WorldWideScience

Sample records for excluded ecotox open

  1. Usefulness of open mixed nut challenges to exclude tree nut allergy in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Erp, Francine C; Knulst, André C; Kok, Irene L; van Velzen, Maartje F; van der Ent, Cornelis K.; Meijer, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To minimize the risk of accidental reactions, atopic children with multiple sensitizations to tree nuts are advised to avoid all nuts. Multiple food challenges would be needed to confirm the clinical relevance, but are too burdensome to be practical. The usefulness of open mixed nut

  2. Linkage analysis of primary open-angle glaucoma excludes the juvenile glaucoma region on chromosome 1q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirtz, M.K.; Acott, T.S.; Samples, J.R. [Casey Eye Institute, Portland, OR (United States)]|[Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The gene for one form of juvenile glaucoma has been mapped to chromosome 1q21-q31. This raises the possibility of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) also mapping to this region if the same defective gene causes both diseases. To ask this question linkage analysis was performed on a large POAG kindred. Blood samples or skin biopsies were obtained from 40 members of this family. Individuals were diagnosed as having POAG if they met two or more of the following criteria: (1) Visual field defects compatible with glaucoma on automated perimetry; (2) Optic nerve head and/or nerve fiber layer analysis compatible with glaucomatous damage; (3) high intraocular pressures (> 20 mm Hg). Patients were considered glaucoma suspects if they only met one criterion. These individuals were excluded from the analysis. Of the 40 members, seven were diagnosed with POAG; four were termed suspects. The earliest age of onset was 38 years old, while the average age of onset was 65 years old. We performed two-point and multipoint linkage analysis, using five markers which encompass the region 1q21-q31; specifically, D1S194, D1S210, D1S212, D1S191 and LAMB2. Two-point lod scores excluded tight linkage with all markers except D1S212 (maximum lod score of 1.07 at theta = 0.0). In the multipoint analysis, including D1S210-D1S212-LAMB2 and POAG, the entire 11 cM region spanned by these markers was excluded for linkage with POAG; that is, lod scores were < -2.0. In conclusion, POAG in this family does not map to chromosome 1q21-q31 and, thus, they carry a gene that is distinct from the juvenile glaucoma gene.

  3. Ecotoxicity evaluation of selected sulfonamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białk-Bielińska, Anna; Stolte, Stefan; Arning, Jürgen; Uebers, Ute; Böschen, Andrea; Stepnowski, Piotr; Matzke, Marianne

    2011-10-01

    Sulfonamides (SAs) are a group of antibiotic drugs widely used in veterinary medicine. The contamination of the environment by these pharmaceuticals has raised concern in recent years. However, knowledge of their (eco)toxicity is still very basic and is restricted to just a few of these substances. Even though their toxicological analysis has been thoroughly performed and ecotoxicological data are available in the literature, a systematic analysis of their ecotoxicological potential has yet to be carried out. To fill this gap, 12 different SAs were chosen for detailed analysis with the focus on different bacteria as well as non-target organisms (algae and plants). A flexible (eco)toxicological test battery was used, including enzymes (acetylcholinesterase and glutathione reductase), luminescent marine bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), soil bacteria (Arthrobacter globiformis), limnic unicellular green algae (Scenedesmus vacuolatus) and duckweed (Lemna minor), in order to take into account both the aquatic and terrestrial compartments of the environment, as well as different trophic levels. It was found that SAs are not only toxic towards green algae (EC₅₀=1.54-32.25 mg L⁻¹) but have even stronger adverse effect on duckweed (EC₅₀=0.02-4.89 mg L⁻¹) than atrazine - herbicide (EC₅₀=2.59 mg L⁻¹). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Modelling the ecotoxicity of naphthenic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redman, A.; McGrath, J. [HydroQual, Calgary, AB (Canada); Parkerton, T. [Exxonmobil Biomedical Sciences Inc., Clinton, NJ (United States); Frank, R. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada); Di Toro, D. [Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Oil sand-derived process water is comprised of mixtures of many different toxic compounds. Recent modelling studies have been developed to assess oil sand ecotoxicity caused by naphthenic acids (NA). The hydrocarbon block method was used to described the ecotoxicity of NA mixtures using a database of physico-chemical properties for individual hydrocarbons. Chemical speciation and biota partitioning models are used to characterize the toxicity of ionizable compounds. An analysis of model predictions has suggested that high MW and compounds from the higher Z families contribute significantly to the ecotoxicity of oil sand-derived process water. However, the current modelling method overpredicts the toxicity of the highest residual fractions, which suggests that the bioavailability of the highest MW compounds is limited. Further model refinement is needed to evaluate NA compounds across a wide range of MW and Z families.

  5. Bioaccumulation and Ecotoxicity of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Petra; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; BAUN Anders; Birkedal, Renie; Kühnel, Dana; Jensen, Keld Alstrup; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan

    2014-01-01

    A review of the existing literature on ecotoxicity of CNT has been performed and the results are presented here. Several studies provide evidence that CNT do not cross biological barriers readily. When ingested by living organisms, CNT are subsequently excreted. When internalized, only a minimal fraction translocates into other body compartments. Thus bioaccumulation is limited; however organisms containing CNT may become source of entry of CNT into the food chain, potentially leading to biom...

  6. Comparative assessment of ecotoxicity of urban aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turóczi, B.; Hoffer, A.; Tóth, Á.; Kováts, N.; Ács, A.; Ferincz, Á.; Kovács, A.; Gelencsér, A.

    2012-08-01

    In addition to its mass concentration, the health effects of urban particulate matter may depend on its particle size distribution and chemical composition. Yet air pollution regulations rely on exclusively bulk PM10 concentration measurements, without regard to their potentially different health effects under different conditions. Aerosols from various sources are well known to contain a plethora of toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic or teratogenic constituents such as heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Extensive public health studies established the link between mass concentrations of PM2.5 / PM10 and health problems within the population. However, little is known about the relative importance of PM from different sources and the effect of seasonality on the toxicity. Here we present the application of a simple and sensitive method for the direct assessment of the overall ecotoxicity of various PM2.5 / PM10 samples collected on filters. The method is based on the Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition bioassay that has been standardized for solid samples, representing a relevant biological exposure route. Direct emission samples proved to be significantly more ecotoxic than photochemically processed aerosol, thus marked differences were observed between the ecotoxicities of urban PM10 in summer and winter. These effects of urban PM10 may be useful supplementary indicators besides the mass concentrations of PM2.5 / PM10 in cities.

  7. Ecotoxicity testing: science, politics and ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Colin H

    2008-02-01

    Animal welfare organisations have long been concerned about the use of animals for ecotoxicity testing. Ecotoxicity testing is a necessary part of the statutory risk assessment of chemicals that may be released into the environment. It is sometimes also carried out during the development of new chemicals and in the investigation of pollution in the field. This review considers the existing requirements for ecotoxicity testing, with particular reference to practices in the European Union, including the recent REACH system proposals, before discussing criticisms that have been made of existing practices for environmental risk assessment. These criticisms have been made on scientific and ethical grounds, as well as on questions of cost. A case is made for greater investment in the development of alternative testing methods, which could improve the science, as well as serving the cause of animal welfare. It has frequently been suggested that the statutory requirements for environmental risk assessment are too rigid and bureaucratic. A case is made for flexibility and the greater involvement of scientists in the risk assessment procedure, in the interests of both improved science and improved animal welfare.

  8. From emission to ecotoxicity: comparative assessment of fate and ecotoxicity in LCA using USEtox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ecotoxicity, impacts are measured as potentially affected or disappeared species [PAF m3-day / kgemitted]. Through analysis of the freshwater CFs of over three thousand organic chemicals, this work provides insight into the chemical properties that most strongly influence freshwater ecosystem toxicity...

  9. Regulatory adequacy of aquatic ecotoxicity testing of nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Rune; Skjolding, Lars Michael; Sørensen, Sara Nørgaard

    2017-01-01

    to question whether ecotoxicity testing is now able to facilitate regulatory decision-making on manufactured nanomaterials (MNs). In this paper, we review the state of aquatic ecotoxicity testing of MNs as well as the overarching issues that challenge the reliability and relevance of such testing. We conclude...

  10. Comparative assessment of ecotoxicity of urban aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Turóczi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In addition to its mass concentration, the health effects of urban particulate matter may depend on its particle size distribution and chemical composition. Yet air pollution regulations rely on exclusively bulk PM10 concentration measurements, without regard to their potentially different health effects under different conditions. Aerosols from various sources are well known to contain a plethora of toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic or teratogenic constituents such as heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Extensive public health studies established the link between mass concentrations of PM2.5 / PM10 and health problems within the population. However, little is known about the relative importance of PM from different sources and the effect of seasonality on the toxicity. Here we present the application of a simple and sensitive method for the direct assessment of the overall ecotoxicity of various PM2.5 / PM10 samples collected on filters. The method is based on the Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition bioassay that has been standardized for solid samples, representing a relevant biological exposure route. Direct emission samples proved to be significantly more ecotoxic than photochemically processed aerosol, thus marked differences were observed between the ecotoxicities of urban PM10 in summer and winter. These effects of urban PM10 may be useful supplementary indicators besides the mass concentrations of PM2.5 / PM10 in cities.

  11. Ecotoxicity of artificial sweeteners and stevioside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolte, Stefan; Steudte, Stephanie; Schebb, Nils Helge; Willenberg, Ina; Stepnowski, Piotr

    2013-10-01

    Produced, consumed and globally released into the environment in considerable quantities, artificial sweeteners have been identified as emerging pollutants. Studies of environmental concentrations have confirmed the widespread distribution of acesulfame (ACE), cyclamate (CYC), saccharin (SAC) and sucralose (SUC) in the water cycle at levels that are among the highest known for anthropogenic trace pollutants. Their ecotoxicity, however, has yet to be investigated at a larger scale. The present study aimed to fill this knowledge gap by systematically assessing the influence of ACE, CYC and SAC and complementing the data on SUC. Therefore we examined their toxicity towards an activated sewage sludge community (30min) and applying tests with green algae Scenedesmus vacuolatus (24h), water fleas Daphnia magna (48h) and duckweed Lemna minor (7d). We also examined the effects caused by the natural sweetener stevioside. The high No Observed Effect Concentrations (NOECs) yielded by this initial evaluation indicated a low hazard and risk potential towards these aquatic organisms. For a complete risk assessment, however, several kinds of data are still lacking. In this context, obligatory ecotoxicity testing and stricter environmental regulations regarding food additives appear to be necessary. © 2013.

  12. Bacterial enzyme biosyntheses inhibition: a tool for ecotoxicity assay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hydrocarbon fuels, oil spill dispersants, household detergents, drilling chemicals and crude oils) were examined as a tool for ecotoxicity assay. The enzyme systems were two extracellular inducible enzymes tryptophanase and a - glucosidase ...

  13. Terrestrial short-term ecotoxicity of a green formicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiepo, Erasmo N; Corrêa, Albertina X R; Resgalla, Charrid; Cotelle, Sylvie; Férard, Jean-François; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2010-07-01

    When ants become annoying, large quantities of formicide are applied to terrestrial ecosystems in tropical regions, but awareness of the health and environmental impacts related to the use of synthetic pesticides has been increasing. The use of green pesticides to combat target organisms could reduce these impacts. In this regard, terrestrial ecotoxicity tests with higher plants (Brassica olaracea, Lactuca sativa and Mucuna aterrima), annelids (Eisenia foetida), Collembola (Folsomia candida) and soil enzyme activity analysis (diacetate fluorescein hydrolysis) were used to evaluate short-term terrestrial ecotoxicity of a green pesticide prepared from naturally-occurring organic compounds. At the highest formicide concentration tested in these experiments (i.e., 50 g kg(-1) soil) no toxicity toward terrestrial organisms was observed. The lack of short-term terrestrial ecotoxicity suggest that this green formicide can be classed as an environmentally friendly product as compared to the ecotoxicity of the most commonly used commercialized formicides. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. An excluded diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Ghiringhelli

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 50-years-old patient with septic fever of unidentifiable source, following resection for rectal adenocarcinoma. He has been in treatment for sepsi two months before. Blood coltures, an accurate amanestic analysis and a transesophageal echocardiography were the major tools for the diagnosis of this disease. After the diagnosis of infective endocarditis had been excluded, antibiotic treatment (with teicoplanin and rifampicine was given for the presence of Staphylococcus epidermidis. The previous pacemaker system was removed and a DDD pacemaker was implanted.

  15. Being Included and Excluded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korzenevica, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Following the civil war of 1996–2006, there was a dramatic increase in the labor mobility of young men and the inclusion of young women in formal education, which led to the transformation of the political landscape of rural Nepal. Mobility and schooling represent a level of prestige that rural...... politics. It analyzes how formal education and mobility either challenge or reinforce traditional gendered norms which dictate a lowly position for young married women in the household and their absence from community politics. The article concludes that women are simultaneously excluded and included from...... people regard as a prerequisite for participating in local community politics. Based on a fieldwork in two villages of Panchthar district in eastern Nepal, this article explores how these changes strengthen or weaken women’s political agency and how this is reflected in their participation in community...

  16. Aquatic ecotoxicity effect of engineered aminoclay nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Moon-Hee; Hwang, Yuhoon; Uk Lee, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    In the present study the short term aquatic ecotoxicity of water-solubilized aminoclay nanoparticles (ANPs) of ~51±31 nm average hydrodynamic diameter was characterized. An ecotoxicological evaluation was carried out utilizing standard test organisms of different phyla and trophic levels namely.......23–0.31) for the cell yield. The entrapping of algal cells in aggregates of ANP may play a major role in the growth inhibition of algae P. subcapitata. No inhibition was observed for V. fisheri up to 25,000 mg/L (no observed effect concentration; NOEC). For D. magna no immobilization was observed in a limit test...... with 100 mg/L in 24 h while in 48 h a single animal was immobilized (5% inhibition). Correspondingly, the NOEC of ANP in 24 h was 100 mg/L and the lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC) for 48 h was 100 mg/L. Therefore it can be considered to use ANP as an algal-inhibition agent at concentrations

  17. Ecotoxicity of carbamazepine and its UV photolysis transformation products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donner, E.; Kosjek, T.; Qualmann, Signe

    2013-01-01

    Carbamazepine, an anti-epileptic pharmaceutical agent commonly found in wastewater, is highly recalcitrant to standard wastewater treatment practices. This study investigated the mixture toxicity of carbamazepine transformation products formed during ultraviolet (UV) photolysis using three standard...... ecotoxicity assays (representing bacteria, algae and crustaceans). UV-treatment of 6 mg L− 1 carbamazepine solution was carried out over a 120 min period and samples were removed periodically over the course of the experiment. Quantification results confirmed the degradation of carbamazepine throughout...... the treatment period, together with concurrent increases in acridine and acridone concentrations. Ecotoxicity was shown to increase in parallel with carbamazepine degradation indicating that the mixture of degradation products formed was more toxic than the parent compound, and all three ecotoxicity endpoints...

  18. Evaluation of Ecotoxicity Effect Indicators for Use in LCIA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henrik Fred; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2007-01-01

    Goal, Scope and Background. The paper describes different ecotoxicity effect indicator methods/approaches. The approaches cover three main groups, viz. PNEC approaches, PAF approaches and damage approaches. Ecotoxicity effect indicators used in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) are typically......, reproducibility, data demand, data availability, quantification of uncertainty, transparency and spatial differentiation. Results and Discussion. The results of the evaluation of the two impact approaches (i.e. PNEC and PAF) show both pros and cons for each of them. The assessment factor-based PNEC approach has....... The PAF approaches have a higher data demand but use all data and can be based on effect data (PNEC is no-effect-based), thus making these approaches non-conservative and more suitable for LCIA. However, indiscriminate use of ecotoxicity data tends to make the PAF-approaches no more environmentally...

  19. Aquatic ecotoxicity assessment of a new natural formicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testolin, Renan C; Tischer, Vinícius; Lima, Andre O S; Cotelle, Sylvie; Férard, Jean-François; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2012-07-01

    Agrochemicals could reach aquatic ecosystems and damage ecosystem functionality. Natural formicide could be an alternative to use in comparison with the more toxic formicides available on the market. Thus, the objective of this study was to assess the ecotoxicity of the new natural formicide Macex® with a battery of classical aquatic ecotoxicity tests. Bacteria (Aliivibrio fischeri), algae (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), hydra (Hydra attenuata), daphnids (Daphnia magna), and fish (Danio rerio) tests were performed in accordance with international standardized methodologies. In the range of formicide concentrations tested (0.03 to 2.0 g L(-1)) EC(50) values varied from 0.49 to >2.0 g L(-1), with P. subcapitata being the most sensitive species and H. attenuata and D. rerio the most tolerant species to this product in aqueous solutions. This new formicide preparation can be classed as a product of low toxicity compared to the aquatic ecotoxicity of the most common commercialized formicides.

  20. Biodegradability and ecotoxicity of commercially available geothermal heat transfer fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kathrin R.; Körner, Birgit; Sacher, Frank; Conrad, Rachel; Hollert, Henner; Tiehm, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Commercially available heat transfer fluids used in borehole heat exchangers were investigated for their composition, their biodegradability as well as their ecotoxicity. The main components of the fluids are organic compounds (often glycols) for freezing protection. Biodegradation of the fluids in laboratory studies caused high oxygen depletion as well as nitrate/iron(III) reduction under anaerobic conditions. Additives such as benzotriazoles for corrosion protection were persistent. Ecotoxicity data show that the commercially available fluids caused much higher ecotoxicity than their main organic constituents. Consequently, with regard to groundwater protection pure water as heat transfer medium is recommended. The second best choice is the usage of glycols without any additives. Effects on groundwater quality should be considered during ecological-economical cost-benefit-analyses of further geothermal energy strategies. The protection of groundwater as the most important drinking water resource must take priority over the energy gain from aquifers.

  1. What is the Right to Exclude Immigrants?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2010-01-01

    of states. The right to exclude claimed by states is analysed and it is shown to differ both conceptually and normatively from rights to impose political authority within a territory. The paper finally indicates how this analysis might broaden the focus of debates about immigration and suggest alternative......It is normally taken for granted that states have a right to control immigration into their territory. When immigration is raised as a normative issue two questions become salient, one about what the right to exclude is, and one about whether and how it might be justified. This paper considers...... the first question. The paper starts by noting that standard debates about immigration have not addressed what the right to exclude is. Standard debates about immigration furthermore tend to result either in fairly strong cases for open borders or in denials that considerations of justice apply...

  2. Alternative approaches for vertebrate ecotoxicity tests in the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The need for alternative approaches to the use of vertebrate animals for hazard assessing chemicals and pollutants has become of increasing importance. It is now the first consideration when initiating a vertebrate ecotoxicity test, to ensure that unnecessary use of vertebrate organisms is minimised wherever possible. For some regulatory purposes, the use of vertebrate organisms for environmental risk assessments (ERA) has even been banned, and in other situations the numbers of organisms tested has been dramatically reduced, or the severity of the procedure refined. However, there is still a long way to go to achieve replacement of vertebrate organisms to generate environmental hazard data. The development of animal alternatives is not just based on ethical considerations but also to reduce the cost of performing vertebrate ecotoxicity tests and in some cases to provide better information aimed at improving ERAs. The present focus paper provides an overview of the considerable advances that have been made towards alternative approaches for ecotoxicity assessments over the last few decades. The need for alternative approaches to the use of vertebrate animals for hazard assessing chemicals and pollutants has become of increasing importance. It is now the first consideration when initiating a vertebrate ecotoxicity test, to ensure that unnecessary use of vertebrate organisms is minimised wherever possible. For some regulatory purposes, the use of vertebrate organi

  3. Ecotoxicity testing of microplastics: Considering the heterogeneity of physicochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Scott; Scherer, Christian; Wagner, Martin

    2017-05-01

    "Microplastic" is an umbrella term that covers many particle shapes, sizes, and polymer types, and as such the physical and chemical properties of environmental microplastics will differ from the primary microbeads commonly used for ecotoxicity testing. In the present article, we discuss the physical and chemical properties of microplastics that are potentially relevant to their ecotoxicity, including particle size, particle shape, crystallinity, surface chemistry, and polymer and additive composition. Overall, there is a need for a structured approach to the testing of different properties to identify which are the most relevant drivers of microplastic toxicity. In addition, the properties discussed will be influenced by and change depending on environmental conditions and degradation pathways. Future challenges include new technologies that will enter the plastic production cycle and the impact of these changes on the composition of environmental microplastics. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:470-475. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  4. Queueing process with excluded-volume effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, Chikashi

    2009-11-01

    We introduce an extension of the M/M/1 queueing process with a spatial structure and excluded-volume effect. The rule of particle hopping is the same as for the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP). A stationary-state solution is constructed in a slightly arranged matrix product form of the open TASEP. We obtain the critical line that separates the parameter space depending on whether the model has the stationary state. We calculate the average length of the model and the number of particles and show the monotonicity of the probability of the length in the stationary state. We also consider a generalization of the model with backward hopping of particles allowed and an alternate joined system of the M/M/1 queueing process and the open TASEP.

  5. Environmentally relevant approaches to assess nanoparticles ecotoxicity: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bour, Agathe; Mouchet, Florence; Silvestre, Jérôme; Gauthier, Laury [Université de Toulouse (France); UPS, INP (France); EcoLab (Laboratoire d’écologie fonctionnelle et environnement) (France); ENSAT, Avenue de l’Agrobiopôle, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan (France); CNRS (France); EcoLab (Laboratoire d’écologie fonctionnelle et environnement), F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan (France); Pinelli, Eric, E-mail: pinelli@ensat.fr [Université de Toulouse (France); UPS, INP (France); EcoLab (Laboratoire d’écologie fonctionnelle et environnement) (France); ENSAT, Avenue de l’Agrobiopôle, F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan (France); CNRS (France); EcoLab (Laboratoire d’écologie fonctionnelle et environnement), F-31326 Castanet-Tolosan (France)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • Integrated ecotoxicity of NPs from organism to community level is reviewed. • Trophic chains allow determining the implication of trophic route in NP toxicity. • The use of microcosms and mesocosms allows studies at larger scale. • Data concerning NP fate and effects in environmental conditions are lacking. - Abstract: Despite the increasing production and use of nanoparticles (NPs), there is a lack of knowledge about their environmental fate and ecotoxicity. Studies in environmentally relevant conditions are necessary to better assess these parameters, but such studies are rather rare. The present work represents first time that studies on engineered NPs using environmentally relevant exposure methods have been reviewed. These exposure methods differ from standardized protocols and can be classified into three groups: experimental trophic chains that allow study of the trophic route, multi-species exposures under laboratory conditions that allow for complex but controlled exposure and outdoor exposures that are more similar to environmentally realistic conditions. The majority of studies of micro- or mesocosms have focused on NP partitioning and bioaccumulation. The other major parameter that has been studied is NP ecotoxicity, which has been assessed in single species, in single species via the trophic route, and at the community level. The induction of biochemical defense systems, immunomodulation, effects on growth and reproduction, behavioral alterations and mortality have been used as indicators of major toxicity, depending on the species studied. The major effects of NPs on both microbial and algal communities include modifications of community compositions and diversities, decreased biomass and changes in community activities.

  6. Key challenges for nanotechnology: Standardization of ecotoxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrillo, Cristina; Barandika, Gotzone; Igartua, Amaya; Areitioaurtena, Olatz; Mendoza, Gemma

    2017-04-03

    Nanotechnology is expected to contribute to the protection of the environment, but many uncertainties exist regarding the environmental and human implications of manufactured nanomaterials (MNMs). Contradictory results have been reported for their ecotoxicity to aquatic organisms, which constitute one of the most important pathways for their entrance and transfer throughout the food web. The present review is focused on the international strategies that are laying the foundations of the ecotoxicological assessment of MNMs. Specific advice is provided on the preparation of MNM dispersions in the culture media of the organisms, which is considered a key factor to overcome the limitations in the standardization of the test methodologies.

  7. Relationship between ecotoxicity and PAH content in coal combustion waste samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastral, A.M.; Callen, M.S.; Garcia, T.; Lopez, J.M.; Maranon, E. [Inst. Carboquim, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Three different series of combustion samples (from the ash pan, samples C; from the particulate matter trapped on cyclone, samples PM; and from the finest particulate matter, samples M) have been analyzed looking for any relationship between their PAH content and their ecotoxicity. PAH content was analyzed by synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. Ecotoxicity of the combustion samples was determined by using the Photobacterium phosphoreum test to assess their toxicity through an ecotoxicity assay. Results obtained are shown and discussed in relation to the PAH content of the samples.

  8. Excluding interlopers from asteroid families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, B.; Radovic, V.

    2014-07-01

    from AstDys database. Next, all family members that do not meet adopted criteria (based on physical and spectral characteristics) are excluded from the initial catalogue. Finally, the HCM analysis is performed again using the improved catalogue. Results: We apply this approach to the Themis family. In the first step the HCM links 3061 asteroids to the family. Among them we identify 113 potential interlopers. After removing interlopers, in the second run of the HCM, the total number of members has decreased to 2847. Thus, 101 extra objects have been excluded from the membership list (see Figure).

  9. Use of the genus Artemia in ecotoxicity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, Bruno S. [Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas de Abel Salazar, Departamento de Estudos de Populacoes, Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Universidade do Porto, Largo Prof. Abel Salazar 2, 4099-003 Porto (Portugal) and Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Marinha e Ambiental, Rua dos Bragas 289, 4150-123 Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: bruno@ufp.pt; Carvalho, Felix D. [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Toxicologia da Faculdade de Farmacia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Anibal Cunha, 164, 4050-047 Porto (Portugal); Guilhermino, Lucia M. [Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas de Abel Salazar, Departamento de Estudos de Populacoes, Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Universidade do Porto, Largo Prof. Abel Salazar 2, 4099-003 Porto (Portugal); Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Marinha e Ambiental, Rua dos Bragas 289, 4150-123 Porto (Portugal); Van Stappen, Gilbert [Laboratory of Aquaculture and Artemia Reference Centre, Ghent University, Rozier 44, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2006-11-15

    Information related to varied uses of several species of the genus Artemia (commonly known as brine shrimp), is dispersed among literature from several scientific areas, such as Ecology, Physiology, Ecotoxicology, Aquaculture and Genetics. The present paper reviews information related to Artemia that may be considered relevant for ecotoxicity testing. Integration of different areas of scientific knowledge concerning biology, life cycle and environmental needs of Artemia is of crucial importance when considering the interpretation of results drawn from tests involving this genus. Furthermore, this paper provides suggestions to overcome problems related to toxicity assessment with the use of Artemia as test organism in bioassays, under the scope of estuarine, marine and hypersaline environments. Aspects related to variability in results, adoptable toxicity end-points, culture conditions, characteristics of species and strains, influence of geographical origins over physiological features and responses to exposure to chemical agents are considered. - The physiology, reproductive processes and general use of Artemia in modern ecotoxicological testing are reviewed.

  10. Chemical Footprint Method for Improved Communication of Freshwater Ecotoxicity Impacts in the Context of Ecological Limits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Anders; Diamond, Miriam; Birkved, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The ecological footprint method has been successful in communicating environmental impacts of anthropogenic activities in the context of ecological limits. We introduce a chemical footprint method that expresses ecotoxicity impacts from anthropogenic chemical emissions as the dilution needed to a...

  11. Application of biotests for the determination of soil ecotoxicity after exposure to biodegradable plastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Sforzini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable plastics are mostly applied in packaging materials (e.g. shopping bags, waste collection bags, catering products, and agricultural applications. In this last case, degradation takes place directly in soil where biodegradable plastic products are intentionally left after use (e.g. mulch films for weeds control. Due to the growing volumes of biodegradable polymers and plastics, interest in their environmental safety is increasing and more research is carried out. Some attempt has been made to apply biotests, used in other sectors of environmental sciences, in the assessment of biodegradable plastics safety. In this work, the quality of soils after biodegradation of the bioplastics Mater-Bi has been assessed with a large array of biotests based on model organisms representative of the different trophic levels in the food chains of the edaphic and aquatic ecosystems. Mater-Bi was degraded under controlled conditions for 6 months at a 1% concentration. The selected organisms included bacteria and protozoa (V. fischeri and D. discoideum, respectively, the green alga P. subcapitata, plants (the monocotyledon S. saccharatum and the dicotyledon L. sativum, and invertebrates animals (D. magna, a freshwater crustacean, and the Oligochaeta earthworm E. andrei, using both acute and chronic endpoints. The results of the applied ecotoxicological tests showed that the Mater-Bi materials tested at very high doses did not affect the soil quality. Soil exposed to Mater-Bi has no noxious effects on edaphic organisms; in particular, mono and dicotyledon plants results, indicate that Mater-Bi plastic products are innocuous for agricultural uses. The use of more sensitive chronic endpoints allows to exclude possible effects at population level. This is the first time that such a comprehensive approach is applied to the assessment of possible ecotoxicity effects induced by biodegradable plastics in soil and represents a possible starting point for

  12. Microscale ecotoxicity testing of Moselle river watershed (Lorraine Province, France sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean François Férard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The ecotoxic potential of seven Moselle river watershed sediments was assessed with a battery of bioassays comprised of rapid phototrophic [LuminoTox solid phase (L-SPA and elutriate (L-ELU assays] and bacterial [Microtox solid phase assay (M-SPA] exposure tests, as well as with two micro-invertebrate solid phase tests conducted with Hydra attenuata (lethal and sublethal effects solid phase assay, HL-SPA and HSL-SPA and Chironomus riparius. Measured effects of sediments and their elutriates were varied and reflected responses that were ecotoxicity test-, endpoint- and site-dependent, suggesting some degree of risk toward benthic and water column organisms, respectively, at specific sites. Correlation analysis demonstrated that L-SPA and M-SPA ecotoxicity responses were significantly linked with the Hydra HSL-SPA assay, indicating their ability to predict ecotoxicity towards an invertebrate taxonomic group representing secondary consumers. While the L-SPA and M-SPA assays hold promise as rapid screens for sediment ecotoxicity, correlation analysis with grain size (L-SPA: r=-0.795, P=0.033; M-SPA: r=-0.73, P=0.07 points out that their responses can be influenced by the presence of fines (i.e., sediment particles ≤0.063 mm in size and that this information is essential to properly interpret ecotoxicity data generated with these assays. Finally, notable differences observed in trophic level sensitivities once again recall the importance of employing a test battery to adequately appraise the ecotoxicity of sediments.

  13. Aquatic concentrations of chemical analytes compared to ecotoxicity estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostich, Mitchell S.; Flick, Robert W.; Angela L. Batt,; Mash, Heath E.; Boone, J. Scott; Furlong, Edward T.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Glassmeyer, Susan T.

    2017-01-01

    We describe screening level estimates of potential aquatic toxicity posed by 227 chemical analytes that were measured in 25 ambient water samples collected as part of a joint USGS/USEPA drinking water plant study. Measured concentrations were compared to biological effect concentration (EC) estimates, including USEPA aquatic life criteria, effective plasma concentrations of pharmaceuticals, published toxicity data summarized in the USEPA ECOTOX database, and chemical structure-based predictions. Potential dietary exposures were estimated using a generic 3-tiered food web accumulation scenario. For many analytes, few or no measured effect data were found, and for some analytes, reporting limits exceeded EC estimates, limiting the scope of conclusions. Results suggest occasional occurrence above ECs for copper, aluminum, strontium, lead, uranium, and nitrate. Sparse effect data for manganese, antimony, and vanadium suggest that these analytes may occur above ECs, but additional effect data would be desirable to corroborate EC estimates. These conclusions were not affected by bioaccumulation estimates. No organic analyte concentrations were found to exceed EC estimates, but ten analytes had concentrations in excess of 1/10th of their respective EC: triclocarban, norverapamil, progesterone, atrazine, metolachlor, triclosan, para-nonylphenol, ibuprofen, venlafaxine, and amitriptyline, suggesting more detailed characterization of these analytes.

  14. Ecotoxicity monitoring and bioindicator screening of oil-contaminated soil during bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Weihang; Zhu, Nengwu; Cui, Jiaying; Wang, Huajin; Dang, Zhi; Wu, Pingxiao; Luo, Yidan; Shi, Chaohong

    2016-02-01

    A series of toxicity bioassays was conducted to monitor the ecotoxicity of soils in the different phases of bioremediation. Artificially oil-contaminated soil was inoculated with a petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial consortium containing Burkholderia cepacia GS3C, Sphingomonas GY2B and Pandoraea pnomenusa GP3B strains adapted to crude oil. Soil ecotoxicity in different phases of bioremediation was examined by monitoring total petroleum hydrocarbons, soil enzyme activities, phytotoxicity (inhibition of seed germination and plant growth), malonaldehyde content, superoxide dismutase activity and bacterial luminescence. Although the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentration in soil was reduced by 64.4%, forty days after bioremediation, the phytotoxicity and Photobacterium phosphoreum ecotoxicity test results indicated an initial increase in ecotoxicity, suggesting the formation of intermediate metabolites characterized by high toxicity and low bioavailability during bioremediation. The ecotoxicity values are a more valid indicator for evaluating the effectiveness of bioremediation techniques compared with only using the total petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations. Among all of the potential indicators that could be used to evaluate the effectiveness of bioremediation techniques, soil enzyme activities, phytotoxicity (inhibition of plant height, shoot weight and root fresh weight), malonaldehyde content, superoxide dismutase activity and luminescence of P. phosphoreum were the most sensitive. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Leaching behaviour and ecotoxicity evaluation of chars from the pyrolysis of forestry biomass and polymeric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, M; Mendes, S; Lapa, N; Gonçalves, M; Mendes, B; Pinto, F; Lopes, H

    2014-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the environmental risk of chars derived from the pyrolysis of mixtures of pine, plastics, and scrap tires, by studying their leaching potential and ecotoxicity. Relationships between chemical composition and ecotoxicity were established to identify contaminants responsible for toxicity. Since metallic contaminants were the focus of the present study, an EDTA washing step was applied to the chars to selectively remove metals that can be responsible for the observed toxicity. The results indicated that the introduction of biomass to the pyrolysis feedstock enhanced the acidity of chars and promote the mobilisation of inorganic compounds. Chars resulting from the pyrolysis of blends of pine and plastics did not produce ecotoxic eluates. A relationship between zinc concentrations in eluates and their ecotoxicity was found for chars obtained from mixtures with tires. A significant reduction in ecotoxicity was found when the chars were treated with EDTA, which was due to a significant reduction in zinc in chars after EDTA washing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 7 CFR 58.137 - Excluded milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Excluded milk. 58.137 Section 58.137 Agriculture... Milk § 58.137 Excluded milk. A plant shall not accept milk from a producer if: (a) The milk has been in...) Three of the last five milk samples have exceeded the maximum bacterial estimate of 500,000 per ml...

  17. Trials of electronet fencing to exclude coyotes

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is on the trials of using electronet fencing to exclude coyotes for the protection of black-footed ferrets in Montana. Reintroduction of black-tailed...

  18. AFSC/ABL: 2009 Chinook Excluder Samples

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project genetically analyzed 1,620 chinook salmon samples from the 2009 spring salmon excluder device test. These samples were collected over a short period of...

  19. Exploring REACH as a potential data source for characterizing ecotoxicity in life cycle assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Nienke; de Zwart, Dick; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2017-01-01

    , such as the European Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation, and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) database. The present study explored REACH as a potential data source for LCIA based on matching reported ecotoxicity data for substances that are currently also included in the United Nations Environment Programme/Society...

  20. The UNEP/SETAC recommended characterisation factors for human health and aquatic ecotoxicity: results and future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Bachmann, Till M.

    of substance coverage and quality assurance of substance data; 2) accommodation of metals; 3) inclusion of terrestrial and marine ecotoxicity; 4) incorporation of indoor emissions; 5) including parameter uncertainty in the uncertainty estimates on the CFs; 6) publication of model documentation 7) development...

  1. Ecotoxicity testing and environmental risk assessment of iron nanomaterials for sub-surface remediation - Recommendations from the FP7 project NanoRem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Rune; Coutris, Claire; Nguyen, Nhung H A; Sevcu, Alena; Gallego-Urrea, Juliàn Alberto; Baun, Anders; Joner, Erik J

    2017-09-01

    Nanoremediation with iron (Fe) nanomaterials opens new doors for treating contaminated soil and groundwater, but is also accompanied by new potential risks as large quantities of engineered nanomaterials are introduced into the environment. In this study, we have assessed the ecotoxicity of four engineered Fe nanomaterials, specifically, Nano-Goethite, Trap-Ox Fe-zeolites, Carbo-Iron® and FerMEG12, developed within the European FP7 project NanoRem for sub-surface remediation towards a test battery consisting of eight ecotoxicity tests on bacteria (V. fisheri, E. coli), algae (P. subcapitata, Chlamydomonas sp.), crustaceans (D. magna), worms (E. fetida, L. variegatus) and plants (R. sativus, L. multiflorum). The tested materials are commercially available and include Fe oxide and nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI), but also hybrid products with Fe loaded into a matrix. All but one material, a ball milled nZVI (FerMEG12), showed no toxicity in the test battery when tested in concentrations up to 100 mg/L, which is the cutoff for hazard labeling in chemicals regulation in Europe. However it should be noted that Fe nanomaterials proved challenging to test adequately due to their turbidity, aggregation and sedimentation behavior in aqueous media. This paper provides a number of recommendations concerning future testing of Fe nanomaterials and discusses environmental risk assessment considerations related to these. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Chemical and ecotoxicity evaluation of tailings rehabilitated using Technosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arán, Diego; Santos, Erika S.; Abreu, Maria Manuela; Macías, Felipe

    2017-04-01

    The Fé mining area was the most important uranium deposit in Spain. In this deposit, the uranium mineralization contains sulfides. Consequently, tailings are a source of polymetallic contamination requiring their rehabilitation in order to decrease the dispersion of potentially hazardous elements (PHEs). The main objective of this work is to evaluate the efficiency of a Technosol application on the rehabilitation of these tailings at chemical and ecotoxicological level. In the field, a layer of 20 cm Technosol with andic and eutrophic characteristic was applied over the tailing (total area: 625 m2). After 20 months, composite samples of Technosol (TEC), recovered tailing (bottom of the Technosol, RT) and tailings without recuperation (T) were collected. These samples were characterized for pH, electric conductivity (EC), PHEs concentration in total fraction and available fraction extracted with rhizosphere-based method. Ecotoxicity bioassays were carried out with two species, Lollium perenne and Trifolium pratense following OECD Guidelines. Three bioassays were carried out: filter paper test and hydroponic test with leachates, and soil test. In leachates (extracted with DIN method) were determined pH, EC and same PHEs than in Technosol/Tailings. Visual aspects, germination, root and shoot elongation and dry biomass were evaluated. The substrate effect on growth of both species was evaluated in pot experiment (500 g Technosol/Tailings per pot, 70% of water-holding capacity) under greenhouse conditions after 69 days by dry shoot biomass. Materials from T had pH 4, EC: 1.2 mS/cm and high total concentrations of several PHEs (g/kg; Al: 46.2; As, Co and Pb: 0.02-0.03; Cu: 0.04; Fe: 63.2 Mn: 1.3; Ni and Zn: 0.1-0.2). However, PHEs concentrations in leachates and available fraction corresponded to 75% of reduction). For both species, the germination percentage and dry biomass weight in filter paper test (Lollium: 62-70%, 38-41 mg; Trifolium: 73-80%, 24-31 mg) and soil

  3. Polyelectrolyte solutions: Excluded-volume considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoussi, Hedi; Karasz, Frank E.

    1993-12-01

    We provide experimental evidence for the electrostatically related excluded-volume effects on the colligative properties and the single chain behavior of polyelectrolyte solutions in the dilute regime. The data are compared to the theory developed by Fixman, Skolnick, Odijk, and Houwaart. Good agreement between these theoretical considerations and the experimental data is observed.

  4. 21 CFR 1308.22 - Excluded substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excluded substances. 1308.22 Section 1308.22 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES... may, under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C. 301), be lawfully sold over the counter...

  5. Empowering the digitally excluded: learning initiatives for (invisible groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Seale

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that some digitally excluded groups of learners are receiving more attention than others. Discussions regarding why some digitally excluded learners are more visible than others and therefore worthy of more committed digital inclusion interventions raises important questions about how we define and conceptualise digital inclusion and digital inclusion practice; particularly in relation to empowerment. In this article, we draw on a range of research, practice and policy literature to examine two important questions: what is empowerment and in whose hands does empowerment lie? We argue that empowerment involves making informed choices about technology use, but that learners often require support- human intervention- to make these choices. However, current digital inclusion research has failed to produce a detailed critique of what constitutes empowering support from educational institutions and their staff. A lack of open and reflexive accounts of practice means that we are no closer to identifying and understanding the kinds of empowering practices that are required to challenge the kinds of prejudices, stereotypes, risk-aversiveness and low aspirations associated with the most invisible of digitally excluded learners.

  6. Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404) and those regulations that implement the statutes and appear to be most relevant to US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  7. USEtox - The UNEP-SETAC toxicity model: recommended characterisation factors for human toxicity and freshwater ecotoxicity in Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Bachmann, Till M; Gold, Lois S.

    2008-01-01

    , and (iii) to build a scientific consensus model from them, representing recommended practice. Methods. A chemical test set of 45 organics covering a wide range of property combinations was selected for this purpose. All models used this set. In three workshops, the model comparison participants identified......, defining a closed or open system environment, or nesting an urban box in a continental box. Discussion. The precision of the new characterisation factors (CFs) is within a factor of 100-1000 for human health and 10-100 for freshwater ecotoxicity of all other models compared to 12 orders of magnitude......, it has now been used to calculate CFs for several thousand substances and forms the basis of the recommendations from UNEP-SETAC’s Life Cycle Initiative regarding characterization of toxic impacts in Life Cycle Assessment. Recommendations and Perspectives. We provide both recommended and interim (not...

  8. Combined ecotoxicity of binary zinc oxide and copper oxide nanoparticles to Scenedesmus obliquus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Nan; Wang, Zhuang; Fang, Hao; Wang, Se; Zhang, Fan

    2017-05-12

    A combined ecotoxicity study was carried out with nano-zinc oxide (nZnO) and nano-copper oxide (nCuO) to freshwater algae Scenedesmus obliquus. Concentration-response analysis indicated that the dissolved metal fraction was not the major source of individual and combined toxicity of the metal-oxide nanoparticles (MONPs). Moreover, the contribution of the nCuO (based on metallic mass) to the combined toxicity was greater than that of the nZnO. The observed combined toxicity can be predicted by the pharmacological concepts of concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA). Combined toxicity prediction (in terms of median effect concentration) based on both concepts tends to overestimate the overall observed toxicity of the MONP mixtures. CA was more accurate for predicting the combined toxicity than IA. It may be concluded that CA gives a valid estimation of the overall ecotoxicity for mixtures comprising of similar acting MONPs.

  9. Modeling ecotoxicity impacts in vineyard production: Addressing spatial differentiation for copper fungicides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña, Nancy; Antón, Assumpció; Kamilaris, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    with methodological limitations, especially for inorganic (i.e. metal-based) pesticides. Downy mildew is one of the most severe diseases for vineyard production. For disease control, copper-based fungicides are the most effective and used PPP in both conventional and organic viticulture. This study aims to improve...... the toxicity-related characterization of copper-based fungicides (Cu) for LCA studies. Potential freshwater ecotoxicity impacts of 12 active ingredients used to control downy mildew in European vineyards were quantified and compared. Soil ecotoxicity impacts were calculated for specific soil chemistries...... toxicity impact profiles, assisting decision makers to better understand copper behavior concerning the receiving environment and therefore how restrictions on the use of copper-based fungicides should be considered in relation to the emission site....

  10. A Methodology for Inclusion of Terrestrial Ecotoxic Impacts of Metals in Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owsianiak, Mikolaj; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2011-01-01

    Terrestrial ecotoxicity is in most cases not addressed or to a very limited extent in life cycle assessment (LCA). We are developing a new method for calculating terrestrial ecotoxicity characterization factor (CF) of metals for application in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA). e method takes...... into account metal speciation and interactions with soil organic constituents, because these mechanisms control metal bioavailability and inuence their toxic properties. Transfer functions and geochemical speciation models are employed to calculate reactive and available fractions of metals in 1300 soils...... and the contribution of EF to the CF is within the same order of magnitude or lower comparing to that of the BF. us, FIAMs can be employed to calculate EFs for metals for which TBLMs are not available. From a set of spatially explicit CFs, site-generic CFs can be derived at global or continental scales...

  11. Environmental risk assessment and management of engineered nanomaterials - The role of ecotoxicity testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Rune

    called-double binds - should also be acknowledged as they dictate the limitations of standardization and therefore also its ability to guide risk assessment. The paradigm of conducting in vivo animal toxicity testing and extrapolating the data to either humans or the environment is gradually being...... to these is the continued examination of the applicability of ecotoxicity testing to encompass the testing of particles, as the tests originally are developed for dissolved chemicals. Furthermore, the ability of such testing to inform environmental risk assessment and environmental risk management, including...... the applicability of these concepts, has been questioned. The present thesis provides an overview of the challenges facing ecotoxicity testing of ENMs and investigates whether we can rely on such testing to inform risk assessment and eventually management of the potential environmental risk of ENMs. Although...

  12. Optimization of extraction procedures for ecotoxicity analyses: Use of TNT contaminated soil as a model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunahara, G.I.; Renoux, A.Y.; Dodard, S.; Paquet, L.; Hawari, J. [BRI, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Ampleman, G.; Lavigne, J.; Thiboutot, S. [DREV, Courcelette, Quebec (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    The environmental impact of energetic substances (TNT, RDX, GAP, NC) in soil is being examined using ecotoxicity bioassays. An extraction method was characterized to optimize bioassay assessment of TNT toxicity in different soil types. Using the Microtox{trademark} (Photobacterium phosphoreum) assay and non-extracted samples, TNT was most acutely toxic (IC{sub 50} = 1--9 PPM) followed by RDX and GAP; NC did not show obvious toxicity (probably due to solubility limitations). TNT (in 0.25% DMSO) yielded an IC{sub 50} 0.98 + 0.10 (SD) ppm. The 96h-EC{sub 50} (Selenastrum capricornutum growth inhibition) of TNT (1. 1 ppm) was higher than GAP and RDX; NC was not apparently toxic (probably due to solubility limitations). Soil samples (sand or a silt-sand mix) were spiked with either 2,000 or 20,000 mg TNT/kg soil, and were adjusted to 20% moisture. Samples were later mixed with acetonitrile, sonicated, and then treated with CaCl{sub 2} before filtration, HPLC and ecotoxicity analyses. Results indicated that: the recovery of TNT from soil (97.51% {+-} 2.78) was independent of the type of soil or moisture content; CaCl{sub 2} interfered with TNT toxicity and acetonitrile extracts could not be used directly for algal testing. When TNT extracts were diluted to fixed concentrations, similar TNT-induced ecotoxicities were generally observed and suggested that, apart from the expected effects of TNT concentrations in the soil, the soil texture and the moisture effects were minimal. The extraction procedure permits HPLC analyses as well as ecotoxicity testing and minimizes secondary soil matrix effects. Studies will be conducted to study the toxic effects of other energetic substances present in soil using this approach.

  13. Ecotoxicity and genotoxicity assessment of exhaust particulates from diesel-powered buses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kováts, Nora; Acs, András; Ferincz, Arpád; Kovács, Anikó; Horváth, Eszter; Kakasi, Balázs; Jancsek-Turóczi, Beatrix; Gelencsér, András

    2013-10-01

    Diesel exhaust is one of the major sources of fine and ultra-fine particulate matter in urban air. Toxicity of diesel-powered engine emissions has been quite widely assessed; however, much less information is available on their ecotoxicity. In our study, the kinetic version of the Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition bioassay based on the ISO 21338:2010 standard was used to characterise the ecotoxicity of diesel-powered buses. It is a direct contact test in which solid samples are tested in suspension and test organisms are in direct contact with toxic particles. The age of the selected buses fell into a wide range; the oldest one was produced in 1987. Diesel engines of different emission standards (Euro0-Euro4) were included. Measured EC50 values of Euro0-Euro1 engine emissions fell into the same range, 1.24-0.96 μg ml(-1), respectively. On the contrary, emission of Euro4 vehicle proved to be non-toxic. Genotoxic potential of the samples was also estimated, using the colorimetric SOS-chromotest™. Genotoxicity was detected also for Euro0 and Euro1 buses, showing correlation with the ecotoxic potential. The fact that the particulates from Euro4 vehicles did not show ecotoxic/genotoxic effect implies that replacing old Euro1 and Euro2 buses can be a highly effective solution for reducing environmental hazard of automotive emissions. The whole-aerosol testing method is a cheap alternative that can be used in engine developments and emission control.

  14. Methodological considerations for testing the ecotoxicity of carbon nanotubes and fullerenes: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Elijah J; Henry, Theodore B

    2012-01-01

    The recent emergence of manufactured nanoparticles (NPs) that are released into the environment and lead to exposure in organisms has accelerated the need to determine NP toxicity. Techniques for measuring the toxicity of NPs (nanotoxicology) in ecological receptors (nanoecotoxicology) are in their infancy, however, and establishing standardized ecotoxicity tests for NPs are presently limited by several factors. These factors include the extent of NP characterization necessary (or possible) before, during, and after toxicity tests such that toxic effects can be related to physicochemical characteristics of NPs; determining uptake and distribution of NPs within exposed organisms (does uptake occur or are effects exerted at organism surfaces?); and determining the appropriate types of controls to incorporate into ecotoxicity tests with NPs. In this review, the authors focus on the important elements of measuring the ecotoxicity of carbon NPs (CNPs) and make recommendations for ecotoxicology testing that should enable more rigorous interpretations of collected data and interlaboratory comparisons. This review is intended to serve as a next step toward developing standardized tests that can be incorporated into a regulatory framework for CNPs. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  15. Implications of handling practices on the ecotoxic profile of alumina nanoparticles towards the bacteria Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiridis, Vasilios; Petala, Maria; Koukiotis, Chris; Darakas, Efthymios

    2017-01-02

    The complex nature and behavior of Engineered Nanomaterials (ENMs) has led to adoption of customized experimental ecotoxicity practices that are prone to possible artefacts in the inherent toxic properties of ENMs. In addition, the lack of standardized handling procedures for the ecotoxicity testing of ENMs prevents the development of experimental protocols for regulatory purposes. In this study, a suite of techniques for dispersion of ENMs was adopted and tested for two types of surface-modified alumina nanoparticles-one hydrophobic and one hydrophilic-towards the bacteria, Vibrio fischeri. The effect of certain handling practices on the observed ecotoxic effects on V. fischeri was examined. The overall goal was to evaluate by what means the handling practices of ENMs may affect the obtained toxicity results. It was realized that the toxicity of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic ENMs was mainly affected by the centrifugation and the salinity of the tested dispersions, respectively. It is more likely that both aluminium and coating substance contributed to the overall toxicity. Toxicity results are discussed with regard to generic physicochemical characteristics of the dispersions.

  16. Reduction in acute ecotoxicity of paper mill effluent by sequential application of xylanase and laccase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Sudha Dhiman

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the ecotoxicity of paper mill, four different enzymatic pretreatment strategies were investigated in comparison to conventional chemical based processes. In strategy I, xylanase-aided pretreatment of pulp was carried out, and in strategy II, xylanase and laccase-mediator systems were used sequentially. Moreover, to compare the efficiency of Bacillus stearothermophilus xylanase and Ceriporiopsis subvermispora laccase in the reduction of ecotoxicity and pollution, parallel strategies (III and IV were implemented using commercial enzymes. Conventional C(DE(OPD(1D(2 (C(D, Cl(2 with ClO2; EOP, H2O2 extraction; D1 and D2, ClO2 and X/XLC(DE(OPD(1D(2 (X, xylanase; L, laccase sequences were employed with non-enzymatic and enzymatic strategies, respectively. Acute toxicity was determined by the extent of inhibition of bioluminescence of Vibrio fischeri with different dilutions of the effluent. Two-fold increase was observed in EC50 values for strategy I compared to the control process. On the other hand, sequential application of commercial enzymes resulted in higher acute toxicity compared to lab enzymes. In comparison to the control process, strategy II was the most efficient and successfully reduced 60.1 and 25.8% of biological oxygen demand (BOD and color of effluents, respectively. We report for the first time the comparative analysis of the ecotoxicity of industrial effluents.

  17. Improving substance information in USEtox® , part 1: Discussion on data and approaches for estimating freshwater ecotoxicity effect factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saouter, Erwan; Aschberger, Karin; Fantke, Peter; Hauschild, Michael Z; Bopp, Stephanie K; Kienzler, Aude; Paini, Alicia; Pant, Rana; Secchi, Michela; Sala, Serenella

    2017-12-01

    The scientific consensus model USEtox® is recommended by the European Commission as the reference model to characterize life cycle chemical emissions in terms of their potential human toxicity and freshwater aquatic ecotoxicity impacts in the context of the International Reference Life Cycle Data System Handbook and the Environmental Footprint pilot phase looking at products (PEF) and organizations (OEF). Consequently, this model has been systematically used within the PEF/OEF pilot phase by 25 European Union industry sectors, which manufacture a wide variety of consumer products. This testing phase has raised some questions regarding the derivation of and the data used for the chemical-specific freshwater ecotoxicity effect factor in USEtox. For calculating the potential freshwater aquatic ecotoxicity impacts, USEtox bases the effect factor on the chronic hazard concentration (HC50) value for a chemical calculated as the arithmetic mean of all logarithmized geometric means of species-specific chronic median lethal (or effect) concentrations (L[E]C50). We investigated the dependency of the USEtox effect factor on the selection of ecotoxicological data source and toxicological endpoints, and we found that both influence the ecotoxicity ranking of chemicals and may hence influence the conclusions of a PEF/OEF study. We furthermore compared the average measure (HC50) with other types of ecotoxicity effect indicators, such as the lowest species EC50 or no-observable-effect concentration, frequently used in regulatory risk assessment, and demonstrated how they may also influence the ecotoxicity ranking of chemicals. We acknowledge that these indicators represent different aspects of a chemical's ecotoxicity potential and discuss their pros and cons for a comparative chemical assessment as performed in life cycle assessment and in particular within the PEF/OEF context. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:3450-3462. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry

  18. 34 CFR 85.950 - Excluded Parties List System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excluded Parties List System 85.950 Section 85.950... (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 85.950 Excluded Parties List System Excluded Parties List System (EPLS) means the... entitled, “List of Parties Excluded or Disqualified from Federal Procurement and Nonprocurement Programs...

  19. Pesticide emission modelling and freshwater ecotoxicity assessment for Grapevine LCA: adaptation of PestLCI 2.0 to viticulture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christel, Renaud-Gentié; Dijkman, Teunis Johannes; Bjørn, Anders

    2015-01-01

    and ecotoxicological impacts of pesticides applied to viticulture. The paper presents (i) a tailored version of PestLCI 2.0, (ii) corresponding characterization factors for freshwater ecotoxicity characterization and (iii) result comparison with other inventory approaches. The purpose of this paper is hence to present...... viticulture type specific spraying equipment and accounting the number of rows treated in one pass, and (iii) accounting for mixed canopy (vine/cover crop) pesticide interception. Applying USEtox™, the PestLCI 2.0 customization is further supported by the calculation of freshwater ecotoxicity characterization...... factors for active ingredients relevant for viticulture. Case studies on three different vineyard technical management routes illustrate the application of the inventory model. The inventory and freshwater ecotoxicity results are compared to two existing simplified emission modelling approaches. Results...

  20. Freshwater ecotoxicity characterisation factor for metal oxide nanoparticles: a case study on titanium dioxide nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salieri, Beatrice; Righi, Serena; Pasteris, Andrea; Olsen, Stig Irving

    2015-02-01

    The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology is widely applied in several industrial sectors to evaluate the environmental performance of processes, products and services. Recently, several reports and studies have emphasized the importance of LCA in the field of engineered nanomaterials. However, to date only a few LCA studies on nanotechnology have been carried out, and fewer still have assessed aspects relating to ecotoxicity. This is mainly due to the lack of knowledge in relation on human and environmental exposure and effect of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs). This bottleneck is continued when performing Life Cycle Impact Assessment, where characterization models and consequently characterization factors (CFs) for ENPs are missing. This paper aims to provide the freshwater ecotoxicity CF for titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO₂). The USEtox model has been selected as a characterisation model. An adjusted multimedia fate model has been developed which accounts for nano-specific fate process descriptors (i.e. sedimentation, aggregation with suspended particle matter, etc.) to estimate the fate of nano-TiO₂ in freshwater. A literature survey of toxicity tests performed on freshwater organism representative of multiple trophic levels was conducted, including algae, crustaceans and fish in order to collect relevant EC₅₀ values. Then, the toxic effect of nano-TiO₂ was computed on the basis of the HC₅₀ value. Thus, following the principle of USEtox model and accounting for nano-specific descriptors a CF for the toxic impact of freshwater ecotoxicity of 0.28 PAFdaym(3)kg(-1) is proposed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Statistical uncertainty in hazardous terrestrial concentrations estimated with aquatic ecotoxicity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golsteijn, Laura; van Zelm, Rosalie; Hendriks, A Jan; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2013-09-01

    Since chemicals' ecotoxic effects depend for most soil species on the dissolved concentration in pore water, the equilibrium partitioning (EP) method is generally used to estimate hazardous concentrations (HC50) in the soil from aquatic toxicity tests. The present study analyzes the statistical uncertainty in terrestrial HC50s derived by the EP-method. For 47 organic chemicals, we compared freshwater HC50s derived from standard aquatic ecotoxicity tests with porewater HC50s derived from terrestrial ecotoxicity tests. Statistical uncertainty in the HC50s due to limited species sample size and in organic carbon-water partitioning coefficients due to predictive error was treated with probability distributions propagated by Monte Carlo simulations. Particularly for specifically acting chemicals, it is very important to base the HC50 on a representative sample of species, composed of both target and non-target species. For most chemical groups, porewater HC50 values were approximately a factor of 3 higher than freshwater HC50 values. The ratio of the porewater HC50/freshwater HC50 was typically 3.0 for narcotic chemicals (2.8 for nonpolar and 3.4 for polar narcotics), 0.8 for reactive chemicals, 2.9 for neurotoxic chemicals (4.3 for AChE agents and 0.1 for the cyclodiene type), and 2.5 for herbicides-fungicides. However, the statistical uncertainty associated with this ratio was large (typically 2.3 orders of magnitude). For 81% of the organic chemicals studied, there was no statistical difference between the hazardous concentration of aquatic and terrestrial species. We conclude that possible systematic deviations between the HC50s of aquatic and terrestrial species appear to be less prominent than the overall statistical uncertainty. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Treatment of adenomyosis (excluding pregnancy project)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelage, L; Fenomanana, S; Brun, J-L; Levaillant, J-M; Fernandez, H

    2015-05-01

    In this review we aimed to update the possibilities of adenomyosis treatment in women excluding those with a desire for pregnancy. Adenomyosis is defined as the presence of endometrial tissue within the myometrium and frequently underestimated. Over the last decades, its pathophysiology has been better known. The diagnosis is essentially based on clinical symptoms like menorrhagia and dysmenorrhea. Transvaginal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are the main tools of the radiologic diagnosis. However, the definitive diagnosis is histological. The most effective treatment remains hysterectomy; however it is expensive, radical and at risk of morbidity compared with medical or surgical conservative management. The literature has reported several series of patients undergoing various treatments, thus allowing different therapeutic options. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device showed its efficacy alone or in combination with hysteroscopic treatment. Oral progestins, GnRH agonists are useful at short term or in preoperative condition. Some conservative treatments like focused ultrasound therapies or uterus-sparing operative treatment stay under evaluation and seems to be effective. Embolization has been the subject of several studies and must be outlined. Furthermore, several molecules, such as modulators of progesterone receptors and the aromatase inhibitors have been recently studied and are perhaps future treatments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Neutron resonance data exclude random matrix theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, P. E.; Bečvář, F.; Krtička, M.; Guber, K. H.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2013-02-01

    Almost since the time it was formulated, the overwhelming consensus has been that random matrix theory (RMT) is in excellent agreement with neutron resonance data. However, over the past few years, we have obtained new neutron-width data at Oak Ridge and Los Alamos National Laboratories that are in stark disagreement with this theory. We also have reanalyzed neutron widths in the most famous data set, the nuclear data ensemble (NDE), and found that it is seriously flawed, and, when analyzed carefully, excludes RMT with high confidence. More recently, we carefully examined energy spacings for these same resonances in the NDE using the $\\Delta_{3}$ statistic. We conclude that the data can be found to either confirm or refute the theory depending on which nuclides and whether known or suspected p-wave resonances are included in the analysis, in essence confirming results of our neutron-width analysis of the NDE. We also have examined radiation widths resulting from our Oak Ridge and Los Alamos measurements, and find that in some cases they do not agree with RMT. Although these disagreements presently are not understood, they could have broad impact on basic and applied nuclear physics, from nuclear astrophysics to nuclear criticality safety.

  4. Neutron resonance data exclude random matrix theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, P.E. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MailStop 6356, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Becvar, F.; Krticka, M. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Guber, K.H. [Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Mail Stop 6356, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Ullmann, J.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Almost since the time it was formulated, the overwhelming consensus has been that random matrix theory (RMT) is in excellent agreement with neutron resonance data. However, over the past few years, we have obtained new neutron-width data at Oak Ridge and Los Alamos National Laboratories that are in stark disagreement with this theory. We also have reanalyzed neutron widths in the most famous data set, the nuclear data ensemble (NDE), and found that it is seriously flawed, and, when analyzed carefully, excludes RMT with high confidence. More recently, we carefully examined energy spacings for these same resonances in the NDE using the {Delta}{sub 3} statistic. We conclude that the data can be found to either confirm or refute the theory depending on which nuclides and whether known or suspected p-wave resonances are included in the analysis, in essence confirming results of our neutron-width analysis of the NDE. We also have examined radiation widths resulting from our Oak Ridge and Los Alamos measurements, and find that in some cases they do not agree with RMT. Although these disagreements presently are not understood, they could have broad impact on basic and applied nuclear physics, from nuclear astrophysics to nuclear criticality safety. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. USEtox fate and ecotoxicity factors for comparative assessment of toxic emissions in Life Cycle Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrew D, Henderson; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Van de Meent, Dik

    2011-01-01

    with characteristic properties, this work provides understanding of the basis for calculations of CFs in USEtox. In addition, it offers insight into the chemical properties and critical mechanisms covering the continuum from chemical emission to freshwater ecosystem toxicity. For an emission directly to water...... orders of magnitude. However, for an emission to air or soil, differences in chemical properties may decrease the CF by up to 10 orders of magnitude, as a result of intermedia transfer and degradation. This result brings new clarity to the relative contributions of fate and freshwater ecotoxicity...

  6. Synthesis Approaches of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles: The Dilemma of Ecotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Naveed Ul Haq

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human’s quest for innovation, finding solutions of problems, and upgrading the industrial yield with energy efficient and cost-effective materials has opened the avenues of nanotechnology. Among a variety of nanoparticles, zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO have advantages because of the extraordinary physical and chemical properties. It is one of the cheap materials in cosmetic industry, nanofertilizers, and electrical devices and also a suitable agent for bioimaging and targeted drug and gene delivery and an excellent sensor for detecting ecological pollutants and environmental remediation. Despite inherent toxicity of nanoparticles, synthetic routes are making use of large amount of chemical and stringent reactions conditions that are contributing as environmental contaminants in the form of high energy consumption, heat generation, water consumption, and chemical waste. Further, it is also adding to the innate toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs that is either entirely ignored or poorly investigated. The current review illustrates a comparison between pollutants and hazards spawned from chemical, physical, and biological methods used for the synthesis of ZnO. Further, the emphasis is on devising eco-friendly techniques for the synthesis of ZnO especially biological methods which are comparatively less hazardous and need to be optimized by controlling the reaction conditions in order to get desired yield and characteristics.

  7. Excluding the Excluded : New Labour’s Penchant for Punishment

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Emma

    2011-01-01

    New Labour’s emphasis on personal responsibility leads it to shun any definition of the socially excluded as the passive victims of socio-economic circumstances. It encourages them to act positively to re-integrate themselves into “mainstream” society by participating in welfare-to-work schemes etc. Importantly, this involves an acceptance of a certain value system as promoted by the government. Refusal to accept these values - often taken to denote membership of an underclass (increasingly u...

  8. Effect of wheat and Miscanthus straw biochars on soil enzymatic activity, ecotoxicity, and plant yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierzwa-Hersztek, Monika; Gondek, Krzysztof; Klimkowicz-Pawlas, Agnieszka; Baran, Agnieszka

    2017-07-01

    The variety of technological conditions and raw materials from which biochar is produced is the reason why its soil application may have different effects on soil properties and plant growth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the addition of wheat straw and Miscanthus giganteus straw (5 t DM ha-1) and biochar obtained from this materials in doses of 2.25 and 5 t DM ha-1 on soil enzymatic activity, soil ecotoxicity, and plant yield (perennial grass mixture with red clover). The research was carried out under field conditions on soil with the granulometric composition of loamy sand. No significant effect of biochar amendment on soil enzymatic activity was observed. The biochar-amended soil was toxic to Vibrio fischeri and exhibited low toxicity to Heterocypris incongruens. Application of wheat straw biochar and M. giganteus straw biochar in a dose of 5 t DM ha-1 contributed to an increase in plant biomass production by 2 and 14%, respectively, compared to the soil with mineral fertilisation. Biochars had a more adverse effect on soil enzymatic activity and soil ecotoxicity to H. incongruens and V. fischeri than non-converted wheat straw and M. giganteus straw, but significantly increased the grass crop yield.

  9. Ecotoxicity and fate of a silver nanomaterial in an outdoor lysimeter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlich, Karsten; Hoppe, Martin; Kraas, Marco; Fries, Elke; Hund-Rinke, Kerstin

    2017-08-01

    Sewage sludge is repeatedly applied as fertilizer on farmland due to its high nutrient content. This may lead to a significant increase of silver nanomaterials (AgNM) in soil over years. Therefore, our aim was to investigate the ecotoxicity and fate of AgNM under environmentally relevant conditions in outdoor lysimeters over 25 months. Two AgNM concentrations (1.7 and 8.0 mg/kg dry matter soil) were applied via sewage sludge into soil. In subsamples of the soil, incubated under laboratory conditions for 180 days, the comparability of outdoor and laboratory results regarding ecotoxicity was determined. The results from our long term lysimeter experiments show no detectable horizontal displacement in combination with very low remobilization to the percolate water. Thus, indicate that the sludge applied AgNM remains nearly immobile in the pathway between soils and leachate. However, Ag uptake to the roots of wheat and canola suggests that the chemical conditions in the rhizosphere induce AgNM remobilization from the incorporated sewage sludge even after two harvesting cycles. At the higher AgNM concentration a steady inhibition of the soil microflora was observed over 25 month in the lysimeter study, while there was no effect at the lower AgNM concentration. The results of the laboratory experiment reflect the findings of the lysimeter study and indicate that a risk assessment for AgNM based on data from laboratory tests is acceptable.

  10. EVALUATION OF LEATHER QUALITY AND ECOTOXICITY IN SIMULATED TANNERY WASTEWATERS USING MIMOSA TANNIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ÇELİK Cem

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The leather tanning industry is characterized by the production of different kinds of effluents, generated in each step of leather processing. These effluents have various chemical compounds which may cause toxicity and endocrine disruption and are thus known as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC. Tanning stabilizes the protein structure of the hide and imparts heat stability, enhanced tensile properties, and resistance to microbial degradation. Currently most high quality leather is "chrome-tanned," produced by treatment of the hide with salts of the mineral chromium. In this study, the wastewater characteristics and ecotoxicity before and after tanning and retanning processes using mimosa tannin are assessed. Vegetable leather production procedure was followed using one dose mimosa tannin. Leather quality was evaluated according to standard methods. Wastewater characteristics showed that mimosa contributed high organic content to the wastewater. Although vegetable tannin was used the effluent toxicity was observed in tanning and retanning effluents. The preliminary results also showed that leather quality tests failed or at minimum level to comply with the standard values indicating that there is still a need to optimize the procedure including mimosa dose. This study was designed to produce eco-friendly leather using mimosa in tanning and retanning processes. Leather quality and the ecotoxicity of each process during leather production was assessed according to standard methods.

  11. Colloidal stability and ecotoxicity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes: Influence of select organic matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrillo, Cristina; Barandika, Gotzone; Igartua, Amaya; Areitioaurtena, Olatz; Uranga, Nerea; Mendoza, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years, the release of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into the environment has raised serious concerns regarding their fate and potential impacts. Aquatic organisms constitute an important pathway for their entrance and transfer throughout the food web, and the current demand for standardization of methodologies to analyze the interactions of MWCNTs with them requires aquatic media that represent natural systems. However, the inherent hydrophobicity of MWCNTs and the substances present in natural waters may greatly affect their stability and bioavailability. The present study analyzes the influence of the most referenced synthetic and natural organic matters (Sigma-Aldrich humic acid and Suwannee River natural organic matter) in the agglomeration kinetics and ecotoxicity of MWCNTs, with the aim of determining their suitability to fulfill the current standardization requirements. Natural organic matter provides increased colloidal stability to the MWCNTs' dispersions, which results in higher adverse effects on the key invertebrate organism Daphnia magna. Furthermore, the results obtained with this type of organic matter allow for observation of the important role of the outer diameter and content impurities of MWCNTs in their stability and ecotoxicity on daphnids. Sigma-Aldrich humic acid appeared to alter the response of the organisms to carbon nanotubes compared with that observed in the presence of natural organic matter. © 2015 SETAC.

  12. Ecotoxicity of arsenic contaminated sludge after mixing with soils and addition into composting and vermicomposting processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vašíčková, Jana; Maňáková, Blanka; Šudoma, Marek; Hofman, Jakub

    2016-11-05

    Sludge coming from remediation of groundwater contaminated by industry is usually managed as hazardous waste despite it might be considered for further processing as a source of nutrients. The ecotoxicity of phosphorus rich sludge contaminated with arsenic was evaluated after mixing with soil and cultivation with Sinapis alba, and supplementation into composting and vermicomposting processes. The Enchytraeus crypticus and Folsomia candida reproduction tests and the Lactuca sativa root growth test were used. Invertebrate bioassays reacted sensitively to arsenic presence in soil-sludge mixtures. The root elongation of L. sativa was not sensitive and showed variable results. In general, the relationship between invertebrate tests results and arsenic mobile concentration was indicated in majority endpoints. Nevertheless, significant portion of the results still cannot be satisfactorily explained by As chemistry data. Composted and vermicomposted sludge mixtures showed surprisingly high toxicity on all three tested organisms despite the decrease in arsenic mobility, probably due to toxic metabolites of bacteria and earthworms produced during these processes. The results from the study indicated the inability of chemical methods to predict the effects of complex mixtures on living organisms with respect to ecotoxicity bioassays. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization modelling of aquatic ecotoxicity from metal emission to be applied in Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Yan

    , with a minor contribution from estuary removal. For the metals that have strong tendency to complex with particles (e.g. Cr, Cu and Pb), the difference between the two marine CFs is 1.5 orders of magnitude. Here estuary removal noticeably reduces the fraction of metals that be transported to seawater by 25...... on bioavailability. However, ecotoxicity of several metals that commonly appear in Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) have not yet been characterized in freshwater by the novel method. Ecotoxicity CF in marine ecosystem has received even less attention. In the previous Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) model, marine CF...... mentioned above, this Ph.D. project aims at developing aquatic CFs for metals, including freshwater CF for 14 metals (Al(III), Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr(III), Cs, Cu(II), Fe(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn) and marine CF for nine metals (Cd, Co, Cr(III), Cu, Fe(III), Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) both for emission...

  14. Integrated microfluidic technology for sub-lethal and behavioral marine ecotoxicity biotests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yushi; Reyes Aldasoro, Constantino Carlos; Persoone, Guido; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-06-01

    Changes in behavioral traits exhibited by small aquatic invertebrates are increasingly postulated as ethically acceptable and more sensitive endpoints for detection of water-born ecotoxicity than conventional mortality assays. Despite importance of such behavioral biotests, their implementation is profoundly limited by the lack of appropriate biocompatible automation, integrated optoelectronic sensors, and the associated electronics and analysis algorithms. This work outlines development of a proof-of-concept miniaturized Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) platform for rapid water toxicity tests based on changes in swimming patterns exhibited by Artemia franciscana (Artoxkit M™) nauplii. In contrast to conventionally performed end-point analysis based on counting numbers of dead/immobile specimens we performed a time-resolved video data analysis to dynamically assess impact of a reference toxicant on swimming pattern of A. franciscana. Our system design combined: (i) innovative microfluidic device keeping free swimming Artemia sp. nauplii under continuous microperfusion as a mean of toxin delivery; (ii) mechatronic interface for user-friendly fluidic actuation of the chip; and (iii) miniaturized video acquisition for movement analysis of test specimens. The system was capable of performing fully programmable time-lapse and video-microscopy of multiple samples for rapid ecotoxicity analysis. It enabled development of a user-friendly and inexpensive test protocol to dynamically detect sub-lethal behavioral end-points such as changes in speed of movement or distance traveled by each animal.

  15. Triclocarban: UV photolysis, wastewater disinfection, and ecotoxicity assessment using molecular biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyro, Suéllen; Saggioro, Enrico Mendes; Veríssimo, Fábio; Buss, Daniel Forsin; de Paiva Magalhães, Danielly; Oliveira, Anabela

    2017-07-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) is an antibacterial agent found in pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCP). It is potentially bioaccumulative and an endocrine disruptor, being classified as a contaminant of emerging concern (CEC). In normal uses, approximately 96% of the used TCC can be washed down the drain going into the sewer system and eventually enter in the aquatic environment. UV photolysis can be used to photodegrade TCC and ecotoxicity assays could indicate the photodegradation efficiency, since the enormous structural diversity of photoproducts and their low concentrations do not always allow to identify and quantify them. In this work, the TCC was efficiently degraded by UVC direct photolysis and the ecotoxicity of the UV-treated mixtures was investigated. Bioassays indicates that Daphnia similis (48 h EC 50  = 0.044 μM) was more sensitive to TCC than Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (72 h IC 50  = 1.01 μM). TCC and its photoproducts caused significant effects on Eisenia andrei biochemical responses (catalase and glutathione-S-transferase); 48 h was a critical exposure time, since GST reached the highest activity values. UVC reduced the TCC toxic effect after 120 min. Furthermore, TCC was photodegraded in domestic wastewater which was simultaneously disinfected for total coliform bacterial (TCB) (360 min) and Escherichia coli (60 min). Graphical abstract TCC degradation and ecotoxicological assessment.

  16. Insights into the Ecotoxicity of Silver Nanoparticles Transferred from Escherichia coli to Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xun; Xu, Shengmin; Yang, Yaning; Li, Luzhi; Chen, Shaopeng; Xu, An; Wu, Lijun

    2016-11-01

    Previous studies have indicated that engineered nanomaterials can be transferred through the food chain. However, their potential ecotoxicity to the environment is not fully understood. Here, we systematically evaluated the physiological behavior and toxicity of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-coated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using a food chain model from Escherichia coli (E. coli) to Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). Our results demonstrated that AgNPs accumulated in E. coli could be transferred to the C. elegans, and AgNPs were clearly distributed in the gut lumen, subcutaneous tissue and gonad. After being transferred to C. elegans through the food chain, the accumulated AgNPs caused serious toxicity to the higher trophic level (C. elegans), including effects on germ cell death, reproductive integrity and life span. Relative to larger particles (75 nm), small AgNPs (25 nm) more easily accumulated in the food chain and exhibited a stronger toxicity to the higher trophic level. More importantly, both the AgNPs that had accumulated in C. elegans through the food chain and the resulting impairment of germ cells could be transferred to the next generation, indicating that AgNP can cause genetic damage across generations. Our findings highlight that nanomaterials pose potential ecotoxicity to ecosystems via transport through the food chain.

  17. Aqueous chlorination of mefenamic acid: kinetics, transformation by-products and ecotoxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adira Wan Khalit, Wan Nor; Tay, Kheng Soo

    2016-05-18

    Mefenamic acid (Mfe) is one of the most frequently detected nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the environment. This study investigated the kinetics and the transformation by-products of Mfe during aqueous chlorination. The potential ecotoxicity of the transformation by-products was also evaluated. In the kinetic study, the second-order rate constant (kapp) for the reaction between Mfe and free available chlorine (FAC) was determined at 25 ± 0.1 °C. The result indicated that the degradation of Mfe by FAC is highly pH-dependent. When the pH was increased from 6 to 8, it was found that the kapp for the reaction between Mfe and FAC was decreased from 16.44 to 4.4 M(-1) s(-1). Characterization of the transformation by-products formed during the chlorination of Mfe was carried out using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight accurate mass spectrometry. Four major transformation by-products were identified. These transformation by-products were mainly formed through hydroxylation, chlorination and oxidation reactions. Ecotoxicity assessment revealed that transformation by-products, particularly monohydroxylated Mfe which is more toxic than Mfe, can be formed during aqueous chlorination.

  18. Spatial variability of sediment ecotoxicity in a large storm water detention basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchan, Carolina Gonzalez; Perrodin, Yves; Barraud, Sylvie; Sébastian, Christel; Becouze-Lareure, Céline; Bazin, Christine; Kouyi, Gislain Lipeme

    2014-04-01

    Detention basins are valuable facilities for urban storm water management, from both the standpoint of flood control and the trapping of pollutants. Studies performed on storm water have shown that suspended solids often constitute the main vector of pollutants (heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), etc.). In order to characterise the ecotoxicity of urban sediments from storm water detention basins, the sediments accumulated over a 6-year period were sampled at five different points through the surface of a large detention basin localised in the east of Lyon, France. A specific ecotoxicological test battery was implemented on the solid phase (raw sediment) and the liquid phase (interstitial water of sediments). The results of the study validated the method formulated for the ecotoxicological characterization of urban sediments. They show that the ecotoxicological effect of the sediments over the basin is heterogeneous and greater in areas often flooded. They also show the relationship between, on one hand, the physical and chemical characteristics of the sediments and, on the other hand, their ecotoxicity. Lastly, they contribute to a better understanding of the dynamics of the pollution close to the bottom of detention basins, which can be useful for improving their design. The results of this research raise particularly the issue of using oil separators on the surface of detention basins.

  19. Ecotoxicity of boric acid in standard laboratory tests with plants and soil organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princz, Juliska; Becker, Leonie; Scheffczyk, Adam; Stephenson, Gladys; Scroggins, Rick; Moser, Thomas; Römbke, Jörg

    2017-05-01

    To verify the continuous sensitivity of ecotoxicological tests (mainly the test organisms), reference substances with known toxicity are regularly tested. Ideally, this substance(s) would lack specificity in its mode action, be bioavailable and readily attainable with cost-effective means of chemical characterization. Boric acid has satisfied these criteria, but has most recently been characterized as a substance of very high concern, due to reproductive effects in humans, thus limiting its recommendation as an ideal reference toxicant. However, there is probably no other chemical for which ecotoxicity in soil has been so intensively studied; an extensive literature review yielded lethal (including avoidance) and sublethal data for 38 taxa. The ecotoxicity data were evaluated using species sensitivity distributions, collectively across all taxa, and separately according to species type, endpoints, soil type and duration. The lack of specificity in the mode of action yielded broad toxicity among soil taxa and soil types, and provided a collective approach to assessing species sensitivity, while taking into consideration differences in test methodologies and exposure durations. Toxicity was species-specific with Folsomia candida and enchytraied species demonstrating the most sensitivity; among plants, the following trend occurred: dicotyledonous (more sensitive) ≫ monocotyledonous ≫ gymnosperm species. Sensitivity was also time and endpoint specific, with endpoints such as lethality and avoidance being less sensitive than reproduction effects. Furthermore, given the breadth of data and toxicity demonstrated by boric acid, lessons learned from its evaluation are discussed to recommend the properties required by an ideal reference substance for the soil compartment.

  20. Arsenate (As V) in water: quantitative sensitivity relationships among biomarker, ecotoxicity and genotoxicity endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Valéria C; Almeida, Sônia M; Resgalla, Charrid; Masfaraud, Jean-François; Cotelle, Sylvie; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2013-06-01

    It is useful to test ecotoxicity and genotoxicity endpoints in the environmental impact assessment. Here, we compare and discuss ecotoxicity and genotoxicity effects in organisms in response to exposure to arsenate (As V) in solution. Eco(geno)toxicity responses in Aliivibrio fischeri, Lytechinus variegatus, Daphnia magna, Skeletonema costatum and Vicia faba were analyzed by assessing different endpoints: biomass growth, peroxidase activity, mitotic index, micronucleus frequency, and lethality in accordance with the international protocols. Quantitative sensitivity relationships (QSR) between these endpoints were established in order to rank endpoint sensitivity. The results for the QSR values based on the lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC) ratios varied from 2 (for ratio of root peroxidase activity to leaf peroxidase activity) to 2286 (for ratio of higher plant biomass growth to root peroxidase activity). The QSR values allowed the following sensitivity ranking to be established: higher plant enzymatic activity>daphnids≈echinoderms>bacteria≈algae>higher plant biomass growth. The LOEC values for the mitotic index and micronucleus frequency (LOEC=0.25mgAsL(-1)) were similar to the lowest LOEC values observed in aquatic organisms. This approach to the QSR of different endpoints could form the basis for monitoring and predicting early effects of pollutants before they give rise to significant changes in natural community structures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 48 CFR 9.404 - Excluded Parties List System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excluded Parties List... ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 9.404 Excluded Parties List System. (a) The General Services Administration (GSA)— (1) Operates the web-based Excluded Parties...

  2. 29 CFR 1471.950 - Excluded Parties List System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excluded Parties List System 1471.950 Section 1471.950... GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1471.950 Excluded Parties List System Excluded Parties List System (EPLS) means the list maintained and disseminated by the General Services...

  3. 26 CFR 1.1563-2 - Excluded stock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excluded stock. 1.1563-2 Section 1.1563-2...) INCOME TAXES Certain Controlled Corporations § 1.1563-2 Excluded stock. (a) Certain stock excluded. For purposes of sections 1561 through 1563 and the regulations thereunder, the term “stock” does not include...

  4. Residual organic matter and microbial respiration in bottom ash: Effects on metal leaching and eco-toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyas, A; Persson, K M; Persson, M

    2015-09-01

    A common assumption regarding the residual organic matter, in bottom ash, is that it does not represent a significant pool of organic carbon and, beyond metal-ion complexation process, it is of little consequence to evolution of ash/leachate chemistry. This article evaluates the effect of residual organic matter and associated microbial respiratory processes on leaching of toxic metals (i.e. arsenic, copper, chromium, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony and zinc), eco-toxicity of ash leachates. Microbial respiration was quantified with help of a respirometric test equipment OXITOP control system. The effect of microbial respiration on metal/residual organic matter leaching and eco-toxicity was quantified with the help of batch leaching tests and an eco-toxicity assay - Daphnia magna. In general, the microbial respiration process decreased the leachate pH and eco-toxicity, indicating modification of bioavailability of metal species. Furthermore, the leaching of critical metals, such as copper and chromium, decreased after the respiration in both ash types (fresh and weathered). It was concluded that microbial respiration, if harnessed properly, could enhance the stability of fresh bottom ash and may promote its reuse. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Using UV-VIS spectrophotometry for determining ecotoxicity of selected non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Čapka, L. (Lukáš); Zlámalová Gargošová, H.; Vávrová, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the use of UV-VIS spectrophotometry as a means of determining ecotoxicity. The method is based on spectrophotometric measuring of micro-algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata in water suspension. Six non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were selected as target compounds.

  6. What can be learnt from an ecotoxicity database in the framework of the REACh regulation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henegar, Adina; Mombelli, Enrico [Unite Modeles pour l' Ecotoxicologie et la Toxicologie (METO), INERIS, Parc Technologique Alata, BP2, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Pandard, Pascal [Unite Expertise et Essais en Ecotoxicologie (EXES), INERIS, Parc Technologique Alata, BP2, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Pery, Alexandre R.R., E-mail: alexandre.pery@ineris.fr [Unite Modeles pour l' Ecotoxicologie et la Toxicologie (METO), INERIS, Parc Technologique Alata, BP2, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France)

    2011-01-01

    Since REACh applies in all of EU, special emphasis has been put on the reduction of systematic ecotoxicity testing. In this context, it is important to extract a maximum of information from existing ecotoxicity databases in order to propose alternative methods aimed at replacing and reducing experimental testing. Consequently, we analyzed a database of new chemicals registered in France and Europe during the last twenty years reporting aquatic ecotoxicity data with respect to three trophic levels (i.e., Algae EC50 72 h, Daphnia EC50 48 h and Fish LC50 96 h). In order to ensure the relevance of the comparison between these three experimental tests, we performed a stringent data selection based on the pertinence and quality of available ecotoxicological information. At the end of this selection, less than 5% of the initial number of chemicals was retained for subsequent analysis. Such an analysis showed that fish was the least sensitive trophic level, whereas Daphnia had the highest sensitivity. Moreover, thanks to an analysis of the relative sensitivity of trophic levels, it was possible to establish that respective correction factors of 50 and 10 would be necessary if only one or two test values were available. From a physicochemical point of view, it was possible to characterize two significant correlations relating the sensitivity of the aforementioned trophic levels with the chemical structure of the retained substances. This analysis showed that algae displayed a higher sensitivity towards chemicals containing acid fragments whereas fish presented a higher sensitivity towards chemicals containing aromatic ether fragments. Overall, our work suggests that statistical analysis of historical data combined with data yielded by the REACh regulation should permit the derivation of robust safety factors, testing strategies and mathematical models. These alternative methods, in turn, could allow a replacement and reduction of ecotoxicological testing. - Research

  7. ECOTOXICITY AND PHYTOTOXICITY OF PLANT PROTECTION PRODUCTS TO RHIZOSPHERE FUNGI AND WINTER WHEAT SEEDLINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Daria Stasiulewicz-Paluch

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Registration of plant protection products involves the analysis of their effects on soil microorganisms. The residues of plant protection products penetrate the soil, but their impact on fungi remains scarcely researched. In this study, the influence of selected plant protection products on the abundance of rhizosphere-dwelling fungi and the growth of winter wheat seedlings was evaluated under greenhouse conditions. The analysed plant protection products had an inhibitory effect on the growth of filamentous fungi in the rhizosphere, whereas yeasts were resistant to those products applied to soil. Tebuconazole exerted the strongest suppressive effect on the growth of filamentous fungi, and propiconazole was characterized by the greatest phytotoxic activity against winter wheat seedlings. Azoxystrobin had the weakest ecotoxic and phytotoxic effects, and its application to soil usually led to a rapid increase in the counts of fungi of the genus Acremonium.

  8. Graphene oxide alleviates the ecotoxicity of copper on the freshwater microalga Scenedesmus obliquus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Changwei; Hu, Naitao; Li, Xiuling; Zhao, Yongjun

    2016-10-01

    The extensive industrial application of graphene oxide (GO), has increased its exposure risk to various aquatic organisms and its potential to affect the toxicity of other environmental pollutants. In this study, we investigated the combined toxicity of GO and copper on the freshwater microalga Scenedesmus obliquus, using the MIXTOX model. The effects of low concentration (1mg/L) exposure to GO were investigated with environmentally relevant concentrations of copper by using a 12-d subacute toxicity test, with pre- and post-GO treatment. Results showed that there were significant antagonistic effects between GO and copper on S. obliquus, and GO was found to reduce ecotoxicity of copper even at low and environmentally relevant concentrations (1mg/L). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Freshwater ecotoxicity characterisation factor for metal oxide nanoparticles: A case study on titanium dioxide nanoparticle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salieri, Beatrice; Righi, Serena; Pasteris, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    on freshwater organism representative of multiple trophic levels was conducted, including algae, crustaceans and fish in order to collect relevant EC50 values. Then, the toxic effect of nano-TiO2 was computed on the basis of the HC50 value. Thus, following the principle of USEtox™ model and accounting for nano...... as a characterisation model. An adjusted multimedia fate model has been developed which accounts for nano-specific fate process descriptors (i.e. sedimentation, aggregation with suspended particle matter, etc.) to estimate the fate of nano-TiO2 in freshwater. A literature survey of toxicity tests performed......-specific descriptors a CF for the toxic impact of freshwater ecotoxicity of 0.28PAFdaym3kg-1 is proposed....

  10. Reproduction of Cubaris murina (Crustacea: Isopoda under laboratory conditions and its use in ecotoxicity tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JC. Niemeyer

    Full Text Available Reproduction of the isopod Cubaris murina was studied in the laboratory in order to observe the offspring number per brood, the number and duration of the incubation periods, and the influence of repeated mating on number of young per brood. An experiment was conducted with two different groups: female/male pairs and females that were isolated after mating. No significant difference was found between the two reproductive female groups for the mean number of young per brood (x = 25 and the duration of the incubation periods (x = 17 days. One mating was enough for at least five broods, with no reduction in brood size. There was no significant difference between the number of adult males and females. Low-density cultures had a significantly higher growth rate compared to high-density cultures. Furthermore, the experimental results for optimization isopod culture conditions for terrestrial ecotoxicity testing are reported.

  11. Aquatic ecotoxicity and biodegradability of cracked gas oils. Summary of relevant test data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comber, M.I.H.; Den Haan, K.; Djemel, N.; Eadsforth, C.V.; King, D.; Parkerton, T.; Leon Paumen, M.; Dmytrasz, B.; Del Castillo, F.

    2013-09-15

    This report describes the experimental procedures and the results obtained in acute and chronic ecotoxicity tests as well as a biodegradation study on cracked gas oil samples. In a CONCAWE study, three samples were tested for toxicity to the crustacean zooplankter, Daphnia magna and the algae, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (alternatively known as Selenastrum capricornutum) using water accommodated fractions. In addition, another sample was tested in a separate API study for toxicity to the fish, Oncorhynchus mykiss, the crustacean zooplankter, Daphnia magna (acute and chronic) and the algae, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata using water accommodated fractions. The API sample was also tested for ready biodegradability in a manometric respirometry test. All these results assist in determining the environmental hazard posed by cracked gas oils.

  12. Aquatic Ecotoxicity Testing of Nanoparticles—The Quest To Disclose Nanoparticle Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjolding, Lars Michael; Sørensen, Sara Nørgaard; Hartmann, Nanna B.

    2016-01-01

    The number of products on the market containing engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) has increased significantly, and concerns have been raised regarding their ecotoxicological effects. Environmental safety assessments as well as relevant and reliable ecotoxicological data are required for the safe...... and sustainable use of ENPs. Although the number of publications on the ecotoxicological effects and uptake of ENPs is rapidly expanding, the applicability of the reported data for hazard assessment is questionable. A major knowledge gap is whether nanoparticle effects occur when test organisms are exposed...... to ENPs in aquatic test systems. Filling this gap is not straightforward, because of the broad range of ENPs and the different behavior of ENPs compared to “ordinary” (dissolved) chemicals in the ecotoxicity test systems. The risk of generating false negatives, and false positives, in the currently used...

  13. Ecotoxicity and Preliminary Risk Assessment of Nonivamide as a Promising Marine Antifoulant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujing Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The unclear environmental performance of nonivamide limits its application as a marine antifoulant. In this study, the natural degradation of nonivamide was studied in seawater and tap water. The half-life was 5.8 d, 8.8 d, 12.2 d, and 14.7 d in seawater and tap water in photolysis and biolysis, respectively. Furthermore, the ecotoxicity of nonivamide was assessed using marine microalgae, Chlorella vulgaris and Platymonas sp.; EC50,  6 d values on the growth of Chlorella vulgaris and Platymonas sp. were 16.9 mg L−1 and 19.21 mg L−1, respectively. The toxicity and environmental risk of nonivamide on microalgae were significantly decreased due to the natural degradation in seawater.

  14. The sea urchin, a versatile model for eco-toxicity studies and ecological experimental research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Privitera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Echinoderm early developmental stages represent a good tool for toxicity testing in different fields, ranging from environment to food contamination, and in full respect of the 3Rs objectives (Reduction, Refinement, Replacement of animal experiments, that will lead to the reduction of vertebrate use for toxicity testing. Further, sea urchins are key species in a wide range of marine habitats, as they are able to structure algal community. Experiments and observations aiming at the  characterization of anthropogenic or climate changes effects on their settlement, population structure, feeding behaviour and reproductive condition, may be useful to describe future scenarios regarding the whole marine community. The present paper represents a short review of the possible applications of eco-toxicity bioassays using Paracentrotus lividus gametes and embryos. Further, examples of ecological researches, involving sea urchins, aiming at the definition of future scenarios will be preserved.

  15. Enabling rapid behavioral ecotoxicity studies using an integrated lab-on-a-chip systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yushi; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-12-01

    Behavioral ecotoxicity tests are gaining an increasing recognition in environmental toxicology. Behavior of sensitive bioindicator species can change rapidly in response to an acute exposure to contaminants and thus has a much higher sensitivity as compared to conventional LC50 mortality tests. Furthermore, behavioral endpoints seems to be very good candidates to develop early-warning biomonitoring systems needed for rapid chemical risk assessment. Behavioral tests are non-invasive, fast, do not harm indicator organisms (behavioural changes are very rapid) and are thus fully compatible with 3R (Replacement - Reduction - Refinement) principle encouraging alternatives to conventional animal testing. These characteristics are essential when designing improved ecotoxicity tests for chemical risk assessment. In this work, we present a pilot development of miniaturized Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) devices for studying toxin avoidance behaviors of small aquatic crustaceans. As an investigative tool, LOCs represent a new direction that may miniaturize and revolutionize behavioral ecotoxicology. Specifically our innovative microfluidic prototype: (i) enables convening "caging" of specimens for real-time videomicroscopy; (ii) eliminates the evaporative water loss thus providing an opportunity for long-term behavioral studies; (iii) exploits laminar fluid flow under low Reynolds numbers to generate discrete domains and gradients enabling for the first time toxin avoidance studies on small aquatic crustaceans; (iv) integrates off-the-chip mechatronic interfaces and video analysis algorithms for single animal movement analysis. We provide evidence that by merging innovative bioelectronic and biomicrofluidic technologies we can deploy inexpensive and reliable systems for culture, electronic tracking and complex computational analysis of behavior of bioindicator organisms.

  16. Influence of Humic Acid on 1-Aminopyrene Ecotoxicity During Solar Photolysis Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey-Min Hwang

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: 1-Aminopyrene (1-AP, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH compound, is a major metabolite during biotransformation of 1-nitropyrene by microflora in natural environment and in the guts of animals and humans. Under UV-A irradiation, 1-AP has been shown to cause light-induced DNA single strand cleavage. Humic acids (HA in aquatic ecosystems can influence the bioavailability, toxicity, and fate of organic xenobiotics. Therefore, photochemical fate and effect of PAH in natural aquatic environment may differ significantly across sites. The objectives of this study are to assess the time course (TC; 18 and 90 minutes influence of HA (0, 20, and 60 ppm on microbial ecotoxicity of 1-AP (0 and 10 μM during solar photolysis process (PP. Microbial ecotoxicity of 1-AP during different time courses in the presence and absence of HA was measured with spread plate counting and microbial mineralization of 14C-D-glucose. The experimental results were analyzed as factorial arrangements of treatment in a complete randomized design using General Linear Model by SAS. LSMEANS was used to separate means or combination of means. Significant effect on glucose mineralization was found by the following treatment interactions 1-AP*TC, 1-AP*PP, TC*PP, HA*1-AP*TC, HA*1-AP*PP, and HA*1-AP*TC*PP. The treatment interaction HA*1-AP was the only one affecting spread plate counting. In the groups exposed to 1-AP (10 μM, microbial heterotrophic mineralization of 14C-D-glucose was significantly inhibited in the presence of HA in light and in darkness. Exposure to HA in light and darkness, however, did not necessarily inhibit bacterial viability at the HA concentration range assayed. Therefore, inhibition on microbial activity could have been caused by multiple factors, instead of toxicity of HA alone.

  17. Synchrotron Radiation Effects in the IR Solenoid Flux Excluder(LCC-0007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenenbaum, P

    2004-04-22

    We examine the emittance dilution due to synchrotron radiation in the fringing fields at the end of the ''flux excluder'' solenoid which protects the final doublet quadrupoles from the main detector solenoid field, and also the effect of SR in the main solenoid field itself.Because the deflection due to the excluder fringe field is opposite in polarity from that of the main solenoid, the resulting dispersive rays cancel at the IP; as a result the synchrotron radiation from the two magnetic fields produces only a small dilution of the vertical spot size. The contribution to the spot size from the finite opening angle of the synchrotron flux is found to be comparable to the contribution from solenoidal dispersion, and both are acceptable. We conclude that SR considerations do not rule out use of a flux excluder, and that the range of crossing angles and solenoidal fields available is large.

  18. Comparison between three different LCIA methods for aquatic ecotoxicity and a product Environmental Risk Assessment – Insights from a Detergent Case Study within OMNIITOX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pant, Rana; Van Hoof, Geert; Feijtel, Tom

    2004-01-01

    set of physico-chemical and toxicological effect data to enable a better comparison of the methodological differences. For the same reason, the system boundaries were kept the same in all cases, focusing on emissions into water at the disposal stage. Results and Discussion. Significant differences...... ecotoxicity is not satisfactory, unless explicit reasons for the differences are identifiable. This can hamper practical decision support, as LCA practitioners usually will not be in a position to choose the 'right' LCIA method for their specific case. This puts a challenge to the entire OMNIITOX project......) with results from an Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA). Material and Methods. The LCIA has been conducted with EDIP97 (chronic aquatic ecotoxicity) [1], USES-LCA (freshwater and marine water aquatic ecotoxicity, sometimes referred to as CML2001) [2, 3] and IMPACT 2002 (covering freshwater aquatic ecotoxicity...

  19. Adverse outcome pathway (AOP) development and weight of evidence evaluation as illustrated by ecological case studies using online tools such as ECOTOX and SeqAPASS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The majority of this dataset includes the query output from online databases ECOTOX and SeqAPASS used to support the ecological AOP case studies described within the...

  20. USEtox - The UNEP-SETAC toxicity model: recommended characterisation factors for human toxicity and freshwater ecotoxicity in Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Bachmann, Till M.; Swirsky Gold, Lois; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; Jolliet, Olivier; Juraske, Ronnie; Koehler, Annette; Larsen, Henrik F.; MacLeod, Matthew; Margni, Manuele; McKone, Thomas E.; Payet, Jerome; Schuhmacher, Marta; van de Meent, Dik; Hauschild, Michael Z.

    2008-02-03

    Background, Aim and Scope. In 2005 a comprehensive comparison of LCIA toxicity characterisation models was initiated by the UNEP-SETAC Life Cycle Initiative, directly involving the model developers of CalTOX, IMPACT 2002, USES-LCA, BETR, EDIP, WATSON, and EcoSense. In this paper we describe this model-comparison process and its results--in particular the scientific consensus model developed by the model developers. The main objectives of this effort were (i) to identify specific sources of differences between the models' results and structure, (ii) to detect the indispensable model components, and (iii) to build a scientific consensus model from them, representing recommended practice. Methods. A chemical test set of 45 organics covering a wide range of property combinations was selected for this purpose. All models used this set. In three workshops, the model comparison participants identified key fate, exposure and effect issues via comparison of the final characterisation factors and selected intermediate outputs for fate, human exposure and toxic effects for the test set applied to all models. Results. Through this process, we were able to reduce inter-model variation from an initial range of up to 13 orders of magnitude down to no more than 2 orders of magnitude for any substance. This led to the development of USEtox, a scientific consensus model that contains only the most influential model elements. These were, for example, process formulations accounting for intermittent rain, defining a closed or open system environment, or nesting an urban box in a continental box. Discussion. The precision of the new characterisation factors (CFs) is within a factor of 100-1000 for human health and 10-100 for freshwater ecotoxicity of all other models compared to 12 orders of magnitude variation between the CFs of each model respectively. The achieved reduction of inter-model variability by up to 11 orders of magnitude is a significant improvement

  1. Evaluation of the Ecotoxicity of Sediments from Yangtze River Estuary and Contribution of Priority PAHs to Ah Receptor-Mediated Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Chen, Ling; Shao, Ying; Zhang, Lili; Floehr, Tilman; Xiao, Hongxia; Yan, Yan; Eichbaum, Kathrin; Hollert, Henner; Wu, Lingling

    2014-01-01

    In this study, in vitro bioassays were performed to assess the ecotoxicological potential of sediments from Yangtze River estuary. The cytotoxicity and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated toxicity of sediment extracts with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver cells were determined by neutral red retention and 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase assays. The cytotoxicity and AhR-mediated activity of sediments from the Yangtze River estuary ranged from low level to moderate level compared with the ecotoxicity of sediments from other river systems. However, Yangtze River releases approximately 14 times greater water discharge compared with Rhine, a major river in Europe. Thus, the absolute pollution mass transfer of Yangtze River may be detrimental to the environmental quality of estuary and East China Sea. Effect-directed analysis was applied to identify substances causing high dioxin-like activities. To identify unknown substances contributing to dioxin-like potencies of whole extracts, we fractionated crude extracts by open column chromatography. Non-polar paraffinic components (F1), weakly and moderately polar components (F2), and highly polar substances (F3) were separated from each crude extract of sediments. F2 showed the highest dioxin-like activities. Based on the results of mass balance calculation of chemical toxic equivalent concentrations (TEQs), our conclusion is that priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons indicated a low portion of bio-TEQs ranging from 1% to 10% of crude extracts. Further studies should be conducted to identify unknown pollutants. PMID:25111307

  2. Evaluation of the ecotoxicity of sediments from Yangtze river estuary and contribution of priority PAHs to ah receptor--mediated activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Chen, Ling; Shao, Ying; Zhang, Lili; Floehr, Tilman; Xiao, Hongxia; Yan, Yan; Eichbaum, Kathrin; Hollert, Henner; Wu, Lingling

    2014-01-01

    In this study, in vitro bioassays were performed to assess the ecotoxicological potential of sediments from Yangtze River estuary. The cytotoxicity and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated toxicity of sediment extracts with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver cells were determined by neutral red retention and 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase assays. The cytotoxicity and AhR-mediated activity of sediments from the Yangtze River estuary ranged from low level to moderate level compared with the ecotoxicity of sediments from other river systems. However, Yangtze River releases approximately 14 times greater water discharge compared with Rhine, a major river in Europe. Thus, the absolute pollution mass transfer of Yangtze River may be detrimental to the environmental quality of estuary and East China Sea. Effect-directed analysis was applied to identify substances causing high dioxin-like activities. To identify unknown substances contributing to dioxin-like potencies of whole extracts, we fractionated crude extracts by open column chromatography. Non-polar paraffinic components (F1), weakly and moderately polar components (F2), and highly polar substances (F3) were separated from each crude extract of sediments. F2 showed the highest dioxin-like activities. Based on the results of mass balance calculation of chemical toxic equivalent concentrations (TEQs), our conclusion is that priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons indicated a low portion of bio-TEQs ranging from 1% to 10% of crude extracts. Further studies should be conducted to identify unknown pollutants.

  3. 48 CFR 609.404 - Excluded parties list system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excluded parties list system. 609.404 Section 609.404 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE COMPETITION... Excluded parties list system. A/OPE shall accomplish the agency responsibilities prescribed in FAR 9.404(c...

  4. 20 CFR 404.1313 - World War II service excluded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false World War II service excluded. 404.1313... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1313 World War II service excluded. Your service was not in the active service of the United...

  5. 8 CFR 1241.20 - Aliens ordered excluded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aliens ordered excluded. 1241.20 Section 1241.20 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS APPREHENSION AND DETENTION OF ALIENS ORDERED REMOVED Deportation of Excluded Aliens...

  6. The Value of the Right to Exclude: An Empirical Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Klick (Jonathan); G. Parchomovsky (Gideon)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractProperty theorists have long deemed the right to exclude fundamental and essential for the efficient use and allocation of property. Recently, however, proponents of the progressive property movement have called into question the centrality of the right to exclude, suggesting that it

  7. Green manure plants for remediation of soils polluted by metals and metalloids: ecotoxicity and human bioavailability assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucault, Y; Lévêque, T; Xiong, T; Schreck, E; Austruy, A; Shahid, M; Dumat, C

    2013-10-01

    Borage, white mustard and phacelia, green manure plants currently used in agriculture to improve soil properties were cultivated for 10 wk on various polluted soils with metal(loid) concentrations representative of urban brownfields or polluted kitchen gardens. Metal(loid) bioavailability and ecotoxicity were measured in relation to soil characteristics before and after treatment. All the plants efficiently grow on the various polluted soils. But borage and mustard only are able to modify the soil characteristics and metal(loid) impact: soil respiration increased while ecotoxicity, bioaccessible lead and total metal(loid) quantities in soils can be decreased respectively by phytostabilization and phytoextraction mechanisms. These two plants could therefore be used for urban polluted soil refunctionalization. However, plant efficiency to improve soil quality strongly depends on soil characteristics. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Assessing ecotoxicity and uptake of metals and metalloids in relation to two different earthworm species (Eiseina hortensis and Lumbricus terrestris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque, Thibaut; Capowiez, Yvan; Schreck, Eva; Mazzia, Christophe; Auffan, Mélanie; Foucault, Yann; Austruy, Annabelle; Dumat, Camille

    2013-08-01

    Due to diffuse atmospheric fallouts of process particles enriched by metals and metalloids, polluted soils concern large areas at the global scale. Useful tools to assess ecotoxicity induced by these polluted soils are therefore needed. Earthworms are currently used as biotest, however the influence of specie and earthworm behaviour, soil characteristics are poorly highlighted. Our aim was therefore to assess the toxicity of various polluted soils with process particles enriches by metals and metalloids (Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, As and Sb) collected from a lead recycling facility on two earthworm species belonging to different ecological types and thus likely to have contrasted behavioural responses (Eiseina hortensis and Lumbricus terrestris). The combination of behavioural factors measurements (cast production and biomass) and physico-chemical parameters such as metal absorption, bioaccumulation by earthworms and their localization in invertebrate tissues provided a valuable indication of pollutant bioavailability and ecotoxicity. Soil characteristics influenced ecotoxicity and metal uptake by earthworms, as well as their soil bioturbation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Use of ecotoxicity test and ecoscores to improve the management of polluted soils: case of a secondary lead smelter plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucault, Yann; Durand, Marie-José; Tack, Karine; Schreck, Eva; Geret, Florence; Leveque, Thibaut; Pradere, Philippe; Goix, Sylvaine; Dumat, Camille

    2013-02-15

    With the rise of sustainable development, rehabilitation of brownfield sites located in urban areas has become a major concern. Management of contaminated soils in relation with environmental and sanitary risk concerns is therefore a strong aim needing the development of both useful tools for risk assessment and sustainable remediation techniques. For soils polluted by metals and metalloids (MTE), the criteria for landfilling are currently not based on ecotoxicological tests but on total MTE concentrations and leaching tests. In this study, the ecotoxicity of leachates from MTE polluted soils sampled from an industrial site recycling lead-acid batteries were evaluated by using both modified Escherichia coli strains with luminescence modulated by metals and normalized Daphnia magna and Alivibrio fischeri bioassays. The results were clearly related to the type of microorganisms (crustacean, different strains of bacteria) whose sensitivity varied. Ecotoxicity was also different according to sample location on the site, total concentrations and physico-chemical properties of each soil. For comparison, standard leaching tests were also performed. Potentially phytoavailable fraction of MTE in soils and physico-chemical measures were finally performed in order to highlight the mechanisms. The results demonstrated that the use of a panel of microorganisms is suitable for hazard classification of polluted soils. In addition, calculated eco-scores permit to rank the polluted soils according to their potentially of dangerousness. Influence of soil and MTE characteristics on MTE mobility and ecotoxicity was also highlighted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Predicting the ecotoxicity of ionic liquids towards Vibrio fischeri using genetic function approximation and least squares support vector machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shuying; Lv, Min; Deng, Fangfang; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Zhai, Honglin; Lv, Wenjuan

    2015-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are widely used in industrial production for their unique physicochemical properties, and they are even regarded as green solvents. However, the recent study showed ILs might pose a potential risk to aquatic ecosystems. In the present work, the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models, including genetic function approximation (GFA) and least squares support vector machine (LSSVM) were developed for predicting the ecotoxicity of ILs towards the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri based on the descriptors calculated from cations and anions. Five descriptors were selected by GFA and used to develop the linear model. From the discussion of descriptors, the cation structure was the main factor to the toxicity, which mainly depended on the size, lipophilic, and 3D molecular structure of cations. In order to capture the nonlinear nature, the LSSVM model was also built for more accurately predicting the ecotoxicity. The GFA and LSSVM models were performed the rigorous internal and external validation, further verifying these models with excellent robustness and predictive ability. Therefore, both of models can be used for the prediction of the ecotoxicity of newly synthesized and untested ILs, and can provide reference information and theoretical guidance for designing and synthesizing safer and more eco-friendly ILs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ecotoxicity assessment of particulate matter emitted from heavy-duty diesel-powered vehicles: influence of leaching conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Albertina X R; Testolin, Renan C; Torres, Mariana M; Cotelle, Sylvie; Schwartz, Jean-Jacques; Millet, Maurice; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2017-04-01

    Concerns regarding the environmental impact of diesel exhaust particulate matter (DPM) have increased in recent years. Following emission to the atmosphere, these fine materials can sorb many contaminants at their surface, which can subsequently be released, for instance, due to physicochemical environmental changes. The desorption of contaminants from particulate matter will increase the environmental pollution and can promote ecotoxicological effects. In this context, the objective of this study was to assess the aquatic ecotoxicity profile of extracts of DPM obtained at two different pH values. Thus, after collecting particulate matter from the diesel exhaust of heavy engines, extracts were obtained with pure water (at pH 2.00 and 5.00) and with a mixture of three organic solvents (dichloromethane, n-hexane, and acetone). To assess the environmental impact of DPM, the exhaust extracts were used in a battery of aquatic bioassays including key organisms of the food chain: bacteria (Aliivibrio fischeri), algae (Scenedesmus subspicatus), daphnids (Daphnia magna), and fishes (Danio rerio). The aqueous leachate at natural pH (2.0) and solvent extracts were extremely ecotoxic, while the aqueous leachate at pH = 5.0 showed the lowest ecotoxicity. The global ranking of sensitivity for the biotests tested was daphnids > algae > bacteria > fishes. Thus, the use of this bioassay battery could improve our understanding of the impact of DPM on aquatic environments, which is dependent on the pH of the leaching process.

  12. NanoE-Tox: New and in-depth database concerning ecotoxicity of nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katre Juganson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing production and use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs inevitably results in their higher concentrations in the environment. This may lead to undesirable environmental effects and thus warrants risk assessment. The ecotoxicity testing of a wide variety of ENMs rapidly evolving in the market is costly but also ethically questionable when bioassays with vertebrates are conducted. Therefore, alternative methods, e.g., models for predicting toxicity mechanisms of ENMs based on their physico-chemical properties (e.g., quantitative (nanostructure-activity relationships, QSARs/QNARs, should be developed. While the development of such models relies on good-quality experimental toxicity data, most of the available data in the literature even for the same test species are highly variable. In order to map and analyse the state of the art of the existing nanoecotoxicological information suitable for QNARs, we created a database NanoE-Tox that is available as . The database is based on existing literature on ecotoxicology of eight ENMs with different chemical composition: carbon nanotubes (CNTs, fullerenes, silver (Ag, titanium dioxide (TiO2, zinc oxide (ZnO, cerium dioxide (CeO2, copper oxide (CuO, and iron oxide (FeOx; Fe2O3, Fe3O4. Altogether, NanoE-Tox database consolidates data from 224 articles and lists altogether 1,518 toxicity values (EC50/LC50/NOEC with corresponding test conditions and physico-chemical parameters of the ENMs as well as reported toxicity mechanisms and uptake of ENMs in the organisms. 35% of the data in NanoE-Tox concerns ecotoxicity of Ag NPs, followed by TiO2 (22%, CeO2 (13%, and ZnO (10%. Most of the data originates from studies with crustaceans (26%, bacteria (17%, fish (13%, and algae (11%. Based on the median toxicity values of the most sensitive organism (data derived from three or more articles the toxicity order was as follows: Ag > ZnO > CuO > CeO2 > CNTs > TiO2 > FeOx. We believe NanoE-Tox database contains

  13. Elimination and ecotoxicity evaluation of phthalic acid esters from textile-dyeing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jieying; Ning, Xun-An; Kong, Minyi; Liu, Daohua; Wang, Guangwen; Cai, Haili; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Yaping; Lu, Xingwen; Yuan, Yong

    2017-12-01

    Phthalic acid esters (PAEs), presented in fabrics, surfactants and detergents, were discharged into the ecosystem during textile-dyeing wastewater treatment and might have adverse effects on water ecosystems. In this study, comprehensive investigations of the content and component distributions of 12 PAEs across different units of four textile-dyeing wastewater plants were carried out in Guangdong Province, China. Ecotoxicity assessments were also conducted based on risk quotients (RQs). On average, 93.54% TOC and 80.14% COD Cr were removed following treatment at the four plants. The average concentration of Σ 12 PAEs in effluent was 11.78 μg/L. PAEs with highest concentrations were dimethylphthalate (6.58 μg/L), bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (2.23 μg/L), and dibutylphthalate (1.98 μg/L). The concentrations of the main toxic PAEs were 2.23 μg/L (bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate), 0.19 μg/L (diisononylphthalate) and 0.67 μg/L (dinoctylphthalate); corresponding RQs were 1.4, 0.55, and 0.54 for green algae, respectively. The RQs of Σ 12 PAEs in effluent of the four plants were >0.1, indicating that Σ 12 PAEs posed medium or higher ecological risk to fish, Daphnia and green algae. Physicochemical-biochemical system was found to be more effective than biochemical-physicochemical system for TOC and COD Cr removal, because pre-physicochemical treatment helped to remove macromolecular organic substances, and reduced the competition with other pollutants during biochemical treatment. However, biochemical-physicochemical system was more effective than physicochemical-biochemical system for elimination of PAEs and for detoxification, since the biochemical treatment might produce the toxic PAEs that could helpfully be settled by post-physicochemical treatment. Moreover, ecotoxicity evaluation was recommended for current textile-dyeing wastewater treatment plants. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Office of Inspector General List of Excluded Individuals and Entities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The objective is to ensure that providers who bill Federal health care programs do not submit claims for services furnished, ordered or prescribed by an excluded...

  15. [Eco-toxicity diagnosis on sediments of petroleum wastewater irrigation channel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yufang; Zhou, Qixing; Song, Xueying; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Tieheng

    2005-01-01

    Sediment samples were collected from several sites in the upper, mid and lower reaches of the petroleum wastewater irrigation channel in eastern Shenyang of China, and the concentrations of their Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd and mineral oil were analyzed. The results showed that the pollutants were accumulated in all of sediment samples, with 408-118,300 mg x kg(-1) mineral oil, 17.83-78.53 mg x kg(-1) Cu, 35.76-155.16 mg x kg(-1) Zn, 8.50-31.03 mg x kg(-1) Pb and 0.1-1.0 mg x kg(-1) Cd. The sediments showed an inhibition or stimulation effect on plant root elongation and a lethal and sub-lethal effect on earthworm. The inhibition rate of root elongation based on germination test was -29.81 to 93.8%. During 14 d exposure, the maximum mortality rate of earworm was 100%, and during 14d and 28d exposure, the inhibition rate of its body weight growth was -36.6%-(-)6.08% and -40.4%-6.1%, respectively. The study indicated that a long-term irrigation with petroleum wastewater resulted in the accumulation of pollutants in channel sediments and enhanced eco-toxicity.

  16. Comparative ecotoxicity of imidacloprid and dinotefuran to aquatic insects in rice mesocosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobashi, Koji; Harada, Takaaki; Adachi, Yoshihiro; Mori, Miho; Ihara, Makoto; Hayasaka, Daisuke

    2017-04-01

    There are growing concerns about the impacts of neonicotinoid insecticides on ecosystems worldwide, and yet ecotoxicity of many of these chemicals at community or ecosystem levels have not been evaluated under realistic conditions. In this study, effects of two neonicotinoid insecticides, imidacloprid and dinotefuran, on aquatic insect assemblages were evaluated in experimental rice mesocosms. During the 5-month period of the rice-growing season, residual concentrations of imidacloprid were 5-10 times higher than those of dinotefuran in both soil and water. Imidacloprid treatment (10kg/ha) reduced significantly the populations of, Crocothemis servilia mariannae and Lyriothemis pachygastra nymphs, whereas those of Orthetrum albistylum speciosum increased slightly throughout the experimental period. However, Notonecta triguttata, which numbers were high from the start, later declined, indicating possible delayed chronic toxicity, while Guignotus japonicus disappeared. In contrast, dinotefuran (10kg/ha) did not decrease the populations of any species, but rather increased the abundance of some insects, particularly Chironominae spp. larvae and C. servilia mariannae nymphs, with the latter being 1.7x higher than those of controls. This was an indirect effect resulting from increased prey (e.g., chironomid larvae) and lack of competition with other dragonfly species. The susceptibilities of dragonfly nymphs to neonicotinoids, particularly imidacloprid, were consistent with those reported elsewhere. In general, imidacloprid had higher impacts on aquatic insects compared to dinotefuran. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The ecotoxicity of graphene family materials: current status, knowledge gaps and future needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jastrzębska, Agnieszka Maria, E-mail: agsolgala@gmail.com; Olszyna, Andrzej Roman, E-mail: aolszyna@meil.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering (Poland)

    2015-01-15

    Recently, graphene family materials (GFMs) have been introduced among all fields of science and still get numerous attention. Also, the applicability of these materials in many areas makes them very attractive. GFMs have attracted both academic and industrial interest as they can produce a dramatic improvement in materials properties at very low filler content. The aim of this review is to identify, summarize, and present the first available information on the influence of GFMs on soil and water environment as well as identify the knowledge gaps and indicate the directions for the next generation of the original scientific investigations. The paper also presents our first preliminary impact assessment and potential pathways of GFMs distribution in the environment. We used as an example the reduced graphene oxide/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite (RGO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) that has been previously designed and synthesized by us. Authors believe that further work should focus on improvement of characterization methodology applicable for ecotoxicity analyses and possible interactions between GFMs and different living ecosystems. Consequently, the potential impact of graphene and its derivatives on environmental health is a matter of academic interest. However, potential hazards sufficient for risk assessment and concerned with GFMs usage in consumer products first need to be investigated and identified. Further research should focus on gathering knowledge on GFMs properties for life cycle analyses, which still poses a great challenge for scientists.

  18. Development of QSAR model to predict the ecotoxicity of Vibrio fischeri using COSMO-RS descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Ouahid Ben; Mutalib, M I Abdul; Lévêque, Jean-Marc; El-Harbawi, Mohanad

    2017-03-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are class of solvent whose properties can be modified and tuned to meet industrial requirements. However, a high number of potentially available cations and anions leads to an even increasing members of newly-synthesized ionic liquids, adding to the complexity of understanding on their impact on aquatic organisms. Quantitative structure activity∖property relationship (QSAR∖QSPR) technique has been proven to be a useful method for toxicity prediction. In this work,σ-profile descriptors were used to build linear and non-linear QSAR models to predict the ecotoxicities of a wide variety of ILs towards bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Linear model was constructed using five descriptors resulting in high accuracy prediction of 0.906. The model performance and stability were ascertained using k-fold cross validation method. The selected descriptors set from the linear model was then used in multilayer perceptron (MLP) technique to develop the non-linear model, the accuracy of the model was further enhanced achieving high correlation coefficient with the lowest value being 0.961 with the highest mean square error of 0.157. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. NAPL migration and ecotoxicity of conventional and renewable fuels in accidental spill scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malk, Vuokko; Barreto Tejera, Eduardo; Simpanen, Suvi; Dahl, Mari; Mäkelä, Riikka; Häkkinen, Jani; Kiiski, Anna; Penttinen, Olli-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    Fuels derived from non-petroleum renewable resources have raised interest due to their potential in replacing petroleum-based fuels, but information on their fate and effects in the terrestrial and aquatic environments in accidental spill scenario is limited. In this study, migration of four fuels (conventional diesel, conventional gasoline, renewable diesel NExBTL, and ethanol-blended gasoline RE85 containing maximum 85% ethanol) as non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) in soil was demonstrated in a laboratory-scale experiment. Ecotoxicity data was produced for the same fuels. There was no significant difference in migration of conventional and renewable diesel, but gasoline migrated 1.5 times deeper and 7-9 times faster in sand than diesel. RE85 spread horizontally wider but not as deep (p Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri, also demonstrating groundwater toxicity. The WAF of conventional gasoline and RE85 showed almost similar toxicity to both the aquatic test species. EC50 values of 1:10 (by volume) WAF were 9.9 %WAF (gasoline) and 9.3 %WAF (RE85) to D. magna and 9.3 %WAF (gasoline) and 12.3 %WAF (RE85) to V. fischeri. Low solubility decreased toxicity potential of conventional diesel in aquatic environment, but direct physical effects of oil phase pose a threat to organisms in nature. Renewable diesel NExBTL did not show clear toxicity to any test species.

  20. Ecotoxicity of Concretes with Granulated Slag from Gray Iron Pilot Production as Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Hybská

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on research concerning the ecotoxicological properties of granulated slag from the pilot production of gray iron with red mud addition and concrete composites with the application of this slag. Red mud is a hazardous waste generated in the production of aluminium oxide. Negative ecotoxicological tests are, therefore, one of the basic prerequisites for the ability to use granulated slag from gray iron pilot production. Granulated slag and concrete composite samples with various ratios of granulated slag have been subject to ecotoxicity tests: determining root growth inhibition in the highly-cultivated plant Sinapis alba, and determining acute toxicity in Daphnia magna. The results of ecotoxicological testing of granulated slag from gray iron standard production and gray iron pilot production with the additive were, according to the standard (STN 83 8303, negative. Additionally, the results of ecotoxicological tests of concrete composites were negative, with the exception of a 50% substitution of fine aggregate with slag from gray iron pilot production.

  1. Chemical footprint method for improved communication of freshwater ecotoxicity impacts in the context of ecological limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørn, Anders; Diamond, Miriam; Birkved, Morten; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2014-11-18

    The ecological footprint method has been successful in communicating environmental impacts of anthropogenic activities in the context of ecological limits. We introduce a chemical footprint method that expresses ecotoxicity impacts from anthropogenic chemical emissions as the dilution needed to avoid freshwater ecosystem damage. The indicator is based on USEtox characterization factors with a modified toxicity reference point. Chemical footprint results can be compared to the actual dilution capacity within the geographic vicinity receiving the emissions to estimate whether its ecological limit has been exceeded and hence whether emissions can be expected to be environmentally sustainable. The footprint method was illustrated using two case studies. The first was all inventoried emissions from European countries and selected metropolitan areas in 2004, which indicated that the dilution capacity was likely exceeded for most European countries and all landlocked metropolitan areas. The second case study indicated that peak application of pesticides alone was likely to exceed Denmark's freshwater dilution capacity in 1999-2011. The uncertainty assessment showed that better spatially differentiated fate factors would be useful and pointed out other major sources of uncertainty and some opportunities to reduce these.

  2. Multiple linear and principal component regressions for modelling ecotoxicity bioassay response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Ana I; Pires, José C M; Figueiredo, Sónia A; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2014-01-01

    The ecotoxicological response of the living organisms in an aquatic system depends on the physical, chemical and bacteriological variables, as well as the interactions between them. An important challenge to scientists is to understand the interaction and behaviour of factors involved in a multidimensional process such as the ecotoxicological response. With this aim, multiple linear regression (MLR) and principal component regression were applied to the ecotoxicity bioassay response of Chlorella vulgaris and Vibrio fischeri in water collected at seven sites of Leça river during five monitoring campaigns (February, May, June, August and September of 2006). The river water characterization included the analysis of 22 physicochemical and 3 microbiological parameters. The model that best fitted the data was MLR, which shows: (i) a negative correlation with dissolved organic carbon, zinc and manganese, and a positive one with turbidity and arsenic, regarding C. vulgaris toxic response; (ii) a negative correlation with conductivity and turbidity and a positive one with phosphorus, hardness, iron, mercury, arsenic and faecal coliforms, concerning V. fischeri toxic response. This integrated assessment may allow the evaluation of the effect of future pollution abatement measures over the water quality of Leça River.

  3. Excluded-volume effects in the diffusion of hard spheres

    KAUST Repository

    Bruna, Maria

    2012-01-03

    Excluded-volume effects can play an important role in determining transport properties in diffusion of particles. Here, the diffusion of finite-sized hard-core interacting particles in two or three dimensions is considered systematically using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. The result is a nonlinear diffusion equation for the one-particle distribution function, with excluded-volume effects enhancing the overall collective diffusion rate. An expression for the effective (collective) diffusion coefficient is obtained. Stochastic simulations of the full particle system are shown to compare well with the solution of this equation for two examples. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  4. Ecotoxicity evaluation of an amended soil contaminated with uranium and radium using sensitive plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, M. M.; Lopes, J.; Magalhães, M. C. F.; Santos, E.

    2012-04-01

    In the centre-north granitic regions of Portugal, during the twenty century radium and uranium were exploited from approximately 60 mines. The closure of all uranium mines, in 2001, raised concerns regarding the possible chemical and radiological effects on the inhabitants health around the mine areas. The main objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of organic amendments and organic hydroxiapatite in the ecotoxicity reduction of agricultural soils contaminated with uranium and radium, by germination and growth tests of two sensitive plants (Lactuca sativa L. and Zea mays L.). Pot experiments, under controlled conditions, were undertaken during two months of incubation at 70% of the soil water-holding capacity. Fluvisol from Urgeiriça region containing large concentration of Utotal (635 mg/kg) and 226Ra (2310 Bq/kg) was used. The soil available fraction, extracted with ammonium acetate, corresponds to 90% and 25% of total concentration of Utotal and 226Ra, respectively. Fine ground bone (FB) and sheep manure (OM) single or mixtures were used as amendments. Four treatments, plus control were carried out in triplicate: (A) soil+40 Mg/ha of FB; (B) soil+70 Mg/ha of OM; (C) soil+70 Mg/ha of OM+40 Mg/ha of FB; (D) soil+70 Mg/ha of OM+20 Mg/ha of FB. After the incubation moist soils were kept at 4-5 °C and subsamples were used for leachates extraction following DIN 38414-S4 method. Maize and lettuce seeds were sown in filter paper moistened with the leachates aqueous solutions and in the moist soil for germination and growth tests. Seedlings after three days of germination were used for growth tests in hydroponic, during seven days, using the leachates. Five seeds per replicate were used. Soil presented: pH(H2O)=5.15, EC=7.3 µS/cm; and Corgnic=12.5 g/kg. After two months of incubation soil pH increased to a maximum of 6.53 in amended samples, and EC showed a dramatic increase when compared to the control (0.398 dS/m), from 1.5 dS/m (treatment-A) to 4.7 d

  5. Ecotoxicity Assessment of Contaminated Dredged Material with the Marine Amphipod Corophium volutator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarelli; Vonck; van Straalen NM; Stronkhorst

    1998-05-01

    The incorporation of toxicological data from bioassays can improve the present system of sediment quality criteria in the Netherlands. The use of acute lethality toxicity tests alone does not however provide sufficient discrimination and sensitivity for predicting ecological effects of slightly and moderately contaminated dredged material. Sublethal endpoints are needed for the assessment of environmental hazards of such dredged material. In this study, two approaches were used to identify toxicity of marine sediments collected from 16 locations classified as "slightly and moderately contaminated" on the basis of chemical data: (1) a comparison of growth vs. mortality as different endpoints in the marine amphipod Corophium volutator (Pallas); (2) an investigation on the use of sediment dilutions to characterize the degree of toxicity. The influence of sediment storage time on toxicity was also evaluated. In four out of 16 locations, mortality over 10 days of exposure ranged 80-100%; in two out of 16 locations mortality ranged 40-60%. In the other 10 locations, mortality was below 15%. Results on growth showed that in all locations final dry weight values were significantly lower (a factor of 1.5 to 3) than in controls. Results of dilution experiments showed that if sediments were diluted with a reference sediment of similar physicochemical characteristics, total concentrations of metals, mineral oil, and PAHs decreased as expected and so did the effects on C. volutator. In the 100% contaminated sediments growth was reduced by 32-60% compared to controls. The dilution rate necessary to reduce toxicity to the EC10 value for growth of C. volutator was considered an appropriate endpoint for the evaluation. When sediments were stored for a period of 3-5 months at 4 degreesC and retested, effects on mortality and growth decreased, although some effects on growth were still measured after 5 months of storage. The experiments illustrate the usefulness of ecotoxicity

  6. Activated carbon from pyrolysed sugarcane bagasse: Silver nanoparticle modification and ecotoxicity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonçalves, Suely Patrícia C., E-mail: suely.goncalves@lnnano.cnpem.br [Brazilian Nanotechnology National Laboratory (LNNano), Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials (CNPEM), CEP 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Strauss, Mathias; Delite, Fabrício S. [Brazilian Nanotechnology National Laboratory (LNNano), Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials (CNPEM), CEP 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Clemente, Zaira [Brazilian Nanotechnology National Laboratory (LNNano), Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials (CNPEM), CEP 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Laboratory of Ecotoxicology and Biosafety, Embrapa, CEP 13820-000 Jaguariúna, SP (Brazil); Castro, Vera L. [Laboratory of Ecotoxicology and Biosafety, Embrapa, CEP 13820-000 Jaguariúna, SP (Brazil); Martinez, Diego Stéfani T., E-mail: diego.martinez@lnnano.cnpem.br [Brazilian Nanotechnology National Laboratory (LNNano), Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials (CNPEM), CEP 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); School of Technology, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), CEP 13484-332 Limeira, SP (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    Activated carbon from pyrolysed sugarcane bagasse (ACPB) presented pore size ranges from 1.0 to 3.5 nm, and surface area between 1200 and 1400 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} that is higher than commonly observed to commercial activated carbon. The ACPB material was successfully loaded with of silver nanoparticles with diameter around 35 nm (0.81 wt.%). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses showed that the material surface contains metallic/Ag{sup 0} (93.60 wt.%) and ionic/Ag{sup +} states (6.40 wt.%). The adsorption capacity of organic model molecules (i.e. methylene blue and phenol) was very efficient to ACPB and ACPB loaded with silver nanoparticles (ACPB-AgNP), indicating that the material modification with silver nanoparticles has not altered its adsorption capacity. ACPB-AgNP inhibited bacteria growth (Escherichia coli), it is a promising advantage for the use of these materials in wastewater treatment and water purification processes. However, ACPB-AgNP showed environmental risks, with toxic effect to the aquatic organism Hydra attenuata (i.e. LC50 value of 1.94 mg L{sup −1}), and it suppressed root development of Lycopersicum esculentum plant (tomato). Finally, this work draw attention for the environmental implications of activated carbon materials modified with silver nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Production of very efficient activated carbon by pyrolysis process of sugarcane bagasse. • Modification of activated carbon with silver nanoparticles to environmental remediation and water purification. • Activated carbon modified with silver nanoparticles showed acute ecotoxic effects.

  7. Ecotoxicity of fluvial sediments downstream of the Ajka red mud spill, Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebercz, Orsolya; Mayes, William M; Ánton, Aron Dániel; Feigl, Viktória; Jarvis, Adam P; Gruiz, Katalin

    2012-08-01

    An integrated assessment of biological activity and ecotoxicity of fluvial sediments in the Marcal river catchment (3078 km(2)), western Hungary, is presented following the accidental spill of bauxite processing residue (red mud) in Ajka. Red mud contaminated sediments are characterised by elevated pH, elevated trace element concentrations (e.g. As, Co, Cr, V), high exchangeable Na, and induce an adverse effect on test species across a range of trophic levels. While background contamination of the river system is highlighted by adverse effects on some test species at sites unaffected by red mud, the most pronounced toxic effects apparent in Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition, Lemna minor bioassay and Sinapis alba root and shoot growth occur at red mud depositional hotspots in the lower Torna Creek and upper Marcal. Heterocypris incongruens bioassays show no clear patterns, although the most red mud-rich sites do exert an adverse effect. Red mud does however appear to induce an increase in the density of aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacterial communities when compared with unaffected sediments and reference sites. Given the volume of material released in the spill, it is encouraging that the signal of the red mud on aquatic biota is visible at a relatively small number of sites. Gypsum-affected samples appear to induce an adverse effect in some bioassays (Sinapis alba and Heterocypris incongruens), which may be a feature of fine grain size, limited nutrient supply and greater availability of trace contaminants in the channel reaches that are subject to intense gypsum dosing. Implications for monitoring and management of the spill are discussed.

  8. Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacteria Exhibit a Species-Specific Response to Dispersed Oil while Moderating Ecotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overholt, Will A.; Marks, Kala P.; Romero, Isabel C.; Hollander, David J.; Snell, Terry W.

    2015-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon blowout in April 2010 represented the largest accidental marine oil spill and the largest release of chemical dispersants into the environment to date. While dispersant application may provide numerous benefits to oil spill response efforts, the impacts of dispersants and potential synergistic effects with crude oil on individual hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria are poorly understood. In this study, two environmentally relevant species of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were utilized to quantify the response to Macondo crude oil and Corexit 9500A-dispersed oil in terms of bacterial growth and oil degradation potential. In addition, specific hydrocarbon compounds were quantified in the dissolved phase of the medium and linked to ecotoxicity using a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-approved rotifer assay. Bacterial treatment significantly and drastically reduced the toxicity associated with dispersed oil (increasing the 50% lethal concentration [LC50] by 215%). The growth and crude oil degradation potential of Acinetobacter were inhibited by Corexit by 34% and 40%, respectively; conversely, Corexit significantly enhanced the growth of Alcanivorax by 10% relative to that in undispersed oil. Furthermore, both bacterial strains were shown to grow with Corexit as the sole carbon and energy source. Hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial species demonstrate a unique response to dispersed oil compared to their response to crude oil, with potentially opposing effects on toxicity. While some species have the potential to enhance the toxicity of crude oil by producing biosurfactants, the same bacteria may reduce the toxicity associated with dispersed oil through degradation or sequestration. PMID:26546426

  9. Improving substance information in usetox®, part 1: discussion on data and approaches for estimating freshwater ecotoxicity effect factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saouter, Erwan; Aschberger, Karin; Fantke, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The scientific consensus model USEtox® is recommended by the European Commission as the reference model to characterize life cycle chemical emissions in terms of their potential human toxicity and freshwater aquatic ecotoxicity impacts in the context of the International Reference Life Cycle Data...... System (ILCD) Handbook and the Environmental Footprint pilot phase looking at products (PEF) and organisations (OEF). Consequently, this model has been systematically used within the PEF/OEF pilot phase by 25 EU industry sectors, which manufacture a wide variety of consumer products. This testing phase...

  10. Ecotoxicity tests based on phototactic behaviour in Daphnia magna; Saggi di ecotossicita` con Daphnia magna basati sul comportamento fototattico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dojmi di Delupis, Gianluigi [Istituto Superiore di Sanita`, Rome (Italy). Lab. di Tossicologia Comparata ed Ecotossicologia

    1997-03-01

    Zooplankton behaviour depending on light, such as phototaxis, is important, mainly in terms of its ecological significance, as, for example, in the role of phototaxis in the diurnal vertical migration of Daphnia magna, and its possible involvement in predator-prey relations. In Daphnia magna chemicals were found to induce roughly three types of phototaxis alteration: depression, enhancement and sign change. These phenomena are based on mechanisms that require further investigation. In spite of the complex photobehaviour of Daphnia magna and the scarce knowledge of toxic effects, it was possible to set up rapid and easy ecotoxicity tests by fixing certain experimental conditions.

  11. 5 CFR 2634.203 - Persons excluded by rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE, QUALIFIED TRUSTS, AND CERTIFICATES OF DIVESTITURE Persons Required To File Public Financial Disclosure Reports § 2634.203 Persons excluded by rule. (a) In general. Any individual or group of... not affect adversely the integrity of the Government or the public's confidence in the integrity of...

  12. 40 CFR 240.201 - Solid wastes excluded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Solid wastes excluded. 240.201 Section 240.201 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.201 Solid...

  13. 42 CFR 412.25 - Excluded hospital units: Common requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... decreased at any time during a cost reporting period if the hospital notifies its fiscal intermediary and... chief medical officer of the hospital in which it is located. (B) It maintains admission and discharge... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excluded hospital units: Common requirements. 412...

  14. 8 CFR 1240.38 - Fingerprinting of excluded aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fingerprinting of excluded aliens. 1240.38 Section 1240.38 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEEDINGS TO DETERMINE REMOVABILITY OF ALIENS IN THE UNITED STATES Exclusion of...

  15. The public space and the right to exclude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Urzúa Bastida

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper raises that the notion of «public space», as is currently used, legitimize, at the same time is the base of what might be called the right to exclude. This is not happening by law, but culture. To argue this, there will develop three ideas: comfort, planning and civic order, presents in the above mentioned notion.

  16. 26 CFR 1.410(b)-6 - Excludable employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... section 861(a)(3)) is treated as an excludable employee. (2) Special treaty rule. In addition, an employee... year (for purposes of this paragraph (f)(1)(v), a plan that uses the elapsed time method of determining... provided for such term by 29 CFR 2530.200b-2 under the general method of crediting service for the employee...

  17. 29 CFR 548.305 - Excluding certain additions to wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... excluded are: modest housing, bonuses or prizes of various sorts, tuition paid by the employer for the... business. It may also include such things as payment by the employer of the employee's social security tax...-of-living bonus of $260 each calendar quarter, or $20 per week. The employee works overtime in only 2...

  18. University Benefits Survey. Part I (All Benefits Excluding Pensions).

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of Western Ontario, London.

    Results of a 1986 survey of benefits, excluding pensions, for 17 Ontario, Canada, universities are presented. Information is provided on the following areas: whether the university self- administers insurance plans, communication of benefits, proposed changes in benefits, provision of accidental death and dismemberment insurance, maternity leave…

  19. University Benefits Survey. Part 1 (All Benefits Excluding Pensions).

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of Western Ontario, London.

    Results of a 1983 survey of benefits, excluding pensions, for 17 Ontario, Canada, universities are presented. Information is provided on the following areas: whether the university self-administers insurance plans, communication of benefits, proposed changes in benefits, provision of life and dismemberment insurance, maternity leave policy,…

  20. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) prediction of (eco)toxicity of short aliphatic protic ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peric, Brezana; Sierra, Jordi; Martí, Esther; Cruañas, Robert; Garau, Maria Antonia

    2015-05-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are considered as a group of very promising compounds due to their excellent properties (practical non-volatility, high thermal stability and very good and diverse solving capacity). The ILs have a good prospect of replacing traditional organic solvents in vast variety of applications. However, the complete information on their environmental impact is still not available. There is also an enormous number of possible combinations of anions and cations which can form ILs, the fact that requires a method allowing the prediction of toxicity of existing and potential ILs. In this study, a group contribution QSAR model has been used in order to predict the (eco)toxicity of protic and aprotic ILs for five tests (Microtox®, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Lemna minor growth inhibition test, and Acetylcholinestherase inhibition and Cell viability assay with IPC-81 cells). The predicted and experimental toxicity are well correlated. A prediction of EC50 for these (eco)toxicity tests has also been made for eight representatives of the new family of short aliphatic protic ILs, whose toxicity has not been determined experimentally to date. The QSAR model applied in this study can allow the selection of potentially less toxic ILs amongst the existing ones (e.g. in the case of aprotic ILs), but it can also be very helpful in directing the synthesis efforts toward developing new "greener" ILs respectful with the environment (e.g. short aliphatic protic ILs). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. NanoCRED: A transparent framework to assess the regulatory adequacy of ecotoxicity data for nanomaterials – relevance and reliability revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Nanna B.; Ågerstrand, Malene; Lützhøft, Hans-Christian Holten

    2017-01-01

    adequate for regulatory use. Here we propose a framework for reliability and relevance evaluation of ecotoxicity data for nanomaterials that take into account the challenges and characterisation requirements associated with testing of these substances. The nanoCRED evaluation criteria, and accompanying...

  2. Ecotoxicity evaluation of a WWTP effluent treated by solar photo-Fenton at neutral pH in a raceway pond reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, A M; Rivas, G; Campos-Mañas, M C; Casas López, J L; Agüera, A; Sánchez Pérez, J A

    2017-01-01

    Some pollutants can be resistant to wastewater treatment, hence becoming a risk to aquatic and terrestrial biota even at the very low concentrations (ng L -1 -μg L -1 ) they are commonly found at. Tertiary treatments are used for micropollutant removal but little is known about the ecotoxicity of the treated effluent. In this study, a municipal secondary effluent was treated by a solar photo-Fenton reactor at initial neutral pH in a raceway pond reactor, and ecotoxicity was evaluated before and after micropollutant removal. Thirty-nine micropollutants were identified in the secondary effluent, mainly pharmaceuticals, with a total concentration of ≈80 μg L -1 . After treatment, 99 % microcontaminant degradation was reached. As for ecotoxicity reduction, the assayed organisms showed the following sensitivity levels: Tetrahymena thermophila > Daphnia magna > Lactuca sativa > Spirodela polyrhiza ≈ Vibrio fischeri. The initial effluent showed an inhibitory effect of 40 % for T. thermophila and 20 % for D. magna. After 20 min of photo-Fenton treatment, no toxic effect was observed for T. thermophila and toxicity dropped to 5 % for D. magna. Graphical abstract Ecotoxicity removal by solar photo-Fenton at neutral pH. ᅟ.

  3. Notification of the commission on the eco-toxicity of chemical substances; Avis de la commission d'evaluation de l'ecotoxicite des substances chimiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The french commission on the evaluation of the chemical substances eco-toxicity, published recommendations concerning the use of additives for the automotive fuels, for the cooling circuit of electric power plants and for gases against fire. The risks for the public health are analysed and safety precautions are asked. (A.L.B.)

  4. Excluded volume effect enhances the homology pairing of model chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamiya, Kazunori; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Isami, Shuhei; Nishimori, Hiraku; Awazu, Akinori

    To investigate the structural dynamics of the homology pairing of polymers, we mod- eled the scenario of homologous chromosome pairings during meiosis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, one of the simplest model organisms of eukaryotes. We consider a simple model consist- ing of pairs of homologous polymers with the same structures that are confined in a cylindrical container, which represents the local parts of chromosomes contained in an elongated nucleus of S. pombe. Brownian dynamics simulations of this model showed that the excluded volume effects among non-homological chromosomes and the transitional dynamics of nuclear shape serve to enhance the pairing of homologous chromosomes.

  5. Diffusion of multiple species with excluded-volume effects

    KAUST Repository

    Bruna, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic models of diffusion with excluded-volume effects are used to model many biological and physical systems at a discrete level. The average properties of the population may be described by a continuum model based on partial differential equations. In this paper we consider multiple interacting subpopulations/species and study how the inter-species competition emerges at the population level. Each individual is described as a finite-size hard core interacting particle undergoing Brownian motion. The link between the discrete stochastic equations of motion and the continuum model is considered systematically using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. The system for two species leads to a nonlinear cross-diffusion system for each subpopulation, which captures the enhancement of the effective diffusion rate due to excluded-volume interactions between particles of the same species, and the diminishment due to particles of the other species. This model can explain two alternative notions of the diffusion coefficient that are often confounded, namely collective diffusion and self-diffusion. Simulations of the discrete system show good agreement with the analytic results. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  6. HLA region excluded by linkage analyses of early onset periodontitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, C.; Wang, S.; Lopez, N.

    1994-09-01

    Previous studies suggested that HLA genes may influence susceptibility to early-onset periodontitis (EOP). Segregation analyses indicate that EOP may be due to a single major gene. We conducted linkage analyses to assess possible HLA effects on EOP. Fifty families with two or more close relatives affected by EOP were ascertained in Virginia and Chile. A microsatellite polymorphism within the HLA region (at the tumor necrosis factor beta locus) was typed using PCR. Linkage analyses used a donimant model most strongly supported by previous studies. Assuming locus homogeneity, our results exclude a susceptibility gene within 10 cM on either side of our marker locus. This encompasses all of the HLA region. Analyses assuming alternative models gave qualitatively similar results. Allowing for locus heterogeneity, our data still provide no support for HLA-region involvement. However, our data do not statistically exclude (LOD <-2.0) hypotheses of disease-locus heterogeneity, including models where up to half of our families could contain an EOP disease gene located in the HLA region. This is due to the limited power of even our relatively large collection of families and the inherent difficulties of mapping genes for disorders that have complex and heterogeneous etiologies. Additional statistical analyses, recruitment of families, and typing of flanking DNA markers are planned to more conclusively address these issues with respect to the HLA region and other candidate locations in the human genome. Additional results for markers covering most of the human genome will also be presented.

  7. Large Marine Ecosystems and coastal water archetypes implemented in LCIA methods for marine eutrophication and metals ecotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosme, Nuno Miguel Dias; Dong, Yan; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    The marine eutrophication (MEu) and marine ecotoxicity (MEc) indicators in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) respectively express the eutrophying impact of nitrogen (N) and the toxic impact of metals emissions to the marine environment. Characterisation Factors (CF) are calculated to translate...... on biota (EF). In both impact categories there is a need for spatial differentiation according to the receiving ecosystems, and the parameterisation of the characterisation models requires the adoption of suitable spatial units out of the global receiving coastal marine ecosystem. The Large Marine......, Archetype 2 (medium dynamics and exposure) with RT=2 yr, Archetype 3 (low dynamics) with RT=25 yr, and Archetype 4 (very low dynamics, embayed, often stratified) with RT=90 yr. It is assumed that the system dynamics is determining the RT of both N and metals in the photic zone in each LME. The LME...

  8. Automated evaluation of pharmaceutically active ionic liquids' (eco)toxicity through the inhibition of human carboxylesterase and Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Susana P F; Justina, Vanessa D; Bica, Katharina; Vasiloiu, Maria; Pinto, Paula C A G; Saraiva, M Lúcia M F S

    2014-01-30

    The toxicity of 16 pharmaceutical active ionic liquids (IL-APIs) was evaluated by automated approaches based on sequential injection analysis (SIA). The implemented bioassays were centered on the inhibition of human carboxylesterase 2 and Vibrio fischeri, in the presence of the tested compounds. The inhibitory effects were quantified by calculating the inhibitor concentration required to cause 50% of inhibition (EC50). The EC50 values demonstrated that the cetylpyridinium group was one of the most toxic cations and that the imidazolium group was the less toxic. The obtained results provide important information about the safety of the studied IL-APIs and their possible use as pharmaceutical drugs. The developed automated SIA methodologies are robust screening bioassays, and can be used as a generic tools to identify the (eco)toxicity of the structural elements of ILs, contributing to a sustainable development of drugs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Calculation of site specific characterisation factors for metal ecotoxicity using decoupled multi species fate and exposure modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkved, Morten; Strandesen, Maria; Larsen, HF

    2004-01-01

    of metals taking into account the speciation pattern under e.g. specific pH, DOM and salinity conditions. The study presented here indicates that CF’s calculated using the traditional assessment method known as single species assessment of metals, under realistic conditions differs significantly, due......Calculation of characterisation factors (CF’s) for metal ecotoxicity typically involves fate and exposure modelling of metals in multi-media models developed for assessment of organic compounds. Metals do not follow the fate patterns of organic chemicals, and the results will therefore most likely...... to the part of the metal species present as complexes which is very hard to account for in single species assessment. Preliminary results on the CF’s based on single species assessment and decoupled multi species assessment will be presented for 4 common metals....

  10. Ecotoxicity of mercury to Folsomia candida and Proisotoma minuta (Collembola: Isotomidae) in tropical soils: Baseline for ecological risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Andressa Cristhy; Niemeyer, Júlia Carina; Fernandes Correia, Maria Elizabeth; Silva-Filho, Emmanoel Vieira

    2016-05-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a highly toxic nonessential trace metal. Despite its natural occurrence in the Earth's Crust, its concentrations have been steadily increasing in the environment due to anthropogenic sources. Recent studies have showed great concern about soil fauna, once the potential adverse effects of mercury concentrations in the environment of these invertebrates are still poorly understood, especially when linked to forest soils and tropical biota. Different collembolan species can show distinct toxicity effects to the contaminants, impairing its developing lifelong and affecting its diversity and abundance in the environment. Laboratory studies were performed to evaluate the ecotoxicity of Hg(II) to collembolan species collected in Brazil, Proisotoma minuta (autochthonous) and Folsomia candida (allochthonous), as a tool to predict effects in ecological risk assessment of tropical regions. Behavioral, acute and chronic tests were carried under temperatures of 20°C and 24°C using two test soils, natural and artificial, spiked with increasing mercury concentrations. F. candida was more sensitive to mercury contamination than P. minuta, presenting the most restrictive values of EC50 and LC50. Reproduction was a considerably more sensitive endpoint than avoidance and mortality. The 28-day lower EC50 values were found in chronic tests for F. candida in natural soil to 24°C (3.32mgHgkg(-1)), while for P. minuta was in tropical artificial soil to 20°C (4.43mgHgkg(-1)). There were similarity for each collembolan species to respond at the Hg(II) effects when exposed at 20°C and 24°C. F. candida can be suitable as a bioindicator species to mercury ecotoxicity tests in tropical forest soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Agro-industrial wastes as effective amendments for ecotoxicity reduction and soil health improvement in aided phytostabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galende, María A; Becerril, José M; Gómez-Sagasti, María T; Barrutia, Oihana; Garbisu, Carlos; Hernández, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    Aided phytostabilization is a technology that uses metal tolerant plants and organic and/or inorganic amendments to reduce soil metal bioavailability, while improving soil health. Our objective was to determine the effects of the application of amendments [sheep manure (SHEEP), poultry litter (POULTRY), cow slurry (COW), and paper mill sludge mixed with poultry litter (PAPER)], together with the growth of a metallicolous Festuca rubra L. population, on (i) chemical and microbial indicators of soil health and (ii) soil ecotoxicity, during the aided phytostabilization of a Zn/Pb contaminated mine soil. Amendment application led to an increase in soil pH, organic matter content, and inorganic salts, resulting in a decrease in Pb and Zn CaCl2-extractable concentrations in soil, which, in turn, contributed to lower ecotoxicity and a stimulation of plant growth and soil microbial communities. The factor most affecting the metal extractability was probably soil pH. POULTRY was the best amendment in terms of increasing plant growth, chlorophylls content, and soil microbial biomass and activity, but resulted in higher levels of phytoavailable Pb and Zn. SHEEP and PAPER were more effective at reducing metal CaCl2-extractability and, consequently, led to lower values of metal accumulation in plant tissues, thereby reducing the risk of metals entering into the food chain. When combined with the application of organic amendments, the metallicolous F. rubra population studied here appears an excellent candidate for aided phytostabilization. Our results indicate that the application of organic amendments is essential for the short-term recovery of highly contaminated metalliferous soils during aided phytostabilization.

  12. The Gore Excluder AAA endoprosthesis with C3 delivery system: results in high-volume centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajcer, Z

    2014-02-01

    The use of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) has increased dramatically, chiefly because of its low perioperative morbidity compared with open surgery. Challenges to the success of EVAR remain, however, with the most important being features of the patient's infrarenal aortic neck anatomy that make optimal placement of the endoprosthesis difficult. These features include a short, wide, severely angulated, or reverse-tapered neck and the presence of calcifications or thrombus. Suboptimal endograft positioning may necessitate use of aortic cuffs, thereby increasing the time and cost of an EVAR procedure, or increase the likelihood of graft migration, which can lead to endoleaks and additional interventions. Efforts to improve outcomes of EVAR and expand its application in patients with challenging aortic neck anatomy have focused on the development of endografts and delivery systems with innovative designs. The low-permeability Gore Excluder AAA endoprosthesis with C3 delivery system, which became available in Europe and the United States in 2010, represents one such design. The C3 system allows the proximal end of the endoprosthesis to be reconstrained after insertion so that the device can, if necessary, be rotated or moved cranially or caudally. Repositioning may facilitate contralateral gate cannulation and placement of the endograft closer to the lowest renal artery (without covering its orifice), thereby possibly decreasing the risk of inadequate sealing and consequent graft migration and endoleaks. Early clinical studies of the Gore Excluder AAA endoprosthesis with C3 delivery system have yielded promising results.

  13. Risk analysis of pyrolyzed biochar made from paper mill effluent treatment plant sludge for bioavailability and eco-toxicity of heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Parmila; Saroha, Anil K

    2014-06-01

    The risk analysis was performed to study the bioavailability and eco-toxicity of heavy metals in biochar obtained from pyrolysis of sludge of pulp and paper mill effluent treatment plant. The sludge was pyrolyzed at different temperatures (200-700°C) and the resultant biochar were analyzed for fractionation of heavy metals by sequential extraction procedure. It was observed that all the heavy metals get enriched in biochar matrix after pyrolysis, but the bioavailability and eco-toxicity of the heavy metals in biochar were significantly reduced as the mobile and bioavailable heavy metal fractions were transformed into the relatively stable fractions. Moreover, it was observed that the leaching potential of heavy metals decreased after pyrolysis and the best results were obtained for biochar pyrolyzed at 700°C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Determinants of prosocial behavior in included versus excluded contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther eCuadrado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prosocial behavior is increasingly becoming necessary as more and more individuals experience exclusion. In this context it is important to understand the motivational determinants of prosocial behavior. Here we report two experiments which analyzed the influence of dispositional (prosocialness; rejection sensitivity and motivational variables (prosocial self-efficacy; prosocial collective efficacy; trust; anger; social affiliation motivation on prosocial behavior under neutral contexts (Study 1, and once under inclusion or exclusion conditions (Study 2. Both studies provided evidence for the predicted mediation of prosocial behavior. Results in both neutral and inclusion and exclusion conditions supported our predictive model of prosocial behavior. In the model dispositional variables predicted motivational variables, which in turn predicted prosocial behavior. We showed that the investigated variables predicted prosocial behavior; this suggests that to promote prosocial behavior one could (1 foster prosocialness, prosocial self and collective efficacy, trust in others and affiliation motivation and (2 try to reduce negative feelings and the tendency to dread rejection in an attempt to reduce the negative impact that these variables have on prosocial behavior. Moreover, the few differences that emerged in the model between the inclusion and exclusion contexts suggested that in interventions with excluded individuals special care emphasis should be placed on addressing rejection sensitivity and lack of trust.

  15. Should the Standard Count Be Excluded from Neutron Probe Calibration?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhuanfang

    2017-10-12

    About 6 decades after its introduction, the neutron probe remains one of the most accurate methods for indirect measurement of soil moisture content. Traditionally, the calibration of a neutron probe involves the ratio of the neutron count in the soil to a standard count, which is the neutron count in the fixed environment such as the probe shield or a specially-designed calibration tank. The drawback of this count-ratio-based calibration is that the error in the standard count is carried through to all the measurements. An alternative calibration is to use the neutron counts only, not the ratio, with proper correction for radioactive decay and counting time. To evaluate both approaches, the shield counts of a neutron probe used for three decades were analyzed. The results show that the surrounding conditions have a substantial effect on the standard count. The error in the standard count also impacts the calculation of water storage and could indicate false consistency among replicates. The analysis of the shield counts indicates negligible aging effect of the instrument over a period of 26 years. It is concluded that, by excluding the standard count, the use of the count-based calibration is appropriate and sometimes even better than ratio-based calibration. The count-based calibration is especially useful for historical data when the standard count was questionable or absent

  16. Pollution-induced community tolerance (PICT) as a tool for monitoring Lake Geneva long-term in situ ecotoxic restoration from herbicide contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larras, Floriane; Rimet, Frédéric; Gregorio, Vincent; Bérard, Annette; Leboulanger, Christophe; Montuelle, Bernard; Bouchez, Agnès

    2016-03-01

    Chemical monitoring revealed a regular decrease in herbicide concentration in Lake Geneva since last decades that may be linked to an ecotoxic restoration of nontarget phytoplanktonic communities. The Pollution-induced community tolerance (PICT) approach was tested as a tool to monitor the ecotoxic restoration of Lake Geneva for herbicides from 1999 to 2011. We conducted monthly assessments in 1999 and in 2011 for the tolerance of the phytoplankton communities to two herbicides (atrazine and copper), using PICT bioassays. The taxonomical composition of the communities was determined on the same collecting dates. The herbicide concentration decrease during the 12 years significantly influenced the composition of communities. The PICT monitoring indicated that a significant tolerance decrease in the community to both herbicides accompanied the herbicide concentration decrease. PICT measurements for atrazine and copper also changed at the intra-annual level. These variations were mainly due to community composition shifts linked to seasonal phosphorus and temperature changes. PICT monitoring on a seasonal basis is required to monitor the mean tolerance of communities. PICT appeared to be a powerful tool that reflected the toxic effects on environmental communities and to monitor ecotoxic ecosystem restoration.

  17. Alternative approaches to vertebrate ecotoxicity tests in the 21st century: A review of developments over the last 2 decades and current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillicrap, Adam; Belanger, Scott; Burden, Natalie; Du Pasquier, David; Embry, Michelle; Halder, Marlies; Lampi, Mark; Lee, Lucy; Norberg-King, Teresa J.; Rattner, Barnett A.; Schirmer, Kristin; Thomas, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The need for alternative approaches to the use of vertebrate animals for hazard assessment of chemicals and pollutants has become of increasing importance. It is now the first consideration when initiating a vertebrate ecotoxicity test, to ensure that unnecessary use of vertebrate organisms is minimized wherever possible. For some regulatory purposes, the use of vertebrate organisms for environmental risk assessments has been banned; in other situations, the number of organisms tested has been dramatically reduced or the severity of the procedure refined. However, there is still a long way to go to achieve a complete replacement of vertebrate organisms to generate environmental hazard data. The development of animal alternatives is based not just on ethical considerations but also on reducing the cost of performing vertebrate ecotoxicity tests and in some cases on providing better information aimed at improving environmental risk assessments. The present Focus article provides an overview of the considerable advances that have been made toward alternative approaches for ecotoxicity assessments over the last few decades.

  18. Linkage analysis excludes the glaucoma locus on 1q from involvement in autosomal dominant glaucoma with iris hypoplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heon, E.; Sheth, B.P.; Kalenak, J.W. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Genetic factors have been implicated in a variety of types of glaucoma including primary open-angle glaucoma, infantile glaucoma, pigmentary glaucoma, and juvenile open-angle glaucoma. We previously mapped the disease-causing gene for one type of juvenile open angle glaucoma to chromosome 1q21-31. Weatherill and Hart (1969) and Pearce (1983) each noted the association of iris hypoplasia and early-onset autosomal dominant glaucoma. We recently had the opportunity to study a large family (12 affected members) with this phenotype. Affected individuals developed glaucoma at an average age of 30 years. These patients also have a strikingly underdeveloped iris stroma which causes a peculiar eye color. Linkage analysis was able to completely exclude the 1q glaucoma locus from involvement in the disorder that affects this family. A complete clinical description of the family and linkage results at additional candidate loci will be presented.

  19. Polder maps: improving OMIT maps by excluding bulk solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebschner, Dorothee; Afonine, Pavel V; Moriarty, Nigel W; Poon, Billy K; Sobolev, Oleg V; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Adams, Paul D

    2017-02-01

    The crystallographic maps that are routinely used during the structure-solution workflow are almost always model-biased because model information is used for their calculation. As these maps are also used to validate the atomic models that result from model building and refinement, this constitutes an immediate problem: anything added to the model will manifest itself in the map and thus hinder the validation. OMIT maps are a common tool to verify the presence of atoms in the model. The simplest way to compute an OMIT map is to exclude the atoms in question from the structure, update the corresponding structure factors and compute a residual map. It is then expected that if these atoms are present in the crystal structure, the electron density for the omitted atoms will be seen as positive features in this map. This, however, is complicated by the flat bulk-solvent model which is almost universally used in modern crystallographic refinement programs. This model postulates constant electron density at any voxel of the unit-cell volume that is not occupied by the atomic model. Consequently, if the density arising from the omitted atoms is weak then the bulk-solvent model may obscure it further. A possible solution to this problem is to prevent bulk solvent from entering the selected OMIT regions, which may improve the interpretative power of residual maps. This approach is called a polder (OMIT) map. Polder OMIT maps can be particularly useful for displaying weak densities of ligands, solvent molecules, side chains, alternative conformations and residues both in terminal regions and in loops. The tools described in this manuscript have been implemented and are available in PHENIX.

  20. The politics of corruption, inequality, and the socially excluded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Salas, Anna

    2013-07-01

    In this article, the production of knowledge in the context of socially excluded people exposed to inequality, oppression, and exploitation is problematized. The analysis follows Enrique Dussel's philosophical exegesis of the politics of power and corruption and his vision of a critical transformation of the social political order. The argument is also informed by the work of critical educator Paulo Freire, who elucidates the conditions of oppression and marginalization and highlights the importance of conscientization to develop a critical awareness of these conditions. Hannah Arendt's work on the politics of understanding totalitarianism also assists in the elucidation of the machinery that operates behind oppression to sustain power and inequality. The article emphasizes the need to recognize the inequality of conditions that exists between the producer of knowledge and those who live through inequality and oppression in their lived corporality. A critical transformation of the process of production of knowledge is needed to both acknowledge the conditions that sustain this endeavour in the first place and avoid the corruption of knowledge. A work of conscientization is also necessary among knowledge producers to undertake a critical analysis of inequality that exposes the corruption of power. This analysis needs to examine and unmask the hidden mechanisms that perpetuate inequality and oppression and serve only the interests of a few. The abysmal gaps between the wealthy and the poor within and among countries bespeak a degree of human indifference that reflects a most serious and complex phenomenon that perverts something profoundly human in our societies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Phosphogypsum as a soil fertilizer: Ecotoxicity of amended soil and elutriates to bacteria, invertebrates, algae and plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hentati, Olfa, E-mail: olfa_hentati@yahoo.fr [High Institute of Biotechnology of Sfax, University of Sfax, Route de Soukra Km 4.5 P.O. Box 1175, 3038 Sfax (Tunisia); Abrantes, Nelson [Departamento de Ambiente da Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CESAM - Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Caetano, Ana Luísa [Departamento de Biologia da Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CESAM - Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Bouguerra, Sirine [High Institute of Biotechnology of Sfax, University of Sfax, Route de Soukra Km 4.5 P.O. Box 1175, 3038 Sfax (Tunisia); Departamento de Biologia da Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre s/n, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR/CIMAR), University of Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, P 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Gonçalves, Fernando [Departamento de Biologia da Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CESAM - Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Römbke, Jörg [ECT Oekotoxikologie GmbH, Böttgerstrasse 2-14, D-65439 Flörsheim am Main (Germany); Pereira, Ruth [Departamento de Biologia da Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre s/n, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR/CIMAR), University of Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, P 4050-123 Porto (Portugal)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Assessment of the impact of Tunisian phosphogypsum on soil biota was performed. • A battery of terrestrial and aquatic species was tested. • E. andrei and D. magna were the most sensitive species in amended soil and elutriate. • The high levels of Ca in PG, suggest that it was responsible for the ecotoxicity. • Serious efforts should be made to set clear limits for PG application in soils. - Abstract: Phosphogypsum (PG) is a metal and radionuclide rich-waste produced by the phosphate ore industry, which has been used as soil fertilizer in many parts of the world for several decades. The positive effects of PG in ameliorating some soil properties and increasing crop yields are well documented. More recently concerns are emerging related with the increase of metal/radionuclide residues on soils and crops. However, few studies have focused on the impact of PG applications on soil biota, as well as the contribution to soils with elements in mobile fractions of PG which may affect freshwater species as well. In this context the main aim of this study was to assess the ecotoxicity of soils amended with different percentages of Tunisian phosphogypsum (0.0, 4.9, 7.4, 11.1, 16.6 and 25%) and of elutriates obtained from PG – amended soil (0.0, 6.25, 12.5 and 25% of PG) to a battery of terrestrial (Eisenia andrei, Enchytraeus crypticus, Folsomia candida, Hypoaspis aculeifer, Zea mays, Lactuca sativa) and aquatic species (Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna, Raphidocelis subcapitata, Lemna minor). Both for amended soils and elutriates, invertebrates (especially D. magna and E. andrei) were the most sensitive species, displaying acute (immobilization) and chronic (reproduction inhibition) effects, respectively. Despite the presence of some concerning metals in PG and elutriates (e.g., zinc and cadmium), the extremely high levels of calcium found in both test mediums, suggest that this element was the mainly responsible for the ecotoxicological effects

  2. 75 FR 49528 - Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Networking and Multimedia Group (“NMG”) Excluding the Multimedia...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... Employment and Training Administration Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Networking and Multimedia Group (``NMG'') Excluding the Multimedia Applications Division Including On- Site Leased Workers of Synergy Services..., applicable to workers of Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Networking and Multimedia Group (``NMG''), excluding...

  3. Casino Self- and Forced Excluders' Gambling Behavior Before and After Exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotter, Roxana; Kräplin, Anja; Bühringer, Gerhard

    2017-11-11

    Casino exclusion programs are intended to prevent or limit gambling-related harm. Although previous research showed that self-exclusion is associated with reduced gambling, it remains unknown whether self- and forced excluded subjects show different patterns of gambling behavior and if exclusion from casino gambling affects all gambling activities. The present study retrospectively investigated (1) the role of voluntariness of exclusion for the first time, and (2) general gambling behavior of excluded individuals before and after exclusion. A total of N = 215 casino excluders (self-excluders: n = 187, forced excluders: n = 28) completed an online survey or a face-to-face interview up to 8 years after enrollment. Self- and forced excluders showed similar rates of abstinence (self-excluders: 19.3%, forced excluders: 28.6%) and reduction (self-excluders: 67.4%, forced excluders: 60.7%), even though forced excluders reported a significantly greater initial gambling intensity compared to self-excluders (e.g., pre-exclusion gambling time; self-excluders: 3.2 days/week, forced excluders: 4.3 days/week). Overall, results indicated that 20.5% of excluders stopped all gambling activities and another 66.5% reduced their gambling. Those who continued gambling significantly reduced this behavior in every segment, except for gambling halls. Findings indicate that self- and forced exclusion are associated with similarly reduced gambling behavior, even in non-excluded segments. However, unchanged gambling in gambling halls emphasizes the importance to implement consistent exclusion programs over all gambling segments.

  4. Open access

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenburg, P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Open access week Van 19 tot en met 25 oktober 2015 vond wereldwijd de Open Access Week plaats. Tijdens deze week werden er over de hele wereld evenementen georganiseerd waar open access een rol speelt. Ook in Nederland zijn er diverse symposia, workshops en debatten georganiseerd zoals het debat in

  5. Investigation on the eco-toxicity of lake sediments with the addition of drinking water treatment residuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Nannan; Wang, Changhui; Pei, Yuansheng

    2016-08-01

    Drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) have a potential to realize eutrophication control objectives by reducing the internal phosphorus (P) load of lake sediments. Information regarding the ecological risk of dewatered WTR reuse in aquatic environments is generally lacking, however. In this study, we analyzed the eco-toxicity of leachates from sediments with or without dewatered WTRs toward algae Chlorella vulgaris via algal growth inhibition testing with algal cell density, chlorophyll content, malondialdehyde content, antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase activity, and subcellular structure indices. The results suggested that leachates from sediments unanimously inhibited algal growth, with or without the addition of different WTR doses (10% or 50% of the sediment in dry weight) at different pH values (8-9), as well as from sediments treated for different durations (10 or 180days). The inhibition was primarily the result of P deficiency in the leachates owing to WTR P adsorption, however, our results suggest that the dewatered WTRs were considered as a favorable potential material for internal P loading control in lake restoration projects, as it shows acceptably low risk toward aquatic plants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Reproducing the organic matter model of anthropogenic dark earth of Amazonia and testing the ecotoxicity of functionalized charcoal compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Rodrigues Linhares

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to obtain organic compounds similar to the ones found in the organic matter of anthropogenic dark earth of Amazonia (ADE using a chemical functionalization procedure on activated charcoal, as well as to determine their ecotoxicity. Based on the study of the organic matter from ADE, an organic model was proposed and an attempt to reproduce it was described. Activated charcoal was oxidized with the use of sodium hypochlorite at different concentrations. Nuclear magnetic resonance was performed to verify if the spectra of the obtained products were similar to the ones of humic acids from ADE. The similarity between spectra indicated that the obtained products were polycondensed aromatic structures with carboxyl groups: a soil amendment that can contribute to soil fertility and to its sustainable use. An ecotoxicological test with Daphnia similis was performed on the more soluble fraction (fulvic acids of the produced soil amendment. Aryl chloride was formed during the synthesis of the organic compounds from activated charcoal functionalization and partially removed through a purification process. However, it is probable that some aryl chloride remained in the final product, since the ecotoxicological test indicated that the chemical functionalized soil amendment is moderately toxic.

  7. Automated evaluation of pharmaceutically active ionic liquids’ (eco)toxicity through the inhibition of human carboxylesterase and Vibrio fischeri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Susana P.F.; Justina, Vanessa D. [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Ciências Químicas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, n° 228, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Bica, Katharina; Vasiloiu, Maria [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Applied and Synthetic Chemistry, A-1060 Vienna (Austria); Pinto, Paula C.A.G., E-mail: ppinto@ff.up.pt [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Ciências Químicas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, n° 228, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Saraiva, M. Lúcia M.F.S., E-mail: lsaraiva@ff.up.pt [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Ciências Químicas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, n° 228, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal)

    2014-01-30

    Highlights: • IL-APIs toxicity on humans and aquatic environment was evaluated by inhibition assays. • The inhibition assays were implemented through automated screening bioassays. • Automation of bioassays enabled a rigorous control of the reaction conditions. • EC{sub 50} obtained provide vital information on IL-APIs safety and potential use as drugs. -- Abstract: The toxicity of 16 pharmaceutical active ionic liquids (IL-APIs) was evaluated by automated approaches based on sequential injection analysis (SIA). The implemented bioassays were centered on the inhibition of human carboxylesterase 2 and Vibrio fischeri, in the presence of the tested compounds. The inhibitory effects were quantified by calculating the inhibitor concentration required to cause 50% of inhibition (EC{sub 50}). The EC{sub 50} values demonstrated that the cetylpyridinium group was one of the most toxic cations and that the imidazolium group was the less toxic. The obtained results provide important information about the safety of the studied IL-APIs and their possible use as pharmaceutical drugs. The developed automated SIA methodologies are robust screening bioassays, and can be used as a generic tools to identify the (eco)toxicity of the structural elements of ILs, contributing to a sustainable development of drugs.

  8. Influence of pH, light cycle, and temperature on ecotoxicity of four sulfonylurea herbicides towards Lemna gibba

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkrantz, Rikke Tjørnhøj; Cedergreen, Nina; Baun, Anders

    2013-01-01

    to tenfold for the four SUs when pH was increased from 6 to 9. Decreasing the temperature from 24 to 15 °C or introducing a dark:light cycle did not cause any trends in changes in toxicity. The results show that test conditions can have an effect on the toxicity and this should be considered when......-chemical properties but is also affected by test conditions. It is therefore important to study the effect of changes in test conditions in order to get reliable input ecotoxicity data for assessing the potential risk posed by a compound. The objective of this study was to investigate the implications of changing...... test conditions on the toxicity of four sulfonylurea herbicides (SUs). The toxicity of the four SUs towards Lemna gibba was investigated at three pH levels (6, 7.5 and 9), at two temperatures (15 and 24 °C) and two light regimes (continuous and 12:12 h light:dark cycle) The EC50 increased twofold...

  9. Bioavailability, ecotoxicity, and geological characteristics of trace lead in sediments from two sites on Negro River, Uruguay, South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Míguez, Diana M; Huertas, Raquel; Carrara, María V; Carnikián, Agustín; Bouvier, María E; Martínez, María J; Keel, Karen; Pioda, Carolina; Darré, Elena; Pérez, Ramiro; Viera, Santiago; Massa, Enrique

    2012-04-01

    Bioassays of two sites along the Rio Negro in Uruguay indicate ecotoxicity, which could be attributable to trace concentrations of lead in river sediments. Monthly samples at two sites at Baygorria and Bonete locations were analyzed for both particle size and lead. Lead was determined by atomic spectrometry in river water and sediment and particle size by sieving and sedimentation. Data showed that Baygorria's sediments have greater percentage of clay than Bonete's (20.4 and 5.8%, respectively). Lead was measurable in Baygorria's sediments, meanwhile in Bonete's, it was always below the detection limit. In water samples, lead was below detection limit at both sites. Bioassays using sub-lethal growth and survival test with Hyalella curvispina amphipod, screening with bioluminescent bacteria Photobacterium leiognathi, and acute toxicity bioassay with Pimephales promelas fish indicated toxicity at Baygorria, with much less effect at Bonete. Even though no lethal effects could be demonstrated, higher sub-lethal toxicity was found in samples from Baygorria site, showing a possible concentration of the contaminant in the clay fraction.

  10. Reporting and evaluation criteria as means towards a transparent use of ecotoxicity data for environmental risk assessment of pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ågerstrand, M; Küster, A; Bachmann, J; Breitholtz, M; Ebert, I; Rechenberg, B; Rudén, C

    2011-10-01

    Ecotoxicity data with high reliability and relevance are needed to guarantee the scientific quality of environmental risk assessments of pharmaceuticals. The main advantages of a more structured approach to data evaluation include increased transparency and predictability of the risk assessment process, and the possibility to use non-standard data. In this collaboration, between the research project MistraPharma and the German Federal Environment Agency, a new set of reporting and evaluation criteria is presented and discussed. The new criteria are based on the approaches in the literature and the OECD reporting requirements, and have been further developed to include both reliability and relevance of test data. Intended users are risk assessors and researchers performing ecotoxicological experiments, but the criteria can also be used for education purposes and in the peer-review process for scientific papers. This approach intends to bridge the gap between the regulator and the scientist's needs and way of work. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fast profiling ecotoxicity and skin permeability of benzophenone ultraviolet filters using biopartitioning micellar chromatography based on penetrable silica spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chen-ru; Ma, Li-yun; Huang, Jian-geng; Xu, Li; Shi, Zhi-guo

    2013-12-04

    Penetrable silica possesses hierarchical pores, mesopores and penetrable macropores, offering fast mass transfer, satisfactory mechanical strength as well as low column pressure. In the present study, penetrable octadecyl-bonded silica (ODS) was for the first time used as biopartitioning micellar chromatography (BMC) stationary phase to profile ecotoxicity and skin permeability of benzophenone UV-filters. Mobile phase (MP) pH and concentration of polyoxyethylene(23)lauryl ether in the MP were systematically studied. Quantitative retention-activity relationships (QRARs) model was established to correlate retention factors (k) on BMC with bioconcentration factor (BCF) and transdermal rate (TR) of UV-filters. Coefficient of determination (r(2)) of the QRARs model between log BCF and log k were 0.9398-0.9753, while r(2) between TR and log k were 0.7569-0.8434, which demonstrated satisfactory predictive ability of the methodology. It was a powerful tool for fast screening by combining penetrable ODS with BMC, and avoiding column blockage often occurring in BMC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are expressly...

  13. Successful off-label use of the GORE EXCLUDER Iliac Branch Endoprosthesis to preserve gluteal perfusion during staged endovascular repair of bilateral isolated hypogastric aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W. Cornwall, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular repair of iliac artery aneurysms has emerged as an alternative to traditional open surgical repair. Although there is little consensus on indications to preserve hypogastric blood flow during aneurysm repair, it is well understood that complications from bilateral hypogastric occlusion may be significant. The GORE EXCLUDER Iliac Branch Endoprosthesis (W. L. Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, Ariz received United States Food and Drug Administration approval in March 2016 for treatment of common iliac artery and aortoiliac aneurysms. This case report discusses an off-label use of GORE EXCLUDER Iliac Branch Endoprosthesis to maintain pelvic perfusion during treatment of bilateral internal iliac artery aneurysms without surrounding aortoiliac pathology.

  14. Open innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Chesbrough, Henry; Moedas, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Open innovation is now a widely used concept in academia, business, and policy making. This article describes the state of open innovation at the intersection of research, practice, and policy. It discusses some key trends (e.g., digital transformation), challenges (e.g., uncertainty......), and potential solutions (e.g., EU funding programs) in the context of open innovation and innovation policy. With this background, the authors introduce select papers published in this Special Section of California Management Review that were originally presented at the second annual World Open Innovation...

  15. Initial results of the management of aortoiliac aneurysms with GORE® Excluder® Iliac Branched Endoprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönhofer, S; Mansour, R; Ghotbi, R

    2015-12-01

    We prospectively observed the outcomes of all patients (N.=15) with an aortoiliac and a common iliac artery aneurysm who were electively treated with the GORE® Excluder® Iliac Branched Endoprosthesis (IBE) with regard to clinical, anatomical and radiological results. We evaluated operative mortality, aneurysm rupture rate and aneurysm related mortality as well as conversion to open surgery, incidence of endoleak, rate of aneurysm migration, aneurysm enlargement, graft patency, reintervention rate and the clinical outcome. Postoperative follow-up included a computed tomography angiography (CTA) before discharge, clinical evaluation and Duplex ultrasound or CTA 3 weeks after the intervention and Duplex ultrasound every 3 months afterwards. Mean patient age was 79 years (range 61-83 years); f/m: 1/2; mean follow-up was 9 months; 80% of the patients presented 2 or more major comorbidities and 1/3 were considered to be not eligible for open repair. Mean hospitalization time was 5 days. Technical success rate was 93.3% (intent-to-treat basis). Mortality within 30 days was 0%; there were no ruptures; type II endoleak directly after the procedure occurred in 20%, dropping to 13.3% after 3 months. We defined the initial technical success in absence of type I endoleaks. The initial technical success rate was 100%. No IBE occlusion or type Ia, Ib or III endoleak was observed during the postoperative follow-up (mean follow-up: 9 months). All of the internal iliac side branches remained patent. Reintervention rate, buttock claudication rate and pelvic complication rate were 0%. The GORE® IBE provides a new and safe alternative for the management of complete endovascular repair of an extensive aortoiliac or common iliac aneurysm while maintaining pelvic blood flow in iliac branched devices. Due to the lower complexity if compared to previous endovascular or hybrid methods, it should be performed in every anatomically suitable case.

  16. Excluding the poor from accessing biomedical literature: a rights violation that impedes global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamey, Gavin

    2008-01-01

    Most biomedical journals charge readers a hefty access toll to read the full text version of a published research article. These tolls bring enormous profits to the traditional corporate publishing industry, but they make it impossible for most people worldwide--particularly in low and middle income countries--to access the biomedical literature. Traditional publishers also insist on owning the copyright on these articles, making it illegal for readers to freely distribute and photocopy papers, translate them, or create derivative educational works. This article argues that excluding the poor from accessing and freely using the biomedical research literature is harming global public health. Health care workers, for example, are prevented from accessing the information they need to practice effective medicine, while policymakers are prevented from accessing the essential knowledge they require to build better health care systems. The author proposes that the biomedical literature should be considered a global public good, basing his arguments upon longstanding and recent international declarations that enshrine access to scientific and medical knowledge as a human right. He presents an emerging alternative publishing model, called open access, and argues that this model is a more socially responsive and equitable approach to knowledge dissemination.

  17. The impact of H2O2 and the role of mineralization in biodegradation or ecotoxicity assessment of advanced oxidation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sági, Gyuri; Bezsenyi, Anikó; Kovács, Krisztina; Klátyik, Szandra; Darvas, Béla; Székács, András; Wojnárovits, László; Takács, Erzsébet

    2018-03-01

    AOP are in the focus of interest as a result of their high efficiency in persistent organic pollutant removal. In the vast majority of experiments targeting quantification of changes in biodegradability or toxicity, conclusions are drawn by a simple comparison of solutions obtained at different stages of the oxidation. These results do not express properly the toxic potential or biodegradability of distinctive product groups, due to performing investigations without taking into account the decrease of organic content caused by mineralization. Moreover, the presence of H2O2 is very often also neglected, although it usually exerts strong interfering effects in the analytical methods applied routinely. The aim of present study was to draw attention towards these effects. In this work, the H2O2 content was removed by catalytic decomposition with MnO2, while exposure to equal pollutant concentrations was achieved by setting the solutions to equal COD or TOC values. Results obtained in such way (biological approach) have been compared to data obtained by neglecting both factors (technological approach). Biodegradation and ecotoxicity experiments were performed on the example of 0.1 mmol dm-3 sulfamethoxazole solutions oxidized during gamma irradiation. Significant differences were evidenced between the two approaches. Technological approach indicted only moderate transformation to bioavailable substances (BOD5 COD-1 = 0.33), while the biological approach referred to ready biodegradability (0.82). Ecotoxicity assessment performed with Vibrio fischeri bacteria demonstrated differences not only in the extent but also in the tendency of inhibition changes. In order to make reliable ecotoxicity assays, the H2O2 concentrations should be reduced to at least 0.05 mmol dm-3 in V. fischeri and P. subcapitata experiments, while, practically complete removal is needed in case of D. magna. In BOD measurements performed by manometric techniques, reducing the H2O2 concentration to at

  18. Ecotoxicity of silver nanomaterials in the aquatic environment: a review of literature and gaps in nano-toxicological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Chavon R; Pool, Edmund J; Somerset, Vernon S

    2014-01-01

    There has been extensive growth in nanoscale technology in the last few decades to such a degree that nanomaterials (NMs) have become a constituent in a wide range of commercial and domestic products. With NMs already in use in several consumer products, concerns have emerged regarding their potential adverse environmental impacts. Although research has been undertaken in order to minimise the gaps in our understanding of NMs in the environment, little is known about their bioavailability and toxicity in the aquatic environment. Nano-toxicology is defined as the study of the toxicity of nanomaterials. Nano-toxicology studies remain poorly and unevenly distributed. To date most of the research undertaken has been restricted to a narrow range of test species such as daphnids. Crabs are bio-indicators that can be used for toxicological research on NMs since they occupy a significant position in the aquatic food chain. In addition, they are often used in conventional ecotoxicological studies due to their high sensitivity to environmental stressors and are abundantly available. Because they are benthic organisms they are prone to contaminant uptake and bioaccumulation. To our knowledge the crab has never been used in nano-toxicological studies. In this context, an extensive review on published scientific literature on the ecotoxicity of silver NPs (AgNPs) on aquatic organisms was conducted. Some of the most common biomarkers used in ecotoxicological studies are described. Emphasis is placed on the use of biomarker responses in crabs as monitoring tools, as well as on its limitations. Additionally, the gaps in nano-toxicological research and recommendations for future research initiatives are addressed.

  19. Open hardware for open science

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by the open source software movement, the Open Hardware Repository was created to enable hardware developers to share the results of their R&D activities. The recently published CERN Open Hardware Licence offers the legal framework to support this knowledge and technology exchange.   Two years ago, a group of electronics designers led by Javier Serrano, a CERN engineer, working in experimental physics laboratories created the Open Hardware Repository (OHR). This project was initiated in order to facilitate the exchange of hardware designs across the community in line with the ideals of “open science”. The main objectives include avoiding duplication of effort by sharing results across different teams that might be working on the same need. “For hardware developers, the advantages of open hardware are numerous. For example, it is a great learning tool for technologies some developers would not otherwise master, and it avoids unnecessary work if someone ha...

  20. Ecotoxicity testing and environmental risk assessment of iron nanomaterials for sub-surface remediation – Recommendations from the FP7 project NanoRem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Rune; Coutris, Claire; Nguyen, Nhung

    2017-01-01

    engineered Fe nanomaterials, specifically, Nano-Goethite, Trap-Ox Fe-zeolites, Carbo-Iron® and FerMEG12, developed within the European FP7 project NanoRem for sub-surface remediation towards a test battery consisting of eight ecotoxicity tests on bacteria (V. fisheri, E. coli), algae (P. subcapitata......, aggregation and sedimentation behavior in aqueous media. This paper provides a number of recommendations concerning future testing of Fe nanomaterials and discusses environmental risk assessment considerations related to these....

  1. Biotic and abiotic studies on the biological fate, transport and ecotoxicity of toxic and hazardous waste in the Mississippi River basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelghani, A.; Pramar, Y.; Mandal, T.

    1996-05-02

    This project assesses the levels of xenobiotics in Devils Swamp and studies their biological fate, transport, ecotoxicity, and potential toxicity to man. This article reports on the following studies: assessment of the acute toxicity of individual xenobiotics and toxicity of organic compounds hexachlorobutadience (HCB) and hexachlorobenzene (HCBD) on juvenile crayfish; determination of the biotic influence of temperature, salinity, pH, oxidation-reduction potential, and sediment composition on the migration of xenobiotics; development of a pharmacokinetics model for xenobiotic absorption and storage, distribution and excretion by fish and crayfish.

  2. Open Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  3. Open Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süreyya Çankırı

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Science is based on the confirmation of phenomena and events in a continuum. In the development of science; the cumulative progress and effective sharing of information comes to the forefront. Within the scope of science, producing new information requires a social approach. Because science has more participants every day so the meaning and importance of science also becomes different. In this sense, the idea of open science, which is based on open access, open data and open source, continues to mediate the socialization of information as well as the purpose of the rapid spread of scientific research results among scientists. In the editorial section, the approach of open science, which has gained momentum in recent years, is evaluated in the context of information retrieval and interaction.

  4. Open Source and Open Standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koper, Rob

    2006-01-01

    Publication reference: Koper, R. (2008). Open Source and Open Standards. In J. M. Spector, M. Merrill, J. van Merriënboer & M. P. Driscol (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Educational Communications and Technology (3rd ed., pp. 355-368). New York: Routledge.

  5. Assessing and monitoring the ecotoxicity of pulp and paper wastewater for irrigating reed fields using the polyurethane foam unit method based on monitoring protozoal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Cheng; Chen, Tianming; Li, Zhaoxia; Yan, Jinlong

    2015-05-01

    Using the standardized polyurethane foam unit (PFU) method, a preliminary investigation was carried out on the bioaccumulation and the ecotoxic effects of the pulp and paper wastewater for irrigating reed fields. Static ectoxicity test had shown protozoal communities were very sensitive to variations in toxin time and effective concentration (EC) of the pulp and paper wastewater. Shannon-Wiener diversity index (H) was a more suitable indicator of the extent of water pollution than Gleason and Margalef diversity index (d), Simpson's diversity index (D), and Pielou's index (J). The regression equation between S eq and EC was S eq  = - 0.118EC + 18.554. The relatively safe concentration and maximum acceptable toxicant concentration (MATC) of the wastewater for the protozoal communities were about 20 % and 42 %, respectively. To safely use this wastewater for irrigation, more than 58 % of the toxins must be removed or diluted by further processing. Monitoring of the wastewater in representative irrigated reed fields showed that the regularity of the protozoal colonization process was similar to the static ectoxicity, indicating that the toxicity of the irrigating pulp and paper wastewater was not lethal to protozoal communities in the reed fields. This study demonstrated the applicability of the PFU method in monitoring the ecotoxic effects of pulp and paper wastewater on the level of microbial communities and may guide the supervision and control of pulp and paper wastewater irrigating within the reed fields ecological system (RFES).

  6. Modeling potential freshwater ecotoxicity impacts due to pesticide use in biofuel feedstock production: the cases of maize, rapeseed, salix, soybean, sugar cane, and wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordborg, Maria; Cederberg, Christel; Berndes, Göran

    2014-10-07

    The inclusion of ecotoxicity impacts of pesticides in environmental assessments of biobased products has long been hampered by methodological challenges. We expanded the pesticide database and the regional coverage of the pesticide emission model PestLCI v.2.0, combined it with the impact assessment model USEtox, and assessed potential freshwater ecotoxicity impacts (PFEIs) of pesticide use in selected biofuel feedstock production cases, namely: maize (Iowa, US, two cases), rapeseed (Schleswig-Holstein, Germany), Salix (South Central Sweden), soybean (Mato Grosso, Brazil, two cases), sugar cane (São Paulo, Brazil), and wheat (Schleswig-Holstein, Germany). We found that PFEIs caused by pesticide use in feedstock production varied greatly, up to 3 orders of magnitude. Salix has the lowest PFEI per unit of energy output and per unit of cultivated area. Impacts per biofuel unit were 30, 750, and 1000 times greater, respectively, for the sugar cane, wheat and rapeseed cases than for Salix. For maize genetically engineered (GE) to resist glyphosate herbicides and to produce its own insecticidal toxin, maize GE to resist glyphosate, soybeans GE to resist glyphosate and conventional soybeans, the impacts were 110, 270, 305, and 310 times greater than for Salix, respectively. The significance of field and site-specific conditions are discussed, as well as options for reducing negative impacts in biofuel feedstock production.

  7. 20 CFR 404.1323 - Post-World War II service excluded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Post-World War II service excluded. 404.1323... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services Post-World War II Veterans § 404.1323 Post-World War II service excluded. Your service was not in the active service...

  8. 8 CFR 241.21 - Stay of deportation of excluded alien.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stay of deportation of excluded alien. 241.21 Section 241.21 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS APPREHENSION AND DETENTION OF ALIENS ORDERED REMOVED Deportation of Excluded Aliens (for Hearings Commenced...

  9. 22 CFR 40.102 - Guardian required to accompany excluded alien.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. 40.102 Section 40.102 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH... Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. INA 212(a)(9)(B) is not applicable at the time of visa...

  10. Bias towards dementia: are hip fracture trials excluding too many patients? A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hebert-Davies, Jonah; Laflamme, G.-Yves; Rouleau, Dominique; Bhandari, Mohit; Devereaux, Philip J.; Guyatt, Gordon; Heetveld, Martin J.; Jeray, Kyle; Liew, Susan; Richardson, Martin J.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Tornetta, Paul; Walter, Stephen; Mohit, Bhandari; Sprague, Sheila; Viveiros, Helena; Simunovic, Nicole; Swinton, Marilyn; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Buckingham, Lisa; Duraikannan, Aravin; Swiontkowski, Marc F.; Agel, Julie; van Lieshout, Esther M. M.; Zielinski, Stephanie M.; Goslings, J. Carel; Haverlag, Robert; Ponsen, M. J.; de Rijcke, P. A. R.; Koppert, C. L.; Buijk, Steven E.; Groenendijk, Richard P. R.; Dawson, I.; de Rycke, P. A. R.; Tetteroo, G. W. M.; Bruijninckx, M. M. M.; Doornebosch, P.; deGraaf, E. J. R.; Patka, Peter; Eversdijk, Martin; Peters, Rolf; van Waes, Oscar; den Hartog, Dennis; van Waes, O.; Oprel, P.; Gasthuis, Kennemer; Visser, Gijs A.; Stockmann, Heyn; Silvis, Rob; Snellen, J. P.; Rybroek, A.; Scheepers, J. J. G.; Vermeulen, Erik G. J.; Siroen, M. P. C.; Vuylsteke, Ronald; Brom, H. L. F.; Ryna, H.; van Laarhoven, H. A. J.; Haag, Den; Rhemrev, S.; Bosman, C. H. R.; van Otterloo, Alexander Mol; Hoogendoorn, Jochem; Idenburg, Floris; de Vries, A. C.; Meylaerts, S. A. G.; Roukema, Gert R.; Josaputra, H.; Keller, Paul; de Rooij, P. P.; Kuiken, H.; Boxma, H.; Cleffken, B. I.; Liem, Ronald; Poolman, Rudolf W.; Simons, Maarten P.; van der Heijden, F. H. W. M.; Willems, W. J.; de Meulemeester, Frank R. A. J.; van der Hart, Cor; Tarkan, K.; Festen, S.; de Nies, F.; Out, N. J. M.; Bosma, J.; de Graaf Gasthuis, Reinier; van der Elst, Maarten; van der Pol, Carmen C.; van't Reit, Martyne; Karsten, T. M.; de Vries, M. R.; Stassen, P. S.; Schep, N.; Schmidt, Ben; Hoffman, W. H.; Segers, J. M.; Zijl, Jacco; Verhoeven, Bart; Smits, Anke; Theunissen, Evert B. M.; Wille, J.; Govaert, Lonnek; Wittich, Phillippe; Brauw, Maurits; Wille, Jan; Ritchie, Ewan D.; Wittish, H.; Wessel, R. N.; Hammacher, E. R.; Ziekenhuis, Elisabeth; Verhofstad, Michiel H. J.; Meijer, Joast M. R.; van Egmond, Teun; van den Heijden, F. H. W. M.; Campo, Martin; Verhagen, Ronald; van Kampen, A.; Biert, J.; van Vugt, Arie B.; Edwards, Michael; Blokhuis, Taco; Frolke, Jan Paul M.; Geeraidts, L.; de Waal Malefyt, M. C.; Schreurs, B.; Simmermacher, Roger K. J.; van Mulken, Jeroen; van Gaalen, Steven M.; Bronovo, Ziekenhuis; Bronkhorst, Maarten W. G. A.; Guicherit, O. R.; Frihagen, Frede; Nordsletten, Lars; Kibsgaard, Thomas; Haug, Knut Jorgen; Lona, Tariei; Ugland, Stein; Nilsen, Kenneth; Brekke, Anne Christin; Vesterhus, Elise Berg; Tetsworth, Kevin; Weinrauch, Patrick; Pincus, Paul; Donald, Geoff; yang, Steven; Halliday, Brett; Gervais, Trevor; Holt, Michael; Flynn, Annette; Pirpiris, Marinis; Love, David; Bucknill, Andrew; Farrugia, Richard J.; Dowrick, Adam; Donohue, Craig; Bedi, Harvinder; Li, Doug; Edwards, Elton; Csonguray, Steven; Miller, Russell; Wang, Otis; Chia, Andrew; Jain, Arvind; Mammen, Mathan; Moaveni, Ash; Murdock, Zoe; Sage, Claire; Bahadur, Tegh; Jain, Anil Kumar; Pankaj, Amite; Pesantez, Rodrigo; Martinez, Adriana; Novoa, Catherine; Buckley, Richard E.; Duffy, Paul; Korley, Robert; Johnston, Kelly; Puloski, Shannon; Carcary, Kimberly; Avram, Victoria; Bicknell, Ryan; Yach, Jeff; Bardana, Davide; Wood, Gavin; Lambert, Sue; Sanders, David W.; Howard, Jamie; Macleod, Mark; Lawendy, Abdel; Bartley, Debra; Laney, Tim; Tieszer, Christina; Peterson, Devin; Zalzal, Paul; Naumetz, Victor; Brien, Heather; Weening, Brad; Wai, Eugene K.; Papp, Steven; Roffey, Darren; McCormack, Robert; Stone, Trevor; Perey, Bertrand; Viskontas, Darius; Boyer, Dory; Moola, Farhad; Zomar, Mauri; Moon, Karyn; McKee, Michael; Hall, Jeremy; Ahn, Henry; Vicente, Milena R.; Wild, Lisa M.; Kreder, Hans J.; Stephen, David J. G.; Nousianinen, Markku; Kunz, Monica; Syed, Khalid; Azad, Tania; Coles, Chad; Leighton, Ross; Johnstone, David; Glazebrook, Mark; Alexander, David; Coady, Cathy; Trask, Kelly; Dobbin, Gwendolyn; Oliver, Todd M.; Jones, Vicky; Ronan, James; Brown, Desmond T.; Carlilse, Hope; Shaughnessy, Lisa; Schwappach, John; Davis, Craig A.; Weingarten, Peter; Weinerman, Stewart; Newman, Heike; Baker, Janell; Browner, Kieran; Hurley, Meghan; Payton, Krystal; Zura, Robert; Manson, Maria J.; Goetz, David; Broderick, Scott J.; Porter, Scott; Pace, Thomas; Tanner, Stephanie L.; Snider, Becky; Schmidt, Andrew H.; Haas, Jonathan; Templeman, David; Westberg, Jerald R.; Mullis, Brian; Ertl, J. P.; Shively, Karl; Frizzel, Valda; Moore, Molly M.; Marcantonio, Andrew J.; Iorio, Richard; Lobo, Margaret; Kain, Michael; Specht, Lawrence; Tilzey, John; Garfi, John; Prayson, Michael J.; Laughlin, Richard; Rubino, Joe; Lawless, Mathew; DiPaola, Matt; Gayton, Chris; Dulaney-Cripe, Liz; Vallier, Heather A.; Wilber, John; Wilber, Roger G.; Sontich, John H.; Patterson, Brendan; Dolenc, Andrea; Robinson, Chalitha; DePaolo, Charles J.; Alosky, Rachel; Shell, E.; Keeve, Jonathan P.; Anderson, Chris; McDonald, Michael; Hoffman, Jodi; Baele, Joseph; Weber, Tim; Edison, Matt; Musapatika, Dana; Jones, Clifford; Ringler, James; Endres, Terrance; Gelbke, Martin; Jabara, Michael; Sietsema, Debra L.; Engerman, Susan M.; Switzer, Julie A.; Li, Mangnai; Marston, Scott; Cole, Peter; Vang, Sandy X.; Ly, Thuan; Anderson, Sarah; Foley, Amy; McBeth, Jessica; Comstock, Curt; Ziran, Navid; Shaer, James; Hileman, Barbara; Karges, David; Cannada, Lisa; Kuldjanov, Djoldas; Watson, John Tracy; Mills, James Jackman Emily; Hill, Leslie; Simon, Tiffanya; Abdelgawad, Amr; Shunia, Juan; Jenkins, Mark; Zumwalt, Mimi; Romero, Amanda West; Lowe, Jason; Goldstein, Jessica; Zamorano, David P.; Lawson, Deanna; Archdeacon, Michael; Wyrick, John; Hampton, Shelley; Lewis, Courtland G.; Ademi, Arben; Sullivan, Raymond; Caminiti, Stephanie; Graves, Matthew; Smith, Lori; Della Rocca, Gregory J.; Crist, Brett D.; Murtha, Yvonne; Anderson, Linda K.; Kliewer, Toni K.; McPherson, Melinda K.; Sullivan, Kelly M.; Jarrett, Sharon L.; Sagebien, Carlos; Seuffert, Patricia; Mehta, Samir; Esterhai, John; Ahn, Jaimo; Tjoumakaris, Fotios; Horan, Annamarie D.; Kaminski, Christine; Tarkin, Ivan; Siska, Peter; Luther, Arlene; Irrgang, James; Farrell, Dana J.; Gorczyca, John T.; Gross, Jonathan M.; Kates, Stephen Lloyd; Colosi, Jen; Hibsch, Nancy; Noble, Krista; Neu, Sarah; Agarwal, Animesh; Wright, Rebecca; Hsu, Joseph R.; Randall, Gayle M.; Ficke, James R.; Charlton, Michael; Fan, Mary; Garcia, Socorro H.; Obremskey, William T.; Richards, Justin Edward; Robinson, Kenya; Carroll, Eben; Kulp, Brenda; Guyatt, Gordon H.; Devereaux, Philip James; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Koval, Ken J.; Tetsworth, Kevin D.; Culgin, Sarah; Desjardin, Heather; Beimers, Lijkele; de Vries, Jasper; Zurcher, Arthur W.; Albers, G. H. Rob; Rademakers, Maarten; Breugem, Stefan; van der Haven, Ibo; Damen, Peter Jan; Bulstra, Gythe H.; Somford, P.; Haverkamp, Daniël; Gasthuis, Onze Lieve Vrouwe; Molekamp, Willem Jan Kleyn; Kleipool, E. B.; Keizer, Stefan B.; Swen, Jan-Willem A.; Nelissen, Eelco M.; Hollander, Peter H. C. den; Metsaars, Weineke; Thomassen, J. W.; Fontijne, W. Peter J.; Wiersma, Saskia C.; Boetes, Bastiaan; JT, Edgar; Ziekenhuis, Spaarne; Nolte, Peter A.; de Jong, Tjitte; van Noort, Arthur; Vergroesen, Diederik A.; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Schutte, Bernard G.; Schuman, Lein; Hillen, Robert Jan; Cheung, John; van der Heide, Huub J. L.; Nagels, Jochem; Krips, Rover; Mullers, J. Bernard; Schüller, Hans; Ziekenhuis, Amphia; van den Hout, Joost A. A. M.; Joosten, Adrianus J. P.; van der Broek, Chris M.; Bolder, Stefan B. T.; Eygendaal, Denise; Moonen, Adrianus F. C. M.; van Geenen, Rutger C. I.; Hoebink, Eric A.; Wagenmakers, Robert; van Helden, Wouter; Kooijman, Rob; Postema, Roelf R.; Lampe, Harald I. H.; Ziekenhuizen, Gelre; Bolhuis, Hugo W.; Bullens, Pieter H. J.; Hogervorst, Mike; de Kroon, Karin E.; Jansen, Rob H.; Raven, Eric E. J.; van Jonbergen, Hans-Peter W.; Reuver, Joost M.; Barnaart, Alexander F. W.; Roerdink, W. Herbert; van Erve, Ruud H. G. P.; Koorevaar, Rinco; Frima, Anthony Hans; Flikweert, Elvira R.; Falke, Mark L. M.; Kurek, Frans J.; Slingerland, Adrianus C. H.; Vallei, Gelderse; van Dijk, Jan P.; van Helden, Wouter H.; Mauer-Hansen, Espen; Boee, Berte; Clarke-Jensen, Jon; Brekke, Anne Christine; Vestergaard, Elise Berg; Carr, Ashley; Russ, Matthias; Li, Douglas; Doig, Stephen; Laflamme, Yves; Fernandes, Julio C.; Poirier, Marie-France; Bogoch, Earl; Kreder, Hans; Axelrod, Terry; Jenkinson, Richard; Wadey, Veronica; Nousiainen, Markku; Stephen, David; Macnevin, Melanie; Richardson, Glen C.; Biddulph, Michael; Gross, Michael; Dunbar, Michael; Dobbin, Gwen; Zarin, Jeffrey; Parvataneni, Hari; Baker, Janell K.; Roberson, James R.; Erens, Greg; Montelione, Anita; Woodard, Shawndra; Ertl, Janos; Cummings, Judd; Worman, Ripley; Webster, Mark; Parr, Andrew; Frizzell, Valda; Moore, Molly; Wilk, Richard; Torchia, Michael; Cross, William; Sems, Andrew; Taunton, Michael; Sanchez-Satelo, Joaquin; Sierrz, Rafsel; Timm, Kimberly; Foreman, Barbara; DePaolo, Charles; Hill, Rocky; Lewis, Coutland; Srivastava, Ajay; Bakeman, James; Sietsema, Deb; Strathy, Gregg; Johnson, Paul; Peter, Kathleen; Morton, Maeghan E.; Parvizi, Javad; Austin, Matthew; Morrison, Tiffany; Mont, Michael; Copeland, Carol; Delanois, Ronald; Khanuja, Harpal; Weddington, Shaquita; Bacon, Madeline; Mullen, Marylou; Kanlic, Enes; Abdelgawad, Amr Atef; Shunia, Juan Gerardo; Horan, Annamarie

    2012-01-01

    Patients with hip fractures are older and often present many co-morbidities, including dementia. These patients cannot answer quality of life questionnaires and are generally excluded from trials. We hypothesized that a significant number of patients are being excluded from these studies and this

  11. 38 CFR 17.260 - Patient care costs to be excluded from direct costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Patient care costs to be excluded from direct costs. 17.260 Section 17.260 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants for Exchange of Information § 17.260 Patient care costs to be excluded from...

  12. 40 CFR 1048.20 - What requirements from this part apply to excluded stationary engines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of another company you choose to designate. (3) State the engine displacement (in liters) and maximum... to excluded stationary engines? 1048.20 Section 1048.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-IGNITION ENGINES Overview and Applicability § 1048.20 What requirements from this part apply to excluded...

  13. 41 CFR 101-30.302 - Types of items excluded from cataloging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Types of items excluded...-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.3-Cataloging Items of Supply § 101-30.302 Types of items excluded from...) Items procured in foreign markets for use in overseas activities of Federal agencies. (e) Printed forms. ...

  14. 26 CFR 31.3402(e)-1 - Included and excluded wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Included and excluded wages. 31.3402(e)-1... SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(e)-1 Included and excluded wages. (a) If a portion of... not more than 31 consecutive days constitutes wages, and the remainder does not constitute wages, all...

  15. Preventing Inclusion? Inclusive Early Childhood Education and the Option to Exclude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cologon, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    While there is increasing international commitment to inclusive education, as outlined in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), many children remain excluded at school. One marginalised and frequently excluded group of people are people who experience disability. In the recently released first report on…

  16. Photocatalytic degradation kinetics, mechanism and ecotoxicity assessment of tramadol metabolites in aqueous TiO{sub 2} suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonopoulou, U. [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 30100 Agrinio (Greece); Department of Chemistry, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Hela, D. [Department of Business Administration of Food and Agricultural Products, University of Patras, Agrinio 30100 (Greece); Konstantinou, I., E-mail: iokonst@cc.uoi.gr [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 30100 Agrinio (Greece); Department of Chemistry, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated for the first time the photocatalytic degradation of three well-known transformation products (TPs) of pharmaceutical Tramadol, N-desmethyl-(N-DES), N,N-bidesmethyl (N,N-Bi-DES) and N-oxide-tramadol (N-OX-TRA) in two different aquatic matrices, ultrapure water and secondary treated wastewater, with high (10 mg L{sup −1}) and low (50 μg L{sup −1}) initial concentrations, respectively. Total disappearance of the parent compounds was attained in all experiments. For initial concentration of 10 mg L{sup −1}, the target compounds were degraded within 30–40 min and a mineralization degree of more than 80% was achieved after 240 min of irradiation, while the contained organic nitrogen was released mainly as NH{sub 4}{sup +} for N-DES, N,N-Bi-DES and NO{sub 3}{sup −} for N-OX-TRA. The degradation rates of all the studied compounds were considerably decreased in the wastewater due to the presence of inorganic and organic constituents typically found in effluents and environmental matrices which may act as scavengers of the HO{sup •}. The effect of pH (4, 6.7, 10) in the degradation rates was studied and for N-DES-TRA and N,N-Bi-DES-TRA, the optimum pH value was 6.7. In contrast, N-OX-TRA showed an increasing trend in the photocatalytic degradation kinetic in alkaline solutions (pH 10). The major transformation products were identified by high resolution accurate mass spectrometry coupled with liquid chromatography (HR-LC–MS). Scavenging experiments indicated for all studied compounds the important role of HO{sup •} in the photocatalytic degradation pathways that included mainly hydroxylation and further oxidation of the parent compounds. In addition, Microtox bioassay (Vibrio fischeri) was employed for evaluating the ecotoxicity of photocatalytically treated solutions. Results clearly demonstrate the progressive decrease of the toxicity and the efficiency of the photocatalytic process in the detoxification of the irradiated solutions

  17. Open access

    CERN Document Server

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder consent, and many authors, musicians, filmmakers, and other creators who depend on royalties are understandably unwilling to give their consent. But for 350 years, scholars have written peer-reviewed journal articles for impact, not for money, and are free to consent to open access without losing revenue. In this concise introduction, Peter Suber tells us what open access is and isn't, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold. Distilling a decade of Suber's influential writing and thinking about open access, this is the indispe...

  18. Open Education and the Open Science Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Openness as a complex code word for a variety of digital trends and movements has emerged as an alternative mode of "social production" based on the growing and overlapping complexities of open source, open access, open archiving, open publishing, and open science. This paper argues that the openness movement with its reinforcing structure of…

  19. Open data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodum, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Everyone wants open data, but the road towards it can be both difficult and long. Implementation of data portals and ICT solutions for support of the data infrastructure can be initiated from the central government through legislation, regulation and public procurement. This is what you would call...

  20. Open Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanderhoff, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Museums around the world hold enormous troves of public domain artworks. In digitized form, they can be powerful tools for research and learning, as well as building blocks, in the hands of students, teachers, scholars, developers, and creative people. By opening up their digitized assets for reuse...

  1. Opening Address

    Science.gov (United States)

    John T. Shannon

    2001-01-01

    I am glad to be here today to help open the symposium on Arkansas' forests. It is gratifying to see so many forestry leaders in attendance. I am particulary pleased to welcome my brother, State Forester from Oklahoma, Roger Davis; and representatives of the State Foresters from Tennessee and Louisiana.

  2. opened capsule

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    by the opened capsule method is bioequivalent to a proprietary formulation approved by regulatory agencies. In the future, paediatric fixed-drug combination (FDC) antiretroviral formulations will greatly accelerate the roll-out of antiretrovirals to children in rural resource-limited settings. However, no paediatric antiretroviral ...

  3. Open IS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germonprez, Matt; Crowston, Kevin; Avital, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The collective intelligence and collective action of “open” communities have produced a variety of complex knowledge goods and radical social change. The Information Systems (IS) community has invested significant effort into researching open communities and the ecosystems in which they operate, ...

  4. Open Source, Open Access, Open Review, Open Data. Initiativen zu mehr Offenheit in der digitalen Welt

    OpenAIRE

    Herb, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the principles of openess, open access and open availability of information based on the examples of open access to scientific information, open government data, open geographical data and open source software.

  5. NNDSS - Table II. Salmonellosis (excluding typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever) to Shigellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Salmonellosis (excluding typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever) to Shigellosis - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable...

  6. Open innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, Joel; Bogers, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Interest in open innovation (OI) as a field of research has grown exponentially since the phrase was coined by Chesbrough in his 2003 book, with numerous articles, special issues, books, and conference sessions. Various reviews of the literature have summarized prior work, offered new frameworks,...... is rejected, abandoned, or fails. Finally, we consider how OI can be better linked to prior theoretical research, including topics such as absorptive capacity, user innovation, resources, dynamic capabilities, business models, and the definition of the firm....

  7. Listening to excluded young people's perspectives on how digital technologies support and challenge their lives

    OpenAIRE

    Sue Cranmer

    2010-01-01

    Listening to excluded young people’s perspectives on how digital technologies support and challenge their lives This article reports on the perspectives of young people who have been excluded from school on how ICTs support and challenge them in their everyday lives. Qualitative in-depth semistructured interviews were carried out with 13 young people at a Pupil Referral Unit (PRU). The analysis provides a nuanced account of young people’s online activities for those who are already experie...

  8. Equation of State for the Two-component Van der Waals Gas with Relativistic Excluded Volumes

    OpenAIRE

    Zeeb, Gebhard; Bugaev, Kyrill A.; Reuter, Philipp T.; Stöcker, Horst

    2002-01-01

    A canonical partition function for the two-component excluded volume model is derived, leading to two different van der Waals approximations. The one is known as the Lorentz-Berthelot mixture and the other has been proposed recently. Both models are analysed in the canonical and grand canonical ensemble. In comparison with the one-component van der Waals excluded volume model the suppression of particle densities is reduced in these two-component formulations, but in two essentially different...

  9. Opening education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marshall S

    2009-01-02

    Spurred by the publication of Massachusetts Institute of Technology OpenCourseWare in 2002, the open educational resources (OER) movement, which has rapidly expanded and captured the imagination and energy of millions of creators and users throughout the world, now faces many opportunities and substantial challenges as it moves to become an integral part of the world's educational environment. The confluence of the Web and a spirit of sharing intellectual property have fueled a worldwide movement to make knowledge and education materials open to all for use. OER are content (courses, books, lesson plans, articles, etc.), tools (virtual laboratories, simulations, and games), and software that support learning and educational practice. OER are free on the Web, and most have licenses that allow copyright holders to retain ownership while providing specified rights for use in original and modified forms. At the least, OER have helped to level the distribution of knowledge across the world. A second promise of OER is to help transform educational practices. This article explores the history of and promises and challenges for OER.

  10. Rapid and efficient degradation of bisphenol A by chloroperoxidase from Caldariomyces fumago: product analysis and ecotoxicity evaluation of the degraded solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaobo; Li, Haiyun; Jiang, Yucheng; Hu, Mancheng; Li, Shuni; Zhai, Quanguo

    2016-09-01

    To degrade enzymatically bisphenol A (BPA) that causes serious environmental concerns and is difficult to be degraded by chemical or physical methods. BPA (150 mg l(-1)) was completely degraded by chloroperoxidase (CPO)/H2O2 within 7 min at room temperature, atmospheric pressure with the enzyme at 6 μg CPO ml(-1). The degradation products were identified by HPLC-MS, which suggested involvement of multiple steps. Enzymatic treatment followed by existing bioremediation technologies (activated sludge) enhanced removal of COD from 9 to 54 %. Using an ecotoxicity evaluation with Chlorella pyrenoidosa, the degradation products had a lower toxicity than BPA. BPA can be degraded rapidly and efficiently under mild conditions with chloroperoxidase at 6 μg ml(-1). The degradation products had a lower toxicity than BPA.

  11. Fast algal eco-toxicity assessment: Influence of light intensity and exposure time on Chlorella vulgaris inhibition by atrazine and DCMU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camuel, Alexandre; Guieysse, Benoit; Alcántara, Cynthia; Béchet, Quentin

    2017-06-01

    In order to develop a rapid assay suitable for algal eco-toxicity assessments under conditions representative of natural ecosystems, this study evaluated the short-term (Chlorella vulgaris was exposed to these herbicides under 'standard' low light intensity (as prescribed by OECD201 guideline), the 20min-EC50 values recorded via oxygen productivity (atrazine: 1.32±0.07μM; DCMU: 0.31±0.005μM) were similar the 96-h EC50 recorded via algal growth (atrazine: 0.56μM; DCMU: 0.41μM), and within the range of values reported in the literature. 20min-EC50 values increased by factors of 3.0 and 2.1 for atrazine and DCMU, respectively, when light intensity increased from 60 to 1400μmolm-2s-1 of photosynthetically active radiation, or PAR. Further investigation showed that exposure time significantly also impacted the sensitivity of C. vulgaris under high light intensity (>840μmolm-2s-1 as PAR) as the EC50 for atrazine and DCMU decreased by up to 6.2 and 2.1 folds, respectively, after 50min of exposure at a light irradiance of 1400μmolm-2s-1 as PAR. This decrease was particularly marked at high light intensities and low algae concentrations and is explained by the herbicide disruption of the electron transfer chain triggering photo-inhibition at high light intensities. Eco-toxicity assessments aiming to understand the potential impact of toxic compounds on natural ecosystems should therefore be performed over sufficient exposure times (>20min for C. vulgaris) and under light intensities relevant to these ecosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ecotoxicity of raw and treated effluents generated by a veterinary pharmaceutical company: a comparison of the sensitivities of different standardized tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselli, Bianca de S; Luna, Luis A V; Palmeira, Joice de O; Tavares, Karla P; Barbosa, Sandro; Beijo, Luiz A; Umbuzeiro, Gisela A; Kummrow, Fábio

    2015-05-01

    Pharmaceutical effluents have recently been recognized as an important contamination source to aquatic environments and the toxicity related to the presence of antibiotics in effluents has attracted great attention. Conventionally, these effluents have been treated using physico-chemical and aerobic biological processes, usually with low rates of pharmaceuticals removal. Due to the complexity of effluents, it is impossible to determine all pharmaceuticals and their degradation products using analytical methods. Ecotoxicity tests with different organisms may be used to determine the effect level of effluents and thus their environmental impacts. The objective of this work was to compare the sensitivities of five ecotoxicity tests using aquatic and terrestrial organisms to evaluate the toxicity of effluents from the production of veterinary medicines before and after treatment. Raw and chemically treated effluent samples were highly toxic to aquatic organisms, achieving 100,000 toxic units, but only few of those samples presented phytotoxicity. We observed a reduction in the toxicity in the biologically treated effluent samples, which were previously chemically pre-treated, however the toxicity was not eliminated. The rank of test organisms' reactions levels was: Daphnia similis > Raphidocelis subcapitata > Aliivibrio fischeri > Allium cepa ~ Lactuca sativa. Effluent treatment employed by the evaluated company was only partially efficient at removing the effluent toxicity, suggesting potential risks to biota. The acute toxicity test with D. similis proved to be the most sensitive for both raw and treated effluents and is a suitable option for further characterization and monitoring of pharmaceutical effluents.

  13. Open University

    CERN Multimedia

    Pentz,M

    1975-01-01

    Michel Pentz est née en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et président de l'associaion du personnel. Il est également fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genève et a participé à la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pédagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la méthode peut s'appliquer.

  14. Medicare Star excludes diabetes patients with poor CVD risk factor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittdiel, Julie; Raebel, Marsha; Dyer, Wendy; Steiner, John; Goodrich, Glenn; Karter, Andy; Nichols, Gregory

    2014-12-01

    CMS recently added medication adherence to antihypertensives, antihyperlipidemics, and oral antihyperglycemics to its Medicare Star quality measures. These CMS metrics exclude patients with Star adherence metrics and assessed the relationship of both Star-defined adherence and exclusion from Star metrics with CVD risk factor control. Cross-sectional, population-based analysis of 129,040 patients with diabetes aged ≥65 years in 2010 from 3 Kaiser Permanente regions. We estimated adjusted risk ratios to assess the relationship between achieving Star adherence and being excluded from Star adherence metrics, with CVD risk factor control (glycated hemoglobin [A1C]Star metrics excluded 27% of patients with diabetes prescribed oral medications. Star-defined nonadherence was negatively associated with CVD risk factor control (risk ratio [RR], 0.95, 0.84, 0.96 for A1C, LDL-C, and SBP control, respectively; PStar metrics due to early nonadherence was also strongly associated with poor control (RR, 0.83, 0.56, 0.87 for A1C, LDL-C, and SBP control, respectively; PStar adherence measures underestimate the prevalence of medication nonadherence in diabetes and exclude patients at high risk for poor CVD outcomes. Up to 3 million elderly patients with diabetes may be excluded from these measures nationally. Quality measures designed to encourage effective medication use should focus on all patients treated for CVD risk.

  15. [Viral load test conducive to excluding negative subjects from suspects in HIV antibody detections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, Fa-Xin; Zhang, Qi-Yun; Sun, Wei-Dong; Zhang, Qin; Ye, Jing-Rong; Liu, Hai-Lin; Lu, Hong-Yan

    2008-01-01

    To study whether plasma viral load testing is helpful to exclude ones free from Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections from suspects in HIV antibody detections. 19 Specimens, which showed disconcordant results of the two HIV EIA testing (S/CO test, were selected. Viral load of the specimens were detected. A six-month follow up survey in detecting HIV antibody was conducted in these subjects. None of these 19 cases was observed to be positive HIV viral loads and there was no any progress in WB bands development during the follow-up period. The possibility of HIV infection could be excluded. When the specimens react with very low intensity in both EIA and WB, negative viral load result is conducive to exclude negative subjects from suspects in HIV antibody detections.

  16. Listening to excluded young people’s perspectives on how digital technologies support and challenge their lives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sue Cranmer

    2010-01-01

    Listening to excluded young people’s perspectives on how digital technologies support and challenge their lives This article reports on the perspectives of young people who have been excluded from school on how ICTs support...

  17. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Table of Excluded Nonnarcotic Products: Vicks® VapoInhaler®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-08

    This final rule adopts the interim final rule, with a correction to spelling of the manufacturer's name that was published in the Federal Register on October 27, 2015. The Drug Enforcement Administration is amending the table of Excluded Nonnarcotic Products to update the listing for Vicks® VapoInhaler®, containing 50 mg levmetamfetamine in a nasal decongestant inhaler, marketed by The Procter & Gamble Company. This over-the-counter, non-narcotic drug product is excluded from provisions of the Controlled Substances Act.

  18. Open access, open education resources and open data in Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... students organized a 3 day workshop Open Access, Open Education Resources and Open Data in Kampala from 15-18 December 2014. One of the aims of the workshop was to engage the Open Access movement in Uganda which encompasses the scientific community, librarians, academia, researchers and students.

  19. Preliminary Experience with the GORE(®) EXCLUDER(®) Iliac Branch Endoprosthesis for Common Iliac Aneurysm Endovascular Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millon, Antoine; Della Schiava, Nellie; Arsicot, Matthieu; De Lambert, Alberic; Feugier, Patrick; Magne, Jean Luc; Lermusiaux, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the safety and the short-term results of endovascular treatment of common iliac artery (CIA) aneurysms using the new GORE EXCLUDER iliac branch endoprosthesis (IBE) device. The study is a retrospective with prospective follow-up nonrandomized, single-arm evaluation. Patients with a CIA aneurysm (diameter >30 mm) extending to the iliac bifurcation underwent endovascular treatment with the Gore IBE. Anatomic and procedural data were collected. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) was performed within the 30 days after the procedure and every 6 month. Thirty-day and at least 6-months outcomes were investigated. From February 2014 to December 2014, 10 male patients with aneurysmal CIA (mean age 75 years old) underwent consecutive endovascular treatment with the Gore IBE. The CIA aneurysm (mean diameter 43.2 mm, range 32-49) treated with the Gore IBE was associated with an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in 5 patients. One patient had a previous AAA open repair. CIA aneurysm was bilateral in 5 patients. Preliminary procedure of internal iliac artery embolization was performed in 3 patients. Technical success rate of the Gore IBE implantation was 100% with a median fluoroscopy time of 35 min (range 12-64, ±16) and median contrast load of 150 mL (range 100-250, ±45). No perioperative complications were observed. Median length of stay was 4 days (range 3-7, ±2). One aortic type Ia endoleak was observed on the postoperative CT scan requiring an aortic extension at day 3. Branch patency was observed in all 10 patients at 1 month and 9 patients at 6 month. All CIA aneurysms were excluded without type Ib or type III endoleak. The technical success and short-term results demonstrate encouraging results and clinical benefits of the new GORE EXCLUDER IBE. A longer follow-up is needed to assess midterm and long-term results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Openness initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, S.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Although antinuclear campaigns seem to be effective, public communication and education efforts on low-level radioactive waste have mixed results. Attempts at public information programs on low-level radioactive waste still focus on influencing public opinion. A question then is: {open_quotes}Is it preferable to have a program focus on public education that will empower individuals to make informed decisions rather than trying to influence them in their decisions?{close_quotes} To address this question, a case study with both quantitative and qualitative data will be used. The Ohio Low-Level Radioactive Waste Education Program has a goal to provide people with information they want/need to make their own decisions. The program initiated its efforts by conducting a statewide survey to determine information needed by people and where they turned for that information. This presentation reports data from the survey and then explores the program development process in which programs were designed and presented using the information. Pre and post data from the programs reveal attitude and knowledge shifts.

  1. Re-opening of Gate C

    CERN Multimedia

    TS-FM Group

    2006-01-01

    From 3rd April to 1st December 2006, Gate C (Satigny) will be open to pedestrians and vehicles (except delivery vehicles) from Monday to Friday, excluding official holidays, between 8.00 a.m. and 9.00 a.m. for those entering the site and between 5.00 p.m. and 6.00 p.m. for those leaving the site. TS-FM Group Reception and Access Control Service

  2. Re-opening of Gate C

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    From 3rd April to 1st December 2006, Gate C (Satigny) will be open to pedestrians and vehicles (except delivery vehicles) from Mondays to Fridays, excluding official holidays, between 8.00 a.m. and 9.00 a.m. for those entering the site and between 5.00 p.m. and 6.00 p.m. for those leaving the site. TS-FM Group Reception and Access Control Service

  3. Cadmium tolerance and accumulation in Excluder Thlaspi arvense and various accessions of hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seregin, I.V.; Kozhevnikova, A.D.; Zhukovskaya, V.; Schat, H.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) accumulation and tolerance were analyzed in hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens F.K. Mey and excluder Thlaspi arvense L. Five accessions of N. caerulescens (La Calamine (LC, Belgium), Saint Félix de Palliéres (SF, France), Col du Mas de l’Aire (CMA, France), Ganges (GA, France) from

  4. 20 CFR 668.650 - Can INA grantees exclude segments of the eligible population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... eligible population? 668.650 Section 668.650 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION... population? (a) No, INA grantees cannot exclude segments of the eligible population. INA grantees must document in their Two Year Plan that a system is in place to afford all members of the eligible population...

  5. Excluding Ethical Issues from U.S. History Textbooks: 911 and the War on Terror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowski, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    This research study examined nine secondary American history textbooks regarding their treatment of 9/11 and related events. The analysis centered on both the knowledge included and excluded from the discussion in each book. Particular attention was given to the moral and ethical issues relevant to 9/11. Findings show that textbooks vary in their…

  6. 75 FR 13678 - Schedules of Controlled Substances; Table of Excluded Nonnarcotic Products: Nasal Decongestant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ... Excluded Nonnarcotic Products: Nasal Decongestant Inhalers Manufactured by Classic Pharmaceuticals, LLC... (containing 50 mg Levmetamfetamine) manufactured by Classic Pharmaceuticals, LLC and marketed under various..., which may be lawfully sold over the counter without a prescription under the Federal Food, Drug, and...

  7. Acting on Observed Social Exclusion: Developmental Perspectives on Punishment of Excluders and Compensation of Victims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Geert-Jan; Crone, Eveline A.; van den Bos, Wouter; Güroglu, Berna

    2013-01-01

    This study examined punishment of excluders and compensation of victims after observing an instance of social exclusion at various phases of adolescent development. Participants (n = 183; age 9 to 22 years) were first included in a virtual ball-tossing game, Cyberball, and then "observed" the exclusion of a peer. Subsequently, they…

  8. NGO Provision of Basic Education: Alternative or Complementary Service Delivery to Support Access to the Excluded?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Pauline

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on approaches by non-government organisations (NGOs) to reach primary school-aged children excluded from access to the conventional state education system. It highlights recent shifts in international literature and agency priorities from the portrayal of NGO provision as a (non-formal) "alternative" to (formal) state…

  9. 7 CFR 205.310 - Agricultural products produced on an exempt or excluded operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agricultural products produced on an exempt or excluded operation. 205.310 Section 205.310 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION AC...

  10. Walk the Talk? The Effect of Voting and Excludability in Public Goods Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans J. Czap

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of voting and excludability on individual contributions to group projects. We conducted two experiments on excludable and nonexcludable public goods, which provided several important results. First, contrary to our expectations, subjects are generally contributing more to the non-excludable compared to the excludable public good. Second, participating in a vote to choose a public project per se makes no difference in contributions. However, if the project that the individual voted for also gets selected by the group, they contribute significantly more to that project. Third, empathy and locus of control are important driving forces of participation in common projects. Our results have implications on the procedural design of obtaining funding for public projects. First, the public should get involved and have a say in the determination of which project should be realized. Second, it might well pay off to attempt to develop a consensus among the population and obtain near unanimous votes, because in our experiment, subjects discriminate between the project they voted for and the project chosen by the majority. Third, the policy proposers should stress the other-regarding interest of the public good rather than just pecuniary incentives.

  11. 46 CFR 148.04-13 - Ferrous metal borings, shavings, turnings, or cuttings (excluding stainless steel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (excluding stainless steel). 148.04-13 Section 148.04-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... stainless steel). (a) This section applies to the stowage and transportation in bulk of hazardous materials... steel). However, unmanned barges on which the article is stowed for or transported on a voyage entirely...

  12. ALTERNATIVE FORMULATIONS TO REDUCE CFC USE IN U.S. EXEMPTED AND EXCLUDED AEROSOL PRODUCTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report examines products exempted and excluded from those affected by the 1978 ban on the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) as aerosol propellants, the present consumption of CFCs still utilized for these products in the U.S., and alternative formulations which may be used to...

  13. 26 CFR 1.401(a)(26)-6 - Excludable employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... nonresident aliens) may be treated as an excludable employee. (ii) Special treaty rule. In addition, an...), a plan that uses the elapsed time method of determining years of service may use either 91... general method of crediting service for the employee. If one of the equivalencies set forth in 29 CFR 2530...

  14. 40 CFR 1039.20 - What requirements from this part apply to excluded stationary engines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... name and trademark of another company you choose to designate. (3) State the engine displacement (in... to excluded stationary engines? 1039.20 Section 1039.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Overview and Applicability § 1039.20 What requirements from this part apply to...

  15. Influence of streambank fencing on the environmental quality of cattle-excluded pastures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J J; Chanasyk, D S; Curtis, T; Willms, W D

    2010-01-01

    Limited information exists on the effect of streambank fencing on riparian zone pastures. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that 4 to 6 yr of streambank fencing would improve the environmental quality of the cattle-excluded pasture compared with the grazed pasture and cause the fenced pasture to act as a buffer or filter strip. Rangeland health, vegetative and soil properties, and rainfall simulation runoff were measured in the cattle-excluded and adjacent grazed native pastures along the fenced reach of the Lower Little Bow River in southern Alberta, Canada, for 3 yr (2005-2007). Rangeland health was improved (health score increase from 55 to 72%); vegetation cover (13-21%) and standing litter (38-742%) were increased; and bare soil (72-93%) and soil bulk density (6-8%) were decreased under cattle exclusion, indicating an improvement in environmental quality from streambank fencing. In contrast, other vegetation (total and live basal area, fallen litter) and soil properties (soil water and soil C, N, and P) were not improved by cattle exclusion. Cattle exclusion significantly (P fenced pasture may act as a buffer for certain runoff variables. In contrast, other runoff variables (turbidity, electrical conductivity, pH, concentrations and loads of total suspended solids, and certain N and P fractions) in the cattle-excluded pasture were generally not improved by streambank fencing. Overall, streambank fencing improved the quality of certain environmental variables within the cattle-excluded pasture.

  16. Unanimous versus partial rejection: How the number of excluders influences the impact of ostracism in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandstrom, M.J.; Deutz, M.H.F.; Lansu, T.A.M.; Noorden, T.H.J. van; Karremans, J.C.T.M.; Cillessen, A.H.N.

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has shown that ostracism - the experience of being ignored and excluded - has negative effects on all of us, young and old. Using a Cyberball paradigm, the present research replicates the effects of ostracism on the moods (anger, anxiety, happiness, and anger) and fundamental needs

  17. Unanimous versus partial rejection : How the number of excluders influences the impact of ostracism in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandstrom, Marlene J.; Deutz, Marike H F; Lansu, Tessa A M; van Noorden, Tirza H J; Karremans, Johan C.; Cillessen, Antonius H N

    Previous research has shown that ostracism-the experience of being ignored and excluded-has negative effects on all of us, young and old. Using a Cyberball paradigm, the present research replicates the effects of ostracism on the moods (anger, anxiety, happiness, and anger) and fundamental needs

  18. Ontario Universities Benefits Survey, 1987-88. Part I: Benefits Excluding Pensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of Western Ontario, London.

    Results of the 1987-1988 survey of benefits, excluding pensions, for 17 Ontario, Canada, universities are presented. Information is provided on the following areas: administration and insurance plans, communication of benefits, proposed changes in benefits, provision of life and dismemberment insurance, maternity leave policy, Ontario health…

  19. Opening Address

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovini, L.

    1994-01-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen To quote Mr Jean Terrien: "Physics must be one step ahead of metrology". A long-serving Director of the BIPM, he said these words when visiting the IMGC in 1970 as a member of the scientific board of our Institute. At that time it was still an open question whether the IMGC should start research work on the absolute measurement of silicon lattice spacing. Mr Terrien underlined the revolutionary character of x-ray interferometry and, eventually, he caused the balance needle to lean towards the ... right direction. Mr Terrien correctly foresaw that, like Michelson's interferometer of 1880, x-ray interferometry could have a prominent place in today's science and technology. And while, in the first case, after more than a century we can see instruments based on electromagnetic wave interaction within every one's reach in laboratories and, sometimes, in workshops, in the second case, twenty-five years since the first development of an x-ray interferometer we can witness its role in nanometrology. Today and tomorrow we meet to discuss how to go beyond the sixth decimal place in the value of the Avogadro constant. We are aware that the quest for this achievement requires the cooperation of scientists with complementary capabilities. I am sure that the present workshop is a very good opportunity to present and discuss results and to improve and extend existing cooperation. The new adjustment of fundamental constants envisaged by the CODATA Task Group is redoubling scientists' efforts to produce competitive values of NA. The results of the measurements of the silicon lattice spacing in terms of an optical wavelength, which were available for the 1986 adjustment, combined with the determination of silicon molar volume, demonstrate how such an NA determination produces a consistent set of other constants and opens the way to a possible redefinition of the kilogram. We shall see in these two days how far we have progressed along this road. For us at the

  20. Endoscopic findings in the excluded stomach after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuga, Rogerio; Safatle-Ribeiro, Adriana V; Faintuch, Joel; Ishida, Robson K; Furuya, Carlos K; Garrido, Arthur B; Cecconello, Ivan; Ishioka, Shinichi; Sakai, Paulo

    2007-10-01

    After gastric bypass surgery performed because of morbid obesity, the excluded stomach can rarely be endoscopically examined. With the advent of a new apparatus and technique, possible mucosal changes can be routinely accessed and monitored, thus preventing potential benign and malignant complications. Prospective observational study in a homogeneous population with nonspecific symptoms. Outpatient clinic of a large public academic hospital. Forty consecutive patients (mean +/- SD age, 44.5 +/- 10.0 y ears; 85.0% women) were seen at a mean +/- SD of 77.3 +/- 19.4 months after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Elective double-balloon enteroscopy of the excluded stomach was performed. Rate of successful intubation, endoscopic findings, and complications. The excluded stomach was reached in 35 of 40 patients (87.5%). Mean +/- SD time to enter the organ was 24.9 +/- 14.3 minutes (range, 5-75 minutes). Endoscopic findings were normal in 9 patients (25.7%), whereas in 26 (74.3%), various types of gastritis (erythematous, erosive, hemorrhagic erosive, and atrophic) were identified, primarily in the gastric body and antrum. No cancer was documented in the present series. Tolerance was good, and no complications were recorded during or after the intervention. The double-balloon method is useful and practical for access to the excluded stomach. Although cancer was not noted, most of the studied population had gastritis, including moderate and severe forms. Surveillance of the excluded stomach is recommended after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery performed because of morbid obesity.

  1. Long-Term Outcome of the GORE EXCLUDER AAA Endoprosthesis for Treatment of Infrarenal Aortic Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poublon, Claire G; Holewijn, Suzanne; van Sterkenburg, Steven M M; Tielliu, Ignace F J; Zeebregts, Clark J; Reijnen, Michel M P J

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate long-term outcome of GORE EXCLUDER AAA Endoprosthesis (W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc, Flagstaff, Arizona) for elective treatment of infrarenal aortic aneurysms and to evaluate performance of different generations of the device. A retrospective analysis was performed of 248 patients undergoing elective endovascular aneurysm repair with the GORE EXCLUDER between January 2000 and December 2015 in 2 hospitals. Primary endpoint was reintervention-free survival. Secondary endpoints were technical success, overall survival, rupture-free survival, endoleaks, sac diameter change (> 5 mm), limb occlusion, and migration (> 5 mm). Median follow-up time was 26 months (range, 1-190 months). Assisted primary technical success was 96.8%. Reintervention-free survival for 5 and 10 years was 85.2% and 75.6%, respectively. Independent risk factors for reintervention were technical success (P < .001), type I endoleak (P < .001), and type II endoleak (P = .003). Late adverse events requiring reintervention included rupture (0.4%), limb occlusion (0.4%), and stent migration (0.4%). Type Ia (4.8%), Ib (2.8%), II (35.9%), and V (6.5%) endoleaks were reported throughout follow-up. Sac growth was more prevalent with the original GORE EXCLUDER compared with the low permeability GORE EXCLUDER (P = .001) and in the presence of type I, II, and V endoleaks (P < .05). Three conversions (1.2%) were performed. Overall survival at 5 and 10 years was 68.4% and 49.0%, with no reported aneurysm-related deaths. Treatment with the GORE EXCLUDER is effective with acceptable reintervention rates in the long-term and few device-related adverse events or ruptures up to 10 years. Observed late adverse events and new-onset endoleaks emphasize the need for long-term surveillance. Copyright © 2017 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Addressing dichotomous data for participants excluded from trial analysis: a guide for systematic reviewers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie A Akl

    Full Text Available Systematic reviewer authors intending to include all randomized participants in their meta-analyses need to make assumptions about the outcomes of participants with missing data.The objective of this paper is to provide systematic reviewer authors with a relatively simple guidance for addressing dichotomous data for participants excluded from analyses of randomized trials.This guide is based on a review of the Cochrane handbook and published methodological research. The guide deals with participants excluded from the analysis who were considered 'non-adherent to the protocol' but for whom data are available, and participants with missing data.Systematic reviewer authors should include data from 'non-adherent' participants excluded from the primary study authors' analysis but for whom data are available. For missing, unavailable participant data, authors may conduct a complete case analysis (excluding those with missing data as the primary analysis. Alternatively, they may conduct a primary analysis that makes plausible assumptions about the outcomes of participants with missing data. When the primary analysis suggests important benefit, sensitivity meta-analyses using relatively extreme assumptions that may vary in plausibility can inform the extent to which risk of bias impacts the confidence in the results of the primary analysis. The more plausible assumptions draw on the outcome event rates within the trial or in all trials included in the meta-analysis. The proposed guide does not take into account the uncertainty associated with assumed events.This guide proposes methods for handling participants excluded from analyses of randomized trials. These methods can help in establishing the extent to which risk of bias impacts meta-analysis results.

  3. TSH alone is not sufficient to exclude all patients with a functioning thyroid nodule from undergoing testing to exclude thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtado-Lopez, Luis-Mauricio; Monroy-Lozano, Blanca-Estela [General Hospital of Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico); Martinez-Duncker, Carlos [Hospital Infantil de Mexico Federico Gomez, Medicina Nuclear Molecular, Mexico City, DF (Mexico)

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of the study was to analyze whether the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) alone avoids tests to exclude malignancy in all patients with functional thyroid nodules (FTN). Sixty-nine patients with FTN on {sup 99m}Tc scintigraphy, radioiodine uptake test (RIU), {sup 99m}Tc thyroid uptake, TSH assay, T3, and T4 obtained within 48 h were retrospectively identified out of 2,356 thyroid scans performed from January 2000 to April 2007. FTNs were classified as causing total, partial, or no inhibition of the thyroid as group 1, 2, or 3, respectively. TSH was subnormal in 21 of 69 (30.43%) patients. In group 1 (N = 23, 33.3%), TSH was subnormal, normal, and high in eight, nine, and six patients; in group 2 (N = 17, 24.6%), TSH was subnormal, normal, and high in four, six, and seven patients, and in group 3 (N = 29, 42%), TSH was subnormal, normal, and high in 9, 13, and 7 patients, respectively. TSH was significantly lower in group 1. In T3, T4, {sup 99m}Tc thyroid uptake, and RIU, there were no differences between the three groups. Only 30.43% of patients had subnormal TSH. TSH alone cannot avoid tests to exclude malignancy in all patients with FTN. FTN existence can only be accurately assessed by thyroid scintigraphy. The current incidence of FTN may be unknown because scintigraphy is not routinely performed in all patients with thyroid nodules. Thyroid scintigraphy of patients with high TSH can detect diseases such as Hashimoto's thyroiditis and identify patients with FTN in whom no further diagnostic procedures would be needed in patients with normal TSH levels with nondiagnostic fine-needle aspiration results. (orig.)

  4. Opening Address

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, T.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, it is my great honor and pleasure to present an opening address of the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3). On the behalf of the organizing committee, I certainly welcome all your visits to KGU Kannai Media Center belonging to Kanto Gakuin University, and stay in Yokohama. In particular, to whom come from abroad more than 17 countries, I would appreciate your participations after long long trips from your homeland to Yokohama. The first international workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics", called SOTANCP, was held in Strasbourg, France, in 2008, and the second one was held in Brussels, Belgium, in 2010. Then the third workshop is now held in Yokohama. In this period, we had the traditional 10th cluster conference in Debrecen, Hungary, in 2012. Thus we have the traditional cluster conference and SOTANCP, one after another, every two years. This obviously shows our field of nuclear cluster physics is very active and flourishing. It is for the first time in about 10 years to hold the international workshop on nuclear cluster physics in Japan, because the last cluster conference held in Japan was in Nara in 2003, about 10 years ago. The president in Nara conference was Prof. K. Ikeda, and the chairpersons were Prof. H. Horiuchi and Prof. I. Tanihata. I think, quite a lot of persons in this room had participated at the Nara conference. Since then, about ten years passed. So, this workshop has profound significance for our Japanese colleagues. The subjects of this workshop are to discuss "the state of the art in nuclear cluster physics" and also discuss the prospect of this field. In a couple of years, we saw significant progresses of this field both in theory and in experiment, which have brought better and new understandings on the clustering aspects in stable and unstable nuclei. I think, the concept of clustering has been more important than ever. This is true also in the

  5. Open Standards, Open Source, and Open Innovation: Harnessing the Benefits of Openness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Committee for Economic Development, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Digitization of information and the Internet have profoundly expanded the capacity for openness. This report details the benefits of openness in three areas--open standards, open-source software, and open innovation--and examines the major issues in the debate over whether openness should be encouraged or not. The report explains each of these…

  6. Assessment of photocatalytic potentiality and determination of ecotoxicity (using plant model for better environmental applicability) of synthesized copper, copper oxide and copper-doped zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debadrito; Datta, Animesh Kumar; Kumbhakar, Divya Vishambhar; Ghosh, Bapi; Pramanik, Ankita; Gupta, Sudha; Mandal, Aninda

    2017-01-01

    A facile cost effective wet chemical method of synthesis is proposed for Cu-NPs, CuO-NPs and Cu-doped ZnO-NPs. The nanomaterials are opto-physically characterized for nano standard quality. Cu-doped ZnO-NPs based catalytic system is found to possess most efficient photocatalytic activity in degradation of two organic azo-dyes namely methyl red (MR) and malachite green (MG) that are released as industrial effluents in eco-environment intercollegium. Two possible photocatalytic degradation pathways are proposed to understand the mechanism of interaction prevailing during the mineralization of MR and MG dyes. Such study provides insight for waste water management. The uniqueness of the present work is 1) possible routes of MG dye degradation by Cu-doped ZnO-NPs and subsequent intermediate by-products are novel and pioneered of its kind. 2) two new intermediate byproducts are identified suggesting prevalence of multiple MR degradation pathways by Cu-doped ZnO-NPs. For assessment of residual NPs impact on environment, eco-toxicological assay is performed using plant system (Sesamum indicum L.) as model. The study encompasses seed germination, seedling morphology, quantification of endogenous H2O2 and MDA generation, estimation of DNA double strand break and analysis of cell cycle inhibition. Results highlight reduced ecotoxicity of Cu-doped ZnO-NPs compared to the other synthesized nanomaterials thereby suggesting better environmental applicability in waste water purification.

  7. Microwave-enhanced UV/H2O2 degradation of an azo dye (tartrazine): optimization, colour removal, mineralization and ecotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolin, Fernanda; Nascimento, Ulisses Magalhães; Azevedo, Eduardo Bessa

    2013-01-01

    This study optimizes two factors, pH and initial [H2O2], in the ultraviolet (UV)/H2O2/microwave (MW) process through experimental design and assesses the effect of MWs on the colour removal of an azo-dye (tartrazine) solution that was favoured by an acidic pH. The estimated optimal conditions were: initial [H2O2] = 2.0 mmol L(-1) and pH = 2.6, at 30 +/- 2 degrees C. We obtained colour removals of approximately 92% in 24 min of irradiation (EDL, 244.2 W), following zero order kinetics: k = (3.9 +/- 0.52) x 10(-2) a.u. min(-1) and R2 = 0.989. Chemical and biological oxygen demand were significantly removed. On the other hand, the carbon content, biodegradability and ecotoxicity (Lactuca sativa) remained approximately the same. The UV/H2O2/MW process was shown to be eight times faster than other tested processes (MW, H2O2, H2O2/MW, and UV/MW).

  8. Evaluation of biological methods for a future methodological implementation of the Hazard criterion H14 'ecotoxic' in the European waste list (2000/532/EC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Heidrun; Roembke, Joerg; Donnevert, Gerhild; Becker, Roland

    2011-02-01

    The ecotoxicological characterization of waste is part of its assessment as hazardous or non-hazardous according to the European Waste List. For this classification 15 hazard criteria are derived from the Council Directive 91/689/EEC on hazardous waste. Some of the hazard criteria are based on the content of dangerous substances. The criterion H14 'ecotoxic' lacks of an assessment and testing strategy and no specific threshold values have been defined so far. Based on the recommendations of CEN guideline 14735 (2005), an international round robin test (ring test) was organized by the German Federal Environment Agency in order to define suitable test methods for the biological assessment of waste and waste eluates. A basic test battery, consisting of three aquatic and three terrestrial tests, was compiled. In addition, data were submitted for ten additional tests (five aquatic (including a genotoxicity test) and five terrestrial ones). The tests were performed with three representative waste types: an ash from an incineration plant, a soil containing high concentrations of organic contaminants (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) and a preserved wood waste. The results of this ring test confirm that a combination of a battery of biological tests and chemical residual analysis is needed for an ecotoxicological characterization of wastes. With small modifications the basic test battery is considered to be well suitable for the hazard and risk assessment of wastes and waste eluates. All results and documents are accessible via a web-based data bank application.

  9. The snowball effect: friendship moderates escalations in depressed affect among avoidant and excluded children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, William M; Laursen, Brett; Hoza, Betsy

    2010-11-01

    A three-wave longitudinal study conducted with preadolescent boys and girls (N = 231 at Time 1 [T1]) was used to assess the hypotheses that aspects of social withdrawal would be predictors of a "snowball" cascade of depressed affect, and that friendship experiences would moderate these effects. Consistent with these hypotheses, multilevel modeling showed that measures of avoidance and exclusion at T1 were associated with concurrent levels of depressed affect and were antecedent to escalating trajectories of depressed affect over time. These accelerating growth curves fit a snowball cascade model. The analyses also showed the protective effects of friendship. Specifically, the snowball effect was limited to avoidant and excluded children who were friendless. Depressed affect did not increase among avoidant and excluded children who were friended.

  10. Trust and cooperation in the public sphere: why Roma people should not be excluded?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoş DRAGOMAN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The recent political developments in Romania and other Central and East European countries, marked by rising populism and political extremism, shed light on the essential issue of building a free, tolerant and inclusive public sphere, which is willing to let arguments to be decisive instead of power, status, race or wealth. The current tendencies of socially excluding Roma, indiscriminately taken by populists for unjustified social burden and intolerable racial difference, are a warning for more radical political action that could undermine on the long-run the effort to set up a democratic public space. Excluding from start an entire minority would only encourage future exclusions based on ideology, ethnicity or religion, according to the narrow definition populists use to give to the concept of ‘people’.

  11. Using coronary calcification to exclude an ischemic etiology for cardiomyopathy: A validation study and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premaratne, Manuja; Shamsaei, Mohabbat; Chow, Jonathan D H; Haddad, Tony; Erthal, Fernanda; Curran, Helen; Yam, Yeung; Szczotka, Agnieszka; Mielniczuk, Lisa; Wells, George A; Beanlands, Rob S; Hossain, Alomgir; Chow, Benjamin J W

    2017-03-01

    Preliminary data suggests the absence of coronary artery calcification (CAC) excludes ischemic etiologies of cardiomyopathy. We prospectively validate and perform a systematic review to determine the utility of an Agatston score=0 to exclude the diagnosis of ischemic cardiomyopathy. Patients with newly diagnosed LV dysfunction were prospectively enrolled. Patients underwent CAC imaging and were followed until an etiologic diagnosis of cardiomyopathy was made. Eighty-two patients were enrolled in the study and underwent CAC imaging with 81.7% patients having non-ischemic cardiomyopathy. An Agatston score=0 successfully excluded an ischemic etiology for cardiomyopathy with a specificity of 100% (CI: 74.7-100%) and a positive predictive value of 100% (CI: 85.0%-100%). A systematic literature review was performed and studies were deemed suitable for inclusion if: 1) patients with CHF, cardiomyopathy or LV dysfunction were enrolled, 2) underwent CAC imaging and patients were assessed for an Agatston score=0 or the absence of CAC, and 3) the final etiologic diagnosis (ischemic or non-ischemic) was provided. Eight studies provided sufficient information to calculate operating characteristics for an Agatston score=0 and were combined with our validation cohort for a total of 754 patients. An Agatston score=0 excluded ischemic cardiomyopathy with specificity and positive predictive values of 98.4% (CI: 95.6-99.5%), and 98.3% (CI: 95.5-99.5%), respectively. In patients with cardiomyopathy of unknown etiology, an Agatston score=0 appears to rule out an ischemic etiology. A screening CAC may be a simple and cost-effective method of triaging patients, identifying those who do and do not need additional CAD investigations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Schoolchildren's consumption of competitive foods and beverages, excluding à la carte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakarala, Madhuri; Keast, Debra R; Hoerr, Sharon

    2010-09-01

    Competitive foods/beverages are those in school vending machines, school stores, snack bars, special sales, and items sold à la carte in the school cafeteria that compete with United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) meal program offerings. Grouping à la carte items with less nutritious items allowed in less regulated venues may obfuscate analysis of the school competitive food environment. Excluding à la carte items from competitive foods, the objectives were to: (1) assess competitive food use by gender, ethnicity, eligibility for free or reduced-price meals, and participation in school meals programs, (2) determine differences between grade levels in energy intakes obtained from food sources, (3) determine the nutrient intake derived from competitive foods for students who consumed them, and (4) determine energy-adjusted differences in 24-hour nutrient intakes of protein, calcium, iron, and other selected nutrients between competitive food consumer and nonconsumers. Competitive foods/beverages use, excluding à la carte items, was examined using the third School Nutrition Dietary Assessment Study (SNDA III), a nationally representative sample of 2309 schoolchildren in grades 1 to 12. Mean nutrient intakes were adjusted for energy intake and other covariates, and differences between consumers and nonconsumers of competitive items were determined using analysis of variance and sudaan. Excluding à la carte items, 22% of schoolchildren consumed competitive items in a representative school day and use was highest in high school. Consumers of competitive items other than à la carte had significantly higher mean energy, sugar intakes, and lower sodium, dietary fiber, B vitamins, and iron intakes than nonconsumers. Use of competitive foods/beverages, excluding à la carte, was detrimental to children's diet quality.

  13. Ionic Asymmetry and Solvent Excluded Volume Effects on Spherical Electric Double Layers: A Density Functional Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medasani, Bharat; Ovanesyan, Zaven; Thomas, Dennis G.; Sushko, Maria L.; Marucho, Marcelo

    2014-05-29

    In this article we present a classical density functional theory for electrical double layers of spherical macroions that extends the capabilities of conventional approaches by accounting for electrostatic ion correlations, size asymmetry and excluded volume effects. The approach is based on a recent approximation introduced by Hansen-Goos and Roth for the hard sphere excess free energy of inhomogeneous fluids (J. Chem. Phys. 124, 154506). It accounts for the proper and efficient description of the effects of ionic asymmetry and solvent excluded volume, especially at high ion concentrations and size asymmetry ratios including those observed in experimental studies. Additionally, we utilize a leading functional Taylor expansion approximation of the ion density profiles. In addition, we use the Mean Spherical Approximation for multi-component charged hard sphere fluids to account for the electrostatic ion correlation effects. These approximations are implemented in our theoretical formulation into a suitable decomposition of the excess free energy which plays a key role in capturing the complex interplay between charge correlations and excluded volume effects. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in various scenarios to validate the proposed approach, obtaining a good compromise between accuracy and computational cost. We use the proposed computational approach to study the effects of ion size, ion size asymmetry and solvent excluded volume on the ion profiles, integrated charge, mean electrostatic potential, and ionic coordination number around spherical macroions in various electrolyte mixtures. Our results show that both solvent hard sphere diameter and density play a dominant role in the distribution of ions around spherical macroions, mainly for experimental water molarity and size values where the counterion distribution is characterized by a tight binding to the macroion, similar to that predicted by the Stern model.

  14. Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404). Environmental guidance program reference book: Revision 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404) and those regulations that implement the statutes and appear to be most relevant to US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  15. A discrete fibre dispersion method for excluding fibres under compression in the modelling of fibrous tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kewei; Ogden, Ray W; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2018-01-01

    Recently, micro-sphere-based methods derived from the angular integration approach have been used for excluding fibres under compression in the modelling of soft biological tissues. However, recent studies have revealed that many of the widely used numerical integration schemes over the unit sphere are inaccurate for large deformation problems even without excluding fibres under compression. Thus, in this study, we propose a discrete fibre dispersion model based on a systematic method for discretizing a unit hemisphere into a finite number of elementary areas, such as spherical triangles. Over each elementary area, we define a representative fibre direction and a discrete fibre density. Then, the strain energy of all the fibres distributed over each elementary area is approximated based on the deformation of the representative fibre direction weighted by the corresponding discrete fibre density. A summation of fibre contributions over all elementary areas then yields the resultant fibre strain energy. This treatment allows us to exclude fibres under compression in a discrete manner by evaluating the tension-compression status of the representative fibre directions only. We have implemented this model in a finite-element programme and illustrate it with three representative examples, including simple tension and simple shear of a unit cube, and non-homogeneous uniaxial extension of a rectangular strip. The results of all three examples are consistent and accurate compared with the previously developed continuous fibre dispersion model, and that is achieved with a substantial reduction of computational cost. © 2018 The Author(s).

  16. Excluded-Mean-Variance Neural Decision Analyzer for Qualitative Group Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Young Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many qualitative group decisions in professional fields such as law, engineering, economics, psychology, and medicine that appear to be crisp and certain are in reality shrouded in fuzziness as a result of uncertain environments and the nature of human cognition within which the group decisions are made. In this paper we introduce an innovative approach to group decision making in uncertain situations by using a mean-variance neural approach. The key idea of this proposed approach is to compute the excluded mean of individual evaluations and weight it by applying a variance influence function (VIF; this process of weighting the excluded mean by VIF provides an improved result in the group decision making. In this paper, a case study with the proposed excluded-mean-variance approach is also presented. The results of this case study indicate that this proposed approach can improve the effectiveness of qualitative decision making by providing the decision maker with a new cognitive tool to assist in the reasoning process.

  17. From Open Source to Open Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Open source is the right to modify, not the right to contribute. Are external contributions absent from your project? Have you ever thought about what is it like to be a new contributor on your project? I challenge you to transform your project from Open Source to an Open Collaboration.

  18. Open access, open education resources and open data in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Ivana Di; Mwoka, Meggie; Kwaga, Teddy; Rukundo, Priscilla Aceng; Ernest, Dennis Ssesanga; Osaheni, Louis Aikoriogie; John, Kasibante; Shafik, Kasirye; de Sousa, Agostinho Moreira

    2015-01-01

    As a follow up to OpenCon 2014, International Federation of Medical Students' Associations (IFMSA) students organized a 3 day workshop Open Access, Open Education Resources and Open Data in Kampala from 15-18 December 2014. One of the aims of the workshop was to engage the Open Access movement in Uganda which encompasses the scientific community, librarians, academia, researchers and students. The IFMSA students held the workshop with the support of: Consortium for Uganda University Libraries (CUUL), The Right to Research Coalition, Electronic Information for Libraries (EIFL), Makerere University, International Health Sciences University (IHSU), Pan African Medical Journal (PAMJ) and the Centre for Health Human Rights and Development (CEHURD). All these organizations are based or have offices in Kampala. The event culminated in a meeting with the Science and Technology Committee of Parliament of Uganda in order to receive the support of the Ugandan Members of Parliament and to make a concrete change for Open Access in the country.

  19. The effect of excluding juveniles on apparent adult olive baboons (Papio anubis) social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedurek, Piotr; Lehmann, Julia

    2017-01-01

    In recent years there has been much interest in investigating the social structure of group living animals using social network analysis. Many studies so far have focused on the social networks of adults, often excluding younger, immature group members. This potentially may lead to a biased view of group social structure as multiple recent studies have shown that younger group members can significantly contribute to group structure. As proof of the concept, we address this issue by investigating social network structure with and without juveniles in wild olive baboons (Papio anubis) at Gashaka Gumti National Park, Nigeria. Two social networks including all independently moving individuals (i.e., excluding dependent juveniles) were created based on aggressive and grooming behaviour. We used knockout simulations based on the random removal of individuals from the network in order to investigate to what extent the exclusion of juveniles affects the resulting network structure and our interpretation of age-sex specific social roles. We found that juvenile social patterns differed from those of adults and that the exclusion of juveniles from the network significantly altered the resulting overall network structure. Moreover, the removal of juveniles from the network affected individuals in specific age-sex classes differently: for example, including juveniles in the grooming network increased network centrality of adult females while decreasing centrality of adult males. These results suggest that excluding juveniles from the analysis may not only result in a distorted picture of the overall social structure but also may mask some of the social roles of individuals belonging to different age-sex classes. PMID:28323851

  20. Method for excluding salt and other soluble materials from produced water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Tommy J [Knoxville, TN; Tsouris, Costas [Oak Ridge, TN; Palumbo, Anthony V [Oak Ridge, TN; Riestenberg, David E [Knoxville, TN; McCallum, Scott D [Knoxville, TN

    2009-08-04

    A method for reducing the salinity, as well as the hydrocarbon concentration of produced water to levels sufficient to meet surface water discharge standards. Pressure vessel and coflow injection technology developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is used to mix produced water and a gas hydrate forming fluid to form a solid or semi-solid gas hydrate mixture. Salts and solids are excluded from the water that becomes a part of the hydrate cage. A three-step process of dissociation of the hydrate results in purified water suitable for irrigation.

  1. Chip-excluding in Lathe Cutting 1st. Report : Chip Form Geometry I

    OpenAIRE

    小尾, 誠; 岩里, 茂; 丹沢, 常正

    1981-01-01

    The cfficiency of chip-excluding in lathe cutting is very often determined by chip forms. So, the relation between the chip form and cutting conditions must be explained from the point of view of not only practical experiences but also theoretical studies. Here in the paper, the basic equation for chip forms has been derived analytically and the chip forms are simulated on the basis of an assumption that the chip is formed by certain herahedrons which are piled. By this study the following re...

  2. 5 CFR 919.420 - May I approve a transaction with an excluded or disqualified person at a lower tier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... excluded or disqualified person at a lower tier? 919.420 Section 919.420 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF... a transaction with an excluded or disqualified person at a lower tier? If a transaction at a lower tier is subject to your approval, you as an agency official may not approve— (a) A covered transaction...

  3. 31 CFR 19.420 - May I approve a transaction with an excluded or disqualified person at a lower tier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I approve a transaction with an excluded or disqualified person at a lower tier? 19.420 Section 19.420 Money and Finance: Treasury Office... transaction with an excluded or disqualified person at a lower tier? If a transaction at a lower tier is...

  4. 20 CFR 10.818 - How is a provider notified of OWCP's intent to exclude him or her?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is a provider notified of OWCP's intent to exclude him or her? 10.818 Section 10.818 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... How is a provider notified of OWCP's intent to exclude him or her? The Regional Director shall...

  5. 20 CFR 30.718 - How is a provider notified of OWCP's intent to exclude him or her?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is a provider notified of OWCP's intent to exclude him or her? 30.718 Section 30.718 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... OWCP's intent to exclude him or her? The Regional Director shall initiate the exclusion process by...

  6. 9 CFR 130.16 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic serology tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or at...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for veterinary diagnostic serology tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or at authorized sites. 130.16 Section 130.16 Animals... USER FEES § 130.16 User fees for veterinary diagnostic serology tests performed at NVSL (excluding...

  7. 9 CFR 130.19 - User fees for other veterinary diagnostic services or materials provided at NVSL (excluding FADDL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for other veterinary... User fees for other veterinary diagnostic services or materials provided at NVSL (excluding FADDL). (a) User fees for other veterinary diagnostic services or materials available from NVSL (excluding FADDL...

  8. The ecotoxic potential of a new zero-valent iron nanomaterial, designed for the elimination of halogenated pollutants, and its effect on reductive dechlorinating microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiwy, Andreas; Maes, Hanna M; Koske, Daniel; Flecken, Mirkko; Schmidt, Kathrin R; Schell, Heico; Tiehm, Andreas; Kamptner, Andre; Thümmler, Silke; Stanjek, Helge; Heggen, Marc; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Braun, Jürgen; Schäffer, Andreas; Hollert, Henner

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ecotoxic potential of a new zero-valent iron nanomaterial produced for the elimination of chlorinated pollutants at contaminated sites. Abiotic dechlorination through the newly developed nanoscale zero-valent iron material and its effects on dechlorinating bacteria were investigated in anaerobic batch and column experiments. The aged, i.e. oxidized, iron material was characterization with dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis, x-ray diffractometry and cell-free reactive oxygen measurements. Furthermore, it was evaluated in aerobic ecotoxicological test systems with algae, crustacean, and fish, and also applied in a mechanism specific test for mutagenicity. The anaerobic column experiments showed co-occurrence of abiotic and biological dechlorination of the common groundwater contaminant perchloroethene. No prolonged toxicity of the nanomaterial (measured for up to 300 days) towards the investigated dechlorinating microorganism was observed. The nanomaterial has a flake like appearance and an inhomogeneous size distribution. The toxicity to crustacean and fish was calculated and the obtained EC50 values were 163 mg/L and 458 mg/L, respectively. The nanomaterial showed no mutagenicity. It physically interacted with algae, which had implications for further testing and the evaluation of the results. Thus, the newly developed iron nanomaterial was slightly toxic in its reduced state but no prolonged toxicity was recorded. The aquatic tests revealed a low toxicity with EC50 values ≥ 163 mg/L. These concentrations are unlikely to be reached in the aquatic environment. Hence, this nanomaterial is probably of no environmental concern not prohibiting its application for groundwater remediation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Evaluation of chemical parameters and ecotoxicity of a soil developed on gossan following application of polyacrylates and growth of Spergularia purpurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Erika S; Abreu, Maria Manuela; de Varennes, Amarilis; Macías, Felipe; Leitão, Sara; Cerejeira, Maria José

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemical characteristics and ecotoxicity of a mine soil developed on gossan materials and amended with hydrophilic polyacrylate polymers after a growth cycle of Spergularia purpurea. Different acute bioassays (Daphnia magna immobilization; microalgae growth inhibition; germination and growth of lettuce and oat) were carried out with simulated leachates, pore water and soil samples. The germination and growth of native shrubs (Cistus ladanifer and Lavandula sampaioana) were also evaluated in the lysimeters where S. purpurea had grown. The soil had high total concentrations (g/kg) of Al (3.50-8.60), As (2.55-2.73), Cu (0.13-0.91) and Pb (4.48-6.16). However, the percentages of elements in aqueous extracts (simulating leachates, pore water, and the conditions of the rhizosphere soil) were small when compared to their total soil concentrations (less than 9% except for Na in leachates). Growth of S. purpurea and other natural colonization of plant species (Poaceae, Fabaceae and Asteraceae families) improved chemical characteristics but the application of the polyacrylate polymers contributed to a further improvement of soil quality. However, this was not sufficient to ensure the growth of a large number of shrubs despite a great germination rate. Among the several species used on the ecotoxicological assessment, the D. magna test was the only bioassay that showed a clear toxicity of soil leachates, suggesting the importance of using several ecotoxicological tests to assess the environmental risk of soil contamination and its rehabilitation. Although the studied soil can be considered contaminated taking into account the total soil concentrations of Al, As, Cu and Pb, the low concentrations of the same chemical elements in extractable solutions, that simulated the fractions really available for organisms, did not demonstrate a substantial toxic effects in the organisms and, consequently, negative impact on the environment

  10. Photodegradation of gaseous acetaldehyde and methylene blue in aqueous solution with titanium dioxide-loaded activated carbon fiber polymer materials and aquatic plant ecotoxicity tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadirova, Zukhra C; Hojamberdiev, Mirabbos; Katsumata, Ken-ichi; Isobe, Toshihiro; Matsushita, Nobuhiro; Nakajima, Akira; Okada, Kiyoshi

    2014-03-01

    TiO2-supported activated carbon felts (TiO2-ACFTs) were prepared by dip coating of felts composed of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) with either polyester fibers (PS-A20) and/or a polyethylene pulp (PE-W15) in a TiO2 aqueous suspension followed by calcination at 250 °C for 1 h. The as-prepared TiO2-ACFTs with 29-35 wt.% TiO2 were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and N2 adsorption. The TiO2-ACFT(PS-A20) samples with 0 and 29 wt.% TiO2 were microporous with specific surface areas (S BET) of 996 and 738 m(2)/g, respectively, whereas the TiO2-ACFT(PE-W15) samples with 0 and 35 wt.% TiO2 were mesoporous with S BET of 826 and 586 m(2)/g, respectively. Adsorption and photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared samples were evaluated by measuring adsorption in the dark and photodegradation of gaseous acetaldehyde (AcH) and methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution under UV light. The TiO2 loading caused a considerable decrease in the S BET and MB adsorption capacity along with an increase in MB photodegradation and AcH mineralization. Lemna minor was chosen as a representative aquatic plant for ecotoxicity tests measuring detoxification of water obtained from the MB photodegradation reaction with the TiO2-ACFT samples under UV light.

  11. Prejudice in practitioners who work with socially excluded people in Andalusia: A dual process approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José-Luis Álvarez-Castillo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is assumed that the professional profile of those who work with socially excluded people is not compatible with the maintenance of prejudices against the group they help. The current study tested this hypothesis regarding the Dual Process Cognitive-Motivational Model of Duckitt (2001 and Duckitt and Sibley (2010. Data from 565 Andalusian professionals were collected in a cross-sectional survey, using measures of socio-demographics, personality, values, ideological attitudes, political position, and prejudice. The model fitted to data reproduced the basic relations in the hypothesized model, although its explanatory power was limited. Prejudice was significantly explained by both paths (authoritarianism and dominance, leading to the conclusion that the reduced level of prejudice held by professionals corresponds to the perception of socially excluded people as a dissident group. This suggests that professional identity as a broad construct may moderate the variance in prejudice. Finally, these findings also suggest that the professional development of social workers should be promoted.

  12. MRI of the breast in patients with DCIS to exclude the presence of invasive disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deurloo, Eline E. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sriram, Jincey D.; Rutgers, Emiel J.T. [Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Teertstra, Hendrik J.; Loo, Claudette E. [Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wesseling, Jelle [Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gilhuijs, Kenneth G.A. [Netherlands Cancer Institute/Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-07-15

    Core biopsy underestimates invasion in more than 20% of patients with preoperatively diagnosed ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) without evidence of invasion (pure DCIS). The aim of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to discriminate between patients with DCIS who are at high risk of invasive breast cancer and patients at low risk. One hundred and twenty-five patients, preoperatively diagnosed with pure DCIS (128 lesions; 3 bilateral) by core-needle biopsy, were prospectively included. Clinical, mammographic, histological (core biopsy) and MRI features were assessed. All patients underwent breast surgery. Analyses were performed to identify features associated with presence of invasion. Eighteen lesions (14.1%) showed invasion on final histology. Seventy-three lesions (57%) showed suspicious enhancement on MRI with a type 1 (n = 12, 16.4%), type 2 (n = 19, 26.0%) or type 3 curve, respectively (n = 42, 57.5%). At multivariate analysis, the most predictive features for excluding presence of invasive disease were absence of enhancement or a type 1 curve on MRI (negative predictive value 98.5%; A{sub Z} 0.80, P = 0.00006). Contrast medium uptake kinetics at MRI provide high negative predictive value to exclude presence of invasion and may be useful in primary surgical planning in patients with a preoperative diagnosis of pure DCIS. (orig.)

  13. A comparison of trapping techniques (Coleoptera: Carabidae, Buprestidae, Cerambycidae, and Curculionoidea excluding Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvarla, Michael J.; Dowling, Ashley P. G.

    2017-01-01

    Beetles (Coleoptera) are a charismatic group of insects targeted by collectors and often used in biodiversity surveys. As part of a larger project, we surveyed a small (4 hectare) plot in the Boston Mountains of Arkansas using 70 traps of 12 trap types and Berlese–Tullgren extraction of leaf litter and identified all Buprestidae, Carabidae, Cerambycidae, and Curculionoidea (Anthribidae, Attelabidae, Brachyceridae, Brentidae, and Curculionidae excluding Scolytinae) to species. This resulted in the collection of 7,973 specimens representing 242 species arranged in 8 families. In a previous publication, we reported new state records and the number of specimens collected per species. In this publication, we used these data to determine the most effective collection method for four beetle groups: Carabidae, Cerambycidae, Curculionoidea (excluding Scolytinae), and Buprestidae. We found that the combination of pitfall and Malaise traps was most effective for Carabidae, Cerambycidae, and Curculionoidea, but that the combination of Malaise and green Lindgren funnel traps was most effective at collecting Buprestidae. Species accumulation curves did not become asymptotic and extrapolated rarefaction curves did not become asymptotic until 350–1,000 samples, suggesting that much more effort is required to completely inventory even a small site. Additionally, seasonal activity is presented for each species and the similarity and overlap between collecting dates and seasons is discussed for each family. PMID:28042105

  14. Tuberculosis peer educators: personal experiences of working with socially excluded communities in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, L A; Hayward, A C; Story, A

    2013-10-01

    Peer education is a relatively unexplored intervention for tuberculosis (TB) control, particularly among socially excluded communities. In London, peer educators are used to raise awareness of TB and promote uptake of radiological screening among people using homeless and/or drug and alcohol treatment services. To understand the motivation and personal impact of being a peer educator on people with experience of anti-tuberculosis treatment, homelessness and addiction. In-depth semi-structured interviews with peer educators were recorded and transcribed, and then analysed using a grounded theory approach to identify themes. Reflexivity and thick description were used to support transparency of findings. Becoming a peer educator supports individuals in making sense of past experiences and renewing their sense of self. The role places value on personal experience and the communication approach this supports. The project environment is an important motivator, providing the peer with structure, social support and respect. Being a peer educator with experience of homelessness and addiction can be beneficial and empowering and help long-term recovery. Peers are an underused resource for strengthening TB control among socially excluded populations. There is a need for further research into the contribution of peers to TB control, including analyses of economic effectiveness.

  15. Computer assisted strain-gauge plethysmography is a practical method of excluding deep venous thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goddard, A.J.P.; Chakraverty, S.; Wright, J

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate a computed strain-gauge plethysmograph (CSGP) as a screening tool to exclude above knee deep venous thrombosis (DVT). METHODS: The first phase took place in the Radiology department. One hundred and forty-nine patients had both Doppler ultrasound and CSGP performed. Discordant results were resolved by venography where possible. The second phase took place in an acute medical admissions ward using a modified protocol. A further 173 patients had both studies performed. The results were collated and analysed. RESULTS: Phase 1. The predictive value of a negative CSGP study was 98%. There were two false-negative CSGP results (false-negative rate 5%), including one equivocal CSGP study which had deep venous thrombosis on ultrasound examination. Two patients thought to have thrombus on ultrasound proved not to have acute thrombus on venography. Phase 2. The negative predictive value of CSGP using a modified protocol was 97%. There were two definite and one possible false-negative studies (false-negative rate 4-7%). CONCLUSION: Computer strain-gauge plethysmograph can provide a simple, cheap and effective method of excluding lower limb DVT. However, its use should be rigorously assessed in each hospital in which it is used. Goddard, A.J.P., Chakraverty, S. and Wright, J. (2001)

  16. Stainless-steel wires exclude gulls from a wastewater treatment plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel E.; Koenen, Kiana K. G.; MacKenzie, Kenneth G.; Pereira, Jillian W.; DeStefano, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    There is growing concern about the prevalence of pathogens and antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the environment and the role wildlife plays in their transmission and dissemination. Gulls feeding at wastewater treatment plants may provide a route for transmission of pathogens and bacteria to public water supplies or other critical areas. The authors identified gulls routinely feeding at a wastewater treatment plant in Millbury, Mass., and tested the effectiveness of overhead stainless-steel wires in excluding gulls from the plant. The number of gulls in certainstructures was compared before and after wiring and during an experimental approach using simultaneous treatments and controls. Stainless-steel wires spaced at 0.9-3.3 m (3-10 ft) effectively prevented gulls from using treatment structures (p 24 months. Materials costs to wire all structures was about $5,700, and labor costs were $4,020. Overhead stainless-steel wires can provide a long-term, cost-efficient method of excluding ring-billed gulls from wastewater treatment plants.

  17. A systematic review of clinical trials of treatments for the congenital ichthyoses, excluding ichthyosis vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Martin, Angela; Aranegui, Beatriz; Martin-Santiago, Ana; Garcia-Doval, Ignacio

    2013-10-01

    The ichthyoses comprise a group of inherited disorders of keratinization. Because of the need for lifelong treatment, it is important that therapies are beneficial, safe, and well tolerated. We sought to review the evidence on existing treatments for the congenital ichthyoses, excluding ichthyosis vulgaris. We undertook a systematic review using the methodology of the Cochrane Collaboration. Articles published in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL and registered clinical trials were screened. Randomized controlled trials involving patients with the inherited ichthyoses, either syndromic or nonsyndromic but excluding ichthyosis vulgaris, were considered. Six trials met the inclusion criteria. Topical treatments including 5% urea, 20% propylene glycol alone or in combination with 5% lactic acid, calcipotriol ointment, and liarozole 5% cream showed therapeutic benefit. Oral liarozole, a retinoic acid metabolism blocking agent, showed no advantage over oral acitretin. Most studies were performed on a small sample of patients and lacked methodological and reporting quality. The small number of trials and the nearly constant positive results make publication bias likely. The absence of standardization of outcome measures precluded the comparison of studies. Topical treatments including emollients, calcipotriol ointment, and liarozole cream seem to have therapeutic benefit and a good safety profile, although the use of topical calcipotriol is limited by a maximum weekly dose of 100 g. The advantage of oral liarozole over acitretin is uncertain. Multicenter trials comparing oral and topical interventions and evaluation of long-term outcomes are needed. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Unanimous versus partial rejection: How the number of excluders influences the impact of ostracism in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandstrom, Marlene J; Deutz, Marike H F; Lansu, Tessa A M; van Noorden, Tirza H J; Karremans, Johan C; Cillessen, Antonius H N

    2017-04-01

    Previous research has shown that ostracism-the experience of being ignored and excluded-has negative effects on all of us, young and old. Using a Cyberball paradigm, the present research replicates the effects of ostracism on the moods (anger, anxiety, happiness, and anger) and fundamental needs (belongingness, control, meaningful existence, and self-esteem) of children (Study 1) and then extends the literature by examining the role of the number of ostracizers and inclusive members in this process by randomly assigning children to conditions varying in degree of ostracism (Study 2). Results of both studies showed that experiencing ostracism strongly and negatively affected all moods and fundamental needs-with the exception of anxiety. Study 2 in addition showed that the ratio of excluders to inclusive group members had different effects across outcomes. In all cases, complete ostracism produced the worst outcomes, suggesting that the presence of even a single ally reduces children's distress. For sadness, unanimous ostracism seemed particularly toxic. In some cases, facing two ostracizers produced significantly worse outcomes than only one, suggesting that consensual rejection might drive the negative effects on happiness, and sense of belonging, control, and meaningful existence. For self-esteem, only one ostracizer (in the presence of two inclusive members) was sufficient to induce a negative effect. Aggr. Behav. 43:190-203, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Matching excluded-volume hadron-resonance gas models and perturbative QCD to lattice calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, M.; Kapusta, J.; Young, C.

    2014-08-01

    We match three hadronic equations of state at low energy densities to a perturbatively computed equation of state of quarks and gluons at high energy densities. One of them includes all known hadrons treated as point particles, which approximates attractive interactions among hadrons. The other two include, in addition, repulsive interactions in the form of excluded volumes occupied by the hadrons. A switching function is employed to make the crossover transition from one phase to another without introducing a thermodynamic phase transition. A χ2 fit to accurate lattice calculations with temperature 100coupling and the hard core radius of protons and neutrons, which turns out to be 0.62±0.04 fm. The most physically reasonable models include the excluded-volume effect. Not only do they include the effects of attractive and repulsive interactions among hadrons, but they also achieve better agreement with lattice QCD calculations of the equation of state. The equations of state constructed in this paper do not result in a phase transition, at least not for the temperatures and baryon chemical potentials investigated. It remains to be seen how well these equations of state will represent experimental data on high-energy heavy-ion collisions when implemented in hydrodynamic simulations.

  20. Chronic ecotoxic effects to Pseudomonas putida and Vibrio fischeri, and cytostatic and genotoxic effects to the hepatoma cell line (HepG2) of ofloxacin photo(cata)lytically treated solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, M.I. [University of Cyprus, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Cyprus, 75 Kallipoleos Street, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Nireas International Water Research Center, University of Cyprus (Cyprus); Garcia-Käufer, M. [University Medical Centre Freiburg, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, 115 B, Breisacher Straße, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Hapeshi, E. [University of Cyprus, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Cyprus, 75 Kallipoleos Street, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Nireas International Water Research Center, University of Cyprus (Cyprus); Menz, J. [Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Leuphana University Lüneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1/C13, 21335 Lüneburg (Germany); Kostarelos, K.; Fatta-Kassinos, D. [University of Cyprus, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Cyprus, 75 Kallipoleos Street, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Nireas International Water Research Center, University of Cyprus (Cyprus); Kümmerer, K., E-mail: Klaus.Kuemmerer@uni.leuphana.de [Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Leuphana University Lüneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1/C13, 21335 Lüneburg (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Ofloxacin (OFL), a broad-spectrum and widespread-used photolabile fluoroquinolone, is frequently found in treated wastewaters, aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems leading to increasing concern during the past decades regarding its effects to the environment and human health. The elimination of OFL and other xenobiotics by the application of advanced oxidation processes using photolytic (PL) and photocatalytic (PC) treatments seems promising. However, an integrated assessment scheme is needed, in which, not only the removal of the parent compound, but also the effects of the photo-transformation products (PTPs) are investigated. For this purpose, in the present study, a chronic ecotoxic assessment using representative bacteria of marine and terrestrial ecosystems and a cytostatic and genotoxic evaluation using hepatoma cell line were performed. PL and PC treatments of OFL were applied using UV radiation. The photo-transformation of OFL during the treatments was monitored by DOC measurements and UPLC–MS/MS analysis. The chronic ecotoxicity of OFL and treated samples was evaluated using Pseudomonas putida and Vibrio fischeri; whereas the cytostasis and genotoxicity were estimated by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN). The main results suggest that photo-transformation of OFL took place during these treatments since the concentration of OFL decreased when the irradiation time increased, as quantified by UPLC–MS/MS analysis, and this was not coupled with an analogous DOC removal. Furthermore, nine compounds were identified as probable PTPs formed through piperazinyl dealkylation and decarboxylation. The ecotoxicity of treated solutions to the bacteria studied decreased while the cytostasis to the hepatoma cell line remained at low levels during both treatments. However, the genotoxicity to the hepatoma cell line demonstrated a different pattern in which treated samples induced a greater number of MNi for the 4–16 min of irradiation (p < 0.05) during

  1. How accurate is ultrasound of the optic nerve sheath diameter performed by inexperienced operators to exclude raised intracranial pressure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. du Toit

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been well documented that ultrasound measurement of the optic nerve sheath diameter performed by an experienced operator shows good correlation with raised intracranial pressure, irrespective of the cause. Objective: To establish the accuracy of this technique performed by inexperienced operators.Method: A prospective analytical cross-sectional study was conducted. All patients ≥18 years of age who presented at our medical casualty and emergency departments with suspected meningitis were enrolled in the study. All patients were evaluated with the use of optic nerve sheath diameter ultrasound with or without computed tomography brain scan prior to lumbar puncture. Lumbar puncture opening pressure measurements were compared with the ultrasound measurements.Results: A total of 73 patients were enrolled in the study, of whom 14 had raised intracranial pressure. The study had a sensitivity of 50% (95% confidence interval (CI 26.8%–73.2% and specificity of 89.8% (95% CI 79.5%–95.3% with a positive predictive value of 54.8% (95% CI 29.1%–76.8% and negative predictive value of 88.3% (95% CI 77.8%–94.2%. The likelihood ratio of a positive test was 4.92 (95% CI 1.95–11.89 and that of a negative test 0.56 (95% CI 0.29–0.83. Cohen’s kappa value was 0.41 which indicates a moderate agreement. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve had an area under the curve (AUC of 0.73 (95% CI 0.51–0.95. Conclusion: Ultrasound measurement of the optic nerve sheath diameter can be used to exclude raised intracranial pressure, even in the hands of inexperienced operators.

  2. Glaucoma, Open-Angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... USAJobs Home > Statistics and Data > Glaucoma, Open-angle Glaucoma, Open-angle Open-angle Glaucoma Defined In open-angle glaucoma, the fluid passes ... 2010 2010 U.S. Age-Specific Prevalence Rates for Glaucoma by Age and Race/Ethnicity The prevalence of ...

  3. OpenGL Insights

    CERN Document Server

    Cozzi, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Get Real-World Insight from Experienced Professionals in the OpenGL Community With OpenGL, OpenGL ES, and WebGL, real-time rendering is becoming available everywhere, from AAA games to mobile phones to web pages. Assembling contributions from experienced developers, vendors, researchers, and educators, OpenGL Insights presents real-world techniques for intermediate and advanced OpenGL, OpenGL ES, and WebGL developers. Go Beyond the Basics The book thoroughly covers a range of topics, including OpenGL 4.2 and recent extensions. It explains how to optimize for mobile devices, explores the design

  4. Negative effects overpower the positive of kelp to exclude invertebrates from the understorey community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Sean D

    2003-09-01

    Marine macroalgal forests are one of the most widespread and studied habitats on subtidal coasts, but there remain challenges in understanding why many sessile invertebrates are anomalously absent from understorey communities. In a series of experiments on recruitment of invertebrates, I partitioned the habitat-modifying effects of kelp into their positive and negative effects. Experiments revealed that a reduction of light intensity and removal of sediment by canopies acted to facilitate recruitment, but physical abrasion by the canopy acted as a negative force to overpower these positive effects. Understorey assemblages, therefore, represent biased subsets of taxa from a local pool capable of colonization. On balance, negative effects acted to exclude invertebrates from the understorey community. The asymmetric strength of negative effects not only explains the enigma of exclusion but also indicates that, when it exists, understorey coexistence with canopy plants must reflect a more even match between positive and negative effects.

  5. Dyslexic adults can learn from repeated stimulus presentation but have difficulties in excluding external noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L Beattie

    Full Text Available We examined whether the characteristic impairments of dyslexia are due to a deficit in excluding external noise or a deficit in taking advantage of repeated stimulus presentation. We compared non-impaired adults and adults with poor reading performance on a visual letter detection task that varied two aspects: the presence or absence of background visual noise, and a small or large stimulus set. There was no interaction between group and stimulus set size, indicating that the poor readers took advantage of repeated stimulus presentation as well as the non-impaired readers. The poor readers had higher thresholds than non-impaired readers in the presence of high external noise, but not in the absence of external noise. The results support the hypothesis that an external noise exclusion deficit, not a perceptual anchoring deficit, impairs reading for adults.

  6. Excluded and behaving unethically: social exclusion, physiological responses, and unethical behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouchaki, Maryam; Wareham, Justin

    2015-03-01

    Across 2 studies, we investigated the ethical consequences of physiological responses to social exclusion. In Study 1, participants who were socially excluded were more likely to engage in unethical behavior to make money and the level of physiological arousal experienced during exclusion--measured using galvanic skin response--mediated the effects of exclusion on unethical behavior. Likewise, in Study 2, results from a sample of supervisor-subordinate dyads revealed a positive relationship between experience of workplace ostracism and unethical behaviors as rated by the immediate supervisors. This relationship was mediated by employees' reports of experienced physiological arousal. Together, the results of these studies demonstrate that physiological arousal accompanies social exclusion and provides an explanatory mechanism for the increased unethical behavior in both samples. Theoretical implications of these findings for research on ethical behavior and social exclusion in the workplace are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. [Immunophenotyping of B chronic lymphoproliferative syndromes (CLL excluded): confrontation with the histology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Borgi, Wijden; Ben Salah, Nawel; Ben Lakhal, Fatma; Makni, Lamia; Gouider, Emna; Hafsia, Raouf

    2013-01-01

    Immunophenotyping is a major tool for the diagnosis of the chronic lymphoïd leukaemia (CLL). Its interest remains limited in the classification of the other B chronic lymphoproliférative syndromes (B-CLPS). We evaluate the place of the flow cytometry (CMF) in the diagnosis and classification of the non CLL B-CLPS. The cases with Matutes score of 4 or more are excluded. A confrontation of the results to the histology is made. 28 cases of non CLL B-CLPS are diagnosed. CMF shows a κ monoclonal population in 15 cases and λ in 13 cases. A co-expression CD19+CD5 + is found in 11 cases concording with an atypic CLL or a mantel cell lymphoma in 6 cases with Matutes score of 3. In 5 cases, we concluded to non CLL B-CLPS (Matutesconfrontation of the histology results remains essential.

  8. A simple and fast method to exclude high Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia in travellers with imported malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gool, Tom; van Wolfswinkel, Marlies E; Koelewijn, Rob; van Thiel, Pieter P A M; Jacobs, Jan; van Hellemond, Jaap J; van Genderen, Perry J J

    2011-10-14

    Counts of malaria parasites in peripheral blood are important to assess severity of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Thin and thick smears are routinely used for this purpose. In this study the Binax NOW Malaria Test, an easy-to-perform rapid diagnostic test, with Histidine Rich Protein-2 (HRP-2) and aldolase as diagnostic markers, was used for semi-quantitative assessment of parasitaemia of P. falciparum. In 257 patients with imported P. falciparum malaria, reactivity of aldolase increased with higher parasitaemia. In all patients with a parasitaemia above 50,000 asexual parasites/μl (> 1%) co-reactivity of HRP-2 and aldolase was observed. Absence of aldolase reactivity in the presence of HRP-2 was a reliable predictive marker to exclude high (> 1%) parasitaemia in P. falciparum malaria. Assessment of HRP-2 and aldolase co-reactivity can be of help in clinical decision making in the acute care setting of returning travellers suspected of having malaria.

  9. Comparing Legal Approaches: Mental Disorders as Grounds for Excluding Criminal Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl-Friedrich Stuckenberg

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of mental disorders on criminal responsibility seems to be more or less the same in all jurisdictions. However, upon a closer look, the details of the regulatory schemes and the practical effects vary considerably and this discord has increased even more in the past 30 years. This article undertakes a brief comparative survey with a focus on substantive criminal law in order to sketch a normative matrix which shows that there are three basic approaches to deal with mental disorders as grounds for excluding criminal responsibility. While psychiatry has made considerable progress over the past 150 years, in providing more humane treatment to mentally ill persons, it is a disturbing observation that the criminal law appears to be significantly less tolerant towards mentally disturbed offenders in modern times than during the previous two millennia.

  10. Excluded-volume effects for a hadron gas in Yang-Mills theory

    CERN Document Server

    Alba, Paolo; Nada, Alessandro; Panero, Marco; Stöcker, Horst

    2016-01-01

    When the multiplicities of particles produced in heavy-ion collisions are fitted to the hadron-resonance-gas model, excluded-volume effects play a significant role. In this work, we study the impact of such effects onto the equation of state of pure Yang-Mills theory at low temperatures, comparing the predictions of the statistical model with lattice results. In particular, we present a detailed analysis of the SU(2) and SU(3) Yang-Mills theories: we find that, for both of them, the best fits to the equilibrium thermodynamic quantities are obtained when one assumes that the volume of different glueball states is inversely proportional to their mass. The implications of these findings for QCD are discussed.

  11. Excluded and avoided: racial microaggressions targeting Asian international students in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshmand, Sara; Spanierman, Lisa B; Tafarodi, Romin W

    2014-07-01

    This qualitative study explored East and South Asian international students' (N = 12) experiences with racial microaggressions at one Canadian university. Data were collected through unstructured, individual interviews. Using a modified version of the consensual qualitative research method (Hill, Thompson, & Williams, 1997), we identified six racial microaggressions themes: (a) excluded and avoided, (b) ridiculed for accent, (c) rendered invisible, (d) disregarded international values and needs, (e) ascription of intelligence, and (f) environmental microaggressions (structural barriers on campus). In addition, we used the same approach to identify themes pertaining to the ways in which students coped with racial microaggressions: (a) engaging with own racial and cultural groups, (b) withdrawing from academic spheres, and (c) seeking comfort in the surrounding multicultural milieu. Microaggressions and coping themes differed based on country of origin and language proficiency. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  12. Experience with the GORE EXCLUDER iliac branch endoprosthesis for common iliac artery aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sterkenburg, Steven M M; Heyligers, Jan M M; van Bladel, Mathijs; Verhagen, Hence J; Eefting, Daniël; van Sambeek, Marc R; Zeebregts, Clark J; Reijnen, Michel M P J

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we analyzed the procedural success and early outcome of endovascular treatment of a multicenter cohort of patients with common iliac artery (CIA) aneurysms treated with the new GORE EXCLUDER (W. L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, Ariz) iliac branch endoprosthesis (IBE). A retrospective cohort analysis was performed in 13 sites in The Netherlands. Anatomic, demographic, procedural, and follow-up data were assessed from hospital records. From November 2013 to December 2014, 51 CIA aneurysms were treated with an IBE in 46 patients. The median diameter of the treated aneurysm was 40.5 (range, 25.0-90.0) mm. The mean procedural time was 198 ± 56 minutes. All but one implantation were successful; two type Ib endoleaks were noticed, resulting in a procedural success rate of 93.5%. The two type Ib endoleaks spontaneously disappeared at 30 days. There was no 30-day mortality. Ipsilateral buttock claudication was present in only two cases at 30 days and disappeared during follow-up. The incidence of reported erectile dysfunction was low and severe ischemic complications were absent. After a mean follow-up of 6 months, data on 17 treated aneurysms were available. Two showed a stable diameter, whereas 15 showed a mean decrease of 3.9 ± 2.2 mm (P < .001). Reinterventions were performed in two patients (7.1%). The 6-month primary patency of the internal component of the IBE device was 94%. The use of the GORE EXCLUDER IBE device for CIA aneurysms is related to high procedural success, high patency rates, and low reintervention rates at short-term follow-up. Prospective data with longer follow-up are awaited to establish the role of the device in the treatment algorithm of CIA aneurysms. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Accountability and the pressures to exclude: A cautionary tale from England.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Rustique-Forrester

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have produced conflicting findings about whether test-based rewards and sanctions create incentives that improve student performance, or hurdles that increase dropout and pushout rates from schools. This article reports the findings from a study that examined the impact of England's accountability reforms and investigated whether the confluent pressures associated with increased testing, school ranking systems, and other sanctions contributed to higher levels of student exclusion (expulsion and suspension. The study found that England's high-stakes approach to accountability, combined with the dynamics of school choice and other curriculum and testing pressures led to a narrowing of the curriculum, the marginalization of low-performing students, and a climate perceived by teachers to be less tolerant of students with academic and behavioral difficulties. A comparison of higher- and lower-excluding schools, however, found that these effects were more pronounced in the higher-excluding schools, which lacked strong systems and internal structures for supporting staff communication, teacher collaboration, and students' individual needs. The study offers an international perspective on recent trends toward greater accountability in education, pointing to a complex inter-relationship between the pressures of national policies and the unintended consequences on schools' organizational and teachers' instructional capacities. The study's findings raise particular implications for the United States and show that in the design of accountability systems, attention must be paid to how the pressures from accountability will affect the capacity of schools and teachers to respond to students who are low-performing and struggling academically.

  14. Increasing the efficiency of bacterial transcription simulations: When to exclude the genome without loss of accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMillen David R

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simulating the major molecular events inside an Escherichia coli cell can lead to a very large number of reactions that compose its overall behaviour. Not only should the model be accurate, but it is imperative for the experimenter to create an efficient model to obtain the results in a timely fashion. Here, we show that for many parameter regimes, the effect of the host cell genome on the transcription of a gene from a plasmid-borne promoter is negligible, allowing one to simulate the system more efficiently by removing the computational load associated with representing the presence of the rest of the genome. The key parameter is the on-rate of RNAP binding to the promoter (k_on, and we compare the total number of transcripts produced from a plasmid vector generated as a function of this rate constant, for two versions of our gene expression model, one incorporating the host cell genome and one excluding it. By sweeping parameters, we identify the k_on range for which the difference between the genome and no-genome models drops below 5%, over a wide range of doubling times, mRNA degradation rates, plasmid copy numbers, and gene lengths. Results We assess the effect of the simulating the presence of the genome over a four-dimensional parameter space, considering: 24 min Conclusion Exclusion of the genome is shown to yield less than 5% difference in transcript numbers over wide ranges of values, and computational speed is improved by two to 24 times by excluding explicit representation of the genome.

  15. Oral Challenge without Skin Testing Safely Excludes Clinically Significant Delayed-Onset Penicillin Hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confino-Cohen, Ronit; Rosman, Yossi; Meir-Shafrir, Keren; Stauber, Tali; Lachover-Roth, Idit; Hershko, Alon; Goldberg, Arnon

    Penicillins are the drug family most commonly associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Current guidelines recommend negative skin tests (ST) before re-administering penicillins to patients with previous nonimmediate reactions (NIR). The objective of this study was to examine whether ST are necessary before re-administering penicillin to patients with NIR. Patients with NIR to penicillins starting longer than 1 hour after last dose administration or starting any time after the first treatment day or patients with vague recollection of their reaction underwent penicillin ST. Disregarding ST results, patients were challenged with the relevant penicillins. One-tenth of the therapeutic dose followed by the full dose was administered at 1-hour interval and patients continued taking the full dose for 5 days. A total of 710 patients with alleged BL allergy were evaluated. Patients with a history of immediate reaction (52, 7.3%) or cephalosporin allergy (16, 2.2%) were excluded. Of the remaining 642 patients, 62.3% had negative ST, 5.3% positive ST, and 32.4% equivocal ST. A total of 617 (96.1%) patients were challenged. Immediate reaction was observed in 9 patients (1.5%): 1-positive ST, 7-negative ST, and 1-equivocal ST (P = .7). Late reaction to the first-day challenge occurred in 24 patients (4%). An at-home challenge was continued by 491 patients. Complete 5-day and partial challenges were well tolerated by 417 (85%) and 44 patients (8.9%), respectively, disregarding ST results. Thirty patients (6.1%) developed mild reactions to the home challenge regardless of their ST results. A 5-day oral challenge without preceding ST is safe and sufficient to exclude penicillin allergy after NIR developing during penicillin treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Metal availability in heavy metal-contaminated open burning and open detonation soil: assessment using soil enzymes, earthworms, and chemical extractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hwan; Kim, Eul-Young; Hyun, Seunghun; Kim, Jeong-Gyu

    2009-10-15

    The effects of heavy metal contamination on soil enzyme activity and earthworm health (bioaccumulation and condition) were studied in contaminated soils collected from an formerly open burning and open detonation (OBOD) site. Soil extraction methods were also evaluated using CaCl(2) and DTPA solutions as surrogate measures of metal bioavailability and ecotoxicity. Total heavy metal content of the soils ranged from 0.45 to 9.68 mg Cd kg(-1), 8.96 to 5103 mg Cu kg(-1), 40.21 to 328 mg Pb kg(-1), and 56.61 to 10,890 mg Zn kg(-1). Elevated metal concentrations are assumed to be primarily responsible for the reduction in enzyme activities and earthworm health indices. We found significant negative relationships between CaCl(2)- and DTPA-extractable metal content (Cd, Cu, and Zn) and soil enzyme activity (Psoil enzyme activity and metal bioaccumulation by earthworms can be used as an ecological indicator of metal availability. Furthermore, CaCl(2) and DTPA extraction methods are proved as promising, precise, and inexpensive surrogate measures of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn bioavailability from heavy metal-contaminated soils.

  17. Open Government and (Linked (Open (Government (Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Philipp Geiger

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the opening and the free usage of stored public sector data, supplied by state. In the age of Open Government and Open Data it’s not enough just to put data online. It should be rather weighed out whether, how and which supplied public sector data can be published. Open Data are defined as stored data which could be made accessible in a public interest without any restrictions for usage and distribution. These Open Data can possibly be statistics, geo data, maps, plans, environmental data and weather data in addition to materials of the parliaments, ministries and authorities. The preparation and the free access to existing data permit varied approaches to the reuse of data, discussed in the article. In addition, impulses can be given for Open Government – the opening of state and administration, to more transparency, participation and collaboration as well as to innovation and business development. The Open Data movement tries to get to the bottom of current publication processes in the public sector which could be formed even more friendly to citizens and enterprises.

  18. Een boekje open over Open Source ERP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sneller, A.C.W.(L.)

    2009-01-01

    Er zijn vele ERP-systemen die met behulp van open source worden ontwikkeld. Organisaties die open source ERP willen implementeren staan voor twee strategische keuzes: hoe zit het met de continuïteit en wie gaat het systeem onderhouden?

  19. Coating carbon nanotubes with humic acid using an eco-friendly mechanochemical method: Application for Cu(II) ions removal from water and aquatic ecotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côa, Francine; Strauss, Mathias; Clemente, Zaira; Rodrigues Neto, Laís L; Lopes, Josias R; Alencar, Rafael S; Souza Filho, Antônio G; Alves, Oswaldo L; Castro, Vera Lúcia S S; Barbieri, Edison; Martinez, Diego Stéfani T

    2017-12-31

    In this work, industrial grade multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were coated with humic acid (HA) for the first time by means of a milling process, which can be considered an eco-friendly mechanochemical method to prepare materials and composites. The HA-MWCNT hybrid material was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopies (SEM and STEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), termogravimetric analysis (TGA), and Raman spectroscopy. STEM and AFM images demonstrated that the MWCNTs were efficiently coated by the humic acid, thus leading to an increase of 20% in the oxygen content at the nanotube surface as observed by the XPS data. After the milling process, the carbon nanotubes were shortened as unveiled by SEM images and the values of ID/IG intensity ratio increased due to shortening of the nanotubes and increasing in the number defects at the graphitic structure of carbon nanotubes walls. The analysis of TGA data showed that the quantity of the organic matter of HA on the nanotube surface was 25%. The HA coating was responsible to favor the dispersion of MWCNTs in ultrapure water (i.e. -42mV, zeta-potential value) and to improve their capacity for copper removal. HA-MWCNTs hybrid material adsorbed 2.5 times more Cu(II) ions than oxidized MWCNTs with HNO3, thus evidencing that it is a very efficient adsorbent material for removing copper ions from reconstituted water. The HA-MWCNTs hybrid material did not show acute ecotoxicity to the tested aquatic model organisms (Hydra attenuata, Daphnia magna, and Danio rerio embryos) up to the highest concentration evaluated (10mgL-1). The results allowed concluding that the mechanochemical method is effective to coat carbon nanotubes with humic acid, thus generating a functional hybrid material with low aquatic toxicity and great potential to be applied in environmental nanotechnologies such as the removal of heavy metal ions from water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  20. Template-based automatic breast segmentation on MRI by excluding the chest region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Muqing; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Wang, Xiaoyong; Chan, Siwa; Chen, Siping; Su, Min-Ying

    2013-12-01

    Methods for quantification of breast density on MRI using semiautomatic approaches are commonly used. In this study, the authors report on a fully automatic chest template-based method. Nonfat-suppressed breast MR images from 31 healthy women were analyzed. Among them, one case was randomly selected and used as the template, and the remaining 30 cases were used for testing. Unlike most model-based breast segmentation methods that use the breast region as the template, the chest body region on a middle slice was used as the template. Within the chest template, three body landmarks (thoracic spine and bilateral boundary of the pectoral muscle) were identified for performing the initial V-shape cut to determine the posterior lateral boundary of the breast. The chest template was mapped to each subject's image space to obtain a subject-specific chest model for exclusion. On the remaining image, the chest wall muscle was identified and excluded to obtain clean breast segmentation. The chest and muscle boundaries determined on the middle slice were used as the reference for the segmentation of adjacent slices, and the process continued superiorly and inferiorly until all 3D slices were segmented. The segmentation results were evaluated by an experienced radiologist to mark voxels that were wrongly included or excluded for error analysis. The breast volumes measured by the proposed algorithm were very close to the radiologist's corrected volumes, showing a % difference ranging from 0.01% to 3.04% in 30 tested subjects with a mean of 0.86% ± 0.72%. The total error was calculated by adding the inclusion and the exclusion errors (so they did not cancel each other out), which ranged from 0.05% to 6.75% with a mean of 3.05% ± 1.93%. The fibroglandular tissue segmented within the breast region determined by the algorithm and the radiologist were also very close, showing a % difference ranging from 0.02% to 2.52% with a mean of 1.03% ± 1.03%. The total error by adding the

  1. Should children with overweight or obesity be excluded from height references?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Júlíusson, Pétur B; Brannsether, Bente; Kristiansen, Hege; Hoppenbrouwers, Karel; Bjerknes, Robert; Roelants, Mathieu

    2015-11-01

    Growth reference charts are usually based on measurements of children free from a medical condition that affects growth. However, samples collected during the past decades often contain a large proportion of overweight or obese children. Because obesity increases linear growth, the question arises to what extent the percentiles curves for length/height are affected by the presence of children with overweight or obesity. Data from two cross-sectional samples of 2-year-old to 18-year-old children were analysed: 12,252 Belgian children, measured in 2002-2004, and 6159 Norwegian children, measured in 2003-2006. The LMS method was used to estimate height-for-age curves with and without children considered overweight or obese according to the International Obesity Task Force thresholds. The prevalence of overweight (including obesity) and obesity was 13.0% and 2.8% in the Belgian and 13.8% and 2.3% in the Norwegian sample. Children were taller when overweight (+0.49 and 0.43 SD, in the Belgian and Norwegian sample, respectively) or obese (+0.73 and 0.72 SD in the Belgian and Norwegian sample, respectively). Effect sizes were smaller in younger and older children, which points to an advanced age of maturation as a possible cause. Excluding overweight and obese children had only a minor impact on the growth curves with largest difference in mean height SD scores -0.09 in the Belgian and -0.12 in the Norwegian sample with a corresponding increase of up to 0.5% and 1.2% in number of children >+2 SD. Current Belgian and Norwegian growth references for length/height were found to be largely unaffected by the current proportion of overweight and obese children. There is, therefore, no need for revised height charts that exclude overweight or obese children. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Infection Rates in Arthroscopic Versus Open Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jonathan D; Hughes, Jessica L; Bartley, Justin H; Hamilton, William P; Brennan, Kindyle L

    2017-07-01

    The prevalence of rotator cuff repair continues to rise, with a noted transition from open to arthroscopic techniques in recent years. One reported advantage of arthroscopic repair is a lower infection rate. However, to date, the infection rates of these 2 techniques have not been directly compared with large samples at a single institution with fully integrated medical records. To retrospectively compare postoperative infection rates between arthroscopic and open rotator cuff repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. From January 2003 until May 2011, a total of 1556 patients underwent rotator cuff repair at a single institution. These patients were divided into an arthroscopic repair group and an open group. A Pearson chi-square test and Fisher exact test were used, with a subgroup analysis to segment the open repair group into mini-open and open procedures. The odds ratio and 95% CI of developing a postoperative infection was calculated for the 2 groups. A multiple-regressions model was then utilized to identify predictors of the presence of infection. Infection was defined as only those treated with surgical intervention, thus excluding superficial infections treated with antibiotics alone. A total of 903 patients had an arthroscopic repair, while 653 had open repairs (600 mini-open, 53 open). There were 4 confirmed infections in the arthroscopic group and 16 in the open group (15 mini-open, 1 open), resulting in postoperative infection rates of 0.44% and 2.45%, respectively. Subgroup analysis of the mini-open and open groups demonstrated a postoperative infection rate of 2.50% and 1.89%, respectively. The open group had an odds ratio of 5.645 (95% CI, 1.9-17.0) to develop a postoperative infection compared with the arthroscopic group. Patients undergoing open rotator cuff repair had a significantly higher rate of postoperative infection compared with those undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

  3. OpenCities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The Open Cities Project aims to catalyze the creation, management and use of open data to produce innovative solutions for urban planning and resilience challenges...

  4. Open Science Framework (OSF)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ariel Deardorff

    2017-01-01

    The Open Science Framework (OSF) is a tool that promotes open, centralized workflows by enabling capture of different aspects and products of the research lifecycle, including developing a research idea, designing a study, storing...

  5. Open Payments Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Open Payments (otherwise known as the Sunshine Act) - Open Payments is a Congressionally-mandated transparency program that increases awareness of financial...

  6. Underestimating intraspecific variation: the problem with excluding Sts 19 from Australopithecus africanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, J C

    1998-04-01

    Two analyses conclude that Sts 19 cannot be accommodated within the Australopithecus africanus hypodigm (Kimbel and Rak [1993] In Kimbel and Martin [eds.]: Species, Species Concepts, and Primate Evolution. New York: Plenum, pp. 461-484; Sarmiento [1993] Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. [Suppl.] 16:173). Both studies exclude Sts 19 because it possesses synapomorphies with Homo. Furthermore, according to Kimbel and Rak (1993), including Sts 19 in A. africanus results in an unacceptably high degree of polymorphism. This study aims to refute the null hypothesis that Sts 19 belongs to A. africanus. Twelve basicranial characters, as defined and implemented in Kimbel and Rak's study, were scored for casts of seven A. africanus and seven Homo habilis basicranial specimens. These characters were also examined on specimens from a large (N = 87) sample of African pongids. Contrary to Kimbel and Rak's (1993) findings, the null hypothesis is not refuted. The degree of polymorphism among A. africanus with Sts 19 included is less than that seen in Pan troglodytes. In addition, Sts 19 shares only one apomorphy with Homo. However, when treated metrically, Sts 19's morphology for this character is not significantly divergent from other A. africanus specimens.

  7. Strategies to exclude subjects who conceal and fabricate information when enrolling in clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric G. Devine

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical trials within the US face an increasing challenge with the recruitment of quality candidates. One readily available group of subjects that have high rates of participation in clinical research are subjects who enroll in multiple trials for the purpose of generating income through study payments. Aside from issues of safety and generalizability, evidence suggests that these subjects employ methods of deception to qualify for the strict entrance criteria of some studies, including concealing information and fabricating information. Including these subjects in research poses a significant risk to the integrity of data quality and study designs. Strategies to limit enrollment of subjects whose motivation is generating income have not been systematically addressed in the literature. The present paper is intended to provide investigators with a range of strategies for developing and implementing a study protocol with protections to minimize the enrollment of subjects whose primary motivation for enrolling is to generate income. This multifaceted approach includes recommendations for advertising strategies, payment strategies, telephone screening strategies, and baseline screening strategies. The approach also includes recommendations for attending to inconsistent study data and subject motivation. Implementing these strategies may be more or less important depending upon the vulnerability of the study design to subject deception. Although these strategies may help researchers exclude subjects with a higher rate of deceptive practices, widespread adoption of subject registries would go a long way to decrease the chances of subjects enrolling in multiple studies or more than once in the same study.

  8. Innovation Chinese rice wine brewing technology by bi-acidification to exclude rice soaking process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao Lu; Liu, Shuang Ping; Yu, Jian Shen; Yu, Yong Jian; Zhu, Sheng Hu; Zhou, Zhi Lei; Hu, Jian; Mao, Jian

    2017-04-01

    As a traditional fermented alcoholic beverage of China, Chinese rice wine (CRW) had a long history of more than 5000 years. Rice soaking process was the most crucial step during CRW brewing process, because rice soaking quality directly determined the quality of CRW. However, rice soaking water would cause the eutrophication of water bodies and waste of water. The longer time of rice soaking, the higher the content of biogenic amine, and it would have a huge impact on human health. An innovation brewing technology was carried out to exclude the rice soaking process and the Lactobacillus was added to make up for the total acid. Compared to the traditional brewing technology, the new technology saved water resources and reduced environmental pollution. The concentration of biogenic amine was also decreased by 27.16%, which improving the security of the CRW. The esters increased led to more soft-tasted CRW and less aging time; the quality of CRW would be improved with less alcohol. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. CONTRIBUTION TO THE KNOWLEDGE OF THE ARACHNIDS IN THE YUCATAN PENINSULA, MEXICO (EXCLUDING ARANAE AND ACARI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Delfin Gonzalez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Chelicerata are the second group of arthropods with the highest diversity after insects and they can inhabit almost all types of environments. The most current classification recognizes 11 orders and estimates in the number of species vary from 52,000 to 100,000. We have made an extensive literature review on the diversity of arachnids in the Yucatan Peninsula (YP (excluding spiders and ticks. In Mexico there are 834 known species which represent 6% of the worldwide diversity. In the YP 63 records were found (58 species and 5 genera of arachnids, which represent 6.8% of the Mexican species. According to our research, 28 of the 58 species (48% in the YP were also record in other parts of Mexico, the continent and the world. Undoubtedly, the state of Yucatan is the best represented of the YP. In order to have a better understanding of the diversity of arachnid species is important to promote biological compendiums and sampling programs, which will improve the representation of this group and probably increasing the number of local species.

  10. Genome-wide association study of handedness excludes simple genetic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J AL; Davison, A; McManus, I C

    2014-01-01

    Handedness is a human behavioural phenotype that appears to be congenital, and is often assumed to be inherited, but for which the developmental origin and underlying causation(s) have been elusive. Models of the genetic basis of variation in handedness have been proposed that fit different features of the observed resemblance between relatives, but none has been decisively tested or a corresponding causative locus identified. In this study, we applied data from well-characterised individuals studied at the London Twin Research Unit. Analysis of genome-wide SNP data from 3940 twins failed to identify any locus associated with handedness at a genome-wide level of significance. The most straightforward interpretation of our analyses is that they exclude the simplest formulations of the ‘right-shift' model of Annett and the ‘dextral/chance' model of McManus, although more complex modifications of those models are still compatible with our observations. For polygenic effects, our study is inadequately powered to reliably detect alleles with effect sizes corresponding to an odds ratio of 1.2, but should have good power to detect effects at an odds ratio of 2 or more. PMID:24065183

  11. Two-year-olds exclude novel objects as potential referents of novel words based on pragmatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassmann, Susanne; Stracke, Marén; Tomasello, Michael

    2009-09-01

    Many studies have established that children tend to exclude objects for which they already have a name as potential referents of novel words. In the current study we asked whether this exclusion can be triggered by social-pragmatic context alone without pre-existing words as blockers. Two-year-old children watched an adult looking at a novel object while saying a novel word with excitement. In one condition the adult had not seen the object beforehand, and so the children interpreted the adult's utterance as referring to the gazed-at object. In another condition the adult and child had previously played jointly with the gazed-at object. In this case, children less often assumed that the adult was referring to the object but rather they searched for an alternative referent--presumably because they inferred that the gazed-at object was old news in their common ground with the adult and so not worthy of excited labeling. Since this inference based on exclusion is highly similar to that underlying the Principle of Contrast/Mutual Exclusivity, we propose that this principle is not purely lexical but rather is based on children's understanding of how and why people direct one another's attention to things either with or without language.

  12. A simple and fast method to exclude high Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia in travellers with imported malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobs Jan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Counts of malaria parasites in peripheral blood are important to assess severity of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Thin and thick smears are routinely used for this purpose. Methods In this study the Binax NOW® Malaria Test, an easy-to-perform rapid diagnostic test, with Histidine Rich Protein-2 (HRP-2 and aldolase as diagnostic markers, was used for semi-quantitative assessment of parasitaemia of P. faciparum. Results In 257 patients with imported P. falciparum malaria, reactivity of aldolase increased with higher parasitaemia. In all patients with a parasitaemia above 50,000 asexual parasites/μl (> 1% co-reactivity of HRP-2 and aldolase was observed. Absence of aldolase reactivity in the presence of HRP-2 was a reliable predictive marker to exclude high (> 1% parasitaemia in P. falciparum malaria. Conclusions Assessment of HRP-2 and aldolase co-reactivity can be of help in clinical decision making in the acute care setting of returning travellers suspected of having malaria.

  13. The 'empowered client' in vocational rehabilitation: the excluding impact of inclusive strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hal, Lineke B E; Meershoek, Agnes; Nijhuis, Frans; Horstman, Klasien

    2012-09-01

    In vocational rehabilitation, empowerment is understood as the notion that people should make an active, autonomous choice to find their way back to the labour process. Following this line of reasoning, the concept of empowerment implicitly points to a specific kind of activation strategy, namely labour participation. This activation approach has received criticism for being paternalistic, disciplining and having a one-sided orientation on labour participation. Although we share this theoretical criticism, we want to go beyond it by paying attention to the practical consequences of understanding empowerment as an activation strategy. Inspired by the field of Science and Technology Studies, we will explore the meaning of empowerment and activation in concrete practices of vocational rehabilitation in the Netherlands. Our analysis is based on the narratives of people with a work disability about their lives and the vocational rehabilitation programmes they participated in. We present five illustrative cases that how empowerment is 'done' in the practice of vocational rehabilitation and its unintended effects. Our analysis demonstrates that activation strategies seem to be caught in a paradox: instead of including people in society, they have excluding consequences. Vocational rehabilitation professionals can go beyond this paradox by learning from the ways in which empowerment is 'done' by clients in vocational rehabilitation programmes.

  14. Open-ended education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Rikke Toft; Paaskesen, Rikke Berggreen

    2016-01-01

    THE ARTICLE DESCRIBES OPEN-ENDED EDUCATION FOR 21ST CENTURY LEARNING AS THE COMING TOGETHER OF OPEN-ENDED TECHNOLOGY, OPEN-ENDED PROJECTS, AND OPEN-ENDED INSTITUTIONS IN WAYS THAT FOSTER AND PROMOTE FUTURE EDUCATION FOR CITIZENSHIP IN SOCIETY. THROUGH THE CASE OF THE CODING PIRATES FUTURE ISLAND,...... FOR EDUCATION AND HIGHLIGHTS THE FACT THAT THE EMPHASIS IN BLOOM’S REVISED TAXONOMY ON INGENUITY, ORIGINALITY, PARTICIPATION, AND ASPIRATION IMPACTS THE PRACTICE OF EDUCATION....

  15. Open Hardware Business Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edy Ferreira

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In the September issue of the Open Source Business Resource, Patrick McNamara, president of the Open Hardware Foundation, gave a comprehensive introduction to the concept of open hardware, including some insights about the potential benefits for both companies and users. In this article, we present the topic from a different perspective, providing a classification of market offers from companies that are making money with open hardware.

  16. OpenGrey

    OpenAIRE

    Pejšová, Petra; Stock, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    OpenGrey is a unique repository providing open access to European grey literature references, the result of 25 years of cooperation. OpenGrey is based on the OpenSIGLE/SIGLE database which contains almost 700 thousand records of grey literature. As a multidisciplinary database it covers Science, Technology, Biomedical Science, Economics, Social Science and Humanities. This paper presents new search functionality, design, logo and vision. The cooperation with GreyNet on GL conference preprints...

  17. Open Source Business Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion IVAN

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This analyses the Open source movement. Open source development process and management is seen different from the classical point of view. This focuses on characteristics and software market tendencies for the main Open source initiatives. It also points out the labor market future evolution for the software developers.

  18. OpenFlow cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Smiler S, Kingston

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for network protocol developers, SDN controller application developers, and academics who would like to understand and develop their own OpenFlow switch or OpenFlow controller in any programming language. With basic understanding of OpenFlow and its components, you will be able to follow the recipes in this book.

  19. OpenShift Workshop

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Rodriguez Peon, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Workshop to introduce developers to the OpenShift platform available at CERN. Several use cases will be shown, including deploying an existing application into OpenShift. We expect attendees to realize about OpenShift features and general architecture of the service.

  20. Quickscan open textbooks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierre Gorissen

    2015-01-01

    Deze quickscan open textbooks is uitgevoerd in opdracht van SURFnet ter voorbereiding van het seminar over open textbooks op 26 november 2015. Het is nadrukkelijk een quickscan, de beschikbare tijd om literatuur te verzamelen en te beoordelen rond open textbooks was begrensd. Deze quickscan heeft

  1. Dimensions of Openness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Christian; Thestrup, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to present a pedagogical approach to openness. The paper develops a framework for understanding the pedagogical opportunities of openness in education. Based on the pragmatism of John Dewey and sociocultural learning theory, the paper defines openness in education as...

  2. [Potentially excluded population from health coverage and health impact since Royal Decree 16/2012: The Central Catalonia experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álamo-Junquera, Dolores; Sala, Núria; Millet, Joan-Pau; Ortega-Gutiérrez, Lluïsa; Planas-Giner, Albert; Rovira, Carol; Comet, Dolors

    2015-01-01

    To assess the proportion of population potentially excluded from healthcare coverage since the Royal Decree-Law 16/2012. To describe the use of health services, the distribution of chronic and infectious diseases, and the pharmaceutical costs in 2012 of the persons potentially excluded compared to the those who maintain their coverage. An observational analytical cross-sectional study was designed and conducted on a Primary Care based population in the Central Catalonia Management Area of the Institut Català de la Salut PARTICIPANTS AND MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Individuals potentially excluded since the application of the Royal Decree-Law 16/2012 were selected and compared with individuals who maintained their healthcare coverage, randomly matched by sex, age and Primary Care service. The information obtained included the use of health services, the distribution of chronic and infectious diseases, and the pharmaceutical costs during the year 2012. A total of 1,699 individuals were identified as potentially excluded from healthcare coverage, 0.53% of the total of population (51.4% men), with a median of age of 34years (interquartile range, 28-43). The use of healthcare services, the chronic morbidity recorded, and the pharmaceutical costs during the year 2012 of the excluded individuals was lower than those of the non-excluded ones (P<.001). On the other hand, the infectious morbidity was higher in the excluded individuals (P<.001). The results of the study suggests that this legislative measure does not seem to be justified for medical or economic reasons. It could also cause public health problems and contribute to the risk of social fracture. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Deploying OpenStack

    CERN Document Server

    Pepple, Ken

    2011-01-01

    OpenStack was created with the audacious goal of being the ubiquitous software choice for building public and private cloud infrastructures. In just over a year, it's become the most talked-about project in open source. This concise book introduces OpenStack's general design and primary software components in detail, and shows you how to start using it to build cloud infrastructures. If you're a developer, technologist, or system administrator familiar with cloud offerings such as Rackspace Cloud or Amazon Web Services, Deploying OpenStack shows you how to obtain and deploy OpenStack softwar

  4. Implementing OpenShift

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Adam

    2013-01-01

    A standard tutorial-based approach to using OpenShift and deploying custom or pre-built web applications to the OpenShift Online cloud.This book is for software developers and DevOps alike who are interested in learning how to use the OpenShift Platform-as-a-Service for developing and deploying applications, how the environment works on the back end, and how to deploy their very own open source Platform-as-a-Service based on the upstream OpenShift Origin project.

  5. Open algebraic surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Miyanishi, Masayoshi

    2000-01-01

    Open algebraic surfaces are a synonym for algebraic surfaces that are not necessarily complete. An open algebraic surface is understood as a Zariski open set of a projective algebraic surface. There is a long history of research on projective algebraic surfaces, and there exists a beautiful Enriques-Kodaira classification of such surfaces. The research accumulated by Ramanujan, Abhyankar, Moh, and Nagata and others has established a classification theory of open algebraic surfaces comparable to the Enriques-Kodaira theory. This research provides powerful methods to study the geometry and topology of open algebraic surfaces. The theory of open algebraic surfaces is applicable not only to algebraic geometry, but also to other fields, such as commutative algebra, invariant theory, and singularities. This book contains a comprehensive account of the theory of open algebraic surfaces, as well as several applications, in particular to the study of affine surfaces. Prerequisite to understanding the text is a basic b...

  6. Open Access @ DTU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrøm, Jeannette

    Open Access is high on the agenda in Denmark and internationally. Denmark has announced a national strategy for Open Access that aims to achieve Open Access to 80% in 2017 and 100% in 2022 to peer review research articles. All public Danish funders as well as H2020 requires that all peer review...... articles that is an outcome of their funding will be Open Access. Uploading your full texts (your final author manuscript after review ) to DTU Orbit is a fundamental part of providing Open Access to your research. We are here to answer all your questions with regards to Open Access and related topics...... such as copyright, DTU Orbit, Open Access journals, APCs, Vouchers etc....

  7. Template-based automatic breast segmentation on MRI by excluding the chest region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Muqing [Tu and Yuen Center for Functional Onco-Imaging, Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-5020 and National-Regional Key Technology Engineering Laboratory for Medical Ultrasound, Guangdong Key Laboratory for Biomedical Measurements and Ultrasound Imaging, Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Shenzhen University, 518060 China (China); Chen, Jeon-Hor [Tu and Yuen Center for Functional Onco-Imaging, Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-5020 and Department of Radiology, E-Da Hospital and I-Shou University, Kaohsiung 82445, Taiwan (China); Wang, Xiaoyong; Su, Min-Ying, E-mail: msu@uci.edu [Tu and Yuen Center for Functional Onco-Imaging, Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-5020 (United States); Chan, Siwa [Department of Radiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 40407, Taiwan (China); Chen, Siping [National-Regional Key Technology Engineering Laboratory for Medical Ultrasound, Guangdong Key Laboratory for Biomedical Measurements and Ultrasound Imaging, Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Shenzhen University, 518060 China (China)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Methods for quantification of breast density on MRI using semiautomatic approaches are commonly used. In this study, the authors report on a fully automatic chest template-based method. Methods: Nonfat-suppressed breast MR images from 31 healthy women were analyzed. Among them, one case was randomly selected and used as the template, and the remaining 30 cases were used for testing. Unlike most model-based breast segmentation methods that use the breast region as the template, the chest body region on a middle slice was used as the template. Within the chest template, three body landmarks (thoracic spine and bilateral boundary of the pectoral muscle) were identified for performing the initial V-shape cut to determine the posterior lateral boundary of the breast. The chest template was mapped to each subject's image space to obtain a subject-specific chest model for exclusion. On the remaining image, the chest wall muscle was identified and excluded to obtain clean breast segmentation. The chest and muscle boundaries determined on the middle slice were used as the reference for the segmentation of adjacent slices, and the process continued superiorly and inferiorly until all 3D slices were segmented. The segmentation results were evaluated by an experienced radiologist to mark voxels that were wrongly included or excluded for error analysis. Results: The breast volumes measured by the proposed algorithm were very close to the radiologist's corrected volumes, showing a % difference ranging from 0.01% to 3.04% in 30 tested subjects with a mean of 0.86% ± 0.72%. The total error was calculated by adding the inclusion and the exclusion errors (so they did not cancel each other out), which ranged from 0.05% to 6.75% with a mean of 3.05% ± 1.93%. The fibroglandular tissue segmented within the breast region determined by the algorithm and the radiologist were also very close, showing a % difference ranging from 0.02% to 2.52% with a mean of 1.03% ± 1

  8. Openness, Web 2.0 Technology, and Open Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Open science is a term that is being used in the literature to designate a form of science based on open source models or that utilizes principles of open access, open archiving and open publishing to promote scientific communication. Open science increasingly also refers to open governance and more democratized engagement and control of science…

  9. Limb muscle sound speed estimation by ultrasound computed tomography excluding receivers in bone shadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xiaolei; Azuma, Takashi; Lin, Hongxiang; Takeuchi, Hideki; Itani, Kazunori; Tamano, Satoshi; Takagi, Shu; Sakuma, Ichiro

    2017-03-01

    Sarcopenia is the degenerative loss of skeletal muscle ability associated with aging. One reason is the increasing of adipose ratio of muscle, which can be estimated by the speed of sound (SOS), since SOSs of muscle and adipose are different (about 7%). For SOS imaging, the conventional bent-ray method iteratively finds ray paths and corrects SOS along them by travel-time. However, the iteration is difficult to converge for soft tissue with bone inside, because of large speed variation. In this study, the bent-ray method is modified to produce SOS images for limb muscle with bone inside. The modified method includes three steps. First, travel-time is picked up by a proposed Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) with energy term (AICE) method. The energy term is employed for detecting and abandoning the transmissive wave through bone (low energy wave). It results in failed reconstruction for bone, but makes iteration convergence and gives correct SOS for skeletal muscle. Second, ray paths are traced using Fermat's principle. Finally, simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) is employed to correct SOS along ray paths, but excluding paths with low energy wave which may pass through bone. The simulation evaluation was implemented by k-wave toolbox using a model of upper arm. As the result, SOS of muscle was 1572.0+/-7.3 m/s, closing to 1567.0 m/s in the model. For vivo evaluation, a ring transducer prototype was employed to scan the cross sections of lower arm and leg of a healthy volunteer. And the skeletal muscle SOSs were 1564.0+/-14.8 m/s and 1564.1±18.0 m/s, respectively.

  10. Oscillometric casual blood pressure normative standards for Swedish children using ABPM to exclude casual hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krmar, Rafael T; Holtbäck, Ulla; Bergh, Anita; Svensson, Eva; Wühl, Elke

    2015-04-01

    Casual blood pressure (CBP) is considered a reliable proxy for cardiovascular health. Although the auscultatory technique is the reference standard method for measuring CBP, oscillometric devices are increasingly being used in children. We sought to establish oscillometric CBP normative standards for Swedish children. Cross-sectional oscillometric CBP readings were obtained by the Welch Allyn Spot Vital Signs 420 monitor and measured according to the International Guidelines' recommendations. Participants with elevated oscillometric CBP levels underwent verification by the auscultatory method. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was used to exclude casual hypertension. Data on 1,470 (772 males) apparently healthy Swedish schoolchildren aged 6-16 years were analyzed and sex-specific reference charts normalized to age or height were constructed. Systolic and diastolic CBP values were significantly higher with age, height, height standard deviation score (SDS), body mass index (BMI), and BMI SDS. Gender differences for systolic CBP were present starting from age of 15 years and revealed significantly higher values in boys than in girls, whereas for diastolic CBP, the differences were apparent at the age of 12 years, with higher values in girls. Increased BMI and BMI SDS were positively associated with CBP levels. Positive parental history of hypertension turned out to be a risk factor for higher systolic and diastolic CBP across all ages. Our normative standard for CBP can be used for blood pressure screening and control programs in Swedish children. The use of ABPM should be considered to confirm the diagnosis of casual hypertension. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Why are people with mental illness excluded from the rational suicide debate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    The topic of rational suicide is often approached with some trepidation by mental health professionals. Suicide prevention strategies are more likely to be seen as the domain of psychiatry and a wealth of psychiatric literature is devoted to identifying and managing suicide risk. Whether or not suicide can be deemed permissible is ostensibly linked to discussions of autonomy and mental capacity, and UK legislation directs that a patient's wishes must be respected with regard to treatment refusal where decisional capacity is intact. In the context of the care and treatment of those with physical disorders, extreme and untreatable physical suffering is likely to be accepted as rational grounds for suicide, where the person possesses cognitive coherence and an ability to realistically appreciate the consequences of his or her actions. In the case of those with serious mental disorder, the grounds for accepting that suicide is rational are however less clear-cut. Serious mental illness is typically conceived of as a coercive pressure which prevents rational deliberation and as such, the suicides of those with serious mental illness are considered to be substantially non-voluntary acts arising from constitutive irrationality. Therefore, where an appropriate clinician judges that a person with serious mental disorder is non-autonomous, suicide prevention is likely to be thought legally and morally justified. There are arguably, two questionable assumptions in the position that psychiatry adopts: Firstly, that psychogenic pain is in some way less real than physical pain and secondly, that mental illness invariably means that a desire to die is irrational and inauthentic. If it can be shown that some people with serious mental illness can be rational with regard to suicide and that psychological pain is of equal significance as physical suffering, then it may be possible to conclude that some persons with serious mental illness should not by definition be excluded from the

  12. Normal pancreatic exocrine function does not exclude MRI/MRCP chronic pancreatitis findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaade, Samer; Cem Balci, Numan; Momtahen, Amir Javad; Burton, Frank

    2008-09-01

    Abnormal pancreatic function tests have been reported to precede the imaging findings of chronic pancreatitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is increasingly accepted as the primary imaging modality for the detection of structural changes of early mild chronic pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate MRI/MRCP findings in patients with symptoms consistent with chronic pancreatitis who have normal Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function test. A retrospective study of 32 patients referred for evaluation of chronic abdominal pain consistent with chronic pancreatitis and reported normal standard abdominal imaging (ultrasound, computed tomography, or MRI). All patients underwent Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function testing and pancreatic MRI/MRCP at our institution. We reviewed the MRI/MRCP images in patients who had normal Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function testing. MRI/MRCP images were assessed for pancreatic duct morphology, gland size, parenchymal signal and morphology, and arterial contrast enhancement. Of the 32 patients, 23 had normal Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function testing, and 8 of them had mild to marked spectrum of abnormal MRI/MRCP findings that were predominantly focal. Frequencies of the findings were as follows: pancreatic duct stricture (n=3), pancreatic duct dilatation (n=3), side branch ectasia (n=4), atrophy (n=5), decreased arterial enhancement (n=5), decreased parenchymal signal (n=1), and cavity formation (n=1). The remaining15 patients had normal pancreatic structure on MRI/MRCP. Normal pancreatic function testing cannot exclude abnormal MRI/MRCP especially focal findings of chronic pancreatitis. Further studies needed to verify significance of these findings and establish MRI/MRCP imaging criteria for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis.

  13. Friedreich's ataxia GAA.TTC duplex and GAA.GAA.TTC triplex structures exclude nucleosome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Haihe; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2008-11-07

    Both chromatin structure and formation of triplex DNA at expanded GAA TTC repeats have been shown to regulate the FXN gene silencing, which causes Friedreich's ataxia. Recent studies have suggested that the presence of heterochromatin at the long expanded GAA TTC repeats, which is enriched in hypoacetylated histones, deters the transcription of the FXN gene. However, neither direct histone binding nor the effect of histone acetylation on the GAA TTC duplex or the GAA GAA TTC triplex has been measured in vitro. In this study, GAA TTC repeating DNAs derived from the human FXN gene, and the GAA GAA TTC triplex, were examined for their ability to assemble single nucleosomes and nucleosome arrays. Competitive nucleosome reconstitution assays demonstrated that the GAA TTC duplex excludes nucleosomes (53% decrease compared to the pUC control DNA) and that the GAA GAA TTC triplex further lowers the nucleosome assembly efficiency (82% decrease compared to the duplex DNA). The difference in assembly efficiency is amplified more significantly when hypoacetylated histones are used, compared to assembly with hyperacetylated histones. By analyzing the formation of nucleosome arrays on GAA TTC-containing plasmids, the triplex structure was shown to destabilize the ability of adjacent sequences to assemble nucleosomes. These results provide the first direct binding measurements for the GAA TTC duplex and the GAA GAA TTC triplex, and on the effect of histone acetylation, towards dissecting the role of chromatin structure in silencing of the FXN gene. These findings suggest that these sequences could profoundly alter local chromatin structure, and the discrepancy between in vivo and in vitro results supports recent studies showing that, in addition to DNA sequences, other factors such as epigenetic marks could be involved in the mechanism for inhibition of FXN gene expression.

  14. OpenSHS: Open Smart Home Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshammari, Nasser; Alshammari, Talal; Sedky, Mohamed; Champion, Justin; Bauer, Carolin

    2017-01-01

    This paper develops a new hybrid, open-source, cross-platform 3D smart home simulator, OpenSHS, for dataset generation. OpenSHS offers an opportunity for researchers in the field of the Internet of Things (IoT) and machine learning to test and evaluate their models. Following a hybrid approach, OpenSHS combines advantages from both interactive and model-based approaches. This approach reduces the time and efforts required to generate simulated smart home datasets. We have designed a replication algorithm for extending and expanding a dataset. A small sample dataset produced, by OpenSHS, can be extended without affecting the logical order of the events. The replication provides a solution for generating large representative smart home datasets. We have built an extensible library of smart devices that facilitates the simulation of current and future smart home environments. Our tool divides the dataset generation process into three distinct phases: first design: the researcher designs the initial virtual environment by building the home, importing smart devices and creating contexts; second, simulation: the participant simulates his/her context-specific events; and third, aggregation: the researcher applies the replication algorithm to generate the final dataset. We conducted a study to assess the ease of use of our tool on the System Usability Scale (SUS). PMID:28468330

  15. OpenSHS: Open Smart Home Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshammari, Nasser; Alshammari, Talal; Sedky, Mohamed; Champion, Justin; Bauer, Carolin

    2017-05-02

    This paper develops a new hybrid, open-source, cross-platform 3D smart home simulator, OpenSHS, for dataset generation. OpenSHS offers an opportunity for researchers in the field of the Internet of Things (IoT) and machine learning to test and evaluate their models. Following a hybrid approach, OpenSHS combines advantages from both interactive and model-based approaches. This approach reduces the time and efforts required to generate simulated smart home datasets. We have designed a replication algorithm for extending and expanding a dataset. A small sample dataset produced, by OpenSHS, can be extended without affecting the logical order of the events. The replication provides a solution for generating large representative smart home datasets. We have built an extensible library of smart devices that facilitates the simulation of current and future smart home environments. Our tool divides the dataset generation process into three distinct phases: first design: the researcher designs the initial virtual environment by building the home, importing smart devices and creating contexts; second, simulation: the participant simulates his/her context-specific events; and third, aggregation: the researcher applies the replication algorithm to generate the final dataset. We conducted a study to assess the ease of use of our tool on the System Usability Scale (SUS).

  16. OpenSHS: Open Smart Home Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Alshammari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a new hybrid, open-source, cross-platform 3D smart home simulator, OpenSHS, for dataset generation. OpenSHS offers an opportunity for researchers in the field of the Internet of Things (IoT and machine learning to test and evaluate their models. Following a hybrid approach, OpenSHS combines advantages from both interactive and model-based approaches. This approach reduces the time and efforts required to generate simulated smart home datasets. We have designed a replication algorithm for extending and expanding a dataset. A small sample dataset produced, by OpenSHS, can be extended without affecting the logical order of the events. The replication provides a solution for generating large representative smart home datasets. We have built an extensible library of smart devices that facilitates the simulation of current and future smart home environments. Our tool divides the dataset generation process into three distinct phases: first design: the researcher designs the initial virtual environment by building the home, importing smart devices and creating contexts; second, simulation: the participant simulates his/her context-specific events; and third, aggregation: the researcher applies the replication algorithm to generate the final dataset. We conducted a study to assess the ease of use of our tool on the System Usability Scale (SUS.

  17. Nanoparticles Ecotoxicity on Daphnia magna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoshnood Reza

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, development of nanotechnology as well as the toxicity potential of nanomaterials on the environment has received much attention. In order to assess the potential toxic impact of nanoparticles on aquatic environments, we used three kinds of nanoparticles, including titanium dioxide (TiO2, copper oxide (CuO, and zinc oxide (ZnO on an aquatic model species, Daphnia magna. In fact, Daphnia magna was exposed to different concentrations for 24, 48, 72, and 96 h at 20-25°C. All the important water quality parameters, such as temperature, pH, and dissolved oxygen (DO were controlled to meet the standard requirements during the experiment. The LC50 values for 24, 48, 72, and 96 h were estimated statistically using Probit methods. The LC50 48 h values for TiO2, CuO, and ZnO were 171.88 mg/l, 6.62 mg/l, and 3.23 mg/l, respectively.

  18. Engineered Nanoparticle (Eco)Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cupi, Denisa

    dispersion protocol development. This may serve as a basis for the development of a harmonized dispersion protocol for ENPs. Natural organic matter (NOM) and aging of suspensions prior to testing were employed in an attempt to stabilize aqueous suspensions of three different ENPs. While NOM helped...... in stabilizing ZnO ENPs suspensions, it caused agglomeration in TiO2 ENP stock suspensions and an underestimation of toxicity for Ag ENPs. Likewise, aging only aided in the stability of ZnO ENPs. It was concluded that NOM can mitigate or eliminate toxicity of Ag ENPs and is not recommended for use. The ratio...... of NOM to ENP proved to be important in stabilizing non-capped ENPs. Another attempt towards stable suspensions involved adjusting different standard testing parameters, such as the pH and ionic strength of the test media. It was found that point of zero charge measurements should be conducted prior...

  19. Open port sampling interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Berkel, Gary J

    2017-04-25

    A system for sampling a sample material includes a probe which can have an outer probe housing with an open end. A liquid supply conduit within the housing has an outlet positioned to deliver liquid to the open end of the housing. The liquid supply conduit can be connectable to a liquid supply for delivering liquid at a first volumetric flow rate to the open end of the housing. A liquid exhaust conduit within the housing is provided for removing liquid from the open end of the housing. A liquid exhaust system can be provided for removing liquid from the liquid exhaust conduit at a second volumetric flow rate, the first volumetric flow rate exceeding the second volumetric flow rate, wherein liquid at the open end will receive sample, liquid containing sample material will be drawn into and through the liquid exhaust conduit, and liquid will overflow from the open end.

  20. Open port sampling interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2018-01-16

    A system for sampling a sample material includes a probe which can have an outer probe housing with an open end. A liquid supply conduit within the housing has an outlet positioned to deliver liquid to the open end of the housing. The liquid supply conduit can be connectable to a liquid supply for delivering liquid at a first volumetric flow rate to the open end of the housing. A liquid exhaust conduit within the housing is provided for removing liquid from the open end of the housing. A liquid exhaust system can be provided for removing liquid from the liquid exhaust conduit at a second volumetric flow rate, the first volumetric flow rate exceeding the second volumetric flow rate, wherein liquid at the open end will receive sample, liquid containing sample material will be drawn into and through the liquid exhaust conduit, and liquid will overflow from the open end.

  1. Visitors speak openly on the Open Day

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On Open Day, CERN was filled with visitors from around Europe—and beyond—who toured the LHC detector sites and visited a multitude of experimental halls and workshops across the Meyrin and Prevessin sites, the vast majority in buildings normally closed to the public.

  2. Open Access Monitor - DK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Michael; Hansen, Lars Asger Juel; Andersen, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    Open Access Monitor - DK (OAM-DK) is a 2-year DEFF funded [DEFF.2016-0018] national project running in 2017-2018 with the aim of collecting, documenting and administrating Open Access publishing costs. OAM-DK is lead by Copenhagen University Library under the Royal Danish Library with participation...... of all Danish University Libraries. This poster presents the first results of Open Access costs related to 2015 publications at the The University of Copenhagen....

  3. Open data for citizens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Götzen, Amalia De; Morelli, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    A large quantity of open data is now available to institutions, business and citizens. The potential of such new resource, though, has not been explored yet, also because of a lack of perspectives and scenarios on how open data can be used. The workshop aims at broadening the perspectives...... on the use of open data by investigating new scenarios for a wide use of open data, where citizens without any IT skills can be involved in a co-design session with the relevant stakeholders....

  4. Open3DQSAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosco, Paolo; Balle, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Open3DQSAR is a freely available open-source program aimed at chemometric analysis of molecular interaction fields. MIFs can be imported from different sources (GRID, CoMFA/CoMSIA, quantum-mechanical electrostatic potential or electron density grids) or generated by Open3DQSAR itself. Much focus...... has been put on automation through the implementation of a scriptable interface, as well as on high computational performance achieved by algorithm parallelization. Flexibility and interoperability with existing molecular modeling software make Open3DQSAR a powerful tool in pharmacophore assessment...

  5. Open data assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, Roumen; Yoshinov, Radoslav; Jekov, Boyan; Pavlova, Galya

    2017-06-01

    The last decade together with rapidly developing of Information and Communication Technologies data and its variety of application fields gaining in popularity. Initially the data becomes Big. Everyday accumulation of so big amount of data and the possibility to analyze it contributes to the ease of modern life. The curiosity of the world enforces the Big Data to become Open and then to connect the available open data in linked. This article presents the Open data and their implication in different fields. Detailed is examined the quality of Open data as the methodology for its evaluation is presented.

  6. Open Data poster for Open Access Week - AI file

    OpenAIRE

    Briney, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Adobe Illustrator (.ai) version of the Open Data/Open Access week poster.   PDF version: http://figshare.com/articles/Open_Data_Poster_for_Open_Access_Week/828595 Combined fileset here: http://figshare.com/articles/Open_Data_Poster_for_Open_Access_Week/828597

  7. Open Data Poster for Open Access Week - PDF file

    OpenAIRE

    Briney, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    .pdf version of the Open Data/Open Access Week poster.   Illustrator version: http://figshare.com/articles/Open_Data_poster_for_Open_Access_Week/828596 Combined fileset here: http://figshare.com/articles/Open_Data_Poster_for_Open_Access_Week/828597

  8. Effects of excluding a set of random effects on prediction error variance of breeding value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantet, R J

    1997-01-12

    The effects of excluding a set of random effects (U-effects) uncorrelated to breeding values (BV) on prediction error variance (PEV) is studied analytically. Two situations are considered for model comparison: (a) existence of a 'true' model, (b) uncertainty about which of the competing models is 'true'. Models compared are the 'long' one, which includes BV + U-effects, and the 'short' one which includes BV's as the only random systematic effect. Expressions for PEV(BV) were obtained for the long model (PEVL); the short model (PEVS); and the short model assuming the long model is the correct one (PEVSI). It is shown that in general PEVS ≤ PEVL ≤ PEVSI. Results are exemplified by means of an example including a computer simulation. RESUMEN: En este trabajo se estudia analiticamente el efecto de excluir una variable aleatoria (efecto U) no correlacionada con el valor de cría (BV), sobre la varianza del error de predicción de este último (PEV(BV)). Para ello se utilizan dos enfoques de comparación de modelos: (a) existencia de un modelo 'verdadero', (b) incertidumbre respecto de cuál de ambos modelos alternativos es el correcto. Los modelos que se comparan son: el 'largo', que incluye BV+U, y el 'corto', el cuál solo incluye BV. Se obtienen las expresiones para PEV(BV) en las siguientes situaciones: (1) en el modelo largo (PEVL), (2) en el modelo corto (PEVS), y (3) en el modelo corto pero asumiendo que el largo es el verdadero (PEVSI). Se demuestra que en general PEVS ≤ PEVL ≤ PEVSI. Los resultados obtenidos son ilustrados mediante un ejemplo que incluye una simulación estocástica. ZUSAMMENFASSUNG: Veränderung der Fehlervarianz der Zuchtwertvoraussage durch Vernachlässigung einer Gruppe zufäliger Wirkungen. Es wird die Auswirkung der Ausschaltung einer Gruppe zufälliger Wirkungen (U-effects), die mit Zuchtwerten (BV) nicht korreliert sind, auf die Varianz des Voraussage-Fehlers (PEV) analytisch untersucht. Zwei Modelle werden betrachtet: (a

  9. 28 CFR 74.4 - Individuals excluded from compensation pursuant to section 108(B) of the Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Individuals excluded from compensation pursuant to section 108(B) of the Act. 74.4 Section 74.4 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... emancipated minors, on the date they departed the United States for Japan are subject to an irrebuttable...

  10. 21 CFR 1.327 - Who is excluded from all or part of the regulations in this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... products to all other buyers. (4) A “retail food establishment” includes grocery stores, convenience stores... establishment and not the entire business, which may own numerous retail stores. (g) Persons who manufacture... from all of the requirements in this subpart. A restaurant/retail facility is excluded from all of the...

  11. 34 CFR 85.420 - May I approve a transaction with an excluded or disqualified person at a lower tier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I approve a transaction with an excluded or disqualified person at a lower tier? 85.420 Section 85.420 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of... lower tier? If a transaction at a lower tier is subject to your approval, you as an agency official may...

  12. 2 CFR 180.420 - May I approve a transaction with an excluded or disqualified person at a lower tier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false May I approve a transaction with an excluded or disqualified person at a lower tier? 180.420 Section 180.420 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF... person at a lower tier? If a transaction at a lower tier is subject to your approval, you as a Federal...

  13. 22 CFR 208.420 - May I approve a transaction with an excluded or disqualified person at a lower tier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May I approve a transaction with an excluded or disqualified person at a lower tier? 208.420 Section 208.420 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL... lower tier? If a transaction at a lower tier is subject to your approval, you as an agency official may...

  14. 45 CFR 2506.5 - If a debt is not excluded from these regulations, may it be compromised, suspended, terminated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false If a debt is not excluded from these regulations, may it be compromised, suspended, terminated, or waived? 2506.5 Section 2506.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE COLLECTION...

  15. Mortality of patients excluded from the Danish Verapamil Infarction Trail II. The DAVIT-II Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J K; Hansen, J F

    1993-01-01

    The 18 month mortality rate in 2180 patients excluded from the Danish Verapamil Infarction Trail II (DAVIT II) was 25.6%. In non-consenters (n = 368) this was 15.0% compared with 13.85 in 897 placebo-treated patients (hazard ratio 1.09 [P = 0.60] when adjusting for sex and age). The increased...

  16. 9 CFR 130.17 - User fees for other veterinary diagnostic laboratory tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for other veterinary... FEES USER FEES § 130.17 User fees for other veterinary diagnostic laboratory tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or at authorized sites. (a) User fees for veterinary diagnostics tests performed at the...

  17. 9 CFR 130.18 - User fees for veterinary diagnostic reagents produced at NVSL or other authorized site (excluding...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for veterinary diagnostic reagents produced at NVSL or other authorized site (excluding FADDL). 130.18 Section 130.18 Animals and... § 130.18 User fees for veterinary diagnostic reagents produced at NVSL or other authorized site...

  18. Data, Data Everywhere--But Not All the Numbers that Count? Mapping Alternative Provisions for Students Excluded from School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Pat; Russell, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    It is now mandatory for English schools to ensure that young people, under 16 years of age, who are excluded from school are placed in an education and training programme within 12 days. The programme must be at least half time, and should offer a meaningful and balanced curriculum. The "Every Child Matters" agenda also suggests that…

  19. Open source community organization

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Molefe, Onkgopotse M

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Open Source communities (OSCs), sometimes referred to as virtual or online communities play a significant role in terms of the contribution they continue to make in producing user-friendly Open Source Software (OSS) solutions. Many projects have...

  20. All channels open

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank Huysmans; Jos de Haan

    2010-01-01

    Original title: Alle kanalen staan open. The rapid changes taking place in the media landscape in the Netherlands - characterised by digitisation and convergence of media technologies - raise the question of how the Dutch are dealing with the many new opportunities that have opened up. All

  1. Mastering OpenStack

    CERN Document Server

    Khedher, Omar

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for system administrators, cloud engineers, and system architects who want to deploy a cloud based on OpenStack in a mid- to large-sized IT infrastructure. If you have a fundamental understanding of cloud computing and OpenStack and want to expand your knowledge, then this book is an excellent checkpoint to move forward.

  2. The Argument for Open

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Is open source business intelligence (OS BI) software ready for prime time? The author thoroughly investigated each of three OS BI toolsets--Pentaho BI Suite, Jaspersoft BI Suite, and Talend Open Studio--by installing the OS BI tools himself, by interviewing technologists at academic institutions who had implemented these OS BI solutions, and by…

  3. Creating Open Source Conversation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Kate

    2009-01-01

    Darien Library, where the author serves as head of knowledge and learning services, launched a new website on September 1, 2008. The website is built with Drupal, an open source content management system (CMS). In this article, the author describes how she and her colleagues overhauled the library's website to provide an open source content…

  4. Open Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Open Veterinary Journal is a peer reviewed international open access online and printed journal that publishes high-quality original research articles, reviews, short communications and case reports dedicated to all aspects of veterinary sciences and its related subjects. Other websites associated with this journal: ...

  5. With an Open Mind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danckert, Bolette; Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Klemmensen, Robert

    2017-01-01

    This article examines whether the effect of interethnic encounters on natives’ attitudes towards immigration varies with the Big Five personality trait openness to experience. We hypothesize that individuals who score high on openness, and who therefore are more appreciative of and responsive...

  6. Pro OpenSSH

    CERN Document Server

    Stahnke, Michael

    2006-01-01

    SSH, acronym for Secure Socket Shell, is for users and administrators wishing to establish secure communication between disparate networks. 'Pro OpenSSH', authored by two Fortune 100 system administrators, provides readers with a highly practical reference for configuring and deploying OpenSSH in their own environment.

  7. OpenShift cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Gulati, Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    If you are a web application developer who wants to use the OpenShift platform to host your next big idea but are looking for guidance on how to achieve this, then this book is the first step you need to take. This is a very accessible cookbook where no previous knowledge of OpenShift is needed.

  8. OpenStack essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Radez, Dan

    2015-01-01

    If you need to get started with OpenStack or want to learn more, then this book is your perfect companion. If you're comfortable with the Linux command line, you'll gain confidence in using OpenStack.

  9. OpenJDK cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Kasko, Alex; Mironchenko, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    If you are an experienced Java developer using Java 7 platform and want to get your grips on OpenJDK for Java development, this is the book for you. JDK users who wish to migrate to OpenJDK will find this book very useful.

  10. The Open Access Divide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingfeng Xia

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an attempt to review various aspects of the open access divide regarding the difference between those academics who support free sharing of data and scholarly output and those academics who do not. It provides a structured description by adopting the Ws doctrines emphasizing such questions as who, what, when, where and why for information-gathering. Using measurable variables to define a common expression of the open access divide, this study collects aggregated data from existing open access as well as non-open access publications including journal articles and extensive reports. The definition of the open access divide is integrated into the discussion of scholarship on a larger scale.

  11. Open3DQSAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosco, Paolo; Balle, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Description Open3DQSAR is an open-source tool aimed at pharmacophore exploration by high-throughput chemometric analysis of molecular interaction fields (MIFs). Open3DQSAR can generate steric potential, electron density and MM/QM electrostatic potential fields; furthermore, it can import GRIDKONT...... binary files produced by GRID and CoMFA/CoMSIA fields (exported from SYBYL with the aid of a small SPL script). Subsequently, Open3DQSAR performs fast, automated PLS chemometric analysis of MIFs allowing to quickly generate and challenge the predictivity of many 3D-QSAR models using different training...... integration with OpenBabel, PyMOL, gnuplot •Multi-threaded computation of MIFs (both MM and QM); support for MMFF94 and GAFF force-fields with automated assignment of atom types to the imported molecular structures •Comprehensive output, including SDF molecular databases, 3D maps and many different plots...

  12. Open Government ist mehr als Open Data

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Lena-Sophie; Klessmann, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Die digitale Revolution verändert Arbeitsweisen und Erwartungshaltungen. Diese Veränderungen sind auch für das politisch administrative System relevant: Die Öffentlichkeit möchte sich zunehmend einbringen und sucht nach neuen Wegen der politischen Teilhabe. Politische und administrative Entscheider reagieren durch die Entscheidung, sich ihrer Umwelt sowie nach innen zunehmend öffnen zu wollen. Diese Öffnung wird unter dem Schlagwort "Open Government" (deutsch: Offenes Regierungs- und Verwaltu...

  13. Model Misspecification When Excluding Instrumental Variables From PS Models in Settings Where Instruments Modify the Effects of Covariates on Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, Richard; Ellis, Alan R.; Lunt, Mark; Brookhart, M. Alan; Glynn, Robert J.; Stürmer, Til

    2014-01-01

    Theory and simulations show that variables affecting the outcome only through exposure, known as instrumental variables (IVs), should be excluded from propensity score (PS) models. In pharmacoepidemiologic studies based on automated healthcare databases, researchers will sometimes use a single PS model to control for confounding when evaluating the effect of a treatment on multiple outcomes. Because these “full” models are not constructed with a specific outcome in mind, they will usually contain a large number of IVs for any individual study or outcome. If researchers subsequently decide to evaluate a subset of the outcomes in more detail, they can construct reduced “outcome-specific” models that exclude IVs for the particular study. Accurate estimates of PSs that do not condition on IVs, however, can be compromised when simply excluding instruments from the full PS model. This misspecification may have a negligible impact on effect estimates in many settings, but is likely to be more pronounced for situations where instruments modify the effects of covariates on treatment (instrument-confounder interactions). In studies evaluating drugs during early dissemination, the effects of covariates on treatment are likely modified over calendar time and IV-confounder interaction effects on treatment are likely to exist. In these settings, refitting more flexible PS models after excluding IVs and IV-confounder interactions can work well. The authors propose an alternative method based on the concept of marginalization that can be used to remove the negative effects of controlling for IVs and IV-confounder interactions without having to refit the full PS model. This method fits the full PS model, including IVs and IV-confounder interactions, but marginalizes over values of the instruments. Fitting more flexible PS models after excluding IVs or using the full model to marginalize over IVs can prevent model misspecification along with the negative effects of balancing

  14. Clarifying the use of aggregated exposures in multilevel models: self-included vs. self-excluded measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etsuji Suzuki

    Full Text Available Multilevel analyses are ideally suited to assess the effects of ecological (higher level and individual (lower level exposure variables simultaneously. In applying such analyses to measures of ecologies in epidemiological studies, individual variables are usually aggregated into the higher level unit. Typically, the aggregated measure includes responses of every individual belonging to that group (i.e. it constitutes a self-included measure. More recently, researchers have developed an aggregate measure which excludes the response of the individual to whom the aggregate measure is linked (i.e. a self-excluded measure. In this study, we clarify the substantive and technical properties of these two measures when they are used as exposures in multilevel models.Although the differences between the two aggregated measures are mathematically subtle, distinguishing between them is important in terms of the specific scientific questions to be addressed. We then show how these measures can be used in two distinct types of multilevel models-self-included model and self-excluded model-and interpret the parameters in each model by imposing hypothetical interventions. The concept is tested on empirical data of workplace social capital and employees' systolic blood pressure.Researchers assume group-level interventions when using a self-included model, and individual-level interventions when using a self-excluded model. Analytical re-parameterizations of these two models highlight their differences in parameter interpretation. Cluster-mean centered self-included models enable researchers to decompose the collective effect into its within- and between-group components. The benefit of cluster-mean centering procedure is further discussed in terms of hypothetical interventions.When investigating the potential roles of aggregated variables, researchers should carefully explore which type of model-self-included or self-excluded-is suitable for a given situation

  15. The Viability of the Oil and Gas Industry within the Former Soviet Union, excluding Kazakhstan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coish, J.; Pyne, M.

    2004-01-15

    The former Soviet Union (FSU) has huge potential in the future of the world's oil and gas industry. The FSU includes some of the biggest producers and consumers of oil and gas in the world, and many of these countries include areas that lie untouched or explored. FSU territory also surrounds the Caspian Sea, which is itself a hotbed of activity in the oil and gas industry. The Caspian alone is important to world energy markets because of its own potential for oil and gas production and export, and this adds to the overall potential of the FSU. The FSU has been moving towards a free market economy since the fall of communism in the early 90's, and as such, is becoming a much more attractive area for foreign companies to operate. The FSU countries still requires foreign investment for their respective industries, and some of them have even put into place legislation to provide benefits to foreign investors. There are many types of foreign investment required in the FSU. Much of the infrastructure already in place is old and dilapidated, and requires maintenance and improvement. As well, new equipment and technologies for exploration and production are required to tap the oil and gas resources that lie in inconvenient locations. Finally, transportation of the oil and gas is a major issue here, as many of the fields are in hard to reach areas, and thus pipeline projects are increasing. Since the fall of communism, the FSU has been opening its doors more and more to foreign investors eager to bite into the huge market, and many of the largest oil and gas companies in the world are already operating there. The industries are still young to foreign investment, however, and those companies who get their foot in the door early, will be able to reap the benefits for years to come.

  16. Open innovation with an effective open innovation team.

    OpenAIRE

    Vanvoorden, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    This master's thesis explores how open innovation teams can successfully support open innovation inside of an organisation. Open innovation is a paradigm introduced by Henry Chesbrough (2003) a decade ago. It expands the innovation potential of organisations by opening them up to new ways of working with external partners. To implement open innovation, many companies rely on a small group of managers named open innovation teams. Although open innovation teams can potentially be vital for impl...

  17. Open source development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses innovations based on open source or non-proprietary knowledge. Viewed through the lens of private property theory, such agency appears to be a true anomaly. However, by a further turn of the theoretical kaleidoscope, we will show that there may be perfectly justifiable reasons...... for not regarding open source innovations as anomalies. The paper is based on three sectorial and generic cases of open source innovation, which is an offspring of contemporary theory made possible by combining elements of the model of private agency with those of the model of collective agency. In closing...

  18. OpenNI cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Falahati, Soroush

    2013-01-01

    This is a Cookbook with plenty of practical recipes enriched with explained code and relevant screenshots to ease your learning curve. If you are a beginner or a professional in NIUI and want to write serious applications or games, then this book is for you. Even OpenNI 1 and OpenNI 1.x programmers who want to move to new versions of OpenNI can use this book as a starting point. This book uses C++ as the primary language but there are some examples in C# and Java too, so you need to have about a basic working knowledge of C or C++ for most cases.

  19. Linking open vocabularies

    CERN Document Server

    Greifender, Elke; Seadle, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Linked Data (LD), Linked Open Data (LOD) and generating a web of data, present the new knowledge sharing frontier. In a philosophical context, LD is an evolving environment that reflects humankinds' desire to understand the world by drawing on the latest technologies and capabilities of the time. LD, while seemingly a new phenomenon did not emerge overnight; rather it represents the natural progression by which knowledge structures are developed, used, and shared. Linked Open Vocabularies is a significant trajectory of LD. Linked Open Vocabularies targets vocabularies that have traditionally b

  20. Open Media Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Moltke Martiny, Kristian; Pedersen, David Budtz; Hansted, Allan Alfred Birkegaard

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we present three challenges to the emerging Open Science (OS) movement: the challenge of communication, collaboration and cultivation of scientific research. We argue that to address these challenges OS needs to include other forms of data than what can be captured in a text...... and extend into a fully-fledged Open Media movement engaging with new media and non-traditional formats of science communication. We discuss two cases where experiments with open media have driven new collaborations between scientists and documentarists. We use the cases to illustrate different advantages...

  1. Opening Pandora's Box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Jane

    1992-01-01

    Excerpts from an architect's return to Virginia school almost 12 years after completion of the design and construction project. Originally designed for open-space education in 1975, the school was subsequently partitioned to form traditional classroom spaces. (MLF)

  2. Open3DGRID

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosco, Paolo; Balle, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    -US, TURBOMOLE, MOLDEN, Molecular Discovery GRID •Multi-threaded computation of MIFs (both MM and QM); support for MMFF94 and GAFF force-fields with automated assignment of atom types to the imported molecular structures •Human and machine-readable text output, integrated with 3D maps in several formats to allow......Description Open3DGRID is an open-source software aimed at high-throughput generation of molecular interaction fields (MIFs). Open3DGRID can generate steric potential, electron density and MM/QM electrostatic potential fields; furthermore, it can import GRIDKONT binary files produced by GRID and Co...... visualization of results in PyMOL, MOE, Maestro and SYBYL •User-friendly interface to all major QM packages (e.g. GAUSSIAN, FIREFLY, GAMESS-US, TURBOMOLE, MOLDEN), allows calculation of QM electron density and electrostatic potential 3D maps from within Open3DGRID •User-friendly interface to Molecular Discovery...

  3. Improving Open Canned Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, David; Barfuss, Steven L.; Johnson, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    The results of a study on the hydraulic performance of open-bottom canned pump intakes should aid engineers and pump users to design these systems with reduced velocity fluctuations and undesirable flow rotation.

  4. Summer Restaurant opening times

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Restaurant No. 1: Open as usual in July and August. Open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Thursday, 10 September (Jeûne genevois).   Restaurant No. 2: Open as usual in July and August. Closed on Thursday, 10 September (Jeûne genevois) and Friday, 11 September. The Brasserie (table service) will be closed from Monday, 4 August to Friday, 11 September.   Restaurant No. 3: Open as usual in July and August, but closed on Saturday, 1 August; Saturday, 15 August; Thursday, 10 September (Jeûne genevois); and Friday, 11 September.   Snack bar in Building 54: Closed from Monday, 4 August to Friday, 11 September.   Snack bars in Buildings 13, 30 and 6: Closed on Thursday, 10 September (Jeûne genevois) and Friday, 11 September.

  5. Open Hardware at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Knowledge Transfer Group

    2015-01-01

    CERN is actively making its knowledge and technology available for the benefit of society and does so through a variety of different mechanisms. Open hardware has in recent years established itself as a very effective way for CERN to make electronics designs and in particular printed circuit board layouts, accessible to anyone, while also facilitating collaboration and design re-use. It is creating an impact on many levels, from companies producing and selling products based on hardware designed at CERN, to new projects being released under the CERN Open Hardware Licence. Today the open hardware community includes large research institutes, universities, individual enthusiasts and companies. Many of the companies are actively involved in the entire process from design to production, delivering services and consultancy and even making their own products available under open licences.

  6. Privacy and Open Government

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Scassa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The public-oriented goals of the open government movement promise increased transparency and accountability of governments, enhanced citizen engagement and participation, improved service delivery, economic development and the stimulation of innovation. In part, these goals are to be achieved by making more and more government information public in reusable formats and under open licences. This paper identifies three broad privacy challenges raised by open government. The first is how to balance privacy with transparency and accountability in the context of “public” personal information. The second challenge flows from the disruption of traditional approaches to privacy based on a collapse of the distinctions between public and private sector actors. The third challenge is that of the potential for open government data—even if anonymized—to contribute to the big data environment in which citizens and their activities are increasingly monitored and profiled.

  7. Open cycle thermoacoustics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Robert Stowers [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    A new type of thermodynamic device combining a thermodynamic cycle with the externally applied steady flow of an open thermodynamic process is discussed and experimentally demonstrated. The gas flowing through this device can be heated or cooled in a series of semi-open cyclic steps. The combination of open and cyclic flows makes possible the elimination of some or all of the heat exchangers (with their associated irreversibility). Heat is directly exchanged with the process fluid as it flows through the device when operating as a refrigerator, producing a staging effect that tends to increase First Law thermodynamic efficiency. An open-flow thermoacoustic refrigerator was built to demonstrate this concept. Several approaches are presented that describe the physical characteristics of this device. Tests have been conducted on this refrigerator with good agreement with a proposed theory.

  8. Reframing Open Big Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marton, Attila; Avital, Michel; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in the techniques and technologies of collecting, sharing and analysing data are challenging the field of information systems (IS) research let alone the boundaries of organizations and the established practices of decision-making. Coined ‘open data’ and ‘big data......’, these developments introduce an unprecedented level of societal and organizational engagement with the potential of computational data to generate new insights and information. Based on the commonalities shared by open data and big data, we develop a research framework that we refer to as open big data (OBD......) by employing the dimensions of ‘order’ and ‘relationality’. We argue that these dimensions offer a viable approach for IS research on open and big data because they address one of the core value propositions of IS; i.e. how to support organizing with computational data. We contrast these dimensions with two...

  9. A communication perspective on open strategy and open innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobusch, L.; Kremser, W.; Seidl, D; Werle, F.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic analysis of the similarities and differences between the fields of open innovation and open strategy. In particular, we examine the concept of openness from a communication-centered perspective and compare processes of open innovation and open strategy with regard to

  10. Open for entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eftekhari, Nazanin; Bogers, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores how an open approach to new venture creation – purposefully managing knowledge flows across the venture's organizational boundary – can be beneficial for start-up entrepreneurs. Our inductive case study, of both failure and success, identifies the key attributes of this open a...... for entrepreneurship and innovation research and practice, providing some attention points for researchers, entrepreneurs, investors and policy makers interested in developing successful new ventures....

  11. Should Controls With Respiratory Symptoms Be Excluded From Case-Control Studies of Pneumonia Etiology? Reflections From the PERCH Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higdon, Melissa M; Hammitt, Laura L; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Baggett, Henry C; Brooks, W Abdullah; Howie, Stephen R C; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Madhi, Shabir A; Murdoch, David R; Scott, J Anthony G; Thea, Donald M; Driscoll, Amanda J; Karron, Ruth A; Park, Daniel E; Prosperi, Christine; Zeger, Scott L; O'Brien, Katherine L; Feikin, Daniel R

    2017-06-15

    Many pneumonia etiology case-control studies exclude controls with respiratory illness from enrollment or analyses. Herein we argue that selecting controls regardless of respiratory symptoms provides the least biased estimates of pneumonia etiology. We review 3 reasons investigators may choose to exclude controls with respiratory symptoms in light of epidemiologic principles of control selection and present data from the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) study where relevant to assess their validity. We conclude that exclusion of controls with respiratory symptoms will result in biased estimates of etiology. Randomly selected community controls, with or without respiratory symptoms, as long as they do not meet the criteria for case-defining pneumonia, are most representative of the general population from which cases arose and the least subject to selection bias. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  12. Business Models for Open Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saebi, Tina; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    Research on open innovation suggests that companies benefit differentially from adopting open innovation strategies; however, it is unclear why this is so. One possible explanation is that companies’ business models are not attuned to open strategies. Accordingly, we propose a contingency model...... of open business models by systematically linking open innovation strategies to core business model dimensions, notably the content, structure, governance of transactions. We further illustrate a continuum of open innovativeness, differentiating between four types of open business models. We contribute...... to the open innovation literature by specifying the conditions under which business models are conducive to the success of open innovation strategies....

  13. CERN: Digitally open, too

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2013-01-01

    The Open Days are here!! From tomorrow onwards, we will be welcoming thousands of people to CERN. No barriers, no boundaries!   For decades, we have welcomed researchers and visitors from around the world to work at CERN, discuss physics research and attend our training sessions, lectures and conferences. This is how fundamental research should be conducted!!! But have you ever noticed how you are welcome at CERN in the digital world, too? Once you are affiliated and are registered with CERN, you receive a CERN computing account and e-mail address.  You can register your laptops, PCs and smartphones to use our (wireless) network, you can easily create your personal webpage, and profit from a vast disk space for file storage (AFS and DFS). CERN is indeed an Open Campus and not only during the Open Days. CERN is an Open Campus in the digital world. This digital Open Campus culture is exactly the reason why “computer security” has been dele...

  14. Open Day: General Information

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    http://www.cern.ch/cern50/ With 50 visit points, including theatre performances, debates and visits to installations that have never before been opened to the public, CERN's 50th anniversary Open Day is set to be a day to remember. Seven hundred volunteers have signed up to help for the day. The Open Day team truly appreciates this wonderful show of support! The Open Day would not be possible without their help. Car parking and Access Cars with a CERN sticker can access all CERN sites as normal. However, to avoid congestion on Meyrin site, we ask you to park in areas that will not be open to the public (see below) and to use the shuttle services wherever possible for your transport during the day. Private cars on the French side of the border without a CERN sticker will be diverted to a car park area in the Prévessin site. There is a shuttle service connecting the Meyrin and Prévessin sites via SM18 every 20 minutes. Private cars on the Swiss side of the border without a CERN sticker will be diverte...

  15. Ubiquitous human 'master' origins of replication are encoded in the DNA sequence via a local enrichment in nucleosome excluding energy barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drillon, Guénola; Audit, Benjamin; Argoul, Françoise; Arneodo, Alain

    2015-02-18

    As the elementary building block of eukaryotic chromatin, the nucleosome is at the heart of the compromise between the necessity of compacting DNA in the cell nucleus and the required accessibility to regulatory proteins. The recent availability of genome-wide experimental maps of nucleosome positions for many different organisms and cell types has provided an unprecedented opportunity to elucidate to what extent the DNA sequence conditions the primary structure of chromatin and in turn participates in the chromatin-mediated regulation of nuclear functions, such as gene expression and DNA replication. In this study, we use in vivo and in vitro genome-wide nucleosome occupancy data together with the set of nucleosome-free regions (NFRs) predicted by a physical model of nucleosome formation based on sequence-dependent bending properties of the DNA double-helix, to investigate the role of intrinsic nucleosome occupancy in the regulation of the replication spatio-temporal programme in human. We focus our analysis on the so-called replication U/N-domains that were shown to cover about half of the human genome in the germline (skew-N domains) as well as in embryonic stem cells, somatic and HeLa cells (mean replication timing U-domains). The 'master' origins of replication (MaOris) that border these megabase-sized U/N-domains were found to be specified by a few hundred kb wide regions that are hyper-sensitive to DNase I cleavage, hypomethylated, and enriched in epigenetic marks involved in transcription regulation, the hallmarks of localized open chromatin structures. Here we show that replication U/N-domain borders that are conserved in all considered cell lines have an environment highly enriched in nucleosome-excluding-energy barriers, suggesting that these ubiquitous MaOris have been selected during evolution. In contrast, MaOris that are cell-type-specific are mainly regulated epigenetically and are no longer favoured by a local abundance of intrinsic NFRs encoded in

  16. OpenLabNotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Markus; Franz, Michael; Tan, Qihua

    2015-01-01

    the longevity of the providers. Turning towards free alternatives, however, raises questions about data protection, which are not sufficiently addressed by available solutions. To serve as legal documents, ELNs must prevent scientific fraud through technical means such as digital signatures. It would also......LabFramework, a powerful and flexible laboratory information management system. In contrast to comparable solutions, it allows to protect the intellectual property of its users by offering data protection with digital signatures. OpenLabNotes effectively Closes the gap between research documentation and sample management...... be advantageous if an ELN was Integrated with a laboratory information management system to allow for a comprehensive documentation of experimental work including the location of samples that were used in a particular experiment. Here, we present OpenLabNotes, which adds state-of-the-art ELN capabilities to Open...

  17. Ready to be Open?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monteiro, L. Felipe; Mol, Michael J.; Birkinshaw, Julian

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides new theory and evidence about the benefits of openness on a firm's innovation performance and, more importantly, the specific firm-level contingencies under which those benefits are more (or less) likely to be observed. Building on Dyer and Singh's (1998) relational view, we...... suggest that a firm's lack of resources and absorptive capacity, as well as its use of secrecy, are significant barriers to benefiting from openness to external knowledge. Using responses from 12,152 firms to the fourth and fifth UK versions of the Community Innovation Survey (CIS), we generate findings...

  18. Ready to be Open?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monteiro, L. Felipe; Mol, Michael J.; Birkinshaw, Julian

    This paper provides new theory and evidence about the benefits of openness on a firm's innovation performance and, more importantly, the specific firm-level contingencies under which those benefits are more (or less) likely to be observed. Building on Dyer and Singh's (1998) relational view, we...... suggest that a firm's lack of resources and absorptive capacity, as well as its use of secrecy, are significant barriers to benefiting from openness to external knowledge. Using responses from 12,152 firms to the fourth and fifth UK versions of the Community Innovation Survey (CIS) we generate findings...

  19. Using OpenRefine

    CERN Document Server

    Verborgh, Ruben

    2013-01-01

    The book is styled on a Cookbook, containing recipes - combined with free datasets - which will turn readers into proficient OpenRefine users in the fastest possible way.This book is targeted at anyone who works on or handles a large amount of data. No prior knowledge of OpenRefine is required, as we start from the very beginning and gradually reveal more advanced features. You don't even need your own dataset, as we provide example data to try out the book's recipes.

  20. Open source molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirhadi, Somayeh; Sunseri, Jocelyn; Koes, David Ryan

    2016-09-01

    The success of molecular modeling and computational chemistry efforts are, by definition, dependent on quality software applications. Open source software development provides many advantages to users of modeling applications, not the least of which is that the software is free and completely extendable. In this review we categorize, enumerate, and describe available open source software packages for molecular modeling and computational chemistry. An updated online version of this catalog can be found at https://opensourcemolecularmodeling.github.io. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Open Day at SHMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosova, M.

    2010-09-01

    During the World Meteorological Day there has been preparing "Open Day" at Slovak Hydrometeorological Institute. This event has more than 10 years traditions. "Open Day" is one of a lot of possibilities to give more information about meteorology, climatology, hydrology too to public. This "Day" is executed in whole Slovakia. People can visit the laboratories, the forecasting room....and meteo and clima measuring points. The most popular is visiting forecasting room. Visitors are interested in e.g. climatologic change in Slovakia territory, preparing weather forecasting, dangerous phenomena.... Every year we have more than 500 visitors.

  2. Support open access publishing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrøm, Jeannette

    2013-01-01

    Projektet Support Open Access Publishing har til mål at få opdateret Sherpa/Romeo databasen (www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo) med fagligt relevante, danske tidsskrifter. Projektet skal endvidere undersøge mulighederne for at få udviklet en database, hvor forskere på tværs af relevante tidsskriftsinformati...... tidsskriftsinformationer (faglig disciplin, BFI niveau, Impact Factor, Open Access) vil kunne danne sig et hurtigt overblik, for derved at kunne træffe et kvalificeret valg om, hvor og hvordan man skal publicere sine forskningsresultater....

  3. Open Technology Development: Roadmap Plan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herz, J. C; Lucas, Mark; Scott, John

    2006-01-01

    .... Collaborative and distributed online tools; and 4. Technological Agility. Open standards and interfaces were initially established through ARPA and distributed via open source software reference implementations...

  4. Probabilistic Open Set Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Lalit Prithviraj

    Real-world tasks in computer vision, pattern recognition and machine learning often touch upon the open set recognition problem: multi-class recognition with incomplete knowledge of the world and many unknown inputs. An obvious way to approach such problems is to develop a recognition system that thresholds probabilities to reject unknown classes. Traditional rejection techniques are not about the unknown; they are about the uncertain boundary and rejection around that boundary. Thus traditional techniques only represent the "known unknowns". However, a proper open set recognition algorithm is needed to reduce the risk from the "unknown unknowns". This dissertation examines this concept and finds existing probabilistic multi-class recognition approaches are ineffective for true open set recognition. We hypothesize the cause is due to weak adhoc assumptions combined with closed-world assumptions made by existing calibration techniques. Intuitively, if we could accurately model just the positive data for any known class without overfitting, we could reject the large set of unknown classes even under this assumption of incomplete class knowledge. For this, we formulate the problem as one of modeling positive training data by invoking statistical extreme value theory (EVT) near the decision boundary of positive data with respect to negative data. We provide a new algorithm called the PI-SVM for estimating the unnormalized posterior probability of class inclusion. This dissertation also introduces a new open set recognition model called Compact Abating Probability (CAP), where the probability of class membership decreases in value (abates) as points move from known data toward open space. We show that CAP models improve open set recognition for multiple algorithms. Leveraging the CAP formulation, we go on to describe the novel Weibull-calibrated SVM (W-SVM) algorithm, which combines the useful properties of statistical EVT for score calibration with one-class and binary

  5. Torii, an Open Portal over Open Archives

    CERN Document Server

    Bertocco, S

    2001-01-01

    The world of academic publishing is undergoing many changes. Everywhere paper-based publishing is being replaced by electronic archives and ink printing by bits. Unrestricted (web) access to many resources is becoming a fundamental feature of the academic research environment. Particularly in the high-energy physics community, the pre-print distribution has moved completely away from the paper-based system into a fully electronic system based on open archives. At the same time, freely accessible peer-reviewed journals have started to challenge the more traditional, and paper-based journals showing that the entire paper-based cycle can be effectively replaced by a web-based one. The TIPS project was born in this environment and from these observations. It is based on the idea that further progress in information distribution and scientific publishing on the web requires some key ingredients: the implementation of a more extensive semantic structure in the documents that are exchanged; a unified, desktop-like, ...

  6. Proposal of a Python interface to OpenMI, as the base for open source hydrological framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Szczepanek

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrologists need simple, yet powerful, open source framework for developing and testing mathematical models. Such framework should ensure long-term interoperability and high scalability. This can be done by implementation of the existing, already tested standards. At the moment two interesting options exist: Open Modelling Interface (OpenMI and Object Modeling System (OMS. OpenMI was developed within the Fifth European Framework Programme for integrated watershed management, described in the Water Framework Directive. OpenMI interfaces are available for the C# and Java programming languages. OpenMI Association is now in the process of agreement with Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC, so the spatial standards existing in OpenMI 2.0 should be better implemented in the future. The OMS project is pure Java, object-oriented modeling framework coordinated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Big advantage of OMS compared to OpenMI is its simplicity of implementation. On the other hand, OpenMI seems to be more powerful and better suited for hydrological models. Finally, OpenMI model was selected as the base interface for the proposed open source hydrological framework.  The existing hydrological libraries and models focus usually on just one GIS package (HydroFOSS – GRASS or one operating system (HydroDesktop – Microsoft Windows. The new hydrological framework should break those limitations. To make hydrological models’ implementation as easy as possible, the framework should be based on a simple, high-level computer language. Low and mid-level languages, like Java (SEXTANTE or C (GRASS, SAGA were excluded, as too complicated for regular hydrologist. From popular, high-level languages, Python seems to be a good choice. Leading GIS desktop applications – GRASS and QGIS – use Python as second native language, providing well documented API. This way, a Python-based hydrological library could be easily integrated with any GIS package supporting

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of plasma NT-proBNP levels for excluding cardiac abnormalities in the very elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westendorp Rudi GJ

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the elderly the diagnosis of chronic heart failure is often challenging and the availability of echocardiography can be limited. Plasma levels of NT-proBNP are valuable tools to diagnose patients with heart failure. However, the performance of this biomarker to detect cardiac abnormalities in the very elderly remains unclear. The aims of this study were to investigate the relation between NT-proBNP and cardiac abnormalities and to evaluate the use of NT-proBNP to exclude structural and functional cardiac abnormalities in a community-based sample of "well-functioning" nonagenarians. Methods A diagnostic cross-sectional study embedded within the Leiden 85-plus Study in the municipality of Leiden, the Netherlands. Plasma NT-proBNP levels were measured and 2-dimensional echocardiography was performed in a subgroup of 80 well-functioning nonagenarians. Linear regression analysis was used to explore the relation between NT-proBNP and cardiac abnormalities and ROC curve analysis was used to assess the performance of NT-proBNP to exclude cardiac abnormalities. The upper limit of the lowest tertile of NT-proBNP was used as a cut-off value. Results NT-proBNP levels were associated with abnormal left ventricular (LV dimensions, LV systolic and diastolic function, left atrial enlargement and valvular heart disease. LV mass, E/A ratio and degree of aortic regurgitation were identified as independent predictors of NT-proBNP. NT-proBNP levels were higher with greater number of echocardiographic abnormalities (P Conclusions In this convenience sample of well-functioning nonagenarians NT-proBNP was related to a wide variety of functional and structural echocardiographic abnormalities. Moreover, NT-proBNP could be used to exclude echocardiographic abnormalities in well-functioning nonagenarians and might be used to indicate who needs to be referred for further cardiovascular examination.

  8. A pragmatic randomized controlled trial of computerized CBT (SPARX) for symptoms of depression among adolescents excluded from mainstream education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Theresa; Dixon, Robyn; Frampton, Christopher; Merry, Sally

    2012-10-01

    Adolescents excluded from mainstream education have high mental health needs. The use of computerized Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (cCBT) has not been investigated with this group. To test the efficacy of the SPARX cCBT programme for symptoms of depression among adolescents in programmes for students excluded or alienated from mainstream education. Adolescents (32; 34% Maori, 38% Pacific Island, 56% male) aged 13-16 with Child Depression Rating Scale Revised (CDRS-R) scores indicating possible through to almost certain depressive disorder were randomized to SPARX to be completed over the following 5 weeks (n = 20) or to waitlist control (n = 12). Assessments were at baseline, 5 weeks and 10 weeks. Those in the wait condition were invited to complete SPARX after the 5 week assessment. Most participants (n = 26, 81%) completed at least 4 levels of SPARX and 22 (69%) completed all 7 levels. Among the 30 (94%) participants who began treatment as randomized and provided 5-week data, significant differences were found between cCBT and wait groups on the CDRS-R (baseline to 5-week mean change -14.7 versus -1.1, pDepression Scale (-4.6 vs. +3.2 p = .05) but not on other self-rating psychological functioning scales. In intent-to-treat analyses CDRS-R changes and remission remained significant. Gains were maintained at 10-week follow-up. SPARX appears to be a promising treatment for students with symptoms of depression who are in alternative schooling programmes for those excluded from mainstream education.

  9. OpenAPS Data Commons on Open Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Dana M.; Ball, Madeleine

    2017-01-01

    Poster describing OpenAPS, Open Humans, and joint work creating a data commons for OpenAPS data in the Open Humans platform. Presented at the 2017 Sage Assembly Bionetworks Assembly and recipient of a Young Innovator/Investigator award.

  10. Information on Open Access

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It concerns the outputs that scholars normally give away free to be published – peer-reviewed journal articles, conference papers and datasets of various kinds." The three original, formal definitions of Open Access are the Budapest (2002), Bethesda (2003) and Berlin (2003) definitions and they are usually referred to as a ...

  11. City of open works

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riesto, Svava; Søberg, Martin; Braae, Ellen Marie

    2012-01-01

    . These contemporary approaches are closely con-nected to challenges following the transformation of existing urban structures – the re-use of metropolis. And the resulting projects are often created as more or less open works; they challenge existing typologies through a particularly inclusive and hetero...

  12. Open access discount information

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Lauren Doyle

    www.springer.com/gp/open-access/authors- rights/self-archiving-policy/2124. Springer offers waivers and discounts for OA based on: 1) Low income economics (countries). 2) Low-Middle income economics (countries). Link to discount/waiver ...

  13. Metaphors of Open Innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marien van den Boom

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we turn to the field of innovation management and the use of metaphors to address the question: what kind of alternative metaphors and narratives have some open-innovation organizations introduced highlighting and fostering knowledge-intensive organizational change? First we draw a

  14. Open Journal Systems

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This journal has not published any issues. ISSN: 0254-6299. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors. OTHER RESOURCES... Journal Quality · for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers · about Open Access · FAQ's · News · AJOL jobs · More about ...

  15. Open Journal Systems Help

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ensuring a Blind Peer Review. Open Journal Systems Help. Journal Home > Editorial Process > Editor's Role > Submission Summary. Submission Summary. The Summary page for each submission is used by the Editor to manage the submission files and its associated metadata or indexing information.

  16. Open Source Software Acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Jesper; Kühn Pedersen, Mogens; Holm Larsen, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Lately we have seen a growing interest from both public and private organisations to adopt OpenSource Software (OSS), not only for a few, specific applications but also on a more general levelthroughout the organisation. As a consequence, the organisations' decisions on adoption of OSS arebecoming...

  17. Quasi-open inflation

    CERN Document Server

    García-Bellido, J; Montes, X; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Garriga, Jaume; Montes, Xavier

    1998-01-01

    We show that a large class of two-field models of single-bubble open inflation do not lead to infinite open universes, as it was previously thought, but to an ensemble of very large but finite inflating `islands'. The reason is that the quantum tunneling responsible for the nucleation of the bubble does not occur simultaneously along both field directions and equal-time hypersurfaces in the open universe are not synchronized with equal-density or fixed-field hypersurfaces. The most probable tunneling trajectory corresponds to a zero value of the inflaton field; large values, necessary for the second period of inflation inside the bubble, only arise as localized fluctuations. The interior of each nucleated bubble will contain an infinite number of such inflating regions of comoving size of order $\\gamma^{-1}$, where $\\gamma$ depends on the parameters of the model. Each one of these islands will be a quasi-open universe. Since the volume of the hyperboloid is infinite, inflating islands with all possible values...

  18. Open Coding Descriptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney G. Glaser, PhD, Hon PhD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Open coding is a big source of descriptions that must be managed and controlled when doing GT research. The goal of generating a GT is to generate an emergent set of concepts and their properties that fit and work with relevancy to be integrated into a theory. To achieve this goal, the researcher begins his research with open coding, that is coding all his data in every possible way. The consequence of this open coding is a multitude of descriptions for possible concepts that often do not fit in the emerging theory. Thus in this case the researcher ends up with many irrelevant descriptions for concepts that do not apply. To dwell on descriptions for inapplicable concepts ruins the GT theory as it starts. It is hard to stop. Confusion easily sets in. Switching the study to a QDA is a simple rescue. Rigorous focusing on emerging concepts is vital before being lost in open coding descriptions. It is important, no matter how interesting the description may become. Once a core is possible, selective coding can start which will help control against being lost in multiple descriptions.

  19. Van: An Open Letter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieman, John Samuel

    2011-01-01

    This essay is an open letter from a classroom teacher to a concerned citizen. The letter lists a variety of problems caused largely by standardization and the more corrosive effects of positivism. Many of these problems are unknown to those outside the immediate school setting. While the letter focuses on a specific setting, an inner city school…

  20. Open-Source Colorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzalone, Gerald C.; Glover, Alexandra G.; Pearce, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    The high cost of what have historically been sophisticated research-related sensors and tools has limited their adoption to a relatively small group of well-funded researchers. This paper provides a methodology for applying an open-source approach to design and development of a colorimeter. A 3-D printable, open-source colorimeter utilizing only open-source hardware and software solutions and readily available discrete components is discussed and its performance compared to a commercial portable colorimeter. Performance is evaluated with commercial vials prepared for the closed reflux chemical oxygen demand (COD) method. This approach reduced the cost of reliable closed reflux COD by two orders of magnitude making it an economic alternative for the vast majority of potential users. The open-source colorimeter demonstrated good reproducibility and serves as a platform for further development and derivation of the design for other, similar purposes such as nephelometry. This approach promises unprecedented access to sophisticated instrumentation based on low-cost sensors by those most in need of it, under-developed and developing world laboratories. PMID:23604032

  1. Drain opener poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drain opener poisoning can cause symptoms in many parts of the body. BLOOD Severe change in acid level of blood (pH balance), which leads to damage in all of the body organs EYES, EARS, NOSE, AND THROAT Burns to the eyes, which ...

  2. Open3DALIGN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosco, Paolo; Balle, Thomas; Shiri, Fereshteh

    2011-01-01

    An open-source, cross-platform software aimed at conformer generation and unsupervised rigid-body molecular alignment is presented. Different algorithms have been implemented to perform single and multi-conformation superimpositions on one or more templates. Alignments can be accomplished...

  3. Open inventor and PREMO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Wang; G.J. Reynolds; I. Herman (Ivan)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractPREMO is an emerging international standard for the presentations of multimedia objects including computer graphics. Open Inventor$^{TM$ is a commercially available ``de facto'' standard for interactive computer graphics packaged as a library of objects. In this report we consider

  4. Open Source in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhan, Shaheen E.; Jhunjhunwala, Kavita

    2008-01-01

    Educational institutions have rushed to put their academic resources and services online, beginning the global community onto a common platform and awakening the interest of investors. Despite continuing technical challenges, online education shows great promise. Open source software offers one approach to addressing the technical problems in…

  5. Evaluating Open Source Portals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Dion; Luyt, Brendan; Chua, Alton; Yee, See-Yong; Poh, Kia-Ngoh; Ng, How-Yeu

    2008-01-01

    Portals have become indispensable for organizations of all types trying to establish themselves on the Web. Unfortunately, there have only been a few evaluative studies of portal software and even fewer of open source portal software. This study aims to add to the available literature in this important area by proposing and testing a checklist for…

  6. The Open Storage Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    Over the past three decades, open storage facilities have been established at four major museums in order to address the long-standing problem of lack of gallery space for putting collections on view. While making tens of thousands of objects available to visitors represents a great leap forward in accessibility, it raises inherent questions about…

  7. Open-Ended Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Tim; Bedau, Mark A.; Channon, Alastair

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the First Workshop on Open-Ended Evolution: Recent Progress and Future Milestones (OEE1), held during the ECAL 2015 conference at the University of York, U.K., in July 2015. We briefly summarise the content of the talks and discussions and the workshop, and provide links...

  8. Bisimulation and open maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joyal, André; Nielsen, Mogens; Winskel, Glynn

    1993-01-01

    ), and Goltz and van Glabeek (1989). A tie-up with open maps in a (pre)topos brings to light a promising new model, presheaves on categories of pomsets, into which the usual category of labeled event structures embeds fully and faithfully. As an indication of its promise, this new presheaf model has refinement...

  9. Bisimulation from Open Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joyal, André; Nielsen, Mogens; Winskel, Glynn

    1996-01-01

    and van Glabeek and Goltz. A tie-up with open maps in a (pre)topos, as they appear in the work of Joyal and Moerdijk, brings to light a new model, presheaves on categories of pomsets, into which the usual category of labelled event structures embeds fully and faithfully. As an indication of its promise...

  10. Nationaal plan open science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wezenbeek, W.J.S.M.; Touwen, H.J.J.; Versteeg, A.M.C.; van Wesenbeeck, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    This National Plan Open Science sets out what the Dutch parties involved in creating this Plan are already doing and what they plan to do to grasp the opportunities and at the same time make science even more accessible to others. A major boost is required if these initiatives are to be coordinated

  11. CERN openlab Open Day

    CERN Multimedia

    Purcell, Andrew Robert

    2015-01-01

    The CERN openlab Open Day took place on 10 June, 2015. This was the first in a series of annual events at which research and industrial teams from CERN openlab can present their projects, share achievements, and collect feedback from their user communities.

  12. KAUST Open Access policy

    KAUST Repository

    Baessa, Mohamed A.

    2017-03-07

    The transition to open access (OA) is being driven by funders, libraries, researchers and publishers around the world, and is having an impact on us all. It is inevitable that different countries, organisations and disciplines are moving at different rates towards an OA model, and it is this that we will focus on in this session. Drawing on experiences from across Europe and the Middle East we will provide perspectives from both a global publisher and institutions based in the region. Taylor & Francis take a flexible, evidence-based approach to open access, providing a choice of publication routes for our authors, and a choice of agreements for our library customers. Carolyn will outline some of the open access developments, opportunities and challenges at Taylor & Francis. The library plays a critical role in facilitating open access for their researchers, from managing a repository to providing support and information on the OA publication process to their authors. Janis Tyhurst and Dr Imad Bachir will each give an overview of how this is being managed by their institution. There will be an opportunity for questions and discussion with the panel.

  13. Open Systems Interconnection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denenberg, Ray

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the need for standards allowing computer-to-computer communication and gives examples of technical issues. The seven-layer framework of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Reference Model is explained and illustrated. Sidebars feature public data networks and Recommendation X.25, OSI standards, OSI layer functions, and a glossary.…

  14. How does the use of mobile phones by 16-24 year old socially excluded women affect their capabilities?

    OpenAIRE

    Faith, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    This research looks at the impact of mobile phone use on the lives and opportunities of 16-24 year-old socially excluded women, using a novel, cross-disciplinary framework of the capability approach and affordances. \\ud \\ud Fieldwork took the form of semi-structured interviews in 2013-14 with 30 women between the ages of 16-24, and four youth workers. The instrumental affordances of mobile phones are examined to understand whether they provide a means to address issues relating to work, healt...

  15. Type specimens of Hymenoptera deposited in the Museu de Zoologia da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil (excluding Aculeata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena C. Onody

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper lists the type specimens of Hymenoptera, excluding Aculeata, deposited in the Museu de Zoologia da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil. We record all labels contents and also additional information from MZSP registers, published material, and other available sources. High resolution photographs of holotypes, lectotypes and syntypes are available through links to Specimage - the image database of The Ohio State University, where they are archived. The collection comprises a total of 332 type-specimens (32 holotypes, 266 paratypes, 12 syntypes, 20 paralectotypes and two lectotypes of eight superfamilies, 18 families, 31 subfamilies, 43 genera and 83 species.

  16. Close connections between open science and open-source software

    OpenAIRE

    YouHua Chen; XueKe Lu; YouFang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Open science is increasingly gaining attention in recent years. In this mini-review, we briefly discuss and summarize the reasons of introducing open science into academic publications for scientists. We argue that open-source software (like R and Python software) can be the universal and important platforms for doing open science because of their appealing features: open source, easy-reading document, commonly used in various scientific disciplines like statistics, chemistry and biology. At ...

  17. Openness, Open Source, and the Veil of Ignorance

    OpenAIRE

    Scotchmer, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    The open source movement evolved in the one industrial context where openness is not required by intellectual property law.1 Nevertheless, openness itself cannot be the driving force behind the open source movement. This is because openness can be achieved in many ways other than the GPL, for example, with proprietary licenses, or licenses that are even more permissive than the GPL, such as the BSD license. Early commentators explained this new development model by focussing on the m...

  18. 2 CFR 801.137 - Who in the Department of Veterans Affairs may grant an exception to allow an excluded person to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Who in the Department of Veterans Affairs may grant an exception to allow an excluded person to participate in a covered transaction? 801.137... Veterans Affairs may grant an exception to allow an excluded person to participate in a covered transaction...

  19. Opening Reproducible Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüst, Daniel; Konkol, Markus; Pebesma, Edzer; Kray, Christian; Klötgen, Stephanie; Schutzeichel, Marc; Lorenz, Jörg; Przibytzin, Holger; Kussmann, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    Open access is not only a form of publishing such that research papers become available to the large public free of charge, it also refers to a trend in science that the act of doing research becomes more open and transparent. When science transforms to open access we not only mean access to papers, research data being collected, or data being generated, but also access to the data used and the procedures carried out in the research paper. Increasingly, scientific results are generated by numerical manipulation of data that were already collected, and may involve simulation experiments that are completely carried out computationally. Reproducibility of research findings, the ability to repeat experimental procedures and confirm previously found results, is at the heart of the scientific method (Pebesma, Nüst and Bivand, 2012). As opposed to the collection of experimental data in labs or nature, computational experiments lend themselves very well for reproduction. Some of the reasons why scientists do not publish data and computational procedures that allow reproduction will be hard to change, e.g. privacy concerns in the data, fear for embarrassment or of losing a competitive advantage. Others reasons however involve technical aspects, and include the lack of standard procedures to publish such information and the lack of benefits after publishing them. We aim to resolve these two technical aspects. We propose a system that supports the evolution of scientific publications from static papers into dynamic, executable research documents. The DFG-funded experimental project Opening Reproducible Research (ORR) aims for the main aspects of open access, by improving the exchange of, by facilitating productive access to, and by simplifying reuse of research results that are published over the Internet. Central to the project is a new form for creating and providing research results, the executable research compendium (ERC), which not only enables third parties to

  20. OpenGL development cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Movania, Muhammad Mobeen

    2013-01-01

    The book is written in a Cookbook format with practical recipes aimed at helping you exploit OpenGL to its full potential.This book is targeted towards intermediate OpenGL programmers. However, those who are new to OpenGL and know an alternate API like DirectX might also find these recipes useful to create OpenGL animations.

  1. Open data and beyond : Exploring existing open data projects to prepare a successful open data strategy; Deelrapport inleiding open data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Loenen, B.

    2012-01-01

    Netwerkbedrijf Alliander was begin 2011 zich aan het oriënteren naar de mogelijkheid om haar gegevens als open data ter beschikking te stellen aan een ieder. Echter wat open data nu precies is, welke mogelijke knelpunten moeten worden opgelost om open data te implementeren, de impact die open data

  2. Routine screening for postnatal depression in a public health family service unit: a retrospective study of self-excluding women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grussu, Pietro; Quatraro, Rosa Maria

    2015-01-01

    At this time, there is limited scientific knowledge about women who exclude themselves from screening programs for postnatal depression. In this retrospective descriptive study, we have sought to investigate the socio-demographic and psycho-social factors of women who withdraw from PND screening of their own accord. Study participants were 525 women attending antenatal classes who later took part in institutional routine screening for PND at the Consultorio Familiare Service of the National Health Service, Italy. The PND screening program consisted of the completion of the postpartum depression predictors inventory-revised and psychological well-being (PWB) questionnaires within eight to nine months of pregnancy, and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, GHQ-12 and PWB within six to eight weeks after childbirth. The Responders group was made up of 346 subjects - 65.9% of the total sample - who completed the entire program of screening for PND. The Non-Responders group, on the other hand, consisted of 179 subjects - 34.1% of the total sample - who, after childbirth, withdrew from the screening program. Compared to the Responders group, the Non-Responders group showed a greater number of subjects with marital dissatisfaction, and with unemployment as a stressful event. Health professionals who detect marital dissatisfaction and/or unemployment as a stressful event in pregnant women should bear in mind that these individuals, besides being at high risk for depression after delivery, will also tend to exclude themselves from screening for PND.

  3. Open Achilles tendon lacerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, M Nader; Al Ateeq Al Dosari, Mohamed; Al Subaii, Nasser; Kawas, Alaa; Al Mas, Ali; Al Ser, Yaser; Abuodeh, Yousef; Shakil, Malik; Habash, Ali; Mukhter, Khalid

    2015-04-01

    In contrast to closed Achilles tendon ruptures, open injuries are rarely reported in the literature. This paper provides information about open Achilles tendon wounds that are eventually seen in the Middle East. The reporting unit, Hamad Medical Corporation, is one of the biggest trauma centers in the Gulf area and the major health provider in Qatar. This is a retrospective study including patients admitted and operated for open Achilles tendon injuries between January 2011 and December 2013. Two hundred and five cases of open Achilles tendon lacerations were operated in Hamad General Hospital in this period. Forty-eight cases showed partial injuries, and the remaining are complete tendons cut. In the same period, fifty-one closed ruptured Achilles tendons were operated in the same trauma unit. In the majority of cases, the open injury resulted from a slip in the floor-leveled traditional toilette seats. Local damage to the toilette seats resulted in sharp edges causing the laceration of the heel if the patient was slipping over the wet floor. This occurrence is the cause in the vast majority of the cases. Wounds were located 1-5 cm proximal to tendon insertion. Standard treatment principles were applied. This included thorough irrigation in the emergency room, intravenous antibiotics, surgical debridement and primary repair within 24 h. Patients were kept in the hospital 1-7 days for intravenous antibiotics and possible dressing changes. Postoperatively below knee slabs were applied in the majority of patients and were kept for about 4 weeks followed by gradual weight bearing and range of motion exercises. Outpatients follow up in 1-2 weeks. Further follow-up visits at around 2-, 4-, 8- and 12-week intervals until complete wound healing and satisfactory rehabilitation outcome. Sixteen cases needed a second procedure. A high incidence of Achilles tendon open injuries is reported. This seems to be related to partially damaged floor-level toilettes in the

  4. Endovascular repair of bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms using GORE Excluder iliac branch endoprosthesis without aortobi-iliac stent graft conjunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardita, Vincenzo; Giaquinta, Alessia; Veroux, Massimiliano; Sanfiorenzo, Angelo; Virgilio, Carla; D’Arrigo, Giuseppe; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Bilateral common iliac artery (CIA) aneurysm (CIAA) is a rare entity. In the past decade, different endovascular approaches have been adopted for patients with several comorbidities or unfit for open repair (OR). Recently, the use of iliac branch stent graft has been proposed, resulting in satisfactory patency rates and decrease in morbidity. Currently, according to instruction for use, the iliac branch stent graft is to be used with aortobi-iliac stent graft conjunction. We describe a case of a successful endovascular repair of bilateral CIAAs using the GORE Excluder iliac branch endoprosthesis (IBEs) without aortobi-iliac stent graft conjunction. Case presentation: An 83-year-old man was admitted with abdominal pain and presence of pulsatile mass in the right and left iliac fossa. Computed tomographic (CT) angiography showed the presence of large bilateral CIAAs (right CIA = 66 mm; left CIA = 38 mm), without concomitant thoracic or abdominal aorta aneurysm. Moreover, CT scan demonstrated the presence of bilateral lower accessory renal artery close to the aortic bifurcation. Due to the high operative risk, the patient was scheduled for endovascular repair with bilateral IBEs, without the aortobi-iliac stent graft conjunction to avoid the renal ischemia as a consequence of renal arteries covering. The procedure was completed without complications and duplex ultrasound demonstrated the complete exclusion of both aneurysms without any type of endoleaks at 1 month of follow-up. Conclusions: GORE IBEs without aortobi-iliac stent graft conjunction seem to be a feasible and effective procedure for the treatment of isolated CIAAs in patients with highly selected anatomical conditions. PMID:28207510

  5. Endovascular repair of bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms using GORE Excluder iliac branch endoprosthesis without aortobi-iliac stent graft conjunction: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardita, Vincenzo; Giaquinta, Alessia; Veroux, Massimiliano; Sanfiorenzo, Angelo; Virgilio, Carla; D'Arrigo, Giuseppe; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2017-02-01

    Bilateral common iliac artery (CIA) aneurysm (CIAA) is a rare entity. In the past decade, different endovascular approaches have been adopted for patients with several comorbidities or unfit for open repair (OR). Recently, the use of iliac branch stent graft has been proposed, resulting in satisfactory patency rates and decrease in morbidity. Currently, according to instruction for use, the iliac branch stent graft is to be used with aortobi-iliac stent graft conjunction. We describe a case of a successful endovascular repair of bilateral CIAAs using the GORE Excluder iliac branch endoprosthesis (IBEs) without aortobi-iliac stent graft conjunction. An 83-year-old man was admitted with abdominal pain and presence of pulsatile mass in the right and left iliac fossa. Computed tomographic (CT) angiography showed the presence of large bilateral CIAAs (right CIA = 66 mm; left CIA = 38 mm), without concomitant thoracic or abdominal aorta aneurysm. Moreover, CT scan demonstrated the presence of bilateral lower accessory renal artery close to the aortic bifurcation. Due to the high operative risk, the patient was scheduled for endovascular repair with bilateral IBEs, without the aortobi-iliac stent graft conjunction to avoid the renal ischemia as a consequence of renal arteries covering. The procedure was completed without complications and duplex ultrasound demonstrated the complete exclusion of both aneurysms without any type of endoleaks at 1 month of follow-up. GORE IBEs without aortobi-iliac stent graft conjunction seem to be a feasible and effective procedure for the treatment of isolated CIAAs in patients with highly selected anatomical conditions.

  6. Excluding the typical patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odlaug, Brian Lawrence; Weinhandl, Eric; Mancebo, Maria C

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, clinical trials have resulted in several successful pharmacotherapies for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), yet patients in clinical settings often report inadequate response. This study compares clinical characteristics of treatment-seeking OCD patients to the inclusion...

  7. Occupants' window opening behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabi, Valentina; Andersen, Rune Korsholm; Corgnati, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    and office buildings. The analysis of the literature highlights how a shared approach on identifying the driving forces for occupants' window opening and closing behaviour has not yet been reached. However, the reporting of variables found not to be drivers may reveal contradictions in the obtained results......Energy consumption in buildings is influenced by several factors related to the building properties and the building controls, some of them highly connected to the behaviour of their occupants.In this paper, a definition of items referring to occupant behaviour related to the building control...... systems is proposed, based on studies presented in literature and a general process leading to the effects on energy consumptions is identified.Existing studies on the topic of window opening behaviour are highlighted and a theoretical framework to deal with occupants' interactions with building controls...

  8. Open Source Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wee, Loo Kang

    2013-01-01

    Open Source Physics (Brown, 2012; Christian, 2010; Esquembre, 2012; Hwang, 2010) empowers teachers and students to create and use these free tools with the associated intellectual property rights given to customise (Wee & Mak, 2009) the computer models/tools to suit their teaching and learning needs. Open Source Physics (OSP) focuses on design of computer models, such as Easy Java Simulations (EJS) and the use of video modeling and analysis (Tracker). They allow students to investigate, explore and analyse data which is either real or simulated. The OSP approach helps users overcome barriers in creating, using and scaling up meaningful ICT use in education. In Singapore, teachers and students have created or customised existing computer models to design and re-purpose EJS models to suit their context and learning needs. Tracker tools allow students to analyse different aspects of a physics phenomena to deepen their understanding of abstract physics concepts. Using Tracker, students record the motion of ob...

  9. Opening up codings?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensig, Jakob; Heinemann, Trine

    2015-01-01

    doing formal coding and when doing more “traditional” conversation analysis research based on collections. We are more wary, however, of the implication that coding-based research is the end result of a process that starts with qualitative investigations and ends with categories that can be coded......We welcome Tanya Stivers’s discussion (Stivers, 2015/this issue) of coding social interaction and find that her descriptions of the processes of coding open up important avenues for discussion, among other things of the precise ad hoc considerations that researchers need to bear in mind, both when....... Instead we propose that the promise of coding-based research lies in its ability to open up new qualitative questions....

  10. Open problems in mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Nash, Jr, John Forbes

    2016-01-01

    The goal in putting together this unique compilation was to present the current status of the solutions to some of the most essential open problems in pure and applied mathematics. Emphasis is also given to problems in interdisciplinary research for which mathematics plays a key role. This volume comprises highly selected contributions by some of the most eminent mathematicians in the international mathematical community on longstanding problems in very active domains of mathematical research. A joint preface by the two volume editors is followed by a personal farewell to John F. Nash, Jr. written by Michael Th. Rassias. An introduction by Mikhail Gromov highlights some of Nash’s legendary mathematical achievements. The treatment in this book includes open problems in the following fields: algebraic geometry, number theory, analysis, discrete mathematics, PDEs, differential geometry, topology, K-theory, game theory, fluid mechanics, dynamical systems and ergodic theory, cryptography, theoretical computer sc...

  11. The Paradox of Openness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Keld; Salter, Ammon

    2014-01-01

    often requires openness, but the commercialization of innovations requires protection. Based on econometric analysis of data from a UK innovation survey, we find a concave relationship between firms’ breadth of external search and formal collaboration for innovation, and the strength of the firms......To innovate, firms often need to draw from, and collaborate with, a large number of actors from outside their organization. At the same time, firms need also to be focused on capturing the returns from their innovative ideas. This gives rise to a paradox of openness—the creation of innovations...... or collaborate with competitors. We explore the implications of these findings for the literature on open innovation and innovation strategy....

  12. Open architecture CNC system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tal, J. [Galil Motion Control Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States); Lopez, A.; Edwards, J.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-04-01

    In this paper, an alternative solution to the traditional CNC machine tool controller has been introduced. Software and hardware modules have been described and their incorporation in a CNC control system has been outlined. This type of CNC machine tool controller demonstrates that technology is accessible and can be readily implemented into an open architecture machine tool controller. Benefit to the user is greater controller flexibility, while being economically achievable. PC based, motion as well as non-motion features will provide flexibility through a Windows environment. Up-grading this type of controller system through software revisions will keep the machine tool in a competitive state with minimal effort. Software and hardware modules are mass produced permitting competitive procurement and incorporation. Open architecture CNC systems provide diagnostics thus enhancing maintainability, and machine tool up-time. A major concern of traditional CNC systems has been operator training time. Training time can be greatly minimized by making use of Windows environment features.

  13. Monographs and Open Access

    OpenAIRE

    Geoffrey Crossick

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the project that I led for HEFCE on the implications of OA (open access) for monographs and other long-form research publications. The likely requirement that books should be OA if submitted to the REF (Research Excellence Framework) after next means that OA development must be based on an understanding of the importance of the monograph in the AHSS (arts, humanities and social sciences) as well as the challenges involved in making the transition to online OA. The projec...

  14. Open Campus: Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    R&D) partnerships between ARL, academia, industry, other government agencies, and entrepreneurs . COLLABORATIVE S&T ECOSYSTEM AND ENTREPRENEURIAL...expand ARL’s S&T ecosystem by bringing together government laboratories, academic institutions, and the private sector to form a global...collaborative network. Open Campus focuses on three major initiatives to create the S&T ecosystem necessary to meet future national security challenges: 1

  15. COMPUTING HELPDESK OPENING HOURS

    CERN Multimedia

    Nicole Cremel, Miguel Marquina,; User Support Group

    1999-01-01

    In the past months the helpdesk staff have been reduced to one person in Building513 on Monday, Wednesday and Friday in order to staff the new helpdesk in Building 40. We have the pleasure to announce that as of this week both desks will be open simultaneously and there will be two persons in 513 so we will again be able to deal with personal visits during that time.Nicole Cremel, Miguel Marquina, Roger WoolnoughUser Support Group

  16. OMG: Open Molecule Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peironcely Julio E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG, which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  17. Open-Access Publishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedjeljko Frančula

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nature, one of the most prominent scientific journals dedicated one of its issues to recent changes in scientific publishing (Vol. 495, Issue 7442, 27 March 2013. Its editors stressed that words technology and revolution are closely related when it comes to scientific publishing. In addition, the transformation of research publishing is not as much a revolution than an attrition war in which all sides are buried. The most important change they refer to is the open-access model in which an author or an institution pays in advance for publishing a paper in a journal, and the paper is then available to users on the Internet free of charge.According to preliminary results of a survey conducted among 23 000 scientists by the publisher of Nature, 45% of them believes all papers should be published in open access, but at the same time 22% of them would not allow the use of papers for commercial purposes. Attitudes toward open access vary according to scientific disciplines, leading the editors to conclude the revolution still does not suit everyone.

  18. ADOPT Open Access

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Are you writing a theoretical paper? An experimental one? Or one about instrumentation? You can publish it in Open Access. Now. Read how... You might have heard about Open Access, the next big thing in scientific publishing. The idea is to make the results of your (publicly funded) research free to read for everyone out there ... not only those lucky ones who work in places where libraries can afford to purchase the expensive subscriptions to scientific journals. CERN, DESY and other particle physics institutes have accepted an offer by one of the leading journals in High Energy Physics, JHEP: our libraries will pay a special subscription fee, and, in exchange, all articles with at least one author from our institutes will be published in Open Access. Anyone, anywhere and anytime will be able to read them, without any financial barrier! If you are writing an instrumentation paper, you can submit it to JINST and benefit from the same offer. This is a major step forward in the planned conversion of existi...

  19. Open source posturography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Martinez, Jorge; Pérez-Fernández, Nicolás

    2016-12-01

    The proposed validation goal of 0.9 in intra-class correlation coefficient was reached with the results of this study. With the obtained results we consider that the developed software (RombergLab) is a validated balance assessment software. The reliability of this software is dependent of the used force platform technical specifications. Develop and validate a posturography software and share its source code in open source terms. Prospective non-randomized validation study: 20 consecutive adults underwent two balance assessment tests, six condition posturography was performed using a clinical approved software and force platform and the same conditions were measured using the new developed open source software using a low cost force platform. Intra-class correlation index of the sway area obtained from the center of pressure variations in both devices for the six conditions was the main variable used for validation. Excellent concordance between RombergLab and clinical approved force platform was obtained (intra-class correlation coefficient =0.94). A Bland and Altman graphic concordance plot was also obtained. The source code used to develop RombergLab was published in open source terms.

  20. Open3DALIGN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosco, Paolo; Balle, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    MOL is installed on the system while Open3DALIGN is being operated interactively, the setup of alignments can be followed in real time on PyMOL's viewport. A typical workflow could be the following: 1.A dataset is imported as SDF file 2.Optionally, for each compound of the dataset a quenched molecular dynamics...... atom types are automatically assigned to all compounds of the dataset with the help of SDF2XYZ2SDF, another tool of ours based on OpenBabel. Alignments are computed in an atom-based fashion (by means of a novel algorithm inspired to the LAMDA algorithm by Richmond and co-workers), in a pharmacophore......-based fashion using Pharao as the alignment engine, or finally in a mixed mode consisting in the combination of the latter two methods. High computational performance is attained splitting the computational tasks over several threads, according to the number of CPUs available in the host running Open3DALIGN...

  1. Bispectrum from open inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Kazuyuki; Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2013-11-01

    We calculate the bispectrum of primordial curvature perturbations, ζ, generated during ``open inflation.'' Inflation occurs inside a bubble nucleated via quantum tunneling from the background false vacuum state. Our universe lives inside the bubble, which can be described as a Friedmann-Lemaȋtre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) universe with negative spatial curvature, undergoing slow-roll inflation. We pay special attention to the issue of an initial state for quantum fluctuations. A ``vacuum state'' defined by a positive-frequency mode in de Sitter space charted by open coordinates is different from the Euclidean vacuum (which is equivalent to the so-called ``Bunch-Davies vacuum'' defined by a positive-frequency mode in de Sitter space charted by flat coordinates). Quantum tunneling (bubble nucleation) then modifies the initial state away from the original Euclidean vacuum. While most of the previous study on modifications of the initial quantum state introduces, by hand, an initial time at which the quantum state is modified as well as the form of the modification, an effective initial time naturally emerges and the form is fixed by quantum tunneling in open inflation models. Therefore, open inflation enables a self-consistent computation of the effect of a modified initial state on the bispectrum. We find a term which goes as langleζk1ζk2ζk3ranglepropto1/k12k34 in the so-called squeezed configurations, k3 << k1 ≈ k2, in agreement with the previous study on modifications of the initial state. The bispectrum in the exact folded limit, e.g., k1 = k2+k3, is also enhanced and remains finite. However, these terms are exponentially suppressed when the wavelength of ζ is smaller than the curvature radius of the universe. The leading-order bispectrum is equal to the usual one from single-field slow-roll inflation; the terms specific for open inflation arise only in the sub-leading order when the wavelength of ζ is smaller than the curvature radius.

  2. Oral health of children from rural excluded villages (Trancas and Calchaqui valleys. Tucumán, Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, A M; Molina, N; Totongi, M; Bordoni, N; Fernandez, C

    1999-01-01

    The general hypothesis of the study was to evaluate strategically important rural areas to confirm their characteristics of "excluded population" and identify the priorities to allocate human and financial resources of the international co-operation project. The aim of this study was to establish the degree of development of villages in the Trancas and Calchaqui valleys, and the oral health of children living in areas involved in an integral study on excluded villages in the northwest of Argentina. These villages are considered a priority in the UNIR Project; they are thus strategically important as a link with countries of the MERCOSUR. Data on living conditions were obtained through direct inquiries (Project UNIR, W. K. Kellogg Foundation/University of Tucumán) and from data supplied by the Ministry of Economy, by the Ministry of Culture and Education and by the SIEMPRO project of the Secretariat of Social Development of the Ministry of Health. The Human Development Index (HDI) was calculated as World Bank criteria (1995), The studies on dental conditions were carried out in all the children between 12 and 14 years old, that is a total of 58 in the Trancas Valley and 212 in the Calchaqui Valley. (1) The HDI was 0.731 for the province, 0.56 for the Trancas Valley and 0.51 for Calchaqui valley. (2) The results are above the values for the country in the first case, and below the average country values for the valleys. (3) The percentage of BNN families reached 92%. The results for oral health show: (4) the DMFT were 6.34 +/- 0.07 in the Trancas Valley and 7.47 +/- 0.276 in the Calchaquí valley. (5) Carious teeth (CT) were the most important component of this index. (6) The absence of a specific and preventive assistance. (a) Children between 12 and 14 living in the Valleys of Trancas and Calchaqui (Tucumán, Argentina) are affected by severe levels of caries, with values above the national and province means. (b) The human development index is below that of the

  3. A New Way of Measuring Openness: The Open Governance Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Laffan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Open source software is now "business as usual" in the mobile industry. While much attention is given to the importance of open source licenses, we argue in this article that the governance model can be as necessary to a project’s success and that projects vary widely in the governance models – whether open or closed – that they employ. Open source governance models describe the control points that are used to influence open source projects with regard to access to the source code, how the source code is developed, how derivatives are created, and the community structure of the project. Governance determines who has control over the project beyond what is deemed legally necessary via the open source licenses for that project. The purpose of our research is to define and measure the governance of open source projects, in other words, the extent to which decision-making in an open source project is "open" or "closed". We analyzed eight open source projects using 13 specific governance criteria across four areas of governance: access, development, derivatives and community. Our findings suggest that the most open platforms will be most successful in the long term, however we acknowledge exceptions to this rule. We also identify best practices that are common across these open source projects with regard to source code access, development of source code, management of derivatives, and community structure. These best practices increase the likelihood of developer use of and involvement in open source projects.

  4. Race, treatment preferences, and hospice enrollment. Eligibility criteria may exclude patients with the greatest needs for care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Jessica; O'Dwyer, Peter; Lu, Hien L.; Henderson, Hope; Asch, David A.; Casarett, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The requirement that patients give up curative treatment makes hospice enrollment unappealing for some patients, and may particularly limit use among African American patients. Objectives To determine whether African-American patients with cancer are more likely than white patients are to have preferences for cancer treatment that exclude them from hospice, and whether they are less likely to want specific hospice services. Methods 283 patients receiving treatment for cancer at six oncology clinics within the University of Pennsylvania Cancer Network completed conjoint interviews measuring their perceived need for five hospice services and their preferences for continuing cancer treatment. Patients were followed for six months or until death. Results African American patients had stronger preferences for continuing their cancer treatments on a 7-point scale even after adjusting for age, sex, finances, education, ECOG performance status, quality of life, and physical and psychological symptom burden (adjusted means 4.75 vs. 3.96; β coefficient 0.82; 95% confidence interval 0.22-1.41; p=0.007). African-American patients also had greater perceived needs for hospice services after adjusting for these characteristics (adjusted means 2.31 vs. 1.83) (β coefficient 0.51; 95% confidence interval 0.11-0.92; p=0.01). However, this effect disappeared after adjusting for household finances. Conclusions Hospice eligibility criteria may exclude African-American patients disproportionately despite greater perceived needs for hospice services in this population. The mechanisms driving this health disparity likely include both cultural differences and economic characteristics, and consideration should be given to redesigning hospice eligibility criteria. PMID:19107761

  5. Race, treatment preferences, and hospice enrollment: eligibility criteria may exclude patients with the greatest needs for care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Jessica; O'Dwyer, Peter; Lu, Hien L; Henderson, Hope R; Henderson, Hope; Asch, David A; Casarett, David J

    2009-02-01

    The requirement that patients give up curative treatment makes hospice enrollment unappealing for some patients and may particularly limit use among African-American patients. The current study was conducted to determine whether African-American patients with cancer are more likely than white patients to have preferences for cancer treatment that exclude them from hospice and whether they are less likely to want specific hospice services. Two hundred eighty-three patients who were receiving treatment for cancer at 6 oncology clinics within the University of Pennsylvania Cancer Network completed conjoint interviews measuring their perceived need for 5 hospice services and their preferences for continuing cancer treatment. Patients were followed for 6 months or until death. African-American patients had stronger preferences for continuing their cancer treatments on a 7-point scale even after adjusting for age, sex, finances, education, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, quality of life, and physical and psychologic symptom burden (adjusted mean score, 4.75 vs 3.96; beta coefficient, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.22-1.41 [P = .007]). African-American patients also had greater perceived needs for hospice services after adjusting for these characteristics (adjusted mean score, 2.31 vs 1.83; beta coefficient, 0.51; 95% confidence interval, 0.11-0.92 [P = .01]). However, this effect disappeared after adjusting for household finances. Hospice eligibility criteria may exclude African-American patients disproportionately despite greater perceived needs for hospice services in this population. The mechanisms driving this health disparity likely include both cultural differences and economic characteristics, and consideration should be given to redesigning hospice eligibility criteria. (c) 2008 American Cancer Society.

  6. The accuracy of transcranial Doppler in excluding intracranial hypertension following acute brain injury: a multicenter prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasulo, Frank A; Bertuetti, Rita; Robba, Chiara; Lusenti, Francesco; Cantoni, Alfredo; Bernini, Marta; Girardini, Alan; Calza, Stefano; Piva, Simone; Fagoni, Nazzareno; Latronico, Nicola

    2017-02-27

    Untimely diagnosis of intracranial hypertension may lead to delays in therapy and worsening of outcome. Transcranial Doppler (TCD) detects variations in cerebral blood flow velocity which may correlate with intracranial pressure (ICP). We investigated if intracranial hypertension can be accurately excluded through use of TCD. This was a multicenter prospective pilot study in patients with acute brain injury requiring invasive ICP (ICPi) monitoring. ICP estimated with TCD (ICPtcd) was compared with ICPi in three separate time frames: immediately before ICPi placement, immediately after ICPi placement, and 3 hours following ICPi positioning. Sensitivity and specificity, and concordance correlation coefficient between ICPi and ICPtcd were calculated. Receiver operating curve (ROC) and the area under the curve (AUC) analyses were estimated after measurement averaging over time. A total of 38 patients were enrolled, and of these 12 (31.6%) had at least one episode of intracranial hypertension. One hundred fourteen paired measurements of ICPi and ICPtcd were gathered for analysis. With dichotomized ICPi (≤20 mmHg vs >20 mmHg), the sensitivity of ICPtcd was 100%; all measurements with high ICPi (>20 mmHg) also had a high ICPtcd values. Bland-Altman plot showed an overestimation of 6.2 mmHg (95% CI 5.08-7.30 mmHg) for ICPtcd compared to ICPi. AUC was 96.0% (95% CI 89.8-100%) and the estimated best threshold was at ICPi of 24.8 mmHg corresponding to a sensitivity 100% and a specificity of 91.2%. This study provides preliminary evidence that ICPtcd may accurately exclude intracranial hypertension in patients with acute brain injury. Future studies with adequate power are needed to confirm this result.

  7. Infection with Strains of Citrus Tristeza Virus Does Not Exclude Superinfection by Other Strains of the Virus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folimonova, Svetlana Y.; Robertson, Cecile J.; Shilts, Turksen; Folimonov, Alexey S.; Hilf, Mark E.; Garnsey, Stephen M.; Dawson, William O.

    2010-01-01

    Superinfection exclusion or homologous interference, a phenomenon in which a primary viral infection prevents a secondary infection with the same or closely related virus, has been observed commonly for viruses in various systems, including viruses of bacteria, plants, and animals. With plant viruses, homologous interference initially was used as a test of virus relatedness to define whether two virus isolates were “strains” of the same virus or represented different viruses, and subsequently purposeful infection with a mild isolate was implemented as a protective measure against isolates of the virus causing severe disease. In this study we examined superinfection exclusion of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a positive-sense RNA closterovirus. Thirteen naturally occurring isolates of CTV representing five different virus strains and a set of isolates originated from virus constructs engineered based on an infectious cDNA clone of T36 isolate of CTV, including hybrids containing sequences from different isolates, were examined for their ability to prevent superinfection by another isolate of the virus. We show that superinfection exclusion occurred only between isolates of the same strain and not between isolates of different strains. When isolates of the same strain were used for sequential plant inoculation, the primary infection provided complete exclusion of the challenge isolate, whereas isolates from heterologous strains appeared to have no effect on replication, movement or systemic infection by the challenge virus. Surprisingly, substitution of extended cognate sequences from isolates of the T68 or T30 strains into T36 did not confer the ability of resulting hybrid viruses to exclude superinfection by those donor strains. Overall, these results do not appear to be explained by mechanisms proposed previously for other viruses. Moreover, these observations bring an understanding of some previously unexplained fundamental features of CTV biology and, most

  8. Infection with strains of Citrus tristeza virus does not exclude superinfection by other strains of the virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Robertson, Cecile J; Shilts, Turksen; Folimonov, Alexey S; Hilf, Mark E; Garnsey, Stephen M; Dawson, William O

    2010-02-01

    Superinfection exclusion or homologous interference, a phenomenon in which a primary viral infection prevents a secondary infection with the same or closely related virus, has been observed commonly for viruses in various systems, including viruses of bacteria, plants, and animals. With plant viruses, homologous interference initially was used as a test of virus relatedness to define whether two virus isolates were "strains" of the same virus or represented different viruses, and subsequently purposeful infection with a mild isolate was implemented as a protective measure against isolates of the virus causing severe disease. In this study we examined superinfection exclusion of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a positive-sense RNA closterovirus. Thirteen naturally occurring isolates of CTV representing five different virus strains and a set of isolates originated from virus constructs engineered based on an infectious cDNA clone of T36 isolate of CTV, including hybrids containing sequences from different isolates, were examined for their ability to prevent superinfection by another isolate of the virus. We show that superinfection exclusion occurred only between isolates of the same strain and not between isolates of different strains. When isolates of the same strain were used for sequential plant inoculation, the primary infection provided complete exclusion of the challenge isolate, whereas isolates from heterologous strains appeared to have no effect on replication, movement or systemic infection by the challenge virus. Surprisingly, substitution of extended cognate sequences from isolates of the T68 or T30 strains into T36 did not confer the ability of resulting hybrid viruses to exclude superinfection by those donor strains. Overall, these results do not appear to be explained by mechanisms proposed previously for other viruses. Moreover, these observations bring an understanding of some previously unexplained fundamental features of CTV biology and, most

  9. The Leishmania donovani lipophosphoglycan excludes the vesicular proton-ATPase from phagosomes by impairing the recruitment of synaptotagmin V.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien F Vinet

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We recently showed that the exocytosis regulator Synaptotagmin (Syt V is recruited to the nascent phagosome and remains associated throughout the maturation process. In this study, we investigated the possibility that Syt V plays a role in regulating interactions between the phagosome and the endocytic organelles. Silencing of Syt V by RNA interference revealed that Syt V contributes to phagolysosome biogenesis by regulating the acquisition of cathepsin D and the vesicular proton-ATPase. In contrast, recruitment of cathepsin B, the early endosomal marker EEA1 and the lysosomal marker LAMP1 to phagosomes was normal in the absence of Syt V. As Leishmania donovani promastigotes inhibit phagosome maturation, we investigated their potential impact on the phagosomal association of Syt V. This inhibition of phagolysosome biogenesis is mediated by the virulence glycolipid lipophosphoglycan, a polymer of the repeating Galbeta1,4Manalpha1-PO(4 units attached to the promastigote surface via an unusual glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. Our results showed that insertion of lipophosphoglycan into ganglioside GM1-containing microdomains excluded or caused dissociation of Syt V from phagosome membranes. As a consequence, L. donovani promatigotes established infection in a phagosome from which the vesicular proton-ATPase was excluded and which failed to acidify. Collectively, these results reveal a novel function for Syt V in phagolysosome biogenesis and provide novel insight into the mechanism of vesicular proton-ATPase recruitment to maturing phagosomes. We also provide novel findings into the mechanism of Leishmania pathogenesis, whereby targeting of Syt V is part of the strategy used by L. donovani promastigotes to prevent phagosome acidification.

  10. Negative D-dimer testing excludes pulmonary embolism in non-high risk patients in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harringa, John B; Bracken, Rebecca L; Nagle, Scott K; Schiebler, Mark L; Pulia, Michael S; Svenson, James E; Repplinger, Michael D

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of d-dimer testing to obviate the need for cross-sectional imaging for patients at "non-high risk" for pulmonary embolism (PE). This is a retrospective study of emergency department patients at an academic medical center who underwent cross-sectional imaging (MRA or CTA) to evaluate for PE from 2008 to 2013. The primary outcome was the NPV of d-dimer testing when used in conjunction with clinical decision instruments (CDIs = Wells', Revised Geneva, and Simplified Revised Geneva Scores). The reference standard for PE status included image test results and a 6-month chart review follow-up for venous thromboembolism as a proxy for false negative imaging. Secondary analyses included ROC curves for each CDI and calculation of PE prevalence in each risk stratum. Of 459 patients, 41 (8.9%) had PE. None of the 76 patients (16.6%) with negative d-dimer results had PE. Thus, d-dimer testing had 100% sensitivity and NPV, and there were no differences in CDI performance. Similarly, when evaluated independently of d-dimer results, no CDI outperformed the others (areas under the ROC curves ranged 0.53-0.55). There was a significantly higher PE prevalence in the high versus "non-high risk" groups when stratified by the Wells' Score (p = 0.03). Negative d-dimer testing excluded PE in our retrospective cohort. Each CDI had similar NPVs, whether analyzed in conjunction with or independently of d-dimer results. Our results confirm that PE can be safely excluded in patients with "non-high risk" CDI scores and a negative d-dimer.

  11. HIV-1 Recruits UPF1 but Excludes UPF2 to Promote Nucleocytoplasmic Export of the Genomic RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajamian, Lara; Abel, Karen; Rao, Shringar; Vyboh, Kishanda; García-de-Gracia, Francisco; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Kulozik, Andreas E.; Gehring, Niels H.; Mouland, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Unspliced, genomic HIV-1 RNA (vRNA) is a component of several ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNP) during the viral replication cycle. In earlier work, we demonstrated that the host upframeshift protein 1 (UPF1), a key factor in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), colocalized and associated to the viral structural protein Gag during viral egress. In this work, we demonstrate a new function for UPF1 in the regulation of vRNA nuclear export. We establish that the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of UPF1 is required for this function and demonstrate that UPF1 exists in two essential viral RNPs during the late phase of HIV-1 replication: the first, in a nuclear export RNP that contains Rev, CRM1, DDX3 and the nucleoporin p62, and the second, which excludes these nuclear export markers but contains Gag in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, we observed that both UPF2 and the long isoform of UPF3a, UPF3aL, but not the shorter isoforms UPF3aS and UPF3b, are excluded from the UPF1-Rev-CRM1-DDX3 complex as they are negative regulators of vRNA nuclear export. In silico protein-protein docking analyses suggest that Rev binds UPF1 in a region that overlaps the UPF2 binding site, thus explaining the exclusion of this negative regulatory factor by HIV-1 that is necessary for vRNA trafficking. This work uncovers a novel and unique regulatory circuit involving several UPF proteins that ultimately regulate vRNA nuclear export and trafficking. PMID:26492277

  12. Ion-ion correlation, solvent excluded volume and pH effects on physicochemical properties of spherical oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovanesyan, Zaven; Aljzmi, Amal; Almusaynid, Manal; Khan, Asrar; Valderrama, Esteban; Nash, Kelly L; Marucho, Marcelo

    2016-01-15

    One major source of complexity in the implementation of nanoparticles in aqueous electrolytes arises from the strong influence that biological environments has on their physicochemical properties. A key parameter for understanding the molecular mechanisms governing the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles is the formation of the surface charge density. In this article, we present an efficient and accurate approach that combines a recently introduced classical solvation density functional theory for spherical electrical double layers with a surface complexation model to account for ion-ion correlation and excluded volume effects on the surface titration of spherical nanoparticles. We apply the proposed computational approach to account for the charge-regulated mechanisms on the surface chemistry of spherical silica (SiO2) nanoparticles. We analyze the effects of the nanoparticle size, as well as pH level and electrolyte concentration of the aqueous solution on the nanoparticle's surface charge density and Zeta potential. We validate our predictions for 580Å and 200Å nanoparticles immersed in acid, neutral and alkaline mono-valent aqueous electrolyte solutions against experimental data. Our results on mono-valent electrolyte show that the excluded volume and ion-ion correlations contribute significantly to the surface charge density and Zeta potential of the nanoparticle at high electrolyte concentration and pH levels, where the solvent crowding effects and electrostatic screening have shown a profound influence on the protonation/deprotonation reactions at the liquid/solute interface. The success of this approach in describing physicochemical properties of silica nanoparticles supports its broader application to study other spherical metal oxide nanoparticles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Open Source Opens Opportunities for Army's Simulation System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parsons, Douglas J; Wittman, Jr, Robert L

    2005-01-01

    .... Postured as an open-architecture, open-source application, the OneSAF program will put this software into the hands of a vast number of developers throughout the Department of Defense with the intent...

  14. Open Source Seismic Hazard Analysis Software Framework (OpenSHA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — OpenSHA is an effort to develop object-oriented, web- & GUI-enabled, open-source, and freely available code for conducting Seismic Hazard Analyses (SHA). Our...

  15. Starchive: The Open Access, Open Source Stellar Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, A. M.; Muna, D.; Addison, B.; Zohrabi, F.; Geneser, C.; Niffenegger, R.

    2017-11-01

    It has become clear that we must understand the host stars as well as their exoplanets. The Starchive is an open source, open access stellar database and intuitive front-end to help astronomers find planets and determine habitability.

  16. OpenGrey = nová OpenSIGLE

    OpenAIRE

    Pejšová, Petra

    2012-01-01

    OpenGrey is based on the OpenSIGLE/SIGLE database which contains almost 700 thousand records of grey literature. OpenGrey is a unique repository providing open access to European grey literature references, the result of 25 years of cooperation. As a multidisciplinary database it covers Science, Technology, Biomedical Science, Economics, Social Science and Humanities. This paper presents new search functionality, design and vision. The cooperation with GreyNet on GL conference preprints will ...

  17. Playfulness and Openness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchetti, Emanuela; Petersson, Eva

    2011-01-01

    What does it mean to design a playful learning tool? What is needed for a learning tool to be perceived by potential users as playful? These questions emerged reflecting on a Participatory Design process aimed at enhancing museum-learning practice from the perspective of primary school children....... Different forms of emergent interactions were evident, both during museum visits and while testing a low-fidelity prototype. Deeper reflections on the meaning of enhancing learning through play from a user’s individual perspective was assessed. In this respect, openness and multimodality were evaluated...

  18. ICALEPS 2005 : opening session

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    ICALEPCS 2005, the tenth International Conference on Accelerator and Large Experimental Physics Control Systems, will be held in Geneva, Switzerland, 10-14 Oct. 2005 at the International Conference Center Geneva (CICG). ICALEPCS 2005 thus falls in the year that UNESCO has declared the "World Year of Physics". ICALEPCS covers all aspects of control and operation of Experimental Physics facilities such as particle accelerators, particle detectors, optical telescopes, radio telescopes, nuclear fusion facilities like Tokamaks, nuclear reactors, lasers, etc .... Opening session by . A. Daneels (CERN): Introducting ICALEPCS 2005 . C.Lamprecht (Republic & State of Geneva): Welcome speech . J. Lister (EPFL): Welcome speech . J. Engelen (CERN): The machine and experiment challenges of LHC

  19. The VLT Opening Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, J.

    1999-06-01

    The beginning of the VLT era was marked by two major events: the VLT Official Inauguration Ceremony at Paranal on 5 March 1999, preceded by the VLT Opening Symposium on 1-4 March. ESO is indebted to Professor J.A. Music Tomicic, Rector of the Universidad Católica del Norte, for hosting this symposium. Another major event occurred on the night of 4 March: First light was achieved ahead of schedule at Kueyen, the second 8.2-m VLT unit telescope.

  20. Open Extension Topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Вячеслав Бабич

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains the results which describe the properties of such general topological construction as open extension topology. In particular, we prove that this topology is not transitive. We find the base of the least cardinality for the topology and local one for the neighborhood system of every point. We calculate the interior, the closure, and the sets of isolated and limit points of any set. Also we prove that this space is path connected and is not metrizable, and investigate its cardinal invariants and separation axioms.

  1. OpenLabNotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Markus; Franz, Michael; Tan, Qihua

    2015-01-01

    the longevity of the providers. Turning towards free alternatives, however, raises questions about data protection, which are not sufficiently addressed by available solutions. To serve as legal documents, ELNs must prevent scientific fraud through technical means such as digital signatures. It would also......LabFramework, a powerful and flexible laboratory information management system. In contrast to comparable solutions, it allows to protect the intellectual property of its users by offering data protection with digital signatures. OpenLabNotes effectively Closes the gap between research documentation and sample management...

  2. Open innovation in networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yimei

    Open innovation in networks has been a popular topic for long, this paper rethinks the concepts of innovation network and network organization, and clarifies the differences between them based on the network perspective. Network perspective means that: network is the context of firms; market...... and hierarchy can be analyzed from a network approach. Within a network perspective, there are different levels of network, and a firm may not always has the power to “manage” innovation networks due to different levels of power. Based on the strength of a firm’s power, its role may varies from manager...

  3. Innovation with open data : Essential elements of open data ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuiderwijk, A.M.G.; Janssen, M.F.W.H.A.; Davis, C.B.

    2014-01-01

    Open data ecosystems are expected to bring many advantages, such as stimulating citizen participation and innovation. However, scant attention has been given to what constitutes an open data ecosystem. The objective of this paper is to provide an overview of essential elements of open data

  4. Printshop open days

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2013-01-01

    With new machines, new services and new opening hours, the CERN Printshop has turned over many new leaves at the start of 2013. Come and find out more from 25 to 27 March at the Printshop open days!   The CERN Printshop’s new 8-metre long black and white printer. The CERN Printshop’s new 8-metre long black-and-white printer is a technical marvel. It can produce 160 pages per minute (it prints on both sides in one pass) and can also staple, punch holes, do thermal binding and make A4 or A5 brochures. The new colour printer is more discreet but no less efficient: it churns out 70 A4 or A3 pages per minute. Once they are printed, colour documents can be inserted into the black and white machine to be hole-punched, made into brochures or bound. They can even be mixed in with black-and-white pages and, as if by magic, come out in the right order! Having recently acquired a state-of-the-art large-format printer, the CERN Printshop can now print posters in A2, A1 or A0 format. ...

  5. [Opening medicine containers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glerup, E; Dengsø, H

    1990-07-09

    In connection with self-administration of medicine for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, patients with weak hands and elderly patients in general, the design of many medicine containers makes them awkward to handle for the patients. In this investigation 12 different medicine containers were tested. The 12 containers represent the antirheumatic medicine containers available on the market in Denmark in 1988. Sixty patients participated in the investigation. Thirty had rheumatoid arthritis and 30 had normal hand function. The age range was 40-85 years The patients had the choice between five possible answers concerning each container. In all patients, grip strength was measured. The patients with rheumatoid arthritis were classified in four functional classes, and pulpa-vola distance end thumb--5th MCP point distance were measured. The opening mechanisms of 29% of the antirheumatic medicine containers are unacceptable; these are plastic containers with a "push-off" top and suppository packs. 46%--(containers with screw cap or pressure dispensing) are considered acceptable. For 25% (tablet and capsule blister packs) the patients' estimate varied. It is important that medicine containers can be opened by the patients without difficulty, so that they do not present a hindrance to a correct intake of medicine or result in an unnecessary admission to hospital. The results of this investigation show that it is of continuous importance to encourage the production of medicine containers that comply with the requirements of the patients.

  6. Review Essay: Controlled Openness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Wenninger

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The book reviewed here contains a written form of Niklas LUHMANN’s last lecture, delivered in winter term 1992/1993 at Bielefeld University, where he was professor for sociology from 1968 to 1993. A more comprehensive and systematic publication titled "Die Gesellschaft der Gesellschaft" was not published until 1997. In comparison to this and to other publications the present one provides an insight into the modality of the theoretical practice of LUHMANN. My review-essay follows up that point and reminds us that LUHMANN worked out his theory of society in view of a sociological problem he had conceived. He accused sociology of accumulating knowledge in a confusing way by empirical social research. His endeavour, in contrast, was to enable research within a consistent theoretical frame that was nevertheless open to expansive explorations. LUHMANN tries to achieve consistency through the reciprocal adjustment of his terms and his theoretical components, which should enable the construction of problems for comparison within global society. This means that his approach stays open for an empirical reality that remains to be explored because the theory of society does not deliver terms to categorize empirical reality. Instead, terms are conceptualized as distinctions with the function to construct problems that instruct observations and make them amenable to theorization. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0803237

  7. Infant open heart surgery (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    During open-heart surgery an incision is made through the breastbone (sternum) while the child is under general anesthesia. ... During open-heart surgery an incision is made through the breastbone (sternum) while the child is under general anesthesia.

  8. Eclipsing binaries in open clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Southworth, John; Clausen, J.V.

    2006-01-01

    Stars: fundamental parameters - Stars : binaries : eclipsing - Stars: Binaries: spectroscopic - Open clusters and ass. : general Udgivelsesdato: 5 August......Stars: fundamental parameters - Stars : binaries : eclipsing - Stars: Binaries: spectroscopic - Open clusters and ass. : general Udgivelsesdato: 5 August...

  9. Against the Odds Exhibition Opens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section Against the Odds Exhibition Opens Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents / ... April 17, Dr. Donald Lindberg officially opened the exhibition, "Against the Odds: Making a Difference in Global ...

  10. SOFTWARE OPEN SOURCE, SOFTWARE GRATIS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Aini Rakhmawati

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Berlakunya Undang – undang Hak Atas Kekayaan Intelektual (HAKI, memunculkan suatu alternatif baru untuk menggunakan software open source. Penggunaan software open source menyebar seiring dengan isu global pada Information Communication Technology (ICT saat ini. Beberapa organisasi dan perusahaan mulai menjadikan software open source sebagai pertimbangan. Banyak konsep mengenai software open source ini. Mulai dari software yang gratis sampai software tidak berlisensi. Tidak sepenuhnya isu software open source benar, untuk itu perlu dikenalkan konsep software open source mulai dari sejarah, lisensi dan bagaimana cara memilih lisensi, serta pertimbangan dalam memilih software open source yang ada. Kata kunci :Lisensi, Open Source, HAKI

  11. Virtuelt skrivebord med open office

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kurt Gammelgaard

    2009-01-01

    SDUs erfaringer med projektet Port 22: en virtuel platform med Open Office som kontorpakke til studerende.......SDUs erfaringer med projektet Port 22: en virtuel platform med Open Office som kontorpakke til studerende....

  12. Open Government Data Publication Methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jan Kucera

    2015-01-01

    .... Open Government Data (OGD) initiatives aim at increasing availability of machine-readable data provided under an open license and therefore these initiatives might facilitate re-use of the government data which in turn might...

  13. Open innovation and serious gaming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westera, Wim

    2010-01-01

    Westera, W. (2010, 15 April). Open innovation and serious gaming. Workshop presentation and discussion with Hogeschool Zuyd, Communication and Multimedia Design, Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open University of the Netherlands.

  14. Software Open Source, Software Gratis?

    OpenAIRE

    Rakhmawati, Nur Aini

    2006-01-01

    Berlakunya Undang – undang Hak Atas Kekayaan Intelektual (HAKI), memunculkan suatu alternatif baru untuk menggunakan software open source. Penggunaan software open source menyebar seiring dengan isu global pada Information Communication Technology (ICT) saat ini. Beberapa organisasi dan Perusahaan mulai menjadikan software open source sebagai pertimbangan. Banyak konsep mengenai software open source ini. Mulai dari software yang gratis sampai software tidak berlisensi. Tidak sepenuhnya isu so...

  15. Open Data for Sustainable Development

    OpenAIRE

    Petrov, Oleg; Gurin, Joel; Manley, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The “open data” principle is becoming an increasingly important part of the data revolution, which is recognized worldwide as a key engine for achieving the post-2015 UN Sustainable Development Goals. Open data—publicly available online information that can be used for any purpose at little or no cost—represent one of the most underutilized key assets of modern government. Open data initiatives are often directed at converting open data into formats that can be reus...

  16. Business Models for Open Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saebi, Tina; Foss, Nicolai J.

    2015-01-01

    Research on open innovation suggests that companies benefit differentially from adopting open innovation strategies; however, it is unclear why this is so. One possible explanation is that companies' business models are not attuned to open strategies. Accordingly, we propose a contingency model o...

  17. Open data within governmental organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.W. (Bert) Mulder; E. (Ed) Visser; B. (Bart) Spée; A. (Antoine) Gribnau; M.W. (Martijn) Hartog

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the growth of open data, open government and the means for transparency and accountability, but aims to reflect on the bottlenecks and actual practicality of opening data to the public domain by two governmental bodies. The Municiaplity of The Hague and The Province of

  18. OpenStack cloud security

    CERN Document Server

    Locati, Fabio Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    If you are an OpenStack administrator or developer, or wish to build solutions to protect your OpenStack environment, then this book is for you. Experience of Linux administration and familiarity with different OpenStack components is assumed.

  19. Cost-effectiveness analysis of therapies for chronic kidney disease patients on dialysis: a case for excluding dialysis costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grima, Daniel T; Bernard, Lisa M; Dunn, Elizabeth S; McFarlane, Philip A; Mendelssohn, David C

    2012-11-01

    In many jurisdictions, cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) plays an important role in determining drug coverage and reimbursement and, therefore, has the potential to impact patient access. Health economic guidelines recommend the inclusion of future costs related to the intervention of interest within CEAs but provide little guidance regarding the definition of 'related'. In the case of CEAs of therapies that extend the lives of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on dialysis but do not impact the need for or the intensity of dialysis, the determination of the relatedness of future dialysis costs to the therapy of interest is particularly ambiguous. The uncertainty as to whether dialysis costs are related or unrelated in these circumstances has led to inconsistencies in the conduct of CEAs for such products, with dialysis costs included in some analyses while excluded in others. Due to the magnitude of the cost of dialysis, whether or not dialysis costs are included in CEAs of such therapies has substantial implications for the results of such analyses, often meaning the difference between a therapy being deemed cost effective (in instances where dialysis costs are excluded) or not cost effective (in instances where dialysis costs are included). This paper explores the issues and implications surrounding the inclusion of dialysis costs in CEAs of therapies that extend the lives of dialysis patients but do not impact the need for dialysis. Relevant case studies clearly demonstrate that, regardless of the clinical benefits of a life-extending intervention for dialysis patients, and due to the high cost of dialysis, the inclusion of dialysis costs in the analysis essentially eliminates the possibility of obtaining a favourable cost-effectiveness ratio. This raises the significant risk that dialysis patients may be denied access to interventions that are cost effective in other populations due solely to the high background cost of dialysis itself. Finally, the

  20. CCI Open Data Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, H.; Pechorro, E.; Bennett, V.; Farquhar, C.; Blower, J.

    2016-08-01

    The European Space Agency's (ESA's) Climate Change Initiative (CCI) Programme, producing harmonised datasets from long term Earth Observation satellite data records for a number of Essential Climate Variables (ECV's), provides a solid basis for climate science and modelling, for specialist application development and ultimately for European and global policy making.The resulting Climate Data Records (CDRs) represent a major investment of science, funding and personal effort, therefore extended access to those products is a key element of programme success.ECV datasets are currently being distributed through individual ECV teams, and access procedures and interfaces vary. To compliment and unify the work of the individual teams and to maximise the visibility and uptake of ECV data in the climate data user community within and beyond the CCI, a new ESA CCI project has started, to create a central open data portal and metadata catalogue for the ESA CCI project.This paper highlights key features of the Portal to date.