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Sample records for excitation transfer dynamics

  1. Excited state conformational dynamics in carotenoids: dark intermediates and excitation energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Warren F; Bishop, Michael M; Roscioli, Jerome D; Ghosh, Soumen; Frank, Harry A

    2015-04-15

    A consideration of the excited state potential energy surfaces of carotenoids develops a new hypothesis for the nature of the conformational motions that follow optical preparation of the S2 (1(1)Bu(+)) state. After an initial displacement from the Franck-Condon geometry along bond length alternation coordinates, it is suggested that carotenoids pass over a transition-state barrier leading to twisted conformations. This hypothesis leads to assignments for several dark intermediate states encountered in femtosecond spectroscopic studies. The Sx state is assigned to the structure reached upon the onset of torsional motions near the transition state barrier that divides planar and twisted structures on the S2 state potential energy surface. The X state, detected recently in two-dimensional electronic spectra, corresponds to a twisted structure well past the barrier and approaching the S2 state torsional minimum. Lastly, the S(∗) state is assigned to a low lying S1 state structure with intramolecular charge transfer character (ICT) and a pyramidal conformation. It follows that the bent and twisted structures of carotenoids that are found in photosynthetic light-harvesting proteins yield excited-state structures that favor the development of an ICT character and optimized energy transfer yields to (bacterio)chlorophyll acceptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Excitation energy transfer in a non-markovian dynamical disordered environment: localization, narrowing, and transfer efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Silbey, Robert J

    2011-05-12

    The non-markovian effect of a fluctuating environment plays an important role in electronic excitation transfer in organic disordered media, such as light-harvesting systems and conjugated polymers. Stochastic Liouville equations (SLE) are used to study the interaction between excitons and the environment. We model the non-markovian environment phenomenologically with a dichotomic process. An exact approach to solve the SLE based on Shapiro and Loginov's differentiation formulas allows us to rigorously study the effect of the non-markovian environment on excitation energy transfer, such as coherence conservation and its implication for transfer efficiency. This simple SLE model goes beyond the perturbative second-order master equation valid for both the weak coupling and short time correlation conditions. In addition, we discuss why our non-markovian model is a good approximation to the SLE model driven by the stationary Gauss-Markov process (Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process) over a broad range of fluctuation strengths and correlation times. Numerical results based on our SLE model for dimeric aggregates and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex reveal the important interplay of intermolecular coupling, correlation time, and fluctuation strength, and their effects on the exciton relaxation process due to the environmental phonon. The results also uncover the connection between localization and motional narrowing, and the efficiency of electronic excitation transfer, demonstrating that the non-markovian environment is critical for chromophore aggregates to achieve an optimal transfer rate in a noisy environment and to contribute to the robustness of the FMO excitation energy transfer network.

  3. Excited State Structural Dynamics of Carotenoids and ChargeTransfer Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Tassle, Aaron Justin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes the development andimplementation of a visible/near infrared pump/mid-infrared probeapparatus. Chapter 1 describes the background and motivation ofinvestigating optically induced structural dynamics, paying specificattention to solvation and the excitation selection rules of highlysymmetric molecules such as carotenoids. Chapter 2 describes thedevelopment and construction of the experimental apparatus usedthroughout the remainder of this dissertation. Chapter 3 will discuss theinvestigation of DCM, a laser dye with a fluorescence signal resultingfrom a charge transfer state. By studying the dynamics of DCM and of itsmethyl deuterated isotopomer (an otherwise identical molecule), we areable to investigate the origins of the charge transfer state and provideevidence that it is of the controversial twisted intramolecular (TICT)type. Chapter 4 introduces the use of two-photon excitation to the S1state, combined with one-photon excitation to the S2 state of thecarotenoid beta-apo-8'-carotenal. These 2 investigations show evidencefor the formation of solitons, previously unobserved in molecular systemsand found only in conducting polymers Chapter 5 presents an investigationof the excited state dynamics of peridinin, the carotenoid responsiblefor the light harvesting of dinoflagellates. This investigation allowsfor a more detailed understanding of the importance of structuraldynamics of carotenoids in light harvesting.

  4. Dynamics of Energy Transfer in a Conjugated Dendrimer Driven by Ultrafast Localization of Excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, Johan F; Atas, Evrim; Altan, Aysun; Kuroda, Daniel G; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Tretiak, Sergei; Roitberg, Adrian E; Kleiman, Valeria D

    2015-09-16

    Solar energy conversion starts with the harvest of light, and its efficacy depends on the spatial transfer of the light energy to where it can be transduced into other forms of energy. Harnessing solar power as a clean energy source requires the continuous development of new synthetic materials that can harvest photon energy and transport it without significant losses. With chemically-controlled branched architectures, dendrimers are ideally suited for these initial steps, since they consist of arrays of chromophores with relative positioning and orientations to create energy gradients and to spatially focus excitation energies. The spatial localization of the energy delimits its efficacy and has been a point of intense research for synthetic light harvesters. We present the results of a combined theoretical experimental study elucidating ultrafast, unidirectional, electronic energy transfer on a complex molecule designed to spatially focus the initial excitation onto an energy sink. The study explores the complex interplay between atomic motions, excited-state populations, and localization/delocalization of excitations. Our findings show that the electronic energy-transfer mechanism involves the ultrafast collapse of the photoexcited wave function due to nonadiabatic electronic transitions. The localization of the wave function is driven by the efficient coupling to high-frequency vibrational modes leading to ultrafast excited-state dynamics and unidirectional efficient energy funneling. This work provides a long-awaited consistent experiment-theoretical description of excited-state dynamics in organic conjugated dendrimers with atomistic resolution, a phenomenon expected to universally appear in a variety of synthetic conjugated materials.

  5. Charge-Transfer Dynamics in the Lowest Excited State of a Pentacene–Fullerene Complex: Implications for Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Joseph, Saju

    2017-10-02

    We characterize the dynamic nature of the lowest excited state in a pentacene/C60 complex on the femtosecond time scale, via a combination of ab initio molecular dynamics and time-dependent density functional theory. We analyze the correlations between the molecular vibrations of the complex and the oscillations in the electron-transfer character of its lowest excited state, which point to vibration-induced coherences between the (pentacene-based) local-excitation (LE) state and the complex charge-transfer (CT) state. We discuss the implications of our results on this model system for the exciton-dissociation process in organic solar cells.

  6. Influence of environment induced correlated fluctuations in electronic coupling on coherent excitation energy transfer dynamics in model photosynthetic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Pengfei; Coker, David F

    2012-03-21

    Two-dimensional photon-echo experiments indicate that excitation energy transfer between chromophores near the reaction center of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides occurs coherently with decoherence times of hundreds of femtoseconds, comparable to the energy transfer time scale in these systems. The original explanation of this observation suggested that correlated fluctuations in chromophore excitation energies, driven by large scale protein motions could result in long lived coherent energy transfer dynamics. However, no significant site energy correlation has been found in recent molecular dynamics simulations of several model light harvesting systems. Instead, there is evidence of correlated fluctuations in site energy-electronic coupling and electronic coupling-electronic coupling. The roles of these different types of correlations in excitation energy transfer dynamics are not yet thoroughly understood, though the effects of site energy correlations have been well studied. In this paper, we introduce several general models that can realistically describe the effects of various types of correlated fluctuations in chromophore properties and systematically study the behavior of these models using general methods for treating dissipative quantum dynamics in complex multi-chromophore systems. The effects of correlation between site energy and inter-site electronic couplings are explored in a two state model of excitation energy transfer between the accessory bacteriochlorophyll and bacteriopheophytin in a reaction center system and we find that these types of correlated fluctuations can enhance or suppress coherence and transfer rate simultaneously. In contrast, models for correlated fluctuations in chromophore excitation energies show enhanced coherent dynamics but necessarily show decrease in excitation energy transfer rate accompanying such coherence enhancement. Finally, for a three state model of the Fenna-Matthews-Olsen light

  7. Dynamics of charge-transfer excited states relevant to photochemical energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, E.C.

    1991-11-01

    The primary objective of the research program is to gain a fundamental understanding of the factors governing the efficiency of excited-state charge transfer CT interactions between two chromophores that are brought together in close proximity, either by a very short covalent linkage or by ground-state complex formation. CT and van der Walls (vdW), interactions in covalently bonded bichromophoric compounds in condensed phase, as well as those in vdW complexes in supersonic jets, are being investigated using laser-based techniques under a variety of experimental conditions. This progress report is divided into three parts, according to the class of molecular systems and the phase (liquid vs. gas) in which the excited-state interactions are probed. The first is concerned with the excited states of bridged diaryl compounds in the condensed phase. The second involves the excited states of vdW complexes in supersonic jets. Finally, the third, is concerned with the excited states of electron donor-acceptor (EDA) systems in both the condensed phase and supersonic jets. In each of these studies, we are concerned with the interchromophore interactions ranging from weak vdW forces to strong CT forces, and the factors determining whether the interaction forces are weak or strong in related molecules.

  8. Dynamics of charge-transfer excited states relevant to photochemical energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, E.C.

    1993-01-01

    A systematic study of intramolecular photoassociation and photoinduced charge transfer (CT) was initiated in bichromophoric systems of M-X-M, where two identical aromatic hydrocarbons M are joined by X=CH[sub 2], O, NH, etc. Dinaphthylamines, dinaphthylethers, and dinaphthylmethanes in nonpolar solvents form triplet excimers, following inter system crossing of singlets to the triplet manifold; in polar solvents, the molecule forms an intramolecular CT state. The interchromophore interaction study was extended to N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine. The lowest excited singlet states of the dinaphthylamines were studied by semiempirical quantum chemical methods. Exciplex formation was studied in excited states of jet-cooled van der Waals complexes, such as fluorene/substituted benzenes and 1-cyanonaphthalene-aliphatic amines.

  9. Electron and excitation energy transfers in covalently linked donor-acceptor dyads: mechanisms and dynamics revealed using quantum chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupellini, Lorenzo; Giannini, Samuele; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2017-12-20

    Photoinduced electron transfer (ET), hole transfer (HT), charge recombination (CR) and energy transfer (EET) are fundamental mechanisms, which occur in both natural and artificial light harvesting systems. Here, we present a computational strategy which determines ET, HT, CR and EET rates in a consistent way and merges them in a kinetic model to reproduce the net excited state dynamics. The effects of the solvent are included in all steps of the calculations making the present strategy a useful tool for a rational design of charge and energy transfer processes in complex systems. An application to covalently linked zinc and free-base porphyrin-naphthalenediimide dyads is presented. For each of the two systems, ultrafast optical spectroscopy experiments have shown a specific photophysics with different processes taking place simultaneously. The model reveals that such a diversity is mainly due to the different relative stability of the charge-separated state, while the electronic couplings for charge and energy transfer processes are quite similar in the two dyads.

  10. Ultrafast Excited-State Dynamics of Diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP)-Based Materials: Static versus Diffusion-Controlled Electron Transfer Process

    KAUST Repository

    Alsulami, Qana

    2015-06-25

    Singlet-to-triplet intersystem crossing (ISC) and photoinduced electron transfer (PET) of platinum(II) containing diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) oligomer in the absence and presence of strong electron-acceptor tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) were investigated using femtosecond and nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy with broadband capabilities. The role of platinum(II) incorporation in those photophysical properties was evaluated by comparing the excited-state dynamics of DPP with and without the metal centers. The steady-state measurements reveal that platinum(II) incorporation facilitates dramatically the interactions between DPP-Pt(acac) and TCNE, resulting in charge transfer (CT) complex formation. The transient absorption spectra in the absence of TCNE reveal ultrafast ISC of DPP-Pt(acac) followed by their long-lived triplet state. In the presence of TCNE, PET from the excited DPP-Pt(acac) and DPP to TCNE, forming the radical ion pairs. The ultrafast PET which occurs statically from DPP-Pt(acac) to TCNE in picosecond regime, is much faster than that from DPP to TCNE (nanosecond time scale) which is diffusion-controlled process, providing clear evidence that PET rate is eventually controlled by the platinum(II) incorporation.

  11. Behavior of Poisson Bracket Mapping Equation in Studying Excitation Energy Transfer Dynamics of Cryptophyte Phycocyanin 645 Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Weon Gyu; Kelly, Aaron; Rhee, Young Min [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Recently, it has been shown that quantum coherence appears in energy transfers of various photosynthetic light harvesting complexes at from cryogenic to even room temperatures. Because the photosynthetic systems are inherently complex, these findings have subsequently interested many researchers in the field of both experiment and theory. From the theoretical part, simplified dynamics or semiclassical approaches have been widely used. In these approaches, the quantum-classical Liouville equation (QCLE) is the fundamental starting point. Toward the semiclassical scheme, approximations are needed to simplify the equations of motion of various degrees of freedom. Here, we have adopted the Poisson bracket mapping equation (PBME) as an approximate form of QCLE and applied it to find the time evolution of the excitation in a photosynthetic complex from marine algae. The benefit of using PBME is its similarity to conventional Hamiltonian dynamics. Through this, we confirmed the coherent population transfer behaviors in short time domain as previously reported with a more accurate but more time-consuming iterative linearized density matrix approach. However, we find that the site populations do not behave according to the Boltzmann law in the long time limit. We also test the effect of adding spurious high frequency vibrations to the spectral density of the bath, and find that their existence does not alter the dynamics to any significant extent as long as the associated reorganization energy is changed not too drastically. This suggests that adopting classical trajectory based ensembles in semiclassical simulations should not influence the coherence dynamics in any practical manner, even though the classical trajectories often yield spurious high frequency vibrational features in the spectral density.

  12. Dynamics of Excited State Proton Transfer in Nitro Substituted 10-Hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marciak, H; Hristova, S.; Deneva, V

    2017-01-01

    of the ground state enol–keto tautomeric equilibrium (ΔG values of 1.03 and 0.62 kcal mol−1 respectively for 2 and 3). The fluorescence stems from the keto form even if the enol form is optically excited as proven by the shape of the excitation spectra indicating that ESIPT takes place. The Stokes shift...... of the substituted compounds is substantially lower compared to HBQ, which follows from the fact that the substitution occurs in the formal cyclohexa-2,4-dienone moiety and leads to a decrease of the HOMO level of the keto tautomer. The pump–probe experiments show that in the nitro substituted HBQs 2 and 3 ESIPT...

  13. Excited-State Dynamics of Biological Molecules in Solution: Photoinduced Charge Transfer in Oxidatively Damaged DNA and Deactivation of Violacein in Viscous Solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckstead, Ashley Ann

    UV radiation from the sun is strongly absorbed by DNA, and the resulting electronic excited states can lead to the formation of mutagenic photoproducts. Decades of research have brought to light the excited-state dynamics of single RNA and DNA nucleobases, but questions remain about the nature of excited states accessed in DNA strands. In this thesis, I present ultrafast spectroscopic observations of photoinduced electron transfer from the oxidatively damaged bases, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, 5-hydroxy-2'-deoxycytidine and 5-hydroxy-2'-deoxyuridine, to adenine in three dinucleotides. The results reveal that charge transfer states are formed on a timescale faster than our instrumental resolution (electron transfer efficiently returns the excited-state population to the ground state on timescales from tens to hundreds of ps. In addition to recent spectroscopic observations of charge transfer state species in DNA by other groups, our results have augmented understanding of the long-lived transient signals observed in DNA strands. The observation of photoinduced electron transfer in these oxidatively damaged nucleobases also supports a recent proposal regarding the role of oxidative products in pre-RNA catalysis. I discuss these observations in the contexts of fundamental DNA excited-state dynamics and prebiotic chemical evolution. In this thesis, I also present the first ultrafast spectroscopic investigation of violacein, a pigment isolated from Antarctic bacteria. Despite claims for the photoprotective role of this pigment, there has never been a spectroscopic analysis of excited-state deactivation in violacein. Emission spectra, fluorescence quantum yields and excited-state lifetimes of violacein in various solvents were measured for the first time. Both the fluorescence quantum yield and excited-state lifetime of violacein increase in increasingly viscous solvents, suggesting a large-scale motion mediates excited-state deactivation. I compare these

  14. Dynamics of transfer of electron excitation in a donor-acceptor system with a carbon chain and ways of its relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Sevryukova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The optical properties and dynamics of transport of electron excitation and the ways of its relaxation in the supramolecular D–π–A complex on the basis of merocyanines have been investigated. There have been found two components in the transfer of charge: fast and slow, which correspond to different conformational states of the carbon chain in merocyanines. It was found that the main photoluminescence of the studied molecular solutions of merocyanines by its nature is similar to the exciplex luminescence, as a manifestation of resonant and charge transfer interaction in an excited state. The lifetime in this state is about 2000 ps.

  15. Dynamics of charge-transfer excited states relevant to photochemical energy conversion. Progress report, June 1, 1991--November 15, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, E.C.

    1991-11-01

    The primary objective of the research program is to gain a fundamental understanding of the factors governing the efficiency of excited-state charge transfer CT interactions between two chromophores that are brought together in close proximity, either by a very short covalent linkage or by ground-state complex formation. CT and van der Walls (vdW), interactions in covalently bonded bichromophoric compounds in condensed phase, as well as those in vdW complexes in supersonic jets, are being investigated using laser-based techniques under a variety of experimental conditions. This progress report is divided into three parts, according to the class of molecular systems and the phase (liquid vs. gas) in which the excited-state interactions are probed. The first is concerned with the excited states of bridged diaryl compounds in the condensed phase. The second involves the excited states of vdW complexes in supersonic jets. Finally, the third, is concerned with the excited states of electron donor-acceptor (EDA) systems in both the condensed phase and supersonic jets. In each of these studies, we are concerned with the interchromophore interactions ranging from weak vdW forces to strong CT forces, and the factors determining whether the interaction forces are weak or strong in related molecules.

  16. Dynamics of charge-transfer excited states relevant to photochemical energy conversion. Technical report, June 1, 1992--March 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, E.C.

    1993-06-01

    A systematic study of intramolecular photoassociation and photoinduced charge transfer (CT) was initiated in bichromophoric systems of M-X-M, where two identical aromatic hydrocarbons M are joined by X=CH{sub 2}, O, NH, etc. Dinaphthylamines, dinaphthylethers, and dinaphthylmethanes in nonpolar solvents form triplet excimers, following inter system crossing of singlets to the triplet manifold; in polar solvents, the molecule forms an intramolecular CT state. The interchromophore interaction study was extended to N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine. The lowest excited singlet states of the dinaphthylamines were studied by semiempirical quantum chemical methods. Exciplex formation was studied in excited states of jet-cooled van der Waals complexes, such as fluorene/substituted benzenes and 1-cyanonaphthalene-aliphatic amines.

  17. Excited state Intramolecular Proton Transfer in Anthralin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Andersen, Kristine B.; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations performed on anthralin (1,8-dihydroxy-9(10H)-anthracenone) predict the possibility of an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the compound dissolved in n-hexane at ambient temperature results in an unus......Quantum chemical calculations performed on anthralin (1,8-dihydroxy-9(10H)-anthracenone) predict the possibility of an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the compound dissolved in n-hexane at ambient temperature results......, associated with an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process....

  18. Theoretical study of excited-state proton transfer of 2,7-diazaindole·(H2O)2 cluster via hydrogen bonding dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Tang, Zhe; Wang, Yi; Tian, Jing; Fei, Xu; Cao, Fang; Li, GuangYue

    2017-12-01

    A new chromophore, 2,7-diazaindole (2,7-DAI), has been designed to surpass the limitation of 7-azaindole (7AI). It exhibits remarkable water catalyzed proton-transfer properties. Excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) has been investigated based on the time-dependent density functional theory method. The calculated vertical excitation energies in the S0 and S1 states agree well with the experimental values. Proton transfer couples with hydrogen-bonding dynamics between the 2,7-diazaindole and the surrounding water molecules. Hydrogen bond strengthening has been testified in the S1 state based on a comparison of primary bond lengths and hydrogen bond energy that is involved in the intermolecular hydrogen bond between the S0 and S1 states. Frontier molecular further suggest that the electron density changes between the ground and excited states serve as basic driving forces for proton transfer. We determined the potential-energy curves of the S0 and S1 states to characterize the ESPT process. This work explains that the ESPT process for 2,7-DAI·(H2O)2 clusters at the molecular level, and highlights the importance of hydrogen bonding in ESPT.

  19. Excited-state proton-transfer dynamics of 1-methyl-6-hydroxyquinolinium embedded in a solid matrix of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun-Young; Lee, Young-Shin; Jang, Du-Jeon

    2008-11-28

    The excited-state intrinsic proton transfer and its geminate recombination, as well as the ground-state equilibria, of 1-methyl-6-hydroxyquinolinium embedded in a solid matrix of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) have been studied by measuring time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence spectra along with absorption and excitation spectra. Proton transfer takes place within 3.3 ns to form ion pairs while its back-reaction occurs on the time scale of 3.7 ns. The ion pairs in the rigid alcoholic matrix go through neither diffusion to form free ions nor subsequent electronic rearrangement to form the keto species within their excited-state lifetimes.

  20. Excitation energy transfer in the photosystem I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, Andrew N

    2012-09-25

    Photosystem I is a multimeric pigment protein complex in plants, green alage and cyanobacteria that functions in series with Photosystem II to use light energy to oxidize water and reduce carbon dioxide. The Photosystem I core complex contains 96 chlorophyll a molecules and 22 carotenoids that are involved in light harvesting and electron transfer. In eucaryotes, PSI also has a peripheral light harvesting complex I (LHCI). The role of specific chlorophylls in excitation and electron transfer are still unresolved. In particular, the role of so-called bridging chlorophylls, located between the bulk antenna and the core electron transfer chain, in the transfer of excitation energy to the reaction center are unknown. During the past funding period, site directed mutagenesis has been used to create mutants that effect the physical properties of these key chlorophylls, and to explore how this alters the function of the photosystem. Studying these mutants using ultrafast absorption spectroscopy has led to a better understanding of the process by which excitation energy is transferred from the antenna chlorophylls to the electron transfer chain chlorophylls, and what the role of connecting chlorophylls and A_0 chlorophylls is in this process. We have also used these mutants to investigate whch of the central group of six chlorophylls are involved in the primary steps of charge separation and electron transfer.

  1. Constrained geometric dynamics of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex: the role of correlated motion in reducing uncertainty in excitation energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokas, Alexander S; Cole, Daniel J; Chin, Alex W

    2014-12-01

    The trimeric Fenna-Mathews-Olson (FMO) complex of green sulphur bacteria is a well-studied example of a photosynthetic pigment-protein complex, in which the electronic properties of the pigments are modified by the protein environment to promote efficient excitonic energy transfer from antenna complexes to the reaction centres. By a range of simulation methods, many of the electronic properties of the FMO complex can be extracted from knowledge of the static crystal structure. However, the recent observation and analysis of long-lasting quantum dynamics in the FMO complex point to protein dynamics as a key factor in protecting and generating quantum coherence under laboratory conditions. While fast inter- and intra-molecular vibrations have been investigated extensively, the slow, conformational dynamics which effectively determine the optical inhomogeneous broadening of experimental ensembles has received less attention. The following study employs constrained geometric dynamics to study the flexibility in the protein network by efficiently generating the accessible conformational states from the published crystal structure. Statistical and principle component analyses reveal highly correlated low frequency motions between functionally relevant elements, including strong correlations between pigments that are excitonically coupled. Our analysis reveals a hierarchy of structural interactions which enforce these correlated motions, from the level of monomer-monomer interfaces right down to the α-helices, β-sheets and pigments. In addition to inducing strong spatial correlations across the conformational ensemble, we find that the overall rigidity of the FMO complex is exceptionally high. We suggest that these observations support the idea of highly correlated inhomogeneous disorder of the electronic excited states, which is further supported by the remarkably low variance (typically <5%) of the excitonic couplings of the conformational ensemble.

  2. Dynamic Coherence in Excitonic Molecular Complexes under Various Excitation Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Chenu, Aurélia; Mancal, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the relevance of dynamic electronic coherence under conditions natural to light-harvesting systems. We formulate the results of a quantum mechanical treatment of a weak light-matter interaction in terms of experimental observable, such as the incident light spectrum and the absorption spectrum of the material, and we derive the description of the incoherent F\\"orster type energy transfer fully from the wave function formalism. We demonstrate that excitation of a coherent superposition of electronic eigenstates of natural light-harvesting complexes by sunlight or by excitation transfer from a neighboring antenna is unlikely and that dynamical coherence therefore cannot play any significant role in natural photosynthesis, regardless of their life time. Dynamical coherence as a transient phenomenon must be strictly distinguished from the effect of excited state delocalization (also termed quantum coherence in the literature) which is established by interaction between the pigments a...

  3. Stochastic Hierarchical Systems: Excitable Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Leonhardt, Helmar; Zaks, Michael A.; Falcke, Martin; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    We present a discrete model of stochastic excitability by a low-dimensional set of delayed integral equations governing the probability in the rest state, the excited state, and the refractory state. The process is a random walk with discrete states and nonexponential waiting time distributions, which lead to the incorporation of memory kernels in the integral equations. We extend the equations of a single unit to the system of equations for an ensemble of globally coupled oscillators, derive...

  4. Relaxation dynamics in the excited states of a ketocyanine dye ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Pramanik et al proposed the twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) process in the S1 state, which .... trile clearly suggests that a photon of 400 nm light excites the molecule to its S2 state, the higher energy emission .... 400 nm photon as well as the dynamics of the re- laxation processes taking place in the S1 state. At.

  5. Quantum dynamics of vibrational excitations and vibrational charge ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quantum dynamics of vibrational excitations and vibrational charge transfer processes in H+ + O2 collisions at collision energy 23 eV ... The Fritz Haber Research Centre and The Department of Physical Chemisry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel 91904; Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of ...

  6. Effects of Herzberg-Teller vibronic coupling on coherent excitation energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hou-Dao; Qiao, Qin; Xu, Rui-Xue; Yan, YiJing

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we study the effects of non-Condon vibronic coupling on the quantum coherence of excitation energy transfer, via the exact dissipaton-equation-of-motion evaluations on excitonic model systems. Field-triggered excitation energy transfer dynamics and two dimensional coherent spectroscopy are simulated for both Condon and non-Condon vibronic couplings. Our results clearly demonstrate that the non-Condon vibronic coupling intensifies the dynamical electronic-vibrational energy transfer and enhances the total system-and-bath quantum coherence. Moreover, the hybrid bath dynamics for non-Condon effects enriches the theoretical calculation, and further sheds light on the interpretation of the experimental nonlinear spectroscopy.

  7. Stochastic hierarchical systems: excitable dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Helmar; Zaks, Michael A; Falcke, Martin; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2008-10-01

    We present a discrete model of stochastic excitability by a low-dimensional set of delayed integral equations governing the probability in the rest state, the excited state, and the refractory state. The process is a random walk with discrete states and nonexponential waiting time distributions, which lead to the incorporation of memory kernels in the integral equations. We extend the equations of a single unit to the system of equations for an ensemble of globally coupled oscillators, derive the mean field equations, and investigate bifurcations of steady states. Conditions of destabilization are found, which imply oscillations of the mean fields in the stochastic ensemble. The relation between the mean field equations and the paradigmatic Kuramoto model is shown.

  8. Dynamic coherence in excitonic molecular complexes under various excitation conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenu, Aurélia; Malý, Pavel; Mančal, Tomáš, E-mail: mancal@karlov.mff.cuni.cz

    2014-08-17

    Highlights: • Dynamic coherence does not improve energy transfer efficiency in natural conditions. • Photo-induced quantum jumps are discussed in classical context. • Natural time scale of a light excitation event is identified. • Coherence in FMO complex averages out under excitation by neighboring antenna. • This result is valid even in absence of dissipation. - Abstract: We investigate the relevance of dynamic quantum coherence in the energy transfer efficiency of molecular aggregates. We derive the time evolution of the density matrix for an open quantum system excited by light or by a neighboring antenna. Unlike in the classical case, the quantum description does not allow for a formal decomposition of the dynamics into sudden jumps in an observable quantity – an expectation value. Rather, there is a natural finite time-scale associated with the excitation process. We propose a simple experiment to test the influence of this time scale on the yield of photosynthesis. We demonstrate, using typical parameters of the Fenna–Matthews–Olson (FMO) complex and a typical energy transfer rate from the chlorosome baseplate, that dynamic coherences are averaged out in the complex even when the FMO model is completely free of all dissipation and dephasing.

  9. Dynamics of excitable nodes on random graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ogy and dynamics of excitable nodes on Erd˝os–Rényi (ER) [16] random graphs. Our focus is on rhythmic dynamics, namely periodic solutions, in this representative model. Since the network topology plays an important role, the question of how different growth rules. DOI: 10.1007/s12043-011-0180-6; ePublication: 31 ...

  10. Dynamic coherence in excitonic molecular complexes under various excitation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenu, Aurélia; Malý, Pavel; Mančal, Tomáš

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the relevance of dynamic quantum coherence in the energy transfer efficiency of molecular aggregates. We derive the time evolution of the density matrix for an open quantum system excited by light or by a neighboring antenna. Unlike in the classical case, the quantum description does not allow for a formal decomposition of the dynamics into sudden jumps in an observable quantity - an expectation value. Rather, there is a natural finite time-scale associated with the excitation process. We propose a simple experiment to test the influence of this time scale on the yield of photosynthesis. We demonstrate, using typical parameters of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex and a typical energy transfer rate from the chlorosome baseplate, that dynamic coherences are averaged out in the complex even when the FMO model is completely free of all dissipation and dephasing.

  11. Dependence of the energy transfer to graphene on the excitation energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackowski, Sebastian, E-mail: mackowski@fizyka.umk.pl; Kamińska, Izabela [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2015-07-13

    Fluorescence studies of natural photosynthetic complexes on a graphene layer demonstrate pronounced influence of the excitation wavelength on the energy transfer efficiency to graphene. Ultraviolet light yields much faster decay of fluorescence, with average efficiencies of the energy transfer equal to 87% and 65% for excitation at 405 nm and 640 nm, respectively. This implies that focused light changes locally the properties of graphene affecting the energy transfer dynamics, in an analogous way as in the case of metallic nanostructures. Demonstrating optical control of the energy transfer is important for exploiting unique properties of graphene in photonic and sensing architectures.

  12. Relativistic dynamical spin excitations of magnetic adatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Dias, M.; Schweflinghaus, B.; Blügel, S.; Lounis, S.

    2015-02-01

    We present a first-principles theory of dynamical spin excitations in the presence of spin-orbit coupling. The broken global spin rotational invariance leads to a new sum rule. We explore the competition between the magnetic anisotropy energy and the external magnetic field, as well as the role of electron-hole excitations, through calculations for 3 d -metal adatoms on the Cu(111) surface. The spin excitation resonance energy and lifetime display nontrivial behavior, establishing the strong impact of relativistic effects. We legitimate the use of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation down to the atomic limit, but with parameters that differ from a stationary theory.

  13. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellman, M.E. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  14. Exciting dynamic anapoles with electromagnetic doughnut pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, Tim; Fedotov, Vassili A.; Papasimakis, Nikitas; Youngs, Ian; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2017-08-01

    As was predicted in 1995 by Afanasiev and Stepanovsky, a superposition of electric and toroidal dipoles can lead to a non-trivial non-radiating charge current-configuration, the dynamic anapole. The dynamic anapoles were recently observed first in microwave metamaterials and then in dielectric nanodisks. However, spectroscopic studies of toroidal dipole and anapole excitations are challenging owing to their diminishing coupling to transverse electromagnetic waves. Here, we show that anapoles can be excited by electromagnetic Flying Doughnut (FD) pulses. First described by Helwarth and Nouchi in 1996, FD pulses (also known as "Flying Toroids") are space-time inseparable exact solutions to Maxwell's equations that have toroidal topology and propagate in free-space at the speed of light. We argue that FD pulses can be used as a diagnostic and spectroscopic tool for the dynamic anapole excitations in matter.

  15. Excitation energy transfer from dye molecules to doped graphene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recently, we have reported theoretical studies on the rate of energy transfer from an electronically excited molecule to graphene. It was found that graphene is a very efficient quencher of the electronically excited states and that the rate -4. The process was found to be effective up to 30 which is well beyond the ...

  16. Excitation energy transfer in isolated chlorosomes from Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiskainen, Jari; Linnanto, Juha; Kananavičius, Robertas; Lehtovuori, Viivi; Korppi-Tommola, Jouko

    2009-07-01

    Chlorosomes from green photosynthetic bacteria Chloroflexus aurantiacus have been studied by time-resolved femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The fastest kinetics of 200-300 fs resolved, was interpreted to stem for intra-chlorosomal excitation energy transfer. Energy transfer from the antenna to the baseplate appeared as a major 9.2 ps rise component detected at the baseplate probe wavelength. Excitation energy transfer rates were evaluated for a model chlorosome. Calculated rod to rod, and rods to baseplate rate constants of 200-400 fs and 10-20 ps, respectively, are in accord with the experimental results.

  17. Size effect of water cluster on the excited-state proton transfer in aqueous solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Hui; Chu, Tian-Shu

    2011-03-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) was used to investigate the excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) dynamics of 6-hydroxyquinolinium (6HQc) in aqueous solvent, resulting in the excited zwitterionic form (6HQz). The optimized excited-state energy profiles of 6HQc:(H 2O) n complexes have been calculated along the phenolic O sbnd H bond to simulate the minimum energy pathway (MEP) in the excited state. The results suggested that the threshold of the size of the water cluster is 3 for the excited-state proton transfer of 6HQc in aqueous solvent, since the conformation of the stable hydrated proton requires proton transferring to the second or deeper shell of water solvent. Moreover, the stability of the hydrated proton can be improved significantly by adding one more H 2O molecule to form an Eigen cation in the excited-state 6HQz:H 9O 4+. The effect of the size of water cluster on the proton transfer is investigated theoretically in the excited state for the first time.

  18. Excitation energy transfer processes in condensed matter theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Jai

    1994-01-01

    Applying a unified quantum approach, contributors offer fresh insights into the theoretical developments in the excitation energy transfer processes in condensed matter This comprehensive volume examines Frenkel and Wannier excitonic processes; rates of excitonic processes; theory of laser sputter and polymer ablation; and polarons, excitonic polarons and self-trapping

  19. Excitation energy transfer from dye molecules to doped graphene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Excitation energy transfer from dye molecules to doped graphene. #. R S SWATHIa and K L SEBASTIANb,∗. aSchool of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Thiruvananthapuram 695 016, India. bDepartment of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, ...

  20. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction in 4-(1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(1-azetidinyl) benzonitrile (P4C) in deuterated and normal methanol, ethanol and acetonitrile has been studied in order to investigate the solvent isotope effects on reaction rates and yields. These quantities (reaction rates and yields) along with several.

  1. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction in 4-(1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(1-azetidinyl) benzonitrile (P4C) in deuterated and normal methanol, ethanol and acetonitrile has been studied in order to investigate the solvent isotope effects on reaction rates and yields. These quantities (reaction rates and yields) along with several other ...

  2. Excited state dynamics in photosynthetic reaction center and light harvesting complex 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strümpfer, Johan; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-08-01

    Key to efficient harvesting of sunlight in photosynthesis is the first energy conversion process in which electronic excitation establishes a trans-membrane charge gradient. This conversion is accomplished by the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) that is, in case of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides studied here, surrounded by light harvesting complex 1 (LH1). The RC employs six pigment molecules to initiate the conversion: four bacteriochlorophylls and two bacteriopheophytins. The excited states of these pigments interact very strongly and are simultaneously influenced by the surrounding thermal protein environment. Likewise, LH1 employs 32 bacteriochlorophylls influenced in their excited state dynamics by strong interaction between the pigments and by interaction with the protein environment. Modeling the excited state dynamics in the RC as well as in LH1 requires theoretical methods, which account for both pigment-pigment interaction and pigment-environment interaction. In the present study we describe the excitation dynamics within a RC and excitation transfer between light harvesting complex 1 (LH1) and RC, employing the hierarchical equation of motion method. For this purpose a set of model parameters that reproduce RC as well as LH1 spectra and observed oscillatory excitation dynamics in the RC is suggested. We find that the environment has a significant effect on LH1-RC excitation transfer and that excitation transfers incoherently between LH1 and RC.

  3. Excited state dynamics of DNA bases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kleinermanns, K.; Nachtigallová, Dana; de Vries, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 2 (2013), s. 308-342 ISSN 0144-235X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/12/1318 Grant - others:National Science Foundation(US) CHE-0911564; NASA(US) NNX12AG77G; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) SFB 663; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) KI 531-29 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA bases * nucleobases * excited state * dynamics * computations * gas phase * conical intersections Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.920, year: 2013

  4. Coherent and Incoherent Structural Dynamics in Laser-Excited Antimony

    CERN Document Server

    Waldecker, Lutz; Bertoni, Roman; Vasileiadis, Thomas; Garcia, Martin E; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S; Ernstorfer, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the excitation of phonons in photoexcited antimony and demonstrate that the entire electron-lattice interactions, in particular coherent and incoherent electron-phonon coupling, can be probed simultaneously. Using femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) with high temporal resolution, we observe the coherent excitation of the fully symmetric \\Ag\\ optical phonon mode via the shift of the minimum of the atomic potential energy surface. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to quantify the change in lattice potential and the associated real-space amplitude of the coherent atomic oscillations. In addition, our experimental configuration allows observing the energy transfer from electrons to phonons via incoherent electron-lattice scattering events. Applying a modified two-temperature model, the electron-phonon coupling is determined from the data as a function of electronic temperature.

  5. Excitation transfer through open quantum networks: Three basic mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Zanardi, Paolo

    2011-10-01

    A variety of open quantum networks are currently under intense examination to model energy transport in photosynthetic systems. Here, we study the coherent transfer of a quantum excitation over a network incoherently coupled with a structured and small environment that effectively models the photosynthetic reaction center. Our goal is to distill a few basic, possibly universal, mechanisms or effects that are featured in simple energy-transfer models. In particular, we identify three different phenomena: the congestion effect, the asymptotic unitarity, and the staircase effects. We begin with few-site models, in which these effects can be fully understood, and then proceed to study more complex networks similar to those employed to model energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes.

  6. The photodissociation and reaction dynamics of vibrationally excited molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crim, F.F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research determines the nature of highly vibrationally excited molecules, their unimolecular reactions, and their photodissociation dynamics. The goal is to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to exploit that understanding to discover and control their chemical pathways. Most recently the author has used a combination of vibrational overtone excitation and laser induced fluorescence both to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to study their photodissociation dynamics. The author has also begun laser induced grating spectroscopy experiments designed to obtain the electronic absorption spectra of highly vibrationally excited molecules.

  7. Excited-State Dynamics of Oxyluciferin in Firefly Luciferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snellenburg, Joris J; Laptenok, Sergey P; DeSa, Richard J; Naumov, Panče; Solntsev, Kyril M

    2016-12-21

    The color variations of light emitted by some natural and mutant luciferases are normally attributed to collective factors referred to as microenvironment effects; however, the exact nature of these interactions between the emitting molecule (oxyluciferin) and the active site remains elusive. Although model studies of noncomplexed oxyluciferin and its variants have greatly advanced the understanding of its photochemistry, extrapolation of the conclusions to the real system requires assumptions about the polarity and proticity of the active site. To decipher the intricate excited-state dynamics, global and target analysis is performed here for the first time on the steady-state and time-resolved spectra of firefly oxyluciferin complexed with luciferase from the Japanese firefly (Luciola cruciata). The experimental steady-state and time-resolved luminescence spectra of the oxyluciferin/luciferase complex in solution are compared with the broadband time-resolved firefly bioluminescence recorded in vivo. The results demonstrate that de-excitation of the luminophore results in a complex cascade of photoinduced proton transfer processes and can be interpreted by the pH dependence of the emitted light. It is confirmed that proton transfer is the central event in the spectrochemistry of this system for which any assignment of the pH-dependent emission to a single chemical species would be an oversimplification.

  8. Excited-State Dynamics of Oxyluciferin in Firefly Luciferase

    KAUST Repository

    Snellenburg, Joris J.

    2016-11-23

    The color variations of light emitted by some natural and mutant luciferases are normally attributed to collective factors referred to as microenvironment effects; however, the exact nature of these interactions between the emitting molecule (oxyluciferin) and the active site remains elusive. Although model studies of noncomplexed oxyluciferin and its variants have greatly advanced the understanding of its photochemistry, extrapolation of the conclusions to the real system requires assumptions about the polarity and proticity of the active site. To decipher the intricate excited-state dynamics, global and target analysis is performed here for the first time on the steady-state and time-resolved spectra of firefly oxyluciferin complexed with luciferase from the Japanese firefly (Luciola cruciata). The experimental steady-state and time resolved luminescence spectra of the oxyluciferin/luciferase complex in solution are compared with the broadband time-resolved firefly bioluminescence recorded in vivo. The results demonstrate that de-excitation of the luminophore results in a complex cascade of photoinduced proton transfer processes and can be interpreted by the pH dependence of the emitted light. It is confirmed that proton transfer is the central event in the spectrochemistry of this system for which any assignment of the pH dependent emission to a single chemical species would be an oversimplification.

  9. Excited State Spectra and Dynamics of Phenyl-Substituted Butadienes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallace-Williams, Stacie E.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.; Møller, Søren

    1994-01-01

    A combination of steady-state and dynamic spectral measurements are used to provide new insights into the nature of the excited-state processes of all-trans-1,4-diphenyl-1,3-butadiene and several analogs: 1,4-diphenyl- 1,3-cyclopentadiene, 1,1,4,4-tetraphenylbutadiene, 1,2,3,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-cyc...... indicate that phenyl torsional motion is not important to the excited-state dynamics and reveal alternative excited-state reaction pathways. The results demonstrate how molecular systems that are structually similar can exhibit different electronic properties and excited-state dynamics....

  10. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation.

  11. Charge-transfer excited states in aqueous DNA: Insights from many-body Green's function theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huabing; Ma, Yuchen; Mu, Jinglin; Liu, Chengbu; Rohlfing, Michael

    2014-06-06

    Charge-transfer (CT) excited states play an important role in the excited-state dynamics of DNA in aqueous solution. However, there is still much controversy on their energies. By ab initio many-body Green's function theory, together with classical molecular dynamics simulations, we confirm the existence of CT states at the lower energy side of the optical absorption maximum in aqueous DNA as observed in experiments. We find that the hydration shell can exert strong effects (∼1  eV) on both the electronic structure and CT states of DNA molecules through dipole electric fields. In this case, the solvent cannot be simply regarded as a macroscopic screening medium as usual. The influence of base stacking and base pairing on the CT states is also discussed.

  12. Excited State Dynamics of DNA and RNA bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudock, Hanneli; Levine, Benjamin; Martinez, Todd

    2007-03-01

    Recent ultrafast spectroscopic experiments have reported excited state lifetimes for DNA and RNA bases and assigned these lifetimes to various electronic states. We have used theoretical and simulation methods to describe the excited state dynamics of these bases in an effort to provide a mechanistic explanation for the observed lifetimes. Our simulations are based on ab initio molecular dynamics, where the electronic and nuclear Schrodinger equations are solved simultaneously. The results are further verified by comparison to high-level ab initio electronic structure methods, including dynamic electron correlation effects through multireference perturbation theory, at important points along the dynamical pathways. Our results provide an explanation of the photochemical mechanism leading to nonradiative decay of the electronic excited states and some suggestions as to the origin of the different lifetimes. Comparisons between pyrimidines illustrate how chemical differences impact excited state dynamics and may play a role in explaining the propensity for dimer formation in thymine.

  13. Excitation Dynamics and Relaxation in a Molecular Heterodimer

    CERN Document Server

    Balevicius, V; Abramavicius, D; Mancal, T; Valkunas, L

    2011-01-01

    The exciton dynamics in a molecular heterodimer is studied as a function of differences in excitation and reorganization energies, asymmetry in transition dipole moments and excited state lifetimes. The heterodimer is composed of two molecules modeled as two-level systems coupled by the resonance interaction. The system-bath coupling is taken into account as a modulating factor of the energy gap of the molecular excitation, while the relaxation to the ground state is treated phenomenologically. Comparison of the description of the excitation dynamics modeled using either the Redfield equations (secular and full forms) or the Hierarchical quantum master equation (HQME) is demonstrated and discussed. Possible role of the dimer as an excitation quenching center in photosynthesis self-regulation is discussed. It is concluded that the system-bath interaction rather than the excitonic effect determines the excitation quenching ability of such a dimer.

  14. Dual fluorescence of ellipticine: excited state proton transfer from solvent versus solvent mediated intramolecular proton transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sanghamitra; Pabbathi, Ashok; Sekhar, M Chandra; Samanta, Anunay

    2011-08-25

    Photophysical properties of a natural plant alkaloid, ellipticine (5,11-dimethyl-6H-pyrido[4,3-b]carbazole), which comprises both proton donating and accepting sites, have been studied in different solvents using steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques primarily to understand the origin of dual fluorescence that this molecule exhibits in some specific alcoholic solvents. Ground and excited state calculations based on density functional theory have also been carried out to help interpretation of the experimental data. It is shown that the long-wavelength emission of the molecule is dependent on the hydrogen bond donating ability of the solvent, and in methanol, this emission band arises solely from an excited state reaction. However, in ethylene glycol, both ground and excited state reactions contribute to the long wavelength emission. The time-resolved fluorescence data of the system in methanol and ethylene glycol indicates the presence of two different hydrogen bonded species of ellipticine of which only one participates in the excited state reaction. The rate constant of the excited state reaction in these solvents is estimated to be around 4.2-8.0 × 10(8) s(-1). It appears that the present results are better understood in terms of solvent-mediated excited state intramolecular proton transfer reaction from the pyrrole nitrogen to the pyridine nitrogen leading to the formation of the tautomeric form of the molecule rather than excited state proton transfer from the solvents leading to the formation of the protonated form of ellipticine. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  15. Coherence, energy and charge transfers in de-excitation pathways of electronic excited state of biomolecules in photosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Malik, F. Bary

    2013-01-01

    The observed multiple de-excitation pathways of photo-absorbed electronic excited state in the peridinin–chlorophyll complex, involving both energy and charge transfers among its constituents, are analyzed using the bio-Auger (B-A) theory. It is also shown that the usually used F¨orster–Dexter th...

  16. Excited state dynamics of liquid water near the surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schultz Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Time resolved photoelectron spectroscopy explores the excited state dynamics of liquid water in presence of cations close to the surface. A transient hydrated electroncation complex is observed.

  17. Electron transfer mechanism and photochemistry of ferrioxalate induced by excitation in the charge transfer band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Hua; Tomov, Ivan V; Rentzepis, Peter M

    2008-03-17

    The photoredox reaction of ferrioxalate after 266/267 nm excitation in the charge transfer band has been studied by means of ultrafast extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis, optical transient spectroscopy, and quantum chemistry calculations. The Fe-O bond length changes combined with the transient spectra and kinetics have been measured and in combination with ultrahigh frequency density functional theory (UHF/DFT) calculations are used to determine the photochemical mechanism for the Fe(III) to Fe(II) redox reaction. The present data and the results obtained with 266/267 nm excitations strongly suggest that the primary reaction is the dissociation of the Fe-O bond before intramolecular electron transfer occurs. Low quantum yield electron photodetachment from ferrioxalate has also been observed.

  18. Excitation of Terahertz Charge Transfer Plasmons in Metallic Fractal Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadivand, Arash; Gerislioglu, Burak; Sinha, Raju; Vabbina, Phani Kiran; Karabiyik, Mustafa; Pala, Nezih

    2017-08-01

    There have been extensive researches on terahertz (THz) plasmonic structures supporting resonant modes to demonstrate nano and microscale devices with high efficiency and responsivity as well as frequency selectivity. Here, using antisymmetric plasmonic fractal Y-shaped (FYS) structures as building blocks, we introduce a highly tunable four-member fractal assembly to support charge transfer plasmons (CTPs) and classical dipolar resonant modes with significant absorption cross section in the THz domain. We first present that the unique geometrical nature of the FYS system and corresponding spectral response allow for supporting intensified dipolar plasmonic modes under polarised light exposure in a standalone structure. In addition to classical dipolar mode, for the very first time, we demonstrated CTPs in the THz domain due to the direct shuttling of the charges across the metallic fractal microantenna which led to sharp resonant absorption peaks. Using both numerical and experimental studies, we have investigated and confirmed the excitation of the CTP modes and highly tunable spectral response of the proposed plasmonic fractal structure. This understanding opens new and promising horizons for tightly integrated THz devices with high efficiency and functionality.

  19. Two-Photon Excitation of Conjugated Molecules in Solution: Spectroscopy and Excited-State Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elles, Christopher G.; Houk, Amanda L.; de Wergifosse, Marc; Krylov, Anna

    2017-06-01

    We examine the two-photon absorption (2PA) spectroscopy and ultrafast excited-state dynamics of several conjugated molecules in solution. By controlling the relative wavelength and polarization of the two photons, the 2PA measurements provide a more sensitive means of probing the electronic structure of a molecule compared with traditional linear absorption spectra. We compare experimental spectra of trans-stilbene, cis-stilbene, and phenanthrene in solution with the calculated spectra of the isolated molecules using EOM-EE-CCSD. The calculated spectra show good agreement with the low-energy region of the experimental spectra (below 6 eV) after suppressing transitions with strong Rydberg character and accounting for solvent and method-dependent shifts of the valence transitions. We also monitor the excited state dynamics following two-photon excitation to high-lying valence states of trans-stilbene up to 6.5 eV. The initially excited states rapidly relax to the lowest singlet excited state and then follow the same reaction path as observed following direct one-photon excitation to the lowest absorption band at 4.0 eV.

  20. Excited-state dynamics of hybrid multichromophoric systems: toward an excitation wavelength control of the charge separation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, Natalie; Duvanel, Guillaume; Perez-Velasco, Alejandro; Maity, Santanu; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan; Vauthey, Eric

    2009-07-23

    The photophysical properties of two hybrid multichromophoric systems consisting of an oligophenylethynyl (OPE) scaffold decorated by 10 red or blue naphthalene diimides (NDIs) have been investigated using femtosecond spectroscopy. Ultrafast charge separation was observed with both red and blue systems. However, the nature of the charge-separated state and its lifetime were found to differ substantially. For the red system, electron transfer occurs from the OPE scaffold to an NDI unit, independently of whether the OPE or an NDI is initially excited. However, charge separation upon OPE excitation is about 10 times faster, and takes place with a 100 fs time constant. The average lifetime of the ensuing charge-separated state amounts to about 650 ps. Charge separation in the blue system depends on which of the OPE scaffold or an NDI is excited. In the first case, an electron is transferred from the OPE to an NDI and the hole subsequently shifts to another NDI unit, whereas in the second case symmetry-breaking charge separation between two NDI units occurs. Although the charges are located on two NDIs in both cases, different recombination dynamics are observed. This is explained by the location of the ionic NDI moieties that depends on the charge separation pathway, hence on the excitation wavelength. The very different dynamics observed with red and blue systems can be accounted for by the oxidation potentials of the respective NDIs that are higher and lower than that of the OPE scaffold. Because of this, the relative energies of the two charge-separated states (hole on the OPE or an NDI) are inverted.

  1. Coherent excitation transferring via dark state in light-harvesting process

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, H; Sun, C P

    2011-01-01

    We study the light absorption and energy transferring in a donor-acceptor system with a bionic structure. In the optimal case with uniform couplings, it is found that the quantum dynamics of this seemingly complicated system is reduced as a three-level system of $\\Lambda$-type. With this observation, we show that the dark state based electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT) effect could enhance the energy transfer efficiency, through a quantum interference effect suppressing the excited population of the donors. We estimate the optimal parameters of the system to achieve the maximum output power. The splitting behavior of maximum power may be used to explain the phenomenon that the photosynthesis systems mainly absorb two colors of light.

  2. Reaction dynamics of electronically excited alkali atoms with simple molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, P.S.; Mestdagh, J.; Schmidt, H.; Vernon, M.F. Covinsky, M.H.; Balko, B.A.; Lee, Y.T.

    1985-09-01

    The reactions of electronically excited sodium atoms with simple molecules have been studied in crossed molecular beams experiments. Electronically excited Na(3/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/,4/sup 2/D/sub 5/2/, and 5/sup 2/S/sub 1/2) were produced by optical pumping using single frequency dye lasers. The effects of the symmetry, and the orientation and alignment of the excited orbital on the chemical reactivity, and detailed information on the reaction dynamics were derived from measurements of the product angular and velocity distributions.

  3. Reaction dynamics of electronically excited alkali atoms with simpler molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, P. S.; Mestdagh, J. M.; Schmidt, H.; Vernon, M. F.; Covinsky, M. H.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1985-05-01

    The reactions of electronically excited sodium atoms with simple molecules have been studied in crossed molecular beams experiments. Electronically excited Na(3(2)P(sub 3/2), 4(2)D(sub 5/2), and 5(2)S(sub 1/2) were produced by optical pumping using single frequency dye lasers. The effects of the symmetry, and the orientation and alignment of the excited orbital on the chemical reactivity, and detailed information on the reaction dynamics were derived from measurements of the product angular and velocity distributions.

  4. Nonlinear Dynamical Analysis for the Cable Excited with Parametric and Forced Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Z. Qian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the deck vibration effect on the cable in cable-stayed bridge, using nonlinear structure dynamics theory, the nonlinear dynamical equation for the stayed cable excited with deck vibration is proposed. Research shows that the vertical vibration of the deck has a combined parametric and forced excitation effect on the cable when the angle of the cable is taken into consideration. Using multiscale method, the 1/2 principle parametric resonance is studied and the bifurcation equation is obtained. Despite the parameters analysis, the bifurcation characters of the dynamical system are studied. At last, by means of numerical method and software MATHMATIC, the effect rules of system parameters to the dynamical behavior of the system are studied, and some useful conclusions are obtained.

  5. Ab Initio molecular dynamics with excited electrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alavi, A.; Kohanoff, J.; Parrinello, M.; Frenkel, D.

    1994-01-01

    A method to do ab initio molecular dynamics suitable for metallic and electronically hot systems is described. It is based on a density functional which is costationary with the finite-temperature functional of Mermin, with state being included with possibly fractional occupation numbers.

  6. Photophysical Model of 10-Hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline: Internal Conversion and Excited State Intramolecular Proton Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Junghwa; Joo, Taiha [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Photophysics of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline (HBQ) has been in controversy, in particular, on the nature of the electronic states before and after the excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT), even though the dynamics and mechanism of the ESIPT have been well established. We report highly time resolved fluorescence spectra over the full emission frequency regions of the enol and keto isomers and the anisotropy in time domain to determine the accurate rates of the population decay, spectral relaxation and anisotropy decay of the keto isomer. We have shown that the ∼300 fs component observed frequently in ESIPT dynamics arises from the S{sub 2}→S{sub 1} internal conversion in the reaction product keto isomer and that the ESIPT occurs from the enol isomer in S{sub 1} state to the keto isomer in S{sub 2} state.

  7. Dynamics of Microbeams under Multi-Frequency Excitations

    KAUST Repository

    Ibrahim, Alwathiqbellah

    2017-01-24

    This paper presents an investigation of the dynamics of microbeams under multiple harmonic electrostatic excitation frequencies. First, the response of a cantilever microbeam to two alternating current (AC) source excitation is examined. We show by simulations the response of the microbeam at primary resonance (near the fundamental natural frequency) and at secondary resonances (near half, superharmonic, and twice, subharmonic, the fundamental natural frequency). A multimode Galerkin method combined with the Euler-Bernoulli beam equation, accounting for the nonlinear electrostatic force, has been used to develop a reduced order model. The response of the cantilever microbeam to three AC source excitation is also investigated and shown as a promising technique to enhance the bandwidth of resonators. Finally, an experimental study of a clamped-clamped microbeam is conducted, demonstrating the multi-frequency excitation resonances using two, three, and four AC sources.

  8. Differential and total cross sections for charge transfer and transfer-excitation in ion-helium collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, S.; Mondal, A.; Samaddar, S.; Mandal, C. R.; Purkait, M.

    2017-09-01

    Total cross sections for single charge transfer in collisions of multicharged bare ions with ground-state helium atoms at incident energy ranging from 40 to 5000 keV/amu have been calculated in the framework of a four-body model of final channel distorted-wave (FC-DW-4B) approximation. In this formalism, distortion in the final channel related to the Coulomb continuum of the target and the Coulomb interaction between the passive electron in the target with the projectile are included. In all cases, total single electron-capture cross sections have been calculated by summing over all contributions up to n =3 shells and subshells. It has been observed that the contribution of the capture cross sections into excited states have insignificant contributions for symmetric collisions. Comprehensive comparisons are made between the four body model of boundary corrected continuum intermediate-state approximations [Phys. Rev. A 83, 032706 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.83.032706] and the present FC-DW-4B model. The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the relative importance of dynamic electron correlation and the role of passive electron in the target at intermediate and high impact energies. In addition, projectile angular differential cross sections (DCS) for charge transfer and transfer-excitation in p -He collisions are calculated at different impact energies. At low projectile energies, the present DCS data exhibits the typical steeply decreasing dependence on the projectile scattering angles, whereas at high impact energies, the double-scattering region centered on the Thomas angle is obtained. Detailed comparisons with the available experimental data and other theories are reported with the purpose of further assessing the relevance of the present model at different impact energies. Overall, the calculated cross sections show good agreement with the available experimental findings.

  9. Dynamic Heat Transfer Model of Refrigerated Foodstuff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Junping; Risum, Jørgen; Thybo, Claus

    2006-01-01

    their temperature relation. This paper discusses the dynamic heat transfer model of foodstuff inside the display cabinet, one-dimensional dynamic model is developed, and the Explicit Finite Difference Method is applied, to handle the unsteady heat transfer problem with phase change, as well as time varying boundary...

  10. Dynamics of UV-excited uracil, thymine, and cytosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudock, Hanneli

    The excited state dynamics of nucleic acids has been a subject of much experimental and theoretical interest. Nucleic acid bases readily absorb UV radiation, which can lead to mutagenic dimer formation. The dynamics of UV-excited nucleic acids is an important step in understanding how these dimers form. The pyrimidine bases (uracil, thymine, and cytosine) have been studied with ab initio multiple spawning molecular dynamics and high level electronic structure methods. This work has involved both gas-phase and aqueous dynamics as well as simulation of the time-resolved photoelectron spectrum, transient absorption, fluorescence, and reaction rates. With these findings, complete relaxation mechanisms are proposed for the pyrimidines and comparisons are made directly to experimental results.

  11. Vibration transfers to measure the performance of vibration isolated platforms on site using background noise excitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segerink, Franciscus B.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2011-01-01

    This article demonstrates a quick and easy way of quantifying the performance of a vibration-isolated platform. We measure the vibration transfer from floor to table using background noise excitation from the floor. As no excitation device is needed, our setup only requires two identical sensors (in

  12. Dynamical mass transfer in cataclysmic binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melia, Fulvio; Lamb, D. Q.

    1987-01-01

    When a binary comes into contact and mass transfer begins, orbital angular momentum is stored in the accretion disk until the disk couples tidally to the binary system. Taam and McDermott (1987) have suggested that this leads to unstable dynamical mass transfer in many cataclysmic variables in which mass transfer would otherwise be stable, and that it explains the gap between 2 and 3 h in the orbital period distribution of these systems. Here the consequences of this hypothesis for the evolution of cataclysmic binaries are explored. It is found that systems coming into contact longward of the period gap undergo one or more episodes of dynamical mass transfer.

  13. Classical Dynamics of Excitations of Bose Condensates in Anisotropic Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Robert

    This lecture discusses some aspects of the dynamics of the collective and single-particle excitations at zero temperature of Bose-Einstein condensates of alkali-vapors in magnetic traps. We shall discuss those aspects which can be understood by taking the short-wavelength or 'eikonal' limit of the excitations. Trapped Bose-Einstein condensates can be excited experimentally either directly via periodic modulations of the trap potential or by scattering light off the condensate. My discussion here will closely follow some theoretical work published in [1-3] that has recently been done in collaboration with Andras Csordas and Peter Szepfalusy at the Research Institute for solid State Physics and Optics in Budapest, Hungary and with Martin Fliesser at the University of Essen, Germany.

  14. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    We will use the twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) model to explain the photo-induced charge transfer ..... full width at half maxima (Γ) are expressed in 103 cm–1. –ΔGr are in kJ mol–1 units. PFH: per- ..... incorrect values of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters calculated using these reaction times, leading to ...

  15. Dynamic Wireless Power Transfer - Grid Impacts Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markel, Tony; Meintz, Andrew; Gonder, Jeff

    2015-12-04

    This presentation discusses the current status of analysis of the electricity grid impacts of a dynamic wireless power transfer system deployed to the Atlanta region on select high traffic roadway segments.

  16. Variety in excitation energy transfer processes from phycobilisomes to photosystems I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yoshifumi; Aikawa, Shimpei; Niwa, Kyosuke; Abe, Tomoko; Murakami, Akio; Kondo, Akihiko; Akimoto, Seiji

    2017-09-01

    The light-harvesting antennas of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms capture light energy and transfer it to the reaction centers of their photosystems. The light-harvesting antennas of cyanobacteria and red algae, called phycobilisomes (PBSs), supply light energy to both photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII). However, the excitation energy transfer processes from PBS to PSI and PSII are not understood in detail. In the present study, the energy transfer processes from PBS to PSs in various cyanobacteria and red algae were examined in vivo by selectively exciting their PSs or PBSs, and measuring the resulting picosecond to nanosecond time-resolved fluorescences. By observing the delayed fluorescence spectrum of PBS-selective excitation in Arthrospira platensis, we demonstrated that energy transfer from PBS to PSI via PSII (PBS→PSII→PSI transfer) occurs even for PSI trimers. The contribution of PBS→PSII→PSI transfer was species dependent, being largest in the wild-type of red alga Pyropia yezoensis (formerly Porphyra yezoensis) and smallest in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Comparing the time-resolved fluorescence after PSs- and PBS-selective excitation, we revealed that light energy flows from CP43 to CP47 by energy transfer between the neighboring PSII monomers in PBS-PSII supercomplexes. We also suggest two pathways of energy transfer: direct energy transfer from PBS to PSI (PBS→PSI transfer) and indirect transfer through PSII (PBS→PSII→PSI transfer). We also infer that PBS→PSI transfer conveys light energy to a lower-energy red chlorophyll than PBS→PSII→PSI transfer.

  17. Nonlinear analysis of magnetization dynamics excited by spin Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of exciting self-oscillation in a perpendicular ferromagnet by the spin Hall effect on the basis of a nonlinear analysis of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. In the self-oscillation state, the energy supplied by the spin torque during a precession on a constant energy curve should equal the dissipation due to damping. Also, the current to balance the spin torque and the damping torque in the self-oscillation state should be larger than the critical current to destabilize the initial state. We find that these conditions in the spin Hall system are not satisfied by deriving analytical solutions of the energy supplied by the spin transfer effect and the dissipation due to the damping from the nonlinear LLG equation. This indicates that the self-oscillation of a perpendicular ferromagnet cannot be excited solely by the spin Hall torque.

  18. Excitation energy transfer in a classical analogue of photosynthetic antennae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mančal, Tomáš

    2013-09-26

    We formulate a classical pure dephasing system-bath interaction model in a full correspondence to the well-studied quantum model of natural light-harvesting antennae. The equations of motion of our classical model not only represent the correct classical analogy to the quantum description of excitonic systems, but they also have exactly the same functional form. We demonstrate derivation of classical dissipation and relaxation tensor in second order perturbation theory. We find that the only difference between the classical and quantum descriptions is in the interpretation of the state and in certain limitations imposed on the parameters of the model by classical physics. The effects of delocalization, transfer pathway interference, and the transition from coherent to diffusive transfer can be found already in the classical realm. The only qualitatively new effect occurring in quantum systems is the preference for a downhill energy transfer and the resulting possibility of trapping the energy in the lowest energy state.

  19. The Role of Electronic Excitations on Chemical Reaction Dynamics at Metal, Semiconductor and Nanoparticle Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tully, John C. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2017-06-10

    Chemical reactions are often facilitated and steered when carried out on solid surfaces, essential for applications such as heterogeneous catalysis, solar energy conversion, corrosion, materials processing, and many others. A critical factor that can determine the rates and pathways of chemical reactions at surfaces is the efficiency and specificity of energy transfer; how fast does energy move around and where does it go? For reactions on insulator surfaces energy transfer generally moves in and out of vibrations of the adsorbed molecule and the underlying substrate. By contrast, on metal surfaces, metallic nanoparticles and semiconductors, another pathway for energy flow opens up, excitation and de-excitation of electrons. This so-called “nonadiabatic” mechanism often dominates the transfer of energy and can directly impact the course of a chemical reaction. Conventional computational methods such as molecular dynamics simulation do not account for this nonadiabatic behavior. The current DOE-BES funded project has focused on developing the underlying theoretical foundation and the computational methodology for the prediction of nonadiabatic chemical reaction dynamics at surfaces. The research has successfully opened up new methodology and new applications for molecular simulation. In particular, over the last three years, the “Electronic Friction” theory, pioneered by the PI, has now been developed into a stable and accurate computational method that is sufficiently practical to allow first principles “on-the-fly” simulation of chemical reaction dynamics at metal surfaces.

  20. Solvent-dependent excited-state hydrogen transfer and intersystem crossing in 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)-benzothiazole

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede

    2015-02-12

    The excited-state intramolecular hydrogen transfer (ESIHT) of 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl) benzothiazole (HBT) has been investigated in a series of nonpolar, polar aprotic, and polar protic solvents. A variety of state-of-the-art experimental methods were employed, including femto- and nanosecond transient absorption and fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy with broadband capabilities. We show that the dynamics and mechanism of ESIHT of the singlet excited HBT are strongly solvent-dependent. In nonpolar solvents, the data demonstrate that HBT molecules adopt a closed form stabilized by O-H⋯N chelated hydrogen bonds with no twisting angle, and the photoinduced H transfer occurs within 120 fs, leading to the formation of a keto tautomer. In polar solvents, owing to dipole-dipole cross talk and hydrogen bonding interactions, the H transfer process is followed by ultrafast nonradiative deactivation channels, including ultrafast internal conversion (IC) and intersystem crossing (ISC). This is likely to be driven by the twisting motion around the C-C bond between the hydroxyphenyl and thiazole moieties, facilitating the IC back to the enol ground state or to the keto triplet state. In addition, our femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence experiments indicate, for the first time, that the lifetime of the enol form in ACN is approximately 280 fs. This observation indicates that the solvent plays a crucial role in breaking the H bond and deactivating the excited state of the HBT. Interestingly, the broadband transient absorption and fluorescence up-conversion data clearly demonstrate that the intermolecular proton transfer from the excited HBT to the DMSO solvent is about 190 fs, forming the HBT anion excited state.

  1. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction in non-aqueous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    concentration dependent reaction rate constant of a. TICT reaction already measured in bulk electrolyte solutions.44–46 Here, we report such a study where photo-induced intramolecular charge transfer reaction has been investigated in AOT/heptane non-aqueous reverse micelles at different Ws values, and also in.

  2. Photoluminescence and excited states dynamics in PbWO4:Pr3+ crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Auffray, E; Shalapska, T; Zazubovich, S

    2014-01-01

    Luminescence and photo-thermally stimulated defects creation processes are studied for a Pr3+-doped PbWO4 crystal at 4.2-400 K under excitation in the band-to-band, exciton, and charge-transfer transitions regions, as well as in the Pr3+-related absorption bands. Emission spectra of Pr3+ centers depend on the excitation energy, indicating the presence of Pr3+ centers of two types. The origin of these centers is discussed. The 2.03-2.06 eV emission, arising from the D-1(2) -> H-3(4) transitions of Pr3+ ions, is found to be effectively excited in a broad intense absorption band peaking at 4.2 K at 3.92 eV. By analogy with some other Pe(3+)-doped compounds, this band is suggested to arise from an electron transfer from an impurity Pr3+ ion to the crystal lattice W6+ or Pb2+ ions. The dynamics of the Pr3+-related excited states is clarified. In the PbWO4:Pr crystal studied, the concentration of single oxygen and lead vacancies as traps for electrons and holes is found to be negligible.

  3. Dynamics of two-electron excitations in helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, C.D.; Menzel, A.; Frigo, S.P. [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Excitation of both electrons in helium offers a unique window for studying electron correlation at the most basic level in an atom in which these two electrons and the nucleus form a three-body system. The authors utilized the first light available at the U-8 undulator-SGM monochromator beamline to investigate the dynamic parameters, partial cross sections, differential cross sections, and photoelectron angular distribution parameters ({beta}), with a high resolving power for the photon beam and at the highly differential level afforded by the use of their electron spectrometer. In parallel, they carried out detailed calculations of the relevant properties by a theoretical approach that is based on the hyperspherical close-coupling method. Partial photoionization cross sections {sigma}{sub n}, and photoelectron angular distributions {beta}{sub n} were measured for all possible final ionic states He{sup +}(n) in the region of the double excitations N(K,T){sup A} up to the N=5 threshold. At a photon energy bandpass of 12 meV below the thresholds N=3, 4, and 5, this level of differentiation offers the most critical assessment of the dynamics of the two-electron excitations to date. The experimental data were seen to be very well described by the most advanced theoretical calculations.

  4. The reaction dynamics of alkali dimer molecules and electronically excited alkali atoms with simple molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Hongtao [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-12-01

    This dissertation presents the results from the crossed molecular beam studies on the dynamics of bimolecular collisions in the gas phase. The primary subjects include the interactions of alkali dimer molecules with simple molecules, and the inelastic scattering of electronically excited alkali atoms with O2. The reaction of the sodium dimers with oxygen molecules is described in Chapter 2. Two reaction pathways were observed for this four-center molecule-molecule reaction, i.e. the formations of NaO2 + Na and NaO + NaO. NaO2 products exhibit a very anisotropic angular distribution, indicating a direct spectator stripping mechanism for this reaction channel. The NaO formation follows the bond breaking of O2, which is likely a result of a charge transfer from Na2 to the excited state orbital of O2-. The scattering of sodium dimers from ammonium and methanol produced novel molecules, NaNH3 and Na(CH3OH), respectively. These experimental observations, as well as the discussions on the reaction dynamics and the chemical bonding within these molecules, will be presented in Chapter 3. The lower limits for the bond dissociation energies of these molecules are also obtained. Finally, Chapter 4 describes the energy transfer between oxygen molecules and electronically excited sodium atoms.

  5. Response analysis of the dynamic excitation of hen eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libor Severa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Commercially produced hen eggs have been tested by means of dynamic excitation of the egg-shells with following analysis of their response. The falling steel ball have been chosen as a exciting instrument and the laser vibrometer have been used as a measuring device for the egg response. The reproductibility of the experiments has been relatively high and the surface velocity has been found to be significantly dependent on the position around the meridian. Analysed frequency spectrum has shown the peak frequency and frequency history. Proposed numerical model has demonstrated reasonable agreement with experimental results and can be used as an effective tool in modelling of analogous or similar experiments.

  6. Adaptive Dynamic Surface Control for Generator Excitation Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiu-yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For the generator excitation control system which is equipped with static var compensator (SVC and unknown parameters, a novel adaptive dynamic surface control scheme is proposed based on neural network and tracking error transformed function with the following features: (1 the transformation of the excitation generator model to the linear systems is omitted; (2 the prespecified performance of the tracking error can be guaranteed by combining with the tracking error transformed function; (3 the computational burden is greatly reduced by estimating the norm of the weighted vector of neural network instead of the weighted vector itself; therefore, it is more suitable for the real time control; and (4 the explosion of complicity problem inherent in the backstepping control can be eliminated. It is proved that the new scheme can make the system semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded. Simulation results show the effectiveness of this control scheme.

  7. Excited state charge transfer reaction in (mixed solvent + electrolyte ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    charge transfer reaction of 4-(1-azetidinyl)benzonitrile (P4C) in two sets of mixed solvents, (1-propanol + ethyl acetate) and (propylene ...... Harun Al Rasid Gazi and Ranjit Biswas. PrOH+EA. Normalized F.I.. 0. 1. Normalized F.I.. 0. 1. -3. 0. 3. 3000. 4000. 5000. 6000. Residual. -3. 0. 3. Residual. -3. 0. 3. Time(ps). 3000. 4000.

  8. Optimal Dynamical Range of Excitable Networks at Criticality

    CERN Document Server

    Kinouchi, Osame

    2006-01-01

    A recurrent idea in the study of complex systems is that optimal information processing is to be found near bifurcation points or phase transitions. However, this heuristic hypothesis has few (if any) concrete realizations where a standard and biologically relevant quantity is optimized at criticality. Here we give a clear example of such a phenomenon: a network of excitable elements has its sensitivity and dynamic range maximized at the critical point of a non-equilibrium phase transition. Our results are compatible with the essential role of gap junctions in olfactory glomeruli and retinal ganglionar cell output. Synchronization and global oscillations also appear in the network dynamics. We propose that the main functional role of electrical coupling is to provide an enhancement of dynamic range, therefore allowing the coding of information spanning several orders of magnitude. The mechanism could provide a microscopic neural basis for psychophysical laws.

  9. Photoinduced charge-transfer electronic excitation of tetracyanoethylene/tetramethylethylene complex in dichloromethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Long-Kun; Bi, Ting-Jun; Ming, Mei-Jun; Wang, Jing-Bo; Li, Xiang-Yuan

    2017-07-01

    Based on the previous work on nonequilibrium solvation model by the authors, Intermolecular charge-transfer electronic excitation of tetracyanoethylene (TCE)/tetramethylethylene (TME) π -stacked complex in dichloromethane (DCM) has been investigated. For weak interaction correction, dispersion corrected functional DFT-D3 is adopted for geometry optimization. In order to identify the excitation metric, dipole moment components of each Cartesian direction, atomic charge, charge separation and Δr index are analyzed for TCE/TME complex. Calculation shows that the calculated excitation energy is dependent on the functional choice, when conjuncted with suitable time-dependent density functional, the modified nonequilibrium expression gives satisfied results for intermolecular charge-transfer electronic excitation.

  10. Manipulating charge transfer excited state relaxation and spin crossover in iron coordination complexes with ligand substitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenkai; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Alonso-Mori, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    state lifetime of iron based complexes due to spin crossover-the extremely fast intersystem crossing and internal conversion to high spin metal-centered excited states. We revitalize a 30 year old synthetic strategy for extending the MLCT excited state lifetimes of iron complexes by making mixed ligand...... iron complexes with four cyanide (CN-;) ligands and one 2,2′-bipyridine (bpy) ligand. This enables MLCT excited state and metal-centered excited state energies to be manipulated with partial independence and provides a path to suppressing spin crossover. We have combined X-ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL......) Kβ hard X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy with femtosecond time-resolved UV-visible absorption spectroscopy to characterize the electronic excited state dynamics initiated by MLCT excitation of [Fe(CN)4(bpy)]2-. The two experimental techniques are highly complementary; the time-resolved UV...

  11. Sub-50 fs excited state dynamics of 6-chloroguanine upon deep ultraviolet excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sayan; Puranik, Mrinalini

    2016-05-18

    The photophysical properties of natural nucleobases and their respective nucleotides are ascribed to the sub-picosecond lifetime of their first singlet states in the UV-B region (260-350 nm). Electronic transitions of the ππ* type, which are stronger than those in the UV-B region, lie at the red edge of the UV-C range (100-260 nm) in all isolated nucleobases. The lowest energetic excited states in the UV-B region of nucleobases have been investigated using a plethora of experimental and theoretical methods in gas and solution phases. The sub-picosecond lifetime of these molecules is not a general attribute of all nucleobases but specific to the five primary nucleobases and a few xanthine and methylated derivatives. To determine the overall UV photostability, we aim to understand the effect of more energetic photons lying in the UV-C region on nucleobases. To determine the UV-C initiated photophysics of a nucleobase system, we chose a halogen substituted purine, 6-chloroguanine (6-ClG), that we had investigated previously using resonance Raman spectroscopy. We have performed quantitative measurements of the resonance Raman cross-section across the Bb absorption band (210-230 nm) and constructed the Raman excitation profiles. We modeled the excitation profiles using Lee and Heller's time-dependent theory of resonance Raman intensities to extract the initial excited state dynamics of 6-ClG within 30-50 fs after photoexcitation. We found that imidazole and pyrimidine rings of 6-ClG undergo expansion and contraction, respectively, following photoexcitation to the Bb state. The amount of distortions of the excited state structure from that of the ground state structure is reflected by the total internal reorganization energy that is determined at 112 cm(-1). The contribution of the inertial component of the solvent response towards the total reorganization energy was obtained at 1220 cm(-1). In addition, our simulation also yields an instantaneous response of the first

  12. Tracking the charge and spin dynamics of electronic excited states in inorganic complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, Kelly

    2015-03-01

    Inorganic complexes have many advantageous properties for solar energy applications, including strong visible absorption and photocatalytic activity. Whether used as a photocatalyst or a photosensitizer, the lifetime of electronic excited states and the earth abundance of the molecular components represent a key property for solar energy applications. These dual needs have undermined the usefulness of many coordination compounds. Isoelectronic iron and ruthenium based complexes represent a clear example. Ru-polypyridal based molecules have been the workhorse of solar energy related research and dye sensitized solar cells for decades, but the replacement of low abundance Ru with Fe leads to million-fold reductions in metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited state lifetimes. Understanding the origin of this million-fold reduction in lifetime and how to control excited state relaxation in 3d-metal complexes motivates the work I will discuss. We have used the spin sensitivity of hard x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and the intense femtosecond duration pulses generated by the LCLS x-ray laser to probe the spin dynamics in a series of electronically excited [Fe(CN)6-2N(2,2'-bipyridine)N]2 N - 4 complexes, with N = 1-3. These femtosecond resolution measurements demonstrate that modification of the solvent and ligand environment can lengthen the MLCT excited state lifetime by more than two orders of magnitude. They also verify the role of triplet ligand field excited states in the spin crossover dynamics from singlet to quintet spin configurations. Work supported by the AMOS program within the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. Posture-Dependent Corticomotor Excitability Differs Between the Transferred Biceps in Individuals With Tetraplegia and the Biceps of Nonimpaired Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Carrie L; Rogers, Lynn M; Bednar, Michael S; Bryden, Anne M; Keith, Michael W; Perreault, Eric J; Murray, Wendy M

    2017-04-01

    Following biceps transfer to enable elbow extension in individuals with tetraplegia, motor re-education may be facilitated by greater corticomotor excitability. Arm posture modulates corticomotor excitability of the nonimpaired biceps. If arm posture also modulates excitability of the transferred biceps, posture may aid in motor re-education. Our objective was to determine whether multi-joint arm posture affects corticomotor excitability of the transferred biceps similar to the nonimpaired biceps. We also aimed to determine whether corticomotor excitability of the transferred biceps is related to elbow extension strength and muscle length. Corticomotor excitability was assessed in 7 arms of individuals with tetraplegia and biceps transfer using transcranial magnetic stimulation and compared to biceps excitability of nonimpaired individuals. Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was delivered to the motor cortex with the arm in functional postures at rest. Motor-evoked potential amplitude was recorded via surface electromyography. Elbow moment was recorded during maximum isometric extension trials, and muscle length was estimated using a biomechanical model. Arm posture modulated corticomotor excitability of the transferred biceps differently than the nonimpaired biceps. Elbow extension strength was positively related and muscle length was unrelated, respectively, to motor-evoked potential amplitude across the arms with biceps transfer. Corticomotor excitability of the transferred biceps is modulated by arm posture and may contribute to strength outcomes after tendon transfer. Future work should determine whether modulating corticomotor excitability via posture promotes motor re-education during the rehabilitative period following surgery.

  14. Femtosecond Charge Transfer Dynamics of a Modified DNA Base: 2-Aminopurine in Complexes with Nucleotides

    OpenAIRE

    Fiebig, Torsten; Wan, Chaozhi; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2002-01-01

    As a fluorescent isomer of adenine, 2-aminopurine (Ap) is a powerful probe of DNA dynamics and DNA-mediated charge transfer processes. Here, we report studies with femtosecond resolution of the excited-state dynamics of Ap in various solvents and in bimolecular complexes with nucleotides. Using time-resolved transient absorption and fluorescence up-conversion methods we identify charge transfer as the origin for the quenching of the Ap fluorescence by all four DNA nucleotides. The direction o...

  15. Scientific Computation Application Partnerships in Materials and Chemical Sciences, Charge Transfer and Charge Transport in Photoactivated Systems, Developing Electron-Correlated Methods for Excited State Structure and Dynamics in the NWChem Software Suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, Christopher J. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-11-12

    Charge transfer and charge transport in photoactivated systems are fundamental processes that underlie solar energy capture, solar energy conversion, and photoactivated catalysis, both organometallic and enzymatic. We developed methods, algorithms, and software tools needed for reliable treatment of the underlying physics for charge transfer and charge transport, an undertaking with broad applicability to the goals of the fundamental-interaction component of the Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences and the exascale initiative of the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research.

  16. Assessment of quantum chemical methods and basis sets for excitation energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, Reinhold F. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Wuerzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Pfister, Johannes; Zhao Hongmei [Institute of Organic Chemistry, University of Wuerzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Engels, Bernd [Institute of Organic Chemistry, University of Wuerzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany)], E-mail: bernd@chemie.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2008-05-04

    The validity of several standard quantum chemical approaches and other models for the prediction of exciton energy transfer is investigated using the HOMO-LUMO excited states of benzene dimer as an example. The configuration interaction singles (CIS), time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TD-HF), time dependent density functional theroy (TD-DFT), and complete-active-space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) methods are applied with a supermolecule approach and compared to the previously established monomer transition density method and the ideal dipole approximation. Strong and physically incorrect admixture of charge-transfer states makes TD-DFT inappropriate for investigations of potential energy surfaces in such dimer systems. CIS, TD-HF and CASSCF perform qualitatively correct. TD-HF seems to be a particularly appropriate method due to its general applicability and overall good performance for the excited state and for transition properties. Double-zeta basis sets with polarisation functions are found to be sufficient to predict transfer rates of dipole allowed excitations. Efficient excitation energy transfer is predicted between degenerate excited states while avoided curve crossings of nearly spaced {pi}-aggregates are identified as a possible trapping mechanism.

  17. Electronic excitation energy transfer and nonstationary processes in KH2PO4:Tl crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikov, I. N.; Pustovarov, V. A.

    2017-04-01

    We report the results of our experimental study and numerical simulation of the electronic excitation energy transfer to impurity centers under conditions where nonstationary processes take place in the hydrogen sublattice of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH2PO4) single crystals doped with mercury-like Tl+ ions (KDP:Tl). We present the experimental results of our investigation of the decay kinetics of the transient optical absorption (100 ns-50 s) of intrinsic defects in the hydrogen sublattice of KDP:Tl obtained by pulsed absorption spectroscopy and the results of our study of the dynamics of the change in steady-state luminescence intensity with irradiation time (1-5000 s). To explain the transfer of the energy being released during electron recombination involving intrinsic KDP:Tl lattice defects, we formulate a mathematical model for the transfer of this energy to impurity Tl+ luminescence centers. Within the model being developed, we present the systems of differential balance equations describing the nonstationary processes in the electron subsystem and the hydrogen sublattice; provide a technique for calculating the pair correlation functions Y( r, t) of dissimilar defects based on the solution of the Smoluchowski equation for the system of mobile hydrogen sublattice defects; calculate the time-dependent reaction rate constants K( t) for various experimental conditions; and outline the peculiarities and results of the model parametrization based on our experimental data. Based on our investigation, the dramatic and significant effect of a gradual inertial increase by a factor of 50-100 in steady-state luminescence intensity in the 4.5-eV band in KDP:Tl crystals due to the luminescence of mercury-like Tl+ ions has been explained qualitatively and quantitatively.

  18. Photochemistry and electron-transfer mechanism of transition metal oxalato complexes excited in the charge transfer band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Hua; Tomov, Ivan V; Ding, Xunliang; Rentzepis, Peter M

    2008-10-07

    The photoredox reaction of trisoxalato cobaltate (III) has been studied by means of ultrafast extended x-ray absorption fine structure and optical transient spectroscopy after excitation in the charge-transfer band with 267-nm femtosecond pulses. The Co-O transient bond length changes and the optical spectra and kinetics have been measured and compared with those of ferrioxalate. Data presented here strongly suggest that both of these metal oxalato complexes operate under similar photoredox reaction mechanisms where the primary reaction involves the dissociation of a metal-oxygen bond. These results also indicate that excitation in the charge-transfer band is not a sufficient condition for the intramolecular electron transfer to be the dominant photochemistry reaction mechanism.

  19. Investigations into photo-excited state dynamics in colloidal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gaurav

    Colloidal Quantum dots (QDs) have garnered considerable scientific and technological interest as a promising material for next generation solar cells, photo-detectors, lasers, bright light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and reliable biomarkers. However, for practical realization of these applications, it is crucial to understand the complex photo-physics of QDs that are very sensitive to surface chemistry and chemical surroundings. Depending on the excitation density, QDs can support single or multiple excitations. The first part of this talk addresses evolution of QD excited state dynamics in the regime of low excitation intensity. We use temperature-resolved time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to study exciton dynamics from picoseconds to microseconds and use kinetic modeling based on classical electron transfer to show the effect of surface trap states on dynamics of ground-state exciton manifold in core-shell CdSe/CdS QDs. We show that the thickness of CdS shell plays an important role in interaction of CdSe core exciton states with nanocrystal environment, and find that a thicker shell can minimize the mixing of QD exciton states with surface trap states. I will then present an investigation into the dynamics of multiply-excited states in QDs. One of the key challenges in QD spectroscopy is to reliably distinguish multi- from single-excited states that have similar lifetime components and spectroscopic signatures. I will describe the development of a novel multi-pulse fluorescence technique to selectively probe multi-excited states in ensemble QD samples and determine the nature of the multi-excited state contributing to the total fluorescence even in the limit of low fluorescent yields. We find that in our sample of CdSe/CdS core/shell QDs the multi-excited emission is dominated by emissive trion states rather than biexcitons. Next, I will discuss the application of this technique to probe exciton-plasmon coupling in layered hybrid films of QD/gold nanoparticles

  20. Ferroelastic domain switching dynamics under electrical and mechanical excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Britson, Jason; Nelson, Christopher T; Jokisaari, Jacob R; Duan, Chen; Trassin, Morgan; Baek, Seung-Hyub; Guo, Hua; Li, Linze; Wang, Yiran; Chu, Ying-Hao; Minor, Andrew M; Eom, Chang-Beom; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Chen, Long-Qing; Pan, Xiaoqing

    2014-05-02

    In thin film ferroelectric devices, switching of ferroelastic domains can significantly enhance electromechanical response. Previous studies have shown disagreement regarding the mobility or immobility of ferroelastic domain walls, indicating that switching behaviour strongly depends on specific microstructures in ferroelectric systems. Here we study the switching dynamics of individual ferroelastic domains in thin Pb(Zr0.2,Ti0.8)O3 films under electrical and mechanical excitations by using in situ transmission electron microscopy and phase-field modelling. We find that ferroelastic domains can be effectively and permanently stabilized by dislocations at the substrate interface while similar domains at free surfaces without pinning dislocations can be removed by either electric or stress fields. For both electrical and mechanical switching, ferroelastic switching is found to occur most readily at the highly active needle points in ferroelastic domains. Our results provide new insights into the understanding of polarization switching dynamics as well as the engineering of ferroelectric devices.

  1. Localization and Targeted Transfer of Atomic-Scale Nonlinear Excitations: Perspectives for Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopidakis, G.; Aubry, S.

    We review nonlinearity-induced localization in discrete systems with emphasis on theory and numerical calculations on models used in materials physics to describe interatomic interactions. We discuss how the concept of discrete breather or intrinsic localized mode could become an important tool for understanding nanoscale phenomena in molecules and solids. A particularly attractive field of application for nonlinear localized excitations is the controlled and directed transport of energy. We discuss the recently proposed targeted transfer of localized excitations based on the concept of nonlinear resonance and its potential applications. As an area for such applications, we present directional ultrafast electron transfer at low temperatures using this selective transfer mechanism and we give examples from biological electron transfer. We finally discuss possible applications in nanotechnology and biomolecules.

  2. Excited-state intramolecular hydrogen transfer (ESIHT) of 1,8-Dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) characterized by ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Omar F.

    2014-05-01

    We combine ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling to investigate the photoinduced excited-state intramolecular hydrogen-transfer dynamics in 1,8-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) in tetrachloroethene, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, and methanol. We analyze the electronic excited states of DHAQ with various possible hydrogen-bonding schemes and provide a general description of the electronic excited-state dynamics based on a systematic analysis of femtosecond UV/vis and UV/IR pump-probe spectroscopic data. Upon photoabsorption at 400 nm, the S 2 electronic excited state is initially populated, followed by a rapid equilibration within 150 fs through population transfer to the S 1 state where DHAQ exhibits ESIHT dynamics. In this equilibration process, the excited-state population is distributed between the 9,10-quinone (S2) and 1,10-quinone (S1) states while undergoing vibrational energy redistribution, vibrational cooling, and solvation dynamics on the 0.1-50 ps time scale. Transient UV/vis pump-probe data in methanol also suggest additional relaxation dynamics on the subnanosecond time scale, which we tentatively ascribe to hydrogen bond dynamics of DHAQ with the protic solvent, affecting the equilibrium population dynamics within the S2 and S1 electronic excited states. Ultimately, the two excited singlet states decay with a solvent-dependent time constant ranging from 139 to 210 ps. The concomitant electronic ground-state recovery is, however, only partial because a large fraction of the population relaxes to the first triplet state. From the similarity of the time scales involved, we conjecture that the solvent plays a crucial role in breaking the intramolecular hydrogen bond of DHAQ during the S2/S1 relaxation to either the ground or triplet state. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  3. Excitation and Ionisation dynamics in high-frequency plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, D.

    2008-07-01

    Non-thermal low temperature plasmas are widely used for technological applications. Increased demands on plasma technology have resulted in the development of various discharge concepts based on different power coupling mechanisms. Despite this, power dissipation mechanisms in these discharges are not yet fully understood. Of particular interest are low pressure radio-frequency (rf) discharges. The limited understanding of these discharges is predominantly due to the complexity of the underlying mechanisms and difficult diagnostic access to important parameters. Optical measurements are a powerful diagnostic tool offering high spatial and temporal resolution. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) provides non-intrusive access, to the physics of the plasma, with comparatively simple experimental requirements. Improved advances in technology and modern diagnostics now allow deeper insight into fundamental mechanisms. In low pressure rf discharges insight into the electron dynamics within the rf cycle can yield vital information. This requires high temporal resolution on a nano-second time scale. The optical emission from rf discharges exhibits temporal variations within the rf cycle. These variations are particularly strong, in for example capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs), but also easily observable in inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), and can be exploited for insight into power dissipation. Interesting kinetic and non-linear coupling effects are revealed in capacitive systems. The electron dynamics exhibits a complex spatio-temporal structure. Excitation and ionisation, and, therefore, plasma sustainment is dominated through directed energetic electrons created through the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath. In the relatively simple case of an asymmetric capacitively coupled rf plasma the complexity of the power dissipation is exposed and various mode transitions can be clearly observed and investigated. At higher pressure secondary electrons dominate the

  4. Versatile single-molecule multi-color excitation and detection fluorescence setup for studying biomolecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M. A.

    2011-11-07

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is at the forefront of tools applied to study biomolecular dynamics both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the single-molecule fluorescence microscope to conduct simultaneous multi-color excitation and detection is a key experimental feature that is under continuous development. In this paper, we describe in detail the design and the construction of a sophisticated and versatile multi-color excitation and emission fluorescence instrument for studying biomolecular dynamics at the single-molecule level. The setup is novel, economical and compact, where two inverted microscopes share a laser combiner module with six individual laser sources that extend from 400 to 640 nm. Nonetheless, each microscope can independently and in a flexible manner select the combinations, sequences, and intensities of the excitation wavelengths. This high flexibility is achieved by the replacement of conventional mechanical shutters with acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). The use of AOTF provides major advancement by controlling the intensities, duration, and selection of up to eight different wavelengths with microsecond alternation time in a transparent and easy manner for the end user. To our knowledge this is the first time AOTF is applied to wide-field total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy even though it has been commonly used in multi-wavelength confocal microscopy. The laser outputs from the combiner module are coupled to the microscopes by two sets of four single-mode optic fibers in order to allow for the optimization of the TIRF angle for each wavelength independently. The emission is split into two or four spectral channels to allow for the simultaneous detection of up to four different fluorophores of wide selection and using many possible excitation and photoactivation schemes. We demonstrate the performance of this new setup by conducting two-color alternating excitation single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy

  5. Versatile single-molecule multi-color excitation and detection fluorescence setup for studying biomolecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhy, M. A.; Elshenawy, M. M.; Takahashi, M.; Whitman, B. H.; Walter, N. G.; Hamdan, S. M.

    2011-11-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is at the forefront of tools applied to study biomolecular dynamics both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the single-molecule fluorescence microscope to conduct simultaneous multi-color excitation and detection is a key experimental feature that is under continuous development. In this paper, we describe in detail the design and the construction of a sophisticated and versatile multi-color excitation and emission fluorescence instrument for studying biomolecular dynamics at the single-molecule level. The setup is novel, economical and compact, where two inverted microscopes share a laser combiner module with six individual laser sources that extend from 400 to 640 nm. Nonetheless, each microscope can independently and in a flexible manner select the combinations, sequences, and intensities of the excitation wavelengths. This high flexibility is achieved by the replacement of conventional mechanical shutters with acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). The use of AOTF provides major advancement by controlling the intensities, duration, and selection of up to eight different wavelengths with microsecond alternation time in a transparent and easy manner for the end user. To our knowledge this is the first time AOTF is applied to wide-field total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy even though it has been commonly used in multi-wavelength confocal microscopy. The laser outputs from the combiner module are coupled to the microscopes by two sets of four single-mode optic fibers in order to allow for the optimization of the TIRF angle for each wavelength independently. The emission is split into two or four spectral channels to allow for the simultaneous detection of up to four different fluorophores of wide selection and using many possible excitation and photoactivation schemes. We demonstrate the performance of this new setup by conducting two-color alternating excitation single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy

  6. Excited states populated via nucleon transfer in the reaction [sup 32]S+[sup 208]Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradi, L.; Petrache, C.M.; Ackermann, D.; De Angelis, G.; Moreno, H.; Napoli, D.R.; Spolaore, P.; Stefanini, A.M. (INFN, Lab. Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy)); Beghini, S.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Segato, G.F.; Signorini, C. (Padua Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica INFN, Padua (Italy)); Pollarolo, G. (Turin Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica INFN, Turin (Italy))

    1993-01-01

    The population strengths of excited states in nuclei produced via transfer reactions in the 185 MeV[sup 32]S+[sup 208]Pb reaction have been investigated by heavy-ion-[gamma] coincidence techniques. The cross sections extracted from the [gamma] spectra, have been analyzed in the framework of the Complex WKB approximation theory. (orig.).

  7. Determining excitation-energy transfer times and mechanisms from stochastic time-dependent density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann-Mees, D; Appel, H; Di Ventra, M; Kümmel, S

    2013-11-21

    We developed an approach for calculating excitation-energy transfer times in supermolecular arrangements based on stochastic time-dependent density functional theory (STDDFT). The combination of real-time propagation and the stochastic Schrödinger equation with a Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian allows for simulating how an excitation spreads through an assembly of molecular systems. The influence that approximations, such as the dipole-dipole coupling approximation of Förster theory, have on energy-transfer times can be checked explicitly. As a first application of our approach we investigate a light-harvesting-inspired model ring system, calculating the time it takes for an excitation to travel from one side of the ring to the opposite side under ideal and perturbed conditions. Among other things we find that completely removing a molecule from the ring may inhibit energy transfer less than having an energetically detuned molecule in the ring. In addition, Förster's dipole coupling approximation may noticeably overestimate excitation-energy transfer efficiency.

  8. Generating Excitement: Build Your Own Generator to Study the Transfer of Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Kurt; Rommel-Esham, Katie; Farthing, Dori; Sheldon, Amy

    2011-01-01

    The transfer of energy from one form to another can be difficult to understand. The electrical energy that turns on a lamp may come from the burning of coal, water falling at a hydroelectric plant, nuclear reactions, or gusts of wind caused by the uneven heating of the Earth. The authors have developed and tested an exciting hands-on activity to…

  9. Elastic, excitation, ionization and charge transfer cross sections of current interest in fusion energy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, D.R.; Krstic, P.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. TN (United States). Physics Div.

    1997-01-01

    Due to the present interest in modeling and diagnosing the edge and divertor plasma regions in magnetically confined fusion devices, we have sought to provide new calculations regarding the elastic, excitation, ionization, and charge transfer cross sections in collisions among relevant ions, neutrals, and isotopes in the low-to intermediate-energy regime. We summarize here some of our recent work. (author)

  10. Symmetry-breaking intramolecular charge transfer in the excited state of meso-linked BODIPY dyads

    KAUST Repository

    Whited, Matthew T.

    2012-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of symmetric BODIPY dyads where the chromophores are attached at the meso position, using either a phenylene bridge or direct linkage. Both molecules undergo symmetry-breaking intramolecular charge transfer in the excited state, and the directly linked dyad serves as a visible-light-absorbing analogue of 9,9′-bianthryl.

  11. Fragment transition density method to calculate electronic coupling for excitation energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voityuk, Alexander A., E-mail: alexander.voityuk@icrea.cat [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, 08010 Barcelona, Spain and Institut de Química Computacional i Catàlisi (IQCC), Universitat de Girona 17071 Girona (Spain)

    2014-06-28

    A general approach, the Fragment Transition Density (FTD) scheme, is introduced to estimate electronic coupling for excitation energy transfer in a molecular system. Within this method, the excitation energies and transition densities of the system are used to derive the coupling matrix element. The scheme allows one to treat systems where exciton donor and acceptor are close together and their exchange interaction and orbital overlap are significant. The FTD method can be applied in combination with any quantum mechanical approach to treat excited states of general nature including single-, double-, and higher excitations. Using FTD approach, we derive excitonic couplings for several systems computed with the CIS, TD DFT and MS-CASPT2 methods. In particular, it is shown that the estimated coupling values in DNA π-stacks are strongly affected by the short-range electronic interaction of adjacent nucleobases.

  12. Theoretical study on the excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer reaction of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline in methanol and cyclohexane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Meng [Department of Chemistry, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); State Key Lab of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Zhao, Jinfeng [Department of Physics, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); State Key Lab of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Cui, Yanling; Wang, Qianyu [Department of Physics, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Dai, Yumei [Normal College, Shenyang University, Shenyang 110044 (China); Song, Peng, E-mail: songpeng@lnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Xia, Lixin, E-mail: lixinxia@lnu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China)

    2015-05-15

    The dynamics of the excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer (ESIPT) reaction of 10-hydroxybenzoquinoline (HBQ) in different solvents, have been investigated based on the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) in detail. Upon excitation, the intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl and phenanthrene functionality is significantly strengthened in the S{sub 1} state, which can be used as a reasonable tendency for facilitating the ESIPT process. In addition, the calculated vertical excitation energies in the S{sub 0} state and S{sub 1} state reproduce the experimental UV–vis absorbance and fluorescence emission spectra well. Through calculating the fluorescence spectra of the HBQ chromophore, two outcomes for this chromophore were found in the S{sub 1} state, which demonstrates that the ESIPT process occurs. The potential energy curves have been calculated to account for the mechanism of the proton-transfer process in the excited-state. As a result, the barrierless ESIPT process can occur in the S{sub 1} state with proton transfer from the O atom to the N atom. And maybe the ESIPT process is easier in methanol solvent due to the higher potential energy difference. - Highlights: • The hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl and phenanthrene is strengthened. • The hydrogen bond facilitates the proton transfer from the hydroxyl group to the N atom. • The spontaneous excited-state intramolecular proton transfer reaction can be observed.

  13. Optical excitations dynamics at hetero-interfaces fullerene/quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righetto, Marcello; Privitera, Alberto; Franco, Lorenzo; Bozio, Renato

    2017-08-01

    Embedding Semiconductor Quantum Dots (QDs) into hybrid organic-inorganic solar cell holds promises for improving photovoltaic performances. Thanks to their strong coupling with electro-magnetic radiation field, QDs represent paradigmatic photon absorbers. Nevertheless, the quest for suitable charge separating hetero-interfaces is still an open challenge. Within this framework, the excited state interactions between QDs and fullerene derivatives are of great interest for ternary solar cells (polymer:QDs:fullerene). In this work, we investigated the exciton dynamics of core/shell CdSe/CdS QDs both in solution and in blends with fullerene derivative (PCBM). By means of transient optical techniques, we aimed to unveil the dynamics of the QDs-PCBM interaction. Indeed, the observed excited state depopulation of QDs in blends is compatible with an excited state interaction living on picosecond timescale. Through electron paramagnetic resonance, we delved into the nature of this interaction, identifying the presence of charge separated states. The concurrence of these observations suggest a fast electron transfer process, where QDs act as donors and PCBM molecules as acceptors, followed by effective charge separation. Therefore, our experimental results indicate the QDs-PCBM heterointerface as suitable exciton separating interface, paving the way for possible applications in photovoltaics.

  14. Interplay between excitation kinetics and reaction-center dynamics in purple bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; Rodríguez, Ferney J.; Quiroga, Luis; Johnson, Neil F.

    2010-09-01

    Photosynthesis is arguably the fundamental process of life, since it enables energy from the Sun to enter the food chain on the Earth. It is a remarkable non-equilibrium process in which photons are converted to many-body excitations, which traverse a complex biomolecular membrane, where they are captured and fuel chemical reactions within a reaction center (RC) in order to produce nutrients. The precise nature of these dynamical processes—which lie at the interface between quantum and classical behavior and involve both noise and coordination—is still being explored. Here, we focus on a striking recent empirical finding concerning an illumination-driven transition in the biomolecular membrane architecture of the purple bacteria Rsp. photometricum. Using stochastic realizations to describe a hopping rate model for excitation transfer, we show numerically and analytically that this surprising shift in preferred architectures can be traced to the interplay between the excitation kinetics and the RC dynamics. The net effect is that the bacteria profit from efficient metabolism at low illumination intensities while using dissipation to avoid an oversupply of energy at high illumination intensities.

  15. Protein electron transfer: Dynamics and statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2013-07-14

    Electron transfer between redox proteins participating in energy chains of biology is required to proceed with high energetic efficiency, minimizing losses of redox energy to heat. Within the standard models of electron transfer, this requirement, combined with the need for unidirectional (preferably activationless) transitions, is translated into the need to minimize the reorganization energy of electron transfer. This design program is, however, unrealistic for proteins whose active sites are typically positioned close to the polar and flexible protein-water interface to allow inter-protein electron tunneling. The high flexibility of the interfacial region makes both the hydration water and the surface protein layer act as highly polar solvents. The reorganization energy, as measured by fluctuations, is not minimized, but rather maximized in this region. Natural systems in fact utilize the broad breadth of interfacial electrostatic fluctuations, but in the ways not anticipated by the standard models based on equilibrium thermodynamics. The combination of the broad spectrum of static fluctuations with their dispersive dynamics offers the mechanism of dynamical freezing (ergodicity breaking) of subsets of nuclear modes on the time of reaction/residence of the electron at a redox cofactor. The separation of time-scales of nuclear modes coupled to electron transfer allows dynamical freezing. In particular, the separation between the relaxation time of electro-elastic fluctuations of the interface and the time of conformational transitions of the protein caused by changing redox state results in dynamical freezing of the latter for sufficiently fast electron transfer. The observable consequence of this dynamical freezing is significantly different reorganization energies describing the curvature at the bottom of electron-transfer free energy surfaces (large) and the distance between their minima (Stokes shift, small). The ratio of the two reorganization energies

  16. Plasmon assisted control of photo-induced excitation energy transfer in a molecular chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luxia; May, Volkhard

    2017-08-01

    The strong and ultrafast laser pulse excitation of a molecular chain in close vicinity to a spherical metal nano-particle (MNP) is studied theoretically. Due to local-field enhancement around the MNP, pronounced excited-state formation has to be expected for the part of the chain which is in proximity to the MNP. Here, the description of this phenomenon will be based on a uniform quantum theory of the MNP-molecule system. It accounts for local-field effects due to direct consideration of the strong excitation energy transfer coupling between the MNP and the various molecules. The molecule-MNP distances are chosen in such a way as to achieve a correct description of the MNP via dipole-plasmon excitations. Short plasmon life-times are incorporated in the framework of a density matrix approach. By extending earlier work the present description allows for multi-exciton formation and multiple dipole-plasmon excitation. The region of less intense and not-too-short optical excitation is identified as being best suited for excitation energy localization in the chain.

  17. Resonant transfer excitation of fluorine-like Mo{sup 33+} ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramadan, Hassan [Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt). Dept. of Basic Sciences; Elkilany, Sabbah [Kafr El-sheikh Univ. (Egypt). Dept. of Mathematics

    2010-06-15

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) cross sections (anti {sigma}{sup DR}) and rate coefficients ({alpha}{sup DR}) for Mo{sup 33+} are calculated using the angular momentum average scheme (AMA). Moreover, the resonant transfer excitation followed by X-ray emission (RTEX) cross sections ({sigma}{sup RTEX}) for the collision of Mo{sup 33+} with H{sub 2} and He targets are calculated and studied. The calculations of the cross sections are performed for both K- and L-shell excitations. A smooth change with the temperatures for {alpha}{sup DR} is found for all kinds of excitations. The rates for K-shell excitation are very small in comparison with the rates for L-shell excitation. The RTEX cross sections for Mo{sup 33+} ions are obtained from their corresponding DR cross sections by the method of folding in the impulse approximation (IMA). {sigma}{sup RTEX} for the K-shell excitation shows two overlapped peaks which may be attributed to the two groups in this excitation process. The present calculations are considered as a database for future comparison with theoretical and experimental data using other coupling schemes. Multiple Auger channels are complicating the dependence of the cross sections on principal quantum numbers. (orig.)

  18. Probing nuclear shell structure beyond the N=40 subshell using multiple Coulomb excitation and transfer experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellgartner, Stefanie Christine

    2015-11-13

    In this work, the N=40 subshell closure is investigated with two complementary methods using a radioactive {sup 72}Zn ISOLDE beam: One- and two-neutron transfer reactions and multiple Coulomb excitation. In the one-neutron transfer reaction, two new levels of {sup 73}Zn were discovered. The two-neutron transfer channel allowed to study the differential cross section of the ground state and the 2{sup +}{sub 1} state of {sup 74}Zn. In the Coulomb excitation experiment, the measured B(E2) values and quadrupole moments of {sup 72}Zn showed that the yrast states 0{sup +}{sub 1}, 2{sup +}{sub 1} and 4{sup +}{sub 1} are moderately collective. Contrary, the 0{sup +}{sub 2} state has a different structure, since it features a stronger closed N=40 configuration compared to the ground state.

  19. Surface electronic excitations and dynamic spectral properties of adsorbates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumhalter, B.

    Many-body aspects of screening and relaxation mechanisms encountered in spectroscopic studies of the electronic structure of adsorbates have recently attracted considerable attention from both experimental and theoretical physicists. Interest in these phenomena has also been augmented by the rapid improvement of experimental techniques which have enabled better resolution and analysis of various subtile components of the adsorbate spectra. Many of these spectral features have until recently been ascribed to purely chemical and initial state effects. One of the first major advances of the theoretical development in this field was to seek and attribute the origin of these structures to the many-body properties of adsorption systems and, secondly, to predict how the many-body effects would manifest themselves in surface spectroscopies. We start with a rather detailed description of the formalism of the surface electronic response and discuss the properties of the surface excitation spectrum of idealized and real metals. This formalism is then successively applied to set up a model of screening firstly in the nonbonding levels of mainly physisorbed adsorbates and later in the core and valence levels of chemisorbed species. Various modifications of the model enable a dynamic description of the final state relaxation and shake-up effects typical of spectroscopic measurements. To treat the particularly complicated problem of dynamic relaxation in the adsorbate valence levels a special perturbational approach based on Mayer's cluster expansion is developed in §5. The characteristics, and some limitations of this approach, which may also prove useful in other physical problems, are described in detail and discussed within the context of the interaction of localized adsorbate charge fluctuations with bosonic surface excitations. Experimental support for the presented theoretical framework and its applications has been very important. A qualitative comparison with the

  20. Vibrational energy transfer in selectively excited diatomic molecules. [Relaxation rates, self-relaxation, upper limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasch, C.J.

    1978-09-01

    Single rovibrational states of HCl(v=2), HBr(v=2), DCl(v=2), and CO(v=2) were excited with a pulsed optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Total vibrational relaxation rates near - resonance quenchers were measured at 295/sup 0/K using time resolved infrared fluorescence. These rates are attributed primarily to V - V energy transfer, and they generally conform to a simple energy gap law. A small deviation was found for the CO(v) + DCl(v') relaxation rates. Upper limits for the self relaxation by V - R,T of HCl(v=2) and HBr(v=2) and for the two quantum exchange between HCl and HBr were determined. The HF dimer was detected at 295/sup 0/K and 30 torr HF pressure with an optoacoustic spectrometer using the OPO. Pulsed and chopped, resonant and non-resonant spectrophones are analyzed in detail. From experiments and first order perturbation theory, these V - V exchange rates appear to behave as a first order perturbation in the vibrational coordinates. The rotational dynamics are known to be complicated however, and the coupled rotational - vibrational dynamics were investigated theoreticaly in infinite order by the Dillon and Stephenson and the first Magnus approximations. Large ..delta..J transitions appear to be important, but these calculations differ by orders of magnitude on specific rovibrational transition rates. Integration of the time dependent semiclassical equations by a modified Gordon method and a rotationally distorted wave approximation are discussed as methods which would treat the rotational motion more accurately. 225 references.

  1. Effect of strong coupling on interfacial electron transfer dynamics in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transient absorption studies on TPP-cat/TiO2 system exciting both the Soret band at 400 nm and the Q-band at 800 nm have been carried out to determine excitation wavelength-dependence on ET dynamics. The reaction channel for the electron-injection process has been found to be different for both the excitation ...

  2. Wagging motion of hydrogen-bonded wire in the excited-state multiple proton transfer process of 7-hydroxyquinoline·(NH3)3 cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Hui; Lan, Sheng-Cheng; Li, Chun-Ran

    2013-08-01

    In this work, the dynamics of hydrogen bonds (as well as the hydrogen-bonded wire) in excited-state tautomerization of 7-hydroxyquinoline·(NH3)3 (7HQ·(NH3)3) cluster has been investigated by using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). It shows that upon an excitation, the hydrogen bond between -OH group in 7-hydroxyquinoline (7HQ) and NH3 moiety would extremely strengthened in S1 state, which could effectively facilitate the releasing of the proton from the phenolic group of 7HQ moiety to the hydrogen-bonded wire and the forming an Eigen-like cationic wire (NH3···NH4(+)···NH3) in the cluster. To fulfill the different optimal angles of NH4(+) in the wire, a wagging motion of hydrogen-bonded wire would occur in excited state. Moreover, the wagging motion of the hydrogen-bonded wire would effectively promote excited-state proton transfer reaction. As the results, an excited-state multiple proton transfer (ESMPT) mechanism containing two concerted and asymmetrical processes has been proposed for the proton transfer dynamics of 7HQ·(NH3)3 cluster. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Hole transfer dynamics from QDs to tethered ferrocene derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivisatos, A. Paul

    Quantum dots (QDs) have shown particular promise in recent years as light absorbers in solar energy conversion schemes. However, in solution junction solar devices such as QD-sensitized solar cells and photocatalytic water splitting systems, efficiencies are often limited by hole transfer from the photoexcited QD. This process is sluggish and can lead to oxidative photocorrosion of the QD material. In order to design highly efficient nanocrystal systems with hole transfer rates that outcompete these undesirable processes, a fundamental understanding of the parameters that control these rates is imperative.We have developed a model system to study charge transfer from QDs to surface bound acceptors, to fundamentally understand the charge transfer processes for QD systems, namely electronic coupling between the donor and acceptor and the thermodynamic driving force for the hole transfer process. Specifically, we examine hole transfer from the nearly spherical CdSe-core CdS-shell QDs with photoluminescence (PL) quantum yields over 80% to ferrocene derivatives bound to the QD surface via an alkane thiol linker. In this system, we mitigate the ill-defined nonradiative charge dynamic pathways that are intrinsic to native CdSe cores, and then controllably engineer on the surface charge acceptors with well-defined oxidation potentials, spatial distribution, and quantity. By Measuring the PL lifetime decay and calibrating the number of hole acceptor ligands per QD via quantitative `H NMR, we extracted the hole transfer rate per acceptor. This rate per acceptor could be varied over four orders of magnitude by changing the coupling between donor and acceptor through modulations in the CdS shell thickness and alkane chain length of the molecule. Furthermore, owning to the large number of acceptors on the surface, we achieve systems in which ~99% of the photoexcited holes are transferred to these well-defined mediators.We further mapped the relationship between the

  4. Directing the path of light-induced electron transfer at a molecular fork using vibrational excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delor, Milan; Archer, Stuart A.; Keane, Theo; Meijer, Anthony J. H. M.; Sazanovich, Igor V.; Greetham, Gregory M.; Towrie, Michael; Weinstein, Julia A.

    2017-11-01

    Ultrafast electron transfer in condensed-phase molecular systems is often strongly coupled to intramolecular vibrations that can promote, suppress and direct electronic processes. Recent experiments exploring this phenomenon proved that light-induced electron transfer can be strongly modulated by vibrational excitation, suggesting a new avenue for active control over molecular function. Here, we achieve the first example of such explicit vibrational control through judicious design of a Pt(II)-acetylide charge-transfer donor-bridge-acceptor-bridge-donor 'fork' system: asymmetric 13C isotopic labelling of one of the two -C≡C- bridges makes the two parallel and otherwise identical donor→acceptor electron-transfer pathways structurally distinct, enabling independent vibrational perturbation of either. Applying an ultrafast UVpump(excitation)-IRpump(perturbation)-IRprobe(monitoring) pulse sequence, we show that the pathway that is vibrationally perturbed during UV-induced electron transfer is dramatically slowed down compared to its unperturbed counterpart. One can thus choose the dominant electron transfer pathway. The findings deliver a new opportunity for precise perturbative control of electronic energy propagation in molecular devices.

  5. A model for energy transfer in collisions of atoms with highly excited molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Paul L; Conte, Riccardo; Bowman, Joel M

    2015-05-21

    A model for energy transfer in the collision between an atom and a highly excited target molecule has been developed on the basis of classical mechanics and turning point analysis. The predictions of the model have been tested against the results of trajectory calculations for collisions of five different target molecules with argon or helium under a variety of temperatures, collision energies, and initial rotational levels. The model predicts selected moments of the joint probability distribution, P(Jf,ΔE) with an R(2) ≈ 0.90. The calculation is efficient, in most cases taking less than one CPU-hour. The model provides several insights into the energy transfer process. The joint probability distribution is strongly dependent on rotational energy transfer and conservation laws and less dependent on vibrational energy transfer. There are two mechanisms for rotational excitation, one due to motion normal to the intermolecular potential and one due to motion tangential to it and perpendicular to the line of centers. Energy transfer is found to depend strongly on the intermolecular potential and only weakly on the intramolecular potential. Highly efficient collisions are a natural consequence of the energy transfer and arise due to collisions at "sweet spots" in the space of impact parameter and molecular orientation.

  6. Coherent wave packet dynamics in photo-excited Nal

    OpenAIRE

    Leitner, Torsten; Buchner, Franziska; Rouzee, Arnaud; Rading, Linea; Johnsson, Per; Odelius, Michael; Karlsson, Hans O; Vrakking, Marc; Wernet, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Time and energy resolved photoelectron distributions of photo-excited Nal are presented. A splitting in the photo-excited state suggested by calculations of the intramolecular potential energy surfaces could be confirmed experimentally for the first time.

  7. Modelling hair follicle growth dynamics as an excitable medium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J Murray

    Full Text Available The hair follicle system represents a tractable model for the study of stem cell behaviour in regenerative adult epithelial tissue. However, although there are numerous spatial scales of observation (molecular, cellular, follicle and multi follicle, it is not yet clear what mechanisms underpin the follicle growth cycle. In this study we seek to address this problem by describing how the growth dynamics of a large population of follicles can be treated as a classical excitable medium. Defining caricature interactions at the molecular scale and treating a single follicle as a functional unit, a minimal model is proposed in which the follicle growth cycle is an emergent phenomenon. Expressions are derived, in terms of parameters representing molecular regulation, for the time spent in the different functional phases of the cycle, a formalism that allows the model to be directly compared with a previous cellular automaton model and experimental measurements made at the single follicle scale. A multi follicle model is constructed and numerical simulations are used to demonstrate excellent qualitative agreement with a range of experimental observations. Notably, the excitable medium equations exhibit a wider family of solutions than the previous work and we demonstrate how parameter changes representing altered molecular regulation can explain perturbed patterns in Wnt over-expression and BMP down-regulation mouse models. Further experimental scenarios that could be used to test the fundamental premise of the model are suggested. The key conclusion from our work is that positive and negative regulatory interactions between activators and inhibitors can give rise to a range of experimentally observed phenomena at the follicle and multi follicle spatial scales and, as such, could represent a core mechanism underlying hair follicle growth.

  8. Construction of Vibronic Diabatic Hamiltonian for Excited-State Electron and Energy Transfer Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yu; Jiang, Shengshi; Zheng, Jie; Lan, Zhenggang

    2017-12-21

    Photoinduced excited-state electron and energy transfer processes are crucial in biological photoharvesting systems and organic photovoltaic devices. We discuss the construction of a diabatic vibronic Hamiltonian for the proper treatment of these processes involving the projection approach acting on both electronic wave functions and vibrational modes. In the electronic part, the wave function projection approach is used to construct the diabatic Hamiltonian in which both local excited states and charge-transfer states are included on the same footing. For the vibrational degrees of freedom, the vibronic couplings in the diabatic Hamiltonian are obtained in the basis of the pseudonormal modes localized on each monomer site by applying delocalized-to-localized mode projection. This systematic approach allows us to construct the vibronic diabatic Hamiltonian in molecular aggregates.

  9. Observation of excited state charge transfer with fs/ps-CARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blom, Alex Jason [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Excited state charge transfer processes are studied using the fs/ps-CARS probe technique. This probe allows for multiplexed detection of Raman active vibrational modes. Systems studied include Michler's Ketone, Coumarin 120, 4-dimethylamino-4'-nitrostilbene, and several others. The vibrational spectrum of the para di-substituted benzophenone Michler's Ketone in the first excited singlet state is studied for the first time. It is found that there are several vibrational modes indicative of structural changes of the excited molecule. A combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to study the simplest 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, Coumarin 120. Vibrations observed in FTIR and spontaneous Raman spectra are assigned using density functional calculations and a continuum solvation model is used to predict how observed modes are affected upon inclusion of a solvent. The low frequency modes of the excited state charge transfer species 4-dimethylamino-4{prime}-nitrostilbene are studied in acetonitrile. Results are compared to previous work on this molecule in the fingerprint region. Finally, several partially completed projects and their implications are discussed. These include the two photon absorption of Coumarin 120, nanoconfinement in cyclodextrin cavities and sensitization of titania nanoparticles.

  10. TDDFT study on the excited-state proton transfer of 8-hydroxyquinoline: key role of the excited-state hydrogen-bond strengthening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Sheng-Cheng; Liu, Yu-Hui

    2015-03-15

    Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations have been employed to study the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8HQ). Infrared spectra of 8HQ in both the ground and the lowest singlet excited states have been calculated, revealing a red-shift of the hydroxyl group (-OH) stretching band in the excited state. Hence, the intramolecular hydrogen bond (O-H···N) in 8HQ would be significantly strengthened upon photo-excitation to the S1 state. As the intramolecular proton-transfer reaction occurs through hydrogen bonding, the ESIPT reaction of 8HQ is effectively facilitated by strengthening of the electronic excited-state hydrogen bond (O-H···N). As a result, the intramolecular proton-transfer reaction would occur on an ultrafast timescale with a negligible barrier in the calculated potential energy curve for the ESIPT reaction. Therefore, although the intramolecular proton-transfer reaction is not favorable in the ground state, the ESIPT process is feasible in the excited state. Finally, we have identified that radiationless deactivation via internal conversion (IC) becomes the main dissipative channel for 8HQ by analyzing the energy gaps between the S1 and S0 states for the enol and keto forms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Vibration transfers to measure the performance of vibration isolated platforms on site using background noise excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerink, F. B.; Korterik, J. P.; Offerhaus, H. L.

    2011-06-01

    This article demonstrates a quick and easy way of quantifying the performance of a vibration-isolated platform. We measure the vibration transfer from floor to table using background noise excitation from the floor. As no excitation device is needed, our setup only requires two identical sensors (in our case, low noise accelerometers), a data acquisition system, and processing software. Background noise excitation from the floor has the additional advantage that any non-linearity in the suspension system relevant to the actual vibration amplitudes will be taken into account. Measurement time is typically a few minutes, depending on the amount of background noise. The (coherent) transfer of the vibrations in the floor to the platform, as well as the (non-coherent) acoustical noise pick-up by the platform are measured. Since we use calibrated sensors, the absolute value of the vibration levels is established and can be expressed in vibration criterion curves. Transfer measurements are shown and discussed for two pneumatic isolated optical tables, a spring suspension system, and a simple foam suspension system.

  12. Excitable actin dynamics in lamellipodial protrusion and retraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Gillian L; Petroccia, Heather M; Watanabe, Naoki; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2012-04-04

    Many animal cells initiate crawling by protruding lamellipodia, consisting of a dense network of actin filaments, at their leading edge. We imaged XTC cells that exhibit flat lamellipodia on poly-L-lysine-coated coverslips. Using active contours, we tracked the leading edge and measured the total amount of F-actin by summing the pixel intensities within a 5-μm band. We observed protrusion and retraction with period 130-200 s and local wavelike features. Positive (negative) velocities correlated with minimum (maximum) integrated actin concentration. Approximately constant retrograde flow indicated that protrusions and retractions were driven by fluctuations of the actin polymerization rate. We present a model of these actin dynamics as an excitable system in which a diffusive, autocatalytic activator causes actin polymerization; F-actin accumulation in turn inhibits further activator accumulation. Simulations of the model reproduced the pattern of actin polymerization seen in experiments. To explore the model's assumption of an autocatalytic activation mechanism, we imaged cells expressing markers for both F-actin and the p21 subunit of the Arp2/3 complex. We found that integrated Arp2/3-complex concentrations spike several seconds before spikes of F-actin concentration. This suggests that the Arp2/3 complex participates in an activation mechanism that includes additional diffuse components. Response of cells to stimulation by fetal calf serum could be reproduced by the model, further supporting the proposed dynamical picture. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Photoinduced excitation and charge transfer processes of organic dyes with siloxane anchoring groups: a combined spectroscopic and computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellucci, Elena; Monini, Marco; Bessi, Matteo; Iagatti, Alessandro; Bussotti, Laura; Sinicropi, Adalgisa; Calamante, Massimo; Zani, Lorenzo; Basosi, Riccardo; Reginato, Gianna; Mordini, Alessandro; Foggi, Paolo; Di Donato, Mariangela

    2017-06-14

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have attracted significant interest in the last few years as effective low-cost devices for solar energy conversion. We have analyzed the excited state dynamics of several organic dyes bearing both cyanoacrylic acid and siloxane anchoring groups. The spectroscopic properties of the dyes have been studied both in solution and when adsorbed on a TiO2 film using stationary and time-resolved techniques, probing the sub-picosecond to nanosecond time interval. The comparison between the spectra registered in solution and on the solid substrate evidences different pathways for energy and electron relaxation. The transient spectra of the TiO2-adsorbed dyes show the appearance of a long wavelength excited state absorption band, attributed to the cationic dye species, which is absent in the spectra measured in solution. Furthermore, the kinetic traces of the samples adsorbed on the TiO2 film show a long decay component not present in solution which constitutes indirect evidence of electron transfer between the dye and the semiconductor. The interpretation of the experimental results has been supported by theoretical DFT calculations of the excited state energies and by the analysis of molecular orbitals of the analyzed dye molecules.

  14. Effects of abnormal excitation on the dynamics of spiral waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min-Yi, Deng; Xue-Liang, Zhang; Jing-Yu, Dai

    2016-01-01

    The effect of physiological and pathological abnormal excitation of a myocyte on the spiral waves is investigated based on the cellular automaton model. When the excitability of the medium is high enough, the physiological abnormal excitation causes the spiral wave to meander irregularly and slowly. When the excitability of the medium is low enough, the physiological abnormal excitation leads to a new stable spiral wave. On the other hand, the pathological abnormal excitation destroys the spiral wave and results in the spatiotemporal chaos, which agrees with the clinical conclusion that the early after depolarization is the pro-arrhythmic mechanism of some anti-arrhythmic drugs. The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are analyzed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11365003 and 11165004).

  15. Control of base-excited dynamical systems through piezoelectric energy harvesting absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmoula, H.; Dai, H. L.; Abdelkefi, A.; Wang, L.

    2017-09-01

    The spring-mass absorber usually offers a good control to dynamical systems under direct base excitations for a specific value of the excitation frequency. As the vibrational energy of a primary dynamical system is transferred to the absorber, it gets dissipated. In this study, this energy is no longer dissipated but converted to available electrical power by designing efficient energy harvesters. A novel design of a piezoelectric beam installed inside an elastically-mounted dynamical system undergoing base excitations is considered. A design is carried out in order to determine the properties and dimensions of the energy harvester with the constraint of simultaneously decreasing the oscillating amplitudes of the primary dynamical system and increasing the harvested power of the energy harvesting absorber. An analytical model for the coupled system is constructed using Euler-Lagrange principle and Galerkin discretization. Different strategies for controlling the primary structure displacement and enhancing the harvested power as functions of the electrical load resistance and thickness of the beam substrate are performed. The linear polynomial approximation of the system’s key parameters as a function of the beam’s substrate thickness is first carried out. Then, the gradient method is applied to determine the adequate values of the electrical load resistance and thickness of the substrate under the constraints of minimizing the amplitudes of the primary structure or maximizing the levels of the harvested power. After that, an iterative strategy is considered in order to simultaneously minimize the amplitudes of the primary structure and maximize the levels of the harvested power as functions of the thickness of the substrate and electrical load resistance. In addition to harmonic excitations, the coupled system subjected to a white noise is explored. Through this analysis, the load resistance and thickness of the substrate of the piezoelectric energy harvester

  16. The role of coherent excitation and collisional energy transfer in atomic vapor filters and photon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correll, Tiffany Lee

    Many optical techniques, including laser Doppler velocimetry, free space optical communications, and chemical imaging, require-or can be enhanced by-high spectral resolution photon detection. Such detection is characterized by spectral discrimination on the order of GHz or MHz i.e., approximately 10-4 nm in the near-infrared region. This spectral resolution has recently been achieved by exploiting the narrow absorption features of gas phase atoms. Absorption of light by alkali vapors is intrinsically selective and can be monitored by detecting the fluorescence resulting from laser excitation coupled to selectively excited atomic states. Imaging can be accomplished by spatially expanding the excitation lasers into two dimensions. Fluorescence photons are only created and detected when the interrogated object is forced to scatter radiation of an energy precisely matching one of the transitions of a pre-determined optimal excitation/fluorescence scheme. Devices based on resonance fluorescence photon detection have recently been described using cesium atoms. In this work, the sensitivity and spectral resolution of cesium-based photon detectors were evaluated and improved. To this end, initial experiments focused on laser induced fluorescence in room temperature cesium vapor. The fluorescence response of the detector was augmented by the use of cesium-induced collisional excitation energy transfer between states involved in the chosen excitation scheme. Additional studies focused on helium and argon-induced collisions in the vapor to increase the signal output while maintaining adequate spatial resolution in imaging mode. The probability or cross section of helium-cesium collisions at the operating temperature of the detector was determined by use of a simplified rate equation model. The spectral response of the detector was improved by the use of coherent optical effects resulting from the interaction of a multi-level atomic system with narrowband radiation. Superior

  17. Bistable dynamics underlying excitability of ion homeostasis in neuron models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Hübel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When neurons fire action potentials, dissipation of free energy is usually not directly considered, because the change in free energy is often negligible compared to the immense reservoir stored in neural transmembrane ion gradients and the long-term energy requirements are met through chemical energy, i.e., metabolism. However, these gradients can temporarily nearly vanish in neurological diseases, such as migraine and stroke, and in traumatic brain injury from concussions to severe injuries. We study biophysical neuron models based on the Hodgkin-Huxley (HH formalism extended to include time-dependent ion concentrations inside and outside the cell and metabolic energy-driven pumps. We reveal the basic mechanism of a state of free energy-starvation (FES with bifurcation analyses showing that ion dynamics is for a large range of pump rates bistable without contact to an ion bath. This is interpreted as a threshold reduction of a new fundamental mechanism of ionic excitability that causes a long-lasting but transient FES as observed in pathological states. We can in particular conclude that a coupling of extracellular ion concentrations to a large glial-vascular bath can take a role as an inhibitory mechanism crucial in ion homeostasis, while the Na⁺/K⁺ pumps alone are insufficient to recover from FES. Our results provide the missing link between the HH formalism and activator-inhibitor models that have been successfully used for modeling migraine phenotypes, and therefore will allow us to validate the hypothesis that migraine symptoms are explained by disturbed function in ion channel subunits, Na⁺/K⁺ pumps, and other proteins that regulate ion homeostasis.

  18. Ligand manipulation of charge transfer excited state relaxation and spin crossover in [Fe(2,2′-bipyridine2(CN2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper S. Kjær

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We have used femtosecond resolution UV-visible and Kβ x-ray emission spectroscopy to characterize the electronic excited state dynamics of [Fe(bpy2(CN2], where bpy=2,2′-bipyridine, initiated by metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT excitation. The excited-state absorption in the transient UV-visible spectra, associated with the 2,2′-bipyridine radical anion, provides a robust marker for the MLCT excited state, while the transient Kβ x-ray emission spectra provide a clear measure of intermediate and high spin metal-centered excited states. From these measurements, we conclude that the MLCT state of [Fe(bpy2(CN2] undergoes ultrafast spin crossover to a metal-centered quintet excited state through a short lived metal-centered triplet transient species. These measurements of [Fe(bpy2(CN2] complement prior measurement performed on [Fe(bpy3]2+ and [Fe(bpy(CN4]2− in dimethylsulfoxide solution and help complete the chemical series [Fe(bpyN(CN6–2N]2N-4, where N = 1–3. The measurements confirm that simple ligand modifications can significantly change the relaxation pathways and excited state lifetimes and support the further investigation of light harvesting and photocatalytic applications of 3d transition metal complexes.

  19. Picosecond excitation energy transfer of allophycocyanin studied in solution and in crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar Choubeh, Reza; Sonani, Ravi R; Madamwar, Datta; Struik, Paul C; Bader, Arjen N; Robert, Bruno; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2018-03-01

    Cyanobacteria perform photosynthesis with the use of large light-harvesting antennae called phycobilisomes (PBSs). These hemispherical PBSs contain hundreds of open-chain tetrapyrrole chromophores bound to different peptides, providing an arrangement in which excitation energy is funnelled towards the PBS core from where it can be transferred to photosystem I and/or photosystem II. In the PBS core, many allophycocyanin (APC) trimers are present, red-light-absorbing phycobiliproteins that covalently bind phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophores. APC trimers were amongst the first light-harvesting complexes to be crystallized. APC trimers have two spectrally different PCBs per monomer, a high- and a low-energy pigment. The crystal structure of the APC trimer reveals the close distance (~21 Å) between those two chromophores (the distance within one monomer is ~51 Å) and this explains the ultrafast (~1 ps) excitation energy transfer (EET) between them. Both chromophores adopt a somewhat different structure, which is held responsible for their spectral difference. Here we used spectrally resolved picosecond fluorescence to study EET in these APC trimers both in crystallized and in solubilized form. We found that not all closely spaced pigment couples consist of a low- and a high-energy pigment. In ~10% of the cases, a couple consists of two high-energy pigments. EET to a low-energy pigment, which can spectrally be resolved, occurs on a time scale of tens of picoseconds. This transfer turns out to be three times faster in the crystal than in the solution. The spectral characteristics and the time scale of this transfer component are similar to what have been observed in the whole cells of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, for which it was ascribed to EET from C-phycocyanin to APC. The present results thus demonstrate that part of this transfer should probably also be ascribed to EET within APC trimers.

  20. Prototropic studies in vitreous and in solid phases: Pyranine and 2-naphthol excited state proton transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Fátima Aparecida das Chagas [Departamento de Química Fundamental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rezende, Eduardo Triboni [Universidade Nove de Julho, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Filho, Décio Briotto [Departamento de Bioquímica Instituto de Química, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Brito Rezende, Daisy de [Departamento de Química Fundamental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cuccovia, Iolanda Midea [Departamento de Bioquímica Instituto de Química, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gome, Ligia Ferreira [Departamento de Análises Clínicas, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Silva, Mauro Francisco Pinheiro da [Departamento de Química Fundamental, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade de São Paulo, SP (Brazil); and others

    2014-02-15

    Excited state proton transfer processes in vitreous glasses and in solid mixtures are investigated by steady state fluorimetry and laser flash photolysis kinetic studies with the photoacids pyranine and 2-naphthol. Glasses were derived from TEOS by the sol–gel condensation process and hydrated solid mixtures from NaCl or KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}/K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4} crystals. The extent of the water content necessary for the reaction is determined. Shrinkage of TEOS derived monoliths from water loss leads to an increase in proton transfer extent due to the increase in local concentrations of accepting and donor buffer species, but the concomitant increase in the ionic strength actuates in an opposite direction. Furthermore, water losses by aging of air-exposed gel goes to a critical 20% weight fraction, beyond it proton transfer reactions are hindered. Similar studies with solid NaCl or solid phosphate buffer mixtures demonstrated the same critical water level indicating that free water molecules are crucial for the proton to escape from the original cage where the geminate ion pair [–||RO{sup −⁎}H{sup +}||–] is formed and can undergo coupled proton transfer reactions. -- Highlights: • Pyranine and 2-naphthol excited state proton transfer in SiO{sub 2} gel, solid phosphate buffer and NaCl. • Sol–gel formation leads to contraction and concentration of donor and accepting species. • 20% weight fraction water is required for the ESPT to go forward.

  1. Evidence for coherent mixing of excited and charge-transfer states in the major plant light-harvesting antenna, LHCII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanan, Charusheela; Ferretti, Marco; van Roon, Henny; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2017-08-30

    LHCII, the major light harvesting antenna from plants, plays a dual role in photosynthesis. In low light it is a light-harvester, while in high light it is a quencher that protects the organism from photodamage. The switching mechanism between these two orthogonal conditions is mediated by protein dynamic disorder and photoprotective energy dissipation. The latter in particular is thought to occur in part via spectroscopically 'dark' states. We searched for such states in LHCII trimers from spinach, at both room temperature and at 77 K. Using 2D electronic spectroscopy, we explored coherent interactions between chlorophylls absorbing on the low-energy side of LHCII, which is the region that is responsible for both light-harvesting and photoprotection. 2D beating frequency maps allow us to identify four frequencies with strong excitonic character. In particular, our results show the presence of a low-lying state that is coupled to a low-energy excitonic state. We assign this to a mixed excitonic-charge transfer state involving the state with charge separation within the Chl a603-b609 heterodimer, borrowing some dipole strength from the Chl a602-a603 excited states. Such a state may play a role in photoprotection, in conjunction with specific and environmentally controlled realizations of protein dynamic disorder. Our identification and assignment of the coherences observed in the 2D frequency maps suggests that the structure of exciton states as well as a mixing of the excited and charge-transfer states is affected by coupling of these states to resonant vibrations in LHCII.

  2. Double, Rydberg and charge transfer excitations from pairing matrix fluctuation and particle-particle random phase approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yang [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Aggelen, Helen van [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Yang, Weitao, E-mail: weitao.yang@duke.edu [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2013-12-14

    Double, Rydberg, and charge transfer (CT) excitations have been great challenges for time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Starting from an (N ± 2)-electron single-determinant reference, we investigate excitations for the N-electron system through the pairing matrix fluctuation, which contains information on two-electron addition/removal processes. We adopt the particle-particle random phase approximation (pp-RPA) and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation (pp-TDA) to approximate the pairing matrix fluctuation and then determine excitation energies by the differences of two-electron addition/removal energies. This approach captures all types of interesting excitations: single and double excitations are described accurately, Rydberg excitations are in good agreement with experimental data and CT excitations display correct 1/R dependence. Furthermore, the pp-RPA and the pp-TDA have a computational cost similar to TDDFT and consequently are promising for practical calculations.

  3. Effects of oxidants and reductants on the efficiency of excitation transfer in green photosynthetic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The efficiency of energy transfer in chlorosome antennas in the green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium vibrioforme and Chlorobium limicola was found to be highly sensitive to the redox potential of the suspension. Energy transfer efficiencies were measured by comparing the absorption spectrum of the bacteriochlorophyll c or d pigments in the chlorosome to the excitation spectrum for fluorescence arising from the chlorosome baseplate and membrane-bound antenna complexes. The efficiency of energy transfer approaches 100% at low redox potentials induced by addition of sodium dithionite or other strong reductants, and is lowered to 10-20% under aerobic conditions or after addition of a variety of membrane-permeable oxidizing agents. The redox effect on energy transfer is observed in whole cells, isolated membranes and purified chlorosomes, indicating that the modulation of energy transfer efficiency arises within the antenna complexes and is not directly mediated by the redox state of the reaction center. It is proposed that chlorosomes contain a component that acts as a highly quenching center in its oxidized state, but is an inefficient quencher when reduced by endogenous or exogenous reductants. This effect may be a control mechanism that prevents cellular damage resulting from reaction of oxygen with reduced low-potential electron acceptors found in the green sulfur bacteria. The redox modulation effect is not observed in the green gliding bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, which contains chlorosomes but does not contain low-potential electron acceptors.

  4. Finite Size Corrections to the Excitation Energy Transfer in a Massless Scalar Interaction Model

    CERN Document Server

    Maeda, N; Tobita, Y; Ishikawa, K

    2016-01-01

    We study the excitation energy transfer (EET) for a simple model in which a virtual massless scalar particle is exchanged between two molecules. If the time interval is finite, then the finite size effect generally appears in a transition amplitude through the regions where the wave nature of quanta remains. We calculated the transition amplitude for EET and obtained finite size corrections to the standard formula derived by using Fermi's golden rule. These corrections for the transition amplitude appear outside the resonance energy region. The estimation in a photosynthesis system indicates that the finite size correction could reduce the EET time considerably.

  5. Assignment of the Charge-Transfer Excited States of Bis(N-Heterocyclic) Complexes of Copper(I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-21

    Excited States of Bis (N-Heterocyclic) Complexes of Copper ( I) 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S( W. L. Parker and G. A. Crosby 3a 7YPE OF REPORT i b ’!ME COVERED ~ aDATE...Assignment of the Charge-Transfer Excited States of Bis (N-Heterocyclic) Complexes of Copper (I) by W. L. Parker and G. A. Crosby Prepared for Publication in...IHmited. Assignment of the Charge-Transfer Excited States of Bis (N-Heterocycl ic) Complexes of Copper (I) W. L. Parker and G. A. Crosby* Chemical

  6. Excited-state structural dynamics of a dual-emission calmodulin-green fluorescent protein sensor for calcium ion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscar, Breland G; Liu, Weimin; Zhao, Yongxin; Tang, Longteng; Wang, Yanli; Campbell, Robert E; Fang, Chong

    2014-07-15

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) have played a pivotal role in bioimaging and advancing biomedicine. The versatile fluorescence from engineered, genetically encodable FP variants greatly enhances cellular imaging capabilities, which are dictated by excited-state structural dynamics of the embedded chromophore inside the protein pocket. Visualization of the molecular choreography of the photoexcited chromophore requires a spectroscopic technique capable of resolving atomic motions on the intrinsic timescale of femtosecond to picosecond. We use femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy to study the excited-state conformational dynamics of a recently developed FP-calmodulin biosensor, GEM-GECO1, for calcium ion (Ca(2+)) sensing. This study reveals that, in the absence of Ca(2+), the dominant skeletal motion is a ∼ 170 cm(-1) phenol-ring in-plane rocking that facilitates excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) with a time constant of ∼ 30 ps (6 times slower than wild-type GFP) to reach the green fluorescent state. The functional relevance of the motion is corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations. Upon Ca(2+) binding, this in-plane rocking motion diminishes, and blue emission from a trapped photoexcited neutral chromophore dominates because ESPT is inhibited. Fluorescence properties of site-specific protein mutants lend further support to functional roles of key residues including proline 377 in modulating the H-bonding network and fluorescence outcome. These crucial structural dynamics insights will aid rational design in bioengineering to generate versatile, robust, and more sensitive optical sensors to detect Ca(2+) in physiologically relevant environments.

  7. Non-typical fluorescence studies of excited and ground state proton and hydrogen transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Michał; Kijak, Michał; Piwoński, Hubert; Herbich, Jerzy; Waluk, Jacek

    2017-03-01

    Fluorescence studies of tautomerization have been carried out for various systems that exhibit single and double proton or hydrogen translocation in various environments, such as liquid and solid condensed phases, ultracold supersonic jets, and finally, polymer matrices with single emitters. We focus on less explored areas of application of fluorescence for tautomerization studies, using porphycene, a porphyrin isomer, as an example. Fluorescence anisotropy techniques allow investigations of self-exchange reactions, where the reactant and product are formally identical. Excitation with polarized light makes it possible to monitor tautomerization in single molecules and to detect their three-dimensional orientation. Analysis of fluorescence from single vibronic levels of jet-isolated porphycene not only demonstrates coherent tunneling of two internal protons, but also indicates that the process is vibrational mode-specific. Next, we present bifunctional proton donor-acceptor systems, molecules that are able, depending on the environment, to undergo excited state single intramolecular or double intermolecular proton transfer. For molecules that have donor and acceptor groups located in separate moieties linked by a single bond, excited state tautomerization can be coupled to mutual twisting of the two subunits.

  8. Non-typical fluorescence studies of excited and ground state proton and hydrogen transfer

    KAUST Repository

    Gil, Michał

    2017-02-03

    Fluorescence studies of tautomerization have been carried out for various systems that exhibit single and double proton or hydrogen translocation in various environments, such as liquid and solid condensed phases, ultracold supersonic jets, and finally, polymer matrices with single emitters.We focus on less explored areas of application of fluorescence for tautomerization studies, using porphycene, a porphyrin isomer, as an example. Fluorescence anisotropy techniques allow investigations of self-exchange reactions, where the reactant and product are formally identical. Excitation with polarized light makes it possible to monitor tautomerization in single molecules and to detect their three-dimensional orientation. Analysis of fluorescence from single vibronic levels of jet-isolated porphycene not only demonstrates coherent tunneling of two internal protons, but also indicates that the process is vibrational mode-specific. Next, we present bifunctional proton donoracceptor systems, molecules that are able, depending on the environment, to undergo excited state single intramolecular or double intermolecular proton transfer. For molecules that have donor and acceptor groups located in separate moieties linked by a single bond, excited state tautomerization can be coupled to mutual twisting of the two subunits.

  9. Bimolecular Excited-State Electron Transfer with Surprisingly Long-Lived Radical Ions

    KAUST Repository

    Alsam, Amani Abdu

    2015-09-02

    We explored the excited-state interactions of bimolecular, non-covalent systems consisting of cationic poly[(9,9-di(3,3’-N,N’-trimethyl-ammonium) propyl fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-co-(9,9-dioctyl-fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)] diiodide salt (PFN) and 1,4-dicyanobenzene (DCB) using steady-state and time-resolved techniques, including femto- and nanosecond transient absorption and femtosecond infrared spectroscopies with broadband capabilities. The experimental results demonstrated that photo-induced electron transfer from PFN to DCB occurs on the picosecond time scale, leading to the formation of PFN+• and DCB-• radical ions. Interestingly, real-time observations of the vibrational marker modes on the acceptor side provided direct evidence and insight into the electron transfer process indirectly inferred from UV-Vis experiments. The band narrowing on the picosecond time scale observed on the antisymmetric C-N stretching vibration of the DCB radical anion provides clear experimental evidence that a substantial part of the excess energy is channeled into vibrational modes of the electron transfer product and that the geminate ion pairs dissociate. More importantly, our nanosecond time-resolved data indicate that the charge-separated state is very long lived ( 30 ns) due to the dissociation of the contact radical ion pair into free ions. Finally, the fast electron transfer and slow charge recombination anticipate the current donor−acceptor system with potential applications in organic solar cells.

  10. Failures of TDDFT in describing the lowest intramolecular charge-transfer excitation in para-nitroaniline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Janus J.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Mikkelsen, Kurt V.

    2013-01-01

    for charge{transfer character, we furthermore conrm that the di¿erence between excitation energies calculated with TDDFT and with the Tamm-Danco¿ approximation (TDA) to TDDFT is indeed correlated with the charge-transfer character of a given electronic transition both in vacuo and in solution...

  11. Theoretical Insights Into the Excited State Double Proton Transfer Mechanism of Deep Red Pigment Alkannin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinfeng; Dong, Hao; Zheng, Yujun

    2018-01-24

    As the most important component of deep red pigments, alkannin is investigated theoretically in detail based on time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method. Exploring the dual intramolecular hydrogen bonds (O1-H2···O3 and O4-H5···O6) of alkannin, we confirm the O1-H2···O3 may play a more important role in the first excited state than the O4-H5···O6 one. Infrared (IR) vibrational analyses and subsequent charge redistribution also support this viewpoint. Via constructing the S1-state potential energy surface (PES) and searching transition state (TS) structures, we illuminate the excited state double proton transfer (ESDPT) mechanism of alkannin is the stepwise process that can be first launched by the O1-H2···O3 hydrogen bond wire in gas state, acetonitrile (CH3CN) and cyclohexane (CYH) solvents. We present a novel mechanism that polar aprotic solvents can contribute to the first-step proton transfer (PT) process in the S1 state, and nonpolar solvents play important roles in lowering the potential energy barrier of the second-step PT reaction.

  12. External Electric Field Effects on Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer in 4'-N,N-Dimethylamino-3-hydroxyflavone in Poly(methyl methacrylate) Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Kazuki; Hino, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Norifumi; Awasthi, Kamlesh; Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Ohta, Nobuhiro; Sekiya, Hiroshi

    2015-09-17

    The external electric field effects on the steady-state electronic spectra and excited-state dynamics were investigated for 4'-N,N-(dimethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone (DMHF) in a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) film. In the steady-state spectrum, dual emission was observed from the excited states of the normal (N*) and tautomer (T*) forms. Application of an external electric field of 1.0 MV·cm(-1) enhanced the N* emission and reduced the T* emission, indicating that the external electric field suppressed the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). The fluorescence decay profiles were measured for the N* and T* forms. The change in the emission intensity ratio N*/T* induced by the external electric field is dominated by ESIPT from the Franck-Condon excited state of the N* form and vibrational cooling in potential wells of the N* and T* forms occurring within tens of picoseconds. Three manifolds of fluorescent states were identified for both the N* and T* forms. The excited-state dynamics of DMHF in PMMA films has been found to be very different from that in solution due to intermolecular interactions in a rigid environment.

  13. Death, dynamics and disorder: Terminating reentry in excitable ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    which the heart can be activated as rapidly as 300 beats per minute. There are multiple mechanisms by which ventricular tachycardia (VT) may arise, but the most common one is due to the formation of a reentrant pathway, i.e., a closed path of excitation feedback. Reentry often has an anatomical substrate, with the.

  14. Femtosecond charge transfer dynamics of a modified DNA base: 2-aminopurine in complexes with nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebig, Torsten; Wan, Chaozhi; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2002-09-16

    As a fluorescent isomer of adenine, 2-aminopurine (Ap) is a powerful probe of DNA dynamics and DNA-mediated charge transfer processes. Here, we report studies with femtosecond resolution of the excited-state dynamics of Ap in various solvents and in bimolecular complexes with nucleotides. Using time-resolved transient absorption and fluorescence up-conversion methods we identify charge transfer as the origin for the quenching of the Ap fluorescence by all four DNA nucleotides. The direction of the redox process is, however, dependent on the base, and from the rates we deduce the nature of the transfer, hole versus electron transfer. The pH and the kinetic isotope effects of these charge transfer reactions revealed no evidence for proton transfer involvement in the rate-determining step. From the measured rates and using electron transfer theory we estimate the driving force for charge transfer between all four nucleobases and Ap. The results are important for the studies of dynamics using Ap in DNA assemblies.

  15. Matrix photochemistry of small molecules: Influencing reaction dynamics on electronically excited hypersurfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laursen, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Investigations of chemical reactions on electronically excited reaction surfaces are presented. The role of excited-surface multiplicity is of particular interest, as are chemical reactivity and energy transfer in systems in which photochemistry is initiated through a metal atom sensitizer.'' Two approaches are employed: A heavy-atom matrix affords access to forbidden triplet reaction surfaces, eliminating the need for a potentially reactive sensitizer. Later, the role of the metal atom in the photosensitization process is examined directly.

  16. Femtosecond insights into direct electron injection in dye anchored ZnO QDs following charge transfer excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pushpendra; Kumar, Sunil; Ghosh, Subrata; Pal, Suman Kalyan

    2016-07-27

    The role of the charge transfer (CT) state in interfacial electron transfer in dye-sensitized semiconductor nanocrystals is still poorly understood. To address this problem, femtosecond transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy is used as a probe to investigate the electron injection across a newly synthesized coumarin dye (8-hydroxy-2-oxo-4-phenyl-2 benzo[h]chromene-3-carbonitrile, coded BC5) and ZnO quantum dots (QDs). Steady state and time-resolved spectroscopic measurements reveal that BC5 dye interacts strongly with ZnO QDs in the ground state forming a CT complex. The BC5-ZnO QD complex absorbs more towards red compared to only the dye and QDs, and emits fluorescence due to radiative recombination of photogenerated charges. The formation of charges following the excitation of the CT complex has been demonstrated by observing the signature of dye radical cations and electrons in the conduction band (CB) of the QDs in the TA spectra. The TA signals of these charges grow sharply as a result of ultrafast direct electron injection into the QD. We have monitored the complete dynamics of photogenerated charges by measuring the TA signals of the charges up to a couple of nanoseconds. The injected electrons that are free or shallowly trapped recombine with a time constant of 625 fs, whereas deeply trapped electrons disappear slowly (526 ps) via radiative recombination. Furthermore, theoretical studies based on ab initio calculations have been carried out to complement the experimental findings.

  17. The theoretical study of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer of 2,5-bis(benzoxazol-2-yl)thiophene-3,4-diol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Rui-Fang; Yang, Yun-Fan; Ma, Yan-Zhen; Li, Yong-Qing

    2017-08-01

    The symmetrical structures 2,5-bis(benzoxazol-2-yl)thiophene-3,4-diol (BBTD) can take shape two intramolecular hydrogen bonds in chloroform. In order to research the molecular dynamic behavior of BBTD upon photo-induced process, we utilize density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to complete theoretical calculation. Through the comparison of bond length, bond angle, IR spectra, and frontier molecular orbitals between ground state (S0) and first excited state (S1), it clearly indicates that photoexcitation have slightly influence for intensity of hydrogen bond. For the sake of understanding the mechanism of excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) of BBTD in chloroform, potential energy surfaces have been scanned along with the orientation of O1-H2 and O4-H5 in S0 and S1 state, respectively. A intrigued hydrogen bond dynamic phenomenon has been found that ESIPT of BBTD is not a synergetic double proton transfer process, but a stepwise single proton transfer process BBTD → BBTD-S → BBTD-D. Moreover, the proton transfer process of BBTD-S → BBTD-D is easier to occur than that of BBTD → BBTD-S in S1 state.

  18. Quantum dynamics and topological excitations in interacting dipolar particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Ana

    2016-05-01

    Dipole-dipole interactions, long-range and anisotropic interactions that arise due to the virtual exchange of photons, are of fundamental importance in optical physics, and are enabling a range of new quantum technologies including quantum networks and optical lattice atomic clocks. In this talk I will first discuss how arrays of dipolar particles with a simple J = 0- J = 1 internal level structure can naturally host topological and chiral excitations including Weyl quasi-particles. Weyl fermions were first predicted to exist in the context of high energy physics but only recently have been observed in solid state systems. I will discuss a proposal of using Mott insulators of Sr atoms to observe and probe the Weyl excitation spectrum and its non-trivial chirality. Finally I will report on a recent experiment done at JILA which validates the underlying microscopic model that predicts the existence of these excitations. The experiment measured the collective emission from a coherently driven gas of ultracold 88 Sr atoms and observed a highly directional and anisotropic emission intensity and a substantial broadening of the atomic spectral lines. All of the measurements are well reproduced by the theoretical model. These investigations open the door for the exploration of novel quantum many-body systems involving strongly interacting atoms and photons, and are useful guides for further developments of optical atomic clocks and other applications involving dense atomic ensembles. AFOSR, MURI-AFOSR, ARO,NSF-PHY-1521080, JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844.

  19. Excited-State Dynamics of Carotenoids Studied by Femtosecond Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ingu; Pang, Yoonsoo [Department of Physics and Photon Science, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sebok [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Carotenoids, natural antenna pigments in photosynthesis share a symmetric backbone of conjugated polyenes. Contrary to the symmetric and almost planar geometries of carotenoids, excited state structure and dynamics of carotenoids are exceedingly complex. In this paper, recent infrared and visible transient absorption measurements and excitation dependent dynamics of 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al and 7',7'-dicyano-7'-apo-β-carotene will be reviewed. The recent visible transient absorption measurements of 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al in polar and nonpolar solvents will also be introduced to emphasize the complex excited-state dynamics and unsolved problems in the S{sub 2} and S{sub 1} excited states.

  20. Energy cascades, excited state dynamics, and photochemistry in cob(III)alamins and ferric porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rury, Aaron S; Wiley, Theodore E; Sension, Roseanne J

    2015-03-17

    Porphyrins and the related chlorins and corrins contain a cyclic tetrapyrrole with the ability to coordinate an active metal center and to perform a variety of functions exploiting the oxidation state, reactivity, and axial ligation of the metal center. These compounds are used in optically activated applications ranging from light harvesting and energy conversion to medical therapeutics and photodynamic therapy to molecular electronics, spintronics, optoelectronic thin films, and optomagnetics. Cobalt containing corrin rings extend the range of applications through photolytic cleavage of a unique axial carbon-cobalt bond, permitting spatiotemporal control of drug delivery. The photochemistry and photophysics of cyclic tetrapyrroles are controlled by electronic relaxation dynamics including internal conversion and intersystem crossing. Typically the electronic excitation cascades through ring centered ππ* states, ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) states, metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) states, and metal centered states. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for the investigation of the electronic state dynamics in metal containing tetrapyrroles. The UV-visible spectrum is sensitive to the oxidation state, electronic configuration, spin state, and axial ligation of the central metal atom. Ultrashort broadband white light probes spanning the range from 270 to 800 nm, combined with tunable excitation pulses, permit the detailed unravelling of the time scales involved in the electronic energy cascade. State-of-the-art theoretical calculations provide additional insight required for precise assignment of the states. In this Account, we focus on recent ultrafast transient absorption studies of ferric porphyrins and corrin containing cob(III)alamins elucidating the electronic states responsible for ultrafast energy cascades, excited state dynamics, and the resulting photoreactivity or photostability of these compounds. Iron

  1. Ab initio QM/MM excited-state molecular dynamics study of coumarin 151 in water solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kina, Daisuke; Arora, Pooja; Nakayama, Akira; Noro, Takeshi; Gordon, Mark S.; Taketsugu, Tetsuya

    Ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations are performed to investigate the excited state dynamics of coumarin 151 (C151) in the gas phase and in water solution at the CASSCF level of theory with segmented DZP basis sets, where in the latter case effective fragment potentials (EFP) are used. The dipole moment of an isolated C151 molecule increases considerably upon electronic vertical excitation, from 5.0 D (S0 state) to 11.1 D (S1 state). Two equilibrium structures have been identified in the S1 state, i.e., a charge-transfer state with a planar amino group and a deformed structure of the six-membered ring with the carbonyl group, and a structure that is similar to the S0 equilibrium structure. In AIMD simulations for an isolated C151 molecule (presumably similar to dynamics in nonpolar solvents), C151 decays from S1 to S0 via a crossing point of the charge-transfer state in some trajectories, while in the AIMD simulations for C151-EFP (including solvent), the S1 and S0 energies show an almost parallel energy variation with structural changes, and no crossing point is observed. This result is in good agreement with the experimental observation.

  2. Characterising excited states in and around the semi-magic nucleus $^{68}$ Ni using Coulomb excitation and one-neutron transfer

    CERN Multimedia

    It is proposed to investigate the structure of excited states in $^{68, 70}$Ni(Z =28, N=40, 42) via the measurement of electromagnetic matrix elements in a Coulomb excitation experiment in order to study the N = 40 harmonic-oscillator shell and the Z = 28 proton shell closures. The measured B(E2) values connecting low-lying 0$^{+}$ and 2$^{+}$ can be compared to shell-model predictions. It is also proposed to perform the one-neutron transfer reaction ${d}$($^{68}$Ni,$^{69}$Ni)${p}$, with the aim of populating excited states in $^{69}$Ni. Comparisons with the states populated in the recently performed ${d}$($^{66}$Ni,$^{67}$Ni)${p}$ reaction will be useful in determining the role of the neutron $d_{5/2}$ orbital in the semi-magic properties of $^{68}$Ni.

  3. Charge-transfer excitations in low-gap systems under the influence of solvation and conformational disorder: Exploring range-separation tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, Thiago B.; Kümmel, Stephan

    2014-08-01

    Charge transfer excitations play a prominent role in the fields of molecular electronics and light harvesting. At the same time they have developed a reputation for being hard to predict with time-dependent density functional theory, which is the otherwise predominant method for calculating molecular structure and excitations. Recently, it has been demonstrated that range-separated hybrid functionals, in particular with an "optimally tuned" range separation parameter, describe charge-transfer excitations reliably for different molecules. Many of these studies focused on molecules in vacuum. Here we investigate the influence of solvation on the electronic excitations of thiophene oligomers, i.e., paradigm low gap systems. We take into account bulk solvation using a continuum solvation model and geometrical distortions from molecular dynamics. From our study, three main findings emerge. First, geometrical distortions increase absorption energies by about 0.5 eV for the longer thiophene oligomers. Second, combining optimal tuning of the range separation parameter with a continuum solvation method is not straightforward and has to be approached with great care. Third, optimally tuned range-separated hybrids without a short-range exchange component tend to inherit undesirable characteristics of semi-local functionals: with increasing system size the range separation parameter takes a smaller value, leading to a functional of effectively more semi-local nature and thus not accurately capturing, e.g., the saturation of the optical gap with increasing system size.

  4. Magnetic correlation, excitation and slow dynamics in concentrated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and the mechanism of slow dynamics have been discussed based on the results of in- elastic scattering, diffuse scattering ... studies revealed that there exist marked differences in the dynamical properties among materials which show ..... Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. References. [1] K Motoya, S M ...

  5. Exploring the vibrational fingerprint of the electronic excitation energy via molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deyne, Andy Van Yperen-De; Pauwels, Ewald; Ghysels, An; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Hemelsoet, Karen, E-mail: karen.hemelsoet@ugent.be [Center for Molecular Modeling (CMM), Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Zwijnaarde (Belgium); De Meyer, Thierry [Center for Molecular Modeling (CMM), Ghent University, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Zwijnaarde (Belgium); Department of Textiles, Ghent University, Technologiepark 907, 9052 Zwijnaarde (Belgium); De Clerck, Karen [Department of Textiles, Ghent University, Technologiepark 907, 9052 Zwijnaarde (Belgium)

    2014-04-07

    A Fourier-based method is presented to relate changes of the molecular structure during a molecular dynamics simulation with fluctuations in the electronic excitation energy. The method implies sampling of the ground state potential energy surface. Subsequently, the power spectrum of the velocities is compared with the power spectrum of the excitation energy computed using time-dependent density functional theory. Peaks in both spectra are compared, and motions exhibiting a linear or quadratic behavior can be distinguished. The quadratically active motions are mainly responsible for the changes in the excitation energy and hence cause shifts between the dynamic and static values of the spectral property. Moreover, information about the potential energy surface of various excited states can be obtained. The procedure is illustrated with three case studies. The first electronic excitation is explored in detail and dominant vibrational motions responsible for changes in the excitation energy are identified for ethylene, biphenyl, and hexamethylbenzene. The proposed method is also extended to other low-energy excitations. Finally, the vibrational fingerprint of the excitation energy of a more complex molecule, in particular the azo dye ethyl orange in a water environment, is analyzed.

  6. High Excitation Transfer Efficiency from Energy Relay Dyes in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hardin, Brian E.

    2010-08-11

    The energy relay dye, 4-(Dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4- dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM), was used with a near-infrared sensitizing dye, TT1, to increase the overall power conversion efficiency of a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) from 3.5% to 4.5%. The unattached DCM dyes exhibit an average excitation transfer efficiency (EÌ?TE) of 96% inside TT1-covered, mesostructured TiO2 films. Further performance increases were limited by the solubility of DCM in an acetonitrile based electrolyte. This demonstration shows that energy relay dyes can be efficiently implemented in optimized dye-sensitized solar cells, but also highlights the need to design highly soluble energy relay dyes with high molar extinction coefficients. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  7. Radioactive beam EXperiments at ISOLDE : Coulomb excitation and neutron transfer reactions of exotic nuclei.

    CERN Multimedia

    Kugler, E; Ratzinger, U; Wenander, F J C

    2002-01-01

    % IS347 \\\\ \\\\We propose to perform a pilot experiment to study very neutron rich (A<32) Na-Mg and (A<52) K-Ca isotopes in the region around the neutron shell closures of N=20 and N=28 after Coulomb excitation and neutron transfer, and to demonstrate highly efficient and cost-effective ways to bunch, charge-state breed and accelerate already existing mass-separated singly-charged radioactive ion beams. \\\\ \\\\To do this we plan to accelerate the ISOLDE beams up to 2~MeV/u by means of a novel acceleration scheme and to install an efficient $\\gamma$-ray array for low-multiplicity events around the target position.

  8. Excited state proton transfer in 9-aminoacridine carboxamides in water and in DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Charles A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-09-26

    The 9-aminoacridine molecule is important in several different fields of chemistry. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of this compound are pH sensitive and it is this property that allowed it to be used as a pH probe in different chemical environments. The compound exhibits proton transfer reactions which are among the most fundamental of chemical reactions. The planarity of 9-aminoacridine allows it to intercalate into DNA. Intercalation is a process in which the aromatic flat surface of the intercalator inserts between adjacent base pairs of DNA. The large surface area of 9-aminoacridine`s fused tricyclic ring system allows strong intercalative binding through van der Waals attractions. 9-aminoacridine and many of its derivatives have been tried as possible antitumor drugs. The cytotoxicity of an antitumor agent can be dramatically increased through the addition of one or two cationic side chains. This increase in cytotoxicity using the 9-aminoacridine compound as a parent molecule has been investigated through various derivatives with cationic side chains consisting of different number of carbon atoms between the proximal and distal N atoms. Similar derivatives varied the position of the carboxamide side chain on the aromatic ring system. The objective of this work is to first create a baseline study of the excited state kinetics of the 9-aminoacridine carboxamides in the absence of DNA. The baseline study will allow the excited state kinetics of these antitumor drugs when placed in DNA to be more fully understood.

  9. Pulsed magnetization transfer contrast MRI by a sequence with water selective excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schick, F. [Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany)

    1996-01-01

    A water selective SE imaging sequence was developed providing suitable properties for the assessment of magnetization transfer (MT) effects in tissues with considerable amounts of fat. The sequence with water selective excitation and slice selective refocusing combines the following features: The RIF exposure on the macromolecular protons is relatively low for single slice imaging without MT prepulses, since no additional pulses for fat saturation are necessary. Water selection by frequency selective excitation diminishes faults in the subtraction of images recorded with and without MT prepulses (which might arise from movements). High differences in the signal amplitudes from hyaline cartilage and muscle tissue were obtained comparing images recorded with irradiation of the series of prepulses for MT and those lacking MT prepulses. Utilizations of the described water selective approach for the assessment of MT effects in lesions of cartilage and bone are demonstrated. MT saturation was also examined in muscles with fatty degeneration of patients suffering from progressive muscular dystrophy. The described technique allows determination of MT effects with good precision in a single slice, especially in regions with dominating fat signals. 22 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Molecular excitation dynamics and relaxation quantum theory and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Valkunas, Leonas; Mancal, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Meeting the need for a work that brings together quantum theory and spectroscopy to convey excitation processes to advanced students and specialists wishing to conduct research and understand the entire field rather than just single aspects.Written by an experienced author and recognized authority in the field, this text covers numerous applications and offers examples taken from different disciplines. As a result, spectroscopists, molecular physicists, physical chemists, and biophysicists will all find this a must-have for their research. Also suitable as supplementary reading in graduate

  11. Excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of N-methylpyrrole: A time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Guorong [National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information & Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Neville, Simon P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Schalk, Oliver [National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Sekikawa, Taro [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Kita-13 Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ashfold, Michael N. R. [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Worth, Graham A. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Stolow, Albert, E-mail: astolow@uottawa.ca [National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2016-01-07

    The dynamics of N-methylpyrrole following excitation at wavelengths in the range 241.5-217.0 nm were studied using a combination of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES), ab initio quantum dynamics calculations using the multi-layer multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method, as well as high-level photoionization cross section calculations. Excitation at 241.5 and 236.2 nm results in population of the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state, in agreement with previous studies. Excitation at 217.0 nm prepares the previously neglected B{sub 1}(π3p{sub y}) Rydberg state, followed by prompt internal conversion to the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state. In contrast with the photoinduced dynamics of pyrrole, the lifetime of the wavepacket in the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state was found to vary with excitation wavelength, decreasing by one order of magnitude upon tuning from 241.5 nm to 236.2 nm and by more than three orders of magnitude when excited at 217.0 nm. The order of magnitude difference in lifetimes measured at the longer excitation wavelengths is attributed to vibrational excitation in the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state, facilitating wavepacket motion around the potential barrier in the N–CH{sub 3} dissociation coordinate.

  12. Strategies to enhance the excitation energy-transfer efficiency in a light-harvesting system using the intra-molecular charge transfer character of carotenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukihira, Nao [Department of Applied Chemistry for Environment; School of Science and Technology; Kwansei Gakuin University; Sanda; Japan; Sugai, Yuko [Department of Applied Chemistry for Environment; School of Science and Technology; Kwansei Gakuin University; Sanda; Japan; Fujiwara, Masazumi [Department of Applied Chemistry for Environment; School of Science and Technology; Kwansei Gakuin University; Sanda; Japan; Kosumi, Daisuke [Institute of Pulsed Power Science; Kumamoto University; Kumamoto; Japan; Iha, Masahiko [South Product Co. Ltd.; Uruma-shi; Japan; Sakaguchi, Kazuhiko [Department of Chemistry; Graduate School of Science; Osaka City University; Osaka 558-8585; Japan; Katsumura, Shigeo [Department of Chemistry; Graduate School of Science; Osaka City University; Osaka 558-8585; Japan; Gardiner, Alastair T. [Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre; University of Glasgow; 126 University Place; Glasgow, G12 8QQ; UK; Cogdell, Richard J. [Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre; University of Glasgow; 126 University Place; Glasgow, G12 8QQ; UK; Hashimoto, Hideki [Department of Applied Chemistry for Environment; School of Science and Technology; Kwansei Gakuin University; Sanda; Japan

    2017-01-01

    Fucoxanthin is a carotenoid that is mainly found in light-harvesting complexes from brown algae and diatoms. Due to the presence of a carbonyl group attached to polyene chains in polar environments, excitation produces an excited intra-molecular charge transfer. This intra-molecular charge transfer state plays a key role in the highly efficient (~95%) energy-transfer from fucoxanthin to chlorophyllain the light-harvesting complexes from brown algae. In purple bacterial light-harvesting systems the efficiency of excitation energy-transfer from carotenoids to bacteriochlorophylls depends on the extent of conjugation of the carotenoids. In this study we were successful, for the first time, in incorporating fucoxanthin into a light-harvesting complex 1 from the purple photosynthetic bacterium,Rhodospirillum rubrumG9+ (a carotenoidless strain). Femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy was applied to this reconstituted light-harvesting complex in order to determine the efficiency of excitation energy-transfer from fucoxanthin to bacteriochlorophyllawhen they are bound to the light-harvesting 1 apo-proteins.

  13. Excitation energy transfer in individual light-harvesting chlorosome from green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus at cryogenic temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saga, Yoshitaka; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Shibata, Yutaka; Itoh, Shigeru

    2005-06-01

    The excitation energy transfer from bacteriochlorophyll(BChl)- c self-aggregates to energy-accepting BChl- a in proteins (baseplates) in an individual photosynthetic light-harvesting complex (chlorosome) of a green filamentous photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus was successfully observed at cryogenic temperature. The ratio of intensity of the fluorescence peak of BChl- a to that of BChl- c self-aggregates in individual chlorosomes, which demonstrated relative efficiency of the excitation energy transfer, was heterogeneous between 0.09 and 0.72. This suggests that excitonic interaction between BChl- c self-aggregates and BChl- a in baseplates was heterogeneous among individual chlorosomes.

  14. Femtosecond double proton transfer dynamics in [2,2'-bipyridyl]-3,3'-diol in sol-gel glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prosposito, P.; Marks, D.R.A.; Zhang, H.; Glasbeek, M.

    1998-01-01

    Abstract: Intramolecular excited state double proton-transfer dynamics has been studied for [2,2'-bipyridyl]-3,3'-diol (BP(OH)2) in sol-gel glass. By means of the femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion technique, the spectral dependence of the fluorescence transients obtained for BP(OH)2 in a few

  15. Ultrafast excited state dynamics in 9,9'-bifluorenylidene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conyard, Jamie; Heisler, Ismael A; Browne, Wesley R; Feringa, Ben L; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Buma, Wybren Jan; Woutersen, Sander; Meech, Stephen R

    2014-08-07

    9,9'-Bifluorenylidene has been proposed as an alternative and flexible electron acceptor in organic photovoltaic cells. Here we characterize its excited state properties and photokinetics, combining ultrafast fluorescence and transient IR measurements with quantum chemical calculations. The fluorescence decay is ultrafast (sub-100 fs) and remarkably independent of viscosity. This suggests that large scale structure change is not the primary relaxation mode. The ultrafast decay populates a dark state characterized by distinct vibrational and electronic spectra. This state decays with a 6 ps time constant to a hot ground state that ultimately populates the initial state with a 20 ps time constant; these times are also insensitive to solvent viscosity. No metastable intermediate structures are resolved in the photocycle after population of the dark state. The implications of these results for the operation of 9,9'-bifluorenylidene as an electron acceptor and as a potential molecular switch are discussed.

  16. Discrimination of nuclear spin isomers exploiting the excited state dynamics of a quinodimethane derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obaid, Rana [Institut für Theoretische Chemie, Universität Wien, Währinger Str. 17, 1090 Wien (Austria); Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Quds University, Abu Dis, Palestine (Country Unknown); Kinzel, Daniel; Oppel, Markus, E-mail: markus.oppel@univie.ac.at; González, Leticia [Institut für Theoretische Chemie, Universität Wien, Währinger Str. 17, 1090 Wien (Austria)

    2014-10-28

    Despite the concept of nuclear spin isomers (NSIs) exists since the early days of quantum mechanics, only few approaches have been suggested to separate different NSIs. Here, a method is proposed to discriminate different NSIs of a quinodimethane derivative using its electronic excited state dynamics. After electronic excitation by a laser field with femtosecond time duration, a difference in the behavior of several quantum mechanical operators can be observed. A pump-probe experimental approach for separating these different NSIs is then proposed.

  17. Cluster Dependent Charge-Transfer Dynamics in Iron-Sulfur Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ziliang; Liou, Shu-Hao; Khadka, Nimesh; Jenney, Francis E; Goodin, David B; Seefeldt, Lance C; Adams, Michael W W; Cramer, Stephen; Larsen, Delmar S

    2018-01-05

    Photo-induced charge-transfer dynamics and the influence of cluster size on the dynamics were investigated using five iron-sulfur clusters: the 1Fe-4S cluster in Pyrococcos furiosus rubredoxin, the 2Fe-2S cluster in Pseudomonas putida putidaredoxin, the 4Fe-4S cluster in nitrogenase iron protein, and the 8Fe-7S P-cluster and the 7Fe-9S-1Mo FeMo cofactor in nitrogenase MoFe protein. Laser excitation promotes the iron-sulfur clusters to excited electronic states that relax to lower states. The electronic relaxation lifetimes of the 1Fe-4S, the 8Fe-7S, and the 7Fe-9S-1Mo clusters are in the picoseconds timescale, although the dynamics of the MoFe protein is a mixture of the dynamics of the later two clusters. The lifetimes of the 2Fe-2S and the 4Fe-4S clusters, however, extend to several nanoseconds. A competition between reorganization energies and density of electronic states (thus electronic coupling between states) mediates the charge-transfer lifetimes, with the 2Fe-2S cluster of Pdx and the 4Fe-4S cluster of Fe protein lying at the optimum leading to them having significantly longer lifetimes. Their long lifetimes make them the optimal candidates for long-range electron transfer and as external photosensitizers for other photo-activated chemical reactions like solar hydrogen production. Potential electron-transfer and hole-transfer pathways are proposed that possibly facilitate these charge transfers.

  18. Structural Influence on Excited State Dynamics in Simple Amines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Liv Bærenholdt

    experiments with calculations, provides new insight into the nature of the internal conversion processes that mediate the dynamical evolution between Rydberg states, and how structural variations in simple amine system have a large impact on the non-adiabatic processes. The experimental method of choice......Simple amines are basic model system of nitrogen-containing chromophores that appear widely in nature. They are also ideal systems for detailed investigation of nonadiabatic dynamical processes and ultrafast temporal evolution of electronic states of the Rydberg type. This investigation, combining...... and sensitive collection of photoelectron spectra. In particular, the angleresolved data available from the VMI approach provides highly detailed mechanistic insight about the relaxation pathways. One striking novel nding is that for tertiary amines, the critical factor driving the non-adiabatic dynamics...

  19. Photoinduced Electron Transfer in DNA: Charge Shift Dynamics Between 8-Oxo-Guanine Anion and Adenine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuyuan; Dood, Jordan; Beckstead, Ashley A; Li, Xi-Bo; Nguyen, Khiem V; Burrows, Cynthia J; Improta, Roberto; Kohler, Bern

    2015-06-18

    Femtosecond time-resolved IR spectroscopy is used to investigate the excited-state dynamics of a dinucleotide containing an 8-oxoguanine anion at the 5'-end and neutral adenine at the 3'-end. UV excitation of the dinucleotide transfers an electron from deprotonated 8-oxoguanine to its π-stacked neighbor adenine in less than 1 ps, generating a neutral 8-oxoguanine radical and an adenine radical anion. These species are identified by the excellent agreement between the experimental and calculated IR difference spectra. The quantum efficiency of this ultrafast charge shift reaction approaches unity. Back electron transfer from the adenine radical anion to the 8-oxguanine neutral radical occurs in 9 ps, or approximately 6 times faster than between the adenine radical anion and the 8-oxoguanine radical cation (Zhang, Y. et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2014, 111, 11612-11617). The large asymmetry in forward and back electron transfer rates is fully rationalized by semiclassical nonadiabatic electron transfer theory. Forward electron transfer is ultrafast because the driving force is nearly equal to the reorganization energy, which is estimated to lie between 1 and 2 eV. Back electron transfer is highly exergonic and takes place much more slowly in the Marcus inverted region.

  20. Development of atomic force microscope with wide-band magnetic excitation for study of soft matter dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageshima, Masami; Chikamoto, Takuma; Ogawa, Tatsuya; Hirata, Yoshiki; Inoue, Takahito; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2009-02-01

    In order to probe dynamical properties of mesoscopic soft matter systems such as polymers, structured liquid, etc., a new atomic force microscopy apparatus with a wide-band magnetic cantilever excitation system was developed. Constant-current driving of an electromagnet up to 1 MHz was implemented with a closed-loop driver circuit. Transfer function of a commercial cantilever attached with a magnetic particle was measured in a frequency range of 1-1000 kHz in distilled water. Effects of the laser spot position, distribution of the force exerted on the cantilever, and difference in the detection scheme on the obtained transfer function are discussed in comparison with theoretical predictions by other research groups. A preliminary result of viscoelasticity spectrum measurement of a single dextran chain is shown and is compared with a recent theoretical calculation.

  1. Ultrafast electronic dynamics in laser-excited crystalline bismuth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chekalin S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond spectroscopy was applied to capture complex dynamics of non equilibrium electrons in bismuth. Data analysis reveals significant wavevector dependence of electron-hole and electron-phonon coupling strength along the Γ-T direction of the Brillouin zone

  2. Influence of nuclear dissipation on fission dynamics of the excited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A stochastic approach to fission dynamics based on two-dimensional Langevin equations was applied to calculate the anisotropy of the fission fragments angular distribution and average pre-scission neutron multiplicities for the compound nucleus 248Cf formed in the $${16}$O+$^{232}$Th reactions. Postsaddle nuclear ...

  3. Tracking excited-state charge and spin dynamics in iron coordination complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenkai; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Bergmann, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Crucial to many light-driven processes in transition metal complexes is the absorption and dissipation of energy by 3d electrons(1-4). But a detailed understanding of such non-equilibrium excited-state dynamics and their interplay with structural changes is challenging: a multitude of excited...... states and possible transitions result in phenomena too complex to unravel when faced with the indirect sensitivity of optical spectroscopy to spin dynamics(5) and the flux limitations of ultrafast X-ray sources(6,7). Such a situation exists for archetypal poly-pyridyl iron complexes, such as [Fe(2......,2'-bipyridine)(3)](2+), where the excited-state charge and spin dynamics involved in the transition from a low-to a high-spin state (spin crossover) have long been a source of interest and controversy(6-15). Here we demonstrate that femtosecond resolution X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, with its sensitivity...

  4. Core-excitation effects in O20(d,pO21 transfer reactions: Suppression or enhancement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Deltuva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available O20(d,pO21 transfer reactions are described using momentum-space Faddeev-type equations for transition operators and including the vibrational excitation of the 20O core. The available experimental cross section data at 10.5 MeV/nucleon beam energy for the 21O ground state 52+ and excited state 12+ are quite well reproduced by our calculations including the core excitation. Its effect can be roughly simulated reducing the single-particle cross section by the corresponding spectroscopic factor. Consequently, the extraction of the spectroscopic factors taking the ratio of experimental data and single-particle cross section at this energy is a reasonable procedure. However, at higher energies core-excitation effects are much more complicated and have no simple relation to spectroscopic factors. We found that core-excitation effects are qualitatively very different for reactions with the orbital angular momentum transfer ℓ=0 and ℓ=2, suppressing the cross sections for the former and enhancing for the latter, and changes the shape of the angular distribution in both cases. Furthermore, the core-excitation effect is a result of a complicated interplay between its contributions of the two- and three-body nature.

  5. ANISOTROPY EFFECTS IN SINGLE-ELECTRON TRANSFER BETWEEN LASER-EXCITED ATOMS AND HIGHLY-CHARGED IONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Recent collision experiments are reviewed in which one-electron transfer between laser excited target atoms and (highly charged) keV-ions has been studied. Especially results showing a dependence of the charge exchange on the initial target orbital alignment are discussed. The question to what

  6. Interplay Effect of Excitation and Temperature on Carrier Transfer between Vertically Aligned InAs/GaAs Quantum Dot Pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Carrier transfer in vertically-coupled InAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD pairs is investigated. Photoluminescence (PL and PL excitation spectra measured at low temperature indicate that the PL peak intensity ratio between the emission from the two sets of QDs—i.e., the relative population of carriers between the two layers of QDs—changes with increasing excitation intensity. Temperature-dependent PL reveals unexpected non-monotonic variations in the peak wavelength and linewidth of the seed layer of QDs with temperature. The PL intensity ratio exhibits a “W” behavior with respect to the temperature due to the interplay between temperature and excitation intensity on the inter-layer carrier transfer.

  7. Nonlinear Dynamic Behavior of a Flexible Structure to Combined External Acoustic and Parametric Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo S. Varoto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Flexible structures are frequently subjected to multiple inputs when in the field environment. The accurate determination of the system dynamic response to multiple inputs depends on how much information is available from the excitation sources that act on the system under study. Detailed information include, but are not restricted to appropriate characterization of the excitation sources in terms of their variation in time and in space for the case of distributed loads. Another important aspect related to the excitation sources is how inputs of different nature contribute to the measured dynamic response. A particular and important driving mechanism that can occur in practical situations is the parametric resonance. Another important input that occurs frequently in practice is related to acoustic pressure distributions that is a distributed type of loading. In this paper, detailed theoretical and experimental investigations on the dynamic response of a flexible cantilever beam carrying a tip mass to simultaneously applied external acoustic and parametric excitation signals have been performed. A mathematical model for transverse nonlinear vibration is obtained by employing Lagrange’s equations where important nonlinear effects such as the beam’s curvature and quadratic viscous damping are accounted for in the equation of motion. The beam is driven by two excitation sources, a sinusoidal motion applied to the beam’s fixed end and parallel to its longitudinal axis and a distributed sinusoidal acoustic load applied orthogonally to the beam’s longitudinal axis. The major goal here is to investigate theoretically as well as experimentally the dynamic behavior of the beam-lumped mass system under the action of these two excitation sources. Results from an extensive experimental work show how these two excitation sources interacts for various testing conditions. These experimental results are validated through numerically simulated results

  8. A novel construction of complex-valued Gaussian processes with arbitrary spectral densities and its application to excitation energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Cao, Jianshu; Silbey, Robert J

    2013-06-14

    The recent experimental discoveries about excitation energy transfer (EET) in light harvesting antenna (LHA) attract a lot of interest. As an open non-equilibrium quantum system, the EET demands more rigorous theoretical framework to understand the interaction between system and environment and therein the evolution of reduced density matrix. A phonon is often used to model the fluctuating environment and convolutes the reduced quantum system temporarily. In this paper, we propose a novel way to construct complex-valued Gaussian processes to describe thermal quantum phonon bath exactly by converting the convolution of influence functional into the time correlation of complex Gaussian random field. Based on the construction, we propose a rigorous and efficient computational method, the covariance decomposition and conditional propagation scheme, to simulate the temporarily entangled reduced system. The new method allows us to study the non-Markovian effect without perturbation under the influence of different spectral densities of the linear system-phonon coupling coefficients. Its application in the study of EET in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson model Hamiltonian under four different spectral densities is discussed. Since the scaling of our algorithm is linear due to its Monte Carlo nature, the future application of the method for large LHA systems is attractive. In addition, this method can be used to study the effect of correlated initial condition on the reduced dynamics in the future.

  9. Stepwise vs concerted excited state tautomerization of 2-hydroxypyridine: Ammonia dimer wire mediated hydrogen/proton transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esboui, Mounir, E-mail: mounir.esboui@fst.rnu.tn [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moléculaire et Applications, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Technical and Vocational Training Corporation, Hail College of Technology, P.O. Box 1960, Hail 81441 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-07-21

    The stepwise and concerted excited state intermolecular proton transfer (PT) and hydrogen transfer (HT) reactions in 2-hydroxypyridine-(NH{sub 3}){sub 2} complex in the gas phase under Cs symmetry constraint and without any symmetry constraints were performed using quantum chemical calculations. It shows that upon excitation, the hydrogen bonded in 2HP-(NH{sub 3}){sub 2} cluster facilitates the releasing of both hydrogen and proton transfer reactions along ammonia wire leading to the formation of the 2-pyridone tautomer. For the stepwise mechanism, it has been found that the proton and the hydrogen may transfer consecutively. These processes are distinguished from each other through charge translocation analysis and the coupling between the motion of the proton and the electron density distribution along ammonia wire. For the complex under Cs symmetry, the excited state HT occurs on the A″({sup 1}πσ{sup ∗}) and A′({sup 1}nσ{sup ∗}) states over two accessible energy barriers along reaction coordinates, and excited state PT proceeds mainly through the A′({sup 1}ππ{sup ∗}) and A″({sup 1}nπ{sup ∗}) potential energy surfaces. For the unconstrained complex, potential energy profiles show two {sup 1}ππ{sup ∗}-{sup 1}πσ{sup ∗} conical intersections along enol → keto reaction path indicating that proton and H atom are localized, respectively, on the first and second ammonia of the wire. Moreover, the concerted excited state PT is competitive to take place with the stepwise process, because it proceeds over low barriers of 0.14 eV and 0.11 eV with respect to the Franck-Condon excitation of enol tautomer, respectively, under Cs symmetry and without any symmetry constraints. These barriers can be probably overcome through tunneling effect.

  10. Collision dynamics of methyl radicals and highly vibrationally excited molecules using crossed molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, P.M.Y.

    1991-10-01

    The vibrational to translational (V{yields}T) energy transfer in collisions between large highly vibrationally excited polyatomics and rare gases was investigated by time-of-flight techniques. Two different methods, UV excitation followed by intemal conversion and infrared multiphoton excitation (IRMPE), were used to form vibrationally excited molecular beams of hexafluorobenzene and sulfur hexafluoride, respectively. The product translational energy was found to be independent of the vibrational excitation. These results indicate that the probability distribution function for V{yields}T energy transfer is peaked at zero. The collisional relaxation of large polyatomic molecules with rare gases most likely occurs through a rotationally mediated process. Photodissociation of nitrobenzene in a molecular beam was studied at 266 nm. Two primary dissociation channels were identified including simple bond rupture to produce nitrogen dioxide and phenyl radical and isomerization to form nitric oxide and phenoxy radical. The time-of-flight spectra indicate that simple bond rupture and isomerization occurs via two different mechanisms. Secondary dissociation of the phenoxy radicals to carbon monoxide and cyclopentadienyl radicals was observed as well as secondary photodissociation of phenyl radical to give H atom and benzyne. A supersonic methyl radical beam source is developed. The beam source configuration and conditions were optimized for CH{sub 3} production from the thermal decomposition of azomethane. Elastic scattering of methyl radical and neon was used to differentiate between the methyl radicals and the residual azomethane in the molecular beam.

  11. Collision dynamics of methyl radicals and highly vibrationally excited molecules using crossed molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Pamela Mei-Ying [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-10-01

    The vibrational to translational (V→T) energy transfer in collisions between large highly vibrationally excited polyatomics and rare gases was investigated by time-of-flight techniques. Two different methods, UV excitation followed by intemal conversion and infrared multiphoton excitation (IRMPE), were used to form vibrationally excited molecular beams of hexafluorobenzene and sulfur hexafluoride, respectively. The product translational energy was found to be independent of the vibrational excitation. These results indicate that the probability distribution function for V→T energy transfer is peaked at zero. The collisional relaxation of large polyatomic molecules with rare gases most likely occurs through a rotationally mediated process. Photodissociation of nitrobenzene in a molecular beam was studied at 266 nm. Two primary dissociation channels were identified including simple bond rupture to produce nitrogen dioxide and phenyl radical and isomerization to form nitric oxide and phenoxy radical. The time-of-flight spectra indicate that simple bond rupture and isomerization occurs via two different mechanisms. Secondary dissociation of the phenoxy radicals to carbon monoxide and cyclopentadienyl radicals was observed as well as secondary photodissociation of phenyl radical to give H atom and benzyne. A supersonic methyl radical beam source is developed. The beam source configuration and conditions were optimized for CH3 production from the thermal decomposition of azomethane. Elastic scattering of methyl radical and neon was used to differentiate between the methyl radicals and the residual azomethane in the molecular beam.

  12. Energy transfer dynamics in an RC-LH1-PufX tubular photosynthetic membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsin, J.; Strümpfer, J.; Şener, M.; Qian, P.; Hunter, C. N.; Schulten, K.

    2010-08-01

    Light absorption and the subsequent transfer of excitation energy are the first two steps in the photosynthetic process, carried out by protein-bound pigments, mainly bacteriochlorophylls (BChls), in photosynthetic bacteria. BChls are anchored in light-harvesting (LH) complexes, such as light-harvesting complex I (LH1), which directly associates with the reaction center (RC), forming the RC-LH1 core complex. In Rhodobacter sphaeroides, RC-LH1 core complexes contain an additional protein, PufX, and assemble into dimeric RC-LH1-PufX core complexes. In the absence of LH complex II (LH2), the former complexes can aggregate into a helically ordered tubular photosynthetic membrane. We have examined the excitation transfer dynamics in a single RC-LH1-PufX core complex dimer using the hierarchical equations of motion for dissipative quantum dynamics that accurately, yet in a computationally costly manner, treat the coupling between BChls and their protein environment. A widely employed description, the generalized Förster (GF) theory, was also used to calculate the transfer rates of the same excitonic system in order to verify the accuracy of this computationally cheap method. Additionally, in light of the structural uncertainties in the Rba. sphaeroides RC-LH1-PufX core complex, geometrical alterations were introduced into the BChl organization. It is shown that the energy transfer dynamics are not affected by the considered changes in the BChl organization and that the GF theory provides accurate transfer rates. An all-atom model for a tubular photosynthetic membrane is then constructed on the basis of electron microscopy data, and the overall energy transfer properties of this membrane are computed.

  13. Obtaining maximum muscle excitation for normalizing shoulder electromyography in dynamic contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, Joanne N; Keir, Peter J

    2013-10-01

    Muscle specific maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) are commonly used to elicit reference amplitudes to normalize electromyographic signals (EMG). It has been questioned whether this is appropriate for normalizing EMG from dynamic contractions. This study compares EMG amplitude when shoulder muscle activity from dynamic contractions is normalized to isometric and isokinetic maximal excitation as well as a hybrid approach currently used in our laboratory. Anterior, middle and posterior deltoid, upper and lower trapezius, pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi and infraspinatus were monitored during (1) manually resisted MVICs, and (2) maximum voluntary dynamic concentric contractions (MVDC) on an isokinetic dynamometer. Dynamic contractions were performed (a) at 30°/s about the longitudinal, frontal and sagittal axes of the shoulder, and (b) during manual bi-rotation of a tilted wheel at 120°/s. EMG from the wheel task was normalized to the maximum excitation from (i) the muscle specific MVIC, (ii) from any MVIC (MVICALL), (iii) for any MVDC, (iv) from any exertion (maximum experimental excitation, MEE). Mean EMG from the wheel task was up to 45% greater when normalized to muscle specific isometric contractions (method i) than when normalized to MEE (method iv). Seventy-five percent of MEE's occurred during MVDCs. This study presents an 20 useful and effective process for obtaining the greatest excitation from the shoulder muscles when normalizing dynamic efforts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamic Features of the Highly Excited Vibrational States of the HOCl Non-Integrable System Based on the Dynamic Potential and Lyapunov Exponent Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aixing; Fang, Chao; Liu, Yibao

    2017-01-07

    In this article the dynamic features of the highly excited vibrational states of the hypochlorous acid (HOCl) non-integrable system are studied using the dynamic potential and Lyapunov exponent approaches. On the condition that the 3:1 resonance between the H-O stretching and H-O-Cl bending modes accompany the 2:1 Fermi resonance between the O-Cl stretching and H-O-Cl bending modes, it is found that the dynamic potentials of the highly excited vibrational states vary regularly with different Polyad numbers (P numbers). As the P number increases, the dynamic potentials of the H-O stretching mode remain the same, but those of the H-O-Cl bending mode gradually become complex. In order to investigate the chaotic and stable features of the highly excited vibrational states of the HOCl non-integrable system, the Lyapunov exponents of different energy levels lying in the dynamic potentials of the H-O-Cl bending mode (P = 4 and 5) are calculated. It is shown that the Lyapunov exponents of the energy levels staying in the junction of Morse potential and inverse Morse potential are relative large, which indicates the degrees of chaos for these energy levels is relatively high, but the stabilities of the corresponding states are good. These results could be interpreted as the intramolecular vibrational relaxation (IVR) acting strongly via the HOCl bending motion and causing energy transfers among different modes. Based on the previous studies, these conclusions seem to be generally valid to some extent for non-integrable triatomic molecules.

  15. The effect of excitation wavelength on dynamics of laser-produced tin plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harilal, S. S.; Sizyuk, T.; Hassanein, A.; Campos, D.; Hough, P.; Sizyuk, V.

    2011-03-01

    We investigated the effect of the excitation wavelength on the density evolution of laser-produced tin plasmas, both experimentally and numerically. For producing plasmas, Sn targets were excited with either 10.6 μm CO2 laser or 1.06 μm Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet laser; both are considered to be potential excitation lasers for extreme ultraviolet lithography laser-produced plasma light sources. The electron density of the plasma during the isothermal expansion regime was estimated using an interferometric technique. The Stark broadening of isolated singly-ionized emission was employed for deducing the density during the plasma adiabatic expansion regime. Our results indicate that the excitation source wavelength determines the initial density of the plasma, as well the plume expansion dynamics. Numerical simulation using HEIGHTS simulation package agrees well with the experimentally measured density profile.

  16. An excited-state intramolecular photon transfer fluorescence probe for localizable live cell imaging of cysteine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Wen; Liu, Si-Jia; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2017-03-01

    Small molecule probes suitable for selective and specific fluorescence imaging of some important but low-concentration intracellular reactive sulfur species such as cysteine (Cys) pose a challenge in chemical biology. We present a readily available, fast-response fluorescence probe CHCQ-Ac, with 2-(5‧-chloro-2-hydroxyl-phenyl)-6-chloro-4(3 H)-quinazolinone (CHCQ) as the fluorophore and acrylate group as the functional moiety, that enables high-selectivity and high-sensitivity for detecting Cys in both solution and biological system. After specifically reacted with Cys, the probe undergoes a seven-membered intramolecular cyclization and released the fluorophore CHCQ with excited-state intramolecular photon transfer effect. A highly fluorescent, insoluble aggregate was then formed to facilitate high-sensitivity and high-resolution imaging. The results showed that probe CHCQ-Ac affords a remarkably large Stokes shift and can detect Cys under physiological pH condition with no interference from other analytes. Moreover, this probe was proved to have excellent chemical stability, low cytotoxicity and good cell permeability. Our design of this probe provides a novel potential tool to visualize and localize cysteine in bioimaging of live cells that would greatly help to explore various Cys-related physiological and pathological cellular processes in cell biology and diagnostics.

  17. General theory of excitation energy transfer in donor-mediator-acceptor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Akihiro

    2009-04-21

    General theory of the excitation energy transfer (EET) in the case of donor-mediator-acceptor system was constructed by using generalized master equation (GME). In this theory, we consider the direct and indirect transitions in the EET consistently. Hence, our theory includes the quantum mechanical interference between the direct and indirect transitions automatically. Memory functions in the GME were expressed by the overlap integrals among the time-dependent emission spectrum of the donor, the absorption spectrum of the mediator, the time-dependent emission spectrum of the mediator, and the absorption spectrum of the acceptor. In the Markov limit of the memory functions, we obtained the rate of EET which consists of three terms due to the direct transition, the indirect transition, and the interference between them. We found that the interference works effectively in the limit of slow thermalization at the intermediate state. The formula of EET rate in this limit was expressed by the convolution of the EET interaction and optical spectra. The interference effect strongly depends on the width of the absorption spectrum of mediator molecule and the energy gap between the donor and the mediator molecules.

  18. Antenna organization in green photosynthetic bacteria. 2. Excitation transfer in detached and membrane-bound chlorosomes from Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, D.C.; King, G.H.; Infosino, A.; Steiner, T.; Thewalt, M.L.W.; Blankenship, R.E.

    1987-12-29

    The photosynthetic antenna of Chloroflexus aurantiacus includes bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c/sub 740/ and BChl a/sub 292/, both of which occur in chlorosomes, and B808-866 (containing BChl a/sub 808/ and BChl a/sub 866/), which is membrane-located (subscripts refer to near-infrared absorption maxima in vivo). BChl a/sub 792/ is thought to mediate excitation transfer from BChl c/sub 740/ to BChl a/sub 808/. Lifetimes of fluorescence from BChl c/sub 792/ and BChl a/sub 792/ were measured in isolated and membrane-bound chlorosomes in order to study energy transfer from these pigments. In both preparations, the lifetime of BChl c/sub 740/ fluorescence was at or below the instrumental limit of temporal resolution (about 30-50 ps), implying extremely fast excitation transfer from this pigment. Attempts to disrupt excitation transfer from BChl c/sub 740/, either by conversion of part of this pigment to a monomeric form absorbing at 671 nm or by partial destruction of BChl a/sub 792/ by oxidation with K/sub 3/Fe(CN)/sub 6/, had no discernible effects on the lifetime of BChl c/sub 740/ fluorescence. Most of the fluorescence from BChl a/sub 792/ decayed with a lifetime of 93 +/- 21 ps in membrane-attached chlorosomes and 155 +/- 22 ps in isolated chlorosomes at room temperature. Assuming that the only difference between these preparations is the occurrence of excitation transfer from BChl a/sub 792/ to B808-866, a 41% efficiency was calculated for this process. These results imply either that BChl a/sub 792/ is not an obligatory intermediate in energy transfer from BChl c/sub 7/$/sub 0/ to B808-866 or (more probably) that chlorosome isolation introduces new processes for quenching fluorescence from BChl a/sub 792/.

  19. Nature of Dynamic Magnetoelectric Coupling and Prediction of Room-Temperature Electromagnon Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Panshuo; Li, Z. L.; Yang, J. H.; Jia, C. L.; Xiang, H. J.

    The dynamical magnetoelectric excitation i.e. electromagnon is essential not only for the intrinsic physical mechanism of magnetoelectric coupling but also to realize application in emerging fields such as magnonics. Here, on the basis of group theory and the general polarization model, we develop an approach to understand the electromagnon excitation in magnetoelectric systems. Both multiferroicity and electromagnon in delafossite CuFeO2 are revealed to originate from the general spin-current model, rather than the spin-dependent d-p hybridization model. Our model is general since it is independent on the specific spin Hamiltonian. Based on this dynamic magnetoelectric coupling model, we predict that the magnon in antiferromagnetic Cr2O3 (TN = 307 K) and ferrimagnetic yttrium iron garnet (Tc = 550 K) could be excited by the electric component of light at room temperature.

  20. Vibronic excitation of single molecules: a new technique for studying low-temperature dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraz, Alper; Ehrl, Moritz; Hellriegel, Christian; Bräuchle, Christoph; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2005-05-01

    Herein, we present vibronic excitation and detection of purely electronic zero-phonon lines (ZPL) of single molecules as a new tool for investigating dynamics at cryogenic temperatures. Applications of this technique to study crystalline and amorphous matrix materials are presented. In the crystalline environment, spectrally stable ZPLs are observed at moderate excitation powers. By contrast, investigations at higher excitation intensities reveal the opening of local degrees of freedom and spectral jumps, which we interpret as the observation of elementary steps in the melting of a crystal. We compare these results to spectral single-molecule trajectories recorded in a polymer. The way in which much more complicated spectral features can be analysed is shown. Surprisingly, pronounced spectral shifts on a previously not accessible large energy scale are observed, which are hard to reconcile with the standard two-level model system used to describe low-temperature dynamics in disordered systems.

  1. Self-modulated dynamics of a relativistic charged particle beam in plasma wake field excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhter, T.; Fedele, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica ‘Ettore Pancini’, Università di Napoli Federico II and INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Nicola, S. De [CNR-SPIN and INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Tanjia, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica ‘Ettore Pancini’, Università di Napoli Federico II and INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Jovanović, D. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Mannan, A. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2016-09-01

    The self-modulated dynamics of a relativistic charged particle beam is provided within the context of the theory of plasma wake field excitation. The self-consistent description of the beam dynamics is provided by coupling the Vlasov equation with a Poisson-type equation relating the plasma wake potential to the beam density. An analysis of the beam envelope self-modulation is then carried out and the criteria for the occurrence of the instability are discussed thereby.

  2. Before there was light : Excited state dynamics in luminescent (nano)materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabouw, F.T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413318036

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we examine two types of luminescent materials: colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (also known as quantum dots), and crystals doped with lanthanide ions. These materials convert one color of light to another. By investigating the dynamics of the excited state, we gain new insights

  3. High resolution IR diode laser study of collisional energy transfer between highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene and CO2: the effect of donor fluorination on strong collision energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kilyoung; Johnson, Alan M; Powell, Amber L; Mitchell, Deborah G; Sevy, Eric T

    2014-12-21

    Collisional energy transfer between vibrational ground state CO2 and highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene (MFB) was studied using narrow bandwidth (0.0003 cm(-1)) IR diode laser absorption spectroscopy. Highly vibrationally excited MFB with E' = ∼41,000 cm(-1) was prepared by 248 nm UV excitation followed by rapid radiationless internal conversion to the electronic ground state (S1→S0*). The amount of vibrational energy transferred from hot MFB into rotations and translations of CO2 via collisions was measured by probing the scattered CO2 using the IR diode laser. The absolute state specific energy transfer rate constants and scattering probabilities for single collisions between hot MFB and CO2 were measured and used to determine the energy transfer probability distribution function, P(E,E'), in the large ΔE region. P(E,E') was then fit to a bi-exponential function and extrapolated to the low ΔE region. P(E,E') and the biexponential fit data were used to determine the partitioning between weak and strong collisions as well as investigate molecular properties responsible for large collisional energy transfer events. Fermi's Golden rule was used to model the shape of P(E,E') and identify which donor vibrational motions are primarily responsible for energy transfer. In general, the results suggest that low-frequency MFB vibrational modes are primarily responsible for strong collisions, and govern the shape and magnitude of P(E,E'). Where deviations from this general trend occur, vibrational modes with large negative anharmonicity constants are more efficient energy gateways than modes with similar frequency, while vibrational modes with large positive anharmonicity constants are less efficient at energy transfer than modes of similar frequency.

  4. Ultrafast fluorescence detection in tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) complex in solution: relaxation dynamics involving higher excited states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasikuttan, Achikanath C; Suzuki, Masaya; Nakashima, Satoru; Okada, Tadashi

    2002-07-17

    The excited-state dynamics of a transition metal complex, tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II), [Ru(bpy)(3)](2+), has been investigated using femtosecond fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy. The relaxation dynamics in these molecules is of great importance in understanding the various ultrafast processes related to interfacial electron transfer, especially in semiconductor nanoparticles. Despite several experimental and theoretical efforts, direct observation of a Franck-Condon singlet excited state in this molecule was missing. In this study, emission from the Franck-Condon excited singlet state of [Ru(bpy)(3)](2+) has been observed for the first time, and its lifetime has been estimated to be 40 +/- 15 fs. Biexponential decays with a fast rise component observed at longer wavelengths indicated the existence of more than one emitting state in the system. From a detailed data analysis, it has been proposed that, on excitation at 410 nm, crossover from higher excited (1)(MLCT) states to the vibrationally hot triplet manifold occurs with an intersystem crossing time constant of 40 +/- 15 fs. Mixing of the higher levels in the triplet state with the singlet state due to strong spin-orbit coupling is proposed. This enhances the radiative rate constant, k(r), of the vibrationally hot states within the triplet manifold, facilitating the upconversion of the emitted photons. The vibrationally excited triplet, which is emissive, undergoes vibrational cooling with a decay time in the range of 0.56-1.3 ps and relaxes to the long-lived triplet state. The results on the relaxation dynamics of the higher excited states in [Ru(bpy)(3)](2+) are valuable in explaining the role of nonequilibrated higher excited sensitizer states of transition metal complexes in the electron injection and other ultrafast processes.

  5. Theoretical study on water-mediated excited-state multiple proton transfer in 7-azaindole: significance of hydrogen bond rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xue-fang; Yamazaki, Shohei; Taketsugu, Tetsuya

    2012-11-01

    Excited-state multiple proton transfer (ESMPT) in the cluster of 7-azaindole with three water molecules [7-azaindole(H(2)O)(3)] is theoretically investigated by the TDDFT, CASPT2, and CC2 methods. Examination of the potential energy surface in the first excited state indicates that ESMPT in 7-azaindole(H(2)O)(3) proceeds initially with the rearrangement of hydrogen bond structure of water molecules from a bridged-planar isomer to a cyclic-nonplanar isomer, followed by triple proton transfer in the latter. This reaction is found to be energetically more favorable than quadruple proton transfer in the bridged-planar isomer without hydrogen bond reorganization. It is also shown that all proton-transfer processes follow a concerted mechanism rather than a stepwise mechanism. The computational results show good consistency with the unexpected experimental observations as to the electronic spectra and excited-state lifetime. In particular, the barrier of the hydrogen bond rearrangement is found to be less than 1 kcal/mol, consistent with the missing vibronic bands for 7-azaindole(H(2)O)(3) with an excess energy of more than 200 cm(-1) in the S(1) state.

  6. Influence of Torsional Excitation on Dynamic Responses of Rotors with a Breathing Slant Crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhiwen; Hua, Chunrong; Dong, Dawei; Yan, Bing; Fan, Kang

    2017-05-01

    Focusing on a rotor-bearing system with a breathing slant crack in the power transmission machine, influence of torsional excitations on the coupled nonlinear responses of the system is studied in this work. The slant crack element stiffness matrix is derived based on energy principal and the crack breathing phenomenon is simulated by the Crack Closure Line Position (CCLP) model; and the time-varying coupled dynamic equation of a rotor with a slant breathing crack considering the eccentricity of static unbalance is established using the finite element method and is solved by the NEWMARK method; then the influences of static torque and periodic torsional excitations on rotor dynamic responses in transverse and torsional directions are discussed. Results show that with the increment of static torque, cracks will become open gradually and the nonlinearity degree of rotors will increase firstly and then decrease. For periodic torsional excitation, the torsional excitation frequency and its rotating frequency combination can be found in transverse vibration response, and the larger is the amplitude of excitation, the larger are the combinational frequency components. Then a crack monitoring method for power transmission machines can be suggested by monitoring the coupled response characteristics and their variation from transverse responses of rotors before and after the loads change.

  7. Unusual spiral wave dynamics in the Kessler-Levine model of an excitable medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, N.; Bodenschatz, E.; Zykov, V. S.

    2015-05-01

    The Kessler-Levine model is a two-component reaction-diffusion system that describes spatiotemporal dynamics of the messenger molecules in a cell-to-cell signaling process during the aggregation of social amoeba cells. An excitation wave arising in the model has a phase wave at the wave back, which simply follows the wave front after a fixed time interval with the same propagation velocity. Generally speaking, the medium excitability and the refractoriness are two important factors which determine the spiral wave dynamics in any excitable media. The model allows us to separate these two factors relatively easily since the medium refractoriness can be changed independently of the medium excitability. For rigidly rotating waves, the universal relationship has been established by using a modified free-boundary approach, which assumes that the front and the back of a propagating wave are thin in comparison to the wave plateau. By taking a finite thickness of the domain boundary into consideration, the validity of the proposed excitability measure has been essentially improved. A novel method of numerical simulation to suppress the spiral wave instabilities is introduced. The trajectories of the spiral tip observed for a long refractory period have been investigated under a systematic variation of the medium refractoriness.

  8. Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Telescopic Mechanism for Truss Structure Bridge Inspection Vehicle Under Pedestrian Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenwen Sui

    Full Text Available Abstract Nonlinear dynamic analysis of an axially moving telescopic mechanism for truss structure bridge inspection vehicle under pedestrian excitation is carried out. A biomechanically inspired inverted-pendulum model is utilized to simplify the pedestrian. The nonlinear equations of motion for the beam-pedestrian system are derived using the Hamilton's principle. The equations are transformed into two ordinary differential equations by applying the Galerkin's method at the first two orders. The solutions to the equations are acquired by using the Newmark-β method associated with the Newton-Raphson method. The time-dependent feature of the eigenfunctions for the two beams are taken into consideration in the solutions. Accordingly, the equations of motion for a simplified system, in which the pedestrian is regarded as moving cart, are given. In the numerical examples, dynamic responses of the telescopic mechanism in eight conditions of different beam-telescoping and pedestrian-moving directions are simulated. Comparisons between the vibrations of the beams under pedestrian excitation and corresponding moving cart are carried out to investigate the influence of the pedestrian excitation on the telescopic mechanism. The results show that the displacement of the telescopic mechanism under pedestrian excitation is smaller than that under moving cart especially when the pedestrian approaches the beams end. Additionally, compared with moving cart, the pedestrian excitation can effectively strengthen the vibration when the beam extension is small or when the pedestrian is close to the beams end.

  9. Excited-State Dynamics of Melamine and Its Lysine Derivative Investigated by Femtosecond Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyuan Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Melamine may have been an important prebiotic information carrier, but its excited-state dynamics, which determine its stability under UV radiation, have never been characterized. The ability of melamine to withstand the strong UV radiation present on the surface of the early Earth is likely to have affected its abundance in the primordial soup. Here, we studied the excited-state dynamics of melamine (a proto-nucleobase and its lysine derivative (a proto-nucleoside using the transient absorption technique with a UV pump, and UV and infrared probe pulses. For melamine, the excited-state population decays by internal conversion with a lifetime of 13 ps without coupling significantly to any photochemical channels. The excited-state lifetime of the lysine derivative is slightly longer (18 ps, but the dominant deactivation pathway is otherwise the same as for melamine. In both cases, the vast majority of excited molecules return to the electronic ground state on the aforementioned time scales, but a minor population is trapped in a long-lived triplet state.

  10. Nonlinear dynamics of a cantilevered piezoelectric rectangular plate with voltage excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J. H.; Zhang, W.; Yao, M. H.; Zhu, G.

    2017-03-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a cantilevered piezoelectric rectangular plate are studied, which are simultaneously forced by the base excitation and the excitation loaded by piezoelectric layers. The nonlinear partial differential governing equations of motion for the system are established by using the Hamilton’s principle. The Galerkin approach is used to discretize the partial differential equations to the ordinary differential equations with four-degree-of-freedom. Numerical simulations are presented to investigate the effects of the voltage excitation on the steady-state responses of the cantilevered piezoelectric plate. The bifurcation diagram of the system for w 1, w 2, w 3, w 4, via the voltage excitation amplitude is obtained. The motions of the system can be shown as follows: the chaotic motion → the multiple periodic motion → the periodic motion → the chaotic motion. Based on the above bifurcation diagrams, the voltage excitation amplitude are changed to obtain the waveforms, two-dimensional phase portraits, three-dimensional phase portraits and Poincare maps. The results show that the amplitude of the system can reduce effectively and keep the stability by adjusting the voltage excitation.

  11. Dynamic multi-coil tailored excitation for transmit B1 correction at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh Rudrapatna, S; Juchem, Christoph; Nixon, Terence W; de Graaf, Robin A

    2016-07-01

    Tailored excitation (TEx) based on interspersing multiple radio frequency pulses with linear gradient and higher-order shim pulses can be used to obtain uniform flip angle in the presence of large radio frequency transmission (B 1+) inhomogeneity. Here, an implementation of dynamic, multislice tailored excitation using the recently developed multi-coil nonlinear shim hardware (MC-DTEx) is reported. MC-DTEx was developed and tested both in a phantom and in vivo at 7 T, and its efficacy was quantitatively assessed. Predicted outcomes of MC-DTEx and DTEx based on spherical harmonic shims (SH-DTEx) were also compared. For a planned 30 ° flip angle, in a phantom, the standard deviation in excitation improved from 28% (regular excitation) to 12% with MC-DTEx. The SD in in vivo excitation improved from 22 to 12%. The improvements achieved with experimental MC-DTEx closely matched the theoretical predictions. Simulations further showed that MC-DTEx outperforms SH-DTEx for both scenarios. Successful implementation of multislice MC-DTEx is presented and is shown to be capable of homogenizing excitation over more than twofold B 1+ variations. Its benefits over SH-DTEx are also demonstrated. A distinct advantage of MC hardware over SH shim hardware is the absence of significant eddy current effects, which allows for a straightforward, multislice implementation of MC-DTEx. Magn Reson Med 76:83-93, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Excited-state dynamics of mononucleotides and DNA strands in a deep eutectic solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuyuan; de La Harpe, Kimberly; Hariharan, Mahesh; Kohler, Bern

    2018-01-31

    The photophysics of several mono- and oligonucleotides were investigated in a deep eutectic solvent for the first time. The solvent glyceline, prepared as a 1 : 2 mole ratio mixture of choline chloride and glycerol, was used to study excited-state deactivation in a non-aqueous solvent by the use of steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopy. DNA strands in glyceline retain the secondary structures that are present in aqueous solution to some degree, thus enabling a study of the effects of solvent properties on the excited states of stacked bases and stacked base pairs. The excited-state lifetime of the mononucleotide 5'-AMP in glyceline is 630 fs, or twice as long as in aqueous solution. Even slower relaxation is seen for 5'-TMP in glyceline, and a possible triplet state with a lifetime greater than 3 ns is observed. Circular dichroism spectra show that the single strand (dA)18 and the duplex d(AT)9·d(AT)9 adopt similar structures in glyceline and in aqueous solution. Despite having similar conformations in both solvents, femtosecond transient absorption experiments reveal striking changes in the dynamics. Excited-state decay and vibrational cooling generally take place more slowly in glyceline than in water. Additionally, the fraction of long-lived excited states in both oligonucleotide systems is lower in glyceline than in aqueous solution. For a DNA duplex, water is suggested to favor decay pathways involving intrastrand charge separation, while the deep eutectic solvent favors interstrand deactivation channels involving neutral species. Slower solvation dynamics in the viscous deep eutectic solvent may also play a role. These results demonstrate that the dynamics of excitations in stacked bases and stacked base pairs depend not only on conformation, but are also highly sensitive to the solvent.

  13. Femtosecond dynamics of fundamental reaction processes in liquids: Proton transfer, geminate recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Benjamin Joel [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-11-01

    The fast excited state intramolecular proton transfer of 3-hydroxyflavone is measured and effects of external hydrogen-bonding interactions on the proton transfer are studied. The proton transfer takes place in ~240 fsec in nonpolar environments, but becomes faster than instrumental resolution of 110 fsec in methanol solution. The dynamics following photodissociation of CH2I2 and other small molecules provide the first direct observations of geminate recombination. The recombination of many different photodissociating species occurs on a ~350 fsec time scale. Results show that recombination yields but not rates depend on the solvent environment and suggest that recombination kinetics are dominated by a single collision with surrounding solvent cage. Studies of sterically locked phenyl-substituted butadienes offer new insights into the electronic structure and isomerization behavior of conjugated polyenes. Data show no simple correlation between hinderance of specific large amplitude motions and signatures of isomerizative behavior such as viscosity dependent excited state lifetimes, implying that the isomerization does not provide a suitable for simple condensed phase reaction rate theories. The spectral dynamics of a photochromic spiropyran indicate that recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation all play important roles in photoreactivity of complex molecules. The interplay of these microscopic phenomena and their effect on macroscopic properties such as photochromism are discussed. All the results indicate that the initial steps of the photochromic reaction process occur extremely rapidly. Laser system and computer codes for data analysis are discussed.

  14. Imaging Magnetic Vortices Dynamics Using Lorentz Electron Microscopy with GHz Excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yimei

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic vortices in thin films are naturally formed spiral spin configurations with a core polarization pointing out of the film plane. They typically represent ground states with high structural and thermal stability as well as four different chirality-polarity combinations, offering great promise in the development of spin-based devices. For applications to spin oscillators, non-volatile memory and logic devices, the fundamental understanding and precise control of vortex excitations and dynamic switching behavior are essential. The compact dimensionality and fast spin dynamics set grand challenges for direct imaging technologies. Recently, we have developed a unique method to directly visualize the dynamic magnetic vortex motion using advanced Lorentz electron microscopy combined with GHz electronic excitations. It enables us to map the orbit of a magnetic vortex core in a permalloy square with Material Sciences and Engineering Division, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  15. Measuring distances within unfolded biopolymers using fluorescence resonance energy transfer: The effect of polymer chain dynamics on the observed fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Dmitrii E.; Plaxco, Kevin W.

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have seen a number of investigations in which distances within unfolded proteins, polypeptides, and other biopolymers are probed via fluorescence resonance energy transfer, a method that relies on the strong distance dependence of energy transfer between a pair of dyes attached to the molecule of interest. In order to interpret the results of such experiments it is commonly assumed that intramolecular diffusion is negligible during the excited state lifetime. Here we explore the conditions under which this “frozen chain” approximation fails, leading to significantly underestimated donor-acceptor distances, and describe a means of correcting for polymer dynamics in order to estimate these distances more accurately. PMID:19725638

  16. Nonlinear excitation kinetics of biased quantum wells. Coherent dynamical screening effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we describe a strongly nonlinear process of ultrafast photoexcitation of a biased quantum well. This process is governed by coherent dynamical screening, where the instantaneously polarized photoexcited carriers screen initial bias field. This results in a dynamic modification...... of the bandstructure of the quantum well, which is totally coherent with the temporal intensity distribution of the excitation laser pulse. We developed a time-resolved theoretical model of coherent dynamical screening, which predicts interesting fundamental consequences, such as nonlinear absorption and ultra...

  17. Shape similarity of charge-transfer (CT) excitation energy curves in a series of donor-acceptor complexes and its description with a transferable energy of CT orbital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, O. V.

    2017-08-01

    A simple nature of charge-transfer (CT) in the prototype complexes Dp -F2 (Dp =NH3 , H2O) manifests itself in a very close shape of their CT excitation energy curves ωCT (R) along the donor-acceptor separation R. It affords a simple orbital description in terms of the CT orbitals (CTOs) obtained with a transformation of the virtual orbitals of the standard local density approximation (LDA). The transferable energy of the relevant CTO as a function of R closely approximates the common shape of ωCT (R) , while the height of the individual curve is determined with the ionization potential of Dp .

  18. Exogenous quinones inhibit photosynthetic electron transfer in Chloroflexus aurantiacus by specific quenching of the excited bacteriochlorophyll c antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, N-U; Tokita, S; Matsuura, K

    1999-01-01

    -hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, or 4 microM 2-acetyl-3-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone. Between 25 and 100 times higher quinone concentrations were needed to quench BChl a fluorescence to a similar extent. These quinones also efficiently inhibited flash-induced cytochrome c oxidation when BChl c was excited......, but not when BChl a was excited. The quenching of BChl c fluorescence induced by these quinones correlated with the inhibition of flash-induced cytochrome c oxidation. We concluded that the quinones inhibited electron transfer in the reaction center by specifically quenching the excitation energy in the BChl c...... antenna. Our results provide a model system for studying the redox-dependent antenna quenching in green sulfur bacteria because the antennas in these bacteria inherently exhibit a sensitivity to O(2) similar to the quinone-supplemented cells of Cfx. aurantiacus....

  19. Comparison of calculated and experimentally resolved rate constants for excitation energy transfer in C-phycocyanin. 1. Monomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debreczeny, M.P.; Sauer, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Zhou, J.; Bryant, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-05-18

    Rate constants for excitation energy transfer in light-harvesting protein, C-phycocyanin (PC), in the monomeric aggregation state, isolated from the cyanobacterium cynechococcus sp. PCC 7002, are calculated, using Foerster theory and compared with the results of time-resolved fluorescence measurements. The assignments of the energy-transfer rate constants in PC monomers are confirmed here by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements of the PC monomers isolated from both the wild-type and a mutant strain (cpcB/C155S) whose PC is missing the {beta}{sub 155} chromophore. It is concluded that the Foerster model of resonant energy transfer in the weak coupling limit successfully describes the dominant energy-transfer processes in this protein in the monomeric state. 31 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Low-threshold wavelength-switchable organic nanowire lasers based on excited-state intramolecular proton transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Yan, Yongli; Gu, Jianmin; Yao, Jiannian; Zhao, Yong Sheng

    2015-06-08

    Coherent light signals generated at the nanoscale are crucial to the realization of photonic integrated circuits. Self-assembled nanowires from organic dyes can provide both a gain medium and an effective resonant cavity, which have been utilized for fulfilling miniaturized lasers. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT), a classical molecular photoisomerization process, can be used to build a typical four-level system, which is more favorable for population inversion. Low-power driven lasing in proton-transfer molecular nanowires with an optimized ESIPT energy-level process has been achieved. With high gain and low loss from the ESIPT, the wires can be applied as effective FP-type resonators, which generated single-mode lasing with a very low threshold. The lasing wavelength can be reversibly switched based on a conformation conversion of the excited keto form in the ESIPT process. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Femtosecond coherent nuclear dynamics of excited tetraphenylethylene: Ultrafast transient absorption and ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayal, Surajit; Roy, Khokan; Umapathy, Siva

    2018-01-14

    Ultrafast torsional dynamics plays an important role in the photoinduced excited state dynamics. Tetraphenylethylene (TPE), a model system for the molecular motor, executes interesting torsional dynamics upon photoexcitation. The photoreaction of TPE involves ultrafast internal conversion via a nearly planar intermediate state (relaxed state) that further leads to a twisted zwitterionic state. Here, we report the photoinduced structural dynamics of excited TPE during the course of photoisomerization in the condensed phase by ultrafast Raman loss (URLS) and femtosecond transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy. TA measurements on the S1 state reveal step-wise population relaxation from the Franck-Condon (FC) state → relaxed state → twisted state, while the URLS study provides insights on the vibrational dynamics during the course of the reaction. The TA spectral dynamics and vibrational Raman amplitudes within 1 ps reveal vibrational wave packet propagating from the FC state to the relaxed state. Fourier transformation of this oscillation leads to a ∼130 cm-1 low-frequency phenyl torsional mode. Two vibrational marker bands, Cet=Cet stretching (∼1512 cm-1) and Cph=Cph stretching (∼1584 cm-1) modes, appear immediately after photoexcitation in the URLS spectra. The initial red-shift of the Cph=Cph stretching mode with a time constant of ∼400 fs (in butyronitrile) is assigned to the rate of planarization of excited TPE. In addition, the Cet=Cet stretching mode shows initial blue-shift within 1 ps followed by frequency red-shift, suggesting that on the sub-picosecond time scale, structural relaxation is dominated by phenyl torsion rather than the central Cet=Cet twist. Furthermore, the effect of the solvent on the structural dynamics is discussed in the context of ultrafast nuclear dynamics and solute-solvent coupling.

  2. Does excited-state proton-transfer reaction contribute to the emission behaviour of 4-aminophthalimide in aqueous media?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khara, Dinesh Chandra; Banerjee, Sanghamitra; Samanta, Anunay

    2014-06-23

    4-Aminophthalimide (AP) is an extensively used molecule both for fundamental studies and applications primarily due to its highly solvent-sensitive fluorescence properties. The fluorescence spectrum of AP in aqueous media was recently shown to be dependent on the excitation wavelength. A time-dependent blue shift of its emission spectrum is also reported. On the basis of these findings, the excited-state solvent-mediated proton-transfer reaction of the molecule, which was proposed once but discarded at a later stage, is reintroduced. We report on the fluorescence behaviour of AP and its imide-H protected derivative, N-BuAP, to prove that a solvent-assisted excited-state keto-enol transformation does not contribute to the steady-state and time-resolved emission behaviour of AP in aqueous media. Our results also reveal that the fluorescence of AP in aqueous media arises from two distinct hydrogen-bonded species. The deuterium isotope effect on the fluorescence quantum yield and lifetime of AP, which was thought to be a reflection of the excited-state proton-transfer reaction in the system, is explained by considering the difference in the influence of H(2)O and D(2)O on the nonradiative rates and ground-state exchange of the proton with the solvent. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. On the phase-correlation and phase-fluctuation dynamics of a strongly excited Bose gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakhel, Roger R., E-mail: rogersakhel@yahoo.com [Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Information Technology, Isra University, Amman 11622 (Jordan); The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34151 (Italy); Sakhel, Asaad R. [Department of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Engineering Technology, Balqa Applied University, Amman 11134 (Jordan); The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34151 (Italy); Ghassib, Humam B. [Department of Physics, The University of Jordan, Amman 11942 (Jordan)

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of a Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) is explored in the wake of a violent excitation caused by a strong time-dependent deformation of a trapping potential under the action of an intense stirring laser. The system is a two-dimensional BEC confined to a power-law trap with hard-wall boundaries. The stirring agent is a moving red-detuned laser potential. The time-dependent Gross–Pitaevskii equation is solved numerically by the split-step Crank–Nicolson method in real time. The phase correlations and phase fluctuations are examined as functions of time to demonstrate the evolving properties of a strongly-excited BEC. Of special significance is the occurrence of spatial fluctuations while the condensate is being excited. These oscillations arise from stirrer-induced density fluctuations. While the stirrer is inside the trap, a reduction in phase coherence occurs, which is attributed to phase fluctuations.

  4. Topological constraints on spiral wave dynamics in spherical geometries with inhomogeneous excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsen, Jörn; Glass, Leon; Kapral, Raymond

    2004-11-01

    We analyze the way topological constraints and inhomogeneity in the excitability influence the dynamics of spiral waves on spheres and punctured spheres of excitable media. We generalize the definition of an index such that it characterizes not only each spiral but also each hole in punctured, oriented, compact, two-dimensional differentiable manifolds and show that the sum of the indices is conserved and zero. We also show that heterogeneity and geometry are responsible for the formation of various spiral-wave attractors, in particular pairs of spirals in which one spiral acts as a source and a second as a sink--the latter similar to an antispiral. The results provide a basis for the analysis of the propagation of waves in heterogeneous excitable media in physical and biological systems.

  5. Photoinduced charge-transfer dynamics of sequentially aligned donor-acceptor systems in an ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Masayasu; Katayama, Tetsuro; Ito, Syoji; Nagasawa, Yutaka; Matsuo, Daisuke; Suzuma, Yoshinori; Peng, Lifen; Orita, Akihiro; Otera, Junzo; Miyasaka, Hiroshi

    2013-10-01

    Photoinduced charge separation processes of linear phenyleneethynylene derivatives (PEN) with different sequences of electron-withdrawing perfluorophenyl groups (A) and electron-donating phenyl groups (D) were investigated in an ionic liquid (IL), BmimTFSI, by picosecond time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) and transient absorption (TA) spectroscopies. Very rapid photoinduced charge separation within 10 ps in AADD was followed by the stabilization of the charge-transfer (CT) state by the solvation, while the excited states in ADAD and ADDA were ascribable to the locally excited (LE) state. Equilibrium between the LE and CT states was established for DAAD with time constants of forward and backward processes much faster than the solvation time. The relative population of the CT state increases with time owing to the dynamic stabilization of the CT state by the solvation. The elementary charge separation process, the increase in the CT population, and their relation to the solvation time were discussed.

  6. Use of dynamical coupling for improved quantum state transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyakhov, A. O.; Bruder, C.

    2006-12-01

    We propose a method to improve quantum state transfer in transmission lines. The idea is to localize the information on the last qubit of a transmission line by dynamically varying the coupling constants between the first and the last pair of qubits. The fidelity of state transfer is higher then in a chain with fixed coupling constants. The effect is stable against small fluctuations in the system parameters.

  7. Use of dynamical coupling for improved quantum state transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Lyakhov, A. O.; Bruder, C.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a method to improve quantum state transfer in transmission lines. The idea is to localize the information on the last qubit of a transmission line, by dynamically varying the coupling constants between the first and the last pair of qubits. The fidelity of state transfer is higher then in a chain with fixed coupling constants. The effect is stable against small fluctuations in the system parameters.

  8. Dynamic management of water transfer between two interconnected river basins

    OpenAIRE

    Cabo, Francisco; Erdlenbruch, Katrin; Tidball, Mabel

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes the dynamic interaction between two regions with interconnected river basins. Precipitation is higher in one river-basin while water productivity is higher in the other. Water transfer increases productivity in the recipient basin, but may cause environmental damage in the donor basin. The recipient faces a trade-off between paying the price of the water transfer, or investing in alternative water supplies to achieve a higher usable water capacity. We analyze the design of...

  9. Dynamic measurement of near-field radiative heat transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, S.; G. Sharma; Molesky, S.; Kränzien, P. U.; Jalas, T.; Z. Jacob; Petrov, A. Yu.; Eich, M.

    2017-01-01

    Super-Planckian near-field radiative heat transfer allows effective heat transfer between a hot and a cold body to increase beyond the limits long known for black bodies. Until present, experimental techniques to measure the radiative heat flow relied on steady-state systems. Here, we present a dynamic measurement approach based on the transient plane source technique, which extracts thermal properties from a temperature transient caused by a step input power function. Using this versatile me...

  10. Transfer of Dynamic Learning Across Postures

    OpenAIRE

    Alaa A Ahmed; Wolpert, Daniel M.

    2009-01-01

    When learning a difficult motor task, we often decompose the task so that the control of individual body segments is practiced in isolation. But on re-composition, the combined movements can result in novel and possibly complex internal forces between the body segments that were not experienced (or did not need to be compensated for) during isolated practice. Here we investigate whether dynamics learned in isolation by one part of the body can be used by other parts of the body to immediately...

  11. Dual electron transfer pathways from the excited C60 radical anion: enhanced reactivities due to the photoexcitation of reaction intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Ohsaka, Tatsuya; Majima, Tetsuro

    2015-12-14

    In the present study, electron transfer (ET) processes from excited radical anions have been investigated using dyad molecules including C60. The deactivation process of excited C60˙(-), including the internal conversion from the D1 to the D0 state and the cooling process of the vibrationally hot ground state (D), was observed spectroscopically for the first time. These processes could be unambiguously distinguished by the observation of the stimulated emission from the D1 state. The intramolecular ET processes from the excited C60˙(-) were confirmed by the transient absorption spectra. Clearly, both D1 and D states acted as precursors for the ET, i.e., dual ET pathways were confirmed. The driving force dependence of the ET rates was well characterized by the Marcus theory, which revealed that the forward ET processes are located at the top region of the Marcus parabola. In addition, the ET from the excited imide radical anion to C60 and that from the ground state C60˙(-) to imide were examined. The ET rate from the excited imide radical anion and that from ground state C60˙(-) did not follow the Marcus parabola estimated for the ET from the excited C60˙(-). The observed difference can be attributed to the difference in the energy required to form the reduced spacer (Δ) in the superexchange mechanism. Because the Δ value tends to become smaller for ET processes from excited radical ions, fast and efficient ET processes are expected from these states as demonstrated in the present study.

  12. Final Report: Vibrational Dynamics in Photoinduced Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth G. Spears

    2006-04-19

    The objective of this grant was to understand how molecular vibrational states (geometry distortions) are involved in photoinduced electron transfer rates of molecules. This subject is an important component of understanding how molecular absorbers of light convert that energy into charge separation. This is important because the absorption usually excites molecular vibrations in a new electronic state prior to electron transfer to other molecules or semiconductor nanoparticles, as in some types of solar cells. The speeds of charge separation and charge recombination are key parameters that require experiments such as those in this work to test the rules governing electron transfer rates. Major progress was made on this goal. Some of the molecular structures selected for developing experimental data were bimolecular charge transfer complexes that contained metals of cobalt or vanadium. The experiments used the absorption of an ultrafast pulse of light to directly separate charges onto the two different molecular parts of the complex. The charge recombination then proceeds naturally, and one goal was to measure the speed of this recombination for different types of molecular vibrations. We used picosecond and femtosecond duration pulses with tunable colors at infrared wavelengths to directly observe vibrational states and their different rates of charge recombination (also called electron transfer). We discovered that different contact geometries in the complexes had very different electron transfer rates, and that one geometry had a significant dependence on the amount of vibration in the complex. This is the first and only measurement of such rates, and it allowed us to confirm our interpretation with a number of molecular models and test the sensitivity of electron transfer to vibrational states. This led us to develop a general theory, where we point out how molecular distortions can change the electron transfer rates to be much faster than prior theories

  13. Transition dynamics of generalized multiple epileptic seizures associated with thalamic reticular nucleus excitability: A computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Suyu; Wang, Qingyun

    2017-11-01

    Presently, we improve a computational framework of thalamocortical circuits related to the Taylor's model to investigate the relationship between thalamic reticular nucleus (RE) excitability and epilepsy. By using bifurcation analysis, we explore the RE's excitability dynamics mechanism in the processes of seizure generation, development and transition. Results show that the seizure-free state, absence seizures, clonic seizures and tonic seizures can be formed as the RE excitability is changed in this established model. Importantly, it is verified that physiological changing GABAA inhibition in RE can elicit absence seizures and clonic seizures and the pathological transitions between these two seizures. Furthermore, when the level of AMPA connection is decreased or increased, this proposed model embraces absence seizures and clonic seizures, and tonic seizures, respectively. Except that, bifurcation mechanisms of dynamical transition of different seizures are analyzed in detail. In addition, hybrid regulations of the reticular nucleus excitability for epileptic seizures are proven to be valid within the suitable levels of AMPA and GABAA connection. Hopefully, the obtained results could be helpful for effective control of epileptic activities with additional pharmacological interference.

  14. Multifrequency excitation method for rapid and accurate dynamic test of micromachined gyroscope chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yan; Zhou, Bin; Xing, Chao; Zhang, Rong

    2014-10-17

    A novel multifrequency excitation (MFE) method is proposed to realize rapid and accurate dynamic testing of micromachined gyroscope chips. Compared with the traditional sweep-frequency excitation (SFE) method, the computational time for testing one chip under four modes at a 1-Hz frequency resolution and 600-Hz bandwidth was dramatically reduced from 10 min to 6 s. A multifrequency signal with an equal amplitude and initial linear-phase-difference distribution was generated to ensure test repeatability and accuracy. The current test system based on LabVIEW using the SFE method was modified to use the MFE method without any hardware changes. The experimental results verified that the MFE method can be an ideal solution for large-scale dynamic testing of gyroscope chips and gyroscopes.

  15. Recombination dynamics of optically excited charge carriers in bulk MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völzer, Tim; Lütgens, Matthias; Fennel, Franziska; Lochbrunner, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), such as MoS2, are promising candidates for optoelectronic or catalytic applications. On that account, a detailed characterization of the electronic dynamics in these materials is of pivotal importance. Here, we investigate the temporal evolution of an excited carrier population by all-optical pump-probe spectroscopy. On the sub-picosecond time scale we observe thermal relaxation of the excited carriers by electron-phonon coupling. The dynamics on the nanosecond time scale can be understood in terms of defect-assisted Auger recombination over a broad carrier density regime spanning more than one order of magnitude. Hence, our results emphasize the importance of defect states for electronic processes in TMDCs at room temperature.

  16. Multifrequency Excitation Method for Rapid and Accurate Dynamic Test of Micromachined Gyroscope Chips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Deng

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel multifrequency excitation (MFE method is proposed to realize rapid and accurate dynamic testing of micromachined gyroscope chips. Compared with the traditional sweep-frequency excitation (SFE method, the computational time for testing one chip under four modes at a 1-Hz frequency resolution and 600-Hz bandwidth was dramatically reduced from 10 min to 6 s. A multifrequency signal with an equal amplitude and initial linear-phase-difference distribution was generated to ensure test repeatability and accuracy. The current test system based on LabVIEW using the SFE method was modified to use the MFE method without any hardware changes. The experimental results verified that the MFE method can be an ideal solution for large-scale dynamic testing of gyroscope chips and gyroscopes.

  17. Dynamic Routing of Short Transfer Baggage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Tommy; Pisinger, David

    of dispatch. Computational results are presented for real-life passenger data with stochastic bag arrival times and travel times. The results indicate that the algorithm is able to dispatch the baggage considerably better than the manual delivery plans reported in the case study, and due to its fast running...... times, the algorithm is suitable for dynamic dispatching. Investigations on the impact of uncertainty and fleet size make it possible to support a trade-off between fleet size and expected service level.......We consider a variant of the Vehicle Routing Problem that arises in airports when transporting baggage for passengers with connecting flights. Each bag can be delivered in two locations with disjunctive time windows. The task is to define multiple trips for the vehicles in order to deliver bags...

  18. Explicit proton transfer in classical molecular dynamics simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Maarten G.; Groenhof, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    We present Hydrogen Dynamics (HYDYN), a method that allows explicit proton transfer in classical force field molecular dynamics simulations at thermodynamic equilibrium. HYDYN reproduces the characteristic properties of the excess proton in water, from the special pair dance, to the continuous fluctuation between the limiting Eigen and Zundel complexes, and the water reorientation beyond the first solvation layer. Advantages of HYDYN with respect to existing methods are computational efficien...

  19. Influence of Road Excitation and Steering Wheel Input on Vehicle System Dynamic Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Feng Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering the importance of increasing driving safety, the study of safety is a popular and critical topic of research in the vehicle industry. Vehicle roll behavior with sudden steering input is a main source of untripped rollover. However, previous research has seldom considered road excitation and its coupled effect on vehicle lateral response when focusing on lateral and vertical dynamics. To address this issue, a novel method was used to evaluate effects of varying road level and steering wheel input on vehicle roll behavior. Then, a 9 degree of freedom (9-DOF full-car roll nonlinear model including vertical and lateral dynamics was developed to study vehicle roll dynamics with or without of road excitation. Based on a 6-DOF half-car roll model and 9-DOF full-car nonlinear model, relationship between three-dimensional (3-D road excitation and various steering wheel inputs on vehicle roll performance was studied. Finally, an E-Class (SUV level car model in CARSIM® was used, as a benchmark, with and without road input conditions. Both half-car and full-car models were analyzed under steering wheel inputs of 5°, 10° and 15°. Simulation results showed that the half-car model considering road input was found to have a maximum accuracy of 65%. Whereas, the full-car model had a minimum accuracy of 85%, which was significantly higher compared to the half-car model under the same scenario.

  20. Interplay between topology and dynamics in excitation patterns on hierarchical graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Hütt

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In a recent publication [Müller-Linow et al. (2008 PLoS Computational Biology 4, 1000190] two types of correlations between network topology and dynamics have been observed: waves propagating from central nodes and module-based synchronization. Remarkably, the dynamic behavior of hierarchical modular networks can switch from one of these modes to the other as the level of spontaneous network activation changes. Here we attempt to capture the origin of this switching behavior in a mean-field model as well in a formalism, where excitation waves are regarded as avalanches on the graph.

  1. Wave Packet Simulation of Nonadiabatic Dynamics in Highly Excited 1,3-Dibromopropane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Rasmus Y.; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Sølling, Theis Ivan

    2008-01-01

    We have conducted wave packet simulations of excited-state dynamics of 1,3-dibromopropane (DBP) with the aim of reproducing the experimental results of the gas-phase pump-probe experiment by Kotting et al. [Kotting. C.; Diau, E. W.-G.; Solling, T. L. Zewail, A. H. J. Phys. Chem. A 2001106, 7530...... of the carbon bromine bonds oil a time scale of 2.5 ps. Building the theoretical framework for the wave packet propagation around this model of the reaction dynamics, the Simulations reproduce, to a good extent, the time scales observed in the experiment. Furthermore. the Simulations provide insight into how...

  2. Charge-Transfer Complexes Studied by Dynamic Force Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurriaan Huskens

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the strength and kinetics of two charge-transfer complexes, naphthol-methylviologen and pyrene-methylviologen, are studied using dynamic force spectroscopy. The dissociation rates indicate an enhanced stability of the pyrene-methylviologen complex, which agrees with its higher thermodynamic stability compared to naphthol-methylviologen complex.

  3. Dynamics of competitive reactions: endothermic proton transfer and exothermic substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jianhua; Brauman, John I

    2004-03-03

    Dynamics of an endothermic proton-transfer reaction, F(-) with dimethyl sulfoxide, and an endothermic proton-transfer reaction with a competing exothermic substitution (S(N)2) channel, F(-) with borane-methyl sulfide complex, were investigated using a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR) and kinetic modeling. The two proton-transfer reactions have slightly positive and a small negative overall free energy changes, respectively. Energy-dependent rate constants were measured as a function of F(-) ion translational energy, and the resulting kinetics were modeled with the RRKM (Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus) theory. The observed rate constants for the proton-transfer reactions of F(-) with dimethyl sulfoxide and with borane-methyl sulfide complex are identical, with a value of 0.17 x 10(-9) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1); for the S(N)2 reaction, k = 0.90 x 10(-9) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 350 K. Both proton-transfer reactions have positive entropy changes in the forward direction and show positive energy dependences. The competing S(N)2 reaction exhibits negative energy dependence and becomes less important at higher energies. The changes of the observed rate constants agree with RRKM theory predictions for a few kcal/mol of additional kinetic energy. The dynamic change of the branching ratio for the competing proton transfer and the substitution reactions results from the competition between the microscopic rate constants associated with each channel.

  4. Ligand-to-metal charge-transfer dynamics in a blue copper protein plastocyanin: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Koji

    2008-01-17

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium dynamics of a blue copper protein plastocyanin in an oxidized state are studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Potential energy functions of the lowest seven electronic states, including ligand-to-metal charge-transfer (LMCT) and copper d --> d excited states, were taken from our previous work (Ando, K. J. Phys. Chem. B 2004, 108, 3940), which employed ab initio molecular orbital and density functional calculations on the active-site model. The equilibrium MD simulations in the ground state indicate that ligand motions coupled to transition from the ground state to the LMCT state are mostly represented by stretching and bending vibrations of the Cu-S(Cys) distance, Ndelta(His)-Cu-Ndelta(His) angle, and S(Cys)-Cu-[Ndelta(His)]2 trigonal pyramid structure. The nonequilibrium dynamics on the LMCT potential exhibit rapid decays in which surface crossings to the d --> d and the first excited states occur in 70-80 fs. The crossing dynamics mostly correlate with cleavage of the Cu-S(Cys) bond and the associated response in the Ndelta(His)-Cu-Ndelta(His) moiety. The average dynamics of the vertical energy gap coordinates exhibit an overdamped decay with a recurrence oscillation in 500 fs, which shows clear coherence surviving after the ensemble averaging. This oscillation stems mostly from the recoiling motion of the Ndelta(His)-Cu-Ndelta(His) part. The dynamics of the energy gaps after this coherent oscillation are randomized such that the ensemble average yields flat profiles along time, although each single trajectory exhibits fluctuations with amplitudes large enough to reach surface crossings. These indicate that the relaxation from the LMCT state first occurs via ballistic and coherent potential crossings in 70-80 and 500 fs, followed by thermally activated random transitions.

  5. Variation of excited-state dynamics in trifluoromethyl functionalized C60 fullerenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehong; Ramirez, Jessica J; Clikeman, Tyler T; Larson, Bryon W; Boltalina, Olga V; Strauss, Steven H; Rumbles, Garry

    2016-08-17

    We report on electronically excited-state dynamics of three different trifluoromethyl C60 fullerenes (TMFs, C60(CF3)n: C60/4-1, C60/6-2, and C60/10-1, featuring four, six, and ten trifluoromethyl groups, respectively) using steady-state and time-resolved optical spectroscopy as well as ultrafast pump/probe transient absorption spectroscopy. C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 dissolved in toluene solvent show near-unity S1 → T1 intersystem crossing quantum yield (ΦISC), ca. 1 ns S1-state lifetimes, and microsecond-timescale T1-state lifetimes, which are typical of the fullerene class. On the other hand, C60/10-1 exhibits a dominant sub-nanosecond nonradiative S1 → S0 relaxation mechanism and negligible ΦISC, therefore decreasing the average excited-state lifetime (τavg) by about 5 orders of magnitude compared to that of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 (τavg ≈ 17 μs and 54 μs for C60/4-1 and C60/6-2, respectively, whereas τavg ≈ 100 ps for C60/10-1). These excited-state characteristics of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 are preserved in polymer matrix, suggesting that fullerene/polymer interactions do not modulate intrinsic photophysics of trifluoromethyl-substituted fullerenes. The contrasting excited-state study results of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 to that of C60/10-1 infer that intrinsic optical properties and excited-state dynamics can be affected by the substitution on the fullerene.

  6. Variation of excited-state dynamics in trifluoromethyl functionalized C 60 fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jaehong; Ramirez, Jessica J.; Clikeman, Tyler T.; Larson, Bryon W.; Boltalina, Olga V.; Strauss, Steven H.; Rumbles, Garry

    2016-01-01

    We report on electronically excited-state dynamics of three different trifluoromethyl C60 fullerenes (TMFs, C60(CF3)n: C60/4-1, C60/6-2, and C60/10-1, featuring four, six, and ten trifluoromethyl groups, respectively) using steady-state and time-resolved optical spectroscopy as well as ultrafast pump/probe transient absorption spectroscopy. C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 dissolved in toluene solvent show near-unity S1--T1 intersystem crossing quantum yield (..phi..ISC), ca. 1 ns S1-state lifetimes, and microsecond-timescale T1-state lifetimes, which are typical of the fullerene class. On the other hand, C60/10-1 exhibits a dominant sub-nanosecond nonradiative S1--S0 relaxation mechanism and negligible ..phi..ISC, therefore decreasing the average excited-state lifetime (..tau..avg) by about 5 orders of magnitude compared to that of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 (..tau..avg approx. 17 us and 54 us for C60/4-1 and C60/6-2, respectively, whereas ..tau..avg approx. 100 ps for C60/10-1). These excited-state characteristics of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 are preserved in polymer matrix, suggesting that fullerene/polymer interactions do not modulate intrinsic photophysics of trifluoromethyl-substituted fullerenes. The contrasting excited- state study results of C60/4-1 and C60/6-2 to that of C60/10-1 infer that intrinsic optical properties and excited-state dynamics can be affected by the substitution on the fullerene.

  7. Tetracarboxy-phthalocyanines: From excited state dynamics to photodynamic inactivation against Bovine herpesvirus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocca, Leandro H Z; Oliveira, Taise M A; Gotardo, Fernando; Teles, Amanda V; Menegatti, Ricardo; Siqueira, Jonathas P; Mendonça, Cleber R; Bataus, Luiz A M; Ribeiro, Anderson O; Souza, Thalita F M; Souza, Guilherme R L; Gonçalves, Pablo J; De Boni, Leonardo

    2017-10-01

    Herein we present the excited state dynamic of zinc and aluminum tetracarboxy-phthalocyanines (ZnPc and AlPc) and its application in the photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of Bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) in vitro. The excited state dynamic provides valuable data to describe the excited state properties of potential optical limiters and/or photosensitizers (PSs), such as: the excited state cross-sections, fluorescence lifetime and triplet state quantum yield. The excited state characterization was performed using three different Z-scan techniques: Single Pulse, White Light Continuum and Pulse Train. Considering the photodynamic inactivation of BoHV-1, an initial viral suspension containing 10 5.75 TCID 50 /mL was incubated with the PSs for 1h at 37°C under agitation and protected from light. The samples were placed in microtiter plates and irradiated (180mW/cm 2 ). During irradiation, a sample was taken every 15min and the viability of the virus was evaluated. The results show that both phthalocyanines were efficient against viruses. However, a higher photodynamic efficiency was observed by ZnPc, which can be attributed to its higher triplet and singlet quantum yields. The results presented here are important for animal health (treatment of BoHV-1) and also open up a field of studies to use AlPc and ZnPc as potential agents against a wide range of microorganisms of veterinary interest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of pyrrole: A time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Guorong [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Neville, Simon P.; Worth, Graham A., E-mail: g.a.worth@bham.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Schalk, Oliver [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 109 61 Stockholm (Sweden); Sekikawa, Taro [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Kita-13 Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ashfold, Michael N. R. [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Stolow, Albert, E-mail: astolow@uottawa.ca [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2015-02-21

    The dynamics of pyrrole excited at wavelengths in the range 242-217 nm are studied using a combination of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and wavepacket propagations performed using the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method. Excitation close to the origin of pyrrole’s electronic spectrum, at 242 and 236 nm, is found to result in an ultrafast decay of the system from the ionization window on a single timescale of less than 20 fs. This behaviour is explained fully by assuming the system to be excited to the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state, in accord with previous experimental and theoretical studies. Excitation at shorter wavelengths has previously been assumed to result predominantly in population of the bright A{sub 1}(ππ{sup ∗}) and B{sub 2}(ππ{sup ∗}) states. We here present time-resolved photoelectron spectra at a pump wavelength of 217 nm alongside detailed quantum dynamics calculations that, together with a recent reinterpretation of pyrrole’s electronic spectrum [S. P. Neville and G. A. Worth, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 034317 (2014)], suggest that population of the B{sub 1}(πσ{sup ∗}) state (hitherto assumed to be optically dark) may occur directly when pyrrole is excited at energies in the near UV part of its electronic spectrum. The B{sub 1}(πσ{sup ∗}) state is found to decay on a timescale of less than 20 fs by both N-H dissociation and internal conversion to the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state.

  9. Dynamics of sessile and pendant drop excited by surface acoustic waves: gravity effects and correlation between oscillatory and translational motions

    CERN Document Server

    Bussonière, Adrien; Brunet, Philippe; Matar, Olivier Bou

    2016-01-01

    When sessile droplets are excited by ultrasonic traveling surface acoustic waves (SAWs), they undergo complex dynamics with both oscillations and translational motion. While the nature of the Rayleigh-Lamb quadrupolar drop oscillations has been identified, their origin and their influence on the drop mobility remains unexplained. Indeed the physics behind this peculiar dynamics is complex with nonlinearities involved both at the excitation level (acoustic streaming and radiation pressure) and in the droplet response (nonlinear oscillations and contact line dynamics). In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of sessile and pendant drops excited by SAWs. For pendant drops, so-far unreported dynamics are observed close to the drop detachment threshold with the suppression of the translational motion. Away from this threshold, the comparison between pendant and sessile drop dynamics allows us to identify the role played by gravity or more generally by an initial or dynamically induced stretching of the drop. In...

  10. Developing Dynamic Digital Image Correlation Technique to Monitor Structural Damage of Old Buildings under External Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsiang Shih

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of buildings to resist external excitation is an important factor to consider for the structural design of buildings. When subject to external excitation, a building may suffer a certain degree of damages, and its residual capacity to resist external excitation cannot be evaluated. In this research, dynamic digital image correlation method combined with parameter evaluation available in system identification is used to evaluate the structural capacity to resist external excitation. The results reveal possible building latent safety problems so that timely structural reinforcement or dismantling of the building can be initiated to alleviate further damages. The results of experiments using the proposed method conform to the results obtained using the conventional method, but this method is more convenient and rapid than the latter in the subsequent procedure of data processing. If only the frequency change is used, the damages suffered by the building can be detected, but the damage location is not revealed. The interstory drift mode shape (IDMS based on the characteristic of story drift has higher sensitivity than the approximate story damage index (ADSI method based on modal frequency and vibration type; however, both indices can be used to determine the degree and location of building damages.

  11. Observation of Electronic Excitation Transfer Through Light Harvesting Complex II Using Two-Dimensional Electronic-Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, NHC; Gruenke, NL; Oliver, TAA; Ballottari, M; Bassi, R; Fleming, GR

    2016-10-05

    Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) serves a central role in light harvesting for oxygenic photosynthesis and is arguably the most important photosynthetic antenna complex. In this article, we present two-dimensional electronic–vibrational (2DEV) spectra of LHCII isolated from spinach, demonstrating the possibility of using this technique to track the transfer of electronic excitation energy between specific pigments within the complex. We assign the spectral bands via comparison with the 2DEV spectra of the isolated chromophores, chlorophyll a and b, and present evidence that excitation energy between the pigments of the complex are observed in these spectra. Lastly, we analyze the essential components of the 2DEV spectra using singular value decomposition, which makes it possible to reveal the relaxation pathways within this complex.

  12. Photo-excited hot carrier dynamics in hydrogenated amorphous silicon imaged by 4D electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Bolin; Najafi, Ebrahim; Li, Heng; Minnich, Austin J.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2017-09-01

    Charge carrier dynamics in amorphous semiconductors has been a topic of intense research that has been propelled by modern applications in thin-film solar cells, transistors and optical sensors. Charge transport in these materials differs fundamentally from that in crystalline semiconductors owing to the lack of long-range order and high defect density. Despite the existence of well-established experimental techniques such as photoconductivity time-of-flight and ultrafast optical measurements, many aspects of the dynamics of photo-excited charge carriers in amorphous semiconductors remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate direct imaging of carrier dynamics in space and time after photo-excitation in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) by scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (SUEM). We observe an unexpected regime of fast diffusion immediately after photoexcitation, together with spontaneous electron-hole separation and charge trapping induced by the atomic disorder. Our findings demonstrate the rich dynamics of hot carrier transport in amorphous semiconductors that can be revealed by direct imaging based on SUEM.

  13. Frenkel and Charge-Transfer Excitations in Donor-acceptor Complexes from Many-Body Green's Functions Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeier, Björn; Andrienko, Denis; Rohlfing, Michael

    2012-08-14

    Excited states of donor-acceptor dimers are studied using many-body Green's functions theory within the GW approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation. For a series of prototypical small-molecule based pairs, this method predicts energies of local Frenkel and intermolecular charge-transfer excitations with the accuracy of tens of meV. Application to larger systems is possible and allowed us to analyze energy levels and binding energies of excitons in representative dimers of dicyanovinyl-substituted quarterthiophene and fullerene, a donor-acceptor pair used in state of the art organic solar cells. In these dimers, the transition from Frenkel to charge transfer excitons is endothermic and the binding energy of charge transfer excitons is still of the order of 1.5-2 eV. Hence, even such an accurate dimer-based description does not yield internal energetics favorable for the generation of free charges either by thermal energy or an external electric field. These results confirm that, for qualitative predictions of solar cell functionality, accounting for the explicit molecular environment is as important as the accurate knowledge of internal dimer energies.

  14. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enriquez, Miriam M.; Zhang, Cheng; Tan, Howe-Siang, E-mail: howesiang@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Akhtar, Parveen; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H., E-mail: lambrev@brc.hu [Institute of Plant Biology, Biological Research Centre, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 521, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)

    2015-06-07

    The pathways and dynamics of excitation energy transfer between the chlorophyll (Chl) domains in solubilized trimeric and aggregated light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) are examined using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). The LHCII trimers and aggregates exhibit the unquenched and quenched excitonic states of Chl a, respectively. 2DES allows direct correlation of excitation and emission energies of coupled states over population time delays, hence enabling mapping of the energy flow between Chls. By the excitation of the entire Chl b Q{sub y} band, energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a states is monitored in the LHCII trimers and aggregates. Global analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) spectra reveals that energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a occurs on fast and slow time scales of 240–270 fs and 2.8 ps for both forms of LHCII. 2D decay-associated spectra resulting from the global analysis identify the correlation between Chl states involved in the energy transfer and decay at a given lifetime. The contribution of singlet–singlet annihilation on the kinetics of Chl energy transfer and decay is also modelled and discussed. The results show a marked change in the energy transfer kinetics in the time range of a few picoseconds. Owing to slow energy equilibration processes, long-lived intermediate Chl a states are present in solubilized trimers, while in aggregates, the population decay of these excited states is significantly accelerated, suggesting that, overall, the energy transfer within the LHCII complexes is faster in the aggregated state.

  15. An excitable cortex and memory model successfully predicts new pseudopod dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Cooper

    Full Text Available Motile eukaryotic cells migrate with directional persistence by alternating left and right turns, even in the absence of external cues. For example, Dictyostelium discoideum cells crawl by extending distinct pseudopods in an alternating right-left pattern. The mechanisms underlying this zig-zag behavior, however, remain unknown. Here we propose a new Excitable Cortex and Memory (EC&M model for understanding the alternating, zig-zag extension of pseudopods. Incorporating elements of previous models, we consider the cell cortex as an excitable system and include global inhibition of new pseudopods while a pseudopod is active. With the novel hypothesis that pseudopod activity makes the local cortex temporarily more excitable--thus creating a memory of previous pseudopod locations--the model reproduces experimentally observed zig-zag behavior. Furthermore, the EC&M model makes four new predictions concerning pseudopod dynamics. To test these predictions we develop an algorithm that detects pseudopods via hierarchical clustering of individual membrane extensions. Data from cell-tracking experiments agrees with all four predictions of the model, revealing that pseudopod placement is a non-Markovian process affected by the dynamics of previous pseudopods. The model is also compatible with known limits of chemotactic sensitivity. In addition to providing a predictive approach to studying eukaryotic cell motion, the EC&M model provides a general framework for future models, and suggests directions for new research regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying directional persistence.

  16. Dynamic analysis of a tunable viscoelastic dielectric elastomer oscillator under external excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianyou; Jiang, Liying; Khayat, Roger E.

    2016-02-01

    As a category of soft electroactive materials, dielectric elastomers (DEs) show great potential for the development of tunable oscillators and resonators for actuating and sensing purposes. However, the dynamic performance of these DE-based vibration devices could be very susceptible to external environment (external loads and excitations) and material viscoelasticity of the DEs. Based on the finite-deformation viscoelasticity theory, this work first investigates the frequency tuning process of a viscoelastic DE membrane oscillator. A comparison of the frequency tuning process and the tunable frequency range between a viscoelastic and a purely elastic DE oscillator is presented. Moreover, particular considerations have been given to the nonlinear response of the oscillator to external harmonic excitation. It is found that the displacement transmissibility of the oscillator can also be actively tuned by changing the static voltage applied to the DE membrane. Under harmonic excitation, various vibration patterns of the oscillator could be actively achieved with the application of both static and alternating electric voltage. Simulation results in this work demonstrate that the material viscoelasticity has a significant effect on the electromechanical coupling and the dynamic performance of the DE-based vibration devices.

  17. An Alternative View of the Dynamical Origin of the P11 Nucleon Resonances: Results from the Excited Baryon Analysis Center

    OpenAIRE

    Kamano, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    We present an alternative interpretation for the dynamical origin of the P11 nucleon resonances, which results from the dynamical coupled-channels analysis at Excited Baryon Analysis Center of Jefferson Lab. The results indicate the crucial role of the multichannel reaction dynamics in determining the N^* spectrum.

  18. Data-driven modelling of vertical dynamic excitation of bridges induced by people running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racic, Vitomir; Morin, Jean Benoit

    2014-02-01

    With increasingly popular marathon events in urban environments, structural designers face a great deal of uncertainty when assessing dynamic performance of bridges occupied and dynamically excited by people running. While the dynamic loads induced by pedestrians walking have been intensively studied since the infamous lateral sway of the London Millennium Bridge in 2000, reliable and practical descriptions of running excitation are still very rare and limited. This interdisciplinary study has addressed the issue by bringing together a database of individual running force signals recorded by two state-of-the-art instrumented treadmills and two attempts to mathematically describe the measurements. The first modelling strategy is adopted from the available design guidelines for human walking excitation of structures, featuring perfectly periodic and deterministic characterisation of pedestrian forces presentable via Fourier series. This modelling approach proved to be inadequate for running loads due to the inherent near-periodic nature of the measured signals, a great inter-personal randomness of the dominant Fourier amplitudes and the lack of strong correlation between the amplitudes and running footfall rate. Hence, utilising the database established and motivated by the existing models of wind and earthquake loading, speech recognition techniques and a method of replicating electrocardiogram signals, this paper finally presents a numerical generator of random near-periodic running force signals which can reliably simulate the measurements. Such a model is an essential prerequisite for future quality models of dynamic loading induced by individuals, groups and crowds running under a wide range of conditions, such as perceptibly vibrating bridges and different combinations of visual, auditory and tactile cues.

  19. Energy transfer in anisotropic systems: A. Excitation migration in substitutionally disordered one-dimensional solids. B. The spectroscopy of molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwemer, D.A.

    1978-11-01

    The energy and dynamics of excited states in a variety of anisotropic environments, including isotopically and chemically mixed crystals and molecular overlayers adsorbed on a nickel (111) surface, are investigated. The relationship between local and long-range structure and spectroscopic properties is explored. A theory for energy transfer in substitutionally disordered solids is presented. Explicit expressions for the ''diffusion'' coefficients and the energy partitioning ratios in binary systems are derived. Energy transfer between localized states is found to be facilitated by concurrent tunnelling and thermal promotion. Experimental results for triplet energy partitioning between mobile and stationary trap states as a function of mobile trap concentration in the ternary d/sub 2/-1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene--h/sub 2/-1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene--pyrazine system are analyzed. It is shown that both tunnelling and thermal detrapping contribute to triplet exciton mobility below 4.2 K. Singlet exciton migration makes an important contribution to trap equilibration before intersystem crossing to the triplet manifold. Spin coherence experiments are used to determine the energy level structure, physical geometry, and exciton dynamics of a series of impurity-induced traps in 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene. The uv spectra of pyrazine, pyridine, and naphthalene adsorbed on a nickel single crystal (111) surface are measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry at low temperatures. The excited electronic and vibronic energy levels measured are similar to bulk molecular crystal values, but pyrazine and pyridine show small, but significant deviations. The ordering of molecular overlays is observed spectroscopically and information about overlayer crystal structure is deduced. 148 references, 48 figures, 5 tables.

  20. Base sequence and higher-order structure induce the complex excited-state dynamics in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalb, Nina K; Temps, Friedrich

    2008-10-10

    The high photostability of DNA is commonly attributed to efficient radiationless electronic relaxation processes. We used femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to reveal that the ensuing dynamics are strongly dependent on base sequence and are also affected by higher-order structure. Excited electronic state lifetimes in dG-doped d(A)20 single-stranded DNA and dG.dC-doped d(A)20.d(T)20 double-stranded DNA decrease sharply with the substitution of only a few bases. In duplexes containing d(AGA).d(TCT) or d(AG).d(TC) repeats, deactivation of the fluorescing states occurs on the subpicosecond time scale, but the excited-state lifetimes increase again in extended d(G) runs. The results point at more complex and molecule-specific photodynamics in native DNA than may be evident in simpler model systems.

  1. Dynamics of ultraviolet emissions in Tm-doped AlN using above band gap excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepal, N.; Zavada, J. M.; Lee, D. S.; Steckl, A. J.

    2008-08-01

    We report on dynamics of ultraviolet (UV) emissions using above band gap excitation in Tm-doped AlN epilayers grown by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. The UV and visible photoluminescence (PL) spectra were measured using the frequency quadrupled output from a Ti:sapphire laser. In the UV region, dominant emissions at 298 and 358 nm were observed under 197 nm excitation. Temperature dependence of the PL intensities of these emission lines reveals a binding energy of ˜150 meV. The quenching of the UV emissions in AlN:Tm appears related to the thermal activation of the excitons bound to the rare-earth structured isovalent charge trap at 1.50 eV below the conduction band.

  2. Measurement of the excited-state transverse hyperfine coupling in NV centers via dynamic nuclear polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggiali, F.; Cappellaro, P.; Fabbri, N.

    2017-05-01

    Precise knowledge of a quantum system's Hamiltonian is a critical pre-requisite for its use in many quantum information technologies. Here, we report a method for the precise characterization of the nonsecular part of the excited-state Hamiltonian of an electronic-nuclear spin system in diamond. The method relies on the investigation of the dynamic nuclear polarization mediated by the electronic spin, which is currently exploited as a primary tool for initializing nuclear qubits and performing enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance. By measuring the temporal evolution of the population of the ground-state hyperfine levels of a nitrogen-vacancy center, we obtain the first direct estimation of the excited-state transverse hyperfine coupling between its electronic and nitrogen nuclear spin. Our method could also be applied to other electron-nuclear spin systems, such as those related to defects in silicon carbide.

  3. Synthesis, spectral behaviour and photophysics of donor-acceptor kind of chalcones: Excited state intramolecular charge transfer and fluorescence quenching studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannipara, Mehboobali; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Alamry, Khalid A.; Arshad, Muhammad N.; El-Daly, Samy A.

    2015-02-01

    The spectral and photophysical properties of two chalcones containing electron donating and accepting groups with intramolecular charge transfer characteristics were synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR and X-ray crystallography. Both compounds show very strong solvent polarity dependent changes in their photophysical characteristics, namely, remarkable red shift in the emission spectra with increasing solvent polarity, large change in Stokes shift, significant reduction in the fluorescence quantum yield; indicating that the fluorescence states of these compounds are of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) character. The solvent effect on the photophysical parameters such as singlet absorption, molar absorptivity, oscillator strength, dipole moment, fluorescence spectra, and fluorescence quantum yield of both compounds have been investigated comprehensively. For both dyes, Lippert-Mataga and Reichardt's correlations were used to estimate the difference between the excited and ground state dipole moments (Δμ). The interactions of dyes with colloidal silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were also studied in ethanol using steady state fluorescence quenching measurements. The fluorescence quenching data reveal that dynamic quenching and energy transfer play a major role in the fluorescence quenching of dyes by Ag NPs.

  4. Exciton and Hole-Transfer Dynamics in Polymer: Fullerene Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Loosdrecht P. H. M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast hole transfer dynamics from fullerene derivative to polymer in bulk heterojunction blends are studied with visible-pump - IR-probe spectroscopy. The hole transfer process is found to occur in 50/300 fs next to the interface, while a longer 15-ps time is attributed to exciton diffusion towards interface in PC71BM domains. High polaron generation efficiency in P3HT blends indicates excellent intercalation between the polymer and the fullerene even at highest PC71BM concentration thereby yielding a valuable information on the blend morphology.

  5. Dynamic measurement of near-field radiative heat transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, S; Sharma, G; Molesky, S; Kränzien, P U; Jalas, T; Jacob, Z; Petrov, A Yu; Eich, M

    2017-10-24

    Super-Planckian near-field radiative heat transfer allows effective heat transfer between a hot and a cold body to increase beyond the limits long known for black bodies. Until present, experimental techniques to measure the radiative heat flow relied on steady-state systems. Here, we present a dynamic measurement approach based on the transient plane source technique, which extracts thermal properties from a temperature transient caused by a step input power function. Using this versatile method, that requires only single sided contact, we measure enhanced radiative conduction up to 16 times higher than the blackbody limit on centimeter sized glass samples without any specialized sample preparation or nanofabrication.

  6. Spectroscopic signatures of proton transfer dynamics in the water dimer cation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamarchik, Eugene; Kostko, Oleg; Bowman, Joel M.; Ahmed, Musahid; Krylov, Anna I.

    2009-12-21

    Using full dimensional EOM-IP-CCSD/aug-cc-pVTZ potential energy surfaces, the photoelectron spectrum, vibrational structure, and ionization dynamics of the water dimer radical cation, (H2O)+2, were computed. We also report an experimental photoelectron spectrum which is derived from photoionization efficiency measurements and compares favorably with the theoretical spectrum. The vibrational structure is also compared with the recent experimental work of Gardenier et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 4772 (2009)] and the recent theoretical calculations by Cheng et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 113 13779 (2009)]. A reduced dimensionality nuclear Hamiltonian was used to compute the ionization dynamics for both the ground state and first excited state of the cation. The dynamics show markedly different behavior and spectroscopic signatures depending on which state of the cation is accessed by the ionization. Ionization to the ground-state cation surface induces a hydrogen transfer which is complete within 50 femtoseconds, whereas ionization to the first excited state results in a much slower process.

  7. Electronic structures and population dynamics of excited states of xanthione and its derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedunov, Roman G.; Rogozina, Marina V.; Khokhlova, Svetlana S.; Ivanov, Anatoly I.; Tikhomirov, Sergei A.; Bondarev, Stanislav L.; Raichenok, Tamara F.; Buganov, Oleg V.; Olkhovik, Vyacheslav K.; Vasilevskii, Dmitrii A.

    2017-09-01

    A new compound, 1,3-dimethoxy xanthione (DXT), has been synthesized and its absorption (stationary and transient) and luminescence spectra have been measured in n-hexane and compared with xanthione (XT) spectra. The pronounced broadening of xanthione vibronic absorption band related to the electronic transition to the second singlet excited state has been observed. Distinctions between the spectra of xanthione and its methoxy derivatives are discussed. Quantum chemical calculations of these compounds in the ground and excited electronic states have been accomplished to clarify the nature of electronic spectra changes due to modification of xanthione by methoxy groups. Appearance of a new absorption band of DXT caused by symmetry changes has been discussed. Calculations of the second excited state structure of xanthione and its methoxy derivatives confirm noticeable charge transfer (about 0.1 of the charge of an electron) from the methoxy group to thiocarbonyl group. Fitting of the transient spectra of XT and DXT has been fulfilled and the time constants of internal conversion S2 →S1 and intersystem crossing S1 →T1 have been determined. A considerable difference between the time constants of internal conversion S2 →S1 in XT and DXT is uncovered.

  8. Terahertz excited plasmon-magnon interaction and magnetoplasmon-enhanced energy transfer within the framework of generalized spin Hamiltonian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritzaenko, Vyacheslav S.; Bazhanov, Dmitry I.; Farberovich, Oleg V.

    2017-10-01

    Research into ultrafast terahertz technology attracts a significant interest nowdays in the fields of plasmonics and magnonics, since a recent progress in both fields unveils new fundamental physics and opens up new opportunities to engineering high-speed spintronic devices. However insufficient exchange of knowledge between these research fields still remains. The goal of this paper is to bridge such a gap by presenting a new theoretical approach to study magnetoplasmon-enhaced energy transfer between supported magnetic nanoparticles in the framework of generalized spin Hamiltonian (GSH) under ultrafast THz-wave excitation.

  9. On the dynamics of excited atoms in time dependent electromagnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerre, Morten

    2004-06-01

    This thesis is composed of seven scientific publications written in the period 2001-2004. The focus has been set on Rydberg atoms of hydrogen and lithium in relatively weak electromagnetic fields. Such atoms have been studied extensively during many years, both experimentally and theoretically, They are relatively easy to handle in the laboratory. Their willingness to react to conventional field sources and their long lifetimes, are two reasons for this. Much new insight into fundamental quantum mechanics has been extracted from such studies. By exciting a non-hydrogenic ground state atom or molecule into a highly excited state, many properties of atomic hydrogen are adopted. In many cases the dynamics of such systems can be accurately described by the hydrogenic theory, or alternatively by some slightly modified version like quantum defect theory. In such theories the Rydberg electron(s) of the non-hydrogenic Rydberg system is treated like it is confined in a modified Coulomb potential, which arises from the non-hydrogenic core. defined by the non-excited electrons and the nucleus. The more heavily bound core electrons are less influenced from external perturbations than the excited electrons, giving rise to the so-called frozen-core approximation. where the total effect of the core electrons is put into a modified Coulomb potential. A major part of this thesis has been allocated to the study of core effects in highly excited states of lithium. In collaboration with time experimental group of Erik Horsdal-Pedersen at Aarhus University, we have considered several hydrogenic and non-hydrogenic aspects of such states, when exposed to weak slowly varying electromagnetic fields. The dynamics was restricted to one principal shell (intrashell). Two general features were observed, either the hydrogenic theory applied or alternatively, in case of massive deviation, the dynamics was accurately described by quantum defect theory, clearly demonstrating the usefulness of such

  10. Excited-State Dynamics of the Thiopurine Prodrug 6-Thioguanine: Can N9-Glycosylation Affect Its Phototoxic Activity?

    OpenAIRE

    Brennan Ashwood; Steffen Jockusch; Carlos E. Crespo-Hernández

    2017-01-01

    6-Thioguanine, an immunosuppressant and anticancer prodrug, has been shown to induce DNA damage and cell death following exposure to UVA radiation. Its metabolite, 6-thioguanosine, plays a major role in the prodrug’s overall photoreactivity. However, 6-thioguanine itself has proven to be cytotoxic following UVA irradiation, warranting further investigation into its excited-state dynamics. In this contribution, the excited-state dynamics and photochemical properties of 6-thioguanine are studie...

  11. Hybrid Coupled Cluster and Molecular Dynamics Approach: Application to the Excitation Spectrum of Cytosine in the Native DNA Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valiev, Marat; Kowalski, Karol

    2006-12-07

    Evolution of the excited state energies of cytosine base in the native DNA environment was investigated using hybrid coupled cluster and classical molecular dynamics approach. The time averaged excitation energies obtained with the variant of the completely renormalized equation-of-motion with singles, doubles, and non-iterative triples approach that includes a bulk of the correlation effects for excited states, are compared with the analogous calculations in the gas phase. Significant blue shifts for the two lowest singlet excitation energies can be observed as a result of interaction of the quantum system with surrounding environment.

  12. Role of dynamical screening in excitation kinetics of biased quantum wells: Nonlinear absorption and ultrabroadband terahertz emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Monozon, B. S.; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2006-01-01

    In this work we describe the ultrafast excitation kinetics of biased quantum well, arising from the optically induced dynamical screening of a bias electric field. The initial bia electric field inside the quantum well is screened by the optically excited polarized electron-hole pairs. This leads...... to a dynamical modification of the properties of the system within an excitation pulse duration. We calculate the excitation kinetics of a biased quantum well and the dependency of resulting electronic and optical properties on the excitation pulse fluence, quantum well width,and initial bias field strength. Our...... wells are in good agreement with our experimental observations [Turchinovich et al., Phys. Rev. B 68, 241307(R) (2003)], as well as in perfect compliance with qualitative considerations. ©2006 American Institute of Physics...

  13. Ultrafast spin exchange-coupling torque via photo-excited charge-transfer processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ma, X; Fang, F; Li, Q; Zhu, J; Yang, Y; Wu, Y Z; Zhao, H B; Lüpke, G

    2015-01-01

    .... Recently developed optical approaches such as ultrafast demagnetization, spin-transfer and spin-orbit torques open new pathways to manipulate spin through its interaction with photon, orbit, charge or phonon...

  14. State-to-state dynamics of molecular energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, W.R.; Giese, C.F. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this research program is to elucidate the elementary dynamical mechanisms of vibrational and rotational energy transfer between molecules, at a quantum-state resolved level of detail. Molecular beam techniques are used to isolate individual molecular collisions, and to control the kinetic energy of collision. Lasers are used both to prepare specific quantum states prior to collision by stimulated-emission pumping (SEP), and to measure the distribution of quantum states in the collision products by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The results are interpreted in terms of dynamical models, which may be cast in a classical, semiclassical or quantum mechanical framework, as appropriate.

  15. Numerical Investigation on Wheel-Rail Dynamic Vibration Excited by Rail Spalling in High-Speed Railway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiyun Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spalling in contact surface of rail is a typical form of rolling contact fatigue, which is a difficult problem to solve in railway. Once the spalling occurs in the rail, the wheel-rail dynamic interaction will become more severe. The wheel-rail dynamic interaction is investigated based on the theory of vehicle-track coupled dynamics in this paper, where the excitation modes of the rail spalling failure are taken into consideration for high-speed wheel-rail system. A modified excitation model of rail spalling failure is proposed. It can enable the investigations on two kinds of excitation modes in wheel-rail system due to the rail spalling, including the pulse and the harmonic excitation modes. The excitation mode can be determined by the ratio of the spalling length to its critical length. Thus, the characteristics of wheel-rail dynamic vibration excited by two kinds of excitation are simulated in detail. Consequently, the limited value of the spalling length is suggested for high-speed railway.

  16. The effect of solvent additives on morphology and excited-state dynamics in PCPDTBT:PCBM photovoltaic blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etzold, Fabian; Howard, Ian A; Forler, Nina; Cho, Don M; Meister, Michael; Mangold, Hannah; Shu, Jie; Hansen, Michael Ryan; Müllen, Klaus; Laquai, Frédéric

    2012-06-27

    The dependence of the thin film morphology and excited-state dynamics for the low-bandgap donor-acceptor copolymer poly[2,6-(4,4-bis-(2-ethylhexyl)-4H-cyclopenta[2,1-b;3,4-b']-dithiophene)-alt-4,7-(2,1,3-benzothiadiazole)] (PCPDTBT) in pristine films and in blends (1:2) with [6,6]-phenyl-C(61)-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) on the use of the solvent additive 1,8-octanedithiol (ODT) is studied by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and broadband visible and near-infrared pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy (TAS) covering a spectral range from 500-2000 nm. The latter allows monitoring of the dynamics of excitons, bound interfacial charge-transfer (CT) states, and free charge carriers over a time range from femto- to microseconds. The broadband pump-probe experiments reveal that excitons are not only generated in the polymer but also in PCBM-rich domains. Depending on the morphology controlled by the use of solvent additives, polymer excitons undergo mainly ultrafast dissociation (photovoltaic devices.

  17. Dynamic response analysis of multi-storey building to a non-uniform excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boron Pawel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the dynamic behaviour of multi-storey steel building is presented. The structure was subjected to a real, strong mining shock. During the analysis the time history analysis and the spectrum method were taken into account. The time history analysis concerns the uniform and non-uniform model of ground motion. A wave velocity of 300m/s was taken under consideration. The kinematic excitation was applied on the structure as support accelerations. The stress at selected points of structure were compared for all methods. The region nearby the connections was analysed particularly. The state of stress for connection zones was recognized.

  18. Simulations of fluorescence solvatochromism in substituted PPV oligomers from excited state molecular dynamics with implicit solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorgaard, J. A.; Nelson, T.; Kalinin, K.; Kuzmenko, V.; Velizhanin, K. A.; Tretiak, S.

    2015-07-01

    An efficient method of treating solvent effects in excited state molecular dynamics (ESMD) is implemented and tested by exploring the solvatochromic effects in substituted p-phenylene vinylene oligomers. A continuum solvent model is used which has very little computational overhead. This allows simulations of ESMD with solvent effects on the scale of hundreds of picoseconds for systems of up to hundreds of atoms. At these time scales, solvatochromic shifts in fluoresence spectra can be described. Solvatochromic shifts in absorption and fluorescence spectra from ESMD are compared with time-dependent density functional theory calculations and experiments.

  19. Transfer reactions and multiple Coulomb excitation in the $^{100}$Sn Region

    CERN Multimedia

    It is proposed to continue our REX-ISOLDE program in the $^{100}$Sn region at HIE-ISOLDE at ~5 MeV/u. Earlier measurements, with a precision of 10-20%, at 3 MeV/u with REX-ISOLDE point to a deviation between the measured B(E2) values for the first excited 2$^{+}$ states in $^{110,108,106}$Sn compared to theoretical predictions. In addition, the trend of B(E2) values for the lighter isotopes, in particular $^{106}$Sn, appear to differ between low- and high-energy measurements. In line with our letter-of-intent we aim in a first step to address the electromagnetic properties of the first 2$^{+}$and 4$^{+}$ states in $^{110,108,106}$Sn using Coulomb excitation. In these measurements we will directly access the lifetimes of the first excited 4$^{+}$ states in $^{110,108,106}$Sn for the first time. The yield of $^{104}$Sn from the LaC$_{x}$ target will be revisited to clarify if the new solid state RILIS gives sufficient yield to expand the measurements to this isotope. Following this proposal we plan similar meas...

  20. Excited singlet (S1) state interactions of calixarenes with chloroalkanes: A combination of concerted and stepwise dissociative electron transfer mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, J.; Pal, H.; Nayak, S. K.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Sapre, A. V.

    2002-12-01

    Both steady-state and time-resolved studies in acetonitrile (ACN) solutions show that the excited singlet (S1) states of calixarenes (CX) undergo quenching by chloroalkanes (CA). It has been revealed by characterizing the Cl ions in the photolyzed CX-CA systems in ACN solutions that the quenching occurs due to dissociative electron transfer (DET) mechanism, whereby a C-Cl bond of the CAs undergoes dissociation on acceptance of an electron from excited CX. The bimolecular quenching constants (kq) in the present systems were correlated with the free energy changes for the concerted DET reactions based on a suitable DET theory. Such a correlation results in the recovery of an intramolecular reorganization energy, which is substantially lower to account for the C-Cl bond dissociation energy of the CAs. Comparing present results with those of an another donor-acceptor system (e.g., biphenyldiol-CA systems) where a concerted DET mechanism is applicable, it is inferred that in CX-CA systems both concerted and stepwise DET mechanisms operate simultaneously. It is proposed that the interaction of excited CXs with encaged CAs follows the stepwise mechanism whereas that with the out of cage CAs follows the concerted mechanism.

  1. Charge transfer dynamics from adsorbates to surfaces with single active electron and configuration interaction based approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan, E-mail: r.ramakrishnan@unibas.ch [Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials (MARVEL), Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Nest, Mathias [Theoretische Chemie, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr. 4, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2015-01-13

    Highlights: • We model electron dynamics across cyano alkanethiolates attached to gold cluster. • We present electron transfer time scales from TD-DFT and TD-CI based simulations. • Both DFT and CI methods qualitatively predict the trend in time scales. • TD-CI predicts the experimental relative time scale very accurately. - Abstract: We employ wavepacket simulations based on many-body time-dependent configuration interaction (TD-CI), and single active electron theories, to predict the ultrafast molecule/metal electron transfer time scales, in cyano alkanethiolates bonded to model gold clusters. The initial states represent two excited states where a valence electron is promoted to one of the two virtual π{sup ∗} molecular orbitals localized on the cyanide fragment. The ratio of the two time scales indicate the efficiency of one charge transfer channel over the other. In both our one-and many-electron simulations, this ratio agree qualitatively with each other as well as with the previously reported experimental time scales (Blobner et al., 2012), measured for a macroscopic metal surface. We study the effect of cluster size and the description of electron correlation on the charge transfer process.

  2. Excited state and ground state proton transfer rates of 3-hydroxyflavone and its derivatives studied by shpol'skii spectroscopy: The influence of redistribution of electron density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bader, A.N.; Pivovarenko, V.; Demchenko, A.P.; Ariese, F.; Gooijer, C.

    2004-01-01

    We studied the mechanisms of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) and ground-state back proton transfer (BPT) in 3-hydroxyflavone (3HF) at cryogenic temperatures. The focus was on substituents that change the distribution of electronic density on the chromophore and their influence

  3. Comparative study on contribution of charge-transfer collision to excitations of iron ion between argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma and nitrogen microwave induced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Kozue; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki, E-mail: wagatuma@imr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes an ionization/excitation phenomenon of singly-ionized iron occurring in an Okamoto-cavity microwave induced plasma (MIP) as well as an argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma (ICP), by comparing the Boltzmann distribution among iron ionic lines (Fe II) having a wide range of the excitation energy from 4.76 to 9.01 eV. It indicated in both the plasmas that plots of Fe II lines having lower excitation energies (4.76 to 5.88 eV) were fitted on each linear relationship, implying that their excitations were caused by a dominant thermal process such as collision with energetic electron. However, Fe II lines having higher excitation energies (more than 7.55 eV) had a different behavior from each other. In the ICP, Boltzmann plots of Fe II lines assigned to the higher excited levels also followed the normal Boltzmann relationship among the low-lying excited levels, even including a deviation from it in particular excited levels having an excitation energy of ca. 7.8 eV. This deviation can be attributed to a charge-transfer collision with argon ion, which results in the overpopulation of these excited levels, but the contribution is small. On the other hand, the distribution of the high-lying excited levels was non-thermal in the Okamoto-cavity MIP, which did not follow the normal Boltzmann relationship among the low-lying excited levels. A probable reason for the non-thermal characteristics in the MIP is that a charge-transfer collision with nitrogen molecule ion having many vibrational/rotational levels could work for populating the 3d{sup 6}4p (3d{sup 5}4s4p) excited levels of iron ion broadly over an energy range of 7.6–9.0 eV, while collisional excitation by energetic electron would occur insufficiently to excite these high-energy levels. - Highlights: • This paper describes the excitation mechanism of iron ion in Okamoto-cavity MIP in comparison with conventional ICP. • Boltzmann distribution is studied among iron ionic lines of

  4. Excitation-resolved multispectral method for imaging pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic fluorescent molecular tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Maomao; Zhou, Yuan; Su, Han; Zhang, Dong; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-04-01

    Imaging of the pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (DFMT) can provide three-dimensional metabolic information for biological studies and drug development. However, owing to the ill-posed nature of the FMT inverse problem, the relatively low quality of the parametric images makes it difficult to investigate the different metabolic processes of the fluorescent targets with small distances. An excitation-resolved multispectral DFMT method is proposed; it is based on the fact that the fluorescent targets with different concentrations show different variations in the excitation spectral domain and can be considered independent signal sources. With an independent component analysis method, the spatial locations of different fluorescent targets can be decomposed, and the fluorescent yields of the targets at different time points can be recovered. Therefore, the metabolic process of each component can be independently investigated. Simulations and phantom experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. The results demonstrated that the proposed excitation-resolved multispectral method can effectively improve the reconstruction accuracy of the parametric images in DFMT.

  5. Enhanced imaging resolution in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography by multispectral excitation method (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Maomao; Zhou, Yuan; Su, Han; Zhang, Dong; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-03-01

    Dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (DFMT) is a promising method for the quantitative evaluation of the metabolic process of fluorescent agents in body. However, the resolution is limited due to the ill-posed nature of fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and the high absorption and scattering of the fluorescent light in biological tissues. In this paper, the resolution of DFMT is improved by multispectral excitation method. Firstly, the imaged object with varied fluorescent concentrations at different time points is excited by several excitation lights with different wavelengths, and the fluorescent images are collected. Secondly, the individual FMT images at different time points are respectively reconstructed, and independent component analysis (ICA) is employed to decompose the fluorescent targets. The independent components (ICs) and corresponding spectrum courses (SCs) which obtained from ICA represent the spatial structures and spectral variations of the fluorescent targets, respectively. Thirdly, the ICs and SCs are combined to quantitatively recover the concentrations of individual fluorescent targets. Finally, the metabolic parameters and DFMT images are obtained by fitting the FMT images of each fluorescent targets at different time points into a two compartment model. Numerical simulations are carried out to validate the feasibility of the proposed method. The results demonstrate that the resolution of DFMT is significantly improved. The metabolic curves can be correctly recovered even when the edge-edge-distance of the fluorescent targets is less than 0.1 cm.

  6. Emergent dynamics of spatio-temporal chaos in a heterogeneous excitable medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittihn, Philip; Berg, Sebastian; Parlitz, Ulrich; Luther, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Self-organized activation patterns in excitable media such as spiral waves and spatio-temporal chaos underlie dangerous cardiac arrhythmias. While the interaction of single spiral waves with different types of heterogeneity has been studied extensively, the effect of heterogeneity on fully developed spatio-temporal chaos remains poorly understood. We investigate how the complexity and stability properties of spatio-temporal chaos in the Bär-Eiswirth model of excitable media depend on the heterogeneity of the underlying medium. We employ different measures characterizing the chaoticity of the system and find that the spatial arrangement of multiple discrete lower excitability regions has a strong impact on the complexity of the dynamics. Varying the number, shape, and spatial arrangement of the heterogeneities, we observe strong emergent effects ranging from increases in chaoticity to the complete cessation of chaos, contrasting the expectation from the homogeneous behavior. The implications of our findings for the development and treatment of arrhythmias in the heterogeneous cardiac muscle are discussed.

  7. Dynamic behaviours of a full floating ring bearing supported turbocharger rotor with engine excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, L.; Wang, W. J.; Peng, Z. J.

    2011-09-01

    The rotor dynamic behaviour of turbochargers (TC) has been paid significant attention because of its importance in their healthy operation. Commonly, the TC is firmly mounted on engines and they will definitely suffer from the vibrations originated from engines in operation. However, only a limited number of papers have been published with consideration of this phenomenon. In this paper, a finite element model of a TC rotor supported by nonlinear floating ring bearings has been established. The nonlinear bearing forces have been calculated by a newly proposed analytical method. An efficient numerical integration approach has been employed to conduct the investigation including the traditional unbalance and the considered engine excitation effects in question. The results show that the unbalance will place considerable influence on the rotor response at a low working speed. At high speeds, the effect will be prevented by the dominant sub-synchronous vibrations, which also prohibit the appearance of a chaotic state. The novel investigation with the proposed model considering engine excitation reveals that the engine induced vibration will greatly affect the TC rotor response at relatively lower rotor speeds as well. At higher speed range, the dominant effect of sub-synchronous vibrations is still capable of keeping the same orbit shapes as that without engine excitation from a relative viewpoint.

  8. Molecular-dynamics study of the dynamical excitations in commensurate monolayer films of nitrogen molecules on graphite: A test of the corrugation in the nitrogen-graphite potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Bruch, Ludwig Walter

    1995-01-01

    The dynamical excitations in a commensurate monolayer solid of N2 molecules adsorbed on graphite have been studied using molecular-dynamics simulations. Velocity and rotational correlation functions as well as coherent intermediate scattering functions and dynamical structure factors have been ca...

  9. Elastic and magnetic dynamics of nanomagnet-ordered arrays impulsively excited by subpicosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comin, A; Giannetti, C; Samoggia, G; Vavassori, P; Grando, D; Colombi, P; Bontempi, E; Depero, L E; Metlushko, V; Ilic, B; Parmigiani, F

    2006-11-24

    This Letter reports on the first observation of elastic and magnetic dynamics of ordered arrays of permalloy nanodots excited by low-intensity 120 fs light pulses. The first order of the diffraction pattern, generated by the probe beam in a pump-probe configuration, is used for time-resolved reflectivity and time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements. The nonadiabatical absorption of the pump triggers an acoustic standing wave, detected by the reflected probe signal, with a frequency related to the array wave vector. Instead, the magneto-optical signal exhibits, on the nanosecond time scale, the signature of the heat-exchange diffusion processes. In addition, a clear oscillation of the magnetic signal, at a frequency close to the frequency of the acoustic wave, is unambiguously detected. Finally, the interplay between the elastic and magnetic dynamics is analyzed and interpreted.

  10. Dynamic responses of a riser under combined excitation of internal waves and background currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Lou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the dynamic responses of a riser under the combined excitation of internal waves and background currents are studied. A modified Taylor-Goldstein equation is used to calculate the internal waves vertical structures when background currents exist. By imposing rigid-lid boundary condition, the equation is solved by Thompson-Haskell method. Based on the principle of virtual work, a nonlinear differential equation for riser motions is established combined with the modified Morison formula. Using Newmark-β method, the motion equation is solved in time domain. It is observed that the internal waves without currents exhibit dominated effect on dynamic response of a riser in the first two modes. With the effects of the background currents, the motion displacements of the riser will increase significantly in both cases that wave goes along and against the currents. This phenomenon is most obviously observed at the motions in the first mode.

  11. Dynamic responses of a riser under combined excitation of internal waves and background currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lou Min

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the dynamic responses of a riser under the combined excitation of internal waves and background currents are studied. A modified Taylor-Goldstein equation is used to calculate the internal waves vertical structures when background currents exist. By imposing rigid-lid boundary condition, the equation is solved by Thompson-Haskell method. Based on the principle of virtual work, a nonlinear differential equation for riser motions is established combined with the modified Morison formula. Using Newmark-β method, the motion equation is solved in time domain. It is observed that the internal waves without currents exhibit dominated effect on dynamic response of a riser in the first two modes. With the effects of the background currents, the motion displacements of the riser will increase significantly in both cases that wave goes along and against the currents. This phenomenon is most obviously observed at the motions in the first mode

  12. Deactivation of 6-Aminocoumarin Intramolecular Charge Transfer Excited State through Hydrogen Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystkowiak, Ewa; Dobek, Krzysztof; Maciejewski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents results of the spectral (absorption and emission) and photophysical study of 6-aminocoumarin (6AC) in various aprotic hydrogen-bond forming solvents. It was established that solvent polarity as well as hydrogen-bonding ability influence solute properties. The hydrogen-bonding interactions between S1-electronic excited solute and solvent molecules were found to facilitate the nonradiative deactivation processes. The energy-gap dependence on radiationless deactivation in aprotic solvents was found to be similar to that in protic solvents. PMID:25244014

  13. Theoretical study on the electronic structure of triphenyl sulfonium salts: Electronic excitation and electron transfer processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsalakis, Ioannis D.; Theodorakopoulos, Giannoula; Lathiotakis, Nektarios N.; Georgiadou, Dimitra G.; Vasilopoulou, Maria; Argitis, Panagiotis

    2014-05-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) and Time Dependent DFT calculations on triphenyl sulfonium cation (TPS) and the salts of TPS with triflate, nonaflate, perfluoro-1-octanesulfonate and hexafluoro antimonate anions are presented. These systems are widely used as cationic photoinitiators and as electron ejection layer for polymer light-emitting diodes. While some differences exist in the electronic structure of the different salts, their lowest energy intense absorption maxima are calculated at nearly the same energy for all systems. The first excited state of TPS and of the TPS salts is dissociating. Electron addition to the TPS salts lowers their energy by 1.0-1.33 eV.

  14. An instrument for fast acquisition of fluorescence decay curves at picosecond resolution designed for "double kinetics" experiments: application to fluorescence resonance excitation energy transfer study of protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishay, Eldad Ben; Hazan, Gershon; Rahamim, Gil; Amir, Dan; Haas, Elisha

    2012-08-01

    The information obtained by studying fluorescence decay of labeled biopolymers is a major resource for understanding the dynamics of their conformations and interactions. The lifetime of the excited states of probes attached to macromolecules is in the nanosecond time regime, and hence, a series of snapshot decay curves of such probes might - in principle - yield details of fast changes of ensembles of labeled molecules down to sub-microsecond time resolution. Hence, a major current challenge is the development of instruments for the low noise detection of fluorescence decay curves within the shortest possible time intervals. Here, we report the development of an instrument, picosecond double kinetics apparatus, that enables recording of multiple fluorescence decay curves with picosecond excitation pulses over wide spectral range during microsecond data collection for each curve. The design is based on recording and averaging multiphoton pulses of fluorescence decay using a fast 13 GHz oscilloscope during microsecond time intervals at selected time points over the course of a chemical reaction or conformational transition. We tested this instrument in a double kinetics experiment using reference probes (N-acetyl-tryptophanamide). Very low stochastic noise level was attained, and reliable multi-parameter analysis such as derivation of distance distributions from time resolved FRET (fluorescence resonance excitation energy transfer) measurements was achieved. The advantage of the pulse recording and averaging approach used here relative to double kinetics methods based on the established time correlated single photon counting method, is that in the pulse recording approach, averaging of substantially fewer kinetic experiments is sufficient for obtaining the data. This results in a major reduction in the consumption of labeled samples, which in many cases, enables the performance of important experiments that were not previously feasible.

  15. Coherence and population dynamics of chlorophyll excitations in FCP complex: Two-dimensional spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butkus, Vytautas; Gelzinis, Andrius; Valkunas, Leonas [Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, Vilnius University, Sauletekio Ave. 9-III, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanoriu Ave. 231, 02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Augulis, Ramūnas [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanoriu Ave. 231, 02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Gall, Andrew; Robert, Bruno [Institut de Biologie et Technologies de Saclay, Bât 532, Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Büchel, Claudia [Institut für Molekulare Biowissenschaften, Universität Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Straße 9, Frankfurt (Germany); Zigmantas, Donatas [Department of Chemical Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Abramavicius, Darius, E-mail: darius.abramavicius@ff.vu.lt [Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, Vilnius University, Sauletekio Ave. 9-III, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2015-06-07

    Energy transfer processes and coherent phenomena in the fucoxanthin–chlorophyll protein complex, which is responsible for the light harvesting function in marine algae diatoms, were investigated at 77 K by using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. Experiments performed on femtosecond and picosecond timescales led to separation of spectral dynamics, witnessing evolutions of coherence and population states of the system in the spectral region of Q{sub y} transitions of chlorophylls a and c. Analysis of the coherence dynamics allowed us to identify chlorophyll (Chl) a and fucoxanthin intramolecular vibrations dominating over the first few picoseconds. Closer inspection of the spectral region of the Q{sub y} transition of Chl c revealed previously not identified, mutually non-interacting chlorophyll c states participating in femtosecond or picosecond energy transfer to the Chl a molecules. Consideration of separated coherent and incoherent dynamics allowed us to hypothesize the vibrations-assisted coherent energy transfer between Chl c and Chl a and the overall spatial arrangement of chlorophyll molecules.

  16. Thermally induced magnetization dynamics of optically excited YIG /Cu /Ni81Fe19 trilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, H. J.; Shelford, L. R.; Aziz, M.; Al-Jarah, U. A. S.; Al-Saigh, R.; Valkass, R. A. J.; Marmion, S.; Hickey, B. J.; Hicken, R. J.

    2017-10-01

    The response of Y3Fe5O12/Cu /Ni81Fe19 trilayer structures to excitation by a femtosecond laser pulse has been studied in optical pump-probe experiments and compared with the response of Y3Fe5O12 (YIG) and Ni81Fe19 reference samples. The optical pump induces a partial demagnetization of the Ni81Fe19 , a large thermal gradient within the YIG, and temperature differences across the interfaces within the sample stack. When a moderate magnetic field is applied close to normal to the sample plane, so as to quasialign the YIG magnetization with the field and cant the Ni81Fe19 magnetization from the plane, ultrafast demagnetization initiates precession of the Ni81Fe19 magnetization. The transient temperature profile within the samples has been modeled using a one-dimensional finite-element computational model of heat conduction, while the magnetization dynamics are well described by a macrospin solution of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The precessional response of the Ni81Fe19 layers within the trilayers and the Ni81Fe19 reference sample are very similar for pump fluences of up to 1.5 mJ /c m2 , beyond which irreversible changes to the magnetic properties of the films are observed. These results suggest that the spin Seebeck effect is ineffective in modifying the precessional dynamics of the present YIG /Cu /Ni81Fe19 samples when subject to ultrafast optical excitation.

  17. Resonant electronic excitation energy transfer by exchange mechanism in the quantum dot system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikalova-Luzina, O. P.; Samosvat, D. M.; Vyatkin, V. M.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2017-11-01

    A microscopic theory of nonradiative resonance energy transfer between spherical A3B5 semiconductor quantum dots by the exchange mechanism is suggested. The interdot Coulomb interaction is taken into consideration. It is assumed that the quantum dot-donor and the quantum dot-acceptor are made from the same A3B5 compound and are embedded in the matrix of another material that produces potential barriers for electrons and holes. The dependences of the energy transfer rate on the quantum-dot system parameters are found in the frame of the Kane model that provides the most adequate description of the real spectra of A3B5 semiconductors. The analytical treatment is carried out with using the density matrix method, which enabled us to perform an energy transfer analysis both in the weak-interaction approximation and in the strong-interaction approximation. The numerical calculations showed the saturation of the energy transfer rate at the distances between the donor and the acceptor approaching the contact one. The contributions of the exchange and direct Coulomb intractions can be of the same order at the small distances and can have the same value in the saturation range.

  18. Excited-state proton transfer from pyranine to acetate in methanol

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    trisulphonate, HPTS) to acetate in methanol has been studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The rate constant of direct proton transfer from pyranine to acetate (1) is calculated to be ∼ 1 × 109 M-1 s-1. This is slower by ...

  19. Spin-transfer-driven spin-waves excitation in a finite-size magnetic waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Consolo, Giancarlo, E-mail: gconsolo@unime.it; Currò, Carmela; Valenti, Giovanna

    2015-06-19

    The current-driven excitation of spin-waves in a one-dimensional magnetic waveguide is examined analytically and numerically. The proposed model accounts for the interference between incident and reflected waves caused by the finite sizes of the physical domain. This effect is relevant in experiments where the demand of miniaturization leads the spin-wave decay length to be of the same scale as the extents of the structures. Particular analytical solutions of the linearized equation for the spin-wave amplitude are found for elongated and contracted nanocontacts. These solutions are compared to those of an infinite waveguide and are also successfully validated through micromagnetic simulations. - Highlights: • We characterize spin-waves in a one-dimensional magnetic waveguide. • Finite-size effects are investigated numerically and analytically. • Spin-waves are excited via a spin-polarized current flowing through a nanocontact. • The model accounts for the interference between incident and reflected waves. • Particular analytical solutions are found in two different ranges of the control parameter.

  20. Ultrafast excited state dynamics of tris-(2,2'-bipyridine) Ruthenium (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Alvin T.W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-03-01

    Time resolved anisotropy measurements and time dependent transient absorption measurements are used to study the evolution of the photoexcited Franck-Condon state to the formation of the long-lived triplet metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (3MLCT) state in tris-(2,2’-bipyridine) ruthenium. [Ru(bpy)3]2+ represents a large class of inorganic compounds with interesting and potentially applicable photophysical properties. These compounds have generated much interest in the inorganic chemistry community because their photophysical properties are easily manipulated by synthetic chemistry methods. However, little remains known about the processes which govern the evolution horn initial photoexcitation to the formation of the long-lived excited state.

  1. Numerical Investigation on Wheel-Rail Dynamic Vibration Excited by Rail Spalling in High-Speed Railway

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiyun Wang; Wanming Zhai; Kaikai Lv; Zaigang Chen

    2016-01-01

    Spalling in contact surface of rail is a typical form of rolling contact fatigue, which is a difficult problem to solve in railway. Once the spalling occurs in the rail, the wheel-rail dynamic interaction will become more severe. The wheel-rail dynamic interaction is investigated based on the theory of vehicle-track coupled dynamics in this paper, where the excitation modes of the rail spalling failure are taken into consideration for high-speed wheel-rail system. A modified excitation model ...

  2. Dynamics of house dust mite transfer in modern clothing fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David; Burke, Daniel; Gormally, Michael; Byrne, Miriam

    2015-04-01

    Clothing is largely presumed as being the mechanism by which house dust mites are distributed among locations in homes, yet little research to date has investigated the capacity with which various clothing fabric types serve as vectors for their accumulation and dispersal. Although previous research has indicated that car seats provide a habitat for mite populations, dynamics involved in the transfer of mites to clothing via car seat material is still unknown. To investigate the dynamics involved in the transfer of house dust mites from car seat material to modern clothing fabrics. A total of 480 samples of car seat material were seeded with mites and subjected to contact with plain woven cotton, denim, and fleece. Contact forces equivalent to the mass of a typical adult and child were administered for different durations of contact. Mean transfer efficiencies of mites from car seat material to receiving clothing fabrics ranged from 7.2% to 19.1%. Fabric type, mite condition (live or dead), and the force applied all revealed a significant effect (P clothing type can have important implications for the colonization of other biotopes by house dust mites, with potential for affecting an individuals' personal exposure to dust mite allergens. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory Outperforms Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory and Multireference Perturbation Theory for Ground-State and Excited-State Charge Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Sonnenberger, Andrew L; Hoyer, Chad E; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-08-11

    The correct description of charge transfer in ground and excited states is very important for molecular interactions, photochemistry, electrochemistry, and charge transport, but it is very challenging for Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT). KS-DFT exchange-correlation functionals without nonlocal exchange fail to describe both ground- and excited-state charge transfer properly. We have recently proposed a theory called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which is based on a combination of multiconfiguration wave function theory with a new type of density functional called an on-top density functional. Here we have used MC-PDFT to study challenging ground- and excited-state charge-transfer processes by using on-top density functionals obtained by translating KS exchange-correlation functionals. For ground-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT performs better than either the PBE exchange-correlation functional or CASPT2 wave function theory. For excited-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT (unlike KS-DFT) shows qualitatively correct behavior at long-range with great improvement in predicted excitation energies.

  4. Tunable luminescence mediated by energy transfer in Tm3+/Dy3+ co-doped phosphate glasses under UV excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Chen, Guohua; Liu, Xiangyu; Yuan, Changlai; Zhou, Changrong

    2017-11-01

    Tm3+/Dy3+ co-doped phosphate glasses for white light-emitting diodes were synthesized by a conventional melting-quenching method. A spectroscopic research based on optical, photoluminescence spectrum and decay time curves in Tm3+/Dy3+ co-doped phosphate glasses was carried out. The color of luminescence could be tuned by altering the concentrations of Tm3+ ions. Under UV light excitation, the CIE chromaticity coordinates (0.3471, 0.3374) and color correlate temperature (CCT = 4866.21 K) close to the standard white-light illumination (0.333, 0.333 and CCT = 5454.12 K) could be achieved in 0.4 Tm3+/0.6 Dy3+ (mol %) co-doped glass sample. The decrease of the Dy3+ emission decay time in existence of Tm3+ ascertained that non-radiative energy transfer from Dy3+ to Tm3+ occurred. Moreover, the research of energy transfers between Dy3+ and Tm3+ based on the Inokuti-Hirayama model revealed that an electric quadrupole-quadrupole interaction might be the predominant mechanism participated in the energy transfer. This finding suggests that the as-prepared Tm3+/Dy3+ co-doped phosphate glasses may be promising candidate for white LEDs and other display devices.

  5. A DYNAMICAL SYSTEM APPROACH IN MODELING TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hennie Husniah

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss a mathematical model of two parties technology transfer from a leader to a follower. The model is reconstructed via dynamical system approach from a known standard Raz and Assa model and we found some important conclusion which have not been discussed in the original model. The model assumes that in the absence of technology transfer from a leader to a follower, both the leader and the follower have a capability to grow independently with a known upper limit of the development. We obtain a rich mathematical structure of the steady state solution of the model. We discuss a special situation in which the upper limit of the technological development of the follower is higher than that of the leader, but the leader has started earlier than the follower in implementing the technology. In this case we show a paradox stating that the follower is unable to reach its original upper limit of the technological development could appear whenever the transfer rate is sufficiently high.  We propose a new model to increase realism so that any technological transfer rate could only has a positive effect in accelerating the rate of growth of the follower in reaching its original upper limit of the development.

  6. Excited-state dynamics in fac-[Re(CO)3(Me4phen)(L)]+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrocinio, Antonio Otavio T; Brennaman, M Kyle; Meyer, Thomas J; Murakami Iha, Neyde Y

    2010-11-25

    Excited-state dynamics in fac-[Re(CO)(3)(Me(4)phen)(cis-L)](+) (Me(4)phen = 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline, L = 4-styrylpyridine (stpy) or 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene (bpe)) were investigated by steady-state and time-resolved techniques. A complex equilibrium among three closely lying excited states, (3)IL(cis-L), (3)MLCT(Re→Me(4)phen), and (3)IL(Me(4)phen), has been established. Under UV irradiation, cis-to-trans isomerization of coordinated cis-L is observed with a quantum yield of 0.15 in acetonitrile solutions. This photoreaction competes with radiative decay from (3)MLCT(Re→Me(4)phen) and (3)IL(Me(4)phen) excited states, leading to a decrease in the emission quantum yield relative to the nonisomerizable complex fac-[Re(CO)(3)(Me(4)phen)(bpa)](+) (bpa = 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane). From temperature-dependent time-resolved emission measurements in solution and in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films, energy barriers (ΔE(a)) for interconversion between (3)MLCT(Re→Me(4)phen) and (3)IL(Me(4)phen) emitting states were determined. For L = cis-stpy, ΔE(a) = 11 (920 cm(-1)) and 15 kJ mol(-1) (1254 cm(-1)) in 5:4 propionitrile/butyronitrile and PMMA, respectively. For L = cis-bpe, ΔE(a) = 13 kJ mol(-1) (1087 cm(-1)) in 5:4 propionitrile/butyronitrile. These energy barriers are sufficient to decrease the rate constant for internal conversion from higher-lying (3)IL(Me(4)phen) state to (3)MLCT(Re→Me(4)phen), k(i) ≅ 10(6) s(-1). The decrease in rate allows for the observation of intraligand phosphorescence, even in fluid medium at room temperature. Our results provide additional insight into the role of energy gap and excited-state dynamics on the photochemical and photophysical properties of Re(I) polypyridyl complexes.

  7. An accurate full-dimensional potential energy surface for H-Au(111): Importance of nonadiabatic electronic excitation in energy transfer and adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Svenja M; Auerbach, Daniel J; Wodtke, Alec M; Kandratsenka, Alexander

    2015-09-28

    We have constructed a potential energy surface (PES) for H-atoms interacting with fcc Au(111) based on fitting the analytic form of the energy from Effective Medium Theory (EMT) to ab initio energy values calculated with density functional theory. The fit used input from configurations of the H-Au system with Au atoms at their lattice positions as well as configurations with the Au atoms displaced from their lattice positions. It reproduces the energy, in full dimension, not only for the configurations used as input but also for a large number of additional configurations derived from ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) trajectories at finite temperature. Adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations on this PES reproduce the energy loss behavior of AIMD. EMT also provides expressions for the embedding electron density, which enabled us to develop a self-consistent approach to simulate nonadiabatic electron-hole pair excitation and their effect on the motion of the incident H-atoms. For H atoms with an energy of 2.7 eV colliding with Au, electron-hole pair excitation is by far the most important energy loss pathway, giving an average energy loss ≈3 times that of the adiabatic case. This increased energy loss enhances the probability of the H-atom remaining on or in the Au slab by a factor of 2. The most likely outcome for H-atoms that are not scattered also depends prodigiously on the energy transfer mechanism; for the nonadiabatic case, more than 50% of the H-atoms which do not scatter are adsorbed on the surface, while for the adiabatic case more than 50% pass entirely through the 4 layer simulation slab.

  8. Conservative modelling of the moisture and heat transfer in building components under atmospheric excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssen, Hans; Blocken, Bert; Carmeliet, Jan

    2007-01-01

    While the transfer equations for moisture and heat in building components are currently undergoing standardisation, atmospheric boundary conditions, conservative modelling and numerical efficiency are not addressed. In a first part, this paper adds a comprehensive description of those boundary...... conditions, emphasising wind-driven rain and vapour exchange, the main moisture supply and removal mechanism, respectively. In the second part the numerical implementation is tackled, with specific attention to the monotony of the spatial discretisation, and to the mass and energy conservation...

  9. Picosecond laser studies of the charge-transfer reaction of excited triplet diphenylcarbene with electron donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitzmann, E. V.; Langan, J.; Eisenthal, K. B.

    1983-12-01

    Evidence of a one-electron transfer process in a carbene reaction has been observed for the first time. The example is the quenching of the photoexcited triplet state of diphenylcarbene ( 3*DPC) by electron donors. Measurement of the fluorescence lifetime as a function of donor concentration yielded the bimolecular rate constant, 3* k. An explanation is offered as to why 3* and 1DPC react efficiently with amines as well as alcohols, whereas the ground triplet, 3DPC, does not.

  10. Testing two-nucleon transfer reaction mechanism with elementary modes of excitation in exotic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Broglia, R A; Idini, A; Barranco, F; Vigezzi, E

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear Field Theory of structure and reactions is confronted with observations made on neutron halo dripline nuclei, resulting in the prediction of a novel (symbiotic) mode of nuclear excitation, and on the observation of the virtual effect of the halo phenomenon in the apparently non-halo nucleus $^7$Li. This effect is forced to become real by intervening the virtual process with an external (t,p) field which, combined with accurate predictive abilities concerning the absolute differential cross section, reveals an increase of a factor 2 in the cross section due to the presence of halo ground state correlations, and is essential to reproduce the value of the observed $d \\sigma(^7$Li(t,p)$^9$Li)/d$\\Omega$.

  11. Excited baryon form-factors at high momentum transfer at CEBAF at higher energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoler, P. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    1994-04-01

    The possibilities of measuring the properties of excited nucleons at high Q{sup 2} by means of exclusive single meson production at CEBAF with an electron energy of 8 GeV is considered. The motivation is to access short range phenomena in baryon structure, and to investigate the transition from the low Q{sup 2} non-perturbative QCD regime, where constituent quark models are valid, to higher Q{sup 2} where it is believed perturbative QCD plays an increasingly important role. It is found that high quality baryon decay angular distributions can be obtained for the most prominent states up to Q{sup 2} {approximately} 12 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} using a set of moderate resolution, large solid angle magnetic spectrometers.

  12. Observation of Ground- and Excited-State Charge Transfer at the C60/Graphene Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jnawali, Giriraj; Rao, Yi; Beck, Jonathan H; Petrone, Nicholas; Kymissis, Ioannis; Hone, James; Heinz, Tony F

    2015-07-28

    We examine charge transfer interactions in the hybrid system of a film of C60 molecules deposited on single-layer graphene using Raman spectroscopy and Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy. In the absence of photoexcitation, we find that the C60 molecules in the deposited film act as electron acceptors for graphene, yielding increased hole doping in the graphene layer. Hole doping of the graphene film by a uniform C60 film at a level of 5.6 × 10(12)/cm(2) or 0.04 holes per interfacial C60 molecule was determined by the use of both Raman and THz spectroscopy. We also investigate transient charge transfer occurring upon photoexcitation by femtosecond laser pulses with a photon energy of 3.1 eV. The C60/graphene hybrid exhibits a short-lived (ps) decrease in THz conductivity, followed by a long-lived increase in conductivity. The initial negative photoconductivity transient, which decays within 2 ps, reflects the intrinsic photoresponse of graphene. The longer-lived positive conductivity transient, with a lifetime on the order of 100 ps, is attributed to photoinduced hole doping of graphene by interfacial charge transfer. We discuss possible microscopic pathways for hot carrier processes in the hybrid system.

  13. High-Speed Rotor Analytical Dynamics on Flexible Foundation Subjected to Internal and External Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jivkov, Venelin S.; Zahariev, Evtim V.

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents a geometrical approach to dynamics simulation of a rigid and flexible system, compiled of high speed rotating machine with eccentricity and considerable inertia and mass. The machine is mounted on a vertical flexible pillar with considerable height. The stiffness and damping of the column, as well as, of the rotor bearings and the shaft are taken into account. Non-stationary vibrations and transitional processes are analyzed. The major frequency and modal mode of the flexible column are used for analytical reduction of its mass, stiffness and damping properties. The rotor and the foundation are modelled as rigid bodies, while the flexibility of the bearings is estimated by experiments and the requirements of the manufacturer. The transition effects as a result of limited power are analyzed by asymptotic methods of averaging. Analytical expressions for the amplitudes and unstable vibrations throughout resonance are derived by quasi-static approach increasing and decreasing of the exciting frequency. Analytical functions give the possibility to analyze the influence of the design parameter of many structure applications as wind power generators, gas turbines, turbo-generators, and etc. A numerical procedure is applied to verify the effectiveness and precision of the simulation process. Nonlinear and transitional effects are analyzed and compared to the analytical results. External excitations, as wave propagation and earthquakes, are discussed. Finite elements in relative and absolute coordinates are applied to model the flexible column and the high speed rotating machine. Generalized Newton - Euler dynamics equations are used to derive the precise dynamics equations. Examples of simulation of the system vibrations and nonstationary behaviour are presented.

  14. Excitable scale free networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copelli, M.; Campos, P. R. A.

    2007-04-01

    When a simple excitable system is continuously stimulated by a Poissonian external source, the response function (mean activity versus stimulus rate) generally shows a linear saturating shape. This is experimentally verified in some classes of sensory neurons, which accordingly present a small dynamic range (defined as the interval of stimulus intensity which can be appropriately coded by the mean activity of the excitable element), usually about one or two decades only. The brain, on the other hand, can handle a significantly broader range of stimulus intensity, and a collective phenomenon involving the interaction among excitable neurons has been suggested to account for the enhancement of the dynamic range. Since the role of the pattern of such interactions is still unclear, here we investigate the performance of a scale-free (SF) network topology in this dynamic range problem. Specifically, we study the transfer function of disordered SF networks of excitable Greenberg-Hastings cellular automata. We observe that the dynamic range is maximum when the coupling among the elements is critical, corroborating a general reasoning recently proposed. Although the maximum dynamic range yielded by general SF networks is slightly worse than that of random networks, for special SF networks which lack loops the enhancement of the dynamic range can be dramatic, reaching nearly five decades. In order to understand the role of loops on the transfer function we propose a simple model in which the density of loops in the network can be gradually increased, and show that this is accompanied by a gradual decrease of dynamic range.

  15. Controllable parametric excitation effect on linear and nonlinear vibrational resonances in the dynamics of a buckled beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djomo Mbong, T. L. M.; Siewe Siewe, M.; Tchawoua, C.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, the effect of a controllable parametric excitation on both linear and nonlinear vibrational resonances on the dynamic of a buckled beam excited by a combination of uncontrollable low- and high-frequency periodic forces are investigated. First of all, the beam dynamic is assumed to be constrained by two periodic and independent ambient solicitations, such as wind and earthquake. An axial load of the beam represented by a periodic and parametric excitation is used to control the vibrational resonance phenomenon, induced by the presence of the two external excitations. Approximate analytical expressions for the linear response and the high-frequency force amplitude at which linear vibrational resonance occurs are obtained. An analytical expression of the amplitude of the nonlinear response at the superharmonic equal to the double of the low-frequency, is obtained. For all these expressions, we show the effect of the parametric excitation. We compare all the obtained results with the ones of the case where, the parametric force is absent. It is shown that, the presence of the parametric excitation permit the suppression of both linear and nonlinear vibrational resonances. Moreover, the vibration amplitudes of the buckled beam are significantly reduced, around certain threshold values for the amplitude and the frequency of the parametric excitation.

  16. Investigation of the charge-transfer in photo-excited nanoparticles for CO2 reduction in non-aqueous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Nada M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Photoinduced charge separation in TiO2 and Cu2O semiconductor nanoparticles was examined using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy in order to get insight into the photocatalytic reduction of CO2 in nonaqueous media. For dissolution/grafting of CO2 we have used carboxy-PEG4-amine, and as a solvent poly(ethylene glycol 200. We have found that, in this system, reduction of CO2 starts at potential of -0.5 V vs Ag/AgCl, which is significantly more positive than the potential for electrochemical reduction of CO2 in most organic solvents and water (-2.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The electron transfer from excited nanoparticles to CO2 is governed both by thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, namely by the redox potential of conduction band electrons and adsorption/binding of CO2 on the surface of nanoparticles.

  17. Driving Force Dependence of Electron Transfer from Electronically Excited [Ir(COD)(μ-Me2pz)]2 to Photo-Acid Generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Wesley; Rachford, Aaron A; LaBeaume, Paul J; Coley, Suzanne M; Thackeray, James W; Cameron, James F; Müller, Astrid M; Winkler, Jay R; Gray, Harry B

    2017-10-12

    We report the rates of electron transfer (ET) reactions of electronically excited [Ir(COD)(μ-Me2pz)]2 with onium salt photoacid generators (PAGs). The reduction potentials of the PAGs span a large electrochemical window that allows determination of the driving force dependence of the ET reactions. Rate constants of ET from electronically excited [Ir(COD)(μ-Me2pz)]2 to onium PAGs are determined by the reaction driving force until the diffusion limit in acetonitrile is reached.

  18. Effect of NaCl Salts on the Activation Energy of Excited-State Proton Transfer Reaction of Coumarin 183.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Joonyoung F; Kim, Sangin; Park, Sungnam

    2015-12-17

    Coumarin 183 (C183) was used as a photoacid to study excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) reactions. Here, we studied the effect of ions on the ESPT of C183 in aqueous NaCl solutions using a steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy and time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) method. The acid dissociation equilibrium of excited-state C183 and the activation energy for the ESPT of C183 were determined as a function of NaCl concentration. The change in the equilibrium constant was found to be correlated with the solvation energy of deprotonated C183. Frequency-resolved TCSPC signals measured at several temperatures were analyzed by using a global fitting analysis method which enabled us to extract all the rate constants involving the ESPT reaction and the spectra of individual species. The activation energy for the ESPT reaction of C183 was highly dependent on NaCl concentration. Quantum chemical calculations were used to calculate the local hydrogen-bond (H-bond) configurations around C183 in aqueous NaCl solutions. It was found that the activation energy for the ESPT was determined by the local H-bond configurations around C183 which were significantly influenced by the dissolved ions.

  19. Excitation functions of fusion reactions and neutron transfer in the interaction of 6He with 197Au and 206Pb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Astabatyan, R. A.; Demekhina, N. A.; Gulbekian, G. G.; Kalpakchieva, R.; Kulko, A. A.; Lukyanov, S. M.; Markaryan, E. R.; Maslov, V. A.; Muzychka, Yu. A.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Revenko, R. V.; Skobelev, N. K.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Testov, D. A.; Zholdybaev, T.

    2007-02-01

    Excitation functions for evaporation residues in the reactions 197Au(6He, xn)203-xnTl, x = 2-7, and 206Pb(6He, 2n)210Po, as well as for neutron transfer reactions for the production of 196Au and 198Au in the interaction of 6He with 197Au were measured. The 6He beam was obtained from the accelerator complex for radioactive beams DRIBs (JINR). The maximum energy of the beam was about 10AMeV and the intensity reached 2×107pps. The stacked-foil activation technique was used directly in the beam extracted from the cyclotron or in the focal plane of the magnetic spectrometer MSP-144. The identification of the reaction products was done by their radioactive γ- or α-decay. The fusion reaction with the evaporation of two neutrons was characterized by an increase in the cross-section compared to statistical model calculations. The analysis of the data in the framework of the statistical model for the decay of excited nuclei, which took into account the sequential fusion of 6He has shown good agreement between the experimental and the calculated values of the cross-sections in the case of sub-Coulomb-barrier fusion in the 206Pb + 6He reaction. An unusually large cross-section was observed below the Coulomb barrier for the production of 198Au in the interaction of 6He with 197Au. Possible mechanisms of formation and decay of transfer reaction products are discussed.

  20. Nonlinear transition dynamics in a time-delayed vibration isolator under combined harmonic and stochastic excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Cao, Qingjie

    2017-04-01

    Based on the quasi-zero stiffness vibration isolation (QZS-VI) system, nonlinear transition dynamics have been investigated coupled with both time-delayed displacement and velocity feedbacks. Using a delayed nonlinear Langevin approach, we discuss a new mechanism for the transition of a vibration isolator in which the energy originates from harmonic and noise excitations. For this stochastic process, the effective displacement potential, stationary probability density function and the escape ratio are obtained. We investigate a variety of noise-induced behaviors affecting the transitions between system equilibria states. The results indicate that the phenomena of transition, resonant activation and delay-enhanced stability may emerge in the QZS-VI system. Moreover, we also show that the time delay, delay feedback intensities, and harmonic excitation play significant roles in the resonant activation and delay-enhanced stability phenomena. Finally, a quantitative measure for amplitude response has been carried out to evaluate the isolation performance of the controlled QZS-VI system. The results show that with properly designed feedback parameters, time delay and displacement feedback intensity can play the role of a damping force. This research provides instructive ideas on the application of the time-delayed control in practical engineering.

  1. Nonlinear dynamics of a support-excited flexible rotor with hydrodynamic journal bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakel, Mzaki; Baguet, Sébastien; Dufour, Régis

    2014-05-01

    The major purpose of this study is to predict the dynamic behavior of an on-board rotor mounted on hydrodynamic journal bearings in the presence of rigid support movements, the target application being turbochargers of vehicles or rotating machines subject to seismic excitation. The proposed on-board rotor model is based on Timoshenko beam finite elements. The dynamic modeling takes into account the geometric asymmetry of shaft and/or rigid disk as well as the six deterministic translations and rotations of the rotor rigid support. Depending on the type of analysis used for the bearing, the fluid film forces computed with the Reynolds equation are linear/nonlinear. Thus the application of Lagrange's equations yields the linear/nonlinear equations of motion of the rotating rotor in bending with respect to the moving rigid support which represents a non-inertial frame of reference. These equations are solved using the implicit Newmark time-step integration scheme. Due to the geometric asymmetry of the rotor and to the rotational motions of the support, the equations of motion include time-varying parametric terms which can lead to lateral dynamic instability. The influence of sinusoidal rotational or translational motions of the support, the accuracy of the linear 8-coefficient bearing model and the interest of the nonlinear model for a hydrodynamic journal bearing are examined and discussed by means of stability charts, orbits of the rotor, time history responses, fast Fourier transforms, bifurcation diagrams as well as Poincaré maps.

  2. Single excitation transfer in the quantum regime. A spin-based solid-state approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zollitsch, Christoph Wilhelm

    2016-12-02

    Realisation of strong coupling between a superconducting microwave resonator and an ensemble of phosphorus donor spins, contained in an isotopically purified silicon host crystal. Investigation of the dynamical properties of the coupled system at mK temperatures and ultra-low microwave powers. The relaxation and coherence times of the coupled system were extracted by pulsed microwave spectroscopy, with the result that the hybrid system's coherence time is enhanced compared to the uncoupled spin system.

  3. Absorption and emission dynamics in concentrated optical ensembles under laser excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, V. A.; Ermolaeva, G. M.; Shilov, V. B.

    2002-06-01

    A new theoretical model describing the emission and absorption dynamics in an ensemble of molecules under intense coherent pulsed pumping is developed on the basis of the concepts of cooperative light-induced luminescence (CLIL). The CLIL development is described within the framework of formalism of the system density matrix in the space of photon wave functions. It is shown that the fast growth of CLIL relates to the development of coherent states of the quantum field in the area of efficient cooperative interactions of molecules (coherence volume). A system of equations for the calculation of CLIL energy, population of excited states, and optical absorption of the system in dependence on the laser pump energy density is solved. The theoretical results obtained are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  4. Complex dynamics of a harmonically excited structure coupled with a nonlinear energy sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Jian; Chen, Li-Qun

    2017-08-01

    Nonlinear behaviors are investigated for a structure coupled with a nonlinear energy sink. The structure is linear and subject to a harmonic excitation, modeled as a forced single-degree-of-freedom oscillator. The nonlinear energy sink is modeled as an oscillator consisting of a mass, a nonlinear spring, and a linear damper. Based on the numerical solutions, global bifurcation diagrams are presented to reveal the coexistence of periodic and chaotic motions for varying nonlinear energy sink mass and stiffness. Chaos is numerically identified via phase trajectories, power spectra, and Poincaré maps. Amplitude-frequency response curves are predicted by the method of harmonic balance for periodic steady-state responses. Their stabilities are analyzed. The Hopf bifurcation and the saddle-node bifurcation are determined. The investigation demonstrates that a nonlinear energy sink may create dynamic complexity.

  5. Dynamic failure of high energy materials under compression and periodic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koslowski, Marisol; Grilli, Nicolo; Tanasoiu, Bogdan; Duarte Cordon, Camilo

    2017-06-01

    Polymer bonded explosives consist of high energetic particles in a polymeric binder. When these composites are subjected to heat, impact, friction, shock, or other initiation stimulus, they undergo a rapid chemical change. The sensitivity to initiation depends not only on the amount of energy available in the system but also on the rate at which available energy is released. Therefore, it is of extreme importance to predict the dissipated energy and its rate due to mechanical insults from accurate predictions of the deformation fields including localization, fracture and plasticity. The focus of this work is to study energy dissipation due to fracture and plasticity in high energy particles embeded in a polymer binder using finite elements. Numerical simulations of crack propagation under compressive load and dynamic excitation are performed with a phase field damage model. A systematic study of the energy release rate and initial microstructure is performed to analyze their repercussion on the dissipated energy and initiation. MURI-ONR.

  6. Nonlinear Dynamic Characteristics and Optimal Control of SMA Composite Wings Subjected to Stochastic Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Wen Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A kind of high-aspect-ratio shape memory alloy (SMA composite wing is proposed to reduce the wing’s fluttering. The nonlinear dynamic characteristics and optimal control of the SMA composite wings subjected to in-plane stochastic excitation are investigated where the great bending under the flight loads is considered. The stochastic stability of the system is analyzed, and the system’s response is obtained. The conditions of stochastic Hopf bifurcation are determined, and the probability density of the first-passage time is obtained. Finally, the optimal control strategy is proposed. Numerical simulation shows that the stability of the system varies with bifurcation parameters, and stochastic Hopf bifurcation appears in the process; the reliability of the system is improved through optimal control, and the first-passage time is delayed. Finally, the effects of the control strategy are proved by experiments. The results of this paper are helpful for engineering applications of SMA.

  7. Vibrational dynamics of aniline (N2)1 clusters in their first excited singlet state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hineman, M. F.; Kim, S. K.; Bernstein, E. R.; Kelley, D. F.

    1992-04-01

    The first excited singlet state S1 vibrational dynamics of aniline(N2)1 clusters are studied and compared to previous results on aniline(CH4)1 and aniline(Ar)1. Intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) and vibrational predissociation (VP) rates fall between the two extremes of the CH4 (fast IVR, slow VP) and Ar (slow IVR, fast VP) cluster results as is predicted by a serial IVR/VP model using Fermi's golden rule to describe IVR processes and a restricted Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) theory to describe unimolecular VP rates. The density of states is the most important factor determining the rates. Two product states, 00 and 10b1, of bare aniline and one intermediate state ˜(00) in the overall IVR/VP process are observed and time resolved measurements are obtained for the 000 and ˜(000) transitions. The results are modeled with the serial mechanism described above.

  8. A radiative transfer model to treat infrared molecular excitation in cometary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debout, V.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Zakharov, V.

    2016-02-01

    The exospheres of small Solar System bodies are now observed with high spatial resolution from space missions. Interpreting infrared spectra of cometary gases obtained with the VIRTIS experiment onboard the Rosetta cometary mission requires detailed modeling of infrared fluorescence emission in optically thick conditions. Efficient computing methods are required since numerous ro-vibrational lines excited by the Sun need to be considered. We propose a new model working in a 3-D environment to compute numerically the local incoming radiation. It uses a new algorithm using pre-defined directions of ray propagation and ray grids to reduce the CPU cost in time with respect to Monte Carlo methods and to treat correctly the sunlight direction. The model is applied to the ν3 bands of CO2 and H2O at 4.3 μ m and 2.7 μ m respectively, and to the CO ∨ (1 → 0) band at 4.7 μ m. The results are compared to the ones obtained by a 1-D algorithm which uses the Escape Probability (EP) method, and by a 3-D ;Coupled Escape Probability; (CEP) model, for different levels of optical thickness. Our results suggest that the total band flux may vary strongly with azimuth for optically thick cases whereas the azimuth average total band flux computed is close to the one obtained with EP. Our model globally predicts less intensity reduction from opacity than the CEP model of Gersch and A'Hearn (Gersch, A.M., A'Hearn, M.F. [2014]. Astrophys. J. 787, 36-56). An application of the model to the observation of CO2, CO and H2O bands in 67/P atmosphere with VIRTIS is presented to predict the evolution of band optical thickness along the mission.

  9. Elucidating energy and electron transfer dynamics within molecular assemblies for solar energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morseth, Zachary Aaron

    The use of sunlight to make chemical fuels (i.e. solar fuels) is an attractive approach in the quest to develop sustainable energy sources. Using nature as a guide, assemblies for artificial photosynthesis will need to perform multiple functions. They will need to be able to harvest light across a broad region of the solar spectrum, transport excited-state energy to charge-separation sites, and then transport and store redox equivalents for use in the catalytic reactions that produce chemical fuels. This multifunctional behavior will require the assimilation of multiple components into a single macromolecular system. A wide variety of different architectures including porphyrin arrays, peptides, dendrimers, and polymers have been explored, with each design posing unique challenges. Polymer assemblies are attractive due to their relative ease of production and facile synthetic modification. However, their disordered nature gives rise to stochastic dynamics not present in more ordered assemblies. The rational design of assemblies requires a detailed understanding of the energy and electron transfer events that follow light absorption, which can occur on timescales ranging from femtoseconds to hundreds of microseconds, necessitating the use of sophisticated techniques. We have used a combination of time-resolved absorption and emission spectroscopies with observation times that span nine orders of magnitude to follow the excited-state evolution within single-site and polymer-based molecular assemblies. We complement experimental observations with electronic structure calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and kinetic modeling to develop a microscopic view of these dynamics. This thesis provides an overview of work on single-site molecular assemblies and polymers decorated with pendant chromophores, both in solution and on surfaces. This work was made possible through extensive collaboration with Dr. Kirk Schanze's and Dr. John Reynolds' research groups who

  10. Diverse mechanisms for photoprotection in photosynthesis. Dynamic regulation of photosystem II excitation in response to rapid environmental change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derks, Allen; Schaven, Kristin; Bruce, Doug

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) of photosynthesis catalyzes one of the most challenging reactions in nature, the light driven oxidation of water and release of molecular oxygen. PSII couples the sequential four step oxidation of water and two step reduction of plastoquinone to single photon photochemistry with charge accumulation centers on both its electron donor and acceptor sides. Photon capture, excitation energy transfer, and trapping occur on a much faster time scale than the subsequent electron transfer and charge accumulation steps. A balance between excitation of PSII and the use of the absorbed energy to drive electron transport is essential. If the absorption of light energy increases and/or the sink capacity for photosynthetically derived electrons decreases, potentially deleterious side reactions may occur, including the production of reactive oxygen species. In response, a myriad of fast (second to minutes timescale) and reversible photoprotective mechanisms are observed to regulate PSII excitation when the environment changes more quickly than can be acclimated to by gene expression. This review compares the diverse photoprotective mechanisms that are used to dissipate (quench) PSII excitation within the antenna systems of higher land plants, green algae, diatoms, and cyanobacteria. The molecular bases of how PSII excitation pressure is sensed by the antenna system and how the antenna then reconfigures itself from a light harvesting to an energy dissipative mode are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Femtosecond dynamics of fundamental reaction processes in liquids: Proton transfer, geminate recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation. [Spiropyrans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, B.J.

    1992-11-01

    The fast excited state intramolecular proton transfer of 3-hydroxyflavone is measured and effects of external hydrogen-bonding interactions on the proton transfer are studied. The proton transfer takes place in [approximately]240 fsec in nonpolar environments, but becomes faster than instrumental resolution of 110 fsec in methanol solution. The dynamics following photodissociation of CH[sub 2]I[sub 2] and other small molecules provide the first direct observations of geminate recombination. The recombination of many different photodissociating species occurs on a [approximately]350 fsec time scale. Results show that recombination yields but not rates depend on the solvent environment and suggest that recombination kinetics are dominated by a single collision with surrounding solvent cage. Studies of sterically locked phenyl-substituted butadienes offer new insights into the electronic structure and isomerization behavior of conjugated polyenes. Data show no simple correlation between hinderance of specific large amplitude motions and signatures of isomerizative behavior such as viscosity dependent excited state lifetimes, implying that the isomerization does not provide a suitable for simple condensed phase reaction rate theories. The spectral dynamics of a photochromic spiropyran indicate that recombination, isomerization and vibrational relaxation all play important roles in photoreactivity of complex molecules. The interplay of these microscopic phenomena and their effect on macroscopic properties such as photochromism are discussed. All the results indicate that the initial steps of the photochromic reaction process occur extremely rapidly. Laser system and computer codes for data analysis are discussed.

  12. Self-Excited Shock Train Dynamics in a Mach 2 Isolator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamba, Mirko; Hunt, Robin; Driscoll, James

    2017-11-01

    A shock train is the complex system of shock waves that forms in a supersonic ducted flow when the back pressure is raised, and it is typically found in the isolator of air-breathing, high-speed systems. Its formation is due to a balance of the inviscid action of a system of shocks in the core of the flow and the viscous effects at walls. Although the typical description and understanding of shock trains is limited to its steady state behavior, a shock train exhibits significant dynamics, most of which are self-excited, even under nominally constant inflow and outflow conditions. Here we evaluate some of the dynamical properties of a shock train generated in a Mach 2.0 ducted flow. Cross-spectral analysis of pressure and shock position fluctuations are used to identify a complex, frequency dependent system of perturbations that affects the unsteady motion of the shock train. Specifically, we have identified two paths of propagation of perturbations that are associated with two different sources, one associated with the regions of separated flow and one external to the shock train, that affect the steadiness of the shock train, thus partially explaining the observed shock train inherent unsteadiness.

  13. Photoluminescence and dynamics of excitation relaxation in graphene oxide-porphyrin nanorods composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khenfouch, M., E-mail: khenfouch@yahoo.fr [University Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah, Faculty of Sciences Dhar el Mahraz, Laboratory of Solid State Physics, Group of Polymers and Nanomaterials, BP 1796 Atlas, Fez 30 000 (Morocco); iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation of South Africa, Old Faure Road, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129, Western Cape Province (South Africa); UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Wéry, J. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes, Cedex 3 (France); Baïtoul, M., E-mail: baitoul@yahoo.fr [University Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah, Faculty of Sciences Dhar el Mahraz, Laboratory of Solid State Physics, Group of Polymers and Nanomaterials, BP 1796 Atlas, Fez 30 000 (Morocco); Maaza, M. [iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation of South Africa, Old Faure Road, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129, Western Cape Province (South Africa); UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2014-01-15

    Generally, porphyrin nanostructured materials are known by playing many roles such as photoconductors, photovoltaics and capable of light induced charging. Also their combination with acceptors like graphene, the rising two dimension material, added exciting physical and chemical properties. In this work, Morphology, optical absorption and photoluminescence properties were investigated in order to elucidate the interaction between the few layered graphene oxide (FGO) and pophyrin nanorods. Reporting on the photoluminescence (PL) of both porphyrin nanorods and FGO/porphyrin nanorods composite, synthesized via a self-assembly method, we have experimentally demonstrated the generation of a new photoluminescence band giving rise to a white light. This luminescence was studied by the analysis of its origins and dynamics which show a huge change of exciton life time found to be longer after the interaction with graphene oxide (GO) sheets. -- Highlights: • We prepared FGO-porphyrin nanorods composite via a simple chemical method. • Luminescence properties were studied presenting the absorption, photoluminescence and dynamics measurements. • These results show the emission of a white light which we studied its emissions origins. • TEM images show FGO sheets decorated with porphyrin nanorods. • FGO had like effect an increase of the exciton lifetime in porphyrin nanorods.

  14. Dynamical and scale invariance of charged particles slipping on a rough surface with periodic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Luo, Pengcheng; Ding, Huifang

    2017-07-01

    This letter deals with the dynamical and scaling invariance of charged particles slipping on a rough surface with periodic excitation. A variant of the Fermi-Ulam model (FUM) is proposed to describe the transport behavior of the particles when the electric field force Fe is smaller or larger than the friction force Ff, i.e., A 0. For these two cases, the stability of fixed points is analyzed with the help of the eigenvalue analysis method, and further the invariant manifolds are constructed to investigate the dynamical invariance such as energy diffusion for some initial conditions in the case A > 0 and decay process in the case A law of the statistical behavior. It follows that both the FA phenomenon for A > 0 and the velocity decay process for A < 0 satisfy scaling invariance with respect to the nondimensional acceleration A. Besides, for A < 0, the transient number nx is proposed to evaluate the speed of the velocity decay process. More importantly, nx is found to possess the attribute of scaling invariance with respect to both the initial velocity V0 and the nondimensional acceleration A. These results are very useful for the in-depth understanding of the energy transport properties of charged particle systems.

  15. Recent advances in experimental techniques to probe fast excited-state dynamics in biological molecules in the gas phase: dynamics in nucleotides, amino acids and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniforth, Michael; Stavros, Vasilios G.

    2013-01-01

    In many chemical reactions, an activation barrier must be overcome before a chemical transformation can occur. As such, understanding the behaviour of molecules in energetically excited states is critical to understanding the chemical changes that these molecules undergo. Among the most prominent reactions for mankind to understand are chemical changes that occur in our own biological molecules. A notable example is the focus towards understanding the interaction of DNA with ultraviolet radiation and the subsequent chemical changes. However, the interaction of radiation with large biological structures is highly complex, and thus the photochemistry of these systems as a whole is poorly understood. Studying the gas-phase spectroscopy and ultrafast dynamics of the building blocks of these more complex biomolecules offers the tantalizing prospect of providing a scientifically intuitive bottom-up approach, beginning with the study of the subunits of large polymeric biomolecules and monitoring the evolution in photochemistry as the complexity of the molecules is increased. While highly attractive, one of the main challenges of this approach is in transferring large, and in many cases, thermally labile molecules into vacuum. This review discusses the recent advances in cutting-edge experimental methodologies, emerging as excellent candidates for progressing this bottom-up approach. PMID:24204191

  16. Evidence that the cortical motor command for the initiation of dynamic plantarflexion consists of excitation followed by inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taube, Wolfgang; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Schubert, Martin

    2011-01-01

    At the onset of dynamic movements excitation of the motor cortex (M1) is spatially restricted to areas representing the involved muscles whereas adjacent areas are inhibited. The current study elucidates whether the cortical motor command for dynamic contractions is also restricted to a certain...... population of cortical neurons responsible for the fast corticospinal projections. Therefore, corticospinal transmission was assessed with high temporal resolution during dynamic contractions after both, magnetic stimulation over M1 and the brainstem. The high temporal resolution could be obtained...... a temporally focused motor command during the execution of dynamic movements....

  17. Role of delocalized exciton states of light-harvesting pigments in excitation energy transfer in natural photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetisova, Zoya; Mauring, Koit; Taisova, Alexandra

    1995-02-01

    Photosynthesis is an extremely efficient converter of light into chemical energy, with an observed quantum yield for primary photochemistry approximately 90%. To achieve this the photosynthetic apparatus must be highly optimized, and some of the design principles that may be involved have been suggested. The role of delocalized exciton states of light-harvesting pigments in the energy transfer process has been considered by mathematical simulation of the light-harvesting process in model systems. Namely, it has been shown that aggregation of antenna pigments (allowing to consider each aggregate as a supermolecule) is biologically expedient, as an efficient strategy for light harvesting in photosynthesis. The question of whether this design principle is realized in a natural antenna has been examined for the 3D chlorosomal superantenna of green bacteria with the hole-burning spectroscopy. Spectral hole burning studies of intact cells of green bacteria Chlorobium phaeovibriodes. Chloroflexus aurantiacus and Chlorobium limicola have proven that the Qy- absorption system of antenna bacteriochlorophylls e or c (BChl e or BChl c) should be interpreted in terms of the delocalized exciton level structure of an aggregate. For the first time the 0-0 transition band of the lowest exciton state of BChl e and BChl c aggregates has been directly detected as the lowest energy inhomogeneously broadened band of the 1.8 K near-infrared excitation spectrum. These lowest energy bands have different spectral position of their maximums: approximately 739 nm in C.phaeovibriodes (BChl e band), approximately 752 nm in C.aurantiacus (BChl c band) and approximately 774 nm in C.limicola (BChl c band) cells. However, these bands display a number of fundamentally similar spectral features: (1) The magnitude of inhomogeneous broadening of these bands is 90 - 100 cm-1; (2) The width of each band is 2 - 3 times less than that of the monomeric BChl c (or BChl e) in vitro at 5 K; (3) Each band

  18. Laser excitation dynamics of argon metastables generated in atmospheric pressure flows by microwave frequency microplasma arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlins, W. T.; Galbally-Kinney, K. L.; Davis, S. J.; Hoskinson, A. R.; Hopwood, J. A.

    2014-03-01

    The optically pumped rare-gas metastable laser is a chemically inert analogue to diode-pumped alkali (DPAL) and alkali-exciplex (XPAL) laser systems. Scaling of these devices requires efficient generation of electronically excited metastable atoms in a continuous-wave electric discharge in flowing gas mixtures at atmospheric pressure. This paper describes initial investigations of the use of linear microwave micro-discharge arrays to generate metastable rare-gas atoms at atmospheric pressure in optical pump-and-probe experiments for laser development. Power requirements to ignite and sustain the plasma at 1 atm are low, 2p9 transition at 811.5 nm and the corresponding laser-induced fluorescence on the 2p10-->1s5 transition at 912.3 nm; the 2p10 state is efficiently populated by collisional energy transfer from 2p9. Using tunable diode laser absorption/gain spectroscopy, we observe small-signal gains of ~1 cm-1 over a 1.9 cm path. We also observe stable, continuous-wave laser oscillation at 912.3 nm, with preliminary optical efficiency ~55%. These results are consistent with efficient collisional coupling within the Ar(4s) manifold.

  19. New insights into the nonadiabatic state population dynamics of model proton-coupled electron transfer reactions from the mixed quantum-classical Liouville approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakib, Farnaz A.; Hanna, Gabriel, E-mail: gabriel.hanna@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G2 (Canada)

    2016-01-14

    In a previous study [F. A. Shakib and G. Hanna, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 044122 (2014)], we investigated a model proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction via the mixed quantum-classical Liouville (MQCL) approach and found that the trajectories spend the majority of their time on the mean of two coherently coupled adiabatic potential energy surfaces. This suggested a need for mean surface evolution to accurately simulate observables related to ultrafast PCET processes. In this study, we simulate the time-dependent populations of the three lowest adiabatic states in the ET-PT (i.e., electron transfer preceding proton transfer) version of the same PCET model via the MQCL approach and compare them to the exact quantum results and those obtained via the fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) approach. We find that the MQCL population profiles are in good agreement with the exact quantum results and show a significant improvement over the FSSH results. All of the mean surfaces are shown to play a direct role in the dynamics of the state populations. Interestingly, our results indicate that the population transfer to the second-excited state can be mediated by dynamics on the mean of the ground and second-excited state surfaces, as part of a sequence of nonadiabatic transitions that bypasses the first-excited state surface altogether. This is made possible through nonadiabatic transitions between different mean surfaces, which is the manifestation of coherence transfer in MQCL dynamics. We also investigate the effect of the strength of the coupling between the proton/electron and the solvent coordinate on the state population dynamics. Drastic changes in the population dynamics are observed, which can be understood in terms of the changes in the potential energy surfaces and the nonadiabatic couplings. Finally, we investigate the state population dynamics in the PT-ET (i.e., proton transfer preceding electron transfer) and concerted versions of the model. The PT

  20. State-selective electron transfer and ionization in collisions of highly charged ions with ground-state Na(3s) and laser-excited Na*(3p)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blank, I.; Otranto, S.; Meinema, C.; Olson, R. E.; Hoekstra, R.

    2012-01-01

    Single electron transfer and ionization in collisions of N5+ and Ne8+ with ground state Na(3s) and laser excited Na*(3p) are investigated both experimentally and theoretically at collision energies from 1 to 10 keV/amu, which includes the classical orbital velocity of the valence electron.

  1. Plasmon switching : Observation of dynamic surface plasmon steering by selective mode excitation in a sub-wavelength slit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghunathan, S.B.; Gan, C.H.; Van Dijk, T.; Ea Kim, B.; Schouten, H.F.; Ubachs, W.; Lalanne, P.; Visser, T.D.

    2012-01-01

    We report a plasmon steering method that enables us to dynamically control the direction of surface plasmons generated by a two-mode slit in a thin metal film. By varying the phase between different coherent beams that are incident on the slit, individual waveguide modes are excited. Different

  2. Evidence of dynamical dipole excitation in the fusion-evaporation of the 40Ca+152Sm heavy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Alba, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Maiolino, C.; Santonocito, D.; Agodi, C.; Baran, V.; Boiano, A.; Colonna, M.; Coniglione, R.; De Filippo, E.; Di Toro, M.; Emanuele, U.; Farinon, F.; Guglielmetti, A.; Inglima, G.; La Commara, M.; Martin, B.; Mazzocchi, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Rizzo, C.; Romoli, M.; Sandoli, M.; Signorini, C.; Silvestri, R.; Soramel, F.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.

    2016-04-01

    The excitation of the dynamical dipole mode along the fusion path was investigated for the first time in the formation of a heavy compound nucleus in the A ˜190 mass region. The compound nucleus was formed at identical conditions of excitation energy and spin from two entrance channels: the charge-asymmetric 40Ca+152Sm and the nearly charge-symmetric 48Ca+144Sm at Elab=11 and 10.1 MeV/nucleon, respectively. High-energy γ rays and light charged particles were measured in coincidence with evaporation residues by means of the MEDEA multidetector array (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Italy) coupled to four parallel plate avalanche counters. The charged particle multiplicity spectra and angular distributions were used to pin down the average excitation energy, the average mass, and the average charge of the compound nucleus. The γ -ray multiplicity spectrum and angular distribution related to the nearly charge-symmetric channel were employed to obtain new data on the giant dipole resonance in the compound nucleus. The dynamical dipole mode excitation in the charge-asymmetric channel was evidenced, in a model-independent way, by comparing the γ -ray multiplicity spectra and angular distributions of the two entrance channels with each other. Calculations of the dynamical dipole mode in the 40Ca+152Sm channel, based on a collective bremsstrahlung analysis of the reaction dynamics, are presented. Possible interesting implications in the superheavy-element quest are discussed.

  3. Flow-induced gate vibrations : Prevention of sef-excitation computation of dynamic gate behaviour and the use of models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, P.A.

    1976-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop design criteria for the dynamic behaviour of gates and valves. To this end, a resume of existing theories is given as well as an extended analysis of the added water mass, hydrodynamic rigidity and damping (also negative damping or self-excitation) and

  4. Challenges in transferring knowledge between scales in coastal sediment dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shari L Gallop

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ‘Packaging’ coastal sediment transport into discrete temporal and spatial scale bands is necessary for measurement programs, modelling, and design. However, determining how to best measure and parameterize information, to transfer between scales, is not trivial. An overview is provided of the major complexities in transferring information on coastal sediment transport between scales. Key considerations that recur in the literature include: interaction between sediment transport and morphology; the influence of biota; episodic sediment transport; and recovery time-scales. The influence of bedforms and landforms, as well as sediment-biota interactions, varies with spatio-temporal scale. In some situations, episodic sediment dynamics is the main contributor to long-term sediment transport. Such events can also significantly alter biogeochemical and ecological processes, which interact with sediments. The impact of such episodic events is fundamentally influenced by recovery time-scales, which vary spatially. For the various approaches to scaling (e.g., bottom-up, aggregation, spatial hierarchies, there is a need for fundamental research on the assumptions inherent in each approach.

  5. Oxidation and metal-insertion in molybdenite surfaces: evaluation of charge-transfer mechanisms and dynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ramana, CV; Becker, U; Shutthanandan, V; Julien, CM

    2008-01-01

    .... In addition, understanding the insertion of metals into molybdenite and evaluation of charge-transfer mechanism and dynamics is important to utilize these minerals in technological applications...

  6. Single Molecule Spectroelectrochemistry of Interfacial Charge Transfer Dynamics In Hybrid Organic Solar Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Shanlin [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2014-11-16

    Our research under support of this DOE grant is focused on applied and fundamental aspects of model organic solar cell systems. Major accomplishments are: 1) we developed a spectroelectorchemistry technique of single molecule single nanoparticle method to study charge transfer between conjugated polymers and semiconductor at the single molecule level. The fluorescence of individual fluorescent polymers at semiconductor surfaces was shown to exhibit blinking behavior compared to molecules on glass substrates. Single molecule fluorescence excitation anisotropy measurements showed the conformation of the polymer molecules did not differ appreciably between glass and semiconductor substrates. The similarities in molecular conformation suggest that the observed differences in blinking activity are due to charge transfer between fluorescent polymer and semiconductor, which provides additional pathways between states of high and low fluorescence quantum efficiency. Similar spectroelectrochemistry work has been done for small organic dyes for understand their charge transfer dynamics on various substrates and electrochemical environments; 2) We developed a method of transferring semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) and graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets into organic solvent for a potential electron acceptor in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells which employed polymer semiconductor as the electron donor. Electron transfer from the polymer semiconductor to semiconductor and GO in solutions and thin films was established through fluorescence spectroscopy and electroluminescence measurements. Solar cells containing these materials were constructed and evaluated using transient absorption spectroscopy and dynamic fluorescence techniques to understand the charge carrier generation and recombination events; 3) We invented a spectroelectorchemistry technique using light scattering and electroluminescence for rapid size determination and studying electrochemistry of single NPs in an

  7. Intramolecular photoassociation and photoinduced charge transfer in bridged diaryl compounds. 2. Charge-transfer interactions in the lowest excited singlet state of dinaphthylamines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresner, J.; Modiano, S.H.; Lim, E.C. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States)

    1992-05-28

    The formation of an intramolecular charge-transfer (CT) exciplex is demonstrated for 1,1{prime}-dinaphthylamine (1,1{prime}-DNA) and 2,2{prime}-dinaphthylamine (2,2{prime}-DNA) in the lowest excited singlet state using steady-state and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The exciplex is formed through a mutual reorientation of the two naphthalene rings. Differences in the rate of formation and relaxation of the CT state for 1,1{prime}-DNA and 2,2{prime}-DNA indicate the importance of the bridge position in this process. The comparison of the steady-state fluorescence of 2,2{prime}-DNA with that of its protonated form, as well as the fluorescence of 2,2{prime}-dinaphthyl ether and 2,2{prime}-dinaphthylmethane, show the role of the lone-pair electrons of the nitrogen atom in the exciplex formation. 18 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Heat transfer and tear film dynamics over multiple blink cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Quan; Braun, R. J.; Driscoll, Tobin A.

    2014-07-01

    We consider model problems for the tear film over multiple blink cycles with heat transfer from the posterior side of the tear film. A nonlinear partial differential equation governs the film thickness on a moving domain in one space dimension and time. One end of the tear film moves in order to mimic blinking in the eye. The film thickness is coupled with the diffusion of heat from the posterior of the film, where the underlying cornea and aqueous humor are modeled as a rectangular domain. The domain of the tear film is located on one edge of the rectangle. The resulting problem is solved using the method of lines with a Chebyshev spectral method in space. Evaporation is included in the model, with end fluxes specified to compensate for the evaporation from the film. The numerical results reveal a similarity to quantitative in vivo observations of the film dynamics and measured ocular surface temperature. Periodicity in the film and temperature dynamics is explored with different flux conditions and end motions, and a transition between periodic and non-periodic solutions is analyzed.

  9. Excitation Method of Linear-Motor-Type Rail Brake without Using Power Sources by Dynamic Braking with Zero Electrical Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Yasuaki; Kashiwagi, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; Sasakawa, Takashi; Fujii, Nobuo

    The eddy current rail brake is a type of braking system used in railway vehicles. Because of problems such as rail heating and problems associated with ensuring that power is supplied when the feeder malfunctions, this braking system has not been used for practical applications in Japan. Therefore, we proposed the use of linear induction motor (LIM) technology in eddy current rail brake systems. The LIM rail brake driven by dynamic braking can reduce rail heating and generate the energy required for self-excitation. In this paper, we present an excitation system and control method for the LIM rail brake driven by “dynamic braking with zero electrical output”. The proposed system is based on the concept that the LIM rail brake can be energized without using excitation power sources such as a feeder circuit and that high reliability can be realized by providing an independent excitation system. We have studied this system and conducted verification tests using a prototype LIM rail brake on a roller rig. The results show that the system performance is adequate for commercializing the proposed system, in which the LIM rail brake is driven without using any excitation power source.

  10. Optically Controlled Electron-Transfer Reaction Kinetics and Solvation Dynamics: Effect of Franck-Condon States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kriti; Patra, Aniket; Dhole, Kajal; Samanta, Alok Kumar; Ghosh, Swapan K

    2017-09-21

    Experimental results for optically controlled electron-transfer reaction kinetics (ETRK) and nonequilibrium solvation dynamics (NESD) of Coumarin 480 in DMPC vesicle show their dependence on excitation wavelength λex. However, the celebrated Marcus theory and linear-response-theory-based approaches for ETRK and NESD, respectively, predict both of the processes to be independent of λex. The above said lacuna in these theories prompted us to develop a novel theory in 1D space, where the effect of innumerable Franck-Condon states is included through λex. The present theory not only sheds light on the origin of failure of the existing theories but also gives the correct trend for the effect of λex on ETRK and NESD. More importantly, the calculated results of NESD are in excellent agreement with the experimental results for different values of λex. The new theory will therefore advance the knowledge of scientific community on the dynamics of photoinduced nonequilibrium processes.

  11. Pulsed Excitation Dynamics of an Optomechanical Crystal Resonator near Its Quantum Ground State of Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seán M. Meenehan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Using pulsed optical excitation and read-out along with single-phonon-counting techniques, we measure the transient backaction, heating, and damping dynamics of a nanoscale silicon optomechanical crystal cavity mounted in a dilution refrigerator at a base temperature of T_{f}≈11  mK. In addition to observing a slow (approximately 740-ns turn-on time for the optical-absorption-induced hot-phonon bath, we measure for the 5.6-GHz “breathing” acoustic mode of the cavity an initial phonon occupancy as low as ⟨n⟩=0.021±0.007 (mode temperature T_{min}≈70  mK and an intrinsic mechanical decay rate of γ_{0}=328±14  Hz (Q_{m}≈1.7×10^{7}. These measurements demonstrate the feasibility of using short pulsed measurements for a variety of quantum optomechanical applications despite the presence of steady-state optical heating.

  12. Dynamic response of mechanical systems to impulse process stochastic excitations: Markov approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwankiewicz, R.

    2016-05-01

    Methods for determination of the response of mechanical dynamic systems to Poisson and non-Poisson impulse process stochastic excitations are presented. Stochastic differential and integro-differential equations of motion are introduced. For systems driven by Poisson impulse process the tools of the theory of non-diffusive Markov processes are used. These are: the generalized Itô’s differential rule which allows to derive the differential equations for response moments and the forward integro-differential Chapman-Kolmogorov equation from which the equation governing the probability density of the response is obtained. The relation of Poisson impulse process problems to the theory of diffusive Markov processes is given. For systems driven by a class of non-Poisson (Erlang renewal) impulse processes an exact conversion of the original non-Markov problem into a Markov one is based on the appended Markov chain corresponding to the introduced auxiliary pure jump stochastic process. The derivation of the set of integro-differential equations for response probability density and also a moment equations technique are based on the forward integro-differential Chapman-Kolmogorov equation. An illustrating numerical example is also included.

  13. Bursts of ULF noise excited by sudden changes of solar wind dynamic pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Safargaleev

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of analysis of the dayside magnetic pulsation response to a sudden change in solar wind dynamic pressure. We concentrate on the events when a burst or a series of short-lived bursts in the Pc1 frequency range with the repetition period of 7–15 min were observed on the ground around the local noon. Not every impulse of large amplitude caused this phenomenon. We have found that the ULF bursts were excited when the spectrograms of the DMSP satellites showed a signature of 10–30 keV ions in the vicinity of the magnetic flux tube of the ground observatory, that may be related to a geomagnetic storm preceding the event. In light of this finding a possible model of the phenomenon is suggested in which the hot protons influence significantly both the generation and modulation of Pc1 activity.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (solar wind – magnetosphere interaction; MHD waves and instabilities; storms and substorms

  14. Bursts of ULF noise excited by sudden changes of solar wind dynamic pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Safargaleev

    Full Text Available We present the results of analysis of the dayside magnetic pulsation response to a sudden change in solar wind dynamic pressure. We concentrate on the events when a burst or a series of short-lived bursts in the Pc1 frequency range with the repetition period of 7–15 min were observed on the ground around the local noon. Not every impulse of large amplitude caused this phenomenon. We have found that the ULF bursts were excited when the spectrograms of the DMSP satellites showed a signature of 10–30 keV ions in the vicinity of the magnetic flux tube of the ground observatory, that may be related to a geomagnetic storm preceding the event. In light of this finding a possible model of the phenomenon is suggested in which the hot protons influence significantly both the generation and modulation of Pc1 activity.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (solar wind – magnetosphere interaction; MHD waves and instabilities; storms and substorms

  15. Study on the Dynamics of Laser Gyro Strapdown Inertial Measurement Unit System Based on Transfer Matrix Method for Multibody System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangli Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic test precision of the strapdown inertial measurement unit (SIMU is the basis of estimating accurate motion of various vehicles such as warships, airplanes, spacecrafts, and missiles. So, it is paid great attention in the above fields to increase the dynamic precision of SIMU by decreasing the vibration of the vehicles acting on the SIMU. In this paper, based on the transfer matrix method for multibody system (MSTMM, the multibody system dynamics model of laser gyro strapdown inertial measurement unit (LGSIMU is developed; the overall transfer equation of the system is deduced automatically. The computational results show that the frequency response function of the LGSIMU got by the proposed method and Newton-Euler method have good agreements. Further, the vibration reduction performance and the attitude error responses under harmonic and random excitations are analyzed. The proposed method provides a powerful technique for studying dynamics of LGSIMU because of using MSTMM and its following features: without the global dynamics equations of the system, high programming, low order of system matrix, and high computational speed.

  16. Neocortical Network Activity In Vivo Is Generated through a Dynamic Balance of Excitation and Inhibition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haider, Bilal; Duque, Alvaro; Hasenstaub, Andrea R; McCormick, David A

    2006-01-01

    .... Models of cortical function often assume that recurrent excitation and inhibition are balanced, and we recently demonstrated that spontaneous network activity in vitro contains a precise balance...

  17. Visualizing the non-equilibrium dynamics of photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer with femtosecond X-ray pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canton, Sophie E.; Kjær, Kasper S.; Vankó, György

    2015-01-01

    spectroscopy with ultrafast X-ray emission spectroscopy and diffuse X-ray scattering at the SACLA facility to track the non-equilibrated electronic and structural dynamics within a bimetallic donor–acceptor complex that contains an optically dark centre. Exploiting the 100-fold increase in temporal resolution...... as compared with storage ring facilities, these measurements constitute the first X-ray-based visualization of a non-equilibrated intramolecular electron transfer process over large interatomic distances. Experimental and theoretical results establish that mediation through electronically excited molecular...... states is a key mechanistic feature. The present study demonstrates the extensive potential of femtosecond X-ray techniques as diagnostics of non-adiabatic electron transfer processes in synthetic and biological systems, and some directions for future studies, are outlined....

  18. Lateral Gene Transfer Dynamics in the Ancient Bacterial Genus Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Bradon R; Currie, Cameron R

    2017-06-06

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) profoundly shapes the evolution of bacterial lineages. LGT across disparate phylogenetic groups and genome content diversity between related organisms suggest a model of bacterial evolution that views LGT as rampant and promiscuous. It has even driven the argument that species concepts and tree-based phylogenetics cannot be applied to bacteria. Here, we show that acquisition and retention of genes through LGT are surprisingly rare in the ubiquitous and biomedically important bacterial genus Streptomyces Using a molecular clock, we estimate that the Streptomyces bacteria are ~380 million years old, indicating that this bacterial genus is as ancient as land vertebrates. Calibrating LGT rate to this geologic time span, we find that on average only 10 genes per million years were acquired and subsequently maintained. Over that same time span, Streptomyces accumulated thousands of point mutations. By explicitly incorporating evolutionary timescale into our analyses, we provide a dramatically different view on the dynamics of LGT and its impact on bacterial evolution.IMPORTANCE Tree-based phylogenetics and the use of species as units of diversity lie at the foundation of modern biology. In bacteria, these pillars of evolutionary theory have been called into question due to the observation of thousands of lateral gene transfer (LGT) events within and between lineages. Here, we show that acquisition and retention of genes through LGT are exceedingly rare in the bacterial genus Streptomyces, with merely one gene acquired in Streptomyces lineages every 100,000 years. These findings stand in contrast to the current assumption of rampant genetic exchange, which has become the dominant hypothesis used to explain bacterial diversity. Our results support a more nuanced understanding of genetic exchange, with LGT impacting evolution over short timescales but playing a significant role over long timescales. Deeper understanding of LGT provides new

  19. Metastable Electronically Excited Atoms and Molecules: Excitation Transfer in Slow Collisions, Probed by Means of a Counter-Rotating Supersonic Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Acetylene S1 State,’’ J. Phys. Chem. A (feature article) 115, 11921-11943 (2011). 5. S. H. Lipoff and D. R. Herschbach, “Low-Energy Limit for...triplet states) and how these mechanisms may be experimentally characterized. Throughout this project, the spin-orbit interaction of the acetylene S1...Laser Excited Metastables (SEELEM) experiments, largely because we have accumulated an unprecedentedly complete description of the vibrational levels

  20. Role of intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the excited-state intramolecular double proton transfer (ESIDPT of calix[4]arene: A TDDFT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Se

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT method was performed to investigate the excited-state intramolecular double proton transfer (ESIDPT reaction of calix[4]arene (C4A and the role of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds in the ESIDPT process. The geometries of C4A in the ground state and excited states (S1, S2 and T1 were optimized. Four intramolecular hydrogen bonds formed in the C4A are strengthened or weakened in the S2 and T1 states compared to those in the ground state. Interestingly, upon excitation to the S1 state of C4A, two protons H1 and H2 transfer along the two intramolecular hydrogen bonds O1-H1···O2 and O2-H2···O3, while the other two protons do not transfer. The ESIDPT reaction breaks the primary symmetry of C4A in the ground state. The potential energy curves of proton transfer demonstrate that the ESIDPT process follows the stepwise mechanism but not the concerted mechanism. Findings indicate that intramolecular hydrogen bonding is critical to the ESIDPT reactions in intramolecular hydrogen-bonded systems.

  1. Importance of polarization in quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics descriptions of electronic excited states: NaI(H2O)n photodissociation dynamics as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Denise M; Peslherbe, Gilles H

    2008-01-17

    Sodium iodide has long been a paradigm for ionic and covalent curve crossing and ultrafast nonadiabatic dynamics, and our interest lies in the influence of solvation on this process. The NaI(H2O)n photodissociation dynamics are simulated with the molecular dynamics with quantum transitions method. A quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) description is adopted for the NaI(H2O)n electronic states, in which a semiempirical valence bond approach is used to describe the NaI electronic structure, and a polarizable optimized potential for cluster simulations model is used to describe solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions. In contrast to previous work with a nonpolarizable MM model [Koch et al., J. Phys. Chem. A, 2006, 110, 1438], this approach predicts that the NaI ionic ground- to covalent first-excited-state Franck-Condon energy gaps reach a plateau by cluster size 16, in relatively good agreement with experiment and electronic structure calculations; this allows us to safely extend our previous simulations to larger cluster sizes, i.e., n > 4. The simulations suggest that the disappearance of the two-photon ionization probe signals observed in femtosecond pump-probe experiments of NaI(H2O)n, n >/= 4, is due to the shift of the NaI curve-crossing region toward larger NaI internuclear separations because of solvent stabilization of the NaI ionic state. Further, the latter causes the adiabatic ground and excited states to acquire pure ionic and covalent character, respectively, by cluster 8, resulting in NaI ionic ground-state recombination or dissociation. To make a connection with electron transfer in solution, free energy curves have been generated as a function of a solvent coordinate similar to that of solution theory. Inspection of the free energy curves together with the results of excited-state simulations reveal that the electron-transfer process in clusters is not governed by the collective motion of the solvent molecules, as in solution, but

  2. Excitation energy transfer in natural photosynthetic complexes and chlorophyll trefoils: hole-burning and single complex/trefoil spectroscopic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryszard Jankowiak, Kansas State University, Department of Chemistry, CBC Bldg., Manhattan KS, 66505; Phone: (785) 532-6785

    2012-09-12

    In this project we studied both natural photosynthetic antenna complexes and various artificial systems (e.g. chlorophyll (Chl) trefoils) using high resolution hole-burning (HB) spectroscopy and excitonic calculations. Results obtained provided more insight into the electronic (excitonic) structure, inhomogeneity, electron-phonon coupling strength, vibrational frequencies, and excitation energy (or electron) transfer (EET) processes in several antennas and reaction centers. For example, our recent work provided important constraints and parameters for more advanced excitonic calculations of CP43, CP47, and PSII core complexes. Improved theoretical description of HB spectra for various model systems offers new insight into the excitonic structure and composition of low-energy absorption traps in very several antenna protein complexes and reaction centers. We anticipate that better understanding of HB spectra obtained for various photosynthetic complexes and their simultaneous fits with other optical spectra (i.e. absorption, emission, and circular dichroism spectra) provides more insight into the underlying electronic structures of these important biological systems. Our recent progress provides a necessary framework for probing the electronic structure of these systems via Hole Burning Spectroscopy. For example, we have shown that the theoretical description of non-resonant holes is more restrictive (in terms of possible site energies) than those of absorption and emission spectra. We have demonstrated that simultaneous description of linear optical spectra along with HB spectra provides more realistic site energies. We have also developed new algorithms to describe both nonresonant and resonant hole-burn spectra using more advanced Redfield theory. Simultaneous description of various optical spectra for complex biological system, e.g. artificial antenna systems, FMO protein complexes, water soluble protein complexes, and various mutants of reaction centers

  3. Hydrogen-bond dynamics and proton transfer in nanoconfinement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Loop, T.H.

    2015-01-01

    Proton transfer is of fundamental importance to both biology and chemistry. Much is known about proton transfer in large water volumes but often proton transfer reactions take place in very small nanometer sized volumes for example between lipid layers and in proton channels in mitochondria and

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Strong Shock Waves Propagating in Dense Deuterium With the Effect of Excited Electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Hao; Kang, Wei; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Huiling; He, X T

    2016-01-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation of shock waves propagating in dense deuterium with the electron force field method [J. T. Su and W. A. Goddard, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 185003 (2007)], which explicitly takes the excitation of electrons into consideration. Non-equilibrium features associated with the excitation of electrons are systematically investigated. We show that chemical bonds in D$_2$ molecules lead to a more complicated shock wave structure near the shock front, compared with the results of classical molecular dynamics simulation. Charge separation can bring about accumulation of net charges on the large scale, instead of the formation of a localized dipole layer, which might cause extra energy for the shock wave to propagate. In addition, the simulations also display that molecular dissociation at the shock front is the major factor corresponding to the "bump" structure in the principal Hugoniot. These results could help to build a more realistic picture of shock wave propagation in fuel mater...

  5. Collective excitations in liquid DMSO : FIR spectrum, Low frequency vibrational density of states and ultrafast dipolar solvation dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Hazra, Milan; Bagchi, Biman

    2016-01-01

    Valuable dynamical and structural information about neat liquid DMSO at ambient conditions can be obtained through study of low frequency vibrations in the far infrared (FIR), that is, terahertz regime. For DMSO, collective excitations as well as single molecule stretches and bends have been measured by different kinds of experiments such as OHD-RIKES and terahertz spectroscopy. In the present work we investigate the intermolecular vibrational spectrum of DMSO through three different computat...

  6. Excitation energy transfer in europium chelate with doxycycline in the presence of a second ligand in micellar solutions of nonionic surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, T. D.; Shtykov, S. N.; Kochubei, V. I.; Khryachkova, E. S.

    2011-01-01

    The complexation of Eu3+ with doxycycline (DC) antibiotic in the presence of several second ligands and surfactant micelles of different types is studied by the spectrophotometric and luminescence methods. It is found that the efficiency of excitation energy transfer in Eu3+-DC chelate depends on the nature of the second ligand and surfactant micelles. Using thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) as an example, it is shown that the second ligand additionally sensitizes the europium fluorescence, and the possibility of intermediate sensitization of DC and then of europium is shown by the example of 1,10-phenanthroline. In all cases, the excitation energy transfer efficiency was increased due to the so-called antenna effect. The decay kinetics of the sensitized fluorescence of the binary and mixed-ligand chelates in aqueous and micellar solutions of nonionic surfactants is studied and the relative quantum yields and lifetimes of fluorescence are determined.

  7. Construction of a molecular beacon based on two-photon excited fluorescence resonance energy transfer with quantum dot as donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingzhi; Li, Hui; Qiu, Ting; Zhou, Guohua; Wong, Kwok-Yin; He, Zhike; Liu, Zhihong

    2011-03-07

    A new molecular beacon (MB) driven by two-photon excitation (TPE) using quantum dots as energy donor is constructed, which provides reduced direct excitation of acceptor and is free of interferences from autofluorescence or scattering light in a complicated biological matrix.

  8. Constrained dynamics of localized excitations causes a non-equilibrium phase transition in an atomistic model of glass formers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, Thomas; Chandler, David

    2012-05-14

    Recent progress has demonstrated that trajectory space for both kinetically constrained lattice models and atomistic models can be partitioned into a liquid-like and an inactive basin with a non-equilibrium phase transition separating these behaviors. Recent work has also established that excitations in atomistic models have statistics and dynamics like those in a specific class of kinetically constrained models. But it has not been known whether the non-equilibrium phase transitions occurring in the two classes of models have similar origins. Here, we show that the origin is indeed similar. In particular, we show that the number of excitations identified in an atomistic model serves as the order parameter for the inactive-active phase transition for that model. In this way, we show that the mechanism by which excitations are correlated in an atomistic model - by dynamical facilitation - is the mechanism from which the active-inactive phase transition emerges. We study properties of the inactive phase and show that it is amorphous lacking long-range order. We also discuss the choice of dynamical order parameters.

  9. Zinc porphyrin-Re(I) bipyridyl-fullerene triad: synthesis, characterization, and kinetics of the stepwise electron-transfer processes initiated by visible excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavigli, Paolo; Da Ros, Tatiana; Kahnt, Axel; Gamberoni, Marta; Indelli, Maria Teresa; Iengo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-05

    A new triad system featuring one zinc porphyrin and one fullerene moieties attached to a central redox-active Re(I) connector was obtained in remarkable yield by cleverly exploiting a facile two-step synthesis. Detailed description and discussion on the characterization of this multicomponent system and of its parent free-base analogue are presented, along with a kinetic study of the stepwise electron-transfer processes occurring upon visible excitation.

  10. Probing the excited state dynamics of a new family of Cu(I)-complexes with an enhanced light absorption capacity: excitation-wavelength dependent population of states through branching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, Panagiotis A; Tkachenko, Nikolai V

    2013-08-21

    The ultrafast dynamics of six homoleptic Cu(I)-complexes and their respective ligands was examined through time-resolved electronic absorption spectroscopy in the subpicosecond time domain, in a variety of solvents, and at different excitation wavelengths. Results indicate that after excitation of the complexes in the blue part of the spectrum, the initially formed intraligand (IL) singlet excited state decays via two pathways yielding simultaneously both the lower-lying MLCT excited state and the ligand locally excited triplet state. The latter is also observed in the case of the free ligands and relaxes back to the ground state in a timescale of 40 ps. Excitation in the red part results in the formation of the MLCT excited state of the complexes which decays to the ground state through the same intraligand triplet excited state. The solvent viscosity does not affect the overall relaxation kinetics. The short time constant observed for the intersystem crossing of the MLCT singlet excited state is discussed in terms of the contribution of the d-orbitals of copper to the wavefunction of these states.

  11. Excited singlet (S1) state interactions of 2,2'- and 4,4'-biphenyldiols with chloroalkanes: Photoinduced dissociative electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, J.; Pal, H.; Sapre, A. V.

    2002-05-01

    Interactions of the excited singlet (S1) state of 2,2'- and 4,4'-biphenyldiols with a number of chloroalkanes (CA) have been investigated in acetonitrile solutions using fluorescence quenching measurements. For any particular diol-CA pair, the bimolecular quenching constants kq obtained from steady-state and time-resolved measurements are found to be the same, indicating the dynamic nature of the interaction. The kq values for different diol-CA pairs are seen to increase as the oxidation potential of the diol becomes less positive or the reduction potential of the CA becomes less negative, indicating the electron transfer (ET) type of interaction for the observed quenching. Following Marcus' outer-sphere ET theory, the correlation of the observed kq values with the free-energy changes for such reactions (ΔG0) results in the recovery of an unusually higher intramolecular reorganization energy (λin), indicating that the ET in the systems studied might not be of outer sphere in nature. Since the CAs are prone to undergo C-Cl bond cleavage following their reduction, a dissociative ET (DET) mechanism has been proposed for the observed fluorescence quenching. The evidence for the DET mechanism has been obtained by characterizing and estimating the Cl- ions in the photolyzed diol-CA solutions. Following a suitable theory for concerted DET reactions, it is seen that the observed kq values correlate well with the free-energy changes (ΔGDET0) for such reactions. It is seen that the reorganization energy recovered from such correlation accounts well for the C-Cl bond dissociation energy of the CAs, supporting a concerted DET mechanism in these systems.

  12. Enhanced neutron pair transfer and collective excitations in the system sup 2 sup 0 sup 6 Pb+ sup 1 sup 1 sup 8 Sn at barrier energies

    CERN Document Server

    Peter, I; Kaspar, M; Kozhoukharov, I; Rejmund, M; Wollersheim, H J; Oertzen, W V; Fachbereich-Physik, F U B; Thummerer, S; Bohlen, H G; Gebauer, B; Kröll, T; Thompson, I J

    2003-01-01

    At energies below the Coulomb barrier, neutron transfer and Coulomb excitation have been measured in a very heavy asymmetric nuclear system, in sup 2 sup 0 sup 6 Pb+ sup 1 sup 1 sup 8 Sn. These are semi-magic nuclei showing super-fluid properties. Particle-gamma coincidence techniques using 5 Euroball Cluster detectors (EB), combined in a set-up with the Heidelberg-Darmstadt NaI Crystal Ball (CB), have been used. Position-sensitive detectors allowed the observation of scattering processes covering angles from 110 up to 150 degrees. The fragments are identified via the known gamma-decays of the lowest excited states using the high resolution of EB. Using the unique feature of the set-up with the CB, transfer to well-defined final channels with known quantum numbers is selected using the high-efficiency multiplicity filter of the CB with no second gamma-ray, i.e. without feeding. The data are analysed using the semi-classical approach and transfer probabilities are obtained. Coulomb excitation has been analysed...

  13. Excitations and relaxation dynamics in multiferroic GeV4S8 studied by terahertz and dielectric spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke, S.; Wang, Zhe; Mayr, F.; Ruff, E.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Tsurkan, V.; Loidl, A.

    2017-10-01

    We report on THz time-domain spectroscopy on multiferroic GeV4S8 , which undergoes orbital ordering at a Jahn-Teller transition at 30.5 K and exhibits antiferromagnetic order below 14.6 K. The THz experiments are complemented by dielectric experiments at audio and radio frequencies. We identify a low-lying excitation close to 0.5 THz, which is only weakly temperature dependent and probably corresponds to a molecular excitation within the electronic level scheme of the V4 clusters. In addition, we detect complex temperature-dependent behavior of a low-lying phononic excitation, closely linked to the onset of orbitally driven ferroelectricity. In the high-temperature cubic phase, which is paramagnetic and orbitally disordered, this excitation is of relaxational character becomes an overdamped Lorentzian mode in the orbitally ordered phase below the Jahn-Teller transition, and finally appears as well-defined phonon excitation in the antiferromagnetic state. Abrupt changes in the real and imaginary parts of the complex dielectric permittivity show that orbital ordering appears via a structural phase transition with strong first-order character and that the onset of antiferromagnetic order is accompanied by significant structural changes, which are of first-order character, too. Dielectric spectroscopy documents that at low frequencies, significant dipolar relaxations are present in the orbitally ordered, paramagnetic phase only. In contrast to the closely related GaV4S8 , this relaxation dynamics that most likely mirrors coupled orbital and polar fluctuations does not seem to be related to the dynamic processes detected in the THz regime.

  14. An Experimental Investigation of the Dynamic Behavior of an In-Plane MEMS Shallow Arch Under Electrostatic Excitation

    KAUST Repository

    Ramini, Abdallah

    2016-01-20

    We present experimental investigation of the nonlinear dynamics of a clamped-clamped in-plane MEMS shallow arch when excited by an electrostatic force. We explore the dynamic behaviors of the in-plane motion of the shallow arches via frequency sweeps in the neighborhood of the first resonance frequency. The shallow arch response is video microscopy recorded and analyzed by means of digital imaging. The experimental data show local softening behavior for small DC and AC loads. For high voltages, the experimental investigation reveals interesting dynamics, where the arch exhibits a dynamic snap-Through behavior. These attractive experimental results verify the previously reported complex behavior of in-plane MEMS arches and show promising results to implement these structures for variety of sensing and actuation applications. © Copyright 2015 by ASME.

  15. Study of the transferred angular momentum as a function of the excitation energy in the Kr + U reaction at 35 A.MeV; Etude du moment angulaire transfere en fonction de l`energie d`excitation dans la reaction Kr + U a 35 A.MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josset, M.

    1996-09-06

    The aim of this study is to measure the angular momentum transferred to the target-like product, in the Kr + U reaction at 35 A.MeV, as a function of the excitation energy. The measured neutron multiplicity, as seen by the detector ORION, was used as the basic event selection criterion. This multiplicity also allows an estimation of the excitation energy transferred to the target-like product on an event by event basis. The study of the behaviour of the projectile-like component allows one to characterize two-body mechanisms, which are associated with a large energy dissipation for less peripheral collisions. The spin transferred to the target-like component is deduced from the out-plane angular distributions of the fission fragments. The study of the angular correlation between these fission fragments confirms that the dominant mechanism is essentially a two-body process. We show that the angular momentum values obtained, as a function of the excitation energy of the target-like product, have little dependence on the time taken for the nucleus to reach the saddle point. We observe a constant increase in the target-like component`s spin, varying from 15{Dirac_h} to 60{Dirac_h}, as the excitation energy increases from roughly 8 to 400 MeV. For the higher excitation energies the spin does not increase. This behaviour reflects the vanishing binary fission mechanism at high angular momenta. (author). 81 refs.

  16. Energy transfer model and its applications of ultrasonic gas flow-meter under static and dynamic flow rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Min; Xu, Ke-Jun; Zhu, Wen-Jiao; Shen, Zi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Most of the ultrasonic gas flow-meters measure the gas flow rate by calculating the ultrasonic transmission time difference between the downstream and upstream. Ultrasonic energy attenuation occurs in the processes of the ultrasonic generation, conversion, transmission, and reception. Additionally, at the same time, the gas flow will also affect the ultrasonic propagation during the measurement, which results in the ultrasonic energy attenuation and the offset of ultrasonic propagation path. Thus, the ultrasonic energy received by the transducer is weaker. When the gas flow rate increases, this effect becomes more apparent. It leads to the measurement accuracy reduced, and the measurement range narrowed. An energy transfer model, where the ultrasonic gas flow-meter under without/with the gas flow, is established by adopting the statistical analysis and curve fitting based on a large amount of experimental data. The static sub model without the gas flow expresses the energy conversion efficiency of ultrasonic gas transducers, and the dynamic sub model with the gas flow reflects the energy attenuation pattern following the flow rate variations. The mathematical model can be used to determine the minimum energy of the excitation signal for meeting the requirement of specific measurement range, and predict the maximum measurable flow rate in the case of fixed energy of excitation signal. Based on the above studies, a method to enhance the excitation signal energy is proposed under the output power of the transmitting circuit being a finite value so as to extend the measurement rage of ultrasonic gas flow-meter.

  17. Pressure-induced emergence of unusually high-frequency transverse excitations in a liquid alkali metal: Evidence of two types of collective excitations contributing to the transverse dynamics at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryk, Taras [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 1 Svientsitskii Street, UA-79011 Lviv (Ukraine); Lviv Polytechnic National University, 12 S. Bandera Street, UA-79013 Lviv (Ukraine); Ruocco, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma La Sapienza, 5 Piazzale Aldo Moro, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Center for Life Nano Science @Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, 295 Viale Regina Elena, I-00161 Roma (Italy); Scopigno, T. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma La Sapienza, 5 Piazzale Aldo Moro, I-00185 Roma (Italy); IPCF-CNR, c/o Universita di Roma La Sapienza, 5 Piazzale Aldo Moro, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Seitsonen, Ari P. [Département de Chimie, Université de Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Département de Chimie, École Normale Supérieure, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2015-09-14

    Unlike phonons in crystals, the collective excitations in liquids cannot be treated as propagation of harmonic displacements of atoms around stable local energy minima. The viscoelasticity of liquids, reflected in transition from the adiabatic to elastic high-frequency speed of sound and in absence of the long-wavelength transverse excitations, results in dispersions of longitudinal (L) and transverse (T) collective excitations essentially different from the typical phonon ones. Practically, nothing is known about the effect of high pressure on the dispersion of collective excitations in liquids, which causes strong changes in liquid structure. Here dispersions of L and T collective excitations in liquid Li in the range of pressures up to 186 GPa were studied by ab initio simulations. Two methodologies for dispersion calculations were used: direct estimation from the peak positions of the L/T current spectral functions and simulation-based calculations of wavenumber-dependent collective eigenmodes. It is found that at ambient pressure, the longitudinal and transverse dynamics are well separated, while at high pressures, the transverse current spectral functions, density of vibrational states, and dispersions of collective excitations yield evidence of two types of propagating modes that contribute strongly to transverse dynamics. Emergence of the unusually high-frequency transverse modes gives evidence of the breakdown of a regular viscoelastic theory of transverse dynamics, which is based on coupling of a single transverse propagating mode with shear relaxation. The explanation of the observed high-frequency shift above the viscoelastic value is given by the presence of another branch of collective excitations. With the pressure increasing, coupling between the two types of collective excitations is rationalized within a proposed extended viscoelastic model of transverse dynamics.

  18. Excited-state kinetics of the carotenoid S//1 state in LHC II and two-photon excitation spectra of lutein and beta-carotene in solution Efficient Car S//1 yields Chl electronic energy transfer via hot S//1 states?

    CERN Document Server

    Walla, P J; Linden, Patricia A; Ohta, Kaoru

    2002-01-01

    The excited-state dynamics of the carotenoids (Car) in light- harvesting complex II (LHC II) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were studied by transient absorption measurements. The decay of the Car S //1 population ranges from similar to 200 fs to over 7 ps, depending on the excitation and detection wavelengths. In contrast, a 200 fs Car S//1 yields Chlorophyll (Chl) energy transfer component was the dominant time constant for our earlier two-photon fluorescence up- conversion measurements (Walla, P.J. ; et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2000, 104, 4799-4806). We also present the two-photon excitation (TPE) spectra of lutein and beta-carotene in solution and compare them with the TPE spectrum of LHC II. The TPE-spectrum of LHC II has an onset much further to the blue and a width that is narrower than expected from comparison to the S//1 fluorescence of lutein and beta-carotene in solution. Different environments may affect the shape of the S//1 spectrum significantly. To explain the blue shift of the TPE spectrum and the d...

  19. Mass Transfer and Tidal Dynamics in White Dwarf Binary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Jeffrey; Fuller, J.

    2014-01-01

    Compact white dwarf (WD) binary systems (with orbital periods ranging from minutes to hours) can produce a variety of interesting astrophysical objects (e.g., type Ia supernovae, AM CVn systems, R Cor Bor stars, sdB stars) upon the onset of mass transfer. These systems are driven toward Roche lobe overflow by the emission of gravitational radiation, but it is not known whether the mass transfer will be stable (forming an Am CVn system) or become unstable (resulting in a merger). We analyze how the combined effects of mass transfer and tidal torques affect the evolution of these systems by creating numerical models with the MESA stellar evolution program. Using new calculations of the tidal torque in rotating WDs, we predict the outcome of mass transfer in these systems as a function of the masses of the WD components. We find that the stability of mass transfer depends primarily on the peak mass transfer rate near the period minimum, which is highly dependent on the WD masses and on the strength of the tidal torques. Except for low WD accretor masses, the tidal torques are insufficient to significantly increase the stability of mass transfer. We find that mass transfer is generally unstable for WD donor masses greater than about 0.25 solar masses, and that the 12 minute system SDSS J0615 will end its inspiral in a WD merger, likely producing an R Cor Bor star.

  20. An analytical dynamic model of heat transfer from the heating body to the heated room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mižáková Jana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available On the base of mathematical description of thermal balance the dynamic model of the hot-water heating body (radiator was designed. The radiator is mathematically described as a heat transfer system between heating water and warmed-up air layer. Similarly, the dynamic model of heat transfer through the wall from the heated space to the outdoor environment was design. Both models were interconnected into dynamic model of heat transfer from the heating body to the heated room and they will be implemented into simulation model of the heating system in Matlab/Simulink environment.

  1. Effect of strong coupling on interfacial electron transfer dynamics in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    regarded as the best sensitizing dyes for solar energy conversion for their strong visible absorption bands, long-lived excited states and excellent photochemi- cal stability. However, the development of organic sensitizers, which can exhibit performances similar to those of metal complexes, gained a lot of interest.

  2. Controlling electron and energy transfer paths by selective excitation in a zinc porphyrin-BODIPY-C60 multi-modular triad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obondi, Christopher O; Lim, Gary N; Martinez, Priscilla; Swamy, Varghese; D'Souza, Francis

    2017-11-23

    A multi-modular donor-acceptor triad composed of zinc porphyrin, BF2-chelated dipyrromethene (BODIPY), and C60 was newly synthesized, with the BODIPY entity at the central position. Using absorbance and emission spectral, electrochemical redox, and computational optimization results, energy level diagrams for the ZnP-BODIPY dyad and ZnP-BODIPY-C60 triad were constructed to envision the different photochemical events upon selective excitation of the BODIPY and ZnP entities. By transient absorption spectral studies covering a wide femtosecond-to-millisecond time scale, evidence for the different photochemical events and their kinetic information was secured. Efficient singlet-singlet energy transfer from 1BODIPY* to ZnP with a rate constant kENT = 1.7 × 1010 s-1 in toluene was observed in the case of the ZnP-BODIPY dyad. Interestingly, in the case of the ZnP-BODIPY-C60 triad, the selective excitation of ZnP resulted in electron transfer leading to the formation of the ZnP˙+-BODIPY-C60˙- charge-separated state. Owing to the distal separation of the radical cation and radical anion species (edge-to-edge distance of 18.7 Å), the radical ion-pair persisted for microseconds. By contrast, the selective excitation of BODIPY resulted in an ultrafast energy transfer to yield ZnP-BODIPY-1C60* as the major product. The 1C60* populated the low-lying 3C60* via intersystem crossing prior to returning to the ground state. The present study successfully demonstrates the importance of supramolecular geometry and selection of excitation wavelength in regulating the different photoprocesses.

  3. Dynamic interactions of an integrated vehicle-electromagnetic energy harvester-tire system subject to uneven road excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jing Tang; Sun, Zhe; Zhou, Sulian; Tan, Mingyi

    2017-04-01

    An investigation is undertaken of an integrated mechanical-electromagnetic coupling system consisting of a rigid vehicle with heave, roll, and pitch motions, four electromagnetic energy harvesters and four tires subject to uneven road excitations in order to improve the passengers' riding comfort and harvest the lost engine energy due to uneven roads. Following the derived mathematical formulations and the proposed solution approaches, the numerical simulations of this interaction system subject to a continuous sinusoidal road excitation and a single ramp impact are completed. The simulation results are presented as the dynamic response curves in the forms of the frequency spectrum and the time history, which reveals the complex interaction characteristics of the system for vibration reductions and energy harvesting performance. It has addressed the coupling effects on the dynamic characteristics of the integrated system caused by: (1) the natural modes and frequencies of the vehicle; (2) the vehicle rolling and pitching motions; (3) different road excitations on four wheels; (4) the time delay of a road ramp to impact both the front and rear wheels, etc., which cannot be tackled by an often used quarter vehicle model. The guidelines for engineering applications are given. The developed coupling model and the revealed concept provide a means with analysis idea to investigate the details of four energy harvester motions for electromagnetic suspension designs in order to replace the current passive vehicle isolators and to harvest the lost engine energy. Potential further research directions are suggested for readers to consider in the future.

  4. Dynamics of coupled plasmon polariton wave packets excited at a subwavelength slit in optically thin metal films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei-Ming; Zhang, Lingxiao; Seideman, Tamar; Petek, Hrvoje

    2012-10-01

    We study by numerical simulations the excitation and propagation dynamics of coupled surface plasmon polariton (SPP) wave packets (WPs) in optically thin Ag films and a bulk Ag/vacuum interface under the illumination of a subwavelength slit by 400 nm continuous wave (cw) and femtosecond pulsed light. The generated surface fields include contributions from both SPPs and quasicylindrical waves, which dominate in different regimes. We explore aspects of the coupled SPP modes in Ag thin films, including symmetry, propagation, attenuation, and the variation of coupling with incident angle and film thickness. Simulations of the electromagnetic transients initiated with femtosecond pulses reveal new features of coupled SPP WP generation and propagation in thin Ag films. Our results show that, under pulsed excitation, the SPP modes in an Ag thin film break up into two distinct bound surface wave packets characterized by marked differences in symmetries, group velocities, attenuation lengths, and dispersion properties. The nanometer spatial and femtosecond temporal scale excitation and propagation dynamics of the coupled SPP WPs are revealed in detail by movies recording the evolution of their transient field distributions.

  5. Collective excitations in liquid dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO): FIR spectrum, low frequency vibrational density of states, and ultrafast dipolar solvation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Milan K.; Bagchi, Biman

    2017-01-01

    Valuable dynamical and structural information about neat liquid DMSO at ambient conditions can be obtained through a study of low frequency vibrations in the far infrared (FIR), that is, terahertz regime. For DMSO, collective excitations as well as single molecule stretches and bends have been measured by different kinds of experiments such as OHD-RIKES and terahertz spectroscopy. In the present work, we investigate the intermolecular vibrational spectrum of DMSO through three different computational techniques namely (i) the far-infrared spectrum obtained through the Fourier transform of total dipole moment auto-time correlation function, (ii) from the Fourier transform of the translational and angular velocity time autocorrelation functions, and (iii) a quenched normal mode analysis of the parent liquid at 300 K. The three spectra, although exhibit differences among each other, reveal similar features which are in good, semi-quantitative, agreement with experimental results. The study of participation ratio of the density of states obtained from the normal mode analysis shows that the broad spectrum around 100 cm-1 involves collective oscillations of 300-400 molecules. Dipolar solvation dynamics exhibit ultrafast energy relaxation with an initial time constant around 157 fs which can be attributed to the coupling to the collective excitations. We compare the properties of DMSO with those of water vis-a-vis the existence of the low frequency collective modes. Last, we find that the collective excitation spectrum exhibits strong temperature dependence.

  6. Collective excitations in liquid dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO): FIR spectrum, low frequency vibrational density of states, and ultrafast dipolar solvation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Milan K; Bagchi, Biman

    2017-01-14

    Valuable dynamical and structural information about neat liquid DMSO at ambient conditions can be obtained through a study of low frequency vibrations in the far infrared (FIR), that is, terahertz regime. For DMSO, collective excitations as well as single molecule stretches and bends have been measured by different kinds of experiments such as OHD-RIKES and terahertz spectroscopy. In the present work, we investigate the intermolecular vibrational spectrum of DMSO through three different computational techniques namely (i) the far-infrared spectrum obtained through the Fourier transform of total dipole moment auto-time correlation function, (ii) from the Fourier transform of the translational and angular velocity time autocorrelation functions, and (iii) a quenched normal mode analysis of the parent liquid at 300 K. The three spectra, although exhibit differences among each other, reveal similar features which are in good, semi-quantitative, agreement with experimental results. The study of participation ratio of the density of states obtained from the normal mode analysis shows that the broad spectrum around 100 cm -1 involves collective oscillations of 300-400 molecules. Dipolar solvation dynamics exhibit ultrafast energy relaxation with an initial time constant around 157 fs which can be attributed to the coupling to the collective excitations. We compare the properties of DMSO with those of water vis-a-vis the existence of the low frequency collective modes. Last, we find that the collective excitation spectrum exhibits strong temperature dependence.

  7. Lattice dynamics in two-photon-excited CdS studied by picosecond time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishimura, Hiroaki; Hironaka, Yoichiro [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, R3-10, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Nakamura, Kazutaka G. [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, R3-10, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)], E-mail: nakamura.k.ai@m.titech.ac.jp

    2008-08-01

    Lattice dynamics and radiative processes in single-crystal cadmium sulfide induced by two-photon excitation with a femtosecond laser are investigated. The development of lattice expansion is directly observed by picosecond time-resolved X-ray diffraction. The obtained lattice dynamics are explained on the basis of a thermally induced impulsive-strain model. The model calculation indicates that two- and more-photon absorption processes occur and that reflectivity rapidly increases under laser irradiation. In photoluminescence spectroscopy, the spectra for TW cm{sup -2} excitation are shifted to lower energy and show an additional shoulder at 2.35 eV. Furthermore, emission due to Fabry-Perot laser modes with self-formed cavities was observed under 11 TW cm{sup -2} excitation. The discrepancy between carrier densities deduced from the lattice expansion and the PL spectra indicates that the predominant process at a higher carrier density is not radiative recombination, but Auger recombination followed by lattice heating.

  8. Structure and conformational dynamics of molecules in the excited electronic states: theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godunov, I. A.; Bataev, V. A.; Maslov, D. V.; Yakovlev, N. N.

    2017-01-01

    The structure of conformational non-rigid molecules in the excited electronic states are investigated by joint theoretical and experimental methods. The theoretical part of work consist of two stages. In first stage the ab initio quantum-chemical calculations are carried out using high level methods. In second stage the vibrational problems of the various dimensions are solved by variational method for vibrations of large amplitude. In experimental part of work the vibronic spectra are investigated: gas-phase absorption and also, fluorescence excitation spectra of jet-cooled molecules. Some examples are considered.

  9. Focus: Phase-resolved nonlinear terahertz spectroscopy—From charge dynamics in solids to molecular excitations in liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsaesser, Thomas, E-mail: elsasser@mbi-berlin.de; Reimann, Klaus; Woerner, Michael, E-mail: woerner@mbi-berlin.de [Max-Born-Institut für Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-06-07

    Intense terahertz (THz) electric field transients with amplitudes up to several megavolts/centimeter and novel multidimensional techniques are the key ingredients of nonlinear THz spectroscopy, a new area of basic research. Both nonlinear light-matter interactions including the non-perturbative regime and THz driven charge transport give new insight into the character and dynamics of low-energy excitations of condensed matter and into quantum kinetic phenomena. This article provides an overview of recent progress in this field, combining an account of technological developments with selected prototype results for liquids and solids. The potential of nonlinear THz methods for future studies of low-frequency excitations of condensed-phase molecular systems is discussed as well.

  10. Dynamic balance of excitation and inhibition rapidly modulates spike probability and precision in feed-forward hippocampal circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlstrom-Helgren, Sarah; Klyachko, Vitaly A

    2016-12-01

    Feed-forward inhibitory (FFI) circuits are important for many information-processing functions. FFI circuit operations critically depend on the balance and timing between the excitatory and inhibitory components, which undergo rapid dynamic changes during neural activity due to short-term plasticity (STP) of both components. How dynamic changes in excitation/inhibition (E/I) balance during spike trains influence FFI circuit operations remains poorly understood. In the current study we examined the role of STP in the FFI circuit functions in the mouse hippocampus. Using a coincidence detection paradigm with simultaneous activation of two Schaffer collateral inputs, we found that the spiking probability in the target CA1 neuron was increased while spike precision concomitantly decreased during high-frequency bursts compared with a single spike. Blocking inhibitory synaptic transmission revealed that dynamics of inhibition predominately modulates the spike precision but not the changes in spiking probability, whereas the latter is modulated by the dynamics of excitation. Further analyses combining whole cell recordings and simulations of the FFI circuit suggested that dynamics of the inhibitory circuit component may influence spiking behavior during bursts by broadening the width of excitatory postsynaptic responses and that the strength of this modulation depends on the basal E/I ratio. We verified these predictions using a mouse model of fragile X syndrome, which has an elevated E/I ratio, and found a strongly reduced modulation of postsynaptic response width during bursts. Our results suggest that changes in the dynamics of excitatory and inhibitory circuit components due to STP play important yet distinct roles in modulating the properties of FFI circuits. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Coherent effects in the relaxation dynamics of a multilevel quantum system excited by ultrashort light pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbukh, I.Sh; Kovarsky, V.A.; Perelman, N.F.

    1989-05-22

    Interference effects in luminescence produced by short light pulse excitation of a single quantum level interacting with a quasi-continuum of background states have been considered. Different regimes of subsequent luminescence quenching are revealed and analytically studied in a unified way: radiationless decay controlled emission, multiple repetitions of the initial pulse form, anharmonic dephasing and following revival, etc. (orig.).

  12. Second OH overtone excitation and statistical dissociation dynamics of peroxynitrous acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konen, Ian M.; Li, Eunice X. J.; Stephenson, Thomas A.; Lester, Marsha I.

    2005-11-01

    The second OH overtone transition of the trans-perp conformer of peroxynitrous acid (tp-HOONO) is identified using infrared action spectroscopy. HOONO is produced by the recombination of photolytically generated OH and NO2 radicals, and then cooled in a pulsed supersonic expansion. The second overtone transition is assigned to tp-HOONO based on its vibrational frequency (10195.3cm-1) and rotational band contour, which are in accord with theoretical predictions and previous observations of the first overtone transition. The transition dipole moment associated with the overtone transition is rotated considerably from the OH bond axis, as evident from its hybrid band composition, indicating substantial charge redistribution upon OH stretch excitation. The overtone band exhibits homogeneous line broadening that is attributed to intramolecular vibrational redistribution, arising from the coupling of the initially excited OH stretch to other modes that ultimately lead to dissociation. The quantum state distributions of the OH XΠ2 (ν =0) products following first and second OH overtone excitation of tp-HOONO are found to be statistical by comparison with three commonly used statistical models. The product state distributions are principally determined by the tp-HOONO binding energy of 16.2(1)kcalmol-1. Only a small fraction of the OH products are produced in ν =1 following the second overtone excitation, consistent with statistical predictions.

  13. Proton transfer dynamics in the propionic acid dimer from path integral molecular dynamics calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durlak, Piotr; Latajka, Zdzisław

    2011-09-01

    The double proton transfer process in the cyclic dimer of propionic acid in the gas phase was studied using a path integral molecular dynamics method. Structures, energies and proton trajectories were determined. Very large amplitude motions of the skeleton of a propionic acid molecule were observed during the simulations, and almost free rotation of the C(2)H(5) group around the C(α)-C bond. A double-well symmetric potential with a very small energy barrier was determined from the free energy profile for the proton motions. Infrared spectra for different isotopomers were calculated, and comparative vibrational analysis was performed. The vibrational results from CPMD appear to be in qualitative agreement with the experimental ones.

  14. Curriculum Development for Transfer Learning in Dynamic Multiagent Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    larger board , or different configu- rations) that require learning new skills and building upon knowledge learned in previous games . The final game is...played over 170 million games spanning 192 variations of the task. The agent used vast amounts of experience about transfer learning in the domain to...extend transfer learning to the problem of curriculum learning . As a motivating example, consider the game of Quick Chess1 (Figure 1). Quick Chess is

  15. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer and conformational relaxation in 4'-N,N-dimethylamino-3-hydroxyflavone doped in acetonitrile crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Kazuki; Yamamoto, Norifumi; Hino, Kazuyuki; Sekiya, Hiroshi

    2016-10-19

    The effect of intermolecular interactions on excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) in 4'-N,N-dimethylamino-3-hydroxyflavone (DMHF) doped in acetonitrile crystals was investigated by measuring its temperature dependence of steady-state fluorescence excitation and fluorescence spectra and picosecond time-resolved spectra. The relative intensity of emission from the excited state of the normal form (N*) to that from the excited state of the tautomer form (T*) and spectral features changed markedly with temperature. Unusual changes in the spectral shift and spectral features were observed in the fluorescence spectra measured between 200 and 218 K, indicating that a solid-solid phase transition of DMHF-doped acetonitrile crystals occurred. Time-resolved fluorescence spectra suggested conformational relaxation of the N* state competed with ESIPT after photoexcitation and the ESIPT rate increased with temperature in the low-temperature phase of acetonitrile. However, the intermolecular interaction of N* with acetonitrile in the high-temperature phase markedly stabilized the potential minimum of the fluorescent N* state and slowed the ESIPT. This stabilization can be explained by reorganization of acetonitrile originating from the strong electric dipole-dipole interaction between DMHF and acetonitrile molecules.

  16. Traceable calibration and demonstration of a portable dynamic force transfer standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlajic, Nicholas; Chijioke, Ako

    2017-08-01

    In general, the dynamic sensitivity of a force transducer depends upon the mechanical system in which it is used. This dependence serves as motivation to develop a dynamic force transfer standard, which can be used to calibrate an application transducer in situ. In this work, we SI-traceably calibrate a hand-held force transducer, namely an impact hammer, by using a mass suspended from a thin line which is cut to produce a known dynamic force in the form of a step function. We show that this instrument is a promising candidate as a transfer standard, since its dynamic response has small variance between different users. This calibrated transfer standard is then used to calibrate a secondary force transducer in an example application setting. The combined standard uncertainty (k  =  2) in the calibration of the transfer standard was determined to be 2.1% or less, up to a bandwidth of 5 kHz. The combined standard uncertainty (k  =  2) in the performed transfer calibration was less than 4%, up to 3 kHz. An advantage of the transfer calibration framework presented here, is that the transfer standard can be used to transfer SI-traceable calibrations without the use of any SI-traceable voltage metrology instrumentation.

  17. Electronic excitation induced hydrogen-bond adjustment and lattice control in organic-inorganic hybrid cubic perovskites: a fixed occupation molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mo-Ran; Ren, Xiang-Yang; Li, Xian-Bin; Chen, Nian-Ke; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2017-10-04

    The organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite has become a new type of semiconductor for low cost and highly efficient solar cells. However, the mechanism of interactions between the organic cation and the inorganic framework is still not completely clear under optical electronic excitation. In this work, we employ first-principles molecular dynamics with electronic excitation effects to prove that the hydrogen-bond interaction between the molecular cation and the inorganic lattice can be readily adjusted by several-percentage-valence-electron excitations in cubic CH3NH3PbI3. While the hydrogen-bond interaction causes serious lattice distortions, the electronic excitation can recover the lattice symmetry largely by weakening hydrogen bonding. The study offers atomic dynamics to understand the excitation process in the organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite semiconductor.

  18. Femtosecond dynamics of momentum-dependent magnetic excitations from resonant inelastic X-ray scattering in CaCu2O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisogni, Valentina; Kourtis, Stefanos; Monney, Claude; Zhou, Kejin; Kraus, Roberto; Sekar, Chinnathambi; Strocov, Vladimir; Büchner, Bernd; van den Brink, Jeroen; Braicovich, Lucio; Schmitt, Thorsten; Daghofer, Maria; Geck, Jochen

    2014-04-11

    Taking spinon excitations in the quantum antiferromagnet CaCu2O3 as an example, we demonstrate that femtosecond dynamics of magnetic electronic excitations can be probed by direct resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS). To this end, we isolate the contributions of single and double spin-flip excitations in experimental RIXS spectra, identify the physical mechanisms that cause them, and determine their respective time scales. By comparing theory and experiment, we find that double spin flips need a finite amount of time to be generated, rendering them sensitive to the core-hole lifetime, whereas single spin flips are, to a very good approximation, independent of it. This shows that RIXS can grant access to time-domain dynamics of excitations and illustrates how RIXS experiments can distinguish between excitations in correlated electron systems based on their different time dependence.

  19. Numerical simulation of heat transfer in microchannel using energy conservative dissipative particle dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelei Xie

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dissipative particle dynamics is a particle-based mesoscopic simulation method. Classic dissipative particle dynamics cannot be used to simulate heat transfer in fluids since the total energy of the system is not conserved. In this article, two-dimensional unsteady heat conduction is first investigated using dissipative particle dynamics with energy conservation. The energy conservative dissipative particle dynamics results are compared with the FLUENT simulation data, and it demonstrates that they are in good agreement with each other. Then, forced convection heat transfers in microchannel of the same wall temperature and different wall temperatures are simulated, respectively, by using periodic boundary condition of dimensionless temperature. The results show that the velocity, temperature, and dimensionless temperature distributions are consistent with theoretical results. Finally, we give a qualitative analysis about the applicability of the energy conservative dissipative particle dynamics approach in simulating flow and heat transfer in rough microchannel.

  20. Interplay between relativistic energy corrections and resonant excitations in x-ray multiphoton ionization dynamics of Xe atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Koudai; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we theoretically study x-ray multiphoton ionization dynamics of heavy atoms taking into account relativistic and resonance effects. When an atom is exposed to an intense x-ray pulse generated by an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL), it is ionized to a highly charged ion via a sequence of single-photon ionization and accompanying relaxation processes, and its final charge state is limited by the last ionic state that can be ionized by a single-photon ionization. If x-ray multiphoton ionization involves deep inner-shell electrons in heavy atoms, energy shifts by relativistic effects play an important role in ionization dynamics, as pointed out in Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 173005 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.173005. On the other hand, if the x-ray beam has a broad energy bandwidth, the high-intensity x-ray pulse can drive resonant photoexcitations for a broad range of ionic states and ionize even beyond the direct one-photon ionization limit, as first proposed in Nat. Photon. 6, 858 (2012), 10.1038/nphoton.2012.261. To investigate both relativistic and resonance effects, we extend the xatom toolkit to incorporate relativistic energy corrections and resonant excitations in x-ray multiphoton ionization dynamics calculations. Charge-state distributions are calculated for Xe atoms interacting with intense XFEL pulses at a photon energy of 1.5 keV and 5.5 keV, respectively. For both photon energies, we demonstrate that the role of resonant excitations in ionization dynamics is altered due to significant shifts of orbital energy levels by relativistic effects. Therefore, it is necessary to take into account both effects to accurately simulate multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics at high x-ray intensity.

  1. A novel chalcone-analogue as an optical sensor based on ground and excited states intramolecular charge transfer: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayed, Tarek A. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, 31527-Tanta (Egypt)], E-mail: tfayed2003@yahoo.co.uk

    2006-05-31

    Steady-state absorption and emission spectroscopic techniques as well as semiempirical quantum calculations at the AM1 and ZINDO/S levels have been used to investigate the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) behaviour of a novel chalcone namely; 1-(2-pyridyl)-5-(4-dimethylaminophenyl)-penta-2,4-diene-1-one, DMAC. The ground state DMAC has a significant ICT character and a great sensitivity to the hydrogen bond donating ability of the medium as reflected from the change of the absorption spectra in pure and mixed organic solvents. On the other hand, its excited singlet state exhibits high ICT characters as manifested by the drastic solvatochromic effects. These results are consistent with the data of charge density calculations in both the ground and excited state, which indicates enhancement of the charge transfer from the dimethyl-amino group to the carbonyl oxygen upon excitation. Also, the dipole moment calculations indicates a highly dipolar excited singlet state ({delta}{mu} {sub eg} = 15.5 D). The solvent dependence of the fluorescence quantum yield of DMAC was interpreted on the basis of positive and negative solvatokinetic as well as the hydrogen bonding effects. Incorporation of the 2-pyridyl group in the chemical structure of the present DMAC led to design of a potential optical sensor for probing acidity of the medium and metal cations such as Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+} and Hg{sup 2+}. This was concluded from the high acidochromic and metallochromic behaviour of DMAC on adding such cations to its acetonitrile solutions.

  2. "NONLINEAR DYNAMIC SYSTEMS RESPONSE TO NON-STATIONARY EXCITATION USING THE WAVELET TRANSFORM"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SPANOS, POL D.

    2006-01-15

    The objective of this research project has been the development of techniques for estimating the power spectra of stochastic processes using wavelet transform, and the development of related techniques for determining the response of linear/nonlinear systems to excitations which are described via the wavelet transform. Both of the objectives have been achieved, and the research findings have been disseminated in papers in archival journals and technical conferences.

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling Three-Dimensional Unsteady Turbulent Flow and Excitation Force in Partial Admission Air Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Xie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Air turbines are widely used to convert kinetic energy into power output in power engineering. The unsteady performance of air turbines with partial admission not only influences the aerodynamic performance and thermodynamic efficiency of turbine but also generates strong excitation force on blades to impair the turbine safely operating. Based on three-dimensional viscous compressible Navier-stokes equations, the present study employs RNG (Renormalization group k-ε turbulence model with finite volume discretization on air turbine with partial admission. Numerical models of four different admission rates with full annulus are built and analyzed via CFD (computational fluid dynamics modeling unsteady flows. Results indicate that the unsteady time-averaged isentropic efficiency is lower than the steady isentropic efficiency, and this difference rises as unsteady isentropic efficiency fluctuates stronger when the admission rate is reduced. The rotor axial and tangential forces with time are provided for all four admission rates. The low frequency excitation forces generated by partial admission are extraordinarily higher than the high frequency excitation forces by stator wakes.

  4. Proton transfer in 3-hydroxyflavone studied by high-resolution 10 K laser-excited Shpol'skii spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bader, A.N.; Ariese, F.; Gooijer, C.

    2002-01-01

    High-resolution 10 K Shpol'skii spectra of 3-hydroxyflavone (3HF) and its deuterated analogue (3DF) in n-octane and n-octane/octanol mixtures are presented for the first time. In pure n-octane for both 3HF and 3DF, well-resolved excitation and emission spectra were observed, showing fluorescence

  5. Development of dynamic response analysis algorithm for beam structures using transfer of mass coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, M. S.; Yeo, D. J.; Byun, J. H.; Suh, J. J.; Yang, J. K. [Chonnam National University, Yeosu (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    The authors developed the transfer mass coefficient method (TMCM) in order to compute effectively the dynamic response of a beam structure. In this paper, the algorithm for the dynamic response analysis of a three-dimensional beam structure is formulated. Through the computation results of numerical models, which are plane and space beam structures, obtained by the transfer mass coefficient method and the direct integration method, we verify that the transfer mass coefficient method can remarkably decrease the computation time of the direct integration method without the loss of accuracy in spite of using small computer storage

  6. Numerical Study of Current-Induced Domain-Wall Dynamics: Crossover from Spin Transfer to Momentum Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Daisuke; Udagawa, Masafumi; Ogata, Masao

    2009-03-01

    We study current-induced dynamics of a magnetic domain wall by solving a time-dependent Schrödinger equation combined with Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation in a one-dimensional electron system coupled to localized spins. Two types of domain-wall motions are observed depending on the hard-axis anisotropy, K\\bot, of the localized spin system. For small values of K\\bot, the magnetic domain wall shows a streaming motion driven by spin transfer. In contrast, for large values of K\\bot, a stick-slip motion driven by momentum transfer is obtained. We clarify the origin of these characters of domain-wall motions in terms of the dynamics of one-particle energy levels and distribution functions.

  7. Velocity dependence of the interocular transfer of dynamic motion afteraffects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, R.; Lankheet, M.J.M.; van de Grind, W.A.V.; Wezel, R.J.A. van

    2002-01-01

    It is well established that motion aftereffects (MAEs) can show interocular transfer (IOT); that is, motion adaptation in one eye can give a MAE in the other eye. Different quantification methods and different test stimuli have been shown to give different IOT magnitudes, varying from no to almost

  8. Velocity dependence of the interocular transfer of dynamic motion aftereffects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, R.; Lankheet, M.J.M.; Wezel, R.J.A. van

    2003-01-01

    It is well established that motion aftereffects (MAEs) can show interocular transfer (IOT); that is, motion adaptation in one eye can give a MAE in the other eye. Different quantification methods and different test stimuli have been shown to give different IOT magnitudes, varying from no to almost

  9. Effect of CH stretching excitation on the reaction dynamics of F + CHD{sub 3} → DF + CHD{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jiayue; Zhang, Dong; Chen, Zhen; Jiang, Bo [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Blauert, Florian [Dynamics at Surfaces, Faculty of Chemistry, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Dai, Dongxu; Wu, Guorong, E-mail: wugr@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: xmyang@dicp.ac.cn; Zhang, Donghui; Yang, Xueming, E-mail: wugr@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: xmyang@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2015-07-28

    The vibrationally excited reaction of F + CHD{sub 3}(ν{sub 1} = 1) → DF + CHD{sub 2} at a collision energy of 9.0 kcal/mol is investigated using the crossed-beams and time-sliced velocity map imaging techniques. Detailed and quantitative information of the CH stretching excitation effects on the reactivity and dynamics of the title reaction is extracted with the help of an accurate determination of the fraction of the excited CHD{sub 3} reagent in the crossed-beam region. It is found that all vibrational states of the CHD{sub 2} products observed in the ground-state reaction, which mainly involve the excitation of the umbrella mode of the CHD{sub 2} products, are severely suppressed by the CH stretching excitation. However, there are four additional vibrational states of the CHD{sub 2} products appearing in the excited-state reaction which are not presented in the ground-state reaction. These vibrational states either have the CH stretching excitation retained or involve one quantum excitation in the CH stretching and the excitation of the umbrella mode. Including all observed vibrational states, the overall cross section of the excited-state reaction is estimated to be 66.6% of that of the ground-state one. Experimental results also show that when the energy of CH stretching excitation is released during the reaction, it is deposited almost exclusively as the rovibrational energy of the DF products, with little portion in the translational degree of freedom. For vibrational states of the CHD{sub 2} products observed in both ground- and excited-state reactions, the CH stretching excitation greatly suppresses the forward scattered products, causing a noticeable change in the product angular distributions.

  10. Hydrated Electron Transfer to Nucleobases in Aqueous Solutions Revealed by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Mei; Fu, Aiyun; Yang, Hongfang; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-08-03

    We present an ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation study into the transfer dynamics of an excess electron from its cavity-shaped hydrated electron state to a hydrated nucleobase (NB)-bound state. In contrast to the traditional view that electron localization at NBs (G/A/C/T), which is the first step for electron-induced DNA damage, is related only to dry or prehydrated electrons, and a fully hydrated electron no longer transfers to NBs, our AIMD simulations indicate that a fully hydrated electron can still transfer to NBs. We monitored the transfer dynamics of fully hydrated electrons towards hydrated NBs in aqueous solutions by using AIMD simulations and found that due to solution-structure fluctuation and attraction of NBs, a fully hydrated electron can transfer to a NB gradually over time. Concurrently, the hydrated electron cavity gradually reorganizes, distorts, and even breaks. The transfer could be completed in about 120-200 fs in four aqueous NB solutions, depending on the electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs and the structural fluctuation of the solution. The transferring electron resides in the π*-type lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the NB, which leads to a hydrated NB anion. Clearly, the observed transfer of hydrated electrons can be attributed to the strong electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs over the hydrated electron cavity, which is the driving force, and the transfer dynamics is structure-fluctuation controlled. This work provides new insights into the evolution dynamics of hydrated electrons and provides some helpful information for understanding the DNA-damage mechanism in solution. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Semi-analytical approach to modelling the dynamic behaviour of soil excited by embedded foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucinskas, Paulius; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard

    2017-01-01

    The underlying soil has a significant effect on the dynamic behaviour of structures. The paper proposes a semi-analytical approach based on a Green’s function solution in frequency–wavenumber domain. The procedure allows calculating the dynamic stiffness for points on the soil surface as well...

  12. Dynamic-Stark-effect-induced coherent mixture of virtual paths in laser-dressed helium: energetic electron impact excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agueny, Hicham; Makhoute, Abdelkader; Dubois, Alain

    2017-06-01

    We theoretically investigate quantum virtual path interference caused by the dynamic Stark effect in bound-bound electronic transitions. The effect is studied in an intermediate resonant region and in connection with the energetic electron impact excitation of a helium atom embedded in a weak low-frequency laser field. The process under investigation is dealt with via a Born-Floquet approach. Numerical calculations show a resonant feature in laser-assisted cross sections. The latter is found to be sensitive to the intensity of the laser field dressing. We show that this feature is a signature of quantum beats which result from the coherent mixture of different quantum virtual pathways, and that excitation may follow in order to end up with a common final channel. This mixture arises from the dynamic Stark effect, which produces a set of avoided crossings in laser-dressed states. The effect allows one to coherently control quantum virtual path interference by varying the intensity of the laser field dressing. Our findings suggest that the combination of an energetic electron and a weak laser field is a useful tool for the coherent control of nonadiabatic transitions in an intermediate resonant region.

  13. Chemical Reactivity Dynamics and Quantum Chaos in Highly Excited Hydrogen Atoms in an External Field: A Quantum Potential Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Maiti

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Dynamical behavior of chemical reactivity indices like electronegativity, hardness, polarizability, electrophilicity and nucleophilicity indices is studied within a quantum fluid density functional framework for the interactions of a hydrogen atom in its ground electronic state (n = 1 and an excited electronic state (n = 20 with monochromatic and bichromatic laser pulses. Time dependent analogues of various electronic structure principles like the principles of electronegativity equalization, maximum hardness, minimum polarizability and maximum entropy have been found to be operative. Insights into the variation of intensities of the generated higher order harmonics on the color of the external laser field are obtained. The quantum signature of chaos in hydrogen atom has been studied using a quantum theory of motion and quantum fluid dynamics. A hydrogen atom in the electronic ground state (n = 1 and in an excited electronic state ( n = 20 behaves differently when placed in external oscillating monochromatic and bichromatic electric fields. Temporal evolutions of Shannon entropy, quantum Lyapunov exponent and Kolmogorov – Sinai entropy defined in terms of the distance between two initially close Bohmian trajectories for these two cases show marked differences. It appears that a larger uncertainty product and a smaller hardness value signal a chaotic behavior.

  14. Dynamic Raman Line Shapes on an Evolving Excited-State Landscape: Insights from Tunable Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscar, Breland G; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Weimin; Zhu, Liangdong; Fang, Chong

    2017-07-27

    Tracking molecular motions in real time remains a formidable challenge in science and engineering fields because the experimental methodology requires simultaneously high spatial and temporal resolutions. Building on early successes and future potential of femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) as a structural dynamics technique, we present a comprehensive study of stimulated Raman line shapes of a photosensitive molecule in solution with tunable Raman pump and probe pulses. Following femtosecond 400 nm electronic excitation, the model photoacid pyranine exhibits dynamic and mode-dependent Raman line shapes when the Raman pump is tuned from the red side toward and across the excited-state absorption (ESA) band (e.g., from S1) with varying resonance conditions. On the anti-Stokes FSRS side, low-frequency modes below ∼1000 cm-1 exhibit a line shape change from gain to dispersive to loss, whereas the dispersive intermediate is much less notable for high-frequency modes. The characteristic mode frequency blue shift involving vibrationally hot states in S1 with time constants of ∼9.6 and 58.6 ps reveals the sensitivity of anti-Stokes FSRS to vibrational cooling and solvation. This work lays the foundation for expanding tunable FSRS technology on both the Stokes and anti-Stokes sides to investigate a variety of photoinduced processes in solution with sufficient resolution to expose functional motions and increased sensitivity to monitor vibrational cooling.

  15. Three-body recombination and dynamics of electrons and excited states in the low-pressure argon afterglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsankov, Tsanko Vaskov; Johnsen, Rainer; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2016-09-01

    The afterglow phase occurs naturally during the power-off period in pulsed low-pressure plasmas and in atmospheric pressure ns discharges. During that period the electron energy rapidly declines and the charged particles are lost due to diffusion and recombination. In low-pressure discharges the dominant process is three-body recombination (TBR) of Ar+ ions with electrons. It leads to complex dynamics of the excited states, dominated by collisional-radiative cascades that eventually repopulate the metastable states. In this contribution the afterglow dynamics of an argon discharge is analyzed in detail to elucidate the roles played by the various processes. An analytical model for the fast drop of the electron energy by evaporative cooling and electron-ion collisions is combined with a time-dependent collisional radiative model for the atomic excited states that numerically solves the electron energy and density balance equations. By including further gas heating and cooling, the model leads to excellent agreement with experiments utilizing different diagnostic techniques, and hence gives insight into the interplay of the various processes in the afterglow. Work Supported by the DFG (Grant No. TS 307/1-1).

  16. Molecular-dynamics simulations of the dynamical excitations in commensurate submonolayer films of nitrogen molecules on graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Bruch, Ludwig Walter; Taub, H.

    1996-01-01

    The dynamics of commensurate submonolayer solids of N-2 molecules adsorbed on the basal planes of graphite have been studied using molecular-dynamics simulations. The calculations yielded the temperature dependence of the Brillouin-zone-center gap in the acoustic-phonon branches, for comparison...

  17. Experimental study of dynamic effects in moisture transfer in building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssen, Hans; Scheffler, Gregor Albrecht; Plagge, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    of the moisture transfer processes involved. The available evidence primarily stems from imbibition and drainage experiments on soils however, and compared to many other porous media, these tests consider rather permeable materials with relatively dominant liquid transport at comparatively large (de...... in building materials. Drying and ad-/desorption tests are executed on two building materials, in which moisture contents and moisture potentials are measured simultaneously. These are translated into dynamic retention relations and dynamic storage coefficients, which both distinctly demonstrate that moisture...... transfer in building materials, similar to moisture transfer in soils, is not free of dynamic effects. The findings imply that the widely accepted static theory for moisture storage in porous media is not generally valid and should be corrected for the occurrences of dynamic effects. Considering...

  18. Wind-excited vibrations - Solution by passive dynamic vibration absorbers of different types

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fischer, Ondřej

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 95, 9-11 (2007), s. 1028-1039 ISSN 0167-6105. [EACWE 4. Praha, 11.07.2005-15.07.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200710505; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA2071401; GA ČR(CZ) GA103/06/0099 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : wind-excited vibrations * slender structures * vibration absorption Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering Impact factor: 0.959, year: 2007

  19. The influence of the excitation pulse length on ultrafast magnetization dynamics in nickel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fognini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The laser-induced demagnetization of a ferromagnet is caused by the temperature of the electron gas as well as the lattice temperature. For long excitation pulses, the two reservoirs are in thermal equilibrium. In contrast to a picosecond laser pulse, a femtosecond pulse causes a non-equilibrium between the electron gas and the lattice. By pump pulse length dependent optical measurements, we find that the magnetodynamics in Ni caused by a picosecond laser pulse can be reconstructed from the response to a femtosecond pulse. The mechanism responsible for demagnetization on the picosecond time scale is therefore contained in the femtosecond demagnetization experiment.

  20. The dynamic regulation of cortical excitability is altered in episodic ataxia type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmich, Rick C; Siebner, Hartwig R; Giffin, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    Episodic ataxia type 2 and familial hemiplegic migraine are two rare hereditary disorders that are linked to dysfunctional ion channels and are characterized clinically by paroxysmal neurological symptoms. Impaired regulation of cerebral excitability is thought to play a role in the occurrence...... of these paroxysms, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Normal ion channels are crucial for coordinating neuronal firing in response to facilitatory input. Thus, we hypothesized that channel dysfunction in episodic ataxia type 2 and familial hemiplegic migraine may impair the ability to adjust...... set the stage for the emergence of paroxysmal neural dysfunction in this disorder....

  1. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics in biological and in organised environments

    OpenAIRE

    Fürstenberg, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    La dynamique d'états excités de sondes fluorescentes placées dans des environnements biologiques et organisés a été étudiée par spectroscopie optique stationnaire et par spectroscopie laser femtoseconde. En particulier, l'influence de tels environnements sur des processus ultrarapides tels que la solvatation, la relaxation vibrationnelle, l'inhibition de fluorescence et la dépolarisation de fluorescence a été suivie. Les systèmes étudiés sont : ( 1) les protéines avidine et streptavidine au l...

  2. Coherent Dynamics of Mixed Frenkel and Charge-Transfer Excitons in Dinaphtho[2,3-b:2'3'-f]thieno[3,2-b]-thiophene Thin Films: The Importance of Hole Delocalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Takatoshi; Atahan-Evrenk, Sule; Sawaya, Nicolas P D; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2016-04-07

    Charge-transfer states in organic semiconductors play crucial roles in processes such as singlet fission and exciton dissociation at donor/acceptor interfaces. Recently, a time-resolved spectroscopy study of dinaphtho[2,3-b:2'3'-f]thieno[3,2-b]-thiophene (DNTT) thin films provided evidence for the formation of mixed Frenkel and charge-transfer excitons after the photoexcitation. Here, we investigate optical properties and excitation dynamics of the DNTT thin films by combining ab initio calculations and a stochastic Schrödinger equation. Our theory predicts that the low-energy Frenkel exciton band consists of 8-47% CT character. The quantum dynamics simulations show coherent dynamics of Frenkel and CT states in 50 fs after the optical excitation. We demonstrate the role of charge delocalization and localization in the mixing of CT states with Frenkel excitons as well as the role of their decoherence.

  3. State-To Rotational and Vibrational Energy Transfers Following Vibrational Excitation of (1010000) and (0112000) in the Ground Electronic State of Acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiande; Freel, Keith; Heaven, Michael C.

    2011-06-01

    We have examined state-to-state rotational and vibrational energy transfers for the vibrational levels (1010000) and (0112000) of C2H2 in the ground electronic state at ambient temperature. Measurements were made using a pulsed IR - UV double resonance technique. Total removal rate constants and state-to-state rotational energy transfer rate constants have been characterized for certain even-numbered rotational levels from J = 0 to 12 within the two vibrational modes. The measured state-to-state rotational energy transfer rate constants were fit to some energy-based empirical scaling and fitting laws, and the rate constants were found to be best reproduced by the statistical power-exponential gap law (PEGL). The measured rate constants were then further evaluated by a kinetic model which simulated the experimental spectra by solving simultaneous first order differential rate equations. Some rotationally-resolved vibrational energy transfer channels were also observed following excitation of (1010000). The vibrational relaxation channels were found to contribute less than 30% to the total removal rate constants of the measured rotational levels for both of the studied vibrational states.

  4. Resonance Raman examination of the electronic excited states of glycylglycine and other dipeptides: Observation of a carboxylate{yields}amide charge transfer transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X.G.; Li, P.; Holtz, J.S.W.; Chi, Z.; Pajcini, V.; Asher, S.A. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kelly, L.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-10-09

    We have examined the UV resonance Raman and the VUV absorption spectra of aqueous glycylglycine and other dipeptides. We observe strong resonance Raman enhancement of the amide I, II, and III bands and the amide C{sub {alpha}}H bending mode in a manner similar to that we observed previously with excitation within the {pi}{yields}{pi}{sup *} transition of N-methylacetamide. However, in addition, we observe strong resonance Raman enhancement of the ca. 1400 cm{sup -1} symmetric COO{sup -} stretching vibration, whose 206.5 nm Raman cross section is increased 20-fold compared to that of the carboxylate in sodium acetate, for example. Addition of a methylene spacer between the amide and carboxylate groups causes the resonance Raman enhancement of this symmetric COO{sup -} stretch to disappear. The UV resonance Raman excitation profiles, the Raman depolarization ratio dispersion, and the VUV absorption spectra of glycylglycine and other dipeptides demonstrate the existence of a new 197 nm charge transfer band which involves electron transfer from a nonbonding carboxylate orbital to the amide-like {pi}{sup *} orbital. This transition occurs at the penultimate carboxylate end of all peptides and proteins. 18 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. The Study of Dynamical Potentials of Highly Excited Vibrational States of HOBr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Fang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The vibrational nonlinear dynamics of HOBr in the bending and O–Br stretching coordinates with anharmonicity and Fermi 2:1 coupling are studied with dynamical potentials in this article. The result shows that the H–O stretching vibration mode has significantly different effects on the coupling between the O–Br stretching mode and the H–O–Br bending mode under different Polyad numbers. The dynamical potentials and the corresponding phase space trajectories are obtained when the Polyad number is 27, for instance, and the fixed points in the dynamical potentials of HOBr are shown to govern the various quantal environments in which the vibrational states lie. Furthermore, it is also found that the quantal environments could be identified by the numerical values of action integrals, which is consistent with former research.

  6. Parallel Dynamic Analysis of a Large-Scale Water Conveyance Tunnel under Seismic Excitation Using ALE Finite-Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Parallel analyses about the dynamic responses of a large-scale water conveyance tunnel under seismic excitation are presented in this paper. A full three-dimensional numerical model considering the water-tunnel-soil coupling is established and adopted to investigate the tunnel’s dynamic responses. The movement and sloshing of the internal water are simulated using the multi-material Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE method. Nonlinear fluid–structure interaction (FSI between tunnel and inner water is treated by using the penalty method. Nonlinear soil-structure interaction (SSI between soil and tunnel is dealt with by using the surface to surface contact algorithm. To overcome computing power limitations and to deal with such a large-scale calculation, a parallel algorithm based on the modified recursive coordinate bisection (MRCB considering the balance of SSI and FSI loads is proposed and used. The whole simulation is accomplished on Dawning 5000 A using the proposed MRCB based parallel algorithm optimized to run on supercomputers. The simulation model and the proposed approaches are validated by comparison with the added mass method. Dynamic responses of the tunnel are analyzed and the parallelism is discussed. Besides, factors affecting the dynamic responses are investigated. Better speedup and parallel efficiency show the scalability of the parallel method and the analysis results can be used to aid in the design of water conveyance tunnels.

  7. Decay dynamics of nascent acetonitrile and nitromethane dipole-bound anions produced by intracluster charge-transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yandell, Margaret A.; King, Sarah B. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Neumark, Daniel M., E-mail: dneumark@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-05-14

    Decay dynamics of nascent dipole bound states of acetonitrile and nitromethane are examined using time-resolved photoelectron imaging of iodide-acetonitrile (I{sup −}·CH{sub 3}CN) and iodide-nitromethane (I{sup −}·CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}) complexes. Dipole-bound anions are created by UV-initiated electron transfer to the molecule of interest from the associated iodide ion at energies just below the vertical detachment energy of the halide-molecule complex. The acetonitrile anion is observed to decay biexponentially with time constants in the range of 4–900 ps. In contrast, the dipole bound state of nitromethane decays rapidly over 400 fs to form the valence bound anion. The nitromethane valence anion species then decays biexponentially with time constants of 2 ps and 1200 ps. The biexponential decay dynamics in acetonitrile are interpreted as iodine atom loss and autodetachment from the excited dipole-bound anion, followed by slower autodetachment of the relaxed metastable ion, while the dynamics of the nitromethane system suggest that a dipole-bound anion to valence anion transition proceeds via intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution to nitro group modes in the vicinity of the iodine atom.

  8. Excited-State Dynamics of the Thiopurine Prodrug 6-Thioguanine: Can N9-Glycosylation Affect Its Phototoxic Activity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brennan Ashwood

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available 6-Thioguanine, an immunosuppressant and anticancer prodrug, has been shown to induce DNA damage and cell death following exposure to UVA radiation. Its metabolite, 6-thioguanosine, plays a major role in the prodrug’s overall photoreactivity. However, 6-thioguanine itself has proven to be cytotoxic following UVA irradiation, warranting further investigation into its excited-state dynamics. In this contribution, the excited-state dynamics and photochemical properties of 6-thioguanine are studied in aqueous solution following UVA excitation at 345 nm in order to provide mechanistic insight regarding its photochemical reactivity and to scrutinize whether N9-glycosylation modulates its phototoxicity in solution. The experimental results are complemented with time-dependent density functional calculations that include solvent dielectric effects by means of a reaction-field solvation model. UVA excitation results in the initial population of the S2(ππ* state, which is followed by ultrafast internal conversion to the S1(nπ* state and then intersystem crossing to the triplet manifold within 560 ± 60 fs. A small fraction (ca. 25% of the population that reaches the S1(nπ* state repopulates the ground state. The T1(ππ* state decays to the ground state in 1.4 ± 0.2 μs under N2-purged conditions, using a 0.2 mM concentration of 6-thioguanine, or it can sensitize singlet oxygen in 0.21 ± 0.02 and 0.23 ± 0.02 yields in air- and O2-saturated solution, respectively. This demonstrates the efficacy of 6-thioguanine to act as a Type II photosensitizer. N9-glycosylation increases the rate of intersystem crossing from the singlet to triplet manifold, as well as from the T1(ππ* state to the ground state, which lead to a ca. 40% decrease in the singlet oxygen yield under air-saturated conditions. Enhanced vibronic coupling between the singlet and triplet manifolds due to a higher density of vibrational states is proposed to be responsible for the observed

  9. Non-Markovian reduced dynamics of ultrafast charge transfer at an oligothiophene–fullerene heterojunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Keith H., E-mail: keith.hughes@bangor.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Cahier, Benjamin [School of Chemistry, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Martinazzo, Rocco [Dipartimento di Chimica Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Tamura, Hiroyuki [WPI-Advanced Institute for Material Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Burghardt, Irene [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 7, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2014-10-17

    Highlights: • Quantum dynamical study of exciton dissociation at a heterojunction interface. • The non-Markovian quantum dynamics involves a highly structured spectral density. • Spectral density is reconstructed from an effective mode transformation of the Hamiltonian. • The dynamics is studied using the hierarchical equations of motion approach. • It was found that the temperature has little effect on the charge transfer. - Abstract: We extend our recent quantum dynamical study of the exciton dissociation and charge transfer at an oligothiophene–fullerene heterojunction interface (Tamura et al., 2012) [6] by investigating the process using the non-perturbative hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) approach. Based upon an effective mode reconstruction of the spectral density the effect of temperature on the charge transfer is studied using reduced density matrices. It was found that the temperature had little effect on the charge transfer and a coherent dynamics persists over the first few tens of femtoseconds, indicating that the primary charge transfer step proceeds by an activationless pathway.

  10. Dynamic monitoring of horizontal gene transfer in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, H. Y.; Masiello, C. A.; Silberg, J. J.; Bennett, G. N.

    2015-12-01

    Soil microbial gene expression underlies microbial behaviors (phenotypes) central to many aspects of C, N, and H2O cycling. However, continuous monitoring of microbial gene expression in soils is challenging because genetically-encoded reporter proteins widely used in the lab are difficult to deploy in soil matrices: for example, green fluorescent protein cannot be easily visualized in soils, even in the lab. To address this problem we have developed a reporter protein that releases small volatile gases. Here, we applied this gas reporter in a proof-of-concept soil experiment, monitoring horizontal gene transfer, a microbial activity that alters microbial genotypes and phenotypes. Horizontal gene transfer is central to bacterial evolution and adaptation and is relevant to problems such as the spread of antibiotic resistance, increasing metal tolerance in superfund sites, and bioremediation capability of bacterial consortia. This process is likely to be impacted by a number of matrix properties not well-represented in the petri dish, such as microscale variations in water, nutrients, and O2, making petri-dish experiments a poor proxy for environmental processes. We built a conjugation system using synthetic biology to demonstrate the use of gas-reporting biosensors in safe, lab-based biogeochemistry experiments, and here we report the use of these sensors to monitor horizontal gene transfer in soils. Our system is based on the F-plasmid conjugation in Escherichia coli. We have found that the gas signal reports on the number of cells that acquire F-plasmids (transconjugants) in a loamy Alfisol collected from Kellogg Biological Station. We will report how a gas signal generated by transconjugants varies with the number of F-plasmid donor and acceptor cells seeded in a soil, soil moisture, and soil O2 levels.

  11. Structural and dynamical aspects of skin studied by multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy-based methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Bagatolli, Luis

    2013-01-01

    This mini-review reports on applications of particular multiphoton excitation microscopy-based methodologies employed in our laboratory to study skin. These approaches allow in-depth optical sectioning of the tissue, providing spatially resolved information on specific fluorescence probes......' parameters. Specifically, by applying these methods, spatially resolved maps of water dipolar relaxation (generalized polarization function using the 6-lauroyl-2-(N,N-dimethylamino)naphthale probe), activity of protons (fluorescence lifetime imaging using a proton sensitive fluorescence probe--2,7-bis-(2......-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein) and diffusion coefficients of distinct fluorescence probes (raster imaging correlation spectroscopy) can be obtained from different regions of the tissue. Comparative studies of different tissue strata, but also between equivalent regions of normal and abnormal...

  12. Structural concerns in dynamic drop loads on transfer lock mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Moran, T.J.; Kulak, R.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Reactor Engineering Div.

    1997-07-01

    Drop loads are usually low probability events that can generate substantial loading to the impacted structures. When the impacted structure contains slender elements, the concern about dynamic buckling must be addressed. The problem of interest here is a structure is also under significant preload, which must be taken into account in the transient analysis. For complex structures, numerical simulations are the only viable option for assessing the transient response to short duration impactive loads. this paper addresses several analysis issues of preloaded structures with slender members subjected to drop loads. A three-dimensional beam element is validated for use in dynamic buckling analysis. the numerical algorithm used to solve the transient response of preloaded structures is discussed. The methodology is applied to an inter-compartment lock that is under significant preloads, and subjected to a drop load.

  13. Cavitation Bubble Dynamics in Ammoniacal Fluids Transferred by Centrifugal Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Reyes-Cruz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An experiment with water and ammoniacal liquor at 27% and 34% concentrations of ammonia was carried out in order to determine the pressure dynamics during the formation of bubbles and their movement when causing cavitations in centrifugal pumps. The dynamics of bubbles was calculated numerically by applying the Rayleigh-Plesset equation using the bubble radius and the bubble build-up time. It is concluded that the pressure to form the bubbles at 22 ºC is 10,135.103 Pa for water and 45,468.103 Pa for the ammoniacal liquor at a concentration of 34 %. The radius of the bubbles found in ammoniacal liquor is in the range of 30 to 120 times the original bubble radius while the bubbles formed in water are only in the range of 15 times the original radius value.

  14. Energy transfer processes in solar energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayer, M.D.

    1986-11-01

    By combining picosecond optical experiments and detailed statistical mechanics theory we continue to increase our understanding of the complex interplay of structure and dynamics in important energy transfer situations. A number of different types of problems will be focused on experimentally and theoretically. They are excitation transport among chromophores attached to finite size polymer coils; excitation transport among chromophores in monolayers, bilayers, and finite and infinite stacks of layers; excitation transport in large vesicle systems; and photoinduced electron transfer in glasses and liquids, focusing particularly on the back transfer of the electron from the photogenerated radical anion to the radical cation. 33 refs., 13 figs.

  15. Qualitative assessment of ultra-fast non-Grotthuss proton dynamics in S1 excited state of liquid H2O from ab initio time-dependent density functional theory★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaei, Vafa; Bredow, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    We study qualitatively ultra-fast proton transfer (PT) in the first singlet (S1) state of liquid water (absorption onset) through excited-state dynamics by means of time-dependent density functional theory and ab initio Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. We find that after the initial excitation, a PT occurs in S1 in form of a rapid jump to a neighboring water molecule, on which the proton either may rest for a relatively long period of time (as a consequence of possible defect in the hydrogen bond network) followed by back and forth hops to its neighboring water molecule or from which it further moves to the next water molecule accompanied by back and forth movements. In this way, the proton may become delocalized over a long water wire branch, followed again by back and forth jumps or short localization on a water molecule for some femtoseconds. As a result, the mechanism of PT in S1 is in most cases highly non-Grotthuss-like, delayed and discrete. Furthermore, upon PT an excess charge is ejected to the solvent trap, the so-called solvated electron. The spatial extent of the ejected solvated electron is mainly localized within one solvent shell with overlappings on the nearest neighbor water molecules and delocalizing (diffuse) tails extending beyond the first solvent sphere. During the entire ultra-short excited-state dynamics the remaining OH radical from the initially excited water molecule exhibits an extremely low mobility and is non-reactive. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2017-80329-7.

  16. General coordination principles elucidated by forward dynamics: minimum fatique does not explain muscle excitation in dynamic tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautz, S A; Neptune, R R; Zajac, F E

    2000-01-01

    The target article presents a framework for coordination of one- and two-joint muscles in a variety of tasks. Static optimization analyses were performed that minimize muscle fatigue, and it is claimed that the predicted muscle forces account for essential features of EMG activity qualitatively well. However, static optimization analyses use the observed joint moments, which implicitly assumes that they minimize the total muscle fatigue of the task. We use a forward dynamics (i.e., relationship between muscle forces and the kinematics and kinetics of task performance) modeling approach to show that this assumption does not appear to be true in cycling (which was used as an example task in the target article). Our results challenge the hypothesized coordination framework and the underlying concept that general coordination principles for dynamic tasks can be elucidated using inverse-dynamics-based analyses.

  17. On the importance of excited state dynamic response electron correlation in polarizable embedding methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Janus J.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Mikkelsen, Kurt Valentin

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the effect of including a dynamic reaction field at the lowest possible ab inito wave function level of theory, namely the Hartree-Fock (HF) Self-Consistent Field (SCF) level within the Polarizable Embedding (PE) formalism. We formulate HF based PE within the linear response theory...

  18. Nonlinear dynamics of soft fermion excitations in hot QCD plasma I: soft-quark - soft-gluon scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Markov, Yu. A.; Markova, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    Within the framework of the hard thermal loop effective theory we derive a system of Boltzmann-like kinetic equations taking into account the simplest processes of nonlinear interaction of soft fermionic and bosonic QCD plasma excitations: elastic scattering of soft-(anti)quark excitations off soft-gluon and soft-quark excitations, pair production of soft quark-antiquark excitations, annihilation into two soft-gluon excitations. The matrix elements of these processes to leading order in the c...

  19. Evidence that the cortical motor command for the initiation of dynamic plantarflexion consists of excitation followed by inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Taube

    Full Text Available At the onset of dynamic movements excitation of the motor cortex (M1 is spatially restricted to areas representing the involved muscles whereas adjacent areas are inhibited. The current study elucidates whether the cortical motor command for dynamic contractions is also restricted to a certain population of cortical neurons responsible for the fast corticospinal projections. Therefore, corticospinal transmission was assessed with high temporal resolution during dynamic contractions after both, magnetic stimulation over M1 and the brainstem. The high temporal resolution could be obtained by conditioning the soleus H-reflex with different interstimulus intervals by cervicomedullary stimulation (CMS-conditioning and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS of M1 (M1-conditioning. This technique provides a precise time course of facilitation and inhibition. CMS- and M1-conditioning produced an 'early facilitation' of the H-reflex, which occurred around 3 ms earlier with CMS-conditioning. The early facilitation is believed to be caused by activation of direct monosynaptic projections to the spinal motoneurons. CMS-conditioning resulted in a subsequent 'late facilitation', which is considered to reflect activity of slow-conducting and/or indirect corticospinal pathways. In contrast, M1-conditioning produced a 'late dis-facilitation' or even 'late inhibition'. As the late dis-facilitation was only seen following M1- but not CMS-conditioning, it is argued that cortical activation during dynamic tasks is restricted to fast, direct corticospinal projections whereas corticomotoneurons responsible for slow and/or indirectly projecting corticospinal pathways are inhibited. The functional significance of restricting the descending cortical drive to fast corticospinal pathways may be to ensure a temporally focused motor command during the execution of dynamic movements.

  20. Frequency Splitting Elimination and Cross-Coupling Rejection of Wireless Power Transfer to Multiple Dynamic Receivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanamoorthi R.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous power transfer to multiple receiver (Rx system is one of the key advantages of wireless power transfer (WPT system using magnetic resonance. However, determining the optimal condition to uniformly transfer the power to a selected Rx at high efficiency is the challenging task under the dynamic environment. The cross-coupling and frequency splitting are the dominant issues present in the multiple Rx dynamic WPT system. The existing analysis is performed by considering any one issue present in the system; on the other hand, the cross coupling and frequency splitting issues are interrelated in dynamic Rx’s, which requires a comprehensive design strategy by considering both the problems. This paper proposes an optimal design of multiple Rx WPT system, which can eliminate cross coupling, frequency splitting issues and increase the power transfer efficiency (PTE of selected Rx. The cross-coupling rejection, uniform power transfer is performed by adding an additional relay coil and independent resonance frequency tuning with capacitive compensation to each Rx unit. The frequency splitting phenomena are eliminated using non-identical transmitter (Tx and Rx coil structure which can maintain the coupling between the coil under the critical coupling limit. The mathematical analysis of the compensation capacitance calculation and optimal Tx coil size identification is performed for the four Rx WPT system. Finite element analysis and experimental investigation are carried out for the proposed design in static and dynamic conditions.

  1. STUDY OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC STABILITY OF THIN-WALLED BARS EXCITED BY PERIODICAL AXIAL EXTERNAL FORCES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minodora Maria PASĂRE

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In these paper, starting from the relations for the displacements and spinning the transversal section of a bar with thin walls of sections opened expressed by the corresponding influence functions and introducing the components of the exterior forces distributed and the moments of the exterior forces distributed due to the inertia forces, the exciting axial forces together with the following effect of these and of the reaction forces of the elastic environment for leaning it may reach to the system of the equations of parametric vibrations under the form of three integral equation These equations may serve for the study of vibrations of the bars, to study the static stability and to study the dynamic stability

  2. Collective excitations in liquid DMSO : FIR spectrum, Low frequency vibrational density of states and ultrafast dipolar solvation dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hazra, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Valuable dynamical and structural information about neat liquid DMSO at ambient conditions can be obtained through study of low frequency vibrations in the far infrared (FIR), that is, terahertz regime. For DMSO, collective excitations as well as single molecule stretches and bends have been measured by different kinds of experiments such as OHD-RIKES and terahertz spectroscopy. In the present work we investigate the intermolecular vibrational spectrum of DMSO through three different computational techniques namely (i) the far-infra red spectrum obtained through Fourier transform of total dipole moment auto time correlation function, (ii) from Fourier transform of the translational and angular velocity time autocorrelation functions and a (iii) quenched normal mode analysis of the parent liquid at 300K. The three spectrum, although exhibit differences among each other, reveal similar features which are in good, semi-quantitative, agreement with experimental results. Study of participation ratio of the density...

  3. Relationship of femtosecond-picosecond dynamics to enzyme-catalyzed H-transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatum, Christopher M; Kohen, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    At physiological temperatures, enzymes exhibit a broad spectrum of conformations, which interchange via thermally activated dynamics. These conformations are sampled differently in different complexes of the protein and its ligands, and the dynamics of exchange between these conformers depends on the mass of the group that is moving and the length scale of the motion, as well as restrictions imposed by the globular fold of the enzymatic complex. Many of these motions have been examined and their role in the enzyme function illuminated, yet most experimental tools applied so far have identified dynamics at time scales of seconds to nanoseconds, which are much slower than the time scale for H-transfer between two heavy atoms. This chemical conversion and other processes involving cleavage of covalent bonds occur on picosecond to femtosecond time scales, where slower processes mask both the kinetics and dynamics. Here we present a combination of kinetic and spectroscopic methods that may enable closer examination of the relationship between enzymatic C-H → C transfer and the dynamics of the active site environment at the chemically relevant time scale. These methods include kinetic isotope effects and their temperature dependence, which are used to study the kinetic nature of the H-transfer, and 2D IR spectroscopy, which is used to study the dynamics of transition-state- and ground-state-analog complexes. The combination of these tools is likely to provide a new approach to examine the protein dynamics that directly influence the chemical conversion catalyzed by enzymes.

  4. Producing coherent excitations in pumped Mott antiferromagnetic insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Claassen, Martin; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2017-12-01

    Nonequilibrium dynamics in correlated materials has attracted attention due to the possibility of characterizing, tuning, and creating complex ordered states. To understand the photoinduced microscopic dynamics, especially the linkage under realistic pump conditions between transient states and remnant elementary excitations, we performed nonperturbative simulations of various time-resolved spectroscopies. We used the Mott antiferromagnetic insulator as a model platform. The transient dynamics of multiparticle excitations can be attributed to the interplay between Floquet virtual states and a modification of the density of states, in which interactions induce a spectral weight transfer. Using an autocorrelation of the time-dependent spectral function, we show that resonance of the virtual states with the upper Hubbard band in the Mott insulator provides the route towards manipulating the electronic distribution and modifying charge and spin excitations. Our results link transient dynamics to the nature of many-body excitations and provide an opportunity to design nonequilibrium states of matter via tuned laser pulses.

  5. Radio galaxies radiation transfer, dynamics, stability and evolution of a synchrotron plasmon

    CERN Document Server

    Pacholczyk, A G

    1977-01-01

    Radio Galaxies: Radiation Transfer, Dynamics, Stability and Evolution of a Synchrotron Plasmon deals with the physics of a region in space containing magnetic field and thermal and relativistic particles (a plasmon). The synchrotron emission and absorption of this region are discussed, along with the properties of its spectrum; its linear and circular polarization; transfer of radiation through such a region; its dynamics and expansion; and interaction with external medium.Comprised of eight chapters, this volume explores the stability, turbulence, and acceleration of particles in a synchrotro

  6. Modeling the film condensate fluid dynamics and heat transfer within the bubble membrane radiator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauley, K.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Thornborrow, J.O. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX (United States). Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

    1992-01-01

    An analytical model of the fluid dynamics and heat transfer characteristics of the condensate within the rotating Bubble Membrane Radiator is developed. The steady-state, three-dimensional heat transfer and flow equations were reduced to a set of third-order ordinary differential equations by employing similarity transformation techniques. These equations are then solved for the radial, axial, and angular flow distributions in the film condensate. Pressure, temperature, heat transfer, film thickness and mass flow rate distributions are also calculated. The analytical model is the basis of the SCRABBLE code which is used both as a zero-g design tool and a ground-test bed analyzer.

  7. Correlation among Singlet-Oxygen Quenching, Free-Radical Scavenging, and Excited-State Intramolecular-Proton-Transfer Activities in Hydroxyflavones, Anthocyanidins, and 1-Hydroxyanthraquinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Shin-Ichi; Bandoh, Yuki; Nagashima, Umpei; Ohara, Keishi

    2017-10-26

    Singlet-oxygen (1O2) quenching, free-radical scavenging, and excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer (ESIPT) activities of hydroxyflavones, anthocyanidins, and 1-hydroxyanthraquinones were studied by means of laser, stopped-flow, and steady-state spectroscopies. In hydroxyflavones and anthocyanidins, the 1O2 quenching activity positively correlates to the free-radical scavenging activity. The reason for this correlation can be understood by considering that an early step of each reaction involves electron transfer from the unfused phenyl ring (B-ring), which is singly bonded to the bicyclic chromen or chromenylium moiety (A- and C-rings). Substitution of an electron-donating OH group at B-ring enhances the electron transfer leading to activation of the 1O2 quenching and free-radical scavenging. In 3-hydroxyflavones, the OH substitution at B-ring reduces the activity of ESIPT within C-ring, which can be explained in terms of the nodal-plane model. As a result, the 1O2 quenching and free-radical scavenging activities negatively correlate to the ESIPT activity. A catechol structure at B-ring is another factor that enhances the free-radical scavenging in hydroxyflavones. In contrast to these hydroxyflavones, 1-hydroxyanthraquinones having an electron-donating OH substituent adjacent to the O-H---O═C moiety susceptible to ESIPT do not show a simple correlation between their 1O2 quenching and ESIPT activities, because the OH substitution modulates these reactions.

  8. Excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) in the Photoresponsive Prototropic Schiff-Base N‧-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)-4-hydroxybenzohydrazide: Computational Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Mottaleb, M. S. A.

    2017-09-01

    Computations within Density Functional Theory (DFT) and its Time-Dependent (TD) extension at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level are performed for both S0 and S1 states to obtain the optimum molecular geometry of the keto-enol photochromic material of the title molecule and to explain the photo-induced ESIPT to generate the corresponding enol tautomer. The choice of the compound is interesting, and deserves attention due to geometrical changes in the electronic structure of the Nsbnd N linkage during the proton transfer (PT) reaction coordinate. In particular, PT path is followed by relaxed scan technique for computing potential energy surface (PES) to identify the transition state and to obtain barrier heights in S0 and S1 states. The photoresponsive H-transfer tautomerism is discussed in terms of different computational parameters including enthalpies and free energies. Both electronic reactivity as well as the thermodynamic stability plays together to facilitate proton transfer in the excited- and ground states of the tautomeric forms.

  9. Study on vinasse dynamics in soil using energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence with radioisotopic excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simabuco, S.M. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia; Nascimento Filho, V.F. [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz]|[Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    1994-05-01

    The distribution of S, Cl, K and Ca along the profiles of two soils of different texture (Red Yellow Podzolic and Dark Red Latosol) treated with amounts of vinasse equivalent to 4000 m{sup 3}/ha were studied using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, observing a significant increase in the contents of these elements. The same effect was observed for Cu, Zn, Rb and Sr contents in soils treated with vinasse as compared to the control. The concentrations of Al, Si, Ti, Mn, Fe and Zr could also be evaluated but no significant variation was observed due to the high soil initial concentrations of these elements as compared to the low concentrations in the vinasse. Annular radioactive sources of Fe-55 and Cd-109 were employed for the excitation of these elements in the soil samples, treated or not with vinasse. For the detection of the characteristic X-rays, a Si(Li) semiconductor detector was used, coupled to a multichannel emulation card inserted in a microcomputer. (author). 8 refs, 6 figs, 4 tabs.

  10. On the dynamic behavior of composite panels under turbulent boundary layer excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciappi, E.; De Rosa, S.; Franco, F.; Vitiello, P.; Miozzi, M.

    2016-03-01

    In this work high Mach number aerodynamic and structural measurements acquired in the CIRA (Italian Aerospace Research Center) transonic wind tunnel and the models used to analyze the response of composite panels to turbulent boundary layer excitation are presented. The two investigated panels are CFRP (Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer) composite plates and their lay-up is similar to configurations used in aeronautical structures. They differ only for the presence of an embedded viscoelastic layer. The experimental set-up has been designed to reproduce a pressure fluctuations field beneath a turbulent boundary layer as close as possible to those in flight. A tripping system, specifically conceived to this aim for this facility, has been used to generate thick turbulent boundary layers at Mach number values ranging between 0.4 and 0.8. It is shown that the designed setup provides a realistic representation of full scale size pressure spectra in the frequency range of interest for the noise component inside the fuselage, generated by turbulent boundary layer. The significant role of the viscoelastic layer at reducing panel's response is detailed and discussed. Finally, it is demonstrated that at high Mach number the aeroelastic effect cannot be neglected when analyzing the panel response, especially when composite materials are considered.

  11. System characterization of neuronal excitability in the hippocampus and its relevance to observed dynamics of spontaneous seizure-like transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalay, Osbert C.; Serletis, Demitre; Carlen, Peter L.; Bardakjian, Berj L.

    2010-06-01

    Most forms of epilepsy are marked by seizure episodes that arise spontaneously. The low-magnesium/high-potassium (low-Mg2+/high-K+) experimental model of epilepsy is an acute model that produces spontaneous, recurring seizure-like events (SLEs). To elucidate the nature of spontaneous seizure transitions and their relationship to neuronal excitability, whole-cell recordings from the intact hippocampus were undertaken in vitro, and the response of hippocampal CA3 neurons to Gaussian white noise injection was obtained before and after treatment with various concentrations of low-Mg2+/high-K+ solution. A second-order Volterra kernel model was estimated for each of the input-output response pairs. The spectral energy of the responses was also computed, providing a quantitative measure of neuronal excitability. Changes in duration and amplitude of the first-order kernel correlated positively with the spectral energy increase following treatment with low-Mg2+/high-K+ solution, suggesting that variations in neuronal excitability are coded by the system kernels, in part by differences to the profile of the first-order kernel. In particular, kernel duration was more sensitive than amplitude to changes in spectral energy, and correlated more strongly with kernel area. An oscillator network model of the hippocampal CA3 was constructed to investigate the relationship of kernel duration to network excitability, and the model was able to generate spontaneous, recurrent SLEs by increasing the duration of a mode function analogous to the first-order kernel. Results from the model indicated that disruption to the dynamic balance of feedback was responsible for seizure-like transitions and the observed intermittency of SLEs. A physiological candidate for feedback imbalance consistent with the network model is the destabilizing interaction of extracellular potassium and paroxysmal neuronal activation. Altogether, these results (1) validate a mathematical model for epileptiform

  12. Dynamic stability of a vertically excited non-linear continuous system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Náprstek, Jiří; Fischer, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 155, July (2015), s. 106-114 ISSN 0045-7949 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01035S Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : non-linear systems * auto-parametric systems * semi-trivial solution * dynamic stability * system recovery * post-critical response Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering Impact factor: 2.425, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0045794915000024

  13. Enroute to investigating protein dynamics under selective vibrational excitation at the THz FEL FELBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, C.; Gensch, M.; Heberle, J.

    2012-05-01

    We aim at investigating proteins under irradiation with intense THz radiation tuned into resonance to specific vibrational modes. This approach is much in analogy to recent experiments that showed selective vibrational control in Complex materials [1, 2, 3]. To achieve the necessary sensitivity for protein dynamics we combine a novel time-resolved IR difference spectroscopic setup with uniquely intense, tuneable narrow bandwidth THz radiation (1.2 - 75 THz) of the free electron laser FELBE.

  14. Dynamic model for tritium transfer in an aquatic food chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melintescu, A; Galeriu, D

    2011-08-01

    Tritium ((3)H) is released from some nuclear facilities in relatively large quantities. It is a ubiquitous isotope because it enters straight into organisms, behaving essentially identically to its stable analogue (hydrogen). Tritium is a key radionuclide in the aquatic environment, in some cases, contributing significantly to the doses received by aquatic, non-human biota and by humans. The updated model presented here is based on more standardized, comprehensive assessments than previously used for the aquatic food chain, including the benthic flora and fauna, with an explicit application to the Danube ecosystem, as well as an extension to the special case of dissolved organic tritium (DOT). The model predicts the organically bound tritium (OBT) in the primary producers (the autotrophs, such as phytoplankton and algae) and in the consumers (the heterotrophs) using their bioenergetics, which involves the investigation of energy expenditure, losses, gains and efficiencies of transformations in the body. The model described in the present study intends to be more specific than a screening-level model, by including a metabolic approach and a description of the direct uptake of DOT in marine phytoplankton and invertebrates. For a better control of tritium transfer into the environment, not only tritiated water must be monitored, but also the other chemical forms and most importantly OBT, in the food chain.

  15. Nonadiabatic dynamics of photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer: comparison of explicit and implicit solvent simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Benjamin; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2012-07-05

    Theoretical approaches for simulating the ultrafast dynamics of photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions in solution are developed and applied to a series of model systems. These processes are simulated by propagating nonadiabatic surface hopping trajectories on electron-proton vibronic surfaces that depend on the solute and solvent nuclear coordinates. The PCET system is represented by a four-state empirical valence bond model, and the solvent is treated either as explicit solvent molecules or as a dielectric continuum, in which case the solvent dynamics is described in terms of two collective solvent coordinates corresponding to the energy gaps associated with electron and proton transfer. The explicit solvent simulations reveal two distinct solvent relaxation time scales, where the faster time scale relaxation corresponds to librational motions of solvent molecules in the first solvation shell, and the slower time scale relaxation corresponds to the bulk solvent dielectric response. The charge transfer dynamics is strongly coupled to both the fast and slow time scale solvent dynamics. The dynamical multistate continuum theory is extended to include the effects of two solvent relaxation time scales, and the resulting coupled generalized Langevin equations depend on parameters that can be extracted from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The implicit and explicit solvent approaches lead to qualitatively similar charge transfer and solvent dynamics for model PCET systems, suggesting that the implicit solvent treatment captures the essential elements of the nonequilibrium solvent dynamics for many systems. A combination of implicit and explicit solvent approaches will enable the investigation of photoinduced PCET processes in a variety of condensed phase systems.

  16. Towards Understanding the Solvent-Dynamic Control of the Transport and Heterogeneous Electron-Transfer Processes in Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Mohsin Ahmad; Ingole, Pravin P; Randriamahazaka, Hyacinthe

    2017-02-17

    The impact of temperature-induced changes in solvent dynamics on the diffusion coefficient and standard rate constant k(0) for heterogeneous electron transfer (ET) of ethylferrocene (EFc) in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM][PF6 ]) is investigated. The results are analysed to understand the impact of solvent-dynamic control, solute-solvent interactions and solvent friction on the transport of redox probes and k(0) . Concentration dependence of the diffusion coefficient of EFc in [BMIM][PF6 ] is observed. This is attributed to the solute-induced enhancement of the structural organisation of the ionic liquid (IL), which is supported by the concentration-dependent UV/Vis absorption and photoluminescence responses of EFc/[BMIM][PF6 ] solutions. Similar values of the activation energies for mass transport and ET and a linear relationship between the diffusion coefficient and the heterogeneous ET rate is observed. The ratio between the diffusion coefficient and the heterogeneous rate constant allows a characteristic length Ld , which is temperature-independent, to be introduced. The presented results clearly establish that mass transport and heterogeneous ET of redox probes are strongly correlated in ILs. It is proposed that the apparent kinetics of heterogeneous ET reactions in ILs can be explained in terms of their impact on thermal equilibration, energy dissipation and thermal excitation of redox-active probes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Dynamic response characteristics of steel portal frames having semi-rigid joints under sinusoidal wave excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Abdul Qadir

    2017-12-01

    To demonstrate the characteristics of the nonlinear response of steel frames, an elastic dynamic response analysis of the semi-rigid frame is performed under the harmonic wave. The semi-rigid contact is represented by the alternating spring which is given stiffness by a three-parameter energy model which approaches the hysterical curve by hardening model. The properties of spectra and hysteric curves are presented. This study shows that (1) the greater the acceleration input capacitance the smaller the instant connection capability and the smaller is the response. (2) However, by allowing an extreme increase in capacitance input acceleration, response spectra can be increased as the contact stiffness results near zero.

  18. Generation of Triplet Excited States via Photoinduced Electron Transfer in meso-anthra-BODIPY: Fluorogenic Response toward Singlet Oxygen in Solution and in Vitro

    KAUST Repository

    Filatov, Mikhail A.

    2017-04-14

    Heavy atom-free BODIPY-anthracene dyads (BADs) generate locally excited triplet states by way of photoinduced electron transfer (PeT), followed by recombination of the resulting charge-separated states (CSS). Subsequent quenching of the triplet states by molecular oxygen produces singlet oxygen (1O2), which reacts with the anthracene moiety yielding highly fluorescent species. The steric demand of the alkyl substituents in the BODIPY subunit defines the site of 1O2 addition. Novel bis- and tetraepoxides and bicyclic acetal products, arising from rearrangements of anthracene endoperoxides were isolated and characterized. 1O2 generation by BADs in living cells enables visualization of the dyads distribution, promising new imaging applications.

  19. Synergy effects of electric and magnetic fields on locally excited-state fluorescence of photoinduced electron transfer systems in a polymer film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Kamlesh; Iimori, Toshifumi; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2009-10-08

    Photoluminescence of electron donor-acceptor pairs that show photoinduced electron transfer (PIET) has been measured in a polymer film under simultaneous application of electric field and magnetic field. Fluorescence emitted from the locally excited state (LE fluorescence) of 9-methylanthracene (MAnt) and pyrene (Py) is quenched by an electric field in a mixture of 1,3-dicyanobenzene (DCB) with MAnt or Py, indicating that PIET from the excited state of MAnt or Py to DCB is enhanced by an electric field. Simultaneous application of electric and magnetic fields enhances the reverse process from the radical-ion pair produced by PIET to the LE fluorescent state of MAnt or Py. As a result, the electric-field-induced quenching of the LE fluorescence is reduced by application of the magnetic fields. Thus, the synergy effect of electric and magnetic fields is observed on the LE fluorescence of MAnt or Py. Exciplex fluorescence spectra resulting from PIET can be obtained by analyzing the field effects on photoluminescence spectra, even when the exciplex fluorescence is too weak to be determined from the steady-state or time-resolved photoluminescence spectra at zero field.

  20. The immediate effects of an anterior-to-posterior talar mobilization on neural excitability, dorsiflexion range of motion, and dynamic balance in patients with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkey, Matthew; McLeod, Michelle; Van Scoit, Ashley; Terada, Masafumi; Tevald, Michael; Gribble, Phillip; Pietrosimone, Brian

    2014-11-01

    Altered neuromuscular function and decreased dorsiflexion range of motion (DFROM) have been observed in patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Joint mobilizations are indicated for restoring DFROM and dynamic postural control, yet it remains unknown if a mobilization can alter neuromuscular excitability in muscles surrounding the ankle. To determine the immediate effects of a Maitland grade III anterior-to-posterior joint mobilization on spinal-reflex and corticospinal excitability in the fibularis longus (FL) and soleus (SOL), DFROM, and dynamic postural control. Single-blinded randomized control trial. Research laboratory. 30 patients with CAI randomized into a mobilization (n = 15) or control (n = 15) group. Maitland grade III anterior-to-posterior joint mobilization. Spinal-reflex excitability was measured with the Hoffmann reflex, while corticospinal excitability was evaluated with transcranial magnetic stimulation. DFROM was measured seated with the knee extended, and dynamic postural control was quantified with the Star Excursion Balance Test. Separate 2 × 2 repeated-measures ANOVAs were performed for each outcome measure. Dependent t tests were used to evaluate individual differences within groups in the presence of significance. Spinal-reflex and corticospinal excitability of the SOL and FL were not altered in the mobilization or control group (P > .05). DFROM increased immediately after the mobilization (P = .05) but not in the control group, while dynamic postural control was unchanged in both groups (P > .05). A single joint-mobilization treatment was efficacious at restoring DFROM in participants with CAI; however, excitability of spinal reflex and corticospinal pathways at the ankle and dynamic postural control were unaffected.

  1. When do we need to account for the geometric phase in excited state dynamics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G; Joubert-Doriol, Loïc; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2014-06-07

    We investigate the role of the geometric phase (GP) in an internal conversion process when the system changes its electronic state by passing through a conical intersection (CI). Local analysis of a two-dimensional linear vibronic coupling (LVC) model Hamiltonian near the CI shows that the role of the GP is twofold. First, it compensates for a repulsion created by the so-called diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction. Second, the GP enhances the non-adiabatic transition probability for a wave-packet part that experiences a central collision with the CI. To assess the significance of both GP contributions we propose two indicators that can be computed from parameters of electronic surfaces and initial conditions. To generalize our analysis to N-dimensional systems we introduce a reduction of a general N-dimensional LVC model to an effective 2D LVC model using a mode transformation that preserves short-time dynamics of the original N-dimensional model. Using examples of the bis(methylene) adamantyl and butatriene cations, and the pyrazine molecule we have demonstrated that their effective 2D models reproduce the short-time dynamics of the corresponding full dimensional models, and the introduced indicators are very reliable in assessing GP effects.

  2. Mean field dynamics of networks of delay-coupled noisy excitable units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franović, Igor, E-mail: franovic@ipb.ac.rs [Scientific Computing Laboratory, Institute of Physics Belgrade, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Todorović, Kristina; Burić, Nikola [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Belgrade, Vojvode Stepe 450, Belgrade (Serbia); Vasović, Nebojša [Department of Applied Mathematics, Faculty of Mining and Geology, University of Belgrade, PO Box 162, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2016-06-08

    We use the mean-field approach to analyze the collective dynamics in macroscopic networks of stochastic Fitzhugh-Nagumo units with delayed couplings. The conditions for validity of the two main approximations behind the model, called the Gaussian approximation and the Quasi-independence approximation, are examined. It is shown that the dynamics of the mean-field model may indicate in a self-consistent fashion the parameter domains where the Quasi-independence approximation fails. Apart from a network of globally coupled units, we also consider the paradigmatic setup of two interacting assemblies to demonstrate how our framework may be extended to hierarchical and modular networks. In both cases, the mean-field model can be used to qualitatively analyze the stability of the system, as well as the scenarios for the onset and the suppression of the collective mode. In quantitative terms, the mean-field model is capable of predicting the average oscillation frequency corresponding to the global variables of the exact system.

  3. Ultrafast vibrational population transfer dynamics in 2-acetylcyclopentanone studied by 2D IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungnam; Ji, Minbiao

    2011-03-14

    2-Acetylcyclopentanone (2-ACP), which is a β-dicarbonyl compound, undergoes keto-enol isomerization, and its enol tautomers are stabilized by a cyclic intramolecular hydrogen bond. 2-ACP (keto form) has symmetric and asymmetric vibrational modes of the two carbonyl groups at 1748 and 1715 cm(-1) , respectively, which are well separated from the carbonyl modes of its enol tautomers in the FTIR spectrum. We have investigated 2-ACP dissolved in carbon tetrachloride by 2D IR spectroscopy and IR pump-probe spectroscopy. Vibrational population transfer dynamics between the two carbonyl modes were observed by 2D IR spectroscopy. To extract the population exchange dynamics (i.e., the down- and uphill population transfer rate constants), we used the normalized volumes of the cross-peaks with respect to the diagonal peaks at the same emission frequency and the survival and conditional probability functions. As expected, the downhill population transfer time constant (3.2 ps) was measured to be smaller than the uphill population transfer time constant (3.8 ps). In addition, the vibrational population relaxation dynamics of the two carbonyl modes were observed to be the same within the experimental error and were found to be much slower than vibrational population transfer between two carbonyl modes. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Momentum-resolved spin dynamics of bulk and surface excited States in the topological insulator Bi(2)Se(3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacho, C; Crepaldi, A; Battiato, M; Braun, J; Cilento, F; Zacchigna, M; Richter, M C; Heckmann, O; Springate, E; Liu, Y; Dhesi, S S; Berger, H; Bugnon, Ph; Held, K; Grioni, M; Ebert, H; Hricovini, K; Minár, J; Parmigiani, F

    2015-03-06

    The prospect of optically inducing and controlling a spin-polarized current in spintronic devices has generated wide interest in the out-of-equilibrium electronic and spin structure of topological insulators. In this Letter we show that only measuring the spin intensity signal over several orders of magnitude by spin-, time-, and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy can provide a comprehensive description of the optically excited electronic states in Bi_{2}Se_{3}. Our experiments reveal the existence of a surface resonance state in the second bulk band gap that is benchmarked by fully relativistic ab initio spin-resolved photoemission calculations. We propose that the newly reported state plays a major role in the ultrafast dynamics of the system, acting as a bottleneck for the interaction between the topologically protected surface state and the bulk conduction band. In fact, the spin-polarization dynamics in momentum space show that these states display macroscopically different temperatures and, more importantly, different cooling rates over several picoseconds.

  5. Momentum-Resolved Spin Dynamics of Bulk and Surface Excited States in the Topological Insulator Bi2Se3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacho, C.; Crepaldi, A.; Battiato, M.; Braun, J.; Cilento, F.; Zacchigna, M.; Richter, M. C.; Heckmann, O.; Springate, E.; Liu, Y.; Dhesi, S. S.; Berger, H.; Bugnon, Ph.; Held, K.; Grioni, M.; Ebert, H.; Hricovini, K.; Minár, J.; Parmigiani, F.

    2015-03-01

    The prospect of optically inducing and controlling a spin-polarized current in spintronic devices has generated wide interest in the out-of-equilibrium electronic and spin structure of topological insulators. In this Letter we show that only measuring the spin intensity signal over several orders of magnitude by spin-, time-, and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy can provide a comprehensive description of the optically excited electronic states in Bi2Se3. Our experiments reveal the existence of a surface resonance state in the second bulk band gap that is benchmarked by fully relativistic ab initio spin-resolved photoemission calculations. We propose that the newly reported state plays a major role in the ultrafast dynamics of the system, acting as a bottleneck for the interaction between the topologically protected surface state and the bulk conduction band. In fact, the spin-polarization dynamics in momentum space show that these states display macroscopically different temperatures and, more importantly, different cooling rates over several picoseconds.

  6. Dynamic nano-imaging of label-free living cells using electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Kanamori, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taichi; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Optical microscopes are effective tools for cellular function analysis because biological cells can be observed non-destructively and non-invasively in the living state in either water or atmosphere condition. Label-free optical imaging technique such as phase-contrast microscopy has been analysed many cellular functions, and it is essential technology for bioscience field. However, the diffraction limit of light makes it is difficult to image nano-structures in a label-free living cell, for example the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi body and the localization of proteins. Here we demonstrate the dynamic imaging of a label-free cell with high spatial resolution by using an electron beam excitation-assisted optical (EXA) microscope. We observed the dynamic movement of the nucleus and nano-scale granules in living cells with better than 100 nm spatial resolution and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) around 10. Our results contribute to the development of cellular function analysis and open up new bioscience applications. PMID:26525841

  7. Dynamic nano-imaging of label-free living cells using electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Kanamori, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taichi; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu

    2015-11-03

    Optical microscopes are effective tools for cellular function analysis because biological cells can be observed non-destructively and non-invasively in the living state in either water or atmosphere condition. Label-free optical imaging technique such as phase-contrast microscopy has been analysed many cellular functions, and it is essential technology for bioscience field. However, the diffraction limit of light makes it is difficult to image nano-structures in a label-free living cell, for example the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi body and the localization of proteins. Here we demonstrate the dynamic imaging of a label-free cell with high spatial resolution by using an electron beam excitation-assisted optical (EXA) microscope. We observed the dynamic movement of the nucleus and nano-scale granules in living cells with better than 100 nm spatial resolution and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) around 10. Our results contribute to the development of cellular function analysis and open up new bioscience applications.

  8. Resonance Raman Intensities Demonstrate that C5 Substituents Affect the Initial Excited-State Structural Dynamics of Uracil More than C6 Substituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teimoory, Faranak; Loppnow, Glen R

    2016-05-04

    Resonance Raman derived initial excited-state structural dynamics provide insight into the photochemical mechanisms of pyrimidine nucleobases, in which the photochemistry appears to be dictated by the C5 and C6 substituents. The absorption and resonance Raman spectra and excitation profiles of 5,6-dideuterouracil were measured to further test this photochemical dependence on the C5 and C6 substituents. The resulting set of excited-state reorganization energies of the observed internal coordinates were calculated and compared to those of other 5- and 6-substituted uracils. The results show that the initial excited-state dynamics along the C5C6 stretch responds to changes in mass at C5 and C6 in the same manner but that the in-plane bends at C5 and C6 are more sensitive to substituents at the C5 position than at the C6 position. In addition, the presence of two deuterium substituents at C5 and C6 decreases the initial excited-state structural dynamics along these in-plane bends, in contrast to what is observed in the presence of two CH3 groups on C5 and C6. The results are discussed in the context of DNA nucleobase photochemistry. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Argumentation Text Construction by Japanese as a Foreign Language Writers: A Dynamic View of Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinnert, Carol; Kobauashi, Hiroe; Katayama, Akemi

    2015-01-01

    This study takes a dynamic view of transfer as reusing and reshaping previous knowledge in new writing contexts to investigate how novice Japanese as a foreign language (JFL) writers draw on knowledge across languages to construct L1 and L2 texts. We analyzed L1 English and L2 Japanese argumentation essays by the same JFL writers (N = 19) and L1…

  10. Dynamic model for the transfer of CS-137 through the soil-grass-lamb foodchain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S.P.

    1994-01-01

    A dynamic radioecological model for the transfer of radiocaesium through the soil-grass-lamb foodchain was constructed on the basis of field data collected in 1990–1993 from the Nordic countries: Denmark, Faroe Islands, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. The model assumes an initial soil...

  11. Toward dynamic structural biology : Two decades of single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lerner, Eitan; Cordes, Thorben; Ingargiola, Antonino; Alhadid, Yazan; Chung, SangYoon; Michalet, Xavier; Weiss, Shimon

    2018-01-01

    Classical structural biology can only provide static snapshots of biomacromolecules. Single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) paved the way for studying dynamics in macromolecular structures under biologically relevant conditions. Since its first implementation in 1996, smFRET

  12. Chemical Kinetics, Heat Transfer, and Sensor Dynamics Revisited in a Simple Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sad, Maria E.; Sad, Mario R.; Castro, Alberto A.; Garetto, Teresita F.

    2008-01-01

    A simple experiment about thermal effects in chemical reactors is described, which can be used to illustrate chemical reactor models, the determination and validation of their parameters, and some simple principles of heat transfer and sensor dynamics. It is based in the exothermic reaction between aqueous solutions of sodium thiosulfate and…

  13. Interplay between Static and Dynamic Energy Transfer in Biofunctional Upconversion Nanoplatforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ding, Yadan; Wu, Fei; Zhang, Youlin; Liu, Xiaomin; de Jong, Elinore M. L. D.; Gregorkiewicz, Tom; Hong, Xia; Liu, Yichun; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Buma, Wybren Jan; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Clarification of the energy-transfer (ET) mechanism is of vital importance for constructing efficient upconversion nanoplatforms for biological/biomedical applications. Yet, most strategies of optimizing these nanoplatforms were casually based on a dynamic ET assumption. In this work, we have

  14. 78 FR 34090 - New Hampshire Water Resources Board, Hydro Dynamics Corporation; Notice of Transfer of Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission New Hampshire Water Resources Board, Hydro Dynamics Corporation; Notice of Transfer of Exemption 1. By letter filed April 16, 2013, New Hampshire Water Resources Board co-exemptee...

  15. UV and 532 nm Photo-Dissociation of 2-Nitrotoluene: Observation of Electronically-Excited NO; Emission from Carbon (I); N2-NO Energy Transfer; and Stabilization of 2-Nitrotoluene-Ar Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-y-Riega, H.; Eilers, H.

    2012-07-01

    2-nitrotoluene is a taggant used in explosive compounds and also often used as a simulant for nitro-based high explosives. Various spectroscopic techniques focus on the detection of vibrationally excited NO as an indicator for the presence of explosives. We report on the photo-dissociation of 2-nitrotoluene using UV and 532 nm wavelengths. We not only observe vibrationally excited NO in its electronic ground state, but also vibrationally excited NO in its electronic excited state. The photo-dissociation of 2-nitrotoluene leads to the formation of atomic carbon and its emission, overlapping the NO emission, is observed. Energy transfer from laser-excited nitrogen to NO leads to NO emission with long lifetimes. Argon atoms stabilize 2-nitrotoluene molecules and delay their photo-dissociation.

  16. Stochastic dynamical model of a growing citation network based on a self-exciting point process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golosovsky, Michael; Solomon, Sorin

    2012-08-31

    We put under experimental scrutiny the preferential attachment model that is commonly accepted as a generating mechanism of the scale-free complex networks. To this end we chose a citation network of physics papers and traced the citation history of 40,195 papers published in one year. Contrary to common belief, we find that the citation dynamics of the individual papers follows the superlinear preferential attachment, with the exponent α=1.25-1.3. Moreover, we show that the citation process cannot be described as a memoryless Markov chain since there is a substantial correlation between the present and recent citation rates of a paper. Based on our findings we construct a stochastic growth model of the citation network, perform numerical simulations based on this model and achieve an excellent agreement with the measured citation distributions.

  17. Attosecond dynamics of light-induced resonant hole transfer in high-order-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jhih-An; Dahlström, Jan Marcus; Rohringer, Nina

    2017-02-01

    We present a study of high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) assisted by extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulses, which can lead to the excitation of inner-shell electrons and the generation of a second HHG plateau. With the treatment of a one-dimensional model of krypton, based on time-dependent configuration interaction singles (TDCIS) of an effective two-electron system, we show that the XUV-assisted HHG spectrum reveals the duration of the semiclassical electron trajectories. The results are interpreted by the strong-field approximation (SFA) and the importance of the hole transfer during the tunneling process is emphasized. Finally, coherent population transfer between the inner and outer holes with attosecond pulse trains is discussed.

  18. Interplay between singlet and triplet excited states in a conformationally locked donor–acceptor dyad

    KAUST Repository

    Filatov, Mikhail A.

    2015-10-13

    The synthesis and photophysical characterization of a palladium(II) porphyrin – anthracene dyad bridged via short and conformationally rigid bicyclo[2.2.2]octadiene spacer were achieved. A spectroscopic investigation of the prepared molecule in solution has been undertaken to study electronic energy transfer in excited singlet and triplet states between the anthracene and porphyrin units. By using steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy it was shown that excitation of the singlet excited state of the anthracene leads to energy transfer to the lower-lying singlet state of porphyrin. Alternatively, excitation of the porphyrin followed by intersystem crossing to the triplet state leads to very fast energy transfer to the triplet state of anthracene. The rate of this energy transfer has been determined by transient absorption spectroscopy. Comparative studies of the dynamics of triplet excited states of the dyad and reference palladium octaethylporphyrin (PdOEP) have been performed.

  19. Femtosecond laser selective intramolecular double proton transfer in [2,2'-bipyridyl]-3,3'-diol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marks, D.R.A.; Prosposito, P.; Zhang, H.; Glasbeek, M.

    1998-01-01

    We report an excitation energy dependence of the dynamics of the excited-state intramolecular double-proton transfer of [2,2'-bipyridyl]-3,3'-diol in liquid solution. By means of femtosecond fluorescence upconversion experiments it is shown that an increase of the vibrational energy in the excited

  20. SEDIGISM: Structure, excitation, and dynamics of the inner Galactic interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, F.; Csengeri, T.; Urquhart, J. S.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Barnes, P. J.; Giannetti, A.; Hernandez, A. K.; Leurini, S.; Mattern, M.; Medina, S.-N. X.; Agurto, C.; Azagra, F.; Anderson, L. D.; Beltrán, M. T.; Beuther, H.; Bontemps, S.; Bronfman, L.; Dobbs, C. L.; Dumke, M.; Finger, R.; Ginsburg, A.; Gonzalez, E.; Henning, T.; Kauffmann, J.; Mac-Auliffe, F.; Menten, K. M.; Montenegro-Montes, F. M.; Moore, T. J. T.; Muller, E.; Parra, R.; Perez-Beaupuits, J.-P.; Pettitt, A.; Russeil, D.; Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Schilke, P.; Schisano, E.; Suri, S.; Testi, L.; Torstensson, K.; Venegas, P.; Wang, K.; Wienen, M.; Wyrowski, F.; Zavagno, A.

    2017-05-01

    data in the (1-0) transition of CO isotopologues from the ThrUMMS survey, we are able to compute a 3D realization of the excitation temperature and optical depth in the interstellar medium. Ultimately, this survey will provide a detailed, global view of the inner Galactic interstellar medium at an unprecedented angular resolution of 30''. This publication is based on data acquired with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) under programmes 092.F-9315(A) and 193.C-0584(A). APEX is a collaboration between the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, the European Southern Observatory, and the Onsala Space Observatory.Full Table 5 and Table A.1 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/601/A124

  1. Comparison of calculated and experimentally resolved rate constants for excitation energy transfer in C-phycocyanin. 2. Trimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debreczeny, M.F.; Sauer, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Zhou, J.; Bryant, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-05-18

    Resolution of the absorption spectrum of the {beta}{sub 155} chromophore in C-phycocyanin (PC) trimers is achieved by comparison of the steady state absorption spectra of ({alpha}{sup PC}{beta}{sup PC}){sub 3} and ({alpha}{sup PC}{beta}{sup *}){sub 3}. Comparison of the anisotropy decays of ({alpha}{sup PC}{beta}{sup PC}){sub 3} and ({alpha}{sup PC}{beta}{sup *}){sub 3} also greatly aids in the assignment of the dominant kinetic processes in PC trimers. A comparison is made of calculated Foerster rate constants for energy transfer with those rate constants resolved experimentally in the PC trimers. 35 refs.., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Nonclassical energy transfer in photosynthetic FMO complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramavicius Vytautas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Excitation energy transfer in a photosynthetic FMO complex has been simulated using the stochastic Schrödinger equation. Fluctuating chromophore transition energies are simulated from the quantum correlation function which allows to properly include the finite temperature. The resulting excitation dynamics shows fast thermalization of chromophore occupations into proper thermal equilibrium. The relaxation process is characterized by entropy dynamics, which shows nonclassical behavior.

  3. Ovarian Cancer Cell Adhesion/Migration Dynamics on Micro-Structured Laminin Gradients Fabricated by Multiphoton Excited Photochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruei-Yu He

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Haptotaxis, i.e., cell migration in response to adhesive gradients, has been previously implicated in cancer metastasis. A better understanding of cell migration dynamics and their regulation could ultimately lead to new drug targets, especially for cancers with poor prognoses, such as ovarian cancer. Haptotaxis has not been well-studied due to the lack of biomimetic, biocompatible models, where, for example, microcontact printing and microfluidics approaches are primarily limited to 2D surfaces and cannot produce the 3D submicron features to which cells respond. Here we used multiphoton excited (MPE phototochemistry to fabricate nano/microstructured gradients of laminin (LN as 2.5D models of the ovarian basal lamina to study the haptotaxis dynamics of a series of ovarian cancer cells. Using these models, we found that increased LN concentration increased migration speed and also alignment of the overall cell morphology and their cytoskeleton along the linear axis of the gradients. Both these metrics were enhanced on LN compared to BSA gradients of the same design, demonstrating the importance of both topographic and ECM cues on the adhesion/migration dynamics. Using two different gradient designs, we addressed the question of the roles of local concentration and slope and found that the specific haptotactic response depends on the cell phenotype and not simply the gradient design. Moreover, small changes in concentration strongly affected the migration properties. This work is a necessary step in studying haptotaxis in more complete 3D models of the tumor microenvironment for ovarian and other cancers.

  4. TRANSFER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Quenching of curcumine fluorescence by thionine, both immobilised in cellulose acetate occurs in accordance with the Forster mechanism of energy transfer. The rate constant of energy transfer for this donor - acceptor pair is found to be 9.4 x 109 L ' mol S1 with R0 = 37±1 Б. When this donor - acceptor pair is ...

  5. Time evolution of photon propagation in scattering and absorbing media: the Dynamic Radiative Transfer System

    CERN Document Server

    Georgakopoulos, A; Georgiou, E

    2016-01-01

    A new dynamic system approach to the problem of radiative transfer inside scattering and absorbing media is presented, directly based on firsthand physical principles. This method, the Dynamic Radiative Transfer System (DRTS), calculates accurately the time evolution of photon propagation in media of complex structure and shape. DRTS employs a dynamical system formality using a global sparse matrix which characterizes the physical, optical and geometrical properties of the material volume of interest. The new system state vector is generated by the above time-independent matrix, using simple matrix vector multiplication addition for each subsequent time step. DRTS simulation results are presented for 3D light propagation in different optical media, demonstrating greatly reduced computational cost and resource requirements compared to other methods. Flexibility of the method allows the integration of time-dependent sources, boundary conditions, different media and several optical phenomena like reflection and ...

  6. Non-linear dynamics in biological microtubules: solitons and dissipation-free energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatos, Nick E.

    2017-08-01

    I review some recent developments concerning soliton solutions in biological microtubules and their significance in transferring energy without dissipation. I discuss various types of soliton solutions, as well as ‘spikes’, of the associated non-linear Lagrange equations describing the dynamics of a ‘pseudo-spin non-linear σ-model’ that models the dynamics of a microtubule system with dipole-dipole interactions. These results will hopefully contribute to a better understanding of the functional properties of microtubules, including the motor protein dynamics and the information transfer processes. With regards to the latter we also speculate on the use of microtubules as ‘logical’ gates. Our considerations are classical, but the soliton solutions may have a microscopic quantum origin, which we briefly touch upon.

  7. An Analysis of Beamed Wireless Power Transfer in the Fresnel Zone Using a Dynamic, Metasurface Aperture

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, David R; Yurduseven, Okan; Larouche, Stephane; Lipworth, Guy; Urzhumov, Yaroslav; Reynolds, Matthew S

    2016-01-01

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) has been an active topic of research, with a number of WPT schemes implemented in the near-field (coupling) and far-field (radiation) regimes. Here, we consider a beamed WPT scheme based on a dynamically reconfigurable source aperture transferring power to receiving devices within the Fresnel (near-zone) region. In this context, the dynamic aperture resembles a reconfigurable lens capable of focusing power to a well-defined spot, whose dimension can be related to a point spread function (PSF). Near-zone focusing can be achieved by generating different amplitude or phase profiles over the aperture, which can be realized using traditional architectures, such as phased arrays. Alternatively, metasurface guided-wave apertures can achieve dynamic focusing, with potentially lower cost implementations. We present an initial tradeoff analysis of the near-zone WPT concept, relating key parameters such as spot size, aperture size, wavelength, focal distance, and availability of sources. We...

  8. Photochemical transformations. 37. Electron-transfer requirements for photosolvolysis and photo-Wagner-Meerwein reactions of some dichlorodibenzobicyclo(2. 2. 2)octadienes in singlet and triplet excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristol, S.J.; Bindel, T.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Aeling, E.O.

    1984-06-29

    Substituted trans-7,8-dichloro-10-X-2,3:5,6-dibenzobicyclo(2.2.2)octa-2,5-dienes (X = COCH/sub 3/, CN, and NO/sub 2/) and corresponding dinitro-substituted compounds (10,15-dinitro) were solvolyzed with silver acetate in acetic acid and were irradiated in glacial acetic acid or acetonitrile with 254- and 300-nm light. The structures of the monoring-substituted diastereoisomeric dichlorides were demonstrated by proof of structures of the daughter solvolysis products. Unlike compounds previously studied, these compounds were either photochemically inert or photoinactive with respect to Wagner-Meerwein rearrangement or to solvolysis. These results have been rationalized in terms of the inability of the excited states of the light-absorbing chromophores in these compounds to transfer electrons to the carbon-chlorine bonds remote from these chromophores. While triplet states of a variety of cis- and trans-7,8-dichloro-2,3:5,6-dibenzobicyclo(2.2.2)octa-2,5-dienes are reported to be similarly inert, the 10,11-dimethoxy derivatives all were photoactive with acetone sensitization. The migration stereochemistries of the sensitized reactions were quite different from those of direct irradiations or of ground-state reactions. Estimations of the free energies of electron transfer were consistent with these and previously reported results. 26 references, 1 table.

  9. Tunable excited-state intramolecular proton transfer reactions with Nsbnd H or Osbnd H as a proton donor: A theoretical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Wen, Keke; Feng, Songyan; Yuan, Huijuan; An, Beibei; Zhu, Qiuling; Guo, Xugeng; Zhang, Jinglai

    2017-12-01

    Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reactions occurring in the S1 state for five molecules, which possess five/six-membered ring intramolecular Nsbnd H···N or Osbnd H···N hydrogen bonds bearing quinoline or 2-phenylpyridine moiety, have been described in detail by the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) approach using the B3LYP hybrid functional. For the five molecules, the constrained potential energy profiles along the ESIPT reactions show that proton transfer is barrierless in molecules possessing six-membered ring intramolecular H-bonds, which is smoother than that with certain barriers in five-membered ring H-bonding systems. For the latter, chemical modification by a more strong acid group can lower the ESIPT barrier significantly, which harnesses the ESIPT reaction from a difficult type to a fast one. The energy barrier of the ESIPT reaction depends on the intensity of the intramolecular H-bond, which can be measured with the topological descriptors by topology analysis of the bond critical point (BCP) of the intramolecular H-bond. It is found that when the value of electron density ρ(r) at BCP is bigger than 0.025 a.u., the corresponding molecule might go through an ultrafast and barrierless ESIPT process, which opens a new scenario to explore the ESIPT reactions.

  10. Faster photoinduced electron transfer in a diluted mixture than in a neat donor solvent: effect of excited-state H-bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Nabajeet; Singha, Debabrata; Sahu, Kalyanasis

    2014-04-07

    In a neat electron-donating solvent (in this case aniline), photoinduced electron transfer (PET) from the solvent to an excited acceptor (e.g. a coumarin fluorophore) may be anticipated to be the most efficient because of the close contact of the acceptor with many donors. Addition of an inert component would most likely retard the PET process by replacing some donors from the neighbourhood of the acceptors. Surprisingly, we found dramatic acceleration of PET (6-10 fold enhancement compared to neat aniline), for coumarin 102 (C102) dissolved in a binary mixture of aniline and an inert solvent (cyclohexane or toluene). The PET induced fluorescence follows an anomalous trend against the mole fraction of aniline (XAN); first quenches up to certain XAN (0.075 for cyclohexane; 0.13 for toluene), thereafter, enhances with increase in XAN. Although the non-interacting component cannot directly participate in the PET process, it may modulate C102-aniline H-bonding association by changing the polarity of the medium or by disrupting the aniline-aniline H-bond. The study clearly illustrates the dominant role of hydrogen bonding in activating the electron transfer rate where standard thermodynamics predicts very weak donor-acceptor interaction.

  11. Systems approach to excitation-energy and electron transfer reaction networks in photosystem II complex: model studies for chlorophyll a fluorescence induction kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Shigenori; Ebina, Kuniyoshi

    2015-09-07

    Photosystem II (PS II) is a protein complex which evolves oxygen and drives charge separation for photosynthesis employing electron and excitation-energy transfer processes over a wide timescale range from picoseconds to milliseconds. While the fluorescence emitted by the antenna pigments of this complex is known as an important indicator of the activity of photosynthesis, its interpretation was difficult because of the complexity of PS II. In this study, an extensive kinetic model which describes the complex and multi-timescale characteristics of PS II is analyzed through the use of the hierarchical coarse-graining method proposed in the authors׳ earlier work. In this coarse-grained analysis, the reaction center (RC) is described by two states, open and closed RCs, both of which consist of oxidized and neutral special pairs being in quasi-equilibrium states. Besides, the PS II model at millisecond scale with three-state RC, which was studied previously, could be derived by suitably adjusting the kinetic parameters of electron transfer between tyrosine and RC. Our novel coarse-grained model of PS II can appropriately explain the light-intensity dependent change of the characteristic patterns of fluorescence induction kinetics from O-J-I-P, which shows two inflection points, J and I, between initial point O and peak point P, to O-J-D-I-P, which shows a dip D between J and I inflection points. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. LIME - a flexible, non-LTE line excitation and radiation transfer method for millimeter and far-infrared wavelengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinch, Christian; Hogerheijde, Michiel

    2010-01-01

    can be used as input, ranging from analytical descriptions over tabulated models to SPH simulations. To generate the Delaunay grid we sample the input model randomly, but weigh the sample probability with the molecular density and other parameters, and thereby we obtain an average grid point...... that can readily be compared to observations. Because of the high dynamic range in scales that can be resolved using this type of grid, our code is particularly well suited for modeling of ALMA data. Our code can furthermore deal with overlapping lines of multiple molecular and atomic species....

  13. PUMP DESIGN AND COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMIC ANALYSIS FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE SULFURIC ACID TRANSFER SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUNG-SIK CHOI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we proposed a newly designed sulfuric acid transfer system for the sulfur-iodine (SI thermochemical cycle. The proposed sulfuric acid transfer system was evaluated using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD analysis for investigating thermodynamic/hydrodynamic characteristics and material properties. This analysis was conducted to obtain reliable continuous operation parameters; in particular, a thermal analysis was performed on the bellows box and bellows at amplitudes and various frequencies (0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 Hz. However, the high temperatures and strongly corrosive operating conditions of the current sulfuric acid system present challenges with respect to the structural materials of the transfer system. To resolve this issue, we designed a novel transfer system using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, Teflon® as a bellows material for the transfer of sulfuric acid. We also carried out a CFD analysis of the design. The CFD results indicated that the maximum applicable temperature of PTFE is about 533 K (260 °C, even though its melting point is around 600 K. This result implies that the PTFE is a potential material for the sulfuric acid transfer system. The CFD simulations also confirmed that the sulfuric acid transfer system was designed properly for this particular investigation.

  14. Solvation dynamics and energetics of intramolecular hydride transfer reactions in biomass conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushrif, Samir H; Varghese, Jithin J; Krishnamurthy, Chethana B

    2015-02-21

    Hydride transfer changes the charge structure of the reactant and thus, may induce reorientation/reorganization of solvent molecules. This solvent reorganization may in turn alter the energetics of the reaction. In the present work, we investigate the intramolecular hydride transfer by taking Lewis acid catalyzed glucose to fructose isomerization as an example. The C2-C1 hydride transfer is the rate limiting step in this reaction. Water and methanol are used as solvents and hydride transfer is simulated in the presence of explicit solvent molecules, treated quantum mechanically and at a finite temperature, using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) and metadynamics. Activation free energy barrier for hydride transfer in methanol is found to be 50 kJ mol(-1) higher than that in water. In contrast, in density functional theory calculations, using an implicit solvent environment, the barriers are almost identical. Analysis of solvent dynamics and electronic polarization along the molecular dynamics trajectory and the results of CPMD-metadynamics simulation of the hydride transfer process in the absence of any solvent suggest that higher barrier in methanol is a result of non-equilibrium solvation. Methanol undergoes electronic polarization during the hydride transfer step. However, its molecular orientational relaxation is a much slower process that takes place after the hydride transfer, over an extended timescale. This results in non-equilibrium solvation. Water, on the other hand, does not undergo significant electronic polarization and thus, has to undergo minimal molecular reorientation to provide near equilibrium solvation to the transition state and an improved equilibrium solvation to the post hydride shift product state. Hence, the hydride transfer step is also observed to be exergonic in water and endergonic in methanol. The aforementioned explanation is juxtaposed to enzyme catalyzed charge transfer reactions, where the enhanced solvation of the

  15. An analysis of beamed wireless power transfer in the Fresnel zone using a dynamic, metasurface aperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David R.; Gowda, Vinay R.; Yurduseven, Okan; Larouche, Stéphane; Lipworth, Guy; Urzhumov, Yaroslav; Reynolds, Matthew S.

    2017-01-01

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) has been an active topic of research, with a number of WPT schemes implemented in the near-field (coupling) and far-field (radiation) regimes. Here, we consider a beamed WPT scheme based on a dynamically reconfigurable source aperture transferring power to receiving devices within the Fresnel region. In this context, the dynamic aperture resembles a reconfigurable lens capable of focusing power to a well-defined spot, whose dimension can be related to a point spread function. The necessary amplitude and phase distribution of the field imposed over the aperture can be determined in a holographic sense, by interfering a hypothetical point source located at the receiver location with a plane wave at the aperture location. While conventional technologies, such as phased arrays, can achieve the required control over phase and amplitude, they typically do so at a high cost; alternatively, metasurface apertures can achieve dynamic focusing with potentially lower cost. We present an initial tradeoff analysis of the Fresnel region WPT concept assuming a metasurface aperture, relating the key parameters such as spot size, aperture size, wavelength, and focal distance, as well as reviewing system considerations such as the availability of sources and power transfer efficiency. We find that approximate design formulas derived from the Gaussian optics approximation provide useful estimates of system performance, including transfer efficiency and coverage volume. The accuracy of these formulas is confirmed through numerical studies.

  16. A Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Hydrated Proton Transfer in Perfluorosulfonate Ionomer Membranes (Nafion 117

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A molecular dynamic model based on Lennard-Jones Potential, the interaction force between two particles, molecular diffusion, and radial distribution function (RDF is presented. The diffusion of the hydrated ion, triggered by both Grotthuss and vehicle mechanisms, is used to study the proton transfer in Nafion 117. The hydrated ion transfer mechanisms and the effects of the temperature, the water content in the membrane, and the electric field on the diffusion of the hydrated ion are analyzed. The molecular dynamic simulation results are in good agreement with those reported in the literature. The modeling results show that when the water content in Nafion 117 is low, H3O+ is the main transfer ion among the different hydrated ions. However, at higher water content, the hydrated ion in the form of H+(H2O2 is the main transfer ion. It is also found that the negatively charged sulfonic acid group as the fortified point facilitates the proton transfer in Nafion 117 better than the free water molecule. The diffusion of the hydrated ion can be improved by increasing the cell temperature, the water content in Nafion, and the electric field intensity.

  17. Poisson-distributed electron-transfer dynamics from single quantum dots to C60 molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Nianhui; Zhu, Haiming; Jin, Shengye; Zhan, Wei; Lian, Tianquan

    2011-01-25

    Functional quantum dot (QD)-based nanostructures are often constructed through the self-assembly of QDs with binding partners (molecules or other nanoparticles), a process that leads to a statistical distribution of the number of binding partners. Using single QD fluorescence spectroscopy, we probe this distribution and its effect on the function (electron-transfer dynamics) in QD-C60 complexes. Ensemble-averaged transient absorption and fluorescence decay as well as single QD fluorescence decay measurements show that the QD exciton emission was quenched by electron transfer from the QD to C60 molecules and the electron-transfer rate increases with the C60-to-QD ratio. The electron-transfer rate of single QD-C60 complexes fluctuates with time and varies among different QDs. The standard deviation increases linearly with the average of electron-transfer rates of single QD-C60 complexes, and the distributions of both quantities obey Poisson statistics. The observed distributions of single QD-C60 complexes and ensemble-averaged fluorescence decay kinetics can be described by a model that assumes a Poisson distribution of the number of adsorbed C60 molecules per QD. Our findings suggest that, in self-assembled QD nanostructures, the statistical distribution of the number of adsorbed partners can dominate the distributions of the averages and standard deviation of their interfacial dynamical properties.

  18. Nuclear spin/parity dependent spectroscopy and predissociation dynamics in vOH = 2 ← 0 overtone excited Ne-H2O clusters: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemkiewicz, Michael P.; Pluetzer, Christian; Loreau, Jérôme; van der Avoird, Ad; Nesbitt, David J.

    2017-12-01

    Vibrationally state selective overtone spectroscopy and state- and nuclear spin-dependent predissociation dynamics of weakly bound ortho- and para-Ne-H2O complexes (D0(ortho) = 34.66 cm-1 and D0(para) = 31.67 cm-1) are reported, based on near-infrared excitation of van der Waals cluster bands correlating with vOH = 2 ← 0 overtone transitions (|02-〉 and |02+〉) out of the ortho (101) and para (000) internal rotor states of the H2O moiety. Quantum theoretical calculations for nuclear motion on a high level potential energy surface [CCSD(T)/VnZf12 (n = 3, 4)], corrected for basis set superposition error and extrapolated to the complete basis set (CBS) limit, are employed to successfully predict and assign Π-Σ, Σ-Σ, and Σ-Π infrared bands in the spectra, where Σ or Π represent approximate projections of the body-fixed H2O angular momentum along the Ne-H2O internuclear axis. IR-UV pump-probe experimental capabilities permit real-time measurements of the vibrational predissociation dynamics, which indicate facile intramolecular vibrational energy transfer from the H2O vOH = 2 overtone vibrations into the VdWs (van der Waals) dissociation coordinate on the τprediss = 15-25 ns time scale. Whereas all predicted strong transitions in the ortho-Ne-H2O complexes are readily detected and assigned, vibrationally mediated photolysis spectra for the corresponding para-Ne-H2O bands are surprisingly absent despite ab initio predictions of Q-branch intensities with S/N > 20-40. Such behavior signals the presence of highly selective nuclear spin ortho-para predissociation dynamics in the upper state, for which we offer a simple mechanism based on Ne-atom mediated intramolecular vibrational relaxation in the H2O subunit (i.e., |02±〉 → {|01±〉; v2 = 2}), which is confirmed by the ab initio energy level predictions and the nascent OH rotational (N), spin orbit (Π1/2,3/2), and lambda doublet product distributions.

  19. The impulsive effects of momentum transfer on the dynamics of a novel ocean wave energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Christopher A.; O'Reilly, Oliver M.; Savaş, Ömer

    2013-10-01

    In a recent paper by Orazov et al. [On the dynamics of a novel ocean wave energy converter. Journal of Sound and Vibration329 (24) (2010) 5058-5069], a wave energy converter (WEC) was proposed. The converter features a mass modulation scheme and a simple model was used to examine its efficacy. The simple model did not adequately account for the momentum transfer which takes place during the mass modulation. The purpose of the present paper is to account for this transfer and to show that the WEC equipped with a novel and more general mass modulation scheme has the potential to improve its energy harvesting capabilities.

  20. Dynamic modeling of the cesium, strontium, and ruthenium transfer to grass and vegetables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renaud, P.; Real, J.; Maubert, H.; Roussel-Debet, S. (CE de Cadarache, Saint-Paul lez Durance (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire)

    1999-05-01

    From 1988 to 1993, the Nuclear Safety and Protection Institute (Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire -- IPSN) conducted experimental programs focused on transfers to vegetation following accidental localized deposits of radioactive aerosols. In relation to vegetable crops (fruit, leaves, and root vegetables) and meadow grass these experiments have enabled a determination of the factors involved in the transfer of cesium, strontium, and ruthenium at successive harvests, or cuttings, in respect of various time lags after contamination. The dynamic modeling given by these results allows an evaluation of changes in the mass activity of vegetables and grass during the months following deposit. It constitutes part of the ASTRAL post-accident radioecology model.