WorldWideScience

Sample records for exercise-related leg pain

  1. Exercise Related Leg Pain (ERLP): a Review of The Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Reinking, Mark F.

    2007-01-01

    Exercise related leg pain (ERLP) is a regional pain syndrome described as pain between the knee and ankle which occurs with exercise. Indiscriminant use of terminology such as “shin splints” has resulted in ongoing confusion regarding the pathoanatomic entities associated with this pain syndrome. Each of the pathoanatomic entities – medial tibial stress syndrome, chronic exertional compartment syndrome, tibial and fibular stress fractures, tendinopathy, nerve entrapment, and vascular patholog...

  2. Exercise Related Leg Pain (ERLP): a Review of The Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinking, Mark F

    2007-08-01

    Exercise related leg pain (ERLP) is a regional pain syndrome described as pain between the knee and ankle which occurs with exercise. Indiscriminant use of terminology such as "shin splints" has resulted in ongoing confusion regarding the pathoanatomic entities associated with this pain syndrome. Each of the pathoanatomic entities - medial tibial stress syndrome, chronic exertional compartment syndrome, tibial and fibular stress fractures, tendinopathy, nerve entrapment, and vascular pathology - which manifest as ERLP are each described in terms of relevant anatomy, epidemiology, clinical presentation, associated pathomechanics, and intervention strategies. Evidence regarding risk factors for ERLP general and specific pathoanatomic entities are presented in the context of models of sports injury prevention.

  3. Exercise-related leg pain in female collegiate athletes: the influence of intrinsic and extrinsic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinking, Mark F

    2006-09-01

    Exercise-related leg pain is a common complaint among athletes, but there is little evidence regarding risk factors for this condition in female collegiate athletes. To examine prospectively the effect of selected extrinsic and intrinsic factors on the development of exercise-related leg pain in female collegiate athletes. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Subjects were 76 female collegiate athletes participating in fall season sports, including cross-country running, field hockey, soccer, and volleyball. Athletes were seen for a pre-season examination that included measures of height, weight, foot pronation, and calf muscle length as well as a questionnaire for disordered eating behaviors. Body mass index was calculated from height and weight (kg/m(2)). Those athletes who developed exercise-related leg pain during the season were seen for follow-up. All athletes who developed the condition and a matched group without such leg pain underwent bone mineral density and body composition testing. Statistical analyses of differences and relationships were conducted. Of the 76 athletes, 58 (76%) reported a history of exercise-related leg pain, and 20 (26%) reported occurrence of exercise-related leg pain during the season. A history of this condition was strongly associated with its occurrence during the season (odds ratio, 13.2). Exercise-related leg pain was most common among field hockey and cross-country athletes and least common among soccer players. There were no differences between athletes with and without such leg pain regarding age, muscle length, self-reported eating behaviors, body mass index, menstrual function, or bone mineral density. Athletes with exercise-related leg pain had significantly (P sport, and a history of this condition, that are associated with an increased risk of exercise-related leg pain.

  4. [Athletes with exercise-related pain at the medial side of the lower leg].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartgens, F; Hoogeveen, A R; Brink, P R G

    2008-08-16

    Two patients were diagnosed with exercise-related pain at the medial side of the lower leg. The first patient, an 18-year-old woman who had expanded her athletic activities extensively, had developed pain at the inner side of the distal third portion of the left lower leg. She showed over-pronation of the ankle during running. A 3-phase bone scintigram revealed diffuse uptake of the tracer covering a large portion of the medial tibia margin. Based on this evidence, a diagnosis of periostalgia was made. She recovered after a period of relative calf massages and used insoles. The second patient was a 28-year-old male endurance runner who developed pain at the medial shin after intensifying his training regimen. The periods without pain during running became increasingly shorter, and the medial side of the lower leg became sore and tense. Intracompartmental pressure measurements indicated exercise-related posterior deep compartment syndrome of the calf. The patient recovered after fasciotomy. In athletes, exercise-related symptoms of the medial side of the lower leg can be usually attributed to the tibial periosteum or tendons of the deep calfmusculature, tibial stress reaction or fracture, or a compartment syndrome of the deep calf. Surgery is indicated for chronic compartment syndrome, but conservative therapy provides favourable outcomes in the other types of disorders. The optimal conservative therapeutic approach is unknown, but it is advisable to temporary reduce symptom-provoking athletic activity and modify any risk factors present. Ankle over-pronation during running is considered a very relevant intrinsic risk factor.

  5. Prevention and treatment of exercise related leg pain in young soldiers; a review of the literature and current practice in the Dutch Armed Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Wes O; Helmhout, P H; Beutler, A

    2017-04-01

    Overuse injuries of the leg are a common problem for young soldiers. This article reviews the literature concerning the prevention and treatment of exercise related leg pain in military settings and presents the latest developments in proposed mechanisms and treatments. Current practice and treatment protocols from the Dutch Armed Forces are reviewed, with an emphasis on the most prevalent conditions of medial tibial stress syndrome and chronic exertional compartment syndrome. The conclusion is that exercise related leg pain in the military is an occupational problem that deserves further study. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. The relationship between isotonic plantar flexor endurance, navicular drop, and exercise-related leg pain in a cohort of collegiate cross-country runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jason E; Reinking, Mark F; Rauh, Mitchell J

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between isotonic ankle plantar flexor endurance (PFE), foot pronation as measured by navicular drop, and exercise-related leg pain (ERLP). Exercise-related leg pain is a common occurrence in competitive and recreational runners. The identification of factors contributing to the development of ERLP may help guide methods for the prevention and management of overuse injuries. Seventy-seven (44 males, 33 females) competitive runners from five collegiate cross-country (XC) teams consented to participate in the study. Isotonic ankle PFE and foot pronation were measured using the standing heel-rise and navicular drop (ND) tests, respectively. Demographic information, anthropometric measurements, and ERLP history were also recorded. Subjects were then prospectively tracked for occurrence of ERLP during the 2009 intercollegiate cross-country season. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to examine the relationships between isotonic ankle joint PFE and ND and the occurrence of ERLP. While no significant differences were identified for isotonic ankle PFE between groups of collegiate XC runners with and without ERLP, runners with a ND >10 mm were almost 7 times (OR=6.6, 95% CI=1.2-38.0) more likely to incur medial ERLP than runners with ND risk factor in the development of ERLP in this group of collegiate XC runners, those with a ND greater than 10 mm may be at greater odds of incurring medial ERLP. 2b.

  7. Chronic Exercise-Induced Leg Pain in Active People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schon, L C; Baxter, D E; Clanton, T O; Sammarco, G J

    1992-01-01

    In brief "Shin splints" is a catchall term for any kind persistent exercise-related lower leg pain with no obvious cause. Such pain can originate from a number of conditions, such as medial tibial stress syndrome, stress fracture, compartment syndrome, vascular pathology, nerve entrapment, and others. A methodical work-up designed to detect problems in all anatomic structures from bone to skin will narrow the possibilities and lay the basis for appropriate treatment.

  8. The effect of transversus abdominis activation on exercise-related transient abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mole, Jason L; Bird, Marie-Louise; Fell, James W

    2014-05-01

    Exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP) affects 40-60% of the physically active population, is detrimental to performance but of unknown aetiology. Excessive movement of abdominal peritoneum is one proposed mechanism. Transversus abdominis (TrA) function may play a role reducing in the incidence of Exercise-related transient abdominal pain via the tensioning of the thoracolumbar fascia or increasing intra-abdominal pressure. The aim of this study is to identify any relationship between transversus abdominis function and exercise-related transient abdominal pain, hypothesing that those with stronger transversus abdominis will have lower incidence of exercise-related transient abdominal pain. Observational study design. Trunk muscle strength was measured clinically using the functional Sahrmann test. Contraction of transversus abdominis was measured by ultrasound imaging of resting muscle size and calculating the change in thickness with a voluntary contraction. Participants completed questionnaires describing any exercise-related transient abdominal pain symptoms, and were divided into four groups dependent upon frequency of any symptoms (never, yearly, monthly and weekly). Between group differences were analysed using analysis of covariance, with Bonferroni correction adjusting for age and training of participants using STATA. Poisson regression determined incident rate ratios for relevant variables. Data was obtained from fifty runners (28 male, 25.8 ± 7.0 years). Sahrmann test score and frequency of Exercise-related transient abdominal pain were significantly different between groups (p=0.002) with asymptomatic runners having significantly higher Sahrmann test scores (stronger muscles) than weekly and yearly Exercise-related transient abdominal pain groups (p=0.001, p=0.02). There were significant between group differences for resting transversus abdominis thickness (p=0.034) but not for transversus abdominis thickness change (p=0.555). Participants who

  9. [Restless legs syndrome and nocturnal leg pain : Differential diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornyak, M; Stiasny-Kolster, K; Evers, S; Happe, S

    2011-09-01

    Pain in the legs belongs to the five most frequent regional pain symptoms. Restless legs syndrome (RLS) presents a particular differential diagnosis for pain in the legs, which is characterized by a nocturnal urge to move the legs often associated with painful sensations in the legs. It is one of the most common neurological disorders and probably the leading cause of nocturnal pain in the legs. In this overview, the diagnosis and therapy of RLS as well as aspects of pain therapy of the disorder are presented. In addition, the differential diagnoses for exclusion of other specific causes of nocturnal pain in the legs are discussed.

  10. Chronic Lower Leg Pain in Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Rachel Biber; Gregory, Andrew J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Chronic lower leg pain in athletes can be a frustrating problem for patients and a difficult diagnosis for clinicians. Myriad approaches have been suggested to evaluate these conditions. With the continued evolution of diagnostic studies, evidence-based guidance for a standard approach is unfortunately sparse. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed was searched from January 1980 to May 2011 to identify publications regarding chronic lower leg pain in athletes (excluding conditions related to the foot), including differential diagnosis, clinical presentation, physical examination, history, diagnostic workup, and treatment. Results: Leg pain in athletes can be caused by many conditions, with the most frequent being medial tibial stress syndrome; chronic exertional compartment syndrome, stress fracture, nerve entrapment, and popliteal artery entrapment syndrome are also considerations. Conservative management is the mainstay of care for the majority of causes of chronic lower leg pain; however, surgical intervention may be necessary. Conclusion: Chronic lower extremity pain in athletes includes a wide differential and can pose diagnostic dilemmas for clinicians. PMID:23016078

  11. Leg pain in the running athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pell, Richard F; Khanuja, Harpal S; Cooley, G Robert

    2004-01-01

    Leg pain is a common complaint among recreational and professional athletes who compete in running sports. Evaluation of the individual with intermittent or constant leg pain should be well organized and inclusive. Duration of the pain, its relation to injury, intensity of the pain, and its pattern are important factors. Additionally, changes in the training regimen, its level, intensity, or duration, or in the nature of the routine are critical components of the assessment. Physical examination can help differentiate bony from soft-tissue etiologies. Studies are dictated by the differential diagnosis but include radiographs in almost all patients and selected use of other modalities. These include bone scans and magnetic resonance imaging for medial tibial stress syndrome and stress fractures and intracompartmental pressure measurements for chronic compartment syndrome. Treatment often requires either rest or a change in training regimen. Surgery for conditions such as chronic compartment syndrome frequently allows a return to preinjury activities.

  12. Conservative interventions for treating exercise-related musculotendinous, ligamentous and osseous groin pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Matheus O; Silva, Brenda N G; Andriolo, Régis B; Atallah, Alvaro N; Peccin, Maria S

    2013-06-06

    Musculoskeletal, ligamentous and osseous groin injuries are common in athletes and may result in a delay of several months to resume sports. Even then, this may not be at the former level of sport activity. The treatment of exercise-related groin pain is mainly conservative (non-surgical), using interventions such as exercises, electrotherapy, manual therapy and steroid injections. To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of conservative interventions for treating exercise-related musculotendinous, ligamentous and osseous groin pain. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (December 2011); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 4); MEDLINE (1948 to November week 3 2011); EMBASE (1980 to Week 49 2011); CINAHL (1982 to December 2011); LILACS (1982 to December 2011); PEDro (1929 to December 2011), SPORTDiscus (1985 to December 2011), OTseeker (to December 2011), reference lists of papers and conference proceedings (2000 to 2011). Randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized controlled trials evaluating conservative interventions for treating exercise-related musculotendinous, ligamentous and osseous groin pain were included. Studies comparing conservative with surgical treatments were excluded. Two review authors independently extracted data and conducted risk of bias assessments. There was no pooling of data. Two studies, involving a total of 122 participants who had experienced adductor-related groin pain for at least two months, were included in this review. All but one of the participants were male athletes aged between 18 and 50 years old. Both studies were assessed as 'high risk of bias' for at least one source of bias domain. The 'successful treatment' outcome reported in both studies was based primarily on pain measures.One study, based on an intention-to-treat analysis, found a significant difference favouring exercise therapy (strengthening with an

  13. Painful legs and moving toes syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-ying Ma

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Painful legs and moving toes syndrome (PLMT is a rare movement disorder with low diagnostic rate, which is characterized by lower limb pain with involuntary movements of feet or toes. Etiology and pathogenesis of this disease is still unclear. Patients have different clinical manifestations, so the diagnosis is difficult. Treatment methods for PLMT are numerous, but so far the treatment of this disease is still a major challenge for clinicians. Further research is still needed to guide clinical work. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.10.013

  14. Lower leg pain. Diagnosis and treatment of compartment syndromes and other pain syndromes of the leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touliopolous, S; Hershman, E B

    1999-03-01

    Leg pain in athletes has many aetiologies. The clinician must strive to specifically define the clinical problem in order to administer the appropriate treatment for the athlete's condition. Clinical conditions in the leg causing symptoms in athletes include chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECC), tendinitis, medial tibial stress syndrome, stress fractures, fascial defects, musculotendinous junction disruptions (tennis leg), popliteal artery entrapment syndrome, effort-induced venous thrombosis and nerve entrapment. Appropriate diagnostic studies are needed to allow accurate diagnosis. A work-up might include radiographs, bone scans and compartment pressure measurement. Many of these conditions relate to overuse and training errors. Conservative measures including rest, activity modification and rehabilitation will permit a gradual return to participation in sports. Some problems such as CECC, popliteal artery entrapment syndrome and nerve entrapment may require surgical intervention to allow the resolution of symptoms. Clinicians should be familiar with the range of problems causing leg pain in order to prescribe specific treatment for each athlete.

  15. Common causes of lower leg pain an Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Pešková, Lucie

    2011-01-01

    An exercise-induced leg pain resulting from chronic overloading is a common condition affecting physically active population. This bachelor thesis gives an overview of recent knowledge in differential diagnosis of a chronic lower leg pain. Theoretic aspects deal with three main conditions with the highest incidence, including stress fractures, medial tibial stress syndrome and chronic exertional compartment syndrome. Particular chapters describe the difference in the epidemiology, aetiology, ...

  16. [How can leg ulcer pain be reduced?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansal, A; Lazareth, I; D'Ussel, M; Priollet, P

    2016-09-01

    Chronic vascular wounds are often painful. Pain can develop whatever the cause of the ulceration. It is well known during wound care but can occur at any time. The pain is often a complex phenomenon involving nociceptive pain, neuropathic pain, anxiety and emotional suffering, all directly related to the chronic disease. Care for the patient suffering from pain must take into consideration all of these aspects of the disease. The therapeutic strategy should rely on the use of different pharmacological agents, well-adapted local care using the different available analgesic tools and include psycho-affective care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Chronic leg pain: putting the diagnostic pieces together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, M R; Cahoon, S; Atkins, T

    1998-07-01

    Chronic pain in the calf, tibia, fibula, or muscle compartments of the leg must be carefully evaluated to make the proper diagnosis and define the most appropriate course of treatment. The most common overuse leg injuries are stress fractures, chronic exertional compartment syndrome, medial tibial stress syndrome, and strains and sprains. The history is the key component of the evaluation. Targeted questions can suggest which ancillary tests can confirm the working diagnosis. Infection, tumors, radiculopathy, and vascular compromise other than compartment syndrome are rare but must be considered in the differential.

  18. Simvastatin-induced nocturnal leg pain disappears with pravastatin substitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojaković Nataša

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Statins have similar side effects that do not always occur at the same rate among the various statins. We present a case of simvastatin-induced muscle toxicity that disappeared when pravastatin was substituted for the original drug. Case Outline. A 74-year-old male, a nonsmoker, complained of severe nocturnal leg cramps. The patient also complained that similar painful cramping occurred when he walked rapidly or jogged. Because some components of his lipid panel exceeded the ‘desirable’ range, and as he had a history of myocardial infarction, his family physician prescribed simvastatin (40 mg/day. The patient had taken this medication for the past eight years. The painful nocturnal episodes started two years ago and affected either one or the other leg. Four months ago we discontinued his simvastatin and prescribed pravastatin (80 mg/day. At a follow-up visit six weeks later, the patient reported that his leg pains at night and the pain experienced after brisk walking had disappeared. Four months after the substitution of pravastatin for simvastatin, the patient reported that his complete lack of symptoms had continued. Conclusion. These painful muscle cramps were probably caused by an inadequate vascular supply to the calf and foot muscles. Perhaps a combination of advanced age and atherosclerotic changes created a predisposition for the simvastatin-induced leg cramps. Pravastatin differs from simvastatin in several ways. It is not metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP 3A4 oxidases, and thus is not influenced by CYP 3A4 inhibitors like simvastatin. Also, simvastatin is associated with single-nucleotide polymorphisms located within the SLCO1B1 gene on the chromosome 12 and established myopathy, while pravastatin lacks this association. These differences may contribute to increased tolerance to pravastatin in this particular case.

  19. Exertional leg pain: teasing out arterial entrapments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thomas T; Kapur, Rahul; Harwood, Marc I

    2007-12-01

    Vascular causes of exertional lower extremity pain are relatively rare, but may be the answer in athletes refractory to treatment for the more common overuse syndromes of the lower extremities. It is important to differentiate these vascular causes from chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS), medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), and stress fractures in order to develop appropriate treatment plans, avoid complications, and return athletes to play expeditiously. Important vascular etiologies to be considered are popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES), endofibrotic disease, popliteal artery aneurysm, cystic adventitial disease, and peripheral arterial dissections. The diagnostic workup involves angiography or noninvasive vascular studies such as Doppler ultrasound or magnetic resonance angiography in both the neutral and provocative positions. Treatment of these vascular abnormalities typically involves surgical correction of the vascular anomaly.

  20. Exercise-induced leg pain: sifting through a broad differential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkola, M; Amendola, A

    2001-06-01

    The causes of exertional leg pain are not always easily determined but are often linked to repetitive stress. Medial tibial stress syndrome or periostitis, tibial stress fractures, deep posterior compartment syndrome, exertional compartment syndrome, fascial hernias, peripheral neuropathy, and blood vessel entrapments have characteristic signs and symptoms. A complete history and exam coupled with wise use of adjunctive investigations will lead to the correct diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Chronic low back pain patients with accompanying leg pain : The relationship between pain extent and pain intensity, disability and health status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Maarten R.; van der Wurff, Peter; Groen, Gerbrand J.

    2013-01-01

    Accompanying leg pain is commonly observed in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and is assumed to be an indicator for the disorder severity. However, it is still unknown whether it is possible to estimate a patient's functional status by the extent of leg pain present. In a post

  2. An exploration of fluoroscopically guided spinal steroid injections in patients with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Neve

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Leon Neve1, John Orchard2, Nathan Gibbs3, Willem van Mechelen4, Evert Verhagen4, Ken Sesel5, Ian Burgess6, Brett Hines61VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 2School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3South Sydney Sports Medicine, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 4EMGO, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 5Sydney X-ray Centre, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 6Mater Imaging, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaBackground: Fluoroscopically guided lumbar cortisone injections have been proven useful in cases of lower-limb pain caused by lumbar disc prolapse (with evidence levels ll-1/ll-2. These injections are also sometimes used clinically in sports medicine for patients with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain, where no prolapse or other obvious cause of nerve-impingement is diagnosed via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI or computed tomography (CT, even though this treatment scenario has not been adequately studied for this last diagnosis.Objectives: To explore whether fluoroscopically guided transforaminal lumbar cortisone injections may be a valid treatment method for non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain.Study design: Retrospective case series.Methods: Patients were selected from databases at two sports clinics and divided into two groups: Group D, with back-related lower-limb pain and disc prolapse proven on CT or MR; and Group N, with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain. Patients were sent a questionnaire regarding: symptoms, improvement, effect of injections, satisfaction, side effects and other used treatments. Outcomes were compared between Group D and N.Results: 153 patients were eligible for the study (Group D: 93/Group N: 60. Eventually 110 patients responded (Group D: 67/Group N: 43. Twelve percent of Group D and 14% of Group N indicated that the injections had fully cured their symptoms. Altogether, 27% of Group D and 24% of Group N were certain the injections had improved their symptoms in the

  3. Association of restless legs syndrome, pain, and mood disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Abdul Qayyum; Qureshi, Abdul Rehman M; Rahman, Labiba; Jesudasan, Ajantha; Hafez, Kevin K; Rana, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to analyze the association between Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome, and to explore the relationship between mood disorder comorbidity (anxiety and depression), pain, and restless legs syndrome. This study included 123 Parkinson's disease patients and 123 non-Parkinson's disease patients matched for age and gender, and evaluated for anxiety severity, depression severity, pain severity, pain interference, pain disability, and restless legs syndrome prevalence. This was performed using semi-structured interviews and a neurological examination through the restless legs syndrome diagnostic criteria and the following inventories; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and Pain Disability Index. Parkinson's disease patients had significantly greater anxiety severity, depression severity, pain severity, pain interference, pain disability, and restless legs syndrome prevalence in comparison to controls. In addition, Parkinson's disease patients' comorbid for anxiety and depression had significantly greater pain severity, pain interference, and pain disability, but not RLS prevalence, in comparison to Parkinson's disease only, Parkinson's disease anxiety, and Parkinson's disease depression patients. Pain interference, pain severity, and pain disability is greater among Parkinson's disease patients with anxiety and depression, in comparison to Parkinson's disease patients without anxiety and depression. On the contrary, the prevalence of restless legs syndrome was not found to be relevant.

  4. Chronic lower leg pain in athletes: a guide for the differential diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Rachel Biber; Gregory, Andrew J M

    2012-03-01

    Chronic lower leg pain in athletes can be a frustrating problem for patients and a difficult diagnosis for clinicians. Myriad approaches have been suggested to evaluate these conditions. With the continued evolution of diagnostic studies, evidence-based guidance for a standard approach is unfortunately sparse. PubMed was searched from January 1980 to May 2011 to identify publications regarding chronic lower leg pain in athletes (excluding conditions related to the foot), including differential diagnosis, clinical presentation, physical examination, history, diagnostic workup, and treatment. Leg pain in athletes can be caused by many conditions, with the most frequent being medial tibial stress syndrome; chronic exertional compartment syndrome, stress fracture, nerve entrapment, and popliteal artery entrapment syndrome are also considerations. Conservative management is the mainstay of care for the majority of causes of chronic lower leg pain; however, surgical intervention may be necessary. Chronic lower extremity pain in athletes includes a wide differential and can pose diagnostic dilemmas for clinicians.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of painful swollen legs in the emergency department: a pictorial essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Ashish; Dubey, Niraj; Chew, Kian Ming; Singh, Dinesh; Gaikwad, Vishal; Peh, Wilfred Cg

    2017-10-01

    Patients presenting with a painful swollen leg are not infrequently encountered at the emergency department and can pose a diagnostic dilemma for attending physicians. The potential causes of leg pain and swelling include trauma, infection, inflammation, and neurogenic, vascular, and iatrogenic conditions; with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) being an important tool in evaluation. We describe the MRI features of various conditions causing painful swollen legs. We also discuss the differential diagnosis and the useful clinical and laboratory findings that radiologists should be aware of, in order to arrive at an accurate diagnosis.

  6. Leg pain location and neurological signs relate to outcomes in primary care patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Lisbeth; Hestbæk, Lise; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    Background Low back pain (LBP) patients with related leg pain and signs of nerve root involvement are considered to have a worse prognosis than patients with LBP alone. However, it is unclear whether leg pain location above or below the knee and the presence of neurological signs are important...... in primary care patients. The objectives of this study were to explore whether the four Quebec Task Force categories (QTFC) based on the location of pain and on neurological signs have different characteristics at the time of care seeking, whether these QTFC are associated with outcome, and if so whether......, across LBP with leg pain above the knee and below the knee to LBP with nerve root involvement. However, the variation within the categories was considerable. Conclusion The QTFC identify different LBP subgroups at baseline and there is a consistent ranking of the four categories with respect to outcomes...

  7. Leg pain location and neurological signs relate to outcomes in primary care patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Lisbeth; Hestbæk, Lise; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low back pain (LBP) patients with related leg pain and signs of nerve root involvement are considered to have a worse prognosis than patients with LBP alone. However, it is unclear whether leg pain location above or below the knee and the presence of neurological signs are important...... in primary care patients. The objectives of this study were to explore whether the four Quebec Task Force categories (QTFC) based on the location of pain and on neurological signs have different characteristics at the time of care seeking, whether these QTFC are associated with outcome, and if so whether......, across LBP with leg pain above the knee and below the knee to LBP with nerve root involvement. However, the variation within the categories was considerable. CONCLUSION: The QTFC identify different LBP subgroups at baseline and there is a consistent ranking of the four categories with respect to outcomes...

  8. The journey to chronic pain: a grounded theory of older adults' experiences of pain associated with leg ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverner, Tarnia; Closs, S José; Briggs, Michelle

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to develop a grounded theory to describe and explain the experience of pain and its impact, as reported by the individuals who had pain associated with chronic leg ulceration. The Strauss and Corbin grounded theory approach was used. In-depth interviews were undertaken with 11 people aged ≥ 65 years from Leeds in the north of England. All participants were cared for by home care nurses and had painful leg ulceration. The emergent grounded theory centered on a core category of "The journey to chronic pain." The theory suggested a trajectory consisting of three phases that the patient experiences, where the end result is a chronic pain syndrome. In phase 1, leg ulcer pain has predominantly acute nociceptive properties, and if this is not managed effectively, or ulcers do not heal, persistent pain may develop with both nociceptive and neuropathic properties (i.e., phase 2). If phase 2 pain is not managed effectively, patients may then develop refractory long-term pain (phase 3). Those who progress to phase 3 tend to experience negative consequences such as insomnia, depression, and suicidal ideation. Only when health care professionals understand and acknowledge the persistent and long-term nature of the pain in this patient group can the pain be managed effectively. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ulcer pain in patients with venous leg ulcers related to antibiotic treatment and compression therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akesson, Nina; Oien, Rut Frank; Forssell, Henrik; Fagerström, Cecilia

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare venous leg ulcer patients with and without ulcer pain to see whether ulcer pain affected the use of antibiotic treatment and compression therapy throughout healing. A total of 431 patients with venous leg ulcers were included during the study period. Every patient was registered in a national quality registry for patients with hard-to-heal leg, foot, and pressure ulcers. A high incidence of ulcer pain (57%) was found when the patients entered the study. Patients with ulcer pain had been treated more extensively with antibiotics both before and during the study period. Throughout healing there was a significant reduction of antibiotic use among patients in the 'no pain' group, from 44% to 23% (P=0.008). There was no significant difference between the two groups concerning compression therapy (85% vs. 88%), but 12% of patients in the 'pain' group did not get their prescribed compression compared with 6% of patients in the 'no pain' group. The groups did not differ significantly in terms of ulcer duration, ulcer size or healing time. This study shows a high incidence of ulcer pain, confirming that pain has a great impact on patients with venous leg ulcers. Results further suggest that the presence of ulcer pain increases the prescription of antibiotics but does not affect the use of compression therapy. Several advantages were found from using a national quality registry. The registry is a valuable clinical tool showing the importance of accurate diagnosis and effective treatment.

  10. Are self-reported pain characteristics, classified using the PainDETECT questionnaire, predictive of outcome in people with low back pain and associated leg pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsø, Lars; Kent, Peter M; Albert, Hanne B

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether the PainDETECT Questionnaire (PDQ) classification was predictive of outcomes at 3 and 12 months follow-up in low back pain (LBP) patients with associated leg pain. Identification of clinically important subgroups and targeted treatment is believed...... to be important in LBP care. The PD-Q is designed to classify whether a person has neuropathic pain, based on their self-reported pain characteristics. However, it is unknown whether this classification is a prognostic factor or predicts treatment response....

  11. The bothersomeness of sciatica: patients’ self-report of paresthesia, weakness and leg pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Anne Julsrud; Keller, Anne; Natvig, Bård; Brox, Jens Ivar; Grotle, Margreth

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate how patients with sciatica due to disc herniation rate the bothersomeness of paresthesia and weakness as compared to leg pain, and how these symptoms are associated with socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 411 patients with clinical signs of radiculopathy. Items from the Sciatica Bothersomeness Index (0 = none to 6 = extremely) were used to establish values for paresthesia, weakness and leg pain. Associations with socio-demographic and clinical variables were analyzed by multiple linear regression. Mean scores (SD) were 4.5 (1.5) for leg pain, 3.4 (1.8) for paresthesia and 2.6 (2.0) for weakness. Women reported higher levels of bothersomeness for all three symptoms with mean scores approximately 10% higher than men. In the multivariate models, more severe symptoms were associated with lower physical function and higher emotional distress. Muscular paresis explained 19% of the variability in self-reported weakness, sensory findings explained 10% of the variability in paresthesia, and straight leg raising test explained 9% of the variability in leg pain. In addition to leg pain, paresthesia and weakness should be assessed when measuring symptom severity in sciatica. PMID:19488793

  12. Spinal manipulation and home exercise with advice for subacute and chronic back-related leg pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bronfort, Gert; Hondras, Maria; Schulz, Craig A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Back-related leg pain (BRLP) is often disabling and costly, and there is a paucity of research to guide its management. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) plus home exercise and advice (HEA) compared with HEA alone reduces leg pain in the short and long...... of SMT plus HEA or HEA alone. MEASUREMENTS: The primary outcome was patient-rated BRLP at 12 and 52 weeks. Secondary outcomes were self-reported low back pain, disability, global improvement, satisfaction, medication use, and general health status at 12 and 52 weeks. Blinded objective tests were done...... at 12 weeks. RESULTS: Of the 192 enrolled patients, 191 (99%) provided follow-up data at 12 weeks and 179 (93%) at 52 weeks. For leg pain, SMT plus HEA had a clinically important advantage over HEA (difference, 10 percentage points [95% CI, 2 to 19]; P = 0.008) at 12 weeks but not at 52 weeks...

  13. Motor control patterns during an active straight leg raise in pain-free subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beales, Darren John; O'Sullivan, Peter Bruce; Briffa, N Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    Repeated measures. To investigate motor control (MC) patterns of normal subjects during the low level physical load of the active straight leg raise (ASLR). Aberrant MC patterns, as observed with the ASLR test, are considered to be a mechanism for ongoing pain and disability in subjects with chronic musculoskeletal pelvic girdle pain. These patterns may not only affect the provision of lumbopelvic stability, but also respiration and the control of continence. Greater understanding of MC patterns in pain-free subjects may improve the management of pelvic girdle pain. METHODS.: Fourteen pain-free nulliparous women were examined during the ASLR. Electromyography of the anterior abdominal wall, right chest wall and the anterior scaleni, intraabdominal pressure (IAP), intrathoracic pressure (ITP), respiratory rate, pelvic floor kinematics, and downward leg pressure of the nonlifted leg were compared between a left and right ASLR. There was greater activation of obliquus internus abdominis and obliquus externus abdominis on the side of the ASLR. The predominant pattern of activation for the chest wall was tonic activation during an ipsilateral ASLR, and phasic respiratory activation lifting the contralateral leg. Respiratory fluctuation of both IAP and ITP did not differ lifting either leg. The baseline shifts of these pressure variables in response to the physical demand of lifting the leg was also the same either side. There was no difference in respiratory rate, pelvic floor kinematics, or downward leg pressure. Pain-free subjects demonstrate a predominant pattern of greater ipsilateral tonic activation of the abdominal wall and chest wall on the side of the ASLR. This was achieved with minimal apparent disruption to IAP and ITP. The findings of this study demonstrate the plastic nature of the abdominal cylinder and the flexibility of the neuromuscular system in controlling load transference during an ASLR.

  14. The role of pain coping and kinesiophobia in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 of the legs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinus, Johan; Perez, Roberto S; van Eijs, Frank; van Gestel, Miriam A; Geurts, José W; Huygen, Frank J; Bauer, Martin C; van Hilten, Jacobus J

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate to what extent pain coping and kinesiophobia contribute to limitations in activity and participation in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) of the lower limbs. A total of 238 patients with CRPS-1 of the legs from 4 pain clinics and 1 Department of Neurology of University Hospitals participated in this study. Pain and CRPS severity were assessed with the pain rating index of the McGill Pain Questionnaire and the CRPS Severity Score, respectively. Activity was measured with the Rising & Walking scale, and participation with the Social Functioning scale of the SF-36. In addition, the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia and Pain Coping Inventory were administered. Hierarchical linear regression was used to evaluate to what extent kinesiophobia and pain coping contributed to difficulties with Rising & Walking and Social Functioning. The analyses showed that the "resting" subscale of the Pain Coping Inventory-that is, 1 of the 3 scales evaluating passive pain coping strategies-contributed significantly to difficulties in rising and walking (explaining 12.5% of the variance) and to difficulties in social functioning (explaining 6.5%), whereas kinesiophobia was not associated with either of these measures. These findings indicate that making use of "resting" as a pain coping strategy contributes significantly to limitations in activity and participation in patients with CRPS-1 of the legs. Indications for a negative influence of kinesiophobia or a positive influence of an active pain coping style were not found.

  15. Difficulty of diagnosing the origin of lower leg pain in patients with both lumbar spinal stenosis and hip joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Junya; Ohtori, Seiji; Kishida, Shunji; Nakamura, Junichi; Takeshita, Munenori; Shigemura, Tomonori; Takazawa, Makoto; Eguchi, Yawara; Inoue, Gen; Orita, Sumihisa; Takaso, Masashi; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Arai, Gen; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Gou; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2012-12-01

    Case series. To present the difficulty of diagnosing the origin of lower leg pain in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and hip joint arthritis. Pain arising from a degenerated hip joint is sometimes localized to the lower leg. Patients with lumbar spinal disease may also show radicular pain corresponding to the lower leg area. If patients present with both conditions and only pain at the lower leg, it is difficult to determine the origin of the pain. We reviewed 420 patients who had leg pain with lumbar spinal stenosis diagnosed by myelography, computed tomography after myelography, or magnetic resonance imaging. Pain only at the ipsilateral lateral aspect of the lower leg but slight low back pain or pain around the hip joint was shown in 4 patients who had lumbar spinal stenosis and hip osteoarthritis. The symptoms resolved after L5 spinal nerve block, but remained after lidocaine infiltration into the hip joint. We performed decompression and posterolateral fusion surgery for these 4 patients. Leg pain did not resolve after lumbar surgery in all patients. Conservative treatment was not effective from 6 to 12 months, so ultimately we performed ipsilateral total hip replacement for all patients and they became symptom-free. It is difficult to determine the origin of lower leg pain by spinal nerve block and hip joint block in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and hip osteoarthritis. We take this into consideration before surgery.

  16. Effects of music therapy on pain, discomfort, and depression for patients with leg fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, In Sook; Kim, Jungnam; Park, Kyung Min

    2006-06-01

    To determine the effects of music therapy on pain, discomfort, and depression for patients with leg fractures. Data were collected from 40 patients admitted in an orthopedic surgery care unit. The subjects included 20 intervention group members and 20 control group members. Music therapy was offered to intervention group members once a day for 3 days for 30-60 minutes per day. Pain was measured with a numeric rating scale and by measuring vital signs. Discomfort and depression were measured with self-administered questionnaires. Patients who received music therapy had a lower degree of pain than patients who did not receive music therapy as measured by the numeric pain score (pmusic therapy also had a lower degree of discomfort than patients who were not provided with this therapy (pmusic therapy is an effective method for decreasing pain and dis-comfort for patients with leg fractures.

  17. Chiropractic management of patients with bilateral congenital hip dislocation with chronic low back and leg pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Francisco

    2004-05-01

    To discuss conservative methods for treating patients with chronic low back and leg pain associated with the biomechanical and postural alterations related to bilateral congenital hip dislocation. This report describes the cases of 2 adult female subjects with bilateral congenital hip dislocation without acetabula formation who suffered from chronic low back and leg pain managed conservatively by chiropractic methods. The first subject is a 45-year-old woman with a 9-month history of right buttock pain and radiating right leg pain and paresthesia down to the first 2 toes, with a diagnosis of a herniated L4 intervertebral disk. The second subject is a 53-year-old woman who complained of chronic intermittent low back pain and constant unremitting pain on her right leg for the last 3 years. Chiropractic manipulation utilizing Logan Basic apex and double notch contacts, as well as sacroiliac manipulation on a drop table with a sacrum contact and with a posterior to anterior and superior to inferior (PA-SI) rocking thrust, together with a spinal stabilization exercise program, were used on these 2 patients. Both patients had significant clinical improvement, with reduction on the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) of 67% and 84%, Oswestry Disability Index improvement of 73% and 81%, and an improvement on the Harris hip score of 71% and 44%, respectively. A conservative management approach, including specific chiropractic manipulation and a spinal stabilization exercise program, can help manage the treatment of adult patients with chronic low back and leg pain related to bilateral congenital dislocation of the hips.

  18. The short term effects of straight leg raise neurodynamic treatment on pressure pain and vibration thresholds in individuals with spinally referred leg pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridehalgh, Colette; Moore, Ann; Hough, Alan

    2016-06-01

    Limited research exists for the effects of neurodynamic treatment techniques. Understanding short term physiological outcomes could help to better understand immediate benefits or harm of treatment. To assess the short-term effects of a straight leg raise (SLR) tensioner 'intervention' on pressure pain thresholds (PPT) and vibration thresholds (VT), and establish if additional factors influence outcome in individuals with spinally referred leg pain. Experimental, repeated measures. Sixty seven participants (mean age (SD) 52.9 (13.3), 33 female) with spinally referred leg pain were divided into 3 sub-groups: somatic referred pain, radicular pain and radiculopathy. Individuals were assessed for central sensitisation (CS) and completed 5 disability and psychosocial questionnaires. PPT and VT were measured pre and post a 3 × 1 min SLR tensioner intervention. No significant differences (p > 0.05) were found between the 3 groups for either outcome measure, or after treatment. Slight improvements in VT were seen in the radiculopathy group after treatment, but were not significant. Only 2 participants were identified with CS. Disability and psychological factors were not significantly different at baseline between the 3 sub-groups, and did not correlate with the outcome measures. No beneficial effects of treatment were found, but the trend for a decrease in VT indicated that even in individuals with radiculopathy, no detrimental changes to nerve function occurred. Psychosocial factors and levels of disability did not influence short term outcome of SLR treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain: part 2 of 3: symptoms and signs of peripheral neuropathic pain in patients with low back (± leg) pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smart, Keith M

    2012-08-01

    As a mechanisms-based classification of pain \\'peripheral neuropathic pain\\' (PNP) refers to pain arising from a primary lesion or dysfunction in the peripheral nervous system. Symptoms and signs associated with an assumed dominance of PNP in patients attending for physiotherapy have not been extensively studied. The purpose of this study was to identify symptoms and signs associated with a clinical classification of PNP in patients with low back (± leg) pain. Using a cross-sectional, between-subjects design; four hundred and sixty-four patients with low back (± leg) pain were assessed using a standardised assessment protocol. Patients\\' pain was assigned a mechanisms-based classification based on experienced clinical judgement. Clinicians then completed a clinical criteria checklist specifying the presence or absence of various clinical criteria. A binary logistic regression analysis with Bayesian model averaging identified a cluster of two symptoms and one sign predictive of PNP, including: \\'Pain referred in a dermatomal or cutaneous distribution\\

  20. Mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain: part 3 of 3: symptoms and signs of nociceptive pain in patients with low back (± leg) pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smart, Keith M

    2012-08-01

    As a mechanisms-based classification of pain \\'nociceptive pain\\' (NP) refers to pain attributable to the activation of the peripheral receptive terminals of primary afferent neurones in response to noxious chemical, mechanical or thermal stimuli. The symptoms and signs associated with clinical classifications of NP have not been extensively studied. The purpose of this study was to identify symptoms and signs associated with a clinical classification of NP in patients with low back (± leg) pain. Using a cross-sectional, between-subjects design; four hundred and sixty-four patients with low back (± leg) pain were assessed using a standardised assessment protocol after which their pain was assigned a mechanisms-based classification based on experienced clinical judgement. Clinicians then completed a clinical criteria checklist indicating the presence\\/absence of various symptoms and signs. A regression analysis identified a cluster of seven clinical criteria predictive of NP, including: \\'Pain localised to the area of injury\\/dysfunction\\

  1. Is Leg Length Discrepancy Associated With the Side of Radiating Pain in Patients With a Lumbar Herniated Disc?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Brinke, Albert P.T.; van der Aa, Hans E.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Oosterveld, Frits P.T.

    1999-01-01

    Study Design. The association between leg length discrepancy and the side of the radiating pain in lumbar disc herniation was investigated in a case series. Objectives. To investigate whether pain tends to radiate into the longer or shorter leg in patients with a lumbar herniated disc. Summary of

  2. Painful swollen leg – think beyond deep vein thrombosis or Baker's cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Vinayagam

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis of leg is very common in clinical practice. Not infrequently a range of pathologies are diagnosed after excluding a thrombosis, often after a period of anticoagulation. Case presentation This is a report of three patients who presented with a painful swollen leg and were initially treated as a deep vein thrombosis or a baker's cyst, but later diagnosed as a pleomorphic sarcoma, a malignant giant cell tumor of the muscle and a myxoid liposarcoma. A brief review of such similar reports and the relevant literature is presented. Conclusion A painful swollen leg is a common clinical scenario and though rare, tumors must be thought of without any delay, in a duplex negative, low risk deep vein thrombosis situation.

  3. The Active Straight Leg Raise test in lumbopelvic pain during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mens, Jan M A; Huis in 't Veld, EMJ; Pool-Goudzwaard, A.L.

    2012-01-01

    Although many properties of the Active Straight Leg Raise (ASLR) test as a diagnostic test in lumbopelvic pain (LPP) are well documented, various elements are lacking. A cross-sectional study was performed to compute sensitivity and specificity, to assess the advantages and disadvantages of various

  4. Neurodynamic treatment for patients with nerve-related leg pain: Protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Giovanni E; Stieven, Fábio F; Araújo, Francisco X; Wiebusch, Matheus; Rosa, Carolina G; Plentz, Rodrigo Della Méa; Silva, Marcelo F

    2016-10-01

    To investigate if neurodynamic treatment is more effective than advice to remain active in patients with nerve-related leg pain. Parallel-group randomized controlled trial blinded to the outcome assessor conducted in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Sixty patients recruited from the community and private practices. Patients will be randomly assigned to receive four sessions of neurodynamic treatment over two weeks comprising passive lumbar foramen opening and neurodynamic sliders plus home exercises or advice to remain active. Leg pain intensity, disability, low back pain intensity, functional ability, symptoms distribution and global impression of recovery will be assessed at two and four weeks after randomization. A linear mixed model will be employed for each outcome following intention to treat principles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Prognostic Factors for Persistent Leg-Pain in Patients Hospitalized With Acute Sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjeld, Olaf; Grotle, Margreth; Siewers, Vibeke; Pedersen, Linda M; Nilsen, Kristian Bernhard; Zwart, John-Anker

    2017-03-01

    Prospective cohort study. To identify potential prognostic factors for persistent leg-pain at 12 months among patients hospitalized with acute severe sciatica. The long-term outcome for patients admitted to hospital with sciatica is generally unfavorable. Results concerning prognostic factors for persistent sciatica are limited and conflicting. A total of 210 patients acutely admitted to hospital for either surgical or nonsurgical treatment of sciatica were consecutively recruited and received a thorough clinical and radiographic examination in addition to responding to a comprehensive questionnaire. Follow-up assessments were done at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months. Potential prognostic factors were measured at baseline and at 6 weeks. The impact of these factors on leg-pain was analyzed by multiple linear regression modeling. A total of 151 patients completed the entire study, 93 receiving nonrandomized surgical treatment. The final multivariate models showed that the following factors were significantly associated with leg-pain at 12 months: high psychosocial risk according to the Örebro Musculosceletal Pain Questionnaire (unstandardized beta coefficient 1.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.72-2.38, P sciatica. 2.

  6. Classification of low back-related leg pain: do subgroups differ in disability and psychosocial factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jeremy; Hall, Toby

    2009-01-01

    It has been proposed that patients with low back-related leg pain can be classified according to pain mechanisms into four distinct subgroups: Central Sensitization (CS), Denervation (D), Peripheral Nerve Sensitization (PNS), and Musculoskeletal (M). The purpose of this study was to determine whether there were any differences in terms of disability and psychosocial factors between these four subgroups. Forty-five subjects with low back-related leg pain completed the Oswestry Disability Index, the hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire. Subsequently, an examiner blinded to the questionnaire results classified the subjects into one of the four subgroups, according to the findings of the self-administered Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Signs and Symptoms questionnaire and a physical examination. It was found that the PNS subgroup had significantly greater disability compared to all other subgroups and significantly greater fear avoidance beliefs about physical activity compared to the CS and D subgroups. This highlights the importance of sub-classification but also the need to take into account disability and psychosocial factors in the management of low back-related leg pain.

  7. A practical approach for the differential diagnosis of chronic leg pain in the athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Peter H; Wright, Michelle L; Hartman, Jodi F

    2005-08-01

    Chronic lower leg pain results from various conditions, most commonly, medial tibial stress syndrome, stress fracture, chronic exertional compartment syndrome, nerve entrapment, and popliteal artery entrapment syndrome. Symptoms associated with these conditions often overlap, making a definitive diagnosis difficult. As a result, an algorithmic approach was created to aid in the evaluation of patients with complaints of lower leg pain and to assist in defining a diagnosis by providing recommended diagnostic studies for each condition. A comprehensive physical examination is imperative to confirm a diagnosis and should begin with an inquiry regarding the location and onset of the patient's pain and tenderness. Confirmation of the diagnosis requires performing the appropriate diagnostic studies, including radiographs, bone scans, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, compartmental pressure measurements, and arteriograms. Although most conditions causing lower leg pain are treated successfully with nonsurgical management, some syndromes, such as popliteal artery entrapment syndrome, may require surgical intervention. Regardless of the form of treatment, return to activity must be gradual and individualized for each patient to prevent future athletic injury.

  8. The effect of resisted inspiration during an active straight leg raise in pain-free subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beales, Darren John; O'Sullivan, Peter Bruce; Briffa, N Kathryn

    2010-04-01

    Alterations of respiratory patterns have been observed in pelvic girdle pain subjects during the active straight leg raise (ASLR). This study investigated how pain-free subjects coordinate motor control during an ASLR when this task is complicated by the addition of a respiratory challenge. Trunk muscle activation, intra-abdominal pressure, intra-thoracic pressure, pelvic floor motion, downward pressure of the non-lifted leg and respiratory rate were compared between resting supine, ASLR, breathing with inspiratory resistance (IR) and ASLR+IR. Subjects responded to ASLR+IR with an increase in the motor activation in the abdominal wall and chest wall compared to when ASLR and IR were performed in isolation. Activation of obliquus internus abdominis was greater on the side of the leg lift during the ASLR+IR, in comparison to symmetrical activation observed in the other abdominal wall muscles. The incremental increase of motor activity was associated with greater intra-abdominal pressure baseline shift when lifting the leg during ASLR+IR compared to ASLR. Individual variation was apparent in the form of the motor control patterns, mostly reflected in variable respiratory activation of the abdominal wall. The findings highlight the flexibility of the neuromuscular system in adapting to simultaneous respiratory and stability demands. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pain and health-related quality of life in people with chronic leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopman, W M; Buchanan, M; VanDenKerkhof, E G; Harrison, M B

    2013-06-01

    Venous leg ulceration is associated with pain and poor health-related quality of life (HRQL). The purpose of this study was to identify demographic and clinical characteristics associated with pain and decreased HRQL in patients with active venous ulcers. Baseline data were combined from two trials that took place between 2001 and 2007 (n = 564). Pain was measured using the Numeric Pain Scale (NPS), and HRQL was measured using the Medical Outcomes Survey 12-item Short Form (SF-12), which generates a Physical (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS). Analyses included logistic and linear regression (for pain and HRQL, respectively). Mean age was 66.5 years; 47% were male. Median NPS score was 2.2 (out of 10) and mean PCS and MCS scores were 38.0 and 50.5, respectively (scores are standardized to a mean of 50 representing average HRQL). Younger age, living with others, and arthritis were associated with pain. Poorer PCS was associated with being female, venous/mixed ulcer etiology, larger ulcers, longer ulcer duration, cardiovascular disease, arthritis and higher pain intensity. Poorer MCS was associated with younger age, longer ulcer duration, comorbidity and higher pain intensity. Research is needed to test strategies to reduce pain and possibly improve HRQL in high risk groups.

  10. Surgical management of symptomatic low back pain and monoradicular leg pain in adolescent and young adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalevski Svetoslav

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of the present retrospective study is to draw attention to symptomatic low back pain in adolescent patients, in order to encourage earlier diagnosis and surgical treatment. The study assessed the radiological, clinical features and surgical outcomes of 13of this kind of patient. Materials and Methods: Out of a series of 983 consecutive cases (1999-2011 of lumbar disc excisions from our neurosurgical institution, 13-1,32% of the patients were between the ages of 15 and 20 mean 17,84. Fifteen operations, including two reoperations, were performed on this patient group, by a conventional microsurgical procedure. The indications for surgery were failure of conservative treatment, intractable pain and/or progressive neurological impairment. Results: Low back pain and monoradicular sciatica were the main complaints in 77%, but findings of neurological deficits were rare - 1 case. The surgical findings revealed a protruding disc in eleven cases, one lateral recess stenosis and one lumbar synovial cyst. Initially, all patients were treated conservatively by their physicians more than 3 months without success. On the day of discharge, Kirkaldy-Willis criteria results were excellent or good in 92% of patients. The follow-up period ranged from 6 months to 2 years with an average of 1 year and 2 months. The results were excellent in 10 patients and good in 3 patients. Discussion: We demonstrate that the cause of low back pain and monoradicular leg pain in adolescent patients may not only be a cause of herniated lumbar disc or lateral recess narrowing. Very rarely these symptoms may be caused by lumbar synovial cysts. Conclusion: Surgical treatment of adolescent patients is able to relieve the clinical symptoms quickly. Clinical symptoms such as low back pain and leg pain and the neurologic deficit disappear within 3 months after surgery.

  11. SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF SYMPTOMATIC LOW BACK PAIN AND MONORADICULAR LEG PAIN IN ADOLESCENT AND YOUNG ADULT PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalevski Svetoslav

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of the present retrospective study is to draw attention to symptomatic low back pain in adolescent patients, in order to encourage earlier diagnosis and surgical treatment. The study assessed the radiological, clinical features and surgical outcomes of 13 of this kind of patient. Materials and Methods: Out of a series of 983 consecutive cases (1999–2011 of lumbar disc excisions from our neurosurgical institution, 13–1,32% of the patients were between the ages of 15 and 20 mean 17,84. Fifteen operations, including two reoperations,were performed on this patient group, by a conventional microsurgical procedure. The indications for surgery were failure of conservative treatment, in tractable pain and/or progressive neurological impairment. Results: Low back pain and monoradicular sciatica were the main complaints in 77%, but findings of neurological deficits were rare — 1 case. The surgical findings revealed a protruding disc in eleven cases, one lateral recess stenosis and one lumbar synovial cyst. Initially, all patients were treated conservatively by their physicians more than 3 months without success. On the day of discharge, Kirkaldy-Willis criteria results were excellent or good in 92% of patients. The follow-up period ranged from 6 months to 2 years with an average of 1 year and 2 months. The results were excellent in 10 patients and good in 3 patients. Discussion: We demonstrate that the cause of low back pain and monoradicular leg pain in adolescent patients may not only be a cause of herniated lumbar disc or lateral recess narrowing. Very rarely these symptoms may be caused by lumbar synovial cysts. Conclusion: Surgical treatment of adolescent patients is able to relieve the clinical symptoms quickly. Clinical symptoms such as low back pain and leg pain and the neurologic deficit disappear within 3 months after surgery.

  12. Pain and quality of life in patients with vascular leg ulcers: an Italian multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnera, G; Tinelli, G; Abeni, D; Di Pietro, C; Sampogna, F; Tabolli, S

    2007-09-01

    To assess pain and quality of life in patients with chronic vascular leg ulcers. A multicentre cross-sectional study was conducted. A questionnaire to assess quality of life and report the experience of pain was developed. It incorporated the SF-12 questionnaire and a visual analogue scale (VAS) for the assessment of pain during the day, night and at dressing change. A total of 381 patients (233 females, 148 males) were observed from September to November 2006. The patients had venous (52%), ischaemic (11%), mixed aetiology (10%), hypertensive (2%), microangiopatic (2%), diabetic (9%) and other (14%) types of ulcers. Women experienced more pain and had a worse quality of life than men. Venous ulcers had high mean VAS values during the day (44.4) and night (44.9). However, a higher mean value was recorded at dressing change, when it was similar to the mean for vascular ulcers (57.5 versus 56.3). There was a direct correlation between pain and quality of life, which was worse for ulcers with a longer duration and larger area. Ulcers of less than three months' duration had mean VAS values of 38.7, 36.9, 46.8 compared with 53.8, 53.9, 62.9 for ulcers of over 12 months' duration. Mean SF-12 values for the physical component of the questionnaire also showed that patients whose ulcers had a longer duration had a poorer quality of life (35.9) than patients whose ulcers were more recent (40.9). Vascular leg ulcers are very painful and result in a poor quality of life, with a direct correlation with both ulcer duration and ulcer area. Pain relief is required, particularly at dressing changes, as is the selection of advanced wound dressings.

  13. Leg Pain From Periostitis as the First Clinical Manifestation of Large-Vessel Vasculitis: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaert, Bert; Brys, Peter; Peers, Koen

    2017-07-03

    We report a case of a 47-year-old woman with isolated periostitis of the lower leg as a first manifestation of large-vessel vasculitis. The diagnosis was first suspected when a second magnetic resonance imaging of the lower leg approximately 4 months after onset of shin pain showed edema near intramuscular vessels. Isolated periostitis is a very rare skeletal manifestation of systemic vasculitis and easily could be misdiagnosed. This case demonstrates that maintaining a broad differential diagnosis for a common presenting complaint such as localized leg pain is imperative. To be determined. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Edematous and painful leg. Pathophysiology in the spotlight: presentation of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estalayo-Gutiérrez, B

    2013-01-01

    We report on a 74-year-old woman visually impaired and under treatment with amlodipine, valsartan and thyroid hormone. The patient complained of her unique, edematous and painful leg after a local trauma. The worsening was slow and gradual, affecting walk and state of mind. Several unsuccessful diagnoses were done before suspecting and confirming a Complex Regional Pain Syndrome. Edema disappeared dramatically after amlodipine empirical discontinuation. Pain improved gradually with rehabilitation exercises but, mainly, after gaining skills and self-esteem due to cataract surgery of her unique functional eye. It was necessary to decrease thyroid hormone dosage after a long lasting balance. The sympathetic nervous system role of the case is discussed. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Leg pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Family Medicine . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 30. White CJ. Atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 79. Review Date 8/14/2015 ...

  16. A case report of an unusual cause of postoperative leg pain after posterior lumbar fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Daureeawoo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 36-year old man who underwent elective posterior lumbar spinal fusion after presenting with bilateral leg pain with associated back pain. He had undergone a L5/S1 discectomy in 2001, which provided good symptomatic relief. On this admission, he underwent elective L4-S1 posterolateral fusion and bilateral L4/5 and L5/S1 decompression. Intra-operatively a pedicle screw had to be re-inserted after fluoroscopy confirmed a lateral breech. The patient had no major postoperative complications until the sixth day when the patient re-presented with acute leg pain and weakness. Following a local multidisciplinary meeting (MDT an MRI showed a large haematoma at the right psoas muscle. CT angiogram confirmed a bleeding lumbar segmental vessel at the site of the previous misplaced screw and an emergency fluoroscopic guided embolisation of the vessel was performed. The patient recovered well post operatively and was discharged back to the community 12 days later. Haemorrhage, as in this case a psoas haematoma should be considered as one of the differentials in patients with recurrent post-operative radiculopathy following posterior lumbar spine fusion. This should be suspected particularly if there has been a misplacement of one or more screws as this can cause injury to blood vessels and be fatal for the patient.

  17. Steadiness of Spinal Regions during Single-Leg Standing in Older Adults with and without Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Liang Kuo

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to compare the steadiness index of spinal regions during single-leg standing in older adults with and without chronic low back pain (LBP and to correlate measurements of steadiness index with the performance of clinical balance tests. Thirteen community-dwelling older adults (aged 55 years or above with chronic LBP and 13 age- and gender-matched asymptomatic volunteers participated in this study. Data collection was conducted in a university research laboratory. Measurements were steadiness index of spinal regions (trunk, thoracic spine, lumbar spine, and pelvis during single-leg standing including relative holding time (RHT and relative standstill time (RST, and clinical balance tests (timed up and go test and 5-repetition sit to stand test. The LBP group had a statistically significantly smaller RHT than the control group, regardless of one leg stance on the painful or non-painful sides. The RSTs on the painful side leg in the LBP group were not statistically significantly different from the average RSTs of both legs in the control group; however, the RSTs on the non-painful side leg in the LBP group were statistically significantly smaller than those in the control group for the trunk, thoracic spine, and lumbar spine. No statistically significant intra-group differences were found in the RHTs and RSTs between the painful and non-painful side legs in the LBP group. Measurements of clinical balance tests also showed insignificant weak to moderate correlations with steadiness index. In conclusion, older adults with chronic LBP demonstrated decreased spinal steadiness not only in the symptomatic lumbar spine but also in the other spinal regions within the kinetic chain of the spine. When treating older adults with chronic LBP, clinicians may also need to examine their balance performance and spinal steadiness during balance challenging tests.

  18. Steadiness of Spinal Regions during Single-Leg Standing in Older Adults with and without Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yi-Liang; Huang, Kuo-Yuan; Chiang, Pei-Tzu; Lee, Pei-Yun; Tsai, Yi-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the steadiness index of spinal regions during single-leg standing in older adults with and without chronic low back pain (LBP) and to correlate measurements of steadiness index with the performance of clinical balance tests. Thirteen community-dwelling older adults (aged 55 years or above) with chronic LBP and 13 age- and gender-matched asymptomatic volunteers participated in this study. Data collection was conducted in a university research laboratory. Measurements were steadiness index of spinal regions (trunk, thoracic spine, lumbar spine, and pelvis) during single-leg standing including relative holding time (RHT) and relative standstill time (RST), and clinical balance tests (timed up and go test and 5-repetition sit to stand test). The LBP group had a statistically significantly smaller RHT than the control group, regardless of one leg stance on the painful or non-painful sides. The RSTs on the painful side leg in the LBP group were not statistically significantly different from the average RSTs of both legs in the control group; however, the RSTs on the non-painful side leg in the LBP group were statistically significantly smaller than those in the control group for the trunk, thoracic spine, and lumbar spine. No statistically significant intra-group differences were found in the RHTs and RSTs between the painful and non-painful side legs in the LBP group. Measurements of clinical balance tests also showed insignificant weak to moderate correlations with steadiness index. In conclusion, older adults with chronic LBP demonstrated decreased spinal steadiness not only in the symptomatic lumbar spine but also in the other spinal regions within the kinetic chain of the spine. When treating older adults with chronic LBP, clinicians may also need to examine their balance performance and spinal steadiness during balance challenging tests.

  19. Use of Temporary Implantable Biomaterials to Reduce Leg Pain and Back Pain in Patients with Sciatica and Lumbar Disc Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gere S. diZerega

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The principle etiology of leg pain (sciatica from lumbar disc herniation is mechanical compression of the nerve root. Sciatica is reduced by decompression of the herniated disc, i.e., removing mechanical compression of the nerve root. Decompression surgery typically reduces sciatica more than lumbar back pain (LBP. Decompression surgery reduces mechanical compression of the nerve root. However, decompression surgery does not directly reduce sensitization of the sensory nerves in the epidural space and disc. In addition, sensory nerves in the annulus fibrosus and epidural space are not protected from topical interaction with pain mediators induced by decompression surgery. The secondary etiology of sciatica from lumbar disc herniation is sensitization of the nerve root. Sensitization of the nerve root results from a mechanical compression, b exposure to cellular pain mediators, and/or c exposure to biochemical pain mediators. Although decompression surgery reduces nerve root compression, sensory nerve sensitization often persists. These observations are consistent with continued exposure of tissue in the epidural space, including the nerve root, to increased cellular and biochemical pain mediators following surgery. A potential contributor to lumbar back pain (LBP is stimulation of sensory nerves in the annulus fibrosus by a cellular pain mediators and/or b biochemical pain mediators that accompany annular tears or disruption. Sensory fibers located in the outer one-third of the annulus fibrosus increase in number and depth as a result of disc herniation. The nucleus pulposus is comprised of material that can produce an autoimmune stimulation of the sensory nerves located in the annulus and epidural space leading to LBP. The sensory nerves of the annulus fibrosus and epidural space may be sensitized by topical exposure to cellular and biochemical pain mediators induced by lumbar surgery. Annulotomy or annular rupture allows the nucleus pulposus

  20. Use of Temporary Implantable Biomaterials to Reduce Leg Pain and Back Pain in Patients with Sciatica and Lumbar Disc Herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    diZerega, Gere S.; Traylor, Melissa M.; Alphonso, Lisa S.; Falcone, Samuel J.

    2010-01-01

    The principle etiology of leg pain (sciatica) from lumbar disc herniation is mechanical compression of the nerve root. Sciatica is reduced by decompression of the herniated disc, i.e., removing mechanical compression of the nerve root. Decompression surgery typically reduces sciatica more than lumbar back pain (LBP). Decompression surgery reduces mechanical compression of the nerve root. However, decompression surgery does not directly reduce sensitization of the sensory nerves in the epidural space and disc. In addition, sensory nerves in the annulus fibrosus and epidural space are not protected from topical interaction with pain mediators induced by decompression surgery. The secondary etiology of sciatica from lumbar disc herniation is sensitization of the nerve root. Sensitization of the nerve root results from a) mechanical compression, b) exposure to cellular pain mediators, and/or c) exposure to biochemical pain mediators. Although decompression surgery reduces nerve root compression, sensory nerve sensitization often persists. These observations are consistent with continued exposure of tissue in the epidural space, including the nerve root, to increased cellular and biochemical pain mediators following surgery. A potential contributor to lumbar back pain (LBP) is stimulation of sensory nerves in the annulus fibrosus by a) cellular pain mediators and/or b) biochemical pain mediators that accompany annular tears or disruption. Sensory fibers located in the outer one-third of the annulus fibrosus increase in number and depth as a result of disc herniation. The nucleus pulposus is comprised of material that can produce an autoimmune stimulation of the sensory nerves located in the annulus and epidural space leading to LBP. The sensory nerves of the annulus fibrosus and epidural space may be sensitized by topical exposure to cellular and biochemical pain mediators induced by lumbar surgery. Annulotomy or annular rupture allows the nucleus pulposus topical

  1. Neurodynamic treatment did not improve pain and disability at two weeks in patients with chronic nerve-related leg pain: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Ferreira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Question: In people with nerve-related leg pain, does adding neurodynamic treatment to advice to remain active improve leg pain, disability, low back pain, function, global perceived effect and location of symptoms? Design: Randomised trial with concealed allocation and intention-to-treat analysis. Participants: Sixty participants with nerve-related leg pain recruited from the community. Interventions: The experimental group received four sessions of neurodynamic treatment. Both groups received advice to remain active. Outcome measures: Leg pain and low back pain (0, none, to 10, worst, Oswestry Disability Index (0, none, to 100, worst, Patient-Specific Functional Scale (0, unable to perform, to 30, able to perform, global perceived effect (–5 to 5 and location of symptoms were measured at 2 and 4 weeks after randomisation. Continuous outcomes were analysed by linear mixed models. Location of symptoms was assessed by relative risk (95% CI. Results: At 2 weeks, the experimental group did not have significantly greater improvement than the control group in leg pain (MD –1.1, 95% CI –2.3 to 0.1 or disability (MD –3.3, 95% CI –9.6 to 2.9. At 4 weeks, the experimental group experienced a significantly greater reduction in leg pain (MD –2.4, 95% CI –3.6 to –1.2 and low back pain (MD –1.5, 95% CI –2.8 to –0.2. The experimental group also improved significantly more in function at 2 weeks (MD 5.2, 95% CI 2.2 to 8.2 and 4 weeks (MD 4.7, 95% CI 1.7 to 7.8, as well as global perceived effect at 2 weeks (MD 2.5, 95% CI 1.6 to 3.5 and 4 weeks (MD 2.9, 95% CI 1.9 to 3.9. No significant between-group differences occurred in disability at 4 weeks and location of symptoms. Conclusion: Adding neurodynamic treatment to advice to remain active did not improve leg pain and disability at 2 weeks. Trial registration: NCT01954199. [Ferreira G, Stieven F, Araujo F, Wiebusch M, Rosa C, Plentz R, et al. (2016 Neurodynamic treatment did not improve

  2. Influence of experimental pain on the perception of action capabilities and performance of a maximal single-leg hop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Thibault; Hug, François; Hodges, Paul W; Tucker, Kylie

    2014-03-01

    Changes in an individual's state-for example, anxiety/chronic pain-can modify the perception of action capabilities and physical task requirements. In parallel, considerable literature supports altered motor performance during both acute and chronic pain. This study aimed to determine the effect of experimental pain on perception of action capabilities and performance of a dynamic motor task. Performance estimates and actual performance of maximal single-leg hops were recorded for both legs in 13 healthy participants before, during, and after an episode of acute pain induced by a single bolus injection of hypertonic saline into vastus lateralis of 1 leg, with the side counterbalanced among participants. Both estimation of performance and actual performance were smaller (P action-scaled relationship between perception and ability during acute pain. This study demonstrates that the relationship between perceived physical ability and actual performance is effectively updated during acute muscle pain. This match between perceived ability and performance could be relevant during clinical pain assessment, with the potential to be a biomarker of transition from acute to chronic pain state. Copyright © 2014 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Patients with low back pain differ from those who also have leg pain or signs of nerve root involvement – a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kongsted Alice

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leg pain associated with low back pain (LBP is recognized as a risk factor for a poor prognosis, and is included as a component in most LBP classification systems. The location of leg pain relative to the knee and the presence of a positive straight leg raise test have been suggested to have clinical implications. To understand differences between such leg pain subgroups, and whether differences include potentially modifiable characteristics, the purpose of this paper was to describe characteristics of patients classified into the Quebec Task Force (QTF subgroups of: 1 LBP only, 2 LBP and pain above the knee, 3 LBP and pain below the knee, and 4 LBP and signs of nerve root involvement. Methods Analysis of routine clinical data from an outpatient department. Based on patient reported data and clinical findings, patients were allocated to the QTF subgroups and described according to the domains of pain, activity limitation, work participation, psychology, general health and clinical examination findings. Results A total of 2,673 patients aged 18–95 years (median 47 who were referred for assessment of LBP were included. Increasing severity was consistently observed across the subgroups from LBP only to LBP with signs of nerve root involvement although subgroup differences were small. LBP patients with leg pain differed from those with LBP only on a wide variety of parameters, and patients with signs of nerve root involvement had a more severe profile on almost all measures compared with other patients with back-related leg pain. Conclusion LBP patients with pain referral to the legs were more severely affected than those with local LBP, and patients with signs of nerve root involvement were the ones most severily affected. These findings underpin the concurrent validity of the Quebec Task Force Classification. However, the small size of many between-subgroup differences amid the large variability in this sample of cross

  4. Evaluation of painful sensory symptoms in restless legs syndrome: experience from two clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornyak, Magdolna; Sohr, Mandy; Busse, Michael

    2011-02-01

    Although "uncomfortable and unpleasant" limb sensations are a core symptom of restless legs syndrome (RLS), change in sensory symptomatology is usually not evaluated as a treatment outcome. In two double-blind trials, patients with idiopathic RLS (n=357 in trial 615 and 398 in trial 604) were randomized to placebo or pramipexole (optimized at 0.125, 0.25, 0.50, or 0.75 mg/day). For entry, trial 604 also required at least moderate mood disturbance. In both trials, 12-week change in RLS-related limb pain was assessed using a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS). At baseline, approximately 75% of patients had limb-pain scores >30. Treatment with pramipexole yielded significant score reduction as early as day 5. At week 12, median score reduction for pramipexole relative to placebo was -33.5 vs. -11.0 (p<0.0001) in trial 615 and -31.0 vs. -11.0 (p<0.0001) in trial 604. Painful sensations may be more frequent in RLS than has previously been appreciated, and their amelioration may be a facet of pramipexole's benefit even in patients with concurrent mood disturbance. Limb pain assessment, e.g., by a VAS, is a useful measure of change in RLS symptom severity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Trigger point-related sympathetic nerve activity in chronic sciatic leg pain: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorupska, Elżbieta; Rychlik, Michał; Pawelec, Wiktoria; Bednarek, Agata; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2014-10-01

    Sciatica has classically been associated with irritation of the sciatic nerve by the vertebral disc and consequent inflammation. Some authors suggest that active trigger points in the gluteus minimus muscle can refer pain in similar way to sciatica. Trigger point diagnosis is based on Travel and Simons criteria, but referred pain and twitch response are significant confirmatory signs of the diagnostic criteria. Although vasoconstriction in the area of a latent trigger point has been demonstrated, the vasomotor reaction of active trigger points has not been examined. We report the case of a 22-year-old Caucasian European man who presented with a 3-year history of chronic sciatic-type leg pain. In the third year of symptoms, coexistent myofascial pain syndrome was diagnosed. Acupuncture needle stimulation of active trigger points under infrared thermovisual camera showed a sudden short-term vasodilatation (an autonomic phenomenon) in the area of referred pain. The vasodilatation spread from 0.2 to 171.9 cm(2) and then gradually decreased. After needling, increases in average and maximum skin temperature were seen as follows: for the thigh, changes were +2.6°C (average) and +3.6°C (maximum); for the calf, changes were +0.9°C (average) and +1.4°C (maximum). It is not yet known whether the vasodilatation observed was evoked exclusively by dry needling of active trigger points. The complex condition of the patient suggests that other variables might have influenced the infrared thermovision camera results. We suggest that it is important to check if vasodilatation in the area of referred pain occurs in all patients with active trigger points. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Effects of neural mobilization on pain, straight leg raise test and disability in patients with radicular low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haris Čolaković

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Radicular low back pain is a disorder involving the dysfunction of the lumbosacral nerve roots. Clinical rehabilitation approaches for low back pain include kinesiotherapy, and physical therapyprocedures: ice , rest , heat, ultrasound, TENS, but evidences regarding their effectiveness are lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine if nerve mobilization brings better improvements in pain, SLR testand functional disability in patients with radicular low back pain compared to standard physical therapy.Methods: The study was conducted on a 60 patients with Radicular low back pain, treated in Regional medical center "Dr Safet Mujić", Mostar, during the period from 01.04.2010 untill 31.04.2011. Patientswere divided into two groups. First group (n=30 received a 4-week rehabilitation program including neural mobilization and lumbar stabilization program. Second group (n=30 received a 4-week rehabilitation program including active range of motion (ROM exercises and lumbar stabilization program.Results: At the beginning, the two groups were not signifi cantly different in terms of score or SLR. After therapy there was statistically signifi cant improvement between groups in both VAS scores[Group A: 1.16±1.5; Group B: 2.25±2.2] and SLR [Group A: 80.9±17.4; Group B: 65.9±16.4]. ]. After the treatment, in group A, 46.6% (14 participants had been rated with 4, but in Group B: 33.3% (10 participants had been rated with 3.Conclusions: Patients treated with neural mobilization and lumbar stabilization showed better VAS scores and Straight Leg Test scores compared to patients treated with active range of motion exercises and lumbar stabilization. Further research to investigate their long term effi cacy is warranted, with emphasis on greater number of participants.

  7. Venous leg ulcer patients: a review of the literature on lifestyle and pain-related interventions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.M.; Achterberg, T. van; Reimer, W.S. op; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Laat, H.E.W. de

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Having a leg ulcer has a major impact on daily life. Lifestyle is mentioned in most leg ulcer guidelines but mostly without much emphasis on the subject. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Evidence for the effect of nutrition, leg elevation and exercise on the healing of leg ulcers was reconsidered.

  8. Effect of Butler's neural tissue mobilization and Mulligan's bent leg raise on pain and straight leg raise in patients of low back ache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambekar, Neha; Sabnis, Shaila; Phadke, Apoorva; Bedekar, Nilima

    2016-04-01

    Low back ache (LBA) is a common musculoskeletal disorder sometimes associated with a positive limited Straight leg raise (SLR) test. Mulligan's bent leg raise (BLR) and Butler's neural tissue mobilization (NTM) are commonly used techniques for the treatment of low back ache where SLR is limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of both the techniques on pain and limited SLR in patients with LBA. Thirty one patients with LBA with radiculopathy were randomly allocated into 2 groups; BLR [n = 16] NTM [n = 15]. The outcome measures i.e. visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain and universal goniometer for measuring SLR range of motion (SROM) were assessed at the baseline, post intervention and after 24 h (follow up). Within group analysis using paired t-test revealed a significant difference between pre-treatment and post-treatment VAS and SROM score(p  0.05). The study showed that both techniques produce immediate improvement in pain and SLR range but this effect was not maintained during the follow up period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain: part 1 of 3: symptoms and signs of central sensitisation in patients with low back (± leg) pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smart, Keith M

    2012-08-01

    As a mechanisms-based classification of pain \\'central sensitisation pain\\' (CSP) refers to pain arising from a dominance of neurophysiological dysfunction within the central nervous system. Symptoms and signs associated with an assumed dominance of CSP in patients attending for physiotherapy have not been extensively studied. The purpose of this study was to identify symptoms and signs associated with a clinical classification of CSP in patients with low back (± leg) pain. Using a cross-sectional, between-subjects design; four hundred and sixty-four patients with low back (± leg) pain were assessed using a standardised assessment protocol. Patients\\' pain was assigned a mechanisms-based classification based on experienced clinical judgement. Clinicians then completed a clinical criteria checklist specifying the presence or absence of various clinical criteria. A binary logistic regression analysis with Bayesian model averaging identified a cluster of three symptoms and one sign predictive of CSP, including: \\'Disproportionate, non-mechanical, unpredictable pattern of pain provocation in response to multiple\\/non-specific aggravating\\/easing factors\\

  10. Poor outcome in patients with spine-related leg or arm pain who are involved in compensation claims: a prospective study of patients in the secondary care sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, C; Leboeuf-Yde, C; Hestbaek, L

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether poor outcome after spinal pain episodes is linked with the claim process and, if so, whether this link is independent of other potential risk factors of chronic pain and disability in patients with spine-related leg or arm pain. METHODS: A 1-year prospective...... outcome study with internal control groups in two Danish secondary care, public, multidisciplinary, non-surgical spine clinics. Patients with low back pain (LBP) radiating to the leg (n = 1243) or with neck and arm pain thought to emanate from the neck (n = 202) were referred to the clinics...

  11. Kinematic analyses of trunk stability in one leg standing for individuals with recurrent low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Yong Woon; Kim, Dong Myung; Baek, Ju Yeoul; Lee, Dongchul C; Sung, Paul S

    2010-12-01

    This prospective study examined normalized stability differences based on dominance side and visual feedback. Subjects with low back pain (LBP) (n=26; 9 men, 17 women) and without LBP (n=28; 11 men, 17 women) participated in this study. All subjects were asked to maintain single leg standing balance with the contralateral hip flexed 90° for 25s. The outcome measures included normalized holding duration and stability. The combined rotation (R(xyz)) was also calculated to compare the upper and lower thorax and lumbar axes relative to the core spine axis. The holding duration was significantly different between groups (T=-2.21, p=0.03). The subjects without recurrent LBP (control group) demonstrated longer hold duration times (24.60±4.2s) than the subjects with recurrent LBP (21.2±7.1s). For the normalized hold duration, there was a significant difference between groups based on visual input (F=7.13, p=0.009). There was also a significant difference in standing stability based on visual input (F=93.93, p=0.0001) and trunk area (F=101.51, p=0.0001). In addition, the normalized stability was significantly different based on dominance and visual input (F=11.28, p=0.002). Therefore, trunk stability could prompt an uncoordinated bracing effect with poor proprioception from injury to passive structures or due to interference of pain during central processing of information in subjects with recurrent LBP. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Correlation between neurological leg deficits and reaction time of upper limbs among low-back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venna, S; Hurri, H; Alaranta, H

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine how neurological deficits of the leg, i.e. sensory deficit, deficient reflexes and muscular weakness, correlate with reaction times of upper limbs in a group with chronic low-back pain. Thirty-two patients were studied. Three sets of measurements of simple reaction time and choice reaction time of upper limbs were conducted at one-week intervals. Neurological deficits of the leg were recorded by a physician and the subjects answered a questionnaire about the severity of their low-back symptoms (Oswestry's index). We also defined a neurological index which reflected the total sum of the three types of leg deficits experienced by each of the subjects. Sensory deficit of the leg and the neurological index correlated strongly with slower reaction times of upper limbs, while the other two neurological deficits did not reach a level of significance. Sensory deficits of the leg seem to be an indicator of much greater motor disability than has been thought so far. The motor disability not only appears distally from the lumbar radicular damage caused for example by an intervertebral herniation, it also seems to relate to psychomotor reaction more generally, even on upper limbs.

  13. Characteristics of trunk control during crook-lying unilateral leg raising in different types of chronic low back pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohe, Atsushi; Kimura, Teiji; Goh, Ah-Cheng; Oba, Akemi; Takahashi, Jun; Mogami, Yuji

    2015-04-15

    Cross-sectional observational study. To quantitatively clarify the characteristics of trunk control during unilateral leg-raising movement in different types of nonspecific chronic low back pain (NS-CLBP) patients who were identified by aggravation of symptoms during trunk movement. Although there is a need to classify NS-CLBP patients for clinical decision making in physical therapy, the characteristics of trunk control during unilateral leg-raising movement in different types of NS-CLBP patients have not been quantitatively analyzed in previous studies by simultaneously measuring the lumbar spine movement, trunk muscle activity, and leg movement. Thirty NS-CLBP patients, of whom 13 were aggravated by trunk flexion (flexion group) and 17 were aggravated by trunk extension (extension group), and 30 healthy controls performed crook-lying unilateral leg-raising movement on the painful side in patient group and the dominant leg in controls. During the unilateral leg-raising movement, pressure changes produced by the movement of the lumbar lordotic curve, measured by a custom-made recording device, were used as indices of the lumbar spine movement. Trunk muscle activities were recorded by surface electromyography and diagnostic ultrasonography. The pressure changes and trunk muscle activities were statistically compared among the 3 groups. At foot-off during unilateral leg-raising movement, the extension group demonstrated increase in pressure changes, whereas the flexion group and controls demonstrated decrease in pressure changes. Bilateral external obliques muscle activities in the extension group were significantly larger than those in the flexion group and controls (P < 0.05). This study demonstrated that the characteristics of trunk control during unilateral leg-raising movement were different depending on the types of NS-CLBP patients. These results indicate that patients with NS-CLBP might select compensatory trunk control strategies subconsciously to prevent

  14. What do patients value about spinal manipulation and home exercise for back-related leg pain? A qualitative study within a controlled clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maiers, M.; Hondras, M. A.; Salsbury, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient perceptions may influence the effectiveness and utilization of healthcare interventions, particularly for complex health conditions such as sciatica or back-related leg pain (BRLP). Objectives To explore BRLP patients’ perceptions of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) and home...

  15. Chiropractic and self-care for back-related leg pain: design of a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulz Craig A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Back-related leg pain (BRLP is a common variation of low back pain (LBP, with lifetime prevalence estimates as high as 40%. Often disabling, BRLP accounts for greater work loss, recurrences, and higher costs than uncomplicated LBP and more often leads to surgery with a lifetime incidence of 10% for those with severe BRLP, compared to 1-2% for those with LBP. In the US, half of those with back-related conditions seek CAM treatments, the most common of which is chiropractic care. While there is preliminary evidence suggesting chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy is beneficial for patients with BRLP, there is insufficient evidence currently available to assess the effectiveness of this care. Methods/Design This study is a two-site, prospective, parallel group, observer-blinded randomized clinical trial (RCT. A total of 192 study patients will be recruited from the Twin Cities, MN (n = 122 and Quad Cities area in Iowa and Illinois (n = 70 to the research clinics at WHCCS and PCCR, respectively. It compares two interventions: chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy (SMT plus home exercise program (HEP to HEP alone (minimal intervention comparison for patients with subacute or chronic back-related leg pain. Discussion Back-related leg pain (BRLP is a costly and often disabling variation of the ubiquitous back pain conditions. As health care costs continue to climb, the search for effective treatments with few side-effects is critical. While SMT is the most commonly sought CAM treatment for LBP sufferers, there is only a small, albeit promising, body of research to support its use for patients with BRLP. This study seeks to fill a critical gap in the LBP literature by performing the first full scale RCT assessing chiropractic SMT for patients with sub-acute or chronic BRLP using important patient-oriented and objective biomechanical outcome measures. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00494065

  16. Neurodynamic mobilization in a collegiate long jumper with exercise-induced lateral leg and ankle pain: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Terry; Sneed, Tom; Hamann, Herb

    2017-09-22

    Case Report. The purpose of this case report is to describe nerve mobilization in the treatment of lower extremity neuropathic pain in a female collegiate long jumper. A 21 year-old long jumper presented 7 months after onset of ankle and leg pain. She complained of "aching" pain over the lateral ankle, radiating proximally to just superior to the lateral knee. Neurodynamic testing of the sural and superficial branch of the fibular nerves was positive. Interventions/Outcomes: Persistent neuropathic pain which impeded sport participation in a collegiate athlete did not improve using traditional rehabilitation intervention, but did ameliorate as a result of an intervention which included self-administered, supervised nerve mobilization of the sural and superficial branch of fibular nerve. The patient improved in all outcome measures including the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS), Numerical Pain Rating Scale (NPRS), and the Global Rating of Change (GROC). In a female collegiate athlete with persistent neuropathic pain, initial improvements were achieved with traditional rehabilitation, but her pain continued. Considerable additional improvements were achieved following the addition of self-administered, supervised nerve mobilization. Neurodynamic testing should be performed on patients with possible peripheral nerve involvement and treatment commenced if positive.

  17. Patients' Attitudes Toward Nonphysician Screening of Low Back and Low Back Related Leg Pain Complaints Referred for Surgical Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, Joshua; Busse, Jason W; Drew, Brian; Reddy, Kesava; Cenic, Aleksa; Kachur, Edward; Murty, Naresh; Candelaria, Henry; Moore, Ainsley E; Riva, John J

    2017-03-01

    A questionnaire survey. The aim of this study was to explore patient attitudes toward screening to assess suitability for low back surgery by nonphysician health care providers. Canadian spine surgeons have shown support for nonphysician screening to assess and triage patients with low back pain and low back related leg pain. However, patients' attitudes toward this proposed model are largely unknown. We administered a 19-item cross-sectional survey to adults with low back and/or low back related leg pain who were referred for elective surgical assessment at one of five spine surgeons' clinics in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The survey inquired about demographics, expectations regarding wait time for surgical consultation, as well as willingness to pay, travel, and be screened by nonphysician health care providers. Eighty low back patients completed our survey, for a response rate of 86.0% (80 of 93). Most respondents (72.5%; 58 of 80) expected to be seen by a surgeon within 3 months of referral, and 88.8% (71 of 80) indicated willingness to undergo screening with a nonphysician health care provider to establish whether they were potentially a surgical candidate. Half of respondents (40 of 80) were willing to travel >50 km for assessment by a nonphysician health care provider, and 46.2% were willing to pay out-of-pocket (25.6% were unsure). However, most respondents (70.0%; 56 of 80) would still want to see a surgeon if they were ruled out as a surgical candidate, and written comments from respondents revealed concern regarding agreement between surgeons' and nonphysicians' determination of surgical candidates. Patients referred for surgical consultation for low back or low back related leg pain are largely willing to accept screening by nonphysician health care providers. Future research should explore the concordance of screening results between surgeon and nonphysician health care providers. 3.

  18. Do diagnostic segmental nerve root blocks in chronic Dow back pain patients with radiation to the leg lack distinct sensory effects? A preliminary study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, AP; Groen, G J; Wilder-Smith, O H G; Richardson, J; van Egmond, J; Crul, B J P

    Background. The present preliminary study documents the effects of a selective nerve root block (SNB) with short or long acting local anaesthetic compared with baseline measurements in patients with chronic low back pain radiating to the leg with maximum pain in one dermatome (1-4). Methods. Ten

  19. Evaluating the Influence of Massage on Leg Strength, Swelling, and Pain Following a Half-Marathon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Lance G.; Dawson, Kimberley A.; Tiidus, Peter M.

    2004-01-01

    Massage therapy is commonly used following endurance running races with the expectation that it will enhance post-run recovery of muscle function and reduce soreness. A limited number of studies have reported little or no influence of massage therapy on post-exercise muscle recovery. However, no studies have been conducted in a field setting to assess the potential for massage to influence muscle recovery following an actual endurance running race. To evaluate the potential for repeated massage therapy interventions to influence recovery of quadriceps and hamstring muscle soreness, recovery of quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength and reduction of upper leg muscle swelling over a two week recovery period following an actual road running race. Twelve adult recreational runners (8 male, 4 female) completed a half marathon (21.1 km) road race. On days 1,4, 8, and 11 post-race, subjects received 30 minutes of standardized massage therapy performed by a registered massage therapist on a randomly assigned massage treatment leg, while the other (control) leg received no massage treatment. Two days prior to the race (baseline) and preceding the treatments on post-race days 1, 4, 8, and 11 the following measures were conducted on each of the massage and control legs: strength of quadriceps and hamstring muscles, leg swelling, and soreness perception. At day 1, post-race quadriceps peak torque was significantly reduced (p massaged and control legs, revealed no significant differences (p > 0.05). All measures had returned to baseline at day 11. Massage did not affect the recovery of muscles in terms of physiological measures of strength, swelling, or soreness. However, questionnaires revealed that 7 of the 12 participants perceived that the massaged leg felt better upon recovery. Key Points Massage does not appear to affect physiological indices of muscle recovery post exercise. Massage does appear to positively influence perceptions of recovery. More research needs to be

  20. Self-reported pain severity, quality of life, disability, anxiety and depression in patients classified with 'nociceptive', 'peripheral neuropathic' and 'central sensitisation' pain. The discriminant validity of mechanisms-based classifications of low back (±leg) pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smart, Keith M

    2012-04-01

    Evidence of validity is required to support the use of mechanisms-based classifications of pain clinically. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the discriminant validity of \\'nociceptive\\' (NP), \\'peripheral neuropathic\\' (PNP) and \\'central sensitisation\\' (CSP) as mechanisms-based classifications of pain in patients with low back (±leg) pain by evaluating the extent to which patients classified in this way differ from one another according to health measures associated with various dimensions of pain. This study employed a cross-sectional, between-subjects design. Four hundred and sixty-four patients with low back (±leg) pain were assessed using a standardised assessment protocol. Clinicians classified each patient\\'s pain using a mechanisms-based classification approach. Patients completed a number of self-report measures associated with pain severity, health-related quality of life, functional disability, anxiety and depression. Discriminant validity was evaluated using a multivariate analysis of variance. There was a statistically significant difference between pain classifications on the combined self-report measures, (p = .001; Pillai\\'s Trace = .33; partial eta squared = .16). Patients classified with CSP (n = 106) reported significantly more severe pain, poorer general health-related quality of life, and greater levels of back pain-related disability, depression and anxiety compared to those classified with PNP (n = 102) and NP (n = 256). A similar pattern was found in patients with PNP compared to NP. Mechanisms-based pain classifications may reflect meaningful differences in attributes underlying the multidimensionality of pain. Further studies are required to evaluate the construct and criterion validity of mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain.

  1. EVALUATING THE INFLUENCE OF MASSAGE ON LEG STRENGTH, SWELLING, AND PAIN FOLLOWING A HALF-MARATHON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M. Tiidus

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Massage therapy is commonly used following endurance running races with the expectation that it will enhance post-run recovery of muscle function and reduce soreness. A limited number of studies have reported little or no influence of massage therapy on post-exercise muscle recovery. However, no studies have been conducted in a field setting to assess the potential for massage to influence muscle recovery following an actual endurance running race. To evaluate the potential for repeated massage therapy interventions to influence recovery of quadriceps and hamstring muscle soreness, recovery of quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength and reduction of upper leg muscle swelling over a two week recovery period following an actual road running race. Twelve adult recreational runners (8 male, 4 female completed a half marathon (21.1 km road race. On days 1,4, 8, and 11 post-race, subjects received 30 minutes of standardized massage therapy performed by a registered massage therapist on a randomly assigned massage treatment leg, while the other (control leg received no massage treatment. Two days prior to the race (baseline and preceding the treatments on post-race days 1, 4, 8, and 11 the following measures were conducted on each of the massage and control legs: strength of quadriceps and hamstring muscles, leg swelling, and soreness perception. At day 1, post-race quadriceps peak torque was significantly reduced (p 0.05. All measures had returned to baseline at day 11. Massage did not affect the recovery of muscles in terms of physiological measures of strength, swelling, or soreness. However, questionnaires revealed that 7 of the 12 participants perceived that the massaged leg felt better upon recovery.

  2. Response of the muscles in the pelvic floor and the lower lateral abdominal wall during the Active Straight Leg Raise in women with and without pelvic girdle pain: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjödahl, Jenny; Gutke, Annelie; Ghaffari, Ghazaleh; Strömberg, Tomas; Öberg, Birgitta

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between activation of the stabilizing muscles of the lumbopelvic region during the Active Straight Leg Raise test and pelvic girdle pain remains unknown. Therefore, the aim was to examine automatic contractions in relation to pre-activation in the muscles of the pelvic floor and the lower lateral abdominal wall during leg lifts, performed as the Active Straight Leg Raise test, in women with and without persistent postpartum pelvic girdle pain. Sixteen women with pelvic girdle pain and eleven pain-free women performed contralateral and ipsilateral leg lifts, while surface electromyographic activity was recorded from the pelvic floor and unilaterally from the lower lateral abdominal wall. As participants performed leg lifts onset time was calculated as the time from increased muscle activity to leg lift initiation. No significant differences were observed between the groups during the contralateral leg lift. During the subsequent ipsilateral leg lift, pre-activation in the pelvic floor muscles was observed in 36% of women with pelvic girdle pain and in 91% of pain-free women (P=0.01). Compared to pain-free women, women with pelvic girdle pain also showed significantly later onset time in both the pelvic floor muscles (P=0.01) and the muscles of the lower lateral abdominal wall (P<0.01). We suggest that disturbed motor activation patterns influence women's ability to stabilize the pelvis during leg lifts. This could be linked to provocation of pain during repeated movements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cultural adaptation to Brazilian Portuguese of the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability revised (FLACCr scale of pain assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Aparecida Bussotti

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: to perform the translation into Brazilian Portuguese and cultural adaptation of the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability revised (FLACCr scale, with children under 18 years old, affected by cerebral palsy, presenting or not cognitive impairment and unable to report their pain.Method: methodological development study of translation into Portuguese and cultural adaptation of the FLACCr. After approval by the ethics committee, the process aimed at translation and back-translation, evaluation of translation and back-translation using the Delphi technique and assessment of cultural equivalence. The process included the five categories of the scale and the four application instructions, considering levels of agreement equal to or greater than 80%.Results: it was necessary three rounds of the Delphi technique to achieve consensus among experts. The agreement achieved for the five categories was: Face 95.5%, Legs 90%, Activity 94.4%, Cry 94.4% and Consolability 99.4%. The four instructions achieved the following consensus levels: 1st 99.1%, 2nd 99.2%, 3rd 99.1% and 4th 98.3%.Conclusion: the method enabled the translation and cultural adaptation of the FLACCr. This is a study able to expand the knowledge of Brazilian professionals on pain assessment in children with CP

  4. Cultural adaptation to Brazilian Portuguese of the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability revised (FLACCr) scale of pain assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussotti, Edna Aparecida; Guinsburg, Ruth; Pedreira, Mavilde da Luz Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    to perform the translation into Brazilian Portuguese and cultural adaptation of the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability revised (FLACCr) scale, with children under 18 years old, affected by cerebral palsy, presenting or not cognitive impairment and unable to report their pain. methodological development study of translation into Portuguese and cultural adaptation of the FLACCr. After approval by the ethics committee, the process aimed at translation and back-translation, evaluation of translation and back-translation using the Delphi technique and assessment of cultural equivalence. The process included the five categories of the scale and the four application instructions, considering levels of agreement equal to or greater than 80%. it was necessary three rounds of the Delphi technique to achieve consensus among experts. The agreement achieved for the five categories was: Face 95.5%, Legs 90%, Activity 94.4%, Cry 94.4% and Consolability 99.4%. The four instructions achieved the following consensus levels: 1st 99.1%, 2nd 99.2%, 3rd 99.1% and 4th 98.3%. the method enabled the translation and cultural adaptation of the FLACCr. This is a study able to expand the knowledge of Brazilian professionals on pain assessment in children with CP.

  5. The Influence of Dual Pressure Biofeedback Units on Pelvic Rotation and Abdominal Muscle Activity during the Active Straight Leg Raise in Women with Chronic Lower Back Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Noh, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Gyoung-Mo; Ha, Sung-min; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to assess the influence of applying dual pressure biofeedback units (DPBUs) on the angle of pelvic rotation and abdominal muscle activity during the active straight leg raise (ASLR). [Subjects] Seventeen patients with low-back pain (LBP) participated in this study. [Methods] The subjects were asked to perform an active straight leg raise (ASLR) without a PBU, with a single PBU, and with DPBUs. The angles of pelvic rotation were measured using a three-dimensi...

  6. The influence of changes in trunk and pelvic posture during single leg standing on hip and thigh muscle activation in a pain free population

    OpenAIRE

    Prior, Simon; Mitchell, Tim; Whiteley, Rod; O’Sullivan, Peter; Williams, Benjamin K; Racinais, Sebastien; Farooq, Abdulaziz

    2014-01-01

    Background Thigh muscle injuries commonly occur during single leg loading tasks and patterns of muscle activation are thought to contribute to these injuries. The influence trunk and pelvis posture has on hip and thigh muscle activation during single leg stance is unknown and was investigated in a pain free population to determine if changes in body posture result in consistent patterns of changes in muscle activation. Methods Hip and thigh muscle activation patterns were compared in 22 asymp...

  7. The role of pain coping and kinesiophobia in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 of the legs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinus, J.; Perez, R.S.G.M.; van Eijs, F.; Van Gestel, M.A.; Geurts, J.W.; Huygen, F.J.; Bauer, M.C.; van Hilten, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate to what extent pain coping and kinesiophobia contribute to limitations in activity and participation in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) of the lower limbs. METHODS: A total of 238 patients with CRPS-1 of

  8. Time course of subjective pain ratings, and wound and leg tenderness after hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Dahl, J B; Erichsen, C J

    1997-01-01

    .0002). CONCLUSION: These results indicate that wound pressure algometry correlates to postoperative pain at rest and during movement and may be an alternative way of assessing wound pain and tenderness. Increased tenderness to mechanical stimulation remote from the surgical wound could not be demonstrated.......BACKGROUND: Little information is available on time course of wound tenderness and relationship to subjective pain ratings following surgery. Furthermore, it is not clarified whether surgical procedures may induce hyperalgesia to mechanical stimulation outside the area of the surgical incision. We...... have therefore assessed postoperative pain and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) adjacent to and remote from the surgical incision in 16 patients undergoing hysterectomy. METHODS: Pressure pain threshold was assessed with pressure algometry preoperatively, 4 and 6 and 1, 4 and 8 d after surgery...

  9. Restless legs syndrome: a new entity of neuropathic pain? Treatment with prolonged release oxycodone/naloxone combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemignani F

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Franco Gemignani,1 Andrea Melpignano,1,2 Giulia Milioli,1,2 Silvia Riccardi,1,2 Liborio Parrino1,2 1Neurology Unit, Department of Neurosciences, University of Parma, Parma, Italy; 2Sleep Disorders Center, Department of Neurosciences, University of Parma, Parma, Italy Abstract: Restless legs syndrome (RLS is a disorder of sensorimotor integration characterized by an urge to move the legs when at rest, especially at night or in the evening, which is relieved by movement. Sensory symptoms may be prominent, often exhibiting features consistent with neuropathic pain. Iron deficiency and genetic factors are implicated in RLS causation in most patients. The pathogenetic model of impaired circadian dopaminergic modulation of sensorimotor integration circuitry at the spinal level is fitting with the co-occurrence of movement disorders, sensory symptoms, and sleep disruption in RLS. Accordingly, levodopa and dopamine agonists are effective for RLS symptoms, which compensate for the impaired descending control by diencephalo-spinal dopa(minergic pathway. Dopamine agonists are usually indicated as the first-line therapy, but their use in long-term treatment is often complicated by augmentation and impulse control disorder, thus alpha-2-delta ligands also are now considered the first line of treatment. It has been recognized that endogenous opioid system is also involved in the mechanisms generating RLS, possibly through an impaired modulation of pain pathways. Opioids can be considered as an alternative therapy, particularly in patients with augmentation and/or refractory to other treatments. Recently introduced prolonged-release oxycodone–naloxone was efficacious for short-term treatment of patients with severe RLS inadequately controlled with previous treatment. It will be important to assess whether opioids, as well as other drugs, are especially effective in definite RLS subtypes such as the painful phenotype. Keywords: small fiber neuropathy

  10. Comprehensive study of back and leg pain improvements after adult spinal deformity surgery: analysis of 421 patients with 2-year follow-up and of the impact of the surgery on treatment satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Justin K; Smith, Justin S; Clark, Aaron J; Lafage, Virginie; Kim, Han Jo; Rolston, John D; Eastlack, Robert; Hart, Robert A; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Kelly, Michael P; Kebaish, Khaled; Gupta, Munish; Klineberg, Eric; Hostin, Richard; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Schwab, Frank; Ames, Christopher P

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT Back and leg pain are the primary outcomes of adult spinal deformity (ASD) and predict patients' seeking of surgical management. The authors sought to characterize changes in back and leg pain after operative or nonoperative management of ASD. Outcomes were assessed according to pain severity, type of surgical procedure, Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-Schwab spine deformity class, and patient satisfaction. METHODS This study retrospectively reviewed data in a prospective multicenter database of ASD patients. Inclusion criteria were the following: age > 18 years and presence of spinal deformity as defined by a scoliosis Cobb angle ≥ 20°, sagittal vertical axis length ≥ 5 cm, pelvic tilt angle ≥ 25°, or thoracic kyphosis angle ≥ 60°. Patients were grouped into nonoperated and operated subcohorts and by the type of surgical procedure, spine SRS-Schwab deformity class, preoperative pain severity, and patient satisfaction. Numerical rating scale (NRS) scores of back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores, physical component summary (PCS) scores of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, minimum clinically important differences (MCIDs), and substantial clinical benefits (SCBs) were assessed. RESULTS Patients in whom ASD had been operatively managed were 6 times more likely to have an improvement in back pain and 3 times more likely to have an improvement in leg pain than patients in whom ASD had been nonoperatively managed. Patients whose ASD had been managed nonoperatively were more likely to have their back or leg pain remain the same or worsen. The incidence of postoperative leg pain was 37.0% at 6 weeks postoperatively and 33.3% at the 2-year follow-up (FU). At the 2-year FU, among patients with any preoperative back or leg pain, 24.3% and 37.8% were free of back and leg pain, respectively, and among patients with severe (NRS scores of 7-10) preoperative back or leg pain, 21.0% and 32.8% were free of back and leg pain, respectively

  11. Application of a classification system and description of a combined manual therapy intervention: a case with low back related leg pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Shannon M; Scott, Daphne R

    2010-06-01

    Low back pain and leg pain commonly occur together. Multiple factors can cause low back related leg pain; therefore, identification of the source of symptoms is required in order to develop an appropriate intervention program. The patient in this case presented with low back and leg pain. A patho-mechanism based classification is described in combination with the patient's subjective and objective examination findings to guide treatment. The patient's symptoms improved marginally with intervention addressing primarily the musculoskeletal impairments and with intervention addressing primarily the neurodynamic impairments. Full functional improvements were attained with a manual therapy intervention directed at both mechanisms simultaneously. The approach described in this case address a mixed pathology utilizing passive accessory and passive physiological lumbar mobilizations in combination with lower extremity neurodynamic mobilization. The patient reported complete resolution of symptoms after a total of seven visits over a period of 6 weeks. While specific guidelines do not yet exist for treatment based on the classification approach utilized, this case report provides an example of manual therapy to address low back related leg pain of mixed pathology.

  12. Novel 10-kHz High-frequency Therapy (HF10 Therapy) Is Superior to Traditional Low-frequency Spinal Cord Stimulation for the Treatment of Chronic Back and Leg Pain: The SENZA-RCT Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapural, Leonardo; Yu, Cong; Doust, Matthew W; Gliner, Bradford E; Vallejo, Ricardo; Sitzman, B Todd; Amirdelfan, Kasra; Morgan, Donna M; Brown, Lora L; Yearwood, Thomas L; Bundschu, Richard; Burton, Allen W; Yang, Thomas; Benyamin, Ramsin; Burgher, Abram H

    2015-10-01

    Current treatments for chronic pain have limited effectiveness and commonly known side effects. Given the prevalence and burden of intractable pain, additional therapeutic approaches are desired. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) delivered at 10 kHz (as in HF10 therapy) may provide pain relief without the paresthesias typical of traditional low-frequency SCS. The objective of this randomized, parallel-arm, noninferiority study was to compare long-term safety and efficacy of SCS therapies in patients with back and leg pain. A total of 198 subjects with both back and leg pain were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to a treatment group across 10 comprehensive pain treatment centers. Of these, 171 passed a temporary trial and were implanted with an SCS system. Responders (the primary outcome) were defined as having 50% or greater back pain reduction with no stimulation-related neurological deficit. At 3 months, 84.5% of implanted HF10 therapy subjects were responders for back pain and 83.1% for leg pain, and 43.8% of traditional SCS subjects were responders for back pain and 55.5% for leg pain (P back and leg pain comparisons). The relative ratio for responders was 1.9 (95% CI, 1.4 to 2.5) for back pain and 1.5 (95% CI, 1.2 to 1.9) for leg pain. The superiority of HF10 therapy over traditional SCS for leg and back pain was sustained through 12 months (P back and leg pain with broad applicability to patients, physicians, and payers.

  13. Comparison between Infusion Pumps: Fentanyl/Ketamine and Fentanyl/Paracetamol in Pain control Following Tight and Leg Surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Mahmoodiyeh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adjuvants such as ketamine, promethazine and paracetamol could bring up patients satisfaction and control harmful effects of opioids besides lessening their needed doses, as seen by fentanyl/paracetamol and fentanyl/ketamine combination before. The current study headed to compare paracetamol and ketamine in addition to fentanyl applied by infusion pumps in order to pain relief following major surgery.Methods: Through a double blinded randomized clinical trial, patients between18 and 65 with elective surgery for tight or leg fractures with ASA Class 1 and 2 referring to a university hospital in Arak, a town in central region of Iran, were recruited and used infusion pump for their postoperative pain control. The participants were divided into cases and controls regarding using ketamine/fentanyl (KF or paracetamol/fentanyl (PF infusion pumps.Results: The mean pain score was totally 3.87 with higher value in KF (5.06 and lower in PF (4.5 immediately after finishing surgery and getting conscious when started using infusion pump. There was no statistical difference between the groups in this regard. Concerning the side effects of the applied medications, blood pressure and heart rate had no differences comparing the groups.Conclusion: This study showed that paracetamol used in infusion pump can be brilliant in pain control after major surgeries like what done in lower extremities and joint replacement while lessens opioid use. Although paracetamol was more effective than ketamine in the current trial, more qualified studies at bigger size and in other fields of surgery beside orthopedic ones would be useful to support the effects if applicable.Keywords: Infusion pump, Ketamine, Paracetamol, Fentanyl, Postoperative pain

  14. Intra-observer and interobserver reliability ofOne Leg Stand Test as a measure of posturalbalance in low back pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo, Thomas; Iversen, Elena; Andersen, Niels Trolle

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the absolute and relative reliability of intra-observer and interobserver To determine the absolute and relative reliability of intra-observer and interobserver measurements of postural balance using the One Leg Stand Test in patients with low back pain. Patients and methods...... in patients with chronic The One Leg Stand Test can be used to test postural balance in patients with chronic low back pain, as the reliability of the test was acceptable.......: Forty-eight patients with chronic low back pain advised to do exercise were : Forty-eight patients with chronic low back pain advised to do exercise were included. A test protocol was established based on review of the literature and a pilot test. Patients were timed for their ability to stand on one...

  15. Influences of spinal decompression therapy and general traction therapy on the pain, disability, and straight leg raising of patients with intervertebral disc herniation

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jioun; Lee, Sangyong; Hwangbo, Gak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify how spinal decompression therapy and general traction therapy influence the pain, disability, and straight leg raise (SLR) ability of patients with intervertebral disc herniation. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 patients with chronic lumbar pain who were divided into a spinal decompression therapy group (SDTG, n=15), and a general traction therapy group (GTTG, n=15). [Methods] The SDTG used a spinal decompression device, and the GTTG used a ...

  16. Aortic Dissection and Thrombosis Diagnosed by Emergency Ultrasound in a Patient with Leg Pain and Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann H. Tsung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a case of aortic dissection and abdominal aortic aneurysm thrombosis in a 78-year-old male who presented to the emergency department (ED complaining of lower extremity and paralysis for the past 1.5 hours. The initial vital signs in the ED were as follows: blood pressure (BP 132/88 mmHg, heart rate (HR 96, respiratory rate (RR 14, and an oxygen saturation of 94% at room air. Physical exam was notable for pale and cold left leg. The ED physician was unable to palpate or detect a Doppler signal in the left femoral artery. Bedside ultrasound was performed which showed non-pulsatile left femoral artery and limited flow on color Doppler. Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening ultrasound was performed showing a 4.99 cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm and an intra-aortic thrombus with an intimal flap. Vascular surgery was promptly contacted and the patient underwent emergent aorto-bi-femoral bypass, bilateral four compartment fasciotomy, right common femoral artery endarterectomy with profundoplasty, and subsequent left leg amputation. Emergency physicians should utilize bedside ultrasound in patients who present with risk factors or threatening signs and symptoms that may suggest aortic dissection or aneurysm. Bedside ultrasound decreases time to definitive treatment and the mortality of the patients.

  17. Pelvic and hip kinematics during single-leg drop-landing are altered in sports participants with long-standing groin pain: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janse van Rensburg, L; Dare, M; Louw, Q; Crous, L; Cockroft, J; Williams, L; Olivier, B

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the differences in three-dimensional pelvic and hip kinematics during a single-leg drop-landing task in active sports participants with long-standing groin pain compared to healthy matched controls. This was a descriptive study incorporating a cross-sectional design. The study was conducted at the Unit for Human Movement Analysis, Stellenbosch University, South Africa. The study sample was comprised of 20 male club level soccer, rugby, running and cycling participants between the ages of 18 and 55 years. Ten cases with long-standing groin pain and ten asymptomatic matched controls participated. Three-dimensional pelvic and hip kinematics were captured with an optical motion capture system during a single-leg drop-landing task. Participants with groin pain landed with more downward lateral pelvic tilt (0.77°, p = 0.01, r = 0.35), hip abduction (2.05°, p Sports participants with long-standing groin pain have altered pelvic and hip kinematics during single-leg drop-landing compared to healthy controls. The kinematic differences may contribute towards the persistent nature of groin pain, although these strategies may also be present as a result of the presence or the expectation of pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Effectiveness of Mechanical Traction Among Subgroups of Patients With Low Back Pain and Leg Pain: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, Anne; Fritz, Julie M; Childs, John D; Brennan, Gerard P

    2016-03-01

    Randomized clinical trial. Background The recommended initial management strategy for patients with low back pain and signs of nerve root compression is conservative treatment, but there is little evidence to guide the most appropriate management strategy. Preliminary research suggests that a treatment protocol of mechanical traction and extension-oriented exercises may be effective, particularly in a specific subgroup of patients. To examine the effectiveness of mechanical traction in patients with lumbar nerve root compression and within a predefined subgroup. One hundred twenty patients with low back pain with nerve root compression were recruited from physical therapy clinics. Using predefined subgrouping criteria, patients were stratified at baseline and randomized to receive an extension-oriented treatment approach with or without the addition of mechanical traction. During a 6-week period, patients received up to 12 treatment visits. Primary outcomes of pain and disability were collected at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year by assessors blinded to group allocation. Outcomes were examined using linear mixed-model analyses examining change over time by treatment and the interaction between treatment and subgrouping status. The mean ± SD age of participants was 41.1 ± 11.3 years, median duration of symptoms was 62 days, and 57% were male. No significant differences in disability or pain outcomes were noted between treatment groups at any time point, nor was any interaction found between subgroup status and treatment. Patients with lumbar nerve root compression presenting for physical therapy can expect significant changes in disability and pain over a 6-week treatment period. There is no evidence that mechanical lumbar traction in combination with an extension-oriented treatment is superior to extension-oriented exercises alone in the management of these patients or within a predefined subgroup of patients. The study protocol was registered with Clinical

  19. Subcutaneous Stimulation as an Additional Therapy to Spinal Cord Stimulation for the Treatment of Low Back Pain and Leg Pain in Failed Back Surgery Syndrome: Four-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm-Faber, Tanja E; Aukes, Hans; van Gorp, Eric-Jan; Gültuna, Ismail

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the efficacy of long-term follow-up of subcutaneous stimulation (SubQ) as an additional therapy for patients with failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) with chronic refractory pain, for whom spinal cord stimulation (SCS) alone was unsuccessful in treating low back pain. Prospective case series. FBSS patients with leg and/or low back pain whose conventional therapies had failed, received a combination of SCS (8-contact Octad lead, 3877-45 cm, Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA) and/or SubQ (4-contact Quad Plus lead (s), 2888-28 cm, Medtronic). Initially, an Octad lead was placed in the epidural space for SCS for a trial stimulation to assess the suppression of leg and/or low back pain. Where SCS alone was insufficient in treating low back pain, lead(s) were placed superficially in the subcutaneous tissue of the lower back, exactly in the middle of the pain area. A pulse generator (Prime Advanced, 37702, Medtronic) was implanted if the patient reported more than 50% pain relief during the trial period. We investigated the long-term effect of neuromodulation on pain with the visual analog scale (VAS), and disability using the Quebec Pain Disability Scale. The results after 46 months are presented. Eleven patients, five men and six women (age 51 ± 8 years, mean ± SD) were included in the pilot study. In nine cases, SCS was used in combination with SubQ leads. Two patients received only SubQ leads. In one patient, the SCS + SubQ system was removed after nine months and these results were not taken into account for the analysis. Baseline scores for leg (N = 8) and low back pain (N = 10) were VASbl: 59 ± 15 and VASbl: 63 ± 14, respectively. The long-term follow-up period was 46 ± 4 months. SCS significantly reduced leg pain after 12 months (VAS12: 20 ± 11, p12 = 0.001) and 46 months (VAS46: 37 ± 17, p46 = 0.027). Similarly, SubQ significantly reduced back pain after 12 months(VAS12: 33 ± 16, p12 = 0.001) and 46 months

  20. Leg stiffness, valgus knee motion, and Q-angle are associated with hypertrophic soft patella tendon and idiopathic knee pain in adolescent basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satkunskiene, Danguole; Mickevicius, Mantas; Snieckus, Audrius; Kamandulis, Sigitas

    2017-01-01

    Knee pain without knee degenerative symptoms is a common phenomenon among young basketball players. The aim of this study was to identify factors predisposing young basketball players to suffer from knee pain. The study involved 20 male adolescent (14-15 years) basketball players who were divided into two equal groups based on knee pain symptoms. Legs torque was tested on an isokinetic dynamometer. The length, elongation and the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the patellar tendon were measured with ultrasonography. Quadriceps angle (Q-angle), knee valgus motion, and joint angular displacement in the sagittal plane were analyzed using video recording during countermovement jump. Ground reaction force was measured using a force platform. Knee pain (KP) participants had a significantly lower Q-angle (P=0.045) and lower maximum varus knee angle (P=0.035), and a greater knee inside displacement (P=0.039) during squat phase. In the KP group, the CSA at the top of the tendon was significantly greater than in the middle (P=0.006) and at the bottom (P=0.039). Absolute tendon stiffness (P=0.013) and Young's modulus (P=0.034) were significantly lower in the KP group compared with controls. Leg stiffness during landing was significantly greater in the control group (P=0.015). Leg stiffness, valgus knee motion, and Q-angle are associated with hypertrophic soft patella tendon and idiopathic knee pain in adolescent basketball players.

  1. Clinical course, characteristics and prognostic indicators in patients presenting with back and leg pain in primary care. The ATLAS study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinou Kika

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low-back related leg pain with or without nerve root involvement is associated with a poor prognosis compared to low back pain (LBP alone. Compared to the literature investigating prognostic indicators of outcome for LBP, there is limited evidence on prognostic factors for low back-related leg pain including the group with nerve root pain. This 1 year prospective consultation-based observational cohort study will describe the clinical, imaging, demographic characteristics and health economic outcomes for the whole cohort, will investigate differences and identify prognostic indicators of outcome (i.e. change in disability at 12 months, for the whole cohort and, separately, for those classified with and without nerve root pain. In addition, nested qualitative studies will provide insights on the clinical consultation and the impact of diagnosis and treatment on patients' symptom management and illness trajectory. Methods Adults aged 18 years and over consulting their General Practitioner (GP with LBP and radiating leg pain of any duration at (n = 500 GP practices in North Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent, UK will be invited to participate. All participants will receive a standardised assessment at the clinic by a study physiotherapist and will be classified according to the clinically determined presence or absence of nerve root pain/involvement. All will undergo a lumbar spine MRI scan. All participants will be managed according to their clinical need. The study outcomes will be measured at 4 and 12 months using postal self-complete questionnaires. Data will also be collected each month using brief postal questionnaires to enable detailed description of the course of low back and leg pain over time. Clinical observations and patient interviews will be used for the qualitative aspects of the study. Discussion This prospective clinical observational cohort will combine self-reported data, comprehensive clinical and MRI

  2. Reliability of the Kinematic Steadiness Index during one-leg standing in subjects with recurrent low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Paul S; Danial, Pamela; Lee, Dongchul C

    2017-10-04

    To assess the reliability of standing time and the Kinematic Steadiness Index (KSI) in one-leg standing compared with the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test while considering anthropometric factors in subjects with recurrent low back pain (LBP). Sixty-six individuals participated in the study. The data were collected on two different days, 1 week apart. The KSI of the core spine, using video motion-capture techniques, was based on the relative standing time and relative standstill time. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC2,1) was compared for the reliability between measures. The covariates, such as age, Body Mass Index, and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), were analyzed for any interactions based on these measures. The standing time (t = - 1.01, p = 0.32) and the KSI (t = - 1.70, p = 0.09) were not significantly different between measures. The TUG results were not different between measures (t = 1.01, p = 0.32). The Cronbach's alpha for the standing time was 0.84, for KSI was 0.89, and for TUG was 0.76. The standing time and KSI demonstrated an interaction with age, while the TUG demonstrated an interaction with the ODI score. The KSI during one-leg standing could help to develop a practical tool to justify quantity and quality of balance outcome measures, which identify balance deficits and core spine rehabilitation strategies in subjects with recurrent LBP.

  3. Peripheral artery disease - legs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the legs, feet, and toes Painful, non-bleeding sores on the feet or toes (most often black) that are slow ... block small arteries Coronary artery disease Impotence Open sores ... (gangrene) The affected leg or foot may need to be amputated

  4. Electromyography and A Review of the Literature Provide Insights into the Role of Sacral Perineural Cysts in Unexplained Chronic Pelvic, Perineal and Leg Pain Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Hulens, Mieke; Bruyninckx, Frans; Somers, Alix; Stalmans, Ingeborg; Peersman, Benjamin; Vansant, Greet; Rasschaert, Ricky; Mulder, Peter; Dankaerts, Wim

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The clinical entity “Symptomatic Tarlov Cysts” is a highly under reported condition. We aimed to perform an electrophysiologic evaluation in patients with Tarlov cysts to determine whether the cysts create electrical abnormalities that could translate into clinical symptoms. The findings are correlated with the data currently available in the literature. Methods: Thirty patients with unexplained pelvic, sacral, perineal and/or leg pain who harbored small and/or large Tarlov cyst...

  5. Lumbar spine stability for subjects with and without low back pain during one-leg standing test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Paul S; Yoon, BumChul; Lee, Dongchul C

    2010-07-15

    An experimental design comparing kinematic changes in the lumbar spine axis in subjects with and without low back pain (LBP) while standing on one leg with and without visual feedback. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the lumbar stability index, which includes relative holding time (RHT) and relative standstill time (RST), in subjects with and without LBP. Even though a number of studies have evaluated postural adjustments based on kinematic changes in subjects with LBP, lumbar spine stability has not been examined for abnormal postural responses with visual feedback. All participants were asked to maintain the stork test position (standing on one leg with the contra lateral hip flexed 90 degrees) for 25 seconds. The outcome measures included RHT and RST for the axes of the core spine and lumbar spine. Independent t tests were used to compare the differences between groups. Two-way repeated measure analysis of variance was used to compare the differences for both axes. The age variable was used as a covariate to control confounding effects for the data analyses. The RHT was longer for the lumbar spine axis in subjects without LBP than those with LBP, especially without visual feedback. There was also significant interaction in RST between subjects with and without LBP (F = 7.18, P = 0.01). For the core axis of the trunk, significant differences existed based on the main effect of side (F = 9.07, P = 0.004), trunk rotation (F = 24.30, P = 0.001), and both of these interactions (F = 8.93, P = 0.004). However, there was a lack of significant interaction with age for the lumbar and core spine axes (F = 0.06, P = 0.81). Although the control group included slightly younger volunteers compared with the LBP group, the stability index of the core spine significantly decreased in RHT and RST, especially when visual feedback was blocked for subjects with LBP. The interaction between visual feedback and trunk rotation indicated that core spine stability is critical in

  6. Social position modifies the association between severe shoulder/arm and knee/leg pain, and quality of life after retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne, Clermont E; Leclerc, Annette; Carton, Matthieu; Mediouni, Zakia; Goldberg, Marcel; Zins, Marie; Descatha, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are extremely frequent and account for an important part of the global burden of disease. Risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders include sustained occupational exposure to physically demanding jobs. The effects of sustained occupational physical exposures on knee and shoulder pain are known to persist after retirement; also, several studies have shown a socio-economic gradient in health and quality-of-life outcomes, including for musculoskeletal pain. It is thus possible that prolonged occupational exposures affect workers differently in the long-term along a socio-economic gradient. This study was conducted to investigate whether the impacts of severe shoulder/arm and knee/leg pain on the quality of life of retired workers follow a socio-economic gradient. Data from the French GAZEL cohort study (n = 14,249) were used to compare the impacts of severe shoulder/arm and knee/leg pain separately on the SF-36, Nottingham Health Profile and limitations in activities of daily living measured in 2006 and 2007, between four groups of social position (measured in 1989). Analyses were made in 2014 with multiple linear and logistic regressions and stratified by sex. For both pain sites, in men and women, there was a strong general tendency for the impacts of severe pain to be smaller among participants in higher social positions. Most important differences were related to pain and physical limitations. These results suggest inequalities in the impacts of severe joint pain by socio-economic status. The source of these inequalities is still speculative and merits the scientific attention.

  7. Agreement and correlation between the self-report leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs and Douleur Neuropathique 4 Questions neuropathic pain screening tools in subjects with low back-related leg pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jeremy; Rabey, Martin I; Hall, Toby M

    2012-01-01

    The self-report Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (S-LANSS) and Douleur Neuropathique 4 Questions (DN4) neuropathic pain screening tools have been shown to be reliable, valid, and able to differentiate neuropathic pain from inflammatory or mixed pain syndromes. However, no studies have compared these tools to determine whether their outcomes are similar. This study evaluated agreement and correlation between the S-LANSS and DN4 in the identification of neuropathic pain in subjects with low back-related leg pain. This observational study compared S-LANSS and DN4 scores in 45 patients with low back-related leg pain. The S-LANSS and DN4 cutoff scores of 12 and 4, respectively, were used to classify subjects as positive or negative for the presence of neuropathic pain for each screening tool. The κ statistic was used to determine whether there was agreement in classification of neuropathic pain between the 2 screening tools. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to determine correlation between scores of the 2 screening tools. Neuropathic pain was identified in 15 subjects (33%) using the S-LANSS and in 19 subjects (42%) using the DN4. Agreement on neuropathic pain classification was fair, with a κ value of 0.34. There was moderate to good correlation (r = 0.62; P < .001) between scores obtained from the 2 tools. The finding of fair agreement suggests that despite the moderate to good correlation between scores, the cutoff points for the classification of neuropathic pain of the 2 tools may not be congruent. Copyright © 2012 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Recurrent back and leg pain and cyst reformation after surgical resection of spinal synovial cysts: systematic review of reported postoperative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bydon, Ali; Xu, Risheng; Parker, Scott L; McGirt, Matthew J; Bydon, Mohamad; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Witham, Timothy F

    2010-09-01

    With improvements in neurological imaging, there are increasing reports of symptomatic spinal synovial cysts. Surgical excision has been recognized as the definitive treatment for symptomatic juxtafacet cysts. However, the role for concomitant fusion and the incidence of recurrent back pain and recurrent cyst formation after surgery remain unclear. To determine the cumulative incidence of postoperative symptomatic relief, recurrent back and leg pain after cyst resection and decompression, and synovial cyst recurrence. Systematic review of the literature. All published studies to date reporting outcomes of synovial cyst excision with and without spinal fusion. Cyst recurrence and Kawabata, Macnab, Prolo, or Stauffer pain scales. We performed a systematic literature review of all articles published between 1970 and 2009 reporting outcomes after surgical management of spinal synovial cysts. Eighty-two published studies encompassing 966 patients were identified and reviewed. Six hundred seventy-two (69.6%) patients presented with radicular pain and 467 (48.3%) with back pain. The most commonly involved spinal level was L4-L5 (75.4%), with only 25 (2.6%) and 12 (1.2%) reported synovial cysts in the cervical or thoracic area, respectively. Eight hundred eleven (84.0%) patients were treated with decompressive surgical excision alone, whereas 155 (16.0%) received additional concomitant spinal fusion. Six hundred fifty-four (92.5%) and 880 (91.1%) patients experienced complete resolution of their back or leg pain after surgery, respectively. By a mean follow-up of 25.4 months, back and leg pain recurred in 155 (21.9%) and 123 (12.7%) patients, respectively. Sixty (6.2%) patients required reoperation, of which the majority (n=47) required fusion for correction of spinal instability and mechanical back pain. Same-level synovial cyst recurrence occurred in 17 (1.8%) patients after decompression alone but has been reported in no (0%) patients after decompression and fusion

  9. A kinematic and kinetic analysis of spinal region in subjects with and without recurrent low back pain during one leg standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Paul S; Leininger, Peter M

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between normalized kinematic and kinetic stability indices for spinal regions with eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions during non-dominant leg standing between subjects with recurrent low back pain and control subjects. The kinematic stability index for the spinal regions (core spine model, lumbar spine, lower and upper thorax) and the kinetic stability index from force plate were measured. All participants were asked to maintain non-dominant leg standing with the dominant hip and knee flexed approximately 90 degrees for 25 seconds. Forty-two participants enrolled in the study, including 22 subjects with low back pain (12 male, 10 female) and 20 control subjects (12 male, 8 female). For the kinematic index for stability, the visual condition (F=30.06, p=0.0001) and spinal region (F=10.82, p=0.002) were statistically significant. The post hoc test results indicated a significant difference in the lumbar spine compared with the upper and lower thorax and the core spine model. The kinetic stability (average [standard deviation]) during the eyes-closed condition significantly decreased in the low back pain group (t=-3.24, p=0.002). The subjects with recurrent low back pain demonstrated higher lumbar spine stability in eyes-open condition. This higher stability of the lumbar spine might be due to a possible pain avoiding strategy from the standing limb. The low back pain group also significantly decreased kinetic stability during the eyes-closed condition. Clinicians need to consider both kinetic and kinematic indices while considering visual condition for lumbar spine stability in subjects with recurrent low back pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Validity of the Korean Version of the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, and Consolability Scale for Assessment of Pain in Dementia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Yeonsil; Kim, Yoon Sook; Lee, Jongmin; Han, Seol Heui

    2017-11-01

    Pain is often associated with a more rapid progression of cognitive and functional decline, and behavioral disturbance in dementia. Therefore, it is essential to accurately assesses pain for proper intervention in patients with dementia. The Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, and Consolability (FLACC) scale is an excellent behaviour scale which includes most of the domains that are recommended by the American Geriatrics Society to evaluate when assessing pain in patients with dementia. The purpose of this study was to develop the Korean version of the FLACC (K-FLACC) and to verify its reliability and validity in assessing pain of elderly patients with dementia. We developed the K-FLACC to consist of the five domains (face, legs, activity, cry, and consolability) with scores of 0, 1, and 2 for each domain and a total score ranging from 0 to 10 as in the original FLACC. Eighty-eight patients with dementia who visited Konkuk University Medical Center were evaluated. The K-FLACC revealed good validity as compared to the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS; r = 0.617, P dementia in Korea. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  11. Three week results of transforaminal epidural steroid injection in patients with chronic unilateral low back related leg pain: The relation to MRI findings and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekedahl, Harald; Jönsson, Bo; Annertz, Mårten; Frobell, Richard B

    2016-11-21

    Transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TESI) is a frequently used intervention for lumbar radicular pain. To evaluate the value of MRI findings, neurologic assessment and the Slump test (neurodynamic test) as predictors of treatment response to TESI. One hundred subjects (mean age 58 [SD13], 54% females) were included in this trial. The sample was stratified by location of disc herniaton, grade of nerve root compression, clinically assessed neurologic deficit and positive Slump test.Treatment response was primarily evaluated by Visual Analogue Scale for leg pain after three weeks. Predictive value for each stratum was analyzed using logistic regression after the sample was dichotomized into definite treatment response (≥ 50% reduction of pain) and negative response (≤ 0% reduction) to TESI (the 1-49% reduction group was excluded). The overall definite treatment response rate was 27%. The Slump test was the only predictor of the response to TESI (p= 0.031). The definite treatment response rates for subjects with positive and negative Slump test were 33% and 15%, respectively. In patients with chronic low back related leg pain, MRI findings and neurologic assessment results failed to predict treatment response, whereas a positive Slump test predicted the best 3-week response to TESI.

  12. Patients' Attitudes Toward Non-Physician Screening of Low Back and Low Back-Related Leg Pain Complaints Referred for Surgical Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, Joshua; Busse, Jason W; Drew, Brian; Reddy, Kesava; Cenic, Aleksa; Kachur, Edward; Murty, Naresh; Candelaria, Henry; Moore, Ainsley E; Riva, John J

    2016-07-07

    Questionnaire survey. To explore patient attitudes towards screening to assess suitability for low back surgery by non-physician healthcare providers. Canadian spine surgeons have shown support for non-physician screening to assess and triage patients with low back pain and low back-related leg pain. However, patients' attitudes towards this proposed model are largely unknown. We administered a 19-item cross-sectional survey to adults with low back and/or low back-related leg pain who were referred for elective surgical assessment at one of five spine surgeons' clinics in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The survey inquired about demographics, expectations regarding wait time for surgical consultation, as well as willingness to pay, travel, and be screened by non-physician healthcare providers. 80 low back patients completed our survey, for a response rate of 86.0% (80 of 93). Most respondents (72.5%; 58 of 80) expected to be seen by a surgeon within 3 months of referral, and 88.8% (71 of 80) indicated willingness to undergo screening with a non-physician healthcare provider to establish if they were potentially a surgical candidate. Half of respondents (40 of 80) were willing to travel >50 km for assessment by a non-physician healthcare provider, and 46.2% were willing to pay out-of-pocket (25.6% were unsure). However, most respondents (70.0%; 56 of 80) would still want to see a surgeon if they were ruled out as a surgical candidate, and written comments from respondents revealed concern regarding agreement between surgeons' and non-physicians' determination of surgical candidates. Patients referred for surgical consultation for low back or low back-related leg pain are largely willing to accept screening by non-physician healthcare providers. Future research should explore the concordance of screening results between surgeon and non-physician healthcare providers. 3.

  13. The influence of changes in trunk and pelvic posture during single leg standing on hip and thigh muscle activation in a pain free population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Simon; Mitchell, Tim; Whiteley, Rod; O'Sullivan, Peter; Williams, Benjamin K; Racinais, Sebastien; Farooq, Abdulaziz

    2014-03-27

    Thigh muscle injuries commonly occur during single leg loading tasks and patterns of muscle activation are thought to contribute to these injuries. The influence trunk and pelvis posture has on hip and thigh muscle activation during single leg stance is unknown and was investigated in a pain free population to determine if changes in body posture result in consistent patterns of changes in muscle activation. Hip and thigh muscle activation patterns were compared in 22 asymptomatic, male subjects (20-45 years old) in paired functionally relevant single leg standing test postures: Anterior vs. Posterior Trunk Sway; Anterior vs. Posterior Pelvic Rotation; Left vs. Right Trunk Shift; and Pelvic Drop vs. Raise. Surface EMG was collected from eight hip and thigh muscles calculating Root Mean Square. EMG was normalized to an "upright standing" reference posture. Repeated measures ANOVA was performed along with associated F tests to determine if there were significant differences in muscle activation between paired test postures. In right leg stance, Anterior Trunk Sway (compared to Posterior Sway) increased activity in posterior sagittal plane muscles, with a concurrent deactivation of anterior sagittal plane muscles (p: 0.016 - <0.001). Lateral hip abductor muscles increased activation during Left Trunk Shift (compared to Right) (p :≤ 0.001). Lateral Pelvic Drop (compared to Raise) decreased activity in hip abductors and increased hamstring, adductor longus and vastus lateralis activity (p: 0.037 - <0.001). Changes in both trunk and pelvic posture during single leg stance generally resulted in large, predictable changes in hip and thigh muscle activation in asymptomatic young males. Changes in trunk position in the sagittal plane and pelvis position in the frontal plane had the greatest effect on muscle activation. Investigation of these activation patterns in clinical populations such as hip and thigh muscle injuries may provide important insights into injury

  14. Evaluation of nurse accuracy in rating procedural pain among pediatric burn patients using the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiabin; Giles, Sheila A; Kurtovic, Kelli; Fabia, Renata; Besner, Gail E; Wheeler, Krista K; Xiang, Huiyun; Groner, Jonathan I

    2017-02-01

    Accurate pain assessment is essential for proper analgesia during medical procedures in pediatric patients. The Faces, Legs, Activity, Cry, and Consolability (FLACC) scale has previously been shown to be a valid and reliable tool for assessing pediatric procedural pain in research labs. However, no study has investigated how rater factors (gender, number of dressing changes performed/week, burn history, having children, nursing experience, stress at home/work) and patient factors (pain intensity) affect the accuracy of FLACC ratings for procedural pain when implemented by bedside care providers. Twenty-four nurses in an ABA verified Pediatric Burn Center watched four videos of dressing changes for pediatric burn patients in random order three times and rated the children's procedural pain using the FLACC scale. The four videos had standard FLACC scores established by an interdisciplinary panel. Descriptive and mixed modeling analysis was conducted to explore nurse rating accuracy and to evaluate the rater and patient factors that influenced the rating accuracy. The highest accuracy was reached when rating high procedural pain (with a FLACC of 6). Nurses underrated both mild and severe procedural pain. Nurses who had less nursing experience demonstrated significantly higher accuracy than those with more experience. The present study is the first study in the literature to systematically examine the factors influencing the accuracy of FLACC rating for pediatric procedural pain among bedside care providers. The findings suggest that nurse clinical experience and patient pain intensity are two significant contributors to rating accuracy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  15. Deconstructing Chronic Low Back Pain in the Older Adult-Step-by-Step Evidence and Expert-Based Recommendations for Evaluation and Treatment: Part XII: Leg Length Discrepancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havran, Mark; Scholten, Joel D; Breuer, Paula; Lundberg, Jennifer; Kochersberger, Gary; Newman, Dave; Weiner, Debra K

    2016-12-01

     To present the last in a 12-part series designed to deconstruct chronic low back pain (CLBP) in older adults. This article focuses on leg length discrepancy (LLD) and presents an algorithm outlining approaches to diagnosis and management of LLD in older adults, along with a representative clinical case. METHODS : Using a modified Delphi approach, the LLD evaluation and treatment algorithm was developed by a multidisciplinary expert panel representing expertise in physical therapy, geriatric medicine, and physical medicine and rehabilitation. The materials were subsequently refined through an iterative process of input from a primary care provider panel comprised of VA and non-VA providers. The clinical case was taken from one of the authors. RESULTS : We present an algorithm and illustrative clinical case to help guide the care of older adults with LLD, which can be an important contributor to CLBP. Firstline assessment includes referral to physical therapy or orthopedics, depending on the context of the LLD. A variety of nonsurgical interventions may ensue depending on the etiology of the LLD, including shoe inserts, customized shoes, manual therapy, or a combination. CONCLUSIONS : To promote a patient-centered approach, providers should consider evaluating for leg length discrepancy when treating older adults with CLBP to help diminish pain and disability. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Academy of Pain Medicine 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  16. Foot posture, leg length discrepancy and low back pain--their relationship and clinical management using foot orthoses--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Julie C; Bird, Adam R; Azari, Michael F

    2014-06-01

    Mechanical low back pain (LBP) is a very common, expensive, and significant health issue in the western world. Functional musculoskeletal conditions are widely thought to cause mechanical low back pain. The role of foot posture and leg length discrepancy in contributing to abnormal biomechanics of the lumbopelvic region and low back pain is not sufficiently investigated. This critical review examines the evidence for the association between foot function, particularly pronation, and mechanical LBP. It also explores the evidence for a role for foot orthoses in the treatment of this condition. There is a body of evidence to support the notion that foot posture, particularly hyperpronation, is associated with mechanical low back pain. Mechanisms that have been put forward to account for this finding are based on either mechanical postural changes or alterations in muscular activity in the lumbar and pelvic muscles. More research is needed to explore and quantify the effects of foot orthoses on chronic low back pain, especially their effects on lumbopelvic muscle function and posture. The clinical implications of this work are significant since foot orthoses represent a simple and potentially effective therapeutic measure for a clinical condition of high personal and social burden. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Influences of spinal decompression therapy and general traction therapy on the pain, disability, and straight leg raising of patients with intervertebral disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jioun; Lee, Sangyong; Hwangbo, Gak

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify how spinal decompression therapy and general traction therapy influence the pain, disability, and straight leg raise (SLR) ability of patients with intervertebral disc herniation. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 patients with chronic lumbar pain who were divided into a spinal decompression therapy group (SDTG, n=15), and a general traction therapy group (GTTG, n=15). [Methods] The SDTG used a spinal decompression device, and the GTTG used a lumbar traction device. Both groups received conservative physical therapy three times a week for four weeks. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to measure the degree of pain the patients with chronic lumbar pain. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was used to measure the degree of functional disability. A goniometer was used to measure the patients' SLR ability. [Results] Both SDTG and GTTG showed statistically significant decreases in VAS and ODI scores and a statistically significant increase in SLR angle. A comparison of the two groups found no statistically significant differences. [Conclusion] Spinal decompression therapy and general traction therapy are effective at improving the pain, disability, and SLR of patients with intervertebral disc herniation. Thus, selective treatment may be required.

  18. Effect of the pelvic compression belt on the hip extensor activation patterns of sacroiliac joint pain patients during one-leg standing: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hee-Seok; Jeon, Hye-Seon; Oh, Duck-Won; Kwon, Oh-Yun

    2013-04-01

    As a means of external stabilization of the sacroiliac joint (SIJ), many clinicians have often advocated the use of the pelvic compression belt (PCB). The objective of this pilot study was to compare the effects of the PCB on hip extensor muscle activation patterns during one-leg standing in subjects with and without sacroiliac joint pain (SIJP). Sixteen subjects with SIJP and fifteen asymptomatic volunteers participated in this study. Surface electromyography (EMG) data [signal amplitude and premotor reaction time (RT)] were collected from the gluteus maximus and biceps femoris muscles of the supporting leg during one-leg standing with and without the PCB. Compared to that of the asymptomatic individuals, the EMG amplitude of the biceps femoris was significantly decreased in individuals with SIJP upon the application of the PCB (p < 0.05). Furthermore, on using the PCB, in individuals with SIJP, the RT of the gluteus maximus was significantly decreased; however, the RT of the biceps femoris was increased (p < 0.05). Thus, our data support the use of the PCB to modify the activation patterns of the hip extensors among patients with SIJP. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Influence of Dual Pressure Biofeedback Units on Pelvic Rotation and Abdominal Muscle Activity during the Active Straight Leg Raise in Women with Chronic Lower Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Gyoung-Mo; Ha, Sung-Min; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2014-05-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to assess the influence of applying dual pressure biofeedback units (DPBUs) on the angle of pelvic rotation and abdominal muscle activity during the active straight leg raise (ASLR). [Subjects] Seventeen patients with low-back pain (LBP) participated in this study. [Methods] The subjects were asked to perform an active straight leg raise (ASLR) without a PBU, with a single PBU, and with DPBUs. The angles of pelvic rotation were measured using a three-dimensional motion-analysis system, and the muscle activity of the bilateral internal oblique abdominis (IO), external oblique abdominis (EO), and rectus abdominis (RA) was recorded using surface electromyography (EMG). One-way repeated-measures ANOVA was performed to determine the rotation angles and muscle activity under the three conditions. [Results] The EMG activity of the ipsilateral IO, contralateral EO, and bilateral RA was greater and pelvic rotation was lower with the DPBUs than with no PBU or a single PBU. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that applying DPBUs during ASLR is effective in decreasing unwanted pelvic rotation and increasing abdominal muscle activity in women with chronic low back pain.

  20. Cross-cultural Adaptation and Validation of the Exercise-Induced Leg Pain Questionnaire for English- and Greek-Speaking Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korakakis, Vasileios; Malliaropoulos, Nikos; Baliotis, Konstantinos; Papadopoulou, Sofia; Padhiar, Nat; Nauck, Tanja; Lohrer, Heinz

    2015-06-01

    Clinical measurement. To translate the German version of the Exercise-Induced Leg Pain Questionnaire (EILP-G) to Greek and English and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Greek version. The EILP-G was developed to evaluate the severity of symptoms and sports ability in individuals with exercise-induced leg pain (EILP). Translation of the questionnaire to other languages will provide a standard outcome measure across populations. The EILP-G questionnaire was cross-culturally adapted to Greek and English, according to established guidelines. The validity and reliability of the Greek version were assessed in 40 patients with EILP, 40 patients with other lower extremity injuries, 40 track-and-field athletes with no history of EILP, and 40 young adults without pathology. Participants completed the questionnaire at baseline and again after 7 to 10 days. The expert committee and the participants considered the questionnaire to have good face and content validity. Concurrent validity as assessed using the Schepsis score was almost perfect (rho = 0.947, PGreek version exhibited excellent test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.995 for the EILP group) and internal consistency (Cronbach α = .942 for the EILP group). Finally, no ceiling or floor effects were found, as none of the individuals with EILP scored the maximum or minimum possible values on the questionnaire. The Greek version, adapted from the original EILP-G, is a valid and reliable questionnaire, and its psychometric properties are comparable with the original version.

  1. Doppler ultrasound exam of an arm or leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related deaths are caused by cardiovascular problems, not lung cancer. Alternative Names Peripheral vascular disease - Doppler; PVD - Doppler; PAD - Doppler; Blockage of leg arteries - Doppler; Intermittent claudication - Doppler; Arterial insufficiency of the legs - Doppler; Leg pain and cramping - ...

  2. Trunk and lower extremity segment kinematics and their relationship to pain following movement instruction during a single-leg squat in females with dynamic knee valgus and patellofemoral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graci, Valentina; Salsich, Gretchen B

    2015-05-01

    To understand how instructing females with patellofemoral pain to correct dynamic knee valgus affects pelvis, femur, tibia and trunk segment kinematics. To determine if pain reduction in the corrected condition was associated with improved segment kinematics. Cross-sectional. A 3D-motion capture system was used to collect multi-joint kinematics on 20 females with dynamic knee valgus and patellofemoral pain during a single-leg squat in two conditions: usual movement pattern, and corrected dynamic knee valgus. During each condition pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Pelvis, femur, tibia and trunk kinematics in the frontal and transverse planes were compared between conditions using a paired T-test. Pearson correlation coefficients were generated between visual analog scale score and the kinematic variables in the corrected condition. In the corrected condition subjects had increased lateral flexion of the pelvis toward the weight-bearing limb (pinstruction was comprised of motion at both the pelvis and femur. Decreased pain levels were associated with lower extremity segment kinematics moving in the direction opposite to dynamic knee valgus. These results increase our understanding of correction strategies used by females with patellofemoral pain and provide insight for rehabilitation. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of a running task on muscle shear elastic modulus of posterior lower leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohya, Shuhei; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Aoki, Takafumi; Suzuki, Daichi; Kikumoto, Takanori; Nakamura, Emi; Ito, Wataru; Hirabayashi, Ryo; Takabayashi, Tomoya; Edama, Mutsuaki

    2017-01-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is one of the most common causes of exercise-related leg pain in runners. Because stopping training due to pain from MTSS could decrease the athlete's competitiveness, it is necessary to construct MTSS prevention and treatment programs. However, the effect of running, which is believed to cause MTSS, on shear elastic modulus of the posterior lower leg is unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 30 min of running on shear elastic modulus of the posterior lower leg in healthy subjects. Twenty healthy males volunteered to participate in this study (age, 20.9 ± 0.6 y; height, 169.6 ± 4.5 cm; weight, 62.6 ± 5.2 kg). The shear elastic modulus of the posterior lower leg was measured using ultrasonic shear wave elastography before and immediately after a 30-min running task. Shear elastic moduli of the flexor digitorum longus and tibialis posterior were significantly increased after 30 min running task. However, there were no significant changes in shear elastic moduli of the lateral gastrocnemius, medial gastrocnemius, peroneus longus and peroneus brevis. The results suggested that the increases in shear elastic moduli of flexor digitorum longus and tibialis posterior after running could be a risk factor for running-related MTSS development.

  4. The Accuracy of the VISA-P Questionnaire, Single-Leg Decline Squat, and Tendon Pain History to Identify Patellar Tendon Abnormalities in Adult Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Luciana de Michelis; Ocarino, Juliana Melo; Bittencourt, Natália Franco Netto; Fernandes, Ludmila Maria Oliveira; Verhagen, Evert; Fonseca, Sérgio Teixeira

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional clinical assessment. Background Patellar tendinopathy is not always accompanied by patellar tendon abnormalities (PTAs). Thus, clinical screening tools to help identify patients with patellar tendon pain who have PTAs could enhance clinical decision making and patient prognosis. Objectives To test the diagnostic accuracy of the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Patella (VISA-P) questionnaire, a single-leg decline squat (SLDS), tendon pain history, age, and years of sports participation to identify athletes with symptomatic patellar tendons who have PTAs confirmed on imaging. Methods Data provided by ultrasound examination, the VISA-P questionnaire, the SLDS, tendon pain history, age, and years of sport participation were collected in 43 athletes. A classification and regression tree (CART) model was developed to verify variables associated with PTA occurrence. Likelihood ratios (LRs) were computed for positive and negative tests. Results The SLDS, VISA-P questionnaire, and tendon pain history were associated with PTA occurrence. Athletes with negative results on all 3 tests (CART model) had a lower likelihood of having PTAs (negative LR = 0.3; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.2, 0.5). The isolated use of the SLDS or tendon pain history (positive LR = 4.2; 95% CI: 2.3, 7.14 and 4.5; 95% CI: 1.8, 11.1, respectively) had similar influence on probability of PTA presence compared to the CART model (positive LR = 4.1; 95% CI: 2.5, 6.3). Conclusion Although the objective was to investigate a clinical test to identify PTAs, the combined use of the tests had greater accuracy to identify individuals without PTAs. Level of Evidence Diagnosis, level 3b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):673-680. Epub 3 Jul 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6192.

  5. An Unusual Case of Leg Pain in a Competitive Cyclist: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lindner, Dror; Agar, Gabriel; Domb, Benjamin Gilbert; Beer, Yiftah; Shub, Idit; Mann, Gideon

    2014-01-01

    ...% of all lower extremity overuse injuries in competitive cyclists are of a vascular source. A 39-year-old competitive cyclist had a 5-year history of thigh pain during cycling, preventing him from competing...

  6. Three single leg standing tests for clinical assessment of chronic plantar heel pain syndrome: static stance, half-squat and heel rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saban, B; Masharawi, Y

    2017-06-01

    To assess reliability and validity of three single leg standing clinical tests in patients with plantar heel pain syndrome (PHPS). Cross-sectional reliability study. Forty patients diagnosed with PHPS. Patients stood on their affected foot in a static stance for up to 30seconds, a half squat for up to 10 repetitions, and a heel rise for up to 10 repetitions. The first sensation of pain (p1) determined the termination of each test, and established a positive test result. The level of p1 was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS); time or repetitions for each test were recorded. Prior to performing the tests, all patients completed the Foot & Ankle Computerized Adaptive Test to measure functional status (FS). Detection of p1 in each test showed good reliability for inter- and intrarater assessment (Kappa=0.60 to 0.78 and 0.56 to 0.77, respectively). The intraclass correlation coefficient for the VAS measures was 0.85 to 0.95 for inter-rater assessment and 0.78 to 0.92 for intrarater assessment. However, the Bland and Altman limits of agreement were wide, indicating that these measures were less reliable than the correlation coefficients suggested. Thirty-five patients (88%) experienced a positive pain response to at least one test. Significant correlations were found between the VAS measures in each test and FS (r=0.63 to 0.72). The static stance, half squat and heel rise tests were easily implemented, and found to be reliable and valid according to one analysis, yet less reliable with another, for pain provocation and VAS levels in patients with PHPS. All three VAS levels correlated well with FS. Copyright © 2016 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of 10-kHz High-Frequency and Traditional Low-Frequency Spinal Cord Stimulation for the Treatment of Chronic Back and Leg Pain: 24-Month Results From a Multicenter, Randomized, Controlled Pivotal Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapural, Leonardo; Yu, Cong; Doust, Matthew W; Gliner, Bradford E; Vallejo, Ricardo; Sitzman, B Todd; Amirdelfan, Kasra; Morgan, Donna M; Yearwood, Thomas L; Bundschu, Richard; Yang, Thomas; Benyamin, Ramsin; Burgher, Abram H

    2016-11-01

    Pain relief with spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has focused historically on paresthesias overlapping chronically painful areas. A higher level evidence supports the use of SCS in treating leg pain than supports back pain, as it is difficult to achieve adequate paresthesia coverage, and then pain relief, in the low back region. In comparison, 10-kHz high-frequency (HF10 therapy) SCS therapy does not rely on intraoperative paresthesia mapping and remains paresthesia-free during therapy. To compare long-term results of HF10 therapy and traditional low-frequency SCS. A pragmatic randomized, controlled, pivotal trial with 24-month follow-up was conducted across 11 comprehensive pain treatment centers. Subjects had Visual Analog Scale scores of ≥5.0/10.0 cm for both back and leg pain, and were assigned randomly (1:1) to receive HF10 therapy or low-frequency SCS. The primary end point was a responder rate, defined as ≥50% back pain reduction from baseline at 3 months with a secondary end point at 12 months (previously reported). In this article, 24-month secondary results are presented. Non-inferiority was first assessed, and if demonstrated the results were tested for superiority. In the study, 198 subjects were randomized (101 HF10 therapy, 97 traditional SCS). One hundred seventy-one subjects (90 HF10 therapy, 81 traditional SCS) successfully completed a short-term trial and were implanted. Subjects averaged 54.9 ± 12.9 years old, 13.6 ± 11.3 years since diagnosis, 86.6% had back surgery, 88.3% were taking opioid analgesics. At 3 months, 84.5% of implanted HF10 therapy subjects were responders for back pain and 83.1% for leg pain, and 43.8% of traditional SCS subjects were responders for back pain and 55.5% for leg pain (P back and leg pain comparisons, non-inferiority and superiority). At 24 months, more subjects were responders to HF10 therapy than traditional SCS (back pain: 76.5% vs 49.3%; 27.2% difference, 95% CI, 10.1%-41.8%; P pain: 72.9% vs 49.3%; 23

  8. Comparison of 10-kHz High-Frequency and Traditional Low-Frequency Spinal Cord Stimulation for the Treatment of Chronic Back and Leg Pain: 24-Month Results From a Multicenter, Randomized, Controlled Pivotal Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cong; Doust, Matthew W.; Gliner, Bradford E.; Vallejo, Ricardo; Sitzman, B. Todd; Amirdelfan, Kasra; Morgan, Donna M.; Yearwood, Thomas L.; Bundschu, Richard; Yang, Thomas; Benyamin, Ramsin; Burgher, Abram H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pain relief with spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has focused historically on paresthesias overlapping chronically painful areas. A higher level evidence supports the use of SCS in treating leg pain than supports back pain, as it is difficult to achieve adequate paresthesia coverage, and then pain relief, in the low back region. In comparison, 10-kHz high-frequency (HF10 therapy) SCS therapy does not rely on intraoperative paresthesia mapping and remains paresthesia-free during therapy. OBJECTIVE: To compare long-term results of HF10 therapy and traditional low-frequency SCS. METHODS: A pragmatic randomized, controlled, pivotal trial with 24-month follow-up was conducted across 11 comprehensive pain treatment centers. Subjects had Visual Analog Scale scores of ≥5.0/10.0 cm for both back and leg pain, and were assigned randomly (1:1) to receive HF10 therapy or low-frequency SCS. The primary end point was a responder rate, defined as ≥50% back pain reduction from baseline at 3 months with a secondary end point at 12 months (previously reported). In this article, 24-month secondary results are presented. Non-inferiority was first assessed, and if demonstrated the results were tested for superiority. RESULTS: In the study, 198 subjects were randomized (101 HF10 therapy, 97 traditional SCS). One hundred seventy-one subjects (90 HF10 therapy, 81 traditional SCS) successfully completed a short-term trial and were implanted. Subjects averaged 54.9 ± 12.9 years old, 13.6 ± 11.3 years since diagnosis, 86.6% had back surgery, 88.3% were taking opioid analgesics. At 3 months, 84.5% of implanted HF10 therapy subjects were responders for back pain and 83.1% for leg pain, and 43.8% of traditional SCS subjects were responders for back pain and 55.5% for leg pain (P back and leg pain comparisons, non-inferiority and superiority). At 24 months, more subjects were responders to HF10 therapy than traditional SCS (back pain: 76.5% vs 49.3%; 27.2% difference, 95% CI, 10

  9. More gain less pain: balance control learning shifts the activation patterns of leg and neck muscles and increases muscular parsimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iodice, Pierpaolo; Cesinaro, Stefano; Romani, Gian Luca; Pezzulo, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Athletes such as skaters or surfers maintain their balance on very unstable platforms. Remarkably, the most skilled athletes seem to execute these feats almost effortlessly. However, the dynamics that lead to the acquisition of a defined and efficient postural strategy are incompletely known. To understand the posture reorganization process due to learning and expertise, we trained twelve participants in a demanding balance/posture maintenance task for 4 months and measured their muscular activity before and after a (predictable) disturbance cued by an auditory signal. The balance training determined significant delays in the latency of participants' muscular activity: from largely anticipatory muscular activity (prior to training) to a mixed anticipatory-compensatory control strategy (after training). After training, the onset of activation was delayed for all muscles, and the sequence of activation systematically reflected the muscle position in the body from top to bottom: neck/upper body muscles were recruited first and in an anticipatory fashion, whereas leg muscles were recruited after the disturbance onset, producing compensatory adjustments. The resulting control strategy includes a mixture of anticipatory and compensatory postural adjustments, with a systematic sequence of muscular activation reflecting the different demands of neck and leg muscles. Our results suggest that subjects learned the precise timing of the disturbance onset and used this information to deploy postural adjustments just-in-time and to transfer at least part of the control of posture from anticipatory to less-demanding feedback-based strategies. In turn, this strategy shift increases the cost-efficiency of muscular activity, which is a key signature of skilled performance.

  10. Reliability of MR-Based Volumetric 3-D Analysis of Pelvic Muscles among Subjects with Low Back with Leg Pain and Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorupska, Elżbieta; Keczmer, Przemysław; Łochowski, Rafał M; Tomal, Paulina; Rychlik, Michał; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Lately, the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging, Lasègue sign and classic neurological signs have been considered not accurate enough to distinguish the radicular from non-radicular low back with leg pain (LBLP) and a calculation of the symptomatic side muscle volume has been indicated as a probable valuable marker. However, only the multifidus muscle volume has been calculated so far. The main objective of the study was to verify whether LBLP subjects presented symptomatic side pelvic muscle atrophy compared to healthy volunteers. The second aim was to assess the inter-rater reliability of 3-D manual method for segmenting and measuring the volume of the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus and piriformis muscles in both LBLP patients and healthy subjects. Two independent raters analyzed MR images of LBLP and healthy subjects towards muscle volume of four pelvic muscles, i.e. the piriformis, gluteus minimus, gluteus medius and gluteus maximus. For both sides, the MR images of the muscles without adipose tissue infiltration were manually segmented in 3-D medical images. Symptomatic muscle atrophy was confirmed in only over 50% of LBLP subjects (gluteus maximus (ppelvic muscles in both healthy and LBLP subjects. To answer the question of what kind of muscle atrophy is indicative of radicular or non-radicular pain further studies are required.

  11. Short-Term Results of a Rehabilitation Program for Service Members With Lower Leg Pain and the Evaluation of Patient Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulekamp, Mariëtte Z; Sauter, Wieteke; Buitenhuis, Marieke; Mert, Agali; van der Wurff, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Lower leg pain (LLP), including medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) and chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS), remains a major problem for the military. Evaluation of patient characteristics and short-term results of the rehabilitation program for service members used in the Military Rehabilitation Centre Aardenburg. This retrospective study includes 161 service members of the Netherlands Armed Forces. Service members were grouped into the following diagnostic categories: MTSS (n = 47), conservative treatment of CECS (n = 34), and rehabilitation after operative intervention of the CECS (CECSo; n = 80). The results showed a significant improvement in all groups regarding the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS). Only the CECSo group showed significant improvement on the Numeric Pain Rating Score (NPRS). None of the patient characteristics like gender, age, military service, duration of symptoms, and treatment setting were identified to correlate with outcome results. Short-term results of the rehabilitation program for service members with LLP are successful as obtained with the PSFS. Evaluation by the NPRS seems insufficient and researchers should consider using other outcome measurements. The CECSo group seems to benefit the most from the rehabilitation program. No patient characteristics could be identified to correlate with outcome results. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  12. Hemoglobinopathies and Leg Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Kirsner, Robert S

    2015-09-01

    Major hemoglobinopathies, including sickle cell anemia, are becoming a global health issue. Leg ulcers are the most common cutaneous manifestation of sickle cell disease and an important contributor to morbidity burden in this population. Leg ulcers following sickling disorders are extremely painful, and hard to heal. The clinical evidence for the optimal management of these ulcers is limited. Treating the cause and the strategies to prevent sickling are the mainstay of treatment. The basic principles of wound bed preparation and compression therapy is beneficial in these patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Broken Leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... been weakened by a condition such as osteoporosis. Risk factors Stress fractures are often the result of repetitive ... the joint and poor bone alignment can cause osteoarthritis years later. If your leg starts to hurt ...

  14. An unusual case of leg pain in a competitive cyclist: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Dror; Agar, Gabriel; Domb, Benjamin Gilbert; Beer, Yiftah; Shub, Idit; Mann, Gideon

    2014-11-01

    Cycling has become a popular recreational and competitive sport. The number of people participating in the sport is gradually increasing. Despite being a noncontact, low-impact sport, as many as 85% of athletes engaged in the sport will suffer from an overuse injury, with the lower limbs comprising the majority of these injuries. Up to 20% of all lower extremity overuse injuries in competitive cyclists are of a vascular source. A 39-year-old competitive cyclist had a 5-year history of thigh pain during cycling, preventing him from competing. The patient was eventually diagnosed with external iliac artery endofibrosis. After conservative treatment failed, the patient underwent corrective vascular surgery with complete resolution of his symptoms and return to competitive cycling by 1 year. Since its first description in 1985, there have been more than 60 articles addressing external iliac artery endofibrosis pathology.

  15. Relationship of the Pain Disability Index (PDI) and the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (ODQ) with three dynamic physical tests in a group of patients with chronic low-back and leg pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönblad, M; Järvinen, E; Hurri, H; Hupli, M; Karaharju, E O

    1994-09-01

    To determine the relationship between overall disability in daily activities, assessed with the Pain Disability Index (PDI) and the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (ODQ), and impaired performance on three physical tests in patients with chronic low-back pain. The PDI and ODQ were administered in a cross-sectional study, before beginning a back rehabilitation program, to 45 patients with low-back pain of > or = 3 months' duration, with or without radiation to the legs. All patients also performed repetitive sit-up, arch-up, and squatting tests. Tertiary care center. Modestly significant (p < 0.05) or significant (p < 0.01) inverse correlations (Pearson's r = 0.30-0.41) were noted between the PDI and the ODQ and all three physical performance tests. When normative data were used, the correlation (Spearman's rs = -0.45) between PDI and the squatting test remained significant (p < 0.01), whereas it was modestly significant (rs = -0.33, p < 0.05) between the ODQ and squatting test and between the PDI and arch-up test (rs = -0.35, p < 0.05). Compared with patients presently working, those on sick leave had significantly higher scores on the PDI and ODQ (Wilcoxon's two-sample test: p < 0.001) and also significantly worse performance on all physical tests (p < 0.001). The PDI and ODQ, as measures of self-perceived disability, and impaired performance on repetitive squatting, arch-up, and sit-up tests, as measures of physical capability, show some overlap in low-back-pain patients. Both types of disability measures are clearly influenced by the patient's work status.

  16. The Effectiveness of EMLA as a Primary Dressing on Painful Chronic Leg Ulcers: Effects on Wound Healing and Health-Related Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Anne; Buckley, Thomas; Fethney, Judith; King, Jennie; Moyle, Wendy; Marshall, Andrea P

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of EMLA 5% cream applied to painful chronic leg ulcers (CLUs) as a primary dressing on wound healing and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). A pilot, parallel-group, nonblinded, randomized controlled trial was conducted in 6 community nursing procedure clinics in New South Wales, Australia. A total of 60 participants with painful CLUs of varied etiology were randomly assigned to the intervention (EMLA daily for 4 weeks as a primary dressing, followed by usual care) or usual care only. Wound size and HRQoL were measured at baseline, end of the intervention period (week 4), and week 12. At baseline, wound sizes were similar for both the intervention and control groups. During the intervention period, there was no significant difference in wound sizes between groups (intervention group: median (cm(2)) = 2.4, IQR = 1.3-12.7; control group: median (cm(2)) = 5.0, IQR = 2.5-9.9; P = .05). Mean HRQoL scores for all subscales at baseline and weeks 4 and 12 were similar between groups except for Wellbeing, which was significantly higher in the intervention group at the end of the 4-week intervention period (intervention group: mean = 52.41, SD = 24.50; control group: mean = 38.15, SD = 21.25; P = .03; d = 0.62). The trial findings suggest that daily applications of EMLA as a primary dressing do not inhibit wound healing and may improve patient well-being. Studies with larger samples are required to more comprehensively evaluate the impact of this treatment on wound healing and HRQoL.

  17. Reliability of MR-Based Volumetric 3-D Analysis of Pelvic Muscles among Subjects with Low Back with Leg Pain and Healthy Volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Skorupska

    Full Text Available Lately, the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging, Lasègue sign and classic neurological signs have been considered not accurate enough to distinguish the radicular from non-radicular low back with leg pain (LBLP and a calculation of the symptomatic side muscle volume has been indicated as a probable valuable marker. However, only the multifidus muscle volume has been calculated so far. The main objective of the study was to verify whether LBLP subjects presented symptomatic side pelvic muscle atrophy compared to healthy volunteers. The second aim was to assess the inter-rater reliability of 3-D manual method for segmenting and measuring the volume of the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus and piriformis muscles in both LBLP patients and healthy subjects.Two independent raters analyzed MR images of LBLP and healthy subjects towards muscle volume of four pelvic muscles, i.e. the piriformis, gluteus minimus, gluteus medius and gluteus maximus. For both sides, the MR images of the muscles without adipose tissue infiltration were manually segmented in 3-D medical images.Symptomatic muscle atrophy was confirmed in only over 50% of LBLP subjects (gluteus maximus (p<0.001, gluteus minimus (p<0.01 and piriformis (p<0.05. The ICC values indicated that the inter-rater reproducibility was greater than 0.90 for all measurements (LBLP and healthy subjects, except for the measurement of the right gluteus medius muscle in LBLP patients, which was equal to 0.848.More than 50% of LBLP subjects presented symptomatic gluteus maximus, gluteus minimus and piriformis muscle atrophy. 3-D manual segmentation reliably measured muscle volume in all the measured pelvic muscles in both healthy and LBLP subjects. To answer the question of what kind of muscle atrophy is indicative of radicular or non-radicular pain further studies are required.

  18. The effect of lumbar posture on abdominal muscle thickness during an isometric leg task in people with and without non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Rafael Zambelli; Ferreira, Paulo Henrique; Franco, Marcia Rodrigues; Ferreira, Mariana Calais; Ferreira, Manuela Loureiro; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci Fuscaldi; Oliveira, Vinicius C; Maher, Christopher

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of lumbar posture on function of transversus abdominis (TrA) and obliquus internus (OI) in people with and without non-specific low back pain (LBP) during a lower limb task. Rehabilitative ultrasound was used to measure thickness change of TrA and OI during a lower limb task that challenged the stability of the spine. Measures were taken in supine in neutral and flexed lumbar postures in 30 patients and 30 healthy subjects. Data were analysed using a two-way (groups, postures) ANOVA. Our results showed that lumbar posture influenced percent thickness change of the TRA muscle but not for OI. An interaction between group and posture was found for TrA thickness change (F(1,56) = 6.818, p = 0.012). For this muscle, only healthy participants showed greater thickness change with neutral posture compared to flexed (mean difference = 6.2%; 95% CI: 3.1-9.3%; p posture can facilitate an increase in thickness of the TrA muscle while performing a leg task, however this effect was not observed for this muscle in patients with LBP. No significant difference in TrA and OI thickness change between people with and without non-specific LBP was found. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Postural balance in low back pain patients: Intra-session reliability of center of pressure on a portable force platform and of the one leg stand test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maribo, Thomas; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Jensen, Lone Donbæk; Andersen, Niels Trolle; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit

    2011-06-01

    Low back pain (LBP) patients have poorer postural control compared to healthy controls, and the importance of assessing and addressing balance is a matter of debate. In the clinic, balance is often tested by means of the one leg stand test (OLST) while research often employs center of pressure (CoP) on a force platform. Portable force platforms might be of clinical relevance, but their reliability for LBP patients in a clinical setting has not been demonstrated. As LBP patients are more dependent on vision compared to healthy controls, the ratio of tests performed with eyes open and eyes closed (Romberg Ratio) might be of clinical interest. This study aimed to assess postural balance in LBP patients by analyzing intra-session reliability of CoP parameters on a portable force platform, the Romberg Ratio, and the OLST. Furthermore, we aimed to determine whether CoP parameters and OLST measure identical aspects of postural stability. We examined 49 LBP patients and found acceptable reliability of the CoP parameters' trace length and velocity, whereas reliability regarding C90 area, the Romberg Ratio, and the OLST was poor. Correlations between the CoP parameters and OLST were insignificant. Reliability of trace length and velocity is acceptable and can be used as parameters when assessing CoP in LBP patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. What do patients value about spinal manipulation and home exercise for back-related leg pain? A qualitative study within a controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiers, Michele; Hondras, Maria A; Salsbury, Stacie A; Bronfort, Gert; Evans, Roni

    2016-12-01

    Patient perceptions may influence the effectiveness and utilization of healthcare interventions, particularly for complex health conditions such as sciatica or back-related leg pain (BRLP). To explore BRLP patients' perceptions of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) and home exercise with advice (HEA). Qualitative study in a controlled clinical trial. Semi-structured interviews conducted after 12 weeks of treatment asked participants about satisfaction with care and whether treatment was worthwhile. An interdisciplinary research team conducted content analysis using qualitative data analysis software to identify and summarize themes. Of 192 trial participants, 174 (91%) completed interviews (66% female, age 57.0 ± 11.5 years). Participants identified interactions with providers and staff, perceived treatment effects, and information as key contributors to both their satisfaction and the worthwhile nature of treatment. HEA was liked for its convenience and ability to foster an exercise habit. SMT was liked for specific aspects of the modality (e.g. manipulation, stretching) and provider competency. Most participants reported no dislikes for SMT or HEA, but some noted the dose/time commitment for SMT and discipline of HEA as least liked aspects of the interventions. The quality of patient-provider interactions, perceived treatment effects, and information sharing influenced BRLP patients' satisfaction with care. Qualitative research describing patients' preferences can facilitate translation of study findings into practice and allow clinicians to tailor treatments to facilitate compliance and satisfaction with care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Laboratory Exercise Relating Soil Energy Budgets to Soil Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Richard T.; Cerny-Koenig, Teresa; Kotuby-Amacher, Janice; Grossl, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Enrollment by students in degree programs other than traditional horticulture, agronomy, and soil science has increased in basic plant and soil science courses. In order to broaden the appeal of these courses to students from majors other than agriculture, we developed a hands-on laboratory exercise relating the basic concepts of a soil energy…

  2. Unusual exercise-related stress fractures. Two case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink-Bennett, D.M.; Benson, M.T.

    1984-08-01

    We describe two unusual exercise-related stress fractures, one in the sacroiliac joint of a long distance runner, the other in the body of the scapulae of an above-knee amputee. Each were detected on a 2-hour delay bone scan. To our knowledge, neither have been described scintigraphically. The bilateral scapular fracture is an unreported entity, and the fractured SI joint is a very uncommon site for an overuse injury.

  3. Exercise-related complications in sickle cell trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripette, Julien; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Romana, Marc; Hue, Olivier; Diaw, Mor; Samb, Abdoulaye; Diop, Saliou; Connes, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    This review presents the epidemiological data regarding the exercise-related complication in exercising sickle cell trait carriers, and focuses on the different potential mechanisms that could be involved in these adverse events, such as hemorheological alterations, inflammation, vascular adhesion of circulating blood cells, oxidative stress and impaired nitric oxide metabolism. We also discuss the effects of different modulating factors such as vascular function, environment (hot temperature), hydration status, physical fitness, exercise intensity and genetic factors.

  4. Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Grant Funding for Pain Initiatives Current Funding Opportunities Research on the Impact of Creative Arts in Military Populations More Health Professional Information Earn CME More Related Topics Chronic Pain ( NINDS ) NIH Pain Seminar Series Pain: You Can Get Help ( NIA ) NIH ...

  5. Facilitated pronociceptive pain mechanisms in radiating back pain compared with localized back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Palsson, Thorvaldur Skuli; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Facilitated pain mechanisms and impaired pain inhibition are often found in chronic pain patients. This study compared clinical pain profiles, pain sensitivity, as well as pro-nociceptive and anti-nociceptive mechanisms in patients with localized low back pain (n=18), localized neck pain (n=17......), low back and radiating leg pain (n=18), or neck and radiating arm pain (n=17). It was hypothesized that patients with radiating pain had facilitated pain mechanisms and impaired pain inhibition compared with localized pain patients. Cuff algometry was performed on the non-painful lower leg to assess...... threshold (HPT) at the non-painful hand were also assessed. Clinical pain intensity, psychological distress, and disability were assessed with questionnaires. TSP was increased in patients with radiating back pain compared with localized back pain (Ppain or localized low...

  6. Reducing wound pain in venous leg ulcers with Biatain Ibu: A randomized, controlled double-blind clinical investigation on the performance and safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, F.; Jorgensen, B.; Karlsmark, T.

    2008-01-01

    Six out of 10 patients with chronic wounds suffer from persistent wound pain. A multinational and multicenter randomized double-blind clinical investigation of 122 patients compared two moist wound healing dressings: a nonadhesive foam dressing with ibuprofen (62 patients randomized to Biatain Ib...

  7. Clinical quality indicators of venous leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Monica L; Mainz, Jan; Soernsen, Lars T

    2005-01-01

    In the clinical setting, diagnosis and treatment of venous leg ulcers can vary considerably from patient to patient. The first step to reducing this variation is to document venous leg ulcer care through use of quantitative scientific documentation principles. This requires the development of valid...... and reliable evidence-based quality indicators of venous leg ulcer care. A Scandinavian multidisciplinary, cross-sectional panel of wound healing experts developed clinical quality indicators on the basis of scientific evidence from the literature and subsequent group nominal consensus of the panel......; an independent medical doctor tested the feasibility and reliability of these clinical indicators, assessing the quality of medical technical care on 100 consecutive venous leg ulcer patients. Main outcome measures were healing, recurrence, pain, venous disease diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment...

  8. The Pathophysiology and Care of Exercise Related Muscle Cramps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhay Kumar Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cramps are major concerns to competing athletes occurring during or after exercise, are common yet, poorly understood phenomena. Pain alone is not object of treatment as serious musculophysiologic and metabolic disturbance of fluid and electrolyte deserve correction. Acute muscle pain and stiffness may cause soreness for longer time. Based on observations, two etiological theories are construed, i.e. the muscle fatigue theory and sodium-water deficit theory. Either has supporting and contradicting facts, but these are relevant to guide prevention and management interventions. Cramps may be different in kind based on different local and/or general causes. Occurrence of cramps in varied situations, environmental conditions and populations, suggests of pleural causal determinents. These include neuromuscular and fluid-electrolyte disturbance factors directly responsible under specific circumstances of individual sports person. Degree of conditioning to particular kind of physical exertion appears most significant factor. Prevention exercises target theorised physiology of muscle tendon and golgi organ receptors, toward delaying fatigability and cramp risk. Occurrence of cramps mostly in hot environments emphasizes support to dehydration-electrolyte imbalance theory. Maintenance of hydration and adequate electrolyte levels in cramp-prone individuals thus makes sense. Worth of variety of measures empirically employed for cramp relief can be judged by scientific understanding. Drugs found useful may not be the best match to pathophysiologic proprieties and thus irrational. The pathophysiological details and relevant clinical information is presented and discussed as first hand understanding for the sports persons and their care givers.

  9. Exercise-related sudden cardiac arrest in London: incidence, survival and bystander response

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Melanie J; Fothergill, Rachael T

    2015-01-01

    Objective The study aimed to (1) establish the incidence of exercise-related sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in London, (2) investigate survival from exercise-related SCA and (3) examine factors related to survival. Method This retrospective observational study examined 2 years’ data from the London Ambulance Service (LAS) cardiac arrest registry for patients in whom resuscitation was attempted following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), a cardiac cause was presumed and the arrest occurre...

  10. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. It may happen ... move the affected body part The cause of CRPS is unknown. There is no specific diagnostic test. ...

  11. Lyden-af-Leg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Herdis

    Præsentation af seniorforsker-projekt Lyden-af-Leg i et traderingsperspektiv og med indledende fokus på YouTube som traderings-platform.......Præsentation af seniorforsker-projekt Lyden-af-Leg i et traderingsperspektiv og med indledende fokus på YouTube som traderings-platform....

  12. Dynamically Stable Legged Locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-27

    balanced itself in 31) using a tabular ctontrol sclwnme. With only thUiee actuated degrees it used a shuffling gait to balance that reminds one of Charlie ... Chaplin . * The present study explores the control of a physical one-legged hopping machine. The objective of using a machine with only one leg was to

  13. Restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletić, Vladimir; Relja, Maja

    2011-12-01

    Being of the most frequent causes of insomnia, which in the end leads to chronic fatigue, inadequate performance of daily activities, and serious disruption of quality of living, restless legs syndrome (RLS) is nowadays not only a serious medical problem but a socio-economical one as well. Prevalence of the disorder in general population is estimated at 5 to 15%. Family history is positive in over 50% of idiopathic RLS patients which points to genetic basis of the disorder. The characteristics of the secondary or acquired form of RLS are symptoms that start later in life as well as a rapid progression of the disease. On the other hand, idiopathic RLS more often starts at a younger age and the prognoses are better. Over twenty disorders and conditions are brought in connection with secondary RLS. Although the cause of primary RLS is still unknown, there is a strong connection between central metabolism of iron as well as dopamine levels and RLS manifestation. A differential diagnosis of RLS includes a wide specter of motor and sensory disorders. Diagnosis is based on clinical features and the history of disease. To correctly diagnose idiopathic RLS one must first eliminate secondary causes of RLS and then also exclude any disorders with clinical features that mimic those of RLS. It has been estimated that some 20 to 25% of patients need pharmacological therapy. Best initial therapy is the application of nonergot dopamine agonists. Anticonvulsants, benzodiazepines and opioides can be given to patients who are refractory to dopaminergic therapy, those suffering from RLS with emphasized painful sensory component and those with RLS connected with insomnia.

  14. Straight leg elevation to rule out pelvic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, Caroline; O'Keeffe, Francis; Finnegan, Pete; Dickson, Kristofer; Smit, De Villiers; Fitzgerald, Mark C; Mitra, Biswadev

    2017-10-09

    Pelvic x-ray is frequently used as a screening tool during initial assessment of injured patients. However routine use in the awake and alert blunt trauma patient may be questioned due to low yield. We propose a clinical tool that may avoid unnecessary imaging by examining whether the ability to straight leg raise, without pain, can rule out pelvic injury. We conducted a prospective cohort study with the exposure variables of ability to straight leg raise and presence of pain on doing so, and presence of pelvic fracture on x-ray as the primary outcome variable. Of the 328 participants, 35 had pelvic fractures, and of these 32 were either unable to straight leg raise, or had pain on doing so, with a sensitivity of 91.43% (95% CI: 76.94-98.2%) and a negative predictive value of 98.57% (95% CI: 95.88-99.70%). The 3 participants with a pelvic fracture who could straight leg raise with no pain, all had a GCS of less than 15, and therefore, among the sub-group of patients with GCS15, a 100% sensitivity and 100% negative predictive value for straight leg raise with no pain to rule out pelvic fracture was demonstrated. Among awake, alert patients, painless straight leg raise can exclude pelvic fractures and be incorporated into initial examination during reception and resuscitation of injured patients. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swelling of the ankles - feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... Foot, leg, and ankle swelling is common when the person also: Is overweight Has a blood clot ...

  16. Problems with Legs and Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Teeth Heart Murmurs Problems With Legs and Feet KidsHealth > For Kids > Problems With Legs and Feet Print A A A Where would you be without your legs and feet? They do a lot to get you where ...

  17. Pain: Hope through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tendonitis or tenosynovitis , affecting one or more tendons. Sciatica is a generic term representing pain in the ... down into the thighs, legs, ankles, and feet . Sciatica can be caused by a number of factors ...

  18. Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of pounding on your legs, such as running, volleyball or basketball. If you want to keep exercising, ... after activity. This can ease the pain and speed up healing. To keep your hands free, use ...

  19. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leg, such as a crush injury, fracture or amputation. Other major and minor traumas — such as surgery, ... diagnose complex regional pain syndrome, but the following procedures may provide important clues: Bone scan. This procedure ...

  20. Low back pain and the post-laminectomy pain syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These include neurofibromas, meningiomas and ependy- momas (e.g. from filum terminale). Tumour can present as back pain plus sciatica or just with incontinence, or with wasted legs without pain. When pain occurs, it can be without signs, and these patients are often labelled neurotic. The pain is, however, characteristic.

  1. Well Leg Compartment Syndrome After Abdominal Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Jens Krogh; Hove, Lars Dahlgaard; Mikkelsen, Kim Lyngby

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Well leg compartment syndrome (WLCS) is a complication to abdominal surgery. We aimed to identify risk factors for and outcome of WLCS in Denmark and literature. METHODS: Prospectively collected claims to the Danish Patient Compensation Association (DPCA) concerning WLCS after abdominal...... surgery (p = 0.04). Duration of the abdominal surgery was 4 times as important as the diagnostic delay for severity of the final outcome. DNPR recorded 4 new cases/year, and half were reported to DPCA. CONCLUSION: The first 24 h following abdominal surgery of >4 h' duration with elevated legs observation...... for WLCS should be standard. Pain in the calf is indicative of WLCS, and elevated serum CK can support the diagnosis. Mannitol infusion and acute four-compartment fasciotomy of the lower leg is the treatment. The risk of severe outcome of WLCS increases with duration of the primary operation. A broad...

  2. Perceptions of exercise consistency: Relation to exercise-related cognitive errors and cognitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Sean R; Brawley, Lawrence R

    2017-04-01

    This study examined psychological differences between individuals (1) with varying perceptions of their exercise adherence pattern and (2) who do and do not make exercise-related cognitive errors. A total of 364 adults completed an exercise pattern and cognitive errors questionnaire. Individuals perceiving themselves as consistent exercisers reported more adaptive social cognitive outcomes (e.g. higher self-regulatory efficacy) than those perceiving themselves as inconsistent. Individuals expressing stronger exercise-related cognitive errors exercised less and reported problematic cognitions (e.g. more struggle with exercise decisions). These results link inconsistent adherence perceptions to weaker social cognitions and exercise-related cognitive errors, a novel form of bias related to limited exercise engagement.

  3. Influence of pain intensity, pain duration and location of pain in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The association of Leg length discrepancy (LLD) in subjects with chronic low back pain (LBPS) has been a debatable issue. The occurrence of LLD in LBPS and comparing with non-low back pain subjects (NLBS) and the possible influence of the site at which pain was felt, duration of low back pain and intensity ...

  4. Surgical management of exertional anterior compartment syndrome of the leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, T; Mohammed, F; Mencia, M; Maharaj, D; Hoford, R

    2013-07-01

    To describe the characteristic presentation of exertional leg pain in athletes and to discuss the diagnostic options and surgical management of exertional anterior compartment syndrome of the leg in this group of patients. Data from a series of athletes presenting with exertional leg pain were analysed and categorized according to aetiology. Sixty-six athletes presenting with exertional leg pain in 102 limbs were analysed. Sixteen patients in a first group of 20 patients with a provisional diagnosis of exertional anterior compartment syndrome of the leg underwent a closed fasciotomy with complete resolution of symptoms. A second group of 42 patients were diagnosed as medial tibial stress syndrome and a third group of four patients had confirmed stress fracture of the tibia. Exertional leg pain is a common presenting complaint of athletes to sports physicians and physiotherapists. Careful analysis can lead to an accurate diagnosis and commencement of effective treatment. Exertional anterior compartment syndrome can be successfully treated utilizing a closed fasciotomy with a rapid return to sport.

  5. Restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateshiah, Saiprakash B; Ioachimescu, Octavian C

    2015-07-01

    Restless legs syndrome is a common sensorimotor disorder characterized by an urge to move, and associated with uncomfortable sensations in the legs (limbs). Restless legs syndrome can lead to sleep-onset or sleep-maintenance insomnia, and occasionally excessive daytime sleepiness, all leading to significant morbidity. Brain iron deficiency and dopaminergic neurotransmission abnormalities play a central role in the pathogenesis of this disorder, along with other nondopaminergic systems, although the exact mechanisms are still. Intensive care unit patients are especially vulnerable to have unmasking or exacerbation of restless legs syndrome because of sleep deprivation, circadian rhythm disturbance, immobilization, iron deficiency, and use of multiple medications that can antagonize dopamine. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Arterial bypass leg - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... presentations/100155.htm Arterial bypass leg - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  7. Leg CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the body area, called slices. These images can be stored, viewed on a monitor, or printed on film. Three-dimensional (3D) models of the leg can ...

  8. Inter-rater reliability of the Active Straight-Leg Raise and One-Leg Standing tests in non-pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Evan H; Virani, Noorshina; Robert, Magali; Gerry, Kate; Harding, Anita; Rose, M Sarah; Dukelow, Sean P; Barton, Pamela M

    2013-11-01

    To determine the inter-rater reliability of the Active Straight-Leg Raise and One-Leg Standing tests. Cross-sectional pilot study. Thirty-one women who were either not pregnant or at least 9 months post-partum. Subjects completed a questionnaire and standardized pain and disability assessments. The Active Straight-Leg Raise and One-Leg Standing tests were assessed by 3 independent, blinded examiners. Inter-rater reliability was determined, and relationships with assessments were explored. For the Active Straight-Leg Raise test, the kappa coefficient was 0.87, sensitivity 71%, and specificity 91%. Relationships with various pain and disability assessments were demonstrated, including the Functional Pelvic Pain Scale (r = 0.77) and Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (r = 0.70). For the One-Leg Standing test, kappa coefficients were -0.02 and 0.14 for the left and right sides, respectively, and thus no further analyses were performed. In women with a spectrum of low-back and pelvic pain, the Active Straight-Leg Raise test had good inter-rater reliability, whereas the One-Leg Standing test did not. Further studies are required regarding the validity of the Active Straight-Leg Raise test.

  9. Approach to leg edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Pomero

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Edema is defined as a palpable swelling caused by an increase in interstitial fluid volume. Leg edema is a common problem with a wide range of possible causes and is the result of an imbalance in the filtration system between the capillary and interstitial spaces. Major causes of edema include venous obstruction, increased capillary permeability and increased plasma volume secondary to sodium and water retention. In both hospital and general practice, the patient with a swollen leg presents a common dilemma in diagnosis and treatment. The cause may be trivial or life-threatening and it is often difficult to determine the clinical pathway. The diagnosis can be narrowed by categorizing the edema according to its duration, distribution (unilateral or bilateral and accompanying symptoms. This work provides clinically oriented recommendations for the management of leg edema in adults.

  10. Leg 179 summary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pettigrew, T.J.; Casey, J.F.; Miller, D.J.; Araki, E.; Boissonnas, R.; Busby, R.; Einaudi, F.; Gerdom, M.; Guo, Z.P.; Hopkins, H.; Myers, G.; Rao, D.G.; Shibata, T.; Thy, P.

    Pettigrew, T.L., Casey, J.F., Miller, D.J., et al., 1999 Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Initial Reports Volume 179 1. LEG 179 SUMMARY 1 Shipboard Scientific Party 2 ABSTRACT Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 179 set out with two primary objectives... a hole, then simultaneously deepen that hole and stabilize its walls with casing. This system is an adaptation of pneu- matically driven drilling systems that have successfully drilled in envi- ronments not unlike those that present our greatest...

  11. Making Better Lives: Patient-Focused Care for Low Back Pain (LBP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Chronic Low Back Pain; Hip Ostearthritis; Myofascial Pain Syndrome; Fibromyalgia; Depression; Maladaptive Coping; Lumbar Spinal Stenosis; Insomnia; Sacroiliac Joint Pain; Lateral Hip and Thigh Pain; Anxiety; Dementia; Recent Leg Length Discrepancy

  12. The mangled lower leg

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, Jochem Maarten

    2002-01-01

    A surgeon faced with a patient presenting with an open tibial/fibular fracture in combination with severe damage of the surrounding soft tissues, has to make the difficult decision whether to attempt salvage or to perform an immediate amputation of the leg. Until late in the nineteenth century the

  13. Compression for venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, Susan; Cullum, Nicky A; Nelson, E Andrea

    2009-01-21

    Around one percent of people in industrialised countries will suffer from a leg ulcer at some time. The majority of these leg ulcers are due to problems in the veins, resulting in an accumulation of blood in the legs. Leg ulcers arising from venous problems are called venous (varicose or stasis) ulcers. The main treatment has been a firm compression garment (bandage or stocking) in order to aid venous return. There is a large number of compression garments available and it is unclear whether they are effective in treating venous ulcers and which compression garment is the most effective. To undertake a systematic review of all randomised controlled trials of the clinical effectiveness of compression bandage or stocking systems in the treatment of venous leg ulceration.Specific questions addressed by the review are:1. Does the application of compression bandages or stockings aid venous ulcer healing? 2. Which compression bandage or stocking system is the most effective? For this update we searched the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (14/10/08); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 4 2008); Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to October Week 1 2008); Ovid EMBASE (1980 to 2008 Week 41) and Ovid CINAHL (1982 to October Week 1 2008). No date or language restrictions were applied. Randomised controlled trials recruiting people with venous leg ulceration that evaluated any type of compression bandage system or compression hosiery were eligible for inclusion. Comparators included no compression (e.g. primary dressing alone, non-compressive bandage) or an alternative type of compression. Trials had to report an objective measure of ulcer healing in order to be included (primary outcome for the review). Secondary outcomes of the review included ulcer recurrence, costs, quality of life, pain, adverse events and withdrawals. There was no restriction on date, language or publication status of trials. Details of eligible studies were

  14. ORTHOPEDIC LEG BRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, William Neil (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Knee braces generally have been rigid in both the knee bending direction and in the knee straightening direction unless a manually operated release is incorporated in them to allow the knee to bend. Desirably a braced knee joint should effectively duplicate the compound, complex, actions of a normal knee. The key to knee braces is the knee joint housing. The housing herein carries a number of cam action pawls. with teeth adapted to engage the internal teeth of a ratchet ring mounted in the housing. Cam action return springs and the shape of the cam action pawl teeth allow rotation of the ratchet ring in a leg straightening direction while still supporting a load. The leg can then be extended during walking while at the same time being prevented by the cam action pawls from buckling in the knee bending direction.

  15. LOW BACK PAINS –THE ORTHOPAEDIC SURGEON'S ENIGMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although man has been troubled by low back and leg pains since the start of recorded history, it is only during this century that the low back pain symptom complex has taken on epidemic proportions in the developed world. It was Cotugno in the 18th century who attributed the leg pain of sciatica to hydrops of the sciatic ...

  16. Quality of Life in People with Leg Ulcer, Integrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Alves

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the main changes in the daily life of people with leg ulcer and how that affects the person’s quality of life. Methodology: We used the methodology PI [C] OD and selected four research articles, taken from EBSCO, PubMed, and EWMA. Results: The main changes identified in the people’s daily live with leg ulcers are physical (pain, decreased mobility, presence of exudate, bad smell from the wound and change in the style of clothing, psychological (sleep disorders, depression, anxiety, feelings of rejection and low self-steem, social (isolation, restriction in leisure activities, inability to perform household chores. Conclusions: The literature about the person’s quality of life with leg ulcer reported a significant impact in the daily life. The care provided by nurses should be centered on the person, integrating all the kind of needs and the leg ulcer must not be the sole focus of care

  17. INSTRUMENTAL STRAIGHT-LEG RAISING - A NEW APPROACH TO LASEGUES TEST

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GOEKEN, LN; HOF, AL

    1991-01-01

    In clinical practice the outcome of Lasegue's test is interpreted with respect to two variables: (1) the maximum angle between the leg and the horizontal plane to which the leg can be lifted, and (2) the pain that is provoked by the movement. For a number of reasons it is difficult in many patients

  18. Leg size and muscle functions associated with leg compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Victor A.; Doerr, Donald F.; Flores, Jose F.; Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe; Buchanan, Paul

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between the leg compliance and factors related to the size of leg muscle and to physical fitness was investigated in ten healthy subjects. Vascular compliance of the leg, as determined by a mercury strain gauge, was found to be not significantly correlated with any variables associated with physical fitness per se (e.g., peak O2 uptake, calf strength, age, body weight, or body composition. On the other hand, leg compliance correlated with the calf cross-sectional area (CSA) and the calculated calf volume, with the CSA of calf muscle being the most dominant contributing factor (while fat and bone were poor predicators). It is suggested that leg compliance can be lowered by increasing calf muscle mass, thus providing structural support to limit the expansion of leg veins.

  19. Leg MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain that does not get better with treatment Instability of your ankle and foot Normal Results A ... Benjamin Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, ...

  20. Fantom pain: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Sanja S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Phantom limb pain is a common problem after limb amputation (41-85%. It is described as an extremely painful sensation in the missing part of the body that can last for hours, days or even years. It is considered to arise from cortical reorganization, although many factors can increase the risk of phantom limb pain: pain before surgery, age and sex of the patients, the time elapsed since surgery, stump pain, inadequate prosthesis. Phantom limb pain therapy is very complicated. Case report We reported a case of 80-year-old patient suffering from phantom limb pain and phantom sensation 25 years after the amputation of his left leg due to the injury. The patient has pain at the site of amputation, sensation that he has the leg and that it occupies an unusual position and almost daily exhausting phantom limb pain (6-9 visual analogue scale - VAS with disturbed sleep and mood. We managed to reduce the pain under 4 VAS and decrease the patient suffering by combining drugs from the group of coanalgetics (antidepressants, antiepileptics, non-pharmacological methods (transcutaneous electroneurostimulation - TENS, mirror therapy and femoral nerve block in the place of disarticulation of the left thigh. Conclusion Phantom limb pain therapy is multimodal, exhausting for both the patient and the physician and it is often unsuccessful. The combination of different pharmacological and non-pharmacological modalities can give satisfactory therapeutic response.

  1. Clinical Characteristics of Mixed Arteriovenous Leg Ulcers: A Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Joseph A; Woo, Kevin Y

    The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical characteristics of mixed arteriovenous leg ulcers (MLU) that differentiated them from venous leg ulcers (VLU). Secondary analysis of data from larger electronic database. The sample comprised 1007 persons with lower extremity ulcers. Two hundred sixty three individuals with MLU were compared to 744 individuals with VLU; their ankle brachial indices were 0.51-0.90 and 0.91-.30 respectively. Subjects were drawn from community care settings from across Canada. Data concerning baseline demographic and pertinent clinical characteristics including ulcer history were collected using multiple validated instruments. The Leg Ulcer Assessment Tool was used to collect demographic and pertinent medical history, The Short Form Health Survey 12 and the Euro Wuol 5D (EQ-5D) were used to measure health related quality of life, the numeric pain scales was used to measure character and intensity of pain. Groups were compared using χ or Mann-Whitney U. Individuals with MLU were significantly older, has lower body mass index, a history of smoking, and more comorbid conditions than subjects with VLU. In many cases, clinical presentation was indicative of significant arterial insufficiency including cool extremities, shiny, cracked and inelastic skin, impaired capillary refill, and weak pedal pulses. Ulcer pain was highly prevalent, but overall pain rating was similar between groups. Mixed arteriovenous leg ulcers were associated with lower health related quality of life, greater mobility impairments, and more deficits in self-care and usual activities. Greater knowledge and understanding of the distinct characteristics of MLU is critical for appropriate screening, prevention, assessment and management of persons with this form of leg ulcer. Pain and health related quality of life factors are important considerations when evaluating and managing these patients.

  2. Exercise increases pressure pain tolerance but not pressure and heat pain thresholds in healthy young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, H. B.; Bement, M. Hoeger; Madsen, A. B.

    2017-01-01

    and counterbalanced order. Cuff pressure pain threshold (cPPT) and pain tolerance (cPTT) were assessed on the ipsilateral lower leg by computer-controlled cuff algometry. Heat pain threshold (HPT) was recorded on the ipsilateral foot by a computer-controlled thermal stimulator. RESULTS: Cuff pressure pain tolerance...

  3. Maneuvers during legged locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindrich, Devin L.; Qiao, Mu

    2009-06-01

    Maneuverability is essential for locomotion. For animals in the environment, maneuverability is directly related to survival. For humans, maneuvers such as turning are associated with increased risk for injury, either directly through tissue loading or indirectly through destabilization. Consequently, understanding the mechanics and motor control of maneuverability is a critical part of locomotion research. We briefly review the literature on maneuvering during locomotion with a focus on turning in bipeds. Walking turns can use one of several different strategies. Anticipation can be important to adjust kinematics and dynamics for smooth and stable maneuvers. During running, turns may be substantially constrained by the requirement for body orientation to match movement direction at the end of a turn. A simple mathematical model based on the requirement for rotation to match direction can describe leg forces used by bipeds (humans and ostriches). During running turns, both humans and ostriches control body rotation by generating fore-aft forces. However, whereas humans must generate large braking forces to prevent body over-rotation, ostriches do not. For ostriches, generating the lateral forces necessary to change movement direction results in appropriate body rotation. Although ostriches required smaller braking forces due in part to increased rotational inertia relative to body mass, other movement parameters also played a role. Turning performance resulted from the coordinated behavior of an integrated biomechanical system. Results from preliminary experiments on horizontal-plane stabilization support the hypothesis that controlling body rotation is an important aspect of stable maneuvers. In humans, body orientation relative to movement direction is rapidly stabilized during running turns within the minimum of two steps theoretically required to complete analogous maneuvers. During straight running and cutting turns, humans exhibit spring-mass behavior in the

  4. Pain modulatory phenotypes differentiate subgroups with different clinical and experimental pain sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    between subgroups. Cuff algometry was performed on lower legs in 400 chronic pain patients to assess pressure pain threshold (cPPT), pressure pain tolerance (cPTT), temporal summation of pain (TSP: increase in pain scores to ten repeated stimulations), and conditioned pain modulation (CPM: increase in c......PPT during cuff pain conditioning on the contralateral leg). Heat detection (HDT) and heat pain thresholds (HPT) at clinical painful and non-painful body areas were assessed. Based on TSP and CPM four distinct groups were formed: Group 1 (n=85) had impaired CPM and facilitated TSP. Group 2 (n=148) had...... impaired CPM and normal TSP. Group 3 (n=45) had normal CPM and facilitated TSP. Group 4 (n=122) had normal CPM and normal TSP. Group 1 showed more pain regions compared with the other three groups (PTSP plays an important role in widespread pain. Group 1...

  5. Klinefelter Syndrome With Leg Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra G

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Leg ulcers are frequently caused by venous insufficiency, arterial insufficiency, neuropathy, or a combination of these factors. Klinefelter syndrome in association with chronic leg ulcers have been reported earlier. We report a case of Klinefelter syndrome with non- healing ulcer. The diagnosis of the Klinefelter syndrome was confirmed by karyotyping.

  6. Predictors of single-leg standing balance in individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Michael A; McManus, Fiona J; Hinman, Rana S; Bennell, Kim L

    2010-04-01

    To identify factors related to single-leg standing balance in individuals with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA). This cross-sectional study assessed clinical, demographic, and biomechanical measures in 57 individuals and their relationships with single-leg standing balance. Differences in age, mass, symptoms, knee pain, radiographic severity, lower extremity alignment, and hip and knee extension as well as hip abduction torques were compared between those who could and could not perform 3 trials of single-leg standing balance. Multiple regression was used to identify predictors of center of pressure (COP) path length in those who could complete the task. Thirty-four individuals (60%) successfully completed all 3 single-leg standing balance trials and were significantly younger (P = 0.003) than those who could not. No other variable was significantly different between the groups. Disease severity, number of painful knees, lower extremity alignment, pain intensity, and quadriceps torque were all significant predictors of COP path length. Specifically, better single-leg standing balance (smaller COP path length) was related to more severe radiographic changes and stronger quadriceps, those with bilateral symptoms, and to less varus malalignment and knee pain. Single-leg standing balance in those with medial knee OA is related to the modifiable factors lower extremity alignment, knee pain, and quadriceps strength. Given the reduced balancing ability in this patient population, interventions targeting these factors are necessary.

  7. Exercise-related respiratory symptoms and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in industrial bakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minov, Jordan B; Karadzinska-Bislimovska, Jovanka D; Vasilevska, Kristin V; Stoleski, Saso B; Mijakoski, Dragan G

    2013-01-01

    In order to assess prevalence and characteristics of exercise-related respiratory symptoms (ERRS) and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) in industrial bakery, the authors performed a cross-sectional study including 57 bakers and an equal number of office workers studied as a control. Evaluation of examined subjects included completion of a questionnaire, skin prick tests to common inhalant and occupational allergens, spirometry, and exercise and histamine challenge. The authors found a similar prevalence of ERRS and EIB in both bakers and controls. EIB was significantly associated with atopy, asthma, family history of asthma, and positive histamine challenge in either group, whereas in bakers it was closely related to sensitization to occupational allergens (p = .032). Bronchial reaction to exercise was significantly higher in bakers with EIB (25.7% vs 19.2%; p = .021). These findings suggest that occupational exposure in industrial bakery may accentuate bronchoconstrictive response to exercise.

  8. [Exercise-related risk at anaerobic threshold in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Q F; Yuan, W; Zhao, X J; Li, B; Wang, H Y

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the exercise-related risk at anaerobic threshold(AT) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD). Sixty two patients [men 56, women 6, aged (66±8) yr] with stable COPD in Beijing Friendship Hospital during 2013-2014, participated in this study. Incremental symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise test was performed on cycle ergometer. The AT was determined using the V-Slope technique and ventilatory equivalents for carbon dioxide and oxygen. Symptoms, 10-lead electrocardiogram, oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry(SpO(2)) were monitored during exercise. The AT, detectable in 53 patients, occurred at (68±10)% of peak oxygen uptake(peak VO(2)). The SpO(2) was in the safe range (94±2) % and the respiratory reserve was relatively high at AT (i.e. 48%). High-intensity exercise training can be performed in patients with moderate-to- severe COPD without resting oxygen desaturation.

  9. Living with Fibromyalgia, Drugs Approved to Manage Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Living with Fibromyalgia, Drugs Approved to Manage Pain Share Tweet Linkedin ... pain, restless leg syndrome, and depression. What Causes Fibromyalgia? Scientists believe that the condition may be due ...

  10. Exploring enhanced menu labels' influence on fast food selections and exercise-related attitudes, perceptions, and intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Morgan S; Thompson, Joel Kevin

    2016-10-01

    Labeling restaurant menus with calorie counts is a popular public health intervention, but research shows these labels have small, inconsistent effects on behavior. Supplementing calorie counts with physical activity equivalents may produce stronger results, but few studies of these enhanced labels have been conducted, and the labels' potential to influence exercise-related outcomes remains unexplored. This online study evaluated the impact of no information, calories-only, and calories plus equivalent miles of walking labels on fast food item selection and exercise-related attitudes, perceptions, and intentions. Participants (N = 643) were randomly assigned to a labeling condition and completed a menu ordering task followed by measures of exercise-related outcomes. The labels had little effect on ordering behavior, with no significant differences in total calories ordered and counterintuitive increases in calories ordered in the two informational conditions in some item categories. The labels also had little impact on the exercise-related outcomes, though participants in the two informational conditions perceived exercise as less enjoyable than did participants in the no information condition, and trends following the same pattern were found for other exercise-related outcomes. The present findings concur with literature demonstrating small, inconsistent effects of current menu labeling strategies and suggest that alternatives such as traffic light systems should be explored. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Biomechanics of Counterweighted One-Legged Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, Steven J; McDaniel, John; Martin, James C

    2016-02-01

    One-legged cycling has served as a valuable research tool and as a training and rehabilitation modality. Biomechanics of one-legged cycling are unnatural because the individual must actively lift the leg during flexion, which can be difficult to coordinate and cause premature fatigue. We compared ankle, knee, and hip biomechanics between two-legged, one-legged, and counterweighted (11.64 kg) one-legged cycling. Ten cyclists performed two-legged (240 W), one-legged (120 W), and counterweighted one-legged (120 W) cycling (80 rpm). Pedal forces and limb kinematics were recorded to determine work during extension and flexion. During counterweighted one-legged cycling relative ankle dorsiflexion, knee flexion, and hip flexion work were less than one-legged but greater than two-legged cycling (all P cycling were greater than one-legged but less than two-legged cycling (all P cycling reduced but did not eliminate differences in joint flexion and extension actions between one- and two-legged cycling. Even with these differences, counterweighted one-legged cycling seemed to have advantages over one-legged cycling. These results, along with previous work highlighting physiological characteristics and training adaptations to counterweighted one-legged cycling, demonstrate that this exercise is a viable alternative to one-legged cycling.

  12. Leg or foot amputation - dressing change

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000018.htm Leg or foot amputation - dressing change To use the sharing features ... chap 14. Read More Compartment syndrome Leg or foot amputation Peripheral artery disease - legs Type 1 diabetes ...

  13. Restless legs syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovallath S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Sujith Ovallath, P DeepaJames Parkinson's Movement Disorder Research Centre, Kannur Medical College, Kerala, IndiaBackground: Restless legs syndrome (RLS is a common sleep-related disorder characterized by abnormal sensation and an urge to move the lower limbs. Symptoms occur at rest in the evening or at night, and they are alleviated by moving the affected extremity or by walking. Although the exact etiopathogenesis of RLS remains elusive, the rapid improvement of symptoms with dopaminergic agents suggests that dopaminergic system dysfunction may be a basic mechanism. Dopaminergic agents are the best-studied agents, and are considered first-line treatment of RLS.Objective: To review the diagnostic criteria, clinical features, etiopathogenesis, and the treatment options of RLS.Methods: The suggestions are based on evidence from studies published in peer-reviewed journals, or upon a comprehensive review of the medical literature.Results/conclusion: Extensive data are available for proving the link between the dopaminergic system and RLS. A possible genetic link also has been studied extensively. Dopamine agonists, especially pramipexole and ropinirole, are particularly useful in the treatment of RLS. Pharmacological treatment should however be limited to those patients who suffer from clinically relevant RLS with impaired sleep quality or quality of life.Keywords: dopamine, levodopa, pramipexole

  14. Restless legs syndrome: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil Symvoulakis

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome is a distressing condition, with negative effects on sleep and daytime activities that affect personal, family and occupational life. The overall impact of restless legs syndrome on quality of life is comparable to that of chronic and frustrating conditions such as depression and diabetes. Misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment may increase patients' suffering in terms of uncertainty, overuse or misuse of care services and lack of trust. Presenting a synthesis of the main topics in the literature on restless legs syndrome facilitates for a better understanding and its management in primary care settings.

  15. Measurement of body fat using leg to leg bioimpedance

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, R; Lau, P; Yu, C; Lam, P; Nelson, E

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—(1) To validate a leg to leg bioimpedance analysis (BIA) device in the measurement of body composition in children by assessment of its agreement with dual energy x ray absorptiometry (DXA) and its repeatability. (2) To establish a reference range of percentage body fat in Hong Kong Chinese children.
METHODS—Sequential BIA and DXA methods were used to determine body composition in 49 children aged 7-18 years; agreement between the two methods was calculated. Repea...

  16. Ropinirole in restless leg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Iftekhar

    2002-01-01

    Restless leg syndrome (RLS) is a disease of unknown etiology, characterized by paresthesias and an irresistible desire to move the legs. Dopaminergic mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of this disorder. Dopamine agonists have been used to treat RLS. This paper describes the use of ropinirole, a non-ergoline dopamine agonist, in the treatment of RLS. Polysomnograms after treatment, as well as patient assessment of their symptoms, showed clinical improvement.

  17. Treatment of Restless Legs Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Comella, Cynthia L.

    2013-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common disorder diagnosed by the clinical characteristics of restlessness in the legs associated often with abnormal sensations that start at rest and are improved by activity, occurring with a diurnal pattern of worsened symptoms at night and improvement in the morning. RLS is the cause of impaired quality of life in those more severely afflicted. Treatment of RLS has undergone considerable change over the last few years. Several classes of medications have ...

  18. Compartment syndrome without pain!

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, M J

    2012-02-03

    We report the case of a young male patient who underwent intra-medullary nailing for a closed, displaced mid-shaft fracture of tibia and fibula. He was commenced on patient controlled analgesia post-operatively. A diagnosis of compartment syndrome in the patient\\'s leg was delayed because he did not exhibit a pain response. This ultimately resulted in a below-knee amputation of the patient\\'s leg. We caution against the use of patient controlled analgesia in any traumatised limb distal to the hip or the shoulder.

  19. Exercise-related changes of networks in aging and mild cognitive impairment brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei eHuang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aging and mild cognitive impairment are accompanied by decline of cognitive functions. Meanwhile, the most common form of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease, which is characterized by loss of memory and other intellectual abilities serious to make difficulties for patients in their daily life. Mild cognitive impairment is a transition period between normal aging and dementia, which has been used for early detection of emerging dementia. It converts to dementia with an annual rate of 5-15% as compared to normal aging with 1% rate. Small decreases in the conversion rate of mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer’s disease might significantly reduce the prevalence of dementia. Thus, it is important to intervene at the preclinical stage. Since there are still no effective drugs to treat Alzheimer’s disease, non-drug intervention is crucial for the prevention and treatment of cognitive decline in aging and mild cognitive impairment populations. Previous studies have found some cognitive brain networks disrupted in aging and mild cognitive impairment population, and physical exercise could effectively remediate the function of these brain networks. Understanding the exercise-related mechanisms is crucial to design efficient and effective physical exercise programs for treatment/intervention of cognitive decline. In this review, we provide an overview of the neuroimaging studies on physical training in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment to identify the potential mechanisms underlying current physical training procedures. Studies of functional magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography and positron emission tomography on brain networks were all included. Based on our review, the default mode network, fronto-parietal network and fronto-executive network are probably the three most valuable targets for efficiency evaluation of interventions.

  20. [When to worry about before a vascular chronic leg ulcer?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazareth, I

    2016-09-01

    Leg ulcers are a chronic condition. Healing can be long for venous ulcers and the risk of complications is significant. Infection is the most severe complication and can occur in the form of easily diagnosed acute bacterial dermohypodermitis that generally responds well to antibiotic treatment if given at an appropriate dose or in the form of localized infection that is more difficult to diagnosis. Indeed, no consensus has been reached in the literature on the clinical criteria to retain for the diagnosis of localized infection. Similarly, the most appropriate treatment remains to be established. Local care would be a logical starting point, followed by systemic antibiotics if this approach is unsuccessful. Individual conditions also should be taken into consideration (immunodepression, severe arteriopathy warranting more rapid use of systemic antibiotics). The second most frequent complication is an allergic reaction to a topical agent used for wound care. The rate of sensitivization in patients with leg ulcers is high (60 %), although the rate is declining with modern dressings. No product can be considered perfectly safe for these polysensitized patients. Dermocorticoid therapy can be very effective. Allergology tests are needed. Certain leg ulcers require special care from diagnosis. An arterial origin must be suspected for deep, or necrotic ulcers. Arterial supply must be explored rapidly, followed by a revascularization procedure when necessary. Highly painful superficial extensive necrotic ulcers due to necrotic angiodermitis require hospital care for skin grafts that will control the antiodermitis and provide pain. Carcinoma should be suspected in cases of leg ulcers with an atypical localization exhibiting excessive budding. A biopsy is mandatory for leg ulcers with an unusual course (absence of healing despite well-conducted care). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Managing painful chronic wounds: the Wound Pain Management Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Patricia; Fogh, Karsten; Glynn, Chris

    2007-01-01

    Chronic wound pain is not well understood and the literature is limited. Six of 10 patients venous leg ulcer experience pain with their ulcer, and similar trends are observed for other chronic wounds. Chronic wound pain can lead to depression and the feeling of constant tiredness. Pain related...... to the wound should be handled as one of the main priorities in chronic wound management together with addressing the cause. Management of pain in chronic wounds depends on proper assessment, reporting and documenting patient experiences of pain. Assessment should be based on six critical dimensions...... document persistent wound pain and not to develop a treatment and monitoring strategy to improve the lives of persons with chronic wounds. Unless wound pain is optimally managed, patient suffering and costs to health care systems will increase. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Apr...

  2. Promethus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AM Girbik; PA Dilorenzo

    2006-01-24

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  3. Leg ulcers due to hyperhomocysteinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupa Shankar D

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic leg ulcers are rare in young adults and generally indicate a vascular cause. We report a case of a 26-year-old man with leg ulcers of eight months duration. Doppler study indicated venous incompetence and a postphlebitic limb. However, as the distribution and number of ulcers was not consistent with stasis alone and no features of collagen vascular disease were noted, a hyperviscosity state was considered and confirmed with significantly elevated homocysteine level in the serum. Administration of vitamins B1, B2, B6 and B12, trimethyl-glycine, mecobalamine, folic acid and povidone iodine dressings with culture-directed antibiotic therapy led to a satisfactory healing of ulcers over a period of one month. Hyperhomocysteinemia must be considered in the differential diagnosis of leg ulcers in young individuals.

  4. Isolated Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome of the Lateral Lower Leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zantvoort, Aniek P.M.; de Bruijn, Johan A.; Winkes, Michiel B.; Dielemans, Jeanne P.; van der Cruijsen-Raaijmakers, Marike; Hoogeveen, Adwin R.; Scheltinga, Marc R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Exercise-induced lower leg pain may be caused by chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS). The anterior (ant-CECS) or deep posterior compartment (dp-CECS) is usually affected. Knowledge regarding CECS of the lateral compartment (lat-CECS) is limited. Purpose: To describe demographic characteristics and symptoms in a consecutive series of patients with isolated CECS of the lateral compartment of the leg. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Since 2001, patients undergoing dynamic intracompartmental pressure (ICP) measurements for suspected CECS in a single institution were prospectively monitored. Individuals with a history possibly associated with lat-CECS and elevated ICP measurements (Pedowitz criteria) were identified. Exclusion criteria were concomitant ipsilateral ant-CECS/dp-CECS, acute compartment syndrome, recent significant trauma, peroneal nerve entrapment, or vascular claudication. Results: During an 11-year time period, a total of 26 patients with isolated lat-CECS fulfilled study criteria (15 females; median age, 21 years; range, 14-48 years). Frequently identified provocative sports were running (n = 4), walking (n = 4), field hockey (n = 3), soccer (n = 3), and volleyball (n = 2). Exercise-induced lateral lower leg pain (92%) and tightness (42%) were often reported. The syndrome was bilateral in almost two-thirds (62%, n = 16). Delay in diagnosis averaged 24 months (range, 2 months to 10 years). Conclusion: Young patients with exercise-induced pain in the lateral portions of the lower leg may suffer from isolated CECS of the lateral compartment. ICP measurements in the lateral compartment in these patients are recommended. PMID:26740955

  5. Self-reported pain and disability outcomes from an endogenous model of muscular back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Steven Z

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our purpose was to develop an induced musculoskeletal pain model of acute low back pain and examine the relationship among pain, disability and fear in this model. Methods Delayed onset muscle soreness was induced in 52 healthy volunteers (23 women, 17 men; average age 22.4 years; average BMI 24.3 using fatiguing trunk extension exercise. Measures of pain intensity, unpleasantness, and location, and disability, were tracked for one week after exercise. Results Pain intensity ranged from 0 to 68 with 57.5% of participants reporting peak pain at 24 hours and 32.5% reporting this at 48 hours. The majority of participants reported pain in the low back with 33% also reporting pain in the legs. The ratio of unpleasantness to intensity indicated that the sensation was considered more unpleasant than intense. Statistical differences were noted in levels of reported disability between participants with and without leg pain. Pain intensity at 24 hours was correlated with pain unpleasantness, pain area and disability. Also, fear of pain was associated with pain intensity and unpleasantness. Disability was predicted by sex, presence of leg pain, and pain intensity; however, the largest amount of variance was explained by pain intensity (27% of a total 40%. The second model, predicting pain intensity only included fear of pain and explained less than 10% of the variance in pain intensity. Conclusions Our results demonstrate a significant association between pain and disability in this model in young adults. However, the model is most applicable to patients with lower levels of pain and disability. Future work should include older adults to improve the external validity of this model.

  6. The one-leg standing radiograph

    OpenAIRE

    Pinsornsak, P.; Naratrikun, K.; Kanitnate, S.; Sangkomkamhang, T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the joint space width between one-leg and both-legs standing radiographs in order to diagnose a primary osteoarthritis of the knee. Methods Digital radiographs of 100 medial osteoarthritic knees in 50 patients were performed. The patients had undergone one-leg standing anteroposterior (AP) views by standing on the affected leg while a both-legs standing AP view was undertaken while standing on both legs. The severity of the osteoarthritis wa...

  7. Popliteal amyloidoma presenting with leg ischemia in a chronic dialysis patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Y.; Kaneda, Kiyoshi; Miyagi, Noboru; Itoh, Manabu; Ohmoto, Hirofumi [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan)

    2000-12-01

    The authors report a case of bilateral popliteal amyloidoma causing stenosis of the popliteal artery and vein. This patient had been treated with hemodialysis for 26 years. The diagnosis was made with MR angiography. A popliteal tumor of the right knee was resected surgically and the histologic examination showed deposition of amyloid. After resecting the popliteal tumor, the severe leg pain and intermittent claudication improved. This report suggests that popliteal amyloid tumors should be considered in a patient undergoing long-term hemodialysis who complains of leg pain and intermittent claudication. (orig.)

  8. Peripheral artery bypass - leg - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your leg. DO NOT sit for more than 1 hour at a time when you first come home. If you can, ... dressing (bandage) and when you may stop using one. Keep your wound dry. If your incision goes to your groin, keep a dry gauze pad over it to keep it dry. Clean your ...

  9. Hypoalgesia after exercise and the cold pressor test is reduced in chronic musculuskeletal pain patients with high pain sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vægter, Henrik Bjarke; Handberg, Gitte; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    AND METHODS: On 2 days, manual pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were recorded at the legs, arm, and shoulder in 61 chronic pain patients and they performed the cold pressor test, 2 exercise conditions (bicycling and isometric contraction), and a control condition in a randomized and counterbalanced order. PPTs...... implications as clinicians should evaluate pain sensitivity when considering treatment options utilizing the descending modulatory pain control.......OBJECTIVES: In chronic pain patients, impaired conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH) have been reported. No studies have compared CPM and EIH in chronic musculoskeletal pain patients with high pain sensitivity (HPS) and low pain sensitivity (LPS). MATERIALS...

  10. Measurement of body fat using leg to leg bioimpedance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, R Y; Lau, P; Yu, C W; Lam, P K; Nelson, E A

    2001-09-01

    (1) To validate a leg to leg bioimpedance analysis (BIA) device in the measurement of body composition in children by assessment of its agreement with dual energy x ray absorptiometry (DXA) and its repeatability. (2) To establish a reference range of percentage body fat in Hong Kong Chinese children. Sequential BIA and DXA methods were used to determine body composition in 49 children aged 7-18 years; agreement between the two methods was calculated. Repeatability for the BIA method was established from duplicate measurements. Body composition was then determined by BIA in 1139 girls and 1243 boys aged 7-16 years, who were randomly sampled in eight local primary and secondary schools to establish reference ranges. The 95% limits of agreement between BIA and DXA methods were considered acceptable (-3.3 kg to -0.5 kg fat mass and -3.9 to 0.6% body fat). The percentage body fat increased with increasing age. Compared to the 1993 Hong Kong growth survey, these children had higher body mass index. Mean (SD) percentage body fat at 7 years of age was 17.2% (4.4%) and 14.0% (3.4%) respectively for boys and girls, which increased to 19.3% (4.8%) and 27.8% (6.3%) at age 16. Leg to leg BIA is a valid alternative method to DXA for the measurement of body fat. Provisional reference ranges for percentage body fat for Hong Kong Chinese children aged 7-16 years are provided.

  11. Quality of life of elderly patients with leg ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Cardoso Tavares

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: To identify compromised domains of the 36-Item Short Form Survey (SF-36 for elderly individuals with leg ulcers and correlate their clinical and sociodemographic variables with the SF-36's components. Method: Exploratory and cross-sectional study conducted with 50 elderly individuals with leg ulcers. The instruments were the sociodemographic and clinical form and the SF-36. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences was used to analyze data. Results: Most were married, retired, and received one times the minimum wage, were Caucasians or of mixed race, and had hypertension. In regard to the SF-36, the most compromised domain was physical limitations, while social aspects and general health status were the less compromised domains. The SF-36 domains were not correlated with age, income, duration or size of the lesion or pain. Conclusion: The ulcer-related biopsychosocial aspects need to be considered in order to devise more effective nursing interventions.

  12. The Legs Problem--For All Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Way, Jenni

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an example of a versatile multi-solution problem that can be used right across the primary years. The basic problem is: "Noah saw 16 legs go past him into the Ark. How many creatures did he see?" Any even number can be used, although, 2 legs allows only one answer and with 16 legs there are already 14 different…

  13. A comparison of one-legged and two-legged countermovement jumps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Soest, A J; Roebroeck, M.E.; Bobbert, M F; Huijing, P A; van Ingen Schenau, G J

    1985-01-01

    Ten well-trained male volleyball players performed one-legged and two-legged vertical countermovement jumps. Ground reaction forces, cinematographic data, and electromyographic data were recorded. Jumping height in one-legged jumps was 58.5% of that reached in two-legged jumps. Mean net torques in

  14. The one-leg standing radiograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naratrikun, K.; Kanitnate, S.; Sangkomkamhang, T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the joint space width between one-leg and both-legs standing radiographs in order to diagnose a primary osteoarthritis of the knee. Methods Digital radiographs of 100 medial osteoarthritic knees in 50 patients were performed. The patients had undergone one-leg standing anteroposterior (AP) views by standing on the affected leg while a both-legs standing AP view was undertaken while standing on both legs. The severity of the osteoarthritis was evaluated using the joint space width and Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) radiographic classification. The t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results The mean medial joint space width found in the one-leg and in the both-legs standing view were measured at 1.8 mm and 2.4 mm, respectively (p leg standing views, respectively. No changes for KL IV osteoarthritis diagnoses have been found between both- and one-leg standing views. Conclusions One-leg standing radiographs better represent joint space width than both-legs standing radiographs. 32% of both-legs standing radiographs have changed the KL grading to a more severe grade than that in the one-leg standing radiographs. Cite this article: P. Pinsornsak, K. Naratrikun, S. Kanitnate, T. Sangkomkamhang. The one-leg standing radiograph: An improved technique to evaluate the severity of knee osteoarthritis. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:436–441. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.59.BJR-2016-0049.R1. PMID:27683299

  15. Relationship between functional assessments and exercise-related changes during static balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Daniel R; Harrison, Blain C; Hertel, Jay; Hart, Joseph M

    2013-04-01

    The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) is currently used for injury risk prediction, although researchers have not studied its relationships to injury risk factors. The purpose of this study was to compare FMS scores at rest to changes in static balance after exercise. Second, we examined FMS scores pre and post exercise. Twenty-five participants performed center of pressure (COP) measures and FMS testing. An acclimatization session for the FMS occurred on day 1, whereas day 2 involved COP measures for static balance and FMS testing before and after a 36-minute exercise protocol. Center of pressure standard deviations in the frontal (COPML-SD) and sagittal (COPAP-SD) planes, center of pressure velocity (COP-Velocity), center of pressure area (COP-Area), and FMS scores were recorded. No significant correlations occurred between preexercise FMS scores and change in COP measures. Preexercise hurdle step scores related to preexercise COPML-SD (p = -0.46), COPAP-SD (p = -0.43), and COP-Area (p = -0.50). Preexercise in-line lunge scores related to postexercise COPAP-SD (p = -0.44) and COP-Velocity (p = -0.39), whereas preexercise active straight leg raise (ASLR) scores related to postexercise COPML-SD (p = -0.46). Functional Movement Screen scores were not related to changes in static balance after exercise and may therefore not be useful to predict who will experience greater static balance deficits after exercise. Additionally, FMS scores did not differ before and after exercise. Clinicians aiming to identify injury risk from a general static balance standpoint may find the hurdle step, in-line lunge, and ASLR useful. Clinicians aiming to identify injury risk from a change in static balance standpoint may need to explore other screening tools.

  16. Elastic actuation for legged locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chongjing; Conn, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    The inherent elasticity of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) gives this technology great potential in energy efficient locomotion applications. In this work, a modular double cone DEA is developed with reduced manufacturing and maintenance time costs. This actuator can lift 45 g of mass (5 times its own weight) while producing a stroke of 10.4 mm (23.6% its height). The contribution of the elastic energy stored in antagonistic DEA membranes to the mechanical work output is experimentally investigated by adding delay into the DEA driving voltage. Increasing the delay time in actuation voltage and hence reducing the duty cycle is found to increase the amount of elastic energy being recovered but an upper limit is also noticed. The DEA is then applied to a three-segment leg that is able to move up and down by 17.9 mm (9% its initial height), which demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing this DEA design in legged locomotion.

  17. Fibromyxoid sarcoma of the leg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 48-year-old female with an atypical plaque-like lesion of the lower leg is presented in this article. Histologic investigation revealed a rare low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma (pT1a cN0 cM0; stage Ia of suprafascial localization. Staging of the patient did not reveal metastatic spread. The tumor was surgically removed with wide safety margins. The defect was closed using a mesh graft transplant and vacuum-assisted closure. Healing was complete. Regular follow-up for at least 5 years is recommended. Besides the rareness of this tumor, this case is also remarkable because of the localization on the lower leg and the suprafascial soft tissue.

  18. Pain education combined with neck- and aerobic training is more effective at relieving chronic neck pain than pain education alone - A preliminary randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brage, K; Ris Hansen, Inge; Falla, D

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of training and pain education vs pain education alone, on neck pain, neck muscle activity and postural sway in patients with chronic neck pain. METHODS: Twenty women with chronic neck pain were randomized to receive pain education and specific training (neck-shoulder...... exercises, balance and aerobic training) (INV), or pain education alone (CTRL). Effect on neck pain, function and Global Perceived Effect (GPE) were measured. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded from neck flexor and extensor muscles during performance of the Cranio-Cervical Flexion Test (CCFT......) and three postural control tests (two-legged: eyes open and closed, one-legged: eyes open). Sway parameters were calculated. RESULTS: Fifteen participants (CTRL: eight; INV: seven) completed the study. Per protocol analyses showed a larger pain reduction (p = 0.002) for the INV group with tendencies...

  19. Født i leg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmeyer, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Langt snarere end intelligens og rationalitet er det vores uophørlige trang til at lege og til at tale (tænk blot på mobiltelefonenn, der så elegant forbinder begge disse faciliteter), der udgør menneskets kreative særtræk blandt dyrene her på Jorden. Og udviklingen af sprog og leg er indvendigt ...

  20. Pain Sensitisation in Women with Active Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vladimirova, Nora; Jespersen, Anders; Bartels, Else Marie

    2015-01-01

    sensitisation in women with active RA compared to healthy controls (HC). Methods. 38 women with active RA (DAS28 > 2.6) and 38 female HC were included in, and completed, the study. Exclusion criteria were polyneuropathy, pregnancy, and no Danish language. Cuff Pressure Algometry measurements were carried out...... on the dominant lower leg. Pain threshold, pain tolerance, and pain sensitivity during tonic painful stimulation were recorded. Results. Women with active RA had significantly lower pain threshold (p

  1. Oral aspirin for treating venous leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Carvalho, Paulo Eduardo; Magolbo, Natiara G; De Aquino, Rebeca F; Weller, Carolina D

    2016-02-18

    Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) or varicose ulcers are the final stage of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), and are the most common type of leg ulcer. The development of VLUs on ankles and lower legs can occur spontaneously or after minor trauma. The ulcers are often painful and exudative, healing is often protracted and recurrence is common. This cycle of healing and recurrence has a considerable impact on the health and quality of life of individuals, and healthcare and socioeconomic costs. VLUs are a common and costly problem worldwide; prevalence is estimated to be between 1.65% to 1.74% in the western world and is more common in adults aged 65 years and older. The main treatment for a VLU is a firm compression bandage. Compression assists by reducing venous hypertension, enhancing venous return and reducing peripheral oedema. However, studies show that it only has moderate effects on healing, with up to 50% of VLUs unhealed after two years of compression. Non-adherence may be the principal cause of these poor results, but presence of inflammation in people with CVI may be another factor, so a treatment that suppresses inflammation (healing ulcers more quickly) and reduces the frequency of ulcer recurrence (thereby prolonging time between recurrent episodes) would be an invaluable intervention to complement compression treatments. Oral aspirin may have a significant impact on VLU clinical practice worldwide. Evidence for the effectiveness of aspirin on ulcer healing and recurrence in high quality RCTs is currently lacking. To assess the benefits and harms of oral aspirin on the healing and recurrence of venous leg ulcers. In May 2015 we searched: The Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE and EBSCO CINAHL. Additional searches were made in trial registers and reference lists of relevant publications for

  2. The effect of lumbosacral manipulation on growing pains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid de Beer

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: The results from this study, specifically the feedback from parent(s/guardians(s and the pain diaries, indicated that spinal manipulation is beneficial in the treatment of growing pains. The results also showed that other methods of treating growing pains, such as simple leg rubs, may also bring relief.

  3. [The prevalence of pain and different pain treatments in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuru, Tuğba; Yeldan, Ipek; Zengin, Ayşe; Kostanoğlu, Alis; Tekeoğlu, Anil; Akbaba, Yildiz Analay; Tarakçi, Devrim

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine prevalence of pain (p) in adults and their preference for pain treatment, by using questionnaire. First 7 questions of "Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form" and "Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire" were applied to 250 participants in face to face interview. A hundred eighty of the individuals were women (38.3±14.0 years old) and 70 were men (36.6±13.2 years old). Data analysis were performed using SPSS, version 10. Eighteen individuals (7.2%) had no pain and 232 (92.8%) of them had pain in different parts of the body. A hundred fourty five individuals had lowback p, 116 neck p, 101 dorsal p, 152 shoulder p, 69 upperarm p, 66 forearm p, 75 wrist p, 59 hip p, 69 upper leg p, 98 knee p, 81 crus pain. Their mean pain score was 3.6±1.8, mean pain score at its worst in the last 24 hours was 4.4±2.6. Thirty three percent of individuals had used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and/or analgesic drugs to relieve pain, 22.7% had physical therapy, 4.1% had other pain-relief methods, 1.2% had surgery, and 38% had nothing. Our results showed that 92.8% adults had pain. Although shoulder has highest pain prevalance, severe pain was mostly described in lowback area. Knee pain was largely interfered work ability. An important percent of persons experiencing pain has recieved no treatment and first preference for treatment was drug. Inspite of high pain prevalence in our study, slightly uncomfortable pain severity and no need for treatment can be explain a result of individual differences in pain perception.

  4. Understanding the Active Straight Leg Raise (ASLR): An electromyographic study in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, H.; Meijer, O.G.; Bruijn, S.M.; Strijers, R.L.M.; Nanayakkara, P.W.B.; van Royen, B.J.; Wu, W; Xia, C.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    The Active Straight Leg Raise (ASLR) is an important test in diagnosing pelvic girdle pain (PGP). It is difficult to understand what happens normally during the ASLR, let alone why it would be impaired in PGP. In the present study, healthy subjects performed the ASLR under normal conditions, with

  5. Association Between Statin Use and Prevalence of Exercise-Related Injuries: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Amateur Runners in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, EA; Timmers, S; Hopman, MTE; Thompson, PD; Verbeek, ALM; Eijsvogels, TMH

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are the first-choice therapy for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Some maintain that statins cause adverse musculoskeletal outcomes in highly active individuals, but few studies have examined the effects of statins on exercise-related injuries. OBJECTIVE: We sought to compare the prevalence of exercise-related injuries between runners who do or do not use statins. METHODS: Amateur runners (n = 4460) completed an extensive online ...

  6. Grid-climbing Behaviour as a Pain Measure for Cancer-induced Bone Pain and Neuropathic Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Sarah; Gallego-Pedersen, Simone; Petersen, Nicolas Caesar

    2017-01-01

    Despite affecting millions of people, chronic pain is generally treated insufficiently. A major point of focus has been the lack of translation from preclinical data to clinical results, with the predictive value of chronic pain models being a major concern. In contrast to current focus on stimulus...... use as a measure of neuropathic and cancer-induced bone pain in mice. In both models, the grid-climbing test demonstrated pain-related sparing of the affected leg during climbing. In both models, the behaviour was reversed by administration of morphine, suggesting that the observed behaviour was pain-specific....

  7. Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... over. There are two types: acute pain and chronic pain. Acute pain lets you know that you may ... have problem you need to take care of. Chronic pain is different. The pain may last for weeks, ...

  8. Epilepsy and restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, James D; Geyer, Emery E; Fetterman, Zachary; Carney, Paul R

    2017-03-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological movement disorder occurring in approximately 10% of the general population. The prevalence of moderately severe RLS is 2.7% overall (3.7% for women and 1.7% for men). Epilepsy is also a common neurological disorder with significant associated morbidity and impact on quality of life. We evaluated the severity and frequency of primary RLS in patients with localization-related temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and investigated the role of prodromal RLS symptoms as a warning sign and lateralizing indicator. All epilepsy patients seen in the outpatient clinic were screened for movement disorders from 2005 to 2015. Ninety-eight consecutive patients with localization-related TLE (50 right TLE and 48 left TLE) who met inclusion criteria were seen in the outpatient clinic. The control group consisted of 50 individuals with no history or immediate family history of epilepsy. Each patient was evaluated with the International Restless Legs Study Group (IRLSSG) questionnaire, NIH RLS diagnostic criteria, ferritin level, and comprehensive sleep screening including polysomnography. Furthermore, patients with obstructive sleep apnea or a definite cause of secondary restless legs syndrome such as low serum ferritin or serum iron levels were also excluded from the study. There was a significant association between the type of epilepsy and whether or not patients had RLS χ 2 (1)=10.17, pepilepsy than if they had left temporal epilepsy, serving as a potential lateralizing indicator. A prodromal sensation of worsening RLS occurred in some patients providing the opportunity to intervene at an earlier stage in this subgroup. We identified frequent moderate to severe RLS in patients with epilepsy. The frequency of RLS was much more common than would typically be seen in patients of similar age. The restlessness was typically described as moderately severe. The RLS symptoms were more common and somewhat more severe in the right TLE group

  9. [Radiation arteritis- and radiodermitis-induced leg ulcer: surgical revascularization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branellec, A; Bureau, J M; Gigou, F; Matichard, E; Debure, C

    2006-02-01

    A forty-four-year old man was hospitalized for diagnosis and treatment of a left leg ulcer which did not heal despite good compliance with a three-month medical regimen. Twenty years before he had undergone surgical curettage and radiotherapy (81 gy) for an osteosarcoma of the upper third of the left tibia. He was considered completely cured with regular findings. On examination he had a 5 X 7 cm deep ulcer with raised margins and no signs of infection, localized on the radiodermatitis on the medial aspect of his left leg. Arterial examination confirmed the left arteriopathy with absence of distal pulses; the Ankle Brachial Pressure Index was 0.69 and the foot TcPO2 27 mmHg. Arteriography confirmed the localized left lesions with three distal popliteal and proximal arterial occlusions, all other arteries being strictly normal. Arterial and dermatological radiation leg ulcer was retained as the etiological diagnosis. As the ulcer was very painful, extensive and limited walking distance, surgical revascularisation was undertaken because endoluminal revascularization was impossible. A femoroperoneal saphenous bypass was performed with surgical incisions beyond the radiodermatitis area. Two months after a split skin graft, the ulcer was considered healed and the patency of the by-pass confirmed on duplex examination. This is the first case report of a successful distal by-pass performed for radiation arteritis and ulcer healing. Long-term follow up should be reported.

  10. Efficacy and Safety of Rituximab in the Treatment of Vasculitic Leg Ulcers Associated with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Bonilla-Abadía

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vasculitic leg ulcers are a cutaneous manifestation of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection often associated with cryoglobulinemia. Their treatment is difficult and is based on steroids and immunosuppressive drugs with an erratic response and a high probability of adverse reaction. We report three patients with vasculitic leg ulcers associated with hepatitis C virus infection who were treated successfully with rituximab. The pain control and healing were achieved quickly. No adverse effects with rituximab in these patients were presented.

  11. An Unusual Case of Leg Pain in a Competitive Cyclist

    OpenAIRE

    Lindner, Dror; Agar, Gabriel; Domb, Benjamin Gilbert; Beer, Yiftah; Shub, Idit; Mann, Gideon

    2014-01-01

    Cycling has become a popular recreational and competitive sport. The number of people participating in the sport is gradually increasing. Despite being a noncontact, low-impact sport, as many as 85% of athletes engaged in the sport will suffer from an overuse injury, with the lower limbs comprising the majority of these injuries. Up to 20% of all lower extremity overuse injuries in competitive cyclists are of a vascular source. A 39-year-old competitive cyclist had a 5-year history of thigh p...

  12. Treatment of restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comella, Cynthia L

    2014-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common disorder diagnosed by the clinical characteristics of restlessness in the legs associated often with abnormal sensations that start at rest and are improved by activity, occurring with a diurnal pattern of worsened symptoms at night and improvement in the morning. RLS is the cause of impaired quality of life in those more severely afflicted. Treatment of RLS has undergone considerable change over the last few years. Several classes of medications have demonstrated efficacy, including the dopaminergic agents and the alpha-2-delta ligands. Levodopa was the first dopaminergic agent found to be successful. However, chronic use of levodopa is frequently associated with augmentation that is defined as an earlier occurrence of symptoms frequently associated with worsening severity and sometimes spread to other body areas. The direct dopamine agonists, including ropinirole, pramipexole, and rotigotine patch, are also effective, although side effects, including daytime sleepiness, impulse control disorders, and augmentation, may limit usefulness. The alpha-2-delta ligands, including gabapentin, gabapentin enacarbil, and pregabalin, are effective for RLS without known occurrence of augmentation or impulse control disorders, although sedation and dizziness can occur. Other agents, including the opioids and clonazepam do not have sufficient evidence to recommend them as treatment for RLS, although in an individual patient, they may provide benefit.

  13. Restless Legs Syndrome -- Causes and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diagnosis Treatment Jet Lag Overview Symptoms & Self Test Treatment Narcolepsy Overview & Facts Symptoms Self-Tests & Diagnosis Treatment Restless Legs Syndrome Overview & Facts Causes & Symptoms Self- ...

  14. Ultrasound-Guided Fasciotomy for Anterior Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome of the Leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balius, Ramon; Bong, David A; Ardèvol, Jordi; Pedret, Carles; Codina, David; Dalmau, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Chronic exertional compartment syndrome is characterized by exertional pain and elevated intracompartmental pressures affecting the leg in physically active young people. In patients who have failed conservative measures, fasciotomy is the treatment of choice. This study presents a new method for performing fasciotomy using high-resolution ultrasound (US) guidance and reports on the clinical outcomes in a group of these patients. Over a 3-year period, 7 consecutive patients with a total of 9 involved legs presented clinically with anterior compartment chronic exertional compartment syndrome, which was confirmed by intracompartmental pressure measurements before and after exercise. After a US examination, fasciotomy under US guidance was performed. Preoperative and postoperative pain and activity levels were assessed as well as number of days needed to "return to play." All patients had a decrease in pain, and all except 1 returned to presymptomatic exercise levels with a median return to play of 35 days. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  15. Guidelines for the management of venous leg ulcers: a gap analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hecke, Ann; Grypdonck, Maria; Defloor, Tom

    2008-10-01

    Since 1998, many leg ulcer practice guidelines were developed. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodological and clinical content quality of those guidelines. Methods PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane Library and websites known for publishing or collecting clinical practice guidelines were explored from 1998 up to June 2006. Reference lists of all identified guidelines were reviewed for other guidelines to be included. Guidelines were eligible if they were written in English, Dutch, French or German, if the scope was the treatment of venous leg ulcers, if the guideline was systematically developed and if the steps in guideline development were reported clearly. Seven guidelines were critically appraised. The venous leg ulcer guidelines were clearly based on evidence. The stakeholder involvement varied during the development process. Especially patients' perspectives were often not considered. There was no uniform method used to weigh the evidence. Limited attention was given to pain and lifestyle advice recommendations. A paucity of information on compliance, quality of life, organizational aspects of care and economic evaluation data was given. Most of the guidelines failed to consider the issues of dissemination and implementation. Revisions of the guidelines for leg ulcer treatment were often not available. It is recommended that leg ulcer guidelines should incorporate a multidisciplinary approach and patient involvement is necessary. Extensive background information and the formulation of the rationale are needed. The development of an implementation guide that addresses the barriers particular to the adoption of guidelines for leg ulcer treatment could support the process of implementation. Recommendations on pain, lifestyle advice, compliance and other quality-of-life issues should be incorporated in guidelines for leg ulcer treatment.

  16. Isolated Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome of the Lateral Lower Leg: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zantvoort, Aniek P M; de Bruijn, Johan A; Winkes, Michiel B; Dielemans, Jeanne P; van der Cruijsen-Raaijmakers, Marike; Hoogeveen, Adwin R; Scheltinga, Marc R

    2015-11-01

    Exercise-induced lower leg pain may be caused by chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS). The anterior (ant-CECS) or deep posterior compartment (dp-CECS) is usually affected. Knowledge regarding CECS of the lateral compartment (lat-CECS) is limited. To describe demographic characteristics and symptoms in a consecutive series of patients with isolated CECS of the lateral compartment of the leg. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Since 2001, patients undergoing dynamic intracompartmental pressure (ICP) measurements for suspected CECS in a single institution were prospectively monitored. Individuals with a history possibly associated with lat-CECS and elevated ICP measurements (Pedowitz criteria) were identified. Exclusion criteria were concomitant ipsilateral ant-CECS/dp-CECS, acute compartment syndrome, recent significant trauma, peroneal nerve entrapment, or vascular claudication. During an 11-year time period, a total of 26 patients with isolated lat-CECS fulfilled study criteria (15 females; median age, 21 years; range, 14-48 years). Frequently identified provocative sports were running (n = 4), walking (n = 4), field hockey (n = 3), soccer (n = 3), and volleyball (n = 2). Exercise-induced lateral lower leg pain (92%) and tightness (42%) were often reported. The syndrome was bilateral in almost two-thirds (62%, n = 16). Delay in diagnosis averaged 24 months (range, 2 months to 10 years). Young patients with exercise-induced pain in the lateral portions of the lower leg may suffer from isolated CECS of the lateral compartment. ICP measurements in the lateral compartment in these patients are recommended.

  17. The Relationship among Leg Strength, Leg Power and Alpine Skiing Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettman, Larry R.; Huckel, Jack R.

    The purpose of this study was to relate leg strength and power to alpine skiing success as measured by FIS points. Isometric leg strength was represented by the knee extension test described by Clarke. Leg power was measured by the vertical jump test and the Margaria-Kalamen stair run. Results in the strength and power tests were correlated with…

  18. Using social learning theory to assess the exercise related health education needs of post-retirement adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, C; Petosa, R

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the exercise related health education needs of post-retirement adults. Social Learning Theory (SLT) was used as the conceptual framework. The target population for this study was post-retirement adults aged sixty years and over living in Columbus, Ohio. Results revealed a serious lack of knowledge regarding the benefits and attributes of exercise. Overall it appeared that few older adults received social support for exercise. Approximately one-half of the sample reported high levels of exercise self-efficacy. Over 50 percent of the sample reported to exercise for health-related benefits. Based on the results, specific recommendations for the promotion of exercise in post-retirement adults are offered.

  19. Leg ischemia post-varicocelectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Wahbi AM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah M Al-Wahbi1, Shaza Elmoukaied2 1Division of Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Surgery, Dr Sulaiman Al Habib Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Varicocelectomy is the most commonly performed operation for the treatment of male infertility. Many surgical approaches are used as each of them has advantages over the other and is preferred by surgeons. Vascular injury has never been reported as a complication of varicocelectomy apart from testicular artery injury. We present a 36-year-old male who developed leg ischemia post-varicocelectomy due to common femoral artery injury. He was successfully treated by using a vein graft. Keywords: varicocele, varicocelectomy, complications, vascular injuries

  20. Health and exercise-related medical issues among 1,212 ultramarathon runners: baseline findings from the Ultrarunners Longitudinal TRAcking (ULTRA) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Martin D; Krishnan, Eswar

    2014-01-01

    Regular exercise is associated with substantial health benefits; however, little is known about the health impact of extreme levels of exercise. This study examined the prevalence of chronic diseases, health-care utilization, and risk factors for exercise-related injuries among ultramarathon runners. Retrospective, self-reported enrollment data from an ongoing longitudinal observational study of 1,212 active ultramarathon runners were analyzed. The most prevalent chronic medical conditions were allergies/hay fever (25.1%) and exercise-induced asthma (13.0%), but there was a low prevalence of serious medical issues including cancers (4.5%), coronary artery disease (0.7%), seizure disorders (0.7%), diabetes (0.7%), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (0.2%). In the year preceding enrollment, most (64.6%) reported an exercise-related injury that resulted in lost training days (median of 14 days), but little nonattendance of work or school due to illness, injury, or exercise-related medical conditions (medians of 0 days for each). The knee was the most common area of exercise-related injury. Prior year incidence of stress fractures was 5.5% with most (44.5%) involving the foot. Ultramarathon runners who sustained exercise-related injuries were younger (pexercise-related injuries but higher proportion of stress fractures involving the foot, and it is the younger and less experienced ultramarathoners who appear most at risk for injury.

  1. Intensive treatment of leg lymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira de Godoy Jose

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite of all the problems caused by lymphedema, this disease continues to affect millions of people worldwide. Thus, the identification of the most efficacious forms of treatment is necessary. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate a novel intensive outpatient treatment for leg lymphedema. Methods: Twenty-three legs of 19 patients were evaluated in a prospective randomized study. The inclusion criteria were patients with Grade II and III lymphedema, where the difference, measured by volumetry, between the affected limb below the knee and the healthy limb was greater than 1.5 kg. Intensive treatment was carried out for 6- to 8-h sessions in the outpatient clinic. Analysis of variance was utilized for statistical analysis with an alpha error of 5% (P-value < 0.05 being considered significant. Results: All limbs had significant reductions in size with the final mean loss being 81.1% of the volume of edema. The greatest losses occurred in the first week (P-value < 0.001. Losses of more than 90% of the lymphedema occurred in 9 (39.13% patients; losses of more than 80% in 13 (56.52%, losses of more than 70% in 17 (73.91% and losses of more than 50% were recorded for 95.65% of the patients; only 1 patient lost less than 50% (37.9% of the edema. Conclusion: The intensive treatment of lymphedema in the outpatient clinic can produce significant reductions in the volume of edema over a short period of time and can be recommended for any grade of lymphedema, in particular the more advanced degrees.

  2. X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leg, and an image is recorded on special film or a computer. This image shows the soft tissues and the bone in the upper leg, which is called the femur. The X-ray image is black and white. Dense body parts that block the passage of the X- ...

  3. Persistent postsurgical pain: risk factors and prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Henrik; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2006-01-01

    Acute postoperative pain is followed by persistent pain in 10-50% of individuals after common operations, such as groin hernia repair, breast and thoracic surgery, leg amputation, and coronary artery bypass surgery. Since chronic pain can be severe in about 2-10% of these patients, persistent...... therapy for postoperative pain should be investigated, since the intensity of acute postoperative pain correlates with the risk of developing a persistent pain state. Finally, the role of genetic factors should be studied, since only a proportion of patients with intraoperative nerve damage develop...... chronic pain. Based on information about the molecular mechanisms that affect changes to the peripheral and central nervous system in neuropathic pain, several opportunities exist for multimodal pharmacological intervention. Here, we outline strategies for identification of patients at risk...

  4. Quality of life in people with venous leg ulcers: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Consuegra, Renata Virginia; Verdú, José

    2011-05-01

    To explore the impact of venous leg ulcers on health-related quality of life and analyse the quality of life instruments that have been used for this topic. Venous leg ulcers represent more than 80% of all chronic leg ulcers. Several studies have demonstrated that health-related quality of life is affected in patients with such lesions. An integrative review was conducted, together with an additional methodological review of quality of life instruments. Eight electronic databases were searched, and all studies published between 2003 and 2008 were considered in with both qualitative and quantitative approaches and in Spanish, English, French, German and Portuguese. Thus, no restrictions were applied as regards study design. Twenty-two studies were included; one used mixed methods, three employed qualitative methods and the remaining articles used a quantitative approach. Pain was the factor most frequently identified as affecting health-related quality of life. The generic instruments most commonly used were Short Form-36 and adaptations, the Nottingham Health Profile and EuroQol-5, whilst the disease-specific tools were Hyland, Cardiff Wound Impact Schedule and Charing Cross Venous Leg Ulcer Questionnaire. Two new instruments were also identified, venous leg ulcer quality of life and Sheffield Preference-based Venous Leg Ulcer 5D. The negative impact of venous leg ulcers on health-related quality of life is confirmed in this review. This impact has been measured using a variety of specific health-related quality of life instruments. However, the review findings suggest that the Charing Cross Venous Leg Ulcer Questionnaire is the most appropriate instrument due to its disease-specific psychometric characteristics. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Static balance according to hip joint angle of unsupported leg during one-leg standing

    OpenAIRE

    Cha, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Jang-Joon; Ye, Jae-Gwan; Lee, Seul-Ji; Hong, Jeong-Mi; Choi, Hyun-Kyu; Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Won-Seob

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine static balance according to hip joint angle of the unsupported leg during one-leg standing. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects included 45 healthy adult males and females in their 20s. During one-leg standing on the non-dominant leg, the position of the unsupported leg was classified according to hip joint angles of point angle was class. Static balance was then measured using a force plate with eyes open and closed. The total length, sway velocity, maximu...

  6. Neck Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Living Well with Rheumatic Disease Neck Pain Neck Pain Fast Facts Whiplash from motor vehicle accidents is ... more frequently in women than men. What causes neck pain? Most episodes of neck pain are caused by ...

  7. The Effect of Shiatsu Massage on Pain Reduction in Burn Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ardabili, Fatemeh Mohaddes; Purhajari, Soybeh; Najafi Ghezeljeh, Tahereh; Haghani, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Burn is a tragedy that follows multiple problems in a patient including pain, anxiety and lack of confidence into medical team. This study evaluated the effect of shiatsu massage on pain intensity of burn patients. METHODS A total of 120 burn patients from Motahhari Burn Hospital and of both genders were randomly divided into 4 groups of undergoing hand massage, leg massage, both hand and leg massages, and the control group. The effect of shiatsu massage in pain relief of burned pa...

  8. Tactile allodynia in patients with lumbar radicular pain (sciatica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrin, Ruth; Devor, Marshall; Brill, Silviu

    2014-12-01

    We report a novel symptom in many patients with low back pain (LBP) that sheds new light on the underlying pain mechanism. By means of quantitative sensory testing, we compared patients with radicular LBP (sciatica), axial LBP (LBP without radiation into the leg), and healthy controls, searching for cutaneous allodynia in response to weak tactile and cooling stimuli on the leg and low back. Most patients with radicular pain (~60%) reported static and dynamic tactile allodynia, as well as cooling allodynia, on the leg, often extending into the foot. Some also reported allodynia on the low back. In axial LBP, allodynia was almost exclusively on the back. The degree of dynamic tactile allodynia correlated with the degree of background pain. The presence of allodynia suggests that the peripheral nerve generators of background leg and back pain have also induced central sensitization. The distal (foot) location of the allodynia in patients who have it indicates that the nociceptive drive that maintains the central sensitization arises paraspinally (ectopically) in injured ventral ramus afferents; this is not an instance of somatic referred pain. The presence of central sensitization also provides the first cogent account of shooting pain in sciatica as a wave of activity sweeping vectorially across the width of the sensitized dorsal horn. Finally, the results endorse leg allodynia as a pain biomarker in animal research on LBP, which is commonly used but has not been previously validated. In addition to informing the underlying mechanism of LBP, bedside mapping of allodynia might have practical implications for prognosis and treatment. How can you tell whether pain radiating into the leg in a patient with sciatica is neuropathic, ie, due to nerve injury? Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Steerable Hopping Six-Legged Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younse, Paulo; Aghazarian, Hrand

    2010-01-01

    The figure depicts selected aspects of a six-legged robot that moves by hopping and that can be steered in the sense that it can be launched into a hop in a controllable direction. This is a prototype of hopping robots being developed for use in scientific exploration of rough terrain on remote planets that have surface gravitation less than that of Earth. Hopping robots could also be used on Earth, albeit at diminished hopping distances associated with the greater Earth gravitation. The upper end of each leg is connected through two universal joints to an upper and a lower hexagonal frame, such that the tilt of the leg depends on the relative position of the two frames. Two non-back-driveable worm-gear motor drives are used to control the relative position of the two frames along two axes 120 apart, thereby controlling the common tilt of all six legs and thereby, further, controlling the direction of hopping. Each leg includes an upper and a lower aluminum frame segment with a joint between them. A fiberglass spring, connected via hinges to both segments, is used to store hopping energy prior to launch into a hop and to cushion the landing at the end of the hop. A cable for loading the spring is run into each leg through the center of the universal joints and then down along the center lines of the segments to the lower end of the leg. A central spool actuated by a motor with a harmonic drive and an electromagnetic clutch winds in all six cables to compress all six springs (thereby also flexing all six legs) simultaneously. To ensure that all the legs push off and land in the same direction, timing- belt pulley drives are attached to the leg segments, restricting the flexing and extension of all six legs to a common linear motion. In preparation for a hop, the spool can be driven to load the spring legs by an amount corresponding to a desired hop distance within range. The amount of compression can be computed from the reading of a shaft-angle encoder that

  10. Pain assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haefeli, Mathias; Elfering, Achim

    2006-01-01

    Pain usually is the major complaint of patients with problems of the back, thus making pain evaluation a fundamental requisite in the outcome assessment in spinal surgery. Pain intensity, pain-related disability, pain duration and pain affect are the aspects that define pain and its effects. For each of these aspects, different assessment instruments exist and are discussed in terms of advantages and disadvantages. Risk factors for the development of chronic pain have been a major topic in pain research in the past two decades. Now, it has been realised that psychological and psychosocial factors may substantially influence pain perception in patients with chronic pain and thus may influence the surgical outcome. With this background, pain acceptance, pain tolerance and pain-related anxiety as factors influencing coping strategies are discussed. Finally, a recommendation for a minimum as well as for a more comprehensive pain assessment is given.

  11. A modified straight leg raise test to differentiate between sural nerve pathology and Achilles tendinopathy. A cross-sectional cadaver study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppieters, M.W.J.; Crooke, J.L.; Lawrenson, P.R.; Khoo, S.J.; Skulstad, T.; Bet-Or, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A modified straight leg raise test for the sural nerve (SLRSURAL) has been proposed to assist in the differential diagnosis of sural nerve pathology in people with posterior calf or ankle pain, or lateral foot pain. The biomechanical rationale is that strain in the

  12. Genetic association between leg conformation in young pigs and sow reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, Thu Hong; Nilsson, Katja; Norberg, Elise

    2015-01-01

    Lameness is an issue of concern in pig production due both to animal welfare and to economical aspects. Lame sows are believed to suffer from pain and stress which is reported to have a negative influence on reproduction. Leg conformation and locomotion traits in young animals are associated....... Estimates of heritabilities and genetic correlations between traits were obtained using a multi-trait linear animal mixed model. The heritability estimates were low to moderate, ranging from 0.02 to 0.20 for conformation traits and from 0.06 to 0.10 for reproduction traits. Significant genetic correlations...... with the risk of lameness at higher age. The purpose of this study was to estimate the genetic parameters of leg conformation traits recorded at performance testing (around 5 months of age) and their genetic correlations with reproduction traits. Information on leg conformation traits from 123,307 pigs scored...

  13. Clinical performance of a new silver dressing, Contreet Foam, for chronic exuding venous leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsmark, T; Agerslev, R H; Bendz, S H

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the safety and performance of a new sustained silver-releasing dressing, Contreet Foam (Coloplast A/S), in the treatment of moderately to highly exuding chronic venous leg ulcers in which healing is delayed due to the presence of bacteria. METHOD......: The clinical performance of Contreet Foam was studied for four weeks in 25 patients with moderately to highly exuding delayed-healing venous leg ulcers. Healing was assessed on a weekly basis with reference to the wound-bed tissue composition, degree of odour and pain, dressing performance and the dressing......: Contreet Foam was found to be safe and performed well when used in the treatment of delayed-healing chronic venous leg ulcers, combining effective antibacterial properties with excellent exudate management. DECLARATION OF INTEREST: This study was supported by Coloplast A/S, Humlebaek, Denmark....

  14. Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor as treatment for chronic leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbolla-Escoboza, J R; María-Aceves, R; López-Hernández, M A; Collados-Larumbe, M T

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a single subcutaneous perilesional administration of 300 micrograms of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (rHGM-CSF) for the treatment of chronic leg ulcers. Prospective, descriptive evaluation in an outpatient group. The Centro Médico Nacional 20 de Noviembre, ISSSTE, Mexico City. 10 patients with chronic leg ulcers. Ulcer diameter and side effects. After 4 weeks observation, 8 of the 10 ulcers had healed; the other two had a mean diameter decrease of 21%. The only side effect was found in a 58 year old female who complained of moderate perilesional pain two days after having received treatment: it was successfully treated with paracetamol. We believe that a single perilesional subcutaneous administration of rhGM-CSF is safe and effective for the treatment of chronic leg ulcers.

  15. Hot Leg Piping Materials Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Munne

    2006-07-19

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the space nuclear power plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) the reactor outlet piping was recognized to require a design that utilizes internal insulation (Reference c). The initial pipe design suggested ceramic fiber blanket as the insulation material based on requirements associated with service temperature capability within the expected range, very low thermal conductivity, and low density. Nevertheless, it was not considered to be well suited for internal insulation use because its very high surface area and proclivity for holding adsorbed gases, especially water, would make outgassing a source of contaminant gases in the He-Xe working fluid. Additionally, ceramic fiber blanket insulating materials become very friable after relatively short service periods at working temperatures and small pieces of fiber could be dislodged and contaminate the system. Consequently, alternative insulation materials were sought that would have comparable thermal properties and density but superior structural integrity and greatly reduced outgassing. This letter provides technical information regarding insulation and materials issues for the Hot Leg Piping preconceptual design developed for the Project Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP).

  16. Benzodiazepines for restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, Karla; Prado, Gilmar F; Teixeira, Camila Dm; Conti, Cristiane; de Oliveira, Marcio M; Prado, Lucila Bf; Carvalho, Luciane Bc

    2017-03-20

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common disease affecting about 5% to 15% of the population. Symptoms of RLS can be severe in a minority of and can have a major impact on sleep, mostly sleep initiation, and quality of life. Benzodiazepines are drugs that can induce and maintain sleep and, hence, intuitively are thought to be beneficial to people with RLS. Altough benzodiazepines, particularly clonazepam, are used to treat RLS symptoms, a systematic review done by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine stated that benzodiazepines should not be used as a first-line treatment, although could be used as a coadjuvant therapy. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of benzodiazepine compared to placebo or other treatment for idiopathic RLS, including unconfounded trials comparing benzodiazepines versus open control. In March 2016 we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase and LILACS We checked the references of each study and contacted study authors to identify any additional studies. We considered studies published in any language. Randomised clinical trials of benzodiazepine treatment in idiopathic RLS. We did not perform data collection and analysis, since we did not include any studies, MAIN RESULTS: We did not identify any studies that met the inclusion criteria of the review. Two cross-over studies are awaiting classification because the cross-over trials did not give data at the end of the first cross-over period. The effectiveness of benzodiazepines for RLS treatment is currently unknown.

  17. Pramipexole: in restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Paul L; Siddiqui, M Asif A

    2007-01-01

    Pramipexole is an oral, non-ergoline dopamine agonist with selectivity for the dopamine D(3) receptor, which was recently approved in the EU and the US for the treatment of idiopathic restless legs syndrome (RLS) in adults. In a polysomnographic study, pramipexole 0.125, 0.25, 0.50 or 0.75 mg once daily for 3 weeks significantly reduced from baseline the periodic limb movement index compared with placebo (-27 to -53 vs -3). Pramipexole at a median dosage of 0.35 mg/day for 6 weeks significantly reduced from baseline the mean International RLS Study Group rating scale (IRLS) score compared with placebo (-12.4 vs -6.1) and produced a significantly higher response ('much improved' or 'very much improved') rate (63% vs 33%) according to the Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement (CGI-I) scale. In a controlled-withdrawal study in which responders to pramipexole following 6 months' therapy were randomised to pramipexole or placebo for 12 weeks, significantly less pramipexole than placebo recipients reached the target event of predefined worsening of symptoms (21% vs 86%). Treatment with pramipexole 0.25, 0.50 or 0.75 mg once daily for 12 weeks significantly reduced IRLS scores from baseline values (-13 to -14 vs -9) and produced significantly higher proportions of CGI-I responders (68-75% vs 51%) compared with placebo. Pramipexole was generally well tolerated, with most adverse events being transient and of mild to moderate severity.

  18. Transiliac Leg Lengthening in Poliomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baghdadi Taghi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The development and widespread use of a prophylactic vaccine significantly reduced the incidence of poliomyelitis. At present we more commonly encounter with poliomyelitis sequelae especially in developing countries. We evaluate the results of a modified innominate osteotomy for leg length discrepancy in poliomyelitis. Instead of triangular bone graft as in Salter’s innominate osteotomy , a trapezoidal bone graft from the ilium is inserted in the site of osteotomy after gradual distraction of the limb. 25 patients (9 males and 16 females with mean age of 25 years (17-37 years were treated by this method. All of them had poliomyelitis with limb shortening. At a mean follow-up of 7 years (3 months to 17 years an average of 3 cm (2.5-3.5 was achieved. Complication was seen in three patients including injury to the lateral cutaneouns nerve of thigh and displacement of osteotomy in two patients .except in one all of the patients satisfied with the operation. We believe this method is safe, effective and cost-benefit for treating of moderate shortening of the lower limb in poliomyelitis.

  19. Painless legs and moving toes syndrome associated with a sacral Tarlov cyst: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrawashdeh, Omar

    2016-03-09

    Painless legs and moving toes syndrome is a very rare syndrome characterized by continuous and involuntary movement of the toes. The etiology of the disease is not clear though it has been linked to a wide range of neuronal insults including proximal root compression and neuropathy. A previous study has reported bilateral painful legs and moving toes syndrome in a patient with a sacral Tarlov cyst. In this report we present a case of unilateral painless legs and moving toes syndrome in a woman with a sacral Tarlov cyst. A 50-year-old Mediterranean woman presented with a 1-year history of involuntary sustained movement of her right toes. Her physical examination and laboratory findings did not show any remarkable abnormality. Her lumbosacral magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a sacral Tarlov cyst. Our patient was given gabapentin, 100 mg per day as a starting dose, and showed modest improvement. Our patient preferred not to continue with the treatment as her symptoms were not disabling and she was only concerned about the cosmetic appearance. This report presents a new case of a very rare syndrome called painless legs and moving toes syndrome, which is possibly a variant of painful legs and moving toes syndrome. This is considered to be the first case of unilateral painless legs and moving toes syndrome that is associated with a sacral Tarlov cyst. Although the disease etiology is still unknown and the presence of the cyst can be accidental, neurologists should be aware that Tarlov cyst is a possible cause. In addition, patients with the painless variant who are not disabled by movement of the toes may not require treatment.

  20. Does a crouched leg posture enhance running stability and robustness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Yvonne; Birn-Jeffery, Aleksandra; Daley, Monica A; Seyfarth, Andre

    2011-07-21

    Humans and birds both walk and run bipedally on compliant legs. However, differences in leg architecture may result in species-specific leg control strategies as indicated by the observed gait patterns. In this work, control strategies for stable running are derived based on a conceptual model and compared with experimental data on running humans and pheasants (Phasianus colchicus). From a model perspective, running with compliant legs can be represented by the planar spring mass model and stabilized by applying swing leg control. Here, linear adaptations of the three leg parameters, leg angle, leg length and leg stiffness during late swing phase are assumed. Experimentally observed kinematic control parameters (leg rotation and leg length change) of human and avian running are compared, and interpreted within the context of this model, with specific focus on stability and robustness characteristics. The results suggest differences in stability characteristics and applied control strategies of human and avian running, which may relate to differences in leg posture (straight leg posture in humans, and crouched leg posture in birds). It has been suggested that crouched leg postures may improve stability. However, as the system of control strategies is overdetermined, our model findings suggest that a crouched leg posture does not necessarily enhance running stability. The model also predicts different leg stiffness adaptation rates for human and avian running, and suggests that a crouched avian leg posture, which is capable of both leg shortening and lengthening, allows for stable running without adjusting leg stiffness. In contrast, in straight-legged human running, the preparation of the ground contact seems to be more critical, requiring leg stiffness adjustment to remain stable. Finally, analysis of a simple robustness measure, the normalized maximum drop, suggests that the crouched leg posture may provide greater robustness to changes in terrain height

  1. Patellofemoral pain in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersen W

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Wolf Petersen,1 Ingo Rembitzki,2 Christian Liebau3 1Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Martin Luther Hospital, Grunewald, Berlin; 2German Sport University Cologne, 3Asklepios Clinic, Bad Harzburg, Germany Abstract: Patellofemoral pain (PFP is a frequent cause of anterior knee pain in athletes, which affects patients with and without structural patellofemoral joint (PFJ damage. Most younger patients do not have any structural changes to the PFJ, such as an increased Q angle and a cartilage damage. This clinical entity is known as patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS. Older patients usually present with signs of patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA. A key factor in PFPS development is dynamic valgus of the lower extremity, which leads to lateral patellar maltracking. Causes of dynamic valgus include weak hip muscles and rearfoot eversion with pes pronatus valgus. These factors can also be observed in patients with PFOA. The available evidence suggests that patients with PFP are best managed with a tailored, multimodal, nonoperative treatment program that includes short-term pain relief with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, passive correction of patellar maltracking with medially directed tape or braces, correction of the dynamic valgus with exercise programs that target the muscles of the lower extremity, hip, and trunk, and the use of foot orthoses in patients with additional foot abnormalities. Keywords: anterior knee pain, dynamic valgus, hip strength, rearfoot eversion, single leg squat, hip strength 

  2. The effects of total knee replacement and non-surgical treatment on pain sensitization and clinical pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren Thorgaard; Roos, Ewa M.; Simonsen, Ole

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective was to compare the effect of total knee replacement (TKR) followed by a 3-month non-surgical treatment with the non-surgical treatment alone in reducing pain sensitization and other pain-related measures in patients with knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: One hundred patients...... pain sensitization than non-surgical treatment alone. Both treatments are equally efficacious in reducing the pain-related measures of this study. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD?: Knee replacement followed by non-surgical treatment is more effective in reducing pain sensitization, but not other pain...... (PPTs) at the knee (localized sensitization) and the lower leg (spreading sensitization), (2) peak pain intensity during the previous 24 h, (3) pain intensity after 30 min of walking, (4) pain location and pattern, (5) spreading of pain on a region-divided body chart and (6) the usage of pain medication...

  3. Motor responses to experimental Achilles tendon pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Aaboe, Jens; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    different days separated by 1 week, three-dimensional ground reaction forces, ankle joint kinematics and surface electromyography (EMG) of the lower leg muscles were recorded during one-legged full weight-bearing ankle plantar (concentric) and dorsal (eccentric) flexion exercises. Measurements were done...... before, during and after either experimental Achilles tendon pain or a non-painful control condition. Pain was induced by intratendinous injections of hypertonic saline with isotonic saline injections as control. Joint kinematics, ground reaction force frequency contents and average EMG amplitudes were...... calculated. Results Compared with the control condition experimental Achilles tendon pain reduced the EMG activity in agonistic, synergistic and antagonistic muscles, and increased the ground reaction force frequency content around 10 Hz, during both eccentric and concentric movement phases. Conclusions...

  4. [Clinical management of low back pain in primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, H

    1999-06-10

    Diagnostic differentiation seems crucial in the treatment of patients with low back pain. We must try to distinguish between pain originating from the moving segments or the soft tissue in the columna, and differentiate between radicular pain and referred pain to the leg. Principles of treatment for the acute and recurrent low back pain attacks are dealt with, as well as the treatment of patients with acute chronic sciatica and spinal stenosis. The special problems concerning treatment of degenerative disc disease and patients with back pain caused by psychosocial problems are further discussed.

  5. Genetic parameters for claw and leg health, foot and leg conformation, and locomotion in Danish Holsteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, M. V.; Boelling, D.; Mark, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the genetic correlations among claw and leg health and potential indicator traits. Claw health was defined as absence of heel horn erosion, interdigital dermatitis, interdigital phlegmon, interdigital hyperplasia, laminitis, and sole ulcer. Leg health was...... as separate traits in genetic evaluations that also include the useful indicator traits to compensate for low heritability of the health traits.......The purpose of this study was to estimate the genetic correlations among claw and leg health and potential indicator traits. Claw health was defined as absence of heel horn erosion, interdigital dermatitis, interdigital phlegmon, interdigital hyperplasia, laminitis, and sole ulcer. Leg health......,877 Danish Holstein cows in first lactation. Binary health traits were divided into 3 subcategories: claw health, leg health, and absence of all claw and leg disorders. Genetic (r(g)) and phenotypic correlations were estimated using a bivariate linear sire model and REML. Estimated heritabilities were 0...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: restless legs syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PubMed Trenkwalder C, Paulus W. Restless legs syndrome: pathophysiology, clinical presentation and management. Nat Rev Neurol. 2010 ... newborn screening? New Pages MDA5 deficiency type 2 diabetes mitochondrial complex I deficiency All New & Updated Pages ...

  7. Passive zero-gravity leg restraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christopher R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A passive zero or microgravity leg restraint is described which includes a central support post with a top and a bottom. Extending from the central support post are a calf pad tab, to which calf pad is attached, and a foot pad tab, to which foot tab is attached. Also extending from central support post are knee pads. When the restraint is in use the user's legs are forced between pads by a user imposed scissors action of the legs. The user's body is then supported in a zero or microgravity neutral body posture by the leg restraint. The calf pad has semi-ridig elastic padding material covering structural stiffener. The foot pad has padding material and a structural stiffener. Knee pads have s structural tube stiffener at their core.

  8. The effect of shiatsu massage on pain reduction in burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardabili, Fatemeh Mohaddes; Purhajari, Soybeh; Najafi Ghezeljeh, Tahereh; Haghani, Hamid

    2014-07-01

    Burn is a tragedy that follows multiple problems in a patient including pain, anxiety and lack of confidence into medical team. This study evaluated the effect of shiatsu massage on pain intensity of burn patients. A total of 120 burn patients from Motahhari Burn Hospital and of both genders were randomly divided into 4 groups of undergoing hand massage, leg massage, both hand and leg massages, and the control group. The effect of shiatsu massage in pain relief of burned patients was evaluated. The visual analog scale (VAS) was used to assess pain in burn patients. Pain intensity in the control group before and after the intervention was not statistically significant (p=1). In all massage groups, the difference for pain intensity before and after the intervention was statistically significant. According to our data, shiatsu method over both hands and legs were effective in pain reduction and can be recommended together with analgesics to decrease the dose.

  9. Living with clipped wings—Patients’ experience of losing a leg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelise Norlyk

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the lived experience of losing a leg as described by the patients themselves post-discharge. Studies have documented that regardless of aetiology patients are faced with severe physical as well as psychosocial challenges post-amputation. However, only few studies explore in-depth the patients’ perspective on the various challenges following the loss of a leg. The study uses the phenomenological approach of Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR. Data were collected from 24 in-depth interviews with 12 Danish patients. Data analysis was performed according to the guidelines given in RLR. The essential meaning of losing a leg is a radical and existential upheaval, which restricts patients’ lifestyle and irretrievably alters their lifeworld. Life after the operation is associated with despair, and a painful sense of loss, but also with the hope of regaining personal independence. The consequences of losing a leg gradually materialize as the patients realize how the loss of mobility limits their freedom. Patients experience the professional help as primarily directed towards physical care and rehabilitation. The findings show that the loss of a leg and, subsequently, the restricted mobility carry with them an existential dimension which refers to limitation of action space and loss of freedom experienced as an exclusion from life. Our findings demonstrate a need for complementary care and stress the importance of an increased awareness of the psychosocial and existential consequences of losing a limb.

  10. Aspirin in venous leg ulcer study (ASPiVLU): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Carolina D; Barker, Anna; Darby, Ian; Haines, Terrence; Underwood, Martin; Ward, Stephanie; Aldons, Pat; Dapiran, Elizabeth; Madan, Jason J; Loveland, Paula; Sinha, Sankar; Vicaretti, Mauro; Wolfe, Rory; Woodward, Michael; McNeil, John

    2016-04-11

    Venous leg ulceration is a common and costly problem that is expected to worsen as the population ages. Current treatment is compression therapy; however, up to 50 % of ulcers remain unhealed after 2 years, and ulcer recurrence is common. New treatments are needed to address those wounds that are more challenging to heal. Targeting the inflammatory processes present in venous ulcers is a possible strategy. Limited evidence suggests that a daily dose of aspirin may be an effective adjunct to aid ulcer healing and reduce recurrence. The Aspirin in Venous Leg Ulcer study (ASPiVLU) will investigate whether 300-mg oral doses of aspirin improve time to healing. This randomised, double-blinded, multicentre, placebo-controlled, clinical trial will recruit participants with venous leg ulcers from community settings and hospital outpatient wound clinics across Australia. Two hundred sixty-eight participants with venous leg ulcers will be randomised to receive either aspirin or placebo, in addition to compression therapy, for 24 weeks. The primary outcome is time to healing within 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes are ulcer recurrence, wound pain, quality of life and wellbeing, adherence to study medication, adherence to compression therapy, serum inflammatory markers, hospitalisations, and adverse events at 24 weeks. The ASPiVLU trial will investigate the efficacy and safety of aspirin as an adjunct to compression therapy to treat venous leg ulcers. Study completion is anticipated to occur in December 2018. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, ACTRN12614000293662.

  11. Pain Sensing System for Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim AL-BAHADLY

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Castration, tail docking and ear tagging are examples of painful process that the lambs in New Zealand undergo in their early life. Massey University is conducting a research to measure the pain sensitivity in animals based upon applying mechanical force. The research will help in better understanding the development of pain sensitivity in the animal, and hence improving the welfare of the lambs and other animals. The traditional measurement system is pneumatic and it has some associated drawbacks such as; inaccuracy in measuring the applied force, inconsistent rate of force application, leaks in the system, and issues of impracticality and safety. This paper presents a new pain sensing system based on the use of stepping motor for applying force and flexiforce sensor for measuring the applied force. The new sensing system was successfully tested on a frozen lamb leg and then on life sheep.

  12. Efficiency and Speed in Legged Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    which we substitute into (4.42) : ( -mv s J O=-km+ mvc -k __ c __ V v 2 c c 46 (4.43) (4.44) (4.45) (4.46) to fInd the switching curve m 3 s...Legged Mechanisms. IVSS. Traverse City, MI Muench, P., Alexander, J., Quinn, R., & Aschenbeck, K. (2005) Pneumatic Spring for Legged Walker. SPIE

  13. Microgravity, Mesh-Crawling Legged Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Alberto; Marzwell, Neville; Matthews, Jaret; Richardson, Krandalyn; Wall, Jonathan; Poole, Michael; Foor, David; Rodgers, Damian

    2008-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and microgravity flight-testing are part of a continuing development of palm-sized mobile robots that resemble spiders (except that they have six legs apiece, whereas a spider has eight legs). Denoted SpiderBots (see figure), they are prototypes of proposed product line of relatively inexpensive walking robots that could be deployed in large numbers to function cooperatively in construction, repair, exploration, search, and rescue activities in connection with exploration of outer space and remote planets.

  14. Pain in persons with postpolio syndrome: frequency, intensity, and impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoelb, Brenda L; Carter, Gregory T; Abresch, Richard T; Purekal, Sophia; McDonald, Craig M; Jensen, Mark P

    2008-10-01

    To describe the frequency, intensity, and impact of pain in persons with postpoliomyelitis syndrome (PPS). Retrospective, cross-sectional survey. Community-based survey. Convenience sample of people with PPS. Not applicable. Overall intensity and duration of pain, pain sites, pain interference, pain treatments, and relief provided by pain treatments. A total of 91% (n=57) of the study participants (N=63) reported pain. The most frequently reported pain sites were the shoulders, lower back, legs, and hips. Participants reported pain intensity to be the greatest in the knees, legs, wrists, lower back, and head. Pain interfered most with sleep and with activities requiring a high level of musculoskeletal involvement. Respondents also reported pain problems that were more severe than those of the general population and than those of a sample of people with multiple sclerosis. Many treatments had been tried previously for pain, but continued use of treatments was reported by relatively few participants at the time of the survey. The findings indicate that pain is a persistent and common problem in persons with PPS, highlighting the need for effective and accessible pain treatments for this population.

  15. Impact of pain on function and health related quality of life in lumbar spinal stenosis. A register study of 14,821 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmundsson, Freyr Gauti; Jönsson, Bo; Strömqvist, Björn

    2013-07-01

    Descriptive register study. To describe preoperative levels of leg and back pain in patients operated for lumbar spinal stenosis, and to obtain information on how 3 different pain constellations (back pain leg pain, back pain = leg pain) correlate to health related quality of life (HRQoL) and function in different morphological types of stenosis. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis is considered a poorly defined clinical syndrome and knowledge of what uniquely characterizes the different morphological types of stenosis is lacking. Using the Swedish Spine Register, we studied (1) the pain characteristics of patients with central spinal stenosis (CSS), lateral recess stenosis, and spinal stenosis with spondylolisthesis (2) how HRQoL and function correlate to leg and back pain. Grading leg pain higher than back pain was the most common pain constellation (49%) followed by grading back pain more than leg pain (39%). Twelve percent had the same intensity of leg and back pain. The type of stenosis grading the highest burden of back pain was spinal stenosis with spondylolisthesis (ratio = 0.93; [95% confidence interval, CI] = 0.92-0.95), followed by central spinal stenosis (ratio = 0.88; [95% CI] = 0.88-0.89). Lateral recess stenosis had the lowest burden of back pain (ratio = 0.85; [95% CI] = 0.83-0.87). The lowest HRQoL and function was found in spinal stenosis with spondylolisthesis (back pain = leg pain group) where 55% ([95% CI] = 50-59) of patients could not walk more than 100 m. Patients with lateral recess stenosis had better self-estimated walking distance. Back pain is generally experienced to a high extent by patients scheduled for spinal stenosis surgery. HRQoL and function are low preoperatively irrespective of whether back or leg pain is predominant. In this large patient material patients who grade their back and leg pain as likeworthy have significantly lower values for HRQoL and function compared to patients reporting predominant leg or back pain but the

  16. Three cross leg flaps for lower leg reconstruction of Gustilo type III C open fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Kazufumi; Ozeki, Satoru; Sugimoto, Ichiro; Ogawa, Masato

    2016-01-01

    A 60 year old male had Gustilo type III C open fracture of the right lower leg. After radical debridement, the large open defect including certain loss of the bone tissue was successfully augmented and covered, by consecutive three cross-leg flaps, which consisted of the free rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap, the fibula osteocutaneous flap and the conventional sural flap. Although indication for amputation or preservation is decided with multiple factors in each case, a strategic combination of cross-leg flap, free flap, external fixation and vascular delay could increase the potential of preservation of the lower leg with even disastrous Gustilo type III C.

  17. Three cross leg flaps for lower leg reconstruction of Gustilo type III C open fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazufumi Sano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60 year old male had Gustilo type III C open fracture of the right lower leg. After radical debridement, the large open defect including certain loss of the bone tissue was successfully augmented and covered, by consecutive three cross-leg flaps, which consisted of the free rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap, the fibula osteocutaneous flap and the conventional sural flap. Although indication for amputation or preservation is decided with multiple factors in each case, a strategic combination of cross-leg flap, free flap, external fixation and vascular delay could increase the potential of preservation of the lower leg with even disastrous Gustilo type III C.

  18. Postural balance in low back pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo, Thomas; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Jensen, Lone Donbæk

    2011-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) patients have poorer postural control compared to healthy controls, and the importance of assessing and addressing balance is a matter of debate. In the clinic, balance is often tested by means of the one leg stand test (OLST) while research often employs center of pressure (Co...

  19. The Impact of Pain on Different Aspects of Life Among Older People With Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mahmoud Mirzamani

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to investe the impact of pain on older people with chronic pain. Methods & Materials: Participants were 585 individuals (n=77 aged 60 years andover, n=508 aged Lessthan 60 years old with chronic pain in their leg, back, hands, neck and shoulders. The main assessment measure was the West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (WHYMPI. Results: The two groups showed significant differences in three scales of important dimentions of pain experience. The old patients experienced more sever pain which effected their life, family supports and dependency. There were significant differents in three scales of evaluation and report of routin activities in the two groups. Conclusion: The old patients with chronic pain experienced more sever pain. The more sever pain, the more negative impact of pain in their life, requirement family support and dependency. Also, in the old patients with chronic pain group, the effect of chronic pain was more on outdoor activities, social and general activities than the group of usual patients with chronic pain. So, we should have more attention to general and social activities for providing care among older people with chrcnic pain than the other goups with chronic pain.

  20. The Verbal Rating Scale Is Reliable for Assessment of Postoperative Pain in Hip Fracture Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, R. D.; Lauritsen, J.; Ovesen, O.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hip fracture patients represent a challenge to pain rating due to the high prevalence of cognitive impairment. Methods. Patients prospectively rated pain on the VRS. Furthermore, patients described the changes in pain after raising their leg, with one of five descriptors. Agreement....... The VRS is reliable for assessment of pain after hip fracture. The validity of intermittent questioning about possible change in pain intensity is poor....

  1. Combined use of an ibuprofen-releasing foam dressing and silver dressing on infected leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, B.; Gottrup, F.; Karlsmark, T.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect and safety of an ibuprofen-releasing foam (Biatain-Ibu, Coloplast A/S) combined with an ionised silver-releasing wound contact layer (Physiotulle Ag, Coloplast A/S) on painful, infected venous leg ulcers. METHOD: This open non-comparative study involved 24...... decreased from 37% to 4%. No serious adverse events were reported. CONCLUSION: The combined use of the ibuprofen-releasing foam dressing and silver-releasing contact layer reduced wound pain and promoted healing without compromising safety Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5...

  2. Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accessed May 29, 2015. Adult acute and subacute low back pain. Bloomington, Minn.: Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement. http://www.icsi.org/low_back_pain/adult_low_back_pain__8.html. Accessed June ...

  3. Physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy due to disc herniation in patients with low-back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Windt, Daniëlle A.W.M.; Simons, Emmanuel; Riphagen, Ingrid; Ammendolia, Carlo; Verhagen, Arianne P.; Laslett, Mark; Devillé, Walter; Aertgeerts, Bert; Deyo, Rick A.; Bouter, Lex M.; De Vet, Henrica C.W.

    2008-01-01

    Of all patients with back pain, less than 2% will undergo surgery for a herniated disc in the lumbar spine. In back pain patients who also have leg pain (sciatica), doctors and therapists use a physical examination to estimate the probability that the p...

  4. Combined intra-articular glucocorticoid, bupivacaine and morphine reduces pain and convalescence after diagnostic knee arthroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sten; Lorentzen, Jan S; Larsen, Allan S

    2002-01-01

    the procedure. Pain during movement and walking, leg muscle force and joint effusion, use of crutches and duration of sick leave were assessed. A combination of bupivacaine and morphine reduced pain, duration of immobilization and of convalescence. The addition of methylprednisolone further reduced pain, use...

  5. Pain management in sickle cell disease: What remedy to reduce the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sickle cell disease is an inherited disorder, the hallmark of which is recurrent acute painful crises requiring opioid therapy. These acute painful episodes when superimposed on chronic pain could last for years especially in association with comorbidities like osteonecrosis, chronic leg ulcers, cholelithiasis or stuttering ...

  6. The Verbal Rating Scale Is Reliable for Assessment of Postoperative Pain in Hip Fracture Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, R. D.; Lauritsen, J.; Ovesen, O.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hip fracture patients represent a challenge to pain rating due to the high prevalence of cognitive impairment. Methods. Patients prospectively rated pain on the VRS. Furthermore, patients described the changes in pain after raising their leg, with one of five descriptors. Agreement be...

  7. Postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H; Dahl, J B

    1993-01-01

    Treatment of postoperative pain has not received sufficient attention by the surgical profession. Recent developments concerned with acute pain physiology and improved techniques for postoperative pain relief should result in more satisfactory treatment of postoperative pain. Such pain relief may...... also modify various aspects of the surgical stress response, and nociceptive blockade by regional anesthetic techniques has been demonstrated to improve various parameters of postoperative outcome. It is therefore stressed that effective control of postoperative pain, combined with a high degree...

  8. Improved Exercise-Related Skeletal Muscle Oxygen Consumption Following Uptake of Endurance Training Measured Using Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siana Jones

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle metabolic function is known to respond positively to exercise interventions. Developing non-invasive techniques that quantify metabolic adaptations and identifying interventions that impart successful response are ongoing challenges for research. Healthy non-athletic adults (18–35 years old were enrolled in a study investigating physiological adaptations to a minimum of 16 weeks endurance training prior to undertaking their first marathon. Before beginning training, participants underwent measurements of skeletal muscle oxygen consumption using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS at rest (resting muscleV˙O2 and immediately following a maximal exercise test (post-exercise muscleV˙O2. Exercise-related increase in muscleV˙O2 (ΔmV˙O2 was derived from these measurements and cardio-pulmonary peakV˙O2 measured by analysis of expired gases. All measurements were repeated within 3 weeks of participants completing following the marathon and marathon completion time recorded. MuscleV˙O2 was positively correlated with cardio-pulmonary peakV˙O2 (r = 0.63, p < 0.001. MuscleV˙O2 increased at follow-up (48% increase; p = 0.004 despite no change in cardio-pulmonary peakV˙O2 (0% change; p = 0.97. Faster marathon completion time correlated with higher cardio-pulmonary peakV˙O2 (rpartial = −0.58, p = 0.002 but not muscleV˙O2 (rpartial = 0.16, p = 0.44 after adjustment for age and sex [and adipose tissue thickness (ATT for muscleV˙O2 measurements]. Skeletal muscle metabolic adaptions occur following training and completion of a first-time marathon; these can be identified non-invasively using NIRS. Although the cardio-pulmonary system is limiting for running performance, skeletal muscle changes can be detected despite minimal improvement in cardio-pulmonary function.

  9. Effect of leg length on ROM, VJ and leg dexterity in dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyon, M A; Nevill, A M; Dekker, K; Brown, D D; Clarke, F; Pelly, J; Koutedakis, Y

    2010-09-01

    We investigated the associations between leg length and specific ballet movements in different skill groups. Volunteers were from an undergraduate dance programme (n=18), a pre-professional school (n=43) and from an elite classical ballet company (n=45). Individual data were collected for anthropometry, vertical jump, leg dexterity, and leg active and passive ROM. ANCOVA identified both main effects as significant with regard to vertical jump (gender Pgender, skill or leg length. Active and passive range of motion noted gender (P=0.001) and skill (P<0.001) differences. Leg length was found to be negatively associated with both active and passive ROM (P=0.002). In conclusion, the present data highlight the diverse and conflicting effects of leg length on fundamental ballet skills. The longer legs that benefit vertical jump have a negative influence on range of motion and leg dexterity except for highly skilled dancers, who through skill, seem to have overcome the effects of some of these dichotomies. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart . New York.

  10. Diurnal variations in lower leg subcutaneous blood flow rate in patients with chronic venous leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, J H; Kastrup, J; Kristensen, J K

    1991-01-01

    The blood flow rate in subcutaneous adipose tissue was measured on the lower legs of 11 patients with chronic lower-leg venous insufficiency and ulceration and in eight age-matched control subjects for 12-20 h, under ambulatory conditions, using the 133Xe wash-out technique with portable Cadmium...

  11. Single-leg squats can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements in "turnout".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Luke S; Sato, Nahoko; Weidemann, Andries L

    2016-01-01

    The physical assessments used in dance injury surveillance programs are often adapted from the sports and exercise domain. Bespoke physical assessments may be required for dance, particularly when ballet movements involve "turning out" or external rotation of the legs beyond that typically used in sports. This study evaluated the ability of the traditional single-leg squat to predict the leg alignment of dancers performing ballet movements with turnout. Three-dimensional kinematic data of dancers performing the single-leg squat and five ballet movements were recorded and analyzed. Reduction of the three-dimensional data into a one-dimensional variable incorporating the ankle, knee, and hip joint center positions provided the strongest predictive model between the single-leg squat and the ballet movements. The single-leg squat can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements, even in "turned out" postures. Clinicians should pay careful attention to observational positioning and rating criteria when assessing dancers performing the single-leg squat.

  12. The Scope of Back Pain in Navy Helicopter Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Experienced an episode of sciatica in which my right leg would experience pain and numbness. Experienced it a couple times on deployment...when off the controls. In 2001 I had bad sciatica . After my surgery, I no longer have sciatica , but I do have stiffness. In the seat too long, the...lower back and neck pain Lower back pain Sciatica Slipped disc (L5-S1) Maybe, since I’ve acquired my own padding the back issues have decreased. If

  13. Health and exercise-related medical issues among 1,212 ultramarathon runners: baseline findings from the Ultrarunners Longitudinal TRAcking (ULTRA Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin D Hoffman

    Full Text Available Regular exercise is associated with substantial health benefits; however, little is known about the health impact of extreme levels of exercise. This study examined the prevalence of chronic diseases, health-care utilization, and risk factors for exercise-related injuries among ultramarathon runners. Retrospective, self-reported enrollment data from an ongoing longitudinal observational study of 1,212 active ultramarathon runners were analyzed. The most prevalent chronic medical conditions were allergies/hay fever (25.1% and exercise-induced asthma (13.0%, but there was a low prevalence of serious medical issues including cancers (4.5%, coronary artery disease (0.7%, seizure disorders (0.7%, diabetes (0.7%, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection (0.2%. In the year preceding enrollment, most (64.6% reported an exercise-related injury that resulted in lost training days (median of 14 days, but little nonattendance of work or school due to illness, injury, or exercise-related medical conditions (medians of 0 days for each. The knee was the most common area of exercise-related injury. Prior year incidence of stress fractures was 5.5% with most (44.5% involving the foot. Ultramarathon runners who sustained exercise-related injuries were younger (p<0.001 and less experienced (p<0.01 than those without injury. Stress fractures were more common (p<0.01 among women than men. We conclude that, compared with the general population, ultramarathon runners appear healthier and report fewer missed work or school days due to illness or injury. Ultramarathon runners have a higher prevalence of asthma and allergies than the general population, and the prevalence of serious medical issues was nontrivial and should be recognized by those providing medical care to these individuals. Ultramarathon runners, compared with shorter distance runners, have a similar annual incidence of exercise-related injuries but higher proportion of stress fractures involving

  14. One-legged endurance training: leg blood flow and oxygen extraction during cycling exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rud, B; Foss, O; Krustrup, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Aim: As a consequence of enhanced local vascular conductance, perfusion of muscles increases with exercise intensity to suffice the oxygen demand. However, when maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2) max) and cardiac output are approached, the increase in conductance is blunted. Endurance training increases...... muscle metabolic capacity, but to what extent that affects the regulation of muscle vascular conductance during exercise is unknown. Methods: Seven weeks of one-legged endurance training was carried out by twelve subjects. Pulmonary VO(2) during cycling and one-legged cycling was tested before and after...... training, while VO(2) of the trained leg (TL) and control leg (CL) during cycling was determined after training. Results: VO(2) max for cycling was unaffected by training, although one-legged VO(2) max became 6.7 (2.3)% (mean ± SE) larger with TL than with CL. Also TL citrate synthase activity was higher...

  15. Levodopa for restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Hanna; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Kohnen, Ralf; Riemann, Dieter; Kriston, Levente; Hornyak, Magdolna

    2011-02-16

    Levodopa plus dopamine decarboxylase inhibitor is a common treatment for restless legs syndrome (RLS). To evaluate efficacy and safety of levodopa for RLS compared to placebo and other active agents. We searched CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 4), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL, from January 1985 to December 2008, reference lists of articles, and contacted pharmaceutical companies. We included double-blind randomised controlled trials (RCT) investigating levodopa treatment versus placebo or other treatment for at least seven days in patients with RLS (age ≥ 18 years). Outcomes included symptom severity, CGI-I, objective as well as self rated sleep parameters, quality of life, and safety parameters. Two authors extracted data, assessed risk of bias, and contacted pharmaceutical companies and authors for additional information. We collected dropouts due to adverse events and patients experiencing adverse events. Six placebo controlled and three active controlled RCTs were included (521 participants). Symptom severity (11 point rating scale, 0 points indicating no symptoms, 10 points indicating maximally severe symptoms) was more reduced with levodopa than placebo in two studies (mean difference (MD) -1.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.18 to -0.5, P = 0.002). Periodic limb movements in sleep per hour of sleep (PLMS-Index; PLMSI) improved by -26.28/h compared to placebo (95% CI -30.53 to -22.02, P < 0.00001).The CGI-I changed more with levodopa than placebo in two studies (MD -1.25, 95% CI -1.89 to -0.62, P = 0.0001). In two studies, sleep quality (sleep questionnaire, visual analogue scale) showed a large effect (standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.92, 95% CI 0.52 to 1.33, P < 0.00001) whereas quality of life (50 mm Visual Analogue Scales) improved by 3.23 compared to placebo (95% CI 1.64 to 4.82, P < 0.0001). Few patients dropped out of treatment (3 of 218 patients) but more levodopa treated patients experienced adverse events than with placebo

  16. Increasing trunk flexion transforms human leg function into that of birds despite different leg morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminiaghdam, Soran; Rode, Christian; Müller, Roy; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2017-02-01

    Pronograde trunk orientation in small birds causes prominent intra-limb asymmetries in the leg function. As yet, it is not clear whether these asymmetries induced by the trunk reflect general constraints on the leg function regardless of the specific leg architecture or size of the species. To address this, we instructed 12 human volunteers to walk at a self-selected velocity with four postures: regular erect, or with 30 deg, 50 deg and maximal trunk flexion. In addition, we simulated the axial leg force (along the line connecting hip and centre of pressure) using two simple models: spring and damper in series, and parallel spring and damper. As trunk flexion increases, lower limb joints become more flexed during stance. Similar to birds, the associated posterior shift of the hip relative to the centre of mass leads to a shorter leg at toe-off than at touchdown, and to a flatter angle of attack and a steeper leg angle at toe-off. Furthermore, walking with maximal trunk flexion induces right-skewed vertical and horizontal ground reaction force profiles comparable to those in birds. Interestingly, the spring and damper in series model provides a superior prediction of the axial leg force across trunk-flexed gaits compared with the parallel spring and damper model; in regular erect gait, the damper does not substantially improve the reproduction of the human axial leg force. In conclusion, mimicking the pronograde locomotion of birds by bending the trunk forward in humans causes a leg function similar to that of birds despite the different morphology of the segmented legs. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Increased pain sensitivity in accident-related chronic pain patients with comorbid posttraumatic stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Andersen, Tonny Elmose; Harvold, Mathea

    2018-01-01

    , anxiety, pain catastrophizing, and fear of movement) in patients with accident-related chronic spinal pain with (N=44) and without (N=64) comorbid PTSD characteristics. METHODS: Cuff algometry was performed on lower legs to assess pressure pain threshold (cPPT), tolerance (cPTT), temporal summation...... (numerical rating scale), psychological distress, and PTSD symptomatology (ICD-11) were assessed with questionnaires. Mediation analyses were performed to investigate possible psychological mediators in the associations between PTSD and pain (intensity and mechanisms). RESULTS: Patients with PTSD...... of movement mediated the association with cPTT. DISCUSSION: The association between PTSD and pain intensity is in accordance with the mutual-maintenance and fear-avoidance models. Future studies should investigate changes in pain intensity and mechanisms after treatment targeting comorbid PTSD in chronic pain...

  18. Muscle power is an independent determinant of pain and quality of life in knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVE: This study examined the relationships between leg muscle strength, power, and perceived disease severity in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (OA) in order to determine whether dynamic leg extensor muscle power would be associated with pain and quality of life in knee OA. METHODS: Baseli...

  19. Role of Repeat Muscle Compartment Pressure Measurements in Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome of the Lower Leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zantvoort, Aniek P. M.; de Bruijn, Johan A.; Winkes, Michiel B.; Hoogeveen, Adwin R.; Teijink, Joep A. W.; Scheltinga, Marc R.

    2017-01-01

    patients [53% female]; mean age, 31 ± 10 years) detected CECS in 3 compartments (15%, all ant-CECS). Conclusion: Previous fasciotomy for lower leg CECS or previously normal muscle pressure (ICP) do not rule out CECS as a cause of persisting lower leg symptoms. Repeat ICP measurement may have a potential role in the evaluation of patients with persistent lower leg complaints. However, other reasons for lower leg exertional pain must always be considered prior to secondary surgery. PMID:28634595

  20. Neuropathic Pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    pain is not at all clear and this can be attributed to the fact that terminology defining the disease is very uncertain. ... This is also classified as chronic pain. In these ... CRPS Type II (Complete regional pain syndrome). * Phantom limb pain. * Spinal cord injury. * Post surgery. - laminectorny. - spinal fusion. - general surgery.

  1. Increased medial foot loading during drop jump in subjects with patellofemoral pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathleff, Michael S; Richter, Camilla; Brushøj, Christoffer

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare medial-to-lateral plantar forces during drop jump and single leg squat in individuals with and without patellofemoral pain. METHODS: This cross-sectional study compared 23 young adults with patellofemoral pain to 20 age- and sex-matched controls without knee pain. The plantar...... pressure distribution was collected during drop jump and single leg squat using pressure-sensitive Pedar insoles, inserted into a standard flat shoe. The primary outcome was the medial-to-lateral force, quantified as the peak force under the medial forefoot as the percentage of force under the total...... forefoot during drop jump. Secondary outcomes included peak medial-to-lateral force during single leg squat and mean forces during drop jump and single leg squat. RESULTS: The primary outcome showed that individuals with patellofemoral pain had a 22 % higher medial-to-lateral peak force during drop jump...

  2. Postural correlates of viewing painful situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry eLelard

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emotional context may play a crucial role in movement production. According to simulation theories, emotional states affect motor systems. The aim of this study was to compare postural responses assessed by posturography and electromyography when subjects were instructed to imagine themselves in a painful or a non-painful situation.Methods: Twenty-nine subjects (22.3 ± 3.7 years participated in this study. While standing quietly on a posturographic platform, they were instructed to imagine themselves in a painful or non-painful situation. Displacement of the centre of pressure (COP, leg muscle electromyographic activity, heart rate, and electrodermal activity were assessed in response to painful and non-painful situations.Results:The anteroposterior path was shorter (p<0.05 when subjects imagined themselves in a painful situation (M = 148.0 ± 33.4 mm compared to a non-painful situation (158.2 ± 38.7 mm. Higher Tibialis Anterior (TA activity (RMS-TA = 3.38 ± 1.95 % vs 3.24 ± 1.85 %; p < 0.001 and higher variability of Soleus (SO activity (variation coefficient of RMS-SO = 13.5 ± 16.2 % vs M = 9.0% ± 7.2 %; p<0.05 were also observed in painful compared to non-painful situations. No significant changes were observed for other physiological data Conclusion: This study demonstrates that simulation of painful situations induces changes in postural control and leg muscle activation compared to non-painful situations, as increased stiffness was demonstrated in response to aversive pictures in accordance with previous results.

  3. Conjoined legs: Sirenomelia or caudal regression syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakti Prasad Das

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Presence of single umbilical persistent vitelline artery distinguishes sirenomelia from caudal regression syndrome. We report a case of a12-year-old boy who had bilateral umbilical arteries presented with fusion of both legs in the lower one third of leg. Both feet were rudimentary. The right foot had a valgus rocker-bottom deformity. All toes were present but rudimentary. The left foot showed absence of all toes. Physical examination showed left tibia vara. The chest evaluation in sitting revealed pigeon chest and elevated right shoulder. Posterior examination of the trunk showed thoracic scoliosis with convexity to right. The patient was operated and at 1 year followup the boy had two separate legs with a good aesthetic and functional results.

  4. Dimensional synthesis of a leg mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, F.; Lovasz, E.-Ch; Pop, C.; Dolga, V.

    2016-08-01

    An eight bar leg mechanism dimensional synthesis is presented. The mathematical model regarding the synthesis is described and the results obtained after computation are verified with help of 2D mechanism simulation in Matlab. This mechanism, inspired from proposed solution of Theo Jansen, is integrated into the structure of a 2 DOF quadruped robot. With help of the kinematic synthesis method described, it is tried to determine new dimensions for the mechanism, based on a set of initial conditions. These are established by taking into account the movement of the end point of the leg mechanism, which enters in contact with the ground, during walking. An optimization process based on the results obtained can be conducted further in order to find a better solution for the leg mechanism.

  5. A systematic review on the impact of leg ulceration on patients' quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rieger Monika A

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A systematic review was conducted to analyse journal articles that describe or measure the impact of leg ulceration on patients' quality of life (QoL in order to improve the content of an educational programme that aims to enhance self-care agency in leg ulcer patients. Method Original articles published in English and German between 1990 and 2006 were included if the findings were analysed at the level of patients. Articles were excluded if (1 they investigated the impact of specific treatments or settings on QoL or (2 focused mainly on arterial ulcers or diabetic foot ulcers. Results Twenty-four original research articles met the inclusion criteria; 11 studies used a quantitative, 11 studies a qualitative, and 2 used a mixed method approach. The findings were collapsed into 5 core domains. Quantitative studies commonly investigated the parameters of pain, sleep, social isolation, and physical mobility. Patients had significantly more pain, more restrictions regarding social functioning, less vitality, and limitations with respect to emotional roles compared to the respective controls. Other problem areas identified were restrictions in work capacity, recreation, social interaction, psychological well-being, as well as problems caused by treatment regimes. Inconclusive results were obtained regarding pain intensity, physical restrictions, and gender effects. Limitations Numerous original studies neither undertook a differentiation of participants by ulcer aetiology nor did they analyse the results according to gender differences. Conclusion As leg ulceration has an impact on QoL, national guidelines on the treatment of leg ulceration need to more specifically address these far-ranging effects identified in this review.

  6. Ulcer recurrence after in-hospital treatment for recalcitrant venous leg ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, S; de Roos, K-P; de Maeseneer, M; Sommer, A; Neumann, H A M

    2013-05-01

    Leg ulceration caused by chronic venous disease occurs in 1% of the adult Western population. A majority of these patients is successfully treated in the outpatient setting. A minority of patients is hospitalized, most frequently because of the lack of healing tendency. The literature provides recurrence rates for ulcer disease, but lacks specific data on recurrence rates after in-hospital treatment of recalcitrant venous leg ulcers. To investigate time to ulcer recurrence after in-hospital treatment of venous leg ulceration. A multicentre, retrospective cohort study of patients admitted for leg ulceration between 1996 and 2007 was conducted. Data could be collected for 107 of the patients. Of these, 27 had conservative treatment (bed rest, local wound care, pain management) and 48 patients underwent surgical ulcer treatment with (n = 19) or without (n = 29) initial vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) treatment. The treatment method was 'miscellaneous' in the remaining 32 patients. Median admission time was 30 days, median percentage of closure at discharge was 95%, and median time to ulcer recurrence 60 days. The Mann-Whitney U-test showed significant differences between the conservative group and the surgery group, the latter having a longer length of hospital stay (P ulcer closure (P ulcer recurrence (P = 0.273). Comparable differences were demonstrated between the conservative group and the VAC plus surgery group. No significant differences could be demonstrated between the surgically treated patients and those treated by VAC and surgery. Hospital stay is significantly shorter in cases of surgical treatment of recalcitrant venous leg ulcers. Most ulcers recur within 2 months after hospital discharge. Recurrence of venous leg ulcers after hospital admission is independent of the method of treatment and cause of ulceration. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  7. Leg Spasticity and Ambulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathi Balantrapu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Spasticity of the legs is common in multiple sclerosis (MS, but there has been limited research examining its association with ambulatory outcomes. Objective. This study examined spasticity of the legs and its association with multiple measures of ambulation in persons with MS. Methods. The sample included 84 patients with MS. Spasticity of the legs was measured using a 5-point rating scale ranging between 0 (normal and 4 (contracted. Patients completed the 6-minute walk (6 MW, timed 25 foot walk (T25FW, and timed up-and-go (TUG, and O2 cost of walking was measured during the 6 MW. The patients undertook two walking trials on a GAITRite (CIR systems, Inc. for measuring spatial and temporal parameters of gait. The patients completed the Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12 (MSWS-12 and wore an accelerometer over a seven-day period. Results. 52% (n=44 of the sample presented with spasticity of the legs. Those with leg spasticity had significantly worse ambulation as measured by 6 MW (P=0.0001, d=-0.86, T25FW (P=0.003,d=0.72, TUG (P=0.001, d=0.84, MSWS-12 (P=0.0001,d=1.09, O2 cost of walking (P=0.001, d=0.75, average steps/day (P<0.05, d=-0.45, and walking velocity (P<0.05, d=-0.53 and cadence (P<0.05, d=-0.46. Conclusion. Leg spasticity was associated with impairments in ambulation, including alterations in spatiotemporal parameters and free-living walking.

  8. Prevalence of somatoform pain complaints in the German population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessel, Aike; Beutel, Manfred; Geyer, Michael; Schumacher, Jörg; Brähler, Elmar

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of somatoform pain complaints was assessed in a representative sample of 2050 persons in Germany in the age range from 18 to 92 years by the Screening for Somatoform Symptoms questionnaire [57]. A high percentage of the study participants turned out to complain of serious somatoform pains. Most frequently, back pain (30.5%), joint pain, pain in the arms and/or legs (19.9%) and headache or facial pain (19.5%) were reported. Women complained of more somatoform pain symptoms than men. Pain was higher with an increasing age, lower education, lower income, rural residency, and residency in Eastern Germany. While the prevalence of somatoform pain is high, the majority of patients does not receive adequate psychotherapeutic care but is inadequately treated by somatic treatments. PMID:19742064

  9. [Contact eczema in patients with leg ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degreef, H; Dooms-Goossens, A; Gladys, K

    1986-01-01

    Patients with leg ulcers or varicose eczema suffer much more often from contact eczema due to the local application of pharmaceutical preparations than patients suffering from other dermatological problems (even those of eczematous origin). This contact allergy may concern not only the active ingredient but also the excipient, the preservative, or even the perfume. In all cases of leg ulcers, of varicose eczema, but also of badly healed ulcers, epicutaneous tests should be carried out with all the components of the pharmaceutical preparations concerned. Moreover, the pharmaceutical industry really must perfect non-allergenic preparations.

  10. Association Between Statin Use and Prevalence of Exercise-Related Injuries: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Amateur Runners in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Esmée A; Timmers, Silvie; Hopman, Maria T E; Thompson, Paul D; Verbeek, André L M; Eijsvogels, Thijs M H

    2017-09-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are the first-choice therapy for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Some maintain that statins cause adverse musculoskeletal outcomes in highly active individuals, but few studies have examined the effects of statins on exercise-related injuries. We sought to compare the prevalence of exercise-related injuries between runners who do or do not use statins. Amateur runners (n = 4460) completed an extensive online questionnaire on their exercise patterns and health status. Participants replied to questions on the prevalence of exercise-related injuries in the previous year. Injuries were divided into general injuries, tendon- and ligament-related injuries, and muscle-related injuries. Participants were also queried about statin use: the type of statin, statin dose, and duration of treatment. Runners were divided into statin users, non-statin users with hypercholesterolemia, and controls for analysis. The crude odds ratios (ORs) for injuries, tendon- or ligament-related injuries, and muscle-related injuries in statin users compared with controls were 1.14 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.79-1.66), 1.10 (95% CI 0.71-1.72), and 1.15 (95% CI 0.69-1.91), respectively. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and metabolic equivalent of task (MET) h/week of exercise, the ORs were 1.11 (95% CI 0.76-1.62), 1.06 (95% CI 0.68-1.66), and 0.98 (95% CI 0.58-1.64), respectively. Similar effect measures were found when comparing non-statin users with hypercholesterolemia and controls. We did not find an association between statin use and the prevalence of exercise-related injuries or tendon-, ligament-, and muscle-related injuries. Runners receiving statins should continue normal physical activity without concern for increased risk of injuries.

  11. Pressure-induced referred pain is expanded by persistent soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doménech-García, V; Palsson, T S; Herrero, P; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2016-05-01

    Several chronic pain conditions are accompanied with enlarged referred pain areas. This study investigated a novel method for assessing referred pain. In 20 healthy subjects, pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were recorded and pressure stimuli (120% PPT) were applied bilaterally for 5 and 60 seconds at the infraspinatus muscle to induce local and referred pain. Moreover, PPTs were measured bilaterally at the shoulder, neck, and leg before, during, and after hypertonic saline-induced referred pain in the dominant infraspinatus muscle. The pressure and saline-induced pain areas were assessed on drawings. Subsequently, delayed onset muscle soreness was induced using eccentric exercise of the dominant infraspinatus muscle. The day-1 assessments were repeated the following day (day 2). Suprathreshold pressure stimulations and saline injections into the infraspinatus muscle caused referred pain to the frontal aspect of the shoulder/arm in all subjects. The 60-second pressure stimulation caused larger referred pain areas compared with the 5-second stimulation (P induced referred pain area was larger (P induced pain, the PPTs at the infraspinatus and supraspinatus muscles were reduced (P induced referred pain area was larger than baseline. Pressure pain thresholds at the infraspinatus and supraspinatus muscles were reduced at day 2 in the delayed onset muscle soreness side (P induced referred pain areas were observed on day 2 (P pain to the shoulder/arm was consistently induced and enlarged after 1 day of muscle soreness, indicating that the referred pain area may be a sensitive biomarker for sensitization of the pain system.

  12. THE EFFECTS OF SINGLE LEG HOP PROGRESSION AND DOUBLE LEGS HOP PROGRESSION EXERCISE TO INCREASE SPEED AND EXPLOSIVE POWER OF LEG MUSCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nining W. Kusnanik

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to determine the effect of single leg hop progression and double legs hop progression exercise to increase speed and explosive power of leg muscles. Plyometric is one of the training methods that can increase explosive power. There are many models of plyometric training including single leg hop progression and double leg hop progression. This research was experimental using match subject design techniques. The subjects of this study were 39 students who joined basketball school club. There were 3 groups in this study: Group 1 were 13 students who given sin¬gle leg hop progression exercise, Group 2 were 13 students who given double legs hop progression exercise, Group 3 were 13 students who given conventional exercise. The data was collected during pre test and post test by testing 30m speed running and vertical jump. The data was analyzed using Analysis of Varians (Anova. It was found that there were significantly increased on speed and explosive power of leg muscles of Group 1 and Group 2. It can be stated that single leg hop progression exercise was more effective than double leg hop progression exercise. The recent findings supported the hypothesis that single leg hop progression and double legs hop progression exercise can increase speed and explosive power of leg muscles. These finding were supported by some previous studies (Singh, et al, 2011; Shallaby, H.K., 2010. The single leg hop progression is more effective than double legs hop progression. This finding was consistent with some previous evidences (McCurdy, et al, 2005; Makaruk et al, 2011.

  13. Task driven optimal leg trajectories in insect-scale legged microrobots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Neel; Goldberg, Benjamin; Jayaram, Kaushik; Wood, Robert

    Origami inspired layered manufacturing techniques and 3D-printing have enabled the development of highly articulated legged robots at the insect-scale, including the 1.43g Harvard Ambulatory MicroRobot (HAMR). Research on these platforms has expanded its focus from manufacturing aspects to include design optimization and control for application-driven tasks. Consequently, the choice of gait selection, body morphology, leg trajectory, foot design, etc. have become areas of active research. HAMR has two controlled degrees-of-freedom per leg, making it an ideal candidate for exploring leg trajectory. We will discuss our work towards optimizing HAMR's leg trajectories for two different tasks: climbing using electroadhesives and level ground running (5-10 BL/s). These tasks demonstrate the ability of single platform to adapt to vastly different locomotive scenarios: quasi-static climbing with controlled ground contact, and dynamic running with un-controlled ground contact. We will utilize trajectory optimization methods informed by existing models and experimental studies to determine leg trajectories for each task. We also plan to discuss how task specifications and choice of objective function have contributed to the shape of these optimal leg trajectories.

  14. Acupuncture Alleviated the Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease including Pain, Depression, and Autonomic Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Iseki, Chifumi; Furuta, Taiga; Suzuki, Masao; Koyama, Shingo; Suzuki, Keiji; Suzuki, Tomoko; Kaneko, Akiyo; Mitsuma, Tadamichi

    2014-01-01

    A woman started to feel intractable pain on her lower legs when she was 76. At the age of 78, she was diagnosed as having Parkinson’s disease (PD). The leg pain was suspected to be a symptom of PD after eliminating other causes. The patient also suffered from nonmotor symptoms, depression, anxiety, hot flashes, and paroxysmal sweating. Though the patient had received pharmacotherapy including levodopa for 5 years, she still suffered from the nonmotor symptoms and was referred to our departmen...

  15. Assessment of the vibration on the foam legged and sheet metal-legged passenger seat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Dahil

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it was aim ed to decrease the vibration reaching to passenger from the legs of vehicle seats. In order to determine the levels of vibrations reaching at passengers, a test pad placed under the passenger seat was used, and HVM100 device was used for digitizing the information obtained. By transferring the vibration data to system by using HVM100 device, the acceleration graphics were prepared with Blaze software. As a result, it was determined that the acceleration values of seat legs made of foam material were lower than that of seat legs made of 2 mm thick sheet metal, so they damped the vibration better.

  16. Referred limb symptoms in chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellin, G; Hurri, H

    1990-03-01

    Referred limb symptoms (RLS) in chronic low back pain patients without signs of root affections were studied in 212 men and 126 women, aged 36-55 years, who were at work, but suffered from chronic or recurrent low back pain. RLS during the past few months were experienced by 17% daily and 22% occasionally. Previous RLS were reported by 34%, whereas 27% had never had such symptoms. There was a 3:4 distribution between symptoms in right and left legs, and 30% claimed symptoms in both legs. The distal extension of RLS into the limbs was as follows: thigh 18%, leg 37%, foot 20%, and toes 26%. The nature of RLS comprised the following: pain 56%, numbness 50%, cramps 22%, sharp pain 15%, and weakness 10%. Occurrence of RLS was not related to age. In both men and women, RLS correlated with subjective disability as well as with pain on bendings and palpation of lumbar spine and muscles. Men with previous and present RLS had greater external rotation of the hips, but otherwise no specific physical measurements were related with RLS. RLS of both legs in women and of distal extension in men showed more findings related with back pain.

  17. Isometric exercises reduce temporal summation of pressure pain in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, H B; Handberg, G; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aerobic and isometric exercises are known to decrease pain sensitivity. The effect of different types of exercise on central mechanisms such as temporal summation of pain (TSP) is less clear. This study hypothesized that both aerobic and isometric exercises would increase pressure pain...... tolerance (PTT) and reduce TSP with greater effects after higher-intensity exercises. METHODS: One hundred thirty-six healthy subjects (18-65 years; 68 women) participated in two randomized crossover experiments with trials on two different days. PTT and TSP were assessed before and after bicycling...... and a non-exercise condition (experiment 1), and after low- and high-intensity bicycling and low- and high-intensity isometric arm and leg exercises with the dominant arm/leg (experiment 2). PTT and TSP were assessed before and after each exercise condition on the non-dominant arm and leg by computer...

  18. Preoperative hypoalgesia after cold pressor test and aerobic exercise is associated with pain relief six months after total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Handberg, Gitte; Emmeluth, Claus

    2017-01-01

    investigated the association between exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH) and CPM on post-TKR pain relief. METHODS: Before and six months post-TKR, 14 patients with chronic knee osteoarthritis performed the cold pressor test on the non-affected leg and two exercise conditions (bicycling and isometric knee...... extension), randomized and counterbalanced. Before and during the cold pressor test and after exercises test-stimuli were applied to extract the pain sensitivity difference: Computer-controlled cuff inflation on the affected lower leg until the subjects detected the cuff pain threshold (c...... at the affected leg improved post-TKR compared with pre-TKR (P

  19. BUILDING A BETTER GLUTEAL BRIDGE: ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF HIP MUSCLE ACTIVITY DURING MODIFIED SINGLE-LEG BRIDGES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehecka, B J; Edwards, Michael; Haverkamp, Ryan; Martin, Lani; Porter, Kambry; Thach, Kailey; Sack, Richard J; Hakansson, Nils A

    2017-08-01

    Gluteal strength plays a role in injury prevention, normal gait patterns, eliminating pain, and enhancing athletic performance. Research shows high gluteal muscle activity during a single-leg bridge compared to other gluteal strengthening exercises; however, prior studies have primarily measured muscle activity with the active lower extremity starting in 90 ° of knee flexion with an extended contralateral knee. This standard position has caused reports of hamstring cramping, which may impede optimal gluteal strengthening. The purpose of this study was to determine which modified position for the single-leg bridge is best for preferentially activating the gluteus maximus and medius. Cross-Sectional. Twenty-eight healthy males and females aged 18-30 years were tested in five different, randomized single-leg bridge positions. Electromyography (EMG) electrodes were placed on subjects' gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, rectus femoris, and biceps femoris of their bridge leg (i.e., dominant or kicking leg), as well as the rectus femoris of their contralateral leg. Subjects performed a maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) for each tested muscle prior to performing five different bridge positions in randomized order. All bridge EMG data were normalized to the corresponding muscle MVIC data. A modified bridge position with the knee of the bridge leg flexed to 135 ° versus the traditional 90 ° of knee flexion demonstrated preferential activation of the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius compared to the traditional single-leg bridge. Hamstring activation significantly decreased (p bridge by flexing the active knee to 135 ° instead of 90 ° minimizes hamstring activity while maintaining high levels of gluteal activation, effectively building a bridge better suited for preferential gluteal activation. 3.

  20. Legged Vehicle for Underwater Mobile Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-15

    N93-139 ___ Legged Vehicle for Underwater Mobile Operations Encl. (1): Progress Report, Prof. Joseph Ayers, Northeastern Univ. Gentlemen: This letter...gravity and searching. The following new modules have been implemented: * AntiGravity Recruiter - Allows recruitment of depressor for pitch and roll

  1. Parental smoking during pregnancy shortens offspring's legs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żądzińska, E; Kozieł, S; Borowska-Strugińska, B; Rosset, I; Sitek, A; Lorkiewicz, W

    2016-12-01

    One of the most severe detrimental environmental factors acting during pregnancy is foetal smoke exposure. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of maternal, paternal and parental smoking during pregnancy on relative leg length in 7- to 10-year-old children. The research conducted in the years 2001-2002 included 978 term-born children, 348 boys and 630 girls, at the age of 7-10 years. Information concerning the birth weight of a child was obtained from the health records of the women. Information about the mother's and the father's smoking habits during pregnancy and about the mothers' education level was obtained from a questionnaire. The influence of parental smoking on relative leg length, controlled for age, sex, birth weight and the mother's education, as a proxy measure of socioeconomic status, and controlled for an interaction between sex and birth weight, was assessed by an analysis of covariance, where relative leg length was the dependent variable, smoking and sex were the independent variables, and birth weight as well as the mother's education were the covariates. Three separate analyses were run for the three models of smoking habits during pregnancy: the mother's smoking, the father's smoking and both parents' smoking. Only both parents' smoking showed a significant effect on relative leg length of offspring. It is probable that foetal hypoxia caused by carbon monoxide contained in smoke decelerated the growth of the long bones of foetuses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Omnidirectional Wheel-Legged Hybrid Mobile Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Vilikó

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of developing hybrid locomotion systems is to merge the advantages and to eliminate the disadvantages of different type of locomotion. The proposed solution combines wheeled and legged locomotion methods. This paper presents the mechatronic design approach and the development stages of the prototype.

  3. Leg og læring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Annette

    2008-01-01

    Leg synes at have et potentiale som metode til at fremme læring. Men hvordan? Legen har en vis grad af parallelitet med den virkelige verden i dens interaktive og relationelle strukturer. Det bliver muligt at finde nye meninger i interaktioner, som refererer til vante interaktionsformer, men alli...

  4. Robust Bipedal Walking with Variable Leg Stiffness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L.C.; Stramigioli, Stefano; Carloni, Raffaella

    The bipedal spring-mass model embodies important characteristics of human walking, and therefore serves as an important starting point in studying human-like walking for robots. In this paper, we propose to extend the bipedal spring-mass model with variable leg stiffness and exploit the potential of

  5. Clinical aspects of lower leg compartment syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, Johan Gerard Henric van den

    2004-01-01

    A compartment syndrome is a condition in which increased pressure within a limited space compromises the circulation and function of tissues within that space. Although pathofysiology is roughly similar in chronic exertional and acute compartment syndrome of the lower leg, the clinical

  6. Dipoles on a Two-leg Ladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelmark, Søren; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas

    2013-01-01

    of lattice filling fractions, perpendicular hopping between the legs, and dipole interaction strength. We show that the system exhibits zig-zag ordering when the dipolar interactions are predominantly repulsive. As a function of dipole moment orientation with respect to the ladder, we find...

  7. Clinical Features of Restless Legs Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical characteristics of childhood-onset restless legs syndrome (RLS were studied in 32 (5.9% patients, <18 years of age, diagnosed with the disorder among 538 who attended the Pediatric Sleep Disorders Center with sleep-wake complaints, between January 2000 and March 2004, at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

  8. Hereditary spherocytosis presenting as indolent leg ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed K

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Indolent leg ulcertation, which is the rarest manifestation of hereditary spherocytosis, started at the age of 5 years affecting a 15-year-old boy and his mother is reported. Review of literature showed very few reports from India and abroad. The response to oral folic acid was excellent

  9. Use of neuropathic pain questionnaires in predicting persistent postoperative neuropathic pain following lumbar discectomy for radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamji, Mohammed F; Shcharinsky, Alina

    2015-10-09

    OBJECT Failed-back surgery syndrome has been historically used to describe extremity neuropathic pain in lumbar disease despite structurally corrective spinal surgery. It is unclear whether specific preoperative pain characteristics can help determine which patients may be susceptible to such postoperative disabling symptoms. METHODS This prospective study analyzed surgical microdiscectomy patients treated for lumbar, degenerative, painful radiculopathy. Clinical parameters included general demographics, preoperative and postoperative clinical examination status, self-reported pain and disability scores, and neuropathic pain scores. The screening tests for neuropathic pain were the Douleur Neuropathique 4 and Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs, with correlation tested for ordinal score and screen positivity. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to define predictors of postoperative symptomatology. RESULTS Twelve percent of the 250 patients with radiculopathy who underwent microdiscectomy experienced persistent postoperative neuropathic pain (PPNP) with only modest, if any, relief of leg pain. The condition was highly associated with abnormal preoperative screen results for neuropathic pain, but not sex, smoking status, or preoperative pain severity (α = 0.05). Good correlation was seen between the 2 screening tests used in this study for both absolute ordinal score (Spearman ρ = 0.84; p < 0.001) and the threshold for terming the patient as having neuropathic pain features (Spearman ρ = 0.48; p < 0.001). Younger age at treatment also correlated with a higher likelihood of developing PPNP (p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS This population exhibited a low overall frequency of PPNP. Higher neuropathic pain screening scores correlated strongly with likelihood of significant postoperative leg pain. Further work is required to develop more accurate prognostication tools for radiculopathy patients undergoing structural spinal surgery.

  10. Lazar K. Lazarević, the author who first described the straight leg raising test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drača, Sanja

    2015-09-22

    To highlight the contributions of Lazar K. Lazarević (1851-1891), physician, scientist, writer, and translator in the field of neurology. During his brief period of professional activities, Lazar K. Lazarević published 78 articles in various branches of medicine. His most important contribution to neurologic science was his description of the straight leg raising test. The article "Ischiac postica cotunnii: one contribution to its differential diagnosis" was published in Serbian in the Serbian Archives of Medicine in 1880, and republished in German in Vienna in 1884. In this article, based on 6 patients from his medical practice, Lazarević correctly explained that stretching the sciatic nerve is the cause of pain during the straight leg raising test. He gave a full description of several maneuvers used to perform the test, and described the control test. Maneuvers described by Lazarević are known by other names. Analysis of the historical events and documentation indicates that Lazarević could have described the straight leg raising test in sciatica before Lasègue. He identified stretching of the sciatic nerve as the cause of pain and presented several maneuvers, which are now known by other names as labels for various diagnostic categories. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Sexual pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, Lori A; Stockdale, Colleen K

    2009-12-01

    Sexual pain is an underrecognized and poorly treated constellation of disorders that significantly impact affected women and their partners. Recognized as a form of chronic pain, sexual pain disorders are heterogeneous and include dyspareunia (superficial and deep), vaginismus, vulvodynia, vestibulitis, and noncoital sexual pain disorder. Women too often tolerate pain in the belief that this will meet their partners' needs. This article provides a review of the terminology and definition of the condition, theories on the pathophysiology, diagnostic considerations, and recommendations on the management of female sexual pain.

  12. Functional Outcomes After the Surgical Management of Isolated Anterolateral Leg Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatenby, Grace; Haysom, Samuel; Twaddle, Bruce; Walsh, Stewart

    2017-11-01

    Failure rates of up to 20% have been reported after fasciotomy for chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS). There is some evidence that postoperative failure and complication rates are higher in the posterior compartments of the lower leg than the anterolateral compartments. Isolated compartment surgery may put patients at risk of requiring revision surgery because of the risk of developing posterior compartment disease. Isolated anterolateral fasciotomy for CECS, in the absence of posterior compartment symptoms, produces satisfactory functional outcomes. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Between 2006 and 2012, patients who had positive intracompartment pressure-testing findings and who underwent isolated anterolateral fasciotomy release for CECS were given a self-administered questionnaire. The minimum follow-up was 3 years. The questionnaire addressed time to return to sport and ongoing symptoms. A visual analog scale was used to assess pain during exercise before and after surgery (score: 0, no pain; 10, worst pain imaginable); overall satisfaction with the procedure was assessed as well. Of 31 eligible patients, 20 patients (36 legs operated on) were assessed. Postoperatively, 90% of participants returned to the same or higher level of sport. The mean pain score during exercise before surgery was 8.17, whereas it was 1.74 after surgery. The overall mean patient satisfaction score was 8.64. Only 1 leg (2.8%) went on to develop posterior compartment syndrome. Isolated anterolateral fasciotomy for CECS produced excellent functional outcomes. Our rate of recurrence was low compared with those found in the literature, and 90% of participants returned to their same or higher level of sport postoperatively.

  13. The psychosocial impact of leg ulcers in patients with sickle cell disease: I don’t want them to know my little secret

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeh, Nkeiruka I.; Ajegba, Brittany; Buscetta, Ashley J.; Abdallah, Khadijah E.; Minniti, Caterina P.

    2017-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease (SCD) impacts millions of individuals worldwide and more than 100,000 people in the United States. Leg ulcers are the most common cutaneous manifestation of SCD. The health status of individuals living with chronic leg ulcers is not only influenced by clinical manifestations such as pain duration and intensity, but also by psychosocial factors. Garnering insights into the psychosocial impact can provide a more holistic view of their influence on quality of life. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants living with active SCD-associated leg ulcers or with a history of ulcers. Subjects were recruited from an ongoing study (INSIGHTS, Clin Trial.Gov NCT02156102) and consented to this qualitative phase of the study. Five areas were explored: leg ulcer pain, physical function, social-isolation, social relationships and religious support. Data was collected from 20 individuals during these interviews and a thematic analysis was performed and reported. Results Twenty participants with a mean age of 42.4 (SD ± 11.1years) were included in the study. Major themes identified included:1) pain (acute and chronic); 2) compromised physical function as demonstrated by decreased ability to walk, run, and play sports; 3) social isolation from activities either by others or self-induced as a means of avoiding certain emotions, such as embarrassment; 4) social relationships (family support and social network); 5) support and comfort through their religion or spirituality. Conclusions SCD patients with leg ulcers expressed that they experience social isolation, intense and frequent ulcer pain, and difficulty in physical function. SCD-associated leg ulcers have been studied from a clinical approach, but the psychosocial factors investigated in this study informs how quality of life is impacted by the leg ulcers. PMID:29045487

  14. The psychosocial impact of leg ulcers in patients with sickle cell disease: I don't want them to know my little secret.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeh, Nkeiruka I; Ajegba, Brittany; Buscetta, Ashley J; Abdallah, Khadijah E; Minniti, Caterina P; Bonham, Vence L

    2017-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) impacts millions of individuals worldwide and more than 100,000 people in the United States. Leg ulcers are the most common cutaneous manifestation of SCD. The health status of individuals living with chronic leg ulcers is not only influenced by clinical manifestations such as pain duration and intensity, but also by psychosocial factors. Garnering insights into the psychosocial impact can provide a more holistic view of their influence on quality of life. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants living with active SCD-associated leg ulcers or with a history of ulcers. Subjects were recruited from an ongoing study (INSIGHTS, Clin Trial.Gov NCT02156102) and consented to this qualitative phase of the study. Five areas were explored: leg ulcer pain, physical function, social-isolation, social relationships and religious support. Data was collected from 20 individuals during these interviews and a thematic analysis was performed and reported. Twenty participants with a mean age of 42.4 (SD ± 11.1years) were included in the study. Major themes identified included:1) pain (acute and chronic); 2) compromised physical function as demonstrated by decreased ability to walk, run, and play sports; 3) social isolation from activities either by others or self-induced as a means of avoiding certain emotions, such as embarrassment; 4) social relationships (family support and social network); 5) support and comfort through their religion or spirituality. SCD patients with leg ulcers expressed that they experience social isolation, intense and frequent ulcer pain, and difficulty in physical function. SCD-associated leg ulcers have been studied from a clinical approach, but the psychosocial factors investigated in this study informs how quality of life is impacted by the leg ulcers.

  15. Changed activation, oxygenation, and pain response of chronically painful muscles to repetitive work after training interventions: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Karen; Blangsted, Anne Katrine; Nielsen, Pernille Kofoed

    2012-01-01

    assigned to: (1) general fitness training performed as leg-bicycling (GFT); (2) specific strength training of the neck/shoulder muscles (SST) or (3) reference intervention without physical exercise. Electromyographic activity (EMG), tissue oxygenation (near infrared spectroscopy), and pain intensity were...... measured in trapezius during pegboard and stress tasks before and after the intervention period. During the pegboard task, GFT improved trapezius oxygenation from a relative decrease of -0.83 ± 1.48 μM to an increase of 0.05 ± 1.32 μM, and decreased pain development by 43%, but did not affect resting...... levels of pain. SST lowered the relative EMG amplitude by 36%, and decreased pain during resting and working conditions by 52 and 38%, respectively, without affecting trapezius oxygenation. In conclusion, GFT performed as leg-bicycling decreased pain development during repetitive work tasks, possibly due...

  16. Negative pressure wound therapy for treating leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumville, Jo C; Land, Lucy; Evans, Debra; Peinemann, Frank

    2015-07-14

    . Participants allocated to the control arm received standard care with dressings and compression until 100% granulation was achieved. These participants also received a punch skin-graft transplant and then further treatment with standard care. All participants were treated as in-patients until healing occurred.There was low quality evidence of a difference in time to healing that favoured the NPWT group: the study reported an adjusted hazard ratio of 3.2, with 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.7 to 6.2. The follow-up period of the study was a minimum of 12 months. There was no evidence of a difference in the total number of ulcers healed (29/30 in each group) over the follow-up period; this finding was also low quality evidence.There was low quality evidence of a difference in time to wound preparation for surgery that favoured NPWT (hazard ratio 2.4, 95% CI 1.2 to 4.7).Limited data on adverse events were collected: these provided low quality evidence of no difference in pain scores and Euroqol (EQ-5D) scores at eight weeks after surgery. There is limited rigorous RCT evidence available concerning the clinical effectiveness of NPWT in the treatment of leg ulcers. There is some evidence that the treatment may reduce time to healing as part of a treatment that includes a punch skin graft transplant, however, the applicability of this finding may be limited by the very specific context in which NPWT was evaluated. There is no RCT evidence on the effectiveness of NPWT as a primary treatment for leg ulcers.

  17. Frequency and predisposing factors of leg cramps in pregnancy: a prospective clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrabvand F

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Leg cramp is the painful contraction of the muscles that often occurs at night. Pregnancy is the most common cause of muscle cramps that usually occur in the second trimester of pregnancy. Although the reasons of the spasms had not been determined, the imbalance between the absorption and elimination of serum electrolytes such as Ca, Mg and potassium and also insufficiency of some vitamins and probably the changes in activities of motor neurons of spinal cord, can be the source of these problems. The aim of this study was the evaluation of frequency and predisposing factors of leg cramps."n"nMethods: In a cross sectional descriptive analytic study, a group of 400 women in the third trimester of pregnancy were asked to record the symptoms of leg cramp. Their education level and job recorded and their total serum level of Ca and Mg was measured in the first visit. Exclusion criteria included systemic medical conditions such as thyroid disease, diabetes, osteoporosis and prenatal disorders such as gestational diabetes mellitus and preeclampsia and patient cooperation."n"nResults: In our study the prevalence of leg cramp was 54.75%. There was a statistically significant relationship between leg cramp and serum

  18. A colored leg banding technique for Amazona parrots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    A technique for individual identification of Amazona was developed using plastic leg bands. Bands were made from 5- and 7-mm-wide strips of laminated PVC coiled 2.5 times with an inside diameter 4-5 mm gt the maximum diameter of the parrot's leg. Seventeen parrots were captured in Puerto Rico, marked with individual plastic leg bands, and observed for 204-658 d with only one lost or damaged plastic band. Plastic leg bands did not cause injury to or calluses on parrots' legs. The plastic material used for making leg bands was available in 18 colors in 1994, which would allow unique marking of 306 individuals using one plastic leg band on each leg.

  19. Static balance according to hip joint angle of unsupported leg during one-leg standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Jang-Joon; Ye, Jae-Gwan; Lee, Seul-Ji; Hong, Jeong-Mi; Choi, Hyun-Kyu; Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Won-Seob

    2017-05-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine static balance according to hip joint angle of the unsupported leg during one-leg standing. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects included 45 healthy adult males and females in their 20s. During one-leg standing on the non-dominant leg, the position of the unsupported leg was classified according to hip joint angles of point angle was class. Static balance was then measured using a force plate with eyes open and closed. The total length, sway velocity, maximum deviation, and velocity on the mediolateral and anteroposterior axes of center of pressure were measured. [Results] In balance assessment with eyes open, there were significant differences between groups according to hip joint angle, except for maximum deviation on the anteroposterior axis. In balance assessment with eyes closed, there were significant differences between total length measurements at 0° and 30°, 60° and between 30° and 90°. There were significant differences between sway velocity measurements at 0° and 30° and between 30° and 90°. [Conclusion] Thus, there were differences in static balance according to hip joint angle. It is necessary to clearly identify the hip joint angle during one-leg standing testing.

  20. Does a crouched leg posture enhance running stability and robustness?

    OpenAIRE

    Blum, Yvonne; Birn-Jeffery, Aleksandra; Daley, Monica A.; Seyfarth, Andre

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Humans and birds both walk and run bipedally on compliant legs. However, differences in leg architecture may result in species-specific leg control strategies as indicated by the observed gait patterns. In this work, control strategies for stable running are derived based on a conceptual model and compared with experimental data on running humans and pheasants (Phasianus colchicus). From a model perspective, running with compliant legs can be represented by the planar spri...

  1. Testicle Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Scrotal pain. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016. Jan. 11, 2018 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/testicle-pain/basics/definition/SYM-20050942 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  2. Neck Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... triggers muscle strains. Even minor things, such as reading in bed or gritting your teeth, can strain ... determine the cause of your pain. Other tests Electromyography (EMG). If your doctor suspects your neck pain ...

  3. A Wolf in Sheep's Clothing: An "Alien Leg" in Corticobasal Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewska, Diana Angelika; McCarthy, Allan; Murray, Brian; Magennis, Brian; Connolly, Sean; Lynch, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Alien limb phenomenon occurs in 50-60% of patients with corticobasal syndrome (CBS) and usually presents with an "alien hand" phenomenon. The "alien foot" presentation is rarer and may be misdiagnosed, as foot involvement can lead to erroneous localization of the clinical problem to the knee, hip, or back. Subsequently misdiagnoses such as myelopathy, radiculopathy, functional disorder, stiff leg syndrome, neuromyotonia, and painful leg moving toes syndrome may occur. We describe two patients with alien foot symptoms that resulted in multiple opinions from different specialists, multiple diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, and delayed diagnosis. Eventually a diagnosis of CBS was made in both. Alien foot symptoms may be more common than initially thought and can result in a delayed diagnosis of CBS. The inclusion of this clinical finding in recently proposed diagnostic criteria highlights the need for increased clinical awareness.

  4. Pilot trial of onabotulinumtoxina (Botox) in moderate to severe restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pinky; Sia, Cherri; Vaish, Narendra; Roy-Faderman, Ina

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate the potential of onabotulinum toxin A (Botox®, Allergan, Inc., Irvine, California) in the treatment of restless legs syndrome (RLS). A single-arm, open-label pilot trial of onabotulinum toxin A was conducted to determine its usefulness as an injectable treatment for RLS. The primary outcome measure, change in score on the International Restless Legs Syndrome Scale, showed a statistically significant improvement in RLS during the first 4 weeks after treatment. Two of the secondary outcome measures, pain (measured using a visual analog scale) and patients' global impression of severity of illness also showed improvement. Onabotulinum toxin A warrants further study in RLS. Increasing the drug dosage, changing the dosing schedule, and increasing the number of injection sites may result in greater activity and longer duration of action.

  5. Educational challenges and requirements for managing leg ulcers in the community.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, Fiona

    2014-06-01

    The significant impact of leg ulcers upon quality of life and disease burden cannot be overemphasised, with the financial and economic impact from an individual, local and national perspective being widely acknowledged. This article attempts to highlight issues relating to education in leg ulcer management while identifying some current and emerging challenges faced in this area by professionals. With regard to education, formal training and perception of professionals, the provision of more specialised and focused training, increased use of patient-related outcome measures and the concept of knowledge brokering have been identified as important aspects in the planning and further development of education. Issues in the domains of community nursing, technology, pain management, nursing diagnosis, availability of research and recurrence were also highlighted.

  6. Lower leg electrical impedance after distal bypass surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belanger, G K; Bolbjerg, M L; Heegaard, N H

    1998-01-01

    Electrical impedance was determined in 13 patients following distal bypass surgery to evaluate lower leg oedema as reflected by its circumference. Tissue injury was assessed by the plasma concentration of muscle enzymes. After surgery, the volume of the control lower leg increased from 1250 (816...... to be a useful method for the evaluation of lower leg oedema after distal bypass surgery....

  7. Protection against high intravascular pressure in giraffe legs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karin K.; Hørlyck, Arne; Østergaard, Kristine H.

    2013-01-01

    The high blood pressure in giraffe leg arteries renders giraffes vulnerable to edema. We investigated in 11 giraffes whether large and small arteries in the legs and the tight fascia protect leg capillaries. Ultrasound imaging of foreleg arteries in anesthetized giraffes and ex vivo examination...

  8. Ziconotide infusion for severe chronic pain: case series of patients with neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermeling, Daniel P; Berger, Joseph R

    2006-03-01

    Ziconotide intrathecal infusion was recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of intractable severe chronic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain make up a significant population among those who experience chronic pain for which there are less than optimal pharmacotherapeutic options. Published clinical trials provide a global view of ziconotide efficacy and safety. A subset of patients in clinical trials obtained complete pain relief, a remarkable finding given the history of drug treatment for neuropathic pain. To provide more information regarding those who respond to ziconotide therapy, we discuss three patients with neuropathic pain who received ziconotide infusion. Two patients with longstanding neuropathic pain, one with complex regional pain syndrome (formerly known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy) of the leg and one with lumbar radiculitis, achieved temporary but complete pain relief from single 5- and 10-microg epidural test doses. In the third case, a patient with longstanding bilateral leg and foot neuropathic pain from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and antiretroviral drug therapy achieved considerable pain relief from a long-term continuous intrathecal infusion. The patients who received a single dose had mild central nervous system adverse effects such as sedation, somnolence, nausea, headache, and lightheadedness. The patient who received the intrathecal infusion experienced mild-to-severe adverse effects depending on the rate of infusion; these effects included sedation, confusion, memory impairment, slurred speech, and double vision. This patient could sense impending adverse effects and made rate adjustments or suspended infusion to avert untoward symptoms. In all three cases, patients achieved considerable pain relief that was long-lasting and persisted well after dose administration or suspension of infusion.

  9. Using verbal instructions to influence lifting mechanics - Does the directive "lift with your legs, not your back" attenuate spinal flexion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Tyson A C; Stankovic, Tatjana; Carnegie, Danielle R; Micay, Rachel; Frost, David M

    2017-10-31

    "Use your legs" is commonly perceived as sound advice to prevent lifting-related low-back pain and injuries, but there is limited evidence that this directive attenuates the concomitant biomechanical risk factors. Body segment kinematic data were collected from 12 men and 12 women who performed a laboratory lifting/lowering task after being provided with different verbal instructions. The main finding was that instructing participants to lift "without rounding your lower back" had a greater effect on the amount of spine flexion they exhibited when lifting/lowering than instructing them to lift "with your legs instead of your back" and "bend your knees and hips". It was concluded that if using verbal instructions to discourage spine flexion when lifting, the instructions should be spine- rather than leg-focused. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Chest Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or tightness in your chest Crushing or searing pain that radiates to your back, neck, jaw, shoulders, and one or both arms Pain that lasts ... com. Accessed Sept. 6, 2017. Yelland MJ. Outpatient evaluation of the adult with chest pain. https://www.uptodate.com/contents/search. Accessed Sept. ...

  11. Neck Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arms or hands or if you have shooting pain into your shoulder or down your arm. Symptoms Signs and symptoms ... org/search/Pages/results.aspx?k=Chronic neck pain. Accessed June 11, 2015. Isaac Z. Evaluation of the patient with neck pain and cervical ...

  12. Breast pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the level of of hormones during menstruation or pregnancy often cause breast pain. Some swelling and tenderness just before your period is normal. Some women who have pain in one or both breasts may fear breast cancer . However, breast pain is not a common symptom ...

  13. Spinal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, R., E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Popolizio, T., E-mail: t.popolizio1@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Fg) (Italy); D’Aprile, P., E-mail: paoladaprile@yahoo.it [Neuroradiology Department, San Paolo Hospital, Bari (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  14. A randomised controlled trial of a community nursing intervention: improved quality of life and healing for clients with chronic leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Helen; Courtney, Mary; Finlayson, Kathleen; Shuter, Patricia; Lindsay, Ellie

    2009-06-01

    The negative impact of chronic leg ulcers on quality of life is well documented. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a new community nursing model of care on quality of life, morale, depression, self-esteem, social support, healing, pain and functional ability of clients with chronic venous leg ulcers. Venous leg ulcers are slow to heal, frequently recur and are associated with pain, restricted mobility and decreased quality of life. Although chronic wound care consumes a large proportion of community nursing time and health care resources, there is little evidence available on the effectiveness of differing models of community care for this population. Randomised controlled trial. We recruited a sample of 67 participants with venous leg ulcers referred for care to a community nursing organisation in Queensland, Australia after obtaining informed consent. Participants were randomised to either the Lindsay Leg Club model of care (n = 34), emphasising socialisation and peer support; or the traditional community nursing model (n = 33) consisting of individual home visits by a registered nurse. Participants in both groups were treated by a core team of nurses using identical research protocols based on short-stretch compression bandage treatment. Data were collected at baseline, 12 and 24 weeks from commencement. Participants who received care under the Leg Club model demonstrated significantly improved outcomes in quality of life (p = 0.014), morale (p ulcers. These results suggest further evaluation and implementation of this model is warranted by community health organisations involved in the care of this population.

  15. Immediate effects of the trunk stabilizing exercise on static balance parameters in double-leg and one-leg stances

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jwa-jun; Park, Se-yeon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate effect of stabilizing exercise using the PNF technique on standing balance in one-leg and double-leg stances. [Subjects and Methods] The present study recruited 34 healthy participants from a local university. The Participants performed four balance tests (double-leg stance with and without vision, one-leg stance with and without vision), before and after exercise. The exercise consisted of exercises performed using PNF techniq...

  16. Comparative study of two antimicrobial dressings in infected leg ulcers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosti, G; Magliaro, A; Mattaliano, V; Picerni, P; Angelotti, N

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of a microorganism-binding (MB) dressing with a silver-containing hydrofiber (SCH) dressing in controlling the bacterial loads of heavily colonised or locally infected chronic venous leg ulcers, before surgical management with homologous skin grafts. A randomised comparative single centre study recruited patients presenting with hard-to-heal critically colonised or locally infected leg ulcers, who could be treated with skin grafting. Inclusion criteria included; ulcers of vascular aetiology, over 18 years old, a wound duration ≥6 months and ankle brachial index (ABPI) >0.6. Patients were randomly assigned to treatment with SCH dressings (Aquacel Ag) or MB dressing (Cutimed Sorbact). Dressings were changed daily over a four-day observation period, after which they were taken for a skin grafting procedure. Swab samples from ulcer beds were taken in order to quantify the bacterial load at inclusion (D0) and at the end of the observation period day 4 (D4). No antibiotics were administered before or during the evaluation period. Both groups (n=20 SCH, n=20 MB) were similar in gender, age, pathophysiology (both had 15 patients with venous leg ulcers and 5 with arterial leg ulcers), ulcer surface, ulcer duration, treatment-related pain and initial bacterial load. Analysing bacterial load variation showed a significant reduction of bacterial burden at D4 in both groups. In the SCH group, we found an average bacterial load reduction of 41.6%, with an average reduction of 73.1% in the MB group (p< 0.00001). No serious adverse events were reported. Our evaluation confirmed that MB and SCH dressings are effective in reducing the bacterial burden in critically colonised or locally infected chronic leg ulcers, without inducing adverse events, with MB dressings significantly more effective. There were no external sources of funding for this study. The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare.

  17. Postoperative neuralgia in the leg after saphenous vein coronary artery bypass graft: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, U R; Griffiths, G; Lawson, R A

    1988-01-01

    The degree of cutaneous sensory deficit in the leg was assessed after removal of the long saphenous vein in 50 consecutive patients undergoing coronary artery bypass vein grafts randomly assigned subcutaneous sutures or a single layer of sutures. Removal of the vein and repair of the leg incision were done by the same team of surgeons. In group 1 (25 patients) the leg incision was repaired with "00" Dexon subcutaneous and "00" prolene subcuticular sutures while in group 2 (25 patients) closure was effected by a single layer of interrupted "00" nylon sutures. All had crepe pressure bandage from the base of the toes to the groin for the first 24 hours followed by TED stockings for six to eight weeks. Sutures were removed on the eighth postoperative day. Cutaneous sensation in the leg and ankle was assessed 48 hours, seven days, and six to eight weeks after surgery, and a final comparison of the cosmetic effects and sensory perception after one year or more was made in 37 patients. There were no major differences between the groups at 48 hours in sensory abnormalities (anaesthesia, hyperaesthesia, and pain) but sensory recovery was significantly better in group 2 at the second and third assessments. There was some reduction in sensory abnormalities at the final review in group 1. No appreciable difference was noted in the quality of the scar between the two groups. We conclude that cutaneous sensation is better preserved by repairing the leg incision in a single layer. Subcutaneous sutures may produce neuropraxia of the long saphenous nerve by direct pressure as healing progresses. PMID:3281308

  18. Multi-leg heat pipe evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alario, J. P.; Haslett, R. A.

    1986-04-01

    A multileg heat pipe evaporator facilitates the use and application of a monogroove heat pipe by providing an evaporation section which is compact in area and structurally more compatible with certain heat exchangers or heat input apparatus. The evaporation section of a monogroove heat pipe is formed by a series of parallel legs having a liquid and a vapor channel and a communicating capillary slot therebetween. The liquid and vapor channels and interconnecting capillary slots of the evaporating section are connected to the condensing section of the heat pipe by a manifold connecting liquid and vapor channels of the parallel evaporation section legs with the corresponding liquid and vapor channels of the condensing section.

  19. Respiratory-related leg movements and their relationship with periodic leg movements during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manconi, Mauro; Zavalko, Irina; Bassetti, Claudio L; Colamartino, Elisabetta; Pons, Marco; Ferri, Raffaele

    2014-03-01

    To describe the time structure of leg movements (LM) in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome, in order to advance understanding of their clinical significance. Sleep Research Centre, Oasi Institute (IRCCS), Troina, Italy. Sleep laboratory. Eighty-four patients (16 females, 68 males, mean age 55.1 y, range 29-74 y). Respiratory-related leg movements (RRLM) and those unrelated to respiratory events (NRLM) were examined within diagnostic polysomnograms alone and together for their distributions within the sleep period and for their periodicity. Patients with OSA and RRLM exhibited more periodic leg movements in sleep (PLMS), particularly in NREM sleep. A gradual decrease in number of NRLM across the sleep period was observed in patients with RRLM. This pattern was less clear for RRLM. Frequency histograms of intermovement intervals of all LMs in patients with RRLM showed a prominent first peak at 4 sec, and a second peak at approximately 24 sec coincident with that of PLMS occurring in the absence of OSA. A third peak of lowest amplitude was the broadest with a maximum at approximately 42 sec. In patients lacking RRLM, NRLM were evident with a single peak at 2-4 sec. A stepwise linear regression analysis showed that, after controlling for a diagnosis of restless legs syndrome and apnea-hypopnea index, PLMS remained significantly associated with RRLM. The time structure of leg movements occurring in conjunction with respiratory events exhibit features of periodic leg movements in sleep occurring alone, only with a different and longer period. This brings into question the validity, both biologic and clinical, of scoring conventions with their a priori exclusion from consideration as periodic leg movements in sleep.

  20. Leg perforators and leg length: an anatomic study focusing on topography and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriani, Filippo; Bruschi, Stefano; Fraccalvieri, Marco; Cipriani, Riccardo

    2010-07-01

    The highly variable anatomic distribution of lower leg perforators is explored, with a standardization based on leg length. The possibility of a correlation between leg length and number of perforators is investigated. Twenty-two lower limbs of cadavers were utilized for an anatomic study on the leg perforators branching from the three major vascular axes, anterior tibial, posterior tibial, and fibular. The parameters considered were the number of vascular pedicles per each major axis, the caliber, the distance of the fascial hole from the bony landmark (knee joint line), and the route of the vessels (muscular, septal). Arteries taken into account had a caliber of 0.5 mm or greater, with a maximum of 1.7 and a mean of 0.78. The perforators of the anterior tibial artery distribute along the entire length of the leg, but the peak of concentration is between second and third tenth and around the middle tenth. The fibular system provides perforators between the fourth and seventh tenth. The posterior tibial perforators concentrate to the middle third and to the supramalleolar region. A correlation exists between leg length and number of perforating vessels for the tibial vascular systems, possibly due to neoangiogenesis during growth, at the level of the metaphyseal plates. On the contrary no relationship was noticed for the fibular artery, whose perforators concentrate far from the growth cartilages. Some tenths where perforators concentrate are identifiable. Tibial systems have a perforator incidence depending on leg length, which, on the contrary, does not influence the number of fibular perforators. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Chronic Leg Ulcers in Drug Abusers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal Radha

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Four young males with chronic non pitting swelling of lower legs associated with multiple ulcers, scars and pigmentation after parenteral drug abuse were observed in the Dermatovenereology department during last one year. Three of them had active ulcers which healed with withdrawal of offending drug, use of systemic and topical antibiotics and B-complex. All cases were referred to the deaddiction centre. The characteristic clinical features helped in the diagnosis even before history of drug abuse was obtained.

  2. Experimental research on pedestrian lower leg impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, B. A.; Iozsa, D. M.; Stan, C.

    2017-10-01

    The present paper is centred on the research of deceleration measured at the level of the lower leg during a pedestrian impact in multiple load cases. Basically, the used methodology for physical test setup is similar to EuroNCAP and European Union regulatory requirements. Due cost reduction reasons, it was not used a pneumatic system in order to launch the lower leg impactor in the direction of the vehicle front-end. During the test it was used an opposite solution, namely the vehicle being in motion, aiming the standstill lower leg impactor. The impactor has similar specifications to those at EU level, i.e. dimensions, materials, and principle of measurement of the deceleration magnitude. Therefore, all the results obtained during the study comply with the requirements of both EU regulation and EuroNCAP. As a limitation, due to unavailability of proper sensors in the equipment of the lower leg impactor, that could provide precise results, the bending angle, the shearing and the detailed data at the level of knee ligaments were not evaluated. The knee joint should be improved for future studies as some bending angles observed during the post processing of several impact video files were too high comparing to other studies. The paper highlights the first pedestrian impact physical test conducted by the author, following an extensive research in the field. Deceleration at the level of pedestrian knee can be substantially improved by providing enough volume between the bumper fascia and the front-end structure and by using pedestrian friendly materials for shock absorbers, such as foams.

  3. Quadruped robot control and variable leg transmissions

    OpenAIRE

    Ingvast, Johan

    2006-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis regards walking of quadruped robots, and particularly the walking of the Warp1 robot. The motivation for the robot is to provide a platform for autonomous walking in rough terrain. The thesis contains six papers ranging from development tools to actuation of robot legs. The first paper describes the methods and tools made for control development. These tools feature: programming of the robot without low level coding (C-code); that the controller has to be...

  4. Spontaneous pain attacks: neuralgic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bont, L.G.

    2006-01-01

    Paroxysmal orofacial pains can cause diagnostic problems, especially when different clinical pictures occur simultaneously. Pain due to pulpitis, for example, may show the same characteristics as pain due to trigeminal neuralgia would. Moreover, the trigger point of trigeminal neuralgia can either

  5. The restless legs syndrome (Ekbom's syndrome)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-04-30

    Apr 30, 1983 ... tendency to move the limbs, pain in the distribution of the paraesthesiae, and ... walk; (iiz) insomnia secondary to the above;. (iv) pain with the same distribution as the paraesthesiae; and (v) anxiety, tension or mild depression. Paraesthesiae or ... 600 patients with Parkinson's disease6. The pathogenesis ...

  6. Restless Legs Syndrome Among the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Hao Chen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome is a sleep and movement disorder that affects 5–15% of the general population, with an increased prevalence among the elderly population. It not only affects quality of life but also increases risk of mortality among older adults. The diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms of the patient by four minimal essential criteria. Restless legs syndrome can be divided into primary or secondary causes. Examination should be performed to rule out potentially treatable illnesses, such as iron deficiency, renal failure or peripheral neuropathy, especially among elderly patients. The initial approach to restless legs syndrome should be nonpharmacologic management, such as good sleep hygiene, regular exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy and avoidance of certain aggravating drugs. An algorithm based on scientific evidence and expert opinion was developed for guidance of treatment. Combination or change of medication can be applied to resistant or difficult cases. Since elderly patients are prone to treatment-related side effects, the best strategy is to start medication cautiously and at the lowest recommended dosage.

  7. Position Sense in Chronic Pain: Separating Peripheral and Central Mechanisms in Proprioception in Unilateral Limb Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Anthony J; Giummarra, Melita J

    2016-07-01

    Awareness of limb position is derived primarily from muscle spindles and higher-order body representations. Although chronic pain appears to be associated with motor and proprioceptive disturbances, it is not clear if this is due to disturbances in position sense, muscle spindle function, or central representations of the body. This study examined position sense errors, as an indicator of spindle function, in participants with unilateral chronic limb pain. The sample included 15 individuals with upper limb pain, 15 with lower limb pain, and 15 sex- and age-matched pain-free control participants. A 2-limb forearm matching task in blindfolded participants, and a single-limb pointer task, with the reference limb hidden from view, was used to assess forearm position sense. Position sense was determined after muscle contraction or stretch, intended to induce a high or low spindle activity in the painful and nonpainful limbs, respectively. Unilateral upper and lower limb chronic pain groups produced position errors comparable with healthy control participants for position matching and pointer tasks. The results indicate that the painful and nonpainful limb are involved in limb-matching. Lateralized pain, whether in the arm or leg, does not influence forearm position sense. Painful and nonpainful limbs are involved in bilateral limb-matching. Muscle spindle function appears to be preserved in the presence of chronic pain. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Responsiveness and minimal clinically important difference for pain and disability instruments in low back pain patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korsholm Lars

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The choice of an evaluative instrument has been hampered by the lack of head-to-head comparisons of responsiveness and the minimal clinically important difference (MCID in subpopulations of low back pain (LBP. The objective of this study was to concurrently compare responsiveness and MCID for commonly used pain scales and functional instruments in four subpopulations of LBP patients. Methods The Danish versions of the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI, the 23-item Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMQ, the physical function and bodily pain subscales of the SF36, the Low Back Pain Rating Scale (LBPRS and a numerical rating scale for pain (0–10 were completed by 191 patients from the primary and secondary sectors of the Danish health care system. Clinical change was estimated using a 7-point transition question and a numeric rating scale for importance. Responsiveness was operationalised using standardardised response mean (SRM, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC, and cut-point analysis. Subpopulation analyses were carried out on primary and secondary sector patients with LBP only or leg pain +/- LBP. Results RMQ was the most responsive instrument in primary and secondary sector patients with LBP only (SRM = 0.5–1.4; ROC = 0.75–0.94 whereas ODI and RMQ showed almost similar responsiveness in primary and secondary sector patients with leg pain (ODI: SRM = 0.4–0.9; ROC = 0.76–0.89; RMQ: SRM = 0.3–0.9; ROC = 0.72–0.88. In improved patients, the RMQ was more responsive in primary and secondary sector patients and LBP only patients (SRM = 1.3–1.7 while the RMQ and ODI were equally responsive in leg pain patients (SRM = 1.3 and 1.2 respectively. All pain measures demonstrated almost equal responsiveness. The MCID increased with increasing baseline score in primary sector and LBP only patients but was only marginally affected by patient entry point and pain location. The MCID of the

  9. Superior Cluneal Nerve Entrapment Neuropathy and Gluteus Medius Muscle Pain: Their Effect on Very Old Patients with Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubo, Rinko; Kim, Kyongsong; Isu, Toyohiko; Morimoto, Daijiro; Iwamoto, Naotaka; Kobayashi, Shiro; Morita, Akio

    2017-02-01

    In the very elderly, their general condition and poor compliance with drug regimens can render the treatment of low back pain (LBP) difficult. We report the effectiveness of a less-invasive treatment for intractable LBP from superior cluneal nerve entrapment neuropathy (SCN-EN) and gluteus medius muscle (GMeM) pain. Between April 2013 and March 2015, we treated 17 consecutive elders with LBP, buttock pain, and leg pain. They were 4 men and 13 women ranging in age from 85 to 91 years (mean 86.6 years). We carefully ascertained that their symptoms were attributable to SCN-EN and GMeM pain. The median follow-up period was 21.5 ± 12.2 months (range 2-35 months). SCN-EN was diagnosed in 15 patients (28 sites) and GMeM pain in 14 (27 sites). In 5 patients, we obtained symptom control by local block (Numerical Rating Scale for LBP: declined from 7.8 to 0.8 [P pain postoperatively, they subsequently underwent peroneal nerve neurolysis and surgery for tarsal tunnel syndrome. These treatments resulted in significantly symptom abatement (Numerical Rating Scale: from 8.2 to 1.7, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire score: from 12.8 to 8.6; P pain, and leg pain due to SCN-EN or GMeM pain can be treated successfully by peripheral block and less-invasive surgery under local anesthesia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A New Diagnostic Clue to Osteomyelitis in Chronic Leg Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schattner, Ami; Dubin, Ina; Gelber, Moshe

    2016-05-01

    Chronic leg ulcers are not infrequently complicated by chronic osteomyelitis, which mandates special treatment but may not be evident on radiography. Inflammatory cytokines may cause reactive thrombocytosis in chronic osteomyelitis. Platelet counts were compared in a group of 24 inpatients with chronic leg ulcers and proven chronic osteomyelitis and 24 inpatients with chronic leg ulcers in whom osteomyelitis was not found. Mean and median platelet counts were significantly higher in the leg ulcer and osteomyelitis group vs the leg ulcer group (P 350 × 10(9)/L, sensitivity was 62.5%, but specificity was 91.7%, with a positive predictive value of 88%. Thrombocytosis in chronic leg ulcers is a new, simple, readily available and inexpensive clue to osteomyelitis in chronic leg ulcers when identified, but its absence cannot rule it out. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. LEG CONQUASATION CAUSED BY PETROL TILLER WITH OPEN LOWER LEG FRACTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Golubović

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a 71-year old patient admitted to Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Clinic, Clinical Center Niš for the right leg conquasation. The patient was injured accidentally by a petrol tiller. On admission, both thigh and lower leg conquasation was observed with large wound on anteromedial thigh and one on medial side of the lower leg. Soft tissue and bones were covered with dirt and pieces of clothing. The wounds were thoroughly rinsed and dirt was removed followed by detailed debridement. After primary surgical treatment of the wound, open proximal lower leg fracture was stabilized with external skeletal fixation using two nails in the proximal and two nails in the distal fragment. Soft tissue defect was treated by plastic surgeon. The patient was administered anti-tetanus protection, antibiotic treatment and anticoagulant prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism. Physical therapy was initiated subsequent to successful healing of the soft tissue wounds. External skeletal fixation was removed after three months for infection around the proximal nails and the treatment was contuinued using functional Sarmiento’s plaster imobilization leading to full recovery of open lower leg fracture.

  12. Kinesiophobia among physiological overusers with musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Mari; Styf, Jorma

    2009-07-01

    Kinesiophobia has been established as an important factor among patients with musculoskeletal pain. Most research has been performed among patient groups described in terms of disuse. Little, however, is known about the impact of affective factors among patients with overuse injuries caused by exercise. The aims were to investigate the occurrence of kinesiophobia among patients with exercise induced pain (overuse group) as compared to a reference group (chronic low back pain, CLBP), and to investigate kinesiophobia in relation to the type of pain and levels of exercise in the overuse group. All patients were referred with unspecific pain to the orthopaedic clinic in order to make a specific diagnosis. The overuse group consisted of 146 patients with exercise induced leg pain, and the reference group consisted of 154 patients with CLBP. All patients completed questionnaires regarding age, pain duration, severity of pain and subjective rating of kinesiophobia (TSK). The overuse group was subgrouped verified by an exercise test and diagnostic criteria and completed questionnaires about the level of exercise. More than 60% of the overusers presented with kinesiophobia, but they did not differ as compared to the reference group. No difference in kinesiophobia was found in the overuse subgroups divided after type of pain. The highest level of kinesiophobia was found among the non-exercisers. The results of this study point out the need for further elaborating on the concepts of use, overuse and disuse in relation to the fear-avoidance model.

  13. Pain genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Foulkes

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Pain, which afflicts up to 20% of the population at any time, provides both a massive therapeutic challenge and a route to understanding mechanisms in the nervous system. Specialised sensory neurons (nociceptors signal the existence of tissue damage to the central nervous system (CNS, where pain is represented in a complex matrix involving many CNS structures. Genetic approaches to investigating pain pathways using model organisms have identified the molecular nature of the transducers, regulatory mechanisms involved in changing neuronal activity, as well as the critical role of immune system cells in driving pain pathways. In man, mapping of human pain mutants as well as twin studies and association studies of altered pain behaviour have identified important regulators of the pain system. In turn, new drug targets for chronic pain treatment have been validated in transgenic mouse studies. Thus, genetic studies of pain pathways have complemented the traditional neuroscience approaches of electrophysiology and pharmacology to give us fresh insights into the molecular basis of pain perception.

  14. The concurrent validity and reliability of the Leg Motion system for measuring ankle dorsiflexion range of motion in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Romero Morales, Carlos; Calvo Lobo, C?sar; Rodr?guez Sanz, David; Sanz Corbal?n, Irene; Ruiz Ruiz, Beatriz; L?pez L?pez, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Background New reliable devices for range of motion (ROM) measures in older adults are necessary to improve knowledge about the functional capability in this population. Dorsiflexion ROM limitation is associated with ankle injuries, foot pain, lower limb disorders, loss of balance, gait control disorders and fall risk in older adults. The aim of the present study was to assess the validity and reliability of the Leg Motion device for measuring ankle dorsiflexion ROM in older adults. Methods A...

  15. Gabapentin Enacarbil: A Review in Restless Legs Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Esther S; Deeks, Emma D

    2016-05-01

    Gabapentin enacarbil is an extended-release prodrug of gabapentin that is approved in the USA (Horizant(®)) and Japan (Regnite(®)) for the treatment of moderate to severe primary restless legs syndrome (RLS) in adults [featured indication]. This article summarizes pharmacological, efficacy and tolerability data relevant to the use of oral gabapentin enacarbil in this indication. In double-blind, multicentre trials, treatment with gabapentin enacarbil 600 mg/day for 12 weeks significantly improved the symptoms of moderate to severe primary RLS in adults. Gabapentin enacarbil also significantly improved RLS pain scores and generally improved sleep and mood outcomes. These data are supported by retrospective pooled analyses of three of these trials (XP081, PIVOT RLS I and PIVOT RLS II), with gabapentin enacarbil generally improving symptoms irrespective of disease severity, associated sleep disturbance or prior dopamine agonist use. Responses to gabapentin enacarbil were sustained in longer-term trials, with lower relapse rates in gabapentin enacarbil than placebo recipients in a longer-term maintenance study. Overall, in short and longer-term trials, relatively few patients discontinued treatment, adverse events were mostly mild to moderate in severity, and somnolence/sedation and dizziness were the most commonly reported adverse events. Notably, there were no reports of augmentation or QT-interval prolongation. Gabapentin enacarbil is an important agent for the treatment of adults with moderate to severe primary RLS.

  16. Virtual reality exposure therapy as treatment for pain catastrophizing in fibromyalgia patients: proof-of-concept study (Study Protocol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Linzette D; Grimmer-Somers, Karen A; Spottiswoode, Bruce; Louw, Quinette A

    2011-04-30

    Albeit exercise is currently advocated as one of the most effective management strategies for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS); the implementation of exercise as a FMS treatment in reality is significantly hampered by patients' poor compliance. The inference that pain catastrophizing is a key predictor of poor compliance in FMS patients, justifies considering the alteration of pain catastrophizing in improving compliance towards exercises in FMS patients. The aim of this study is to provide proof-of-concept for the development and testing of a novel virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) program as treatment for exercise-related pain catastrophizing in FMS patients. Two interlinked experimental studies will be conducted. Study 1 aims to objectively ascertain if neurophysiological changes occur in the functional brain areas associated with pain catastrophizing, when catastrophizing FMS subjects are exposed to visuals of exercise activities. Study 2 aims to ascertain the preliminary efficacy and feasibility of exposure to visuals of exercise activities as a treatment for exercise-related pain catastrophizing in FMS subjects. Twenty subjects will be selected from a group of FMS patients attending the Tygerberg Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa and randomly allocated to either the VRET (intervention) group or waiting list (control) group. Baseline neurophysiological activity for subjects will be collected in study 1 using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In study 2, clinical improvement in pain catastrophizing will be measured using fMRI (objective) and the pain catastrophizing scale (subjective). The premise is if exposing FMS patients to visuals of various exercise activities trigger the functional brain areas associated with pain catastrophizing; then as a treatment, repeated exposure to visuals of the exercise activities using a VRET program could possibly decrease exercise-related pain catastrophizing in FMS patients. Proof-of-concept will either be

  17. Bone pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Charlotte Ørsted; Hansen, Rikke Rie; Heegaard, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal conditions are common causes of chronic pain and there is an unmet medical need for improved treatment options. Bone pain is currently managed with disease modifying agents and/or analgesics depending on the condition. Disease modifying agents affect the underlying pathophysiology...... of the disease and reduce as a secondary effect bone pain. Antiresorptive and anabolic agents, such as bisphosphonates and intermittent parathyroid hormone (1-34), respectively, have proven effective as pain relieving agents. Cathepsin K inhibitors and anti-sclerostin antibodies hold, due to their disease...... modifying effects, promise of a pain relieving effect. NSAIDs and opioids are widely employed in the treatment of bone pain. However, recent preclinical findings demonstrating a unique neuronal innervation of bone tissue and sprouting of sensory nerve fibers open for new treatment possibilities....

  18. Ejaculatory pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, Eske K; Møhl, Bo; Kehlet, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sexual dysfunction due to ejaculatory and genital pain after groin hernia surgery may occur in approximately 2.5% of patients. However, the specific psychosexological and neurophysiologic characteristics have not been described, thereby precluding assessment of pathogenic mechanisms...... and treatment strategies. METHODS: Ten patients with severe pain-related sexual dysfunction and ejaculatory pain were assessed in detail by quantitative sensory testing and interviewed by a psychologist specialized in evaluating sexual functional disorders and were compared with a control group of 20 patients...... with chronic pain after groin hernia repair but without sexual dysfunction, to identify sensory changes associated with ejaculatory pain. RESULTS: Quantitative sensory testing showed significantly higher thermal and mechanical detection thresholds and lowered mechanical pain detection thresholds in both groups...

  19. Immobilization tests and periodic leg movements in sleep for the diagnosis of restless leg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montplaisir, J; Boucher, S; Nicolas, A; Lesperance, P; Gosselin, A; Rompré, P; Lavigne, G

    1998-03-01

    Patients with restless leg syndrome (RLS) complain of motor restlessness, usually occurring while they rest in the evening. Two immobilization tests have been described to assess leg restlessness in these patients. In the first test, the patient sits in bed with his or her legs outstretched while electromyograms are recorded from right and left anterior tibialis muscles for an hour (Suggested Immobilization Test [SIT]); in the second test, the legs are immobilized in a stretcher (Forced Immobilization Test [FIT]). In the current study, the SIT and the FIT were compared in patients with RLS and normal control subjects matched for age and sex. More leg movements were seen in patients than in controls during immobilization tests, especially the SIT. These movements were periodic, occurring at a frequency of approximately one every 12 seconds. The SIT (index > 40) was found to discriminate between RLS and control subjects better than the FIT (index > 25). Patients were also recorded during two consecutive nights to measure periodic leg movements in sleep (PLMS). A SIT index greater than 40 and a PLMS index greater than 11 (highest PLMS index of 2 consecutive nights) were found to discriminate patients with RLS from control subjects with similar power. With each of these two measures, the clinical diagnosis was correctly predicted in 81% of patients and 81% of the control subjects. The SIT has several advantages over the measure of the PLMS index; it does not require an all-night polygraphic recording and can be administered several times a day to measure circadian fluctuation of motor restlessness.

  20. Kinesiophobia is associated with pain intensity but not pain sensitivity before and after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaegter, H. B.; Madsen, A. B.; Handberg, G.

    2018-01-01

    pre-post within-subject study. SETTING: An exercise laboratory in a multidisciplinary pain clinic. PARTICIPANTS: Fifty-four patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. INTERVENTIONS: Acute aerobic and isometric leg exercises. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinical pain intensity (numerical rating scale......, range 0 to 10), Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia, aerobic and isometric exercise performances (intensity and maximal voluntary contraction), and PPTs at local and remote body areas before and after exercise conditions. RESULTS: Patients with a high degree of kinesiophobia demonstrated increased pain...... differences were found in PPTs before and after exercise. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical pain intensity was significantly higher in patients with a high degree of kinesiophobia compared with patients with a low degree of kinesiophobia. Despite a difference in isometric exercise performance, the hypoalgesic responses...

  1. A sleeping phantom leg awakened following hemicolectomy, thrombosis, and chemotherapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiou-Karistianis Nellie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We describe the case of a patient who experienced phantom pain that began 42 years after right above-the-knee amputation. Immediately prior to phantom pain onset, this long-term amputee had experienced, in rapid succession, cancer, hemicolectomy, chemotherapy, and thrombotic occlusion. Very little has been published to date on the association between chemotherapy and exacerbation of neuropathic pain in amputees, let alone the phenomenon of bringing about pain in amputees who have been pain-free for many decades. While this patient presented with a unique profile following a rare sequence of medical events, his case should be recognized considering the frequent co-occurrence of osteomyelitis, chemotherapy, and amputation. Case presentation A 68-year-old Australian Caucasian man presented 42 years after right above-the-knee amputation with phantom pain immediately following hemicolectomy, thrombotic occlusion in the amputated leg, and chemotherapy treatment with leucovorin and 5-fluorouracil. He exhibited probable hyperalgesia with a reduced pinprick threshold and increased stump sensitivity, indicating likely peripheral and central sensitization. Conclusion Our patient, who had long-term nerve injury due to amputation, together with recent ischemic nerve and tissue injury due to thrombosis, exhibited likely chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. While he presented with unique treatment needs, cases such as this one may actually be quite common considering that osteosarcoma can frequently lead to amputation and be followed by chemotherapy. The increased susceptibility of amputees to developing potentially intractable chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain should be taken into consideration throughout the course of chemotherapy treatment. Patients in whom chronic phantom pain then develops, perhaps together with mobility issues, inevitably place greater demands on healthcare service providers that require treatment by various

  2. Physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy due to disc herniation in patients with low-back pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, D.A.W.M. van der; Simons, E.; Riphagen, I.I.; Ammendolia, C.; Verhangen, A.P.; Laslett, M.; Devillé, W.; Deyo, R.A.; Bouter, L.M.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Aertgeerts, B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Low-back pain with leg pain (sciatica) may be caused by a herniated intervertebral disc exerting pressure on the nerve root. Most patients will respond to conservative treatment, but in carefully selected patients, surgical discectomy may provide faster relief of symptoms. Primary care

  3. The pants too short, the leg too long: leg length inequality after THA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubash, Harry E; Parvataneni, Hari K

    2007-09-01

    It is critical to develop and use a consistent, systematic and reproducible approach to, perioperatively, evaluate leg length discrepancy in patients undergoing THA. Careful preoperative planning is critical but does not preclude the need for intraoperative assessment once trial components and final components are implanted. Newer techniques such as digital templating and image-guided surgery may provide more accurate techniques, although this has not been proven. Most importantly, careful preoperative planning, intraoperative measurement, and attention to detail will avoid major leg length discrepancies in the majority of patients.

  4. Leg stiffness of sprinters using running-specific prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Craig P.; Grabowski, Alena M.; McDermott, William J.; Herr, Hugh M.; Kram, Rodger

    2012-01-01

    Running-specific prostheses (RSF) are designed to replicate the spring-like nature of biological legs (bioL) during running. However, it is not clear how these devices affect whole leg stiffness characteristics or running dynamics over a range of speeds. We used a simple spring–mass model to examine running mechanics across a range of speeds, in unilateral and bilateral transtibial amputees and performance-matched controls. We found significant differences between the affected leg (AL) of unilateral amputees and both ALs of bilateral amputees compared with the bioL of non-amputees for nearly every variable measured. Leg stiffness remained constant or increased with speed in bioL, but decreased with speed in legs with RSPs. The decrease in leg stiffness in legs with RSPs was mainly owing to a combination of lower peak ground reaction forces and increased leg compression with increasing speeds. Leg stiffness is an important parameter affecting contact time and the force exerted on the ground. It is likely that the fixed stiffness of the prosthesis coupled with differences in the limb posture required to run with the prosthesis limits the ability to modulate whole leg stiffness and the ability to apply high vertical ground reaction forces during sprinting. PMID:22337629

  5. Loading and performance of the support leg in kicking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Kevin

    2013-09-01

    The punt kick is important in many football codes and support leg kinematics and ground reaction forces have been implicated in injury and performance in kicking. To evaluate ground reaction forces and support leg kinematics in the punt kick. Cross sectional study. Seven elite Australian football players performed maximal kicks into a net using both the preferred and non-preferred legs. A force plate measured ground reaction forces and an optical motion capture system (200Hz) collected kinematic data during the stance phase of the kick. Preferred and non-preferred legs were compared and performance was evaluated by correlating parameters with foot speed at ball contact. Vertical forces were larger than running at a similar speed but did not reach levels that might be considered an injury risk. Braking forces were directed solely posteriorly, as for soccer kicks, but lateral force patterns varied with some players experiencing greater forces medially and others laterally. A more extended support leg, larger peak vertical and braking force during the stance phase and a shorter stance contact time was associated with larger kick leg foot speed at ball contact. No difference existed between the preferred and non-preferred legs for ground reaction forces or support leg mechanics. To punt kick longer, a straighter support leg, less time on the ground and stronger braking should be encouraged. Conditioning the support leg to provide stronger braking potential is recommended. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. On the Biomimetic Design of Agile-Robot Legs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Elena; Arevalo, Juan Carlos; Muñoz, Gustavo; Gonzalez-de-Santos, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The development of functional legged robots has encountered its limits in human-made actuation technology. This paper describes research on the biomimetic design of legs for agile quadrupeds. A biomimetic leg concept that extracts key principles from horse legs which are responsible for the agile and powerful locomotion of these animals is presented. The proposed biomimetic leg model defines the effective leg length, leg kinematics, limb mass distribution, actuator power, and elastic energy recovery as determinants of agile locomotion, and values for these five key elements are given. The transfer of the extracted principles to technological instantiations is analyzed in detail, considering the availability of current materials, structures and actuators. A real leg prototype has been developed following the biomimetic leg concept proposed. The actuation system is based on the hybrid use of series elasticity and magneto-rheological dampers which provides variable compliance for natural motion. From the experimental evaluation of this prototype, conclusions on the current technological barriers to achieve real functional legged robots to walk dynamically in agile locomotion are presented. PMID:22247667

  7. Leg stiffness and sprint ability in amputee sprinters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobara, Hiroaki; Tominaga, Shuichi; Umezawa, Shingo; Iwashita, Koudai; Okino, Atsuo; Saito, Taku; Usui, Fumio; Ogata, Toru

    2012-09-01

    Understanding leg stiffness (K (leg)) in amputee sprinters is important for the evaluation of their sprint ability and development of running-specific prostheses (RSP). To investigate K (leg) during hopping in amputee sprinters. Cross-sectional study. Seven transtibial (TT) and seven transfemoral (TF) amputee sprinters, as well as seven non-active able-bodied subjects, performed one-legged hopping matching metronome beats at 2.2 Hz. Amputees hopped on their sound limb whereas able-bodied (AB) subjects hopped on their dominant limb. Using a spring-mass model, K (leg) was calculated from the subjects' body mass, ground contact and flight times. Both TT and TF sprinters demonstrated significantly higher K (leg) than AB subjects. K (leg) during hopping on the sound leg significantly correlated with personal records attained in a 100-m sprint in both TT (r = -0.757) and TF sprinters (r = -0.855). The results of the present study suggest that amputee sprinters have a greater K (leg) during hopping than inactive non-amputees, and that their sprint ability can be predicted from the K (leg) during hopping at 2.2 Hz on the sound limb.

  8. Leg stiffness of sprinters using running-specific prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Craig P; Grabowski, Alena M; McDermott, William J; Herr, Hugh M; Kram, Rodger

    2012-08-07

    Running-specific prostheses (RSF) are designed to replicate the spring-like nature of biological legs (bioL) during running. However, it is not clear how these devices affect whole leg stiffness characteristics or running dynamics over a range of speeds. We used a simple spring-mass model to examine running mechanics across a range of speeds, in unilateral and bilateral transtibial amputees and performance-matched controls. We found significant differences between the affected leg (AL) of unilateral amputees and both ALs of bilateral amputees compared with the bioL of non-amputees for nearly every variable measured. Leg stiffness remained constant or increased with speed in bioL, but decreased with speed in legs with RSPs. The decrease in leg stiffness in legs with RSPs was mainly owing to a combination of lower peak ground reaction forces and increased leg compression with increasing speeds. Leg stiffness is an important parameter affecting contact time and the force exerted on the ground. It is likely that the fixed stiffness of the prosthesis coupled with differences in the limb posture required to run with the prosthesis limits the ability to modulate whole leg stiffness and the ability to apply high vertical ground reaction forces during sprinting.

  9. Robust and efficient walking with spring-like legs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rummel, J; Blum, Y; Seyfarth, A, E-mail: juergen.rummel@uni-jena.d, E-mail: andre.seyfarth@uni-jena.d [Lauflabor Locomotion Laboratory, University of Jena, Dornburger Strasse 23, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    The development of bipedal walking robots is inspired by human walking. A way of implementing walking could be performed by mimicking human leg dynamics. A fundamental model, representing human leg dynamics during walking and running, is the bipedal spring-mass model which is the basis for this paper. The aim of this study is the identification of leg parameters leading to a compromise between robustness and energy efficiency in walking. It is found that, compared to asymmetric walking, symmetric walking with flatter angles of attack reveals such a compromise. With increasing leg stiffness, energy efficiency increases continuously. However, robustness is the maximum at moderate leg stiffness and decreases slightly with increasing stiffness. Hence, an adjustable leg compliance would be preferred, which is adaptable to the environment. If the ground is even, a high leg stiffness leads to energy efficient walking. However, if external perturbations are expected, e.g. when the robot walks on uneven terrain, the leg should be softer and the angle of attack flatter. In the case of underactuated robots with constant physical springs, the leg stiffness should be larger than k-tilde = 14 in order to use the most robust gait. Soft legs, however, lack in both robustness and efficiency.

  10. Robust and efficient walking with spring-like legs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, J; Blum, Y; Seyfarth, A

    2010-12-01

    The development of bipedal walking robots is inspired by human walking. A way of implementing walking could be performed by mimicking human leg dynamics. A fundamental model, representing human leg dynamics during walking and running, is the bipedal spring-mass model which is the basis for this paper. The aim of this study is the identification of leg parameters leading to a compromise between robustness and energy efficiency in walking. It is found that, compared to asymmetric walking, symmetric walking with flatter angles of attack reveals such a compromise. With increasing leg stiffness, energy efficiency increases continuously. However, robustness is the maximum at moderate leg stiffness and decreases slightly with increasing stiffness. Hence, an adjustable leg compliance would be preferred, which is adaptable to the environment. If the ground is even, a high leg stiffness leads to energy efficient walking. However, if external perturbations are expected, e.g. when the robot walks on uneven terrain, the leg should be softer and the angle of attack flatter. In the case of underactuated robots with constant physical springs, the leg stiffness should be larger than k = 14 in order to use the most robust gait. Soft legs, however, lack in both robustness and efficiency.

  11. Sympathetic Blocks Provided Sustained Pain Relief in a Patient with Refractory Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The sympathetic nervous system has been implicated in pain associated with painful diabetic neuropathy. However, therapeutic intervention targeted at the sympathetic nervous system has not been established. We thus tested the hypothesis that sympathetic nerve blocks significantly reduce pain in a patient with painful diabetic neuropathy who has failed multiple pharmacological treatments. The diagnosis of small fiber sensory neuropathy was based on clinical presentations and confirmed by skin biopsies. A series of 9 lumbar sympathetic blocks over a 26-month period provided sustained pain relief in his legs. Additional thoracic paravertebral blocks further provided control of the pain in the trunk which can occasionally be seen in severe diabetic neuropathy cases, consequent to extensive involvement of the intercostal nerves. These blocks provided sustained and significant pain relief and improvement of quality of life over a period of more than two years. We thus provided the first clinical evidence supporting the notion that sympathetic nervous system plays a critical role in painful diabetic neuropathy and sympathetic blocks can be an effective management modality of painful diabetic neuropathy. We concluded that the sympathetic nervous system is a valuable therapeutic target of pharmacological and interventional modalities of treatments in painful diabetic neuropathy patients.

  12. [Bow legged adjectives in ancient literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Frantisek; Steger, Florian

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of capturing the medical entity called 'curved legs' in a terminologically exact way. In so doing, it refers to the long-lasting process of differentiation of exact nuances of meaning in Ancient Greek and Latin. In the chronological perusal of ancient Greek literature, it becomes evident that the various adjectives employed are often vague when looking at non-medical literature. By contrast, in the Hippocratic corpus these terms are for the first time annotated with explanations intended to lead to a more precise understanding of the described deformity. Further attempts of differentiation can be found in the writings of Galen, who not only distinguishes between outward and inward curvatures, but also between deformities of the thigh and lower leg as well as between pathological and natural curvatures. Latin literature also provides a series of adjectives that were initially often used in the meaning of 'curved' but it was not until Celsus that these were differentiated with respect to the type and direction of the curvature. When comparing Greek and Latin adjectives, it turns out that though the Latin term blaesus can be traced back etymologically to the Greek word beta lambda alpha iota sigma ó zeta, the meaning of beta lambda alpha iota sigma ó zeta does not fully correspond to that of the Latin word. It is not before the later common transliteration of Greek words that this adjective took on the meaning of beta lambda alpha iota sigma ó zeta; however, this was finally lost again. In summary, the article concludes that exact word meanings in ancient literature are often unclear and precise ascriptions of meanings are inconsistent. In the case of "curved legs," this has led to misunderstandings regarding the respective types and directions of the curvature.

  13. Leg ulcer in lepromatous leprosy - Case report*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Tania Rita Moreno de Oliveira; dos Santos, Talita Suzany Siqueira; Lopes, Ramon Rodrigues de Macedo

    2016-01-01

    In Brazil, leprosy is a widespread infectious and contagious disease. Clinicians and specialists view leprosy broadly as a systemic infection, since, in its manifestations, it mimics many conditions, such as rheumatic, vascular, ENT, neurological and dermatological diseases. There are few studies that characterize the factors associated with ulcers in leprosy. These injuries should be prevented and treated promptly to avoid serious problems like secondary infections, sepsis, carcinomatous degeneration and amputations. We describe a patient with ulcers on his legs, involving late diagnosis of lepromatous leprosy. PMID:27828650

  14. Gabapentin encarbil (Horizant) for restless leg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-05

    Gabapentin enacarbil (Horizant-GlaxoSmithKline), a new extended-release (ER) tablet formulation of gabapentin, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of moderate-to-severe restless legs syndrome (RLS). The immediate-release (IR) formulation of gabapentin (Neurontin,and others), which is approved for treatment of epilepsy and postherpetic neuralgia, has been used for many years to treat RLS. Another ER tablet formulation of gabapentin (Gralise) has been approved by the FDA for treatment of postherpetic neuralgia. © 2011 The Medical Letter, Inc.

  15. 1989 Volvo Award in clinical sciences. Reproducibility of physical signs in low-back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCombe, P F; Fairbank, J C; Cockersole, B C; Pynsent, P B

    1989-09-01

    The reproducibility between observers of physical signs in patients with low-back pain was investigated. Fifty patients were examined by two surgeons and another sample of 33 patients was examined by a surgeon and a physiotherapist. Continuous data on five signs were analyzed by Pearsons' correlation coefficient, and binary data on 54 signs were analyzed by the Kappa agreement coefficient. Reliable signs consisted of measurements of lordosis and flexion range, determination of pain on flexion and lateral bend, nearly all measurements associated with the straight leg raising test, determination of pain location in the thigh and legs, and determination of sensory changes in the legs. Signs of root tension showed better agreement when qualified with a description of where the pain was experienced. Bony tenderness was more reliable than soft tissue tenderness.

  16. The effect of lumbosacral manipulation on growing pains | de Beer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Often parent(s)/guardian(s) of children who suffer from growing pains will rub the child's legs and offer verbal reassurance in an attempt to console their children. Parent(s)/guardian(s) of both groups were encouraged to continue to do this throughout the duration of the trial. Instructions were given to the parents so that the ...

  17. Management of subcalcaneal pain and Achilles tendonitis with heel inserts

    OpenAIRE

    Maclellan, G. E.; Vyvyan, Barbara

    1981-01-01

    Soft tissue symptoms in the leg due to sporting activity are commonly associated with the force of heel strike. Conventional training shoes compromise between comfort and performance; few models are suitably designed for both considerations. Using a visco-elastic polymer insert the symptoms of heel pain and Achilles tendonitis have been largely or completely abolished in a preliminary study.

  18. Single minimal incision fasciotomy for chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the lower leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffulli, Nicola; Loppini, Mattia; Spiezia, Filippo; D'Addona, Alessio; Maffulli, Gayle D

    2016-05-24

    Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) involves a painful increase in compartment pressure caused by exercise and relieved by rest, common in athletes. The most common site for CECS in the lower limbs is the anterior leg compartment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of a single minimal incision fasciotomy in athletes and their capability to return to high level sport activity. The study reports mid-term results in a series of 18 consecutive athletes with chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the leg who had undergone minimally invasive fasciotomy. Between 2000 and 2007, we prospectively enrolled 18 consecutive athletes (12 males and six females, median age 27 years) with unilateral or bilateral chronic exertional compartment syndrome undergoing unilateral or bilateral minimally invasive fasciotomy. Clinical outcomes were assessed with Short-Form Health Survey-36 (SF-36) and European Quality of Life-5 Dimension (EQ-5D) scale. The ability to participate in sport before and after surgery and the time to return to training (RTT) and to sport (RTS) were recorded. The median follow-up after surgery was 36 months. Both questionnaires showed a statistically significant improvement (P compartment syndrome of the anterior and lateral compartments of the leg with good results in the mid-term.

  19. Long-Term treatment of a patient with severe restless legs syndrome using intrathecal morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornyak, Magdolna; Kaube, Holger

    2012-12-11

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common sensorimotor disorder.(1) The symptoms have a strong circadian rhythmicity and are most severe at night and at rest. In the most severe cases, symptoms are accompanied by serious sleep disturbances and unbearable paresthesias. First-line treatments of RLS are dopamine agonists, but GABAergic anticonvulsants and opioids are also effective.(2,3) Patients with the most severe RLS are often treated with oral opioids.(4) The use of these may, however, be limited due to side effects. The intrathecal administration of opioids results in better pain relief and fewer side effects in severe chronic pain. Case reports of 4 patients have documented excellent results with short-term use of intrathecal opioids also in RLS.

  20. The revised FLACC score: Reliability and validation for pain assessment in children with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line Kjeldgaard; Rahbek, Ole; Nikolajsen, Lone

    2015-01-01

    AbstractBackground and aims Pain in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is difficult to assess and is therefore not sufficiently recognized and treated. Children with severe cognitive impairments have an increased risk of neglected postoperative, procedural and chronic pain resulting in decreased...... quality of life. The r-FLACC (revised Face, Legs, Activity, Cry and Consolability) pain score is an internationally acclaimed tool for assessing pain in children with CP because of its ease to use and its use of core pain behaviours. In addition the r-FLACC pain score may be superior to other pain...... of the r-FLACC pain score for use in Danish children with CP. Methods Twenty-seven children aged 3–15 years old with CP were included after orthopaedic surgery. Two methods for assessment of postoperative pain were used. Pain intensity was assessed by r-FLACC, with a 2 min standardized video recording...

  1. Determining if wearable sensors affect infant leg movement frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Crystal; Lane, Christianne J; Perkins, Emily; Schiesel, Derek; Smith, Beth A

    2017-06-14

    There is interest in using wearable sensors to measure infant leg movement patterns; however, they were not developed for infant use and their presence may adversely affect infant movement production. Their weight may discourage leg movement production, or their presence may annoy an infant and encourage higher rates of leg movement production. Our purpose was to determine whether wearable sensors affected the frequency of infant leg movements produced. We included 10 infants with typical development and 10 infants at risk of developmental delay, between 2 and 10 months' chronological age. After collecting and analyzing video recordings of infants, we found a negligible difference between the numbers of spontaneous leg movements made while infants wore sensors, compared to those without sensors. Wearable sensors have a negligible effect on the frequency of infant leg movement production, supporting their use in infant movement analysis.

  2. Why do arms extract less oxygen than legs during exercise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, J A L; Holmberg, H-C; Rosdahl, H

    2005-01-01

    % maximal O2 uptake (V(O2)max) and at V(O2)max with different techniques: diagonal stride (combined arm and leg exercise), double poling (predominantly arm exercise), and leg skiing (predominantly leg exercise). The percentage of O2 extraction was always higher for the legs than for the arms. At maximal...... exercise (diagonal stride), the corresponding mean values were 93 and 85% (n = 3; P extraction correlated with the P(O2) value that causes hemoglobin to be 50% saturated (P50: r = 0.93, P extraction was always higher......Hg, respectively. Because conditions for O2 off-loading from the hemoglobin are similar in leg and arm muscles, the observed differences in maximal arm and leg O2 extraction should be attributed to other factors, such as a higher heterogeneity in blood flow distribution, shorter mean transit time, smaller...

  3. [Chest pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain in ambulatory setting is predominantly not heart-associated. Most patients suffer from muskuloskeletal or functional (psychogenic) chest pain. Differential diagnosis covers aortic dissection, rib-fracture, shingles, GERD, Tietze-Syndrome, pulmonary embolism, pleuritis, pneumothorax, pleurodynia and metastatic disease. In most cases history, symptoms and signs allow a clinical diagnosis of high pretest-probability.

  4. Breast Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... result in the development of breast cysts. Breast trauma, prior breast surgery or other factors localized to the breast can lead to breast pain. Breast pain may also start outside the breast — in the chest wall, muscles, joints or heart, for example — and ...

  5. Muscle pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of muscle or tendons.4,14. Management of muscle pain. Non-Pharmacological Management. The non-pharmacological treatments for muscle pain are illustrated in Figure 1. Treatment modalities include the following. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS). TENS is a non-invasive procedure used in rehabilitation to.

  6. Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... weight loss slowed growth rate lots of vomiting chronic severe diarrhea gastrointestinal blood loss persistent pain on the right ... or Spanish)—from The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and ... Chronic Abdominal Pain in Children , a clinical report from ...

  7. Painful shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benno Ejnismann

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Many factors can be involved in the painful shoulder. Beyond articularcauses other pathologies such as artrosis, periarticular diseases as rotadorcuff tears, long head of the biceps tendinitis, adhesive capsulitis, calcifyingtendinitis, degenerative arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint, cervicalradiculopathy and nervous injuries can cause pain in the shoulder.

  8. Shoulder pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and ligaments inside the shoulder become stiff, making movement difficult and painful Overuse or injury of nearby tendons, such as the bicep muscles of the arms Tears of the rotator cuff tendons Watch this video about: Shoulder joint dislocation Sometimes, shoulder pain may ...

  9. Painful shoulder

    OpenAIRE

    Benno Ejnismann; Gustavo Cará Monteiro; Luis Fernando Uyeda

    2008-01-01

    Many factors can be involved in the painful shoulder. Beyond articularcauses other pathologies such as artrosis, periarticular diseases as rotadorcuff tears, long head of the biceps tendinitis, adhesive capsulitis, calcifyingtendinitis, degenerative arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint, cervicalradiculopathy and nervous injuries can cause pain in the shoulder.

  10. Neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Re

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is the expression of a dysfunction or primary lesion of a nerve in the peripheral or central nervous system, or both, rather than the biological signal transmitted by the nerve following peripheral nociceptor activation. It represents about 20% of all painful syndromes, with an estimated prevalence of 1.5%, however is actual incidence is hard to pinpoint due to the difficulties encountered in distinguishing it from chronic pain, of which it represents a significant percentage, on account of the not infrequent concurrence of conditions. It is crucial to recognise the variety of symptoms with which it can present: these can be negative and positive and, in turn, motor, sensitive and autonomic. In public health terms, it is important to emphasise that the diagnosis of neuropathic pain does not in most cases require sophisticated procedures and does not therefore weigh on health expenditure. In clinical practice, a validated scale (the LANSS is mentioned is useful for identifying patients presenting neuropathic pain symptoms. Therapy is based on three categories of medication: tricyclic antidepressants, anti-epileptics and opioids at high doses: neuropathic pain has a bad reputation for often resisting common therapeutic approaches and responding less well that nociceptor pain to monotherapy. Therapeutic strategies are all the more adequate the more they are based on symptoms and therefore on the pain generation mechanisms, although the recommendations are dictated more by expert opinions that double-blind randomised trials.

  11. Chest pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain. The pain may spread to the arm, shoulder, jaw, or back. A tear in the wall of the aorta, the large blood vessel that takes blood from the heart to the rest of the body ( aortic dissection ) causes sudden, severe ...

  12. [Pain and sensory disturbance in Parkinson disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Fumihito

    2012-04-01

    Pain or sensory symptoms are a frequent complaint in Parkinson disease (PD), which reduce health-related quality of life (QOL) and interfere with patient's ability to participate in activities of daily living, thus contributing to sleep disturbance or major depression. The frequency of pain is thought to have a bimodal distribution. The initial peak seems to occur before, or at the onset of PD and a second peak occurs later in the disease course in conjunction with the development of motor fluctuations or dyskinesia. The spectrum of sensory symptoms is wide, and the most common sites that experience pain are the back, legs, and shoulders. In cases, pain occurs on the side that is more affected by parkinsonism; however unusual distributions, such as oral or genital pain syndrome, chest pain, and upper or lower abdominal discomfort may be observed. The etiological basis of PD-related pain is multifactorial, with varying degrees of contribution from peripheral and central sources. Central mechanisms include derangement of the intrinsic pain-modulating monoaminergic mechanism in addition to plastic central nervous system changes induced by chronic anti-parkinsonian medication. The importance of dopaminergic deficits as a causal factor in PD-related pain is supported by the normalization of these abnormalities after L-dopa administration, which suggests that the human striatum plays a central role in processing nociceptive information. Nevertheless, the lack of response to dopaminergic agents in some patients suggests the involvement of non-dopaminergic structures in PD. Abnormalities of noradrenergic and serotonergic pathways descending to the spinal cord are assumed to play a role in pain perception in PD. Some reports have highlighted the problem of delayed diagnosis in PD patients with an initial presentation of pain. Greater awareness of this possibility among physicians is important. Physicians also should bear in mind that psychological factors are major

  13. Leg ulcers: a new symptom of Blau syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhondt, Veerle; Hofman, Sarah; Dahan, Karin; Beele, Hilde

    2008-01-01

    Blau syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant condition, typically defined by granulomatous polyarthritis, uveitis and skin eruption. Biopsy specimens demonstrate non-caseating granulomas in all lesions. We present a case of Blau syndrome associated with large recalcitrant leg ulcers. Biopsies taken in the leg ulcers of our patient systematically showed granulomas. Although leg ulcers have not previously been described as a part of Blau syndrome, we assume that the ulcerations in this case form part of Blau syndrome.

  14. Vibration transmission characteristics of the legs of freely standing honeybees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrseitz, Kristin; Kilpinen, Ole

    1997-01-01

    The leg vibrations of honeybees standing on a vibrating substrate were measured with laser Doppler vibrometry, both in freely standing bees and in bees attached to a holder. In both cases, no resonances were found. In the fixed bee preparation, the legs moved with approximately the same amplitude...... that the subgenual organ is sensitive mainly to vibrations in the direction of the long axis of the leg....

  15. Stable bipedal walking with a swing-leg protraction strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhounsule, Pranav A; Zamani, Ali

    2017-01-25

    In bipedal locomotion, swing-leg protraction and retraction refer to the forward and backward motion, respectively, of the swing-leg before touchdown. Past studies have shown that swing-leg retraction strategy can lead to stable walking. We show that swing-leg protraction can also lead to stable walking. We use a simple 2D model of passive dynamic walking but with the addition of an actuator between the legs. We use the actuator to do full correction of the disturbance in a single step (a one-step dead-beat control). Specifically, for a given limit cycle we perturb the velocity at mid-stance. Then, we determine the foot placement strategy that allows the walker to return to the limit cycle in a single step. For a given limit cycle, we find that there is swing-leg protraction at shallow slopes and swing-leg retraction at steep slopes. As the limit cycle speed increases, the swing-leg protraction region increases. On close examination, we observe that the choice of swing-leg strategy is based on two opposing effects that determine the time from mid-stance to touchdown: the walker speed at mid-stance and the adjustment in the step length for one-step dead-beat control. When the walker speed dominates, the swing-leg retracts but when the step length dominates, the swing-leg protracts. This result suggests that swing-leg strategy for stable walking depends on the model parameters, the terrain, and the stability measure used for control. This novel finding has a clear implication in the development of controllers for robots, exoskeletons, and prosthetics and to understand stability in human gaits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. An Ultralightweight and Living Legged Robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo Doan, Tat Thang; Tan, Melvin Y W; Bui, Xuan Hien; Sato, Hirotaka

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we describe the most ultralightweight living legged robot to date that makes it a strong candidate for a search and rescue mission. The robot is a living beetle with a wireless electronic backpack stimulator mounted on its thorax. Inheriting from the living insect, the robot employs a compliant body made of soft actuators, rigid exoskeletons, and flexure hinges. Such structure would allow the robot to easily adapt to any complex terrain due to the benefit of soft interface, self-balance, and self-adaptation of the insect without any complex controller. The antenna stimulation enables the robot to perform not only left/right turning but also backward walking and even cessation of walking. We were also able to grade the turning and backward walking speeds by changing the stimulation frequency. The power required to drive the robot is low as the power consumption of the antenna stimulation is in the order of hundreds of microwatts. In contrast to the traditional legged robots, this robot is of low cost, easy to construct, simple to control, and has ultralow power consumption.

  17. Compression Stockings for Treating Venous Leg Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Benigni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In order to treat venous leg ulcers, it is recommended to use high pressure compression (30–40 mmHg at the ankle. Compression stockings which are not operator dependant could be the best option because of their pressure control. However 30–40 mmHg compression stockings are often hard to put on. Putting two lower pressure compression stockings over each other could be a good therapeutic alternative. Objectives. To compare the in vitro pressures given by the manufacturers of 2 antiulcer kits with the in vivo interface pressures measured in healthy subjects and to evaluate the stiffness and friction indices from those kits based on the interface pressure in order to assess their clinical properties. Material and Methods. Using a Kikuhime pressure device, interface pressure was measured in 12 healthy subjects at the reference point B1. One stiffness index (Static Stiffness Index (SSI and a friction index have been calculated. Results. Mediven Ulcer kit gets the recommended pressures whereas Jobst’s Ulcer Care kit does not for treating a venous leg ulcer. Jobst’s Ulcer Care transmits entirely the pressure in relation to a friction index close to 1. Conclusion. This antiulcer kit study underlines that in vivo and in vitro pressures can be different (Jobst’s Ulcer Care kit and Mediven Ulcer kit. In order not to lose pressure, it is important to take into account the friction index when superimposing two stockings.

  18. Effect of two contrasting types of physical exercise on chronic neck muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Kjaer, Michael; Søgaard, Karen

    2008-01-01

    for the affected muscle, general fitness training performed as leg bicycling with relaxed shoulders, or a reference intervention without physical activity. The main outcome measure was an acute and prolonged change in intensity of neck muscle pain (100-mm visual analog scale [VAS]). RESULTS: A decrease of 35 mm......OBJECTIVE: The prevalence of neck muscle pain has steadily increased and especially pain from the descending part of the trapezius muscle has been associated with monotonous work tasks such as computer work. Physical exercise is generally recommended as treatment, but it is unclear which type...... of training is most effective. Our objective was to determine the effectiveness of specific strength training of the painful muscle versus general fitness training without direct involvement of the painful muscle (leg bicycling) on work-related neck muscle pain. METHODS: We conducted a randomized controlled...

  19. Experiences of leg bag users and emerging design priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Louise; McCarthy, Avril

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore participants' experiences of urinary incontinence and leg bag use in order to identify priorities for product redesign. Twenty-nine leg bag users and 5 carers and healthcare professionals participated in the study. They were recruited through a UK hospital Trust and a UK-wide charity for people with bladder and bowel control problems. The study employed a descriptive design with qualitative and quantitative elements to determine current experiences with urinary drainage leg bags and identify potential ways to improve their design. Data collection occurred during semistructured face-to-face and telephone semistructured interviews. Thematic analysis revealed that leg bag design and performance influenced users' relationships, confidence, and ability to socialize. The most significant issues related to leg bag use were reliable functioning without leakage, secure positioning, and discretion when worn under clothing. All participants reported having experienced significant urine leakage due to usability issues with the leg bags. Respondents identified a number of design issues with current leg bags that need to be addressed to improve the ease of use and overall experience when using leg bags for containing urinary output. The findings have been used to define design requirements for further development of leg bags and their component parts.

  20. Restless Legs Syndrome -- Self-Tests and Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diagnosis Treatment Jet Lag Overview Symptoms & Self Test Treatment Narcolepsy Overview & Facts Symptoms Self-Tests & Diagnosis Treatment Restless Legs Syndrome Overview & Facts Causes & Symptoms Self- ...

  1. Immediate effects of the trunk stabilizing exercise on static balance parameters in double-leg and one-leg stances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jwa-Jun; Park, Se-Yeon

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate effect of stabilizing exercise using the PNF technique on standing balance in one-leg and double-leg stances. [Subjects and Methods] The present study recruited 34 healthy participants from a local university. The Participants performed four balance tests (double-leg stance with and without vision, one-leg stance with and without vision), before and after exercise. The exercise consisted of exercises performed using PNF techniques (stabilizing reversal and rhythmic stabilization), which were applied to facilitate trunk musculature. To examine balance ability, total displacement of the center of pressure was measured during balance tests. [Results] The total anterior-posterior center of pressure displacement was significantly reduced after applying rhythmic stabilization compared before exercise regardless of the balance test conditions. [Conclusion] The present results suggest that trunk stability exercise using rhythmic stabilization could effectively enhance balance ability under one-leg and double-leg conditions.

  2. Myocardial infarction is a frequent cause of exercise-related resuscitated out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a general non-athletic population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søholm, Helle; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig

    2014-01-01

    performed (88% vs. 54%, ptime to ROSC was shorter (12 min (IQR: 5-19) vs. 15 (9-22), p=0.007) and the primary rhythm was more frequently shock-able (91% vs. 49%, pexercise patients. Cardiac etiology was the predominant cause of OHCA in both exercise and non-exercise patients...... (97% vs. 80%, pexercise patients (59% vs. 38%, pexercise was even after adjustment associated with a significantly lower mortality (HR=0.40 (95%CI: 0.23-0.72), p=0.002). CONCLUSIONS......: OHCA occurring during exercise was associated with a significantly lower mortality in successfully resuscitated patients even after adjusting for confounding factors. Acute coronary syndrome was more common among exercise-related cardiac arrest patients....

  3. The relationship of hip muscle performance to leg, ankle and foot injuries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Nili; Dar, Gali; Dunlop, Martin; Gaida, James Edmund

    2017-02-01

    Hip control affects movement and muscle firing patterns in the leg, ankle and foot, and may contribute to overuse injuries. Muscle performance can be measured as strength, endurance or muscle activation patterns. Our objective was to systematically review whether hip muscle performance is associated with leg, ankle and foot injuries. A structured and comprehensive search of six medical literature databases was combined with forward and backward citation tracking (AMED, CINAHL, EMBASE, Medline, Scopus and SportDiscus). Eligible studies measured hip muscle performance in individuals with musculoskeletal injuries below the tibial tuberosity, using dynamometry or electromyography (EMG). All studies compared an injured group with a control group or compared the injured and non-injured limb in the same individual. Data was extracted from each study independently by two authors. Twenty case-control and four prospective studies (n = 24) met the inclusion criteria. Injury classifications included chronic ankle instability (n = 18), Achilles tendinopathy (n = 2), medial tibial stress syndrome and tibial stress fracture (n = 1), posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (n = 1), and exertional medial tibial pain (n = 2). Eleven of the studies revealed differences in hip muscle performance indicating less strength, delayed onset activation and decreased duration of activation in the injured groups. Two studies found evidence for differences between groups only in some of their measurements. Three out of the four prospective studies revealed that hip muscle performance was not a risk factor for leg, ankle and foot injuries. This review provides limited evidence that hip muscle performance variables are related to leg, ankle and foot injuries. Emerging evidence indicates this might be a result of the injury rather than a contributor to the injury.

  4. Effects of Calcium Carbonate on Pain Symptoms in Third Trimester of Pregnancy and Nursing Period: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soosan Alimohammadzadeh Taher

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The study evaluated the efficacy of oral calcium carbonate supplement on leg pain in pregnancy and nursing period.Materials and methods: A total number of 176 women at third trimester of pregnancy or nursing period till to one year after delivery with complaint of leg pain, low back pain (LBP, and posterior pelvic pain (PPP were evaluated for distinct primary causes and were excluded, then 58 patients randomized into calcium group (n=27 treated with 500 mg calcium carbonate orally per day just for one week, and control group (n=31 received no drug. Incidence of days with leg, low back, and posterior pelvic pain per week were evaluated and compared between the two groups at 3 different weeks before, during, and after discontinuation of drug. Statistical significance was defined as P<0.05.  Results: Mean number of days with leg pain per week during calcium carbonate intake was significantly different between the study and control groups (P<0.05. Mean number of days with LBP and PPP was not significantly different between two groups.Conclusion: The use of oral calcium supplement was associated with lower episodes of leg pain but failed to reduce the incidence of LBP and PPP in pregnancy and nursery period.

  5. FUNCTIONAL AND NEUROMUSCULAR CHANGES IN THE HAMSTRINGS AFTER DROP JUMPS AND LEG CURLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejc Sarabon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to use a holistic approach to investigate changes in jumping performance, kinaesthesia, static balance, isometric strength and fast stepping on spot during a 5-day recovery period, following an acute bout of damaging exercise consisted of drop jumps and leg curls, where specific emphasis was given on the hamstring muscles. Eleven young healthy subjects completed a series of highly intensive damaging exercises for their hamstring muscles. Prior to the exercise, and during the 5-day recovery period, the subjects were tested for biochemical markers (creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase, perceived pain sensation, physical performance (squat jump, counter movement jump, maximal frequency leg stamping, maximal isometric torque production and maximally explosive isometric torque production, kinaesthesia (active torque tracking and static balance. We observed significant decreases in maximal isometric knee flexion torque production, the rate of torque production, and majority of the parameters for vertical jump performance. No alterations were found in kinaesthesia, static balance and fast stepping on spot. The highest drop in performance and increase in perceived pain sensation generally occurred 24 or 48 hours after the exercise. Damaging exercise substantially alters the neuromuscular functions of the hamstring muscles, which is specifically relevant for sports and rehabilitation experts, as the hamstrings are often stretched to significant lengths, in particular when the knee is extended and hip flexed. These findings are practically important for recovery after high-intensity trainings for hamstring muscles

  6. Quality of life and satisfaction of patients with leg ulcers--results of a community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberger, K; Rustenbach, S J; Haartje, O; Blome, C; Franzke, N; Schäfer, I; Radtke, M; Augustin, M

    2011-03-01

    Leg ulcers have a major socio-economic impact because of their frequency and societal costs. Patients with leg ulcers experience major Health related Quality of Life (HrQoL) impairments. The aim of the present study was to assess the disease-specific HrQoL and the influence of care on HrQoL with leg ulcer. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the metropolitan area of Hamburg to assess the quality of care as well as HrQoL in an unrestricted sample of patients with leg ulcers by questionnaires and subsequent clinical examinations. A total of 530 patients were consecutively recruited across all wound care provider sections in the metropolitan area of Hamburg. 53 % of the patients were highly or very satisfied with the health services provided. Significant correlations were found between the disease-specific HrQoL, patient satisfaction and satisfaction with wound treatment. Furthermore, significant predictors of HrQoL were: inadequate pain therapy, insurance status, wound size, time required for dressing changes and wound etiology. Most relevant predictors for satisfaction with health services were: HrQoL, duration of wound, health insurance status and treatment by office-based physicians. In contrast, no statistically significant association with HrQoL and satisfaction was found for gender, living district, education, number of dressing changes per week and the number of comorbidities. The results show that chronic leg ulceration has a major impact on patients HrQoL. Clinical and treatment characteristics, but not socio-demographic data, were predictors of HrQoL and satisfaction with health services. The systematic assessment of HrQoL in patients with leg ulcers across all sectors of health-care is a novum and provides important insights into the reality and quality of care.

  7. [Painful ejaculation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavierre, D; Sibert, L; Rigaud, J; Labat, J-J

    2014-06-01

    To clarify definition, epidemiology, diagnosis, evaluation, etiologies and treatment of painful ejaculation (PE). Review of the literature performed by searching the Medline database using keywords ejaculation, orgasm, pain, pelvic pain, sexual behavior. PE is a pelviperineal pain caused by ejaculation or orgasm. Its prevalence rate is between 1 and 4% amongst the general population. Mainly located in the penis, pain usually lasts less than 5 minutes. Assessment is clinical and there is no level of evidence about the strategy of complementary investigations. Benign prostatic hyperplasia, chronic pelvic pain syndrome, radical prostatectomy, prostate brachytherapy and some antidepressant medications are the best estimated etiologies found in the literature. A link between urogenital infections and PE is likely but not clearly established. Alpha-blockers had good therapeutic results in few low level of evidence studies. The assessment of PE is not clearly defined. Some etiologies are known but PE may be a functionnal pain. Only high level of evidence studies would validate the use of the alpha-blockers as an efficient therapeutic option. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. [Hindfoot pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Joël; Bouysset, Maurice

    2010-03-20

    The hindfoot is the part of the foot which is proximal to the midtarsal joint. The obvious causes of pain are not considered (post-traumatic etiologies, sprains and fractures but also cutaneous lesions). The main etiologies on the subject are successively exposed by following the localization of the pain. Diffuse pains (ankle arthritis tarsal osteoarthritis, algodystrophy, calcaneo-navicular synostosis but also bone diseases like stress fractures, Paget disease or tumors). Plantar talalgia (Sever's disease, plantar fasciitis and entrapment neuropathies such as (esions of the medial calcaneal nerve, of the first branch of the plantar lateral nerve, medial plantar nerve and lateral plantar nerve). Posterior pains: calcaneal tendinopathy including peritendinitis, tendinosis, retro-calcaneal bursitis and pathology of the postero-lateral talar tuberosity. Medial pains: tendinopathies of the posterior tibial tendon and tendinopathy of the flexor hallucis longus tendon and tarsal tunnel syndrome. Lateral pains: fibularis tendinopathies including split lesions of the fibularis brevis tendon, displacement of the fibularis iongus tendon, sinus tarsi syndrome and finally thickenings of capsules and ligaments and ossifications localized under the tibial malleoli. Anterior pains: antero-inferior tibio-fibular ligament, anterior tibial tendinopathy and anterior impingment syndrome.

  9. Pain Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Capela

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pain disorder is a psychiatric disorder diagnosed when the pain becomes the predominant focus of the clinical presentation and causes significant distress or impairment. Besides the high economic impact, there is a reciprocal relationship with the affective state. Pain is a subjective sensation and its severity and quality of experience in an individual is dependent on a complex mix of factors. In the treatment of acute pain, the primary purpose is pain relief, while chronic pain typically requires a combination of psychotropic drugs. In this context, it is also important to recognize and treat depression. Psychological treatments aimed at providing mechanisms to allow patients to "control and live with the pain" rather than aspire to eliminate it completely. A growing group of researchers proposes the elimination of the chapter of Somatoform Disorders and the modification of the category "psychological factors affecting a medical condition" to "psychological factors affecting an identified or feared medical condition" with clinical entities as ubchapters, largely based upon Diagnostics for Psychosomatic Research criteria.

  10. Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia - Worsening Pain in Opioid-Dependent Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    presented to the emergency department (ED) with severe pain in his left leg and perineum. The patient had a history of bilateral above- the-knee amputations...and had progressively worsened over the last 3 days since his primary care manager discontinued his hydromorphone, reduced his fentanyl patch from 100...other symptoms. His medical history was significant for posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety, chronic pain, phantom limb pain, insomnia, and depression

  11. Motor adaptations to local muscle pain during a bilateral cyclic task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brøchner Nielsen, Niels-Peter; Tucker, Kylie; Dorel, Sylvain; Guével, Arnaud; Hug, François

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how unilateral pain, induced in two knee extensor muscles, affects muscle coordination during a bilateral pedaling task. Fifteen participants performed a 4-min pedaling task at 130 W in two conditions (Baseline and Pain). Pain was induced by injection of hypertonic saline into the vastus medialis (VM) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles of one leg. Force applied throughout the pedaling cycle was measured using an instrumented pedal and used to calculate pedal power. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded bilaterally from eight muscles to assess changes in muscle activation strategies. Compared to Baseline, during the Pain condition, EMG amplitude of muscles of the painful leg (VL and VM-the painful muscles, and RF-another quadriceps muscle with no pain) was lower during the extension phase [(mean ± SD): VL: -22.5 ± 18.9%; P W, P = 0.001) during Pain compared to Baseline. This decrease was compensated for by an 11.3 ± 8.1 W increase in pedal power applied by the non-painful leg during its extension phase (P = 0.04). These results support pain adaptation theories, which suggest that when there is a clear opportunity to compensate, motor adaptations to pain occur to decrease load within the painful tissue. Although the pedaling task offered numerous possibilities for compensation, only between-leg compensations were systematically observed. This finding is discussed in relation to the mechanical and neural constraints of the pedaling task.

  12. Hubungan Sikap Dan Posisi Kerja Dengan Low Back Pain Pada Perawat RSUD Purbalingga

    OpenAIRE

    Fatoni, Himawan; Handoyo; Swasti, Keksi Girindra

    2012-01-01

    Low back pain is the pain suffered in under side of waist and able to spread into the leg, specifically in its backsides and outer parts. One of its causes is musculoskeletal problems caused by not well body activities done. The purpose of this research is for seeing whether the correlation of job posture and position with low back pain suffered by the nurses in Purbalingga Hospital. 32 respondents fulfilling inclusion criteria who are chosen through purposive sampling. The research instrumen...

  13. A diagnostic study in patients with sciatica establishing the importance of localization of worsening of pain during coughing, sneezing and straining to assess nerve root compression on MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwoerd, Annemieke J H; Mens, Jan; El Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Peul, Wilco C; Koes, Bart W; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2016-05-01

    To test whether the localization of worsening of pain during coughing, sneezing and straining matters in the assessment of lumbosacral nerve root compression or disc herniation on MRI. Recently the diagnostic accuracy of history items to assess disc herniation or nerve root compression on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was investigated. A total of 395 adult patients with severe sciatica of 6-12 weeks duration were included in this study. The question regarding the influence of coughing, sneezing and straining on the intensity of pain could be answered on a 4 point scale: no worsening of pain, worsening of back pain, worsening of leg pain, worsening of back and leg pain. Diagnostic odds ratio's (DORs) were calculated for the various dichotomization options. The DOR changed into significant values when the answer option was more narrowed to worsening of leg pain. The highest DOR was observed for the answer option 'worsening of leg pain' with a DOR of 2.28 (95 % CI 1.28-4.04) for the presence of nerve root compression and a DOR of 2.50 (95 % CI 1.27-4.90) for the presence of a herniated disc on MRI. Worsening of leg pain during coughing, sneezing or straining has a significant diagnostic value for the presence of nerve root compression and disc herniation on MRI in patients with sciatica. This study also highlights the importance of the formulation of answer options in history taking.

  14. Joint-space width in the weight-bearing radiogram of the tibiofemoral joint. Should the patient stand on one leg or two?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boegaard, T.; Rudling, O. [County Hospital, Helsingborg (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Petersson, I.F. [Spenshult Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Halmstad (Sweden); Jonsson, K. [Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden)

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to compare the minimal joint-space (MJS) width of the tibiofemoral joint (TFJ) in weight-bearing radiograms with the patient in two different positions. Material and Methods: From a study of 54 patients with chronic knee pain (aged 42-59 years, mean 52 years), we selected 21 consecutive patients for this study. In these 21 patients, both knees were examined by means of p.a. weight-bearing radiograms in semiflexion with fluoroscopic guidance. The patient stood with the weight: (1) almost entirely on the examined leg; and (2) equally distributed on both legs. The MJS was measured with a scale loupe in tenths of a millimeter in the medial and lateral compartments of the TFJ. Results: With the patient standing on one leg, the MJS was 0.18 mm wider (p<0.006) in the medial compartment and 0.18 mm narrower (p<0.029) in the lateral compartment as compared to standing on both legs. Conclusion: With the technique used, the assessment of the MJS width in the p.a. view of the TFJ in weight-bearing examinations should be performed with equal weight on both legs. Standing on only the examined leg might be an option in cases of suspected narrowing in the lateral compartment. (orig.).

  15. Referred pain patterns provoked on intra-pelvic structures among women with and without chronic pelvic pain: a descriptive study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Torstensson

    Full Text Available To describe referred pain patterns provoked from intra-pelvic structures in women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP persisting after childbirth with the purpose to improve diagnostics and give implications for treatment.In this descriptive and comparative study 36 parous women with CPP were recruited from a physiotherapy department waiting list and by advertisements in newspapers. A control group of 29 parous women without CPP was consecutively assessed for eligibility from a midwifery surgery. Inclusion criterion for CPP was: moderate pain in the sacral region persisting at least six months after childbirth confirmed by pelvic pain provocation tests. Exclusion criteria in groups with and without CPP were: persistent back or pelvic pain with onset prior to pregnancy, previous back surgery and positive neurological signs. Pain was provoked by palpation of 13 predetermined intra-pelvic anatomical landmarks. The referred pain distribution was expressed in pain drawings and described in pain maps and calculated referred pain areas.Pain provoked by palpation of the posterior intra-pelvic landmarks was mostly referred to the sacral region and pain provoked by palpation of the ischial and pubic bones was mostly referred to the groin and pubic regions, with or without pain referred down the ipsilateral leg. The average pain distribution area provoked by palpation of all 13 anatomical landmarks was 30.3 mm² (19.2 to 53.7 in women with CPP as compared to 3.2 mm² (1.0 to 5.1 in women without CPP, p< 0.0001.Referred pain patterns provoked from intra-pelvic landmarks in women with CPP are consistent with sclerotomal sensory innervation. Magnification of referred pain patterns indicates allodynia and central sensitization. The results suggest that pain mapping can be used to evaluate and confirm the pain experience among women with CPP and contribute to diagnosis.

  16. Back pain: a real target for spinal cord stimulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoard, Philippe; Delmotte, Alexandre; D'Houtaud, Samuel; Misbert, Lorraine; Diallo, Bakari; Roy-Moreau, Aline; Durand, Sylvain; Royoux, Solène; Giot, Jean-Philippe; Bataille, Benoit

    2012-03-01

    Failed back surgery syndrome represents one of the most frequent etiologies of chronic back pain and is a major public health issue. Neurostimulation has currently not been validated in the treatment of back pain because of technological limitations in implantable spinal cord stimulation (SCS) systems. New-generation leads using several columns of stimulation can generate longitudinal and/or transverse stimulation fields into the spinal cord. To investigate, through extensive stimulation testing, the capacity of multicolumn tripolar leads to achieve back territory paresthesia coverage in refractory failed back surgery syndrome patients. Eleven patients implanted with a 16-contact spinal cord stimulation lead (Specify 5-6-5, Medtronic Inc) were assessed with a systematic exploration of 43 selected stimulation configurations to generate bilateral back paresthesia in addition to leg territory coverage. The tripolar lead successfully generated paresthesia in both bilateral back and leg territories in 9 patients (81.8%). Success rates of multicolumn stimulation patterns were significantly higher than for longitudinal configurations for lombodorsal paresthesia coverage. Six months after implantation, significant pain relief was obtained compared with preoperative evaluation for global pain (Visual Analog Scale, 2.25 vs 8.2 preoperatively; P < .05), leg pain (Visual Analog Scale, 0.5 vs 7.6 preoperatively; P < .05), and back pain (Visual Analog Scale, 1.5 vs 7.8 preoperatively; P < .05). These results suggest that multicolumn leads can reliably generate back pain coverage and favor pain relief outcomes. This may lead physicians to reconsider new indications for spinal cord stimulation. Expanding neurostimulation perspectives to intractable back pain syndromes could become realistic in the near future.

  17. What Is Chronic Pain?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Learned Going to the ER Communication Tools Pain Management Programs Videos Resources FAQs Glossary Surveys Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Treatments The Art of Pain Management Partners for Understanding Pain Pain Awareness Toolkits September ...

  18. Chronic Pelvic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Chronic Pelvic Pain Home For Patients Search FAQs Chronic Pelvic Pain ... Chronic Pelvic Pain FAQ099, August 2011 PDF Format Chronic Pelvic Pain Gynecologic Problems What is chronic pelvic pain? What ...

  19. Low Dose of Clonazepam Is Effective in the Treatment of Painless Legs and Moving Toes Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumihiro Kawajiri

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Painless legs and moving toes syndrome (PoLMT is a rare movement disorder characterized by flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, and torsion of toes in the absence of pain. It is considered a variant of painful legs and moving toes syndrome, which is characterized by similar movements but is accompanied by pain. Although neuropathy, spinal cord compression, brain tumor, cerebral infarction, and Wilson's disease have been reported to be associated with PoLMT, the actual cause, trigger, and mechanism remain unclear. Therefore, a standardized treatment for PoLMT is not established yet. Case Presentation: We describe a 64-year-old Japanese woman with no past medical history who presented with nonrhythmic repetitive involuntary toe movement of the left foot in the absence of pain. She was diagnosed with idiopathic PoLMT and treated with a low dose of clonazepam (0.5 mg/day. The involuntary movement disappeared completely several days after treatment. Conclusion: A low dose of clonazepam is effective in the treatment of PoLMT.

  20. Comparisons of knee and ankle joint angles and ground reaction force according to functional differences during single-leg drop landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kewwan; Jeon, Kyoungkyu

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine potential predictors of functional instability of the knee and ankle joints during single-leg drop landing based on the prior history of injury. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 24 collegiate soccer players without pain or dysfunction. To compare the differences between the stable and unstable sides during single-leg drop landing, 8 motion analysis cameras and a force plate were used. The Cortex 4 software was used for a biomechanical analysis of 3 events. An independent t-test was used for statistical comparison between both sides; pangle of the knee joint can help prevent injury during landing.

  1. Gabapentin Enacarbil: Pharmacotherapy of Restless Legs Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Jones

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS is a prevalent sleep-associated movement disorder greatly affecting patients’ quality of life (QoL. Several drugs can be used to control this condition although the first-line dopamine agents often cause adverse effects. Non-dopaminergic drugs such as oral gabapentin (GBP have been more recently advocated. Despite ameliorating RLS symptoms, GBP's pharmacokinetic limitations restrict its overall effectiveness. A novel specifically designed prodrug, gabapentin enacarbil (GE, has demonstrated successful RLS alleviation with a superior pharmacokinetic profile. This review aims to examine the efficacy and tolerability of both GBP and GE as pharmacotherapy for RLS. Despite some heterogeneity and limitations across research methodologies, GE appears to be a potential RLS therapy superior to GBP and other dopaminergic agents.

  2. Acute Compartment Syndrome of the Leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konda, Sanjit R; Kester, Benjamin S; Fisher, Nina; Behery, Omar A; Crespo, Alexander M; Egol, Kenneth A

    2017-08-01

    Acute compartment syndrome (ACS) is well known among orthopaedic surgeons. The timely diagnosis and management of ACS is crucial to avoiding its sequelae, including renal failure, ischemic contractures, and limb loss. Despite its relative importance, ACS poses a challenge to many residents and clinicians as diagnosis relies largely on clinical judgment. Timely diagnosis and thorough compartment release are essential to optimizing outcomes in ACS. This video highlights a clinical case in which compartment syndrome of the leg was considered, diagnosed, and surgically managed. This video will present the indications for compartment release and a video-guided demonstration of compartment checks using an arterial line transducer, a 4-compartment fasciotomy with 2 incisions, and temporizing vessel loop closure. Compartment syndrome can be a devastating complication of common fractures. It is essential that orthopaedic practitioners understand the immediacy of intervention. We have a responsibility to provide timely, accurate diagnosis along with expedient surgical management.

  3. Series Elastic Actuators for legged robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Jerry E.; Krupp, Benjamin T.

    2004-09-01

    Series Elastic Actuators provide many benefits in force control of robots in unconstrained environments. These benefits include high force fidelity, extremely low impedance, low friction, and good force control bandwidth. Series Elastic Actuators employ a novel mechanical design architecture which goes against the common machine design principal of "stiffer is better." A compliant element is placed between the gear train and driven load to intentionally reduce the stiffness of the actuator. A position sensor measures the deflection, and the force output is accurately calculated using Hooke"s Law (F=Kx). A control loop then servos the actuator to the desired output force. The resulting actuator has inherent shock tolerance, high force fidelity and extremely low impedance. These characteristics are desirable in many applications including legged robots, exoskeletons for human performance amplification, robotic arms, haptic interfaces, and adaptive suspensions. We describe several variations of Series Elastic Actuators that have been developed using both electric and hydraulic components.

  4. Phantom Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 16, 2014. Phantom pain Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  5. Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have shown that there are higher levels of endorphins in cerebrospinal fluid following acupuncture. Investigators are studying the effect of stress on the experience of chronic pain. Chemists are synthesizing new analgesics and discovering painkilling ...

  6. Penis pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - penis ... Bites, either human or insect Cancer of the penis Erection that does not go away (priapism) Genital herpes Infected hair follicles Infected prosthesis of the penis Infection under the foreskin of uncircumcised men ( balanitis ) ...

  7. Joint pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or conditions. It may be linked to arthritis , bursitis , and muscle pain . No matter what causes it, ... Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus Bursitis Chondromalacia patellae Crystals in the joint: Gout (especially ...

  8. Elbow pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chap 62. Kane SF, Lynch JH, Taylor JC. Evaluation of elbow pain in adults. Am Fam Physician . ... Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, ...

  9. Habituating pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajslev, Jeppe Zielinski Nguyen; Lund, Henrik Lambrecht; Møller, Jeppe Lykke

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the relations between discursive practices within the Danish construction industry and the perceived pain, physical deterioration, and strain affecting the construction workers. Of central importance is the widely accepted hegemonic discourse on physical strain...... and pain as unavoidable conditions in construction work. Based on 32 semi-structured interviews performed in eight case studies within four different construction professions, workers’ descriptions of physical strain and its relation to the organizational and social context are analyzed through concepts...... the industry reproduce physical strain and the habituation of pain as unquestioned conditions in construction work. The understanding of this mutual reinforcement of the necessity of physically straining, painful, high-paced construction work provides fruitful perspectives on the overrepresentation...

  10. Heel Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... improperly fitted or excessively worn shoes, or obesity. Plantar Fasciitis: Both heel pain and heel spurs are frequently associated with plantar fasciitis, an inflammation of the band of fibrous connective ...

  11. Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... emotional stress. Sometimes the cause is unknown. Common risk factors for back pain include being overweight, poor physical conditioning, smoking, whole body vibration, and improper lifting technique and body mechanics, including poor posture. Repeated activities (lifting, carrying, bending, ...

  12. Neuropathic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... feels, and how much it hurts. This graphic representation provides a lot of important information in an ... can learn about the different parts of the body where nerve pain can manifest. Online Tool Back ...

  13. Period Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your uterus or other reproductive organs, such as endometriosis and uterine fibroids. This kind of pain often ... Taking a hot bath Doing relaxation techniques, including yoga and meditation You might also try taking over- ...

  14. Predictors of Persistent Disability and Back Pain in Older Adults with a New Episode of Care for Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundell, Sean D; Sherman, Karen J; Heagerty, Patrick J; Mock, Charles N; Dettori, Nathan J; Comstock, Bryan A; Avins, Andrew L; Nedeljkovic, Srdjan S; Nerenz, David R; Jarvik, Jeffrey G

    2017-06-01

     To identify predictors of persistent disability and back pain in older adults.  Prospective cohort study.  Back pain outcomes using longitudinal data registry.  Five thousand two hundred twenty adults age 65 years and older with a new primary care visit for back pain.  Baseline measurements included: demographics, health, and back pain characteristics. We abstracted imaging findings from 348 radiology reports. The primary outcomes were the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and back pain intensity. We defined persistent disability as RMDQ of 4/24 or higher at both six and 12 months and persistent back pain as pain 3/10 or higher at both six and 12 months.  There were 2,498 of 4,143 (60.3%) participants with persistent disability, and 2,099 of 4,144 (50.7%) had persistent back pain. Adjusted analyses showed the following characteristics most strongly predictive of persistent disability and persistent back pain: sex, race, worse baseline clinical characteristics of back pain, leg pain, back-related disability and duration of symptoms, smoking, anxiety symptoms, depressive symptoms, a history of falls, greater number of comorbidities, knee osteoarthritis, wide-spread pain syndromes, and an index diagnosis of lumbar spinal stenosis. Within the imaging data subset, central spinal stenosis was not associated with disability or pain.  We found that many predictors in older adults were similar to those for younger populations.

  15. The Effects of Active Straight Leg Raising on Tonicity and Activity of Pelvic Stabilizer Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Shadmehr

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Active straight leg raising (SLR test is advocated as a valid diagnostic method in diagnosis of sacroiliac joint (SIJ dysfunction that can assess the quality of load transfer between trunk and lower limb. The aim of this study is Comparison of changes in tonicity and activity of pelvic stabilizer muscles during active SLR, between healthy individuals and patients with sacroiliac joint pain. Materials & Methods: A case – control study was designed in 26 women (19-50 years old. With use of simple sampling, surface electromyography from rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, adductor longus, erector spine, gluteus maximus and biceps femoris was recorded in 26 subjects (15 healthy females and 11 females with sacroiliac pain in resting position and during active SLR test. Resting muscle tonicity and rms during ramp time and hold time in active SLR test were assessed by non parametric-two independent sample test. Results: Biceps femoris activity in resting position was significantly larger in patients group (P<0.05. During the active SLR, the women with sacroiliac joint pain used much less activity in some pelvic stabilizer muscles compared to the healthy subjects (P<0.05. Conclusion: The increased resting tonicity of biceps femoris and decreased activity of pelvic stabilizer muscles in subjects with sacroiliac joint pain, suggests an alteration in the strategy for lumbopelvic stabilization that may disrupt load transference through the pelvis.

  16. Restless legs syndrome in patients on hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Mohammad Yaser Salman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome (RLS is common among dialysis patients, with a reported prevalence of 6-60%. The prevalence of RLS in Syrian patients on hemodialysis (HD is not known. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of RLS in patients on regular HD, and to find the possible correlation between the presence of RLS and demographic, clinical, and biochemical factors. One hundred and twenty-three patients (male/female = 70/53, mean age = 41.95 ± 15.11 years on HD therapy at the Aleppo University Hospital were enrolled into the study. RLS was diagnosed based on criteria established by the International Restless Legs Syn-drome Study Group (IRLSSG. Data procured were compared between patients with and without RLS. Applying the IRLSSG criteria for the diagnosis, RLS was seen in 20.3% of the study pa-tients. No significant difference in age, gender, and intake of nicotine and caffeine was found between patients with and without the RLS. Similarly, there was no difference between the two groups in the duration of end-stage renal disease (ESRD, the period of dialysis dependence, dialysis adequacy, urea and creatinine levels, and the presence of anemia. The co-morbidities and the use of drugs also did not differ in the two groups. Our study suggests that the high prevalence of RLS among patients on HD requires careful attention and correct diagnosis can lead to better therapy and better quality of life. The pathogenesis of RLS is not clear and further studies are required to identify any possible cause as well as to discover the impact of this syndrome on sleep, quality of life, and possibly other complications such as cardiovasculare disease.

  17. Intradermal capsaicin as a neuropathic pain model in patients with unilateral sciatica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykanat, Verna; Gentgall, Melanie; Briggs, Nancy; Williams, Desmond; Yap, Sharon; Rolan, Paul

    2012-01-01

    AIM This study compared the responses between patients with unilateral sciatica and pain-free volunteers following administration of intradermal capsaicin. METHODS Fourteen patients with unilateral sciatica and 12 pain-free volunteers received one injection per hour over 4 h of 1 µg and 10 µg capsaicin, into each calf. For each dose, spontaneous pain (10 cm VAS), area of flare (cm2) and the sum of allodynia and hyperalgesia radii across eight axes (cm) were recorded pre-injection and at 5, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min post injection. RESULTS Sciatica subjects experienced higher spontaneous pain and hyperalgesia responses in both legs compared with pain-free volunteers. The largest mean difference in spontaneous pain was 2.8 cm (95% CI 1.6, 3.9) at 5 min in the unaffected leg following 10 µg. The largest mean difference in hyperalgesia was 19.7 cm (95% CI 12.4, 27.0) at 60 min in the unaffected leg following 10 µg. Allodynia was greater in patients than in controls with the largest mean difference of 2.9 cm (95% CI 1, 4.8) at 5 min following 10 µg in the affected leg. Allodynia was also higher in the affected leg compared with the unaffected leg in sciatica patients with the highest mean difference of 3.0 cm (95% CI 1.2, 4.7) at 5 min following 10 µg. CONCLUSIONS The responses to intradermal capsaicin are quantitatively and qualitatively different in unilateral sciatica patients compared with pain-free controls. PMID:21740458

  18. Traction as conservative management of lower back pain: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Al-Sadek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of traction on lower back pain. METHODS: a prospective study of 100 patients with lower back pain with straight leg raising test positive and with decrease in disc space on X-ray. RESULTS: 83.6% of the patients got relief. Patients who got relief were evaluated radiologically and clinically. CONCLUSION: We conclude that traction is cost effective and very effective method for relieving low back pain due to disc pathology and stable lumbar fractures.

  19. In-patient management of leg ulcers | Ohanaka | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To review in-patient management of leg ulcers and to compare our experiences with those from other similar centres. Design: A retrospective study. Setting: University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Patients: Forty five patients hospitalisad with leg ulcers. Results: There were 27 male and 18 females (MF 3:2) ...

  20. Common Leg Aliment Of Poultry In Plateau State, Nigeria | Ogbe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... cockerels 17(18.68 %), guinea fowls 15(39.47 %) and ostriches2(5.26 %). Curled toes, mange, Newcastle disease, Mareks disease and Clostridia infections resulting in leg ailments were also observed. Keywords: Leg ailments, Poultry, Implication, Plateau State Animal Research International Vol. 1 (3) 2004 pp. 208-211 ...

  1. Secondary hyperparathyroidism: Uncommon cause of a leg ulcer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijssen, L. B.; Brenninkmeijer, E. E. A.; Nieveen van Dijkum, E. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Most leg ulcers are vascular based. Only if vascular therapy fails other causes are considered. We report the case of a female with incapacitating leg ulcers caused by a rare condition which was only diagnosed after failing treatment. PRESENTATION OF CASE: The female had an extensive previous

  2. Leg ulcers: a review of their impact on daily life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persoon, A.; Heinen, M.M.; Vleuten, C.J.M. van der; Rooij, M.J.M. de; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Achterberg, T. van

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current nursing care for leg ulcer patients often focuses on wound care and providing compression therapy. Nurses perceive leg ulcer patients as 'under-served' with regard to problems patients experience in daily life. An overview of patient problems is a first and essential step in the

  3. The recalcitrant venous leg ulcer - A never ending story?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.I. Reeder (Suzan); M.B. Maessen-Visch (Birgitte); S.I. Langendoen; K.P. de Roos; H.A.M. Neumann (Martino)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: In general, four particular causes of recalcitrant venous leg ulcers may be distinguished. These are foot pump insufficiency, chronic venous compartment syndrome and non-re-canalized popliteal vein thrombosis. The fourth cause of recalcitrant venous leg ulcers is

  4. Leg length, sitting height and postmenopausal breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellemkjær, L; Christensen, J; Frederiksen, K

    2012-01-01

    Tallness has consistently been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. We investigated the association further by decomposing height into leg length and sitting height.......Tallness has consistently been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. We investigated the association further by decomposing height into leg length and sitting height....

  5. Ubx regulates differential enlargement and diversification of insect hind legs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmus Mahfooz

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Differential enlargement of hind (T3 legs represents one of the hallmarks of insect evolution. However, the actual mechanism(s responsible are yet to be determined. To address this issue, we have now studied the molecular basis of T3 leg enlargement in Oncopeltus fasciatus (milkweed bug and Acheta domesticus (house cricket. In Oncopeltus, the T3 tibia displays a moderate increase in size, whereas in Acheta, the T3 femur, tibia, and tarsus are all greatly enlarged. Here, we show that the hox gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx is expressed in the enlarged segments of hind legs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that depletion of Ubx during embryogenesis has a primary effect in T3 legs and causes shortening of leg segments that are enlarged in a wild type. This result shows that Ubx is regulating the differential growth and enlargement of T3 legs in both Oncopeltus and Acheta. The emerging view suggests that Ubx was co-opted for a novel role in regulating leg growth and that the transcriptional modification of its expression may be a universal mechanism for the evolutionary diversification of insect hind legs.

  6. Ubx Regulates Differential Enlargement and Diversification of Insect Hind Legs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfooz, Najmus; Turchyn, Nataliya; Mihajlovic, Michelle; Hrycaj, Steven; Popadić, Aleksandar

    2007-01-01

    Differential enlargement of hind (T3) legs represents one of the hallmarks of insect evolution. However, the actual mechanism(s) responsible are yet to be determined. To address this issue, we have now studied the molecular basis of T3 leg enlargement in Oncopeltus fasciatus (milkweed bug) and Acheta domesticus (house cricket). In Oncopeltus, the T3 tibia displays a moderate increase in size, whereas in Acheta, the T3 femur, tibia, and tarsus are all greatly enlarged. Here, we show that the hox gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx) is expressed in the enlarged segments of hind legs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that depletion of Ubx during embryogenesis has a primary effect in T3 legs and causes shortening of leg segments that are enlarged in a wild type. This result shows that Ubx is regulating the differential growth and enlargement of T3 legs in both Oncopeltus and Acheta. The emerging view suggests that Ubx was co-opted for a novel role in regulating leg growth and that the transcriptional modification of its expression may be a universal mechanism for the evolutionary diversification of insect hind legs. PMID:17848997

  7. Leg power among malaysian netball players | Geok | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of the Vertical Jump Test were used to compare the leg power among the subjects in this study and other studies. ... The overall result showed that the Malaysian national netball players had higher leg power compared to other netball players as indicated by Hooper et al., (1995), and Schweigert (1996).

  8. Cloacal impaction with cloacolith in a black-legged seriema ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ibrahim Eldaghayes

    2017-12-07

    Dec 7, 2017 ... the first published description of cloacal impaction with cloacolith in black-legged seriema. Case Details. A 5-year-old intact female, captive hatched, black- legged seriema (Chunga burmeisteri) (1,360 kg body weight, body score 3/5) presented for manifesting a behavioral change with a slight decrease in ...

  9. ODYSSEUS autonomous walking robot: The leg/arm design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbakis, N. G.; Maas, M.; Tascillo, A.; Vandewinckel, C.

    1994-01-01

    ODYSSEUS is an autonomous walking robot, which makes use of three wheels and three legs for its movement in the free navigation space. More specifically, it makes use of its autonomous wheels to move around in an environment where the surface is smooth and not uneven. However, in the case that there are small height obstacles, stairs, or small height unevenness in the navigation environment, the robot makes use of both wheels and legs to travel efficiently. In this paper we present the detailed hardware design and the simulated behavior of the extended leg/arm part of the robot, since it plays a very significant role in the robot actions (movements, selection of objects, etc.). In particular, the leg/arm consists of three major parts: The first part is a pipe attached to the robot base with a flexible 3-D joint. This pipe has a rotated bar as an extended part, which terminates in a 3-D flexible joint. The second part of the leg/arm is also a pipe similar to the first. The extended bar of the second part ends at a 2-D joint. The last part of the leg/arm is a clip-hand. It is used for selecting several small weight and size objects, and when it is in a 'closed' mode, it is used as a supporting part of the robot leg. The entire leg/arm part is controlled and synchronized by a microcontroller (68CH11) attached to the robot base.

  10. Chronic venous leg ulcers – role of topical zinc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher SF

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sara F Maher Physical Therapy Program, Department of Healthcare Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA Abstract: Topical zinc has been used in the treatment of wounds for over 3,000 years, and is reported to have antiseptic, astringent, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and wound healing properties. Fourteen studies were identified and reviewed, to assess the efficacy of this treatment modality as either a bandage or skin protectant in the treatment of venous ulcers. The authors of three studies reported improved healing time or success rate in wounds treated with zinc-based products. However, the authors of one study attributed the faster healing rate mainly to the extra compression (that improved venous blood return, delivered by the non-elastic paste bandage, and not by the zinc oxide alone. The quality of evidence is fair, as 50% of the studies were conducted prior to 2000 and 50% of the studies utilized fewer than 45 patients randomized to two or more groups. Other treatments have been reported to be more cost-effective than zinc, including hydrocolloids, four-layer compression systems, and CircAid Thera-boots. Finally, zinc was reported to be less comfortable, less easy to use, and caused increased pain, in comparison to other products on the market. This literature review, therefore, demonstrated that current evidence is insufficient to determine the effectiveness of zinc-based products in the treatment of venous wounds. Future research is needed focusing on larger, high-quality trials with an emphasis on quality of life issues and cost-effectiveness of treatment. Keywords: chronic wounds, leg ulcers, venous insufficiency, topical zinc

  11. Nerve Decompression and Restless Legs Syndrome: A Retrospective Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C. Anderson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionRestless legs syndrome (RLS is a prevalent sleep disorder affecting quality of life and is often comorbid with other neurological diseases, including peripheral neuropathy. The mechanisms related to RLS symptoms remain unclear, and treatment options are often aimed at symptom relief rather than etiology. RLS may present in distinct phenotypes often described as “primary” vs. “secondary” RLS. Secondary RLS is often associated with peripheral neuropathy. Nerve decompression surgery of the common and superficial fibular nerves is used to treat peripheral neuropathy. Anecdotally, surgeons sometimes report improved RLS symptoms following nerve decompression for peripheral neuropathy. The purpose of this retrospective analysis was to quantify the change in symptoms commonly associated with RLS using visual analog scales (VAS.MethodsForty-two patients completed VAS scales (0–10 for pain, burning, numbness, tingling, weakness, balance, tightness, aching, pulling, cramping, twitchy/jumpy, uneasy, creepy/crawly, and throbbing, both before and 15 weeks after surgical decompression.ResultsSubjects reported significant improvement among all VAS categories, except for “pulling” (P = 0.14. The change in VAS following surgery was negatively correlated with the pre-surgery VAS for both the summed VAS (r = −0.58, P < 0.001 and the individual VAS scores (all P < 0.01, such that patients who reported the worst symptoms before surgery exhibited relatively greater reductions in symptoms after surgery.ConclusionThis is the first study to suggest improvement in RLS symptoms following surgical decompression of the common and superficial fibular nerves. Further investigation is needed to quantify improvement using RLS-specific metrics and sleep quality assessments.

  12. Short-interval leg movements during sleep entail greater cardiac activation than periodic leg movements during sleep in restless legs syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Raffaele; Rundo, Francesco; Silvani, Alessandro; Zucconi, Marco; Aricò, Debora; Bruni, Oliviero; Lanuzza, Bartolo; Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Manconi, Mauro

    2017-10-01

    Periodic leg movements during sleep (PLMS) are sequences of ≥4 motor events with intermovement intervals (IMI) of 10-90 s. PLMS are a supportive diagnostic criterion for restless legs syndrome (RLS) and entail cardiac activation, particularly when associated with arousal. RLS patients also over-express short-interval leg movements during sleep (SILMS), which have IMI sleep. We assessed cardiac activation based on the R-R interval decrease with respect to baseline during NREM sleep without leg movements. We found that the duration of the R-R interval decrease with SILMS doublets was significantly longer than that with PLMS, whereas the maximal decrease in R-R interval was similar. Scoring SILMS in RLS patients may therefore be relevant from a cardiac autonomic perspective. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  13. Laboratory on Legs: An Architecture for Adjustable Morphology with Legged Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Adjustable Morphology with Legged Robots 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...Research RHex, but is constructed via an interlock- ing design of flat aluminum pieces, all machined using a waterjet cutter, rather than CNC milling...evenly throughout the body, all mounted on the waterjet cut frame. Through the use of a USB bus as the common communication method within the robot

  14. Relationship between Leg Mass, Leg Composition and Foot Velocity on Kicking Accuracy in Australian Football

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas H. Hart, Jodie L. Cochrane, Tania Spiteri, Sophia Nimphius, Robert U. Newton

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Kicking a ball accurately over a desired distance to an intended target is arguably the most important skill to acquire in Australian Football. Therefore, understanding the potential mechanisms which underpin kicking accuracy is warranted. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between leg mass, leg composition and foot velocity on kicking accuracy in Australian Football. Thirty-one Australian Footballers (n = 31; age: 22.1 ± 2.8 years; height: 1.81 ± 0.07 m; weight: 85.1 ± 13.0 kg; BMI: 25.9 ± 3.2 each performed ten drop punt kicks over twenty metres to a player target. Athletes were separated into accurate (n = 15 and inaccurate (n = 16 kicking groups. Leg mass characteristics were assessed using whole body DXA scans. Foot velocity was determined using a ten-camera optoelectronic, three-dimensional motion capture system. Interactions between leg mass and foot velocity evident within accurate kickers only (r = -0.670 to -0.701. Relative lean mass was positively correlated with kicking accuracy (r = 0.631, while no relationship between foot velocity and kicking accuracy was evident in isolation (r = -0.047 to -0.083. Given the evident importance of lean mass, and its interaction with foot velocity for accurate kickers; future research should explore speed-accuracy, impulse-variability, limb co-ordination and foot-ball interaction constructs in kicking using controlled with-in subject studies to examine the effects of resistance training and skill acquisition programs on the development of kicking accuracy.

  15. Knee-ligament injuries associated with leg fractures. Prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matić, A; Kasić, M; Hudolin, I

    1992-09-01

    It has been proved in 25-35% of the cases that knee-ligament injuries are associated with fracture of the femoral diaphysis. No such association has been confirmed between leg fractures and knee ligaments. In order to find out if this is a coincidence, a prospective study was conducted on 229 patients who had undergone operations for leg fractures at various locations and of variable intensity. It was established in 41 cases (17.34%) that the leg fracture was associated with knee-ligament injuries, resulting in joint instability. A significantly higher percentage of associated ligament lesions was found in open fractures as opposed to closed leg fractures. The examination was carried out with the patient under general or block anesthesia. On the basis of what was established it is recommended that the knee be examined clinically in all leg osteosynthesis cases.

  16. One-leg standing balance and sports activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, T; Foldspang, A; Vestergaard, E; Ingemann-Hansen, T

    1999-02-01

    The objective of the present cross-sectional study was to estimate one-leg standing balance in athletes and to investigate the relationship with type and amount of sports activity. The study comprised 339 active, competitive, non-pregnant athletes, aged 14-24 years from two sports clubs in the county of Aarhus, Denmark. The athletes answered a questionnaire about occupation and sports activity. One-leg standing balance was measured as the maximum time of one-legged balancing. The mean of the maximum time of one-legged balancing was 29 s (interquartile range 11.25-33.5 s). One-leg standing balance was positively associated with years of participation in basketball and was not associated with sex and age. We conclude that participation in basketball may induce significantly adaptive effects on standing balance.

  17. Identifying relationships between symptom clusters and quality of life in adults with chronic mixed venous and arterial leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Hien Thi Thu; Edwards, Helen; Finlayson, Kathleen

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to identify symptom clusters and their effect on quality of life (QOL) of adults with chronic leg ulcers of mixed venous and arterial aetiology. A secondary analysis of data from four existing prospective longitudinal studies conducted by a wound healing research group in Australia was undertaken. A total of 110 patients who met the inclusion criteria were selected for this study. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was used to identify symptom clusters and correlational analyses to examine relationships between the identified symptom clusters and QOL. The EFA identified two distinct symptom clusters: a 'systemic symptom cluster' consisting of pain, fatigue and depressive symptoms; and a 'localised-leg symptom cluster' including pain, fatigue, oedema, lower limb inflammation and exudate. Physical QOL correlated significantly with the systemic symptom cluster (r = -0·055, P < 0·0001) and the localised-leg symptom cluster (r = -0·054, P < 0·0001), whereas mental QOL was associated only with the systemic symptom cluster (r = -0·038, P = 0·01). The results suggest that appropriate intervention strategies targeting specific symptom clusters should be developed. Targeting patients with symptom clusters is particularly important because they are at high risk and the most vulnerable for reduced QOL. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Validation of a leg movements count and periodic leg movements analysis in a custom polysomnography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, Ambra; Heidbreder, Anna; Hackner, Heinz; Högl, Birgit

    2017-02-23

    Periodic leg movements (PLM) during sleep (PLMS) are considered strongly related to restless legs syndrome (RLS), and are associated with polymorphisms in RLS risk genes. Various software for automatic analysis of PLMS are available, but only few of them have been validated. Aim of this study was to validate a leg movements count and analysis integrated in a commercially available polysomnography (PSG) system against manual scoring. Twenty RLS patients with a PLMS index > 20/h and 20 controls with a PLMS index PLM was performed according to the standard American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) criteria. LM and PLM indices during sleep and wakefulness, the rate of PLMS associated with respiratory events, intermovement interval and periodicity indices were manually and automatically scored. The correlation between manual and computerized scoring was high for all investigated parameters (Spearman correlation coefficients 0.751-0.996, p PLM analysis against the gold standard manual scoring according to AASM criteria. The data demonstrate that the software used in this study has an outstanding performance for computerized LM and PLM scoring, and LM and PLM indices generated with this software can be reliably integrated in the routine PSG report. This automatic analysis is also an excellent tool for research purposes.

  19. LEGS AND TRUNK MUSCLE HYPERTROPHY FOLLOWING WALK TRAINING WITH RESTRICTED LEG MUSCLE BLOOD FLOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikako Sakamaki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effect of walk training combined with blood flow restriction (BFR on the size of blood flow-restricted distal muscles, as well as, on the size of non-restricted muscles in the proximal limb and trunk. Nine men performed walk training with BFR and 8 men performed walk training alone. Training was conducted two times a day, 6 days/wk, for 3 wk using five sets of 2-min bouts (treadmill speed at 50 m/min, with a 1-min rest between bouts. After walk training with BFR, MRI-measured upper (3.8%, P < 0.05 and lower leg (3.2%, P < 0. 05 muscle volume increased significantly, whereas the muscle volume of the gluteus maximus (-0.6% and iliopsoas (1.8% and the muscle CSA of the lumber L4-L5 (-1.0 did not change. There was no significant change in muscle volume in the walk training alone. Our results suggest that the combination of leg muscle blood flow restriction with slow walk training elicits hypertrophy only in the distal blood flow restricted leg muscles. Exercise intensity may be too low during BFR walk training to increase muscle mass in the non- blood flow restricted muscles (gluteus maximus and other trunk muscles.

  20. Detection of Periodic Leg Movements by Machine Learning Methods Using Polysomnographic Parameters Other Than Leg Electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlhan Umut

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of channels used for polysomnographic recording frequently causes difficulties for patients because of the many cables connected. Also, it increases the risk of having troubles during recording process and increases the storage volume. In this study, it is intended to detect periodic leg movement (PLM in sleep with the use of the channels except leg electromyography (EMG by analysing polysomnography (PSG data with digital signal processing (DSP and machine learning methods. PSG records of 153 patients of different ages and genders with PLM disorder diagnosis were examined retrospectively. A novel software was developed for the analysis of PSG records. The software utilizes the machine learning algorithms, statistical methods, and DSP methods. In order to classify PLM, popular machine learning methods (multilayer perceptron, K-nearest neighbour, and random forests and logistic regression were used. Comparison of classified results showed that while K-nearest neighbour classification algorithm had higher average classification rate (91.87% and lower average classification error value (RMSE = 0.2850, multilayer perceptron algorithm had the lowest average classification rate (83.29% and the highest average classification error value (RMSE = 0.3705. Results showed that PLM can be classified with high accuracy (91.87% without leg EMG record being present.

  1. Referred Pain Patterns Provoked on Intra-Pelvic Structures among Women with and without Chronic Pelvic Pain: A Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Stephen; Peterson, Magnus; Eriksson, Margaretha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe referred pain patterns provoked from intra-pelvic structures in women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP) persisting after childbirth with the purpose to improve diagnostics and give implications for treatment. Materials and Methods In this descriptive and comparative study 36 parous women with CPP were recruited from a physiotherapy department waiting list and by advertisements in newspapers. A control group of 29 parous women without CPP was consecutively assessed for eligibility from a midwifery surgery. Inclusion criterion for CPP was: moderate pain in the sacral region persisting at least six months after childbirth confirmed by pelvic pain provocation tests. Exclusion criteria in groups with and without CPP were: persistent back or pelvic pain with onset prior to pregnancy, previous back surgery and positive neurological signs. Pain was provoked by palpation of 13 predetermined intra-pelvic anatomical landmarks. The referred pain distribution was expressed in pain drawings and described in pain maps and calculated referred pain areas. Results Pain provoked by palpation of the posterior intra-pelvic landmarks was mostly referred to the sacral region and pain provoked by palpation of the ischial and pubic bones was mostly referred to the groin and pubic regions, with or without pain referred down the ipsilateral leg. The average pain distribution area provoked by palpation of all 13 anatomical landmarks was 30.3 mm² (19.2 to 53.7) in women with CPP as compared to 3.2 mm² (1.0 to 5.1) in women without CPP, ppain patterns provoked from intra-pelvic landmarks in women with CPP are consistent with sclerotomal sensory innervation. Magnification of referred pain patterns indicates allodynia and central sensitization. The results suggest that pain mapping can be used to evaluate and confirm the pain experience among women with CPP and contribute to diagnosis. PMID:25793999

  2. Referred pain patterns provoked on intra-pelvic structures among women with and without chronic pelvic pain: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torstensson, Thomas; Butler, Stephen; Lindgren, Anne; Peterson, Magnus; Eriksson, Margaretha; Kristiansson, Per

    2015-01-01

    To describe referred pain patterns provoked from intra-pelvic structures in women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP) persisting after childbirth with the purpose to improve diagnostics and give implications for treatment. In this descriptive and comparative study 36 parous women with CPP were recruited from a physiotherapy department waiting list and by advertisements in newspapers. A control group of 29 parous women without CPP was consecutively assessed for eligibility from a midwifery surgery. Inclusion criterion for CPP was: moderate pain in the sacral region persisting at least six months after childbirth confirmed by pelvic pain provocation tests. Exclusion criteria in groups with and without CPP were: persistent back or pelvic pain with onset prior to pregnancy, previous back surgery and positive neurological signs. Pain was provoked by palpation of 13 predetermined intra-pelvic anatomical landmarks. The referred pain distribution was expressed in pain drawings and described in pain maps and calculated referred pain areas. Pain provoked by palpation of the posterior intra-pelvic landmarks was mostly referred to the sacral region and pain provoked by palpation of the ischial and pubic bones was mostly referred to the groin and pubic regions, with or without pain referred down the ipsilateral leg. The average pain distribution area provoked by palpation of all 13 anatomical landmarks was 30.3 mm² (19.2 to 53.7) in women with CPP as compared to 3.2 mm² (1.0 to 5.1) in women without CPP, ppain patterns provoked from intra-pelvic landmarks in women with CPP are consistent with sclerotomal sensory innervation. Magnification of referred pain patterns indicates allodynia and central sensitization. The results suggest that pain mapping can be used to evaluate and confirm the pain experience among women with CPP and contribute to diagnosis.

  3. Experimental muscle pain challenges the postural stability during quiet stance and unexpected posture perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Rogério Pessoto; Ervilha, Ulysses Fernandes; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Musculoskeletal pain impairs postural control and stability. Nine subjects stood as quietly as possible on a moveable force platform before, during, and after experimental pain in the right leg muscles. A moveable force platform was used to measure the center of pressure and provided unexpected perturbations. Lower limb muscle activity, joint angles, and foot pressure distributions were measured. Hypertonic saline was used to induce pain in the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, or biceps femoris muscle of the right leg. Compared to baseline and control sessions, pain in the knee extensor muscles during quiet standing evoked: 1) larger sway area, greater medial-lateral center of pressure displacement and higher speed (P increased sway displacement in the anterior-posterior direction (P increased electromyography (EMG) activity for left tibialis anterior and left erector spinae muscles (P < .05). Pain provoked longer time to return to an equilibrium posture after forward EMG activity for, and pain in vastus medialis muscle decreased the time for the maximum hip flexion during this perturbation (P < .05). These results show that muscle pain impairs postural stability during quiet standing and after unexpected perturbation, which suggest that people suffering from leg muscle pain are more vulnerable to falls. This article presents the acute responses to leg muscle pain on the postural control. This measure could potentially help clinicians who seek to assess how pain responses may contribute to patient's postural control and stability during quiet standing and after recovering from unexpected perturbations. Copyright © 2011 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Protection against high intravascular pressure in giraffe legs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Karin K; Hørlyck, Arne; Ostergaard, Kristine H; Andresen, Joergen; Broegger, Torbjoern; Skovgaard, Nini; Telinius, Niklas; Laher, Ismael; Bertelsen, Mads F; Grøndahl, Carsten; Smerup, Morten; Secher, Niels H; Brøndum, Emil; Hasenkam, John M; Wang, Tobias; Baandrup, Ulrik; Aalkjaer, Christian

    2013-11-01

    The high blood pressure in giraffe leg arteries renders giraffes vulnerable to edema. We investigated in 11 giraffes whether large and small arteries in the legs and the tight fascia protect leg capillaries. Ultrasound imaging of foreleg arteries in anesthetized giraffes and ex vivo examination revealed abrupt thickening of the arterial wall and a reduction of its internal diameter just below the elbow. At and distal to this narrowing, the artery constricted spontaneously and in response to norepinephrine and intravascular pressure recordings revealed a dynamic, viscous pressure drop along the artery. Histology of the isolated median artery confirmed dense sympathetic innervation at the narrowing. Structure and contractility of small arteries from muscular beds in the leg and neck were compared. The arteries from the legs demonstrated an increased media thickness-to-lumen diameter ratio, increased media volume, and increased numbers of smooth muscle cells per segment length and furthermore, they contracted more strongly than arteries from the neck (500 ± 49 vs. 318 ± 43 mmHg; n = 6 legs and neck, respectively). Finally, the transient increase in interstitial fluid pressure following injection of saline was 5.5 ± 1.7 times larger (n = 8) in the leg than in the neck. We conclude that 1) tissue compliance in the legs is low; 2) large arteries of the legs function as resistance arteries; and 3) structural adaptation of small muscle arteries allows them to develop an extraordinary tension. All three findings can contribute to protection of the capillaries in giraffe legs from a high arterial pressure.

  5. Pain relief can be painful

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Bindra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular nerve block is periodically used procedure used to treat neuralgic pain in the distribution of trigeminal nerve. It is a commonly performed block in outpatient settings at our institute. We present a case of an elderly edentulous patient with trigeminal neuralgia who suffered recurrent temporomandibular joint (TMJ dislocation following mandibular nerve block. The patient presented with complaints of severe pain, inability to close mouth, and eat food since 2 days. Anterior closed reduction of TMJ resulted in reduction of joint and immediate pain relief. However, the maneuver failed due to recurrent dislocation of the joint. A Barton dressing was applied to prevent another dislocation. This was followed by autologous blood injection into the joint. This case focuses on the preponderance of clinical evaluation and accentuates the need for additional forethought to be taken during pain procedures, particularly in the geriatric population.

  6. Pain and pain management in haemophilia

    OpenAIRE

    Auerswald, Günter; Dolan, Gerry; Duffy, Anne; Hermans, Cédric; Jiménez-Yuste, Victor; Ljung, Rolf; Morfini, Massimo; Lambert, Thierry; Šalek, Silva Zupančić

    2016-01-01

    Joint pain is common in haemophilia and may be acute or chronic. Effective pain management in haemophilia is essential to reduce the burden that pain imposes on patients. However, the choice of appropriate pain-relieving measures is challenging, as there is a complex interplay of factors affecting pain perception. This can manifest as differences in patients? experiences and response to pain, which require an individualized approach to pain management. Prophylaxis with factor replacement redu...

  7. Single-leg squats can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements in “turnout”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopper LS

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Luke S Hopper,1 Nahoko Sato,2 Andries L Weidemann1 1Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts, Edith Cowan University, Mt Lawley, WA, Australia; 2Department of Physical Therapy, Nagoya Gakuin University, Seto, Japan Abstract: The physical assessments used in dance injury surveillance programs are often adapted from the sports and exercise domain. Bespoke physical assessments may be required for dance, particularly when ballet movements involve “turning out” or external rotation of the legs beyond that typically used in sports. This study evaluated the ability of the traditional single-leg squat to predict the leg alignment of dancers performing ballet movements with turnout. Three-dimensional kinematic data of dancers performing the single-leg squat and five ballet movements were recorded and analyzed. Reduction of the three-dimensional data into a one-dimensional variable incorporating the ankle, knee, and hip joint center positions provided the strongest predictive model between the single-leg squat and the ballet movements. The single-leg squat can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements, even in “turned out” postures. Clinicians should pay careful attention to observational positioning and rating criteria when assessing dancers performing the single-leg squat. Keywords: injury, motion capture, clinical assessment

  8. Single-leg squats can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements in “turnout”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Luke S; Sato, Nahoko; Weidemann, Andries L

    2016-01-01

    The physical assessments used in dance injury surveillance programs are often adapted from the sports and exercise domain. Bespoke physical assessments may be required for dance, particularly when ballet movements involve “turning out” or external rotation of the legs beyond that typically used in sports. This study evaluated the ability of the traditional single-leg squat to predict the leg alignment of dancers performing ballet movements with turnout. Three-dimensional kinematic data of dancers performing the single-leg squat and five ballet movements were recorded and analyzed. Reduction of the three-dimensional data into a one-dimensional variable incorporating the ankle, knee, and hip joint center positions provided the strongest predictive model between the single-leg squat and the ballet movements. The single-leg squat can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements, even in “turned out” postures. Clinicians should pay careful attention to observational positioning and rating criteria when assessing dancers performing the single-leg squat. PMID:27895518

  9. Trigger Points, Pressure Pain Hyperalgesia, and Mechanosensitivity of Neural Tissue in Women with Chronic Pelvic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Márquez, Pedro; Valenza, Marie Carmen; Cabrera-Martos, Irene; Ríos-Sánchez, Ana; Ocón-Hernández, Olga

    2017-08-25

    This study aims to evaluate the presence of myofascial trigger points (TrPs), widespread pressure pain sensitivity, and mechanosensitivity of neural tissue in women with chronic pelvic pain. Case-control study. Faculty of Health Sciences. Forty women with chronic pelvic pain between age 18 and 60 years and 40 matched healthy controls were included in the study. TrPs were bilaterally explored in gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, quadratus lumborum, and adductor magnus muscles. The referred pain reproduced lumbopelvic symptoms. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were also bilaterally assessed over the Pfannenstiel incision point on the abdominal, C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior muscle. Mechanosensitivity of neural tissue was assessed with the neurodynamics tests of slump and the straight-leg raising. Significant between-group differences were found in TrP presence in patients with chronic pelvic pain (P Neurodynamics show a significantly decreased value in women with CPP. Patients with chronic pelvic pain presented a high percentage of TrPs that reproduce their symptoms. Patients also showed a widespread pressure pain hyperalgesia and more mechanosensitive neural tissue due to a decrease on the range of motion related to neurodynamics.

  10. Reference values of mechanical and thermal pain tests in a pain-free population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neziri, Alban Y; Scaramozzino, Pasquale; Andersen, Ole K; Dickenson, Anthony H; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Curatolo, Michele

    2011-04-01

    Quantitative sensory tests are widely used in human research to evaluate the effect of analgesics and explore altered pain mechanisms, such as central sensitization. In order to apply these tests in clinical practice, knowledge of reference values is essential. The aim of this study was to determine the reference values of pain thresholds for mechanical and thermal stimuli, as well as withdrawal time for the cold pressor test in 300 pain-free subjects. Pain detection and pain tolerance thresholds to pressure, heat and cold were determined at three body sites: (1) lower back, (2) suprascapular region and (3) second toe (for pressure) or the lateral aspect of the leg (for heat and cold). The influences of gender, age, height, weight, body-mass index (BMI), body side of testing, depression, anxiety, catastrophizing and parameters of Short-Form 36 (SF-36) were analyzed by multiple regressions. Quantile regressions were performed to define the 5th, 10th and 25th percentiles as reference values for pain hypersensitivity and the 75th, 90th and 95th percentiles as reference values for pain hyposensitivity. Gender, age and/or the interaction of age with gender were the only variables that consistently affected the pain measures. Women were more pain sensitive than men. However, the influence of gender decreased with increasing age. In conclusion, normative values of parameters related to pressure, heat and cold pain stimuli were determined. Reference values have to be stratified by body region, gender and age. The determination of these reference values will now allow the clinical application of the tests for detecting abnormal pain reactions in individual patients. Copyright © 2010 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Artificial Leg Design and Control Research of a Biped Robot with Heterogeneous Legs Based on PID Control Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hualong Xie

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A biped robot with heterogeneous legs (BRHL is proposed to provide an ideal test-bed for intelligent bionic legs (IBL. To make artificial leg gait better suited to a human, a four-bar mechanism is used as its knee joint, and a pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM is used as its driving source. The static mathematical model of PAM is established and the mechanical model of a single degree of freedom of a knee joint driven by PAM is analyzed. A control simulation of an artificial leg based on PID control algorithm is carried out and the simulation results indicate that the artificial leg can simulate precisely a normal human walking gait.

  12. Physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy due to disc herniation in patients with low-back pain (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Windt, D.A.W.M.; Simons, E.; Riphagen, I.I.; Ammendolia, C.; Verhagen, A.P.; Laslett, M.; Devillé, W.; Deyo, R.A.; Bouter, L.M.; de Vet, H.C.W.; Aertgeerts, B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Low-back pain with leg pain (sciatica) may be caused by a herniated intervertebral disc exerting pressure on the nerve root. Most patients will respond to conservative treatment, but in carefully selected patients, surgical discectomy may provide faster relief of symptoms. Primary care

  13. Physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy due to disc herniation in patients with low-back pain (Protocol)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Windt, D.A.W.M.; Simons, E.; Riphagen, I.; Ammendolia, C.; Verhagen, A.P.; Laslett, M.; Devillé, W.; Aertgeerts, B.; Deyo, R.A.; Bouter, L.M.; de Vet, H.C.W.

    2008-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: The general aim of our review is to provide information that may assist the clinician in making decisions about appropriate management in patients with low-back pain and leg pain suspected of having radicular

  14. Low back pain - acute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backache; Low back pain; Lumbar pain; Pain - back; Acute back pain; Back pain - new; Back pain - short-term; Back strain - new ... lower back supports most of your body's weight. Low back pain is the number two reason that Americans see ...

  15. Improvement in upper leg muscle strength underlies beneficial effects of exercise therapy in knee osteoarthritis: secondary analysis from a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, J; Steultjens, M P M; Roorda, L D; Lems, W F; van der Esch, M; Thorstensson, C A; Twisk, J W R; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A; van der Leeden, M; Dekker, J

    2015-06-01

    Although exercise therapy is effective for reducing pain and activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), the underlying mechanisms are unclear. This study aimed to evaluate if improvements in neuromuscular factors (i.e. upper leg muscle strength and knee proprioception) underlie the beneficial effects of exercise therapy in patients with knee OA. Secondary analyses from a randomised controlled trial, with measurements at baseline, 6 weeks, 12 weeks and 38 weeks. Rehabilitation centre. One hundred and fifty-nine patients diagnosed with knee OA. Exercise therapy. Changes in pain [numeric rating scale (NRS)] and activity limitations [Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) physical function subscale and get-up-and-go test] during the study period. Independent variables were changes in upper leg muscle strength and knee joint proprioception (i.e. motion sense) during the study period. Longitudinal regression analyses (generalised estimating equation) were performed to analyse associations between changes in upper leg muscle strength and knee proprioception with changes in pain and activity limitations. Improved muscle strength was significantly associated with reductions in NRS pain {B coefficient -2.5 [95% confidence interval (CI) -3.7 to -1.4], meaning that every change of 1 unit of strength was linked to a change of -2.5 units of pain}, WOMAC physical function (-8.8, 95% CI -13.4 to -4.2) and get-up-and-go test (-1.7, 95% CI -2.4 to -1.0). Improved proprioception was not significantly associated with better outcomes of exercise therapy (P>0.05). Upper leg muscle strengthening is one of the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of exercise therapy in patients with knee OA. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Don't break a leg: running birds from quail to ostrich prioritise leg safety and economy on uneven terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn-Jeffery, Aleksandra V; Hubicki, Christian M; Blum, Yvonne; Renjewski, Daniel; Hurst, Jonathan W; Daley, Monica A

    2014-11-01

    Cursorial ground birds are paragons of bipedal running that span a 500-fold mass range from quail to ostrich. Here we investigate the task-level control priorities of cursorial birds by analysing how they negotiate single-step obstacles that create a conflict between body stability (attenuating deviations in body motion) and consistent leg force-length dynamics (for economy and leg safety). We also test the hypothesis that control priorities shift between body stability and leg safety with increasing body size, reflecting use of active control to overcome size-related challenges. Weight-support demands lead to a shift towards straighter legs and stiffer steady gait with increasing body size, but it remains unknown whether non-steady locomotor priorities diverge with size. We found that all measured species used a consistent obstacle negotiation strategy, involving unsteady body dynamics to minimise fluctuations in leg posture and loading across multiple steps, not directly prioritising body stability. Peak leg forces remained remarkably consistent across obstacle terrain, within 0.35 body weights of level running for obstacle heights from 0.1 to 0.5 times leg length. All species used similar stance leg actuation patterns, involving asymmetric force-length trajectories and posture-dependent actuation to add or remove energy depending on landing conditions. We present a simple stance leg model that explains key features of avian bipedal locomotion, and suggests economy as a key priority on both level and uneven terrain. We suggest that running ground birds target the closely coupled priorities of economy and leg safety as the direct imperatives of control, with adequate stability achieved through appropriately tuned intrinsic dynamics. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Effect of Mild and Severe Unilateral Knee Joint Pain on Gait in Elderly Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Sugiura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gait change in the elderly may be a strategy to maintain postural stability while walking. However, gait laterality is accompanied by back pain or an increased risk of a fall. This study aimed to examine group-related differences and gait laterality in elderly females with mild or severe unilateral knee pain. Seventy-five elderly females (66–87 years old were included, which comprised the following groups: 47 with mild unilateral knee pain and 28 with severe unilateral knee pain. They completed a 12 m walk test with maximum effort. Stance time, swing time, and step length were selected as evaluation parameters. A two-way ANOVA (group × leg was used for analysis. No significant differences were found in interaction or in either main factor of the group and leg. In conclusion, elderly females do not show group-related differences or gait laterality regardless of the degree (mild or severe of unilateral knee pain.

  18. The effect of preoperative dexamethasone on pain 1 year after lumbar disc surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rikke Vibeke; Fomsgaard, Jonna; Mathiesen, Ole

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that dexamethasone can inhibit persistent postoperative pain, but data on humans is lacking and results from animal studies are conflicting. We explored the effect of 16 mg dexamethasone IV administered preoperatively on persistent pain 1 year after lumbar...... discectomy. METHODS: This is a prospective 1-year follow-up on a single-centre, randomized, and blinded trial exploring the analgesic effect of 16 mg IV dexamethasone or placebo after lumbar discectomy. One year follow-up was a written questionnaire including back and leg pain (VAS 0-100 mm), Short Form 36...... survey (SF-36), EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D), OSWESTRY Low Back Pain Questionnaire, duration of sick leave, working capability, contentment with surgical result. RESULTS: Response rate was 71% (55 patients) in the dexamethasone group, 58% (44 patients) in the placebo group. Leg pain (VAS) was significantly lower...

  19. Restless legs syndrome in patients on dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Jahdali Hamdan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome (RLS is an extremely distressing problem experienced by patients on dialysis; the prevalence appears to be greater than in the general population, with a wide variation from 6.6% to 80%. The diagnosis of RLS is a clinical one, and its definition has been clarified and standardized by internationally recognized diagnostic criteria, published in 1995 by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG. This study was designed to find out the prevalence of RLS in Saudi patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD on maintenance dialysis. This is a cross sectional study carried out between May and Sept 2007 at two centers, King Abdulaziz Medical City-King Fahad National Guard Hospital (KAMC-KFNGH, Riyadh and King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre (KFHRC, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Data were gathered on 227 Saudi patients on chronic maintenance hemodialysis or chronic peritoneal dialysis. The prevalence of RLS was measured using IRLSSG′s RLS Questionnaire (RLSQ. Potential risk factors for RLS including other sleep disorders, underlying cause of chronic renal failure, duration on dialysis, dialysis shift, biochemical tests and demographic data were also evaluated. The overall prevalence of RLS was 50.22% including 53.7% males and 46.3% females. Their mean age was 55.7 ± 17.2 years and mean duration on dialysis 40.4 ± 37.8 months. Significant predictors of RLS were history of diabetes mellitus (DM, coffee intake, afternoon dialysis, gender and type of dialysis (P= 0.03, 0.01, < 0.001, 0.05 and 0.009 respectively. Patients with RLS were found to be at increased risk of having insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS (P= < 0.001 and 0.001, respectively. Our study suggests that RLS is a very common problem in dialysis population and was significantly associated with other sleep disorders, particularly insomnia, and EDS. Optimal care of dialysis patient should include particular attention to the diagnosis

  20. A Rare Case of Progressive Palsy of the Lower Leg during Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy via a Transforaminal Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Manabe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous endoscopic discectomy (PED for lumbar disc herniation is gaining popularity with the transforaminal (TF approach preferred because it allows surgery under local anesthesia and preserves the spinal muscles. Although this procedure has some characteristic complications, it is rare for PED to be converted to conventional open surgery due to worsening of symptoms intraoperatively. Here, we report PED via the TF approach that required conversion to open surgery. A 20-year-old man with a large disc herniation at L3/4 developed severe progressive leg pain and muscle weakness of the left leg intraoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the size of the herniation was unchanged and the endoscope did not reach the herniated mass. We converted to open surgery, and the patient’s postoperative course was favorable. We discuss the reasons for failure of the approach and suggest planning for an appropriate foraminoplasty to avoid the potential need for conversion to open surgery.