled Breath Acetone in the Prognosis of Patients with Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction (HFrEF. One Year of Clinical Follow-up.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana G Marcondes-Braga

    Full Text Available The identification of new biomarkers of heart failure (HF could help in its treatment. Previously, our group studied 89 patients with HF and showed that exhaled breath acetone (EBA is a new noninvasive biomarker of HF diagnosis. However, there is no data about the relevance of EBA as a biomarker of prognosis.To evaluate whether EBA could give prognostic information in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF.After breath collection and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and by spectrophotometry, the 89 patients referred before were followed by one year. Study physicians, blind to the results of cardiac biomarker testing, ascertained vital status of each study participant at 12 months.The composite endpoint death and heart transplantation (HT were observed in 35 patients (39.3%: 29 patients (32.6% died and 6 (6.7% were submitted to HT within 12 months after study enrollment. High levels of EBA (≥3.7μg/L, 50th percentile were associated with a progressively worse prognosis in 12-month follow-up (log-rank = 11.06, p = 0.001. Concentrations of EBA above 3.7μg/L increased the risk of death or HT in 3.26 times (HR = 3.26, 95%CI = 1.56-6.80, p = 0.002 within 12 months. In a multivariable cox regression model, the independent predictors of all-cause mortality were systolic blood pressure, respiratory rate and EBA levels.High EBA levels could be associated to poor prognosis in HFrEF patients.

  11. Exhaled breath condensate pH does not discriminate asymptomatic gastroesophageal reflux or the response to lansoprazole treatment in children with poorly controlled asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Holbrook, Janet T; Wei, Christine Y; Brown, Meredith S; Wise, Robert A; Teague, W Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Although exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH has been identified as an "emerging" biomarker of interest for asthma clinical trials, the clinical determinants of EBC pH remain poorly understood. Other studies have associated acid reflux-induced respiratory symptoms, for example, cough, with transient acidification of EBC. We sought to determine the clinical and physiologic correlates of EBC acidification in a highly characterized sample of children with poorly controlled asthma. We hypothesized that (1) children with asymptomatic gastroesophageal reflux determined by 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring would have a lower EBC pH than children without gastroesophageal reflux, (2) treatment with lansoprazole would alter EBC pH in those children, and (3) EBC acidification would be associated with increased asthma symptoms, poorer asthma control and quality of life, and increased formation of breath nitrogen oxides (NOx). A total of 110 children, age range 6 to 17 years, with poor asthma control and esophageal pH data enrolled in the Study of Acid Reflux in Children with Asthma (NCT00442013) were included. Children submitted EBC samples for pH and NOx measurement at randomization and at study weeks 8, 16, and 24. Serial EBC pH measurements failed to distinguish asymptomatic gastroesophageal reflux and was not associated with breath NOx formation. EBC pH also did not discriminate asthma characteristics such as medication and health care utilization, pulmonary function, and asthma control and quality of life both at baseline and across the study period. Despite the relative ease of EBC collection, EBC pH as a biomarker does not provide useful information of children with asthma who were enrolled in asthma clinical trials. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A population-based study of smoking, serum cotinine and exhaled nitric oxide among asthmatics and a healthy population in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohui; Hu, Hui; Kearney, Gregory D; Kan, Haidong; Carrillo, Genny; Chen, Xinguang

    2016-12-01

    Fractional concentration of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) is recommended by the American Thoracic Society (ATS) as a noninvasive biomarker of airway inflammation. In addition to inflammation, many factors may be associated with FeNO, particularly tobacco exposure; however, only age has been included as an influential factor for children below 12 years. Numerous studies have demonstrated negative associations between tobacco exposure and FeNO levels with self-reported data, but few with an objective assessment of smoking. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2012 were analyzed to examine the association between FeNO and active/passive tobacco. Exposure was assessed by both self-report and serum cotinine levels among 11,160 subjects aged 6-79 years old with asthma, or without any respiratory disease. Study results indicated 28.8% lower FeNO, 95% CI [25.2%, 32.3%] and 38.1% lower FeNO, 95% CI: [28.1, 46.2] was observed among healthy and asthmatic participants with serum cotinine in the highest quartile compared to those in the lowest quartile, respectively. Self-reported smoking status and recent tobacco use were also associated with decreased FeNO. Self-reported passive smoking was significantly associated with a 1.0% decrease in FeNO 95% CI [0.0, 2.0] among asthmatic subjects but not among healthy subjects. Active smoking, whether measured by self-report or serum cotinine, was associated with decreased FeNO levels. In addition to age, increased attention should be given to tobacco exposure when using FeNO as a biomarker in clinical practice. Additional research is needed to establish reference value of FeNO considering the impact of tobacco exposure.

  13. Emulating exhalative chemistry: synthesis and structural characterization of ilinskite, Na[Cu5O2](SeO3)2Cl3, and its K-analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovrugin, Vadim M.; Siidra, Oleg I.; Colmont, Marie; Mentré, Olivier; Krivovichev, Sergey V.

    2015-08-01

    The K- and Na-synthetic analogues of the fumarolic mineral ilinskite have been synthesized by the chemical vapor transport (CVT) reactions method. The A[Cu5O2](SeO3)2Cl3 ( A + = K+, Na+) compounds crystallize in the orthorhombic space group Pnma: a = 18.1691(6) Å, b = 6.4483(2) Å, c = 10.5684(4) Å, V = 1238.19(7) Å3, R 1 = 0.018 for 1957 unique reflections with F > 4σ F for K[Cu5O2](SeO3)2Cl3 ( KI), and a = 17.7489(18) Å, b = 6.4412(6) Å, c = 10.4880(12) Å, V = 1199.0(2) Å3, R 1 = 0.049 for 1300 unique reflections with F > 4σ F for Na[Cu5O2](SeO3)2Cl3 ( NaI). The crystal structures of KI and NaI are based upon the [O2Cu5]6+ sheets consisting of corner-sharing (OCu4)6+ tetrahedra. The Na-for-K substitution results in the significant expansion of the interlayer space and changes in local coordination of some of the Cu2+ cations. The A + cation coordination changes from fivefold (for Na+) to ninefold (for K+). The CVT reactions method provides a unique opportunity to model physicochemical conditions existing in fumarolic environments and may be used not only to model exhalative processes, but also to predict possible mineral phases that may form in fumaroles. In particular, the K analogue of ilinskite is not known in nature, whereas it may well form from volcanic gases in a K-rich local geochemical environment.

  14. Short-Term Intra-Subject Variation in Exhaled Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs in COPD Patients and Healthy Controls and Its Effect on Disease Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Phillips

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Exhaled volatile organic compounds (VOCs are of interest for their potential to diagnose disease non-invasively. However, most breath VOC studies have analyzed single breath samples from an individual and assumed them to be wholly consistent representative of the person. This provided the motivation for an investigation of the variability of breath profiles when three breath samples are taken over a short time period (two minute intervals between samples for 118 stable patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD and 63 healthy controls and analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy (GC/MS. The extent of the variation in VOC levels differed between COPD and healthy subjects and the patterns of variation differed for isoprene versus the bulk of other VOCs. In addition, machine learning approaches were applied to the breath data to establish whether these samples differed in their ability to discriminate COPD from healthy states and whether aggregation of multiple samples, into single data sets, could offer improved discrimination. The three breath samples gave similar classification accuracy to one another when evaluated separately (66.5% to 68.3% subjects classified correctly depending on the breath repetition used. Combining multiple breath samples into single data sets gave better discrimination (73.4% subjects classified correctly. Although accuracy is not sufficient for COPD diagnosis in a clinical setting, enhanced sampling and analysis may improve accuracy further. Variability in samples, and short-term effects of practice or exertion, need to be considered in any breath testing program to improve reliability and optimize discrimination.

  15. Assessing ventilatory control in infants at high risk of sleep disordered breathing: a study of infants with cleft lip and/or palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Joanna E; Tan, Sara; Fitzgerald, Dominic A; Waters, Karen A

    2013-03-01

    Neonatal exposure to intermittent hypoxia results in altered ventilatory response to subsequent hypoxia in animal models. The effect of similar exposure in human infants is unknown. Our objective was to determine the impact of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in early infancy on ventilatory response in infants. We recruited consecutive infants with cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) to undergo ventilatory response testing using exposure to a hypoxic (15% O(2) ) gas mixture during sleep. This population is at high risk of SDB because of smaller airway caliber and abnormal palatal muscle attachments predisposing them to airway obstruction of ranging severity from birth. Ventilatory responses were compared between infants with a low apnea-hypopnea index (AHI; AHI pattern of ventilatory response to hypoxia differed between the two groups; infants with high AHI had an earlier ventilatory decline and a blunted maximal ventilatory response to hypoxia. Infants with a high AHI use a different strategy to augment ventilation in response to hypoxia; while infants with a low AHI initially increased respiratory rate, tidal volume was the first parameter to increase in infants with high AHI. These results demonstrate that SDB in infancy is associated with altered ventilatory response to hypoxia. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Promoter Haplotypes and Residential Traffic-Related Air Pollution Jointly Influence Exhaled Nitric Oxide Level in Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad T Salam

    Full Text Available Exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO, a biomarker of airway inflammation, predicts asthma risk in children. We previously found that the promoter haplotypes in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2 and exposure to residential traffic independently influence FeNO level. Because NOS2 is inducible by environmental exposures such as traffic-related exposure, we tested the hypothesis that common NOS2 promoter haplotypes modulate the relationship between residential traffic-related exposure and FeNO level in children.In a cross-sectional population-based study, subjects (N = 2,457; 7-11 year-old were Hispanic and non-Hispanic white children who participated in the Southern California Children's Health Study and had FeNO measurements. For residential traffic, lengths of local roads within circular buffers (50m, 100m and 200m radii around homes around the subjects' homes were estimated using geographic information system (GIS methods. We interrogated the two most common NOS2 promoter haplotypes that were found to affect FeNO level.The relationship between local road lengths within 100m and 200m circular buffers and FeNO level varied significantly by one of the NOS2 promoter haplotypes (P-values for interaction between road length and NOS2 promoter haplotype = 0.02 and 0.03, respectively. In children who had ≤250m of local road lengths within 100m buffer around their homes, those with two copies of the haplotype had significantly lower FeNO (adjusted geometric mean = 11.74ppb; 95% confidence intervals (CI: 9.99 to 13.80 than those with no copies (adjusted geometric mean = 15.28ppb; 95% CI: 14.04 to 16.63 with statistically significant trend of lower FeNO level with increasing number of haplotype copy (P-value for trend = 0.002. In contrast, among children who had >250m of local road lengths within 100m buffer, FeNO level did not significantly differ by the haplotype copy-number (P-value for trend = 0.34. Similar interactive effects of this haplotype and local

  17. Helicopter AFMAG (ZTEM) EM and magnetic results over sedimentary exhalative (SEDEX) lead-zinc deposits at Howard's Pass in Selwyn Basin, Yukon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legault, Jean M.; Latrous, Ali; Zhao, Shengkai; Bournas, Nasreddine; Plastow, Geoffrey C.; Xue, Gabriel Guang

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, a regional scale 24,675 line-km survey covering a 25,000 km2 area (1 km line spacing) was flown in the Selwyn Basin. The survey footprint straddles east-central Yukon and overlaps into the western North-west Territories. In March 2013, Yukon Geological Survey purchased the survey data and, in November 2013, released the data publicly. The Selwyn Basin area is prospective for sedimentary exhalative (SEDEX)-style Pb-Zn-Ag mineralisation and the z-axis tipper electromagnetic (ZTEM) survey data provide insights into regional structures and plutons in the region. The survey overflew the Howard's Pass SEDEX deposits at the south-eastern edge of the Selwyn Basin survey area that hosts a ~250 million tonne resource with ~4.5% Zn and ~1.5% Pb. Airborne geophysics has not been extensively used in SEDEX exploration of the Selwyn Basin and the ZTEM survey is one of the few publicly available airborne audio-frequency magnetic (AFMAG) EM-magnetic datasets that offer the opportunity to study the deposit response at Howard's Pass in close detail. Rock physical properties indicate that the lowest resistivities are associated with the Road River Group that contains the Pb-Zn mineralised horizon at Howard's Pass, but also include graphitic shales in the same formation. Major NW-SE to ESE and minor NNW-SSE linear conductive trends correlate with known regional geologic, structural and inferred mineral trends that were previously not visible in magnetic results. At the deposit scale, a thin NW-SE trending conductive lineament extends along the > 37-km-long `Zinc Corridor' horizon at Howard's Pass, but must include both the Pb-Zn sulphide mineralisation deposit horizon as well as the surrounding graphitic black shales. 2D and 3D ZTEM inversions reveal zones of enhanced conductivity along strike and at depth that appear to correlate with the clustering of Pb-Zn deposits, which had not been previously noticed.

  18. Exhaled breath NOx levels in a middle-aged adults population-based study: reference values and association with the smoking status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chérot-Kornobis, Nathalie; Hulo, Sébastien; Giovannelli, Jonathan; de Broucker, Virginie; Matran, Régis; Amouyel, Philippe; Sobaszek, Annie; Dauchet, Luc; Edmé, Jean-Louis

    2018-04-01

    Biomarkers in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) are potentially sensitive indicators of early biochemical changes in airways following exposure to pneumotoxic substances, particularly in susceptible subjects. NOx are the stable end products of the nitrite-nitrate-NO oxidative stress pathway and can be used to monitor airway inflammatory diseases, especially in asthma. Nevertheless, population-based surveys are needed to better interpret EBC NOx levels in clinical studies. The aim of this study was to establish reference values of EBC NOx in a large group of middle-aged, healthy adults of a sample of the general population with particular focus on the smoking status. The EBC NOx levels were analysed from 2872 subjects among the ELISABET population-based cross sectional study including a representative sample of men and women aged from 40 to 66 years olds conducted in northern France, which included comprehensive questionnaires by interview and spirometry data. Healthy participants were defined as participants with no self-reported respiratory disease. For the healthy subjects (n = 1251), the median NOx concentration (IQR) was equal to 7.2  μM (3.12) and concentrations of NOx in EBC did not differ significantly according to smoking status. The upper fifth percentile (95%) (ULN) of NOx concentrations among healthy subjects was equal to 13.6  μM, ranging from 12.7  μM (smokers) to 14.4  μM (ex smokers). Among subjects with EBC NOx values higher than the ULN and compared with subjects that had EBC NOx values lower than the ULN, we found a significant higher proportion of subjects with current asthma (10.5% vs 6.5%) or with chronic bronchitis symptoms (7.6% vs 3.3%). This population-based study has provided the distribution and the upper limit reference value of a nitrosative stress biomarker (NOx) in EBC of middle aged, healthy adults. EBC NOx levels were not associated with smoking status. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Temperatura do ar exalado, um novo biomarcador no controle da asma: um estudo piloto Exhaled breath temperature, a new biomarker in asthma control: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Emrich Melo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar se a temperatura do ar exalado (TAE, medida por um método não invasivo, é efetiva no monitoramento de pacientes com asma não controlada. MÉTODOS: Estudo piloto com nove pacientes (sete mulheres e dois homens; média de idade: 39 anos com diagnóstico de asma por pelo menos um ano e sem uso de tratamento de manutenção por pelo menos três meses antes do início do estudo. Na primeira visita, os pacientes foram submetidos à espirometria e à medida da TAE. Todos os pacientes foram orientados a iniciar tratamento com budesonida/formoterol (200/6 µg inalatório a cada 12 h por seis semanas. Além disso, os pacientes com asma grave (VEF1 OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the exhaled breath temperature (EBT, measured by a noninvasive method, is an effective means of monitoring patients with uncontrolled asthma. METHODS: A pilot study comprising nine patients (seven women and two men; mean age: 39 years diagnosed with asthma at least one year prior to the beginning of the study and not having been under maintenance therapy for the last three months. In the first visit, the patients underwent spirometry and measurement of EBT. The patients were then instructed to use inhaled budesonide/formoterol (200/6 µg every 12 h for six weeks. In addition, the patients with severe asthma (FEV1 < 60% of predicted were instructed to use oral prednisolone (40 mg/day for five days. After six weeks, the patients underwent the same tests. RESULTS: All of the patients reported an improvement in the symptoms of asthma, as confirmed by a statistically significant increase in FEV1 from the first to the second visit (mean, 56.1% vs. 88.7% of predicted; p < 0.05. Five patients used oral prednisolone for the first five days of the treatment period. Six patients used additional doses of inhaled budesonide/formoterol (mean duration, 2.5 weeks. The EBT decreased significantly from the first to the second visit (mean EBT: 35.1ºC vs. 34.1ºC; p < 0

  20. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide in healthy non-asthmatic 7-year olds and prenatal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: nested regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrychowski, Wieslaw; Maugeri, Umberto; Mroz, Elzbieta; Flak, Elzbieta; Rembiasz, Maria; Jacek, Ryszard; Sowa, Agata

    2012-11-01

    The main goal of the study was to assess possible association between transplacental exposure to genotoxic PAH compounds assessed by the cord blood PAH-DNA adducts and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) measured in healthy non-asthmatic children at the age of 7 years. The subjects included the subsample of 89 children who took part in the ongoing population based birth cohort study in Krakow and attended FeNO testing. The effect of transplacental PAH exposure was adjusted for potential confounders, such as maternal allergy and children's specific atopy to common domestic allergens. FeNO values were significantly elevated in children with higher prenatal PAH exposure (gmean = 7.7 ppb; 95% CI: 5.8-10.2 ppb) compared with those at low exposure level (gmean = 3.8 ppb; 95% CI: 2.3-6.3) (P = 0.011). Children with maternal allergy had also significantly higher mean FeNO values (gmean = 13.7 ppb, 95% CI: 8.8-21.4 ppb) compared with the subjects whose mothers denied allergy (gmean = 5.6 ppb, 95% CI: 4.3-7.3 ppb) (P = 0.012). Similarly, FeNO values in atopic children were higher (gmean = 11.2 ppb; 95% CI: 3.8-32.8 ppb) than in non-atopic individuals (gmean = 6.0 ppb; 95% CI: 4.7-7.7 ppb, P = 0.079). The results of the nested multivariable linear regression analysis showed that both maternal allergy and sensitization of children to domestic aeroallergens jointly explained 10.4% of FeNO variance, however, the additional 10.9% was determined by prenatal PAH exposure. FeNO is more than a marker useful for screening atopy or symptomatic bronchial inflammation and may also be a proxy for cytokine deregulation and "allergic response" phenotype possibly established in fetal period due to transplacental PAH exposure. Preliminary results of our study should encourage more studies on intrauterine PAH exposure and later respiratory symptoms. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Contraption and Prediction of Exhalation Tight Brownstone in Exhalation Cistern

    OpenAIRE

    XhingZhiwang, -; Xuchao, -

    2012-01-01

    The reservoir connate water saturation is high and gas wells generally produce water which seriously affects the productivity of gas wells in Xujiahe tight sandstone gas reservoirs in Sichuan Basin. Take the sixth formation for example, there are 39 wells producing water unequally in the 42 commissioning wells, and the excessive water production leads to the production of the gas well declining rapidly. Studying of the mechanism of water production in tight sandstone gas reservoirs and predic...

  2. Gaia's breath - Global methane exhalations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Rogers, B.W.

    2005-01-01

    Methane (CH4) is the most abundant organic compound in the Earth's atmosphere, where it acts as a greenhouse gas and thus has implications for global climate change. The current atmospheric CH4 budget, however, does not take into account geologically-sourced CH4 seepage. Geological sources of CH4 include natural macro- and micro-seeps, mud volcanoes, and other miscellaneous sources such as gas hydrates, magmatic volcanoes, geothermal regions, and mid-ocean ridges. Macro-seeps contribute ???25 Tg (teragrams) CH4/yr to the atmosphere, whereas, micro-seepage contributes perhaps 7 Tg CH4/yr. Mud volcanoes emit ???5 Tg CH4/yr, and miscellaneous sources emit ???8 Tg CH4/yr to the atmosphere. Thus, the total contribution to the atmosphere from geological sources is estimated to be 45 Tg CH4/yr, which is significant to the atmospheric organic carbon cycle and should be included in any global inventory of atmospheric CH4. We argue that the atmospheric CH4 global inventory of the Interplanetary Panel on Climate Change must be adjusted in order to incorporate geologically-sourced CH4 from naturally occurring seepage.

  3. A respiration-metabolism chamber system and a GC-MS method developed for studying exhalation of perfluorobutane in rats after intravenous injection of the ultrasound contrast agent Sonazoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uran, Steinar; Landmark, Kristin; Normann, Per Trygve; Hals, Petter-Arnt; Toft, Kim Gunnar; Skotland, Tore

    2005-09-15

    Sonazoid is a new contrast agent for ultrasound imaging comprising an aqueous suspension of lipid-stabilised perfluorobutane (PFB) gas microbubbles. A respiration-metabolism chamber system was developed to collect exhaled air following intravenous administration of Sonazoid to rats. Analysis of PFB in the exhaled rat air was performed using a modified version of an earlier published method for blood samples, i.e. an automatic headspace gas chromatographic mass spectrometric (GC-MS) method using electron impact ionisation. The calibration standards were PFB diluted in air (2.5-1800 pg/ml). Perfluoropentane (PFP) was used as an internal standard and the MS detector was set to single ion monitoring of the base fragment ions of PFB (m/z 69 and 119) and PFP (m/z 69). The calibration curve, made by plotting the peak area ratios of PFB (m/z 69) to PFP (m/z 69) against the theoretical concentration of PFB, was fitted to a linear equation with weighting 1/y2 and found to be reproducible. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 2.5 pg PFB/ml. The between-day variation of the method was below 2.6% relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) and the within-day variation of the method was below 6.4% R.S.D. The accuracy of the method was evaluated and showed a relative error less than 5.2%. PFB was found to be stable for 14 days when stored in Tedlar sample bags at room temperature. An even lower detection limit may be obtained by using the more time-consuming process of solid-phase micro extraction; thus, by concentrating PFB on carboxen-PDMS fibres an LLOQ of 0.5 pg PFB/ml was obtained. When five rats were given an i.v. bolus injection of Sonazoid at a dose of 8 microl microbubbles/kg a mean recovery of 96% (range, 81-110%) was found during 24 h; more than 50% was exhaled during the first 30 min after injection.

  4. Evaluation of color and radon exhalation rate in granite rocks between accelerated aging cycles; Avaliacao da cor e taxa de exalacao de radonio em rochas graniticas entre ciclos de envelhecimento acelerado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Francisco Diones Oliveira

    2016-07-01

    Data used for the assessment of the analyzes performed on three types of dimension stone (Juparana Bordeaux, Branco Nevasca and Golden Artico), in natural state and after several cycles of accelerated aging are presented, correlating them with the gas exhalation rate radon issued by the analyzed lithologies. In the samples were conducted permeability, porosity, colorimetry, image analysis, petrographic and exhalation rate of radon, accompanied by aging tests on climate simulation chamber which simulates change situations of materials by weathering agents, accelerating wear and tear samples. The measurements were performed on samples in natural state, with 50 and 100 cycles of aging acceleration, where each cycle corresponds to variations in temperature and humidity in climatic simulation chamber, with the addition of an internal atmosphere of SO{sub 2} with 25 concentration ppm. The results obtained during the tests were related to better analysis of the changes observed on the samples and the variation rate of exhalation radon emitted. The rocks have radon concentration values above the limits suggested by relevant international agencies (200-400 Bq/m³), with average values in the natural state, in 6149, 1619 and 866 Bq/m³ for Juparana Bordeaux, Branco Nevasca and Golden Arctic, respectively. The other aging cycles (50 and 100 cycles) showed an average increase of 0.8% for Juparana Bordeaux, 6.9% for White Blizzard and -23.87% for the Golden Arctic, with 50 cycles. From 50 to 100 cycles, there was reduction of 3.43% for Juparana Bordeaux and 22.15% for Branco Nevasca and an increase of 13.82% in the Golden Artico. The porosity results in the natural state obtained values an average of 0.696% for Juparana Bordeaux, 0.919% for Branco Nevasca and 0.830% for Golden Artico, and after 50 cycles of accelerated aging, obtained 0.621% to Juparana Bordeaux, 0.910% for Branco Nevasca and 0.840% for Golden Artico. The permeability of the samples showed values in the natural

  5. Poly arginine-graphene quantum dots as a biocompatible and non-toxic nanocomposite: Layer-by-layer electrochemical preparation, characterization and non-invasive malondialdehyde sensory application in exhaled breath condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Mokhtari, Fozieh; Shadjou, Nasrin; Eftekhari, Aziz; Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad; Jouyban-Gharamaleki, Vahid; Mahboob, Soltanali

    2017-01-01

    This study reports on the electropolymerization of a low toxic and biocompatible polymer with entitle poly arginine-graphene quantum dots (PARG-GQDs) as a novel strategy for surface modification of glassy carbon (GC) surface and preparation a new interface for biomedical application. The fabrication of PARG-GQDs on GCE was performed using Layer-by-layer regime. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was confirmed dispersion of GQDs on the surface of PARG which lead to increase of surface coverage of PARG. The redox behavior of prepared sensor was then characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and chronoamperometry (CHA), square wave voltammetry (SWV), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV). The electroactivity of PARG-GQDs coating towards detection and determination of malondialdehyde (MDA) as one of the most common biomarkers of oxidative stress, was then studied. Then, application of prepared sensor for the detection of MDA in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is described. Electrochemical based sensor shows the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) were 0.329 nanomolar. This work is the first report on the integration of GQDs to poly amino acids. Further development can lead to monitoring of MDA or other exhaled breath biomarkers by GQDs functionalized poly amino acids in EBC using electrochemical methods. - Highlights: • Simple and one pot electropolymerization was used to preparation of Poly arginine-graphene quantum dots. • PARG-GQDs-GCE shows an excellent electroactivity towards malondialdehyde. • High sensitivity and efficiency is achieved through a simple method of modification. • MDA electrochemical sensor for a direct evaluation of oxidative stress in EBC media is possible.

  6. Measurement of IL-13–Induced iNOS-Derived Gas Phase Nitric Oxide in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Vinod; Mih, Justin D.; George, Steven C.

    2007-01-01

    Exhaled nitric oxide (NO) is altered in numerous diseases including asthma, and is thought broadly to be a noninvasive marker of inflammation. However, the precise source of exhaled NO has yet to be identified, and the interpretation is further hampered by significant inter-subject variation. Using fully differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells, we sought to determine (1) the rate of NO release (flux, pl·s−1.cm−2) into the gas; (2) the effect of IL-13, a prominent mediator of allergic inflammation, on NO release; and (3) inter-subject/donor variability in NO release. NHBE cells from three different donors were cultured at an air–liquid interface and stimulated with different concentrations of IL-13 (0, 1, and 10 ng/ml) for 48 h. Gas phase NO concentrations in the headspace over the cells were measured using a chemiluminescence analyzer. The basal NO flux from the three donors (0.05 ± 0.03) is similar in magnitude to that estimated from exhaled NO concentrations, and was significantly increased by IL-13 in a donor-specific fashion. The increase in NO release was strongly correlated with inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene and protein expression. There was a trend toward enhanced production of nitrate relative to nitrite as an end product of NO metabolism in IL-13–stimulated cells. NO release from airway epithelial cells can be directly measured. The rate of release in response to IL-13 is strongly dependent on the individual donor, but is primarily due to the expression of iNOS. PMID:17347445

  7. Measurement of IL-13-induced iNOS-derived gas phase nitric oxide in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Vinod; Mih, Justin D; George, Steven C

    2007-07-01

    Exhaled nitric oxide (NO) is altered in numerous diseases including asthma, and is thought broadly to be a noninvasive marker of inflammation. However, the precise source of exhaled NO has yet to be identified, and the interpretation is further hampered by significant inter-subject variation. Using fully differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells, we sought to determine (1) the rate of NO release (flux, pl.s(-1.)cm(-2)) into the gas; (2) the effect of IL-13, a prominent mediator of allergic inflammation, on NO release; and (3) inter-subject/donor variability in NO release. NHBE cells from three different donors were cultured at an air-liquid interface and stimulated with different concentrations of IL-13 (0, 1, and 10 ng/ml) for 48 h. Gas phase NO concentrations in the headspace over the cells were measured using a chemiluminescence analyzer. The basal NO flux from the three donors (0.05 +/- 0.03) is similar in magnitude to that estimated from exhaled NO concentrations, and was significantly increased by IL-13 in a donor-specific fashion. The increase in NO release was strongly correlated with inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene and protein expression. There was a trend toward enhanced production of nitrate relative to nitrite as an end product of NO metabolism in IL-13-stimulated cells. NO release from airway epithelial cells can be directly measured. The rate of release in response to IL-13 is strongly dependent on the individual donor, but is primarily due to the expression of iNOS.

  8. Exhaled breath condensate collection for nitrite dosage: a safe and low cost adaptation Coleta do condensado do ar exalado pulmonar para a dosagem de nitrito: Uma adaptação segura e barata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela Saraiva Reis

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Standardization of a simple and low cost technique of exhaled breath condensate (EBC collection to measure nitrite. METHODS: Two devices were mounted in polystyrene boxes filled either with crushed ice/salt crystals or dry ice/crushed ice. Blood samples were stored at -70º C for posterior nitrite dosages by chemiluminescence and the Griess reaction. RESULTS: a The use of crushed ice/dry ice or salt revealed sufficient EBC room air collection, but was not efficient for patients under ventilation support; b the method using crushed ice/salt collected greater EBC volumes, but the nitrite concentrations were not proportional to the volume collected; c The EBC nitrite values were higher in the surgical group using both methods; d In the surgical group the nasal clip use diminished the EBC nitrite concentrations in both methods. CONCLUSIONS: The exhaled breath condensate (EBC methodology collection was efficient on room air breathing. Either cooling methods provided successful EBC collections showing that it is possible to diminish costs, and, amongst the two used methods, the one using crushed ice/salt crystals revealed better efficiency compared to the dry ice method.OBJETIVO: Padronizar técnica simples e barata de coleta do condensado do ar exalado pulmonar (CEP para medir nitrito. MÉTODOS: Dois dispositivos foram montados em caixas de isopor e preenchidos com gelo picado/sal grosso ou gelo picado/gelo seco. Amostras de sangue foram armazenadas a -70º C para dosagem de nitrito por quimiluminescência e pela reação de Griess. RESULTADOS: a a utilização de gelo picado/gelo seco ou sal foi eficiente para a coleta em respiração espontânea, mas ineficiente durante ventilação mecânica; b o método gelo picado/sal coletou volumes maiores, sem aumento proporcional do nitrito; c os valores do nitrito foram mais elevados no grupo cirúrgico utilizando os dois métodos; d no grupo cirúrgico com clipe nasal ocorreu diminuição do

  9. Energetic and exergetic comparison of the human body for the summer season

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caliskan, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Energetic and exergetic comparison of the human body. • Usage of summe