WorldWideScience

Sample records for excess light energy

  1. Bridges, Lights, and Hubris: Examples of Excessive Light Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upgren, A. R.

    2000-12-01

    Recently many new lighting projects have been planned, frequently for the purpose of bringing attention to a tower or bridge, with the intent of promoting it as a tourist attraction. Examples of this form of light pollution are illustrated here. Many proceed with plans to mount new floodlights pointed upward with most of the light shining directly up into the sky. At least three of the more excessive among them have been tabled or aborted upon objections by members of the International Dark-Sky Association and other environmental groups. Opposition to the most ill-conceived of these plans centers on waste of money and energy, excessive fatalities among migratory birds, damage to the aesthetic beauty and study of the night sky, and (near seacoasts) damage to the nesting and hatching of sea turtles. Constructive opposition to lighting excess and glare may include the substitution of tracer lights, such as the ones that adorn the great suspension bridges of New York and San Francisco. Tracer lights using full-cutoff shielding outline a structure much as lights on a Christmas tree delineate its shape, but floodlights in the mix render a washed-out effect similar to a Christmas tree in broad daylight. The AAS Committee on Light Pollution, Radio Interference, and Space Debris encourages a greater role for the Society in coordinating opposition to such projects, which is too often local and inexperienced.

  2. 10 CFR 904.10 - Excess energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Excess energy. 904.10 Section 904.10 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE CHARGES FOR THE SALE OF POWER FROM THE BOULDER CANYON PROJECT Power Marketing § 904.10 Excess energy. (a) If excess Energy is determined by the United States to be available...

  3. Principles of light energy management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, N.

    1994-01-01

    Six methods used to minimize excess energy effects associated with lighting systems for plant growth chambers are reviewed in this report. The energy associated with wall transmission and chamber operating equipment and the experimental requirements, such as fresh air and internal equipment, are not considered here. Only the energy associated with providing and removing the energy for lighting is considered.

  4. Principles of light energy management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, N. [Growth Chambers, Chagrin Falls, OH (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A review is presented on methods to minimize the effects of excess energy associated with lighting systems for plant growth. Information on lamp efficiencies and methods for separating and collecting unwanted heat is included.

  5. Metabolic acclimation to excess light intensity in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Maria C; Fiehn, Oliver; Durnford, Dion G

    2013-07-01

    There are several well-described acclimation responses to excess light in green algae but the effect on metabolism has not been thoroughly investigated. This study examines the metabolic changes during photoacclimation to high-light (HL) stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. Using principal component analysis, a clear metabolic response to HL intensity was observed on global metabolite pools, with major changes in the levels of amino acids and related nitrogen metabolites. Amino acid pools increased during short-term photoacclimation, but were especially prominent in HL-acclimated cultures. Unexpectedly, we observed an increase in mitochondrial metabolism through downstream photorespiratory pathways. The expression of two genes encoding key enzymes in the photorespiratory pathway, glycolate dehydrogenase and malate synthase, were highly responsive to the HL stress. We propose that this pathway contributes to metabolite pools involved in nitrogen assimilation and may play a direct role in photoacclimation. Our results suggest that primary and secondary metabolism is highly pliable and plays a critical role in coping with the energetic imbalance during HL exposure and a necessary adjustment to support an increased growth rate that is an effective energy sink for the excess reducing power generated during HL stress. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Energy potential of the modified excess sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zawieja Iwona

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the SCOD value of excess sludge it is possible to estimate an amount of energy potentially obtained during the methane fermentation process. Based on a literature review, it has been estimated that from 1 kg of SCOD it is possible to obtain 3.48 kWh of energy. Taking into account the above methane and energy ratio (i.e. 10 kWh/1Nm3 CH4, it is possible to determine the volume of methane obtained from the tested sludge. Determination of potential energy of sludge is necessary for the use of biogas as a source of power generators as cogeneration and ensure the stability of this type of system. Therefore, the aim of the study was to determine the energy potential of excess sludge subjected to the thermal and chemical disintegration. In the case of thermal disintegration, test was conducted in the low temperature 80°C. The reagent used for the chemical modification was a peracetic acid, which in an aqueous medium having strong oxidizing properties. The time of chemical modification was 6 hours. Applied dose of the reagent was 1.0 ml CH3COOOH/L of sludge. By subjecting the sludge disintegration by the test methods achieved an increase in the SCOD value of modified sludge, indicating the improvement of biodegradability along with a concomitant increase in their energy potential. The obtained experimental production of biogas from disintegrated sludge confirmed that it is possible to estimate potential intensity of its production. The SCOD value of 2576 mg O2/L, in the case of chemical disintegration, was obtained for a dose of 1.0 ml CH3COOH/L. For this dose the pH value was equal 6.85. In the case of thermal disintegration maximum SCOD value was 2246 mg O2/L obtained at 80°C and the time of preparation 6 h. It was estimated that in case of thermal disintegration as well as for the chemical disintegration for selected parameters, the potential energy for model digester of active volume of 5L was, respectively, 0.193 and 0,118 kWh.

  7. Energy potential of the modified excess sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawieja, Iwona

    2017-11-01

    On the basis of the SCOD value of excess sludge it is possible to estimate an amount of energy potentially obtained during the methane fermentation process. Based on a literature review, it has been estimated that from 1 kg of SCOD it is possible to obtain 3.48 kWh of energy. Taking into account the above methane and energy ratio (i.e. 10 kWh/1Nm3 CH4), it is possible to determine the volume of methane obtained from the tested sludge. Determination of potential energy of sludge is necessary for the use of biogas as a source of power generators as cogeneration and ensure the stability of this type of system. Therefore, the aim of the study was to determine the energy potential of excess sludge subjected to the thermal and chemical disintegration. In the case of thermal disintegration, test was conducted in the low temperature 80°C. The reagent used for the chemical modification was a peracetic acid, which in an aqueous medium having strong oxidizing properties. The time of chemical modification was 6 hours. Applied dose of the reagent was 1.0 ml CH3COOOH/L of sludge. By subjecting the sludge disintegration by the test methods achieved an increase in the SCOD value of modified sludge, indicating the improvement of biodegradability along with a concomitant increase in their energy potential. The obtained experimental production of biogas from disintegrated sludge confirmed that it is possible to estimate potential intensity of its production. The SCOD value of 2576 mg O2/L, in the case of chemical disintegration, was obtained for a dose of 1.0 ml CH3COOH/L. For this dose the pH value was equal 6.85. In the case of thermal disintegration maximum SCOD value was 2246 mg O2/L obtained at 80°C and the time of preparation 6 h. It was estimated that in case of thermal disintegration as well as for the chemical disintegration for selected parameters, the potential energy for model digester of active volume of 5L was, respectively, 0.193 and 0,118 kWh.

  8. Energy Efficient Task Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Logadottir, Asta; Ardkapan, Siamak Rahimi; Johnsen, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    the light source as far from the bottom edge as possible. The main results of the project show opportunities for energy savings in an office environment by reducing the installed power for the general lighting by applying a task light with a wide light distribution across the desk area , providing high...... illuminance uniformity . There is still work to be done on the prototype to optimize the energy consumption of the task light and measures need to be taken to minimize glare from the task light as well as reflected glare . The lamp head adjustment possibilities regarding tilting and turning result in problems...... to all objects on the desk than the two traditional reference task lights with LED retrofit light bulbs . By utilising this new type of task light, the energy consumption by general lighting can be reduced by approximately 40 % by fully exploiting the lower illuminance levels required by lighting...

  9. Light pollution: the possible consequences of excessive illumination on retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contín, M A; Benedetto, M M; Quinteros-Quintana, M L; Guido, M E

    2016-02-01

    Light is the visible part of the electromagnetic radiation within a range of 380-780 nm; (400-700 on primates retina). In vertebrates, the retina is adapted to capturing light photons and transmitting this information to other structures in the central nervous system. In mammals, light acts directly on the retina to fulfill two important roles: (1) the visual function through rod and cone photoreceptor cells and (2) non-image forming tasks, such as the synchronization of circadian rhythms to a 24 h solar cycle, pineal melatonin suppression and pupil light reflexes. However, the excess of illumination may cause retinal degeneration or accelerate genetic retinal diseases. In the last century human society has increased its exposure to artificial illumination, producing changes in the Light/Dark cycle, as well as in light wavelengths and intensities. Although, the consequences of unnatural illumination or light pollution have been underestimated by modern society in its way of life, light pollution may have a strong impact on people's health. The effects of artificial light sources could have direct consequences on retinal health. Constant exposure to different wavelengths and intensities of light promoted by light pollution may produce retinal degeneration as a consequence of photoreceptor or retinal pigment epithelium cells death. In this review we summarize the different mechanisms of retinal damage related to the light exposure, which generates light pollution.

  10. Two mechanisms for dissipation of excess light in monomeric and trimeric light-harvesting complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall' Osto, Luca [Univ. di Verona, Verona (Italy). Dipartimento di Biotecnologie; Cazzaniga, Stefano [Univ. di Verona, Verona (Italy). Dipartimento di Biotecnologie; Bressan, Mauro [Univ. di Verona, Verona (Italy). Dipartimento di Biotecnologie; Paleček, David [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Physics; Židek, Karel [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Physics; Niyogi, Krishna K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Dept. of Plant and Microbial Biology; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division; Fleming, Graham R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry, Graduate Group in Applied Science and Technology; Zigmantas, Donatas [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Physics; Bassi, Roberto [Univ. di Verona, Verona (Italy). Dipartimento di Biotecnologie; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Firenze (Italy). Istituto per la Protezione delle Piante (IPP)

    2017-04-10

    Oxygenic photoautotrophs require mechanisms for rapidly matching the level of chlorophyll excited states from light harvesting with the rate of electron transport from water to carbon dioxide. These photoprotective reactions prevent formation of reactive excited states and photoinhibition. The fastest response to excess illumination is the so-called non-photochemical quenching which, in higher plants, requires the luminal pH sensor PsbS and other yet unidentified components of the photosystem II antenna. Both trimeric light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) and monomeric LHC proteins have been indicated as site(s) of the heat-dissipative reactions. Different mechanisms have been proposed: Energy transfer to a lutein quencher in trimers, formation of a zeaxanthin radical cation in monomers. Here, we report on the construction of a mutant lacking all monomeric LHC proteins but retaining LHCII trimers. Its non-photochemical quenching induction rate was substantially slower with respect to the wild type. A carotenoid radical cation signal was detected in the wild type, although it was lost in the mutant. Here, we conclude that non-photochemical quenching is catalysed by two independent mechanisms, with the fastest activated response catalysed within monomeric LHC proteins depending on both zeaxanthin and lutein and on the formation of a radical cation. Trimeric LHCII was responsible for the slowly activated quenching component whereas inclusion in supercomplexes was not required. Finally, this latter activity does not depend on lutein nor on charge transfer events, whereas zeaxanthin was essential.

  11. Assessment of photobiological safety of energy-efficiency urban lighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Stanisław Pierzchała

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Exceeding the safe threshold for exposure on high energy radiation (UV and blue light could cause the emergence of a number of diseases. Eyesight is particularly sensitive to excessive lighting. This paper presents the laboratory research on the assessment of the photobiological risk generated by the energy-efficiency urban lighting. The results show that LED lighting systems can be a source of radiation that significantly negatively affects the eyesight and could contribute to circadian rhythm disorders.

  12. [Effects of excess Mn on photosynthesis characteristics in cucumber under different light intensity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qinghua; Zhu, Zhujun; Ying, Quansheng; Qian, Qiongqiu

    2005-06-01

    By a solution culture experiment, this paper studied the effects of excess Mn on the growth, chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and photosynthesis of cucumber under different light intensity. The results indicated that excess Mn inhibited plant growth, which was more obvious under high light intensity than under low light intensity. The primary maximum photochemical efficiency of PSII (v/Fm), quantum efficiency of non-cyclic electron transport of PSII (phiPSII), and photochemical quenching (qP) were significantly decreased in excess Mn treatment under high light intensity, while no significant effects on Fv/Fm and qP were observed under low light intensity. Excess Mn, particularly under high light intensity, decreased net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and stomatal conductance (Gs). Excess Mn increased intracellular CO2 (Ci) under high light intensity and decreased Ci under low light intensity, while stomatal limitation value (Ls) was just reverse to Ci. It could be concluded that the decrease of Pn in excess Mn treatment was not resulted from stomatal limitation under high light intensity, but was true under low light intensity.

  13. ENERGY STAR Certified Products - Lighting

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data set contains a simplified list of all currently certified ENERGY STAR Lighting models with basic model information collected across all product categories...

  14. Intermediate-energy light sources

    CERN Document Server

    Corbett, W

    2003-01-01

    Increasingly, atomic scale information underlies scientific and technological progress in disciplines ranging from pharmaceutical development to materials synthesis to environmental remediation. While a variety of research tools are used to provide atomic scale information, synchrotron radiation has proved invaluable in this quest. The rapid growth of soft- and hard X-ray synchrotron light sources stands as stark testimony to the importance and utility of synchrotron radiation. Starting from just a handful of synchrotron light sources in the early 1970s, this burgeoning field now includes over 70 proposed, in-construction, or operating facilities in 23 countries on five continents. Along the way, synchrotron light facilities have evolved from small laboratories extracting light parasitically from storage rings designed for high-energy physics research to large, dedicated sources using the latest technology to produce extraordinarily bright photon beams. The basic layout of a multi-GeV storage ring light sourc...

  15. Dissipation of excess excitation energy of the needle leaves in Pinus trees during cold winters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, AO; Cui, Zhen-Hai; Yu, Jia-Lin; Hu, Zi-Ling; Ding, Rui; Ren, Da-Ming; Zhang, Li-Jun

    2016-12-01

    Photooxidative damage to the needle leaves of evergreen trees results from the absorption of excess excitation energy. Efficient dissipation of this energy is essential to prevent photodamage. In this study, we determined the fluorescence transients, absorption spectra, chlorophyll contents, chlorophyll a/ b ratios, and relative membrane permeabilities of needle leaves of Pinus koraiensis, Pinus tabulaeformis, and Pinus armandi in both cold winter and summer. We observed a dramatic decrease in the maximum fluorescence ( F m) and substantial absorption of light energy in winter leaves of all three species. The F m decline was not correlated with a decrease in light absorption or with changes in chlorophyll content and chlorophyll a/ b ratio. The results suggested that the winter leaves dissipated a large amount of excess energy as heat. Because the cold winter leaves had lost normal physiological function, the heat dissipation depended solely on changes in the photosystem II supercomplex rather than the xanthophyll cycle. These findings imply that more attention should be paid to heat dissipation via changes in the photosystem complex structure during the growing season.

  16. Energy Efficiency Through Lighting Upgrades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berst, Kara [Chickasaw Nation, Ada, OK (United States); Howeth, Maria [Chickasaw Nation, Ada, OK (United States)

    2013-02-26

    Lighting upgrades including neon to LED, incandescent to CFL's and T-12 to T-8 and T-5's were completed through this grant. A total of 16 Chickasaw nation facilities decreased their carbon footprint because of these grant funds. Calculations used were based on comparing the energy usage from the previous year's average and the current energy usage. For facilities without a full year's set of energy bills, the month after installation was compared to the same month from the previous year. Overall, the effect the lighting change-outs had for the gaming centers and casinos far exceeded expectations. For the Madill Gaming Center; both an interior and exterior upgrade was performed which resulted in a 31% decrease in energy consumption. This same reduction was seen in every facility that participated in the grant. Just by simply changing out light bulbs to newer energy efficient equivalents, a decrease in energy usage can be achieved and this was validated by the return on investment seen at Chickasaw Nation facilities. Along with the technical project tasks were awareness sessions presented at Chickasaw Head Starts. The positive message of environmental stewardship was passed down to head start students and passed along to Chickasaw employees. Excitement was created in those that learned what they could do to help reduce their energy bills and many followed through and took the idea home. For a fairy low cost, the general public can also use this technique to lower their energy consumption both at home and at work. Although the idea behind the project was somewhat simple, true benefits have been gained through environmental awareness and reductions of energy costs.

  17. Unfair and excessive prices in the energy sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Woude, M. [Erasmus University, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-05-15

    The concept of competition refers to a process where firms dispute the favour of their customers by proposing better products at the lowest possible price. This consumer welfare creating process is to a large extent Darwinian in nature: those who cannot compete must die. The law of supply and demand is ruthless and so is competition law. Principles of fairness and justice are extraneous to competition law: the lion eats the deer. Still, EC competition law is not amoral, as illustrated by the very first example of abusive conduct given by Article 82 EC: 'directly or indirectly imposing unfair purchase or selling prices or other unfair trading conditions' can constitute an abuse. The concept of fairness as a constituent element of EC competition law may disturb those who analyze the competitive process through a scientific lens. Fairness does not relate to economic effects and cannot be measured or quantified. It is a concept that appeals to ethics and norms. The dichotomy between competition as an amoral welfare creating process, that can be the subject of economic research, and the normative concept of fairness does not necessarily lead to a contradiction. Fairness becomes relevant where the competitive process has ceased to play its welfare creating role: i.e. where monopolies prevail over perfect competition. When confronted to a monopoly, abstention is the customer's only choice and for some goods, such as food, clothing and housing, abstention is not considered as a realistic choice. In scenarios where the monopolist faces an inelastic demand curve, fairness is probably the customer's only safety buoy. The energy sector is one of the sectors where these situations occur. In our modern societies, customers expect the light to go on, when they turn the switch, and their houses to be heated, when activating their boilers. Candles and jumpers not offering realistic alternatives, demand is close to inelastic, at least on the short term. Moreover

  18. MicroBooNE: The Search For The MiniBooNE Low Energy Excess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaleko, David [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes work towards the search for a low energy excess in MicroBooNE. What MicroBooNE is, what the low energy excess is, and how one searches for the latter in the former will be described in detail.

  19. Replication of the Apparent Excess Heat Effect in a Light Water-Potassium Carbonate-Nickel Electrolytic Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedra, Janis M.; Myers, Ira T.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Baldwin, Richard S.

    1996-01-01

    Replication of experiments claiming to demonstrate excess heat production in light water-Ni-K2CO3 electrolytic cells was found to produce an apparent excess heat of 11 W maximum, for 60 W electrical power into the cell. Power gains range from 1.06 to 1.68. The cell was operated at four different dc current levels plus one pulsed current run at 1 Hz, 10% duty cycle. The 28 liter cell used in these verification tests was on loan from a private corporation whose own tests with similar cells are documented to produce 50 W steady excess heat for a continuous period exceeding hundreds of days. The apparent excess heat can not be readily explained either in terms of nonlinearity of the cell's thermal conductance at a low temperature differential or by thermoelectric heat pumping. However, the present data do admit efficient recombination of dissolved hydrogen-oxygen as an ordinary explanation. Calorimetry methods and heat balance calculations for the verification tests are described. Considering the large magnitude of benefit if this effect is found to be a genuine new energy source, a more thorough investigation of evolved heat in the nickel-hydrogen system in both electrolytic and gaseous loading cells remains warranted.

  20. Revisiting light stringy states in view of the 750 GeV diphoton excess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Anastasopoulos

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate light massive string states that appear at brane intersections. They replicate the massless spectrum in a richer fashion and may be parametrically lighter than standard Regge excitations. We identify the first few physical states and determine their BRST invariant vertex operators. In the supersymmetric case we reconstruct the super-multiplet structure. We then compute some simple interactions, such as the decay rate of a massive scalar or vector into two massless fermions. Finally we suggest an alternative interpretation of the 750 GeV diphoton excess at LHC in terms of a light massive string state, a replica of the Standard Model Higgs.

  1. Revisiting light stringy states in view of the 750 GeV diphoton excess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastasopoulos, Pascal, E-mail: pascal@hep.itp.tuwien.ac.at [Technische Universität Wien, Institut für Theoretische Physik, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Bianchi, Massimo, E-mail: massimo.bianchi@roma2.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica and Sezione I.N.F.N., Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy)

    2016-10-15

    We investigate light massive string states that appear at brane intersections. They replicate the massless spectrum in a richer fashion and may be parametrically lighter than standard Regge excitations. We identify the first few physical states and determine their BRST invariant vertex operators. In the supersymmetric case we reconstruct the super-multiplet structure. We then compute some simple interactions, such as the decay rate of a massive scalar or vector into two massless fermions. Finally we suggest an alternative interpretation of the 750 GeV diphoton excess at LHC in terms of a light massive string state, a replica of the Standard Model Higgs.

  2. Conversion of light energy in algal culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorschot, van J.L.P.

    1955-01-01

    The conversion of light energy in algal culture was quantitatively studied under various growth conditions. Absorbed light energy during growth and energy fixed in organic material were estimated. The efficiency of the conversion was expressed as percentage of fixed energy (calculated from estimates

  3. Excess heat production of future net zero energy buildings within district heating areas in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steffen; Möller, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    buildings in Denmark are connected to electricity grids and around half are connected to districtheating (DH) systems. Connecting buildings to larger energy systems enables them to send and receive energy from these systems. This paper’s objective is to examine how excess heat production from NZEBs...... excess heat production from solar thermal collectors. The main findings are that the excess heat from NZEBs can benefit DH systems by decreasing the production from production units utilizing combustible fuels. In DH areas where the heat demand in summer months is already covered by renewable energy......Denmark’s long-term energy goal is to develop an energy system solely based on renewable energy sources by 2050. To reach this goal, energy savings in buildings is essential. Therefore, the focus on energy efficient measures in buildings and netzeroenergybuildings (NZEBs) has increased. Most...

  4. Periods of Excess Energy in Extreme Weather Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor G. Zurbenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of periodic signals that are embedded in noise is a very important task in many applications. This already difficult task is even more complex when some observations are missed or some are presented irregularly in time. Kolmogorov-Zurbenko (KZ filtration, a well-developed method, offers a solution to this problem. One section of this paper provides examples of very precise reconstructions of multiple periodic signals covered with high level noise, noise levels that make those signals invisible within the original data. The ability to reconstruct signals from noisy data is applied to the numerical reconstruction of tidal waves in atmospheric pressure. The existence of such waves was proved by well-known naturalist Chapman, but due to the high synoptic fluctuation in atmospheric pressure he was unable to numerically reproduce the waves. Reconstruction of the atmospheric tidal waves reveals a potential intensification on wind speed during hurricanes, which could increase the danger imposed by hurricanes. Due to the periodic structure of the atmospheric tidal wave, it is predictable in time and space, which is important information for the prediction of excess force in developing hurricanes.

  5. Light-induced changes within photosystem II protects Microcoleus sp. in biological desert sand crusts against excess light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itzhak Ohad

    Full Text Available The filamentous cyanobacterium Microcoleus vaginatus, a major primary producer in desert biological sand crusts, is exposed to frequent hydration (by early morning dew followed by desiccation during potentially damaging excess light conditions. Nevertheless, its photosynthetic machinery is hardly affected by high light, unlike "model" organisms whereby light-induced oxidative stress leads to photoinactivation of the oxygen-evolving photosystem II (PSII. Field experiments showed a dramatic decline in the fluorescence yield with rising light intensity in both drying and artificially maintained wet plots. Laboratory experiments showed that, contrary to "model" organisms, photosynthesis persists in Microcoleus sp. even at light intensities 2-3 times higher than required to saturate oxygen evolution. This is despite an extensive loss (85-90% of variable fluorescence and thermoluminescence, representing radiative PSII charge recombination that promotes the generation of damaging singlet oxygen. Light induced loss of variable fluorescence is not inhibited by the electron transfer inhibitors 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU, 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropylbenzoquinone (DBMIB, nor the uncoupler carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP, thus indicating that reduction of plastoquinone or O(2, or lumen acidification essential for non-photochemical quenching (NPQ are not involved. The rate of Q(A (- re-oxidation in the presence of DCMU is enhanced with time and intensity of illumination. The difference in temperatures required for maximal thermoluminescence emissions from S(2/Q(A (- (Q band, 22 degrees C and S(2,3/Q(B (- (B band, 25 degrees C charge recombinations is considerably smaller in Microcoleus as compared to "model" photosynthetic organisms, thus indicating a significant alteration of the S(2/Q(A (- redox potential. We propose that enhancement of non-radiative charge recombination with rising light intensity may reduce

  6. The 750 GeV diphoton excess as a first light on supersymmetry breaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Casas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the most exciting explanations advanced for the recent diphoton excess found by ATLAS and CMS is in terms of sgoldstino decays: a signal of low-energy supersymmetry-breaking scenarios. The sgoldstino, a scalar, couples directly to gluons and photons, with strength related to gaugino masses, that can be of the right magnitude to explain the excess. However, fitting the suggested resonance width, Γ≃45 GeV, is not so easy. In this paper we explore efficient possibilities to enhance the sgoldstino width, via the decay into two Higgses, two Higgsinos and through mixing between the sgoldstino and the Higgs boson. In addition, we present an alternative and more efficient mechanism to generate a mass splitting between the scalar and pseudoscalar components of the sgoldstino, which has been suggested as an interesting alternative explanation to the apparent width of the resonance.

  7. Rapid Recovery Gene Downregulation during Excess-Light Stress and Recovery in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Peter A; Ganguly, Diep R; Smith, Aaron B; Murray, Kevin D; Estavillo, Gonzalo M; Searle, Iain; Ford, Ethan; Bogdanović, Ozren; Lister, Ryan; Borevitz, Justin O; Eichten, Steven R; Pogson, Barry J

    2017-08-01

    Stress recovery may prove to be a promising approach to increase plant performance and, theoretically, mRNA instability may facilitate faster recovery. Transcriptome (RNA-seq, qPCR, sRNA-seq, and PARE) and methylome profiling during repeated excess-light stress and recovery was performed at intervals as short as 3 min. We demonstrate that 87% of the stress-upregulated mRNAs analyzed exhibit very rapid recovery. For instance, HSP101 abundance declined 2-fold every 5.1 min. We term this phenomenon rapid recovery gene downregulation (RRGD), whereby mRNA abundance rapidly decreases promoting transcriptome resetting. Decay constants (k) were modeled using two strategies, linear and nonlinear least squares regressions, with the latter accounting for both transcription and degradation. This revealed extremely short half-lives ranging from 2.7 to 60.0 min for 222 genes. Ribosome footprinting using degradome data demonstrated RRGD loci undergo cotranslational decay and identified changes in the ribosome stalling index during stress and recovery. However, small RNAs and 5'-3' RNA decay were not essential for recovery of the transcripts examined, nor were any of the six excess light-associated methylome changes. We observed recovery-specific gene expression networks upon return to favorable conditions and six transcriptional memory types. In summary, rapid transcriptome resetting is reported in the context of active recovery and cellular memory. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  8. ENERGY STAR Certified Light Commercial HVAC

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 3.1 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Light Commercial HVAC that are effective as of...

  9. Guide to Energy-Efficient Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-10-01

    A fact sheet from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Lighting accounts for about 15% of an average home’s electricity use, so it pays to make energy-efficient choices.

  10. Energy efficient lighting in the retail sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This Good Practice Guide gives details on how energy efficient lighting can be incorporated in the brief for a lighting consultant or contractor. The advantages of energy efficiency are highlighted, and the lighting of retail stores, the introduction of energy efficiency measures, and the application of good practice are discussed. Case studies of W H Smith, Cambridge, Tesco Stores, Boots plc, the Harvey Centre, Harlow, and the National Westminster Bank plc are presented. A guide for senior executives and specialists in lighting design is also included. (UK)

  11. New Light on Dark Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    observations show that the temperature changes with radius are much steeper than predicted by the currently favoured models, indicating that most of the near-infrared emission emerges from hot material located very close to the star, that is, within one or two times the Earth-Sun distance (1-2 AU). This also implies that dust cannot exist so close to the star, since the strong energy radiated by the star heats and ultimately destroys the dust grains. ESO PR Photo 03/08 ESO PR Photo 03b/08 The Region Around MWC 147 "We have performed detailed numerical simulations to understand these observations and reached the conclusion that we observe not only the outer dust disc, but also measure strong emission from a hot inner gaseous disc. This suggests that the disc is not a passive one, simply reprocessing the light from the star," explained Kraus. "Instead, the disc is active, and we see the material, which is just transported from the outer disc parts towards the forming star." ESO PR Photo 03/08 ESO PR Photo 03c/08 Close-up on MWC 147 The best-fit model is that of a disc extending out to 100 AU, with the star increasing in mass at a rate of seven millionths of a solar mass per year. "Our study demonstrates the power of ESO's VLTI to probe the inner structure of discs around young stars and to reveal how stars reach their final mass," said Stefan Kraus. More Information The authors report their results in a paper in the Astrophysical Journal ("Detection of an inner gaseous component in a Herbig Be star accretion disk: Near- and mid-infrared spectro-interferometry and radiative transfer modeling of MWC 147", by Stefan Kraus, Thomas Preibisch, Keichii Ohnaka").

  12. HOT DUST OBSCURED GALAXIES WITH EXCESS BLUE LIGHT: DUAL AGN OR SINGLE AGN UNDER EXTREME CONDITIONS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assef, R. J.; Diaz-Santos, T. [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército Libertador 441, Santiago (Chile); Walton, D. J.; Brightman, M. [Space Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stern, D.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Tsai, C.-W. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Mail Stop 169-236, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Alexander, D. [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Bauer, F. [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Blain, A. W. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, 1 University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Finkelstein, S. L. [The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Hickox, R. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Wu, J. W., E-mail: roberto.assef@mail.udp.cl [UCLA Astronomy, P.O. Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    Hot dust-obscured galaxies (Hot DOGs) are a population of hyper-luminous infrared galaxies identified by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission from their very red mid-IR colors, and characterized by hot dust temperatures (T > 60 K). Several studies have shown clear evidence that the IR emission in these objects is powered by a highly dust-obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) that shows close to Compton-thick absorption at X-ray wavelengths. Thanks to the high AGN obscuration, the host galaxy is easily observable, and has UV/optical colors usually consistent with those of a normal galaxy. Here we discuss a sub-population of eight Hot DOGs that show enhanced rest-frame UV/optical emission. We discuss three scenarios that might explain the excess UV emission: (i) unobscured light leaked from the AGN by reflection over the dust or by partial coverage of the accretion disk; (ii) a second unobscured AGN in the system; or (iii) a luminous young starburst. X-ray observations can help discriminate between these scenarios. We study in detail the blue excess Hot DOG WISE J020446.13–050640.8, which was serendipitously observed by Chandra/ACIS-I for 174.5 ks. The X-ray spectrum is consistent with a single, hyper-luminous, highly absorbed AGN, and is strongly inconsistent with the presence of a secondary unobscured AGN. Based on this, we argue that the excess blue emission in this object is most likely either due to reflection or a co-eval starburst. We favor the reflection scenario as the unobscured star formation rate needed to power the UV/optical emission would be ≳1000 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. Deep polarimetry observations could confirm the reflection hypothesis.

  13. Embodied Energy and Off-Grid Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alstone, Peter; Mills, Evan; Jacobson, Arne

    2011-01-25

    The greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from fuel-based lighting are substantial given the paltry levels of lighting service provided to users, leading to a great opportunity for GHG mitigation byencouraging the switch from fuel-based to rechargeable LED lighting. However, as with most new energy technology, switching to efficient lighting requires an up-front investment of energy(and GHGs) embedded in the manufacture of replacement components. We studied a population of off-grid lighting users in 2008-2009 in Kenya who were given the opportunity to adopt LEDlighting. Based on their use patterns with the LED lights and the levels of kerosene offset we observed, we found that the embodied energy of the LED lamp was"paid for" in only one month for grid charged products and two months for solar charged products. Furthermore, the energyreturn-on investment-ratio (energy produced or offset over the product's service life divided by energy embedded) for off-grid LED lighting ranges from 12 to 24, which is on par with on-gridsolar and large-scale wind energy. We also found that the energy embodied in the manufacture of a typical hurricane lantern is about one-half to one-sixth of that embodied in the particular LEDlights that we evaluated, indicating that the energy payback time would be moderately faster if LEDs ultimately displace the production of kerosene lanterns. As LED products improve, weanticipate longer service lives and more successful displacement of kerosene lighting, both of which will speed the already rapid recovery of embodied energy in these products. Our studyprovides a detailed appendix with embodied energy values for a variety of components used to construct off-grid LED lighting, which can be used to analyze other products.

  14. Energy efficient lighting and communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Z.; Kavehrad, M.; Deng, P.

    2012-01-01

    As Light-Emitting Diode (LED)'s increasingly displace incandescent lighting over the next few years, general applications of Visible Light Communication (VLC) technology are expected to include wireless internet access, vehicle-to-vehicle communications, broadcast from LED signage, and machine-to-machine communications. An objective in this paper is to reveal the influence of system parameters on the power distribution and communication quality, in a general plural sources VLC system. It is demonstrated that sources' Half-Power Angles (HPA), receivers' Field-Of Views (FOV), sources layout and the power distribution among sources are significant impact factors. Based on our findings, we developed a method to adaptively change working status of each LED respectively according to users' locations. The program minimizes total power emitted while simultaneously ensuring sufficient light intensity and communication quality for each user. The paper also compares Orthogonal Frequency-Division Multiplexing (OFDM) and On-Off Keying (OOK) signals performance in indoor optical wireless communications. The simulation is carried out for different locations where different impulse response distortions are experienced. OFDM seems a better choice than prevalent OOK for indoor VLC due to its high resistance to multi-path effect and delay spread. However, the peak-to-average power limitations of the method must be investigated for lighting LEDs.

  15. ENERGY RECOVERY POTENTIAL FROM EXCESS PRESSURE in WATER SUPPLY and DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Ethem Karadirek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability of water supply systems has started to become an important issue besides continuous and hygienic supply of water. Sustainable water supply systems require improvement of energy efficiency, reduction of energy and water losses in water distribution systems and reduction of carbon dioxide emissions. Pressure is one of the main design parameters for gravity water supply systems and water distribution networks. Therefore, pressure has to be between certain limits. An excess pressure occurs during water transmission from high elevations of water resources to low elevations. By use of break pressure tanks, water storage tanks or pressure reducing valves (PRV excess pressure is reduced and damages on transmission pipes are prevented. However, energy recovery from excess pressure is possible at this stage by using turbines. Similarly, PRVs are used at certain locations of water distribution networks to control excess water pressure and to reduce it down to optimum operational levels. Energy recovery from excess pressure is also possible at this stage although energy recovery will be low. High pressure at water supply systems causes both energy and water losses. In Turkey, allowable water pressure at water distribution networks is between 20-60 m water column but excess pressure is commonly observed. At low pressure levels, water cannot reach water subscribers and this causes customer dissatisfaction. On the other side, at high pressure levels, water losses and pipe bursts increase which causes indirect increase in energy losses. For sustainable operation of water distribution networks, it is recommended to divide the network into smaller and independent subzones (District Metered Area, DMA. By placing a flow meter and a pressure meter at the entrance of a DMA, flow rate and pressure could be monitored on-line. However, in order to monitor spatial and temporal variations of flow rate and pressure at all pipes in the network, a hydraulic

  16. The price of protein: combining evolutionary and economic analysis to understand excessive energy consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, R C; Simpson, S J; Raubenheimer, D

    2010-12-01

    Excessive weight gain appears, thermodynamically at least, straightforward: growing energy intake and/or falling energy expenditure create an energetic surplus, resulting in fat accumulation. The situation is, however, far more complex, with genetic, physiological, social, psychological and economic factors all implicated. Thus the causes of excessive weight gain remain difficult to disentangle. We combine two recent developments from different areas of nutrition research: the study of food prices in relation to energy content and the hypothesis that an evolved propensity to regulate protein intake more strongly than non-protein calories exerts powerful leverage on overall energy intake. We partition the energy content of a range of common supermarket foods, and show that increasing overall energy content only modestly raises the cost of foods, largely as a result of macronutrients having very different costs. Higher food prices are associated with higher protein content and lower carbohydrate content, whereas fat content was not significantly associated with food price. We show that the differential costs of energy from protein and carbohydrates may bias consumers towards diets high in carbohydrate energy, leading them to consume excessive energy to meet their dietary protein needs. We review evidence from physiology, evolution and economics that support our suggestion. © 2010 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2010 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  17. Procedure to Measure Indoor Lighting Energy Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deru, M.; Blair, N.; Torcellini, P.

    2005-10-01

    This document provides standard definitions of performance metrics and methods to determine them for the energy performance of building interior lighting systems. It can be used for existing buildings and for proposed buildings. The primary users for whom these documents are intended are building energy analysts and technicians who design, install, and operate data acquisition systems, and who analyze and report building energy performance data. Typical results from the use of this procedure are the monthly and annual energy used for lighting, energy savings from occupancy or daylighting controls, and the percent of the total building energy use that is used by the lighting system. The document is not specifically intended for retrofit applications. However, it does complement Measurement and Verification protocols that do not provide detailed performance metrics or measurement procedures.

  18. Electrical Energy Harvesting from Thermal Energy with Converged Infrared Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, S. Y.; Kok, S. L.

    2017-06-01

    Photovoltaics (PV) cell is a common energy harvester that had been used to harvest solar energy and convert it into electrical energy. However, the vast energy from the spectrum of sunlight is not fully harvested. Therefore, thermoelectric (TE) module that harvest electrical energy from heat is being proposed in this paper. Generally, the part of the sunlight spectrum that induce heat is in the spectrum band of infrared (IR). For the experimental set-up in this paper, infrared (IR) light bulb was being used to simulate the IR spectrum band of the sunlight. In order to maximize the heat energy collection, a convex lens was being used to converge the IR light and therefore focused the heat on an aluminium sheet and heat sink which was placed on top of the hot side of the TE module. The distance between convex lens and IR light bulb is varying in between 10cm and 55cm and the reading was taken at an interval of 5cm. Firstly, the temperature of the IR light and converged IR light were recorded and plotted in graph. The graph showed that the temperature of the converged IR light bulb is higher than the IR light bulb. Lastly, the voltage and power output of the TE module with different heat source was compared. The output voltage and power of the TE module increased inverse proportional to the distance between IR light bulb and TE module.

  19. Green Lighting. Energy-efficient integrated lighting systems - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linhart, F.; Scartezzini, J.-L.

    2009-10-15

    The objective of the Green Lighting project was to develop a High Performance Integrated Lighting System, based on advanced technologies for day- and electric lighting, achieving a Lighting Power Density (LPD) that does not exceed 3 W/m{sup 2}. The project has revealed that Anidolic Daylighting Systems (ADS) are an ideal basis for High Performance Integrated Lighting Systems. Not only are they able to provide adequate illumination (i.e. sufficiently high illuminance) in office rooms during large fractions of normal office hours, under various sky conditions and over the entire year, but they are also highly appreciated by office occupants at the condition that glare control mechanisms are available. Complementary electric lighting is, however, still necessary to back up the ADS at times when there is insufficient daylight flux available. It was shown during this project, that the most interesting trade-offs between energy-efficiency and visual comfort are obtained by using a combination of ceiling-mounted directly emitting luminaires with very high optical efficiencies for ambient lighting and portable desk lamps for temporary task lighting. The most appropriate lamps for the ceiling-mounted luminaires are currently highly efficient fluorescent tubes, but white LED tubes can be considered a realistic option for the future. The most suitable light sources for desk lamps for temporary task lighting are Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) and white LED light bulbs. Based on the above-mentioned technologies, a High Performance Integrated Lighting System with a very low LPD has been developed over the last three years. The system has been set up in an office room of the LESO solar experimental building located on the EPFL campus; it has been tested intensively during a Post-Occupancy Evaluation (POE) study involving twenty human subjects. This study has revealed that the subjects' performance and subjective visual comfort was improved by the new system, compared to

  20. Water droplet excess free energy determined by cluster mitosis using guided molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Gabriel V.; Hunt, Patricia A.; Müller, Erich A.; Jackson, George; Ford, Ian J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a vital role in affecting climate by influencing the properties and lifetimes of clouds and precipitation. Understanding the underlying microscopic mechanisms involved in the nucleation of aerosol droplets from the vapour phase is therefore of great interest. One key thermodynamic quantity in nucleation is the excess free energy of cluster formation relative to that of the saturated vapour. In our current study, the excess free energy is extracted for clusters of pure water modelled with the TIP4P/2005 intermolecular potential using a method based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and the Jarzynski relation. The change in free energy associated with the "mitosis" or division of a cluster of N water molecules into two N/2 sub-clusters is evaluated. This methodology is an extension of the disassembly procedure used recently to calculate the excess free energy of argon clusters [H. Y. Tang and I. J. Ford, Phys. Rev. E 91, 023308 (2015)]. Our findings are compared to the corresponding excess free energies obtained from classical nucleation theory (CNT) as well as internally consistent classical theory (ICCT). The values of the excess free energy that we obtain with the mitosis method are consistent with CNT for large cluster sizes but for the smallest clusters, the results tend towards ICCT; for intermediate sized clusters, we obtain values between the ICCT and CNT predictions. Furthermore, the curvature-dependent surface tension which can be obtained by regarding the clusters as spherical droplets of bulk density is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cluster size for the studied range. The data are compared to other values reported in the literature, agreeing qualitatively with some but disagreeing with the values determined by Joswiak et al. [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 4267 (2013)] using a biased mitosis approach; an assessment of the differences is the main motivation for our current study.

  1. Water droplet excess free energy determined by cluster mitosis using guided molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, Gabriel V.; Müller, Erich A.; Jackson, George [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hunt, Patricia A. [Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Ford, Ian J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-28

    Atmospheric aerosols play a vital role in affecting climate by influencing the properties and lifetimes of clouds and precipitation. Understanding the underlying microscopic mechanisms involved in the nucleation of aerosol droplets from the vapour phase is therefore of great interest. One key thermodynamic quantity in nucleation is the excess free energy of cluster formation relative to that of the saturated vapour. In our current study, the excess free energy is extracted for clusters of pure water modelled with the TIP4P/2005 intermolecular potential using a method based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and the Jarzynski relation. The change in free energy associated with the “mitosis” or division of a cluster of N water molecules into two N/2 sub-clusters is evaluated. This methodology is an extension of the disassembly procedure used recently to calculate the excess free energy of argon clusters [H. Y. Tang and I. J. Ford, Phys. Rev. E 91, 023308 (2015)]. Our findings are compared to the corresponding excess free energies obtained from classical nucleation theory (CNT) as well as internally consistent classical theory (ICCT). The values of the excess free energy that we obtain with the mitosis method are consistent with CNT for large cluster sizes but for the smallest clusters, the results tend towards ICCT; for intermediate sized clusters, we obtain values between the ICCT and CNT predictions. Furthermore, the curvature-dependent surface tension which can be obtained by regarding the clusters as spherical droplets of bulk density is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cluster size for the studied range. The data are compared to other values reported in the literature, agreeing qualitatively with some but disagreeing with the values determined by Joswiak et al. [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 4267 (2013)] using a biased mitosis approach; an assessment of the differences is the main motivation for our current study.

  2. Water droplet excess free energy determined by cluster mitosis using guided molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Gabriel V; Hunt, Patricia A; Müller, Erich A; Jackson, George; Ford, Ian J

    2015-12-28

    Atmospheric aerosols play a vital role in affecting climate by influencing the properties and lifetimes of clouds and precipitation. Understanding the underlying microscopic mechanisms involved in the nucleation of aerosol droplets from the vapour phase is therefore of great interest. One key thermodynamic quantity in nucleation is the excess free energy of cluster formation relative to that of the saturated vapour. In our current study, the excess free energy is extracted for clusters of pure water modelled with the TIP4P/2005 intermolecular potential using a method based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and the Jarzynski relation. The change in free energy associated with the "mitosis" or division of a cluster of N water molecules into two N/2 sub-clusters is evaluated. This methodology is an extension of the disassembly procedure used recently to calculate the excess free energy of argon clusters [H. Y. Tang and I. J. Ford, Phys. Rev. E 91, 023308 (2015)]. Our findings are compared to the corresponding excess free energies obtained from classical nucleation theory (CNT) as well as internally consistent classical theory (ICCT). The values of the excess free energy that we obtain with the mitosis method are consistent with CNT for large cluster sizes but for the smallest clusters, the results tend towards ICCT; for intermediate sized clusters, we obtain values between the ICCT and CNT predictions. Furthermore, the curvature-dependent surface tension which can be obtained by regarding the clusters as spherical droplets of bulk density is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cluster size for the studied range. The data are compared to other values reported in the literature, agreeing qualitatively with some but disagreeing with the values determined by Joswiak et al. [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 4267 (2013)] using a biased mitosis approach; an assessment of the differences is the main motivation for our current study.

  3. Effect of Surface Excess Energy Transport on the Rupture of an Evaporating Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yan; Zhou, Jianqiu; Yang, Xia; Liu, Rong

    2017-12-01

    In most of existing works on the instabilities of an evaporating film, the energy boundary condition only takes into account contributions of the evaporation latent heat and the heat conduction in the liquid. We use a new generalized energy boundary condition at the evaporating liquid-vapor interface, in which the contribution of the transport of the Gibbs excess energy is included. We have derived the long-wave equations in which the thickness of film and the interfacial temperature are coupled to describe the dynamics of an evaporating thin film. The results of our computation show that the transport of the Gibbs excess internal energy delay the rupture of thin films due to van de Waals force, evaporating effect and vapor recoil.

  4. Lighting Energy Saving with Light Pipe in Farm Animal Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans von Wachenfelt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Swedish animal production sector has potential for saving electric lighting of €4-9 million per year using efficient daylight utilisation. To demonstrate this, two light pipe systems, Velux® (house 1 and Solatube® (house 2, are installed in two identical pig houses to determine if the required light intensity, daylight autonomy (DA, and reduced electricity use for illumination can be achieved. In each house, three light sensors continuously measure the indoor daylight relative to an outdoor sensor. If the horizontal illuminance at pig height decreases below 40 lux between 08.00 and 16.00 hours, an automatic control system activates the lights, and electricity use is measured. The daylight factor (DF and DA are determined for each house, based on annual climate data. The mean annual DA of 48% and 55% is achieved for house 1 and house 2, respectively. Light pipes in house 2 have delivered significantly more DA than those in house 1. The most common illuminance range between 0 and 160 lux is recorded in both houses, corresponding to approximately 82% and 83% of daylight time for house 1 and house 2, respectively. Further, the daylighting system for house 2 has produced a uniform DF distribution between 0.05 and 0.59. The results demonstrate that considerable electric energy savings can be achieved in the animal production sector using light pipes. Saving 50% of electric lighting would correspond to 36 GWh or 2520 t CO2 per year for Sweden, but currently the energy savings are not making the investment profitable.

  5. Dissipation of the excess energy of the adsorbate- thermalization via electron transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Strak, Paweł; Krukowski, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    A new scenario of thermalization process of the adsorbate attached at solid surfaces is proposed. The scenario is based on existence of electric dipole layer in which the electron wavefunctions extend over the positive ions. Thus the strong local electric field exists which drags electron into the solids and repels the positive ions. The electrons are tunneling conveying the energy into the solid interior. The positive ions are retarded in the field, which allows them to loose excess kinetic energy and to be located smoothly into the adsorption sites. In this way the excess energy is not dissipated locally avoiding melting or creation of defects, in accordance with the experiments. The scenario is supported by the ab intio calculation results including density function theory of the slabs representing AlN surface and the Schrodinger equation for time evolution of hydrogen-like atom at the solid surface.

  6. Energy costs of feeding excess protein from corn-based byproducts to finishing cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, J S; Meyer, B E; Guiroy, P J; Cole, N A

    2018-01-30

    The increased use of byproducts in finishing diets leads to diets that contain greater concentrations of CP and MP than required by cattle. The hypothesis was that excess dietary CP and MP would increase maintenance energy requirements due to the energy costs of removing excess N as urea in urine. To evaluate the potential efficiency lost, two experiments were performed to determine the effects of feeding excess CP and MP to calves fed a finishing diet at 1 x maintenance energy intake (Exp. 1) and at 2 x maintenance intake (Exp. 2). In each experiment, 8 crossbred Angus-based steers were assigned to two dietary treatments in a switch back design with three periods. Treatments were steam-flaked corn-based finishing diets with two dietary CP concentrations, 13.8% CP/9.63% MP (CON) or 19.5% CP/14.14% MP (DM basis; ECP) containing corn gluten meal to reflect a diet with excess CP and MP from corn by-products. Each period was 27-d in length with a 19-d dietary adaptation period in outdoor individual pens followed by a 4-d sample collection in one of four open circuit respiration chambers, 2-d fast in outdoor pen, and 2-d fast in one of four respiration chambers. Energy metabolism, diet digestibility, C and nitrogen (N) balance, oxygen consumption, and carbon dioxide, and methane production were measured. At both levels of intake, DE as a proportion of GE tended to be greater (P energy as proportion of GE tended to be greater (P = 0.08) in the ECP steers than the CON steers at 2 x maintenance intake. At 1 x and 2 x maintenance intake, urinary N excretion (g/d) was greater (P energy intake it was not different (63.9 vs 63.8%, respectively). At 1 x maintenance intake fasting heat production (FHP) was similar (P = 0.45) for both treatments; whereas, at 2 x maintenance intake FHP tended to be greater (P = 0.09) by 6% in ECP than CON steers. Maintenance energy requirements estimated from linear and quadratic regression of energy retention on ME intake were 4 to 6% greater for

  7. High-Energy Compton Scattering Light Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Hartemann, Fred V; Barty, C; Crane, John; Gibson, David J; Hartouni, E P; Tremaine, Aaron M

    2005-01-01

    No monochromatic, high-brightness, tunable light sources currently exist above 100 keV. Important applications that would benefit from such new hard x-ray sources include: nuclear resonance fluorescence spectroscopy, time-resolved positron annihilation spectroscopy, and MeV flash radiography. The peak brightness of Compton scattering light sources is derived for head-on collisions and found to scale with the electron beam brightness and the drive laser pulse energy. This gamma 2

  8. Energy efficient lighting for the biological clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Dieter

    2011-03-01

    Unexpectedly the existence of a formerly unknown type of photoreceptor in the human eye has been proven about 10 years ago. Primarily sensitive in the blue spectral range it is responsible for transducing light signals directly into the brain, controlling essential biological functions like setting of the circadian clock or daytime activation. Recent scientific research has enabled beneficial applications. The paradigms for good lighting design are shifting and standardization activities have been started to build up a sound base for description and application of biologically effective lighting. Latest improvements of LED technology are now allowing realizeation of advanced lighting solutions based on SSL. Optimization of biological effects is possible while demands on good vision are maintained. As biologically effective lighting is addressing a second system besides vision in the human body a measure beyond lumen per watt is required for a proper description of energy efficiency.

  9. Making More Light with Less Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuritzky, Leah; Jewell, Jason

    2013-07-18

    Representing the Center for Energy Efficient Materials (CEEM), this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge. As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE: energy. The mission of the CEEM is to discover and develop materials that control the interactions among light, electricity, and heat at the nanoscale for improved solar energy conversion, solid-state lighting, and conversion of heat into electricity.

  10. Case Study: Energy Reduction through Lighting Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center in North Chicago, Illinois, reduced its energy consumption by 15 percent in one year.One key project was replacing fluorescent lighting in many areas of campus with more efficient LED bulbs.

  11. Energy Conservation through More Efficient Lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, J.; Grossman, M. W.; Lagushenko, R.; Waymouth, J. F.

    1984-10-01

    The efficiency of a mercury-rare gas electrical discharge, which forms the basis of a fluorescent lamp, can be increased about 5 percent simply by increasing the concentration of mercury-196 from 0.146 percent (natural) to about 3 percent. These findings can be implemented immediately without any significant change in the process of manufacturing of this widely used source of illumination, provided that mercury-196 can be obtained economically. The potential energy savings for the United States are estimated to be worth in excess of 200 million per year.

  12. Light harvesting for quantum solar energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markvart, Tomas

    2000-05-01

    Despite wide structural and functional differences, the laws that govern quantum solar energy conversion to chemical energy or electricity share many similarities. In the photosynthetic membrane, in common with semiconductor solar cells, the conversion process proceeds from the creation of electron-hole pairs by a photon of light, followed by charge separation to produce the required high-energy product. In many cases, however, mechanisms are needed to enhance the optical absorption cross-section and extend the spectral range of operation. A common way of achieving this is by light harvesting: light absorption by a specialised unit which transfers the energy to the conversion apparatus. This paper considers two examples of light harvesting - semiconductor solar cells and the photosynthetic apparatus - to illustrate the basic operation and principles that apply. The existence of a light harvesting unit in photosynthesis has been known since the early 1930's but details of the process - relating, in particular, to the relationship between the structure and spectral properties - are still being unravelled. The excitation energy carriers are excitons but the precise nature of the transport - via the solid state Frenkel-Peierls variety or by Förster's resonant energy transfer - is still subject to debate. In semiconductor solar cells, the energy of the absorbed photon is collected by minority carriers but the broad principles remain the same. In both cases it is shown that the rate of energy conversion is described by a law which parallels the Shockley's solar cell equation, and the light harvesting energy collection is subject to reciprocity relations which resemble Onsager's reciprocity relations between coefficients which couple appropriate forces and flows in non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Differences in the basic atomic make-up in the two systems lead to different energy transport equations. In both cases, however, similar mathematical techniques based on Green

  13. Energy-conservation opportunities in lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-04-01

    Technologies and techniques which can be employed by your existing personnel - without the need for consultants - to reduce your lighting costs by as much as 70% are discussed. Four basic steps to reduce energy costs and improve the effectiveness of the lighting system discussed are: get acquainted with some of the basic terminology and energy efficient lamps and fixtures which are on the market; conduct a survey of the building to determine where and how much energy and money can be saved in the process; implement the simple, low-cost or no-cost measures immediately; and calculate the payback period for capital investment modifications, and implement those which make economic sense. Case studies are used to illustrate the recommendations. (MCW)

  14. Energy Optimization of Road Tunnel Lighting Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinando Salata

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A road tunnel is an enclosed and covered infrastructure for the vehicular traffic. Its lighting system provides 24 h of artificial sources only, with a higher amount of electric power used during the day. Due to safety reasons, when there is natural lighting outside the tunnel, the lighting levels in the stretches right after the entrance and before the exit must be high, in order to guide the driver’s eye towards the middle of the tunnel where the luminance must guarantee safe driving, avoid any over-dimensioning of the lighting systems, and produce energy savings. Such effects can be reached not only through the technological advances in the field of artificial lighting sources with high luminous efficiency, but also through new materials for road paving characterized by a higher reflection coefficient than other ordinary asphalts. This case study examines different technical scenarios, analyzing and comparing possible energy and economic savings. Traditional solutions are thus compared with scenarios suggesting the solutions previously mentioned. Special asphalts are interesting from an economic point of view, whereas the high costs of LED sources nowadays represent an obstacle for their implementation.

  15. Excess Diffuse Light Absorption in Upper Mesophyll Limits CO2 Drawdown and Depresses Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earles, J Mason; Théroux-Rancourt, Guillaume; Gilbert, Matthew E; McElrone, Andrew J; Brodersen, Craig R

    2017-06-01

    In agricultural and natural systems, diffuse light can enhance plant primary productivity due to deeper penetration into and greater irradiance of the entire canopy. However, for individual sun-grown leaves from three species, photosynthesis is actually less efficient under diffuse compared with direct light. Despite its potential impact on canopy-level productivity, the mechanism for this leaf-level diffuse light photosynthetic depression effect is unknown. Here, we investigate if the spatial distribution of light absorption relative to electron transport capacity in sun- and shade-grown sunflower (Helianthus annuus) leaves underlies its previously observed diffuse light photosynthetic depression. Using a new one-dimensional porous medium finite element gas-exchange model parameterized with light absorption profiles, we found that weaker penetration of diffuse versus direct light into the mesophyll of sun-grown sunflower leaves led to a more heterogenous saturation of electron transport capacity and lowered its CO2 concentration drawdown capacity in the intercellular airspace and chloroplast stroma. This decoupling of light availability from photosynthetic capacity under diffuse light is sufficient to generate an 11% decline in photosynthesis in sun-grown but not shade-grown leaves, primarily because thin shade-grown leaves similarly distribute diffuse and direct light throughout the mesophyll. Finally, we illustrate how diffuse light photosynthetic depression could overcome enhancement in canopies with low light extinction coefficients and/or leaf area, pointing toward a novel direction for future research. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Ultrasonic reduction of excess sludge from activated sludge system: energy efficiency improvement via operation optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Junguo; Wan, Tian; Zhang, Guangming; Yang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    This paper studied the influences of operational parameters to improve the energy efficiency during 'ultrasonic lysis-cryptic growth' sludge reduction. Subsequent batch reactor with a hydraulic retention time of 8 h was used to treat urban sewage, and ultrasound wave with a specific energy of 20 kWh/kg TS was employed for sludge lysis. A new index, EE, was defined to evaluate the energy efficiency in ultrasonic lysis-cryptic growth sludge reduction system. Results showed that the most important operational parameter was the proportion of sonicated sludge (SP), which determined the energy consumption and significantly impacted the energy efficiency. The upper limit of SP in this study was 30%, beyond which the effluent quality was unacceptable. Higher SP caused heavier sludge reduction but more energy consumption; when SP was 30%, the excess sludge reduction was the greatest (67.6%) and the energy consumption was the highest (0.101 kWh/d). With a given SP, frequent sludge lysis was adverse to sludge reduction. In summary, the recommended conditions for 'ultrasonic lysis-cryptic growth' sludge reduction were SP of 15%, lysis frequency of 1 time/day. Under these conditions, the highest energy efficiency of 0.012 kg TS/kWh was achieved. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The 8Be excess and search for the X → e+e− decay of a new light boson with NA64 detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gninenko, Sergei

    2017-01-01

    The X → e+e− decay of a new short-lived neutral boson X with a mass mX = 16.7 MeV and coupling to electrons in the range 10−4 < εe < 10−3 could explain the excess of e+e− pairs recently observed in the excited 8Be nucleus decays. If such X’s exist, they could be searched for in a light-shining-through-a-wall experiment with a high energy electron beam. The electron energy absorption in a calorimeter (WCAL) is accompanied by the emission of bremsstrahlung X’s in the reaction eZ → eZX of electrons scattering on nuclei due to the e−X coupling. A part of the primary beam energy is deposited in the WCAL, while the rest of the energy is transmitted by the X through the ”WCAL wall” and deposited in another downstream calorimeter ECAL by the e+e− pair from the X → e+e− decay in flight. Thus, the X’s could be observed by looking for an excess of events with the two-shower signature generated by a single high energy electron in the WCAL and ECAL. In October 2016 NA64 took a short ru...

  18. Low energy gamma ray excess confronting a singlet scalar extended inert doublet dark matter model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Dutta Banik

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent study of gamma rays originating from the region of galactic centre has confirmed an anomalous γ-ray excess within the energy range 1–3 GeV. This can be explained as the consequence of pair annihilation of a 31–40 GeV dark matter into bb¯ with thermal annihilation cross-section σv∼1.4–2.0×10−26 cm3/s. In this work we revisit the Inert Doublet Model (IDM in order to explain this gamma ray excess. Taking the lightest inert particle (LIP as a stable DM candidate we show that a 31–40 GeV dark matter derived from IDM will fail to satisfy experimental limits on dark matter direct detection cross-section obtained from ongoing direct detection experiments and is also inconsistent with LHC findings. We show that a singlet extended inert doublet model can easily explain the reported γ-ray excess which is as well in agreement with Higgs search results at LHC and other observed results like DM relic density and direct detection constraints.

  19. Excess LIGHT contributes to placental impairment, increased secretion of vasoactive factors, hypertension, and proteinuria in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Parchim, Nicholas F; Iriyama, Takayuki; Luo, Renna; Zhao, Cheng; Liu, Chen; Irani, Roxanna A; Zhang, Weiru; Ning, Chen; Zhang, Yujin; Blackwell, Sean C; Chen, Lieping; Tao, Lijian; Hicks, M John; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang

    2014-03-01

    Preeclampsia, a prevalent hypertensive disorder of pregnancy, is believed to be secondary to uteroplacental ischemia. Accumulating evidence indicates that hypoxia-independent mediators, including inflammatory cytokines and growth factors, are associated with preeclampsia, but it is unclear whether these signals directly contribute to placental damage and disease development in vivo. We report that LIGHT, a novel tumor necrosis factor superfamily member, is significantly elevated in the circulation and placentas of preeclamptic women compared with normotensive pregnant women. Injection of LIGHT into pregnant mice induced placental apoptosis, small fetuses, and key features of preeclampsia, hypertension and proteinuria. Mechanistically, using neutralizing antibodies specific for LIGHT receptors, we found that LIGHT receptors herpes virus entry mediator and lymphotoxin β receptor are required for LIGHT-induced placental impairment, small fetuses, and preeclampsia features in pregnant mice. Accordingly, we further revealed that LIGHT functions through these 2 receptors to induce secretion of soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 and endothelin-1, 2 well-accepted pathogenic factors in preeclampsia, and thereby plays an important role in hypertension and proteinuria in pregnant mice. Lastly, we extended our animal findings to human studies and demonstrated that activation of LIGHT receptors resulted in increased apoptosis and elevation of soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 secretion in human placental villous explants. Overall, our human and mouse studies show that LIGHT signaling is a previously unrecognized pathway responsible for placental apoptosis, elevated secretion of vasoactive factors, and subsequent maternal features of preeclampsia, and reveal new therapeutic opportunities for the management of the disease.

  20. Comparative study of energy saving light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, N.; Abas, N. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Comsats Institute of Information technology, Park Road, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-01-15

    Techno-economic performance comparison of compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) with light emitting diodes (LED), electrode less fluorescent lamps (EEFL), fluorescent tubes, incandescent bulbs, photovoltaic (PV) and fiber optic lighting systems was carried out in view of worsening power and energy crisis in Pakistan. Literature survey showed 23 W CFL, 21 W EEFL, 18 W fluorescent tube or 15 W LED lamps emit almost same quantity of luminous flux (lumens) as a standard 100 W incandescent lamp. All inclusive, operational costs of LED lamps were found 1.21, 1.62. 1.69, 6.46, 19.90 and 21.04 times lesser than fluorescent tubes, CFL, EEFL, incandescent bulbs, fiber optic solar lighting and PV systems, respectively. However, tubes, LED, CFL and EEFL lamps worsen electric power quality of low voltage networks due to high current harmonic distortions (THD) and poor power factors (PF). Fluorescent lamps emit UV and pollute environment by mercury and phosphors when broken or at end of their life cycle. Energy consumption, bio-effects, and environmental concerns prefer LED lamps over phosphor based lamps but power quality considerations prefer EEFL. CFL and EEFL manufacturers claim operating temperatures in range of -20 C < T{sub CFL} < 60 C and -30 C < T{sub CFL} < 50 C but CFL frequently damage in wet and damp locations. Costs of low THD and high PF CFL, EEFL and LED lamps may be five to ten times higher that high THD and low PF lamps. Choice of a lamp depends upon its current THD, PF, life span, energy consumption, efficiency, efficacy, color rendering index (CRI) and associated physical effects. This work proposes manufacturing and user level innovations to get rid of low PF problems. Keeping in view downside of phosphor based lamps our research concludes widespread adoption of LED lamps. Government and commercial buildings may consider full spectrum hybrid thermal photovoltaic and solar fiber optic illumination systems. (author)

  1. Energy Recovery Linacs for Light Source Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Neil

    2011-04-01

    Energy Recovery Linacs are being considered for applications in present and future light sources. ERLs take advantage of the continuous operation of superconducting rf cavities to accelerate high average current beams with low losses. The electrons can be directed through bends, undulators, and wigglers for high brightness x ray production. They are then decelerated to low energy, recovering power so as to minimize the required rf drive and electrical draw. When this approach is coupled with advanced continuous wave injectors, very high power, ultra-short electron pulse trains of very high brightness can be achieved. This paper will review the status of worldwide programs and discuss the technology challenges to provide such beams for photon production.

  2. Interruption of scheduled, automatic feeding and reduction of excess energy intake in toddlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciampolini M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mario Ciampolini,1 J Thomas Brenna,2 Valerio Giannellini,3 Stefania Bini11Preventive Gastroenterology Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Università di Firenze, Florence, Italy; 2Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA; 3Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Università di Firenze, Florence, ItalyBackground: Childhood obesity due to the consumption of excess calories is a severe problem in developed countries. In a previous investigation on toddlers, hospital laboratory measurements showed an association of food-demand behavior with constant lower blood glucose before meals than for scheduled meals. We hypothesize that maternal scheduling of meals for toddlers results in excess energy intake compared to feeding only on demand (previously “on request”.Objective: We tested the cross-sectional null hypothesis of no difference in energy intake between scheduled (automatic and demanded meals (administered after evaluation in 24 mother–toddler (21 months old at entry pairs with chronic, nonspecific diarrhea presenting at a clinic. We tested the same hypothesis in a subset of 14 toddlers by measuring the resting (sleeping metabolic rate 4 hours after lunch, as well as the total daily energy expenditure (TEE in 10 toddlers.Methods: We trained mothers to recognize meal demands (as in the previous investigation and to provide food in response, but required no blood glucose measurements before meals. Energy intake was assessed by a 10-day food diary, resting metabolic rate (RMR by respiratory analyses (indirect calorimetry in 14 toddlers, and TEE by doubly labeled water in 10 toddlers. Their blood parameters, anthropometry, and number of days with diarrhea were assessed before training and 50 days after training.Results: RMR decreased from 58.6 ± 7.8 to 49.0 ± 9.1 kcal/kg/d (P < 0.001 and TEE decreased from 80.1 ± 6.9 to 67.8 ± 10.0 kcal/kg/d (P < 0.001. Energy intake decreased from 85.7 ± 15.3 to 70.3 ± 15.8 kcal

  3. Excess diffuse light absorption in upper mesophyll limits CO2 drawdown and depresses photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun-grown and shade-grown leaves of some species absorb direct and diffuse light differently. Sun-grown leaves can photosynthesize ~10-15% less under diffuse compared to direct irradiance, while shade-grown leaves do not exhibit this sensitivity. In this study, we investigate if the spatial differen...

  4. Acute hepatitis in a woman following excessive ingestion of an energy drink: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waked Alain

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The consumption of energy drinks has increased significantly. We report the case of a patient who presented to our hospital with jaundice, abdominal pain, and markedly increased liver transaminases likely due to the increased consumption of an energy drink. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report in the literature linking the development of acute hepatitis to the consumption of an energy drink. Case presentation A 22-year-old Caucasian woman presented to our hospital with epigastric pain, nausea, vomiting, and low-grade fever. She had been drinking 10 cans of an energy drink daily for two weeks prior to presentation. Her physical examination revealed mild epigastric tenderness. Her initial blood tests revealed elevated alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and total bilirubin. A computed tomographic scan of the abdomen and pelvis was normal, and the patient was discharged to home. She returned to the Emergency Department of our hospital with worsening pain and new-onset jaundice. This time her physical examination revealed epigastric tenderness and icteric sclera. Her aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and international normalized ratio were markedly elevated. Further radiological studies were non-specific, and she was admitted to our hospital with a diagnosis of acute hepatitis. Her viral serology and toxicology screens were negative. The patient was treated supportively and was discharged after resolution of her symptoms and a marked decrease in her liver enzymes. Conclusion The development of acute hepatitis in this patient was most likely due to the excessive ingestion of an energy drink, and we speculate that niacin was the culprit ingredient.

  5. Origin of the low-mass electron pair excess in light nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agakichiev, G.; Balanda, A.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A. V.; Blanco, A.; Böhmer, M.; Boyard, J. L.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Cabanelas, P.; Castro, E.; Chernenko, S.; Christ, T.; Destefanis, M.; Díaz, J.; Dohrmann, F.; Dybczak, A.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O. V.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fonte, P.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Gil, A.; Gilardi, C.; Göbel, K.; Golubeva, M.; González-Díaz, D.; Guber, F.; Hennino, T.; Holzmann, R.; Iori, I.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Kirschner, D.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Kotte, R.; Krizek, F.; Krücken, R.; Kühn, W.; Kugler, A.; Kurepin, A.; Lang, S.; Lange, J. S.; Lapidus, K.; Liu, T.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michalska, B.; Michel, J.; Morinière, E.; Mousa, J.; Müntz, C.; Naumann, L.; Otwinowski, J.; Pachmayer, Y. C.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramstein, B.; Reshetin, A.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Schmah, A.; Schwab, E.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Sturm, C.; Sudol, M.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Trebacz, R.; Tsertos, H.; Wagner, V.; Weber, M.; Wisniowski, M.; Wojcik, T.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Yurevich, S.; Zanevsky, Y. V.; Zhou, P.; HADES Collaboration

    2010-06-01

    We report measurements of electron pair production in elementary p+p and d+p reactions at 1.25 GeV/u with the HADES spectrometer. For the first time, the electron pairs were reconstructed for n+p reactions by detecting the proton spectator from the deuteron breakup. We find that the yield of electron pairs with invariant mass M>0.15 GeV/c2 is about an order of magnitude larger in n+p reactions as compared to p+p. A comparison to model calculations demonstrates that the production mechanism is not sufficiently described yet. The electron pair spectra measured in C+C reactions are compatible with a superposition of elementary n+p and p+p collisions, leaving little room for additional electron pair sources in such light collision systems.

  6. Interior LED Lighting Technology. Navy Energy Technology Validation (Techval) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Approved for public release: distribution unlimited TDS-NAVFAC EXWC-PW-1601 Sep 2015 Interior LED Lighting Technology Navy Energy...NAVFAC EXWC) to determine the potential energy savings for Interior LED lighting technology in office environments. NAVAFAC EXWC concluded that... Interior LED Lighting Technology can save money in comparison to the conventional incandescent, halogen, and where cost-effective, compact fluorescent

  7. Opportunities of energy saving in lighting systems for public buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Abd El-khalek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The lighting system provides many options for cost-effective energy saving with low or no inconvenience. Lighting improvements are excellent investments in most public buildings, it is usually cost-effective to address because lighting improvements are often easier to make than many process upgrades.For public buildings, the easy no and low cost options to help save money and improve the energy performance are:Understand energy use.Identify optionsPrioritize actionsMake the changes and measure the savings.Continue managing energy efficiency.The challenge is to retrofit traditional lamps with LED lamps of good quality. The benefits of LED light bulbs are long-lasting, durable, cool, mercury free, more efficient, and cost effective.The light Emitting Diode (LED bulb uses a semiconductor as its light source, and is currently one of the most energy efficient and quickly developing types of bulbs for lighting. LEDs increasingly are being purchased to replace traditional bulbs. LEDs are relatively more expensive than other types of bulbs, but are very cost-effective because they use only a fraction of electricity of traditional lighting methods nd can last for longer.Benchmarking guides decision makers to policies aimed at the energy sector through better understanding of energy consumption trends nationwide, e.g.: energy price, moderating, peak demand, and encouraging sectors, low energy expansions.The “Improving Energy Efficiency Project of Lighting and Appliances” carried out energy audits and implemented opportunities of energy saving in lighting for different type of public buildings.To rationalize the use of energy by giving guidelines to consumers, the IEEL&A project prepared some brochures.This paper leads with the results of case studies as energy audits, opportunities in lighting systems, energy saving and CO2 reduction.

  8. Energy Efficient LED Spectrally Matched Smart Lighting Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innovative Imaging and Research has teamed with the University of Southern Mississippi to develop a novel energy efficient smart light system. Smart lighting adds an...

  9. Enantiomeric Excesses Induced in Amino Acids by Ultraviolet Circularly Polarized Light Irradiation of Extraterrestrial Ice Analogs: A Possible Source of Asymmetry for Prebiotic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modica, Paola; Meinert, Cornelia; de Marcellus, Pierre; Nahon, Laurent; Meierhenrich, Uwe J.; Le Sergeant d'Hendecourt, Louis

    2014-06-01

    The discovery of meteoritic amino acids with enantiomeric excesses of the L-form (ee L) has suggested that extraterrestrial organic materials may have contributed to prebiotic chemistry and directed the initial occurrence of the ee L that further led to homochirality of amino acids on Earth. A proposed mechanism for the origin of ee L in meteorites involves an asymmetric photochemistry of extraterrestrial ices by UV circularly polarized light (CPL). We have performed the asymmetric synthesis of amino acids on achiral extraterrestrial ice analogs by VUV CPL, investigating the chiral asymmetry transfer at two different evolutionary stages at which the analogs were irradiated (regular ices and/or organic residues) and at two different photon energies (6.6 and 10.2 eV). We identify 16 distinct amino acids and precisely measure the L-enantiomeric excesses using the enantioselective GC × GC-TOFMS technique in five of them: α-alanine, 2,3-diaminopropionic acid, 2-aminobutyric acid, valine, and norvaline, with values ranging from ee L = -0.20% ± 0.14% to ee L = -2.54% ± 0.28%. The sign of the induced ee L depends on the helicity and the energy of CPL, but not on the evolutionary stage of the samples, and is the same for all five considered amino acids. Our results support an astrophysical scenario in which the solar system was formed in a high-mass star-forming region where icy grains were irradiated during the protoplanetary phase by an external source of CPL of a given helicity and a dominant energy, inducing a stereo-specific photochemistry.

  10. Enantiomeric excesses induced in amino acids by ultraviolet circularly polarized light irradiation of extraterrestrial ice analogs: A possible source of asymmetry for prebiotic chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modica, Paola; De Marcellus, Pierre; D' Hendecourt, Louis Le Sergeant [Univ. Paris-Sud, Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, UMR 8617, F-91405 Orsay (France); Meinert, Cornelia; Meierhenrich, Uwe J. [Univ. Nice Sophia Antipolis, Institut de Chimie de Nice, UMR 7272 CNRS, F-06108 Nice (France); Nahon, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.nahon@synchrotron-soleil.fr, E-mail: ldh@ias.u-psud.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2014-06-10

    The discovery of meteoritic amino acids with enantiomeric excesses of the L-form (ee {sub L}) has suggested that extraterrestrial organic materials may have contributed to prebiotic chemistry and directed the initial occurrence of the ee {sub L} that further led to homochirality of amino acids on Earth. A proposed mechanism for the origin of ee {sub L} in meteorites involves an asymmetric photochemistry of extraterrestrial ices by UV circularly polarized light (CPL). We have performed the asymmetric synthesis of amino acids on achiral extraterrestrial ice analogs by VUV CPL, investigating the chiral asymmetry transfer at two different evolutionary stages at which the analogs were irradiated (regular ices and/or organic residues) and at two different photon energies (6.6 and 10.2 eV). We identify 16 distinct amino acids and precisely measure the L-enantiomeric excesses using the enantioselective GC × GC-TOFMS technique in five of them: α-alanine, 2,3-diaminopropionic acid, 2-aminobutyric acid, valine, and norvaline, with values ranging from ee {sub L} = –0.20% ± 0.14% to ee {sub L} = –2.54% ± 0.28%. The sign of the induced ee {sub L} depends on the helicity and the energy of CPL, but not on the evolutionary stage of the samples, and is the same for all five considered amino acids. Our results support an astrophysical scenario in which the solar system was formed in a high-mass star-forming region where icy grains were irradiated during the protoplanetary phase by an external source of CPL of a given helicity and a dominant energy, inducing a stereo-specific photochemistry.

  11. ENERGY STAR Certified Light Bulbs Version 2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Certified models meet all ENERGY STAR requirements as listed in the Version 2.0 and V2.1 ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Lamps (Light Bulbs) that are effective...

  12. Study on light intensity in the process of photocatalytic degradation of indoor gaseous formaldehyde for saving energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Liping [Research Center of Combustion and Environmental Technology, School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Liu, Zhenyan [Research Center of Combustion and Environmental Technology, School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)]. E-mail: yanglp@sjtu.edu.cn

    2007-03-15

    The light intensity, one of the most important factors for photocatalysis, directly influences the photocatalytic reaction rate and the utilization ratio of energy. Its rational selection has vital significance for saving energy. In the present paper, light energy losses in the heterogeneous photocatalysis process were analyzed. A method was presented to determine appropriate light intensities for the photocatalytic degradation of indoor gaseous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) based on the degradation mechanism. For simplifying the method, an excess coefficient of light intensity was defined based on the assumption of complete utilization of excited electron-hole pairs. The excess coefficients and the appropriate light intensities for degrading formaldehyde were determined according to the data from a titania-coated glass plate reactor and a titania-coated reticular foam nickel reactor. The results showed that the derived light intensities according to our method were appropriate. Good degradation performance and high utilization ratio of light energy can be attained simultaneously when the excess coefficient was 1.3-1.5 for formaldehyde with the concentration from 20.45 {mu}mol/m{sup 3} (0.5 ppm) to 81.8 {mu}mol/m{sup 3} (2 ppm), which is the concentration range of formaldehyde in 'sick buildings'.

  13. Lighting

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Lighting Systems Test Facilities aid research that improves the energy efficiency of lighting systems. • Gonio-Photometer: Measures illuminance from each portion of...

  14. Search for scalar dark matter via pseudoscalar portal interactions in light of the Galactic Center gamma-ray excess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kwei-Chou

    2018-01-01

    In light of the observed Galactic center gamma-ray excess, we investigate a simplified model, for which the scalar dark matter interacts with quarks through a pseudoscalar mediator. The viable regions of the parameter space, that can also account for the relic density and evade the current searches, are identified, if the low-velocity dark matter annihilates through an s -channel off shell mediator mostly into b ¯b , and/or annihilates directly into two hidden on shell mediators, which subsequently decay into the quark pairs. These two kinds of annihilations are s wave. The projected monojet limit set by the high luminosity LHC sensitivity could constrain the favored parameter space, where the mediator's mass is larger than the dark matter mass by a factor of 2. We show that the projected sensitivity of 15-year Fermi-LAT observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies can provide a stringent constraint on the most parameter space allowed in this model. If the on shell mediator channel contributes to the dark matter annihilation cross sections over 50%, this model with a lighter mediator can be probed in the projected PICO-500L experiment.

  15. Non-contact pumping of light emitters via non-radiative energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, Victor I.; Achermann, Marc

    2010-01-05

    A light emitting device is disclosed including a primary light source having a defined emission photon energy output, and, a light emitting material situated near to said primary light source, said light emitting material having an absorption onset equal to or less in photon energy than the emission photon energy output of the primary light source whereby non-radiative energy transfer from said primary light source to said light emitting material can occur yielding light emission from said light emitting material.

  16. Energy efficiency of lighting installations: Software application and experimental validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Lobão

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The rational use of energy and energy-efficient environmental public street lighting is an important topic. In the design of new public lighting installations, national regulations containing energy-efficient guidelines are already used. Nevertheless, either in new installations or in reconstructions of existing lighting, designers do not generally consider all the available means to save energy. In installations of street lighting, energy consumption can be reduced by reducing the losses in the conductors, associated with the efficiency of the equipment, allowing better use of the available energy. The losses in the conductors must be analysed in conjunction with all the loads that contribute to the current in the sections of the installed street lighting. When opting for more efficient lamps and luminaires or lighting control systems, the current decreases in the sections covered with the most significant power loss due to proportionality with the square of the current. This decrease, often forgotten, is considered in this work in the investment analysis of efficiency and sustainable street lighting via simulation and experimental results. This analysis, combined with the features and operating parameters of the electrical installation, accounts for all the gains that can make a difference in the choice of efficient street lighting.

  17. Basic Energy Conservation and Management Part 1: Looking at Lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Glenn

    2012-01-01

    Reducing school district energy expenditures has become a universal goal. However, school board members, superintendents, and directors of buildings and grounds are often unaware of the many options available to conserve energy. School energy conservation used to be relatively simple: turn off the lights and turn down the heat in the winter and…

  18. Boxes, Boosts, and Energy Duality: Understanding the Galactic-Center Gamma-Ray Excess through Dynamical Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Boddy, Kimberly K.

    2017-03-28

    Many models currently exist which attempt to interpret the excess of gamma rays emanating from the Galactic Center in terms of annihilating or decaying dark matter. These models typically exhibit a variety of complicated cascade mechanisms for photon production, leading to a non-trivial kinematics which obscures the physics of the underlying dark sector. In this paper, by contrast, we observe that the spectrum of the gamma-ray excess may actually exhibit an intriguing "energy-duality" invariance under $E_\\gamma \\rightarrow E_\\ast^2/E_\\gamma$ for some $E_\\ast$. As we shall discuss, such an energy duality points back to a remarkably simple alternative kinematics which in turn is realized naturally within the Dynamical Dark Matter framework. Observation of this energy duality could therefore provide considerable information about the properties of the dark sector from which the Galactic-Center gamma-ray excess might arise, and highlights the importance of acquiring more complete data for the Galactic-Center exce...

  19. Mechanisms of Light Energy Harvesting in Dendrimers and Hyperbranched Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Andrews

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Since their earliest synthesis, much interest has arisen in the use of dendritic and structurally allied forms of polymer for light energy harvesting, especially as organic adjuncts for solar energy devices. With the facility to accommodate a proliferation of antenna chromophores, such materials can capture and channel light energy with a high degree of efficiency, each polymer unit potentially delivering the energy of one photon—or more, when optical nonlinearity is involved. To ensure the highest efficiency of operation, it is essential to understand the processes responsible for photon capture and channelling of the resulting electronic excitation. Highlighting the latest theoretical advances, this paper reviews the principal mechanisms, which prove to involve a complex interplay of structural, spectroscopic and electrodynamic properties. Designing materials with the capacity to capture and control light energy facilitates applications that now extend from solar energy to medical photonics.

  20. Building a Road from Light to Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Anton; Bilby, David; Barito, Adam; Vyletel, Brenda

    2013-07-18

    Representing the Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion (CSTEC), this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge. As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE energy. The mission of the Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion (CSTEC) is to design and to synthesize new materials for high efficiency photovoltaic (PV) and thermoelectric (TE) devices, predicated on new fundamental insights into equilibrium and non-equilibrium processes, including quantum phenomena, that occur in materials over various spatial and temporal scales.

  1. Energy-saving Lighting Technology of Petrochemical Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baohu Gu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The shortage of energy resources is a serious problem our country is facing the world today, petrochemical enterprises are the main pillar of our economy, in our country, because petrochemical companies accounted for about 30.2% of the total energy consumption of energy. This paper focuses on the traditional energy-saving lighting methods proposed intelligent energy-saving system based on a fuzzy control. The purpose is to make the electrical equipment to fully meet, under the premise of improving its functional requirements, as far as possible to reduce energy consumption and improve energy efficiency.

  2. Energy Efficient LED Spectrally Matched Smart Lighting Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innovative Imaging and Research and the University of Houston Clear Lake have teamed to develop a widely extensible, affordable, energy efficient, smart lighting...

  3. Potential sustainable energy source: Pheroid™ with incorporated light harvesting materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smit, Jacoba E

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The most efficient light harvesting and energy transfer systems are found in nature as part of the photosynthesis process. By extracting these system fragments and maximising their organisational structure, researchers are developing similar...

  4. Saving energy by overriding automatic lighting control: A case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelkens, A.

    2011-01-01

    Modern office buildings are often equipped with automatic systems that turn on the lights if somebody enters a room and turn them off when everybody has left the room. This ensures that users do not leave the lights on during the night and thus avoids wasting energy. For cost reasons, most of these

  5. Individual discounting, energy conservation, and household demand for lighting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooreman, P

    This paper analyzes household appliance purchase and energy consumption and conservation related to demand for lighting. The behavioral model is estimated using data on consumers' choices between various types of electric light bulbs with large differences in purchase costs, operating costs and

  6. The role of energy losses in photosynthetic light harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, T. P. J.; van Grondelle, R.

    2017-07-01

    Photosynthesis operates at the bottom of the food chain to convert the energy of light into carbohydrates at a remarkable global rate of about 130 TW. Nonetheless, the overall photosynthetic process has a conversion efficiency of a few percent at best, significantly less than bottom-up photovoltaic cells. The primary photosynthetic steps, consisting of light harvesting and charge separation, are often presented as having near-unity quantum efficiency but this holds only true under ideal conditions. In this review, we discuss the importance of energy loss mechanisms to establish robustness in photosynthetic light harvesting. Thermal energy dissipation of light-harvesting complexes (LHCs) in different environments is investigated and the relationships and contrasts between concentration quenching of high pigment concentrations, photoprotection (non-photochemical quenching), quenching due to protein aggregation, and fluorescence blinking are discussed. The role of charge-transfer states in light harvesting and energy dissipation is highlighted and the importance of controlled protein structural disorder to switch the light-harvesting antennae between effective light harvesters and efficient energy quenchers is underscored. The main LHC of plants, LHCII, is used as a prime example.

  7. Implications of light energy on food quality and packaging selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Susan E; Chang, Hao-Hsun

    2012-01-01

    Light energy in the ultraviolet and visible light regions plays a critical role in overall food quality, leading to various degradation and oxidation reactions. Food degradation and oxidation result in the destruction of nutrients and bioactive compounds, the formation of off odors and flavors, the loss of food color, and the formation of toxic substances. Food compounds are sensitive to various light wavelengths. Understanding the effect that specific light wavelengths have on food compounds will allow the development of novel food packaging materials that block the most damaging light wavelengths to photostability of specific food compounds. Future research should focus more specifically on the effect of specific light wavelengths on the quality of specific food products, as there is limited published information on this particular topic. This information also can be directly related to the selection of food packaging materials to retain both high quality and visual clarity of food products exposed to light. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Crystallization kinetics and excess free energy of H2O and D2O nanoscale films of amorphous solid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R Scott; Matthiesen, Jesper; Knox, Jake; Kay, Bruce D

    2011-06-16

    Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) are used to investigate the crystallization kinetics and measure the excess free energy of metastable amorphous solid water films (ASW) of H(2)O and D(2)O grown using molecular beams. The desorption rates from the amorphous and crystalline phases of ASW are distinct, and as such, crystallization manifests can be observed in the TPD spectrum. The crystallization kinetics were studied by varying the TPD heating rate from 0.001 to 3 K/s. A coupled desorption-crystallization kinetic model accurately simulates the desorption spectra and accurately predicts the observed temperature shifts in the crystallization. Isothermal crystallization studies using RAIRS are in agreement with the TPD results. Furthermore, highly sensitive measurements of the desorption rates were used to determine the excess free energy of ASW near 150 K. The excess entropy obtained from these data is consistent with there being a thermodynamic continuity between ASW and supercooled liquid water. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  9. UV emissions from low energy artificial light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Leona; Moseley, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Energy efficient light sources have been introduced across Europe and many other countries world wide. The most common of these is the Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL), which has been shown to emit ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are an alternative technology that has minimal UV emissions. This brief review summarises the different energy efficient light sources available on the market and compares the UV levels and the subsequent effects on the skin of normal individuals and those who suffer from photodermatoses. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Highly efficient combustion with low excess air in a modern energy-from-waste (EfW) plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Reto; Waldner, Maurice H; Gablinger, Helen

    2017-07-07

    The effect of low excess air and high adiabatic combustion temperatures on CO and NOx formation has been investigated on a commercially operated energy-from-waste plant. With optimal combination of low O2 levels and stable combustion control, uncontrolled NOx levels could be lowered to 100-150mg/Nm(3) (dry, at 11% O2) while keeping CO emissions at low levels. Even at adiabatic temperatures above 1400°C thermal NOx hardly contributed to the total NOx emissions in a grate-fired EfW plant. An advanced combustion control system allowed continuous operation with very little excess air (λ<1.2) while keeping CO and NOx at levels well below the legal emission limits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Plasticity in light reactions of photosynthesis for energy production and photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jeffrey A; Avenson, Thomas J; Kanazawa, Atsuko; Takizawa, Kenji; Edwards, Gerald E; Kramer, David M

    2005-01-01

    Plant photosynthesis channels some of the most highly reactive intermediates in biology, in a way that captures a large fraction of their energy to power the plant. A viable photosynthetic apparatus must not only be efficient and robust machinery, but also well integrated into the plant's biochemical and physiological networks. This requires flexibility in its responses to the dramatically changing environmental conditions and biochemical demands. First, the output of the energy-storing light reactions must match the demands of plant metabolism. Second, regulation of the antenna must be flexible to allow responses to diverse challenges that could result in excess light capture and subsequent photoinhibition. Evidence is presented for the interplay of two types of mechanistic flexibility, one that modulates the relative sensitivity of antenna down-regulation to electron flow, and the other, which primarily modulates the output ratio of ATP/NADPH, but also contributes to down-regulation.

  12. Surface energy and work function of the light actinides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollár, J.; Vitos, Levente; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1994-01-01

    We have calculated the surface energy and work function of the light actinides Fr, Ra, Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, and Pu by means of a Green's-function technique based on the linear-muffin-tin-orbitals method within the tight-binding representation. In these calculations we apply an energy functional which....... The calculated surface energies and work functions are in good agreement with the limited experimental data....

  13. TESTING THE MILLISECOND PULSAR SCENARIO OF THE GALACTIC CENTER GAMMA-RAY EXCESS WITH VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Qiang [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01002 (United States); Ioka, Kunihito [Theory Center, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    Recent analyses of Fermi Large Area Telescope data show an extended GeV γ-ray excess on top of the expected diffuse background in the Galactic center region, which can be explained by annihilating dark matter (DM) or a population of millisecond pulsars (MSPs). We propose observations of very high energy (VHE) γ-rays to distinguish the MSP scenario from the DM scenario. GeV γ-ray MSPs should release most of their energy to the relativistic e{sup ±} wind, which will diffuse into the Galaxy and radiate TeV γ-rays through inverse Compton scattering and bremsstrahlung processes. By calculating the spectrum and spatial distribution, we show that such emission is detectable with the next generation VHE γ-ray observatory, the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), under reasonable model parameters. It is essential to search for multi-wavelength counterparts to the GeV γ-ray excess in order to solve this mystery in the high-energy universe.

  14. The cost of surviving nitrogen excess: energy and protein demand in the lichen Cladonia portentosa as revealed by proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munzi, Silvana; Sheppard, Lucy J; Leith, Ian D; Cruz, Cristina; Branquinho, Cristina; Bini, Luca; Gagliardi, Assunta; Cai, Giampiero; Parrotta, Luigi

    2017-04-01

    Different nitrogen forms affect different metabolic pathways in lichens. In particular, the most relevant changes in protein expression were observed in the fungal partner, with NO 3- mostly affecting the energetic metabolism and NH 4+ affecting transport and regulation of proteins and the energetic metabolism much more than NO 3- did. Excess deposition of reactive nitrogen is a well-known agent of stress for lichens, but which symbiont is most affected and how, remains a mystery. Using proteomics can expand our understanding of stress effects on lichens. We investigated the effects of different doses and forms of reactive nitrogen, with and without supplementary phosphorus and potassium, on the proteome of the lichen Cladonia portentosa growing in a 'real-world' simulation of nitrogen deposition. Protein expression changed with the nitrogen treatments but mostly in the fungal partner, with NO3- mainly affecting the energetic metabolism and NH4+ also affecting the protein synthesis machinery. The photobiont mainly responded overexpressing proteins involved in energy production. This suggests that in response to nitrogen stress, the photobiont mainly supports the defensive mechanisms initiated by the mycobiont with an increased energy production. Such surplus energy is then used by the cell to maintain functionality in the presence of NO3-, while a futile cycle of protein production can be hypothesized to be induced by NH4+ excess. External supply of potassium and phosphorus influenced differently the responses of particular enzymes, likely reflecting the many processes in which potassium exerts a regulatory function.

  15. Solid-state lighting: an energy-economics perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsao, J Y; Creighton, J R; Coltrin, M E; Simmons, J A [Physical, Chemical and Nano Sciences Center, Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0601 (United States); Saunders, H D, E-mail: jytsao@sandia.go, E-mail: jrcreig@sandia.go, E-mail: mecoltr@sandia.go, E-mail: jsimmon@sandia.go, E-mail: hsaunders@decisionprocessesinc.co [Decision Processes Incorporated, 2308 Saddleback Drive, Danville, CA 94506 (United States)

    2010-09-08

    Artificial light has long been a significant factor contributing to the quality and productivity of human life. As a consequence, we are willing to use huge amounts of energy to produce it. Solid-state lighting (SSL) is an emerging technology that promises performance features and efficiencies well beyond those of traditional artificial lighting, accompanied by potentially massive shifts in (a) the consumption of light, (b) the human productivity and energy use associated with that consumption and (c) the semiconductor chip area inventory and turnover required to support that consumption. In this paper, we provide estimates of the baseline magnitudes of these shifts using simple extrapolations of past behaviour into the future. For past behaviour, we use recent studies of historical and contemporary consumption patterns analysed within a simple energy-economics framework (a Cobb-Douglas production function and profit maximization). For extrapolations into the future, we use recent reviews of believed-achievable long-term performance targets for SSL. We also discuss ways in which the actual magnitudes could differ from the baseline magnitudes of these shifts. These include: changes in human societal demand for light; possible demand for features beyond lumens; and guidelines and regulations aimed at economizing on consumption of light and associated energy.

  16. Solid-State Lighting: An Energy Economics Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Saunders, Harry D.; Creighton, J. Randall; Coltrin, Michael E.; Simmons, Jerry A.

    2010-08-19

    Artificial light has long been a significant factor contributing to the quality and productivity of human life. As a consequence, we are willing to use huge amounts of energy to produce it. Solid-state lighting (SSL) is an emerging technology that promises performance features and efficiencies well beyond those of traditional artificial lighting, accompanied by potentially massive shifts in (a) the consumption of light, (b) the human productivity and energy use associated with that consumption and (c) the semiconductor chip area inventory and turnover required to support that consumption. In this paper, we provide estimates of the baseline magnitudes of these shifts using simple extrapolations of past behaviour into the future. For past behaviour, we use recent studies of historical and contemporary consumption patterns analysed within a simple energy-economics framework (a Cobb–Douglas production function and profit maximization). For extrapolations into the future, we use recent reviews of believed-achievable long-term performance targets for SSL. We also discuss ways in which the actual magnitudes could differ from the baseline magnitudes of these shifts. These include: changes in human societal demand for light; possible demand for features beyond lumens; and guidelines and regulations aimed at economizing on consumption of light and associated energy.

  17. Solid-state lighting: an energy-economics perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, J. Y.; Saunders, H. D.; Creighton, J. R.; Coltrin, M. E.; Simmons, J. A.

    2010-09-01

    Artificial light has long been a significant factor contributing to the quality and productivity of human life. As a consequence, we are willing to use huge amounts of energy to produce it. Solid-state lighting (SSL) is an emerging technology that promises performance features and efficiencies well beyond those of traditional artificial lighting, accompanied by potentially massive shifts in (a) the consumption of light, (b) the human productivity and energy use associated with that consumption and (c) the semiconductor chip area inventory and turnover required to support that consumption. In this paper, we provide estimates of the baseline magnitudes of these shifts using simple extrapolations of past behaviour into the future. For past behaviour, we use recent studies of historical and contemporary consumption patterns analysed within a simple energy-economics framework (a Cobb-Douglas production function and profit maximization). For extrapolations into the future, we use recent reviews of believed-achievable long-term performance targets for SSL. We also discuss ways in which the actual magnitudes could differ from the baseline magnitudes of these shifts. These include: changes in human societal demand for light; possible demand for features beyond lumens; and guidelines and regulations aimed at economizing on consumption of light and associated energy.

  18. Low-energy light bulbs, computers, tablets and the blue light hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, J B; Khazova, M; Price, L L A

    2016-02-01

    The introduction of low energy lighting and the widespread use of computer and mobile technologies have changed the exposure of human eyes to light. Occasional claims that the light sources with emissions containing blue light may cause eye damage raise concerns in the media. The aim of the study was to determine if it was appropriate to issue advice on the public health concerns. A number of sources were assessed and the exposure conditions were compared with international exposure limits, and the exposure likely to be received from staring at a blue sky. None of the sources assessed approached the exposure limits, even for extended viewing times.

  19. [Energy saving and LED lamp lighting and human health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deĭnego, V N; Kaptsov, V A

    2013-01-01

    The appearance of new sources of high-intensity with large proportion of blue light in the spectrum revealed new risks of their influence on the function of the eye and human health, especially for children and teenagers. There is an urgent need to reconsider the research methods of vision hygiene in conditions of energy-saving and LED bulbs lighting. On the basis of a systematic approach and knowledge of the newly discovered photosensitive receptors there was built hierarchical model of the interaction of "light environment - the eye - the system of formation of visual images - the hormonal system of the person - his psycho-physiological state." This approach allowed us to develop a range of risk for the negative impact of spectrum on the functions of the eye and human health, as well as to formulate the hygiene requirements for energy-efficient high-intensity light sources.

  20. CMOS indoor light energy harvesting system for wireless sensing applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira Carvalho, Carlos Manuel

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses in detail the CMOS implementation of energy harvesting.  The authors describe an integrated, indoor light energy harvesting system, based on a controller circuit that dynamically and automatically adjusts its operation to meet the actual light circumstances of the environment where the system is placed.  The system is intended to power a sensor node, enabling an autonomous wireless sensor network (WSN). Although designed to cope with indoor light levels, the system is also able to work with higher levels, making it an all-round light energy harvesting system.  The discussion includes experimental data obtained from an integrated manufactured prototype, which in conjunction with a photovoltaic (PV) cell, serves as a proof of concept of the desired energy harvesting system.  ·         Discusses several energy sources which can be used to power energy harvesting systems and includes an overview of PV cell technologies  ·         Includes an introduction to voltage step-...

  1. Ice rinks skate to energy savings, light quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1997-11-01

    Retrofitting community ice arenas with modern fluorescent lighting systems in place of the traditional high intensity discharge (HID) metal halide, high pressure sodium or mercury vapour systems to achieve significant energy savings, was discussed. Using the one-two-three-lamp version of a `Triad` instant start, RH series electronic ballasts (manufactured by MagneTek of Nashville, Tennessee) and the right combination of housing, energy consumption at full lighting levels has dropped to 45 to 50 per cent of the previous HID system. The new system also provides a wide range of light levels, and since full illumination is needed only occasionally the actual energy savings are in the 75 to 80 per cent range.

  2. EuropeaN Energy balance Research to prevent excessive weight Gain among Youth (ENERGY project: Design and methodology of the ENERGY cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno Luis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity treatment is by large ineffective long term, and more emphasis on the prevention of excessive weight gain in childhood and adolescence is warranted. To inform energy balance related behaviour (EBRB change interventions, insight in the potential personal, family and school environmental correlates of these behaviours is needed. Studies on such multilevel correlates of EBRB among schoolchildren in Europe are lacking. The ENERGY survey aims to (1 provide up-to-date prevalence rates of measured overweight, obesity, self-reported engagement in EBRBs, and objective accelerometer-based assessment of physical activity and sedentary behaviour and blood-sample biomarkers of metabolic function in countries in different regions of Europe, (2 to identify personal, family and school environmental correlates of these EBRBs. This paper describes the design, methodology and protocol of the survey. Method/Design A school-based cross-sectional survey was carried out in 2010 in seven different European countries; Belgium, Greece, Hungary, the Netherlands, Norway, Slovenia, and Spain. The survey included measurements of anthropometrics, child, parent and school-staff questionnaires, and school observations to measure and assess outcomes (i.e. height, weight, and waist circumference, EBRBs and potential personal, family and school environmental correlates of these behaviours including the social-cultural, physical, political, and economic environmental factors. In addition, a selection of countries conducted accelerometer measurements to objectively assess physical activity and sedentary behaviour, and collected blood samples to assess several biomarkers of metabolic function. Discussion The ENERGY survey is a comprehensive cross-sectional study measuring anthropometrics and biomarkers as well as assessing a range of EBRBs and their potential correlates at the personal, family and school level, among 10-12 year old children in seven

  3. Controlling Light to Make the Most Energy From the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callahan, Dennis; Corcoran, Chris; Eisler, Carissa; Flowers, Cris; Goodman, Matt; Hofmann, Carrie; Sadtler, Bryce

    2013-07-18

    Representing the Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion (LMI), this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge. As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE energy. The mission of LMI to tailor the morphology, complex dielectric structure, and electronic properties of matter so as to sculpt the flow of sunlight and heat, enabling light conversion to electrical and chemical energy with unprecedented efficiency.

  4. Estimation of Lighting Energy Consumption Required for Red Leaf Lettuce Production under Different Blue/Red Ratios and Light Intensity Conditions in a Plant Factory with Artificial Lighting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shinichi FURUYAMA; Yasuhiro ISHIGAMI; Shoko HIKOSAKA; Eiji GOTO

    2017-01-01

    .... The lighting energy consumption per plant required for the test period was calculated from summing the daily value multiplied by the amount of light received to the whole plant by the lighting...

  5. New Light on Dark Energy (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linder, Eric; Ho, Shirly; Aldering, Greg; Fraiknoi, Andrew

    2011-04-25

    A panel of Lab scientists — including Eric Linder, Shirly Ho, and Greg Aldering — along with Andrew Fraiknoi, the Bay Area's most popular astronomy explainer, gathered at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre on Monday, April 25, 2011, for a discussion about "New Light on Dark Energy." Topics will include hunting down Type 1a supernovae, measuring the universe using baryon oscillation, and whether dark energy is the true driver of the universe.

  6. Light's labour's lost - policies for energy-efficient lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-06-29

    When William Shakepeare wrote Love's Labour's Lost he would have used light from tallow candles at a cost (today) of 12,000 British pounds per million-lumen hours. The same amount of light from electric lamps now costs only 2 pounds! But today's low-cost illumination still has a dark side. Globally, lighting consumes more electricity than is produced by either hydro or nuclear power and results in CO2 emissions equivalent to two thirds of the world's cars. A standard incandescent lamp may be much more efficient than a tallow candle, but it is far less efficient than a high-pressure sodium lamp. Were inefficient light sources to be replaced by the equivalent efficient ones, global lighting energy demand would be up to 40% less at a lower overall cost. Larger savings still could be realised through the intelligent use of controls, lighting levels and daylight. But achieving efficient lighting is not just a question of technology; it requires policies to transform current practice. This book documents the broad range of policy measures to stimulate efficient lighting that have already been implemented around the world and suggests new ways these could be strengthened to prevent light's labour's from being lost.

  7. Overconsumption of Energy and Excessive Discretionary Food Intake Inflates Dietary Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilly A. Hendrie

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Population dietary guidelines have started to include information about the environmental impacts of food choices, but more quantifiable evidence is needed, particularly about the impacts associated with discretionary foods. This paper utilised the 2011–2012 Australian Health Survey food intake data along with a highly disaggregated input–output model to estimate the greenhouse gas emissions (GHGe of Australians’ dietary intake, and compare current patterns of eating which vary in diet quality and GHGe to the recommended diet. The average dietary GHGe were 18.72 ± 12.06 and 13.73 ± 8.72 kg CO2e/day for male and female adults, respectively. The correlation between total energy and GHGe was r = 0.54 (p < 0.001. Core foods contributed 68.4% and discretionary foods 29.4%. Within core foods, fresh meat and alternatives (33.9% was the greatest contributor. The modelling of current dietary patterns showed the contribution of discretionary foods to GHGe was 121% greater in the average diet and 307% greater in the “lower quality, higher GHGe” diet compared to the recommended diet. Reducing discretionary food intake would allow for small increases in emissions from core foods (in particular vegetables, dairy and grains, thereby providing a nutritional benefit at little environmental expense. Public health messages that promote healthy eating, eating to one’s energy needs and improved diet quality will also contribute to lowering GHGe.

  8. Effects of coconut oil consumption on energy metabolism, cardiometabolic risk markers, and appetitive responses in women with excess body fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Flávia Xavier; Cândido, Flávia Galvão; Lopes, Lílian Lelis; Dias, Desirrê Morais; Carvalho, Samantha Dalbosco Lins; Pereira, Patrícia Feliciano; Bressan, Josefina

    2017-04-12

    Virgin coconut oil (VCO) is a medium-chain fatty acid source with popularly attributed benefits on obesity management. However, its role on obesity requires elucidation due to its saturated nature. In the study herein, we investigated acute effects of VCO consumption on energy metabolism, cardiometabolic risk markers, and appetitive responses in women with excess body fat. Fifteen adult women with excess body fat (37.43 ± 0.83%) participated in this randomized, crossover, controlled study. Two isocaloric mixed breakfasts containing 25 mL of VCO or control (extra-virgin olive oil-C) were evaluated. Resting energy expenditure (REE), fat oxidation rate (FOR), diet induced thermogenesis (DIT) and appetitive subjective responses were assessed at fasting and postprandial periods (up to 240 min). Cardiometabolic risk markers were assessed at fasting and up to 180 min postprandially. VCO did not affect REE, FOR, and DIT compared to C. In addition, VCO did not cause deleterious change in triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-c, LDL-c, triglycerides/HDL-c ratio, uric acid, glucose and Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance Index (HOMA-IR) (P time×treatment  > 0.05). However, VCO suppressed less hunger (P time×treatment  = 0.003), total satiety (P iAUC  = 0.021) and total fullness (P iAUC  = 0.035) responses than C. VCO consumption did not acutely change energy metabolism and cardiometabolic risk markers when added to a mixed breakfast but promoted less appetitive responses.

  9. Excess entropy and energy feedback from within cluster cores up to r200

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Asif; Majumdar, Subhabrata; Nath, Biman B.; Ettori, Stefano; Eckert, Dominique; Malik, Manzoor A.

    2017-11-01

    We estimate the 'non-gravitational' entropy-injection profiles, ΔK, and the resultant energy feedback profiles, ΔE, of the intracluster medium for 17 clusters using their Planck Sunyaev-Zel'dovich and ROSAT X-ray observations, spanning a large radial range from 0.2r500 up to r200. The feedback profiles are estimated by comparing the observed entropy, at fixed gas mass shells, with theoretical entropy profiles predicted from non-radiative hydrodynamic simulations. We include non-thermal pressure and gas clumping in our analysis. The inclusion of non-thermal pressure and clumping results in changing the estimates for r500 and r200 by 10-20 per cent. When clumpiness is not considered it leads to an underestimation of ΔK ≈ 300 keV cm2 at r500 and ΔK ≈ 1100 keV cm2 at r200. On the other hand, neglecting non-thermal pressure results in an overestimation of ΔK ≈ 100 keV cm2 at r500 and underestimation of ΔK ≈ 450 keV cm2 at r200. For the estimated feedback energy, we find that ignoring clumping leads to an underestimation of energy per particle ΔE ≈ 1 keV at r500 and ΔE ≈ 1.5 keV at r200. Similarly, neglect of the non-thermal pressure results in an overestimation of ΔE ≈ 0.5 keV at r500 and underestimation of ΔE ≈ 0.25 keV at r200. We find entropy floor of ΔK ≈ 300 keV cm2 is ruled out at ≈3σ throughout the entire radial range and ΔE ≈ 1 keV at more than 3σ beyond r500, strongly constraining intracluster medium pre-heating scenarios. We also demonstrate robustness of results w.r.t. sample selection, X-ray analysis procedures, entropy modelling, etc.

  10. Leveraging Lighting for Energy Savings: GSA Northwest/Artic Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-01-01

    Case study describes how the Northwest/Arctic Region branch of the General Services Administration (GSA) improved safety and energy efficiency in its Fairbanks Federal Building parking garage used by federal employees, U.S. Marshals, and the District Court. A 74% savings was realized by replacing 220 high-pressure sodium fixtures with 220 light-emitting diode fixtures.

  11. The role of energy losses in photosynthetic light harvesting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruger, T. P. J.; van Grondelle, R.

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthesis operates at the bottom of the food chain to convert the energy of light into carbohydrates at a remarkable global rate of about 130 TW. Nonetheless, the overall photosynthetic process has a conversion efficiency of a few percent at best, significantly less than bottom-up photovoltaic

  12. Proton Energy Dependence of the Light Output in Gallium Nitride Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, S. M.; Estan, D.; Erhardt, L. S.; Houdayer, A.; Carlone, C.; Ionascut-Nedelcescu, A.; Messenger, S. R.; Walters, R. J.; Summers, G. P.; Warner, J. H.; Jun, Insoo

    2004-10-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN)-based blue-emitting diodes (CREE Model C430-DH85) were irradiated at room temperature with protons in the energy range 2 to 115 MeV at fluences varying from 1/spl times/10/sup 11/ to 1/spl times/10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/. Light output degradation curves were obtained for each energy and the damage constant (A) associated with these curves was determined according to the theory of Rose and Barnes. For proton energies less than 10 MeV, A varies inversely with the proton energy (E). At higher energies, A is consistently above the 1/E relationship. The change in nature of the energy dependence is attributed to nuclear interactions. Nonionizing energy loss calculations for the case of protons on GaN are presented. Good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained.

  13. Optimal Energy Transfer in Light-Harvesting Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipeng Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis is one of the most essential biological processes in which specialized pigment-protein complexes absorb solar photons, and with a remarkably high efficiency, guide the photo-induced excitation energy toward the reaction center to subsequently trigger its conversion to chemical energy. In this work, we review the principles of optimal energy transfer in various natural and artificial light harvesting systems. We begin by presenting the guiding principles for optimizing the energy transfer efficiency in systems connected to dissipative environments, with particular attention paid to the potential role of quantum coherence in light harvesting systems. We will comment briefly on photo-protective mechanisms in natural systems that ensure optimal functionality under varying ambient conditions. For completeness, we will also present an overview of the charge separation and electron transfer pathways in reaction centers. Finally, recent theoretical and experimental progress on excitation energy transfer, charge separation, and charge transport in artificial light harvesting systems is delineated, with organic solar cells taken as prime examples.

  14. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conan O' Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle Three of PEARL program during the period of October 2002 to April 2003, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. The products tested are 20 models of screw-based compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) of various types and various wattages made or marketed by 12 different manufacturers, and ten models of residential lighting fixtures from eight different manufacturers.

  15. Reuse of the Reflective Light and the Recycle Heat Energy in Concentrated Photovoltaic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Chien Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A complex solar unit with microcrystalline silicon solar cells placed around the centered GaAs triple junction solar cell has been proposed and carried out. With the same illumination area and intensity, the total resultant power shows that the excess microcrystalline silicon solar cells increase the total output power by 13.2% by absorbing the reflective light from the surface of optical collimators. Furthermore, reusing the residual heat energy generated from the above-mentioned mechanism helps to increase the output power by around 14.1%. This mechanism provides a simple method to enhance the utility rate of concentrated photovoltaic (CPV system. Such concept can be further applied to the aerospace industry and the development of more efficient CPV solar energy applications.

  16. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conan O' Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle Four and Cycle Five of PEARL program during the period of October 2003 to April 2004, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. The parameter tested for Cycle Four is lumen maintenance at 40% rated life, and parameters tested for Cycle Five are all parameters required in Energy Star specifications except lumen maintenance at 40% rated life.

  17. Energy Star Lighting Verification Program (Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conan O' Rourke; Yutao Zhou

    2006-03-01

    The Program for the Evaluation and Analysis of Residential Lighting (PEARL) is a watchdog program. It was created in response to complaints received by utility program managers about the performance of certain Energy Star lighting products being promoted within their service territories and the lack of a self-policing mechanism within the lighting industry that would ensure the reliability of these products and their compliance with ENERGY STAR specifications. To remedy these problems, PEARL purchases and tests products that are available to the consumers in the marketplace. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) tests the selected products against the corresponding Energy Star specifications. This report includes the experimental procedure and data results of Cycle Three and Cycle Four of PEARL program during the period of April 2003 to October 2003, along with the description of apparatus used, equipment calibration process, experimental methodology, and research findings from the testing. The parameter tested for Cycle three is lumen maintenance at 40% rated life, and parameters tested for Cycle Four are all parameters required in Energy Star specifications except lumen maintenance at 40% rated life.

  18. Lighting energy efficiency in office buildings: Sri Lanka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijayatunga, Priyantha D.C. [Moratuwa Univ., Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Moratuwa (Sri Lanka); Fernando, W.J.L.S.; Ranasinghe, S. [Sri Lanka Energy Managers Association, Colombo (Sri Lanka)

    2003-09-01

    This paper describes a study conducted in the lighting sector of office buildings as a part of a broader research study aimed at developing building codes for Sri Lanka addressing lighting as well as thermal comfort in order to optimise the use of electricity within these buildings. The study covered different tasks performed in office buildings and the optimum lighting levels required to perform these tasks in the office environment in Sri Lanka. Also, it included assessing the visual performance of people involved in different activities under varying illumination levels in a controlled environment and a comparison of these optimum lighting levels with international standards. It can be seen that the required optimum lighting levels are generally lower in Sri Lanka in comparison to specified standard levels, and this scenario is likely to be similar in other developing countries too. These findings clearly emphasise the need to adopt lighting standards most appropriate to local conditions, in turn helping improve the energy efficiency within buildings. (Author)

  19. Smart LED lighting for major reductions in power and energy use for plant lighting in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulet, Lucie

    Launching or resupplying food, oxygen, and water into space for long-duration, crewed missions to distant destinations, such as Mars, is currently impossible. Bioregenerative life-support systems under development worldwide involving photoautotrophic organisms offer a solution to the food dilemma. However, using traditional Earth-based lighting methods, growth of food crops consumes copious energy, and since sunlight will not always be available at different space destinations, efficient electric lighting solutions are badly needed to reduce the Equivalent System Mass (ESM) of life-support infrastructure to be launched and transported to future space destinations with sustainable human habitats. The scope of the present study was to demonstrate that using LEDs coupled to plant detection, and optimizing spectral and irradiance parameters of LED light, the model crop lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Waldmann's Green) can be grown with significantly lower electrical energy for plant lighting than using traditional lighting sources. Initial experiments aimed at adapting and troubleshooting a first-generation "smart" plant-detection system coupled to LED arrays resulted in optimizing the detection process for plant position and size to the limits of its current design. Lettuce crops were grown hydroponically in a growth chamber, where temperature, relative humidity, and CO2 level are controlled. Optimal irradiance and red/blue ratio of LED lighting were determined for plant growth during both lag and exponential phases of crop growth. Under optimizing conditions, the efficiency of the automatic detection system was integrated with LED switching and compared to a system in which all LEDs were energized throughout a crop-production cycle. At the end of each cropping cycle, plant fresh and dry weights and leaf area were measured and correlated with the amount of electrical energy (kWh) consumed. Preliminary results indicated that lettuce plants grown under optimizing

  20. Unravelling radiative energy transfer in solid-state lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikov, Rustamzhon; Press, Daniel Aaron; Ganesh Kumar, Baskaran; Sadeghi, Sadra; Nizamoglu, Sedat

    2018-01-01

    Today, a wide variety of organic and inorganic luminescent materials (e.g., phosphors, quantum dots, etc.) are being used for lighting and new materials (e.g., graphene, perovskite, etc.) are currently under investigation. However, the understanding of radiative energy transfer is limited, even though it is critical to understand and improve the performance levels of solid-state lighting devices. In this study, we derived a matrix approach that includes absorption, reabsorption, inter-absorption and their iterative and combinatorial interactions for one and multiple types of fluorophores, which is simplified to an analytical matrix. This mathematical approach gives results that agree well with the measured spectral and efficiency characteristics of color-conversion light-emitting diodes. Moreover, it also provides a deep physical insight by uncovering the entire radiative interactions and their contribution to the output optical spectrum. The model is universal and applicable for all kinds of fluorophores.

  1. the Use of Solar Light for Energy Saving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Peña-García

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Shifting the threshold zone of road tunnels with semitransparent tension structures has shown itself to be an effective way of saving energy in regards to electricity consumption, maintenance, and construction materials used in the electrical lighting, thus lessening negative environmental impacts. Even though the shape of the tension structure has a major influence on energy savings, the optimal type of structure for each tunnel is often difficult to determine, because experiments using real tunnels are extremely expensive. It is thus necessary to find methods of doing this that are both reliable as well as economical. In this research study, three candidate structures were set up at the portal of a scale model of a real tunnel. The energy savings in each case were analyzed and compared. As a result, it was possible to formulate a new equation that calculates the energy savings in the threshold zone.

  2. Light element production by low energy nuclei from massive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangioni-Flam, E.; Casse, M.; Ramaty, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Orion complex is a source of gamma rays attributed to the de-excitation of fast carbon and oxygen nuclei excited through interactions with ambient hydrogen and helium. This has consequences for the production and evolution of light isotopes in the Galaxy, as massive stars appear as prolific sources of C-O rich low energy nuclei. The different stages of massive star evolution are considered in relation to the acceleration of nuclei to moderate energies. It is concluded that the low energy nuclear component originating from massive stars plays a larger role than the usual Galactic cosmic rays in shaping the evolution of Li-6, Be-9, B-10 and B-11, especially in the early Galactic evolution. The enhancement of the B-11/B-10 ratio observed in meteorites and in the interstellar medium is attributed to the interaction of low energy carbon nuclei with ambient H and to a lesser degree, to neutrino spallation.

  3. Self-heating co-pyrolysis of excessive activated sludge with waste biomass: energy balance and sludge reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hong-Sheng; Jiang, Hong

    2013-04-01

    In this work, co-pyrolysis of sludge with sawdust or rice husk was investigated. The results showed that the co-pyrolysis technology could be used to dispose of the excessive activated sludge without external energy input. The results also demonstrated that no obvious synergistic effect occurred except for heat transfer in the co-pyrolysis if the co-feeding biomass and sludge had similar thermogravimetric characteristics. The experimental results combined with calculation showed that adding sawdust accounting for 49.6% of the total feedstock or rice husk accounting for 74.7% could produce bio-oil to keep the energy balance of the co-pyrolysis system and self-heat it. The sludge from solar drying bed can be further reduced by 38.6% and 35.1% by weight when co-pyrolyzed with rice husk and sawdust, respectively. This study indicates that sludge reduction without external heat supply through co-pyrolysis of sludge with waste biomass is practically feasible. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Effects of Brazilian Green Propolis against Excessive Light-Induced Cell Damage in Retina and Fibroblast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi Murase

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We investigated the effects of Brazilian green propolis and its constituents against white light- or UVA-induced cell damage in mouse retinal cone-cell line 661W or human skin-derived fibroblast cells (NB1-RGB. Methods. Cell damage was induced by 3,000lx white light for 24 h or 4/10 J/cm2 UVA exposure. Cell viability was assessed by Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide staining or by tetrazolium salt (WST-8 cell viability assay. The radical scavenging activity of propolis induced by UVA irradiation in NB1-RGB cells was measured using a reactive-oxygen-species- (ROS- sensitive probe CM-H2DCFDA. Moreover, the effects of propolis on the UVA-induced activation of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK were examined by immunoblotting. Results. Treatment with propolis and two dicaffeoylquinic acids significantly inhibited the decrease in cell viability induced by white light in 661W. Propolis and its constituents inhibited the decrease in cell viability induced by UVA in NB1-RGB. Moreover, propolis suppressed the intracellular ROS production by UVA irradiation. Propolis also inhibited the levels of phosphorylated-p38 and ERK by UVA irradiation. Conclusion. Brazilian green propolis may become a major therapeutic candidate for the treatment of AMD and skin damage induced by UV irradiation.

  5. Mechanisms of energy transfer and conversion in plant Light-Harvesting Complex II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, Tiago Ferreira de

    2009-09-24

    The light-harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHC-II) is the major antenna complex in plant photosynthesis. It accounts for roughly 30% of the total protein in plant chloroplasts, which makes it arguably the most abundant membrane protein on Earth, and binds about half of plant chlorophyll (Chl). The complex assembles as a trimer in the thylakoid membrane and binds a total of 54 pigment molecules, including 24 Chl a, 18 Chl b, 6 lutein (Lut), 3 neoxanthin (Neo) and 3 violaxanthin (Vio). LHC-II has five key roles in plant photosynthesis. It: (1) harvests sunlight and transmits excitation energy to the reaction centres of photosystems II and I, (2) regulates the amount of excitation energy reaching each of the two photosystems, (3) has a structural role in the architecture of the photosynthetic supercomplexes, (4) contributes to the tight appression of thylakoid membranes in chloroplast grana, and (5) protects the photosynthetic apparatus from photo damage by non photochemical quenching (NPQ). A major fraction of NPQ is accounted for its energy-dependent component qE. Despite being critical for plant survival and having been studied for decades, the exact details of how excess absorbed light energy is dissipated under qE conditions remain enigmatic. Today it is accepted that qE is regulated by the magnitude of the pH gradient ({delta}pH) across the thylakoid membrane. It is also well documented that the drop in pH in the thylakoid lumen during high-light conditions activates the enzyme violaxanthin de-epoxidase (VDE), which converts the carotenoid Vio into zeaxanthin (Zea) as part of the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, studies with Arabidopsis mutants revealed that the photosystem II subunit PsbS is necessary for qE. How these physiological responses switch LHC-II from the active, energy transmitting to the quenched, energy-dissipating state, in which the solar energy is not transmitted to the photosystems but instead dissipated as heat, remains unclear and is the

  6. ACTIVATION PARAMETERS AND EXCESS THERMODYANAMIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Applying these data, viscosity-B-coefficients, activation parameters (Δμ10≠) and (Δμ20≠) and excess thermodynamic functions, viz., excess molar volume (VE), excess viscosity, ηE and excess molar free energy of activation of flow, (GE) were calculated. The value of interaction parameter, d, of Grunberg and Nissan ...

  7. Effectiveness Of UVC Lights Irradiation To Improve Energy Saving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer A. Bilal

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available HVAC Heating Ventilation and Air conditioning is the largest consumer of energy in commercial and industrial buildings. HVAC systems account for an approximated 50 of energy use in buildings. The sources of contamination and odour comes from the growth of bacteria mold and fungus that accumulate and develop on wet surfaces of HVAC coils and drain pans causing respiratory infection cough tight chest and wheezing. Besides the effects on human health Fungal contamination that adheres to the fins of cooling coil of air handling unit AHU cause a significant increase in pressure drop across the coil and decrease in heat exchange efficiency which Leeds to loss of cooling capacity and additional energy use. To prevent the fungal and microorganism growth on the cooling coil and drain pan of HVAC systems many studies conducted but not all these solutions were sufficient to remove microbial organism from the HVAC 100 . The UV-C light options through a process known as UVGI Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation is a technology showed a significant impact to produce clean air and improve indoor air quality 16. UVGI lights produce short wavelength light kills microorganisms including viruses bacteria mold and many other fungi by disrupting their DNA. The effectiveness of UVGI installed inside HVAC systems depends on many factors and the application Methods in HVAC systems. A few studies showed whether the use of UVGI results in energy saving. The objective of this study is to find the effect of fungal growth on the cooling coil surface by using field measurements at actual operating conditions of heat transfer and air flow for a non-irradiated coil in comparison to irradiated coil .Hence evaluate if there would be an enthalpy change at the coil and document the effectiveness of UVGI coil cleaning on restoring cooling capacity and save energy.

  8. Flow of light energy in benthic photosynthetic microbial mats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Najjar, Mohammad Ahmad A.

    2010-12-15

    The work in this thesis demonstrates the assessment of the energy budget inside microbial mat ecosystems, and the factors affecting light utilization efficiency. It presents the first balanced light energy budget for benthic microbial mat ecosystems, and shows how the budget and the spatial distribution of the local photosynthetic efficiencies within the euphotic zone depend on the absorbed irradiance (Jabs). The energy budget was dominated by heat dissipation on the expense of photosynthesis. The maximum efficiency of photosynthesis was at light limiting conditions When comparing three different marine benthic photosynthetic ecosystems (originated from Abu-Dhabi, Arctic, and Exmouth Gulf in Western Australia), differences in the efficiencies were calculated. The results demonstrated that the maximum efficiency depended on mat characteristics affecting light absorption and scattering; such as, photopigments ratio and distribution, and the structural organization of the photosynthetic organisms relative to other absorbing components of the ecosystem (i.e., EPS, mineral particles, detritus, etc.). The maximum efficiency decreased with increasing light penetration depth, and increased with increasing the accessory pigments (phycocyanin and fucoxanthin)/chlorophyll ratio. Spatial heterogeneity in photosynthetic efficiency, pigment distribution, as well as light acclimation in microbial mats originating from different geographical locations was investigated. We used a combined pigment imaging approach (variable chlorophyll fluorescence and hyperspectral imaging), and fingerprinting approach. For each mat, the photosynthetic activity was proportional to the local pigment concentration in the photic zone, but not for the deeper layers and between different mats. In each mat, yield of PSII and E1/2 (light acclimation) generally decreased in parallel with depth, but the gradients in both parameters varied greatly between samples. This mismatch between pigments concentration

  9. Energy utilization of light and heavy weaned piglets subjected to different dietary energy levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Machado Leal Ribeiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary metabolisable energy (ME: 3.25, 3.40, 3.55, or 3.70 Mcal kg−1 and weaning weight (WW: light 4.0±0.7 kg, and heavy: 6.3±0.6 kg on productive response and energy utilization of weaned piglets. Sixty-four male piglets were housed in 32 metabolic cages (two animals per cage during the first 14 d postweaning. At day 15, only one animal per cage was kept until day 28. Body composition, energy, and nutrient deposition rates and energy utilization efficiency were measured through a comparative slaughter procedure. Piglets with light WW had a poorer feed conversion ratio and lower weight gain and feed intake when expressed per live weight. Increased ME led to greater daily fat deposition in the empty bodies (defined as weighted mean of the carcass + organs + blood, no intestinal content, while light WW piglets had a reduced protein deposition. Light WW piglets increased heat production with increased ME, but no effect was seen for the heavy WW piglets. By contrast, heavy WW piglets increased empty body gross energy as ME increased, while no influence was observed on light WW piglets. Increasing dietary energy levels did not contribute to the subsequent growth performance of piglets that were lighter at weaning. The lack of interaction between weaning weight and dietary ME content on growth performance does not support the hypothesis that light piglets at weaning do not exhibit compensatory growth because of limitations in energy intake.

  10. Excessive somnolence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Tavares

    Full Text Available Excessive somnolence can be quite a incapacitating manifestation, and is frequently neglected by physicians and patients. This article reviews the determinant factors, the evaluation and quantification of diurnal somnolence, and the description and treatment of the main causes of excessive somnolence.

  11. Excessive somnolence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, S; Alóe, F; Gentil, V; Scaff, M

    1996-01-01

    Excessive somnolence can be quite a incapacitating manifestation, and is frequently neglected by physicians and patients. This article reviews the determinant factors, the evaluation and quantification of diurnal somnolence, and the description and treatment of the main causes of excessive somnolence.

  12. Heat, power and light: revolutions in energy services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger Fouquet [University of the South Pacific (Fiji). School of Economics

    2008-07-01

    In the trio of introductory chapters the author looks first briefly at the past, present and future of energy services, and at energy demand, technical change and economic development and then describes the historical data and methods he has chosen to use. The book's most substantial part deals with the development of individual energy services with separate chapters for heating, stationary (industrial) power, transport and lighting: in most cases the time span under consideration is 1300-2000. The third part analyzes long-term trends in the production, consumption and costs of these services (including their externalities) across the same time span, and some of the policies that have influenced those trends. The closing trio of very short chapters speculates about future trends and policies that may yield 'sustainable' futures.

  13. Synergetic Effect between Lighting Efficiency Enhancement and Building Energy Reduction Using Alternative Thermal Operating System of Indoor LED Lighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Lip Ahn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the synergetic effect between light-emitting diode (LED lighting efficiency and building energy savings in heating and cooling using an alternative thermal operating system (ATOS of indoor LED lighting integrated with the ventilation system of a building as an active cooling device. The heat generated from LED lighting and the indoor lighting illuminance were experimentally determined. The indoor heat gains in cooling and heating periods were determined using measurement data; the annual energy savings of an office building in heating and cooling were calculated through simulation. The LED lighting illuminance increased by approximately 40% and the lighting contribution for indoor heat gain was 7.8% in summer, while 69.8% in winter with the ATOS. Consequently, the annual total energy use of the office building could be reduced by 5.9%; the energy use in cooling and heating was reduced by 18.4% and 3.3%, respectively.

  14. Effect of low energy light irradiation by light emitting diode on U937 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoto, G; De Iuliis, V; Petrini, M; Flati, V; Di Gregorio, J; Vitale, D; Caruso, M; Dadorante, V; Ciarmoli, M; Robuffo, I; Martinotti, S; Toniato, E

    2016-01-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) can induce a set of different biological modulators either in vitro or in vivo. Experimental evidence has highlighted the role of light effects on the mechanisms related to inflammation, apoptosis and autophagy. The goal of this project was the evaluation of PBM on U937, an established cell line of histiocytic lymphoma origin. Several aspects of modulation of proinflammatory pathways were analyzed and autophagic and proapoptotic mechanisms related to low laser light exposure of cells were studied. As a source of low energy light emission, we used an NIR-LED device, characterized by an 880 nm-wavelength as light source. Flow cytometry analysis was performed on supernatants of controls and treated U937 cells to detect inflammatory cytokine levels. In order to evaluate NF-kB and caspase3 expressions, Western blot analysis was performed according to standard procedures. In this report, we show the effect of PBM on a monocyte/macrophage established tumor cell line (U-937). We demonstrate that LED exposure, in the presence or absence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), activates cell degranulation, increased expression of Interleukin-8 (IL-8) and modulation of beta galactosidase activity. Evidence shows that the well-known pro-inflammatory nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-kB) and the apoptotic marker (caspase3/cleaved-caspase3 ratio) are up-regulated in response to a proinflammatory biochemical pathway.

  15. η-meson production in proton-proton collisions at excess energies of 40 and 72 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrén, H.; Bargholtz, Chr.; Bashkanov, M.; Bogoslavsky, D.; Calén, H.; Clement, H.; Demirörs, L.; Ekström, C.; Fransson, K.; Fäldt, G.; Gerén, L.; Höistad, B.; Ivanov, G.; Jacewicz, M.; Jiganov, E.; Johansson, T.; Keleta, S.; Khakimova, O.; Koch, I.; Kren, F.; Kullander, S.; Kupść, A.; Lindberg, K.; Marciniewski, P.; Morosov, B.; Pauly, C.; Petukhov, Y.; Povtorejko, A.; Schönning, K.; Scobel, W.; Skorodko, T.; Stepaniak, J.; Tegnér, P.-E.; Thörngren Engblom, P.; Tikhomirov, V.; Wilkin, C.; Wolke, M.; Zabierowski, J.; Zartova, I.; Złomańczuk, J.

    2010-11-01

    The production of η mesons in proton-proton collisions has been studied using the WASA detector at the CELSIUS storage ring at excess energies of Q=40 MeV and Q=72 MeV. The η was detected through its 2γ decay in a near-4π electromagnetic calorimeter, whereas the protons were measured by a combination of straw chambers and plastic scintillator planes in the forward hemisphere. About 6.9×104 and 9.3×104 events were found at Q=40 MeV and Q=72 MeV, respectively, with background contributions of less than 5%. A simple parametrization of the production cross section in terms of low partial waves was used to evaluate the acceptance corrections. Strong evidence was found for the influence of higher partial waves. The Dalitz plots show the presence of p waves in both the pp and the η{pp} systems and the angular distributions of the η in the center-of-mass frame suggest the influence of d-wave η mesons.

  16. Economic photoprotection in photosystem II that retains a complete light-harvesting system with slow energy traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgio, Erica; Kapitonova, Ekaterina; Chmeliov, Jevgenij; Duffy, Christopher D P; Ungerer, Petra; Valkunas, Leonas; Ruban, Alexander V

    2014-07-11

    The light-harvesting antenna of higher plant photosystem II has an intrinsic capability for self-defence against intense sunlight. The thermal dissipation of excess energy can be measured as the non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence. It has recently been proposed that the transition between the light-harvesting and self-defensive modes is associated with a reorganization of light-harvesting complexes. Here we show that despite structural changes, the photosystem II cross-section does not decrease. Our study reveals that the efficiency of energy trapping by the non-photochemical quencher(s) is lower than the efficiency of energy capture by the reaction centres. Consequently, the photoprotective mechanism works effectively for closed rather than open centres. This type of defence preserves the exceptional efficiency of electron transport in a broad range of light intensities, simultaneously ensuring high photosynthetic productivity and, under hazardous light conditions, sufficient photoprotection for both the reaction centre and the light-harvesting pigments of the antenna.

  17. How the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 Affects Light Bulbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inefficient light bulbs are being phased out under the New Light Bulb Law. It does not sweepingly ban incandescent bulbs, just those not energy efficient (with some exemptions). It also includes many provisions not pertaining to lighting.

  18. Ultrafast energy relaxation in single light-harvesting complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malý, Pavel; Gruber, J. Michael; Cogdell, Richard J.; Mančal, Tomáš; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-02-22

    Energy relaxation in light-harvesting complexes has been extensively studied by various ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, the fastest processes being in the sub–100-fs range. At the same time, much slower dynamics have been observed in individual complexes by single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy (SMS). In this work, we use a pump–probe-type SMS technique to observe the ultrafast energy relaxation in single light-harvesting complexes LH2 of purple bacteria. After excitation at 800 nm, the measured relaxation time distribution of multiple complexes has a peak at 95 fs and is asymmetric, with a tail at slower relaxation times. When tuning the excitation wavelength, the distribution changes in both its shape and position. The observed behavior agrees with what is to be expected from the LH2 excited states structure. As we show by a Redfield theory calculation of the relaxation times, the distribution shape corresponds to the expected effect of Gaussian disorder of the pigment transition energies. By repeatedly measuring few individual complexes for minutes, we find that complexes sample the relaxation time distribution on a timescale of seconds. Furthermore, by comparing the distribution from a single long-lived complex with the whole ensemble, we demonstrate that, regarding the relaxation times, the ensemble can be considered ergodic. Our findings thus agree with the commonly used notion of an ensemble of identical LH2 complexes experiencing slow random fluctuations.

  19. Ultrafast Energy Relaxation in Single Light-Harvesting Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Malý, Pavel; Cogdell, Richard J; Mančal, Tomáš; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2015-01-01

    Energy relaxation in light-harvesting complexes has been extensively studied by various ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, the fastest processes being in the sub-100 fs range. At the same time much slower dynamics have been observed in individual complexes by single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy (SMS). In this work we employ a pump-probe type SMS technique to observe the ultrafast energy relaxation in single light-harvesting complexes LH2 of purple bacteria. After excitation at 800 nm, the measured relaxation time distribution of multiple complexes has a peak at 95 fs and is asymmetric, with a tail at slower relaxation times. When tuning the excitation wavelength, the distribution changes in both its shape and position. The observed behaviour agrees with what is to be expected from the LH2 excited states structure. As we show by a Redfield theory calculation of the relaxation times, the distribution shape corresponds to the expected effect of Gaussian disorder of the pigment transition energies. By repe...

  20. Replacement of Lighting Fixtures with LED Energy Efficient Lights at the Parking Facility, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Brien

    2012-06-21

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC or Tribe) owns a six-story parking facility adjacent to its Potawatomi Bingo Casino (the Casino) in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, as well as a valet parking facility under the Casino (collectively, the Parking Facility). The Parking Facility contained 205-watt metal halide-type lights that, for security reasons, operated 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. Starting on August 30, 2010, the Tribe replaced these fixtures with 1,760 state-of-the-art, energy efficient 55-Watt LED lights. This project resulted in an immediate average reduction in monthly peak demand of 238 kW over the fourth quarter of 2010. The average reduction in monthly peak demand from October 1 through December 31, 2010 translates into a forecast annual electrical energy reduction of approximately 1,995,000 kWh or 47.3% of the pre-project demand. This project was technically effective, economically feasible, and beneficial to the public not only in terms of long term energy efficiency and associated emissions reductions, but also in the short-term jobs provided for the S.E. Wisconsin region. The project was implemented, from approval by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to completion, in less than 6 months. The project utilized off-the-shelf proven technologies that were fabricated locally and installed by local trade contractors.

  1. Membrane systems for energy efficient separation of light gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, D.J.; Archuleta, T.; Barbero, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Ethylene and propylene are two of the largest commodity chemicals in the United States and are major building blocks for the petrochemicals industry. These olefins are separated currently by cryogenic distillation which demands extremely low temperatures and high pressures. Over 75 billion pounds of ethylene and propylene are distilled annually in the US at an estimated energy requirement of 400 trillion BTU`s. Non-domestic olefin producers are rapidly constructing state-of-the-art plants. These energy-efficient plants are competing with an aging United States olefins industry in which 75% of the olefins producers are practicing technology that is over twenty years old. New separation opportunities are therefore needed to continually reduce energy consumption and remain competitive. Amoco has been a leader in incorporating new separation technology into its olefins facilities and has been aggressively pursuing non-cryogenic alternatives to light gas separations. The largest area for energy reduction is the cryogenic isolation of the product hydrocarbons from the reaction by-products, methane and hydrogen. This separation requires temperatures as low as {minus}150{degrees}F and pressures exceeding 450 psig. This CRADA will focus on developing a capillary condensation process to separate olefinic mixtures from light gas byproducts at temperatures that approach ambient conditions and at pressures less than 250 psig; this technology breakthrough will result in substantial energy savings. The key technical hurdle in the development of this novel separation concept is the precise control of the pore structure of membrane materials. These materials must contain specially-shaped channels in the 20-40A range to provide the driving force necessary to remove the condensed hydrocarbon products. In this project, Amoco is the technology end-user and provides the commercialization opportunity and engineering support.

  2. The otherness of sexuality: excess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Ruth

    2008-03-01

    The present essay, the second of a series of three, aims at developing an experience-near account of sexuality by rehabilitating the idea of excess and its place in sexual experience. It is suggested that various types of excess, such as excess of excitation (Freud), the excess of the other (Laplanche), excess beyond symbolization and the excess of the forbidden object of desire (Leviticus; Lacan) work synergistically to constitute the compelling power of sexuality. In addition to these notions, further notions of excess touch on its transformative potential. Such notions address excess that shatters psychic structures and that is actively sought so as to enable new ones to evolve (Bersani). Work is quoted that regards excess as a way of dealing with our lonely, discontinuous being by using the "excessive" cosmic energy circulating through us to achieve continuity against death (Bataille). Two contemporary analytic thinkers are engaged who deal with the object-relational and intersubjective vicissitudes of excess.

  3. A newly isolated Chlorella sp. from desert sand crusts exhibits a unique resistance to excess light intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treves, Haim; Raanan, Hagai; Finkel, Omri M; Berkowicz, Simon M; Keren, Nir; Shotland, Yoram; Kaplan, Aaron

    2013-12-01

    We recently isolated a small green alga from a biological sand crust (BSC) in the NW Negev, Israel. Based on its 18S rRNA and rbcL genes, it is a close relative of Chlorella sorokiniana and of certain strains of C. vulgaris and C. variabilis, but differs substantially in many aspects from C. sorokiniana. Because the classification of Chlorellales is still not resolved, we designated this species as C. ohadii (Trebouxiophyceae) in honor of Professor Itzhak Ohad. Under controlled laboratory conditions, C. ohadii showed marked structural and photosynthetic performance changes, depending on the carbon source used during growth, as well as remarkable resistance to photoinhibition. CO2 -dependent O2 evolution was not affected even when exposed to a light intensity of 3500 μmole photons m(-2)  s(-1) , over 1.5 times the maximal intensity reached at the BSC surface, whereas the variable fluorescence declined sharply. We briefly discuss the use of fluorescence to assess photosynthetic rate and the implications of this finding for the assessment of global BSCs activity. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Laser, light, and energy devices for cellulite and lipodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jennifer D; Goldman, Mitchel P

    2011-07-01

    Cellulite affects all races, and it is estimated that 85% of women older than 20 years have some degree of cellulite. Many currently accepted cellulite therapies target deficiencies in lymphatic drainage and microvascular circulation. Devices using radiofrequency, laser, and light-based energies, alone or in combination and coupled frequently with tissue manipulation, are available for improving cellulite. Laser assisted liposuction may improve cellulite appearance. Although improvement using these devices is temporary, it may last several months. Patients who want smoother skin with less visible cellulite can undergo a series of treatments and then return for additional treatments as necessary. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, A. D.; Patel, D. M.; Bertram, K. M.

    2013-03-01

    Considerable research has focused on energy efficiency and fuel substitution options for light-duty vehicles, while much less attention has been given to medium- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, aircraft, marine vessels, trains, pipeline, and off-road equipment. This report brings together the salient findings from an extensive review of literature on future energy efficiency options for these non-light-duty modes. Projected activity increases to 2050 are combined with forecasts of overall fuel efficiency improvement potential to estimate the future total petroleum and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current levels. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  6. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, A. D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Patel, D. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bertram, K. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Considerable research has focused on energy efficiency and fuel substitution options for light-duty vehicles, while much less attention has been given to medium- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, aircraft, marine vessels, trains, pipeline, and off-road equipment. This report brings together the salient findings from an extensive review of literature on future energy efficiency options for these non-light-duty modes. Projected activity increases to 2050 are combined with forecasts of overall fuel efficiency improvement potential to estimate the future total petroleum and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current levels. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  7. The water-water cycle in leaves is not a major alternative electron sink for dissipation of excess excitation energy when CO2 assimilation is restricted

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driever, S.M.; Baker, N.R.

    2011-01-01

    Electron flux from water via photosystem II (PSII) and PSI to oxygen (water–water cycle) may provide a mechanism for dissipation of excess excitation energy in leaves when CO2 assimilation is restricted. Mass spectrometry was used to measure O2 uptake and evolution together with CO2 uptake in leaves

  8. Nanostructures for Enhanced Light Absorption in Solar Energy Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav Edman Jonsson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The fascinating optical properties of nanostructured materials find important applications in a number of solar energy utilization schemes and devices. Nanotechnology provides methods for fabrication and use of structures and systems with size corresponding to the wavelength of visible light. This opens a wealth of possibilities to explore the new, often of resonance character, phenomena observed when the object size and the electromagnetic field periodicity (light wavelength λ match. Here we briefly review the effects and concepts of enhanced light absorption in nanostructures and illustrate them with specific examples from recent literature and from our studies. These include enhanced optical absorption of composite photocatalytically active TiO2/graphitic carbon films, systems with enhanced surface plasmon resonance, field-enhanced absorption in nanofabricated carbon structures with geometrical optical resonances and excitation of waveguiding modes in supported nanoparticle assembles. The case of Ag particles plasmon-mediated chemistry of NO on graphite surface is highlighted to illustrate the principle of plasmon-electron coupling in adsorbate systems.

  9. Lighting and social practices - what role does lighting play for low energy house (LEH) households and LED frontrunners?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Charlotte Louise

    As lighting in Danish households consume approximately 1.3 TWh every year, reducing electricity consumption from lighting is important. Studies have shown that a mere substitution of inefficient lighting technologies towards more efficient ones may not be possible, as many social and cultural...... dimensions influence how people use and relate to lighting. Assessing how very distinctive contexts of households (that diverge from an exemplary kind of household), such as low energy houses and LED frontrunner households, use and understand lighting, may give some insight into what may trigger or hamper...... a transition towards less electricity-consuming lighting patterns....

  10. Plasmonic harvesting of light energy for Suzuki coupling reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Li, Chuanhao; Chen, Huanjun; Jiang, Ruibin; Sun, Ling-Dong; Li, Quan; Wang, Jianfang; Yu, Jimmy C; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2013-04-17

    The efficient use of solar energy has received wide interest due to increasing energy and environmental concerns. A potential means in chemistry is sunlight-driven catalytic reactions. We report here on the direct harvesting of visible-to-near-infrared light for chemical reactions by use of plasmonic Au-Pd nanostructures. The intimate integration of plasmonic Au nanorods with catalytic Pd nanoparticles through seeded growth enabled efficient light harvesting for catalytic reactions on the nanostructures. Upon plasmon excitation, catalytic reactions were induced and accelerated through both plasmonic photocatalysis and photothermal conversion. Under the illumination of an 809 nm laser at 1.68 W, the yield of the Suzuki coupling reaction was ~2 times that obtained when the reaction was thermally heated to the same temperature. Moreover, the yield was also ~2 times that obtained from Au-TiOx-Pd nanostructures under the same laser illumination, where a 25-nm-thick TiOx shell was introduced to prevent the photocatalysis process. This is a more direct comparison between the effect of joint plasmonic photocatalysis and photothermal conversion with that of sole photothermal conversion. The contribution of plasmonic photocatalysis became larger when the laser illumination was at the plasmon resonance wavelength. It increased when the power of the incident laser at the plasmon resonance was raised. Differently sized Au-Pd nanostructures were further designed and mixed together to make the mixture light-responsive over the visible to near-infrared region. In the presence of the mixture, the reactions were completed within 2 h under sunlight, while almost no reactions occurred in the dark.

  11. Energy Saving by Chopping off Peak Demand Using Day Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar Maitra

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available An artificial intelligent technique has been implemented in this research using real time datas to calculate how much energy can be chopped from peak load demand. The results are based on real time data that are taken from power delivering centers. These datas do reflect the present condition of power and a solution to those critical conditions during the peak period. These are done in such a way such that helps in judicious scheduling of load. The time based load scheduling has been done so as to understand the basic criteria for solving power crisis during morning peak and early evening peak. The sunray availability and percentage of load that will use day light saving (DLS technique has been taken into account in this work. The results shows that about 0.5% to 1% of load can be shedded off from the peak load period which otherwise is reduction of power. Thus it otherwise also means that an equivalent amount of energy is saved which amounts to a large saving of national money. This result is obtained on monthly and even daily basis. Thus this paper justifies DLS gives a new renewable technique to save energy.

  12. The effect of nocturnal blue light exposure from light-emitting diodes on wakefulness and energy metabolism the following morning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayaba, Momoko; Iwayama, Kaito; Ogata, Hitomi; Seya, Yumi; Kiyono, Ken; Satoh, Makoto; Tokuyama, Kumpei

    2014-09-01

    The control of sleep/wakefulness is associated with the regulation of energy metabolism. The present experiment was designed to assess the effect of nocturnal blue light exposure on the control of sleep/wakefulness and energy metabolism until next noon. In a balanced cross-over design, nine young male subjects sitting in a room-size metabolic chamber were exposed either to blue LEDs or to no light for 2 h in the evening. Wavelength of monochromatic LEDs was 465 nm and its intensity was 12.1 μW/cm(2). During sleep, sleep architecture and alpha and delta power of EEG were similar in the two experimental conditions. However, the following morning, when subjects were instructed to stay awake in a sitting position, duration judged as sleep at stages 1 and 2 was longer for subjects who received than for those who received no light exposure. Energy metabolism during sleep was not affected by evening blue light exposure, but the next morning energy expenditure, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production and the thermic effect of breakfast were significantly lower in subjects who received blue light exposure than in those who received no light exposure. Exposure to low intensity blue light in the evening, which does not affect sleep architecture and energy metabolism during sleep, elicits drowsiness and suppression of energy metabolism the following morning.

  13. The integration of daylighting with artificial lighting to enhance building energy performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ashwal, Najib Taher; Hassan, Ahmad Sanusi

    2017-10-01

    In sustainable building designs, daylight is considered as an alternative source of light to artificial lighting. Daylight is an energy-free and efficient-cost lighting source. Natural light is the best source for light due to its good quality, which matches the visual response of the human eyes. Daylight positively affects people by providing a sense of liveliness and brightness in the living space. The positive impact of daylight on the building occupants' visual comfort, health and performance is well recognized. However, daylight is not widely utilized to supplement artificial lighting, because there is a lack of information and tools to evaluate daylighting and potentials for energy savings. The efficient utilization of natural lighting will not only affect the interior environment and the occupants' health and performance but also has a direct impact on the building energy performance. Therefore, this paper reviews and discusses the effects of daylighting on the building energy performance mainly in schools and office buildings. This includes lighting energy performance, total energy consumption, cooling load. The methods, which are used to estimate the possible reduction in total energy consumption, are also reviewed in this research paper. Previous studies revealed that a clear reduction can be obtained in the energy consumed by electric lighting, as well as in the total energy end-use when a suitable lighting control system is applied to utilize the available natural light.

  14. Light harvesting via energy transfer in the dye solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegers, Conrad

    2007-11-09

    The PhD-thesis ''Light Harvesting via Energy Transfer in the Dye Solar Cell'' (University of Freiburg, July 2007) describes the conceptual design, synthesis and testing of energy donor acceptor sensitizers for the dye solar cell (DSC). Under monochromatic illumination solar cells sensitized with the novel donor acceptor systems revealed a higher power conversion efficiency than cells containing exclusively the acceptor component. The following approach led to this conclusion: (i) the choice of suitable chromophores as energy donor and acceptor moieties according to the Foerster-theory, (ii) the synthesis of different donor acceptor systems, (iii) the development of a methodology allowing the quantification of energy transfer within dye solar cells, and (iv) the evaluation of characteristics of DSCs that were sensitized with the different donor acceptor systems. The acceptor chromophores used in this work were derived from [Ru(dcbpy)2acac]Cl (dcbpy = 4,4'-dicarboxy-2,2'-bipyridin, acac = acetylacetonato). This complex offered the opportunity to introduce substituents at the acac-ligand's terminal CH3 groups without significantly affecting its excellent photoelectrochemical properties. Alkylated 4-amino-1,8-naphthalimides (termed Fluorols in the following) were used as energy donor chromophores. This class of compounds fulfils the requirements for efficient energy transfer to [Ru(dcbpy)2acac]Cl. Covalently linking donor and acceptor chromophores to one another was achieved by two different concepts. A dyad comprising one donor and one acceptor chromophore was synthesized by subsequent hydrosilylation steps of an olefin-bearing donor and an acceptor precursor to the dihydrosilane HSiMe2-CH2CH2-SiMe2H. A series of polymers comprising multiple donor and acceptor units was made by the addition of alkyne-bearing chromophores to hyperbranched polyglycerol azide (''Click-chemistry''). In this series the donor acceptor

  15. High Energy Density Science at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, R W

    2007-10-19

    High energy density science (HEDS), as a discipline that has developed in the United States from National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA)-sponsored laboratory research programs, is, and will remain, a major component of the NNSA science and technology strategy. Its scientific borders are not restricted to NNSA. 'Frontiers in High Energy Density Physics: The X-Games of Contemporary Science' identified numerous exciting scientific opportunities in this field, while pointing to the need for a overarching interagency plan for its evolution. Meanwhile, construction of the first x-ray free-electron laser, the Office-of-Science-funded Linear Coherent Light Source-LCLS: the world's first free electron x-ray laser, with 100-fsec time resolution, tunable x-ray energies, a high rep rate, and a 10 order-of-magnitude increase in brightness over any other x-ray source--led to the realization that the scientific needs of NNSA and the broader scientific community could be well served by an LCLS HEDS endstation employing both short-pulse and high-energy optical lasers. Development of this concept has been well received in the community. NNSA requested a workshop on the applicability of LCLS to its needs. 'High Energy Density Science at the LCLS: NNSA Defense Programs Mission Need' was held in December 2006. The workshop provided strong support for the relevance of the endstation to NNSA strategic requirements. The range of science that was addressed covered a wide swath of the vast HEDS phase space. The unique possibilities provided by the LCLS in areas of intense interest to NNSA Defense Programs were discussed. The areas of focus included warm dense matter and equations of state, hot dense matter, and behavior of high-pressure materials under conditions of high strain-rate and extreme dynamic loading. Development of new and advanced diagnostic techniques was also addressed. This report lays out the relevant science, as brief summaries (Ch. II), expanded

  16. Colloidal transport in complex potential energy landscapes created with light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladavac, Kosta

    This thesis describes experimental studies of the overdamped transport of colloidal spheres moving through structured potential energy landscapes, precisely tailored with computer-generated holograms. In static landscapes, we demonstrate optical fractionation, a continuous and continuously optimized sorting technique, which can sort mixtures of colloidal particles by size and other properties. Separation is based on the ability of a periodic landscape to deflect trajectories away from the direction of an externally applied driving force. We show that the crossover from free-flowing to deflected transport can depend exponentially on an object's size, with this exceptional selectivity emerging from the periodicity of the environment. Next we describe colloidal motion induced by a dynamic potential energy landscape, a cycle of three optical trapping patterns. For diffusing colloidal spheres this system is an optical thermal ratchet, and the ratchet-driven transport displays flux reversal as a function of the cycle frequency and the inter-trap separation. This is the first experimental observation of flux reversal in a symmetric thermal ratchet. Active potential energy landscapes are implemented with optical vortices, created from helical modes of light, that exert torques as well as forces. We demonstrate that arrays of optical vortices can organize colloidal spheres into microoptomechanical pumps, assembled by optical gradient forces and actuated by photon orbital angular momentum. Concentric circulating rings of particles formed by coaxial optical vortices form a microscopic Couette cell, in which hydrodynamic drag experienced by the spheres depends on the relative sense of the rings' circulation. Tracking the particles' motions we measure hydrodynamic coupling between the circular particle trains.

  17. Activation energy of light induced isomerization of resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiras, Teresa Sofia; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Petersen, Steffen B

    2011-09-01

    Isomerization of trans-stilbenes is known to be induced by light. The two isomers have distinct absorption, fluorescence excitation and emission spectra. Resveratrol, 3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene, is a member of the stilbene family. The interest of the scientific community in resveratrol has increased over the last years due to its biomedical properties. Whereas there is a growing confidence that trans-resveratrol is non-toxic, very little is known about the pharmacology of cis-resveratrol. Of this very reason there is considerable interest in knowing the energetics of the trans-cis conversion. Cis-resveratrol is characterized by a large fluorescence quantum yield when compared to trans-resveratrol. In the present paper we report a detailed analysis of the spectral changes induced in trans-resveratrol upon 260 nm excitation for different time periods. Spectral changes have been monitored with UV-visible absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy at pH 4 at 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45 and 50 °C. Continuous 260 nm excitation induces a blue shift in the absorption and fluorescence excitation spectra of resveratrol and a 14 nm blue shift in its fluorescence emission. The photoisomerization yield is reported as a function of 260 nm excitation time. 330 min continuous excitation led to ~60% isomerization yield. The kinetics of trans-cis isomerization has been monitored following the increase in fluorescence quantum yield upon continuous 260 nm excitation of trans-resveratrol. The study was carried out at the above mentioned temperatures in order to obtain the Arrhenius activation energy of photoisomerization. Activation energy and pre-exponential factor were 3.7 ± 0.3 kcal.mol(-1) and 10.6 ± 1.6 s(-1), respectively. The activation energy is comparable with previously reported values for the photoisomerization of other stilbenes.

  18. Deployment methods of visible light communication lights for energy efficient buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niaz, Muhammad Tabish; Imdad, Fatima; Kim, Soomi; Kim, Hyung Seok

    2016-10-01

    Indoor visible light communication (VLC) uses light emitting diodes (LEDs) to provide both illumination and data communication. The deployment of LED plays an important role in maintaining a steady optical power distribution over the reference receiving plane. Typical ways of luminaire deployment in offices and homes are not optimized for VLC. This paper investigates various configurations of LEDs for deploying them on the ceilings of offices and homes. The existing square array deployment of LEDs does not provide a full coverage on the receiving plane leaving dead spaces, which in turn affects the performance of the whole system. An optimized circular deployment scheme is proposed that considers both the position of the LED transmitters on the ceiling and the first reflections at each wall to yield more accurate results. Rectangular deployment and circular deployment are analyzed through simulation of the received optical power distribution, average outage area rate, and energy consumption. An optimization technique is developed to analyze the LED deployment schemes. It is clear from the results that the circular LED deployment provides a better performance than the square array grid LED deployment.

  19. The back and forth of energy transfer between carotenoids and chlorophylls and its role in the regulation of light harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleboom, Christoph-Peter; Walla, Peter J

    2014-02-01

    Many aspects in the regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting of plants are still quite poorly understood. For example, it is still a matter of debate which physical mechanism(s) results in the regulation and dissipation of excess energy in high light. Many researchers agree that electronic interactions between chlorophylls (Chl) and certain states of carotenoids are involved in these mechanisms. However, in particular, the role of the first excited state of carotenoids (Car S1) is not easily revealed, because of its optical forbidden character. The use of two-photon excitation is an elegant approach to address directly this state and to investigate the energy transfer in the direction Car S1 → Chl. Meanwhile, it has been applied to a large variety of systems starting from simple carotenoid-tetrapyrrole model compounds up to entire plants. Here, we present a systematic summary of the observations obtained by two-photon excitation about Car S1 → Chl energy transfer in systems with increasing complexity and the correlation to fluorescence quenching. We compare these observations directly with the energy transfer in the opposite direction, Chl → Car S1, for the same systems as obtained in pump-probe studies. We discuss what surprising aspects of this comparison led us to the suggestion that quenching excitonic Car-Chl interactions could contribute to the regulation of light harvesting, and how this suggestion can be connected to other models proposed.

  20. The response of Hordeum spontaneum desert ecotype to drought and excessive light intensity is characterized by induction of O2 dependent photochemical activity and anthocyanin accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppel, Amir; Keren, Nir; Salomon, Eitan; Volis, Sergei; Rachmilevitch, Shimon

    2013-03-01

    The goal of the current research was to study the role of anthocyanin accumulation, O(2)-related photochemical processes and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) in the response of desert and Mediterranean plants to drought and excessive light. Plants of Hordeum spontaneum were collected from Mediterranean and desert environments and were subjected to terminal drought for 25 days and then measured for PSII yield at 2 and 21% O(2), NPQ, net carbon assimilation, stomatal conductance, leaf relative water content (LRWC), anthocyanin concentration and leaf absorbance. Under terminal drought, LRWC, carbon assimilation and stomatal conductance decreased similarly and significantly in both the Mediterranean and the desert ecotypes. Anthocyanin accumulated more in the desert ecotype than in the Mediterranean ecotype. NPQ increased more in the Mediterranean ecotype as compared with the desert ecotype. PSII yield decreased significantly in the Mediterranean ecotype under drought and was much lower than in the desert ecotype under drought. The relatively high PSII yield under drought in the desert ecotype was O(2) dependent. The response of the H. spontaneum ecotype from a desert environment to drought stress was characterized by anthocyanin accumulation and induction of O(2) dependent photochemical activity, while the response of the Mediterranean ecotype was based on a higher induction of NPQ. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Next Generation Luminaires: Recognizing Innovative, Energy-Efficient Commercial Lighting Luminaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-04-01

    Fact sheet that describes the Next Generation Luminaires SSL lighting design competition, which recognizes excellence in technical innovation and design of high-quality, energy-efficient commercial lighting, both indoor and outdoor.

  2. Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Program Implementation for Energy Savings: Field Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Kelly L.; Sullivan, Gregory P.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Richman, Eric E.; Matzke, Brett D.

    2006-08-22

    This report provides results from an evaluation PNNL conducted of a spectrally enhanced lighting demonstration project. PNNL performed field measurements and occupant surveys at three office buildings in California before and after lighting retrofits were made in August and December 2005. PNNL measured the following Overhead lighting electricity demand and consumption, Light levels in the workspace, Task lighting use, and Occupant ratings of satisfaction with the lighting. Existing lighting, which varied in each building, was replaced with lamps with correlated color temperature (CCT) of 5000 Kelvin, color rendering index (CRI) of 85, of varying wattages, and lower ballast factor electronic ballasts. The demonstrations were designed to decrease lighting power loads in the three buildings by 22-50 percent, depending on the existing installed lamps and ballasts. The project designers hypothesized that this reduction in electrical loads could be achieved by the change to higher CCT lamps without decreasing occupant satisfaction with the lighting.

  3. Energy efficiency and colour quality improvement and subjective preference of LED office lighting

    OpenAIRE

    Baniya, Rupak Raj

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this thesis were to explore different approaches to improve energy efficiency and colour quality, and to find out the subjective preference of LED office lighting. Four approaches (optimization of LED spectra, lighting retrofitting, hue-heat hypothesis, and smart indoor lighting control) were studied for energy efficiency and colour quality improvement. Two experiments, one in lighting booths and the other in an office room, were conducted to examine subjective preferences. ...

  4. Savings in Cooling Energy with a Thermal Management System for LED Lighting in Office Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Lip Ahn

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Light-emitting diode (LED lighting should be considered for lighting efficiency enhancement, however, waste heat from light-emitting diode (LED lighting increases the internal cooling load during the summer season. In order to solve this problem we propose a thermal management system for light-emitting diode (LED lighting with a heat exchanger module integrated with the building’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC system to move the lighting’s waste heat outdoors. An experiment was carried out to investigate the thermal effects in a test chamber and the heat exchange rate between the heat sink and the duct air. The heat generated by the light-emitting diode (LED lighting was calculated as 78.1% of light-emitting diode (LED input power and the heat exchange rate of the lighting heat exchange module was estimated to be between 86.5% and 98.1% according to the light-emitting diode (LED input power and the flow rate of air passing the heat sink. As a result, the average light-emitting diode (LED lighting heat contribution rate for internal heat gain was determined as 0.05; this value was used to calculate the heating and cooling energy demand of the office building through an energy simulation program. In the simulation results, the cooling energy demand was reduced by 19.2% compared with the case of conventionally installed light-emitting diode (LED lighting.

  5. 10 CFR 904.9 - Excess capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Marketing § 904.9 Excess capacity. (a) If the Uprating Program results in Excess Capacity, Western shall be entitled to such Excess Capacity to integrate the operation of the Boulder City Area Projects and other... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Excess capacity. 904.9 Section 904.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF...

  6. Energy efficient lighting design for Venlo type greenhouses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, E.G.O.N.; Zonneveldt, L.; Sools, F.

    2005-01-01

    TNO has developed a Radiance software model to calculate the light distribution in the greenhouse using raytracing methods, suitable for daylight and artificial lighting. The model is based on a 3d CAD model. The objective is to maximize the efficiency of the artificial lighting system (the amount

  7. Molecular design of the photosystem II light-harvesting antenna: photosynthesis and photoprotection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peter Horton; Alexander Ruban

    The photosystem II (PSII) light-harvesting system carries out two essential functions, the efficient collection of light energy for photosynthesis, and the regulated dissipation of excitation energy in excess of that which...

  8. Reactive oxygen species and transcript analysis upon excess light treatment in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana vs a photosensitive mutant lacking zeaxanthin and lutein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roncaglia Enrica

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS are unavoidable by-products of oxygenic photosynthesis, causing progressive oxidative damage and ultimately cell death. Despite their destructive activity they are also signalling molecules, priming the acclimatory response to stress stimuli. Results To investigate this role further, we exposed wild type Arabidopsis thaliana plants and the double mutant npq1lut2 to excess light. The mutant does not produce the xanthophylls lutein and zeaxanthin, whose key roles include ROS scavenging and prevention of ROS synthesis. Biochemical analysis revealed that singlet oxygen (1O2 accumulated to higher levels in the mutant while other ROS were unaffected, allowing to define the transcriptomic signature of the acclimatory response mediated by 1O2 which is enhanced by the lack of these xanthophylls species. The group of genes differentially regulated in npq1lut2 is enriched in sequences encoding chloroplast proteins involved in cell protection against the damaging effect of ROS. Among the early fine-tuned components, are proteins involved in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, chlorophyll catabolism, protein import, folding and turnover, synthesis and membrane insertion of photosynthetic subunits. Up to now, the flu mutant was the only biological system adopted to define the regulation of gene expression by 1O2. In this work, we propose the use of mutants accumulating 1O2 by mechanisms different from those activated in flu to better identify ROS signalling. Conclusions We propose that the lack of zeaxanthin and lutein leads to 1O2 accumulation and this represents a signalling pathway in the early stages of stress acclimation, beside the response to ADP/ATP ratio and to the redox state of both plastoquinone pool. Chloroplasts respond to 1O2 accumulation by undergoing a significant change in composition and function towards a fast acclimatory response. The physiological implications of this signalling specificity are

  9. Modeling Ultraviolet (UV) Light Emitting Diode (LED) Energy Propagation in Reactor Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    concern is through Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOP). One such process uses ultraviolet (UV) energy to decompose hydrogen peroxide ( H2O2 ) to create...MODELING ULTRAVIOLET (UV) LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED) ENERGY PROPAGATION IN REACTOR VESSELS THESIS...

  10. Effect of light energy on peroxide tooth bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Karen; Tam, Laura; Hubert, Manfred

    2004-02-01

    Light-activated bleaching is a method of tooth whitening. The authors conducted a study to compare the whitening effects and tooth temperature changes induced by various combinations of peroxide bleaches and light sources. The authors randomly assigned 250 extracted human teeth halves into experimental groups (n = 10). A placebo gel (control), a 35 percent hydrogen peroxide or a 10 percent carbamide peroxide bleach was placed on the tooth surface and was irradiated with no light (control); a halogen curing light; an infrared, or IR, light; an argon laser; or a carbon dioxide, or CO2, laser. Color changes were evaluated immediately, one day and one week after treatment using a value-oriented shade guide and an electronic dental color analyzer. The outer enamel and inner dentin surface temperatures were monitored before and immediately after each 30-second application of light using a thermocouple thermometer. Color and temperature changes were significantly affected by an interaction of the bleach and light variables. The application of lights significantly improved the whitening efficacy of some bleach materials, but it caused significant temperature increases in the outer and inner tooth surfaces. The IR and CO2 laser lights caused the highest tooth temperature increases. Dentists performing an in-office bleaching technique with the use of an additional light source to accelerate tooth whitening should consider the specific bleaching agent being used, as well as the potential risks of heating teeth. A specific combination of bleach and light that demonstrates good color change and little temperature rise should be selected for in-office tooth bleaching.

  11. Investigation of a scanning laser projector as an energy-efficient light source in plant production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murase, Haruhiko; Helm, van der Bob; Oke, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    The energy costs for artificial lighting in plant factories are very high, but may be decreased by introducing more efficient light sources. Light absorption in plants takes place in the order of a femtosecond, while the chemical reactions for carbon fixation of 5 milliseconds are limiting the

  12. Energy efficient lighting design for Venlo type greenhouses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, E.; Zonneveldt, L.; Sools, F.

    2006-01-01

    TNO has developed a Radiance software model to calculate the light distribution in the greenhouse using raytracing methods, suitable for daylight and artificial lighting. The model is based on a 3D CAD (Computer aided design) model. The objective is to maximize the efficiency of the artificial

  13. Energy efficient lighting in the residences of staff of the University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is estimated that 15% of electric power production is used for lighting consumption in Ghana. This figure is likely to increase as the country develops. There is no doubt therefore, that improving the energy efficiency of lighting in Ghana could have a great impact on Ghana's energy consumption, and subsequently, on the ...

  14. Audit Report on "The Department of Energy's Opportunity for Energy Savings Through Improved Management of Facility Lighting"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-06-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) highlighted the importance of reducing the Nation's dependence on foreign oil and conserving scarce energy resources. The Department of Energy, as the designated lead agency for promoting new technologies, providing leadership for energy conservation and helping Federal agencies reduce energy costs, plays a pivotal role in achieving the Recovery Act's energy related goals. The Department spends nearly $300 million per year in energy costs for its 9,000 buildings at 24 sites. Electricity costs, totaling $190 million, account for close to two-thirds of the Department's total energy expenditures, with roughly 40 percent or $76 million of those costs attributable to the cost of lighting. New lighting technologies and advanced lighting systems offer the Department the opportunity to significantly reduce energy consumption; decrease operating costs at its sites throughout the country; and, demonstrate the benefits of using new lighting technologies that are currently being developed in its laboratories and by other sources. Because of its energy conservation leadership role, we initiated this audit to determine whether the Department's facilities had implemented lighting conservation measures.

  15. Energy-neutral solar-powered street lighting with predictive and adaptive behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Sei Ping; Weddell, Alex S.; Merrett, Geoff V.; White, NM

    2014-01-01

    Street lighting can enhance the safety and security of residential and commercial areas. However, its installation and operation is expensive: cables must be installed, and power is drawn from the grid which is typically dominated by non-renewable sources. A potential solution is the use of solar energy to power individual street lights locally. However, with limited energy storage and variable solar availability, existing lighting control strategies are unsuitable for this application. This ...

  16. Intensification of anaerobic digestion efficiency with use of mechanical excess sludge disintegration in the context of increased energy production in wastewater treatment plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żubrowska-Sudoł Monika

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the study was to evaluate the effects of mechanical sludge disintegration for enhancing full scale anaerobic digestion of municipal sludge. Batch disintegration tests and lab dewatering tests were also performed aiming at determining the release of organic compounds and assessing the impact of disintegration of excess sludge before the fermentation process of mixed sludge on the dewaterability of post-fermented sludge, respectively. In the study a disc disintegrator driven by a motor with a power of 30 kW, revolutions n = 2950 rpm has been used. It was shown that with increase of energy consumed in the disintegration, the increased amounts of organic compounds were released from the sludge. It was also documented that the introduction of the excess sludge disintegration prior to fermentation tank, resulted in a significant increase in biogas production (by an average of 33.9% and in increase in volatile total solids reduction in the fermented sludge (by an average of 22.7%. Moreover, the obtained results indicate the possibility of obtaining a higher degree of sludge dewatering, which was subjected to anaerobic stabilization with using disintegrated excess sludge.

  17. Intensification of anaerobic digestion efficiency with use of mechanical excess sludge disintegration in the context of increased energy production in wastewater treatment plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żubrowska-Sudoł, Monika; Podedworna, Jolanta; Bisak, Agnieszka; Sytek-Szmeichel, Katarzyna; Krawczyk, Piotr; Garlicka, Agnieszka

    2017-11-01

    The main goal of the study was to evaluate the effects of mechanical sludge disintegration for enhancing full scale anaerobic digestion of municipal sludge. Batch disintegration tests and lab dewatering tests were also performed aiming at determining the release of organic compounds and assessing the impact of disintegration of excess sludge before the fermentation process of mixed sludge on the dewaterability of post-fermented sludge, respectively. In the study a disc disintegrator driven by a motor with a power of 30 kW, revolutions n = 2950 rpm has been used. It was shown that with increase of energy consumed in the disintegration, the increased amounts of organic compounds were released from the sludge. It was also documented that the introduction of the excess sludge disintegration prior to fermentation tank, resulted in a significant increase in biogas production (by an average of 33.9%) and in increase in volatile total solids reduction in the fermented sludge (by an average of 22.7%). Moreover, the obtained results indicate the possibility of obtaining a higher degree of sludge dewatering, which was subjected to anaerobic stabilization with using disintegrated excess sludge.

  18. Shining light on radiation detection and energy transfer : Triazole ligands used for detection of radiation and lanthanide binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Some substances, fluorophores, absorb light and then emit that light again as fluorescence. Apart from absorption of light, some of these substances can also emit light after having absorbed energy from radiation. A substance which can absorb radiation and emit the energy as light is called a

  19. Role of silicon excess in Er-doped silicon-rich nitride light emitting devices at 1.54 μm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez, J. M., E-mail: jmramirez@el.ub.edu; Berencén, Y.; Garrido, B. [MIND-IN2UB, Department Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Cueff, S. [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon, École Centrale de Lyon, Écully 69134 (France); Labbé, C. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique (CIMAP), UMR 6252 CNRS/CEA/Ensicaen/UCBN, Caen 14050 (France)

    2014-08-28

    Erbium-doped silicon-rich nitride electroluminescent thin-films emitting at 1.54 μm have been fabricated and integrated within a metal-oxide-semiconductor structure. By gradually varying the stoichiometry of the silicon nitride, we uncover the role of silicon excess on the optoelectronic properties of devices. While the electrical transport is mainly enabled in all cases by Poole-Frenkel conduction, power efficiency and conductivity are strongly altered by the silicon excess content. Specifically, the increase in silicon excess remarkably enhances the conductivity and decreases the charge trapping; however, it also reduces the power efficiency. The main excitation mechanism of Er{sup 3+} ions embedded in silicon-rich nitrides is discussed. The optimum Si excess that balances power efficiency, conductivity, and charge trapping density is found to be close to 16%.

  20. Joint Power and Beam Angle Control for Energy Efficiency in Lighting Control Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Din

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers an energy-efficient utilization in lighting control systems (LCS. A joint power and beam angle control in LCS is proposed that reduces energy consumption while satisfying the user’s lighting requirements. A problem to find the optimal pair of power and the beam angle of luminaries is formulated and an algorithm to find the optimal solution is suggested. The simulation results show that the proposed scheme achieves considerable improvement in energy savings compared to conventional lighting energy saving scheme which does not consider the beam angle control.

  1. Solar Lighting Technologies for Highway Green Rest Areas in China: Energy Saving Economic and Environmental Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochun Qin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, taking Lushan West Sea highway green rest area in Jiangxi Province of China as the case study, the suitable types, applicability, advantages, and effective methods of solar lighting technologies for highway rest area were determined based on the analysis of characteristics of highway green rest area. It was proved that solar lighting technologies including the natural light guidance system, solar LED lighting, and maximizing natural light penetration were quite suitable for highway rest area in terms of lighting effects and energy and economic efficiency. The illuminance comparison of light guidance system with electrical lighting was made based on the on-site experiment. Also, the feasibility of natural light guidance system was well verified in terms of the lighting demand of the visitor centre in the rest area by the illuminance simulation analysis. The evaluation of the energy saving, economic benefits, and environmental effects of solar lighting technologies for highway rest area was, respectively, made in detail. It was proved that the application of solar technology for green lighting of highway rest facilities not only could have considerable energy saving capacity and achieve high economic benefits, but also make great contributions to the reduction of environment pollution.

  2. Re-interpreting anaerobic metabolism: an argument for the application of both anaerobic glycolysis and excess post-exercise oxygen comsumption (EPOC) as independent sources of energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, C B

    1998-02-01

    Due to current technical difficulties and changing cellular conditions, the measurement of anaerobic and recovery energy expenditure remains elusive. During rest and low-intensity steady-state exercise, indirect calorimetric measurements successfully represent energy expenditure. The same steady-state O2 uptake methods are often used to describe the O2 deficit and excess post-oxygen consumption (EPOC): 1 l O2 = 5 kcal = 20.9 kJ. However, an O2 deficit plus exercise O2 uptake measurement ignores energy expenditure during recovery, and an exercise O2 uptake plus EPOC measurement misrepresents anaerobic energy expenditure. An alternative solution has not yet been proposed. Anaerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration are construed here as a symbiotic union of metabolic pathways, each contributing independently to energy expenditure and heat production. Care must be taken when using O2 uptake alone to quantify energy expenditure because various high-intensity exercise models reveal that O2 uptake can lag behind estimated energy demands or exceed them. The independent bioenergetics behind anaerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration can acknowledge these discrepancies. Anaerobic glycolysis is an additive component to an exercise O2 uptake measurement. Moreover, it is the assumptions behind steady-state O2 uptake that do not permit proper interpretation of energy expenditure during EPOC; 1 l O2 not = 20.9 kJ. Using both the O2 deficit and a modified EPOC for interpretation, rather than one or the other, leads to a better method of quantifying energy expenditure for higher intensity exercise and recovery.

  3. Thermodynamic description of the Al-Mg-Si system using a new formulation for the temperature dependence of the excess Gibbs energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Ying [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Du, Yong, E-mail: yongducalphad@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Zhang, Lijun [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Interdisciplinary Centre for Advanced Materials Simulation (ICAMS), Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Stiepeler Str. 129, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Yuan, Xiaoming [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Kaptay, George [Department of Nanotechnology, University of Miskolc, H-3515 Miskolc, Egyetemvaros E/7 - 606 (Hungary); Department of Nano-materials, BAY-LOGI Research Institute, H-3515 Miskolc, Egyetemvaros E/7 - 606 (Hungary)

    2012-01-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An exponential formulation to describe ternary excess Gibbs energy is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theoretical analysis is performed to verify stability of phase using new formulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al-Mg-Si system and its boundary binaries have been assessed by the new formulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Present calculations for Al-Mg-Si system are more reasonable than previous ones. - Abstract: An exponential formulation was proposed to replace the linear interaction parameter in the Redlich-Kister (R-K) polynomial for the excess Gibbs energy of ternary solution phase. The theoretical analysis indicates that the proposed new exponential formulation can not only avoid the artificial miscibility gap at high temperatures but also describe the ternary system well. A thermodynamic description for the Al-Mg-Si system and its boundary binaries was then performed by using both R-K linear and exponential formulations. The inverted miscibility gaps occurring in the Mg-Si and the Al-Mg-Si systems at high temperatures due to the use of R-K linear polynomials are avoided by using the new formulation. Besides, the thermodynamic properties predicted with the new formulation confirm the general thermodynamic belief that the solution phase approaches to the ideal solution at infinite temperatures, which cannot be described with the traditional R-K linear polynomials.

  4. Mass-energy balance analysis for estimation of light energy conversion in an integrated system of biological H2 production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Gavrisheva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated an integrated system of biological H2 production, which includes the accumulation of biomass of autotrophic microalgae, dark fermentation of biomass, and photofermentation of the dark fermentation effluent. Particular emphasis was placed on the estimation of the conversion efficiency of light into hydrogen energy at each stage of this system. For this purpose, the mass and energy balance regularities were applied. The efficiency of the energy transformation from light into the microalgal biomass did not exceed 5%. The efficiency of the energy transformation from biomass to biological H2 during the dark fermentation stage stood at about 0.3%. The photofermentation stage using the model fermentation effluent could improve this estimation to 11%, resulting in an overall efficiency 0.55%. Evidently, this scheme is counterproductive for light energy bioconversion due to numerous intermediate steps even if the best published data would be taken into account.

  5. National award for energy-efficient town lighting. Compilation of energy-efficient town lighting techniques; Bundeswettbewerb Energieeffiziente Stadtbeleuchtung. Sammlung energieeffizienter Techniken fuer die Stadtbeleuchtung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piller, Sabine; Huebner, Vanessa; Barbre, Felix; Schaefer, Moritz [Berliner Energieagentur GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-02-11

    The national award for innovative urban lighting was initiated by the Federal Environmental Office. The resulting publication presents innovative techniques for urban lighting. While it is not a complete market survey, it provides an outline of modern, energy-efficient and environment-friendly technologies that are commercially available. Most systems are also available at comparatively low cost. For more information, interested users should refer to http://www.bmu.de/klimaschutzinitiative/aktuell/41708.php. (orig./AKB)

  6. New rules of thumb maximizing energy efficiency in street lighting with discharge lamps: The general equations for lighting design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-García, A.; Gómez-Lorente, D.; Espín, A.; Rabaza, O.

    2016-06-01

    New relationships between energy efficiency, illuminance uniformity, spacing and mounting height in public lighting installations were derived from the analysis of a large sample of outputs generated with a widely used software application for lighting design. These new relationships greatly facilitate the calculation of basic lighting installation parameters. The results obtained are also based on maximal energy efficiency and illuminance uniformity as a premise, which are not included in more conventional methods. However, these factors are crucial since they ensure the sustainability of the installations. This research formulated, applied and analysed these new equations. The results of this study highlight their usefulness in rapid planning and urban planning in developing countries or areas affected by natural disasters where engineering facilities and computer applications for this purpose are often unavailable.

  7. Electron, photons, and molecules: Storing energy from light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.R. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Molecular charge separation has important potential for photochemical energy storage. Its efficiency can be enhanced by principals which maximize the rates of the electron transfer steps which separate charge and minimize those which recombine high-energy charge pairs to lose stored energy. Dramatic scientific progress in understanding these principals has occurred since the founding of DOE and its predecessor agency ERDA. While additional knowledge in needed in broad areas of molecular electron transfer, some key areas of knowledge hold particular promise for the possibility of moving this area from science toward technology capable of contributing to the nation`s energy economy.

  8. The impact of clerestory lights on energy efficiency of buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đenadić Dalibor M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The buildings are among major energy consumers, whose energy efficiency is rather low. Clerestory windows are responsible for a large portion of energy losses from the buildings. The energy efficiency of buildings can greatly be improved by upgrading clerestory and other windows. This paper focuses on the theoretical and experimental investigations on how this can be performed in an old school building in the town of Bor in eastern part of Serbia. For that purpose a modern measuring technique has been applied to identify the existing status, and to compare theoretical and actual conditions.

  9. Regulating the Energy Flow in a Cyanobacterial Light-Harvesting Antenna Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Ido; Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; Harris, Dvir; Yochelis, Shira; Huelga, Susana F; Plenio, Martin B; Adir, Noam; Keren, Nir; Paltiel, Yossi

    2017-02-16

    Photosynthetic organisms harvest light energy, utilizing the absorption and energy-transfer properties of protein-bound chromophores. Controlling the harvesting efficiency is critical for the optimal function of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here, we show that the cyanobacterial light-harvesting antenna complex may be able to regulate the flow of energy to switch reversibly from efficient energy conversion to photoprotective quenching via a structural change. We isolated cyanobacterial light-harvesting proteins, phycocyanin and allophycocyanin, and measured their optical properties in solution and in an aggregated-desiccated state. The results indicate that energy band structures are changed, generating a switch between the two modes of operation, exciton transfer and quenching, achieved without dedicated carotenoid quenchers. This flexibility can contribute greatly to the large dynamic range of cyanobacterial light-harvesting systems.

  10. Energy Savings Forecast of Solid-State Lighting in General Illumination Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-08-29

    With declining production costs and increasing technical capabilities, LED adoption has recently gained momentum in general illumination applications. This is a positive development for our energy infrastructure, as LEDs use significantly less electricity per lumen produced than many traditional lighting technologies. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Savings Forecast of Solid-State Lighting in General Illumination Applications examines the expected market penetration and resulting energy savings of light-emitting diode, or LED, lamps and luminaires from today through 2030.

  11. Impaired Mitochondrial Energy Production Causes Light-Induced Photoreceptor Degeneration Independent of Oxidative Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Jaiswal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Two insults often underlie a variety of eye diseases including glaucoma, optic atrophy, and retinal degeneration--defects in mitochondrial function and aberrant Rhodopsin trafficking. Although mitochondrial defects are often associated with oxidative stress, they have not been linked to Rhodopsin trafficking. In an unbiased forward genetic screen designed to isolate mutations that cause photoreceptor degeneration, we identified mutations in a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene, ppr, a homolog of human LRPPRC. We found that ppr is required for protection against light-induced degeneration. Its function is essential to maintain membrane depolarization of the photoreceptors upon repetitive light exposure, and an impaired phototransduction cascade in ppr mutants results in excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis. Moreover, loss of ppr results in a reduction in mitochondrial RNAs, reduced electron transport chain activity, and reduced ATP levels. Oxidative stress, however, is not induced. We propose that the reduced ATP level in ppr mutants underlies the phototransduction defect, leading to increased Rhodopsin1 endocytosis during light exposure, causing photoreceptor degeneration independent of oxidative stress. This hypothesis is bolstered by characterization of two other genes isolated in the screen, pyruvate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase. Their loss also causes a light-induced degeneration, excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis and reduced ATP without concurrent oxidative stress, unlike many other mutations in mitochondrial genes that are associated with elevated oxidative stress and light-independent photoreceptor demise.

  12. Fast curing of restorative materials through the soft light energy release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, R; Gloria, A; Prisco, D; Amendola, E; Puppulin, L; Pezzotti, G; Rengo, S; Ambrosio, L; Nicolais, L

    2010-09-01

    The effect of a novel light curing process, namely soft light energy release (SLER), on shrinkage, mechanical strength and residual stress of four dental restorative materials (DEI experience, Gradia Direct, Enamel Plus HFO and Venus) was investigated. Composite specimens were fast cured through high level of power density and soft light energy release. Temperature, linear shrinkage and light power measurements were acquired in parallel in order to assess the effect of light modulation on temperature and shrinkage profiles during the light curing process and the following dark reaction phase. The small punch test and Raman spectroscopy were adopted to investigate the effect of SLER on mechanical strength and on internal stress, respectively. The soft light energy release photo-polymerization allows to reduce of about 20% the shrinkage rate and to increase the strength of fast light cured specimens. In addition, a more relaxed and homogeneous internal stress distribution was observed. Properties of fast cured restorative materials can be improved by adopting the soft light energy release process. Copyright 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Connected Lighting Systems Efficiency Study$-$ PoE Cable Energy Losses, Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuenge, Jason [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kelly, Karsten [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poplawski, Michael [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-11-30

    First report in a study of the efficiency of connected lighting systems. The report summarizes the results of an exploratory study investigating power losses in Ethernet cables used between PoE switches and luminaires in PoE connected lighting systems. Testing was conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Connected Lighting Test Bed in September 2017. The results were analyzed to explore the impact of cable selection on PoE lighting system energy efficiency, as well as the effectiveness of guidelines recently introduced by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) C137 Lighting Systems Committee.

  14. Cryometry and excess functions of the adduct of light fullerene c 60 and arginine - c 60(c 6H 12nan 4o 2) 8H 8 aqueous solutions

    OpenAIRE

    MATUZENKO M. YU.; SHESTOPALOVA A.A.; SEMENOV K.N.; CHARYKOV N.A.; KESKINOV V.A.

    2015-01-01

    Cryometry investigation of C 60(C 6H 12NaN 4O 2) H 2O solutions was made over concentrations ranging from 0.1 10 g of fullerene-arginine adduct per 1 dm 3. Freezing point depression was measured for these aqueous solutions. Excess functions for water and fullerene-arginine adduct activities, activity coefficients and excess Gibbs energy of the solutions were calculated. All solutions demonstrate huge deviations from ideality. The last fact, to our opinion, is caused by the very specific hiera...

  15. The traces of anisotropic dark energy in light of Planck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardona, Wilmar; Kunz, Martin [Département de Physique Théorique and Center for Astroparticle Physics, Université de Genève, 24 Quai Ernest Ansermet, 1211 Genève 4 (Switzerland); Hollenstein, Lukas, E-mail: wilmar.cardona@unige.ch, E-mail: lukas.hollenstein@zhaw.ch, E-mail: martin.kunz@unige.ch [IAS Institute of Applied Simulation, ZHAW Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Grüental, PO Box, 8820 Wädenswil (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    We study a dark energy model with non-zero anisotropic stress, either linked to the dark energy density or to the dark matter density. We compute approximate solutions that allow to characterise the behaviour of the dark energy model and to assess the stability of the perturbations. We also determine the current limits on such an anisotropic stress from the cosmic microwave background data by the Planck satellite, and derive the corresponding constraints on the modified growth parameters like the growth index, the effective Newton's constant and the gravitational slip.

  16. Dissipation of excess excitation energy by drought-induced nonphotochemical quenching in two species of drought-tolerant moss: desiccation-induced acceleration of photosystem II fluorescence decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Hisanori; Itoh, Shigeru

    2013-07-02

    Drought-tolerant mosses survive with their green color intact even after long periods of dehydration that would kill ordinary plants. The mechanism of dissipation of excitation energy under drought stress was studied in two species of drought-tolerant moss, Rhytidium rugosum and Ceratodon purpureus. They showed severe quenching of photosystem II chlorophyll fluorescence (PSII) after being dehydrated in the dark. Quenching was induced by the acceleration of the fluorescence decay rate. This drought-induced nonphotochemical quenching (designated d-NPQ) was fully reversed by rehydration. Global analysis of fluorescence decay at 77 K indicated rapid 46 ps transfer of excitation energy from the 680-690 nm PSII bands to a 710 nm band, and to 740-760 nm bands. The latter bands decayed to the ground state with the same time constant showing the rapid dissipation of excitation energy into heat. The quenching by d-NPQ in dry moss was stronger than that by PSII charge separation or nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ), which operates under hydrating conditions. Drought-tolerant mosses, thus, dissipate excess excitation energy into heat. The d-NPQ mechanism in moss resembles that reported in lichens, suggesting their common origin.

  17. Limiting Excess Weight Gain in Healthy Pregnant Women: Importance of Energy Intakes, Physical Activity, and Adherence to Gestational Weight Gain Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara R. Cohen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have investigated if compliance with energy intakes, physical activity, and weight gain guidelines attenuate postpartum weight retention (PPWR in mothers attending prenatal classes. We investigated whether (a daily energy intakes within 300 kcal of estimated energy requirements (EERs, (b walking more than 5000 steps/day, (c targeting the recommended weight gain goals for prepregnancy BMI, and/or (d achieving weekly or total gestational weight gain (GWG recommendations minimized PPWR in 54 women attending prenatal classes in Montreal/Ottawa, Canada. Participants completed a validated pregnancy physical activity questionnaire (PPAQ, 3 telephone-validated 24-hr dietary recalls, and wore a pedometer for one week. PPWR was measured 6 weeks after delivery. Results showed that 72% had healthy prepregnancy BMIs. However, 52% consumed >300 kcal/day in excess of their EER, 54% exceeded recommended GWG, and more overweight (93% than normal weight women (38% cited nonrecommended GWG targets. Following delivery, 33% were classified as overweight, and 17% were obese. Multiple logistic regressions revealed that women targeting “recommended weight gain advice” were 3 times more likely to meet total GWG recommendations (OR: 3.2, P<0.05; women who complied with weekly GWG goals minimized PPWR (OR: 4.2, P<0.02. In conclusion, appropriate GWG targets, lower energy intakes, and physical activity should be emphasized in prenatal education programs.

  18. MCNP6 Simulation of Light and Medium Nuclei Fragmentation at Intermediate Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashnik, Stepan Georgievich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kerby, Leslie Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)

    2015-08-24

    Fragmentation reactions induced on light and medium nuclei by protons and light nuclei of energies around 1 GeV/nucleon and below are studied with the Los Alamos transport code MCNP6 and with its CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 event generators. CEM and LAQGSM assume that intermediate-energy fragmentation reactions on light nuclei occur generally in two stages. The first stage is the intranuclear cascade (INC), followed by the second, Fermi breakup disintegration of light excited residual nuclei produced after the INC. CEM and LAQGSM account also for coalescence of light fragments (complex particles) up to sup>4He from energetic nucleons emitted during INC. We investigate the validity and performance of MCNP6, CEM, and LAQGSM in simulating fragmentation reactions at intermediate energies and discuss possible ways of further improving these codes.

  19. Modelling excitonic-energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Tobias; Kreisbeck, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental study of energy transfer in photosynthesis has revealed an interesting transport regime, which lies at the borderline between classical transport dynamics and quantum-mechanical interference effects. Dissipation is caused by the coupling of electronic degrees of freedom to vibrational modes and leads to a directional energy transfer from the antenna complex to the target reaction-center. The dissipative driving is robust and does not rely on fine-tuning of spe...

  20. Energy Conservation Using Scotopically Enhanced Fluorescent Lighting In An Office Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-03-01

    This study was conducted in a recently built and occupied office building to determine whether the energy savings benefits of scotopically enhanced fluorescent lighting can be achieved while maintaining user acceptability.

  1. Can the Abraham Light Momentum and Energy in a Medium Constitute a Lorentz Four-Vector?

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Changbiao

    2014-01-01

    By analyzing the Einstein-box thought experiment with the principle of relativity, it is shown that Abraham's light momentum and energy in a medium cannot constitute a Lorentz four-vector, and they consequentially break global momentum and energy conservation laws. In contrast, Minkowski's momentum and energy always constitute a Lorentz four-vector no matter whether in a medium or in vacuum, and the Minkowski's momentum is the unique correct light momentum. A momentum-associated photon mass in a medium is exposed, which explains why only the Abraham's momentum is derived in the traditional "center-of-mass-energy" approach. The EM boundary-condition matching approach, combined with Einstein light-quantum hypothesis, is proposed to analyze this thought experiment, and it is found for the first time that only from Maxwell equations without resort to the relativity, the correctness of light momentum definitions cannot be identified. Optical pulling effect is studied as well.

  2. High-Efficiency Perovskite Quantum-Dot Light-Emitting Devices by Effective Washing Process and Interfacial Energy Level Alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Takayuki; Hoshi, Keigo; Pu, Yong-Jin; Takeda, Yuya; Hayashi, Yukihiro; Ohisa, Satoru; Kawata, So; Kido, Junji

    2017-05-31

    All inorganic perovskites quantum dots (PeQDs) have attracted much attention for used in thin film display applications and solid-state lighting applications, owing to their narrow band emission with high photoluminescence quantum yields (PLQYs), color tunability, and solution processability. Here, we fabricated low-driving-voltage and high-efficiency CsPbBr3 PeQDs light-emitting devices (PeQD-LEDs) using a PeQDs washing process with an ester solvent containing butyl acetate (AcOBu) to remove excess ligands from the PeQDs. The CsPbBr3 PeQDs film washed with AcOBu exhibited a PLQY of 42%, and a narrow PL emission with a full width at half-maximum of 19 nm. We also demonstrated energy level alignment of the PeQD-LED in order to achieve effective hole injection into PeQDs from the adjacent hole injection layer. The PeQD-LED with AcOBu-washed PeQDs exhibited a maximum power efficiency of 31.7 lm W-1 and EQE of 8.73%. Control of the interfacial PeQDs through ligand removal and energy level alignment in the device structure are promising methods for obtaining high PLQYs in film state and high device efficiency.

  3. The renewable energy household lighting for Chibayish inhabitant’s in Iraq★

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawood Furat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Affordable and clean energy is one of the major goals for global sustainable development. Lighting is a major aspect of human energy consumption and access to quality lighting is one of the most important indicators of human development. Like other countries around the world, the Iraqi government has realized the importance of climate change and the necessity for clean energy which has led them to officially ratifying the Kyoto Protocol in January 2008. However, it is challenging to implement a clean and renewable energy lighting system for a small community like Chibayish in the Iraqi marshes. The Chibayish unique house building technique of man-made islands (floating baskets, results that these floating houses are not connected to the Iraqi national grid. The villagers in Chibayish require artificial light for their indoor living areas after dark and also for night fishing, which is a common practice. In this research study, various renewable energy resources have been examined in order to identify the most locally practical renewable energy technology for household lighting needs. The solar irradiance profile in the area showed the viability of solar energy in comparison to other renewable energy sources considered within these specific environmental conditions. An analysis carried out using HOMER Pro simulator shows that the solar photovoltaic is an affordable and reliable option for this community.

  4. Pore-Confined Light Metal Hydrides for Energy Storage and Catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bramwell, P.L.

    2017-01-01

    Light metal hydrides have enjoyed several decades of attention in the field of hydrogen storage, but their applications have recently begun to diversify more and more into the broader field of energy storage. For example, light metal hydrides have shown great promise as battery materials, in sensors

  5. Modelling Domestic Lighting Energy Consumption in Romania by Integrating Consumers Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Reveiu; Ion Smeureanu; Marian Dardala; Roman Kanala

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable energy consumption is a research area of a large interest in last years. New energy efficient lighting technologies exist which can significantly reduce household electricity consumption but their adoption has been slow. A considerable number of international studies show that sustainable development scenarios will be realistic if they involve the human behavior. The paper provides a solution to integrate consumer behavior with techno economic energy issues inside a complex energy...

  6. Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

    1992-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy`s Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE`s Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

  7. The effect of autoclaving and polishing techniques on energy transmission of light-curing tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofford, K R; Wakefield, C W; Nunn, M E

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if autoclaving light-curing tips in sterilization packages using a properly maintained autoclave filled with distilled water reduced the buildup of boiler scale and allowed the tips to maintain their ability to transmit energy. Thirty light-curing tips were divided into groups: control, never autoclaved; group 1, no light-curing tip treatment, autoclaved only; group 2, autoclaved and treated with the Demetron/Kerr Optics Maintenance Kit; group 3, autoclaved and treated with the EFOS Fiberoptic Cleaning Kit; group 4, autoclaved and treated with Shofu Brownie and Greenie polishing points; and group 5, autoclaved and treated with a standard rubber prophylaxis cup. The curing tips were packaged and subjected to 30 autoclave cycles in a clinical autoclave with standard loads of clinical instruments. The light transmission was measured with a curing radiometer. Results showed a 7% decrease in energy transmission for the untreated tips compared to the control. Both polishing system groups demonstrated a 4% decrease. There was no significant difference between the control and the first three groups. The polishing point and prophylaxis cup groups showed significantly decreased energy transmission (decreases of 11% and 25%, respectively). Light-curing tips can be autoclaved with routine packaged loads of clinical instruments and retain their ability to transmit light energy, provided that the tips are packaged and the autoclave is properly maintained and filled with distilled water. Commercially available optics maintenance kits are effective in removing deposits and restoring light energy transmission.

  8. Solar PV Powered Energy Efficient LED Lighting System for a Class Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sathya

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of Solar PV based LED lighting system suitable for a class room. The model of class room is created using DIALux 4.11and LED lighting system is provided inside the room for illumination. The design calculations of the lighting are done as per the IESNA (Illumination Engineering Society of North America standards. Based on the lighting load requirement, the number of solar panels and batteries required to generate and store the power is determined. To assess the performance of the lighting system, simulation is done and the photometric parameters are calculated from the observed values. In addition to the photometric parameters, the annual lighting energy required for illuminating the room is also estimated. The computed result has proved that the LED lighting system is suitable for residential indoor applications providing good visual clarity and comfort.

  9. Illumination performance and energy saving of a solar fiber optic lighting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingfors, David; Volotinen, Tarja

    2013-07-01

    The illumination performance and energy savings of a solar fiber optic lighting system have been verified in a study hall--corridor interior. The system provides intensive white light with a high luminous flux of 4500 lm under 130000 lx direct sun radiation at a 10 m fiber distance from the sun-tracking light collector. The color temperature that describes the light color perceived is 5800 ± 300 K, i.e. close to the direct sunlight outside, and the color rendering index (86), that describes how well colors are rendered under the light source, is higher for the solar lights than for the supplementary fluorescent lights (77). Thus this high quality solar lighting improves the visibility of all kinds of objects compared to the fluorescent lights. Annual lighting energy savings of 19% in Uppsala, Sweden and 46% in southern Europe were estimated for a study hall interior, as well as 27% and 55% respectively in an interior illuminated 16 h per day all days of a year.

  10. Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

    1992-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy's Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE's Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

  11. [Effects of NO3- stress on photosynthetic rate, photochemical efficiency of PS II and light energy allocation in cucumber seedling leaves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiu-Rong; Wang, Xiu-Feng; Yang, Feng-Juan; Wei, Min

    2007-07-01

    This paper studied the effects of different NO3- concentration on the photosynthetic rate, photochemical efficiency, and absorbed light energy allocation in cucumber seedling leaves. The results indicated that when the available NO3- concentration in the medium was low (14-98 mmol NO3- x L(-1)), an appropriate supplement of NO3- could enhance the capability of cucumber leaves in capturing light energy, and promote the photosynthesis. However, with further increase of NO3-, the photochemical efficiency of PS II decreased, electron transfer restrained, and net photosynthetic rate as well as the absorbed light energy used in photochemical reaction of PS II decreased. At the same time, the light energy used in antenna heat dissipation increased, while the photochemical efficiency decreased. After treated with 140 and 182 mmol NO3- x L(-1) for 6 days, the photosynthetic rate (P(n)) was decreased by 35% and 78%, respectively, maximal PS II efficiency at open centers in the absence of NPQ (F(v)/F(m)), antenna efficiency at open centers in the presence of NPQ (F(v)'/F(m)'), actual PS II efficiency (phi (PSII ) and photochemical quenching (q(P)) were lower, non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) was higher, and the deviation from full balance between PS I and PS II (beta/alpha - 1) was improved significantly, compared with the control. The fluctuant ranges of these chlorophyll fluorescence parameters were increased at higher NO3- concentration, compared with those at lower NO3- concentration. The absorbed light energy allocated to the photochemical reaction of PS II (P) was reduced by high light intensity and high NO3- concentration. Meanwhile, the proportion allocated in antenna heat dissipation (D) increased significantly. Antenna heat dissipation was the main way for excessive energy dissipation.

  12. Energy Savings Forecast of Solid-State Lighting in General Illumination Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penning, Julie [Navigant Consulting Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Stober, Kelsey [Navigant Consulting Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Taylor, Victor [Navigant Consulting Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Yamada, Mary [Navigant Consulting Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The DOE report, Energy Savings Forecast of Solid-State Lighting in General Illumination Applications, is a biannual report which models the adoption of LEDs in the U.S. general-lighting market, along with associated energy savings, based on the full potential DOE has determined to be technically feasible over time. This version of the report uses an updated 2016 U.S. lighting-market model that is more finely calibrated and granular than previous models, and extends the forecast period to 2035 from the 2030 limit that was used in previous editions.

  13. An Intelligent Energy Saving System for Controlling the Lighting and Ventilation of an Area

    OpenAIRE

    Kadiri Kamoru. O; Omotosho O. J

    2014-01-01

    Intelligent Energy Saving System is a control system used to control a particular environment in other to optimize the energy. It can be used to control the lighting or air conditioning of an area. An example is the library which can be well illuminated with many lamps. When people are not present at a reading place, the lighting can be made OFF and when they are present, the lighting is made ON by using a sensor to sense the environment condition example temperature, obstacle etc. All these ...

  14. The efficiency, energy intensity and visual impact of the accent lighting in the retail grocery stores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľudmila Nagyová

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, topics of displaying, presentation, lighting, energy saving and issues related to the environment while selling the fresh food (fruits, vegetable, bakery products, meat are becoming an important matter among traders. However, just bigger companies with transnational capital have devoted their attention to this issue yet. Generally, the energy costs make up 70% of operating costs in retail stores where the cooling system and lighting are the most energy consuming. Accent lighting in modern retails is largely involved in the overall design and atmosphere in shops and plays a crucial role in presenting the goods as well. Using of accent lighting can draw the customer's attention to a specific part of the sales area and achieve the overall harmonization in the store. With the rational using of combination of energy saving and effective accent lighting retailers can achieve not only attractive presentation of displayed products but also appreciable savings in the operation of their stores. It is the only factor that can be exactly measured and controlled. Using a Colour and Lux Meters we found out the intensity and color temperature of accent lighting used in domestic and foreign retail chains for the different kinds of fresh food products. Based on the obtained values we have compiled graphs, which are showing visual comfort. We also identified different types of accent lighting, which we assigned to their impact on emotional involvement of consumers. The starting points were the tests we conducted in simulated laboratory conditions. While searching of a compromise between effective and energy efficient accent lighting we take into consideration consumers' emotional response as well as the annual electricity consumption of different types of light sources. At the end we recommend options for energy-efficient, effective and spectacular lighting while using the optimal number of light sources and their logical organization

  15. Spectral light management for solar energy conversion systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Cameron

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the inherent broadband nature of the solar radiation, combined with the narrow spectral sensitivity range of direct solar to electricity devices, there is a massive opportunity to manipulate the solar spectrum to increase the functionality and efficiency of solar energy conversion devices. Spectral splitting or manipulation facilitates the efficient combination of both high-temperature solar thermal systems, which can absorb over the entire solar spectrum to create heat, and photovoltaic cells, which only convert a range of wavelengths to electricity. It has only recently been possible, with the development of nanofabrication techniques, to integrate micro- and nano-photonic structures as spectrum splitters/manipulators into solar energy conversion devices. In this paper, we summarize the recent developments in beam splitting techniques, and highlight some relevant applications including combined PV-thermal collectors and efficient algae production, and suggest paths for future development in this field.

  16. Modelling excitonic-energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental study of energy transfer in photosynthesis has revealed an interesting transport regime, which lies at the borderline between classical transport dynamics and quantum-mechanical interference effects. Dissipation is caused by the coupling of electronic degrees of freedom to vibrational modes and leads to a directional energy transfer from the antenna complex to the target reaction-center. The dissipative driving is robust and does not rely on fine-tuning of specific vibrational modes. For the parameter regime encountered in the biological systems new theoretical tools are required to directly compare theoretical results with experimental spectroscopy data. The calculations require to utilize massively parallel graphics processor units (GPUs) for efficient and exact computations.

  17. A Household-based analysis of domestic energy consumption for lighting in Jaipur City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nand Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available India being the third largest economy of the world, more than two third of the total population lives in villages and started to consuming more quantity of energy in the recent years. Though the electricity consumption in the domestic sector has increased up to 22 per cent of the total electricity consumption, electricity consumption in villages is very less, since good number of villages in the rural system are not even electrified. In urban areas almost 90 percent of the household use electricity for lighting and just 10 percent use kerosene for the said purpose, whereas in the rural areas still more number of households use kerosene for lighting purposes. In this paper an attempt is made to analyze the domestic energy consumption for lighting in Jaipur city. Good amount of literature collected pertaining to domestic energy consumption for lighting purposes across the globe, analyzed thoroughly and presented. Further, a household survey was conducted among 684 households in Jaipur city by employing pre-tested schedule. The schedule has few variables including identification particulars, economic conditions, demographic pattern, domestic lighting appliances at the household level; and the energy consumption pattern. Further the collected data are analyzed and a multiple regression model was developed by considering the total electricity consumption as dependent variable ‘Y’ and the electrical appliances for lighting purposes, such as the number of incandescent bulbs, tube lights, CFL, and LED are considered as ‘X’ variables; and this study conclude with plausible findings and recommendations.

  18. Light Absorption and Energy Transfer in the Antenna Complexes of Photosynthetic Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkovic, Tihana; Ostroumov, Evgeny E; Anna, Jessica M; van Grondelle, Rienk; Govindjee; Scholes, Gregory D

    2017-01-25

    The process of photosynthesis is initiated by the capture of sunlight by a network of light-absorbing molecules (chromophores), which are also responsible for the subsequent funneling of the excitation energy to the reaction centers. Through evolution, genetic drift, and speciation, photosynthetic organisms have discovered many solutions for light harvesting. In this review, we describe the underlying photophysical principles by which this energy is absorbed, as well as the mechanisms of electronic excitation energy transfer (EET). First, optical properties of the individual pigment chromophores present in light-harvesting antenna complexes are introduced, and then we examine the collective behavior of pigment-pigment and pigment-protein interactions. The description of energy transfer, in particular multichromophoric antenna structures, is shown to vary depending on the spatial and energetic landscape, which dictates the relative coupling strength between constituent pigment molecules. In the latter half of the article, we focus on the light-harvesting complexes of purple bacteria as a model to illustrate the present understanding of the synergetic effects leading to EET optimization of light-harvesting antenna systems while exploring the structure and function of the integral chromophores. We end this review with a brief overview of the energy-transfer dynamics and pathways in the light-harvesting antennas of various photosynthetic organisms.

  19. Multireference excitation energies for bacteriochlorophylls A within light harvesting system 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anda, Andre; Hansen, Thorsten; De Vico, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Light-harvesting system 2 (LH2) of purple bacteria is one of the most popular antenna complexes used to study Nature's way of collecting and channeling solar energy. The dynamics of the absorbed energy is probed by ultrafast spectroscopy. Simulation of these experiments relies on fitting a range ...

  20. Energy Efficient Lighting in the Residences of Staff of the University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kofimereku

    This in no small way contributes to a lot of wastage in terms of electricity consumption. There is therefore the need to find alternative ways of household lighting to conserve energy. An alternative lamp type called compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) is recommended. This lamp-type offers benefits in terms of energy cost-control.

  1. Effects of Light Color on Energy Expenditure and Behavior in Broiler Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nara; Lee, Sang-Rak; Lee, Sang-Jin

    2014-07-01

    This study was conducted in order to investigate whether the presence of light or different colors of light would influence the energy expenditure and behavior of broiler chickens. Eight 8-week-old broiler chickens were adapted to a respiration chamber (Length, 28.5 cm; Height, 38.5 cm; Width, 44.0 cm) for one week prior to the initiation of the experiment. In experiment 1, energy expenditure and behavior of the chickens were analyzed in the presence or absence of light for four days. Chickens were exposed to 6 cycles of 2 h light/2 h dark period per day. In experiment 2, the broiler chickens that had been used in experiment 1 were used to evaluate the effect of 4 different wavelength light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on the energy expenditure and behavior of broiler chickens. The LEDs used in this study had the following wavelength bands; white (control), red (618 to 635 nm), green (515 to 530 nm) and blue (450 to 470 nm). The chickens were randomly exposed to a 2-h LED light in a random and sequential order per day for 3 days. Oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production of the chickens were recorded using an open-circuit calorimeter system, and energy expenditure was calculated based on the collected data. The behavior of the chickens was analyzed based on following categories i.e., resting, standing, and pecking, and closed-circuit television was used to record these behavioral postures. The analysis of data from experiment 1 showed that the energy expenditure was higher (pbroiler chickens were found to be strongly affected by the presence of light. On the other hand, there was no discernible difference in their energy expenditure and behavior of broiler chickens exposed to the different LED lights.

  2. Effects of Light Color on Energy Expenditure and Behavior in Broiler Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nara Kim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to investigate whether the presence of light or different colors of light would influence the energy expenditure and behavior of broiler chickens. Eight 8-week-old broiler chickens were adapted to a respiration chamber (Length, 28.5 cm; Height, 38.5 cm; Width, 44.0 cm for one week prior to the initiation of the experiment. In experiment 1, energy expenditure and behavior of the chickens were analyzed in the presence or absence of light for four days. Chickens were exposed to 6 cycles of 2 h light/2 h dark period per day. In experiment 2, the broiler chickens that had been used in experiment 1 were used to evaluate the effect of 4 different wavelength light-emitting diodes (LEDs on the energy expenditure and behavior of broiler chickens. The LEDs used in this study had the following wavelength bands; white (control, red (618 to 635 nm, green (515 to 530 nm and blue (450 to 470 nm. The chickens were randomly exposed to a 2-h LED light in a random and sequential order per day for 3 days. Oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production of the chickens were recorded using an open-circuit calorimeter system, and energy expenditure was calculated based on the collected data. The behavior of the chickens was analyzed based on following categories i.e., resting, standing, and pecking, and closed-circuit television was used to record these behavioral postures. The analysis of data from experiment 1 showed that the energy expenditure was higher (p<0.001 in chickens under light condition compared with those under dark condition. The chickens spent more time with pecking during a light period, but they frequently exhibited resting during a dark period. Experiment 2 showed that there was no significant difference in terms of energy expenditure and behavior based on the color of light (white, red, green, and blue to which the chickens were exposed. In conclusion, the energy expenditure and behavior of broiler chickens were

  3. Radiative Energy Budgets of Phototrophic Surface-Associated Microbial Communities and their Photosynthetic Efficiency Under Diffuse and Collimated Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Mads; Brodersen, Kasper E; Kühl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the radiative energy budgets of a heterogeneous photosynthetic coral reef sediment and a compact uniform cyanobacterial biofilm on top of coastal sediment. By combining electrochemical, thermocouple and fiber-optic microsensor measurements of O 2 , temperature and light, we could calculate the proportion of the absorbed light energy that was either dissipated as heat or conserved by photosynthesis. We show, across a range of different incident light regimes, that such radiative energy budgets are highly dominated by heat dissipation constituting up to 99.5% of the absorbed light energy. Highest photosynthetic energy conservation efficiency was found in the coral sediment under low light conditions and amounted to 18.1% of the absorbed light energy. Additionally, the effect of light directionality, i.e., diffuse or collimated light, on energy conversion efficiency was tested on the two surface-associated systems. The effects of light directionality on the radiative energy budgets of these phototrophic communities were not unanimous but, resulted in local spatial differences in heat-transfer, gross photosynthesis, and light distribution. The light acclimation index, E k , i.e., the irradiance at the onset of saturation of photosynthesis, was >2 times higher in the coral sediment compared to the biofilm and changed the pattern of photosynthetic energy conservation under light-limiting conditions. At moderate to high incident irradiances, the photosynthetic conservation of absorbed energy was highest in collimated light; a tendency that changed in the biofilm under sub-saturating incident irradiances, where higher photosynthetic efficiencies were observed under diffuse light. The aim was to investigate how the physical structure and light propagation affected energy budgets and light utilization efficiencies in loosely organized vs. compact phototrophic sediment under diffuse and collimated light. Our results suggest that the optical properties and the

  4. Radiative Energy Budgets of Phototrophic Surface-Associated Microbial Communities and their Photosynthetic Efficiency Under Diffuse and Collimated Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Mads; Brodersen, Kasper E.; Kühl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the radiative energy budgets of a heterogeneous photosynthetic coral reef sediment and a compact uniform cyanobacterial biofilm on top of coastal sediment. By combining electrochemical, thermocouple and fiber-optic microsensor measurements of O2, temperature and light, we could calculate the proportion of the absorbed light energy that was either dissipated as heat or conserved by photosynthesis. We show, across a range of different incident light regimes, that such radiative energy budgets are highly dominated by heat dissipation constituting up to 99.5% of the absorbed light energy. Highest photosynthetic energy conservation efficiency was found in the coral sediment under low light conditions and amounted to 18.1% of the absorbed light energy. Additionally, the effect of light directionality, i.e., diffuse or collimated light, on energy conversion efficiency was tested on the two surface-associated systems. The effects of light directionality on the radiative energy budgets of these phototrophic communities were not unanimous but, resulted in local spatial differences in heat-transfer, gross photosynthesis, and light distribution. The light acclimation index, Ek, i.e., the irradiance at the onset of saturation of photosynthesis, was >2 times higher in the coral sediment compared to the biofilm and changed the pattern of photosynthetic energy conservation under light-limiting conditions. At moderate to high incident irradiances, the photosynthetic conservation of absorbed energy was highest in collimated light; a tendency that changed in the biofilm under sub-saturating incident irradiances, where higher photosynthetic efficiencies were observed under diffuse light. The aim was to investigate how the physical structure and light propagation affected energy budgets and light utilization efficiencies in loosely organized vs. compact phototrophic sediment under diffuse and collimated light. Our results suggest that the optical properties and the

  5. Application of white LED lighting to energy-saving-type street lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Tsunemasa; Uchida, Yuji; Setomoto, Tatsumi; Kobashi, Katsuya

    2001-05-01

    We describe the lighting characteristics and systems of the power energy-saving type street lamp which consists of white light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and a solar-cell and battery system. The prototype street lamp has been constructed by two LED light sources, each of which includes a total of 700 units of 10 cd-class white LEDs. The white LED lighting system is mainly divided into three components which are the control, the electric-power supply and LED lighting divisions. The illuminance is normally 80 lx. When a person approaches within 2 m near the lamp, the body sensor catches the situation. The illuminance then increases to about 660 lx, which is about 50 times brighter than that of a white incandescent lamp. The color rendering index is estimated to be 85 which is similar to that of three color fluorescent tube. The illuminance distribution can be analyzed by our recently developed 'multi sources of LED light' theory.

  6. Modelling Domestic Lighting Energy Consumption in Romania by Integrating Consumers Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana REVEIU; Smeureanu, Ion; Marian DARDALA; Kanala, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable energy consumption is a research area of a large interest in last years. New energy-efficient lighting technologies exist, which can significantly reduce household electricity consumption, but their adoption has been slow. A considerable number of international studies show that sustainable development scenarios will be realistic if they involve the human behavior. The paper provides a solution to integrate consumer behavior with techno-economic energy issues, inside a complex ene...

  7. Modeling Domestic Lighting Energy Consumption in Romania and Integrating Consumers’ Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Ion Smeureanu; Roman Kanala; Adriana Reveiu; Marian Dardala

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable energy consumption is a research area of a large interest in the last years. New energy efficient lighting technologies exist and can significantly reduce household electricity consumption but their adoption has been slow. A considerable number of international studies show that sustainable development scenarios will be realistic if they involve the human behavior. The paper provides a solution to integrate consumer behavior with techno economic energy issues inside a complex ener...

  8. IC-BASED CONTROLS FOR ENERGY-EFFICIENT LIGHTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Zhang

    2005-03-01

    A new approach for driving high frequency energy saving ballasts is developed and documented in this report. The developed approach utilizes an IC-based platform that provides the benefits of reduced system cost, reduced ballast size, and universal application to a wide range of lamp technologies, such as linear fluorescent lamps (LFL), compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) and high intensity discharge lamps (HID). The control IC chip set developed for the platform includes dual low voltage (LV) IC gate drive that provides gate drive for high and low side power switches in typical ballast circuits, and ballast controller IC that provides control functionalities optimal for different lamps and digital interface for future extension to more sophisticated control and communication.

  9. Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, N.B.; Kristensen, Helle Halkjær; Wathes, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality......This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality...

  10. A Hybrid Indoor Ambient Light and Vibration Energy Harvester for Wireless Sensor Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Yu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To take advantage of applications where both light and vibration energy are available, a hybrid indoor ambient light and vibration energy harvesting scheme is proposed in this paper. This scheme uses only one power conditioning circuit to condition the combined output power harvested from both energy sources so as to reduce the power dissipation. In order to more accurately predict the instantaneous power harvested from the solar panel, an improved five-parameter model for small-scale solar panel applying in low light illumination is presented. The output voltage is increased by using the MEMS piezoelectric cantilever arrays architecture. It overcomes the disadvantage of traditional MEMS vibration energy harvester with low voltage output. The implementation of the maximum power point tracking (MPPT for indoor ambient light is implemented using analog discrete components, which improves the whole harvester efficiency significantly compared to the digital signal processor. The output power of the vibration energy harvester is improved by using the impedance matching technique. An efficient mechanism of energy accumulation and bleed-off is also discussed. Experiment results obtained from an amorphous-silicon (a-Si solar panel of 4.8 × 2.0 cm2 and a fabricated piezoelectric MEMS generator of 11 × 12.4 mm2 show that the hybrid energy harvester achieves a maximum efficiency around 76.7%.

  11. The Energy Audit Activity Focused on the Lighting Systems in Historical Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Salvadori

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The energy audit for a building is a procedure designed mainly to obtain adequate knowledge of the energy consumption profile, identify, and quantify opportunities for energy savings by a cost-benefit analysis and report, clearly and comprehensively, about the obtained results. If the audit is referred to a building with a significant historical and artistic value, a compatibility evaluation of the energy saving interventions with the architectural features should also be developed. In this paper, analysing the case study of a historical building used as public offices in Pisa (Italy, the authors describe how it is possible to conduct an energy audit activity (especially dedicated to the lighting system and they show how, for this type of buildings, it is possible to obtain significant energy savings with a refurbishment of the lighting system. A total number of seven interventions on indoor and outdoor lighting sub-systems were analysed in the paper. They are characterised by absolute compatibility with the historical and artistic value of the building and they show short payback times, variable between 4 and 34 months, allowing a reduction of the electrical energy consumption for the artificial indoor and outdoor lighting variable from 1.1 MWh/year to 39.0 MWh/year. The followed methodology and the evaluation results described in the paper, although based on a case study, can be extended to numerous historical buildings used as public offices, a recurring situation in the centres of Italian historical cities.

  12. Singlet Energy Dissipation in the Photosystem II Light-Harvesting Complex Does Not Involve Energy Transfer to Carotenoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Marc G.; Lambrev, Petar; Reus, Michael; Wientjes, Emilie; Croce, Roberta; Holzwarth, Alfred R.; Müller, Marc G.

    2010-01-01

    The energy dissipation mechanism in oligomers of the major light-harvesting complex II (LHC II) from Arabidopsis thaliana mutants npq1 and npq2, zeaxanthin-deficient and zeaxanthin-enriched, respectively, has been studied by femtosecond transient absorption. The kinetics obtained at different

  13. Maintenance and Energy Optimization of Lighting Systems for the Improvement of Historic Buildings: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinando Salata

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Proper lighting is vital to improve, from an artistic point of view, the surface expanse and decorative detailing of architectural heritage buildings considered valuable. When properly lit, monumental buildings can become to onlookers an essential part of the city. Nowadays, for design planners dealing with the improvement of buildings, whose architectural design should be valorized, the real challenge is to combine the lighting artistic requirements with scrupulous economic management in order to limit the energy demand and to respect the environment. For these reasons, this case study examines the lighting of the monumental façade and the cloister of St. Peter in Chains situated in the Faculty of Engineering of Sapienza University of Rome. The present lighting installation, characterized by metal halides, compact fluorescent and halogen lamps, is compared with an alternative scenario presenting LED lamps and scenographic lighting of the monumental façade. Such comparison is based on the evaluation of the lighting levels for different visual tasks and on energy and maintenance issues; the first analysis was performed through the software DIALux Evo 4.0, whereas the second was performed using ecoCALC. This study leads to the conclusion that the lighting levels of the solution presenting LED lamps are better than those of the present solution, and they comply with current standards. Finally, the higher costs of LED lamp installations and the scenographic lighting of the monumental façade are balanced by lower maintenance costs, with a payback period of seven years.

  14. Mono-energy coronary angiography with a compact light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggl, Elena; Mechlem, Korbinian; Braig, Eva; Kulpe, Stephanie; Dierolf, Martin; Günther, Benedikt; Achterhold, Klaus; Herzen, Julia; Gleich, Bernhard; Rummeny, Ernst; Noël, Peter B.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Muenzel, Daniela

    2017-03-01

    While conventional x-ray tube sources reliably provide high-power x-ray beams for everyday clinical practice, the broad spectra that are inherent to these sources compromise the diagnostic image quality. For a monochromatic x-ray source on the other hand, the x-ray energy can be adjusted to optimal conditions with respect to contrast and dose. However, large-scale synchrotron sources impose high spatial and financial demands, making them unsuitable for clinical practice. During the last decades, research has brought up compact synchrotron sources based on inverse Compton scattering, which deliver a highly brilliant, quasi-monochromatic, tunable x-ray beam, yet fitting into a standard laboratory. One application that could benefit from the invention of these sources in clinical practice is coronary angiography. Being an important and frequently applied diagnostic tool, a high number of complications in angiography, such as renal failure, allergic reaction, or hyperthyroidism, are caused by the large amount of iodine-based contrast agent that is required for achieving sufficient image contrast. Here we demonstrate monochromatic angiography of a porcine heart acquired at the MuCLS, the first compact synchrotron source. By means of a simulation, the CNR in a coronary angiography image achieved with the quasi-mono-energetic MuCLS spectrum is analyzed and compared to a conventional x-ray-tube spectrum. The results imply that the improved CNR achieved with a quasi-monochromatic spectrum can allow for a significant reduction of iodine contrast material.

  15. Energy transfer and clustering of photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes in reconstituted lipid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewa, Takehisa, E-mail: takedewa@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Frontier Materials, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology, PRESTO, 4-1-8 Honcho Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Sumino, Ayumi; Watanabe, Natsuko; Noji, Tomoyasu [Department of Frontier Materials, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nango, Mamoru, E-mail: nango@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Frontier Materials, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: ► Photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes were reconstituted into lipid membranes. ► Energy transfers between light-harvesting complexes were examined. ► Atomic force microscopy indicated cluster formation of light-harvesting complexes. ► Efficient energy transfer was observed for the clustered complexes in the membranes. - Abstract: In purple photosynthetic bacteria, light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) and light harvesting/reaction centre core complex (LH1-RC) play the key roles of capturing and transferring light energy and subsequent charge separation. These photosynthetic apparatuses form a supramolecular assembly; however, how the assembly influences the efficiency of energy conversion is not yet clear. We addressed this issue by evaluating the energy transfer in reconstituted photosynthetic protein complexes LH2 and LH1-RC and studying the structures and the membrane environment of the LH2/LH1-RC assemblies, which had been embedded into various lipid bilayers. Thus, LH2 and LH1-RC from Rhodopseudomonas palustris 2.1.6 were reconstituted in phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylcholine (PC), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)/PG/cardiolipin (CL). Efficient energy transfer from LH2 to LH1-RC was observed in the PC and PE/PG/CL membranes. Atomic force microscopy revealed that LH2 and LH1-RC were heterogeneously distributed to form clusters in the PC and PE/PG/CL membranes. The results indicated that the phospholipid species influenced the cluster formation of LH2 and LH1-RC as well as the energy transfer efficiency.

  16. LED Surgical Task Lighting Scoping Study: A Hospital Energy Alliance Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2011-01-17

    Tungsten-halogen (halogen) lamps have traditionally been used to light surgical tasks in hospitals, even though they are in many respects ill-suited to the application due to the large percentage of radiant energy outside the visible spectrum and issues with color rendering/quality. Light-emitting diode (LED) technology offers potential for adjustable color and improved color rendition/quality, while simultaneously reducing side-effects from non-visible radiant energy. It also has the potential for significant energy savings, although this is a fairly narrow application in the larger commercial building energy use sector. Based on analysis of available products and Hospital Energy Alliance member interest, it is recommended that a product specification and field measurement procedure be developed for implementation in demonstration projects.

  17. Understanding energy efficient lighting as an outcome of dynamics of social practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Charlotte Louise

    2017-01-01

    - and professional practices, by presenting a historical account of particular spatio-temporal moments in the development of domestic lighting. The analysis unfolds how a number of lighting-related practices seem to have influenced each other and that these practices have been (re-) configured in particular ways due...... to certain social-political arrangements (such as breaks with dominant philosophical tendencies in lifestyles as well as lighting design), culturaldiscursive arrangements (such as emphasis on increasing energy demand vs. emphasis on decreasing energy demand), and material-economic arrangements (such...... and modifications of these wider practice-arrangements related to the provisioning and consumption of lighting. In doing so, this research extends the current field of social practice theoretical understandings of innovation and consumption dynamics....

  18. Cost-Benefit Analysis and Emission Reduction of Energy Efficient Lighting at the Universiti Tenaga Nasional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. B. Ganandran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the result of an investigation on the potential energy saving of the lighting systems at selected buildings of the Universiti Tenaga Nasional. The scope of this project includes evaluation of the lighting system in the Library, Admin Building, College of Engineering, College of Information Technology, Apartments, and COE Food court of the university. The main objectives of this project are to design the proper retrofit scenario and to calculate the potential electricity saving, the payback period, and the potential environmental benefits. In this survey the policy for retrofitting the old lighting system with the new energy saving LEDs starts with 10% for the first year and continues constantly for 10 years until all the lighting systems have been replaced. The result of the life cycle analysis reveals that after four years, the selected buildings will bring profit for the investment.

  19. Towards building artificial light harvesting complexes: enhanced singlet-singlet energy transfer between donor and acceptor pairs bound to albumins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Challa V; Duff, Michael R

    2008-12-01

    Specific donor and acceptor pairs have been assembled in bovine serum albumin (BSA), at neutral pH and room temperature, and these dye-protein complexes indicated efficient donor to acceptor singlet-singlet energy transfer. For example, pyrene-1-butyric acid served as the donor and Coumarin 540A served as the acceptor. Both the donor and the acceptor bind to BSA with affinity constants in excess of 2x10(5) M(-1), as measured in absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectral titrations. Simultaneous binding of both the donor and the acceptor chromophores was supported by CD spectra and one chromophore did not displace the other from the protein host, even when limited concentrations of the host were used. For example, a 1:1:1 complex between the donor, acceptor and the host can be readily formed, and spectral data clearly show that the binding sites are mutually exclusive. The ternary complexes (two different ligands bound to the same protein molecule) provided opportunities to examine singlet-singlet energy transfer between the protein-bound chromophores. Donor emission was quenched by the addition of the acceptor, in the presence of limited amounts of BSA, while no energy transfer was observed in the absence of the protein host, under the same conditions. The excitation spectra of the donor-acceptor-host complexes clearly show the sensitization of acceptor emission by the donor. Protein denaturation, as induced by the addition of urea or increasing the temperature to 360 K, inhibited energy transfer, which indicate that protein structure plays an important role. Sensitization also proceeded at low temperature (77 K) and diffusion of the donor or the acceptor is not required for energy transfer. Stern-Volmer quenching plots show that the quenching constant is (3.1+/-0.2)x10(4) M(-1), at low acceptor concentrations (light harvesting, conversion and storage.

  20. Energy savings by implementation of light quality LED lighting. Final report; Implementering af energibesparelser ved benyttelse af hoejkvalitets LED belysning. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dam-Hansen, C.; Thorseth, A.; Poulsen, Peter

    2010-03-15

    The project developed two new LED light sources and systems, emphasising the potential of LED technology for energy savings and lighting quality. A LED light source for display case lighting, replacing incandescent lamps, was successfully installed in the Treasury at Rosenborg Castle in Copenhagen, Denmark, and it was decided to extend the solution in 2010. Electricity savings of 74% were achieved. LED light sources replacing halogen bulbs in cooker hoods reduce electricity consumption by 69% and ensure even lighting of the entire working surface with about 500 lux at all cooking areas. Furthermore, a new LED optics system was patented. (ln)

  1. Controlling light-use by Rhodobacter capsulatus continuous cultures in a flat-panel photobioreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, S.; Douma, R.D.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Tramper, J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2006-01-01

    The main bottleneck in scale-up of phototrophic fermentation is the low efficiency of light energy conversion to the desired product, which is caused by an excessive dissipation of light energy to heat. The photoheterotrophic formation of hydrogen from acetate and light energy by the microorganism

  2. Artificial Light at Night Reduces Daily Energy Expenditure in Breeding Great Tits (Parus major)

    OpenAIRE

    Welbers, Anouk A. M. H.; van Dis, Natalie E.; Kolvoort, Anne M.; Ouyang, Jenny; Visser, Marcel E.; Spoelstra, Kamiel; Davide M. Dominoni

    2017-01-01

    The ecological impact of artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasingly recognized process that accompanies expanding urbanization. Yet, we have limited knowledge on the impact of ALAN on wild species, and on the potential to mitigate any negative effects by using different light sources and colors. In birds, effects of ALAN on activity levels are reported for several species and, hence, their daily energy expenditure (DEE) may be affected. DEE is a potent mediator of life-history trade-...

  3. Measurement and Verification of Energy Savings and Performance from Advanced Lighting Controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PNNL

    2016-02-21

    This document provides a framework for measurement and verification (M&V) of energy savings, performance, and user satisfaction from lighting retrofit projects involving occupancy-sensor-based, daylighting, and/or other types of automatic lighting. It was developed to provide site owners, contractors, and other involved organizations with the essential elements of a robust M&V plan for retrofit projects and to assist in developing specific project M&V plans.

  4. Heavy and light flavor jet quenching at RHIC and LHC energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shanshan; Luo, Tan; Qin, Guang-You; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2018-02-01

    The Linear Boltzmann Transport (LBT) model coupled to hydrodynamical background is extended to include transport of both light partons and heavy quarks through the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The LBT model includes both elastic and inelastic medium-interaction of both primary jet shower partons and thermal recoil partons within perturbative QCD (pQCD). It is shown to simultaneously describe the experimental data on heavy and light flavor hadron suppression in high-energy heavy-ion collisions for different centralities at RHIC and LHC energies. More detailed investigations within the LBT model illustrate the importance of both initial parton spectra and the shapes of fragmentation functions on the difference between the nuclear modifications of light and heavy flavor hadrons. The dependence of the jet quenching parameter q ˆ on medium temperature and jet flavor is quantitatively extracted.

  5. Purple-bacterial light harvesting benefits more from energy funnelling than from delocalisation

    CERN Document Server

    Baghbanzadeh, Sima

    2015-01-01

    Light-harvesting complexes of purple bacteria have two properties that are thought to contribute to the efficiency of their exciton transport: an energy funnel that directs excitons towards the reaction centre as well as substantial excitonic delocalisation, which can enhance transport through supertransfer. To determine the relative importance of these two features, we compared models of the light-harvesting apparatus with thousands of counterfactual situations in which the extent of delocalisation and the energy landscape were altered. We find that the influence of delocalisation is usually minor and sometimes deleterious, especially when compared to the decisive importance of a funnel in the energy landscape. Consequently, delocalisation is most likely a side-effect of the dense chlorophyll packing that evolved to increase light absorption per reaction centre.

  6. High Performance and Energy Efficient Traffic Light Controller Design Using FPGA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Sujeet; Shrivastav, Vivek Kumar; Sharma, Rashmi

    2017-01-01

    In this work, Verilog is used as hardware description language for implementation of traffic light controller. It shows Red, Green and Yellow color at a predefined interval. Technology scaling is used as energy efficient technique. We have used 90nm, 65nm, 40nm and 28nm technology based FPGA...... and then we have analyzed power consumption for traffic light controller on different FPGA. Leakage power is in range of 97.5-99% of total power consumption by traffic light controller on Virtex-7 FPGA. Signal power, clock power and IOs power are almost negligible. Power dissipation is measured on XPOWER...

  7. Evaluation of energy efficiency in street lighting: model proposition considering climate variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaury Caruzzo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the impacts of climate variability on efficient electricity consumption in street lighting in Brazil. The Climate Demand Method (CDM was applied, and the energy savings achieved by Brazil’s National Efficient Street Lighting Program (ReLuz in 2005 were calculated, considering the monthly climatology of sunshine duration, disaggregated by county in Brazil. The total energy savings in street lighting in 2005 were estimated at 63 GWh/year or 1.39% higher than the value determined by ReLuz/Eletrobrás and there was a 15 MW reduction in demand in Brazil, considering the nearly 393,000 points in ReLuz served in 2005. The results indicate that, besides the difference in latitude, climate variability in different county increases the daily usage of street lighting up to 19%. Furthermore, Brazil’s large size means that seasonality patterns in energy savings are not homogeneous, and there is a correlation between the monthly variability in sunshine duration and the latitude of mesoregions. The CDM was also shown to be suitable for ranking mesoregions with the highest levels of energy saving lighting.

  8. Texas State Building Energy Code: Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Commercial Lighting Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richman, Eric E.; Belzer, David B.; Winiarski, David W.

    2005-09-15

    The State Energy Conservation Office of Texas has asked the U.S. Department of Energy to analyze the potential energy effect and cost-effectiveness of the lighting requirements in the 2003 IECC as they consider adoption of this energy code. The new provisions of interest in the lighting section of IECC 2003 include new lighting power densities (LPD) and requirements for automatic lighting shutoff controls. The potential effect of the new LPD values is analyzed as a comparison with previous values in the nationally available IECC codes and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1. The basis for the analysis is a set of lighting models developed as part of the ASHRAE/IES code process, which is the basis for IECC 2003 LPD values. The use of the models allows for an effective comparison of values for various building types of interest to Texas state. Potential effects from control requirements are discussed, and available case study analysis results are provided but no comprehensive numerical evaluation is provided in this limited analysis effort.

  9. Surface Adsorption in Ternary Surfactant Mixtures above the Critical Micelle Concentration: Effects of Asymmetry on the Composition Dependence of the Excess Free Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liley, Jessica R; Thomas, Robert K; Penfold, Jeffrey; Tucker, Ian M; Petkov, Jordan T; Stevenson, Paul; Webster, John R P

    2017-04-06

    The composition of the adsorbed layer of a ternary surfactant mixture at the air-water interface has been studied by neutron reflectivity. The adsorption of the ternary mixture of octaethylene monododecyl ether (C12E8) sodium dodecyl 6-benzene sulfonate (LAS), and sodium dioxyethylene glycol monododecyl sulfate (SLES), as well as each of the binary mixtures, at solution concentrations greater than the mixed critical micelle concentration is highly nonideal. In the ternary mixture, the surface adsorption is dominated by C12E8 and LAS, and there is little SLES at the interface. The departure from ideality in the binary mixtures can be quantitatively described by applying the pseudophase approximation with quadratic and cubic terms in the excess free energy of mixing (GE) both at the surface and in the micelles. The same parameters that describe the binary interactions give a quantitative fit to the adsorbed fractions in the ternary mixture over a wide range of composition. A similar analysis is effective for the mixture containing sodium dodecyl sulfate instead of SLES. Of the set of six GE required to fit the ternary data, one is ideal (SLES-LAS) and three, LAS-C12E8 (micelle) and C12E8-SLES (micelle and surface), have minima occurring at a composition (mole fraction) of the anionic species of 1/3.

  10. Dissipation of excess photosynthetic energy contributes to salinity tolerance: a comparative study of salt-tolerant Ricinus communis and salt-sensitive Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Neto, Milton C; Lobo, Ana K M; Martins, Marcio O; Fontenele, Adilton V; Silveira, Joaquim Albenisio G

    2014-01-01

    The relationships between salt tolerance and photosynthetic mechanisms of excess energy dissipation were assessed using two species that exhibit contrasting responses to salinity, Ricinus communis (tolerant) and Jatropha curcas (sensitive). The salt tolerance of R. communis was indicated by unchanged electrolyte leakage (cellular integrity) and dry weight in leaves, whereas these parameters were greatly affected in J. curcas. The leaf Na+ content was similar in both species. Photosynthesis was intensely decreased in both species, but the reduction was more pronounced in J. curcas. In this species biochemical limitations in photosynthesis were more prominent, as indicated by increased C(i) values and decreased Rubisco activity. Salinity decreased both the V(cmax) (in vivo Rubisco activity) and J(max) (maximum electron transport rate) more significantly in J. curcas. The higher tolerance in R. communis was positively associated with higher photorespiratory activity, nitrate assimilation and higher cyclic electron flow. The high activity of these alternative electron sinks in R. communis was closely associated with a more efficient photoprotection mechanism. In conclusion, salt tolerance in R. communis, compared with J. curcas, is related to higher electron partitioning from the photosynthetic electron transport chain to alternative sinks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Energy and traffic light labelling have no impact on parent and child fast food selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Pennie; Wolfenden, Luke; Chapman, Kathy; Wellard, Lyndal; Hughes, Clare; Wiggers, John

    2013-10-25

    Labelling of food from fast food restaurants at point-of-purchase has been suggested as one strategy to reduce population energy consumption and contribute to reductions in obesity prevalence. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of energy and single traffic light labelling systems on the energy content of child and adult intended food purchases. The study employed a randomised controlled trial design. English speaking parents of children aged between three and 12 years were recruited from an existing research cohort. Participants were mailed one of three hypothetical fast food menus. Menus differed in their labelling technique- either energy labels, single traffic light labels, or a no-label control. Participants then completed a telephone survey which assessed intended food purchases for both adult and child. The primary trial outcome was total energy of intended food purchase. A total of 329 participants completed the follow-up telephone interview. Eighty-two percent of the energy labelling group and 96% of the single traffic light labelling group reported noticing labelling information on their menu. There were no significant differences in total energy of intended purchases of parents, or intended purchases made by parents for children, between the menu labelling groups, or between menu labelling groups by socio-demographic subgroups. This study provided no evidence to suggest that energy labelling or single traffic light labelling alone were effective in reducing the energy of fast food items selected from hypothetical fast food menus for purchase. Additional complementary public health initiatives promoting the consumption of healthier foods identified by labelling, and which target other key drivers of menu item selection in this setting may be required. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Excess plutonium disposition using ALWR technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, A. (ed.); Buckner, M.R.; Radder, J.A.; Angelos, J.G.; Inhaber, H.

    1993-02-01

    The Office of Nuclear Energy of the Department of Energy chartered the Plutonium Disposition Task Force in August 1992. The Task Force was created to assess the range of practicable means of disposition of excess weapons-grade plutonium. Within the Task Force, working groups were formed to consider: (1) storage, (2) disposal,and(3) fission options for this disposition,and a separate group to evaluate nonproliferation concerns of each of the alternatives. As a member of the Fission Working Group, the Savannah River Technology Center acted as a sponsor for light water reactor (LWR) technology. The information contained in this report details the submittal that was made to the Fission Working Group of the technical assessment of LWR technology for plutonium disposition. The following aspects were considered: (1) proliferation issues, (2) technical feasibility, (3) technical availability, (4) economics, (5) regulatory issues, and (6) political acceptance.

  13. Differentiation in light energy dissipation between hemiepiphytic and non-hemiepiphytic Ficus species with contrasting xylem hydraulic conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Guang-You; Wang, Ai-Ying; Liu, Zhi-Hui; Franco, Augusto C; Goldstein, Guillermo; Cao, Kun-Fang

    2011-06-01

    Hemiepiphytic Ficus species (Hs) possess traits of more conservative water use compared with non-hemiepiphytic Ficus species (NHs) even during their terrestrial growth phase, which may result in significant differences in photosynthetic light use between these two growth forms. Stem hydraulic conductivity, leaf gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence were compared in adult trees of five Hs and five NHs grown in a common garden. Hs had significantly lower stem hydraulic conductivity, lower stomatal conductance and higher water use efficiency than NHs. Photorespiration played an important role in avoiding photoinhibition at high irradiance in both Hs and NHs. Under saturating irradiance levels, Hs tended to dissipate a higher proportion of excessive light energy through thermal processes than NHs, while NHs dissipated a larger proportion of electron flow than Hs through the alternative electron sinks. No significant difference in maximum net CO2 assimilation rate was found between Hs and NHs. Stem xylem hydraulic conductivity was positively correlated with maximum electron transport rate and negatively correlated with the quantum yield of non-photochemical quenching across the 10 studied Ficus species. These findings indicate that a canopy growth habit during early life stages in Hs of Ficus resulted in substantial adaptive differences from congeneric NHs not only in water relations but also in photosynthetic light use and carbon economy. The evolution of epiphytic growth habit, even for only part of their life cycle, involved profound changes in a suite of inter-correlated ecophysiological traits that persist to a large extent even during the later terrestrial growth phase.

  14. Light and energy - solar cells in transparent facades. Final report; Lys og energi - solceller i transparente facader. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-07-01

    The overall purpose with the project 'LIGHT AND ENERGY - solar cells in transparent facades' is to demonstrate and disseminate the potentials for the application of light-filtering solar cells as multi-functional components, which meets the architectural objectives while contributing to a good indoor climate, a suitable quality of lighting indoor and at the same time produces electricity. The project was divided into six activities. The first activity 'zooms in' on the light-filtering solar cells on the market today. The following activities gradually 'zoom out' from the solar cell itself to the building component and ends up in the facade and the room behind. This order - which largely reflects the chronological development of the project - is repeated in the final project report to ensure the best possible overview. The characterisation in the different activities has been a combination of technical measurements, simulations, calculations and a thorough architectural evaluation of solar cell component, facade and room for attain an overall, interprofessional evaluation of the solar cell panels. It is important to stress that the basis of the project is the solar cell products available on the market today and In the near future. The possibilities and ideas have been evaluated and documented using mock-ups in 1:1 scale since the individual components have completely other qualities when they are integrated in a facade - the platform of this project. These models in full scale are a possibility to register and experience the character of the light inside out and under different light settings. It has been important to think of the solar cell filter as a part of the architecture instead of a replacement for windows and actively use the light-filtering features as a possibility in new facade designs - a filter which in combination with the completely transparent glass and completely light-blocking materials opens up for new possibilities

  15. Influence of the variation potential on photosynthetic flows of light energy and electrons in pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhova, Ekaterina; Mudrilov, Maxim; Vodeneev, Vladimir; Sukhov, Vladimir

    2017-10-31

    Local damage (mainly burning, heating, and mechanical wounding) induces propagation of electrical signals, namely, variation potentials, which are important signals during the life of plants that regulate different physiological processes, including photosynthesis. It is known that the variation potential decreases the rate of CO2 assimilation by the Calvin-Benson cycle; however, its influence on light reactions has been poorly investigated. The aim of our work was to investigate the influence of the variation potential on the light energy flow that is absorbed, trapped and dissipated per active reaction centre in photosystem II and on the flow of electrons through the chloroplast electron transport chain. We analysed chlorophyll fluorescence in pea leaves using JIP-test and PAM-fluorometry; we also investigated delayed fluorescence. The electrical signals were registered using extracellular electrodes. We showed that the burning-induced variation potential stimulated a nonphotochemical loss of energy in photosystem II under dark conditions. It was also shown that the variation potential gradually increased the flow of light energy absorbed, trapped and dissipated by photosystem II. These changes were likely caused by an increase in the fraction of absorbed light distributed to photosystem II. In addition, the variation potential induced a transient increase in electron flow through the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Some probable mechanisms for the influence of the variation potential on the light reactions of photosynthesis (including the potential role of intracellular pH decrease) are discussed in the work.

  16. Light ion beam approach to ICF ignition, gain, and energy production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, R.; Allshouse, G.; Cook, D.; Lockner, T.; Mazarakis, M.; Olson, C.; Smith, D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)); Peterson, R.; Adler, D.; Bruggink, D.; Englestad, R.; Khater, H.; Kulcinski, G.; Lovell, E.; MacFarlane, J.; Morgahead, E.; Moses, G.; Rutledge, S.; Sawan, M.; Sviatoslalvsky, I.; Wang, P.; Wittenberg, L. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States))

    1994-10-05

    A review of anticipated achievements in the light ion beam method of the inertial confinement fusion program is presented. They allow to estimate the cost of produced electric energy. It appears to be quite competitive to other fusion reactor designs at the 1000 MWe level and above. (AIP) [copyright] [ital American] [ital Institute] [ital of] [ital Physics] 1994

  17. Porphyrin nanorods characterisation for an artificial light harvesting and energy transfer system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mongwaketsi, N

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available s 1 0 h r s 1 3 h r s 1 5 h r s 1 8 h r s Porphyrin Nanorods Characterization for an Artificial Light Harvesting and Energy Transfer System Nametso Mongwaketsi1,2,3, Raymond Sparrow2, Bert Klumperman3, Malik Maaza1 1 NanoSciences Lab...

  18. The phenomenon of firefly bioluminescence: Conversion of chemical energy into light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, W. (Inst. of Organic Chemistry, Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany)); Schulz, M.H. (Inst. of Organic Chemistry, Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany))

    1993-12-01

    We all know this - the sparkling of fireflies in Summer nights. This article shows, at the example of fireflies, the chemical reactions in the conversion of energy to light. Basing on this, the technical ways of utilizing this prinicple are dealt with. They will revolutionize chemistry, biology, biotechnology and medicine in the next years. (BWI)

  19. Fusion of light exotic nuclei at near-barrier energies: Effect of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of inelastic excitation of exotic light projectiles (proton- as well as neutron- rich) 17F and 11Be on fusion with heavy target has been studied at near-barrier energies. The cal- culations have been performed in the coupled channels approach where, in addition to the normal coupling of the ground state of ...

  20. An Improvement to Calculation of Lighting Energy Requirement in the European Standard EN 15193:2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Tian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Daylighting has a recognized potential for electric energy savings when is used as a complement for artificial lighting. This study reviews the comprehensive calculation method for lighting energy requirement in non-residential buildings introduced by the European Standard EN 15193: 2007 and investigates its feasibility in China. The location of building influences the intensity and duration of daylight. In EN 15193 calculation method, the daylight supply factor, which represents the effect of daylighting on usage of artificial lighting, is the only factor related to location and calculated according to latitude, however the current method (EN15193: 2007 limits the latitude range from 38° to 60° north in Europe, for which the relationship between daylight supply factor and latitude is approximately linear. This study shows that a quadratic relationship needs to be used for a wider range of latitudes. The coefficients of the proposed quadratic relationship are determined for the classified daylight penetration and maintained illuminance level. Various control types are also considered. Prediction of energy requirement for lighting is obtained through building simulation tool EnergyPlus and the effects of some setting factors are discussed.

  1. Selected List of Low Energy Beam Transport Facilities for Light-Ion, High-Intensity Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, L. R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-02-17

    This paper presents a list of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) facilities for light-ion, high-intensity accelerators. It was put together to facilitate comparisons with the PXIE LEBT design choices. A short discussion regarding the importance of the beam perveance in the choice of the transport scheme follows.

  2. Artificial Light at Night Reduces Daily Energy Expenditure in Breeding Great Tits (Parus major)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welbers, Anouk; Dis, van Natalie; Kolvoort, A.M.; Ouyang, J.; Visser, M.E.; Spoelstra, K.; Dominoni, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Artificial Light at Night Reduces Daily
    Energy Expenditure in Breeding
    Great Tits (Parus major)
    Anouk A. M. H. Welbers 1, Natalie E. van Dis 1, Anne M. Kolvoort 1, Jenny Ouyang2,
    Marcel E. Visser 1, Kamiel Spoelstra1 and Davide M. Dominoni 1, 3*
    1 Department of Animal Ecology,

  3. Replacement policy of residential lighting optimized for cost, energy, and greenhouse gas emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lixi; Keoleian, Gregory A.; Saitou, Kazuhiro

    2017-11-01

    Accounting for 10% of the electricity consumption in the US, artificial lighting represents one of the easiest ways to cut household energy bills and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by upgrading to energy-efficient technologies such as compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) and light emitting diodes (LED). However, given the high initial cost and rapidly improving trajectory of solid-state lighting today, estimating the right time to switch over to LEDs from a cost, primary energy, and GHG emissions perspective is not a straightforward problem. This is an optimal replacement problem that depends on many determinants, including how often the lamp is used, the state of the initial lamp, and the trajectories of lighting technology and of electricity generation. In this paper, multiple replacement scenarios of a 60 watt-equivalent A19 lamp are analyzed and for each scenario, a few replacement policies are recommended. For example, at an average use of 3 hr day‑1 (US average), it may be optimal both economically and energetically to delay the adoption of LEDs until 2020 with the use of CFLs, whereas purchasing LEDs today may be optimal in terms of GHG emissions. In contrast, incandescent and halogen lamps should be replaced immediately. Based on expected LED improvement, upgrading LED lamps before the end of their rated lifetime may provide cost and environmental savings over time by taking advantage of the higher energy efficiency of newer models.

  4. Investigating Students' Mental Models about the Quantization of Light, Energy, and Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didis, Nilüfer; Eryilmaz, Ali; Erkoç, Sakir

    2014-01-01

    This paper is the first part of a multiphase study examining students' mental models about the quantization of physical observables--light, energy, and angular momentum. Thirty-one second-year physics and physics education college students who were taking a modern physics course participated in the study. The qualitative analysis of data revealed…

  5. High-energy gamma-ray beams from Compton-backscattered laser light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandorfi, A.M.; LeVine, M.J.; Thorn, C.E.; Giordano, G.; Matone, G.

    1983-01-01

    Collisions of light photons with relativistic electrons have previously been used to produce polarized ..gamma..-ray beams with modest (-10%) resolution but relatively low intensity. In contrast, the LEGS project (Laser + Electron Gamma Source) at Brookhaven will produce a very high flux (>2 x 10/sup 7/ s/sup -1/) of background-free polarized ..gamma.. rays whose energy will be determined to a high accuracy (..delta..E = 2.3 MeV). Initially, 300(420)-MeV ..gamma.. rays will be produced by backscattering uv light from the new 2.5(3.0)-GeV X-ray storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The LEGS facility will operate as one of many passive users of the NSLS. In a later stage of the project, a Free Electron Laser is expectred to extend the ..gamma..-ray energy up to 700 MeV.

  6. Lighting standards updated. Energy consumption in new standards; Verlichtingsnormen gewijzigd. Energiegebruik in nieuwe normen verwerkt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, R. [Professional Lighting Designers' Association PLDA, Guetersloh (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    For the illumination of workplaces, a new version of the standard NEN-EN 12464-1 (Light and illumination. Lighting for workplaces. Part 1. Indoor workplaces) has been published. Also the Dutch standard NEN 3087 on visual ergonomics is completely revised . Furthermore, the guideline NPR 3437 (Ergonomics. Visual aspects of tinted glazing in the work environment) is repealed. Finally, NEN 2916 is replace by NEN 7120, a standard on energy consumption of lighting in relation to the energy performance of buildings. [Dutch] Voor de verlichting van werkplekken is een nieuwe versie van NEN-EN 12464-1 verschenen (Licht en verlichting. Werkplekverlichting. Deel 1. Werkplekken binnen). Ook is de Nederlandse norm NEN 3087 over visuele ergonomie geheel herzien. Verder is de Praktijkrichtlijn NPR 3437 (Ergonomie. Visuele aspecten van getinte beglazing in de werkomgeving) ingetrokken en is NEN 2916 vervangen door NEN 7120, een norm over het energiegebruik van verlichting in relatie tot de energieprestatie van gebouwen.

  7. Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Unlock the mysteries of energy! Energy is more than ""the ability to do work""; we present these concepts in a way that makes them more accessible to students and easier to understand. The best way to understand energy is to first look at all the different kinds of energy including: What Is Energy, Mechanical Energy, Thermal, Sound Energy and Waves, as well as Light Energy.

  8. LED (Light-Emitting Diode Road Lighting in Practice: An Evaluation of Compliance with Regulations and Improvements for Further Energy Savings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika K. Jägerbrand

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Light-emitting diode (LED road lighting has been widely implemented in recent years, but few studies have evaluated its performance after installation. This study investigated whether LED road lighting complies with minimum regulations in terms of traffic safety and whether improvements for energy efficiency are possible. Average road surface luminance (L, overall luminance uniformity (Uo, longitudinal luminance uniformity (UI, power density (PD and normalised power density (PN were evaluated for 14 roads (seven designed for vehicular traffic and seven for pedestrians and bicycles. Energy savings were calculated as the percentage reduction to the minimum level of the existing lighting class or a lower lighting class and by applying a dimming schedule. The results showed that LED road lighting for vehicular traffic roads generally fulfilled the requirements, whereas that for pedestrian and bicycle roads generally corresponded to the lowest lighting class for L, and often did not meet the statutory requirements for Uo and UI. By adapting lighting levels to the minimum requirement of the existing lighting class or by dropping to a lower lighting class, vehicular traffic roads could save 6%–35% on L to lighting class M5 and 23%–61% on L to lighting class M6. A dimming schedule could lead to energy savings of 49%. There is little potential for savings on pedestrian and bicycle roads, except by implementing a dimming schedule. Thus, in general, for vehicular, pedestrian and bicycle roads, a dimming schedule can save more energy than can be achieved in general by reducing lighting class. Furthermore, since a dimming schedule can be adjusted to traffic intensity, any potential risk of compromising traffic safety is minimised.

  9. Evolution of the energy consumed by street lighting in Spain estimated with DMSP-OLS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez de Miguel, Alejandro; Zamorano, Jaime; Gómez Castaño, José; Pascual, Sergio

    2014-05-01

    We present the results of the analysis of satellite imagery to study light pollution in Spain. Both calibrated and non-calibrated DMSP-OLS images were used. We describe the method to scale the non-calibrated DMSP-OLS images which allows us to use differential photometry techniques in order to study the evolution of the light pollution. Population data and DMSP-OLS satellite calibrated images for the year 2006 were compared to test the reliability of official statistics in public lighting consumption. We found a relationship between the population and the energy consumption which is valid for several regions. Finally the true evolution of the electricity consumption for street lighting in Spain from 1992 to 2010 was derived; it has been doubled in the last 18 years in most of the provinces.

  10. Study of halo nuclei breakup on light targets at intermediate and high energies

    CERN Document Server

    Parfenova, Ioulia

    2002-01-01

    The study of exotic nuclei is one of the most important topics in modern nuclear physics. It allows general understanding of the structure and nature of light nuclear systems in the vicinity of the driplines. Most of the leading facilities in the world, CERN, GANIL, GSI in Europe, RIKEN in Japan, and NSCL(MSU) in USA, are involved in these investigations. Recently, new experimental data on the properties of light halo nuclei such as extremely large interaction cross sections, huge electromagnetic dissociation cross sections, narrow momentum distribution of fragments from breakup reactions, unusual modes of the beta-decay of these nuclei on the borders of the stability, were obtained. This Thesis is based on a series of articles devoted to theoretical investigations of nuclear breakup reactions with light halo nuclei at intermediate energies impinging on light target nuclei. Special attention is paid to the question of sensitivity of the calculated breakup cross sections and longitudinal momentum distributions...

  11. Light spectrum modifies the utilization pattern of energy sources in Pseudomonas sp. DR 5-09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaie, Samareh; Vaas, Lea A I; Rosberg, Anna Karin; Windstam, Sofia T; Karlsson, Maria E; Bergstrand, Karl-Johan; Khalil, Sammar; Wohanka, Walter; Alsanius, Beatrix W

    2017-01-01

    Despite the overruling impact of light in the phyllosphere, little is known regarding the influence of light spectra on non-phototrophic bacteria colonizing the leaf surface. We developed an in vitro method to study phenotypic profile responses of bacterial pure cultures to different bands of the visible light spectrum using monochromatic (blue: 460 nm; red: 660 nm) and polychromatic (white: 350-990 nm) LEDs, by modification and optimization of a protocol for the Phenotype MicroArray™ technique (Biolog Inc., CA, USA). The new protocol revealed high reproducibility of substrate utilization under all conditions tested. Challenging the non-phototrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. DR 5-09 with white, blue, and red light demonstrated that all light treatments affected the respiratory profile differently, with blue LED having the most decisive impact on substrate utilization by impairing respiration of 140 substrates. The respiratory activity was decreased on 23 and 42 substrates under red and white LEDs, respectively, while utilization of one, 16, and 20 substrates increased in the presence of red, blue, and white LEDs, respectively. Interestingly, on four substrates contrasting utilization patterns were found when the bacterium was exposed to different light spectra. Although non-phototrophic bacteria do not rely directly on light as an energy source, Pseudomonas sp. DR 5-09 changed its respiratory activity on various substrates differently when exposed to different lights. Thus, ability to sense and distinguish between different wavelengths even within the visible light spectrum must exist, and leads to differential regulation of substrate usage. With these results, we hypothesize that different light spectra might be a hitherto neglected key stimulus for changes in microbial lifestyle and habits of substrate usage by non-phototrophic phyllospheric microbiota, and thus might essentially stratify leaf microbiota composition and diversity.

  12. Light spectrum modifies the utilization pattern of energy sources in Pseudomonas sp. DR 5-09.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samareh Gharaie

    Full Text Available Despite the overruling impact of light in the phyllosphere, little is known regarding the influence of light spectra on non-phototrophic bacteria colonizing the leaf surface. We developed an in vitro method to study phenotypic profile responses of bacterial pure cultures to different bands of the visible light spectrum using monochromatic (blue: 460 nm; red: 660 nm and polychromatic (white: 350-990 nm LEDs, by modification and optimization of a protocol for the Phenotype MicroArray™ technique (Biolog Inc., CA, USA. The new protocol revealed high reproducibility of substrate utilization under all conditions tested. Challenging the non-phototrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. DR 5-09 with white, blue, and red light demonstrated that all light treatments affected the respiratory profile differently, with blue LED having the most decisive impact on substrate utilization by impairing respiration of 140 substrates. The respiratory activity was decreased on 23 and 42 substrates under red and white LEDs, respectively, while utilization of one, 16, and 20 substrates increased in the presence of red, blue, and white LEDs, respectively. Interestingly, on four substrates contrasting utilization patterns were found when the bacterium was exposed to different light spectra. Although non-phototrophic bacteria do not rely directly on light as an energy source, Pseudomonas sp. DR 5-09 changed its respiratory activity on various substrates differently when exposed to different lights. Thus, ability to sense and distinguish between different wavelengths even within the visible light spectrum must exist, and leads to differential regulation of substrate usage. With these results, we hypothesize that different light spectra might be a hitherto neglected key stimulus for changes in microbial lifestyle and habits of substrate usage by non-phototrophic phyllospheric microbiota, and thus might essentially stratify leaf microbiota composition and diversity.

  13. The Effects of Choline on Hepatic Lipid Metabolism, Mitochondrial Function and Antioxidative Status in Human Hepatic C3A Cells Exposed to Excessive Energy Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Choline plays a lipotropic role in lipid metabolism as an essential nutrient. In this study, we investigated the effects of choline (5, 35 and 70 μM on DNA methylation modifications, mRNA expression of the critical genes and their enzyme activities involved in hepatic lipid metabolism, mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px in C3A cells exposed to excessive energy substrates (lactate, 10 mM; octanoate, 2 mM and pyruvate, 1 mM; lactate, octanoate and pyruvate-supplemented medium (LOP. Thirty five micromole or 70 μM choline alone, instead of a low dose (5 μM, reduced hepatocellular triglyceride (TG accumulation, protected Δψm from decrement and increased GSH-Px activity in C3A cells. The increment of TG accumulation, reactive oxygen species (ROS production and Δψm disruption were observed under LOP treatment in C3A cells after 72 h of culture, which were counteracted by concomitant treatment of choline (35 μM or 70 μM partially via reversing the methylation status of the peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα gene promoter, upregulating PPARα, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-I (CPT-I and downregulating fatty acid synthase (FAS gene expression, as well as decreasing FAS activity and increasing CPT-I and GSH-Px activities. These findings provided a novel insight into the lipotropic role of choline as a vital methyl-donor in the intervention of chronic metabolic diseases.

  14. Simple estimates of excitation energy sharing between heavy and light fragments in heavy-ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasso, C.H.; Lozano, M.; Pollarolo, G.

    1985-12-01

    Qualitative arguments are used to estiamte the ratio of excitation energies between heavy and light fragments for asymmetric heavy-ion collisions. The value of this quantity is linked to the relative role played by inelastic and transfer degrees of freedom and thereby to an approximate function of the total kinetic energy loss. A numerical analysis that confirms the trends anticipated by the simple arguments is performed for the reactions /sup 56/Fe+ /sup 238/U and /sup 86/Kr+ /sup 208/Pb at bombarding energies in the laboratory of 476 and 1565 MeV, respectively.

  15. Mathematical and computational aspects of quaternary liquid mixing free energy measurement using light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahle, Chris W; Ross, David S; Thurston, George M

    2012-07-21

    We provide a mathematical and computational analysis of light scattering measurement of mixing free energies of quaternary isotropic liquids. In previous work, we analyzed mathematical and experimental design considerations for the ternary mixture case [D. Ross, G. Thurston, and C. Lutzer, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 064106 (2008); C. Wahle, D. Ross, and G. Thurston, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 034201 (2012)]. Here, we review and introduce dimension-free general formulations of the fully nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) and its linearization, a basis for applying the method to composition spaces of any dimension, in principle. With numerical analysis of the PDE as applied to the light scattering implied by a test free energy and dielectric gradient combination, we show that values of the Rayleigh ratio within the quaternary composition tetrahedron can be used to correctly reconstruct the composition dependence of the free energy. We then extend the analysis to the case of a finite number of data points, measured with noise. In this context the linearized PDE describes the relevant diffusion of information from light scattering noise to the free energy. The fully nonlinear PDE creates a special set of curves in the composition tetrahedron, collections of which form characteristics of the nonlinear and linear PDEs, and we show that the information diffusion has a time-like direction along the positive normals to these curves. With use of Monte Carlo simulations of light scattering experiments, we find that for a modest laboratory light scattering setup, about 100-200 samples and 100 s of measurement time are enough to be able to measure the mixing free energy over the entire quaternary composition tetrahedron, to within an L(2) error norm of 10(-3). The present method can help quantify thermodynamics of quaternary isotropic liquid mixtures.

  16. Particle and light fragment emission in peripheral heavy ion collisions at Fermi energies

    CERN Document Server

    Piantelli, S; Olmi, A; Bardelli, L; Bartoli, A; Bini, M; Casini, G; Coppi, C; Mangiarotti, A; Pasquali, G; Poggi, G; Stefanini, A A; Taccetti, N; Vanzi, E

    2006-01-01

    A systematic investigation of the average multiplicities of light charged particles and intermediate mass fragments emitted in peripheral and semiperipheral collisions is presented as a function of the beam energy, violence of the collision and mass of the system. The data have been collected with the "Fiasco" setup in the reactions 93Nb+93Nb at 17, 23, 30, 38AMeV and 116Sn+116Sn at 30, 38AMeV. The midvelocity emission has been separated from the emission of the projectile-like fragment. This last component appears to be compatible with an evaporation from an equilibrated source at normal density, as described by the statistical code Gemini at the appropriate excitation energy. On the contrary, the midvelocity emission presents remarkable differences for what concerns both the dependence of the multiplicities on the energy deposited in the midvelocity region and the isotopic composition of the emitted light charged particles.

  17. A nano-graphite cold cathode for an energy-efficient cathodoluminescent light source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Obraztsov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of new types of light sources is necessary in order to meet the growing demands of consumers and to ensure an efficient use of energy. The cathodoluminescence process is still under-exploited for light generation because of the lack of cathodes suitable for the energy-efficient production of electron beams and appropriate phosphor materials. In this paper we propose a nano-graphite film material as a highly efficient cold cathode, which is able to produce high intensity electron beams without energy consumption. The nano-graphite film material was produced by using chemical vapor deposition techniques. Prototypes of cathodoluminescent lamp devices with a construction optimized for the usage of nano-graphite cold cathodes were developed, manufactured and tested. The results indicate prospective advantages of this type of lamp and the possibility to provide advanced power efficiency as well as enhanced spectral and other characteristics.

  18. Optimization of wave energy capture of wave-powered navigational lighting buoys of seadromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Guangda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] This paper proposes an optimized design for wave-power navigational lighting buoys of seadromes.[Methods] Based on the theory of three-dimensional potential flow, the buoyant motion response of a buoy is calculated. A type of array of wave-power navigational lighting buoys located in an offshore seadrome is proposed,and a procedure for the design optimization of its component buoys is presented. Matching the best Power Take-Off(PTO damping, the diameter to draft ratio and array distance with the best energy capture width ratio are acquired, and the energy capture for the short-term forecast of the buoy array is accomplished. On this basis, combined with the actual sea conditions, energy capture for the long-term forecast of an individual buoy is accomplished. The influence of the buoy diameter, buoy draft and array distance on the energy capture width ratio is discussed.[Results] The results show that the energy capture width ratio is at its greatest when the diameter to draft ratio is between 2.4-2.6; the smaller the distance between array buoys, the greater the energy capture width of each buoy.[Conclusions] The results can provide a reference and suggestions for the optimization of the design of wave energy generation for arrays buoy.

  19. Innovative, energy-efficient lighting for New York state roadways : opportunities for incorporating mesopic visibility considerations into roadway lighting practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    The present report outlines activities undertaken to assess the potential for implementing research on visibility at mesopic light levels into lighting practices for roadways in New York State. Through measurements of light levels at several roadway ...

  20. Beyond the Physical Limit:Energy Saving Lighting and Illumination by Using Repetitive Intense and Fast Pulsed Light Sources and the Effect on Human Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, Masafumi; Morita, Keiji; Tomita, Yudai; Toda, Yukinobu; Motomura, Hideki

    By using Blue, Green and Red LEDs it is shown that the Broca-Sulzer effect holds for a repetitive pulse operated LED lighting system. In other words Talbot-Plateau Law does not hold. The effective enhancement at 60 Hz with a 5% duty ratio is about 1.5 to 2.7 times that of DC operation for blue and green light. This result suggests that pulsed operation can be a way to solving the energy saving problem of lighting.

  1. Using Microwave Energy to Synthesize Light Weight/Energy Saving Magnesium Based Materials: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Leong Eugene Wong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microwave energy can be used for the processing of a wide variety of materials. It is used most commonly for the heating of food and has been increasingly applied for processing of polymers; ceramics; metals; minerals and composites. The use of microwave energy allows rapid and volumetric heating where heat is generated from within the material instead of via radiative heat transfer from external heating elements. This paper aims to provide a review on the use of energy efficient and environment friendly microwave energy route to synthesize magnesium based materials reinforced with various types of metallic and ceramic reinforcements. Magnesium composites are extremely attractive for weight critical applications in automotive; aerospace; electronics and transportation sectors. The magnesium composites were prepared using blend—compact—microwave sintering—extrusion methodology. Microwave sintering allowed a significant reduction of 80% in both processing time and energy consumption over conventional sintering without any detrimental effect on the properties of the synthesized magnesium composites. Physical; microstructure and mechanical properties of microwave sintered magnesium composites will also be discussed and compared with magnesium composites processed by conventional liquid and solid processing techniques.

  2. Energy-dependent microscopic optical potential for scattering of nucleons on light nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farag, M.Y.H.; Esmael, E.H. [Cairo University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Giza (Egypt); Maridi, H.M. [Cairo University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Giza (Egypt); Taiz University, Physics Department, Faculty of Applied Science, Taiz (Yemen)

    2014-06-15

    We present an energy-dependent microscopic optical model potential for elastic scattering of nucleons on light nuclei. The single-folding model is used for the real part of the optical potential (OP), while the imaginary part is derived within the high-energy approximation theory. The energy dependence of the OP is determined from the parameterization of the volume integrals those calculated from the best-fit OP that fit the experimental data of the cross sections and analyzing powers. This energy-dependent OP is successfully applied to analyze the proton elastic scattering of {sup 4,6,i8}He, {sup 6,7}Li, and {sup 9,10}Be nuclei at low and intermediate incident energies up to 200MeV/nucleon. (orig.)

  3. Application of users’ light-switch stochastic models to dynamic energy simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Camisassi, V.; Fabi, V.; Andersen, Rune Korsholm

    2015-01-01

    The design of an innovative building should include building overall energy flows estimation. They are principally related to main six influencing factors (IEA-ECB Annex 53): climate, building envelope and equipment, operation and maintenance, occupant behaviour and indoor environment conditions...... deterministic inputs, due to the uncertain nature of human behaviour. In this paper, new stochastic models of users’ interaction with artificial lighting systems are developed and implemented in the energy simulation software IDA ICE. They were developed from field measurements in an office building in Prague....... The aim is to evaluate the impact of a user's switching action over whole building energy consumption. Indeed, it is interesting not only to see the variance related to electric energy consumption, but the overall effect on a building's energy load....

  4. Self-reverse-biased solar panel optical receiver for simultaneous visible light communication and energy harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Won-Ho; Yang, Se-Hoon; Kwon, Do-Hoon; Han, Sang-Kook

    2016-10-31

    We propose a self-reverse-biased solar panel optical receiver for energy harvesting and visible light communication. Since the solar panel converts an optical component into an electrical component, it provides both energy harvesting and communication. The signal component can be separated from the direct current component, and these components are used for communication and energy harvesting. We employed a self-reverse-biased receiver circuit to improve the communication and energy harvesting performance. The reverse bias on the solar panel improves the responsivity and response time. The proposed system achieved 17.05 mbps discrete multitone transmission with a bit error rate of 1.1 x 10-3 and enhanced solar energy conversion efficiency.

  5. Fabrication of Scalable Indoor Light Energy Harvester and Study for Agricultural IoT Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, M.; Nakamura, A.; Kunii, A.; Kusano, K.; Futagawa, M.

    2015-12-01

    A scalable indoor light energy harvester was fabricated by microelectromechanical system (MEMS) and printing hybrid technology and evaluated for agricultural IoT applications under different environmental input power density conditions, such as outdoor farming under the sun, greenhouse farming under scattered lighting, and a plant factory under LEDs. We fabricated and evaluated a dye- sensitized-type solar cell (DSC) as a low cost and “scalable” optical harvester device. We developed a transparent conductive oxide (TCO)-less process with a honeycomb metal mesh substrate fabricated by MEMS technology. In terms of the electrical and optical properties, we achieved scalable harvester output power by cell area sizing. Second, we evaluated the dependence of the input power scalable characteristics on the input light intensity, spectrum distribution, and light inlet direction angle, because harvested environmental input power is unstable. The TiO2 fabrication relied on nanoimprint technology, which was designed for optical optimization and fabrication, and we confirmed that the harvesters are robust to a variety of environments. Finally, we studied optical energy harvesting applications for agricultural IoT systems. These scalable indoor light harvesters could be used in many applications and situations in smart agriculture.

  6. Achieving Energy Savings with Highly-Controlled Lighting in an Open-Plan Office

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Enscoe, Abby

    2010-04-19

    An installation in a Federal building tested the effectiveness of a highly-controlled, workstation-specific lighting retrofit. The study took place in an open-office area with 86 cubicles and low levels of daylight. Each cubicle was illuminated by a direct/indirectpendant luminaire with three 32 watt lamps, two dimmable DALI ballasts, and an occupancy sensor. A centralized control system programmed all three lamps to turn on and off according to occupancy on a workstation-by-workstation basis. Field measurements taken over the course of several monthsdemonstrated 40% lighting energy savings compared to a baseline without advanced controls that conforms to GSA's current retrofit standard. A photometric analysis found that the installation provided higher desktop light levels than the baseline, while an occupant survey found that occupants in general preferred the lighting system to thebaseline.Simple payback is fairly high; projects that can achieve lower installation costs and/or higher energy savings and those in which greenhouse gas reduction and occupant satisfaction are significant priorities provide the ideal setting for workstation-specific lighting retrofits.

  7. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Why is left right and right left in the mirror? Baffled by the basics of reflection and refraction? Wondering just how the eye works? If you have trouble teaching concepts about light that you don t fully grasp yourself, get help from a book that s both scientifically accurate and entertaining with Light. By combining clear explanations, clever drawings, and activities that use easy-to-find materials, this book covers what science teachers and parents need to know to teach about light with confidence. It uses ray, wave, and particle models of light to explain the basics of reflection and refraction, optical instruments, polarization of light, and interference and diffraction. There s also an entire chapter on how the eye works. Each chapter ends with a Summary and Applications section that reinforces concepts with everyday examples. Whether you need a deeper understanding of how light bends or a good explanation of why the sky is blue, you ll find Light more illuminating and accessible than a college textbook...

  8. Overview of the US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. A. McCarthy; D. L. Williams; R. Reister

    2012-05-01

    The US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is focused on the long-term operation of US commercial power plants. It encompasses two facets of long-term operation: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the nuclear industry that support implementation of performance improvement technologies. An important aspect of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is partnering with industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to support and conduct the long-term research needed to inform major component refurbishment and replacement strategies, performance enhancements, plant license extensions, and age-related regulatory oversight decisions. The Department of Energy research, development, and demonstration role focuses on aging phenomena and issues that require long-term research and/or unique Department of Energy laboratory expertise and facilities and are applicable to all operating reactors. This paper gives an overview of the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, including vision, goals, and major deliverables.

  9. Lighting energy savings potential of split-pane electrochromic windows controlled for daylighting with visual comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Software, Anyhere; Fernandes, Luis; Lee, Eleanor; Ward, Greg

    2013-03-15

    A simulation study was conducted to evaluate lighting energy savings of split-pane electrochromic (EC) windows controlled to satisfy key visual comfort parameters. Using the Radiance lighting simulation software, interior illuminance and luminance levels were computed for a south-facing private office illuminated by a window split into two independently-controlled EC panes. The transmittance of these was optimized hourly for a workplane illuminance target while meeting visual comfort constraints, using a least-squares algorithm with linear inequality constraints. Blinds were successively deployed until visual comfort criteria were satisfied. The energy performance of electrochromics proved to be highly dependent on how blinds were controlled. With hourly blind position adjustments, electrochromics showed significantly higher (62percent and 53percent, respectively without and with overhang) lighting energy consumption than clear glass. With a control algorithm designed to better approximate realistic manual control by an occupant, electrochromics achieved significant savings (48percent and 37percent, respectively without and with overhang). In all cases, energy consumption decreased when the workplace illuminance target was increased. In addition, the fraction of time during which the occupant had an unobstructed view of the outside was significantly greater with electrochromics: 10 months out of the year versus a handful of days for the reference case.

  10. Energy transfer pathways in semiconducting carbon nanotubes revealed using two-dimensional white-light spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlenbacher, Randy D; McDonough, Thomas J; Grechko, Maksim; Wu, Meng-Yin; Arnold, Michael S; Zanni, Martin T

    2015-04-13

    Thin film networks of highly purified semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being explored for energy harvesting and optoelectronic devices because of their exceptional transport and optical properties. The nanotubes in these films are in close contact, which permits energy to flow through the films, although the pathways and mechanisms for energy transfer are largely unknown. Here we use a broadband continuum to collect femtosecond two-dimensional white-light spectra. The continuum spans 500 to 1,300 nm, resolving energy transfer between all combinations of bandgap (S1) and higher (S2) transitions. We observe ultrafast energy redistribution on the S2 states, non-Förster energy transfer on the S1 states and anti-correlated energy levels. The two-dimensional spectra reveal competing pathways for energy transfer, with S2 excitons taking routes depending on the bandgap separation, whereas S1 excitons relax independent of the bandgap. These observations provide a basis for understanding and ultimately controlling the photophysics of energy flow in CNT-based devices.

  11. Possibility of cost effective and energy efficient high-quality natural white light sources with new nano-phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Dilip K.; Olukunle, Olawole C.; Iorkyaa, Ahemen; Willoughby, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we present results authors published initially on the white light emission with broad band (330-465 nm) excitation of the specially prepared nano-phosphor: Eu3+: ZnS which is capped with sodium methyl carboxylate and on pure red-light emission from the nano-phosphor when capped with alpha methyl acrylic acid and prepared in a different method. Then we discuss possible methods of future improvement of the white light emission from the nano-phosphor. We then present the cost effective and energy efficient method of obtaining highest quality natural white light sources using such nano-phosphor and blue or near UV blue light emitting diodes. The latter discussion includes the driving circuit for the white LED and powering the LED by concentrated solar photovoltaics for both lighting and waste heat energy storage for completely clean energy natural white lighting sources.

  12. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Light Metals Permanent Mold Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasoyinu, Yemi [CanmetMATERIALS

    2014-03-31

    Current vehicles use mostly ferrous components for structural applications. It is possible to reduce the weight of the vehicle by substituting these parts with those made from light metals such as aluminum and magnesium. Many alloys and manufacturing processes can be used to produce these light metal components and casting is known to be most economical. One of the high integrity casting processes is permanent mold casting which is the focus of this research report. Many aluminum alloy castings used in automotive applications are produced by the sand casting process. Also, aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloys are the most widely used alloy systems for automotive applications. It is possible that by using high strength aluminum alloys based on an aluminum-copper (Al-Cu) system and permanent mold casting, the performance of these components can be enhanced significantly. This will also help to further reduce the weight. However, many technological obstacles need to be overcome before using these alloys in automotive applications in an economical way. There is very limited information in the open literature on gravity and low-pressure permanent mold casting of high strength aluminum alloys. This report summarizes the results and issues encountered during the casting trials of high strength aluminum alloy 206.0 (Al-Cu alloy) and moderate strength alloy 535.0 (Al-Mg alloy). Five engineering components were cast by gravity tilt-pour or low pressure permanent mold casting processes at CanmetMATERIALS (CMAT) and two production foundries. The results of the casting trials show that high integrity engineering components can be produced successfully from both alloys if specific processing parameters are used. It was shown that a combination of melt processing and mold temperature is necessary for the elimination of hot tears in both alloys.

  13. Predictive control strategies for energy saving of hybrid electric vehicles based on traffic light information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaijiang YU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As the conventional control method for hybrid electric vehicle doesn’t consider the effect of known traffic light information on the vehicle energy management, this paper proposes a model predictive control intelligent optimization strategies based on traffic light information for hybrid electric vehicles. By building the simplified model of the hybrid electric vehicle and adopting the continuation/generalized minimum residual method, the model prediction problem is solved. The simulation is conducted by using MATLAB/Simulink platform. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed model of the traffic light information, and that the proposed model predictive control method can improve fuel economy and the real-time control performance significantly. The research conclusions show that the proposed control strategy can achieve optimal control of the vehicle trajectory, significantly improving fuel economy of the vehicle, and meet the system requirements for the real-time optimal control.

  14. Subluminal and superluminal light propagation in a superconducting quantum circuit via Josephson coupling energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamedi, H.R., E-mail: hamid.r.hamedi@gmail.com

    2015-05-15

    We investigate the dispersion-group index, as well as the transmission coefficient properties of a weak probe field in a superconducting quantum circuit with a tunable V-type artificial molecule constructed by two superconducting Josephson charge qubits coupled with each other through a superconducting quantum interference device. It is realized that the slope of dispersion can be changed from negative to positive or vice versa through the ratio of the Josephson coupling energy to the capacitive coupling strength which provides an extra controlling parameter for controlling the slope of dispersion. The temporal behavior of the probe dispersion and the required switching time for switching the superluminal light propagation to the subluminal light propagation are also discussed. The results may be useful for understanding the switching feature of slow light-based systems and have potential application in optical information processing.

  15. Subluminal and superluminal light propagation in a superconducting quantum circuit via Josephson coupling energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, H. R.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the dispersion-group index, as well as the transmission coefficient properties of a weak probe field in a superconducting quantum circuit with a tunable V-type artificial molecule constructed by two superconducting Josephson charge qubits coupled with each other through a superconducting quantum interference device. It is realized that the slope of dispersion can be changed from negative to positive or vice versa through the ratio of the Josephson coupling energy to the capacitive coupling strength which provides an extra controlling parameter for controlling the slope of dispersion. The temporal behavior of the probe dispersion and the required switching time for switching the superluminal light propagation to the subluminal light propagation are also discussed. The results may be useful for understanding the switching feature of slow light-based systems and have potential application in optical information processing.

  16. Effects of a power and photon energy of incident light on near-field etching properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsui, T.; Saito, H.; Nishioka, K.; Leuschel, B.; Soppera, O.; Nobusada, K.

    2017-12-01

    We developed a near-field etching technique for realizing an ultra-flat surfaces of various materials and structures. To elucidate the near-field etching properties, we have investigated the effects of power and the photon energy of the incident light. First, we established theoretically that an optical near-field with photon energy lower than the absorption edge of the molecules can induce molecular vibrations. We used nanodiamonds to study the power dependence of the near-field etching properties. From the topological changes of the nanodiamonds, we confirmed the linear-dependence of the etching volume with the incident power. Furthermore, we studied the photon energy dependence using TiO2 nanostriped structures, which revealed that a lower photon energy results in a lower etching rate.

  17. The low energy frontier: searches for ultra-light particles beyond the Standard Model

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    In the recent years theoretical studies and astrophysical observations have confirmed that unknown constituents of our universe like dark matter may find its explanation not only at large-scale experiments at highest energies, but could also show up at the opposite energy scale. In many laboratories world-wide searches for axions, axion-like particles, hidden photons, chameleons or other so-called WISPs with masses below the eV scale are ongoing. Examples at DESY are the experiments ALPS ("Any Light Particle Search") and SHIPS ("Solar HIdden Photon Search"). At CERN CAST and OSQAR take data. In all these experiments new particles could manifest themselves in a very spectacular manner. Light would apparently shine through thickest walls. The results of a first generation of laboratory and astrophysics experiments will be summarized and plans for future enterprises be discussed

  18. Alleviating Energy Poverty through innovation: The case of Jyotigram Yojana (rural lighting scheme) of Gujarat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Pramod Kumar

    2010-09-15

    Access to electricity is important for alleviation energy poverty in rural areas of developing countries. In spite of rural electrification schemes people in numerous villages do not have access to electricity because of inadequate and erratic power supply. The Jyotigram Yojana (Rural Lighting Scheme) of Gujarat in India transformed the rural electricity distribution scenario creating immense opportunities for socio-economic development. It shows how vision and political will can transcend the boundaries of technical and financial expertise and systemic rigidities, and facilitate successful adoption of simple but innovative approaches for alleviation of energy poverty and bringing about socio-economic development.

  19. Energy-recycling pixel for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Che-Yu; Cho, Ting-Yi; Chen, Yen-Yu; Yang, Chih-Jen; Meng, Chao-Yu; Yang, Chieh-Hung; Yang, Po-Chuan; Chang, Hsu-Yu; Hsueh, Chun-Yuan; Wu, Chung-Chih; Lee, Si-Chen

    2007-06-01

    The authors report a pixel structure for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays that has a hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cell inserted between the driving polycrystalline Si thin-film transistor and the pixel OLED. Such an active-matrix OLED pixel structure not only exhibits a reduced reflection (and thus improved contrast) compared to conventional OLEDs but also is capable of recycling both incident photon energies and internally generated OLED radiation. Such a feature of energy recycling may be of use for portable/mobile electronics, which are particularly power aware.

  20. Pulsed ion hall accelerator for investigation of reactions between light nuclei in the astrophysical energy range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystritsky, V. M.; Bystritsky, Vit. M.; Dudkin, G. N.; Nechaev, B. A.; Padalko, V. N.

    2017-07-01

    The factors defining the constraints on the current characteristics of the magnetically insulated ion diode (IDM) are considered. The specific current parameters close to the maximum possible ones are obtained for the particular IDM-40 design assigned for acceleration of light ions and investigation of nuclear reactions with small cross sections in the astrophysical energy range (2-40 keV) in the entrance channel. It is experimentally demonstrated that the chosen optimal operation conditions for IDM-40 units provide high stability of the parameters (energy distribution and composition of accelerated particle beams, degree of neutralization) of the accelerated particle flux, which increases during the working pulse.

  1. Energy-autonomous wake-up receiver using solar panel and visible light communication

    OpenAIRE

    Sariol Ramos, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    One of the most promising energy-efficient communication methods is the use of wake-up receivers. In this work, we will develop a novel wake-up communication system that uses Visual Light Communication (VLC) and an indoor solar panel as the receiver of the wake-up signal. After the reception of the wake-up signal, an interrupt generated by the wake-up receiver wakes up the wireless device attached. The use of wake-up communication systems is a potential energy-efficient and low-cost soluti...

  2. Measurement of light and charge yield of low-energy electronic recoils in liquid xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzke, L. W.; Aprile, E.; Anthony, M.; Plante, G.; Weber, M.

    2017-11-01

    The dependence of the light and charge yield of liquid xenon on the applied electric field and recoil energy is important for dark matter detectors using liquid xenon time projections chambers. Few measurements have been made of this field dependence at recoil energies less than 10 keV. In this paper, we present results of such measurements using a specialized detector. Recoil energies are determined via the Compton coincidence technique at four drift fields relevant for liquid xenon dark matter detectors: 0.19, 0.48, 1.02, and 2.32 kV /cm . Mean recoil energies down to 1 keV were measured with unprecedented precision. We find that the charge and light yield are anticorrelated above ˜3 keV and that the field dependence becomes negligible below ˜6 keV . However, below 3 keV, we find a charge yield significantly higher than expectation and a reconstructed energy deviating from linearity.

  3. An empirical study on energy efficiency improvement through photovoltaic systems and a LED lighting control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Kwan; Lee, Jae Hyeong

    2015-09-01

    In this research, a facility was constructed and its performance was analyzed to improve the energy efficiency of a vertical-type water treatment building. After the design and construction of a fixed tilt Photovoltaic in Building (PVIB) on the rooftop using a crystalline silicon solar cell module and photovoltaic generator integrated with the building by using a Building Integrated Photovoltaic System (BIPV), a thin-film module on the rooftop and outer wall of water treatment building, and the generation efficiency was analyzed. Also, a DC distribution was established for use of a brushless DC (BLDC) pump motor, and the existing lighting-facility-based manual on-off method was turned into a system for energy conservation by controlling light emitting diode (LED) through a wireless motion sensor and dimming control. In addition, a Building Energy Management System (BEMS) for a real-time analysis of the energy efficiency for a vertical0type water treatment building was prepared and tested. The vertical-type water treatment building developed in this study is currently operating the BEMS. The vertical-type water treatment building reported in this paper is expected to reduce energy consumption by about 30% compared to existing water treatment systems.

  4. Optoelectronic energy transfer at novel biohybrid interfaces using light harvesting complexes from Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Arati; Muthuswamy, Jit; Pizziconi, Vincent B

    2009-06-02

    In nature, nanoscale supramolecular light harvesting complexes initiate the photosynthetic energy collection process at high quantum efficiencies. In this study, the distinctive antenna structure from Chloroflexus aurantiacusthe chlorosomeis assessed for potential exploitation in novel biohybrid optoelectronic devices. Electrochemical characterization of bacterial fragments containing intact chlorosomes with the photosynthetic apparatus show an increase in the charge storage density near the working electrode upon light stimulation and suggest that chlorosomes contribute approximately one-third of the overall photocurrent. Further, isolated chlorosomes (without additional photosynthetic components, e.g., reaction centers, biochemical mediators) produce a photocurrent (approximately 8-10 nA) under light saturation conditions. Correlative experiments indicate that the main chlorosome pigment, bacteriochlorophyll-c, contributes to the photocurrent via an oxidative mechanism. The results reported herein are the first to demonstrate that isolated chlorosomes (lipid-enclosed sacs of pigments) directly transduce light energy in an electrochemical manner, laying an alternative, biomimetic approach for designing photosensitized interfaces in biofuel cells and biomedical devices, such as bioenhanced retinal prosthetics.

  5. Conversion and conservation of light energy in a photosynthetic microbial mat ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Najjar, A.A.; De Beer, D.; Jørgensen, B. B.

    2011-01-01

    Here we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first balanced light energy budget for a benthic microbial mat ecosystem, and show how the budget and the spatial distribution of the local photosynthetic efficiencies within the euphotic zone depend on the absorbed irradiance (J(abs)). Our...... with intense absorption and scattering. Furthermore, our analysis has promising applications in other areas of photosynthesis research, such as plant biology and biotechnology....

  6. Light quark energy loss in strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesler, Paul M.; Jensen, Kristan; Karch, Andreas; Yaffe, Laurence G.

    2009-06-01

    We compute the penetration depth of a light quark moving through a large Nc, strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma using gauge/gravity duality and a combination of analytic and numerical techniques. We find that the maximum distance a quark with energy E can travel through a plasma is given by Δxmax⁡(E)=(C/T)(E/Tλ)1/3 with C≈0.5.

  7. Investigating students’ mental models about the quantization of light, energy, and angular momentum

    OpenAIRE

    Nilüfer Didiş; Ali Eryılmaz; Şakir Erkoç

    2014-01-01

    This paper is the first part of a multiphase study examining students’ mental models about the quantization of physical observables—light, energy, and angular momentum. Thirty-one second-year physics and physics education college students who were taking a modern physics course participated in the study. The qualitative analysis of data revealed six variations in students’ mental models about the quantization of physical observables: scientific model, primitive scientific model, shredding mod...

  8. Conservation and dissipation of light energy in desiccation-tolerant photoautotrophs, two sides of the same coin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heber, Ulrich

    2012-09-01

    Conservation of light energy in photosynthesis is possible only in hydrated photoautotrophs. It requires complex biochemistry and is limited in capacity. Charge separation in reaction centres of photosystem II initiates energy conservation but opens also the path to photooxidative damage. A main mechanism of photoprotection active in hydrated photoautotrophs is controlled by light. This is achieved by coupling light flux to the protonation of a special thylakoid protein which activates thermal energy dissipation. This mechanism facilitates the simultaneous occurrence of energy conservation and energy dissipation but cannot completely prevent damage by light. Continuous metabolic repair is required to compensate damage. More efficient photoprotection is needed by desiccation-tolerant photoautotrophs. Loss of water during desiccation activates ultra-fast energy dissipation in mosses and lichens. Desiccation-induced energy dissipation neither requires a protonation reaction nor light but photoprotection often increases when light is present during desiccation. Two different mechanisms contribute to photoprotection of desiccated photoautotrophs. One facilitates energy dissipation in the antenna of photosystem II which is faster than energy capture by functional reaction centres. When this is insufficient for full photoprotection, the other one permits energy dissipation in the reaction centres themselves.

  9. Design a light pattern of multiple concentric circles for LED fishing lamps using Fourier series and an energy mapping method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, S C; Li, J S; Huang, M C

    2014-06-02

    Fourier series and an energy mapping method were used in this study to design a lens that produces a light pattern of multiple concentric circles (LPMCC) for a light-emitting diode (LED) fishing lamp. Fourier series were used to represent the light intensity distribution curve (LIDC) of the LPMCC light pattern. Energy mapping involves performing angular energy mapping based on the LIDCs of an LED light source and LPMCC to design a freeform lens. Type I and Type II LPMCC lenses were designed according to the phototaxis behavior of fish to create a LPMCC light pattern of interleaving light-dark zones that attracts fish shoals to stay in an area for a long period. The experimental results indicated that, in comparing the LIDCs of the Type I and II lenses with the respective simulation values, the normalized cross-correlation (NCC) value reached 96%. According to a 24-hour observation of the phototaxis of Poecilia reticulata to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed light pattern to attract fish, when a fish shoal was habituated to a light source that emitted constant illumination light, it gradually moved away from the intense light zone and hovered around the junction of the light and dark zones. In the future, the design used in this study can be applied to LED fishing lamps to replace traditional fishing lamps.

  10. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Ditchburn, R W

    1963-01-01

    This classic study, available for the first time in paperback, clearly demonstrates how quantum theory is a natural development of wave theory, and how these two theories, once thought to be irreconcilable, together comprise a single valid theory of light. Aimed at students with an intermediate-level knowledge of physics, the book first offers a historical introduction to the subject, then covers topics such as wave theory, interference, diffraction, Huygens' Principle, Fermat's Principle, and the accuracy of optical measurements. Additional topics include the velocity of light, relativistic o

  11. The health risks associated with energy efficient fluorescent, LEDs, and artificial lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahi, Allen

    2014-09-01

    With the phasing out of incandescent lamps in many countries, the introduction of new LED based light sources and luminaries sometimes raise the question of whether the spectral characteristics of the LED and other energy savings Fluorescent lights including the popular CFLs are suitable to replace the traditional incandescent lamps. These concerns are sometimes raised particularly for radiation emissions in the UV and Blue parts of the spectrum. This paper aims to address such concerns for the common `white light' sources typically used in household and other general lighting used in the work place. Recent studies have shown that women working the night shift have an increased probability of developing breast cancer. We like to report on the findings of many studies done by medical professionals, in particular the recent announcement of AMA in the US and many studies conducted in the UK, as well as the European community to increase public awareness on the long term health risks of the optical and opto-biological effects on the human health caused by artificial lighting.

  12. Engineering Designed Proteins for Light Capture, Energy Transfer, and Emissive Sensing In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Joshua A.

    Proteins that are used for photosynthetic light harvesting and biological signaling are critical to life. These types of proteins act as scaffolds that hold small, sometimes metal-containing organic molecules in precise locations for light absorption and successive use. For signaling proteins, this energy can be used to induce a photoisomerization of the small molecule that can turn on or off a signaling cascade that controls the physiology of an organism. Alternatively, photosynthetic light-harvesting proteins funnel this energy in a directional manner towards a charge separating catalytic component that can change this light energy into chemical energy. The protein environment also serves to tune the photophysical properties of the small molecules. This is seen extensively with the linear tetrapyrroles that are used in both photosynthetic and signaling proteins. Many efforts have been made to harness these natural proteins for societal use, including improving photophysical properties and interfacing capabilities with manmade catalytic components. Several methods of achieving improvement have entailed structurally guided mutation and directed evolution. However, these methods all have their limitations due to the inherent complexity and fragility of the natural proteins. This work presents an alternative more robust method to natural proteins. My thesis states: that man-made proteins, known as maquettes, employing basic rules of protein folding, can be designed to become light harvesting and signaling proteins that can be assembled fully in vivo providing an alternative, robust, and versatile platform for meeting the diverse array of societal "green chemistry" and biomedical needs. This in vivo assembly is carried out by interacting with cyanobacterial protein and pigment machinery, both as stand-alone units and as protein fusions with natural antenna complexes. Additionally, this work offers insight for fast and tight binding of circular and linear tetrapyrroles

  13. Contributions of artificial lighting sources on light pollution in Hong Kong measured through a night sky brightness monitoring network

    OpenAIRE

    Pun, Chun Shing Jason; So, Chu Wing; Leung, Wai Yan; Wong, Chung Fai

    2014-01-01

    Light pollution is a form of environmental degradation in which excessive artificial outdoor lighting, such as street lamps, neon signs, and illuminated signboards, affects the natural environment and the ecosystem. Poorly designed outdoor lighting not only wastes energy, money, and valuable Earth resources, but also robs us of our beautiful night sky. Effects of light pollution on the night sky can be evaluated by the skyglow caused by these artificial lighting sources, through measurements ...

  14. Excessive Daytime Sleepiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz Selvi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Excessive daytime sleepiness is one of the most common sleep-related patient symptoms, with preva-lence in the community estimated to be as high as 18%. Patients with excessive daytime sleepiness may exhibit life threatening road and work accidents, social maladjustment, decreased academic and occupational performance and have poorer health than comparable adults. Thus, excessive daytime sleepiness is a serious condition that requires investigation, diagnosis and treatment primarily. As with most medical condition, evaluation of excessive daytime sleepiness begins a precise history and various objective and subjective tools have been also developed to assess excessive daytime sleepiness. The most common causes of excessive daytime sleepiness are insufficient sleep hygiene, chronic sleep deprivation, medical and psychiatric conditions and sleep disorders, such as obstructive sleep apnea, medications, and narcolepsy. Treatment option should address underlying contributors and promote sleep quantity by ensuring good sleep hygiene. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(2: 114-132

  15. Efficient energy transfer in light-harvesting systems, I: optimal temperature, reorganization energy and spatial-temporal correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Jianlan; Liu Fan; Shen Young; Cao Jianshu; Silbey, Robert J, E-mail: jianshu@mit.ed, E-mail: silbey@mit.ed [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Understanding the mechanisms of efficient and robust energy transfer in light-harvesting systems provides new insights for the optimal design of artificial systems. In this paper, we use the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein complex and phycocyanin 645 (PC 645) to explore the general dependence on physical parameters that help maximize the efficiency and maintain its stability. With the Haken-Strobl model, the maximal energy transfer efficiency (ETE) is achieved under an intermediate optimal value of dephasing rate. To avoid the infinite temperature assumption in the Haken-Strobl model and the failure of the Redfield equation in predicting the Forster rate behavior, we use the generalized Bloch-Redfield (GBR) equation approach to correctly describe dissipative exciton dynamics, and we find that maximal ETE can be achieved under various physical conditions, including temperature, reorganization energy and spatial-temporal correlations in noise. We also identify regimes of reorganization energy where the ETE changes monotonically with temperature or spatial correlation and therefore cannot be optimized with respect to these two variables.

  16. Holidays in lights: Tracking cultural patterns in demand for energy services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, Miguel O.; Stokes, Eleanor C.

    2015-06-01

    Successful climate change mitigation will involve not only technological innovation, but also innovation in how we understand the societal and individual behaviors that shape the demand for energy services. Traditionally, individual energy behaviors have been described as a function of utility optimization and behavioral economics, with price restructuring as the dominant policy lever. Previous research at the macro-level has identified economic activity, power generation and technology, and economic role as significant factors that shape energy use. However, most demand models lack basic contextual information on how dominant social phenomenon, the changing demographics of cities, and the sociocultural setting within which people operate, affect energy decisions and use patterns. Here we use high-quality Suomi-NPP VIIRS nighttime environmental products to: (1) observe aggregate human behavior through variations in energy service demand patterns during the Christmas and New Year's season and the Holy Month of Ramadan and (2) demonstrate that patterns in energy behaviors closely track sociocultural boundaries at the country, city, and district level. These findings indicate that energy decision making and demand is a sociocultural process as well as an economic process, often involving a combination of individual price-based incentives and societal-level factors. While nighttime satellite imagery has been used to map regional energy infrastructure distribution, tracking daily dynamic lighting demand at three major scales of urbanization is novel. This methodology can enrich research on the relative importance of drivers of energy demand and conservation behaviors at fine scales. Our initial results demonstrate the importance of seating energy demand frameworks in a social context.

  17. Holiday in Lights: Tracking Cultural Patterns in Demand for Energy Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Miguel O.; Stokes, Eleanor C.

    2015-01-01

    Successful climate change mitigation will involve not only technological innovation, but also innovation in how we understand the societal and individual behaviors that shape the demand for energy services. Traditionally, individual energy behaviors have been described as a function of utility optimization and behavioral economics, with price restructuring as the dominant policy lever. Previous research at the macro-level has identified economic activity, power generation and technology, and economic role as significant factors that shape energy use. However, most demand models lack basic contextual information on how dominant social phenomenon, the changing demographics of cities, and the sociocultural setting within which people operate, affect energy decisions and use patterns. Here we use high-quality Suomi-NPP VIIRS nighttime environmental products to: (1) observe aggregate human behavior through variations in energy service demand patterns during the Christmas and New Year's season and the Holy Month of Ramadan and (2) demonstrate that patterns in energy behaviors closely track sociocultural boundaries at the country, city, and district level. These findings indicate that energy decision making and demand is a sociocultural process as well as an economic process, often involving a combination of individual price-based incentives and societal-level factors. While nighttime satellite imagery has been used to map regional energy infrastructure distribution, tracking daily dynamic lighting demand at three major scales of urbanization is novel. This methodology can enrich research on the relative importance of drivers of energy demand and conservation behaviors at fine scales. Our initial results demonstrate the importance of seating energy demand frameworks in a social context.

  18. Light, nutrients, and food-chain length constrain planktonic energy transfer efficiency across multiple trophic levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, Elizabeth M; Newell, Jennifer M; González, María J; Vanni, Michael J

    2008-11-25

    The efficiency of energy transfer through food chains [food chain efficiency (FCE)] is an important ecosystem function. It has been hypothesized that FCE across multiple trophic levels is constrained by the efficiency at which herbivores use plant energy, which depends on plant nutritional quality. Furthermore, the number of trophic levels may also constrain FCE, because herbivores are less efficient in using plant production when they are constrained by carnivores. These hypotheses have not been tested experimentally in food chains with 3 or more trophic levels. In a field experiment manipulating light, nutrients, and food-chain length, we show that FCE is constrained by algal food quality and food-chain length. FCE across 3 trophic levels (phytoplankton to carnivorous fish) was highest under low light and high nutrients, where algal quality was best as indicated by taxonomic composition and nutrient stoichiometry. In 3-level systems, FCE was constrained by the efficiency at which both herbivores and carnivores converted food into production; a strong nutrient effect on carnivore efficiency suggests a carryover effect of algal quality across 3 trophic levels. Energy transfer efficiency from algae to herbivores was also higher in 2-level systems (without carnivores) than in 3-level systems. Our results support the hypothesis that FCE is strongly constrained by light, nutrients, and food-chain length and suggest that carryover effects across multiple trophic levels are important. Because many environmental perturbations affect light, nutrients, and food-chain length, and many ecological services are mediated by FCE, it will be important to apply these findings to various ecosystem types.

  19. Light dark sector searches at low-energy high-luminosity e + e - colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Peng-Fei; Zhu, Shou-Hua

    2016-10-01

    Although the standard model (SM) is extremely successful, there are various motivations for considering the physics beyond the SM. For example, the SM includes neither dark energy nor dark matter, which has been confirmed through astrophysical observations. Examination of the dark sector, which contains new, light, weakly-coupled particles at the GeV scale or lower, is well motivated by both theory and dark-matter detection experiments. In this mini-review, we focus on one particular case in which these new particles can interact with SM particles through a kinematic mixing term between U(1) gauge bosons. The magnitude of the mixing can be parameterized by a parameter є. Following a brief overview of the relevant motivations and the constraints determined from numerous experiments, we focus on the light dark sector phenomenology at low-energy high-luminosity e + e - colliders. These colliders are ideal for probing the new light particles, because of their large production rates and capacity for precise resonance reconstruction. Depending on the details of a given model, the typical observed signatures may also contain multi lepton pairs, displaced vertices, and/or missing energy. Through the use of extremely large data samples from existing experiments, such as KLOE, CLEO, BABAR, Belle, and BESIII, the magnitude of the mixing can be parameterized by a parameter є < 10-4-10-3 constraint can be obtained. Obviously, future experiments with larger datasets will provide opportunities for the discovery of new particles in the dark sector, or for stricter upper limits on є. Once the light dark sector is confirmed, the particle physics landscape will be changed significantly.

  20. Does lighting fit in an energy efficient cultivation of peppers?; Past belichting in een energiezuinige paprikateelt?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieleman, J.A.; Kempkes, F.L.K.; Elings, A. [Plant Research International PRI, Wageningen (Netherlands); Esmeijer, M.H.; Houter, G. [Praktijkonderzoek Plant en Omgeving, PPO Glastuinbouw, Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2006-04-15

    In 2004 the Wageningen University and Research Centre made an analysis of the cultivation strategy of three sweet pepper growers with low energy use, i.e. approximately 33 m{sup 3} gas per m{sup 2} annually. The main characteristics of their cultivation concept are that cultivation takes place at a relatively low temperature with limited humidity regulation and steady climate transitions. This research projects examined to what extent assimilation lighting can be fitted in this energy efficient concept for sweet pepper. For this purpose interviews were held with three energy efficient sweet pepper growers who don't use assimilation lighting and with growers using assimilation lighting. Next, calculations were made with a greenhouse climate model and a crop cultivation model. Finally, the results were discussed with a group of sweet pepper growers using assimilation lighting. (mk) [Dutch] In 2004 is door Wageningen UR een analyse gemaakt van de teeltstrategie van drie paprikatelers met een laag energiegebruik, circa 33 m{sup 3} gas per m{sup 2} per jaar. De belangrijkste karakteristieken van hun teeltconcept zijn dat geteeld wordt bij een relatief lage temperatuur, dat er weinig op vocht geregeld wordt en dat er rustige klimaatovergangen aangelegd worden. In dit onderzoeksproject is nagegaan in hoeverre belichting in te passen is in dit energiezuinige teeltconcept voor paprika. Hiervoor zijn interviews gehouden met drie energiezuinige onbelichtende paprikatelers en met belichtende telers. Vervolgens zijn er berekeningen gedaan met een kasklimaatmodel en een gewasgroeimodel. Tenslotte zijn de resultaten besproken met een groep belichtende paprikatelers.

  1. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation.

  2. Quantum Dot Light-Emitting Devices: Beyond Alignment of Energy Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaiats, Gary; Ikeda, Shingo; Kinge, Sachin; Kamat, Prashant V

    2017-09-13

    Multinary semiconductor nanoparticles such as CuInS2, AgInS2, and the corresponding alloys with ZnS hold promise for designing future quantum dot light-emitting devices (QLED). The QLED architectures require matching of energy levels between the different electron and hole transport layers. In addition to energy level alignment, conductivity and charge transfer interactions within these layers determine the overall efficiency of QLED. By employing CuInS2-ZnS QDs we succeeded in fabricating red-emitting QLED using two different hole-transporting materials, polyvinylcarbazole and poly(4-butylphenyldiphenylamine). Despite the similarity of the HOMO-LUMO energy levels of these two hole transport materials, the QLED devices exhibit distinctly different voltage dependence. The difference in onset voltage and excited state interactions shows the complexity involved in selecting the hole transport materials for display devices.

  3. Can renewable energy turn Nigeria’s lights on? Briefing paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newsom, Chris

    2013-01-15

    Around 70 million Nigerians have no access to grid electricity. Reliable night-time lighting for households, for refrigeration, and affordable power for businesses would change many lives, and renewable energy has the potential to do this. But for solar power, hydropower and wind energy to be made available on a significant scale, government policy needs to change. Affordable loans to finance development and market growth for a range of installations, including solar thermal power, which shows major long-term potential for northern Nigeria, are essential. And government and non-government organisations must implement a strategy to increase understanding among individual consumers, business people and policymakers about the benefits of renewable energy.

  4. ON IMPROVING THE ENERGY SUPPLY OF BATCH DYEING APPARATUSES IN THE LIGHT INDUSTRY ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Romaniuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper offers the results of pinch analysis, thermodynamic analysis based on exergy method that determine the energy-supply efficacy enhancement variants for the processing equipment in the light industry finishing production as exemplified by the apparatuses of batch operation for textile dyeing. Scientifically substantiated improvement feasibility estimation for the Belarusian light industry enterprises thermo-technological production energy supply is of current concern and in demand in the existing economic situation. Exergy method allows obtaining the indicated estimation by the simplest and most logical way as against the other methods of thermodynamic analysis e.g. entropy method or employing the cycle theory. Pinch analysis employment not only allows verifying the estimation results but also points out the problem spots demanding cardinal changes and modernization. This complex approach renders possible outlining simple ways of energy saving in the existing technical systems of substance transformation, which is important under the conditions of operating production for successful handling the problem of lowering production costs. The example of the most widespread thermo-technological production of the light industry illustrates the above stated. For most enterprises of the republic, it remains problematic in many ways. The suggested ways of solving the problem are not exhaustive and offer evolutionary changes that secure economic indicators fitting the dictates of time and the enterprises capabilities. Another critical factor of the presented analysis and ways for thermo-technological energy supply improvement is that the proposed changes can realize on basis of the equipment that established a good reputation during continuous service in different productions and manufactured in the republic in working partnership with foreign design engineers. 

  5. Importance of light scattering properties of cloud particles on calculating the earth energy cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letu, H.; Nakajima, T. Y.; Nagao, T. M.; Ishimoto, H.

    2013-12-01

    The Earth is an open system, and the energy cycle of the Earth is not always a certain amount. In other words, the energy cycle in the nature is imbalance. A better understanding of the earth energy cycle is very important to study global climate change. the IPCC-AR4 reported that the cloud in the atmosphere are still characterized by large uncertainties in the estimation of their effects on energy sysle of the Earth's atmosphere. There are two types of cloud in the atmosphere, which are Cirrus and warm water cloud. In order to strongly reflect visible wavelength from sun light, thick water cloud has the effect of cooling the earth surface. When Cirrus is compared to water cloud, temperature is almost lower. Thus, there is a feature that Cirrus is easy to absorb long-wave radiation than warm water cloud. However, in order to quantitatively evaluate the reflection and absorption characteristics of cloud on remote senssing application and energy cycle of the imbalance of nature, it is necessary to obtain the scattering properties of cloud particles. Since the shapes of the water cloud particle are close to spherical, scattering properties of the particles can be calculated accurately by the Mie theory. However, Cirrus particles have a complex shape, including hexagonal, plate, and other non- spherical shapes. Different from warm water cloud partical, it is required to use several different light scattering methods when calculating the light scattering properties of the non-spherical Cirrus cloud particals. Ishimoto et al. [2010, 2012] and Masuda et al. [2012] developed the Finite-Difference Time Domain method (FDTD) and Improved Geometrical-Optics Method (IGOM) for the solution of light scattering by non-spherical particles. Nakajima et al [1997,2009] developed the LIght Scattering solver for Arbitral Shape particle (Lisas)-Geometrical-Optics Method (GOM) and Surface Integral Equations Method of Müller-type (SIEMM) to calculate the light scattering properties for

  6. Basic Research Needs for Solid-State Lighting. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solid-State Lighting, May 22-24, 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J. M.; Burrows, P. E.; Davis, R. F.; Simmons, J. A.; Malliaras, G. G.; So, F.; Misewich, J.A.; Nurmikko, A. V.; Smith, D. L.; Tsao, J. Y.; Kung, H.; Crawford, M. H.; Coltrin, M. E.; Fitzsimmons, T. J.; Kini, A.; Ashton, C.; Herndon, B.; Kitts, S.; Shapard, L.; Brittenham, P. W.; Vittitow, M. P.

    2006-05-24

    The workshop participants enthusiastically concluded that the time is ripe for new fundamental science to beget a revolution in lighting technology. SSL sources based on organic and inorganic materials have reached a level of efficiency where it is possible to envision their use for general illumination. The research areas articulated in this report are targeted to enable disruptive advances in SSL performance and realization of this dream. Broad penetration of SSL technology into the mass lighting market, accompanied by vast savings in energy usage, requires nothing less. These new ?good ideas? will be represented not by light bulbs, but by an entirely new lighting technology for the 21st century and a bright, energy-efficient future indeed.

  7. Special features of radio control link for energy efficient LED light sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey V. Aladov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to reveal the special features of radio control link model in LR-WPAN under operating conditions of interference of the reflected and the line-of-sight component and to evaluate the radio link's range of positive light source control. The results of development and practical implementation of controlled spectrally tunable light emitting diode (LED light sources with ISM- and ZigBee (IEEE 802.15.04-based radio frequency transceivers are presented. A software application developed in LabVIEW simulation of a radio control link for light sources and used for evaluating the radio control link's range of various combinations of polarization of transmitting and receiving antennas has been discussed. It was established and experimentally verified that the received energy was able to be computed using the two-ray model: a line-of-sight ray and the reflected one. This approach is simpler as compared to cellular networks in which multiple reflections from various objects result in multi-path propagation without line-of-sight component.

  8. An Energy Efficient Lighting Design Strategy to Enhance Visual Comfort in Offices with Windows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Amirkhani

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A high luminance contrast between windows and surrounding surfaces can increase the risk of discomfort glare, which can diminish office workers’ satisfaction and productivity. Accordingly, it can lead to occupant interventions, such as drawing window blinds or increasing electric light levels, which are intended to enhance indoor visual comfort but counterproductively act to increase energy consumption. Increasing the luminance of the areas surrounding the windows using a supplementary lighting system, such as wall-washing with light emitting diode (LED linear luminaires, could reduce discomfort glare arising from windowed walls. This paper reports on the results of a study in a typical office room in Brisbane, Australia. The outcomes of this study indicate that creating a luminance contrast of between 11:1 and 12:1 on the window wall in an office room with a 45% window-to-exterior-wall ratio using a supplementary LED system leads to improved subjective assessments of window appearance. The results suggest that such an enhancement could significantly reduce discomfort glare from windows, as well as diminishing the likelihood of the users intending to turn on the ceiling lights or to move the blinds.

  9. Energy down converting organic fluorophore functionalized mesoporous silica hybrids for monolith-coated light emitting diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Börgardts

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The covalent attachment of organic fluorophores in mesoporous silica matrices for usage as energy down converting phosphors without employing inorganic transition or rare earth metals is reported in this article. Triethoxysilylpropyl-substituted derivatives of the blue emitting perylene, green emitting benzofurazane, and red emitting Nile red were synthesized and applied in the synthesis of mesoporous hybrid materials by postsynthetic grafting to commercially available MCM-41. These individually dye-functionalized hybrid materials are mixed in variable ratios to furnish a powder capable of emitting white light with CIE chromaticity coordinates of x = 0.33, y = 0.33 and an external quantum yield of 4.6% upon irradiation at 410 nm. Furthermore, as a proof of concept two different device setups of commercially available UV light emitting diodes, are coated with silica monoliths containing the three triethoxysilylpropyl-substituted fluorophore derivatives. These coatings are able to convert the emitted UV light into light with correlated color temperatures of very cold white (41100 K, 10700 K as well as a greenish white emission with correlated color temperatures of about 5500 K.

  10. Light energy attenuation through orthodontic ceramic brackets at different irradiation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Ario; Tiu, Szu Hui; McGuinness, Niall J P; Aldossary, Mohammed Saeed

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the total light energy (TLE) transmission through three types of ceramic brackets with, bracket alone and with the addition of orthodontic adhesive, at different exposure durations, and to compare the microhardness of the cured adhesive. Three different makes of ceramic brackets, Pure Sapphire(M), Clarity™ ADVANCED(P) and Dual Ceramic(P) were used. Eighteen specimens of each make were prepared and allocated to three groups (n = 6). MARC(®)-resin calibrator was used to determine the light curing unit (LCU) tip irradiance (mW/cm(2)) and TLE (J/cm(2)) transmitted through the ceramic brackets, and through ceramic bracket plus Transbond™ XT Light Cure Adhesive, for 5, 10 and 20 s. Vickers-hardness values at the bottom of the cured adhesive were determined. Statistical analysis used one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA); P = 0.05. TLE transmission rose significantly among all samples with increasing exposure durations. TLE reaching the adhesive- enamel interface was less than 10 J/cm(2), and through monocrystalline and polycrystalline ceramic brackets was significantly different (P brackets. Clinicians are advised to measure the tip irradiance of their LCUs and increase curing time beyond 5 s. Orthodontic clinicians should understand the type of light curing device and the orthodontic adhesive used in their practice.

  11. Energy dependence of acceptance-corrected dielectron excess mass spectrum at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN=19.6 and 200 GeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Adamczyk

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The acceptance-corrected dielectron excess mass spectra, where the known hadronic sources have been subtracted from the inclusive dielectron mass spectra, are reported for the first time at mid-rapidity |yee|<1 in minimum-bias Au+Au collisions at sNN=19.6 and 200 GeV. The excess mass spectra are consistently described by a model calculation with a broadened ρ spectral function for Mee<1.1 GeV/c2. The integrated dielectron excess yield at sNN=19.6 GeV for 0.4excess yield in central collisions is higher than that at sNN=17.3 GeV and increases from peripheral to central collisions. These measurements indicate that the lifetime of the hot, dense medium created in central Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV is longer than those in peripheral collisions and at lower energies.

  12. Light-harvesting host-guest antenna materials for solar energy conversion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Stefan; Calzaferri, Gion

    2006-04-01

    In natural photosynthesis, light is absorbed by photonic antenna systems consisting of a few hundred chlorophyll molecules. These devices allow fast energy transfer from an electronically excited molecule to an unexcited neighbour molecule in such a way that the excitation energy reaches the reaction centre with high probability. Trapping occurs there. The anisotropic arrangement of the chlorophyll molecules is important for efficient energy migration. In natural antennae the formation of aggregates is prevented by fencing the chlorophyll molecules in polypeptide cages. A similar approach is possible by enclosing dyes inside a microporous material and by choosing conditions such that the cavities are able to uptake only monomers but not aggregates. In most of our experiments we have been using zeolite L as a host because it was found to be very versatile. Its crystals are of cylindrical shape and consist of an extended one-dimensional tube system. They can be prepared in wide size range. We have filled the individual tubes with successive chains of different dye molecules and we have shown that photonic antenna materials can be prepared. Moreover, fluorescent dye molecules can be bound covalently to the channel entrances. Dependent on the spectral properties of these stopcock molecules, the electronic excitation energy is transported radiationless to the stopcock fixed at the ends of the nanochannels or injected from the stopcock to the dyes inside the zeolite. The radiationless energy migration is in competition with spontaneous emission, thermal deactivation, quenching, and photochemically induced degradation. Fast energy migration is therefore crucial for an efficient antenna material. - The supramolecular organization of the dyes inside the channels is a first stage of organization. It allows light harvesting within the volume of a dye-loaded zeolite L crystal and radiationless transport to both ends of the cylinder or from the ends to the centre. The second

  13. Noise-assisted energy transfer in quantum networks and light-harvesting complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, A W; Caruso, F; Huelga, S F; Plenio, M B [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069, Ulm (Germany); Datta, A, E-mail: alex.chin@uni-ulm.d [Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Imperial College London, 53 Exhibition Road, London SW7 2PG (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    We provide physically intuitive mechanisms for the effect of noise on excitation energy transfer (EET) in networks. Using these mechanisms of dephasing-assisted transport (DAT) in a hybrid basis of both excitons and sites, we develop a detailed picture of how noise enables energy transfer with efficiencies well above 90% across the Fenna-Matthew-Olson (FMO) complex, a type of light-harvesting molecule. We demonstrate explicitly how noise alters the pathways of energy transfer across the complex, suppressing ineffective pathways and facilitating direct ones to the reaction centre. We explain that the fundamental mechanisms underpinning DAT are expected to be robust with respect to the considered noise model but show that the specific details of the exciton-phonon coupling, which remain largely unknown in these type of complexes, and in particular the impact of non-Markovian effects, result in variations of dynamical features that should be amenable to experimental verification with current or planned technology. A detailed understanding of DAT in natural compounds could open up a new paradigm of 'noise-engineering' by which EET can be optimized in artificial light-harvesting structures.

  14. Efficient phosphorescent polymer light-emitting diodes by suppressing triplet energy back transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Shaolong; Yang, Chuluo; Qin, Jingui

    2012-07-21

    Phosphorescent polymer light-emitting diodes (PhPLEDs) are promising devices in flat panel displays and solid state lighting sources since they can combine the advantages of the high efficiency of electrophosphorescence and low-cost, large-scale manufacture by using a solution process. However, their efficiencies are generally much lower than those of small-molecule-based devices fabricated by using a thermal deposition approach. One of the major reasons for their low efficiency is that energy is lost by back transfer to a polymer host. This tutorial review gives a brief introduction to the fundamentals of PhPLEDs, and then highlights recent progress in the main approaches to suppress triplet energy back transfer from the phosphor to the polymer host towards realizing highly efficient PhPLEDs. The suppressing mechanisms are discussed, and the achievement of high device efficiencies are demonstrated. Emphasis is placed on the relationships between molecular structure, the extent of suppressing triplet energy back transfer, and device performance.

  15. Family sociodemographic characteristics as correlates of children's breakfast habits and weight status in eight European countries. The ENERGY (EuropeaN Energy balance Research to prevent excessive weight Gain among Youth) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manios, Yannis; Moschonis, George; Androutsos, Odysseas; Filippou, Christina; Van Lippevelde, Wendy; Vik, Froydis N; te Velde, Saskia J; Jan, Natasha; Dössegger, Alain; Bere, Elling; Molnar, Denes; Moreno, Luis A; Chinapaw, Mai J M; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Brug, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the associations of family sociodemographic characteristics with children's weight status and whether these potential associations are mediated by children's breakfast habits. A school-based survey among 10-12-year-old children was conducted in eight European countries. Children's weight and height were measured and breakfast habits and family sociodemographic characteristics were self-reported by 5444 children and their parents. International Obesity Task Force cut-off points were used to categorize children as overweight/obese or normal weight. Mediation analyses were used to test the potential mediating effect of children's breakfast consumption on the associations between family sociodemographic characteristics and children's overweight/obesity. Schools in eight European countries participating in the ENERGY (EuropeaN Energy balance Research to prevent excessive weight Gain among Youth) project. Children aged 10-12 years and their parents (n 5444). Children's reported daily breakfast consumption varied from 56 % in Slovenia to 92 % in Spain on weekdays and from 79 % in Greece to 93 % in Norway on weekends. Children of native parents, with both parents employed and with at least one parent having more than 14 years of education were more likely to consume breakfast daily and less likely to be overweight/obese. Finally, mediation analyses revealed that the association of parental nationality and parental educational status with children's overweight/obesity was partially mediated by children's daily breakfast consumption. The study shows that the lower likelihood of being overweight/obese among 10-12-year-old children of native background and higher parental educational status was partially mediated by children's daily breakfast consumption.

  16. Light yield and energy resolution studies for SoLid phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boursette, Delphine; SoLid Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The SoLid experiment is searching for sterile neutrinos at a nuclear research reactor. It looks for inverse beta decays (producing a positron and a neutron in delayed coincidence) with a very segmented detector made of thousands of scintillating cubes. SoLid has a very innovative hybrid technology with two different scintillators which have different light emissions: polyvynil-toluene cubes (PVT) to detect the positrons and 6LiF:ZnS sheets on two faces of each PVT cube to detect the neutrons. It allows us to do an efficient pulse shape analysis to identify the signals from neutrons and positrons. The 288 kg detector prototype (SM1) took data in 2015. It demonstrated the detection principle and background rejection efficiency. The construction of SoLid phase I (˜ 1.5 t) has now started. To improve the energy resolution of SoLid phase I, we have tried to increase the light yield studying separately the two scintillators: PVT and ZnS. A test bench has been built to fully characterize and improve the neutron detection with the ZnS using an AmBe source. To study the positron light yield on the PVT, we have built another test bench with a 207Bi source. We have improved the design of the cubes, their wrapping or the type and the configuration of the fibers. We managed to increase the PVT light yield by about 66 % and improve the resolution of the positron energy on the test bench from 21 % to 16 % at 1 MeV.

  17. A theoretical investigation of symmetry-origin unidirectional energy gradient in light-harvesting dendrimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda, Shin-ichi

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically investigate a possibility that the symmetry of the repetitively branched structure of light-harvesting dendrimers creates the energy gradient descending toward inner generations (layers of pigment molecules) of the dendrimers. In the first half of this paper, we define a model system using the Frenkel exciton Hamiltonian that focuses only on the topology of dendrimers and numerically show that excitation energy tends to gather at inner generations of the model system at a thermal equilibrium state. This indicates that an energy gradient is formed in the model system. In the last half, we attribute this result to the symmetry of the model system and propose two symmetry-origin mechanisms creating the energy gradient. The present analysis and proposition are based on the theory of the linear chain (LC) decomposition [S. Koda, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 204112 (2015)], which equivalently transforms the model system into a set of one-dimensional systems on the basis of the symmetry of dendrimers. In the picture of the LC decomposition, we find that energy gradient is formed both in each linear chain and among linear chains, and these two mechanisms explain the numerical results well.

  18. Aerobic, anaerobic, and excess postexercise oxygen consumption energy expenditure of muscular endurance and strength: 1-set of bench press to muscular fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Christopher B; Leighton, Brian H; Ahearn, Kelly J; McManus, James J

    2011-04-01

    We use a new approach to the estimation of energy expenditure for resistance training involving nonsteady state measures of work (weight × displacement), exercise O2 uptake, blood lactate, and recovery O2 uptake; all lifts were performed to muscular failure. Our intent was to estimate and compare absolute and relative aerobic and anaerobic exercise energy expenditure and recovery energy expenditure. Single-set bench press lifts of ∼ 37, ∼ 46, and ∼ 56% (muscular endurance-type exercise) along with 70, 80, and 90% (strength-type exercise) of a 1 repetition maximum were performed. Collectively, the muscular endurance lifts resulted in larger total energy expenditure (60.2 ± 14.5 kJ) as compared with the strength lifts (43.2 ± 12.5 kJ) (p = 0.001). Overall work also was greater for muscular endurance (462 ± 131 J) as opposed to strength (253 ± 93 J) (p = 0.001); overall work and energy expenditure were related (r = 0.87, p = 0.001). Anaerobic exercise and recovery energy expenditure were significantly larger for all strength lifts as compared with aerobic exercise energy expenditure (p anaerobic energy expenditure was larger than recovery energy expenditure (p exercise energy expenditure (p anaerobic and recovery energy expenditure contributions can be significantly larger than aerobic energy expenditure during the exercise. To our surprise, recovery energy expenditure was similar both within strength and muscular-endurance protocols and between protocols; moreover, recovery energy expenditure had little to no relationship with aerobic and anaerobic exercise energy expenditure or work.

  19. Diphoton excess through dark mediators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chien-Yi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria,Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,Waterloo, ON N2J 2W9 (Canada); Lefebvre, Michel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria,Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); Pospelov, Maxim [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria,Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,Waterloo, ON N2J 2W9 (Canada); Zhong, Yi-Ming [C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stony Brook University,Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States)

    2016-07-12

    Preliminary ATLAS and CMS results from the first 13 TeV LHC run have encountered an intriguing excess of events in the diphoton channel around the invariant mass of 750 GeV. We investigate a possibility that the current excess is due to a heavy resonance decaying to light metastable states, which in turn give displaced decays to very highly collimated e{sup +}e{sup −} pairs. Such decays may pass the photon selection criteria, and successfully mimic the diphoton events, especially at low counts. We investigate two classes of such models, characterized by the following underlying production and decay chains: gg→S→A{sup ′}A{sup ′}→(e{sup +}e{sup −})(e{sup +}e{sup −}) and qq̄→Z{sup ′}→sa→(e{sup +}e{sup −})(e{sup +}e{sup −}), where at the first step a heavy scalar, S, or vector, Z{sup ′}, resonances are produced that decay to light metastable vectors, A{sup ′}, or (pseudo-)scalars, s and a. Setting the parameters of the models to explain the existing excess, and taking the ATLAS detector geometry into account, we marginalize over the properties of heavy resonances in order to derive the expected lifetimes and couplings of metastable light resonances. We observe that in the case of A{sup ′}, the suggested range of masses and mixing angles ϵ is within reach of several new-generation intensity frontier experiments.

  20. Multiplicity dependence of light flavour hadron production at LHC energies in the strangeness canonical suppression picture

    CERN Document Server

    Vislavicius, Vytautas

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of data on light flavour hadron production as function of event multiplicity at LHC energies measured by the ALICE collaboration. The strangeness-canonical approach within the framework of the THERMUS statistical hadronisation model is used for a simultaneous description of pp, p-Pb, and Pb-Pb collisions. The rapidity window dependence of the strangeness correlation volume is addressed and a value of $\\Delta y = 1.43 \\pm 0.13$ is found. With the exception of the $\\phi$-meson, an excellent description of the experimental data is found.

  1. Energy transfer from conjugated polymer to bacterial light-harvesting complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczynska, D.; Bujak, Ł.; Loi, M. A.; Brotosudarmo, T. H. P.; Cogdell, R.; Mackowski, S.

    2012-10-01

    Energy transfer from a conjugated polymer blend (poly(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl):poly (2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1, 4-phenylenevinylene) to a light-harvesting complex 2 from purple bacteria has been demonstrated using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. For our hybrid nanostructure, we observe a 30% reduction of the fluorescence lifetime of the polymer emission as compared to the pure polymer layer. This result is an important step towards integrating naturally evolved biomolecules with synthetic materials into biohybrid organic electronic systems.

  2. Solar-energy production and energy-efficient lighting: photovoltaic devices and white-light-emitting diodes using poly(2,7-fluorene), poly(2,7-carbazole), and poly(2,7-dibenzosilole) derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaupré, Serge; Boudreault, Pierre-Luc T; Leclerc, Mario

    2010-02-23

    World energy needs grow each year. To address global warming and climate changes the search for renewable energy sources with limited greenhouse gas emissions and the development of energy-efficient lighting devices are underway. This Review reports recent progress made in the synthesis and characterization of conjugated polymers based on bridged phenylenes, namely, poly(2,7-fluorene)s, poly(2,7-carbazole)s, and poly(2,7-dibenzosilole)s, for applications in solar cells and white-light-emitting diodes. The main strategies and remaining challenges in the development of reliable and low-cost renewable sources of energy and energy-saving lighting devices are discussed.

  3. Quantifying the effects of light intensity on bioproduction and maintenance energy during photosynthetic growth of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Saheed; Fitzgerald, Colin M; Cook, Emily M; Donohue, Timothy J; Noguera, Daniel R

    2015-02-01

    Obtaining a better understanding of the physiology and bioenergetics of photosynthetic microbes is an important step toward optimizing these systems for light energy capture or production of valuable commodities. In this work, we analyzed the effect of light intensity on bioproduction, biomass formation, and maintenance energy during photoheterotrophic growth of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Using data obtained from steady-state bioreactors operated at varying dilution rates and light intensities, we found that irradiance had a significant impact on biomass yield and composition, with significant changes in photopigment, phospholipid, and biopolymer storage contents. We also observed a linear relationship between incident light intensity and H2 production rate between 3 and 10 W m(-2), with saturation observed at 100 W m(-2). The light conversion efficiency to H2 was also higher at lower light intensities. Photosynthetic maintenance energy requirements were also significantly affected by light intensity, with links to differences in biomass composition and the need to maintain redox homeostasis. Inclusion of the measured condition-dependent biomass and maintenance energy parameters and the measured photon uptake rate into a genome-scale metabolic model for R. sphaeroides (iRsp1140) significantly improved its predictive performance. We discuss how our analyses provide new insights into the light-dependent changes in bioenergetic requirements and physiology during photosynthetic growth of R. sphaeroides and potentially other photosynthetic organisms.

  4. Extra light and save energy in ideal winter-light greenhouse : effect of condensation still being researched

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arkesteijn, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    A consortium of companies, together with Wageningen UR, is developing a greenhouse that will maximise the amount of light entering between October and March. The goal is to achieve 10% extra yield during these months. The gain in light should come from a combination of various adjustments and

  5. Measurement of light yield dependence on electron energy for SNO+ scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Chan Tseung, Hok

    2011-10-01

    SNO+ is a multi-purpose neutrino experiment whose reach extends to the following areas of neutrino physics: neutrinoless double beta decay (with Nd-loaded scintillator), geo-neutrinos, reactor and low-energy solar neutrinos, as well as supernova neutrinos. It is a ~780-tonne liquid scintillator detector currently under construction at the SNOLAB facility in Sudbury, Ontario,Canada. The scintillator to be used in SNO+ is linear alkylbenzene (LAB) with ~2 g/L of PPO (2,5-diphenyloxazole). In this talk, we describe an experiment to test the linearity of the response of LAB-PPO with respect to electrons. We find that below ~0.4 MeV, the energy scale of LAB-PPO becomes non-linear. An explanation is given in terms of Cherenkov light absorption and re-emission by the scintillator. This research has been supported under DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  6. Prevention of excess gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, J; Truesdale, K P; Wang, C-H; Cai, J

    2009-11-01

    Obesity prevention trials are designed to promote healthy weight. The success of these trials is often assessed using one of three metrics--means, incidence or prevalence. In this study, we point out conceptual shortcomings of these metrics and introduce an alternative that we call 'excess gain'. A mathematical demonstration using simulated data shows a scenario in which the statistical power of excess gain compares favorably with that of incidence and prevalence. Prevention of excess gain communicates an easily understood public health message that is applicable to all individuals regardless of weight status.

  7. The High Energy Light Isotope eXperiment (HELIX): Ohio State Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, James

    We propose to join the High Energy Light Isotope eXperiment (HELIX), a balloon-borne magnetic spectrometer designed to measure the isotopic composition of cosmic ray nuclei from hydrogen to neon, with particular emphasis on the important Be-10/Be-9 `'clock' isotopic ratio.HELIX is a collaborative experiment headed by Scott Wakely (Chicago), with collaborators from Indiana University, Michigan, Penn State, and Northern Kentucky University. The HELIX instrument is designed to make measurements of the composition of light cosmic rays in the energy range from below 1 GeV/n to 5 GeV/n in its initial phase, with a specific emphasis on the determination of astrophysically important isotopic abundance ratios. Measurements of this kind at lower energies have in the past provided profound insights into the nature and origin of cosmic rays, revealing, for instance, information about acceleration and confinement timescales, and exposing some conspicuous discrepancies between solar and cosmic-ray abundances. We propose to contribute to HELIX by enhancing the mass resolution of the instrument and thus the range of masses and energies that can be studied, and by laying the technical foundation for extended operation of the magnet for a full 14-day Antarctic flight. The mass resolution will be enhanced by improving the rigidity resolution of the spectrometer by adding high-resolution silicon-strip tracking sensors repurposed from the Fermilab CDF inner tracker to augment the drift chamber, and by increasing the number of sensors in the RICH focal plane from 175 to 275. We will also develop an in-flight helium transfer process and demonstrate this capability in a CONUS test flight, and prepare a design for an auxiliary helium dewar and in-flight helium transfer system for use in future HELIX flights. This proposal is responsive to NASA's Strategic Objective 1.6: "Discover how the universe works, explore how it began and evolved, and search for life on planets around other stars."

  8. Use of Natural Light vs. Cold LED Lighting in Installations for the Recovery of Victims of Gender Violence: Impact on Energy Consumption and Victims’ Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Amorim

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of lighting installations is a major challenge concerning Governments, productive sectors and individuals. However, the importance of accurate lighting in some areas, especially those related to Health and Wellbeing is so critical that the constraints of energy efficiency and sustainability are not always a priority. This situation has become more critical with the current boom in the application of non-visual effects of light to these areas. In this study, the effects oftwo different kinds of lighting on femalevictims of gender violence are compared and analyzed in terms of positive results and impact on energy consumption and sustainability. The lighting technologies used are integrated in facilities where these women carry out different activities aimed at their integration into daily life after their traumatic experiences. The results are expected to become a tool for professionals working with these collectives and for installation designers. In spite of the well-known effects of cold light, especially for tasks involving arousal, sleepiness and other critical variables, it is demonstrated that daylight, which is obviously cheaper from productive and environmental perspectives, is better for this application.

  9. Slow-light-enhanced energy efficiency for graphene microheaters on silicon photonic crystal waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Siqi; Zhu, Xiaolong; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N Asger; Dong, Jianji; Ding, Yunhong

    2017-02-09

    Slow light has been widely utilized to obtain enhanced nonlinearities, enhanced spontaneous emissions and increased phase shifts owing to its ability to promote light-matter interactions. By incorporating a graphene on a slow-light silicon photonic crystal waveguide, here we experimentally demonstrate an energy-efficient graphene microheater with a tuning efficiency of 1.07 nmmW-1 and power consumption per free spectral range of 3.99 mW. The rise and decay times (10-90%) are only 750 and 525 ns, which, to the best of our knowledge, are the fastest reported response times for microheaters in silicon photonics. The corresponding figure of merit of the device is 2.543 nW s, one order of magnitude better than results reported in previous studies. The influence of the length and shape of the graphene heater to the tuning efficiency is further investigated, providing valuable guidelines for enhancing the tuning efficiency of the graphene microheater.

  10. Effects of light energy and reducing agents on C60-mediated photosensitizing reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinones, Michael; Zhang, Yazhou; Riascos, Penelope; Hwang, Huey-Min; Aker, Winfred G; He, Xiaojia; Gao, Ruomei

    2014-01-01

    Many biomolecules contain photoactive reducing agents, such as reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and 6-thioguanine (6-TG) incorporated into DNA through drug metabolism. These reducing agents may produce reactive oxygen species under UVA irradiation or act as electron donors in various media. The interactions of C60 fullerenes with biological reductants and light energy, especially via the Type-I electron-transfer mechanism, are not fully understood although these factors are often involved in toxicity assessments. The two reductants employed in this work were NADH for aqueous solutions and 6-TG for organic solvents. Using steady-state photolysis and electrochemical techniques, we showed that under visible light irradiation, the presence of reducing agents enhanced C60 -mediated Type-I reactions that generate superoxide anion (O2(.-)) at the expense of singlet oxygen ((1)O2) production. The quantum yield of O2(.-) production upon visible light irradiation of C60 is estimated below 0.2 in dipolar aprotic media, indicating that the majority of triplet C60 deactivate via Type-II pathway. Upon UVA irradiation, however, both C60 and NADH undergo photochemical reactions to produce O2(.-), which could lead to a possible synergistic toxicity effects. C60 photosensitization via Type-I pathway is not observed in the absence of reducing agents. © 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.

  11. Tailoring the Energy Landscape in Quasi-2D Halide Perovskites Enables Efficient Green-Light Emission

    KAUST Repository

    Quan, Li Na

    2017-05-10

    Organo-metal halide perovskites are a promising platform for optoelectronic applications in view of their excellent charge-transport and bandgap tunability. However, their low photoluminescence quantum efficiencies, especially in low-excitation regimes, limit their efficiency for light emission. Consequently, perovskite light-emitting devices are operated under high injection, a regime under which the materials have so far been unstable. Here we show that, by concentrating photoexcited states into a small subpopulation of radiative domains, one can achieve a high quantum yield, even at low excitation intensities. We tailor the composition of quasi-2D perovskites to direct the energy transfer into the lowest-bandgap minority phase and to do so faster than it is lost to nonradiative centers. The new material exhibits 60% photoluminescence quantum yield at excitation intensities as low as 1.8 mW/cm2, yielding a ratio of quantum yield to excitation intensity of 0.3 cm2/mW; this represents a decrease of 2 orders of magnitude in the excitation power required to reach high efficiency compared with the best prior reports. Using this strategy, we report light-emitting diodes with external quantum efficiencies of 7.4% and a high luminescence of 8400 cd/m2.

  12. Excess wind power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2005-01-01

    analyses it is analysed how excess productions are better utilised; through conversion into hydrogen of through expansion of export connections thereby enabling sales. The results demonstrate that particularly hydrogen production is unviable under current costs but transmission expansion could...

  13. Enhancement of fusion at near and sub-barrier energies for neutron-rich light nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Varinderjit; Steinbach, T K; Wiggins, B B; Hudan, S; Lin, R T deSouza Zidu; Horowitz, C J; Baby, L T; Kuvin, S A; Tripathi, Vandana; Wiedenhover, I

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of the fusion cross-section for neutron-rich light nuclei is crucial in ascertaining if fusion of these nuclei occurs in the outer crust of a neutron star. We have therefore measured the fusion excitation function at near-barrier energies for the 19O + 12C system and compared the experimental results with the fusion excitation function of 18O + 12C and 16O + 12C. In the experiment a beam of 19O, produced via the 18O(d,p) reaction, was incident on a 12C target at energies near the Coulomb barrier. Evaporation residues produced in fusion of 18,19O ions with 12C target nuclei were detected with good geometric efficiency and identified by measuring their energy and time-of-flight. A significant enhancement in the fusion probability of 19O ions with a 12C target as compared to 18O ions is observed. The significantly larger cross-sections observed at near barrier energies are not predicted by a static model of fusion for 19O + 12C indicating that dynamics play an important role in the fusion of neutron-...

  14. Photoluminescence and reflectivity studies of high energy light ions irradiated polymethyl methacrylate films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Madhu Lata; Singh, Fouran; Ramola, R. C.; Joshi, Veena

    2017-11-01

    The self-standing films of non-conducting polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) were irradiated in vacuum using high energy light ions (HELIs) of 50 MeV Lithium (Li+3) and 80 MeV Carbon (C+5) at various ion dose to induce the optical changes in the films. Upon HELI irradiation, films exhibit a significant enhancement in optical reflectivity at the highest dose. Interestingly, the photoluminescence (PL) emission band with green light at (514.5 nm) shows a noticeable increase in the intensity with increasing ion dose for both ions. However, the rate of increase in PL intensity is different for both HELI and can be correlated with the linear energy transfer by these ions in the films. Origin of PL is attributed to the formation of carbon cluster and hydrogenated amorphous carbon in the polymer films. HAC clusters act as PL active centres with optical reflectivity. Most of the harmful radiation like UV are absorbed by the material and is becoming opaque after irradiation and this PL active material are useful in fabrication of optoelectronic devices, UV-filter, back-lit components in liquid crystal display systems, micro-components for integrate optical circuits, diffractive elements, advanced materials and are also applicable to the post irradiation laser treatment by means of ion irradiation.

  15. MCNP6 Simulation of Light and Medium Nuclei Fragmentation at Intermediate Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashnik, Stepan Georgievich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kerby, Leslie Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-22

    MCNP6, the latest and most advanced LANL Monte Carlo transport code, representing a merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX, is actually much more than the sum of those two computer codes; MCNP6 is available to the public via RSICC at Oak Ridge, TN, USA. In the present work, MCNP6 was validated and verified (V&V) against different experimental data on intermediate-energy fragmentation reactions, and results by several other codes, using mainly the latest modifications of the Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM) and of the Los Alamos version of the Quark-Gluon String Model (LAQGSM) event generators CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03. It was found that MCNP6 using CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 describes well fragmentation reactions induced on light and medium target nuclei by protons and light nuclei of energies around 1 GeV/nucleon and below, and can serve as a reliable simulation tool for different applications, like cosmic-ray-induced single event upsets (SEU’s), radiation protection, and cancer therapy with proton and ion beams, to name just a few. Future improvements of the predicting capabilities of MCNP6 for such reactions are possible, and are discussed in this work.

  16. On stimulated scattering of laser light in inertial fusion energy targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, Lj [National Inst. for Fusion Science, The Graduate Univ. for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Skoric, M.M. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Ishiguro, S. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Theory and Computer Simulation Center, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Sato, T. [JAMSTEC, Earth Simulator Center, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    Propagation of a laser light through regions of an underdense plasma is an active research topic in laser fusion. In particular, a large effort has been invested in studies of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) which can reflect laser energy and produce energetic particles to preheat a fusion energy target. Experiments, theory and simulations agree on a complex interplay between various laser-plasma instabilities. By particle-in-cell simulations of an underdense electron-plasma, we have found, apart from the standard SRS, a strong backscattering near the electron plasma frequency at densities beyond the quarter critical. This novel instability, recognized in recent experiments as stimulated laser scattering on a trapped electron-acoustic mode (SEAS), is absent from a classical theory of laser-parametric instabilities. A parametric excitation of SEAS instability, is explained by a three-wave resonant decay of the incident laser light into a standing backscattered wave and a slow trapped electron acoustic wave ({omega} < {omega}{sub p}). Large SEAS pulsations, eventually suppressed by relativistic heating of electrons, are observed in our simulations. This phenomenon seems relevant to future hohlraum target and fast ignition experiments. (author)

  17. Green methanol from hydrogen and carbon dioxide using geothermal energy and/or hydro power in Iceland or excess renewable electricity in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauw, Marco; Benders, Reinerus; Visser, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of green methanol from hydrogen and carbon dioxide can contribute to mitigation of greenhouse gasses. This methanol can be utilized as either a transport fuel or as an energy carrier for electricity storage. It is preferable to use inexpensive, reliable and renewable energy sources to

  18. Daylight and energy performances of a new type of light pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canziani, R.; Peron, F.; Rossi, G. [Dipartimento di Costruzione dell' Architettura, University IUAV of Venice, Venezia (Italy)

    2004-07-01

    Daylight represents a free source of illumination of building's internal spaces. For the right and optimal use of this resource, in addition to the resort to some simple designing expedients that can be brought back to the practice of 'building in a workmanlike manner', it is possible to adopt specific devices able to improve the sunlight collection. Among these devices a class that presents a very interesting compromise between simplicity of realization, costs and daylighting performances is represented by the so-called 'light pipes'. Light pipes usually work by means of a device placed on an external closing element which attends to collect, redirect and in some cases, concentrate or collimate the incident luminous flux, and a device situated inside the environments able to transport the daylight inwards the building and distribute it into the deep zone of the rooms so as to obtain a better illuminance distribution. In this work, we propose a light pipe equipped with a flat collection system suitable to be integrated in a building's facade, without any protrusion as to the architectural envelope. This system includes: a planar closing element, a sunlight's collecting and deflecting device that optimizes the direction of the incoming solar rays as the solar position varies, a rectilinear duct with optical properties suitable for the transport of the sunlight and for its introduction into the room that has to be illuminated. The daylighting performances are simulated in different conditions of external illuminance and it is done an assessment of the lighting energy savings in a test room simulating a class room. At the end, some considerations and applying indications useful for the designer are presented. (author)

  19. Artificial Light at Night Reduces Daily Energy Expenditure in Breeding Great Tits (Parus major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk A. M. H. Welbers

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The ecological impact of artificial light at night (ALAN is an increasingly recognized process that accompanies expanding urbanization. Yet, we have limited knowledge on the impact of ALAN on wild species, and on the potential to mitigate any negative effects by using different light sources and colors. In birds, effects of ALAN on activity levels are reported for several species and, hence, their daily energy expenditure (DEE may be affected. DEE is a potent mediator of life-history trade-offs and fitness and thus an important aspect to consider when examining the potential long-term ecological effects of ALAN. Previous work has suggested that birds exposed to ALAN show higher levels of provisioning and nocturnal activity, suggesting that white ALAN increases DEE. Other factors regulating DEE, such as provisioning behavior and food availability, might also respond to ALAN and thus indirectly affect DEE. We tested the hypothesis that ALAN increases DEE using an experimental setup where four previously unlit transects were illuminated with either white, green, or red LED light, or left dark as a control treatment. This setup was replicated in eight locations across the Netherlands. We measured DEE of our focal species, the great tit (Parus major, using a novel doubly labeled water technique that uses breath rather than blood samples. Contrary to our expectations, birds feeding their offspring under white and green ALAN showed lower DEE compared to birds in the control dark treatment. Differences in chick provisioning activity did not explain this result, as neither visit rates nor daily activity timing was affected by light treatment. However, food availability under white and green light was much higher compared to red light and the dark control. This difference strongly suggests that the lower DEE under white and green ALAN sites is a consequence of higher food availability in these treatments. This result shows that there can be positive

  20. Energy-efficiency labels and standards: A guidebook for appliances, equipment and lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, James E.; Wiel, Stephen

    2001-02-16

    Energy-performance improvements in consumer products are an essential element in any government's portfolio of energy-efficiency and climate change mitigation programs. Governments need to develop balanced programs, both voluntary and regulatory, that remove cost-ineffective, energy-wasting products from the marketplace and stimulate the development of cost-effective, energy-efficient technology. Energy-efficiency labels and standards for appliances, equipment, and lighting products deserve to be among the first policy tools considered by a country's energy policy makers. The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the United Nations Foundation (UNF) recognize the need to support policy makers in their efforts to implement energy-efficiency standards and labeling programs and have developed this guidebook, together with the Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (CLASP), as a primary reference. This guidebook was prepared over the course of the past year with significant contribution from the authors and reviewers mentioned previously. Their diligent participation has made this the international guidance tool it was intended to be. The lead authors would also like to thank the following individuals for their support in the development, production, and distribution of the guidebook: Marcy Beck, Elisa Derby, Diana Dhunke, Ted Gartner, and Julie Osborn of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as well as Anthony Ma of Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc. This guidebook is designed as a manual for government officials and others around the world responsible for developing, implementing, enforcing, monitoring, and maintaining labeling and standards-setting programs. It discusses the pros and cons of adopting energy-efficiency labels and standards and describes the data, facilities, and institutional and human resources needed for these programs. It provides guidance on the design, development, implementation, maintenance, and evaluation of the

  1. The lighting system is integrated to the building energy management system for more energy saving; L'eclairage s'integre a la GTB pour economiser encore plus d'energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2004-09-01

    The lighting loads represent the next goal in the technical fight against energy wasting. The solution will come from the use of natural lighting in building design, from the replacement of lighting systems by new more efficient light sources, and above all, by the integration of lighting management in the energy management and supervision of buildings. About 30 to 50% of the electricity of a tertiary building is consumed by the lighting systems. For this reason, the French general direction of energy and transports (TREN) has launched the European voluntary program 'Greenlight' for the development of modern lighting solutions. The overall projects carried out so far in the framework of the Greenlight program indicate 40% of energy saving and 45 months of payback period as an average. Several French supermarket companies received the Greenlight awards 2004. This article presents also some integrated lighting management systems, in particular the digital addressable lighting interface (DALI) presented at the Light and Lighting 2004 exhibition of Frankfurt. (J.S.)

  2. Family- and school-based correlates of energy balance-related behaviours in 10-12-year-old children: a systematic review within the ENERGY (EuropeaN Energy balance Research to prevent excessive weight Gain among Youth) project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verloigne, M.; Van Lippevelde, W.; Maes, L.; Brug, J.; de Bourdeaudhuij, I.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify family- and school-based correlates of specific energy balance-related behaviours (physical activity, sedentary behaviour, breakfast consumption, soft drink consumption) among 10-12-year-olds, using the EnRG framework (Environmental Research framework for weight Gain

  3. (Vapour + liquid) equilibrium in (N,N-dimethylacetamide + methanol + water) at the temperature 313.15 K[N,N-Dimethylacetamide; Water; Methanol; Amides; Binary mixtures; Ternary mixtures; (Vapour+liquid) equilibrium; Excess Gibbs free energy; Correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielkiewicz, Jan. E-mail: jaz@altis.chem.pg.gda.pl

    2003-12-01

    Total vapour pressures, measured at the temperature 313.15 K, are reported for the ternary mixture (N,N-dimethylacetamide + methanol + water), and for binary constituents (N,N-dimethylacetamide + methanol) and (N,N-dimethylacetamide + water). The present results are compared with previously obtained data for binary mixtures (amide + water) and (amide + methanol), where amide=N-methylformamide, N,N-dimethylformamide, N-methyl-acetamide, 2-pyrrolidinone and N-methylpyrrolidinone. Moreover, it was found that excess Gibbs free energy of mixing for binary mixtures varies roughly linearly with the molar volume of amide.

  4. Characterizing high-energy light curves of Fermi/LatGRBs - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillette, Jarred [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-23

    A systematic analysis of the light curves of Gamma-Ray Burst (GRBs) with redshift and detected at high-energy (> 100 MeV) by Fermi/LAT has never been done before our work, because there were only a handful of detections. Now we have 20 of those, which we can use to characterize the GRBs in their rest frame. We compared a characteristic decay times Tc of GRBs with redshifts using the new "Pass8" data, and used a Crystal Ball function to parametrize GRB characteristics. An unexpected anti-correlation between Tc and the peak flux was observed. This means that brighter peaked GRBs have shorter durations. There is also no correlation between Tc and the decay index, which is one of the competing hypothesis on the origin of the high-energy emission. We did not observe any bimodality, which is seen in GRBs at lower energies.

  5. Characterizing high-energy light curves of Fermi/Lat GRBs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillette, Jarred [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-21

    A systematic analysis of the light curves of Gamma-Ray Burst (GRBs) with redshift and detected at high-energy (> 100 MeV) by Fermi/LAT has never been done before our work, because there were only a handful of detections. Now we have 20 of those, which we can use to characterize the GRBs in their rest frame. We compared a characteristic decay times Tc of GRBs with redshifts using the new “Pass 8” data, and used a Crystal Ball function to parametrize GRB characteristics. An unexpected anti-correlation between Tc and the peak flux was observed. This means that brighter peaked GRBs have shorter durations. There is also no correlation between the Tc and the decay index, which makes the anti-correlation with brightness more clear. This results appears to be consistent with the External Shock model, which is one of the competing hypothesis on the origin of the high-energy emission. We did not observe any bimodality, which is seen in GRBs at lower energies.

  6. Synergistic "ping-pong" energy transfer for efficient light activation in a chromophore-catalyst dyad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Annamaria; Charalambidis, Georgios; Herrero, Christian; Margiola, Sofia; Leibl, Winfried; Coutsolelos, Athanassios; Aukauloo, Ally

    2015-10-07

    The synthesis of a porphyrin-Ru(II) polypyridine complex where the porphyrin acts as a photoactive unit and the Ru(II) polypyridine as a catalytic precursor is described. Comparatively, the free base porphyrin was found to outperform the ruthenium based chromophore in the yield of light induced electron transfer. Mechanistic insights indicate the occurrence of a ping-pong energy transfer from the (1)LC excited state of the porphyrin chromophore to the (3)MCLT state of the catalyst and back to the (3)LC excited state of the porphyrin unit. The latter, triplet-triplet energy transfer back to the chromophore, efficiently competes with fast radiationless deactivation of the excited state at the catalyst site. The energy thus recovered by the chromophore allows improved yield of formation of the oxidized form of the chromophore and concomitantly of the oxidation of the catalytic unit by intramolecular charge transfer. The presented results are among the rare examples where a porphyrin chromophore is successfully used to drive an oxidative activation process where reductive processes prevail in the literature.

  7. Reduced energy consumption by massive thermoelectric waste heat recovery in light duty trucks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetto, D.; Vidiella, G.

    2012-06-01

    The main objective of the EC funded HEATRECAR project is to reduce the energy consumption and curb CO2 emissions of vehicles by massively harvesting electrical energy from the exhaust system and re-use this energy to supply electrical components within the vehicle or to feed the power train of hybrid electrical vehicles. HEATRECAR is targeting light duty trucks and focuses on the development and the optimization of a Thermo Electric Generator (TEG) including heat exchanger, thermoelectric modules and DC/DC converter. The main objective of the project is to design, optimize and produce a prototype system to be tested on a 2.3l diesel truck. The base case is a Thermo Electric Generator (TEG) producing 1 KWel at 130 km/h. We present the system design and estimated output power from benchmark Bi2Te3 modules. We discuss key drivers for the optimization of the thermal-to-electric efficiency, such as materials, thermo-mechanical aspects and integration.

  8. Developments in Polarization and Energy Control of APPLE-II Undulators at Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, E. C.; Bencok, P.; Dobrynin, A.; Rial, E. C. M.; Rose, A.; Steadman, P.; Thompson, C.; Thomson, A.; Wang, H.

    2013-03-01

    A pair of 2m long APPLE-II type undulators have been built for the I10 BLADE beamline at Diamond Light Source. These 48mm period devices have gap as well as four moveable phase axes which provide the possibility to produce the full range of elliptical polarizations as well as linear polarization tilted through a full 180deg. The mechanical layout chosen has a 'master and slave' arrangement of the phase axes on the top and bottom. This arrangement allows the use of symmetries to provide operational ease for both changing energy using only the master phase while keeping fixed linear horizontal or circular polarization, as well as changing linear polarization angle while keeping fixed energy [1]. The design allows very fast motion of the master phase arrays, without sacrifice of accuracy, allowing the possibility of mechanical polarization switching at 1Hz for dichroism experiments. We present the mechanical design features of these devices, as well as the results of magnetic measurements and shimming from before installation. Finally, we present the results of characterization of these devices by the beamline, including polarimetry, which has been done on the various modes of motion to control energy and polarization. These modes of operation have been available to users since 2011.

  9. The production of consuming less: Energy efficiency, climate change, and light bulbs in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoyre, Autumn

    In this research, I have analyzed the production of consuming less electricity through a case study of promotions of compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs). I focused on the CFL because it has been heavily promoted by environmentalists and electricity companies as a key tool for solving climate change, yet such promotions appear counter-intuitive. The magnitude of CFL promotions by environmentalists is surprising because CFLs can only impact less than 1% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. CFL promotions by electricity providers are surprising given such companies' normal incentives to sell more of their product. I used political ecological and symbolic interactionist theories, qualitative methods of data collection (including interviews, participant-observation, texts, and images), and a grounded theory analysis to understand this case. My findings suggest that, far from being a self-evident technical entity, energy efficiency is produced as an idea, a part of identities, a resource, and a source of value through social, political, and economic processes. These processes include identity formation and subjectification; gender-coded household labor; and corporate appropriation of household value resulting from environmental governance. I show how environmentalists use CFLs to make and claim neoliberal identities, proposing the concept of green neoliberal identity work as a mechanism through which neoliberal ideologies are translated into practices. I analyze how using this seemingly easy energy efficient technology constitutes labor that is gendered in ways that reflect and reproduce inequalities. I show how electricity companies have used environmental governance to valorize and appropriate home energy efficiency as an accumulation strategy. I conclude by discussing the symbolic power of CFLs, proposing a theory of green obsolescence, and framing the production of energy efficiency as a global production network. I found that promoting energy efficiency involves

  10. Excessive crying in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Halpern

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Review the literature on excessive crying in young infants, also known as infantile colic, and its effects on family dynamics, its pathophysiology, and new treatment interventions. Data source: The literature review was carried out in the Medline, PsycINFO, LILACS, SciELO, and Cochrane Library databases, using the terms “excessive crying,” and “infantile colic,” as well technical books and technical reports on child development, selecting the most relevant articles on the subject, with emphasis on recent literature published in the last five years. Summary of the findings: Excessive crying is a common symptom in the first 3 months of life and leads to approximately 20% of pediatric consultations. Different prevalence rates of excessive crying have been reported, ranging from 14% to approximately 30% in infants up to 3 months of age. There is evidence linking excessive crying early in life with adaptive problems in the preschool period, as well as with early weaning, maternal anxiety and depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and other behavioral problems. Several pathophysiological mechanisms can explain these symptoms, such as circadian rhythm alterations, central nervous system immaturity, and alterations in the intestinal microbiota. Several treatment alternatives have been described, including behavioral measures, manipulation techniques, use of medication, and acupuncture, with controversial results and effectiveness. Conclusion: Excessive crying in the early months is a prevalent symptom; the pediatrician's attention is necessary to understand and adequately manage the problem and offer support to exhausted parents. The prescription of drugs of questionable action and with potential side effects is not a recommended treatment, except in extreme situations. The effectiveness of dietary treatments and use of probiotics still require confirmation. There is incomplete evidence regarding alternative

  11. Investigating students' mental models about the quantization of light, energy, and angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didiş, Nilüfer; Eryılmaz, Ali; Erkoç, Şakir

    2014-12-01

    This paper is the first part of a multiphase study examining students' mental models about the quantization of physical observables—light, energy, and angular momentum. Thirty-one second-year physics and physics education college students who were taking a modern physics course participated in the study. The qualitative analysis of data revealed six variations in students' mental models about the quantization of physical observables: scientific model, primitive scientific model, shredding model, alternating model, integrative model, and evolution model. These models were determined to be context dependent. In addition, some students are in a mixed-model state where they use multiple mental models in explaining a phenomenon and use these models inconsistently.

  12. Investigating students’ mental models about the quantization of light, energy, and angular momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilüfer Didiş

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the first part of a multiphase study examining students’ mental models about the quantization of physical observables—light, energy, and angular momentum. Thirty-one second-year physics and physics education college students who were taking a modern physics course participated in the study. The qualitative analysis of data revealed six variations in students’ mental models about the quantization of physical observables: scientific model, primitive scientific model, shredding model, alternating model, integrative model, and evolution model. These models were determined to be context dependent. In addition, some students are in a mixed-model state where they use multiple mental models in explaining a phenomenon and use these models inconsistently.

  13. A SOFTWARE PRODUCT LINE FOR ENERGY-EFFICIENT CONTROL OF SUPPLEMENTARY LIGHTING IN GREENHOUSES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mærsk-Møller, Hans Martin; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard

    2011-01-01

    of 2009 – 2010 showed 25 percent savings with no negative effect on plant quality. To accelerate the impact of our approach, we chose to use Software Product Line Engineering, as it enables a greater variety of related software tools to be created faster. We have created a web-based analysis tool, Dyna...... preserving production quality. This paper presents a novel approach addressing this issue. We use weather forecasts and electricity prices to compute cost- and energy-efficient supplementary light plans that achieve the required plant growth defined by the grower. Experiments performed during the winter...... of these two tools is described together with the lessons learned from using Software Product Line Engineering in the domain of greenhouse software development....

  14. High energy QCD at NLO: from light-cone wave function to JIMWLK evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lublinsky, Michael; Mulian, Yair

    2017-05-01

    Soft components of the light cone wave-function of a fast moving projectile hadron is computed in perturbation theory to the third order in QCD coupling constant. At this order, the Fock space of the soft modes consists of one-gluon, two-gluon, and a quark-antiquark states. The hard component of the wave-function acts as a non-Abelian background field for the soft modes and is represented by a valence charge distribution that accounts for non-linear density effects in the projectile. When scattered off a dense target, the diagonal element of the S-matrix reveals the Hamiltonian of high energy evolution, the JIMWLK Hamiltonian. This way we provide a new direct derivation of the JIMWLK Hamiltonian at the Next-to-Leading Order.

  15. The measurements of light high-energy ions in NINA-2 experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Leonov

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The flux of energetic light ions at low altitude is both an important input and output for self-consistent calculations of albedo particles resulting from the interaction of trapped and cosmic ray particles, with the upper atmosphere. In addition, data on the flux of light ions are needed to evaluate radiation damages on space-borne instruments and on space mission crews. In spite of that, sources of data on the flux of energetic ions at LEO are roughly limited to the AP-8 model, CREME/CREME96 codes and the SAMPEX, NOAA/TIROS satellites. The existing and operational European SAC-C/ICARE and PROBA-1/SREM instruments could also be potential sources for proton data at LEO. Although AP-8 and SAMPEX/PSB97 may be publicly accessed through the SPENVIS, they exhibit an order of magnitude difference in low altitude proton fluxes and they do not contain helium fluxes. Therefore, improved light ion radiation models are still needed.

    In this paper we present a procedure to identify and measure the energy of ions that are not stopped in the NINA-2 instrument. Moreover, problems related to particles that cross the instrument in the opposite direction are addressed and shown to be a possible cause of particle misidentification. Measuring fluxes of low abundance elements like energetic helium ions requires a good characterisation of all possible sources of backgrounds in the detector. Hints to determine the several contributions to the background are presented herein and may be applied to extract an order of magnitude of energetic ions fluxes from existing data sets, while waiting for dedicated high performance instruments.

  16. Energy transfer and colour tunability in UV light induced Tm3 +/Tb3 +/Eu3 +: ZnB glasses generating white light emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh, V.; Gupta, Kiran; Parthasaradhi Reddy, C.; Ham, Byoung S.

    2017-03-01

    A promising energy transfer (Tm3 + → Tb3 + → Eu3 +) approach is brought forward to generate white light emission under ultraviolet (UV) light excitation for solid state lightening. Tm3 +/Tb3 +/Eu3 + ions are combinedly doped in zinc borate glass system in view of understanding energy transfer process resulting in white light emission. Zinc borate (host) glass displayed optical and luminescence properties due to formation of Zn(II)x-[O(- II)]y centres in the ZnB glass matrix. At 360 nm (UV) excitation, triply doped Tm3 +/Tb3 +/Eu3 +: ZnB glasses simultaneously shown their characteristic emission bands in blue (454 nm: 1D2 → 3F4), green (547 nm: 5D4 → 7F5) and red (616 nm: 5D0 → 7F2) regions. In triple ions doped glasses, energy transfer dynamics is discussed in terms of Forster-Dexter theory, excitation & emission profiles, lifetime curves and from partial energy level diagram of three ions. The role of Tb3 + in ET from Tm3 + → Eu3 + was discussed using branch model. From emission decay analysis, energy transfer probability (P) and efficiency (η) were evaluated. Colour tunability from blue to white on varying (Tb3 +, Eu3 +) content is demonstrated from Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates. Based on chromaticity coordinates, other colour related parameters like correlated colour temperature (CCT) and colour purity are also computed for the studied glass samples. An appropriate blending of such combination of rare earth ions could show better suitability as potential candidates in achieving multi-colour and warm/cold white light emission for white LEDs application in the field of solid state lightening.

  17. Energy transfer and colour tunability in UV light induced Tm(3+)/Tb(3+)/Eu(3+): ZnB glasses generating white light emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh, V; Gupta, Kiran; Parthasaradhi Reddy, C; Ham, Byoung S

    2017-03-15

    A promising energy transfer (Tm(3+)→Tb(3+)→Eu(3+)) approach is brought forward to generate white light emission under ultraviolet (UV) light excitation for solid state lightening. Tm(3+)/Tb(3+)/Eu(3+) ions are combinedly doped in zinc borate glass system in view of understanding energy transfer process resulting in white light emission. Zinc borate (host) glass displayed optical and luminescence properties due to formation of Zn(II)x-[O(-II)]y centres in the ZnB glass matrix. At 360nm (UV) excitation, triply doped Tm(3+)/Tb(3+)/Eu(3+): ZnB glasses simultaneously shown their characteristic emission bands in blue (454nm: (1)D2→(3)F4), green (547nm: (5)D4→(7)F5) and red (616nm: (5)D0→(7)F2) regions. In triple ions doped glasses, energy transfer dynamics is discussed in terms of Forster-Dexter theory, excitation & emission profiles, lifetime curves and from partial energy level diagram of three ions. The role of Tb(3+) in ET from Tm(3+)→Eu(3+) was discussed using branch model. From emission decay analysis, energy transfer probability (P) and efficiency (η) were evaluated. Colour tunability from blue to white on varying (Tb(3+), Eu(3+)) content is demonstrated from Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates. Based on chromaticity coordinates, other colour related parameters like correlated colour temperature (CCT) and colour purity are also computed for the studied glass samples. An appropriate blending of such combination of rare earth ions could show better suitability as potential candidates in achieving multi-colour and warm/cold white light emission for white LEDs application in the field of solid state lightening. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Relative Composition and Energy Spectra of Light Nuclei in Cosmic Rays. Results from AMS-01

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Allaby, J; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Ao, L; Arefiev, A; Arruda, L; Azzarello, P; Basile, M; Barao, F; Barreira, G; Vartoloni, A; Battiston, R; Becker, R; Becker, U; Bellagamba, L; Bene, P; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Biland, A; Bindi, V; Boella, G; Boschini, M; Bourquin, M; Bruni, G; Buenerd, M; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Cannarsa, P; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Chang, Y H; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, Z G; Chernoplekov, N A; Chiueh, T H; Choi, Y Y; Cindolo, F; Commichau, V; Contin, A; Cortina-Gil, E; Crespo, D; Cristinziani, M; Dai, T S; Dela Guia, C; Delgado, C; Di Falco, S; Djambazov, L; D'Antoine, I; Dong, Z R; Duranti, M; Engelberg, J; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Extermann, P; Favier, J; Fiandrini, E; Fisher, P H; Flugge, G; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Y; Gervasi, M; Giovacchini, F; Giusti, P; Grandi, D; Grimm, O; Gu, W Q; Haino, S; Hangarter, K; Hasan, A; Hermel, V; Hofer, H; Hungerford, W; Ionica, M; Jongmanns, M; Karlamaa, K; Karpinski, W; Kenney, G; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, T; Klimentov, A; Kossakowski, R; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Kraeber, M; Laborie, G; Laitinen, T; Lamanna, G; Laurenti, G; Lebedev, A; Lechanoine-Leluc, C; Lee, M W; Lee, S C; Levi, G; Lin, C H; Liu, H T; Lu, G; Lubelsmeyer, K; Luckey, D; Lustermann, W; Mana, C; Margotti, A; Mayet, F; McNeil, R R; Menichelli, M; Mihul, A; Mujunen, A; Oliva, A; Palmonari, F; Park, H B; Park, W H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, F; Pereira, R; Perrin, E; Pevsner, A; Pilo, F; Pimenta, M; Plyaskin, V; Pojidaev, V; Pohl, M; Produit, N; Quadrani, L; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ren, D; Ren, Z; Ribordy, M; Richeux, J P; Riihonen, E; Ritakari, J; Ro, S; Roeser, U; Sagdeev, R; Santos, D; Sartorelli, G; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E S; Shin, J W; Shoumilov, E; Shoutko, V; Siedenburg, T; Siedling, R; Son, D; Song, T; Spada, F R; Spinella, F; Steuer, M; Sun, G S; Suter, H; Tang, X W; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Tornikoski, M; Torsti, J; Trumper, J; Ulbricht, J; Urpo, S; Valtonen, E; Vandenhirtz, J; Velikhov, E; Verlaat, B; Vetlitsky, I; Vezzu, F; Vialle, J P; Viertel, G; Vite, D; Von Gunten, H; Waldmeier Wicki, S; Wallraff, W; Wang, J Z; Wiik, K; Williams, C; Wu, S X; Xia, P C; Xu, S; Xu, Z Z; Yan, J L; Yan, L G; Yang, C G; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, S W; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhou, F; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, W Z; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zuccon, P

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of the chemical and isotopic composition of cosmic rays is essential for the precise understanding of their propagation in the galaxy. While the model parameters are mainly determined using the B/C ratio, the study of extended sets of ratios can provide stronger constraints on the propagation models. In this paper the relative abundances of the light nuclei lithium, beryllium, boron and carbon are presented. The secondary to primary ratios Li/C, Be/C and B/C have been measured in the kinetic energy range 0.35-45 GeV/nucleon. The isotopic ratio 7Li/6Li is also determined in the magnetic rigidity interval 2.5-6.3 GV. The secondary to secondary ratios Li/Be, Li/B and Be/B are also reported. These measurements are based on the data collected by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer AMS-01 during the STS-91 space shuttle flight in 1998 June. Our experimental results are in substantial agreement with other measurements, where they exist. We describe our light-nuclei data with a diffusive-reacceleration model....

  19. Surface Modification of Light Alloys by Low-Energy High-Current Pulsed Electron Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. D. Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews results obtained by the research groups developing the low-energy high-current pulsed electron beam (LEHCPEB in Dalian (China and Metz (France on the surface treatment of light alloys. The pulsed electron irradiation induces an ultra-fast thermal cycle at the surface combined with the formation of thermal stress and shock waves. As illustrated for Mg alloys and Ti, this results in deep subsurface hardening (over several 100 μm which improves the wear resistance. The analysis of the top surface melted surface of light alloys also often witnesses evaporation and condensation of chemical species. This phenomenon can significantly modify the melt chemistry and was also suggested to lead to the development of specific solidification textures in the rapidly solidified layer. The potential use of the LEHCPEB technique for producing thermomechanical treatments under the so-called heating mode and, thus, modify the surface crystallographic texture, and enhance solid-state diffusion is also demonstrated in the case of the FeAl intermetallic compound.

  20. Interaction of light with a metal wedge: the role of diffraction in shaping energy flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Yonggang; Jung, Yun Suk; Kim, Hong Koo

    2010-02-01

    When a light wave hits a metal wedge structure, the metal surfaces respond to the incident light by generating both free-space and surface-bound waves. Here we present a physical model that elucidates electromagnetic interactions of an incoming planar wave with a simple semi-infinite 90 degrees metal wedge. We show that a metal wedge structure possesses an intrinsic capability of directing the incident power around the corner into the forward direction. Interplay of the boundary diffraction wave and the incident and reflection waves in the near field region of a metal corner is found to form a basis of the funneling phenomena that are commonly observed in metal nanoslit structures. Theory and experiment reveal that the incident wave propagating parallel to the sidewall destructively interferes with the boundary diffraction wave forming a depleted-energy-flow region along the glancing angle direction. A physical understanding of various electromagnetic phenomena associated with a metal wedge structure confirms rich potential of the simple structure as an elemental building block of complex metal nanostructures.

  1. Electronic coherence and the kinetics of inter-complex energy transfer in light-harvesting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Pengfei; Miller, Thomas F

    2015-12-14

    We apply real-time path-integral dynamics simulations to characterize the role of electronic coherence in inter-complex excitation energy transfer (EET) processes. The analysis is performed using a system-bath model that exhibits the essential features of light-harvesting networks, including strong intra-complex electronic coupling and weak inter-complex coupling. Strong intra-complex coupling is known to generate both static and dynamic electron coherences, which delocalize the exciton over multiple chromophores and potentially influence the inter-complex EET dynamics. With numerical results from partial linearized density matrix (PLDM) real-time path-integral calculations, it is found that both static and dynamic coherence are correlated with the rate of inter-complex EET. To distinguish the impact of these two types of intra-complex coherence on the rate of inter-complex EET, we use Multi-Chromophore Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (MC-FRET) theory to map the original parameterization of the system-bath model to an alternative parameterization for which the effects of static coherence are preserved while the effects of dynamic coherence are largely eliminated. It is then shown that both parameterizations of the model (i.e., the original that supports dynamic coherence and the alternative that eliminates it), exhibit nearly identical EET kinetics and population dynamics over a wide range of parameters. These observations are found to hold for cases in which either the EET donor or acceptor is a dimeric complex and for cases in which the dimeric complex is either symmetric or asymmetric. The results from this study suggest that dynamic coherence plays only a minor role in the actual kinetics of inter-complex EET, whereas static coherence largely governs the kinetics of incoherent inter-complex EET in light-harvesting networks.

  2. Non-photochemical quenching and xanthophyll cycle activities in six green algal species suggest mechanistic differences in the process of excess energy dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaas, Theresa; Berteotti, Silvia; Ballottari, Matteo; Flieger, Kerstin; Bassi, Roberto; Wilhelm, Christian; Goss, Reimund

    2015-01-01

    In the present study the non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of four biofilm-forming and two planktonic green algae was investigated by fluorescence measurements, determinations of the light-driven proton gradient and determination of the violaxanthin cycle activity by pigment analysis. It was observed that, despite the common need for efficient photoprotection, the structural basis of NPQ was heterogeneous in the different species. Three species, namely Chlorella saccharophila, Chlorella vulgaris and Bracteacoccus minor, exhibited a zeaxanthin-dependent NPQ, while in the three other species, Tetracystis aeria, Pedinomonas minor and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii violaxanthin de-epoxidation was absent or unrelated to the establishment of NPQ. Acclimation of the algae to high light conditions induced an increase of the NPQ activity, suggesting that a significant part of the overall NPQ was rather inducible than constitutively present in the green algae. Comparing the differences in the NPQ mechanisms with the phylogenetic position of the six algal species led to the conclusion that the NPQ heterogeneity observed in the present study was not related to the phylogeny of the algae but to the environmental selection pressure. Finally, the difference in the NPQ mechanisms in the different species is discussed within the frame of the current NPQ models. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Reducing Excessive Television Viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason, Leonard A.; Rooney-Rebeck, Patty

    1984-01-01

    A youngster who excessively watched television was placed on a modified token economy: earned tokens were used to activate the television for set periods of time. Positive effects resulted in the child's school work, in the amount of time his family spent together, and in his mother's perception of family social support. (KH)

  4. HIV Excess Cancers JNCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2010, an estimated 7,760 new cancers were diagnosed among the nearly 900,000 Americans known to be living with HIV infection. According to the first comprehensive study in the United States, approximately half of these cancers were in excess of what wo

  5. Improved Dark Energy Constraints From ~ 100 New CfA Supernova Type Ia Light Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicken, Malcolm; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Harvard U.; Wood-Vasey, W.Michael; /Pittsburgh U.; Blondin, Stephane; /European Southern Observ.; Challis, Peter; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Jha, Saurabh; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Kelly, Patrick L.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Rest, Armin; /Harvard U. /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.; Kirshner, Robert P.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2012-04-06

    We combine the CfA3 supernovae Type Ia (SN Ia) sample with samples from the literature to calculate improved constraints on the dark energy equation of state parameter, w. The CfA3 sample is added to the Union set of Kowalski et al. to form the Constitution set and, combined with a BAO prior, produces 1 + w = 0.013{sub -0.068}{sup +0.066} (0.11 syst), consistent with the cosmological constant. The CfA3 addition makes the cosmologically useful sample of nearby SN Ia between 2.6 and 2.9 times larger than before, reducing the statistical uncertainty to the point where systematics play the largest role. We use four light-curve fitters to test for systematic differences: SALT, SALT2, MLCS2k2 (R{sub V} = 3.1), and MLCS2k2 (R{sub V} = 1.7). SALT produces high-redshift Hubble residuals with systematic trends versus color and larger scatter than MLCS2k2. MLCS2k2 overestimates the intrinsic luminosity of SN Ia with 0.7 < {Delta} < 1.2. MLCS2k2 with R{sub V} = 3.1 overestimates host-galaxy extinction while R{sub V} {approx} 1.7 does not. Our investigation is consistent with no Hubble bubble. We also find that, after light-curve correction, SN Ia in Scd/Sd/Irr hosts are intrinsically fainter than those in E/S0 hosts by 2{sigma}, suggesting that they may come from different populations. We also find that SN Ia in Scd/Sd/Irr hosts have low scatter (0.1 mag) and reddening. Current systematic errors can be reduced by improving SN Ia photometric accuracy, by including the CfA3 sample to retrain light-curve fitters, by combining optical SN Ia photometry with near-infrared photometry to understand host-galaxy extinction, and by determining if different environments give rise to different intrinsic SN Ia luminosity after correction for light-curve shape and color.

  6. Excessive prices as abuse of dominance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Lisbeth; Møllgaard, Peter

    2007-01-01

    firm abused its position by charging excessive prices. We also test whether tightening of the Danish competition act has altered the pricing behaviour on the market. We discuss our results in the light of a Danish competition case against the dominant cement producer that was abandoned by the authority...

  7. Photophysical characterization of low-molecular weight organogels for energy transfer and light harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsbeha, T.; Bussotti, L.; Cicchi, S.; Foggi, P.; Ghini, G.; Lascialfari, L.; Marcelli, A.

    2011-05-01

    The choice of a donor and an acceptor with suitable optical and self-assembly properties is essential in the design of organogel-based light harvesting systems. Organogels can provide supramolecular structures capable of enhancing energy transfer processes. In this work, we present the characterization of N-(naphthalene-1-carboxyamide)-(3 S,4 S)-pyrrolidin-(3,4)-bisdodecyl-carbamoyldiester ( 1) and N-(4-nitrobenzofurazan-7-amino)-(3 S,4 S)-pyrrolidin-(3,4)-bisdodecyl-carbamoyldiester ( 2) which are used as donor and acceptor moieties, respectively. The donor molecule is hardly capable to form a gelon its own but it can be assembled at reasonable concentrations with the acceptor gelator to form a two-component donor-acceptor organogels in cyclohexane. Stable organogels are formed from cyclohexane for gelator concentrations as low as ≈10 -3 M. UV-vis and steady-state fluorescence spectroscopies were used to provide a characterization of their molecular interactions. The optical changes observed during the cooling of two-component solutions of these systems are indicative of typical sol-gel transitions. The occurrence of excitation energy transfer processes in the gels is confirmed by comparison of their excitation and absorption spectra.

  8. Design of New Power Management Circuit for Light Energy Harvesting System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issa Jafer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, it can be observed that Wireless Sensors Networks (WSN are taking increasingly vital roles in many applications, such as building energy monitoring and control, which is the focus of the work in this paper. However, the main challenging issue with adopting WSN technology is the use of power sources such as batteries, which have a limited lifetime. A smart solution that could tackle this problem is using Energy Harvesting technology. The work in this paper will be focused on proposing a new power management design through harvesting indoor light intensity. The new approach is inspired by the use of the Fractional Open Circuit Voltage based Maximum Power Point tracking (MPPT concept for sub mw Photo Voltaic (PV cells. The new design adopts two main features: First, it minimizes the power consumed by the power management section; and second, it maximizes the MPPT-converted output voltage and consequently improves the efficiency of the power conversion in the sub mw power level. The new experimentally-tested design showed an improvement of 81% in the efficiency of MPPT conversion using 0.5 mW input power in comparison with the other presented solutions that showed less efficiency with higher input power.

  9. Nuclear modification of light flavour and strangeness at LHC energies with ALICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Ramona; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    Thanks to its unique particle identification capabilities the ALICE detector is able to identify light-flavour, strange and multi-strange hadrons, including π, K, p, {{K}}{{S}}0, Λ, Ξ and Ω, over a wide range of transverse momentum, from pp and p-Pb interactions up to central Pb-Pb collisions. The latest results on the nuclear modification factor, R AA, as a function of the Pb-Pb collision centrality, is shown for various particle specie at \\sqrt{{s}{{N}{{N}}}}=2.76 {TeV} centre-of-mass energy. For each particle specie, the R AA is compared with the nuclear modification factors R pA in p-Pb collisions to asses the presence of hot nuclear matter effects affecting the high-p Τ particle production in Pb-Pb collisions. The results on the R AA of charged hadrons at \\sqrt{{s}{{N}{{N}}}}=5.02 {TeV}, the highest energy ever reached in the laboratory for heavy-ion collisions, is also shown.

  10. The Study for Saving Energy and Optimization of LED Street Light Heat Sink Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chang Hsieh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available LED lamps are characterized by high energy efficiency, high luminance, and long lifespans. However, the heat radiation problem caused by the extra high power shortens the lifespan and reduces the luminous efficiency of such lamps. This study introduced the development of a novel cooling fin structure for LED lamps and compared its performance with those of commercially available products. The objective of the design was to reduce the maximum temperature and temperature difference on the fin, the amount of aluminum required for fin manufacturing, and CO2 emissions to save energy. The study employed the Taguchi method for experiment planning and used gray relational analysis and principal component analysis to determine the optimal parameter combination for cooling fins. The results showed that the maximum temperature on the fin surface dropped by 2.62°C in environments without forced convection, which indicated improved lighting efficiency. Furthermore, the amount of aluminum used per unit volume for fins was reduced by 15%, which effectively reduced CO2 emissions during the manufacturing process.

  11. Coupled dark matter-dark energy in light of near Universe observations

    CERN Document Server

    Honorez, Laura Lopez; Mena, Olga; Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul

    2010-01-01

    Cosmological analysis based on currently available observations are unable to rule out a sizeable coupling among the dark energy and dark matter fluids. We explore a variety of coupled dark matter-dark energy models, which satisfy cosmic microwave background constraints, in light of low redshift and near universe observations. We illustrate the phenomenology of different classes of dark coupling models, paying particular attention in distinguishing between effects that appear only on the expansion history and those that appear in the growth of structure. We find that while a broad class of dark coupling models are effectively models where general relativity (GR) is modified --and thus can be probed by a combination of tests for the expansion history and the growth of structure--, there is a class of dark coupling models where gravity is still GR, but the growth of perturbations is, in principle modified. While this effect is small in the specific models we have considered, one should bear in mind that an inco...

  12. Evaluating an emergent behaviour algorithm in JCSP for energy conservation in lighting systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosek, Anna Magdalena; Syed, Aly; Kerridge, J.

    2011-01-01

    Since the invention of the light bulb, artificial light is accompanying people all around the world every day and night. As the light bulb itself evolved a lot through years, light control systems are still switch-based and require users to make most of the decisions about its behaviour. This paper...

  13. Orbital rotation without orbital angular momentum: mechanical action of the spin part of the internal energy flow in light beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, O. V.; Bekshaev, A. Ya; Maksimyak, P. P.

    2012-01-01

    The internal energy flow in a light beam can be divided into the "orbital" and "spin" parts, associated with the spatial and polarization degrees of freedom of light. In contrast to the orbital one, experimental observation of the spin flow seems problematic because it is converted into an orbital...... flow upon tight focusing of the beam, usually applied for energy flow detection by means of the mechanical action upon probe particles. We propose a two-beam interference technique that results in an appreciable level of spin flow in moderately focused beams and detection of the orbital motion of probe...... particles within a field where the transverse energy circulation is associated exclusively with the spin flow. This result can be treated as the first demonstration of mechanical action of the spin flow of a light field....

  14. Research on natural lighting in reading spaces of university libraries in Jinan under the perspective of energy-efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zengzhang

    2017-11-01

    The natural lighting design in the reading spaces of university libraries not only influences physical and mental health of readers but also concerns the energy consumption of the libraries. The scientific and rational design of natural lighting is the key to the design of energy saving for physical environment of the reading space. The paper elaborates the present situation and existed problems of natural lighting in reading spaces of university libraries across Jinan region based on characteristics of light climate of Jinan region and concrete utilization of reading spaces in university libraries, and combining field measurement, survey, research and data analysis of reading spaces in Shandong Women’s University’s library. The paper, under the perspective of energy-efficiency, puts forward proposals to improve natural lighting in the reading spaces of university libraries from five aspects, such as adjustment of interior layout, optimization of outer windows design, employment of the reflector panel, design lighting windows on inner walls and utilization of adjustable sun shading facilities.

  15. Black Carbon and Kerosene Lighting: An Opportunity for Rapid Action on Climate Change and Clean Energy for Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, Arne [Humboldt State Univ., MN (United States). Schatz Energy Research Center; Bond, Tami C. [Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Lam, Nicholoas L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Health Sciences; Hultman, Nathan [The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Replacing inefficient kerosene lighting with electric lighting or other clean alternatives can rapidly achieve development and energy access goals, save money and reduce climate warming. Many of the 250 million households that lack reliable access to electricity rely on inefficient and dangerous simple wick lamps and other kerosene-fueled light sources, using 4 to 25 billion liters of kerosene annually to meet basic lighting needs. Kerosene costs can be a significant household expense and subsidies are expensive. New information on kerosene lamp emissions reveals that their climate impacts are substantial. Eliminating current annual black carbon emissions would provide a climate benefit equivalent to 5 gigatons of carbon dioxide reductions over the next 20 years. Robust and low-cost technologies for supplanting simple wick and other kerosene-fueled lamps exist and are easily distributed and scalable. Improving household lighting offers a low-cost opportunity to improve development, cool the climate and reduce costs.

  16. Illuminating the Pecking Order in Off-Grid Lighting: A Demonstration of LED Lighting for Saving Energy in the Poultry Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tracy, Jennifer; Mills, Evan

    2010-11-06

    The Lumina Project and Lighting Africa conducted a full-scale field test involving a switch from kerosene to solar-LED lighting for commercial broiler chicken production at an off-grid farm in Kenya. The test achieved lower operating costs, produced substantially more light, improved the working environment, and had no adverse effect on yields. A strategy using conventional solar-fluorescent lighting also achieved comparable yields, but entailed a six-fold higher capital cost and significantly higher recurring battery replacement costs. Thanks to higher energy and optical efficiencies, the LED system provided approximately twice the illumination to the chicken-production area and yet drew less than half the power.At the study farm, 3000 chickens were grown in each of three identical houses under kerosene, fluorescent, and LED lighting configurations. Under baseline conditions, a yearly expenditure of 1,200 USD is required to illuminate the three houses with kerosene. The LED system eliminates this fuel use and expense with a corresponding simple payback time of 1.5 years, while the solar-fluorescent system has a payback time of 9.3 years. The corresponding reduction in fuel expenditure in both cases represents a 15percent increase in after-tax net income (revenues minus expenses) across the entire business operation. The differential cost-effectiveness between the LED and fluorescent systems would be substantially greater if the fluorescent system were upsized to provide the same light as the LED system. Providing light with the fluorescent or LED systems is also far more economical than connecting to the grid in this case. The estimated grid-connection cost at this facility is 1.7 million Kenya Schillings (approximately 21,250 USD), which is nearly six-times the cost of the fluorescent system and 35-times the cost of the LED system.The LED system also confers various non-energy benefits. The relative uniformity of LED lighting, compared to the fluorescent or

  17. Teager-Kaiser Energy and Higher-Order Operators in White-Light Interference Microscopy for Surface Shape Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Ouahab Boudraa

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In white-light interference microscopy, measurement of surface shape generally requires peak extraction of the fringe function envelope. In this paper the Teager-Kaiser energy and higher-order energy operators are proposed for efficient extraction of the fringe envelope. These energy operators are compared in terms of precision, robustness to noise, and subsampling. Flexible energy operators, depending on order and lag parameters, can be obtained. Results show that smoothing and interpolation of envelope approximation using spline model performs better than Gaussian-based approach.

  18. The effects of excessive humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R B

    1998-06-01

    Humidification devices and techniques can expose the airway mucosa to a wide range of gas temperatures and humidities, some of which are excessive and may cause injury. Humidified gas is a carrier of both water and energy. The volume of water in the gas stream depends on whether the water is in a molecular form (vapor), particulate form (aerosol), or bulk form (liquid). The energy content of gas stream is the sum of the sensible heat (temperature) of the air and any water droplets in it and the heat of vaporization (latent energy) of any water vapor present. Latent heat energy is much larger than sensible heat energy, so saturated air contains much more energy than dry air. Thus every breath contains a water volume and energy (thermal) challenge to the airway mucosa. When the challenge exceeds the homeostatic mechanisms airway dysfunction begins, starting at the cellular and secretion level and progressing to whole airway function. A large challenge will result in quick progression of dysfunction. Early dysfunction is generally reversible, however, so large challenges with short exposure times may not cause irreversible injury. The mechanisms of airway injury owing to excess water are not well studied. The observation of its effects lends itself to some general conclusions, however. Alterations in the ventilation-perfusion ratio, decrease in vital capacity and compilance, and atelectasis are suggestive of partial or full occlusion of small airways. Changes in surface tension and alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient are consistent with flooding of alveoli. There also may be osmotic challenges to mucosal cell function as evidenced by the different reaction rates with hyper- and hypotonic saline. The reaction to nonisotonic saline also may partly explain increases in specific airway resistance. Aerosolized water and instilled water may be hazardous because of their demonstrated potential for delivering excessive water to the airway. Their use for airway humidification or

  19. Cooling energy savings potential of light-colored roofs for residential and commercial buildings in 11 US metropolitan areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.; Pomerantz, M.; Gabersek, S.; Gartland, L.

    1997-05-01

    Light-colored roofs reflect more sunlight than dark roofs, thus they keep buildings cooler and reduce air-conditioning demand. Typical roofs in the United States are dark, which creates a potential for savings energy and money by changing to reflective roofs. In this report, the authors make quantitative estimates of the impact of roof color by simulating prototypical buildings with light- and dark-colored roofs and calculating savings by taking the differences in annual cooling and heating energy use, and peak electricity demand. Monetary savings are calculated using local utility rates. Savings are estimated for 11 U.S. Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) in a variety of climates.

  20. The effect of energy and traffic light labelling on parent and child fast food selection: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Pennie; Wolfenden, Luke; Chapman, Kathy; Wellard, Lyndal; Hughes, Clare; Wiggers, John

    2014-02-01

    Labelling of food from fast food restaurants at point-of-purchase has been suggested as one strategy to reduce population energy consumption and contribute to reductions in obesity prevalence. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of energy and single traffic light labelling systems on the energy content of child and adult intended food purchases. The study employed a randomised controlled trial design. English speaking parents of children aged between three and 12 years were recruited from an existing research cohort. Participants were mailed one of three hypothetical fast food menus. Menus differed in their labelling technique – either energy labels, single traffic light labels, or a no-label control. Participants then completed a telephone survey which assessed intended food purchases for both adult and child. The primary trial outcome was total energy of intended food purchase. A total of 329 participants completed the follow-up telephone interview. Eighty-two percent of the energy labelling group and 96% of the single traffic light labelling group reported noticing labelling information on their menu. There were no significant differences in total energy of intended purchases of parents, or intended purchases made by parents for children, between the menu labelling groups, or between menu labelling groups by socio-demographic subgroups. This study provided no evidence to suggest that energy labelling or single traffic light labelling alone were effective in reducing the energy of fast food items selected from hypothetical fast food menus for purchase. Additional complementary public health initiatives promoting the consumption of healthier foods identified by labelling, and which target other key drivers of menu item selection in this setting may be required.

  1. Excessive crying in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Halpern

    2016-05-01

    Conclusion: Excessive crying in the early months is a prevalent symptom; the pediatrician's attention is necessary to understand and adequately manage the problem and offer support to exhausted parents. The prescription of drugs of questionable action and with potential side effects is not a recommended treatment, except in extreme situations. The effectiveness of dietary treatments and use of probiotics still require confirmation. There is incomplete evidence regarding alternative treatments such as manipulation techniques, acupuncture, and use of the herbal supplements and behavioral interventions.

  2. Evaluation of signal energy calculation methods for a light-sharing SiPM-based PET detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qingyang; Ma, Tianyu; Xu, Tianpeng; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Gu, Yu

    2017-03-01

    Signals of a light-sharing positron emission tomography (PET) detector are commonly multiplexed to three analog pulses (E, X, and Y) and then digitally sampled. From this procedure, the signal energy that are critical to detector performance are obtained. In this paper, different signal energy calculation strategies for a self-developed SiPM-based PET detector, including pulse height and different integration methods, are evaluated in terms of energy resolution and spread of the crystal response in the flood histogram using a root-mean-squared (RMS) index. Results show that integrations outperform the pulse height. Integration using the maximum derivative value of the pulse E as the landmark point and 28 integrated points (448 ns) has the best performance in these evaluated methods for our detector. Detector performance in terms of energy and position is improved with this integration method. The proposed methodology is expected to be applicable for other light-sharing PET detectors.

  3. Evaluation of signal energy calculation methods for a light-sharing SiPM-based PET detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Qingyang [School of Automation and Electrical Engineering, University of Science & Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Engineering Research Center of Industrial Spectrum Imaging, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Ma, Tianyu; Xu, Tianpeng; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Gu, Yu, E-mail: guyu@ustb.edu.cn [School of Automation and Electrical Engineering, University of Science & Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2017-03-11

    Signals of a light-sharing positron emission tomography (PET) detector are commonly multiplexed to three analog pulses (E, X, and Y) and then digitally sampled. From this procedure, the signal energy that are critical to detector performance are obtained. In this paper, different signal energy calculation strategies for a self-developed SiPM-based PET detector, including pulse height and different integration methods, are evaluated in terms of energy resolution and spread of the crystal response in the flood histogram using a root-mean-squared (RMS) index. Results show that integrations outperform the pulse height. Integration using the maximum derivative value of the pulse E as the landmark point and 28 integrated points (448 ns) has the best performance in these evaluated methods for our detector. Detector performance in terms of energy and position is improved with this integration method. The proposed methodology is expected to be applicable for other light-sharing PET detectors.

  4. In pursuit of a light bulb and a smokeless kitchen : longitudinal analysis of the role of energy sector policies to alleviate rural energy poverty in India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinha, S.

    2012-01-01

    After more than six decades of development planning, the majority of India’s population,especially those living in villages, continue to wait for access to energy forms that enable them to switch on an electric light bulb and to cook food on a clean stove in a smokeless kitchen. India is a country

  5. Xenon lighting adjusted to plant requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koefferlein, M.; Doehring, T.; Payer, H.D.; Seidlitz, H.K. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    The high luminous flux and spectral properties of xenon lamps would provide an ideal luminary for plant lighting if not excess IR radiation poses several problems for an application: the required filter systems reduce the irradiance at spectral regions of particular importance for plant development. Most of the economical drawbacks of xenon lamps are related to the difficult handling of that excess IR energy. Furthermore, the temporal variation of the xenon output depending on the oscillations of the applied AC voltage has to be considered for the plant development. However, xenon lamps outperform other lighting systems with respect to spectral stability, immediate response, and maximum luminance. Therefore, despite considerable competition by other lighting techniques, xenon lamps provide a very useful tool for special purposes. In plant lighting however, they seem to play a less important role as other lamp and lighting developments can meet these particular requirements at lower costs.

  6. Modelling the cosmic spectral energy distribution and extragalactic background light over all time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, S. K.; Driver, S. P.; Davies, L. J. M.; Lagos, C. d. P.; Robotham, A. S. G.

    2018-02-01

    We present a phenomological model of the cosmic spectral energy distribution (CSED) and the integrated galactic light (IGL) over all cosmic time. This model, based on an earlier model by Driver et al., attributes the cosmic star formation history (CSFH) to two processes - first, chaotic clump accretion and major mergers, resulting in the early-time formation of bulges and secondly, cold gas accretion, resulting in late-time disc formation. Under the assumption of a Universal Chabrier initial mass function, we combine the Bruzual & Charlot stellar libraries, the Charlot & Fall dust attenuation prescription and template spectra for emission by dust and active galactic nuclei to predict the CSED - pre- and post-dust attenuation - and the IGL throughout cosmic time. The phenomological model, as constructed, adopts a number of basic axioms and empirical results and has minimal free parameters. We compare the model output, as well as predictions from the semi-analytic model GALFORM to recent estimates of the CSED out to z = 1. By construction, our empirical model reproduces the full energy output of the Universe from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared extremely well. We use the model to derive predictions of the stellar and dust mass densities, again finding good agreement. We find that GALFORM predicts the CSED for z < 0.3 in good agreement with the observations. This agreement becomes increasingly poor towards z = 1, when the model CSED is ˜50 per cent fainter. The latter is consistent with the model underpredicting the CSFH. As a consequence, GALFORM predicts a ˜30 per cent fainter IGL.

  7. Visible light stimulating dual-wavelength emission and O vacancy involved energy transfer behavior in luminescence for coaxial nanocable arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Dong, Jiazhang; Jiang, Zhongcheng; Pan, Anlian; Zhuang, Xiujuan

    2014-06-01

    We report a strategy to investigate O vacancy (VO) involved energy transfer and dual-wavelength yellow emission in coaxial nanocable. By electric field deposition and subsequent sol-gel template approach, ZnO:Tb/Y2O3:Eu coaxial nanocable arrays are synthesized. After visible light excitation, system is promoted to O vacancy charge transfer state of VO(0/+). In the following cross relaxation, energy transfer from VO to the excitation energy level of Tb3+ in ZnO:Tb core area. While in Y2O3:Eu shell area, energy transfer to the excitation energy level of Eu3+. Subsequently, dual-wavelength emission is observed. By constructing nanocable with dual-wavelength emission, yellow luminescence is obtained. Adjust doping concentration of Eu3+ or Tb3+ in the range of 0.01-0.05, chromaticity coordinates of ZnO:Tb/Y2O3:Eu nanocable stably stays at yellow region in color space except ZnO:Tb0.01/Y2O3:Eu0.01. As Vo states act as media in energy transfer process in nanocablers, visible light can stimulate dual-wavelength emissions. Yellow luminescent nanocable arrays will have great applications in light-emitting diode luminescence.

  8. Energy saving lamps. Lighting efficiency for professional uses; Les lampes a economie d'energie. Efficacite lumineuse pour des usages professionnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    Energy saving lamps are compact fluorescent lamps which can be used as replacement of traditional incandescent bulbs. Their advantage is their lighting efficiency (up to 5 times greater) and their lower energy consumption (20% lower) and longer service life thanks to an integrated electronic ballast. This document presents the characteristics of the energy saving lamps for professional use and for 'large public' use, their quality criteria, cost and performance with respect to each other and with respect to incandescent bulbs. (J.S.)

  9. [LIGHT POLLUTION AS THE HYGIENIC PROBLEM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptsov, V A; Gerasev, V F; Deynego, V N

    2015-01-01

    Mass introduction of lighting devices according to the concept of "maximum coverage area" and multistoried buildings of cities gave rise to light pollution, which became a problem for astronomers, ecologists and hygienists. Analysis of modern lighting devices and installations has shown that about 30-45% of the luminous flux becomes the light pollution. Night lighting of cities causes both direct and indirect damage to the environment, leads to unnecessary energy wastes. So in the USA due to excessive light there is wasted about 2 million barrels of oil per day. Light pollution affects the human hormonal system, causing various health disorders, such as insomnia and depression as a consequence. The light pollution through the ganglion cells of the retina affects the synthesis of melatonin by the pineal gland (epiphysis) and contributes to its calcification, which greatly affects the human psyche. At present, many countries have been paying much state attention to this problem via delivery of national documents and change of the concept of the designing of lighting devices and installations. The essence of this concept--to shine with a preset quality of light only in the right place at the specified time interval. This reduces the light pollution, saves energy and increases the environmental safety of lighting. There is presented an example of a technical solution to reduce the light pollution in the application of the light panel in the form of the gradient of the light guide generator project development.

  10. 10 CFR Appendix V to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Ceiling Fan Light Kits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of Ceiling Fan Light Kits V Appendix V to Subpart B of Part 430 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS Test Procedures Pt. 430, Subpt. B, App. V Appendix V to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Ceiling Fan...

  11. Three-Dimensional Hetero-Integration of Faceted GaN on Si Pillars for Efficient Light Energy Conversion Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Rip; Lee, Chi Hwan; Cho, In Sun; Jang, Hanmin; Jeon, Min Soo; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2017-07-25

    An important pathway for cost-effective light energy conversion devices, such as solar cells and light emitting diodes, is to integrate III-V (e.g., GaN) materials on Si substrates. Such integration first necessitates growth of high crystalline III-V materials on Si, which has been the focus of many studies. However, the integration also requires that the final III-V/Si structure has a high light energy conversion efficiency. To accomplish these twin goals, we use single-crystalline microsized Si pillars as a seed layer to first grow faceted Si structures, which are then used for the heteroepitaxial growth of faceted GaN films. These faceted GaN films on Si have high crystallinity, and their threading dislocation density is similar to that of GaN grown on sapphire. In addition, the final faceted GaN/Si structure has great light absorption and extraction characteristics, leading to improved performance for GaN-on-Si light energy conversion devices.

  12. Toward Control of Matter: Basic Energy Science Needs for a New Class of X-Ray Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenholz, Elke; Belkacem, Ali; Cocke, Lew; Corlett, John; Falcone, Roger; Fischer, Peter; Fleming, Graham; Gessner, Oliver; Hasan, M. Zahid; Hussain, Zahid; Kevan, Steve; Kirz, Janos; McCurdy, Bill; Nelson, Keith; Neumark, Dan; Nilsson, Anders; Siegmann, Hans; Stocks, Malcolm; Schafer, Ken; Schoenlein, Robert; Spence, John; Weber, Thorsten

    2008-09-24

    Over the past quarter century, light-source user facilities have transformed research in areas ranging from gas-phase chemical dynamics to materials characterization. The ever-improving capabilities of these facilities have revolutionized our ability to study the electronic structure and dynamics of atoms, molecules, and even the most complex new materials, to understand catalytic reactions, to visualize magnetic domains, and to solve protein structures. Yet these outstanding facilities still have limitations well understood by their thousands of users. Accordingly, over the past several years, many proposals and conceptual designs for"next-generation" x-ray light sources have been developed around the world. In order to survey the scientific problems that might be addressed specifically by those new light sources operating below a photon energy of about 3 keV and to identify the scientific requirements that should drive the design of such facilities, a workshop"Science for a New Class of Soft X-Ray Light Sources" was held in Berkeley in October 2007. From an analysisof the most compelling scientific questions that could be identified and the experimental requirements for answering them, we set out to define, without regard to the specific technologies upon which they might be based, the capabilities such light sources would have to deliver in order to dramatically advance the state of research in the areas represented in the programs of the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES). This report is based on the workshop presentations and discussions.

  13. Influence of light intensity on surface free energy and dentin bond strength of core build-up resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Y; Tsujimoto, A; Furuichi, T; Suzuki, T; Tsubota, K; Miyazaki, M; Platt, J A

    2015-01-01

    We examined the influence of light intensity on surface free energy characteristics and dentin bond strength of dual-cure direct core build-up resin systems. Two commercially available dual-cure direct core build-up resin systems, Clearfil DC Core Automix with Clearfil Bond SE One and UniFil Core EM with Self-Etching Bond, were studied. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in acrylic resin and the facial dentin surfaces were wet ground on 600-grit silicon carbide paper. Adhesives were applied to dentin surfaces and cured with light intensities of 0 (no irradiation), 200, 400, and 600 mW/cm(2). The surface free energy of the adhesives (five samples per group) was determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. To determine the strength of the dentin bond, the core build-up resin pastes were condensed into the mold on the adhesive-treated dentin surfaces according to the methods described for the surface free energy measurement. The resin pastes were cured with the same light intensities as those used for the adhesives. Ten specimens per group were stored in water maintained at 37°C for 24 hours, after which they were shear tested at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute in a universal testing machine. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a Tukey-Kramer test were performed, with the significance level set at 0.05. The surface free energies of the adhesive-treated dentin surfaces decreased with an increase in the light intensity of the curing unit. Two-way ANOVA revealed that the type of core build-up system and the light intensity significantly influence the bond strength, although there was no significant interaction between the two factors. The highest bond strengths were achieved when the resin pastes were cured with the strongest light intensity for all the core build-up systems. When polymerized with a light intensity of 200 mW/cm(2) or less, significantly lower bond strengths were observed. CONClUSIONS: The

  14. Wasting of energy in the public lighting and solution proposals; Desperdicio de energia na iluminacao publica e propostas de solucao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, Jose Roberto Fantinatti de

    2000-03-01

    This article proposes actions for the reducing of the energy waste by the public lighting as follows: correction of the reactor power factor, reprogramming the time schedule for lamps switch on and off, and performing of predictive maintenance of the installations.

  15. Optimizing lighting, thermal performance, and energy production of building facades by using automated blinds and PV cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzoubi, Hussain Hendi

    Energy consumption in buildings has recently become a major concern for environmental designers. Within this field, daylighting and solar energy design are attractive strategies for saving energy. This study seeks the integrity and the optimality of building envelopes' performance. It focuses on the transparent parts of building facades, specifically, the windows and their shading devices. It suggests a new automated method of utilizing solar energy while keeping optimal solutions for indoor daylighting. The method utilizes a statistical approach to produce mathematical equations based on physical experimentation. A full-scale mock-up representing an actual office was built. Heat gain and lighting levels were measured empirically and correlated with blind angles. Computational methods were used to estimate the power production from photovoltaic cells. Mathematical formulas were derived from the results of the experiments; these formulas were utilized to construct curves as well as mathematical equations for the purpose of optimization. The mathematical equations resulting from the optimization process were coded using Java programming language to enable future users to deal with generic locations of buildings with a broader context of various climatic conditions. For the purpose of optimization by automation under different climatic conditions, a blind control system was developed based on the findings of this study. This system calibrates the blind angles instantaneously based upon the sun position, the indoor daylight, and the power production from the photovoltaic cells. The functions of this system guarantee full control of the projected solar energy on buildings' facades for indoor lighting and heat gain. In winter, the system automatically blows heat into the space, whereas it expels heat from the space during the summer season. The study showed that the optimality of building facades' performance is achievable for integrated thermal, energy, and lighting

  16. Antioxidant enzymes induced by repeated intake of excess energy in the form of high-fat, high-carbohydrate meals are not sufficient to block oxidative stress in healthy lean individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sangbin; Won, Hyeran; Kim, Yeonghwan; Jang, Miran; Jyothi, K R; Kim, Youngseol; Dandona, Paresh; Ha, Joohun; Kim, Sung Soo

    2011-11-01

    It has been reported that high-fat, high-carbohydrate (HFHC) meals increase oxidative stress and inflammation. We examined whether repeated intake of excess energy in the form of HFHC meals alters reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and the expression levels of antioxidant enzymes and mitochondrial proteins in mononuclear cells, and to determine whether this is associated with insulin resistance. We recruited healthy lean individuals (n 10). The individuals were divided into two groups: one group (n 5) ingested 10878·4 kJ/d (2600 kcal/d; 55-70 % carbohydrate, 9·5-16 % fat, 7-20 % protein) recommended by the Dietary Reference Intake for Koreans for 4 d and the other group (n 5) ingested a HFHC meal containing 14 644 kJ/d (3500 kcal/d). Then, measurements of blood insulin and glucose levels, together with suppressor of cytokine signalling-3 (SOCS-3) expression levels, were performed in both groups. Also, cellular and mitochondrial ROS levels as well as malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured. Expression levels of cytosolic and mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes, and mitochondrial complex proteins were analysed. Repeated intake of HFHC meals induced an increase in homeostasis model of assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), together with an increase in SOCS-3 expression levels. While a single intake of the HFHC meal increased cytosolic and mitochondrial ROS, repeated intake of HFHC meals reduced them and increased the levels of MDA, cytosolic and mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes, and several mitochondrial complex proteins. Repeated intake of HFHC meals induced cellular antioxidant mechanisms, which in turn increased lipid peroxidation (MDA) and SOCS-3 expression levels, induced hyperinsulinaemia and increased HOMA-IR, an index of insulin resistance. In conclusion, excess energy added to a diet can generate detrimental effects in a short period.

  17. Excitation energy transfer in individual light-harvesting chlorosome from green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus at cryogenic temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saga, Yoshitaka; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Shibata, Yutaka; Itoh, Shigeru

    2005-06-01

    The excitation energy transfer from bacteriochlorophyll(BChl)- c self-aggregates to energy-accepting BChl- a in proteins (baseplates) in an individual photosynthetic light-harvesting complex (chlorosome) of a green filamentous photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus was successfully observed at cryogenic temperature. The ratio of intensity of the fluorescence peak of BChl- a to that of BChl- c self-aggregates in individual chlorosomes, which demonstrated relative efficiency of the excitation energy transfer, was heterogeneous between 0.09 and 0.72. This suggests that excitonic interaction between BChl- c self-aggregates and BChl- a in baseplates was heterogeneous among individual chlorosomes.

  18. Gasto energético e consumo de oxigênio pós-exercício contra-resistência Energy expenditure and excess post-exercise oxygen consumption of resistance exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Matsuura

    2006-12-01

    forma, para a prescrição dietética, o nutricionista deve considerar e se beneficiar dos efeitos do treinamento com exercício contra-resistência sobre o aumento do gasto energético.The increase in energy expenditure through physical activity is recognized as an important component in weight loss programs. The impact of resistance exercise, including excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (correspond to the post-exercise energy expenditure, on energy expenditure, however, remains inconclusive. The purpose of the present review was to discuss the influence of the resistance exercise variables (intensity, rest interval, movement velocity, number of sets, and type - circuit or continuous on energy expenditure during and after an exercise bout. The excess post-exercise oxygen consumption mechanisms were also discussed. The innumerous possibilities of combinations among resistance exercise variables result in a wide range of energy expenditure values for an exercise session (approximately between 3 to 10kcal·min-1. Nevertheless, volume appears to be determinant in the energy expenditure of resistance exercise itself, excess post-exercise oxygen consumption, on the other side, may be affected by exercise intensity. The manipulation of resistance exercise variables may affect the metabolic processes underlying excess post-exercise oxygen consumption, including resynthesis of high energy phosphates stores, resaturation of oxyhemoglobin and oxymyoglobin, thermogenic effects, lactate removal, increased protein turnover, and effects mediated by sympathetic activity. In conclusion, it might be advisable to use low intensity and high volume exercises in a training session for untrained and overweight subjects. However, trained individuals could benefit from more intense resistance exercise, due to the effects of intensity on excess post-exercise oxygen consumption. Thus, nutritionists should consider the effects of resistance exercise on total energy expenditure in order to

  19. Science-based design of stable quantum dots for energy-efficient lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, James E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rohwer, Lauren E. S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); van Swol, Frank B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zhou, Xiaowang [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lu, Ping [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    II-VI quantum dots, such as CdSe and CdTe, are attractive as downconversion materials for solid-state lighting, because of their narrow linewidth, tunable emission. However, for these materials to have acceptable quantum yields (QYs) requires that they be coated with a II-VI shell material whose valence band offset serves to confine the hole to the core. Confinement prevents the hole from accessing surface traps that lead to nonradiative decay of the exciton. Examples of such hole-confined core/shell QDs include CdTe/CdSe and CdSe/CdS. Unfortunately, the shell can also cause problems due to lattice mismatch, which ranges from 4-6% for systems of interest. This lattice mismatch can create significant interface energies at the heterojunction and places the core under radial compression and the shell under tangential tension. At elevated temperatures (~240°C) interfacial diffusion can relax these stresses, as can surface reconstruction, which can expose the core, creating hole traps. But such high temperatures favor the hexagonal Wurtzite structure, which has lower QY than the cubic zinc blende structure, which can be synthesized at lower temperatures, ~140°C. In the absence of alloying the core/shell structure can become metastable, or even unstable, if the shell is too thick. This can cause result in an irregular shell or even island growth. But if the shell is too thin thermallyactivated transport of the hole to surface traps can occur. In our LDRD we have developed a fundamental atomistic modeling capability, based on Stillinger-Weber and Bond-Order potentials we developed for the entire II-VI class. These pseudo-potentials have enabled us to conduct large-scale atomistic simulations that have led to the computation of phase diagrams of II-VI QDs. These phase diagrams demonstrate that at elevated temperatures the zinc blende phase of CdTe with CdSe grown on it epitaxially becomes thermodynamically unstable due to alloying. This is accompanied by a loss of hole

  20. Vibronic coupling explains the ultrafast carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in natural and artificial light harvesters

    CERN Document Server

    Perlík, Václav; Cranston, Laura J; Cogdell, Richard J; Lincoln, Craig N; Savolainen, Janne; Šanda, František; Mančal, Tomáš; Hauer, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The initial energy transfer in photosynthesis occurs between the light-harvesting pigments and on ultrafast timescales. We analyze the carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 Marichromatium purpuratum as well as in an artificial light-harvesting dyad system by using transient grating and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with 10 fs time resolution. We find that F\\"orster-type models reproduce the experimentally observed 60 fs transfer times, but overestimate coupling constants, which leads to a disagreement with both linear absorption and electronic 2D-spectra. We show that a vibronic model, which treats carotenoid vibrations on both electronic ground and excited state as part of the system's Hamiltonian, reproduces all measured quantities. Importantly, the vibronic model presented here can explain the fast energy transfer rates with only moderate coupling constants, which are in agreement with structure based calculations. Counterintuitively, the vibrational levels on the carotenoid el...

  1. Background model systematics for the Fermi GeV excess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calore, Francesca; Cholis, Ilias; Weniger, Christoph

    2015-03-01

    The possible gamma-ray excess in the inner Galaxy and the Galactic center (GC) suggested by Fermi-LAT observations has triggered a large number of studies. It has been interpreted as a variety of different phenomena such as a signal from WIMP dark matter annihilation, gamma-ray emission from a population of millisecond pulsars, or emission from cosmic rays injected in a sequence of burst-like events or continuously at the GC. We present the first comprehensive study of model systematics coming from the Galactic diffuse emission in the inner part of our Galaxy and their impact on the inferred properties of the excess emission at Galactic latitudes 2° < |b| < 20° and 300 MeV to 500 GeV. We study both theoretical and empirical model systematics, which we deduce from a large range of Galactic diffuse emission models and a principal component analysis of residuals in numerous test regions along the Galactic plane. We show that the hypothesis of an extended spherical excess emission with a uniform energy spectrum is compatible with the Fermi-LAT data in our region of interest at 95% CL. Assuming that this excess is the extended counterpart of the one seen in the inner few degrees of the Galaxy, we derive a lower limit of 10.0° (95% CL) on its extension away from the GC. We show that, in light of the large correlated uncertainties that affect the subtraction of the Galactic diffuse emission in the relevant regions, the energy spectrum of the excess is equally compatible with both a simple broken power-law of break energy E(break) = 2.1 ± 0.2 GeV, and with spectra predicted by the self-annihilation of dark matter, implying in the case of bar bb final states a dark matter mass of m(χ)=49(+6.4)(-)(5.4)  GeV.

  2. Influence of energy density of different light sources on knoop hardness of a dual-cured resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Piva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Knoop hardness of a dual-cured resin-based luting cement irradiated with different light sources as well energy density through a ceramic sample. Three light-curing unit (LCUs were tested: tungsten halogen light (HAL, light-emitting diode (LED and xenon plasma-arc (PAC lamp. Disc-shaped specimens were fabricated from a resin-based cement (Enforce. Three energy doses were used by modifying the irradiance (I of each LCU and the irradiation time (T: 24 Jcm-2 (I/2x2T, 24 Jcm-2 (IxT and 48 Jcm-2 (Ix2T. Energy doses were applied through a 2.0-mm-thick ceramic sample (Duceram Plus. Three groups underwent direct irradiation over the resin cement with the different LCUs and a chemically-activated group served as a control. Thirteen groups were tested (n=10. Knoop hardness number (KHN means were obtained from cross-sectional areas. Two-way ANOVA and the Holm-Sidak method were used for statistical comparisons of activation mode and energy doses (a=5%. Application of 48 J.cm-2 energy dose through the ceramic using LED (50.5±2.8 and HAL (50.9±3.7 produced significantly higher KHN means (p<0.05 than the control (44.7±3.8. LED showed statistically similar performance to HAL. Only HAL showed a relationship between the increase of LCU energy dose and hardness increase.

  3. Light and energy and architecture. Potentials in transparent solar cells; Lys og energi og arkitektur. Potentialer i transparente solceller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Ellen Kathrine; Hilberth, T.R.; Munk, L.

    2008-04-15

    This publication aims to inspire and challenge to: 1) transform energy technology to architectural potentials, 2) introduce visions about daylight's potential into the energy debate, and 3) develop new strategies for interdisciplinary collaboration. In addition to converting solar energy to electricity transparent solar cells can be integrated into glass facades and thereby regulate indoor climate and daylight intake. Furthermore solar cells can contribute new visual dimensions. (BA)

  4. Origin of excess 176Hf in meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Kristine; Connelly, James; Bizzarro, Martin

    2010-01-01

    with Lu/Hf elemental ratios in meteorites older than similar to 4.56 Ga meteorites unresolved. We attribute (176)Hf excess in older meteorites to an accelerated decay of (176)Lu caused by excitation of the long-lived (176)Lu ground state to a short-lived (176m)Lu isomer. The energy needed to cause...

  5. Topiramate Induced Excessive Sialorrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersel Dag

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well-known that drugs such as clozapine and lithium can cause sialorrhea. On the other hand, topiramate has not been reported to induce sialorrhea. We report a case of a patient aged 26 who was given antiepileptic and antipsychotic drugs due to severe mental retardation and intractable epilepsy and developed excessive sialorrhea complaint after the addition of topiramate for the control of seizures. His complaints continued for 1,5 years and ended after giving up topiramate. We presented this case since it was a rare sialorrhea case induced by topiramate. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of sialorrhea development which causes serious hygiene and social problems when they want to give topiramate to the patients using multiple drugs.

  6. Energy-efficient multicast traffic grooming strategy based on light-tree splitting for elastic optical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huanlin; Yin, Yarui; Chen, Yong

    2017-07-01

    In order to address the problem of optimizing the spectrum resources and power consumption in elastic optical networks (EONs), we investigate the potential gains by jointly employing the light-tree splitting and traffic grooming for multicast requests. An energy-efficient multicast traffic grooming strategy based on light-tree splitting (EED-MTGS-LS) is proposed in this paper. Firstly, we design a traffic pre-processing mechanism to decide the multicast requests' routing order, which considers the request's bandwidth requirement and physical hops synthetically. Then, by dividing a light-tree to some sub-light-trees and grooming the request to these sub-light-trees, the light-tree sharing ratios of multicast requests can be improved. What's more, a priority scheduling vector is constructed, which aims to improve the success rate of spectrum assignment for grooming requests. Finally, a grooming strategy is designed to optimize the total power consumption by reducing the use of transponders and IP routers during routing. Simulation results show that the proposed strategy can significantly improve the spectrum utilization and save the power consumption.

  7. Artificial Light at Night Reduces Daily Energy Expenditure in Breeding Great Tits (Parus major)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welbers, Anouk; van Dis, Natalie; Kolvoort, Annemieke; Ouyang, J.Q.; Visser, M.E.; Spoelstra, K.; Dominoni, D.M.

    2017-01-01

    The ecological impact of artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasingly recognized process that accompanies expanding urbanization. Yet, we have limited knowledge on the impact of ALAN on wild species, and on the potential to mitigate any negative effects by using different light sources and

  8. EFFECT OF ENERGY EFFICIENT LIGHT SOURCES ON READABILITY OF STUDENTS – AN EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SATHYA P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to investigate the effect of light sources on readability of students using psychophysical methods. Light sources such as Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL and Light Emitting Diode lamp (LED of same power rating were used in this research work because of their high lighting efficiency and uniformity of illuminance compared to that of Incandescent lamp (IL and florescent lamp (FL. A group of prospective students having normal vision, and abnormal vision like myopia, hypermetropia and astigmatism were involved in the test process. Three types of test like Snellen visual acuity, Color contrast test and Readability test were conducted on student participants under different lighting conditions. Test results showed the visibility and color contrast sensitivity of the students were high in the LED illumination. The quantitative measure of readability under different circumstances showed that the lightness difference on text under different color combination and font size, affected their readability. The computed average results confirmed that the luminance and color contrast were improved in LED illumination and also proved a high readability measure in the experimentation. Both the results of psychophysical test were proven that LED lighting was the best lighting system suitable for color distinction and readability.

  9. Increase the absorption plasm and the flow of light energy in ultra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The silicon thin film solar cells in the visible region, The low absorption which reduces its efficiency. The use of metallic nanostructures help, to increase light absorption and reduce the size of the entire structure will be. The process of light absorption in solar cells is one of the factors in improving the performance of solar ...

  10. Hybrid lead halide perovskites for light energy conversion: Excited state properties and photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manser, Joseph S.

    travel 220 nm over the course of 2 ns after photoexcitation, with an extrapolated diffusion length greater than one micrometer over the full excited state lifetime. The solution-processability of metal halide perovskites necessarily raises questions as to the properties of the solvated precursors and their connection to the final solid-state perovskite phase. Through structural and steady-state and time-resolved absorption studies, the important link between the excited state properties of the precursor components, composed of solvated and solid-state halometallate complexes, and CH3NH3PbI3 is evinced. This connection provides insight into optical nonlinearities and electronic properties of the perovskite phase. Fundamental studies of CH 3NH3PbI3 ultimately serve as a foundation for application of this and other related materials in high-performance devices. In the final chapter, the operation of CH3NH3PbI 3 solar cells in a tandem architecture is presented. The quest for economic, large scale hydrogen production has motivated the search for new materials and device designs capable of splitting water using only energy from the sun. In light of this, we introduce an all solution-processed tandem water splitting assembly composed of a BiVO4 photoanode and a single-junction CH3NH3PbI3 hybrid perovskite solar cell. This unique configuration allows efficient solar photon management, with the metal oxide photoanode selectively harvesting high energy visible photons and the underlying perovskite solar cell capturing lower energy visible-near IR wavelengths in a single-pass excitation. Operating without external bias under standard terrestrial one sun illumination, the photoanode-photovoltaic architecture, in conjunction with an earthabundant cobalt phosphate catalyst, exhibits a solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 2.5% at neutral pH. The design of low-cost tandem water splitting assemblies employing single-junction hybrid perovskite materials establishes a potentially

  11. Human-centered sensor-based Bayesian control: Increased energy efficiency and user satisfaction in commercial lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granderson, Jessica Ann

    2007-12-01

    The need for sustainable, efficient energy systems is the motivation that drove this research, which targeted the design of an intelligent commercial lighting system. Lighting in commercial buildings consumes approximately 13% of all the electricity generated in the US. Advanced lighting controls1 intended for use in commercial office spaces have proven to save up to 45% in electricity consumption. However, they currently comprise only a fraction of the market share, resulting in a missed opportunity to conserve energy. The research goals driving this dissertation relate directly to barriers hindering widespread adoption---increase user satisfaction, and provide increased energy savings through more sophisticated control. To satisfy these goals an influence diagram was developed to perform daylighting actuation. This algorithm was designed to balance the potentially conflicting lighting preferences of building occupants, with the efficiency desires of building facilities management. A supervisory control policy was designed to implement load shedding under a demand response tariff. Such tariffs offer incentives for customers to reduce their consumption during periods of peak demand, trough price reductions. In developing the value function occupant user testing was conducted to determine that computer and paper tasks require different illuminance levels, and that user preferences are sufficiently consistent to attain statistical significance. Approximately ten facilities managers were also interviewed and surveyed to isolate their lighting preferences with respect to measures of lighting quality and energy savings. Results from both simulation and physical implementation and user testing indicate that the intelligent controller can increase occupant satisfaction, efficiency, cost savings, and management satisfaction, with respect to existing commercial daylighting systems. Several important contributions were realized by satisfying the research goals. A general

  12. Episodic Excessive Blinking in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Yasmin Poustchi; Simon, John W; Chaudhri, Imran; Zobal-Ratner, Jitka; Barry, Gerard P

    2016-01-01

    Many children present with excessive blinking. Categorization, associated conditions, and prognosis are controversial. All children with excessive blinking were reviewed, excluding those with known uveitis, glaucoma, or obvious eyelid abnormalities. Parents were telephoned for follow-up. No ocular pathology was identified in 31 of 34 children with excessive blinking (91%). Parents were able to report a specific cause of blinking in 7 (21%). In 24 of 34 (71%), parents reported complete resolution of excessive blinking. No new ophthalmologic diagnoses were uncovered on follow-up. Episodes of excessive blinking rarely indicate neurologic disorders and frequently resolve spontaneously. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Predictions for the energy loss of light ions in laser-generated plasmas at low and medium velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayzac, W; Bagnoud, V; Basko, M M; Blažević, A; Frank, A; Gericke, D O; Hallo, L; Malka, G; Ortner, A; Tauschwitz, An; Vorberger, J; Roth, M

    2015-11-01

    The energy loss of light ions in dense plasmas is investigated with special focus on low to medium projectile energies, i.e., at velocities where the maximum of the stopping power occurs. In this region, exceptionally large theoretical uncertainties remain and no conclusive experimental data are available. We perform simulations of beam-plasma configurations well suited for an experimental test of ion energy loss in highly ionized, laser-generated carbon plasmas. The plasma parameters are extracted from two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, and a Monte Carlo calculation of the charge-state distribution of the projectile ion beam determines the dynamics of the ion charge state over the whole plasma profile. We show that the discrepancies in the energy loss predicted by different theoretical models are as high as 20-30%, making these theories well distinguishable in suitable experiments.

  14. Förster resonance energy transfer enhanced color-conversion using colloidal semiconductor quantum dots for solid state lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizamoglu, Sedat; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we present Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-enhanced color-conversion using colloidal semiconductor quantum dot nanocrystals (NCs) to make reddish-orange light-emitting diodes for use in ultraefficient solid state lighting. To achieve FRET enhancement at 614 nm, we use an energy gradient hybrid structure made of cyan- and orange-emitting CdSe/ZnS NCs (λPL=492 and 588 nm in solution, respectively). This enables recycling of trapped excitons using FRET and achieves a relative quantum efficiency enhancement of 15.1% in reddish-orange full color-conversion for the integrated hybrid cyan-orange NC layer with respect to the case of full color-conversion using only orange NCs without FRET.

  15. Chapter 3: Commercial and Industrial Lighting Controls Evaluation Protocol. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurnik, Charles W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Carlson, Stephen [DNV GL, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-10-04

    This Commercial and Industrial Lighting Controls Evaluation Protocol (the protocol) describes methods to account for energy savings resulting from programmatic installation of lighting control equipment in large populations of commercial, industrial, government, institutional, and other nonresidential facilities. This protocol does not address savings resulting from changes in codes and standards, or from education and training activities. When lighting controls are installed in conjunction with a lighting retrofit project, the lighting control savings must be calculated parametrically with the lighting retrofit project so savings are not double counted.

  16. A review on recent light particle correlation data from heavy ion collisions at intermediate and low energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardouin, D.

    1996-12-31

    A review of recent two-particle interferometry data for heavy-ion collisions in the domain of energy between ten and a few hundreds of MeV/nucleon is presented. Not only identical particles but unlike particle correlations have been used successfully as a probe for space-time dynamics of the collision process. Due to the availability of new dedicated charged particles or photon multi-detectors, the field of particle interferometry is moving to a good level of quantitative description: excitation energy and impact parameter dependences are now provided which should stimulate additional theoretical calculations for two-particle cross sections and emission of light fragments. (author). 102 refs.

  17. Parametric analysis of cherenkov light LDF from EAS for high energy gamma rays and nuclei: Ways of practical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elshoukrofy A.Sh.M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a ‘knee-like’ approximation of the lateral distribution of the Cherenkov light from extensive air showers in the energy range 30–3000 TeV and study a possibility of its practical application in high energy ground-based gamma-ray astronomy experiments (in particular, in TAIGA-HiSCORE. The approximation has a very good accuracy for individual showers and can be easily simplified for practical application in the HiSCORE wide angle timing array in the condition of a limited number of triggered stations.

  18. Targeted Construction of Light-Harvesting Metal-Organic Frameworks Featuring Efficient Host-Guest Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoyu; Song, Xiaoyu; Li, Yang; Chang, Ze; Chen, Long

    2018-01-30

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have emerged as promising light-harvesting platforms for energy-transfer materials. However, the targeted construction of MOFs with desirable photophysical properties and pore structures is still a challenge. Herein, 1,1,2,2-tetrakis(4-(pyridin-4-yl)phenyl)ethene (tppe) is selected as the ligand for the construction of light-harvesting MOFs due to its highly emissive and rigid backbone, which could benefit the light-harvesting performance of the MOFs. Three MOFs (MOFs 1-3) were obtained on the basis of different metal centers (Zn2+ and Cd2+) and carboxylate building blocks. The complete structure characterization of the MOFs helps the illustration of the principles for structure tuning of this system. All three MOFs exhibit strong tppe-originated photoluminescence emission, with quantum yields as high as 47.6%. The fluorescence quantum yield and time-resolved fluorescence studies reveal that a remarkable energy-transfer efficiency (up to 96%) was achieved in this system. These results clearly indicate tppe-MOFs could be promising light-harvesting materials.

  19. Energy Migration Engineering of Bright Rare-Earth Upconversion Nanoparticles for Excitation by Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yeteng; Rostami, Iman; Wang, Zihua; Dai, Hongjie; Hu, Zhiyuan

    2015-11-04

    A novel Nd(3+) -sensitized upconversion nanoparticle (UCNP) that can be excited by near-infrared 740 nm light-emitting diode (LED) lamps with bright upconversion luminescence is designed. Yb(3+) ion distribution is engineered to increase the energy migration efficiency. The benefit of the novel LED-excited UCNPs is demonstrated by imaging of breast cancer cells and enabling an economic handheld semiquantitative visual measurement device. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Gamma-Light: High-Energy Astrophysics above 10 MeV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morselli, Aldo; Argan, Andrea; Barbiellini, Guido

    2013-01-01

    The energy range between 10 and 50 MeV is an experimentally very difficult range and remained uncovered since the time of COMPTEL. Here we propose a possible mission to cover this energy range.......The energy range between 10 and 50 MeV is an experimentally very difficult range and remained uncovered since the time of COMPTEL. Here we propose a possible mission to cover this energy range....

  1. Extension of an Exponential Light Curve GRB Pulse Model Across Energy Bands

    OpenAIRE

    Nemiroff, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    A simple mathematical model of GRB pulses in time, suggested in Norris et al. (2005), is extended across energy. For a class of isolated pulses, two of those parameters appear effectively independent of energy. Specifically, statistical fits indicate that pulse amplitude $A$ and pulse width $\\tau$ are energy dependent, while pulse start time and pulse shape are effectively energy independent. These results bolster the Pulse Start and Pulse Scale conjectures of Nemiroff (2000) and add a new Pu...

  2. Energy, Electron Transfer and Photocatalytic Reactions of Visible Light Absorbing Transition Metal Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmehl, Russell H. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States)

    2016-03-02

    This is the final technical report for a project carried out at Tulane University of New Orleans that describes the development of light induced (solar) reactions geared toward decomposing water into its component elements : hydrogen and oxygen. Much of the work involved optimizing systems for absorbing visible light and undergoing light promoted reactions to generate very strong reducing agents that are capable of reacting with water to produce hydrogen. Additional portions of the research were collaborative efforts to put the strong reducing agents to work in reaction with hydrogen generation catalysts prepared elsewhere. Time resolved laser spectroscopic methods were used to evaluate the light induced reactions and characterize very reactive intermediate substances formed during the reactions.

  3. Gender and the energy transition in the North: light on dark area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clancy, Joy S.; Sugey Garcia Vazquez, Carla; Warbroek, Wynzen Douwe Beau

    2016-01-01

    Energy policies assume that women and men have the same values, experiences and aspirations towards energy production and use. In other words, energy policies are gender blind – neglecting gender-based differences in perception, socialization and values. There are arguments that ignoring these

  4. Public, road, urban and large areas lighting, illuminations and lifestyles. The right lighting. Mastery of needs, mastery of quality, mastery of light, mastery of energy; Eclairage public, routier, urbain, grand espaces, illuminations et cadre de vie. Eclairer juste. Maitrise des besoins, maitrise de la qualite, maitrise de la lumiere, maitrise de l'energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The evolution of the economical and social life has led to an increase of the security, comfort and environment protection needs. Thus, the local authorities have to define the best lighting systems with the right light at the right place, at the right time at at the best cost. Despite the evolutions noticed during the last years, the lighting systems of urban areas is not always well adapted to the users' needs. Thanks to the products and equipments available today it is possible to light better and to consume less. This document summarizes the requirements for the mastery of lighting systems cost: mastery of needs, mastery of quality (lamps, lighting systems, electronic ballasts), mastery of light (time and quantity control), light management and maintenance; specifications for a road lighting project; specifications for an urban lighting project; lighting of parks and monuments; large areas, car parks and recreational facilities; power supply and management auxiliaries; advices and financial help from the French agency of environment and energy mastery, the European 'Greenlight' program. (J.S.)

  5. Predesign energy analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-09-01

    A new graphic technique developed to help architects and engineers design more energy-efficient buildings is presented. An energy-efficient design includes two interrelated elements: physical design characteristics which minimize testing, cooling, and lighting loads; and mechanical and electrical subsystems which meet energy loads efficiently. The technique focuses on manipulation of design variables to effectively reduce excessive heat gains and losses. The technique, termed a visual one, is designed to show how a building uses energy. The technique described can also be done manually.

  6. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enriquez, Miriam M.; Zhang, Cheng; Tan, Howe-Siang, E-mail: howesiang@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Akhtar, Parveen; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H., E-mail: lambrev@brc.hu [Institute of Plant Biology, Biological Research Centre, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 521, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)

    2015-06-07

    The pathways and dynamics of excitation energy transfer between the chlorophyll (Chl) domains in solubilized trimeric and aggregated light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) are examined using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). The LHCII trimers and aggregates exhibit the unquenched and quenched excitonic states of Chl a, respectively. 2DES allows direct correlation of excitation and emission energies of coupled states over population time delays, hence enabling mapping of the energy flow between Chls. By the excitation of the entire Chl b Q{sub y} band, energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a states is monitored in the LHCII trimers and aggregates. Global analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) spectra reveals that energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a occurs on fast and slow time scales of 240–270 fs and 2.8 ps for both forms of LHCII. 2D decay-associated spectra resulting from the global analysis identify the correlation between Chl states involved in the energy transfer and decay at a given lifetime. The contribution of singlet–singlet annihilation on the kinetics of Chl energy transfer and decay is also modelled and discussed. The results show a marked change in the energy transfer kinetics in the time range of a few picoseconds. Owing to slow energy equilibration processes, long-lived intermediate Chl a states are present in solubilized trimers, while in aggregates, the population decay of these excited states is significantly accelerated, suggesting that, overall, the energy transfer within the LHCII complexes is faster in the aggregated state.

  7. Effects of supplemental calcium salts of palm oil and chromium-propionate on insulin sensitivity and productive and reproductive traits of mid- to late-lactating Holstein × Gir dairy cows consuming excessive energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, T; Cooke, R F; Brandão, A P; Bertin, R D; Colombo, E A; Miranda, V F B; Lourenço, L A C; Rodrigues, S M B; Vasconcelos, J L M

    2017-10-25

    This experiment compared insulin sensitivity, milk production, and reproductive outcomes in dairy cows consuming excessive energy during mid to late lactation and receiving in a 2 × 2 factorial design (1) concentrate based on ground corn (CRN; n = 20) or including 8% (DM basis) of Ca salts of palm oil (CSPO; n = 20), and (2) supplemented (n = 20) or not (n = 20) with 2.5 g/d of Cr-propionate. During the experiment (d 0-203), 40 multiparous, nonpregnant, lactating 3/4 Holstein × 1/4 Gir cows (initial days in milk = 81 ± 2; mean ± SE) were offered corn silage for ad libitum consumption, and individually received concentrate formulated to allow diets to provide 160% of their daily net energy for lactation requirements. From d -15 to 203, milk production was recorded daily, blood samples collected weekly, and cow body weight (BW) and body condition score (BCS) recorded on d 0 and 203. For dry matter intake evaluation, cows from both treatments were randomly divided in 5 groups of 8 cows each, and allocated to 8 individual feeding stations for 3 d. Intake was evaluated 6 times/group. Glucose tolerance tests (GTT; 0.5 g of glucose/kg of BW) were performed on d -3, 100, and 200. Follicle aspiration for in vitro embryo production was performed via transvaginal ovum pick-up on d -1, 98, and 198. Mean DMI, net energy for lactation intake, as well as BW and BCS change were similar across treatments. On average, cows gained 40 kg of BW and 0.49 BCS during the experiment. Within weekly blood samples, CRN cows had lower serum concentrations of glucose, insulin, fatty acids, and insulin-to-glucose ratio compared with CSPO cows, suggesting increased insulin sensitivity in CRN cows. During the GTT, insulin-sensitivity traits were also greater in CRN versus CSPO cows. Supplemental Cr-propionate resulted in lower serum insulin concentrations and insulin-to-glucose ratio within CRN cows only, indicating that Cr-propionate improved basal insulin sensitivity in CRN but not in CSPO

  8. Energy efficiency and color quality limits in artificial light sources emulating natural illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertog, Wim; Llenas, Aleix; Quintero, Jesús M; Hunt, Charles E; Carreras, Josep

    2014-12-15

    We present in this work a calculation of the theoretical limits attainable for natural light emulation with regard to the joint optimization of the Luminous Efficacy of Radiation and color fidelity by using multiple reflectance spectra datasets, along with an implementation of a physical device that approaches these limits. A reduced visible spectrum of blackbody radiators is introduced and demonstrated which allows lamps designed to emulate natural light to operate with excellent color fidelity and higher efficiency as compared to full visible spectrum sources. It is shown that even though 3,000K and 5,500K blackbody sources have maximum efficacies of 21 lm/W and 89 lm/W, respectively, reduced-spectrum artificial light sources can exceed those values up to 363 lm/W and 313 lm/W, respectively, while retaining excellent color fidelity. Experimental demonstration approaching these values is accomplished through the design and implementation of a 12-channel light engine which emits arbitrarily-tunable spectra. The color fidelity of the designed spectra is assessed through Color Rendering Maps, showing that color fidelity is preserved uniformly over a large spectral reflectance dataset, unlike other approaches to generate white light.

  9. Visible light-harvesting photoanodes for solar energy conversion: A comparison of anchoring groups to titanium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Lauren A.

    Environmental concerns related to climate change and geopolitical issues related to energy security have led to a widespread pursuit of alternative, non-fossil fuel energy sources capable of meeting our increasing global energy demands. Solar energy, which strikes the earth's surface at a rate vastly exceeding our current worldwide power demand, presents itself as a promising source of clean, abundant and renewable energy. The capture and conversion of solar energy into electricity as well as storable, transportable chemical fuels has therefore become major area of chemical research. Inspired by photosynthesis in nature, in which plants and algae convert sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide into oxygen and stored chemical fuel in the form of sugars, recent work has focused on visible light-driven water-splitting technologies for the production of solar fuels. Honda and Fujishima reported the first example of photoelectrochemical water oxidation in 1972. In their system, an inexpensive titanium dioxide semiconductor irradiated with ultraviolet light produced oxygen at the photoanode surface and hydrogen at the surface of a platinum counter electrode. In attempt to harness visible light instead, titanium dioxide and other inexpensive wide band gap photoanodes have been functionalized with visible light-absorbing molecular dyes. These dye-sensitized photoanodes have been used successfully to convert solar energy into electrical current, as in dye-sensitized solar cells, and to drive chemical processes like water oxidation, as in photocatalytic cells. In both systems, a long-lived charge separation is established upon illumination of the photoanode surface when a photoexcited molecular chromophore transfers an electron to the semiconductor conduction band. Following this electron injection process, a nearby redox-active species is oxidized and refills the hole left behind on the molecular chromophore. While the steps of this scheme are relatively straightforward, the

  10. Chapter 2: Commercial and Industrial Lighting Evaluation Protocol. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurnik, Charles W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gowans, Dakers [Left Fork Energy, Harrison, NY (United States); Telarico, Chad [DNV GL, Mahwah, NJ (United States)

    2017-11-02

    The Commercial and Industrial Lighting Evaluation Protocol (the protocol) describes methods to account for gross energy savings resulting from the programmatic installation of efficient lighting equipment in large populations of commercial, industrial, and other nonresidential facilities. This protocol does not address savings resulting from changes in codes and standards, or from education and training activities. A separate Uniform Methods Project (UMP) protocol, Chapter 3: Commercial and Industrial Lighting Controls Evaluation Protocol, addresses methods for evaluating savings resulting from lighting control measures such as adding time clocks, tuning energy management system commands, and adding occupancy sensors.

  11. Non-disruptive regime changes-The case of competing energy efficient lighting trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franceschini, Simone; Alkemade, Floortje

    2016-01-01

    Technologies within the same industry are expected to follow similar patterns of innovation, and when the dominant patterns change, this is often expected to have disruptive effects on the industry. However, the three most recent lighting technologies (fluorescent, compact fluorescent, and LED......) show different patterns of innovative activities despite similarities in the determinants of innovation; and we observed multiple technological regimes within the lighting industry. Furthermore, we observed changes in these innovative patterns without widespread disruptive effects. While FL and LED...... for policymakers in stimulating new technologies in industries with undesirable Mark II pattern through the influence of all the dimensions of the technological regimes....

  12. Sputtering layers of different materials on tungsten surface by light ions of medium energy bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukhin, V. V.

    2017-11-01

    There is an analytical formula allows to calculate the sputtering yields of heterogonous solid targets with light ions, based on the model of sputtering layered surfaces with light ions. Of particular interest is the sputtering of layers of different materials with the tungsten surface, which can be a material for the first wall of fusion reactor. The results of the calculations are in good agreement with the data of computer simulation, and show that the sputtering yields layers with a certain thickness, higher than the sputtering yields of homogeneous material layer targets (“mirror effect”).

  13. Oxidative damage and photosynthetic impairment in tropical rice cultivars upon exposure to excess iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel de Souza Pinto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Iron plays a pivotal role in the redox reactions of photosynthesis and metabolic processes such as chlorophyll synthesis. Iron availability in waterlogged soils can reach toxic levels and promote oxidative stress. Fe toxicity is the most concerning of stresses for rice in many lowland environments around the world and may cause severe impairments in rice photosynthesis. This study aimed to investigate the extension of oxidative stress after excess Fe exposure and its effects on the photosynthesis of rice cultivars with differential sensitivity. Three Brazilian rice cultivars (EPAGRI 107, BRSMG SELETA and BR IRGA 409 were grown in Hoagland nutrient solution (pH 4.0 with two Fe-EDTA doses corresponding to excess Fe (7 mM and control (0.009 mM treatments. After just three days of excess Fe exposure, there was a significant increase in iron concentration in the shoots. The BR IRGA 409 cultivar exhibited higher Fe accumulation in its shoots, and the EPAGRI 107 cultivar recorded the lowest values, which were below the critical toxicity level, as a resistance strategy. Impairment in light energy partitioning and oxidative damage became evident before changes in stomatal resistance, chlorophyll content, maximal PSII quantum yield or visual symptoms for the most sensitive cultivar (BR IRGA 409. The photosynthesis limitations, in addition to the impairment of excess energy dissipation in rice from iron toxicity, are the results of oxidative damage.

  14. Energy Impacts of Wide Band Gap Semiconductors in U.S. Light-Duty Electric Vehicle Fleet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Joshua A; Riddle, Matthew E; Graziano, Diane J; Das, Sujit; Upadhyayula, Venkata K K; Masanet, Eric; Cresko, Joe

    2015-09-01

    Silicon carbide and gallium nitride, two leading wide band gap semiconductors with significant potential in electric vehicle power electronics, are examined from a life cycle energy perspective and compared with incumbent silicon in U.S. light-duty electric vehicle fleet. Cradle-to-gate, silicon carbide is estimated to require more than twice the energy as silicon. However, the magnitude of vehicle use phase fuel savings potential is comparatively several orders of magnitude higher than the marginal increase in cradle-to-gate energy. Gallium nitride cradle-to-gate energy requirements are estimated to be similar to silicon, with use phase savings potential similar to or exceeding that of silicon carbide. Potential energy reductions in the United States vehicle fleet are examined through several scenarios that consider the market adoption potential of electric vehicles themselves, as well as the market adoption potential of wide band gap semiconductors in electric vehicles. For the 2015-2050 time frame, cumulative energy savings associated with the deployment of wide band gap semiconductors are estimated to range from 2-20 billion GJ depending on market adoption dynamics.

  15. Vibronic coupling explains the ultrafast carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in natural and artificial light harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlík, Václav; Seibt, Joachim; Cranston, Laura J.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Lincoln, Craig N.; Savolainen, Janne; Šanda, František; Mančal, Tomáš; Hauer, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    The initial energy transfer steps in photosynthesis occur on ultrafast timescales. We analyze the carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 Marichromatium purpuratum as well as in an artificial light-harvesting dyad system by using transient grating and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with 10 fs time resolution. We find that Förster-type models reproduce the experimentally observed 60 fs transfer times, but overestimate coupling constants, which lead to a disagreement with both linear absorption and electronic 2D-spectra. We show that a vibronic model, which treats carotenoid vibrations on both electronic ground and excited states as part of the system's Hamiltonian, reproduces all measured quantities. Importantly, the vibronic model presented here can explain the fast energy transfer rates with only moderate coupling constants, which are in agreement with structure based calculations. Counterintuitively, the vibrational levels on the carotenoid electronic ground state play the central role in the excited state population transfer to bacteriochlorophyll; resonance between the donor-acceptor energy gap and the vibrational ground state energies is the physical basis of the ultrafast energy transfer rates in these systems.

  16. Vibronic coupling explains the ultrafast carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in natural and artificial light harvesters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlík, Václav; Seibt, Joachim; Šanda, František; Mančal, Tomáš [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, Ke Karlovu 5, Prague 121 16 (Czech Republic); Cranston, Laura J.; Cogdell, Richard J. [Institute of Molecular Cell and System Biology, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre, 120 University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Lincoln, Craig N.; Hauer, Jürgen, E-mail: juergen.hauer@tuwien.ac.at [Photonics Institute, Vienna University of Technology, Gusshausstrasse 27, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Savolainen, Janne [Department of Physical Chemistry II, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2015-06-07

    The initial energy transfer steps in photosynthesis occur on ultrafast timescales. We analyze the carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 Marichromatium purpuratum as well as in an artificial light-harvesting dyad system by using transient grating and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with 10 fs time resolution. We find that Förster-type models reproduce the experimentally observed 60 fs transfer times, but overestimate coupling constants, which lead to a disagreement with both linear absorption and electronic 2D-spectra. We show that a vibronic model, which treats carotenoid vibrations on both electronic ground and excited states as part of the system’s Hamiltonian, reproduces all measured quantities. Importantly, the vibronic model presented here can explain the fast energy transfer rates with only moderate coupling constants, which are in agreement with structure based calculations. Counterintuitively, the vibrational levels on the carotenoid electronic ground state play the central role in the excited state population transfer to bacteriochlorophyll; resonance between the donor-acceptor energy gap and the vibrational ground state energies is the physical basis of the ultrafast energy transfer rates in these systems.

  17. New air Cherenkov light detectors to study mass composition of cosmic rays with energies above knee region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsunesada, Yoshiki, E-mail: tsunesada@cr.phys.titech.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 Japan (Japan); Katsuya, Ryoichi, E-mail: katsuya@cr.phys.titech.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 Japan (Japan); Mitsumori, Yu; Nakayama, Keisuke; Kakimoto, Fumio; Tokuno, Hisao [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 Japan (Japan); Tajima, Norio [RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Miranda, Pedro; Salinas, Juan; Tavera, Wilfredo [Instituto de Investigaciones Físicas, Universidad Mayor de San Andrés, La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of)

    2014-11-01

    We have installed a hybrid detection system for air showers generated by cosmic rays with energies greater than 3×10{sup 15}eV at Mount Chacaltaya (5200 m above the sea level), in order to study the mass composition of cosmic rays above the knee region. This detection system comprises an air shower array with 49 scintillation counters in an area of 500 m×650 m, and seven new Cherenkov light detectors installed in a radial direction from the center of the air shower array with a separation of 50 m. It is known that the longitudinal development of a particle cascade in the atmosphere strongly depends on the type of the primary nucleus, and an air shower initiated by a heavier nucleus develops faster than that by a lighter primary of the same energy, because of the differences in the interaction cross-section and the energy per nucleon. This can be measured by detecting the Cherenkov radiation emitted from charged particles in air showers at higher altitudes. In this paper we describe the design and performance of our new non-imaging Cherenkov light detectors at Mount Chacaltaya that are operated in conjunction with the air shower array. The arrival directions and energies of air showers are determined by the shower array, and information about the primary masses is obtained from the Cherenkov light data including the time profiles and lateral distributions. The detector consists of photomultiplier tube (PMT), high-speed ADCs, other control modules, and data storage device. The Cherenkov light signals from an air shower are typically 10–100 ns long, and the waveforms are digitized with a sampling frequency of 1 GHz and recorded in situ without long-distance analog signal transfers. All the Cherenkov light detectors record their time-series data by receiving a triggering signal transmitted from the trigger module of the air shower array, which is fired by a coincidence of shower signals in four neighboring scintillation counters. The optical characteristics of the

  18. Design and testing of a separate-type lighting system using solar energy and cold-cathode fluorescent lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.-P. [Department of Electrical Engineering, China Institute of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan 115, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: april4120@tp.edu.tw; Hsiao, H.-C. [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan 106, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: hsiao@mouse.ee.ntust.edu.tw

    2007-01-15

    This paper presents a solar-powered lighting system, using cold-cathode fluorescent-lamps (CCFLs), with its battery-charging circuit and lamp-ignition circuit being separated so that its solar panels can be installed at any distance deemed necessary away from the lighting site in order to receive the maximum solar energy available. This system adopts the maximum-power point tracking (MPPT) method to control the power output of the solar panels and uses the zero-voltage switching (ZVS) DC-DC converter, as the charging circuit, to increase the panels' power generation efficiency and the charging circuit's conversion efficiency. The electronic ballast circuit for the CCFL is constructed with a half-bridge inverter, a resonant inductor, and a Rosen-type piezoelectric transformer, which forms a piezoelectric resonant-type inverter: to simplify the circuitry and to improve the power conversion efficiency, the ballast circuit is designed to directly step up the battery voltage in igniting the lamp. We also establish the transmission-parameter model for the piezoelectric resonant-type inverter to provide the base for the electric-power circuit design. Our experimental results indicate that the proposed system possesses some advantages, such as greater energy efficiency, circuitry simplicity, and so on, and is suitable for night lighting in house yards, parks and advertising panels.

  19. Aligned energy-level design for decreasing operation voltage of tandem white organic light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chih-Hao, E-mail: chc@saturn.yzu.edu.tw [Department of Photonics Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li 32003, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wu, Zih-Jyun; Liang, Yi-Hu; Chang, Yu-Shuo; Chiu, Chuan-Hao; Tai, Cheng-Wei [Department of Photonics Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li 32003, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chang, Hsin-Hua, E-mail: hhua3@mail.vnu.edu.tw [Department of Electro-Optical Engineering, Vanung University, Chung-Li 32061, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-12-02

    In general, organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) need to operate at higher current density levels to ensure an ample light flux. However, stressed operation will result in poor performance and limited device lifetime. Recently, a tandem structure has been proposed as a pivotal technique to meet the stringent lighting requirements for OLED commercialization, with a research focus on decreasing the concomitant higher operation voltage. Driving two connected emission units (EMUs) in a tandem structure often requires more than twice the driving voltage for a single EMU. This study investigates bipolar host materials and their effective employment in fabricating tandem white phosphorescent OLEDs (PhOLEDs). In addition, the design of a mechanism to align the energy level between the hole transport layer/emitting layer is shown to effectively mitigate operational voltages. In sharp contrast to devices using a unipolar host material, we demonstrate that the turn-on voltage of blue PhOLEDs could be decreased from 3.8 V to 2.7 V through utilizing a bipolar host. Furthermore, applying the proposed techniques to tandem white PhOLEDs produces a luminance of 10{sup 3} cd/m{sup 2} by a 10.1 V driving voltage. - Highlights: • The matched energy level between the hole transport/emitting layer lowers voltages. • Multiple conduction dopants were used to investigate charge generation layer. • Two-color emitters were used to quantify the charge generation strength.

  20. Lighting and energy supply for heating in building using algae power

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Today, given the rapid population growth and human needs as well as the increasing consumption of energy, the phenomenon of energy crisis can be seen in the world. In the past one hundred years, the need for sustainable, cheap and clean fuel sources has been taken into consideration more than before. A significant ...

  1. 76 FR 47178 - Energy Efficiency Program: Test Procedure for Lighting Systems (Luminaires)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ... STAR test procedures reference industry test procedures for fluorescent, high-intensity discharge and... unit consisting of a fluorescent lamp or lamps, together with parts designed to distribute the light... for the high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps determination arguing that ``industry believes that the...

  2. Wearable monitors criterion validity for energy expenditure in sedentary and light activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florez-Pregonero Alberto

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: None of the WMs tested in this study were equivalent with the criterion measure (VO2 in estimating sedentary-to-light activities; however, the activPAL had greater overall accuracy in measuring SB and LPA than did the ActiGraph and SenseWear 2 monitors.

  3. Investigating Bandgap Energies, Materials, and Design of Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Eugene P., II

    2016-01-01

    A student laboratory experiment to investigate the intrinsic and extrinsic bandgaps, dopant materials, and diode design in light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is presented. The LED intrinsic bandgap is determined by passing a small constant current through the diode and recording the junction voltage variation with temperature. A second visible…

  4. Mathematical review of the energy transduction stoichiometries of C4 leaf photosynthesis under limiting light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, X.; Struik, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    A generalized model for electron (e-) transport limited C4 photosynthesis of NAD–malic enzyme and NADP–malic enzyme subtypes is presented. The model is used to review the thylakoid stoichiometries in vivo under strictly limiting light conditions, using published data on photosynthetic quantum yield

  5. Effect of condensation on light transmission and energy budget of seven greenhouse cover materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Mohammadkhani; Gert-Jan Swinkels; C. Stanghellini; Piet Sonneveld; M.A. Bruins

    2011-01-01

    Model calculations and the few data that are available show that over 100 L water condense yearly on each square meter of a greenhouse cover. It is known that the presence of condensate reduces light transmission. This effect is suppressed to some extent by adding film-forming (anti-drop) additives

  6. Effect of condensation on light transmission and energy budget of seven greenhouse cover materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanghellini, C.; Bruins, M.A.; Mohammadkhani, V.; Swinkels, G.L.A.M.; Sonneveld, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Model calculations and the few data that are available show that over 100 L water condense yearly on each square meter of a greenhouse cover. It is known that the presence of condensate reduces light transmission. This effect is suppressed to some extent by adding film-forming (anti-drop) additives

  7. Solar-light photocatalytic disinfection using crystalline/amorphous low energy bandgap reduced TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngmin; Hwang, Hee Min; Wang, Luyang; Kim, Ikjoon; Yoon, Yeoheung; Lee, Hyoyoung

    2016-01-01

    A generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from TiO2 under solar light has been long sought since the ROS can disinfect organic pollutants. We found that newly developed crystalline/amorphous reduced TiO2 (rTiO2) that has low energy bandgap can effectively generate ROS under solar light and successfully remove a bloom of algae. The preparation of rTiO2 is a one-pot and mass productive solution-process reduction using lithium-ethylene diamine (Li-EDA) at room temperature. Interestingly only the rutile phase of TiO2 crystal was reduced, while the anatase phase even in case of both anatase/rutile phased TiO2 was not reduced. Only reduced TiO2 materials can generate ROS under solar light, which was confirmed by electron spin resonance. Among the three different types of Li-EDA treated TiO2 (anatase, rutile and both phased TiO2), the both phased rTiO2 showed the best performance to produce ROS. The generated ROS effectively removed the common green algae Chlamydomonas. This is the first report on algae degradation under solar light, proving the feasibility of commercially available products for disinfection. PMID:27121120

  8. Light energy management in micropropagated plants of Castanea sativa, effects of photoinhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Patricia L; Bravo, León A; Latsague, Mirtha I; Toneatti, Marcelo J; Sánchez-Olate, Manuel; Ríos, Darcy G

    2013-03-01

    The limited development of photoprotective mechanisms, specifically heat dissipation capacity, found in micropropagated plants may be the result of low xanthophyll cycle pigment content and reduced de-epoxidation capacity making them highly susceptible to photodamage. The effects of gradual or sudden increase of light on Castanea sativa in vitro cultured and during their ex vitro transference was evaluated. The results were compared with those determined in nursery-grown plants. In vitro plants responded poorly to gradual increase in irradiance, exhibiting a low electron transport rate (ETR) agreeing with low non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and a limited de-epoxidation capacity, not synthesizing detectable amounts of zeaxanthin (Z). Regarding a sudden increase in light (photoinhibition treatment, PhT); post-PhT as in vitro as well nursery plants showed a significant decrease in their maximal efficiency of PSII (F(v)/F(m)), but in vitro the decrease was very drastic (around 0.2) different from that observed in nursery (around 0.69). In vitro, NPQ was mainly determined by the slow relaxing component, NPQ(s) (80.8%), concomitant with a pronounced decrease of D1 protein post-PhT, and a lack of de-epoxidation capacity. During ex vitro transfer, PhT lead to death of some plants, specifically during root induction. The photoprotective mechanisms were activated over time in ex vitro conditions, indicating that micropropagated Castanea sativa display a potential for light acclimation, adjusting their photosynthetic apparatus to the ambient growth irradiance. Understanding the mechanisms that micropropagated plants deployed and how they face high light intensity events, will allow us to search for strategies to improve performance to possible light fluctuations that normally occur in ex vitro conditions during plant acclimation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Design principles of photosynthetic light-harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Graham R; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S; Amarnath, Kapil; Zaks, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms are capable of harvesting solar energy with near unity quantum efficiency. Even more impressively, this efficiency can be regulated in response to the demands of photosynthetic reactions and the fluctuating light-levels of natural environments. We discuss the distinctive design principles through which photosynthetic light-harvesting functions. These emergent properties of photosynthesis appear both within individual pigment-protein complexes and in how these complexes integrate to produce a functional, regulated apparatus that drives downstream photochemistry. One important property is how the strong interactions and resultant quantum coherence, produced by the dense packing of photosynthetic pigments, provide a tool to optimize for ultrafast, directed energy transfer. We also describe how excess energy is quenched to prevent photodamage under high-light conditions, which we investigate through theory and experiment. We conclude with comments on the potential of using these features to improve solar energy devices.

  10. Evaluation of excitation energy and spin from light charged particles multiplicities in heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Steckmeyer, J C; Grotowski, K; Pawowski, P; Aiello, S; Anzalone, A; Bini, M; Borderie, B; Bougault, R; Cardella, G; Casini, G; Cavallaro, S; Charvet, J L; Dayras, R; De Filippo, E; Durand, D; Femin, S; Frankland, J D; Galíchet, E; Geraci, M; Giustolisi, F; Guazzoni, P; Iacono-Manno, M; Lanzalone, G; Lanzan, G; Le Neindre, N; Lo Nigro, S; Lo Piano, F; Olmi, A; Pagano, A; Papa, M; Pârlog, M; Pasquali, G; Piantelli, S; Pirrone, S; Politi, G; Porto, F; Rivet, M F; Rizzo, F; Rosato, E; Roy, R; Sambataro, S; Sperduto, M L; Stefanini, A A; Sutera, C; Tamain, B; Vient, E; Volant, C; Wieleczko, J P; Zetta, L

    2005-01-01

    A simple procedure for evaluating the excitation energy and the spin transfer in heavy-ion dissipative collisions is proposed. It is based on a prediction of the GEMINI evaporation code : for a nucleus with a given excitation energy, the average number of emitted protons decreases with increasing spin, whereas the average number of alpha particles increases. Using that procedure for the reaction 107Ag+58Ni at 52 MeV/nucleon, the excitation energy and spin of quasi-projectiles have been evaluated. The results obtained in this way have been compared with the predictions of a model describing the primary dynamic stage of heavy-ion collisions.

  11. Energy-efficient light scooter; Energieeffizienter Leicht-Scooter im Gewichtsbereich eines Mofa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, A.

    2005-07-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of feasibility study on the development of an energy-efficient lightweight scooter. The report looks at the low energy consumption and low CO{sub 2} emissions of ultra-lightweight vehicles and presents a market analysis. The state-of-the-art of electrically-powered two-wheel vehicles is reviewed. Further topics include technical feasibility, drive-system components and battery-management systems. Safety considerations and economical feasibility are examined, as are functional requirements. A vision for a ultra-lightweight scooter is presented and industrial production aspects are reviewed.

  12. Light Spins of Cylindrical Electromagnetic Waves and their Jumps across Material Interfaces in the Presence of Energy Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mok

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate light spins for cylindrical electromagnetic waves on resonance. To this goal, we consider both a dielectric cylinder of infinite length immersed in vacuum and a cylindrical hole punched through a dense dielectric medium. In order for waves of constant frequencies to be established through lossless media, energy absorption is allowed in the surrounding medium to compensate for radiation loss. The dispersion relation is then numerically solved for an asymmetry parameter implying a balance in energy exchange. Numerical studies are performed by varying parameters of refractive index contrast, azimuthal mode index, and size parameter of a cylindrical object. The resulting data is presented mostly in terms of a specific spin, defined as light spin per energy density. This specific spin is found to be bounded in its magnitude, with its maximum associated with either optical vortices or large rotations. Depending on parametric combinations, the specific spin could not only undergo finite jumps across the material interface but also exhibit limit behaviors.

  13. Energy Levels of Light Nuclei, A = 3--20, Available from Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory on the World Wide Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheves, C. M.; Chasteler, R. M.; Guillemette, J. F.; Laymon, C. M.; Weller, H. R.; Tilley, D. R.

    1996-10-01

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) Nuclear Data Evaluation Group provides an extensive collection of nuclear data information for A=3--20 on the World Wide Web. Currently included are: Energy Level Diagrams for A=4--20. (2) Abridged versions of TUNL's most recent evaluations, ``Energy Levels of Light Nuclei'' for A=16, 17, 18, 19, and 20 (preliminary). (3) Adopted levels and decay data in ENSDAT style for A=3--20 nuclei as well as reaction data for A=18, 19. This format is similar to the Nuclear Data Sheets style for higher mass nuclei and is based on information from the NNDC Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENSDF). (4) The A=1--20 portion of the Table of Isotopes, which was provided to TUNL by the Berkeley Isotopes Project. (5) Information about the current status of A=3--20 ``Energy Levels of Light Nuclei'' reviews by Fay Ajzenberg-Selove and by the TUNL group. (6) Abridged versions of Fay Ajzenberg-Selove's most recent evaluation for A=5--10. Work supported by DOE Contract Nos. DEFG05-91-ER40619 and DEFG05-88-ER40441.

  14. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Compact Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barletta, William A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Borland, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2010-05-11

    This report is based on a BES Workshop on Compact Light Sources, held May 11-12, 2010, to evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of compact light source approaches and compared their performance to the third generation storage rings and free-electron lasers. The workshop examined the state of the technology for compact light sources and their expected progress. The workshop evaluated the cost efficiency, user access, availability, and reliability of such sources. Working groups evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of Compact Light Source (CLS) approaches, and compared their performance to the third-generation storage rings and free-electron lasers (FELs). The primary aspects of comparison were 1) cost effectiveness, 2) technical availability v. time frame, and 3) machine reliability and availability for user access. Five categories of potential sources were analyzed: 1) inverse Compton scattering (ICS) sources, 2) mini storage rings, 3) plasma sources, 4) sources using plasma-based accelerators, and 5) laser high harmonic generation (HHG) sources. Compact light sources are not a substitute for large synchrotron and FEL light sources that typically also incorporate extensive user support facilities. Rather they offer attractive, complementary capabilities at a small fraction of the cost and size of large national user facilities. In the far term they may offer the potential for a new paradigm of future national user facility. In the course of the workshop, we identified overarching R&D topics over the next five years that would enhance the performance potential of both compact and large-scale sources: Development of infrared (IR) laser systems delivering kW-class average power with femtosecond pulses at kHz repetition rates. These have application to ICS sources, plasma sources, and HHG sources. Development of laser storage cavities for storage of 10-mJ picosecond and femtosecond pulses focused to micron beam sizes. Development of high-brightness, high

  15. Measuring Excess Noise in SDL's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzberg, S. J.; Kowitz, H. R.; Rowland, C. W.; Shull, T. A.; Ruggles, S. L.; Matthews, L. F.

    1983-01-01

    New instrument gives quantitive information on "excess noise" in semiconductor-diode laser (SDL's). By proper selection of detector, instrument tests any SDL from visible wavelengths through thermal infrared. Lasers determine excess noise in SKL source by measuring photocurrent generated in photodetector exposed first to reference laser then to SKL under test.

  16. Green light for the Green Certificate System for sustainable energy?; Groen licht voor het groencertificatensysteem?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgers, J. [Wetenschappelijke Raad voor het Regeringsbeleid WRR, The Hague (Netherlands); Van den Bergh, J.C.J.M.; Van Eijs, D.D.M.H. [Faculteit der Economische Wetenschappen en Econometrie, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    In 2001, the Green Certificate System for Sustainable Energy will become operational. This certificate system will stimulate sustainable production of energy in the Netherlands, which should reduce the Dutch contribution to CO2 emissions. The pros and cons of such a system are discussed it is investigated whether it is ready for implementation. Liberalisation of energy markets in an international context serves as a starting point, because it has an important influence on trends in national energy provision. It is also examined whether anything can be learned from the experience gained with American systems of tradable permits, which show some similarity to the Green Certificate System. Finally, a checklist of characteristics, that the system should meet in order to be an effective part of the environmental and especially climate policy of the Netherlands, is given. If those conditions are satisfied, the system seems ripe for implementation. 7 refs.

  17. On the Early-Time Excess Emission in Hydrogen-Poor Superluminous Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreeswijk, Paul M.; Leloudas, Giorgos; Gal-Yam, Avishay; De Cia, Annalisa; Perley, Daniel A.; Quimby, Robert M.; Waldman, Roni; Sullivan, Mark; Yan, Lin; Ofek, Eran O.; hide

    2017-01-01

    We present the light curves of the hydrogen-poor super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe I) PTF 12dam and iPTF 13dcc, discovered by the (intermediate) Palomar Transient Factory. Both show excess emission at early times and a slowly declining light curve at late times. The early bump in PTF 12dam is very similar in duration (approximately 10 days) and brightness relative to the main peak (23 mag fainter) compared to that observed in other SLSNe I. In contrast, the long-duration (greater than 30 days) early excess emission in iPTF 13dcc, whose brightness competes with that of the main peak, appears to be of a different nature. We construct bolometric light curves for both targets, and fit a variety of light-curve models to both the early bump and main peak in an attempt to understand the nature of these explosions. Even though the slope of the late-time decline in the light curves of both SLSNe is suggestively close to that expected from the radioactive decay of 56Ni and 56Co, the amount of nickel required to power the full light curves is too large considering the estimated ejecta mass. The magnetar model including an increasing escape fraction provides a reasonable description of the PTF 12dam observations. However, neither the basic nor the double-peaked magnetar model is capable of reproducing the light curve of iPTF 13dcc. A model combining a shock breakout in an extended envelope with late-time magnetar energy injection provides a reasonable fit to the iPTF 13dcc observations. Finally, we find that the light curves of both PTF 12dam and iPTF 13dcc can be adequately fit with the model involving interaction with the circumstellar medium.

  18. On the Early-time Excess Emission in Hydrogen-poor Superluminous Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreeswijk, Paul M.; Leloudas, Giorgos; Gal-Yam, Avishay; De Cia, Annalisa; Perley, Daniel A.; Quimby, Robert M.; Waldman, Roni; Sullivan, Mark; Yan, Lin; Ofek, Eran O.; Fremling, Christoffer; Taddia, Francesco; Sollerman, Jesper; Valenti, Stefano; Arcavi, Iair; Howell, D. Andrew; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Yaron, Ofer; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Cao, Yi; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Horesh, Assaf; Rubin, Adam; Lunnan, Ragnhild; Nugent, Peter E.; Laher, Russ; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Woźniak, Przemysław; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    2017-01-01

    We present the light curves of the hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSNe I) PTF 12dam and iPTF 13dcc, discovered by the (intermediate) Palomar Transient Factory. Both show excess emission at early times and a slowly declining light curve at late times. The early bump in PTF 12dam is very similar in duration (˜10 days) and brightness relative to the main peak (2-3 mag fainter) compared to that observed in other SLSNe I. In contrast, the long-duration (>30 days) early excess emission in iPTF 13dcc, whose brightness competes with that of the main peak, appears to be of a different nature. We construct bolometric light curves for both targets, and fit a variety of light-curve models to both the early bump and main peak in an attempt to understand the nature of these explosions. Even though the slope of the late-time decline in the light curves of both SLSNe is suggestively close to that expected from the radioactive decay of 56Ni and 56Co, the amount of nickel required to power the full light curves is too large considering the estimated ejecta mass. The magnetar model including an increasing escape fraction provides a reasonable description of the PTF 12dam observations. However, neither the basic nor the double-peaked magnetar model is capable of reproducing the light curve of iPTF 13dcc. A model combining a shock breakout in an extended envelope with late-time magnetar energy injection provides a reasonable fit to the iPTF 13dcc observations. Finally, we find that the light curves of both PTF 12dam and iPTF 13dcc can be adequately fit with the model involving interaction with the circumstellar medium.

  19. Decoherence- and Dimerization-assisted Energy Transport in Protomer of Light-Harvesting Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yun-Qing; Li, You-Quan

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of a protomer coupled to two different decoherent environments, each in a configuration called the spin star configuration. Using the quantum mechanics method, in different situations, we obtain the analytical expressions for the transition probability in the protomer system. In thermal equilibrium, there exist well-defined ranges of parameters for which decoherent interaction between the protomer and the environment assists energy transfer in the protomer system, while in pure quantum mechanics states, the decoherent interaction assists energy transfer for an eigenstate but against energy transfer for quantum mechanics averages. In particular, we also find that the dimerization of two bacteriochlorophylls in protomer can always assist energy transfer in certain parameter range, and in the appropriate spin bath energy, the efficiency of energy transport is sensitively depended on the temperature of environments. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11274272, 11304281, 31201001, and by the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province under Grant Nos. Y6110250, LY14A040001 and Zhejiang Ocean University (X12ZD10)

  20. Metasurface integrated high energy efficient and high linearly polarized InGaN/GaN light emitting diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miao; Xu, Fuyang; Lin, Yu; Cao, Bing; Chen, Linghua; Wang, Chinhua; Wang, Jianfeng; Xu, Ke

    2017-07-06

    We proposed and demonstrated an integrated high energy efficient and high linearly polarized InGaN/GaN green LED grown on (0001) oriented sapphire with combined metasurface polarizing converter and polarizer system. It is different from those conventional polarized light emissions generated with plasmonic metallic grating in which at least 50% high energy loss occurs inherently due to high reflection of the transverse electric (TE) component of an electric field. A reflecting metasurface, with a two dimensional elliptic metal cylinder array (EMCA) that functions as a half-wave plate, was integrated at the bottom of a LED such that the back-reflected TE component, that is otherwise lost by a dielectric/metal bi-layered wire grids (DMBiWG) polarizer on the top emitting surface of the LED, can be converted to desired transverse magnetic (TM) polarized emission after reflecting from the metasurface. This significantly enhances the polarized light emission efficiency. Experimental results show that extraction efficiency of the polarized emission can be increased by 40% on average in a wide angle of ±60° compared to that with the naked bottom of sapphire substrate, or 20% compared to reflecting Al film on the bottom of a sapphire substrate. An extinction ratio (ER) of average value 20 dB within an angle of ±60° can be simultaneously obtained directly from an InGaN/GaN LED. Our results show the possibility of simultaneously achieving a high degree of polarization and high polarization extraction efficiency at the integrated device level. This advances the field of GaN LED toward energy efficiency, multi-functional applications in illumination, display, medicine, and light manipulation.

  1. Solar-energy conversion and light emission in an atomic monolayer p-n diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospischil, Andreas; Furchi, Marco M; Mueller, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    The limitations of the bulk semiconductors currently used in electronic devices-rigidity, heavy weight and high costs--have recently shifted the research efforts to two-dimensional atomic crystals such as graphene and atomically thin transition-metal dichalcogenides. These materials have the potential to be produced at low cost and in large areas, while maintaining high material quality. These properties, as well as their flexibility, make two-dimensional atomic crystals attractive for applications such as solar cells or display panels. The basic building blocks of optoelectronic devices are p-n junction diodes, but they have not yet been demonstrated in a two-dimensional material. Here, we report a p-n junction diode based on an electrostatically doped tungsten diselenide (WSe2) monolayer. We present applications as a photovoltaic solar cell, a photodiode and a light-emitting diode, and obtain light-power conversion and electroluminescence efficiencies of ∼ 0.5% and ∼ 0.1%, respectively. Given recent advances in the large-scale production of two-dimensional crystals, we expect them to profoundly impact future developments in solar, lighting and display technologies.

  2. Visible light emission and energy transfer processes in Sm-doped nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, A. R.

    2012-06-01

    Even though the great interest in studying the near-infrared light emission due to Er3+ ions for telecommunication purposes, efficient visible radiation can be achieved from many different rare-earth (RE) ions. In fact, visible and/or near-infrared light emission takes place in RE-doped wide bandgap semiconductors following either photon or electron excitation, suggesting their technological potential in devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED's) and flat-panel displays, for example. Taking into consideration these aspects, the present contribution reports on the investigation of AlN, BeN, GeN, and SiN thin films doped with samarium. The samples were prepared by sputtering and as a result of the deposition method and conditions they present an amorphous structure and Sm concentrations in the low 0.5 at. %. After deposition, the samples were submitted to thermal annealing treatments and investigated by different spectroscopic techniques. A detailed examination of the experimental data allowed to identify optical transitions due to Sm3+ and Sm2+ ions as well as differences in their mechanisms of photon excitation and recombination. Moreover, it is shown that the Sm-related spectral features and emission intensity are susceptible, respectively, to the atomic environment the Sm3+/Sm2+ ions experience and to the presence of non-radiative recombination centers.

  3. Role of delocalized exciton states of light-harvesting pigments in excitation energy transfer in natural photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetisova, Zoya; Mauring, Koit; Taisova, Alexandra

    1995-02-01

    Photosynthesis is an extremely efficient converter of light into chemical energy, with an observed quantum yield for primary photochemistry approximately 90%. To achieve this the photosynthetic apparatus must be highly optimized, and some of the design principles that may be involved have been suggested. The role of delocalized exciton states of light-harvesting pigments in the energy transfer process has been considered by mathematical simulation of the light-harvesting process in model systems. Namely, it has been shown that aggregation of antenna pigments (allowing to consider each aggregate as a supermolecule) is biologically expedient, as an efficient strategy for light harvesting in photosynthesis. The question of whether this design principle is realized in a natural antenna has been examined for the 3D chlorosomal superantenna of green bacteria with the hole-burning spectroscopy. Spectral hole burning studies of intact cells of green bacteria Chlorobium phaeovibriodes. Chloroflexus aurantiacus and Chlorobium limicola have proven that the Qy- absorption system of antenna bacteriochlorophylls e or c (BChl e or BChl c) should be interpreted in terms of the delocalized exciton level structure of an aggregate. For the first time the 0-0 transition band of the lowest exciton state of BChl e and BChl c aggregates has been directly detected as the lowest energy inhomogeneously broadened band of the 1.8 K near-infrared excitation spectrum. These lowest energy bands have different spectral position of their maximums: approximately 739 nm in C.phaeovibriodes (BChl e band), approximately 752 nm in C.aurantiacus (BChl c band) and approximately 774 nm in C.limicola (BChl c band) cells. However, these bands display a number of fundamentally similar spectral features: (1) The magnitude of inhomogeneous broadening of these bands is 90 - 100 cm-1; (2) The width of each band is 2 - 3 times less than that of the monomeric BChl c (or BChl e) in vitro at 5 K; (3) Each band

  4. Estimating the impact of labelling high quality compact fluorescent lamps on the energy consumption for lighting in the residential sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zissis, G.; Ruscassie, R.; Aubes, M. [LAPLACE, Universite de Toulouse (France)

    2007-07-01

    European Climate Change Programme (ECCP) identified residential lighting as an important area, which could result in cost-effective savings of 7 Mtonnes of CO{sub 2} by 2010. However, the residential lighting market is still dominated by inefficient incandescence lamps. Market research indicated that to achieve durable market transformation and to substantially increase the use of Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) in this sector, it is essential to market attractive and good quality CFLs. One of the conclusions is that after a considerable number of promotion and rebate schemes, organised by national energy agencies, energy utilities and lamp manufacturers, the number of CFLs in household remains marginal. A first reason of pouting CFLs is directly linked to the poor quality of some products that standard customer may find in the European market. One of the objectives of the project EnERLIn (Energy Efficient Residential Lighting Initiative, EIE-05-0176) supported by European Commission (SAVE program) is to establish a list of criteria that should fulfil high quality CFLs and to propose a standard testing protocol. Both criteria list and procedure should be based on scientific arguments taking into account existing technology limitations. The proposed protocol could then be used for labelling high quality products and thus set customer's mind in rest. The use of a CFL Quality Charter instead of imposing new standards has the advantage to be easier to adopt and may phase-out low quality product just by exploring end-user behaviour. The first objective of the present paper is to give a draft of the criteria and of the proposed protocol. Then we will examine the impact of marketing 'labelled' high quality CFLs by elaborating scenarios for energy consumption for lighting in residential sector. In those scenarios we propose to extrapolate market size using existing growth rates 'filtered' by end-user behaviour ('evolutional', &apos

  5. The influence of intermittent fasting on the circadian pattern of melatonin while controlling for caloric intake, energy expenditure, light exposure, and sleep schedules: A preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aljohara S Almeneessier

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: In this preliminary report, under controlled conditions of light exposure, meal composition, energy expenditure, and sleep-wake schedules, intermittent fasting has no significant influence on the circadian pattern of melatonin.

  6. Handbook of industrial lighting

    CERN Document Server

    Lyons, Stanley L

    2013-01-01

    Handbook of Industrial Lighting is a practical guide on the specification, design, installation, operation, and maintenance of lighting in industrial premises. Coverage of the book includes the importance of good localized lighting; the different lighting schemes; lighting for difficult visual tasks; lighting in consideration to safety; and emergency lighting. The book also includes the practical, thermal, ventilation, and energy considerations; lighting in different environments; maintenance of lighting installations; and the cost benefits of efficient lighting. Appendices include useful info

  7. Crash compatibility between cars and light trucks: benefits of lowering front-end energy-absorbing structure in SUVs and pickups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Bryan C; Nolan, Joseph M; O'Neill, Brian; Genetos, Alexander P

    2008-01-01

    Passenger vehicles are designed to absorb crash energy in frontal crashes through deformation or crush of energy-absorbing structures forward of the occupant compartment. In collisions between cars and light trucks (i.e., pickups and SUVs), however, the capacity of energy-absorption structures may not be fully utilized because mismatches often exist between the heights of these structures in the colliding vehicles. In 2003 automakers voluntarily committed to new design standards aimed at reducing the height mismatches between cars and light trucks. By September 2009 all new light trucks will have either the primary front structure (typically the frame rails) or a secondary structure connected to the primary structure low enough to interact with the primary structures in cars, which for most cars is about the height of the front bumper. To estimate the overall benefit of the voluntary commitment, the real-world crash experience of light trucks already meeting the height-matching criteria was compared with that of light trucks not meeting the criteria for 2000-2003 model light trucks in collisions with passenger cars during calendar years 2001-2004. The estimated benefits of lower front energy-absorbing structure were a 19 percent reduction (pcar drivers in front-to-front crashes with light trucks and a 19 percent reduction (pcar drivers in front-to-driver-side crashes with light trucks.

  8. Design and geometry of hybrid white light-emitted diodes for efficient energy transfer from the quantum well to the nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopylov, Oleksii; Huck, Alexander; Shirazi, Roza

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate light color conversion in patterned InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which is enhanced via nonradiative exciton resonant energy transfer (RET) from the electrically driven diode to colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs). Patterning of the diode is essential for the coupling...

  9. Luminescence imaging of water during irradiation of X-ray photons lower energy than Cerenkov- light threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Koyama, Shuji; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center (Japan)

    2016-10-01

    Luminescence imaging of water using X-ray photon irradiation at energy lower than maximum energy of ~200 keV is thought to be impossible because the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov- light. Contrary to this consensus assumption, we show that the luminescence imaging of water can be achieved by X-ray irradiation at energy lower than 120 keV. We placed water phantoms on a table with a conventional X-ray imaging system, and luminescence images of these phantoms were measured with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera during X-ray photon irradiation at energy below 120 keV. We also carried out such imaging of an acrylic block and plastic scintillator. The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during X-ray photon irradiation clearly showed X-ray photon distribution. The intensity of the X-ray photon images of the phantom increased almost proportionally to the number of X-ray irradiations. Lower-energy X-ray photon irradiation showed lower-intensity luminescence at the deeper parts of the phantom due to the higher X-ray absorption in the water phantom. Furthermore, lower-intensity luminescence also appeared at the deeper parts of the acrylic phantom due to its higher density than water. The intensity of the luminescence for water was 0.005% of that for plastic scintillator. Luminescence imaging of water during X-ray photon irradiation at energy lower than 120 keV was possible. This luminescence imaging method is promising for dose estimation in X-ray imaging systems.

  10. Lights, Camera, Action ... and Cooling - The case for centralized low carbon energy at Fox Studios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Alastair [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Regnier, Cindy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Fox Studios partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to retrofit two production stages and one of its central cooling plants, to reduce energy consumption by at least 30% as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) Program. Although this case study reports expected savings arising from proposed design recommendations for a unique building type and the unusual load characteristics associated with its use, the EEMs implemented for the central plant are applicable to any large campus, office and higher education facility. The intent is that by making the energy-efficiency measures (EEMs) set that were assessed as cost-effective from this project applicable to a larger number of buildings on the campus Fox Studios will be able to implement an integrated campus-wide energy strategy for the long term. The significant challenges for this project in the design phase included identifying how to assess and analyze multiple system types, develop a coherent strategy for assessment and analysis, implement the measurement and verification activities to collect the appropriate data (in terms of capturing ‘normal’ operating characteristics and granularity) and determine the best approach to providing cooling to the site buildings based on the nature of existing systems and the expected improvement in energy performance of the central cooling plant. The analytical framework adopted provides a blueprint for similar projects at other large commercial building campuses.

  11. The stopping power and energy straggling of light ions in graphene oxide foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikšová, R.; Macková, A.; Malinský, P.; Sofer, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Energy-loss and straggling experiments were performed using 2-4 MeV 1H+ and 7.4-9.0 MeV 4He2+ ions in graphene oxide foils by the transmission technique. The thickness of the graphene oxide foils was determined using a detailed image analysis of a graphene oxide cut, which was used to refine the graphene oxide density. The density was determined by the standard technique of micro-balance weighing. The stoichiometry of the graphene oxide foils before the irradiation was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) using 2 and 2.5 MeV 4He+. The measured energy stopping powers for hydrogen and helium ions in graphene oxide were compared with the predictions obtained from the SRIM-2013 code. The energy straggling was compared with that calculated using Bohr's, Bethe-Livingston and Yang predictions. The results show that the stopping power of graphene oxide foils irradiated by both ion species decreases with increasing energies, the differences between the measured and predicted values being below 3.8%. The energy straggling determined in our experiment is higher than Bohr's and Bethe-Livingston predicted values; the predictions by Yang are in better agreement with our experiment.

  12. Low-Energy Microfocus X-Ray Source for Enhanced Testing Capability in the Stray Light Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica; O'Dell, Stephen; Kolodziejczak, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Research toward high-resolution, soft x-ray optics (mirrors and gratings) necessary for the next generation large x-ray observatories requires x-ray testing using a low-energy x-ray source with fine angular size (energy microfocus (approximately 0.1 mm spot) x-ray source from TruFocus Corporation that mates directly to the Stray Light Facility (SLF). MSFC X-ray Astronomy team members are internationally recognized for their expertise in the development, fabrication, and testing of grazing-incidence optics for x-ray telescopes. One of the key MSFC facilities for testing novel x-ray instrumentation is the SLF. This facility is an approximately 100-m-long beam line equipped with multiple x-ray sources and detectors. This new source adds to the already robust compliment of instrumentation, allowing MSFC to support additional internal and community x-ray testing needs.

  13. Sensitization and quenching in the conversion of light energy into chemical energy. Progress report, February 1, 1980-January 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristol, S.J.

    1980-09-01

    Extensive data from Stern-Volmer, Lamola-Hammond, and Ilenda-Daughenbaugh-Cristol quenching kinetics have now been accumulated on photosolvolysis in t-butyl alcohol for benzyl chloride and a number of meta and para substituted benzyl chlorides. Evidence for the existence of two triplet states, one relatively short-lived (tau 0-2 nsec) which gives solvolysis product and a second, relatively long-lived (tau 5-26 nsec), which does not give product, but instead is energy wasting, has been accumulated. The system, p-acetobenzyl chloride, has been investigated in detail. A method for quenching of singlet states for measurement of singlet lifetimes in the 100 picosecond to nanosecond range is being developed. Preliminary work on benzyl acetate photosolvolysis has been conducted. Some work on the goemetrical requirements for intra-molecular excitation transfer in bichromophoric molecules has been conducted. Several dienes related to norbornadiene have been prepared and preparative photoisomerizations to quadricyclene analogues have been carried out. Considerable attention has been given to certain di-..pi..-methane rearrangements, work on most of which is still in progress. One system, the ethyl ester of dibenzobarrelene-7-carboxylic acid, has been scrutinized in detail.

  14. An energy-reduced dietary pattern, including moderate protein and increased nonfat dairy intake combined with walking promotes beneficial body composition and metabolic changes in women with excess adiposity: a randomized comparative trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlisky, Julie D; Durward, Carrie M; Zack, Melissa K; Gugger, Carolyn K; Campbell, Jessica K; Nickols-Richardson, Sharon M

    2015-09-01

    Moderate protein and nonfat dairy intake within an energy-reduced diet (ERD) may contribute to health benefits achieved with body weight (BW) loss. The current study examined the effectiveness of a weight-loss/weight-loss maintenance intervention using an ERD with moderate dietary protein (30% of kcals) and increased nonfat dairy intake (4-5 svg/d), including yogurt (INT group) and daily walking compared to an ERD with standard protein (16-17% of kcals) and standard nonfat dairy intake (3 svg/d) (COM group) with daily walking. A randomized comparative trial with 104 healthy premenopausal women with overweight/obesity was conducted in a university setting. Women were randomized to INT group or COM group. Anthropometric measurements, as well as dietary intake, selected vital signs, resting energy expenditure, blood lipids, glucose, insulin, and selected adipose-derived hormones were measured at baseline, and weeks 2, 12, and 24. Targets for dietary protein and nonfat dairy intake, while initially achieved, were not sustained in the INT group. There were no significant effects of diet group on anthropometric measurements. Women in the INT group and COM group, respectively, reduced BW (-4.9 ± 3.2 and -4.3 ± 3.3 kg, P < 0.001) and fat mass (-3.0 ± 2.2 and -2.3 ± 2.3 kg, P < 0.001) during the 12-week weight-loss phase and maintained these losses at 24 weeks. Both groups experienced significant decreases in body mass index, fat-free soft tissue mass, body fat percentage, waist and hip circumferences and serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, and leptin (all P < 0.001). Healthy premenopausal women with excess adiposity effectively lost BW and fat mass and improved some metabolic risk factors following an ERD with approximately 20% protein and 3 svg/d of nonfat dairy intake.

  15. Increased light harvesting in dye-sensitized solar cells with energy relay dyes

    KAUST Repository

    Hardin, Brian E.

    2009-06-21

    Conventional dye-sensitized solar cells have excellent charge collection efficiencies, high open-circuit voltages and good fill factors. However, dye-sensitized solar cells do not completely absorb all of the photons from the visible and near-infrared domain and consequently have lower short-circuit photocurrent densities than inorganic photovoltaic devices. Here, we present a new design where high-energy photons are absorbed by highly photoluminescent chromophores unattached to the titania and undergo Förster resonant energy transfer to the sensitizing dye. This novel architecture allows for broader spectral absorption, an increase in dye loading, and relaxes the design requirements for the sensitizing dye. We demonstrate a 26% increase in power conversion efficiency when using an energy relay dye (PTCDI) with an organic sensitizing dye (TT1). We estimate the average excitation transfer efficiency in this system to be at least 47%. This system offers a viable pathway to develop more efficient dye-sensitized solar cells.

  16. Increase of energy efficiency in horticultural tissue culture with high-power-LED lighting systems; Energieeffizienzsteigerung pflanzlicher In-vitro-Kulturverfahren mit Hochleistungs-LED-Belichtungssystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornwasser, Thorsten

    2011-07-01

    The lighting of tissue cultures is one of the main cost factors in growing rooms due to the high energy need. A lighting system with high-power light-emitting diodes (HP-LEDs) was tested as an alternative to the conventionally used fluorescent tubes. Therefore the HP-LED-types royal-blue, red, and cool white were used to create different spectral outputs. The photon flux yield, level of efficiency, and spectral shift of the single HP-LEDs were measured beforehand at different operating conditions (i.e. increasing current and junction temperature). The energy efficiency of the HP-LED lighting system was determined at 0.83 {mu}mol W{sup -1}s{sup -1} with the same shelf board distance (300 mm) and average PPFD on the exposed surface as compared to the control lighting system. The energy efficiency of the fluorescent lighting system could reach a maximum value of 0.68 {mu}mol W{sup -1}s{sup -1}. In addition to the reduced energy needs, HP-LED lighting systems reduce the need for cooling energy in culture rooms to regulate the room temperature. HP-LED lighting systems allow the reduction of the shelf board distance due to the small mass volume of LEDs and diminished radiant heat output towards the plant. The lower shelf board distance led to an additional increase of the energy efficiency up to 1.16 {mu}mol W{sup -1}s{sup -1} at a distance of 210 mm. Simultaneously the PPFD distribution was more regular than under the exposure with a fluorescent tube. Beside the increase of energy efficiency, HP-LEDs facilitate the control of the spectral composition. The spectral output can be adjusted to the plants' needs and thereby permit a more optimal production and influence the plant morphology (Nhut und Na, 2010; Morrow, 2008). Various plant tissue cultures and their response to different spectral compositions were investigated with the developed HP-LED lighting system. For none of the tested cultures could a preference for one of the spectral compositions be determined

  17. Light polymerization during cavity filling: influence of total energy density on shrinkage and marginal adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotto, Tissiana; Prando, Federico; Dietschi, Didier; Krejci, Ivo

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the marginal adaptation and shrinkage stress development of a micro hybrid restorative composite as a function of energy density. Linear displacement and shrinkage forces were measured with custom-made devices for energies of 4,000, 8,000, 16,000 and 32,000 mJ/cm(2) at a constant power density of 800 mW/cm(2). Marginal adaptation of composite restorations cured with the same energy density was evaluated before and after mechanical loading with 300,000 cycles at 70 N. The group "4,000 mJ/cm(2)" showed the lowest shrinkage force [2.9(0.2) kg] and linear displacement [23.5(0.7) μm] but led to the worst marginal adaptation after loading [46.4(23.5) %CM] probably due to under-curing. When the maximum energy of 32,000 mJ/cm(2) was applied, a slight increase in shrinkage forces [3.6(0.2) kg and 29.2(0.8) μm], and a slight decrease in marginal adaptation after loading [75.4(11.5) %CM] were observed, but these changes were not significantly different in comparison to groups cured with energies of 8,000 and 16,000 mJ/cm(2). For the resin composite tested in this study, no differences in marginal adaptation could be detected above the energy threshold of 8,000 mJ/cm(2).

  18. Visible Light Communication System Using Silicon Photocell for Energy Gathering and Data Receiving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiongbin Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon photocell acts as the detector and energy convertor in the VLC system. The system model was set up and simulated in Matlab/Simulink environment. A 10 Hz square wave was modulated on LED and restored in voltage mode at the receiver. An energy gathering and signal detecting system was demonstrated at the baud rate of 19200, and the DC signal is about 2.77 V and AC signal is around 410 mV.

  19. Energy-Saving Automation and LED Lighting Systems in Industry, Transport, Building and Municipal Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Klimenko

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Protocol of diverse technological data unification providing the ability to scale with a minimal increase in auxiliary information volume that allows its usage, ranging from the simplest microcontrollers to integration of automation equipment in global systems was designed for industrial automation systems. Basic technical solutions implemented in development of LED lighting systems of salon subway cars, including a schematic diagram of the lamp, the main technical characteristics of the lamp power supply, the peculiarities of developed design of LED modules are described.

  20. Future oriented light-wave cable devices for energy supply. Zukunftssichere LWL-Kabelanlagen fuer Energieversorgungsunternehmen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittich, D. (ANT-Nachrichtentechnik G.m.b.H., Backnang (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-02-01

    Cable systems in electricity utilities require high investment and are schedulled for a service life of 20 years and over. Today, telecommunications technology is undergoing rapid changes which is indicated by terms like digital technology, integrated networks and light-wave conductors to name but a few. Hence, operators are faced with the difficult task to select on economic system solution from among the component available on today's market. These systems expected to technically handle a relatively small amount of information at present but also to keep abreast with the foreseeable rise in telecommunications. (orig.).