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Sample records for exanthematous pustulosis induced

  1. Midodrine-induced acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghpour, Mona; Bunick, Christopher G; Robinson, Deanne Mraz; Galan, Anjela; Tigelaar, Robert E; Imaeda, Suguru

    2014-05-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is an acute sterile pustular eruption most commonly induced by medications. We present a case of AGEP with erythroderma following use of midodrine in a 58-year-old man. Although antibiotics are most commonly implicated in AGEP, we emphasize that nonantibiotic agents also may cause AGEP, which often manifests after a longer time interval compared to antibiotic-associated AGEP.

  2. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis induced by piroxicam: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherif, Y; Jallouli, Moez; Mseddi, M; Turki, H; Bahloul, Z

    2014-01-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a severe adverse cutaneous reaction characterized by an acute episode of sterile pustules over erythematous-edematous skin. The main triggering drugs are antibiotics, mainly beta-lactam and macrolides. Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs may rarely be responsible. We describe a case of a woman with AGEP, who presented with generalized pustulosis lesions after the use of piroxicam for renal colic. The diagnosis was confirmed by the clinical and histological correlations and the dermatosis resolved after withdrawal of the drug.

  3. Circumferential Acute Localized Exanthematous Pustulosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-15

    Acute localized exanthematcus pustulosis ( ALEP ) is a rare localized variant of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis ( AGEP ), first described by...Prange et al . in 3005. It is clinically and histologically consistent with AGEP with the exception of its limited distribution on the body.

  4. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis provoked by furosemide

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    Andżelika Schwann-Majewska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP is a skin disease characterized by the sudden appearance of generalized pustules, accompanied by elevated body temperature and neutrophilia. Objective. Presentation of a patient with AGEP provoked by furosemide. Case report. We present a case of a 65-year-old patient diagnosed with and treated for generalized pustular eruption, with fever and changes in laboratory tests. Numerous coexisting medical conditions and a great number of frequently changed drugs (ciprofloxacin, allopurinol, folic acid, calcium carbonate, cyclophosphamide, atorvastatin, betaxolol and furosemide hindered identification of the causative factor. Conclusions. On the basis of the medical history and clinical picture, the patient was diagnosed with generalized exanthematous pustulosis induced by furosemide.

  5. Acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis induced by Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia prophylaxis with dapsone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vas, A; Laws, P; Marsland, Am; McQuillan, O

    2013-09-01

    We describe the case of HIV-1 infected patient presenting to hospital with a severe cutaneous adverse drug reaction shortly after commencing dapsone therapy as Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia prophylaxis. To the best of our knowledge, acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis has not been reported as a reaction to dapsone in the setting of HIV.

  6. Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis (AGEP Induced by Cetirizine in a Child A Case Report

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    Gunseli Pancar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis (AGEP, is a rare cutaneous rash characterized by widespread sterile non-follicular pustules. AGEP is a rare disease in childhood and it is often due to drugs. Antibiotics, sulphanamides and antipyretic-analgesics are the main reasons of this drug reaction . Cetirizine is a second generation antihistamine is often used in the treatment of angioedema, atopic dermatitis and urticaria in children. Cetirizine induced AGEP was not reported in the literature. In this case a twelve year old child was admitted with urticarial plaques located on her trunk. She developed maculopapular lesions and pustular eruption with Cetirizine (once a day treatment. Cetirizine was stopped and the nonfollicular pustules cleared with a desquamation. The result of the oral challenge test was positive. We present this rare case to show that the antihistamines (cetirizine may cause AGEP in childhood.

  7. Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis (AGEP Induced by Cetirizine in a Child A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunseli Pancar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis (AGEP, is a rare cutaneous rash characterized by widespread sterile non-follicular pustules. AGEP is a rare disease in childhood and it is often due to drugs. Antibiotics, sulphanamides and antipyretic-analgesics are the main reasons of this drug reaction . Cetirizine is a second generation antihistamine is often used in the treatment of angioedema, atopic dermatitis and urticaria in children. Cetirizine induced AGEP was not reported in the literature. In this case a twelve year old child was admitted with urticarial plaques located on her trunk. She developed maculopapular lesions and pustular eruption with Cetirizine (once a day treatment. Cetirizine was stopped and the nonfollicular pustules cleared with a desquamation. The result of the oral challenge test was positive. We present this rare case to show that the antihistamines (cetirizine may cause AGEP in childhood.

  8. Acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis secondary to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-02

    Nov 2, 2012 ... Superficial dermal vessels were mildly dilated and contained marginated neutrophils. Special stains for fungi and acid- fast bacilli were negative and no granulomas, dysplastic or malignant cells were found. A histopathological diagnosis of acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) was made.

  9. The histopathological spectrum of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) and its differentiation from generalized pustular psoriasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kardaun, Sylvia H.; Kuiper, Hilde; Fidler, Vaclav; Jonkman, Marcel F.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) represents a severe, acute, pustular skin reaction that is most often induced by drugs. AGEP can be difficult to differentiate from generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) both clinically and histopathologically. We present a systematic

  10. Acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis: An update

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    Abhishek De

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP is a severe cutaneous adverse reaction and is attributed to drugs in more than 90% of cases. It is a rare disease, with an estimated incidence of 1–5 patients per million per year. The clinical manifestations characterised by the rapid development of sterile pustular lesions, fever and leucocytosis. Number of drugs has been reported to be associated with AGEP, most common being the antibiotics. Histopathologically there is intraepidermal pustules and papillary dermal oedema with neutrophilic and eosinophilic infiltrations. Systemic involvement can be present in more severe cases. Early diagnosis with withdrawal of the causative drug is the most important step in the management. Treatment includes supportive care, prevention of antibiotics and use of a potent topical steroid.

  11. Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis Induced by Erlotinib (Tarceva with Superimposed Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection in a Pancreatic Cancer Patient: A Case Report

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    Egbert Liquete

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP is a rare acute reaction that is drug induced in 90% of the cases and characterized by a widespread, sterile pustular rash. Erlotinib, a small-molecule EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been approved by the FDA for patients with pancreatic cancer and non-small cell lung cancer. Skin rash is a well-known side effect related with all EGFR blocking agents. It has been suggested that rash could be used as a surrogate marker for response and possibly be associated with prolonged survival. We report a case of rare presentation of AGEP involving an adverse effect of erlotinib. The commonly reported adverse effects of erlotinib are mild skin eruptions. However, our case describes the rare presentation of AGEP induced by erlotinib. The estimated incidence rate of AGEP is approximately 1–5 cases per million/year.

  12. Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis Due to Oral Use of Blue Dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Osman; Kose, Ösman; Safali, Mukerrem

    2011-01-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis is a rare severe pustular cutaneous adverse reaction characterized by a rapid clinical course with typical histological findings. It is accompanied by fever and acute eruption of non-follicular pustules overlying erythrodermic skin. The causative agents are most frequently antibacterial drugs. We present a patient with acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis caused by methylene blue and indigotin dyes. PMID:22016599

  13. The spectrum of histopathological features in acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis : a study of 102 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halevy, S.; Kardaun, S. H.; Davidovici, B.; Wechsler, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a rare severe pustular reaction pattern with a typical clinical picture. Objectives To characterize the histopathological features of AGEP in a large series of cases with a validated diagnosis. Methods A multinational retrospective

  14. Severe flucloxacillin-induced acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP), with toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN)-like features : does overlap between AGEP and TEN exist? Clinical report and review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hattem, S.; Beerthuizen, G. I.; Kardaun, S. H.

    2014-01-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS)/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are rare but severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions. Especially in TEN, large areas of the skin and mucosae may become detached. Although AGEP and SJS/TEN are distinct entities with

  15. Rapid Involution of Pustules during Topical Steroid Treatment of Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis

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    Christiane Kley

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP is a dramatic generalized pustular rash of severe onset, which is considered a serious cutaneous adverse reaction to drugs. However, even though the clinical features are impressive and are often accompanied by systemic inflammation, it can be controlled quickly and safely by topical steroids subsequent to interruption of the offending drug. Here, we describe the management of a case and the evolution of the pustular rash. An elderly woman consulted with a generalized crop of 2–3 mm, nonfollicular pustules on erythematous background. In the 4 preceding weeks, she had been using amoxicillin/clavulanic acid for a bacterial implant infection and rivaroxaban. The clinical EuroSCAR criteria including the histology confirmed AGEP. Her medication was stopped and topical clobetasol propionate was used. Within 24 h, the development of new pustules ceased and the patient was discharged after 7 days of hospitalization with only a faint, diffuse erythema and focal desquamation remaining. This and many other cases in the literature suggest that topical steroids should be considered as a first-line treatment option, especially as systemic steroids themselves can sometimes induce generalized pustulosis.

  16. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP. Case report Pustulose exantemática aguda generalizada (AGEP

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    Walter Belda Junior

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis (AGEP is a drug-induced dermatosis characterized by an acute episode of sterile pustules over erythematous-edematous skin. It is accompanied by an episode of fever, which regresses a few days after discontinuation of the drug that caused the condition or as a result of corticosteroid treatment. The main triggering drugs are antibiotics, mainly beta-lactam ones. Other medications, such as antifungal agents, non steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, analgesics, antiarrhythmic, anticonvulsant and antidepressant drugs, may also be responsible. Histologically, it is characterized by the existence of vasculitis, associated with non-follicular subcorneal pustules. A case of a Caucasian female outpatient unit of Dermatology with AGEP, who presented with generalized pustulosis lesions after the use of cephalosporin for urinary infection is related. The diagnosis was confirmed by the clinical and pathological correlations, the resolution of the dermatosis after discontinuation of the drug and use of systemic corticosteroid treatment, and the recurrence of the disorder after the introduction of a similar drug. The importance of the recognition of this drug-induced dermatosis is given by its main differential clinical and histological diagnoses: generalized pustular psoriasis and subcorneal pustulosis.A pustulose exantemática aguda generalizada (AGEP é uma dermatose induzida por droga, caracterizada por episódio agudo de aparecimento de pústulas estéreis sobre base eritemato-edematosa, acompanhado de febre. Este quadro regride espontâneamente após a suspensão da droga ou em resultado do tratamento com corticóide sistêmico. As principais drogas envolvidas são agentes antifúngicos, antiinflamatórios não hormonais, analgésicos, antiarrítmicos e anticonvulsivantes. Histologicamente caracteriza-se por vasculite associada a pústulas subcórneas não foliculares. Relatamos caso de paciente branca, feminina

  17. Pustulosis exantemática aguda generalizada asociada a Epstein Barr: A propósito de un caso. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis associated to Epstein Barr: A propose of a case

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    A L Scaglione

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available La pustulosis exantemática aguda generalizada (PEAG es una rara afección de hipersensibilidad, inducida principalmente por drogas y se manifiesta por una erupción aguda de pústulas estériles, acompañada de fiebre, que regresa en pocos días luego de discontinuar el fármaco causante. Se comunica el caso de una paciente de 23 años de edad, sin antecedentes de psoriasis que consulta por fiebre y una erupción pustulosa generalizada, asociada a la ingesta previa de amoxicilina y ácido clavulánico en el contexto de una mononucleosis infecciosa, con resolución espontánea del cuadro. El cultivo microbiológico no objetivó gérmenes patógenos.Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP is a rare skin eruption most commonly caused by medications. It is characterized by an acute eruption of sterile pustules and it is accompanied by an episode of fever, which regresses a few days after discontinuation of the drug that caused the condition. We report a case 23 year-old woman without history of psoriasis, that consults for fever and an acute generalized pustular eruption after amoxicillin, with clavulanic acid administration in a mononucleosis infection context, which resolved spontaneously. The microbiologic culture was negative for pathogenic germens.

  18. Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis (AGEP Triggered by a Spider Bite

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    Michael Makris

    2009-01-01

    Discussion: A spider bite may represent a possible causative factor of AGEP. A spider's venom contains sphingomyelinase that stimulates the release of IL8 and GM-CSF, which are involved in AGEP pathogenesis. Whether or not the con-current use of antibiotics has an effect in AGEP appearance when combined with a spider's venom, cannot be excluded.

  19. The spontaneous regression of palmoplantar pustulosis following removal of dental amalgams: A report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Zhang, Min; Lou, Yanfeng; Liu, Haibo; Sang, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Metal allergens are occasionally reported to be associated with palmoplantar pustulosis. We describe two severe, therapy-resistant, chronic cases of palmoplantar pustulosis induced by metal dental fillings. Both patients' clinical findings and symptoms regressed following the removal of their metal teeth. A patch test examination revealed positive reactions to metal allergens in both cases (in Case 1 the positive reactions were to cobalt chloride hexahydrate and nickel sulfate and in Case 2 the positive reaction was to nickel sulphate). Our studies suggest that metal allergens may play an important role in the pathogenesis of palmoplantar pustulosis. © 2015 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  20. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis caused by morphine, confirmed by positive patch test and lymphocyte transformation test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kardaun, Sylvia H.; de Monchy, Jan G.

    Morphine, an opium alkaloid, frequently causes side effects such as hyperhidrosis and facial flushing, but serious cutaneous adverse drug reactions are seldom observed. Best known are Urticaria, erythema, and pruritus; sometimes pseudoallergic anaphylactoid reactions, and blisters are reported.

  1. Pustulosis palmoplantaris udløst af angiotensinkonverterende enzymhaemmere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Christiansen, J J; Asmussen, I

    1995-01-01

    demonstrated that the arachidonic acid system may play a role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis/volar pustulosis. Our patient was treated with Captopril and developed a rash identical to volar pustulosis within six weeks. Captopril was substituted with Perindopril, and the eruptions had almost disappeared five...

  2. Palmoplantar Psoriasis and Palmoplantar Pustulosis: Current Treatment and Future Prospects.

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    Raposo, Inês; Torres, Tiago

    2016-08-01

    Palmoplantar psoriasis and palmoplantar pustulosis are chronic skin diseases with a large impact on patient quality of life. They are frequently refractory to treatment, being generally described as a therapeutic challenge. This article aims to review the definitions of palmoplantar psoriasis and palmoplantar pustulosis, highlighting the similarities and differences in terms of epidemiology, clinical presentation, genetics, histopathology, and pathogenesis, as well as treatment options for both entities. Classical management of mild to moderate palmoplantar pustulosis and palmoplantar psoriasis relies on use of potent topical corticosteroids, phototherapy, and/or acitretin. Nevertheless, these drugs have proven to be insufficient in long-term control of extensive disease. Biologic therapy-namely, anti-interleukin-17 agents and phosphodiesterase type 4 inhibitors-has recently shown promising results in the treatment of palmoplantar psoriasis. Knowledge of the pathophysiologic pathways of both entities is of utmost importance and may, in the future, allow development of molecularly targeted therapeutics.

  3. Pustulosis palmoplantaris is a disease distinct from psoriasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, A.C. de; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de

    2011-01-01

    Pustulosis palmoplantaris (PPP) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a considerable impairment of quality of life and is characterized by sterile pustules and red, scaly skin on the palms and soles. The position of PPP in relation to psoriasis is unclear. Some authors regard PPP as a distinct

  4. Cutaneous Small Vessel Vasculitis Accompanied by Pustulosis Palmaris et Plantaris

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    Motoko Kosaka

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 64-year-old woman who has suffered from pustulosis palmaris et plantaris for 10 years. At the first examination, many erythematous lesions with purpura, blood crusts, and blisters were present in the lower legs and dorsum of the feet. Painful swelling in the sternal region and dorsal pain were also noted. Elevation of the CRP and myogenic enzyme levels, and liver and renal dysfunctions were noted on blood testing. Histopathologically, leukocytoclastic vasculitis was noted in small blood vessels in the whole dermal layers, and deposition of IgM and C3 in the vascular wall was detected by the direct immunofluorescence techniques. Based on these findings, cutaneous small vessel vasculitis was diagnosed. Because the patient complained of a toothache during the clinical course, an X-ray examination was performed. On pantomography, a radicular cyst and apical periodontitis were noted. The tooth symptoms changed with exacerbation and remission of the skin symptoms. These findings indicate that odontogenic infection is very likely to be a cause of cutaneous small vessel vasculitis in a manner similar to pustulosis palmaris et plantaris.

  5. Synovis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome: A case of spine, pelvis, and anterior chest wall involvement, with overlooked plantar pustulosis

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    Kim, Hyun Soo; Jeong, Soh Yong; Lee, Sujin; Baek, In Woon; Park, Jeongmi [Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome is an inflammatory clinical condition with aseptic bone lesions and characteristic skin manifestations. A 63-year-old woman presented with vague musculoskeletal symptoms including chronic buttock pain. The clinical work-up revealed multiple spine and osteoarticular involvement. Multilevel bone marrow edema and cortical erosions involving the spine, asymmetric sacroiliitis, and osteosclerosis of the sternoclavicular joint were consistent with a diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome. Considering SAPHO syndrome in the differential diagnosis, subsequent skin inspection revealed plantar pustulosis. Despite the unique feature of accompanying skin and skeletal lesions, skin lesions could be overlooked if not suspected.

  6. IL-8 as antibody therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases: Reduction of clinical activity in palmoplantar pustulosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, L.; Beurskens, F.J.; Reitamo, S.

    2008-01-01

    IL-8 is a chemokine that has been implicated in a number of inflammatory diseases involving neutrophil activation. HuMab 10F8 is a novel fully human mAb against IL-8, which binds a discontinuous epitope on IL-8 overlapping the receptor binding site, and which effectively neutralizes IL-8-dependent...... human neutrophil activation and migration. We investigated whether interference in the cytokine network by HuMab 10F8 might benefit patients suffering from palmoplantar pustulosis, a chronic inflammatory skin disease. Treatment of patients with HuMab 10F8 was well tolerated and significantly reduced...... clinical disease activity at all five endpoints, which included a >= 50% reduction in the formation of fresh pustules. IL-8 neutralization was monitored at the site of inflammation by assessing exudates of palmoplantar pustulosis lesions. HuMab 10F8 sequestered IL-8 in situ, as observed by rapid dose...

  7. Ustekinumab in der Therapie der Pustulosis palmoplantaris - Eine Fallserie mit neun Patienten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buder, Valeska; Herberger, Katharina; Jacobi, Arnd; Augustin, Matthias; Radtke, Marc Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Die Pustulosis palmoplantaris ist eine chronisch entzündliche Hauterkrankung, die mit bedeutenden Einschränkungen der Lebensqualität und der Belastbarkeit einhergeht. Aufgrund von Zulassungsbeschränkungen und einem häufig therapierefraktären Verlauf sind die Behandlungsmöglichkeiten limitiert. Nach zuvor frustranen Therapien erhielten 9 Patienten mit Pustulosis palmoplantaris nach Ausschluss einer latenten Tuberkulose Ustekinumab (45 mg Ustekinumab bei  100 kg KG) in Woche 0, 4, 12 und 24. Reguläre Visiten erfolgten nach 4 und 12 Wochen, im weiteren Verlauf alle 12 Wochen. Das Durchschnittsalter bei Therapiebeginn betrug 48 Jahre. Drei Patienten waren männlich. Bei n  =  4 Patienten (44,4 %) wurde eine Verbesserung um 75 % des Palmoplantar-Psoriasis-Area-Severity-Index (PPPASI) erreicht. Insgesamt verbesserte sich der PPPASI nach 24 Wochen durchschnittlich um 71,6 %. Eine komplette Abheilung zeigte sich bei n  =  2 Patienten nach 24 Wochen. Bis auf lokale Injektionsreaktionen und leichte Infekte wurden keine unerwünschten Wirkungen beobachtet. Die Fallserie ist ein weiterer Beleg für die Wirksamkeit und Verträglichkeit von Ustekinumab in der Therapie der Pustulosis palmoplantaris. Zur Beurteilung der Langzeitwirkung und -sicherheit sowie der Wirksamkeit einer intermittierenden Therapie sind kontrollierte Studiendaten sowie Beobachtungen im Rahmen von Patientenregistern notwendig. © 2016 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Synovitis, Acne, Pustulosis, Hyperostosis and Osteitis (SAPHO) and chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO): Role of imaging in diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Uma; Blacksin, Marcia; Beebe, Kathleen; Neilson, J.C.; Dashefsky, Barry; Tagoylo, Gino

    2012-01-01

    There is a spectrum of musculoskeletal disorders which can be associated with dermatologic findings, the fundamental component of which is a nonbacterial osteitis. CRMO (Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis) and SAPHO syndrome (Synovitis, Acne, Pustulosis, Hyperostosis and Osteitis) describe paediatric and adult conditions, respectively, of inflammatory osteitis that can be associated with palmoplantar pustulosis and acne. Imaging findings are similar and a key component to the diagnosis in both conditions. This report describes two patients with strikingly similar radiologic presentations of clavicular osteitis in whom the diagnosis was made predominantly on the basis of imaging findings. The typical imaging features and radiographic hallmarks of both conditions will also be discussed.

  9. Imaging manifestations and its clinical significance in patients with synovitis acne pustulosis hyperostosis osteomyelitis syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Wei; Lin Qiang; Yao Jinpeng; Chang Yinjuan; Zhou Xiaohong

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical and imaging manifestations of patients with synovitis acne pustulosis hyperostosis osteomyelitis (SAPHO) syndrome, and to analyze the diagnostic importance of different clinical and imaging manifestations for SAPHO syndrome. Methods: Seventeen patients (7 males and 10 females) with SAPHO syndrome were recruited in this study. Age ranged from 36 to 67 years with a mean age of (48 ± 8) years. All patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of Benhamou. Serum HLA B27 antigen records were reviewed for all patients. Imaging data of the abnormal bone sites were collected by conventional radiograph in all patients, CT in 13 patients as well as MR in 3 patients. Average time to take for a definite diagnosis of the syndrome was 3.7 years (ranged from O.5 to 13 years). Results: Serum HLA B27 antigen was positive in all patients. Both skin and bone abnormalities were found in all patients. Ten patients had skin palmoplantar pustulosis and two patients had acne. Involving sites of bone and joints include sacroiliac joints, anterior chest and limbs. Sacroiliac joints were asymmetrically involved with imaging features in all patients. Eight patients exhibited anterior chest wall involvement. Five patients had osteomyelitis at limbs. For all images of 17 patients, CT was superior to conventional radiography in detecting abnormal changes of bone erosion and soft tissue swelling. MR imaging was able to depict edema changes that was not detectable by CT and radiography. Conclusion: SAPHO syndrome is a rare disease, but for patients with skin and bone-joint abnormalities, especially with skin palmoplantar pustulosis, acne as well as with imaging features at the sacroiliac joint and anterior chest wall, SAPHO syndrome should be taken into a diagnostic consideration. (authors)

  10. Manifestações articulares nas viroses exantemáticas Joint complaints in exanthematic diseases

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    Solange Artimos de Oliveira

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available A freqüência de manifestações articulares foi avaliada em 251 pacientes com diagnóstico clínico e laboratorial (detecção de IgM por ensaio imunoenzimático de virose exantemática. As artropatias (artralgia e/ou artrite foram mais observadas nos casos de dengue (49% e de rubéola (38,2% do que naqueles com parvovirose humana (30% e sarampo (28,1%. Com exceção do sarampo, as artropatias predominaram nos adultos (315 anos de idade, sendo tal diferença estatisticamente significativa. A ocorrência maior de artropatias em adultos foi mais evidente nos pacientes com parvovirose (75%, rubéola (65% e dengue (57,7% do que naqueles com sarampo (31%. As queixas articulares também predominaram nos pacientes do sexo feminino para todas as viroses avaliadas. Os resultados encontrados demonstram o freqüente acometimento articular nas doenças estudadas, e indicam a necessidade de comprovação laboratorial para o diagnóstico diferencial entre elas.The frequency of arthropathy was evaluated in 251 patients with clinical and serological diagnosis (specific IgM detection by enzyme immunoassay of exanthematic disease. Arthropathy (arthralgia and/or arthritis was more frequent in dengue fever (49% and rubella (38.2% cases than in human parvovirus (30% and measles (28.1% cases. Except for measles cases, joint complaints prevailed in adults (315 years of age and this difference was significant. The higher frequency of arthropathy in adults was more evident in human parvovirus (75%, rubella (65% and dengue fever (57.7% cases than in measles cases (31%. Arthropathy was also more frequent in females for all rash diseases studied. The results of this study showed the high occurrence of joint complaints in the diseases described here and the importance of laboratory confirmation for their differential diagnosis.

  11. Diagnosis of human herpesvirus 6B primary infection by polymerase chain reaction in young children with exanthematic disease

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    Ivna de Melo Magalhães

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Exanthem subitum is a classical rash disease of early childhood caused by human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B. However, the rash is frequently misdiagnosed as that of either measles or rubella. METHODS: In this study, a nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to diagnose HHV-6B primary infection, differentiate it from infections caused by HHV-6A and compare it to antibody avidity tests. The samples were separated into case group and control group according to the results of the indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA technique. RESULTS: From the saliva samples analyzed, HHV-6A DNA was detected in 3.2% of the case group and in 2.6% of the control group. Regarding HHV-6B, PCR detected viral DNA in 4.8% of the case group and in 1.3% of the control group. Among the serum samples studied, a frequency of 1.7% was determined for HHV-6A in the case group and 1.2% in the control group. PCR did not detect HHV-6B DNA in serum samples. The sensitivity and specificity of the PCR technique ranged from 0% to 4.8% and 97.5% to 100%, respectively, compared to IFA. CONCLUSIONS: The PCR technique was not suitable for diagnosing primary infection by HHV-6B in children with exanthematic disease and should not substitute the IFA.

  12. Toxic epidermal necrolysis, DRESS, AGEP : Do overlap cases exist?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouvresse, Sophie; Valeyrie-Allanore, Laurence; Ortonne, Nicolas; Konstantinou, Marie Pauline; Kardaun, Sylvia H.; Bagot, Martine; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Roujeau, Jean-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Background: Severe cutaneous adverse reactions to drugs (SCARs) include acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP), drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) and epidermal necrolysis (Stevens-Johnson syndrome-toxic epidermal necrolysis [SJS-TEN]). Because of the varied

  13. Insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus and thyroid dysfunction in patients with palmoplantar pustulosis: a case-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Ataş

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP is a chronic pustular inflammatory skin disease; however, its pathogenesis is not well understood. Several factors, such as genetics, tobacco use and autoimmune issues, may contribute to this disease. Aim : This research was conducted to investigate the relationships between insulin resistance, thyroid disease and PPP. Material and methods : Thirty-three patients with PPP and 27 age- and gender-matched controls were analysed for their smoking histories, thyroid function tests, anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (anti-TPO levels, fasting glucose, fasting insulin levels and the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA index for insulin resistance. Results : We found significant differences between the PPP and control groups according to their tobacco use and anti-TPO levels (p = 0.009 and p = 0.009, respectively. The proportion of tobacco use was 90% in the PPP patients and 63% in the controls. Gender and tobacco use were predictive risk factors for PPP in the multivariate analysis (OR = 141.7, p 35 U/ml and the presence of a thyroid abnormality were independent risk factors in the univariate, but not the multivariate analysis (OR = 4.2, p = 0.025 and OR = 5.4, p = 0.004, respectively. A moderate correlation between the gender and anti-TPO level was found (r = 0.361, p = 0.039; however, the fasting glucose, insulin and HOMA index were not significant between the PPP and control groups. Conclusions : Female gender and smoking were the most important risk factors for PPP; however, the increase in the anti-TPO level may be related to the predominance of females afflicted with this disease. Additional studies are necessary to clarify the relationships between PPP, thyroid disease and diabetes mellitus.

  14. Akut generaliseret eksantematøs pustulose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comstedt, Lisbeth Rosholm; Gregersen, Janni Hjortlund; Bygum, Anette

    2010-01-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a rare cutaneous drug reaction often caused by beta-lactam antibiotics. The reaction is characterized by sudden occurrence of a generalized exanthema, developing within 1-2 days. Hundreds of sterile pustules arise on an oedematous and erythemat...... and erythematous base. The cutaneous symptoms are accompanied by fever and neutrophilia. The pustules resolve within 4-10 days once the causative drug has been withdrawn. We hereby present a classical case of amoxicillin-induced AGEP in a 34-year-old woman. Udgivelsesdato: 2010-Feb-22...

  15. Increased Pro-inflammatory Cytokines (TNF-a and IL-6 and Anti-inflammatory Compounds (sTNFRp55 and sTNFRp75 in Brazilian Patients during Exanthematic Dengue Fever

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    Luzia MO Pinto

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-a, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interleukin-1b (IL-1b as well as anti-inflammatory compounds, soluble TNF-Receptor p55 (sTNFRp55, sTNFRp75 and IL-1 receptor antagonist (sIL-1Ra, were investigated in 34 Brazilian cases of dengue fever (DF originated from a study of exanthematic virosis. The presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines was detected in sera from these patients by ELISA. TNF-a and IL-6 levels were significantly higher than control subjects in 32% and 52% patients, respectively. To our knowledge this was the first time a receptor antagonist and soluble receptors for cytokines were detected in sera obtained during exanthematic DF without hemorrhagic manifestations. Both sTNFRp55 and sTNFRp75 were consistently elevated in 42% and 84% patients, respectively. Most patients had IL-1b levels not different from those of normal subjects, except for one case. Only 16% patients had altered levels of IL-1Ra. Previous studies in dengue hemorrhagic fever patients demonstrated production of these soluble factors; here we observed that they are found in absence of hemorrhagic manifestations. The possible role of these anti-inflammatory compounds in immune cell activation and in regulating cytokine-mediated pathogenesis during dengue infection is discussed.

  16. Presence of keratin-specific antibody-forming cells in palatine tonsils of patients with pustulosis palmaris et plantaris (PPP) and its correlation with prognosis after tonsillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Yoichiro; Fukuyama, Satoshi; Tanaka, Norimitsu; Ohori, Jun-Ichiro; Tanimoto, Yukari; Kurono, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Keratin-specific immune responses in tonsils may be associated with the pathogenesis of pustulosis palmaris et plantaris (PPP). Evaluation of keratin-specific immune responses in tonsils might be useful to predict the effectiveness of tonsillectomy for patients with PPP. The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of keratin-specific immune responses in the pathogenesis of PPP in tonsils. It has been reported that anti-keratin antibodies in serum were higher in patients with PPP and decreased after tonsillectomy, indicating that anti-keratin antibodies might be generated in tonsils. In order to demonstrate the presence of keratin-specific immune responses in tonsils, the numbers of keratin-specific antibody-forming cells (AFCs) in tonsillar and peripheral blood lymphocytes were examined by enzyme-linked immunospot assay. The prognosis of PPP was compared after tonsillectomy. The numbers of keratin-specific IgM and IgG AFCs in tonsils and of IgG AFCs in peripheral blood were significantly increased in patients with PPP. The numbers of keratin-specific IgG AFCs in peripheral blood correlated positively with tonsil and serum IgG antibodies specific to keratin. Our data show that a good prognosis in patients with PPP depended on the numbers of keratin-specific IgG and IgM AFCs in peripheral blood and the levels of keratin-specific IgG antibodies in serum being significantly decreased 6 months after tonsillectomy.

  17. Expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha converting enzyme and matrix metalloproteinase-3 in proliferated synovium in a patient with synovitis-acne-pustulosis-hyperostosis-osteitis syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komiya Koichiro

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Synovitis-acne-pustulosis-hyperostosis-osteitis (SAPHO syndrome is a rare disorder. The etiology remains unknown and the treatment is still empirical. Synovitis is one of the major manifestations, but information on histopathological features is still lacking. In this case, we investigated the histopathological features of SAPHO syndrome synovitis. Case presentation We present the case of a 53-year-old Japanese woman with SAPHO syndrome accompanied by marked knee synovitis and palmoplantar pustulosis. We found abundant sterile joint fluid in the right knee, and a blood test showed abnormally high values of C-reactive protein (17.26 mg/dl and matrix metalloproteinase-3 (800 ng/ml. Arthroscopic surgery revealed marked proliferation of villous synovial tissues similar to rheumatoid arthritis and standard microscopic findings were also similar to rheumatoid arthritis. Furthermore, for the first time, we demonstrated by immunohistochemistry the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α converting enzyme, TNF-α and matrix metalloproteinase-3 in the proliferated synovial lining cells. After arthroscopic synovectomy, her knee symptoms immediately diminished and laboratory data (matrix metalloproteinase-3 and C-reactive protein normalized within 2 weeks of surgery. Conclusion We demonstrate the expression of TNF-α converting enzyme, TNF-α and matrix metalloproteinase-3 in SAPHO syndrome synovitis for the first time and also show, both macro- and microscopically, the similarity between SAPHO syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis synovitis. These new findings support the recently reported successful treatment of SAPHO syndrome with antirheumatic drugs, especially with anti-TNF-α agents.

  18. Expression of cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA) in tonsillar T-cells and its induction by in vitro stimulation with alpha-streptococci in patients with pustulosis palmaris et plantaris (PPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Hayabusa; Kishibe, Kan; Takahara, Miki; Harabuchi, Yasuaki

    2005-07-01

    Pustulosis palmaris et plantaris (PPP) is known to be a one of the tonsil-related diseases because tonsillectomy is quite effective in curing this condition. However etiological association between tonsils and PPP have not fully clarified yet. Cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA) is known to be a specific homing receptor that facilitates T-cell migration into skin. In this study, we investigated the expression of CLA on T-cells in tonsil, peripheral blood, and skin from patients with PPP. Two-color flow cytometric and two-color immunohistological analyses revealed that the numbers of CLA/CD3 double-positive cells in freshly isolated tonsillar mononuclear cells (TMC) and in tonsillar tissues were significantly higher in patients with PPP than in patients without PPP (PPPP (PPPP. In peripheral blood from PPP patients, the number of the CLA/CD3 double-positive cells significantly decreased at 6 months after tonsillectomy (PPPP as compared to that from healthy volunteers (PPPP, resulting in moving of CLA-positive tonsillar T-cells to skin and tissue damages. This may play a key role in pathogenesis of PPP.

  19. Pustular drug eruption due to Panax notoginseng saponins

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    Yin ZQ

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available ZhiQiang Yin,1,* LiWen Ma,1,* JiaLi Xu,2,* JiPing Xia,1 Dan Luo1 1Department of Dermatology, 2Department of Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS are a patented product in the People's Republic of China, and have extensive effects on the cardiovascular system. Here we report on four elderly patients (one male and three female with drug eruption induced by PNS injection. All developed a sudden skin rash with pruritus from head to foot, and subsequently accepted hospitalization. In each case, PNS had been used for less than 1 week before appearance of the rash. No specific short-term medications or changes in diet or exposure to environmental factors immediately prior to appearance of the rash were identified. These four patients had some interesting features in common, ie, pustules, fever, and elevated circulating neutrophil counts, which required high-dose, long-term glucocorticoid therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of pustular drug eruption induced by PNS and provides a useful reference and warning for clinicians. Keywords: pustule, drug eruption, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, Panax notoginseng saponins

  20. Overlapping DRESS and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneline Casagranda

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs include acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS, and epidermal necrolysis (Stevens-Johnson syndrome [SJS], toxic epidermal necrolysis. The identification of the causal drug is crucial in order to avoid further exposure, but making the right differential diagnosis of the type of SCAR is equally important since treatment, follow-up, and prognosis of different SCARs are not the same. These syndromes are distinct entities with different clinical, biological, and histological patterns, but sometimes the early distinction between 2 SCARs can be extremely challenging, and overlapping conditions could therefore be taken into consideration, although true overlapping SCARs are very rare when using strict diagnostic criteria (described by the RegiSCAR group. Only a better understanding of the physiopathology of the SCARs could possibly explain these ambiguities and overlaps. We report a case of SCAR in an 86-year-old patient probably induced by allopurinol and simultaneously fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for DRESS and SJS, thus considered as an overlapping case of SCARs.

  1. Overlapping DRESS and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casagranda, Aneline; Suppa, Mariano; Dehavay, Florence; Del Marmol, Véronique

    2017-01-01

    Drug-induced severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs) include acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), and epidermal necrolysis (Stevens-Johnson syndrome [SJS], toxic epidermal necrolysis). The identification of the causal drug is crucial in order to avoid further exposure, but making the right differential diagnosis of the type of SCAR is equally important since treatment, follow-up, and prognosis of different SCARs are not the same. These syndromes are distinct entities with different clinical, biological, and histological patterns, but sometimes the early distinction between 2 SCARs can be extremely challenging, and overlapping conditions could therefore be taken into consideration, although true overlapping SCARs are very rare when using strict diagnostic criteria (described by the RegiSCAR group). Only a better understanding of the physiopathology of the SCARs could possibly explain these ambiguities and overlaps. We report a case of SCAR in an 86-year-old patient probably induced by allopurinol and simultaneously fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for DRESS and SJS, thus considered as an overlapping case of SCARs.

  2. Steven johnsons syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri ram Anne

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN and Stevens Johnson Syndrome (SJS are severe adverse cutaneous drug reactions that predominantly involve the skin and mucous membranes. They are characterized by mucocutaneous tenderness and typically hemorrhagic erosions, erythema and more or less severe epidermal detachment presenting as blisters and areas of denuded skin. Drugs are assumed or identified as the main cause of SJS/TEN in most cases, but Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Herpes simplex virus infections are well documented causes alongside rare cases in which the etiology remains unknown. Several drugs are at "high" risk of inducing TEN/SJS including: Allopurinol, Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and other sulfonamide-antibiotics, aminopenicillins, cephalosporins, quinolones, carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital and NSAID's of the oxicam-type. Differential diagnosis includes linear IgA dermatosis and paraneoplastic pemphigus, pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP, disseminated fixed bullous drug eruption and staphyloccocal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS. Due to the high risk of mortality, management of patients with SJS/TEN requires rapid diagnosis, identification and interruption of the culprit drug, specialized supportive care ideally in an intensive care unit, and consideration of immunomodulating agents such as high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin therapy.

  3. [Severe cutaneous drug reactions to celecoxib (Celebrex)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquès, S; Milpied, B; Foulc, P; Barbarot, S; Cassagnau, E; Stalder, J-F

    2003-11-01

    Celecoxib (Celebrex) is a Cox 2 selective non steroidal anti-inflammatory agent. Adverse reactions reported are usually benign, such as maculopapular exanthema. However, recently severe toxiderma have started to appear. We report two patients who developed a sever celecoxib drug skin reaction. Case no 1. In a 73 year-old woman, treated with celecoxib for cervical arthralgia, a maculopapular exanthema five days after treatment was started. The exanthema, initially edematous and purpural became bullous with multi-visceral failure (disseminated intravascular coagulation, renal failure, hepatitis and pancreatic). The disease slowly regressed. Case no 2. A 72 year-old man, treated for cervicalgia with celecoxib, presented a pustular exanthema of the face and the trunk, ten days after introduction of the treatment, associated with an inflammatory syndrome and hepatic cytolysis. Within 8 days the disease had regressed. In both these patients, the celecoxib patch tests were positive. Until now, the side effects reported with celecoxib have been generally benign exanthemas. We report two cases of severe celecoxib-induced toxiderma: a hypersensitivity syndrome with multi-organ failure and an acute generalized atypical exanthematous pustulosis. These severe toxidermas have rarely been reported in the literature, but we now need to reassess the risks with these new molecules.

  4. Severe delayed skin reactions related to drugs in the paediatric age group: A review of the subject by way of three cases (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis and DRESS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belver, M T; Michavila, A; Bobolea, I; Feito, M; Bellón, T; Quirce, S

    2016-01-01

    Severe delayed drug-induced skin reactions in children are not common but potentially serious. This article describes aspects concerning the etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of these processes; it presents three paediatric cases, namely STS (Steven Johnson Syndrome), TEN (toxic epidermal necrolysis), probably related to amoxicillin/clavulanate and ibuprofen and DRESS (a drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) secondary to phenytoin; and in relation to them, the diagnosis and the treatment of these processes are discussed and reviewed. The AGEP (acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis) is also reviewed. The aetiological diagnosis of severe non-immediate reactions is difficult, and the value of current allergological testing is not well defined in these cases. Diagnosis is based on clinical history, the empirical risk of drugs to trigger SJS/TEN or DRESS, and the in vivo and in vitro testing of the suspect drug. Skin biopsy confirms that the clinical diagnosis and delayed hypersensitivity tests, especially the patch test and the lymphoblastic transformation test (LTT), may be important to confirm the aetiological diagnosis, in our cases emphasising the latter. These diseases can be life threatening (especially DRESS and TEN) and/or have a high rate of major complications or sequelae (SJS/TEN). The three cases described progressed well without sequelae. All were treated with corticosteroids, which is the most currently accepted treatment although the effect has not been clearly demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Immunohistopathological Findings of Severe Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions

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    Mari Orime

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions should involve immunohistopathological examination, which gives insight into the pathomechanisms of these disorders. The characteristic histological findings of erythema multiforme (EM, Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS, and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN provide conclusive evidence demonstrating that SJS/TEN can be distinguished from EM. Established SJS/TEN shows full-thickness, extensive keratinocyte necrosis that develops into subepidermal bullae. Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS and exanthema in drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS each display a variety of histopathological findings, which may partly correlate with the clinical manifestations. Although the histopathology of DRESS is nonspecific, the association of two or more of the four patterns—eczematous changes, interface dermatitis, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis- (AGEP- like patterns, and EM-like patterns—might appear in a single biopsy specimen, suggesting the diagnosis and severe cutaneous manifestations of DRESS. Cutaneous dendritic cells may be involved in the clinical course. AGEP typically shows spongiform superficial epidermal pustules accompanied with edema of the papillary dermis and abundant mixed perivascular infiltrates. Mutations in IL36RN may have a definite effect on pathological similarities between AGEP and generalized pustular psoriasis.

  6. Imaging findings of synovitis-acne-pustulosis-hyperostosis-osteomyelitis syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Jun; Gong Wuxian; Liu Licheng; Xu Aide; Wang Shishan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the imaging characteristics of SAPHO syndrome in 11 cases. Methods: Clinical features and imaging findings from 11 patients (6 male, 5 female, 28 to 68 years old) with SAPHO syndrome were analyzed retrospectively Including DR in 9 cases, CT in 10 cases, MRI and radioisotope scanning in 3 cases. Results: Multi-bones of anterior chest wall disorders were shown in 9 cases on DR images including superior sternum, anterior first rib and clavicle hyperostosis. Bony fusion and bony bridge were also seen in these cases. Hyperostosis osteosclerosis, bone destruction and bony fusion of sternoclavicular articulation and first rib were shown on CT images in 9 cases. Osteosclerosis of the joint between manubrium and midsternum was seen in 1 case on CT image. The sign of flying sea gull was seen in 2 cases on axial anterior chest wall CT images. The disorders of anterior chest wall were bilateral in 8 cases and unilateral in 2 cases. Sacroiliitis and osteomyelitis of ilium were found accompanied in 1 case. Osteomyelitis of thoracic vertebrae were found in 2 cases, while sclerosing osteitis of lumbar vertebrae and osteoarthritis of bilateral hands were observed respectively in 1 case. The thicken soft tissue surround clavicle head, thoracic vertebra disease with long T 1 , jumbly T 2 and high fat suppression signal, long T 1 and short T 2 signal under sacroiliac joint were shown on MRI. Radioisotope scanning displayed higher radioactive uptake of radionuclides, with T shape in sternoclavicular area in 3 cases. Conclusions: Multi-bones of anterior chest wall involvement was the common imaging characteristics in 11 patients. Sacroiliitis, osteomyelitis of' vertebrae and ilium, sclerosing osteitis, ostearthritis of hand could be seen in some cases. (authors)

  7. Treatments for Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yung-Tsu

    2017-01-01

    Severe cutaneous adverse reaction (SCAR) is life-threatening. It consists of Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP), and generalized bullous fixed drug eruptions (GBFDE). In the past years, emerging studies have provided better understandings regarding the pathogenesis of these diseases. These diseases have unique presentations and distinct pathomechanisms. Therefore, theoretically, the options of treatments might be different among various SCARs. However, due to the rarity of these diseases, sufficient evidence is still lacking to support the best choice of treatment for patients with SCAR. Herein, we will provide a concise review with an emphasis on the characteristics and treatments of each SCAR. It may serve as a guidance based on the current best of knowledge and may shed light on the directions for further investigations. PMID:29445753

  8. Treatments for Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Tsu Cho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe cutaneous adverse reaction (SCAR is life-threatening. It consists of Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP, and generalized bullous fixed drug eruptions (GBFDE. In the past years, emerging studies have provided better understandings regarding the pathogenesis of these diseases. These diseases have unique presentations and distinct pathomechanisms. Therefore, theoretically, the options of treatments might be different among various SCARs. However, due to the rarity of these diseases, sufficient evidence is still lacking to support the best choice of treatment for patients with SCAR. Herein, we will provide a concise review with an emphasis on the characteristics and treatments of each SCAR. It may serve as a guidance based on the current best of knowledge and may shed light on the directions for further investigations.

  9. Psoriasis and other Th17-mediated skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokura, Yoshiki; Mori, Tomoko; Hino, Ryosuke

    2010-12-01

    dermatitis (AD) and associated with the severity of AD. Drug eruption is another disease where Th17 cells are involved in the pathogenesis. The percentage of circulating Th17 cells are increased in drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, etc. Th17 cells and IL-22 are increased in patients with acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis. Since IL-17 and IL-22 cooperatively stimulate keratinocytes to produce IL-8, keratinocyte-derived IL-8 contributes to the accumulation ofneutrophils in the lesional epidermis of this drug eruption.

  10. Severe Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions in Pediatric Patients: A Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibek Misirlioglu, Emine; Guvenir, Hakan; Bahceci, Semiha; Haktanir Abul, Mehtap; Can, Demet; Usta Guc, Belgin Emine; Erkocoğlu, Mustafa; Toyran, Muge; Nacaroglu, Hikmet Tekin; Civelek, Ersoy; Buyuktiryaki, Betul; Ginis, Tayfur; Orhan, Fazil; Kocabas, Can Naci

    The severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (SCARs) are rare but could be life-threatening. These include drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis. The purpose of this study was the evaluation of the clinical characteristics of patients with the diagnosis of SCARs. Patients who were diagnosed with SCARs between January 2011 and May 2016 by pediatric allergy clinics in the provinces of Ankara, Trabzon, Izmir, Adana, and Bolu were included in this multicenter study. Clinical and laboratory findings, the time between suspected drug intake and development of clinical findings, treatments they have received, and length of recovery time were recorded. Fifty-eight patients with SCARs were included in this study. The median age of the patients was 8.2 years (interquartile range, 5.25-13 years) and 50% (n = 29) were males. Diagnosis was Stevens-Johnson syndrome/TEN in 60.4% (n = 35), DRESS in 27.6% (n = 16), and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis in 12% (n = 7) of the patients. In 93.1% of the patients, drugs were the cause of the reactions. Antibiotics ranked first among the drugs (51.7%) and antiepileptic drugs were the second (31%) most common. A patient who was diagnosed with TEN developed lagophthalmos and a patient who was diagnosed with DRESS developed secondary diabetes mellitus. Only 1 patient with the diagnosis of TEN died. SCARs in children are not common but potentially serious. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of SCARs will reduce the incidence of morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Scarlet fever: A not so typical exanthematous pharyngotonsillitis (based on 171 cases).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vera, César; de Dios Javierre, Bárbara; Castán Larraz, Beatriz; Arana Navarro, Teresa; Cenarro Guerrero, Teresa; Ruiz Pastora, Rafael; Sánchez Gimeno, Javier

    2016-01-01

    To describe the age, signs and clinical symptoms of children with scarlet fever at the present time, and to check whether they are equivalent to those with traditional streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis. An observational, retrospective study was conducted on the clinical records of 5500 children aged from 0 to 15 years attending a primary health care center. A record was made of the percentage of the cases in which signs and symptoms appear and the Centor score was calculated. Microbiological diagnosis of the disease was made using the rapid antigen-detection test or traditional culture. A total of 171 out of 252 scarlet fever diagnoses were microbiologically verified in 158 patients. The median age was 3.8 years (interquartile range: 2.91-4.78), with the majority (57%) under the age of 4 years. There was fever in 89% of the processes (95% CI: 84-94%), with a temperature of >38°C in 73% (95% CI: 65-80%), enlarged lymph nodes in 70% (95% CI: 58-82%), absence of cough in 73% (95% CI: 65-80%), and tonsillar exudate in only 24% (95% CI: 17-31%). The Centor score (n=105) was ≤2 points in 86% (95% CI: 79-92%). The only difference regarding age is that episodes in patients under the age of 4 years old have significantly higher fever (>38°C) than the older ones (80% versus 63%. OR 3.13; 95% CI: 1.46-6.71). Scarlet fever pharyngotonsillitis differs from the traditional streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis, and its evaluation using clinical prediction rules such as Centor or McIsaac is questionable. The main diagnostic key must certainly be rash, regardless of patient age. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  12. Toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens-Johnson syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and Stevens Johnson Syndrome (SJS) are severe adverse cutaneous drug reactions that predominantly involve the skin and mucous membranes. Both are rare, with TEN and SJS affecting approximately 1or 2/1,000,000 annually, and are considered medical emergencies as they are potentially fatal. They are characterized by mucocutaneous tenderness and typically hemorrhagic erosions, erythema and more or less severe epidermal detachment presenting as blisters and areas of denuded skin. Currently, TEN and SJS are considered to be two ends of a spectrum of severe epidermolytic adverse cutaneous drug reactions, differing only by their extent of skin detachment. Drugs are assumed or identified as the main cause of SJS/TEN in most cases, but Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Herpes simplex virus infections are well documented causes alongside rare cases in which the aetiology remains unknown. Several drugs are at "high" risk of inducing TEN/SJS including: Allopurinol, Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and other sulfonamide-antibiotics, aminopenicillins, cephalosporins, quinolones, carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital and NSAID's of the oxicam-type. Genetic susceptibility to SJS and TEN is likely as exemplified by the strong association observed in Han Chinese between a genetic marker, the human leukocyte antigen HLA-B*1502, and SJS induced by carbamazepine. Diagnosis relies mainly on clinical signs together with the histological analysis of a skin biopsy showing typical full-thickness epidermal necrolysis due to extensive keratinocyte apoptosis. Differential diagnosis includes linear IgA dermatosis and paraneoplastic pemphigus, pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP), disseminated fixed bullous drug eruption and staphyloccocal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS). Due to the high risk of mortality, management of patients with SJS/TEN requires rapid diagnosis, evaluation of the prognosis using SCORTEN

  13. Induced Abortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search FAQs Induced Abortion Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Induced Abortion Patient Education FAQs Induced Abortion Patient ... given for the procedure? Before the procedure, local anesthesia is given to numb the cervix. Sedatives may ...

  14. Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome presenting a primary sternal lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, Carlos A.; Leani, Marcelo J.; Rieu, Juan; Serrano, Santiago O.; Dettano, Veronica

    2003-01-01

    SAPHO syndrome-acronym for synovitis, acne, pustules, hyperostosis and osteitis, is a nosological entity including multiple affections with cutaneous and osteoarticular involvement. We report the case of a 59 years old female patient that consulted due to an acute sternal pain. After some months the patient showed a palm-plantar pustular exanthem, acne and fever. SAPHO syndrome was diagnosed based on a CT, an osseous gammagraphy and a biopsy of cutaneous lesions. The current actual tendency is to consider the SAPHO syndrome as a seronegative arthropathy with a similar pathophysiology to Reiter's syndrome. (author)

  15. Inducing autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Lea M; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Andersen, Jens S.

    2014-01-01

    catabolism, which has recently been found to induce autophagy in an MTOR independent way and support cancer cell survival. In this study, quantitative phosphoproteomics was applied to investigate the initial signaling events linking ammonia to the induction of autophagy. The MTOR inhibitor rapamycin was used...... as a reference treatment to emphasize the differences between an MTOR-dependent and -independent autophagy-induction. By this means 5901 phosphosites were identified of which 626 were treatment-specific regulated and 175 were coregulated. Investigation of the ammonia-specific regulated sites supported that MTOR...

  16. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  17. Patch Testing in Non-Immediate Drug Eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romano Antonino

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The present review addresses the literature regarding the sensitivity and specificity of the various diagnostic methods for evaluating non-immediate (ie, occurring more than 1 hour after drug administration hypersensitivity reactions associated with β-lactams and other antibiotics, anticonvulsants, heparins, iodinated contrast media, etc. Such reactions include several clinical entities, which range from mild reactions, such as maculopapular rash and delayed-appearing urticaria, to severe ones, such as acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN. Clinical and laboratory studies indicate that a cell-mediated pathogenic mechanism is often involved in maculopapular rashes. However, this mechanism has also been demonstrated in other non-immediate reactions, such as urticarial and/or angioedematous manifestations, TEN, bullous exanthems, and AGEP. Patch tests, together with delayed-reading intradermal tests, lymphocyte transformation tests, and challenges, are useful tools for evaluating non-immediate drug eruptions. Patch tests can be performed with any form of commercial drugs and are safer than intradermal tests. However, patch tests are less sensitive than intradermal tests, and their sensitivity may vary, depending on the vehicle used.

  18. Drug-induced thrombocytopenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, U; Andersen, M; Hansen, P B

    1997-01-01

    induced by non-cytotoxic drugs is characterised by heterogeneous clinical picture and recovery is generally rapid. Although corticosteroids seem inefficient, we still recommend that severe symptomatic cases of drug-induced thrombocytopenia are treated as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura due...

  19. Material Induced Anisotropic Damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niazi, Muhammad Sohail; Wisselink, H.H.; Meinders, Vincent T.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Hora, P.

    2012-01-01

    The anisotropy in damage can be driven by two different phenomena; anisotropic defor-mation state named Load Induced Anisotropic Damage (LIAD) and anisotropic (shape and/or distribution) second phase particles named Material Induced Anisotropic Damage (MIAD). Most anisotropic damage models are based

  20. Diet induced thermogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Daily energy expenditure consists of three components: basal metabolic rate, diet-induced thermogenesis and the energy cost of physical activity. Here, data on diet-induced thermogenesis are reviewed in relation to measuring conditions and characteristics of the diet. METHODS: Measuring

  1. Diet induced thermogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westerterp KR

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective Daily energy expenditure consists of three components: basal metabolic rate, diet-induced thermogenesis and the energy cost of physical activity. Here, data on diet-induced thermogenesis are reviewed in relation to measuring conditions and characteristics of the diet. Methods Measuring conditions include nutritional status of the subject, physical activity and duration of the observation. Diet characteristics are energy content and macronutrient composition. Results Most studies measure diet-induced thermogenesis as the increase in energy expenditure above basal metabolic rate. Generally, the hierarchy in macronutrient oxidation in the postprandial state is reflected similarly in diet-induced thermogenesis, with the sequence alcohol, protein, carbohydrate, and fat. A mixed diet consumed at energy balance results in a diet induced energy expenditure of 5 to 15 % of daily energy expenditure. Values are higher at a relatively high protein and alcohol consumption and lower at a high fat consumption. Protein induced thermogenesis has an important effect on satiety. In conclusion, the main determinants of diet-induced thermogenesis are the energy content and the protein- and alcohol fraction of the diet. Protein plays a key role in body weight regulation through satiety related to diet-induced thermogenesis.

  2. Bleomycin-induced pneumonitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Sleijfer (Stefan)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe cytotoxic agent bleomycin is feared for its induction of sometimes fatal pulmonary toxicity, also known as bleomycin-induced pneumonitis (BIP). The central event in the development of BIP is endothelial damage of the lung vasculature due to bleomycin-induced

  3. Induced radioactivity at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    A description of some of the problems and some of the advantages associated with the phenomenon of induced radioactivity at accelerator centres such as CERN. The author has worked in this field for several years and has recently written a book 'Induced Radioactivity' published by North-Holland.

  4. Induced classical gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novozhilov, Yu.V.; Vassilevich, D.V.

    1991-01-01

    We review the induced-gravity approach according to which the Einstein gravity is a long-wavelength effect induced by underlying fundamental quantum fields due to the dynamical-scale symmetry breaking. It is shown that no ambiguities arise in the definition of the induced Newton and cosmological constants if one works with the path integral for fundamental fields in the low-scale region. The main accent is on a specification of the path integral which enables us to utilize the unitarity condition and thereby avoid ambiguities. Induced Einstein equations appear from the symmetry condition that the path integral of fundamental fields for a slowly varying metric is invariant under the local vertical strokeGL(4, R)-transformations of a tetrad, which contain the local Euclidean Lorentz, O(4)-rotations as a subgroup. The relatinship to induced quantum gravity is briefly outlined. (orig.)

  5. Induced affine inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azri, Hemza; Demir, Durmuş

    2018-02-01

    Induced gravity, metrical gravity in which gravitational constant arises from vacuum expectation value of a heavy scalar, is known to suffer from Jordan frame vs Einstein frame ambiguity, especially in inflationary dynamics. Induced gravity in affine geometry, as we show here, leads to an emergent metric and gravity scale, with no Einstein-Jordan ambiguity. While gravity is induced by the vacuum expectation value of the scalar field, nonzero vacuum energy facilitates generation of the metric. Our analysis shows that induced gravity results in a relatively large tensor-to-scalar ratio in both metrical and affine gravity setups. However, the fact remains that the induced affine gravity provides an ambiguity-free framework.

  6. Vitiligo, drug induced (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this person's face have resulted from drug-induced vitiligo. Loss of melanin, the primary skin pigment, occasionally ... is the case with this individual. The typical vitiligo lesion is flat and depigmented, but maintains the ...

  7. Beam induced RF heating

    CERN Document Server

    Salvant, B; Arduini, G; Assmann, R; Baglin, V; Barnes, M J; Bartmann, W; Baudrenghien, P; Berrig, O; Bracco, C; Bravin, E; Bregliozzi, G; Bruce, R; Bertarelli, A; Carra, F; Cattenoz, G; Caspers, F; Claudet, S; Day, H; Garlasche, M; Gentini, L; Goddard, B; Grudiev, A; Henrist, B; Jones, R; Kononenko, O; Lanza, G; Lari, L; Mastoridis, T; Mertens, V; Métral, E; Mounet, N; Muller, J E; Nosych, A A; Nougaret, J L; Persichelli, S; Piguiet, A M; Redaelli, S; Roncarolo, F; Rumolo, G; Salvachua, B; Sapinski, M; Schmidt, R; Shaposhnikova, E; Tavian, L; Timmins, M; Uythoven, J; Vidal, A; Wenninger, J; Wollmann, D; Zerlauth, M

    2012-01-01

    After the 2011 run, actions were put in place during the 2011/2012 winter stop to limit beam induced radio frequency (RF) heating of LHC components. However, some components could not be changed during this short stop and continued to represent a limitation throughout 2012. In addition, the stored beam intensity increased in 2012 and the temperature of certain components became critical. In this contribution, the beam induced heating limitations for 2012 and the expected beam induced heating limitations for the restart after the Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) will be compiled. The expected consequences of running with 25 ns or 50 ns bunch spacing will be detailed, as well as the consequences of running with shorter bunch length. Finally, actions on hardware or beam parameters to monitor and mitigate the impact of beam induced heating to LHC operation after LS1 will be discussed.

  8. Terahertz field induced electromigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strikwerda, Andrew; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof

    We report the first observation of THz-field-induced electromigration in sub-wavelength metallic gap structures after exposure to intense single-cycle, sub-picosecond electric field transients of amplitude up to 400 kV/cm....

  9. Terahertz Induced Electromigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strikwerda, Andrew; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    We report the first observation of THz-field-induced electromigration in subwavelength metallic gap structures after exposure to intense single-cycle, sub-picosecond electric field transients of amplitude up to 400 kV/cm....

  10. Terahertz Induced Electromigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strikwerda, Andrew; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof

    We report the first observation of THz-field-induced electromigration in subwavelength metallic gap structures after exposure to intense single-cycle, sub-picosecond electric field transients of amplitude up to 400 kV/cm....

  11. [Exercise induced hyponatremia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadad, Eran; Rosen, Eli; Heled, Yuval; Moran, Daniel S; Schindel, Yair

    2004-05-01

    A normal water-electrolyte balance is essential for normal function of body systems during physical activity. During recent years, awareness of the importance of drinking amongst athletes and Israeli Defense Force (IDF) soldiers, in particular, has been highlighted. A large number of athletes tend to drink prior to, during and after their exercise in order to enhance physical abilities and to prevent heat casualties and dehydration. However, excessive water consumption combined with sweat induced electrolytes loss during physical activity, may cause hyponatremia in extreme cases. Recently, several cases of exercise induced hyponatremia were reported in the IDF, resulting from improper water consumption. In this article, we describe a clinical case of exercise-induced hyponatremia in a soldier and a review of the literature, including the etiology, clinical characterization and recommended treatment. Moreover, water consumption recommendations with regard to physical activity are presented. The application of such recommendations may prevent future events of exercise-induced hyponatremia.

  12. Cold-induced metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenbelt, W. van Marken; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose of review Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesis by sympathetic, norepinephrine-induced mitochondrial heat production in brown adipose tissue is a well known component of this metabolic

  13. Fexofenadine-Induced Urticaria

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang Woo; Byun, Ji Yeon; Choi, You Won; Myung, Ki Bum; Choi, Hae Young

    2011-01-01

    Fexofenadine (Allegra? 180) is a second-generation antihistamine. It is widely used as anti-allergic drug, which suppresses various allergic reactions mediated by histamines. A few cases of H1-antihistamine-induced urticaria have been reported. Herein, we report a rare case of fexofenadine-induced urticaria which was confirmed by a prick test, oral provocation test, and flow cytometry assisted-basophil activation test.

  14. Hemorrhagic gianotti-crosti syndrome in a one and half month old infant: An extremely unusual presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilendu Sarma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gianotti-Crosti syndrome is parainfectious exanthematous disease having unique presentation of small papulovesicular eruptions symmetrically over extensor surface of limbs and face in children. Hemorrhagic lesions are very rare and are always localized. Here, a case of EBV-induced Gianotti-Crosti syndrome with extensive hemorrhagic vesicles in a one and half month old infant, possibly induced by Epstein Barr virus, is reported. Neither the involvement of the disease at this early age nor the extensive hemorrhagic vesicles as the predominant presentation is reported before.

  15. Laser-induced interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    This dissertation discusses some of the new ways that lasers can be used to control the energy flow in a medium. Experimental and theoretical considerations of the laser-induced collision are discussed. The laser-induced collision is a process in which a laser is used to selectively transfer energy from a state in one atomic or molecular species to another state in a different species. The first experimental demonstration of this process is described, along with later experiments in which lasers were used to create collisional cross sections as large as 10 - 13 cm 2 . Laser-induced collisions utilizing both a dipole-dipole interaction and dipole-quadrupole interaction have been experimentally demonstrated. The theoretical aspects of other related processes such as laser-induced spin-exchange, collision induced Raman emission, and laser-induced charge transfer are discussed. Experimental systems that could be used to demonstrate these various processes are presented. An experiment which produced an inversion of the resonance line of an ion by optical pumping of the neutral atom is described. This type of scheme has been proposed as a possible method for constructing VUV and x-ray lasers

  16. Toxic epidermal necrolysis, DRESS, AGEP: Do overlap cases exist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouvresse Sophie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe cutaneous adverse reactions to drugs (SCARs include acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS and epidermal necrolysis (Stevens-Johnson syndrome–toxic epidermal necrolysis [SJS-TEN]. Because of the varied initial presentation of such adverse drug reactions, diagnosis may be difficult and suggests overlap among SCARs. Overlapping SCARs are defined as cases fulfilling the criteria for definite or probable diagnosis of at least 2 ADRs according to scoring systems for AGEP, DRESS and SJS-TEN. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of overlap among SCARs among cases in the referral hospital in France. Methods We retrospectively analyzed data for 216 patients hospitalized in the referral centre over 7 years with a discharge diagnosis of AGEP (n = 45, DRESS (n = 47, SJS-TEN (n = 80 or “drug rash” (n = 44. Each case with detailed clinical data and a skin biopsy specimen was scored for AGEP, DRESS and SJS-TEN by use of diagnostic scores elaborated by the RegiSCAR group. Results In total, 45 of 216 cases (21% had at least 2 possible diagnoses: 35 had a single predominant diagnosis (definite or probable, 7 had several possible diagnoses and 3 (2.1% of 145 confirmed SCARs were overlap SCARs. Conclusions Despite ambiguities among SCARs, confirmed overlap cases are rare. This study did not avoid pitfalls linked to its retrospective nature and selection bias. In the acute stage of disease, early identification of severe ADRs can be difficult because of clinical or biologic overlapping features and missing data on histology, biology and evolution. Retrospectively analyzing cases by use of diagnostic algorithms can lead to reliable discrimination among AGEP, DRESS and SJS-TEN.

  17. Induced polarization response of microbial induced sulfideprecipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Slater, Lee; Hubbard, Susan

    2004-06-04

    A laboratory scale experiment was conducted to examine the use of induced polarization and electrical conductivity to monitor microbial induced sulfide precipitation under anaerobic conditions in sand filled columns. Three columns were fabricated; one for electrical measurements, one for geochemical sampling and a third non-inoculated column was used as a control. A continual upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Desulfovibrio vulgaris microbes were injected into the middle of the geochemical and electrical columns. Iron and zinc sulfides precipitated along a microbial action front as a result of sulfate reduction due by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. The precipitation front initially developed near the microbial injection location, and subsequently migrated towards the nutrient inlet, as a result of chemotaxis by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Sampling during and subsequent to the experiment revealed spatiotemporal changes in the biogeochemical measurements associated with microbial sulfate reduction. Conductivity measurements were insensitive to all biogeochemical changes occurred within the column. Changes in the IP response (of up to 14 mrad)were observed to coincide in place and in time with the active microbe respiration/sulfide precipitation front as determined from geochemical sampling. The IP response is correlated with the lactate concentration gradient, an indirect measurement of microbial metabolism, suggesting the potential of IP as a method for monitoring microbial respiration/activity. Post experimental destructive sample analysis and SEM imaging verified the geochemical results and supported our hypothesis that microbe induced sulfide precipitation is directly detectable using electrical methods. Although the processes not fully understood, the IP response appears to be sensitive to this anaerobic microbial precipitation, suggesting a possible novel application for the IP method.

  18. Chemical-induced Vitiligo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis Chemical-induced depigmentation of the skin has been recognized for over 75 years, first as an occupational hazard but then extending to those using household commercial products as common as hair dyes. Since their discovery, these chemicals have been used therapeutically in patients with severe vitiligo to depigment their remaining skin and improve their appearance. The importance of recognizing this phenomenon was highlighted during an outbreak of vitiligo in Japan during the summer of 2013, when over 16,000 users of a new skin lightening cosmetic cream developed skin depigmentation at the site of contact with the cream and many in remote areas as well. Depigmenting chemicals appear to be analogs of the amino acid tyrosine that disrupt melanogenesis and result in autoimmunity and melanocyte destruction. Because chemical-induced depigmentation is clinically and histologically indistinguishable from non-chemically induced vitiligo, and because these chemicals appear to induce melanocyte autoimmunity, this phenomenon should be known as “chemical-induced vitiligo”, rather than less accurate terms that have been previously used. PMID:28317525

  19. [Amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogazzi, Fausto; Tomisti, Luca; Di Bello, Vitantonio; Martino, Enio

    2017-03-01

    Amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction occurs in about 15-20% of patients under amiodarone therapy. Amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism (AIH) can develop in patients with an apparently normal thyroid gland or in those with an underlying chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. On a clinical ground, AIH is not challenging and can be easily treated with L-thyroxine therapy. Amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT) can occur in patients with (AIT 1) or without (AIT 2) an underlying thyroid disease. AIT 1 is a true iodine-induced hyperthyroidism occurring in patients with an underlying thyroid autonomy while AIT 2 is a drug-induced destructive thyroiditis. According to the different pathogenetic mechanism, AIT 2 is treated with glucocorticoids while AIT 1 usually responds to thionamides. Thyroidectomy should be considered when AIT represents an imminent risk for cardiac conditions, when patients require a prompt resolution of thyrotoxicosis or when they do not respond to the medical therapy. An effective collaboration between cardiologists and endocrinologists is crucial in each part of the management of AIT patients, including the evaluation of cardiological conditions with regard to thyroid hormone excess and whether, or not, it is necessary to continue amiodarone therapy.

  20. Stimulant-induced trichotillomania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamalian, Gareen; Citrome, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    A prior report described the presentation of cocaine-induced trichotillomania, which resolved with the cessation of cocaine use. Here the authors describe the case of stimulant-induced trichotillomania that resolved with the discontinuation of stimulants and initiation of olanzapine. To the authors' knowledge this is the first reported adult case of stimulant-induced trichotillomania. The case is of a patient with a previous diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder whose symptoms of trichotillomania coincide with abuse of amphetamine and with the resolution of symptoms in the absence of amphetamine use. Given the increase in exposure of prescription amphetamines among adults, further study into the association between stimulants and adverse events such as trichotillomania is needed.

  1. [Drug induced diarrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morard, Isabelle; Hadengue, Antoine

    2008-09-03

    Diarrhea is a frequent adverse event involving the most frequently antibiotics, laxatives and NSAI. Drug induced diarrhea may be acute or chronic. It may be due to expected, dose dependant properties of the drug, to immuno-allergic or bio-genomic mechanisms. Several pathophysiological mechanisms have been described resulting in osmotic, secretory or inflammatory diarrhea, shortened transit time, or malabsorption. Histopathological lesions sometimes associated with drug induced diarrhea are usually non specific and include ulcerations, inflammatory or ischemic lesions, fibrous diaphragms, microscopic colitis and apoptosis. The diagnosis of drug induced diarrhea, sometimes difficult to assess, relies on the absence of other obvious causes and on the rapid disappearance of the symptoms after withdrawal of the suspected drug.

  2. Time Domain Induced Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest

    2012-01-01

    Time-domain-induced polarization has significantly broadened its field of reference during the last decade, from mineral exploration to environmental geophysics, e.g., for clay and peat identification and landfill characterization. Though, insufficient modeling tools have hitherto limited the use...... of time-domaininduced polarization for wider purposes. For these reasons, a new forward code and inversion algorithm have been developed using the full-time decay of the induced polarization response, together with an accurate description of the transmitter waveform and of the receiver transfer function......%. Furthermore, the presence of low-pass filters in time-domain-induced polarization instruments affects the early times of the acquired decays (typically up to 100 ms) and has to be modeled in the forward response to avoid significant loss of resolution. The developed forward code has been implemented in a 1D...

  3. Rosuvastatin-induced pemphigoid.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murad, Aizuri A

    2012-01-01

    Statins are widely prescribed medications and very well tolerated. Rosuvastatin is another member of this drug used to treat dyslipidaemia. It is a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase. Immunobullous disease is usually idiopathic but can be drug-induced. Both idiopathic and iatrogenic forms share common clinical and immunohistological features. The authors report a case of pemphigoid induced by rosuvastatin, a commonly prescribed medication. To our knowledge, there is limited report on rosuvastatin associated with pemphigoid in the literature.

  4. Tumor-induced osteomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan de Beur, Suzanne M

    2005-09-14

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare paraneoplastic form of renal phosphate wasting that results in severe hypophosphatemia, a defect in vitamin D metabolism, and osteomalacia. This debilitating disorder is illustrated by the clinical presentation of a 55-year-old woman with progressive fatigue, weakness, and muscle and bone pain with fractures. After a protracted clinical course and extensive laboratory evaluation, tumor-induced osteomalacia was identified as the basis of her clinical presentation. In this article, the distinctive clinical characteristics of this syndrome, the advances in diagnosis of TIO, and new insights into the pathophysiology of this disorder are discussed.

  5. Exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, George

    2014-11-03

    Exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis, or exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER), is a clinical entity typically considered when someone presents with muscle stiffness, swelling, and pain out of proportion to the expected fatigue post exercise. The diagnosis is confirmed by myoglobinuria, and an elevated serum Creatinine Phosphokinase (CPK) level, usually 10 times the normal range. However, an elevation in CPK is seen in most forms of strenuous exercise, up to 20 times the upper normal range. Therefore, there is no definitive pathologic CPK cut-off. Fortunately the dreaded complication of acute renal failure is rare compared to other forms rhabdomyolysis. We review the risks, diagnosis, clinical course and treatment for exercise- induced rhabdomyolysis.

  6. Inducible laryngeal obstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvorsen, Thomas; Walsted, Emil Schwarz; Bucca, Caterina

    2017-01-01

    Inducible laryngeal obstruction (ILO) describes an inappropriate, transient, reversible narrowing of the larynx in response to external triggers. ILO is an important cause of a variety of respiratory symptoms and can mimic asthma. Current understanding of ILO has been hampered by imprecise nomenc...

  7. Drug induced aseptic meningitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2013-09-29

    Sep 29, 2013 ... Abstract. Drug-induced aseptic meningitis (DIAM) is a rare but important and often challenging diagnosis for the physician. Intake of antimicrobials, steroids, anal- gesics amongst others has been implicated. Signs and symptoms generally develop within 24-48 hours of drug ingestion. The pa- tient often ...

  8. Advertising-Induced Embarrassment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puntoni, S.; Hooge, de I.E.; Verbeke, W.J.M.I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Consumer embarrassment is a concern for many advertisers. Yet little is known about ad-induced embarrassment. The authors investigate when and why consumers experience embarrassment as a result of exposure to socially sensitive advertisements. The theory distinguishes between viewing

  9. [Medically-induced rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosulya, E V

    This paper summarizes the currently accepted concepts of the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying the morphological and functional changes in intranasal mucosa of the patients having a long history of the application of the long-acting topical vasoconstrictor agents. The author presents the data illustrating the effectiveness of various methods for the pharmacotherapeutic treatment of medically-induced rhinitis.

  10. Induced nuclear beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiss, H.R.

    1986-01-01

    Certain nuclear beta decay transitions normally inhibited by angular momentum or parity considerations can be induced to occur by the application of an electromagnetic field. Such decays can be useful in the controlled production of power, and in fission waste disposal

  11. Geomagnetism and Induced Voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Razzaq, W.; Biller, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    Introductory physics laboratories have seen an influx of "conceptual integrated science" over time in their classrooms with elements of other sciences such as chemistry, biology, Earth science, and astronomy. We describe a laboratory to introduce this development, as it attracts attention to the voltage induced in the human brain as it…

  12. Bowthruster-induced damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schokking, L.A.; Janssen, P.C.; Verhagen, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    The stability of stones in propeller-induced jet wash is still difficult to predict. Especially the trend of bowthrusters increasing in size and power in sea going ships (especially ferries) over the last years may be a reason for concern when dealing with the protection of slopes and beds. But also

  13. Irradiation-Induced Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birtcher, R.C.; Ewing, R.C.; Matzke, Hj.; Meldrum, A.; Newcomer, P.P.; Wang, L.M.; Wang, S.X.; Weber, W.J.

    1999-08-09

    This paper summarizes the results of the studies of the irradiation-induced formation of nanostructures, where the injected interstitials from the source of irradiation are not major components of the nanophase. This phenomena has been observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in a number of intermetallic compounds and ceramics during high-energy electron or ion irradiations when the ions completely penetrate through the specimen. Beginning with single crystals, electron or ion irradiation in a certain temperature range may result in nanostructures composed of amorphous domains and nanocrystals with either the original composition and crystal structure or new nanophases formed by decomposition of the target material. The phenomenon has also been observed in natural materials which have suffered irradiation from the decay of constituent radioactive elements and in nuclear reactor fuels which have been irradiated by fission neutrons and other fission products. The mechanisms involved in the process of this nanophase formation are discussed in terms of the evolution of displacement cascades, radiation-induced defect accumulation, radiation-induced segregation and phase decomposition, as well as the competition between irradiation-induced amorphization and recrystallization.

  14. Induced Norm Control Toolbox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beran, Eric Bengt

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the basic nature of the InducedNorm Control Toolbox (INCT). The toolbox is a set of Matlab-filesusing LMITOOL and the Semidefinite Programming package(SP). Thetoolbox is public domain. The INCT provides a series of analysisand synthesis tools for continuous time...

  15. Understanding induced seismicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsworth, Derek; Spiers, Christopher J.; Niemeijer, Andre R.

    2016-01-01

    Fluid injection–induced seismicity has become increasingly widespread in oil- and gas-producing areas of the United States (1–3) and western Canada. It has shelved deep geothermal energy projects in Switzerland and the United States (4), and its effects are especially acute in Oklahoma, where

  16. Injection-induced earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, William L

    2013-07-12

    Earthquakes in unusual locations have become an important topic of discussion in both North America and Europe, owing to the concern that industrial activity could cause damaging earthquakes. It has long been understood that earthquakes can be induced by impoundment of reservoirs, surface and underground mining, withdrawal of fluids and gas from the subsurface, and injection of fluids into underground formations. Injection-induced earthquakes have, in particular, become a focus of discussion as the application of hydraulic fracturing to tight shale formations is enabling the production of oil and gas from previously unproductive formations. Earthquakes can be induced as part of the process to stimulate the production from tight shale formations, or by disposal of wastewater associated with stimulation and production. Here, I review recent seismic activity that may be associated with industrial activity, with a focus on the disposal of wastewater by injection in deep wells; assess the scientific understanding of induced earthquakes; and discuss the key scientific challenges to be met for assessing this hazard.

  17. Metronidazole-Induced Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. O'Halloran

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion. This case provides the eighth report of Metronidazole induced pancreatitis. All of the cases were reported in females and ran a benign course.Early diagnosis, discontinuation of the drug and supportive care will lead to a successful recovery in the majority of cases.

  18. Ethionamide-induced gynecomastia

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Ramakant; George, Jacob; Sharma, Arun K.; chhabra, Naveen; Jangir, Suresh K.; Mishra, Vikas

    2012-01-01

    Gynecomastia is very rare during antituberculosis chemotherapy. We describe a 38-year-old male patient who developed a painful gynecomastia following second-line drug therapy for multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis. Gynecomastia disappeared after stopping the ethionamide. A published literature on antituberculosis-induced gynecomastia is also briefly discussed.

  19. Sequelae of induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, P

    1985-01-01

    In the long-term prospective controlled study reported here, 1509 general practitioners and 795 gynaecologists in England, Scotland and Wales are cooperating in providing information on the sequelae of abortion, especially on the problems of later pregnancies, subfertility and all reported morbidity, in particular psychiatric illness. Morbidity within 21 days after induced abortion, and considered to be related to induced abortion, was found in 10% of 6105 women who had an induced abortion in their index pregnancy, and there were major complications in 2.1%. The main factors affecting morbidity were the place of operation, gestation at termination, the method of termination, sterilization at the time of operation, and smoking habits. Several differences between National Health Service and private sector operations were found which could affect the morbidity rates. Possible means of reducing early morbidity are discussed. The outcome of the first post-index pregnancy in 745 women whose index pregnancy had ended in induced abortion and in 1339 controls was also compared. There was no statistically significant difference between cases and controls. Further analysis of a large number of pregnancies is required to permit confident interpretation of these observations.

  20. Hyperthermia-induced apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, E.H.A.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes a number of studies that investigated several aspects of heat-induced apoptosis in human lymphoid malignancies. Cells harbour both pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and the balance between these proteins determines whether a cell is susceptible to undergo apoptosis. In this

  1. Drug-induced hyperkalemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Badreddine, Atef; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Hmouda, Houssem

    2014-09-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common clinical condition that can be defined as a serum potassium concentration exceeding 5.0 mmol/L. Drug-induced hyperkalemia is the most important cause of increased potassium levels in everyday clinical practice. Drug-induced hyperkalemia may be asymptomatic. However, it may be dramatic and life threatening, posing diagnostic and management problems. A wide range of drugs can cause hyperkalemia by a variety of mechanisms. Drugs can interfere with potassium homoeostasis either by promoting transcellular potassium shift or by impairing renal potassium excretion. Drugs may also increase potassium supply. The reduction in renal potassium excretion due to inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system represents the most important mechanism by which drugs are known to cause hyperkalemia. Medications that alter transmembrane potassium movement include amino acids, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, suxamethonium, and mannitol. Drugs that impair renal potassium excretion are mainly represented by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-II receptor blockers, direct renin inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, calcineurin inhibitors, heparin and derivatives, aldosterone antagonists, potassium-sparing diuretics, trimethoprim, and pentamidine. Potassium-containing agents represent another group of medications causing hyperkalemia. Increased awareness of drugs that can induce hyperkalemia, and monitoring and prevention are key elements for reducing the number of hospital admissions, morbidity, and mortality related to drug-induced hyperkalemia.

  2. Lupus induced by medicaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canas D, Carlos Alberto; Perafan B, Pablo Eduardo

    2001-01-01

    We describe a 55 years old female patient who consulted by fever syndrome, artralgias and the presence of high tittles positives antinuclear antibodies. She had arterial hypertension in treatment with captopril. We suspected the clinical diagnoses of drug-induced lupus; the withdraw of captopril was associated with the remission of the clinical and laboratory manifestations

  3. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... January 2014 More on this topic for: Parents Kids Teens Can Kids and Teens With Asthma Play Sports? Asthma Center When to Go to the ER if Your Child Has Asthma Kids and Exercise Asthma Triggers Word! Exercise-Induced Asthma ...

  4. Uterine contraction induced by Tanzanian plants used to induce abortion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolajsen, Tine; Nielsen, Frank; Rasch, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Women in Tanzania use plants to induce abortion. It is not known whether the plants have an effect.......Women in Tanzania use plants to induce abortion. It is not known whether the plants have an effect....

  5. Contrast induced nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacul, Fulvio; van der Molen, Aart J; Reimer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Contrast Media Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) has updated its 1999 guidelines on contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN). AREAS COVERED: Topics reviewed include the definition of CIN, the choice of contrast medium, the prophylactic...... measures used to reduce the incidence of CIN, and the management of patients receiving metformin. Key Points • Definition, risk factors and prevention of contrast medium induced nephropathy are reviewed. • CIN risk is lower with intravenous than intra-arterial iodinated contrast medium. • eGFR of 45 ml....../min/1.73 m (2) is CIN risk threshold for intravenous contrast medium. • Hydration with either saline or sodium bicarbonate reduces CIN incidence. • Patients with eGFR = 60 ml/min/1.73 m (2) receiving contrast medium can continue metformin normally....

  6. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-04-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure.

  7. Chemotherapeutic drug induced pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, M.; Brugger, E.

    1981-01-01

    A series of chemotherapeutic drugs is known to induce interstitial lung disease of letal outcome. Diffuse fibrosing interstitial pneumonias are more frequently observed due to Busulfan, Bleomycin, BCNU or Methotrexat therapy. As well literature as our own investigations demonstrate low sensitivity of X-ray controlls in diagnosing beginning changes. Lung function tests including diffusion capacity analysis are more practicable to recognize early phases of disease. Nevertheless, clinical practice shows patients being moust sensitive in decovering beginning decreases of lung function. Exercise induced dyspnea, raw cough and often fever, dyspnea at rest and finally pulmonary insufficiency will be the climax of symptoms. All patients treated with Busulfan, Bleomycin, BCNU and probably Methotrexat should regulary be controlled by lung function analysis. (orig.) [de

  8. Chemotherapeutic drug induced pneumonitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, M.; Brugger, E.

    1981-09-01

    A series of chemotherapeutic drugs is known to induce interstitial lung disease of letal outcome. Diffuse fibrosing interstitial pneumonias are more frequently observed due to Busulfan, Bleomycin, BCNU or Methotrexat therapy. As well literature as our own investigations demonstrate low sensitivity of X-ray controlls in diagnosing beginning changes. Lung function tests including diffusion capacity analysis are more practicable to recognize early phases of disease. Nevertheless, clinical practice shows patients being moust sensitive in decovering beginning decreases of lung function. Exercise induced dyspnea, raw cough and often fever, dyspnea at rest and finally pulmonary insufficiency will be the climax of symptoms. All patients treated with Busulfan, Bleomycin, BCNU and probably Methotrexat should regulary be controlled by lung function analysis.

  9. Anesthetic-induced anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norred, Carol L

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this course is to update nurse anesthetists about anesthetic-induced anaphylaxis. This course discusses the pathophysiologic process of anaphylaxis with descriptions of the allergic immune response and the mediators and mechanisms of mast cell activation. The preoperative identification of patients at high risk and the assessment of potential anesthetic triggers of a hypersensitivity and/or allergic reaction are prudent strategies to minimize the risk of anaphylaxis. Other practices recommended for clinicians include suggestions for anesthetic management to decrease threat of an allergic response in high-risk patients. Furthermore, the identification of the severity grade of hypersensitivity reactions and the appropriate treatment of perioperative anaphylaxis is discussed. In addition, postoperative and follow-up interventions, including testing for patients who have had an anesthetic-induced hypersensitivity reaction, are considered.

  10. Subsidence Induced by Underground Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Devin L.

    2016-01-01

    Subsidence induced by underground extraction is a class of human-induced (anthropogenic) land subsidence that principally is caused by the withdrawal of subsurface fluids (groundwater, oil, and gas) or by the underground mining of coal and other minerals.

  11. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Noise-Induced Hearing Loss On this page: What is ... I find additional information about NIHL? What is noise-induced hearing loss? Every day, we experience sound ...

  12. Polarization induced doped transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  13. Lime-induced phytophotodermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Hankinson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This case describes a scenario of lime-induced phytophotodermatitis. Phytophotodermatitis is a dermatitis caused after the skin is exposed to photosensitizing compounds in plants and then exposed to sunlight. Many common plants including citrus fruits, celery, and wild parsnip contain these photosensitizing compounds which cause phytophotodermatitis. It is important for a physician to be aware of phytophotodermatitis because it may often be misdiagnosed as other skin conditions including fungal infection, cellulitis, allergic contact dermatitis, and even child abuse.

  14. Induced current heating probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thatcher, G.; Ferguson, B.G.; Winstanley, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    An induced current heating probe is of thimble form and has an outer conducting sheath and a water flooded flux-generating unit formed from a stack of ferrite rings coaxially disposed in the sheath. The energising coil is made of solid wire which connects at one end with a coaxial water current tube and at the other end with the sheath. The stack of ferrite rings may include non-magnetic insulating rings which help to shape the flux. (author)

  15. Cocaine-induced psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, K T; Lydiard, R B; Malcolm, R; Ballenger, J C

    1991-12-01

    Chronic stimulant use can produce a paranoid psychosis that is similar to acute paranoid schizophrenia. While this phenomenon has been systematically explored in amphetamine abusers, it has been relatively unexplored in a systematic fashion in cocaine abusers. The experience of cocaine-induced psychosis was evaluated in 55 individuals consecutively admitted for treatment of DSM-III-R cocaine dependence. Each subject was interviewed about their experiences of psychosis while intoxicated by means of a standardized, semistructured interview. Fifty-three percent (29/55) of those interviewed reported experiencing transient cocaine-induced psychosis. There was no significant difference in lifetime amount of cocaine use or amount of cocaine use in the month before admission between those who experienced psychosis and those who did not. The psychosis-positive group used significantly more cocaine in the year prior to admission (p less than or equal to .02) and had a longer duration of use (p less than or equal to .01). Males were significantly (p less than or equal to .05) more likely than females to develop psychosis. Ninety percent (26/29) developed paranoid delusions directly related to drug use. Ninety-six percent (28/29) of the subjects experienced hallucinations: 83% (24/29), auditory hallucinations; 38% (11/29), visual hallucinations; and 21% (6/29), tactile hallucinations. Twenty-seven percent (15/55) of subjects developed transient behavioral stereotypies. Cocaine-induced paranoia is a common experience among chronic users. Amount and duration of use are related to its development. Implications for a kindling model of cocaine-induced psychosis will be discussed.

  16. Xerostomia induced by radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Alimi, David

    2015-01-01

    David Alimi Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USAWe read with great interest the excellent review on xerostomia induced by radiotherapy, by Pinna et al.1 The authors should be congratulated for a very detailed review of the physiopathology, clinical symptoms, and therapeutic management of an extremely difficult condition. Although we agree that the use of anticholinergic medication represents treatment, it requires the patient to have resi...

  17. Induced quantum torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denardo, G.; Spallucci, E.

    1985-07-01

    We study pregeometry in the framework of a Poincare gauge field theory. The Riemann-Cartan space-time is shown to be an ''effective geometry'' for this model in the low energy limit. By using Heat Kernel techniques we find the induced action for curvature and torsion. We obtain in this way the usual Einstein-Hilbert action plus an axial Maxwell term describing the propagation of a massless, axial vector torsion field. (author)

  18. Ketamine-Induced Hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Albert R; Gancsos, Mark G; Finn, Emily S; Morgan, Peter T; Corlett, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine, the NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist drug, is increasingly employed as an experimental model of psychosis in healthy volunteers. At subanesthetic doses, it safely and reversibly causes delusion-like ideas, amotivation and perceptual disruptions reminiscent of the aberrant salience experiences that characterize first-episode psychosis. However, auditory verbal hallucinations, a hallmark symptom of schizophrenia, have not been reported consistently in healthy volunteers even at high doses of ketamine. Here we present data from a set of healthy participants who received moderately dosed, placebo-controlled ketamine infusions in the reduced stimulation environment of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. We highlight the phenomenological experiences of 3 participants who experienced particularly vivid hallucinations. Participants in this series reported auditory verbal and musical hallucinations at a ketamine dose that does not induce auditory hallucination outside of the scanner. We interpret the observation of ketamine-induced auditory verbal hallucinations in the context of the reduced perceptual environment of the MRI scanner and offer an explanation grounded in predictive coding models of perception and psychosis - the brain fills in expected perceptual inputs, and it does so more in situations of altered perceptual input. The altered perceptual input of the MRI scanner creates a mismatch between top-down perceptual expectations and the heightened bottom-up signals induced by ketamine. Such circumstances induce aberrant percepts, including musical and auditory verbal hallucinations. We suggest that these circumstances might represent a useful experimental model of auditory verbal hallucinations and highlight the impact of ambient sensory stimuli on psychopathology. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Laser induced energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falcone, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    Two related methods of rapidly transferring stored energy from one excited chemical species to another are described. The first of these, called a laser induced collision, involves a reaction in which the energy balance is met by photons from an intense laser beam. A collision cross section of ca 10 - 17 cm 2 was induced in an experiment which demonstrated the predicted dependence of the cross section on wavelength and power density of the applied laser. A second type of laser induced energy transfer involves the inelastic scattering of laser radiation from energetically excited atoms, and subsequent absorption of the scattered light by a second species. The technique of producing the light, ''anti-Stokes Raman'' scattering of visible and infrared wavelength laser photons, is shown to be an efficient source of narrow bandwidth, high brightness, tunable radiation at vacuum ultraviolet wavelengths by using it to excite a rare gas transition at 583.7 A. In addition, this light source was used to make the first measurement of the isotopic shift of the helium metastable level at 601 A. Applications in laser controlled chemistry and spectroscopy, and proposals for new types of lasers using these two energy transfer methods are discussed

  20. Induced QCD I: theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, Bastian B. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Goethe-University of Frankfurt,60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Regensburg,93040 Regensburg (Germany); Lohmayer, Robert; Wettig, Tilo [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Regensburg,93040 Regensburg (Germany)

    2016-11-14

    We explore an alternative discretization of continuum SU(N{sub c}) Yang-Mills theory on a Euclidean spacetime lattice, originally introduced by Budzcies and Zirnbauer. In this discretization the self-interactions of the gauge field are induced by a path integral over N{sub b} auxiliary boson fields, which are coupled linearly to the gauge field. The main progress compared to earlier approaches is that N{sub b} can be as small as N{sub c}. In the present paper we (i) extend the proof that the continuum limit of the new discretization reproduces Yang-Mills theory in two dimensions from gauge group U(N{sub c}) to SU(N{sub c}), (ii) derive refined bounds on N{sub b} for non-integer values, and (iii) perform a perturbative calculation to match the bare parameter of the induced gauge theory to the standard lattice coupling. In follow-up papers we will present numerical evidence in support of the conjecture that the induced gauge theory reproduces Yang-Mills theory also in three and four dimensions, and explore the possibility to integrate out the gauge fields to arrive at a dual formulation of lattice QCD.

  1. Glycerol-induced hyperhydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedesel, Marvin L.; Lyons, Timothy P.; Mcnamara, M. Colleen

    1991-01-01

    Maintenance of euhydration is essential for maximum work performance. Environments which induce hypohydration reduce plasma volume and cardiovascular performance progressively declines as does work capacity. Hyperhydration prior to exposure to dehydrating environments appears to be a potential countermeasure to the debilitating effects of hypohydration. The extravascular fluid space, being the largest fluid compartment in the body, is the most logical space by which significant hyperhydration can be accomplished. Volume and osmotic receptors in the vascular space result in physiological responses which counteract hyperhydration. Our hypothesis is that glycerol-induced hyperhydration (GIH) can accomplish extravascular fluid expansion because of the high solubility of glycerol in lipid and aqueous media. A hypertonic solution of glycerol is rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, results in mild increases in plasma osmolality and is distributed to 65 percent of the body mass. A large volume of water ingested within minutes after glycerol intake results in increased total body water because of the osmotic action and distribution of glycerol. The resulting expanded extravascular fluid space can act as a reservoir to maintain plasma volume during exposure to dehydrating environments. The fluid shifts associated with exposure to microgravity result in increased urine production and is another example of an environment which induces hypohydration. Our goal is to demonstrate that GIH will facilitate maintenance of euhydration and cardiovascular performance during space flight and upon return to a 1 g environment.

  2. [Induced abortion, epidemiological problem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasević, M

    1995-01-01

    A large number of induced abortions exist in central Serbia, in spite of the fact that modern science made new methods and devices for the birth control available, which are more acceptable both from the medical and personal point of view. This fact shows contradictory situation and opens several questions. The crucial being: why do wome rely on abortion and do not use modern contraception? In research done in 1991--it refers to Belgrade and it includes four hundred women--confirmed was the accepted hypothesis that the extension of induced abortion developed from the discordance between comprehension of the need of birth control and the way it should be accomplished. The main causes of the discordance are insufficient knowledge about modern contraception, phychological barriers, insufficient cultural level (general, health, sex) of the population and lack of institutionalized contemporary concept fof family planning. Duration of prevalence of induced abortions indicates that underlying causes of frequency are numerous and stable over time. Considering this, and the slowness of any spontaneous change, it may be expected that the problem of abortions will be present in the years to come. However, duration of abortion prevalence will depend, to a large extent, on the ability and willingness of the State to cope with this issue.

  3. Drug-induced thrombocytopenic purpura

    OpenAIRE

    Sathiasekar, Anisha Cynthia; Deepthi, D. Angeline; Sathia Sekar, G. Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced thrombocytopenic purpura is a skin condition result from a low platelet count due to drug-induced anti-platelet antibodies caused by drugs. Drug-induced thrombocytopenic purpura should be suspected when a patient, child or adult, has sudden, severe thrombocytopenia. Drug-induced thrombocytopenic purpura is even more strongly suspected when a patient has repeated episodes of sudden, severe thrombocytopenia

  4. Drug-induced liver injuries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-02

    Jun 2, 2011 ... Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a term increasingly being used by most clinicians and is synonymous with drug-induced hepatotoxicity. A succinct definition of a DILI is 'a liver injury induced by a drug or herbal medicine resulting in liver test abnormalities or liver dysfunction with a reasonable exclusion of ...

  5. Paliperidone palmitate-induced sialorrhoea

    OpenAIRE

    Cengiz Cengisiz; Onder Tugal; Yarkin Ozenli

    2016-01-01

    Extrapyramidal, metabolic, and cardiac side effects were reported for atypical antipsychotics; although a few resources show paliperidone-induced sialorrhea, there are no resources that show paliperidone palmitate-induced sialorrhea. In this paper, we present the paliperidone palmitate-induced sialorrhea side effects of a patient who applied on our clinic [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(0.100): 8-13

  6. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  7. High pressure induced superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaya, K.; Shimizu, K

    2003-10-15

    We have developed complex extreme condition of very low temperature down to 30 mK and ultra high pressure exceeding 200 GPa by assembling compact diamond anvil cell (DAC) on a powerful {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He dilution refrigerator. We have also developed measuring techniques of electrical resistance, magnetization and optical measurement for the sample confined in the sample space of the DAC. Using the newly developed apparatus and techniques, we have searched for superconductivity in various materials under pressure. In this paper, we will shortly review our newly developed experimental apparatus and techniques and discuss a few examples of pressure induced superconductivity which were observed recently.

  8. Catatonia induced by disulfiram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HK Goswami

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Catatonia is a clinical syndrome with varieties of psychomotor abnormalities of retardation and excitement. It can occur both in psychiatric and medical conditions. The aetiology of catatonia has not been fully described. Many researchers suggest that catatonia can occur due to deficiency of cortical gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA which is an inhibitory neurotransmitter. Disulfiram is an agent that is being used in the treatment of alcohol dependence by its aversive effect. It has been seen that disulfiram is one of the causes of catatonia. This paper aimed to report a case of catatonia induced by disulfiram with no past history of any psychiatric or medical illness.

  9. Induced mutations in citrus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegel-Roy, P.; Vardi, Aliza

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Parthenocarpic tendency is an important prerequisite for successful induction of seedlessness in breeding and especially in mutation breeding. A gene for asynapsis and accompanying seedless fruit has been found by us in inbred progeny of cv. 'Wilking'. Using budwood irradiation by gamma rays, seedless mutants of 'Eureka' and 'Villafranca' lemon (original clone of the latter has 25 seeds) and 'Minneola' tangelo have been obtained. Ovule sterility of the three mutants is nearly complete, with some pollen fertility still remaining. A semi-compact mutant of Shamouti orange has been obtained by irradiation. A programme for inducing seedlessness in easy peeling citrus varieties and selections has been initiated. (author)

  10. Pancreatitis Induced by Cocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Pablo Chapela

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatitis is one of the commonest diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, characterized by epigastric pain of moderate to severe intensity, which radiates to the back, elevation of pancreatic lipase and amylase enzymes, and changes in pancreatic parenchyma in imaging methods. The most common etiologies vary, generally the most frequent being biliary lithiasis and alcohol, followed by hypertriglyceridemia. Among the less frequent causes is drug-induced pancreatitis. We report a case of acute pancreatitis caused by cocaine, rarely described in literature.

  11. Xerostomia induced by radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimi D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available David Alimi Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USAWe read with great interest the excellent review on xerostomia induced by radiotherapy, by Pinna et al.1 The authors should be congratulated for a very detailed review of the physiopathology, clinical symptoms, and therapeutic management of an extremely difficult condition. Although we agree that the use of anticholinergic medication represents treatment, it requires the patient to have residual salivary gland function. Unfortunately, it is well established that in most cases radiotherapy destroys most of the salivary gland and associated salivary secretions.     

  12. Antioxidant-Induced Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Kross

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants are among the most popular health-protecting products, sold worldwide without prescription. Indeed, there are many reports showing the benefits of antioxidants but only a few questioning the possible harmful effects of these “drugs”. The normal balance between antioxidants and free radicals in the body is offset when either of these forces prevails. The available evidence on the harmful effects of antioxidants is analyzed in this review. In summary, a hypothesis is presented that “antioxidant-induced stress” results when antioxidants overwhelm the body’s free radicals.

  13. Contrast induced nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacul, Fulvio; van der Molen, Aart J; Reimer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Contrast Media Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) has updated its 1999 guidelines on contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN). AREAS COVERED: Topics reviewed include the definition of CIN, the choice of contrast medium, the prophylactic me....../min/1.73 m (2) is CIN risk threshold for intravenous contrast medium. • Hydration with either saline or sodium bicarbonate reduces CIN incidence. • Patients with eGFR = 60 ml/min/1.73 m (2) receiving contrast medium can continue metformin normally....

  14. Contrast induced nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacul, Fulvio; van der Molen, Aart J; Reimer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Contrast Media Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) has updated its 1999 guidelines on contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN). AREAS COVERED: Topics reviewed include the definition of CIN, the choice of contrast medium, the prophylactic me....../min/1.73 m (2) is CIN risk threshold for intravenous contrast medium. • Hydration with either saline or sodium bicarbonate reduces CIN incidence. • Patients with eGFR ≥ 60 ml/min/1.73 m (2) receiving contrast medium can continue metformin normally....

  15. Organophosphate induced delayed polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Asif; Ali, Rajab; Yaqoob, M Yousuf; Saleem, Omema

    2007-07-01

    Organophosphate induced delayed polyneuropathy (OPIDP) is a rare sensory-motor distal axonopathy, which usually occur after ingestion of large doses of certain organophosphate insecticide. The clinical picture is characterized by the distal paresis in lower limb associated with sensory symptoms. Electrodiagnostic studies show a motor axonal neuropathy. This case occurred in a 14 years old girl who developed cramping pain in both calves associated with lower limbs paresis 6 weeks after accidental organophosphate poisoning. After another week, she also developed weakness in both hands. Electrophysiological study was characterized by an axonal polyneuropathy pattern. Patient improved upon oral multivitamin therapy and physiotherapy.

  16. Photon-induced cataracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, G.; Haye, C.; Grillon, G.

    1975-01-01

    Proton irradiation of the rabbit's eye resulted in injuries of the same nature as those from other ionizing radiations, yet the evolution of the pathological processes thus induced were different since the injuries became stabilized at a precise stage of cataractogenesis. The localization of the radiosensitive sites was verified and a lack of LET effect was noticed. Since mammalian lens are not very different from one another, the results can be extrapolated to man. The hazards to man arising from accidental exposures exist but they are very low [fr

  17. [Neuroleptic induced deficit syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szafrański, T

    1995-01-01

    Increasing interest in subjective aspects of therapy and rehabilitation focused the attention of psychiatrists, psychologists and psychopharmacologists on the mental side effects of neuroleptics. For the drug-related impairment of affective, cognitive and social function the name of neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS) is proposed. Patients with NIDS appear to be indifferent to the environmental stimuli, retarded and apathetic. They complain of feeling drugged and drowsy, weird, they suffer from lack of motivation, feel like "zombies". The paper presents description of NIDS and its differentiation from negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia and subjective perceiving of extrapyramidal syndromes.

  18. Drug-induced hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo F. L. Rizzo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The thyroid axis is particularly prone to interactions with a wide variety of drugs, whose list increases year by year. Hypothyroidism is the most frequent consequence of drug-induced thyroid dysfunction. The main mechanisms involved in the development of primary hypothyroidism are: inhibition of the synthesis and/or release of thyroid hormones, immune mechanisms related to the use of interferon and other cytokines, and the induction of thyroiditis associated with the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and drugs blocking the receptors for vascular endothelial growth factor. Central hypothyroidism may be induced by inhibition of thyroid-stimulating hormone (bexarotene or corticosteroids or by immunological mechanisms (anti-CTLA4 or anti-PD-1 antibody drugs. It is also important to recognize those drugs that generate hypothyroidism by interaction in its treatment, either by reducing the absorption or by altering the transport and metabolism of levothyroxine. Thus, it is strongly recommended to evaluate thyroid function prior to the prescription of medications such as amiodarone, lithium, or interferon, and the new biological therapies that show important interaction with thyroid and endocrine function in general.

  19. [Amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Parras, M A; Marín Patón, M; Negrillo Cantero, A M; Caro Cruz, E; González Rivera, F; Moreno Carazo, A

    2000-10-01

    Amiodarone is extensively used in cardiology practice because of its excellent antiarrhythmic properties. It produces alterations in thyroid functional because it contains 37% iodine and it is structurally similar to the thyroid hormones. Amiodarone inhibits 5'-deiodinase in the liver. The incidence of amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism is between 6% and 12% of treated patients. The figures for pediatric patients are similar. Determination of tri-iodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) plays an important role in the diagnosis and follow-up of thyroid alterations. Treatment options in amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism in children include thionamide, potassium perchlorate, and prednisone. We present the case of hyperthyroidism secondary to amiodarone in a 10-year-old boy with Marfan's syndrome who was admitted several times for crises of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia and atrial fibrillation. After amiodarone treatment he presented a clinical and analytical picture of hyperthyroidism with very low TSH levels and increased free-T4 levels. Thyroid echography and scintigraphy were normal. Treatment with thiamazole did not alter the clinical picture, which returned to normal after prednisone administration. Currently, prednisone is being slowly withdrawn.Amiodarone. Hyperthyroidism. Antiarrhythmics.

  20. Oxalate induces breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellaro, Andrés M; Tonda, Alfredo; Cejas, Hugo H; Ferreyra, Héctor; Caputto, Beatriz L; Pucci, Oscar A; Gil, German A

    2015-10-22

    Microcalcifications can be the early and only presenting sign of breast cancer. One shared characteristic of breast cancer is the appearance of mammographic mammary microcalcifications that can routinely be used to detect breast cancer in its initial stages, which is of key importance due to the possibility that early detection allows the application of more conservative therapies for a better patient outcome. The mechanism by which mammary microcalcifications are formed is still largely unknown but breast cancers presenting microcalcifications are more often associated with a poorer prognosis. We combined Capillary Electrochromatography, histology, and gene expression (qRT-PCR) to analyze patient-matched normal breast tissue vs. breast tumor. Potential carcinogenicity of oxalate was tested by its inoculation into mice. All data were subjected to statistical analysis. To study the biological significance of oxalates within the breast tumor microenvironment, we measured oxalate concentration in both human breast tumor tissues and adjoining non-pathological breast tissues. We found that all tested breast tumor tissues contain a higher concentration of oxalates than their counterpart non-pathological breast tissue. Moreover, it was established that oxalate induces proliferation of breast cells and stimulates the expression of a pro-tumorigenic gene c-fos. Furthermore, oxalate generates highly malignant and undifferentiated tumors when it was injected into the mammary fatpad in female mice, but not when injected into their back, indicating that oxalate does not induce cancer formation in all types of tissues. Moreover, neither human kidney-epithelial cells nor mouse fibroblast cells proliferate when are treated with oxalate. We found that the chronic exposure of breast epithelial cells to oxalate promotes the transformation of breast cells from normal to tumor cells, inducing the expression of a proto-oncogen as c-fos and proliferation in breast cancer cells

  1. Oxalate induces breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellaro, Andrés M.; Tonda, Alfredo; Cejas, Hugo H.; Ferreyra, Héctor; Caputto, Beatriz L.; Pucci, Oscar A.; Gil, German A.

    2015-01-01

    Microcalcifications can be the early and only presenting sign of breast cancer. One shared characteristic of breast cancer is the appearance of mammographic mammary microcalcifications that can routinely be used to detect breast cancer in its initial stages, which is of key importance due to the possibility that early detection allows the application of more conservative therapies for a better patient outcome. The mechanism by which mammary microcalcifications are formed is still largely unknown but breast cancers presenting microcalcifications are more often associated with a poorer prognosis. We combined Capillary Electrochromatography, histology, and gene expression (qRT-PCR) to analyze patient-matched normal breast tissue vs. breast tumor. Potential carcinogenicity of oxalate was tested by its inoculation into mice. All data were subjected to statistical analysis. To study the biological significance of oxalates within the breast tumor microenvironment, we measured oxalate concentration in both human breast tumor tissues and adjoining non-pathological breast tissues. We found that all tested breast tumor tissues contain a higher concentration of oxalates than their counterpart non-pathological breast tissue. Moreover, it was established that oxalate induces proliferation of breast cells and stimulates the expression of a pro-tumorigenic gene c-fos. Furthermore, oxalate generates highly malignant and undifferentiated tumors when it was injected into the mammary fatpad in female mice, but not when injected into their back, indicating that oxalate does not induce cancer formation in all types of tissues. Moreover, neither human kidney-epithelial cells nor mouse fibroblast cells proliferate when are treated with oxalate. We found that the chronic exposure of breast epithelial cells to oxalate promotes the transformation of breast cells from normal to tumor cells, inducing the expression of a proto-oncogen as c-fos and proliferation in breast cancer cells

  2. Modeling Explosion Induced Aftershocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, K.; Ford, S. R.; Pitarka, A.; Walter, W. R.; Richards-Dinger, K. B.

    2017-12-01

    Many traditional earthquake-explosion discrimination tools are based on properties of the seismic waveform or their spectral components. Common discrimination methods include estimates of body wave amplitude ratios, surface wave magnitude scaling, moment tensor characteristics, and depth. Such methods are limited by station coverage and noise. Ford and Walter (2010) proposed an alternate discrimination method based on using properties of aftershock sequences as a means of earthquakeexplosion differentiation. Previous studies have shown that explosion sources produce fewer aftershocks that are generally smaller in magnitude compared to aftershocks of similarly sized earthquake sources (Jarpe et al., 1994, Ford and Walter, 2010). It has also been suggested that the explosion-induced aftershocks have smaller Gutenberg- Richter b-values (Ryall and Savage, 1969) and that their rates decay faster than a typical Omori-like sequence (Gross, 1996). To discern whether these observations are generally true of explosions or are related to specific site conditions (e.g. explosion proximity to active faults, tectonic setting, crustal stress magnitudes) would require a thorough global analysis. Such a study, however, is hindered both by lack of evenly distributed explosion-sources and the availability of global seismicity data. Here, we employ two methods to test the efficacy of explosions at triggering aftershocks under a variety of physical conditions. First, we use the earthquake rate equations from Dieterich (1994) to compute the rate of aftershocks related to an explosion source assuming a simple spring-slider model. We compare seismicity rates computed with these analytical solutions to those produced by the 3D, multi-cycle earthquake simulator, RSQSim. We explore the relationship between geological conditions and the characteristics of the resulting explosion-induced aftershock sequence. We also test hypothesis that aftershock generation is dependent upon the frequency

  3. Paliperidone palmitate-induced sialorrhoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Cengisiz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Extrapyramidal, metabolic, and cardiac side effects were reported for atypical antipsychotics; although a few resources show paliperidone-induced sialorrhea, there are no resources that show paliperidone palmitate-induced sialorrhea. In this paper, we present the paliperidone palmitate-induced sialorrhea side effects of a patient who applied on our clinic [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(0.100: 8-13

  4. Trauma Induced Coagulopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genét, Gustav Folmer; Johansson, Per; Meyer, Martin Abild Stengaard

    2013-01-01

    It remains debated whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces a different coagulopathy compared to non-TBI. This study investigated traditional coagulation tests, biomarkers of coagulopathy and endothelial damage in trauma patients with and without TBI. Blood from 80 adult trauma patients were...... sampled (median of 68 min (IQR 48-88) post-injury) upon admission to our trauma centre. Plasma/serum were retrospectively analysed for biomarkers reflecting sympathoadrenal activation (adrenaline, noradrenaline), coagulation activation/inhibition and fibrinolysis (protein C, activated protein C, tissue......+other had significantly higher plasma levels of adrenaline, noradrenaline, annexinV, d-dimer, IL6, syndecan-1, solubel thrombomodulin, and reduced protein C and factor XIII levels (all p...

  5. Virus-induced chalazion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, A M; Chan, C-C; Crawford, M A; Tabbarah, Z A; Shen, D; Haddad, W F; Salti, I; Ghazi, N G

    2006-02-01

    To investigate a viral etiology in certain chalazia. A prospective study over 7.5 years of all newly presenting chalazia associated with diffuse follicular conjunctivitis but without any other aetiological factors. Patients were investigated for ocular or systemic infections by history, physical exam, slit-lamp exam, and/or histology of conjunctival biopsy (including transmission electron microscopy). A total of 27 patients developed follicular conjunctivitis without meibomian gland dysfunction, blepharitis, or sexually transmitted diseases. Evidence for a viral aetiology included: recent systemic viral illness (15/27), recent contact with subjects with chalazia or follicular conjunctivitis (5/27), preauricular lymphadenopathy (4/27), viral corneal disease (4/27), or viral particles by ultrastructure (4/4). Chalazia may be associated with viral conjunctivitis. Intralesional corticosteroids should be considered with great caution for viral-induced chalazia.

  6. Aripiprazole-induced priapism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya K Trivedi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Priapism is a urologic emergency representing a true disorder of penile erection that persists beyond or is unrelated to sexual interest or stimulation. A variety of psychotropic drugs are known to produce priapism, albeit rarely, through their antagonistic action on alpha-1 adrenergic receptors. We report such a case of priapism induced by a single oral dose of 10 mg aripiprazole, a drug with the least affinity to adrenergic receptors among all atypical antipsychotics. Polymorphism of alpha-2A adrenergic receptor gene in schizophrenia patients is known to be associated with sialorrhea while on clozapine treatment. Probably, similar polymorphism of alpha-1 adrenergic receptor gene could contribute to its altered sensitivity and resultant priapism. In future, pharmacogenomics-based approach may help in personalizing the treatment and effectively prevent the emergence of such side effects.

  7. Radiation induced pesticidal microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. J.; Lim, D. S

    2001-01-01

    To isolate pesticidal microbes against plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria(K1. K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 12 kinds of fungi. Specific proteins and the specific transcribed genes were found from the YS1 and its radiation-induced mutants. And knock-out mutants of antifungal activity were derived by transposon mutagenesis. From these knock-out mutants, the antifungal activity related genes and its modification by gamma-ray radiation are going to be studied. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful tool for the induction of functional mutants.

  8. Radiation induced microbial pesticide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Young Keun; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Sang Jae

    2000-01-01

    To control plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria (K1, K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 13 kinds of fungi. Mutants of K1 and YS1 strains were induced by gamma-ray radiation and showed promising antifungal activities. These wild type and mutants showed resistant against more than 27 kinds of commercial pesticides among 30 kinds of commercial pesticides test particularly, YS1-1006 mutant strain showed resistant against hydrogen oxide. And mutants had increased antifungal activity against Botryoshaeria dothidea. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful method for the induction of functional mutants. (author)

  9. Radiation induced pesticidal microbes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. J.; Lim, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    To isolate pesticidal microbes against plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria(K1. K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 12 kinds of fungi. Specific proteins and the specific transcribed genes were found from the YS1 and its radiation-induced mutants. And knock-out mutants of antifungal activity were derived by transposon mutagenesis. From these knock-out mutants, the antifungal activity related genes and its modification by gamma-ray radiation are going to be studied. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful tool for the induction of functional mutants

  10. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  11. [Complications of induced abortions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duprez, D; Fortuna, P

    1989-02-01

    All physicians should be aware of the possible complications of induced abortions if only because the procedure is so commonplace. Some 250,000 induced abortions occur annually in France, amounting to 24.4 abortions per 100 live births. The rates of different complications of induced abortions before 12 weeks are .5-5/1000 for uterine perforation, .5-3.4% for hemorrhage with or without placental retention, 1% for endometritis, .3% for salpingitis .5% for continuing pregnancy, and .006 to .3/10,000 for death. A well done curettage is preferable to a poorly performed aspiration procedure. If an aspiration is done, the practitioner should bear in mind that retention of 50-200 cc of blood clots may occur if dilatation is insufficient. Symptoms appear 1-5 days after the abortion and end with expulsion of the clots or aspiration. Curettage is useless, as the clots do not represent a true retention. Uterine contractions during the aspiration can occasionally prompt a premature decision that evacuation is complete. Retention is difficult to diagnose immediately after aspiration but can be sonographically confirmed after the 8th day. Aspiration should be done after the 6th week and before the 12th week. Aspiration before the 6th week is often painful and is associated with higher rates of partial retention and of complete failure. Endouterine aspiration, regardless of technical proficiency, establishes a pathway between the vagina and the uterine cavity, which exposes the latter to the risk of trauma, endometrial lesions, and perforation. Induced abortion promotes infection by 2 mechanisms. Latent infections that were not detected in the medical history or physical examination can emerge and cause endometritis, which should be treated by ice, rest, and antibiotics. Or contamination of the passage by an infected cervical mucus can lead to salpingitis, abscess, and pelviperitonitis, or even general peritonitis. More often, these conditions develop from inadequately treated

  12. [Cannabis-induced disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyka, M; Preuss, U; Hoch, E

    2017-03-01

    Use and misuse of cannabis and marihuana are frequent. About 5% of the adult population are current users but only 1.2% are dependent. The medical use of cannabis is controversial but there is some evidence for improvement of chronic pain and spasticity. The somatic toxicity of cannabis is well proven but limited and psychiatric disorders induced by cannabis are of more relevance, e.g. cognitive disorders, amotivational syndrome, psychoses and delusional disorders as well as physical and psychological dependence. The withdrawal symptoms are usually mild and do not require pharmacological interventions. To date there is no established pharmacotherapy for relapse prevention. Psychosocial interventions include psychoeducation, behavioral therapy and motivational enhancement. The CANDIS protocol is the best established German intervention among abstinence-oriented therapies.

  13. Alcohol-Induced Blackout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Jin Kim

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available For a long time, alcohol was thought to exert a general depressant effect on the central nervous system (CNS. However, currently the consensus is that specific regions of the brain are selectively vulnerable to the acute effects of alcohol. An alcohol-induced blackout is the classic example; the subject is temporarily unable to form new long-term memories while relatively maintaining other skills such as talking or even driving. A recent study showed that alcohol can cause retrograde memory impairment, that is, blackouts due to retrieval impairments as well as those due to deficits in encoding. Alcoholic blackouts may be complete (en bloc or partial (fragmentary depending on severity of memory impairment. In fragmentary blackouts, cueing often aids recall. Memory impairment during acute intoxication involves dysfunction of episodic memory, a type of memory encoded with spatial and social context. Recent studies have shown that there are multiple memory systems supported by discrete brain regions, and the acute effects of alcohol on learning and memory may result from alteration of the hippocampus and related structures on a cellular level. A rapid increase in blood alcohol concentration (BAC is most consistently associated with the likelihood of a blackout. However, not all subjects experience blackouts, implying that genetic factors play a role in determining CNS vulnerability to the effects of alcohol. This factor may predispose an individual to alcoholism, as altered memory function during intoxication may affect an individual‟s alcohol expectancy; one may perceive positive aspects of intoxication while unintentionally ignoring the negative aspects. Extensive research on memory and learning as well as findings related to the acute effects of alcohol on the brain may elucidate the mechanisms and impact associated with the alcohol- induced blackout.

  14. Induced Pluripotency and Epigenetic Reprogramming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochedlinger, Konrad; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Induced pluripotency defines the process by which somatic cells are converted into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) upon overexpression of a small set of transcription factors. In this article, we put transcription factor–induced pluripotency into a historical context, review current methods to generate iPSCs, and discuss mechanistic insights that have been gained into the process of reprogramming. In addition, we focus on potential therapeutic applications of induced pluripotency and emerging technologies to efficiently engineer the genomes of human pluripotent cells for scientific and therapeutic purposes. PMID:26626939

  15. Radio-induced brain lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorgan Mircea Radu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Radiotherapy, an important tool in multimodal oncologic treatment, can cause radio-induced brain lesion development after a long period of time following irradiation.

  16. Radiation induced nano structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibragimova, E.M.; Kalanov, M.U.; Khakimov, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Nanometer-size silicon clusters have been attracting much attention due to their technological importance, in particular, as promising building blocks for nano electronic and nano photonic systems. Particularly, silicon wires are of great of interest since they have potential for use in one-dimensional quantum wire high-speed field effect transistors and light-emitting devices with extremely low power consumption. Carbon and metal nano structures are studied very intensely due to wide possible applications. Radiation material sciences have been dealing with sub-micron objects for a long time. Under interaction of high energy particles and ionizing radiation with solids by elastic and inelastic mechanisms, at first point defects are created, then they form clusters, column defects, disordered regions (amorphous colloids) and finally precipitates of another crystal phase in the matrix. Such irradiation induced evolution of structure defects and phase transformations was observed by X-diffraction techniques in dielectric crystals of quartz and corundum, which exist in and crystal modifications. If there is no polymorphism, like in alkali halide crystals, then due to radiolysis halogen atoms are evaporated from the surface that results in non-stoichiometry or accumulated in the pores formed by metal vacancies in the sub-surface layer. Nano-pores are created by intensive high energy particles irradiation at first chaotically and then they are ordered and in part filled by inert gas. It is well-known mechanism of radiation induced swelling and embrittlement of metals and alloys, which is undesirable for construction materials for nuclear reactors. Possible solution of this problem may come from nano-structured materials, where there is neither swelling nor embrittlement at gas absorption due to very low density of the structure, while strength keeps high. This review considers experimental observations of radiation induced nano-inclusions in insulating

  17. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced asthma, is a narrowing of the airways causing difficulty ... exercise. Yet some people who don’t have asthma experience symptoms only when they exercise. Symptoms include: • Shortness of breath • Coughing • Wheezing • Tight ...

  18. Contrast-induced nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, P.B. [Inst. of Physiology, Humboldt Univ., Medizinische Fakultaet (Charite), Berlin (Germany)

    2005-11-15

    How contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN) comes about is not fully understood, although CIN constitutes a leading cause of renal failure. Here, a short review of clinical trials and a more thorough outline of mechanisms thought to cause CIN are outlined. Osmolality is only one of several physicochemical properties of contrast media (CM). Iso-osmolar CM are dimers, not monomers. Thus, they have physicochemical features different from other CM, e. g., in terms of viscosity (which is over fivefold greater than plasma viscosity). This may be of considerable pathophysiologic and clinical importance. There are studies providing evidence for a greater perturbation in renal functions by iso-osmolar CM in comparison to nonionic low-osmolar CM. Conversely, some previous clinical trials indicate an advantage of the iso-osmolar CM. This review highlights altered rheological properties, perturbation of renal hemodynamics, regional hypoxia, auto- and paracrine factors (adenosine, endothelin, reactive oxygen species) and direct cytotoxic effects, which are all thought to participate in causing CIN. It is concluded that the use of CM in general, and high viscous iso-osmolar CM in particular, can be deleterious to the kidney due to augmented resistance in the renal tubules. (orig.)

  19. Geomagnetically Induced Currents: Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Denny M.; Ngwira, Chigomezyo M.

    2017-10-01

    The geospace, or the space environment near Earth, is constantly subjected to changes in the solar wind flow generated at the Sun. The study of this environment variability is called Space Weather. Examples of effects resulting from this variability are the occurrence of powerful solar disturbances, such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The impact of CMEs on the Earth's magnetosphere very often greatly perturbs the geomagnetic field causing the occurrence of geomagnetic storms. Such extremely variable geomagnetic fields trigger geomagnetic effects measurable not only in the geospace but also in the ionosphere, upper atmosphere, and on and in the ground. For example, during extreme cases, rapidly changing geomagnetic fields generate intense geomagnetically induced currents (GICs). Intense GICs can cause dramatic effects on man-made technological systems, such as damage to high-voltage power transmission transformers leading to interruption of power supply, and/or corrosion of oil and gas pipelines. These space weather effects can in turn lead to severe economic losses. In this paper, we supply the reader with theoretical concepts related to GICs as well as their general consequences. As an example, we discuss the GIC effects on a North American power grid located in mid-latitude regions during the 13-14 March 1989 extreme geomagnetic storm. That was the most extreme storm that occurred in the space era age.

  20. Disorder Induced Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steimel, Joshua; Kachman, Tal; Aragones, Juan; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    Transport of active or driven particles plays a crucial role in a myriad of processes ranging from biological systems to quantum phenomena. Here we study the transport of active spinning particles in a confined substrate that contains fixed obstacles. Except for a handful of systems, a disordered environment in the form of impurities or obstacles in a material will inhibit transport, and under some circumstances lead to localization. Such phenomena has been directly seen in transport of light in disordered photonic crystals. This is an important question because many vital biological processes depend on the active transport of molecules inside cells and organisms, from molecular motors to cellular transport. In particular, it is vital to know whether disorder leads to the inhibition of transport and localization, or enhances transport. We demonstrate with experiments and simulations that, contrary to intuition, active spinning matter exhibits a disorder-induced delocalization transition dependent on the local order of the obstacles on the substrate. For the regimes studied, we always find anomalous super-diffusive transport that slowly approaches the diffusive regime in the limit of high activity. These results shed light on the effect of hydrodynamic boundary conditions and optimal transport processes in active matter in disordered environments.

  1. Donepezil-induced mania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Jonathan G

    2014-03-01

    To report a case of mania associated with the titration of donepezil in an elderly patient. A 400-bed academic acute care psychiatric facility. A 70-year-old male with a history of paranoid schizophrenia, alcohol dependence, and mild cognitive impairment was admitted after concerns that he was responding to internal stimuli and exhibited increased disorganization. The patient was initiated on quetiapine, titrated to 500 mg at bedtime, to address disorganization, hallucinations, and poor sleep. After improvement of psychotic symptoms and assessment of cognitive function, donepezil 5 mg daily was initiated and titrated to 10 mg daily after two weeks. Days following the increase of donepezil to 10 mg daily, the patient exhibited symptoms of mania and became hyperverbal with elevated mood and agitation. A decreased need for sleep with an increase in cleaning activities throughout the day was noted. Donepezil was suspected to have induced the new symptoms and was discontinued. Following discontinuation, the manic symptoms completely resolved over a two-week period. The titration of donepezil was associated with the onset of mania. Previous trials involving off-label donepezil use in patients with bipolar disorder, but not schizophrenia, have reported the development of manic symptoms. Although rare, there is mounting evidence that donepezil is associated with the emergence of mania. Clinicians should be aware of this potential side effect in all patients treated with donepezil.

  2. Ceftazidime-induced thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo-Chiva, E; Díaz-Rangel, M; Monsalve-Naharro, J Á; Cuesta-Montero, P; Catalá-Ripoll, J V; García-Martínez, E M

    2017-12-01

    Ceftazidime is an antibiotic belonging to the group of third generation cephalosporins, frequently used in clinical practice for its broad antibacterial spectrum. A case report is presented on a 78-year-old man who entered the intensive care unit due to respiratory failure secondary to nosocomial pneumonia in the postoperative period of a laparoscopic hepatic bisegmentectomy for a hepatocarcinoma. It required invasive mechanical ventilation and was treated with ceftazidime, developing a progressive decrease in platelet count after the onset of this drug and after re-exposure to it, not coinciding with the introduction of other drugs. The adverse reaction was reported to the Spanish pharmacosurveillance system and according to the Naranjo algorithm the causal relationship was probable. Since no case of ceftazidime-induced thrombocytopenia was found in the literature, we consider knowledge of it relevant as an adverse effect to be taken into account given its potential severity, especially when it cannot be explained by other causes. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Neutron induced electron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Marcos Leandro Garcia

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper a new radiography technique, the 'Neutron Induced Electron Radiography' - NIER, to inspect low thickness samples on the order of micra, has been developed. This technique makes use of low energy electrons as penetrating radiation generated from metallic gadolinium screens when irradiated by thermal neutrons. The conditions to obtain the best image for the conventional X-ray film Kodak-AA were determined by using a digital system to quantify the darkening level of the film. The irradiations have been performed at a radiography equipment installed at the beam-hole no. 8 of the 5 MW IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor of IPEN-CNEN/SP. The irradiation time to obtain the best radiography was 100 seconds and for such condition the technique was able to discern 1 μm in 24 μm of aluminum at a resolution of 32 μm. By visual comparison the images obtained by the NIER shown a higher quality when compared with the ones from other usual techniques the make use of electrons a penetrating radiation and films for image registration. Furthermore the use of the digital system has provided a smaller time for data acquisition and data analysis as well as an improvement in the image visualization. (author)

  4. Methaemoglobinemia Induced by MDMA?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. W. Verhaert

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Case. A 45-year-old man with a blank medical history presented at the emergency room with dizziness and cyanosis. Physical examination showed cyanosis with a peripheral saturation (SpO2 of 85%, he did not respond to supplemental oxygen. Arterial blood gas analysis showed a striking chocolate brown colour. Based on these data, we determined the arterial methaemoglobin concentration. This was 32%. We gave 100% oxygen and observed the patient in a medium care unit. The next day, patient could be discharged in good condition. Further inquiry about exhibitions and extensive history revealed that the patient used MDMA (3,4- methylenedioxymethamphetamine, the active ingredient of ecstasy. Conclusion. Acquired methaemoglobinemia is a condition that occurs infrequently, but is potentially life threatening. Different nutrients, medications, and chemicals can induce methaemoglobinemia by oxidation of haemoglobin. The clinical presentation of a patient with methaemoglobinemia is due to the impossibility of O2 binding and transport, resulting in tissue hypoxia. Important is to think about methaemoglobin in a patient who presents with cyanosis, a peripheral saturation of 85% that fails to respond properly to the administration of O2. Because methaemoglobin can be reduced physiologically, it is usually sufficient to remove the causative agent, to give O2, and to observe the patient.

  5. Induced mutations in castor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, K.; Javad Hussain, H.S.; Vindhiyavarman, P.

    2001-01-01

    Castor (Ricinus communis L.) is an important oilseed crop in India. To create variability mutations were induced in two cultivars 'TMV5' (maturing in 130-140 days) and 'CO1' (perennial type). Gamma rays and diethyl sulphate and ethidium bromide were used for seed treatment. Ten doses, from 100 to 1000 Gy were employed. For chemical mutagenesis five concentrations of mutagenes from 10 to 50 mM were tried. No economic mutants could be isolated after treatment with the chemical mutagens. The following economic mutants were identified in the dose 300 Gy of gamma rays. Annual types from perennial CO 1 castor CO 1 is a perennial variety (8-10 years) with bold seeds (100 seed weight 90 g) and high oil content (57%). Twenty-one lines were isolated with annual types (160-180 days) with high yield potential as well as bold seeds and high oil content. These mutants, identified in M 3 generation were bred true in subsequent generations up to M 8 generation. Critical evaluation of the mutants in yield evaluation trials is in progress

  6. Radiation-induced cerebrovasculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeyama, Yukihide; Abiko, Seisho; Kurokawa, Yasushi; Okamura, Tomomi; Watanabe, Kohsaku; Inoue, Shinichi; Fujii, Yasuhiro.

    1993-01-01

    We reported a patient who suffered from cerebrovasculopathy after irradiation therapy for astrocytoma located at the left temporal lobe. An eleven year-old boy who presented with headache and vomiting received partial removal of a tumor. Histological diagnosis of the tumor was astrocytoma (grade II). His preoperative cerebral angiograms showed mass sign solely, without stenosis or occlusion of the cerebral vessel. Postoperatively, he was treated with irradiation therapy involving the whole brain with a total of 30 Gy, and gamma knife therapy. Six months after irradiation, he started suffering from frequent cerebral ischemic attacks, but there was no regrowth of the tumor visible on CT scans. Cerebral angiograms were made again, and revealed multifocal stenoses in the bilateral internal carotid arteries, middle cerebral arteries, and the anterior cerebral artery. His symptoms did not improve after conservative treatment with steroids, calcium antagonist, or low molecular weight dextran. Although he received a superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomoses bilaterally, multiple cerebral infarctions appeared. Although irradiation therapy is acceptable in patients with brain tumor, cerebrovasculopathy after irradiation should be considered as one of the most important complications, and the risk incurred by irradiation therapy should lead to more careful consideration and caution when treating intracranial brain tumors, especially in children. From our experience, the usefulness of bypass surgery for radiation-induced cerebrovasculopathy is still controversial. (author)

  7. Doxycycline induced Esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Karakus Yilmaz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Esophagitis is a hazardous condition such as acid reflux of esophageal mucosa, infection, systemic diseases, radiation, drugs and trauma. Drug- induced esophagial injury (DIEI is a disease with the use of variety of drugs that caused serious damage and ulcer in the mucosa of the esophagus. The most commonly implicated drugs are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, chloride and especially antibiotics. Thirty-six year-old female patient presented to the emergency department with odynophagia during swallowing and complaining of retrosternal pain. One week before 100 mg doxycycline (2x1 PO for therapeutic abortion were prescribed. It was learned that in the third day of the initiation of medication, the patient\\'s symptoms began and stopped using drug by the fourth day due to advers effect of drugs, but her symptoms didn’t regressed although she didn’t use them. Endoscopy appointment was taken, proton pump inhibitor and antiacid treatment was given, than patient was discharged from the emergency department. In the endoscopy, 20 mm segment esophageal ulcer was seen approximately in the 30.th cm of the esophagius. DIEI is a relatively common, although under-recognized, so this case was presented for remainding DIEI to emergency medicine personals and reweiving its diagnosis, treatment and follow-up.

  8. Laxative-induced rhabdomyolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Merante

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Alfonso Merante1, Pietro Gareri2,3, Norma Maria Marigliano2, Salvatore De Fazio2, Elvira Bonacci1, Carlo Torchia1, Gaetano Russo1, Pasquale Lacroce1, Roberto Lacava3, Alberto Castagna3, Giovambattista De Sarro2, Giovanni Ruotolo11Geriatrist, Geriatric Unit “Pugliese-Ciaccio” Hospital, Catanzaro, Italy; 2Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro, Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacovigilance Unit, Mater Domini University Hospital, Catanzaro, Italy; 3Geriatrist, Operative Unit Elderly Health Care, Catanzaro, ItalyAbstract: The present study describes a case of laxative-induced rhabdomyolysis in an elderly patient. An 87-year-old woman was hospitalized for the onset of confusion, tremors, an inability to walk, and a fever that she had been experiencing for 36 hours. She often took high dosages of lactulose and sorbitol syrup as a laxative (about 70 g/day. During her physical examination, the patient was confused, drowsy, and she presented hyposthenia in her upper and lower limbs, symmetric and diffuse moderate hyporeflexia, and her temperature was 37.8°C. Laboratory tests revealed severe hyponatremia with hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, hypochloremia, and metabolic alkalosis. Moreover, rhabdomyolysis markers were found. The correction of hydroelectrolytic imbalances with saline, potassium and sodium chlorure, calcium gluconate was the first treatment. During her hospitalization the patient presented acute delirium, treated with haloperidol and prometazine chloridrate intramuscularly. She was discharged 12 days later, after resolution of symptoms, and normalized laboratory tests. Over-the-counter drugs such as laxatives are usually not considered dangerous; on the other hand, they may cause serum electrolytic imbalance and rhabdomyolysis. A careful monitoring of all the drugs taken by the elderly is one of the most important duties of a physician since drug interactions and

  9. Systemic resistance induced by rhizosphere bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.C. van; Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Nonpathogenic rhizobacteria can induce a systemic resistance in plants that is phenotypically similar to pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR) has been demonstrated against fungi, bacteria, and viruses in Arabidopsis, bean,

  10. Tumor-induced osteomalacia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Florenzano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome clinically characterized by bone pain, fractures and muscle weakness. It is caused by tumoral overproduction of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23 that acts primarily at the proximal renal tubule, decreasing phosphate reabsorption and 1α-hydroxylation of 25 hydroxyvitamin D, thus producing hypophosphatemia and osteomalacia. Lesions are typically small, benign mesenchymal tumors that may be found in bone or soft tissue, anywhere in the body. In up to 60% of these tumors, a fibronectin-1(FN1 and fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1 fusion gene has been identified that may serve as a tumoral driver. The diagnosis is established by the finding of acquired chronic hypophosphatemia due to isolated renal phosphate wasting with concomitant elevated or inappropriately normal blood levels of FGF23 and decreased or inappropriately normal 1,25-OH2-Vitamin D (1,25(OH2D. Locating the tumor is critical, as complete removal is curative. For this purpose, a step-wise approach is recommended, starting with a thorough medical history and physical examination, followed by functional imaging. Suspicious lesions should be confirmed by anatomical imaging, and if needed, selective venous sampling with measurement of FGF23. If the tumor is not localized, or surgical resection is not possible, medical therapy with phosphate and active vitamin D is usually successful in healing the osteomalacia and reducing symptoms. However, compliance is often poor due to the frequent dosing regimen and side effects. Furthermore, careful monitoring is needed to avoid complications such us secondary/tertiary hyperparathyroidism, hypercalciuria, and nephrocalcinosis. Novel therapeutical approaches are being developed for TIO patients, such as image-guided tumor ablation and medical treatment with the anti-FGF23 monoclonal antibody KRN23 or anti FGFR medications. The case of a patient with TIO is presented to

  11. Drug-induced lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kidney inflammation (nephritis) can develop with drug-induced lupus caused by TNF inhibitors or with ANCA vasculitis due to hydralazine or levamisole. Nephritis may require treatment with prednisone and immunosuppressive medicines. Avoid taking the ...

  12. Reaper Induced Cytochrome C Release

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olson, Michael

    2002-01-01

    .... The interaction of reaper with scythe liberates a soluble factor (SCF) that induces apoptosis by effecting the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, a critical step in activating apoptosis in many systems...

  13. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and ask for appropriate care. Question 2 My child with asthma or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction can't exercise and ... to respond to problems. Question 5 If my child has asthma, he or she can never be an Olympic ...

  14. Iodine-induced thyroid dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Angela M.; Braverman, Lewis E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize the mechanisms of iodine-induced hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, identify the risk factors for thyroid dysfunction following an iodine load, and summarize the major sources of excess iodine exposure. Recent findings Excess iodine is generally well tolerated, but individuals with underlying thyroid disease or other risk factors may be susceptible to iodine-induced thyroid dysfunction following acute or chronic exposure. Sources of increased iodine exposure include the global public health efforts of iodine supplementation, the escalating use of iodinated contrast radiologic studies, amiodarone administration in vulnerable patients, excess seaweed consumption, and various miscellaneous sources. Summary Iodine-induced thyroid dysfunction may be subclinical or overt. Recognition of the association between iodine excess and iodine-induced hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism is important in the differential diagnosis of patients who present without a known cause of thyroid dysfunction. PMID:22820214

  15. [Induced abortion. Legislation, epidemiology, complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, E; Nisand, I

    1995-11-15

    In France, induced abortion was legalized under certain conditions since the January 1975 and December 1979 laws suspended the effects of Article 317 of the French Penal Code that forbade induced abortion. For more than 15 years, induced abortion has been part of current gynecological practice. Adverse effects of abortions have been reduced. In the upcoming years, the interest in drug-induced abortion and abortion under local anesthesia will increase due to a concern for reducing risks that deteriorate physical integrity and women's gynecological/obstetrical future. Induced abortion still remains a very important act, if not serious, in a woman's life. Prevention of induced abortion remains the absolute medical objective and is necessary for information campaigns on contraceptives, especially among youth. If accessible and equal access to induced abortion is becoming a reality in France, abortion will always remain a failure and proof for women that they have recourse to abortion. Induced abortions have remained relatively stable in France (170,000 in 1980; 181,154 in 1991). The abortion rate ranges from 20 to 25 per 100 live births. 50% of women of reproductive age will have an induced abortion in their life. The fertility rate in France has been 1.8 since 1976. First trimester abortion-related mortality is less than 1/100,000. Abortion-related mortality increases with gestational age (0.5/100,000 at 8 weeks vs. 1.1/100,000 at 12 weeks). It is also associated with the anesthesia used (0.15 for local anesthesia vs. 0.58 for general anesthesia). The leading causes of abortion-related mortality are infection, pulmonary embolism, and anesthetic accidents. Immediate complications of induced abortion are anesthetic accidents, hemorrhage, uterine perforations, accumulation of blood in the uterus, cervical tears, and vagal discomfort. In France, the induced abortion related-perforation rate is between 0.2% and 1.2%. Perforation is more likely after 10 weeks and under

  16. [Medical induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettahar, K; Pinton, A; Boisramé, T; Cavillon, V; Wylomanski, S; Nisand, I; Hassoun, D

    2016-12-01

    Updated clinical recommendations for medical induced abortion procedure. A systematic review of French and English literature, reviewing the evidence relating to the provision of medical induced abortion was carried out on PubMed, Cochrane Library and international scientific societies recommendations. The effectiveness of medical abortion is higher than 95% when the protocols are adjusted to gestational age (EL1). Misoprostol alone is less effective than a combination of mifepristone and misoprostol (EL1). Gemeprost is less effective than misoprostol (EL2). The dose of 200mg of mifepristone should be preferred to 600mg (NP1, Rank A). Mifepristone can be taken at home (professional agreement). The optimum interval between mifepristone and misoprostol intake should be 24 to 48 hours (EL1, grade A). Before 7 weeks LMP, the dose of 400μg misoprostol should be given orally (EL1, grade A) eventually repeated after 3hours if no bleeding occurs. For optimal effectiveness between 7 and 14 LMP, the interval between mifepristone and misoprostol should not be shortened to less than 8hours (grade 1). An interval of 24 to 48hours will not affect the effectiveness of the method provided misoprostol dosage is 800μg (EL1). Vaginal, sublingual or buccal routes of administration are more effective and better tolerated than the oral route, which should be abandoned (EL1). An amount of 800μg sublingual or buccal misoprostol route has the same effectiveness than the vaginal route but more gastrointestinal side effects (EL1, grade A). Between 7 and 9 LMP, it does not seem necessary to repeat misoprostol dose whereas it should be repeated beyond 9 SA (grade B). Between 9 and 14 LMP, the dose of 400μg misoprostol given either vaginally, buccally or sublingually should be repeated every 3hours if needed (with a maximum of 5 doses) (EL2, grade B). There is no strong evidence supporting routine antibiotic prophylaxis for medical abortion (professional agreement). Rare contraindications

  17. Holographic Two-Photon Induced Photopolymerization

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Holographic two-photon-induced photopolymerization (HTPIP) offers distinct advantages over conventional one-photon-induced photopolymerization and current techniques...

  18. Mitochondrial Swelling Induced by Glutathione

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehninger, Albert L.; Schneider, Marion

    1959-01-01

    Reduced glutathione, in concentrations approximating those occurring in intact rat liver, causes swelling of rat liver mitochondria in vitro which is different in kinetics and extent from that yielded by L-thyroxine. The effect is also given by cysteine, which is more active, and reduced coenzyme A, but not by L-ascorbate, cystine, or oxidized glutathione. The optimum pH is 6.5, whereas thyroxine-induced swelling is optimal at pH 7.5. The GSH-induced swelling is not inhibited by DNP or dicumarol, nor by high concentrations of sucrose, serum albumin, or polyvinylpyrrolidone, in contrast to thyroxine-induced swelling. ATP inhibits the GSH swelling, but ADP and AMP are ineffective. Mn-+ is a very potent inhibitor, but Mg++ is ineffective. Ethylenediaminetetraacetate is also an effective inhibitor of GSH-induced swelling. The respiratory inhibitors amytal and antimycin A do not inhibit the swelling action of GSH, but cyanide does; these findings are consistent with the view that the oxidation-reduction state of the respiratory chain between cytochrome c and oxygen is a determinant of GSH-induced swelling. Reversal of GSH-induced swelling by osmotic means or by ATP in KCl media could not be observed. Large losses of nucleotides and protein occur during the swelling by GSH, suggesting that the action is irreversible. The characteristically drastic swelling action of GSH could be prevented if L-thyroxine was also present in the medium. PMID:13630941

  19. Induced mutations in sesame breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashri, A.

    2001-01-01

    The scope of induced mutations in sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) breeding is reviewed. So far in Egypt, India, Iraq, Rep. of Korea, and Sri Lanka, 14 officially released varieties have been developed through induced mutations: 12 directly and 2 through cross breeding (one using the 'dt45' induced mutant from Israel). For another variety released in China there are no details. The induced mutations approach was adopted primarily in order to obtain genetic variability that was not available in the germplasm collection. The mutagens commonly applied have been gamma rays, EMS and sodium azide. Sesame seeds can withstand high mutagen doses, and there are genotypic differences in sensitivity between varieties. The mutants induced in the above named countries and others include better yield, improved seed retention, determinate habit, modified plant architecture and size, more uniform and shorter maturation period, earliness, resistance to diseases, genic male sterility, seed coat color, higher oil content and modified fatty acids composition. Some of the induced mutants have already given rise to improved varieties, the breeding value of other mutants is now being assessed and still others can serve as useful markers in genetic studies and breeding programmes. (author)

  20. [Determinants of induced abortion delay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font-Ribera, Laia; Pérez, Glòria; Espelt, Albert; Salvador, Joaquin; Borrell, Carme

    2009-01-01

    In induced abortion, the method, the risk of complications and the economic cost of the abortion are determined by gestational age. The aim of this study was to describe the determinants of induced abortion delay until the second trimester of pregnancy in Barcelona. We performed a cross-sectional study of induced abortions due to the physical or mental health of the woman (Barcelona, 2004-2005; N=9,175). The city's induced abortion register provided data on gestational age at abortion (dependent variable), educational level, age, cohabitation with the partner, number of children previous abortions, and type of center. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) were calculated with log-binomial regression models. A total of 7.7% of induced abortions were second-trimester abortions and 99.3% were performed in private centers. Compared with women with a university education, those with primary education or less had an aPR of 1.8 (95% confidence interval [95%CI]: 1.4-2.2) of delaying the abortion until the second trimester. A higher proportion of second-trimester abortions were also recorded in women aged less than 18 years old (aPR=2.6; 95%CI: 2.0-3.4), women not cohabiting with their partners (aRP=1.4; 95% CI: 1.2-1.6) and in public centers (aPR=2.8; 95% CI: 2.2-3.7). No differences were found in induced abortion delay among women with previous abortions and those without. Induced abortion delay until the second trimester of pregnancy was associated with low educational level, young ages, not cohabiting with a partner, and public centers. This study demonstrates the existence of socioeconomic inequalities in access conditions to abortion services.

  1. Adverse drug reactions and organ damage: The skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzano, Angelo V; Borghi, Alessandro; Cugno, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions are frequent, affecting 2-3% of hospitalized patients and in one twentieth of them are potentially life-threatening. Almost any pharmacologic agent can induce skin reactions, and certain drug classes, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and antiepileptics, have drug eruption rates ranging from 1% to 5%. Cutaneous drug reactions recognize several different pathomechanisms: some skin manifestations are immune-mediated like allergic reactions while others are the result of non immunological causes such as cumulative toxicity, photosensitivity, interaction with other drugs or different metabolic pathways. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions can be classified into two groups: common non-severe and rare life-threatening adverse drug reactions. Non-severe reactions are often exanthematous or urticarial whereas life-threatening reactions typically present with skin detachment or necrosis of large areas of the body and mucous membrane involvement, as in the Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis. Clinicians should carefully evaluate the signs and symptoms of all cutaneous adverse drug reactions thought to be due to drugs and immediately discontinue drugs that are not essential. Short cycles of systemic corticosteroids in combination with antihistamines may be necessary for widespread exanthematous rashes, while more aggressive corticosteroid regimens or intravenous immunoglobulins associated with supportive treatment should be used for patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Sociocultural determinants of induced abortion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korejo, R.; Noorani, K.J.; Bhutta, S.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of induced abortion and identity the role of sociocultural factors contributing to termination of pregnancy and associated morbidity and mortality in hospital setting. Subjects and Methods: The patients who were admitted for induced abortion were interviewed in privacy. On condition of anonymity they were asked about the age, parity, family setup and relationships, with particular emphasis on sociocultural reasons and factors contributing to induction of abortion. Details of status of abortionist and methods used for termination of pregnancy, the resulting complications and their severity were recorded. Results: Out of total admissions, 57(2.35%) gave history of induced abortion. All women belonged to low socioeconomic class and 59.6% of them were illiterate. Forty-three (75.5%) of these women had never practiced concentration. Twenty-four (42%) were grandmultiparae and did not want more children. In 29 women (50.9%) the decision for abortion had been supported by the husband. In 25 (43.8%) abortion was carried out by Daiyan (traditional midwives). Serious complications like uterine perforation with or without bowel injury were encouraged in 25 (43.8%) of these women. During the study period illegally induced abortion accounted for 6 (10.5%) maternal deaths. Conclusion: Prevalence of poverty, illiteracy, grand multiparity and non-practice of contraception are strong determinants of induced abortion. (author)

  3. Metal-induced crystallization fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zumin; Mittemeijer, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction to Metal-Induced CrystallizationAtomic Mechanisms and Interface Thermodynamics of Metal-Induced Crystallization of Amorphous Semiconductors at Low TemperaturesThermodynamics and Kinetics of Layer Exchange upon Low-Temperature Annealing Amorphous Si/Polycrystalline Al Layered StructuresMetal-Induced Crystallization by Homogeneous Insertion of Metallic Species in Amorphous SemiconductorsAluminum-Induced Crystallization: Applications in Photovoltaic TechnologiesApplications of Metal-Induced Crystallization for Advanced Flat-Panel DisplaysLaser-Assisted Meta

  4. Uterine contraction induced by Ghanaian plants used to induce abortion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Birgitte HV; Soelberg, Jens; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    Ethnomedicinal observations from the time of the Atlantic slave trade show women in Ghana historically used plants as emmenagogues (menstruation stimulants) and to induce abortion. This study investigates the effect of four of these plants on uterine contraction. The historically used plants were...

  5. Cyclophosphamide-induced pulmonary toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, D.W.; Macler, L.; Penney, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    Unlike radiation effects, pulmonary toxicity following drug treatments may develop soon after exposure. The dose-response relationship between Cyclophosphamide and lung toxicity was investigated using increased breathing frequency assays used successfully for radiation induced injury. The data indicate that release of protein into the alveolus may play a significant role in Cy induced pulmonary toxicity. Although the mechanism responsible for the increased alveolar protein is as yet not identified, the present findings suggest that therapeutic intervention to inhibit protein release may be an approach to protect the lungs from toxic effects. (UK)

  6. Induced modules over group algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Karpilovsky, Gregory

    1990-01-01

    In 1898 Frobenius discovered a construction which, in present terminology, associates with every module of a subgroup the induced module of a group. This construction proved to be of fundamental importance and is one of the basic tools in the entire theory of group representations.This monograph is designed for research mathematicians and advanced graduate students and gives a picture of the general theory of induced modules as it exists at present. Much of the material has until now been available only in research articles. The approach is not intended to be encyclopedic, rather each topic is

  7. Matrix models of induced QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makeenko, Yu.

    1994-01-01

    I review recent works on the problem of inducing large-N QCD by matrix fields. In the first part of the talk I describe the matrix models which induce large-N QCD and present the results of studies of their phase structure by the standard lattice technology (in particular, by the mean field method). The second part is devoted to the exact solution of these models in the strong coupling region by means of the loop equations. I describe the solution of the Kazakov-Migdal model with the quadratic and logarithmic potentials as well as that of analogous fermionic models with the quadratic potential. (orig.)

  8. Induced piezoelectricity in isotropic biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, R L

    1976-01-01

    Isotropic material can be made to exhibit piezoelectric effects by the application of a constant electric field. For insulators, the piezoelectric strain constant is proportional to the applied electric field and for semiconductors, an additional out-of-phase component of piezoelectricity is proportional to the electric current density in the sample. The two induced coefficients are proportional to the strain-dependent dielectric constant (depsilon/dS + epsilon) and resistivity (drho/dS - rho), respectively. The latter is more important at frequencies such that rhoepsilonomega less than 1, often the case in biopolymers.Signals from induced piezoelectricity in nature may be larger than those from true piezoelectricity. PMID:990389

  9. Induced radioactivity in LDEF components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    A systematic study of the induced radioactivity of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is being carried out in order to gather information about the low earth orbit radiation environment and its effects on materials. The large mass of the LDEF spacecraft, its stabilized configuration, and long mission duration have presented an opportunity to determine space radiation-induced radioactivities with a precision not possible before. Data presented include preliminary activities for steel and aluminum structural samples, and activation subexperiment foils. Effects seen in the data show a clear indication of the trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly and suggest contributions from different sources of external radiation fluxes.

  10. Congruence properties of induced representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Dieter; Momeni, Arash; Venkov, Alexei

    In this paper we study representations of the projective modular group induced from the Hecke congruence group of level 4 with Selberg's character. We show that the well known congruence properties of Selberg's character are equivalent to the congruence properties of the induced representations. ...... by Zograf's geometric method. They belong to the class of character groups of type $\\rm I$ for the principal congruence subgroup $\\Gamma(4)$ and have, contrary to the noncongruence groups determined by Selberg's character which all have genus $g=0$, arbitrary genus $g\\geq 0$....

  11. Drug-induced Brugada syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshino Minoura

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome (BrS is an inherited cardiac disorder that is associated with an electrocardiogram pattern of ST segment elevation on right precordial leads and a high incidence of sudden death. Diagnosis requires documentation of a coved-type ST segment that occurs spontaneously or in the presence of a class IA or IC antiarrhythmic agent. A wide variety of other drugs, including antianginals, antidepressants, antipsychotics, and antihistamines, have been reported to unmask or induce the electrocardiographic and arrhythmic manifestations of BrS. This review focuses on drug-induced BrS phenotypes, prevalence, and underlying mechanisms.

  12. Exorcising ghosts in induced gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narain, Gaurav [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China (KITPC), Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-10-15

    Unitarity of the scale-invariant coupled theory of higher-derivative gravity and matter is investigated. A scalar field coupled with a Dirac fermion is taken as the matter sector. Following the idea of induced gravity the Einstein-Hilbert term is generated via dynamical symmetry breaking of scale invariance. The renormalisation group flows are computed and one-loop RG improved effective potential of scalar is calculated. The scalar field develops a new minimum via the Coleman-Weinberg procedure inducing the Newton constant and masses in the matter sector. The spin-2 problematic ghost and the spin-0 mode of the metric fluctuation get a mass in the broken phase of the theory. The energy dependence of the vacuum expectation value in the RG improved scenario implies a running for the induced parameters. This sets up platform to ask whether it is possible to evade the spin-2 ghost by keeping its mass always above the running energy scale? In broken phase this question is satisfactorily answered for a large domain of coupling parameter space where the ghost is evaded. The spin-0 mode can be made physically realisable or not depending upon the choice of the initial parameters. The induced Newton constant is seen to vanish in the ultraviolet case. By properly choosing parameters it is possible to make the matter fields physically unrealisable. (orig.)

  13. Drug-induced peripheral neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilholm, Ole Jakob; Christensen, Alex Alban; Zedan, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy can be caused by medication, and various descriptions have been applied for this condition. In this MiniReview, the term 'drug-induced peripheral neuropathy' (DIPN) is used with the suggested definition: Damage to nerves of the peripheral nervous system caused by a chemical ...

  14. Drug-induced hepatic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Henrik; Andreasen, P B

    1992-01-01

    The Danish Committee on Adverse Drug Reactions received 1100 reports of suspected drug-induced hepatic injury during the decade 1978-1987. The causal relationship between drug and hepatic injury was classified as definite in 57 (5.2%) reports, probable in 989 (89.9%) reports, possible in 50 (4...

  15. Food-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok K; Upparahalli Venkateshaiah, Sathisha; Goyal, Hemant; Mishra, Anil

    2017-12-01

    Food allergy, a commonly increasing problem worldwide, defined as an adverse immune response to food. A variety of immune-related effector cells such as mast cells, eosinophils, neutrophils, and T cells are involved in food-related allergic responses categorized as IgE mediated, non-IgE mediated, and mixed (IgE and non-IgE) depending upon underlying immunological mechanisms. The dietary antigens mainly target the gastrointestinal tract including pancreas that gets inflamed due to food allergy and leads acute pancreatitis. Reports indicate several food proteins induce pancreatitis; however, detailed underlying mechanism of food-induced pancreatitis is unexplored. The aim of the review is to understand and update the current scenario of food-induced pancreatitis. A comprehensive literature search of relevant research articles has been performed through PubMed, and articles were chosen based on their relevance to food allergen-mediated pancreatitis. Several cases in the literature indicate that acute pancreatitis has been provoked after the consumption of mustard, milk, egg, banana, fish, and kiwi fruits. Food-induced pancreatitis is an ignored and unexplored area of research. The review highlights the significance of food in the development of pancreatitis and draws the attention of physicians and scientists to consider food allergies as a possible cause for initiation of pancreatitis pathogenesis.

  16. SPS Ion Induced Desorption Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    This experiment will give a study about the induced desorption from heavy ion (Indium ion run from week 45 in SPS T4-H8 area) impacting LHC type graphite collimator. 4 different samples are located in the 4 chambers 90° one to each other: pure graphite, graphite with copper coating, graphite with NEG coating, 316LN stainless steal (reference).

  17. Characterization of Entamoeba histolytica- induced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    at 37°C in a humidified 5% CO2 atmosphere. CHO cells were harvested by trypsinization (0⋅25% for 3 min incu ... of fluorescence intensity of each sample compared to the basal level of Jurkat cells alone. ... induced a 70⋅2% drop in phosphotyrosine levels, whereas incubation with E. moshkovskii produced an insignificant.

  18. Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Alex P; Marshall-Bowman, Karina

    2015-06-01

    Although once a widely speculated about and largely theoretical topic, spaceflight-induced intracranial hypertension has gained acceptance as a distinct clinical phenomenon, yet the underlying physiological mechanisms are still poorly understood. In the past, many terms were used to describe the symptoms of malaise, nausea, vomiting, and vertigo, though longer duration spaceflights have increased the prevalence of overlapping symptoms of headache and visual disturbance. Spaceflight-induced visual pathology is thought to be a manifestation of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) because of its similar presentation to cases of known intracranial hypertension on Earth as well as the documentation of increased ICP by lumbar puncture in symptomatic astronauts upon return to gravity. The most likely mechanisms of spaceflight-induced increased ICP include a cephalad shift of body fluids, venous outflow obstruction, blood-brain barrier breakdown, and disruption to CSF flow. The relative contribution of increased ICP to the symptoms experienced during spaceflight is currently unknown, though other factors recently posited to contribute include local effects on ocular structures, individual differences in metabolism, and the vasodilator effects of carbon dioxide. This review article attempts to consolidate the literature regarding spaceflight-induced intracranial hypertension and distinguish it from other pathologies with similar symptomatology. It discusses the proposed physiological causes and the pathological manifestations of increased ICP in the spaceflight environment and provides considerations for future long-term space travel. In the future, it will be critical to develop countermeasures so that astronauts can participate at their peak potential and return safely to Earth.

  19. (UVB)-induced DNA damage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-17

    Aug 17, 2011 ... E-mail: renu2498@hotmail.com. Abbreviations: POE, Pandanus ordoratissimus extract; KSCs, keratinocyte stem cells; AAG, ascorbyl glucoside. as the major cause of human skin cancer. It is well established that UVB induced DNA damage by photoi- somerization, resulting in the formation of the 6-4 photo-.

  20. Plasma generation induced by triboelectrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Singh, Shailendra Vikram; Michelsen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    A gas discharge plasma can be induced by triboelectrification around a sliding contact. The detailed physical mechanism of triboelectrification is unknown, but an empirical classification scheme can be referred to in practice. It is reported that intense ultra-violet emission from a plasma...

  1. Late onset startle induced tics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, M. A.; Brown, P.; Morris, H. R.; Lees, A.

    1999-01-01

    Three cases of late onset Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome are presented. The motor tics were mainly induced by an unexpected startling stimulus, but the startle reflex was not exaggerated. The tics developed after physical trauma or a period of undue emotional stress. Reflex tics may occur in

  2. Late onset startle induced tics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, MAJ; Brown, P; Morris, HR; Lees, A

    1999-01-01

    Three cases of late onset Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome are presented. The motor ties were mainly induced by an unexpected startling stimulus, but the startle reflex was not exaggerated. The ties developed after physical trauma or a period of undue emotional stress. Reflex ties may occur in

  3. Drug-induced renal injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    induced renal toxicity into four major renal syndromes: • acute renal failure. • chronic renal failure. • glomerulonephritis. • tubulopathies. These major renal syndromes are discussed in further detail below (see summary in Table I). Acute renal failure. Drugs can cause acute renal failure by causing pre-renal, intrinsic or.

  4. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  5. Transdermal hyoscine induced unilateral mydriasis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, Breffni

    2012-03-20

    The authors present a case of unilateral mydriasis in a teenager prescribed transdermal hyoscine hydrobromide (scopolamine) for chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting. The authors discuss the ocular side-effects associated with this particular drug and delivery system and the potential use of transdermal hyoscine as an antiemetic agent in this group.

  6. components in induced sorghum mutants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (1984) evaluated induced mutation and hybridisation methods for producing genetic variability in 15 quantitative characters of sorghum. Their results showed large variability in grain yield, plant maturity, plant height and panicles length. Selected mutants with favorable properties can be directly combined in varietal hybrids.

  7. Local Anesthetic-Induced Neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlinde, Mark; Hollmann, Markus W.; Stevens, Markus F.; Hermanns, Henning; Werdehausen, Robert; Lirk, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge concerning incidence, risk factors, and mechanisms of perioperative nerve injury, with focus on local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Perioperative nerve injury is a complex phenomenon and can be caused by a number of clinical factors. Anesthetic risk

  8. Hydralazine-induced constrictive pericarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, CFC; ElGamal, MIH; Gans, ROB; Hoorntje, SJ

    A 59-year-old man was diagnosed as having constrictive pericarditis 17 months after a typical hydralazine-induced autoimmune syndrome, This late complication of hydralazine has been reported only once. Ten years later the patient was found to have anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies directed

  9. Eye changes induced by radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.N.; Lloyd, R.D.; Shabestari, Lorraine; Angus, Walter; Muggenburg, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents some features of the radium induced eye syndrome observed in beagles, including the prominence of intraocular pigmentary lesions and compares these with the results of rodent studies (Onychomys leucogaster) featuring a heavily pigmented uvea, and with the radiation syndrome reported in humans. (author)

  10. [Readers' position against induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-25

    Replies to the request by the Journal of Nursing on readers' positions against induced abortion indicate there is a definite personal position against induced abortion and the assistance in this procedure. Some writers expressed an emotional "no" against induced abortion. Many quoted arguments from the literature, such as a medical dictionary definition as "a premeditated criminally induced abortion." The largest group of writers quoted from the Bible, the tenor always being: "God made man, he made us with his hands; we have no right to make the decision." People with other philosophies also objected. Theosophical viewpoint considers reincarnation and the law of cause and effect (karma). This philosophy holds that induced abortion impedes the appearance of a reincarnated being. The fundamental question in the abortion problem is, "can the fetus be considered a human life?" The German anatomist Professor E. Bleckschmidt points out that from conception there is human life, hence the fertilized cell can only develop into a human being and is not merely a piece of tissue. Professional nursing interpretation is that nursing action directed towards killing of a human being (unborn child) is against the nature and the essence of the nursing profession. A different opinion states that a nurse cares for patients who have decided for the operation. The nurse doesn't judge but respects the individual's decision. Some proabortion viewpoints considered the endangering of the mother's life by the unborn child, and the case of rape. With the arguments against abortion the question arises how to help the woman with unwanted pregnancy. Psychological counseling is emphasized as well as responsible and careful assistance. Referral to the Society for Protection of the Unborn Child (VBOK) is considered as well as other agencies. Further reader comments on this subject are solicited.

  11. Does a parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia induce vestigial cytoplasmic incompatibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraaijeveld, Ken; Reumer, Barbara M.; Mouton, Laurence; Kremer, Natacha; Vavre, Fabrice; van Alphen, Jacques J. M.

    2011-03-01

    Wolbachia is a maternally inherited bacterium that manipulates the reproduction of its host. Recent studies have shown that male-killing strains can induce cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) when introgressed into a resistant host. Phylogenetic studies suggest that transitions between CI and other Wolbachia phenotypes have also occurred frequently, raising the possibility that latent CI may be widespread among Wolbachia. Here, we investigate whether a parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia strain can also induce CI. Parthenogenetic females of the parasitoid wasp Asobara japonica regularly produce a small number of males that may be either infected or not. Uninfected males were further obtained through removal of the Wolbachia using antibiotics and from a naturally uninfected strain. Uninfected females that had mated with infected males produced a slightly, but significantly more male-biased sex ratio than uninfected females that had mated with uninfected males. This effect was strongest in females that mated with males that had a relatively high Wolbachia titer. Quantitative PCR indicated that infected males did not show higher ratios of nuclear versus mitochondrial DNA content. Wolbachia therefore does not cause diploidization of cells in infected males. While these results are consistent with CI, other alternatives such as production of abnormal sperm by infected males cannot be completely ruled out. Overall, the effect was very small (9%), suggesting that if CI is involved it may have degenerated through the accumulation of mutations.

  12. Esomeprazole-induced photoallergic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There are no published case reports of esomeprazole-induced photoallergic dermatitis. We report here a 58-year-old lady with prior history of propylthiouracil and carbimazole-induced photoallergy, who presented with heartburn and dysphagia. She was diagnosed to have erosive esophagitis and was treated with esomeprazole, following which she developed photoallergic dermatitis. It improved on cessation of the drug and did not recur on subsequent treatment with ranitidine. Naranjo score for this adverse drug event was 8, thereby making it a probable adverse drug reaction. This reaction may be due to sulphur moiety, which is common to all these drugs. Physicians must be aware of this possible side-effect, especially in patients with prior history of photoallergy to other drugs.

  13. Taxane-Induced Peripheral Neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Roser; Bruna, Jordi

    2015-04-28

    Taxane-derived agents are chemotherapy drugs widely employed in cancer treatment. Among them, paclitaxel and docetaxel are most commonly administered, but newer formulations are being investigated. Taxane antineoplastic activity is mainly based on the ability of the drugs to promote microtubule assembly, leading to mitotic arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells. Peripheral neurotoxicity is the major non-hematological adverse effect of taxane, often manifested as painful neuropathy experienced during treatment, and it is sometimes irreversible. Unfortunately, taxane-induced neurotoxicity is an uncertainty prior to the initiation of treatment. The present review aims to dissect current knowledge on real incidence, underlying pathophysiology, clinical features and predisposing factors related with the development of taxane-induced neuropathy.

  14. [Psychological aspects of induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sz Makó, Hajnalka; Veszprémi, Béla

    2011-01-01

    The present paper, based on the results of international studies, is focused on the reconsideration of the psychological aspects of induced abortion. By presenting a narrow cross-section of the Hungarian demographic data, we would like to emphasise the necessity and the significance of a deeper understanding of the subject. Factors behind the decision-making, short- and long term outcomes of the intervention influencing primarily the mental health of women and partner-relationship aspects are discussed in details. While acknowledging the complexity of the subject deriving from the legal, ethical, moral, religious, medical, social and sociological concerns, our aim is to call attention to the psychological aspects of induced abortion and the importance of psychological care of women undergoing surgical operation.

  15. Prediction of pilot induced oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin PANĂ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available An important problem in the design of flight-control systems for aircraft under pilotedcontrol is the determination of handling qualities and pilot-induced oscillations (PIO tendencieswhen significant nonlinearities exist in the vehicle description. The paper presents a method to detectpossible pilot-induced oscillations of Category II (with rate and position limiting, a phenomenonusually due to a misadaptation between the pilot and the aircraft response during some tasks in whichtight closed loop control of the aircraft is required from the pilot. For the analysis of Pilot in the LoopOscillations an approach, based on robust stability analysis of a system subject to uncertainparameters, is proposed. In this analysis the nonlinear elements are substituted by linear uncertainparameters. This approach assumes that PIO are characterized by a limit cycle behavior.

  16. Experimental radiation-induced leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upton, A.C.

    1977-01-01

    Of the various neoplasms induced by ionizing radiation in human and animal populations, leukemias and lymphomas were among the first to receive systematic study and have remained under intensive investigation up to the present time. The reticular tissue neoplasm that has been the most thoroughly studied is a lymphoma of the thymus which characteristically predominates in whole- bodyirradiated mice. Thanks to intensive research on this tumor, much is now known about its pathogenesis. The purpose of this report is to review the knowledge of pathogenesis of other types of radiation-induced leukemias and lymphomas, in an effort to assess the extent to which the comparative data for all such diseases can be integrated into a single unifying framework

  17. Methadone Induced Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadi Saifan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL caused by opiate abuse or overuse has been well documented in the medical literature. Most documented case reports have involved either heroin or hydrocodone/acetaminophen. Recently, case reposts of methadone induced SSHL have been published. Case Report. We present the case of a 31-year-old man who developed SSHL after a methadone overdose induced stupor. He was subsequently restarted on methadone at his regular dose. On follow-up audiometry exams, he displayed persistent moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss bilaterally. Discussion. This case is notable because unlike all but one previously reported case, the patient—who was restated on methadone—did not make a complete recovery. Conclusion. Methadone overuse in rare cases causes SSHL.

  18. Color-induced graph colorings

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive treatment of color-induced graph colorings is presented in this book, emphasizing vertex colorings induced by edge colorings. The coloring concepts described in this book depend not only on the property required of the initial edge coloring and the kind of objects serving as colors, but also on the property demanded of the vertex coloring produced. For each edge coloring introduced, background for the concept is provided, followed by a presentation of results and open questions dealing with this topic. While the edge colorings discussed can be either proper or unrestricted, the resulting vertex colorings are either proper colorings or rainbow colorings. This gives rise to a discussion of irregular colorings, strong colorings, modular colorings, edge-graceful colorings, twin edge colorings and binomial colorings. Since many of the concepts described in this book are relatively recent, the audience for this book is primarily mathematicians interested in learning some new areas of graph colorings...

  19. Inducing Lactation: Breastfeeding for Adoptive Moms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Inducing Lactation: Breastfeeding for Adoptive Moms Page Content Article Body A growing number of adoptive mothers are interested in breastfeeding their babies through induced lactation. Prescription Medications No ...

  20. Induced disease resistance signaling in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, B.W.M.; Loon, L.C. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    To protect themselves from disease, plants have evolved sophisticated inducible defense mechanisms in which the signal molecules salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene often play crucial roles. Elucidation of signaling pathways controlling induced disease resistance is a major objective in

  1. MRI-induced retrocalcaneal bursitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tol, J.L.; Dijk, C.N. van; Maas, M.

    1999-01-01

    This case report describes a patient with acute retrocalcaneal bursitis, which developed after MRI examination of the ankle. The sagittal T2*-weighted gradient echo sequence revealed an extensive susceptibility artifact in the area surrounding the Achilles tendon near its insertion at the os calcis. This artifact was caused by postsurgical metallic particles. We postulate that these particles were mechanically stimulated by the magnetic field and induced the inflammatory response. (orig.)

  2. MRI-induced retrocalcaneal bursitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tol, J.L.; Dijk, C.N. van [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, M. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1999-10-01

    This case report describes a patient with acute retrocalcaneal bursitis, which developed after MRI examination of the ankle. The sagittal T2*-weighted gradient echo sequence revealed an extensive susceptibility artifact in the area surrounding the Achilles tendon near its insertion at the os calcis. This artifact was caused by postsurgical metallic particles. We postulate that these particles were mechanically stimulated by the magnetic field and induced the inflammatory response. (orig.)

  3. Induced Mutations in Thai Rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klakhaeng, Kanchana

    2014-01-01

    Rice is the primary source of food for more than half of the world's population. It benefits greatly from technological inputs in the area of breeding such as induced mutation. Induced mutation can produce mutants with significant improvement in plant type, maturity, yields and protein ratio when compared to the parent. These improved traits enable the mutants to fit into farming systems with either shorter or longer growing seasons. Three induced mutant rice varieties, including RD6, RD10 and RD15, are well accepted by farmers and consumers in Thailand. RD6 and RD15 were aromatic, photosensitive varieties which were derived from KDML105 by acute irradiation of 20 and 15 kilorad gamma ray, respectively. After induced mutation, pedigree selection was applied. RD6 showed drought tolerance and also good grain quality including softness and good aroma with a higher average yield than the famous glutinous variety, San-Pah-Tong. Additionally, it was resistant to blast and brown spot diseases with an average yield of 4.19 tons/ha. RD15 showed drought tolerance and resistance to brown spot disease with the highest yield of 3.5 tons/ha. These two mutant varieties are currently the most famous aromatic rice varieties in Thailand. On the other hand, RD10 is a glutinous, photoperiod insensitive rice variety which was derived from RD1 by irradiation of 1 kilorad fast neutrons. RD10 showed good grain quality such as softness and stickiness with the yield of 4.25 tons/ha. As an on-going project, recommended rice varieties were irradiated with electron beam for anaerobic germination ability, submergence tolerance, stagnant-flood tolerance and also internode elongation.

  4. Teriparatide Induced Delayed Persistent Hypercalcemia

    OpenAIRE

    Thiruchelvam, Nirosshan; Randhawa, Jaskirat; Sadiek, Happy; Kistangari, Gaurav

    2014-01-01

    Teriparatide, a recombinant PTH, is an anabolic treatment for osteoporosis that increases bone density. Transient hypercalcemia is a reported side effect of teriparatide that is seen few hours following administration of teriparatide and resolves usually within 16 hours of drug administration. Persistent hypercalcemia, although not observed in clinical trials, is rarely reported. The current case describes a rare complication of teriparatide induced delayed persistent hypercalcemia.

  5. [Bonsai induced acute myocardial infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayhan, Hüseyin; Aslan, Abdullah Nabi; Süygün, Hakan; Durmaz, Tahir

    2014-09-01

    Incidences of drug abuse and cannabis have increased in young adults, recently. Cannabis induced myocardial infarction has rarely been reported in these people. There is no any literature about a synthetic cannabinoid, being recently most popular Bonsai, to cause myocardial infarction. In this case report we presented a 33-year-old male patient who developed acute myocardial infarction after taking high doses of Bonsai.

  6. Radiation induced crosslinking of polytetrafluoroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Akihiro; Tabata, Yoneho; Ikeda, Shigetoshi; Otsuhata, Kazushige; Kudoh, Hisaaki; Seguchi, Tadao.

    1995-01-01

    The Irradiation temperature effect on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) from room temperature to 380degC was investigated by tensile test and thermal analysis. The behavior of tensile properties and changes of crystallinity on irradiation indicated the formation of a network structure in PTFE by radiation induced crosslinking in inert gas in the molten state just above the melting temperature of PTFE (327degC). The crosslinked PTFE showed a much improved radiation resistance in an atmospheric radiation field. (author)

  7. Risperidone-induced reversible neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattalai Kailasam, Vasanth; Chima, Victoria; Nnamdi, Uchechukwu; Sharma, Kavita; Shah, Kairav

    2017-01-01

    This case report presents a 44-year-old man with a history of schizophrenia who developed neutropenia on risperidone therapy. The patient's laboratory reports showed a gradual decline of leukocytes and neutrophils after resolution and rechallenging. This was reversed with the discontinuation of risperidone and by switching to olanzapine. In this case report, we also discuss the updated evidence base for management of risperidone-induced neutropenia.

  8. Teriparatide Induced Delayed Persistent Hypercalcemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirosshan Thiruchelvam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Teriparatide, a recombinant PTH, is an anabolic treatment for osteoporosis that increases bone density. Transient hypercalcemia is a reported side effect of teriparatide that is seen few hours following administration of teriparatide and resolves usually within 16 hours of drug administration. Persistent hypercalcemia, although not observed in clinical trials, is rarely reported. The current case describes a rare complication of teriparatide induced delayed persistent hypercalcemia.

  9. Laser-induced multiphoton transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenholm, S.

    1978-06-01

    Laser induced multiphoton processes are reviewed. The effects of strong fields on atoms are discussed. The perturbation treatment is presented and also its generalization to treat intermediate resonances. The influence of atomic coherence is discussed heuristically and the relation between quantal and classical descriptions of the field is elucidated by reference to the dressed atom description. Atomic ionization experiments are reviewed and the present understanding of multiphoton dissociation of molecules is explained. Finally some prospects for the future are discussed. (author)

  10. Food-induced Allergic Rhinitis

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Hasan Bemanian; Saba Arshi; Mohammad Nabavi

    2013-01-01

    Food allergy is estimated about 8% in children. The relationship between food and manifestation of allergy symptoms and its confirmation for accurate diagnosis is very important. Allergic rhinitis is a common disease with a prevalence of 40% among different societies. The prevalence of food-induced allergic rhinitis appears to be less than 1 percent. Food reactions often lead to rhinitis symptoms at a no immunologic nature. Although the role of food and fruits in developing allergic rhinitis ...

  11. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S. [GSI, Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/{mu}m) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  12. Radiation-induced heart injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yoshihiko; Niibe, Hideo

    1975-01-01

    In order to identify radiation-induced heart injury and to differentiate it from heart disease, an attempt was made to clarify post-irradiation heart injury by investigating the histological changes which occur during the internal between the irradiation and the time of demonstrable histological changes. A study was made of 83 autopsies in which most of the primary neoplasms were breast cancers, lung cancers and mediastinal tumors. In 43 of these autopsies the heart had been irradiated. Sixty eight dd-strain mice were also used for microautoradiographic study. Histological changes in the heart were observed in 27 of the 43 cases receiving irradiation. The limit of the tolerance dose to the heart for indicating histological changes was 1220 ret in humans. The latent period without histological changes was 2.7 months after initiation of radiation therapy. Greater heart injury was observed after re-irradiation or after the combined therapy of radiation and chemotherapy especially mitomycin (MMC). The histological findings after treatment with MMC were similar to those of radiation-induced heart injury. Results of the study indicate that the damage is secondary to radiation-induced changes of the vascula connective tissue. (Evans, G.)

  13. Ventilator-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, J D; Dreyfuss, D; Saumon, G

    2003-08-01

    During mechanical ventilation, high end-inspiratory lung volume (whether it be because of large tidal volume (VT) and/or high levels of positive end-expiratory pressure) results in a permeability type pulmonary oedema, called ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Previous injury sensitises lung to mechanical ventilation. This experimental concept has recently received a resounding clinical illustration after a 22% reduction of mortality was observed in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients whose VT had been reduced. In addition, it has been suggested that repetitive opening and closing of distal units at low lung volume could induce lung injury but this notion has been challenged both conceptually and clinically after the negative results of the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome clinical Network Assessment of Low tidal Volume and Elevated end-expiratory volume to Obviate Lung Injury (ARDSNet ALVEOLI) study. Experimentally and clinically, involvement of inflammatory cytokines in VILI has not been unequivocally demonstrated. Cellular response to mechanical stretch has been increasingly investigated, both on the epithelial and the endothelial side. Lipid membrane trafficking has been thought to be a means by which cells respond to stress failure. Alterations in the respiratory system pressure/volume curve during ventilator-induced lung injury that include decrease in compliance and position of the upper inflection point are due to distal obstruction of airways that reduce aerated lung volume. Information from this curve could help avoid potentially harmful excessive tidal volume reduction.

  14. Induced mutation of Dendrobium orchid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakinah Ariffin; Mohd Nazir Basiran

    2000-01-01

    Dendrobiiim orchids serve as the main orchid cut flower export of Malaysia. The wide range of colour and forms presently available in the market are obtained through hybridisation. Induced mutation breeding program was initiated on a commercial variety Dendrobium 'Sonia Kai' to explore the possibilities of obtaining new colour and forms. Matured seeds from self pollination were cultured and irradiated at 35 Gy at the protocorm-like bodies (PLBS) stage. Selection of induced mutations was done after the first flowering of the plants regenerated from the irradiated protocorms. Results showed changes in flower colour, shape and size. Most of these chances are expressed in different combinations in the petals, sepals and lip of the flowers. Thus, resulting. in a very wide spectrum of mutations. Some of these chances are not stable. To date, mutants that showed stable characteristics changes are grouped into 11 categories based on flower colour and form. These results show that the combination of its vitro technique and induced mutation can be applied in orchid breeding to produce new interesting and attractive variety for the market

  15. YAP Induces Human Naive Pluripotency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Qin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The human naive pluripotent stem cell (PSC state, corresponding to a pre-implantation stage of development, has been difficult to capture and sustain in vitro. We report that the Hippo pathway effector YAP is nuclearly localized in the inner cell mass of human blastocysts. Overexpression of YAP in human embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced PSCs (iPSCs promotes the generation of naive PSCs. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA can partially substitute for YAP to generate transgene-free human naive PSCs. YAP- or LPA-induced naive PSCs have a rapid clonal growth rate, a normal karyotype, the ability to form teratomas, transcriptional similarities to human pre-implantation embryos, reduced heterochromatin levels, and other hallmarks of the naive state. YAP/LPA act in part by suppressing differentiation-inducing effects of GSK3 inhibition. CRISPR/Cas9-generated YAP−/− cells have an impaired ability to form colonies in naive but not primed conditions. These results uncover an unexpected role for YAP in the human naive state, with implications for early human embryology.

  16. Systemic resistance induced by rhizosphere bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Loon, L.C. van; Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Nonpathogenic rhizobacteria can induce a systemic resistance in plants that is phenotypically similar to pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR) has been demonstrated against fungi, bacteria, and viruses in Arabidopsis, bean, carnation, cucumber, radish, tobacco, and tomato under conditions in which the inducing bacteria and the challenging pathogen remained spatially separated. Bacterial strains differ in their ability to ...

  17. Material Induced Anisotropic Damage in DP600

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niazi, Muhammad Sohail; Wisselink, H.H.; Meinders, Vincent T.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.

    2013-01-01

    Plasticity induced damage development in metals is anisotropic by nature. The anisotropy in damage is driven by two different phenomena; anisotropic deformation state i.e. Load Induced Anisotropic Damage (LIAD) and anisotropic microstructure i.e. Material Induced Anisotropic Damage (MIAD). The

  18. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  19. Antidepressant-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSanty, Kevin P; Amabile, Celene M

    2007-07-01

    To review principles of drug-induced liver injury (DILI), summarize characteristics of antidepressant-mediated liver injury, and provide recommendations for monitoring and management. A search relating to antidepressant-induced liver injury was performed using MEDLINE (1966-March 2007). Search terms included antidepressant, cholestasis, hepatotoxicity, jaundice, liver injury, toxic hepatitis, and transaminases. Reference citations not identified in the initial database search were also utilized. All English-language case reports, letters, and review articles identified from the data sources were used. Case reports and letters relating to hepatotoxicity from antidepressant overdose were excluded. Antidepressant-induced liver injury described in published cases were of the idiopathic type and, by definition, cannot be predicted based on dose or specific risk factors. Paroxetine had the largest number of cases within the selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor class. Nefazodone, a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, appeared to have the most serious cases and is the only antidepressant agent that carries a Food and Drug Administration Black Box Warning regarding hepatotoxicity. The tricyclic antidepressants and monoamine oxidase inhibitors are capable of producing hepatotoxicity, but fewer cases with these agents have been reported in the past 15 years, possibly due to a decline in their use. Causality has not been well established in all reports due to the concurrent use of other drugs and/or underlying liver disease. Most antidepressant agents have the potential to produce idiopathic liver injury. There is no way to prevent idiopathic DILI, but the severity of the reaction may be minimized with prompt recognition and early withdrawal of the agent. The clinician must be careful to provide ongoing therapy of the underlying depressive disorder and be aware of possible drug discontinuation syndromes should potential hepatotoxicity be suspected.

  20. Amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzi, Sara; Klein, Irwin

    2015-05-01

    Amiodarone is an effective medication for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Originally developed for the treatment of angina, it is now the most frequently prescribed antiarrhythmia drug despite the fact that its use is limited because of potential serious side effects including adverse effects on the thyroid gland and thyroid hormones. Although the mechanisms of action of amiodarone on the thyroid gland and thyroid hormone metabolism are poorly understood, the structural similarity of amiodarone to thyroid hormones, including the presence of iodine moieties on the inner benzene ring, may play a role in causing thyroid dysfunction. Amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction includes amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT) and amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism (AIH). The AIT develops more commonly in iodine-deficient areas and AIH in iodine-sufficient areas. The AIT type 1 usually occurs in patients with known or previously undiagnosed thyroid dysfunction or goiter. The AIT type 2 usually occurs in normal thyroid glands and results in destruction of thyroid tissue caused by thyroiditis. This is the result of an intrinsic drug effect from the amiodarone itself. Mixed types are not uncommon. Patients with cardiac disease receiving amiodarone treatment should be monitored for signs of thyroid dysfunction, which often manifest as a reappearance of the underlying cardiac disease state. When monitoring patients, initial tests should include the full battery of thyroid function tests, thyroid-stimulating hormone, thyroxine, triiodothyronine, and antithyroid antibodies. Mixed types of AIT can be challenging both to diagnose and treat and therapy differs depending on the type of AIT. Treatment can include thionamides and/or glucocorticoids. The AIH responds favorably to thyroid hormone replacement therapy. Amiodarone is lipophilic and has a long half-life in the body. Therefore, stopping the amiodarone therapy usually has little short-term benefit. © The Author(s) 2013.

  1. Sad Music Induces Pleasant Emotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AI eKAWAKAMI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In general, sad music is thought to cause us to experience sadness, which is considered an unpleasant emotion. As a result, the question arises as to why we listen to sad music if it evokes sadness. One possible answer to this question is that we may actually feel positive emotions when we listen to sad music. This suggestion may appear to be counterintuitive; however, in this study, by dividing musical emotion into perceived emotion and felt emotion, we investigated this potential emotional response to music. We hypothesized that felt and perceived emotion may not actually coincide in this respect: sad music would be perceived as sad, but the experience of listening to sad music would evoke positive emotions. A total of 44 participants listened to musical excerpts and provided data on perceived and felt emotions by rating 62 descriptive words or phrases related to emotions on a scale that ranged from 0 (not at all to 4 (very much. The results revealed that the sad music was perceived to be more tragic, whereas the actual experiences of the participants listening to the sad music induced them to feel more romantic, more blithe, and less tragic emotions than they actually perceived with respect to the same music. Thus, the participants experienced ambivalent emotions when they listened to the sad music. After considering the possible reasons that listeners were induced to experience emotional ambivalence by the sad music, we concluded that the formulation of a new model would be essential for examining the emotions induced by music and that this new model must entertain the possibility that what we experience when listening to music is vicarious emotion.

  2. Sad music induces pleasant emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Ai; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Katahira, Kentaro; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    In general, sad music is thought to cause us to experience sadness, which is considered an unpleasant emotion. As a result, the question arises as to why we listen to sad music if it evokes sadness. One possible answer to this question is that we may actually feel positive emotions when we listen to sad music. This suggestion may appear to be counterintuitive; however, in this study, by dividing musical emotion into perceived emotion and felt emotion, we investigated this potential emotional response to music. We hypothesized that felt and perceived emotion may not actually coincide in this respect: sad music would be perceived as sad, but the experience of listening to sad music would evoke positive emotions. A total of 44 participants listened to musical excerpts and provided data on perceived and felt emotions by rating 62 descriptive words or phrases related to emotions on a scale that ranged from 0 (not at all) to 4 (very much). The results revealed that the sad music was perceived to be more tragic, whereas the actual experiences of the participants listening to the sad music induced them to feel more romantic, more blithe, and less tragic emotions than they actually perceived with respect to the same music. Thus, the participants experienced ambivalent emotions when they listened to the sad music. After considering the possible reasons that listeners were induced to experience emotional ambivalence by the sad music, we concluded that the formulation of a new model would be essential for examining the emotions induced by music and that this new model must entertain the possibility that what we experience when listening to music is vicarious emotion.

  3. Auditory hallucinations induced by trazodone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiotsuki, Ippei; Terao, Takeshi; Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Hatano, Koji

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old female outpatient presenting with a depressive state suffered from auditory hallucinations at night. Her auditory hallucinations did not respond to blonanserin or paliperidone, but partially responded to risperidone. In view of the possibility that her auditory hallucinations began after starting trazodone, trazodone was discontinued, leading to a complete resolution of her auditory hallucinations. Furthermore, even after risperidone was decreased and discontinued, her auditory hallucinations did not recur. These findings suggest that trazodone may induce auditory hallucinations in some susceptible patients. PMID:24700048

  4. Clozapine-induced late leukopenia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Latif, Z

    2012-03-01

    A patient with a 28-year history of schizophrenia was treated with a wide range of antipsychotic medications since diagnosis. She had experienced no clinically significant symptomatic relief until she commenced treatment on clozapine. Her psychotic symptoms, self care, and general sense of well-being improved significantly. After 6 years of successful treatment, she developed leukopenia and clozapine was discontinued. The following issues will be discussed in the article: rechallenge with clozapine following leukopenia during previous therapy and the choice of and haematological monitoring needs with other antipsychotic medications after clozapine-induced blood dyscrasia.

  5. Aripiprazole-induced skin rash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santanu Nath

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adverse skin reactions are an important type of adverse drug reactions which have been reported with a wide variety of psychotropics including both typical and atypical antipsychotics. Like typical antipsychotics, atypical antipsychotics such as olanzapine, risperidone, and paliperidone have been documented to cause skin reactions. Reports of aripiprazole-induced skin reactions are sparse. We report a case of skin rash that developed after starting aripiprazole in a male patient suffering from schizophrenia and which remitted after the drug was stopped.

  6. Polymers modifications induced by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, M.C.R.; Nakahija, H.K.; Araujo, E.P.

    1990-01-01

    The use of gamma and electron radiation on polymers modifications is one of the industrials applications of radiation that presents the most commercial interest. Nowadays, the graft copolymerization, i.e., the addition of monomer onto a polymer, is one of the most exploraded technique. In this present paper the hydrophilization of polyethylene and polypropylene films by grafting of hydrophilic monomers such as acrylic and methacrylic acids were studied. The radiation induced graft copolymerization by simultaneous irradiation and preirradiation method and the reaction parameters were also investigated. (author) [pt

  7. Airway management: induced tension pneumoperitoneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Khedher; Amine, El Ghali Mohamed; Abdelbaki, Azouzi; Jihene, Ayachi; Khaoula, Meddeb; Yamina, Hamdaoui; Mohamed, Boussarsar

    2016-01-01

    Pneumoperitoneum is not always associated with hollow viscus perforation. Such condition is called non-surgical or spontaneous pneumoperitoneum. Intrathoracic causes remain the most frequently reported mechanism inducing this potentially life threatening complication. This clinical condition is associated with therapeutic dilemma. We report a case of a massive isolated pneumoperitoneum causing acute abdominal hypertension syndrome, in a 75 year female, which occurred after difficult airway management and mechanical ventilation. Emergent laparotomy yielded to full recovery. The recognition of such cases for whom surgical management can be avoided is primordial to avoid unnecessary laparotomy and its associated morbidity particularly in the critically ill.

  8. Cetirizine-Induced atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altuğ Osken

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common observed arrhythmia in clinical practice. In the literature, AF events associated with drug induction are available. Cetirizine is a second-generation histamine antagonist used in the treatment of allergies, angioedema, and urticaria. We wish to present an atypical case who took cetirizine medication for relieving symptoms of upper tract respiratory system infection, experienced rapid ventricular response AF and treated successfully. To best of our knowledge, this is the first case of cetirizine-induced AF.

  9. Protostellar Collapse Induced by Compression

    OpenAIRE

    Hennebelle, P.; Whitworth, A. P.; Gladwin, P. P.; Andre, Ph.

    2002-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of the evolution of low-mass, isothermal, molecular cores which are subjected to an increase in external pressure $P\\xt$. If $P\\xt$ increases very slowly, the core approaches instability quite quasistatically. However, for larger (but still quite modest) $dP\\xt/dt$ a compression wave is driven into the core, thereby triggering collapse from the outside in. If collapse of a core is induced by increasing $P\\xt$, this has a number of interesting consequences. (i)...

  10. Diseases induced by ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    An interim report is presented by the Industrial Injuries Advisory Council in accordance with Section 141 of the Social Security Act 1975 on the question whether the terms of prescription for occupational diseases induced by ionising radiation should be amended to cover a wider range of conditions. A lack of persuasive statistical data has prevented reliable estimates of health risks of radiation workers in the UK to be made. However the report gives details of the progress made so far and the difficulties encountered. (U.K.)

  11. Food-induced Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hasan Bemanian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Food allergy is estimated about 8% in children. The relationship between food and manifestation of allergy symptoms and its confirmation for accurate diagnosis is very important. Allergic rhinitis is a common disease with a prevalence of 40% among different societies. The prevalence of food-induced allergic rhinitis appears to be less than 1 percent. Food reactions often lead to rhinitis symptoms at a no immunologic nature. Although the role of food and fruits in developing allergic rhinitis is not clearly identified, in a very small percentage of patients, rhinitis is the clinical manifestation of food allergy.

  12. Condensation induced water hammer safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gintner, M.A.

    1997-03-10

    Condensation induced water hammer events in piping systems can cause catastrophic steam system failures which can result in equipment damage, personal injury, and even death. As an industry, we have learned to become accustomed to the ''banging'' that we often hear in our steam piping systems, and complacent in our actions to prevent it. It is unfortunate that lives are lost needlessly, as this type of water hammer event is preventable if one only applies some basic principles when operating and maintaining their steam systems. At the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site where I work, there was one such accident that occurred in 1993 which took the life of a former co-worker and friend of mine. Hanford was established as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. it is a 560 square mile complex located along the banks of the Columbia River in Southeastern Washington State. For almost 45 years, hanford's mission was to produce weapons grade plutonium for our nations defense programs. Today, Hanford no longer produces plutonium, but is focused on site clean-up and economic diversification. Hanford still uses steam for heating and processing activities, utilizing over 20 miles of piping distribution systems similar to those found in industry. Although these aging systems are still sound, they cannot stand up to the extreme pressure pulses developed by a condensation induced water hammer.

  13. Induced gravity II: grand unification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einhorn, Martin B. [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kohn Hall,University of California,Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4030 (United States); Jones, D.R. Timothy [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kohn Hall,University of California,Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4030 (United States); Dept. of Mathematical Sciences, University of Liverpool,Peach Street, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-31

    As an illustration of a renormalizable, asymptotically-free model of induced gravity, we consider an SO(10) gauge theory interacting with a real scalar multiplet in the adjoint representation. We show that dimensional transmutation can occur, spontaneously breaking SO(10) to SU(5)⊗U(1), while inducing the Planck mass and a positive cosmological constant, all proportional to the same scale v. All mass ratios are functions of the values of coupling constants at that scale. Below this scale (at which the Big Bang may occur), the model takes the usual form of Einstein-Hilbert gravity in de Sitter space plus calculable corrections. We show that there exist regions of parameter space in which the breaking results in a local minimum of the effective action giving a positive dilaton (mass){sup 2} from two-loop corrections associated with the conformal anomaly. Furthermore, unlike the singlet case we considered previously, some minima lie within the basin of attraction of the ultraviolet fixed point. Moreover, the asymptotic behavior of the coupling constants also lie within the range of convergence of the Euclidean path integral, so there is hope that there will be candidates for sensible vacua. Although open questions remain concerning unitarity of all such renormalizable models of gravity, it is not obvious that, in curved backgrounds such as those considered here, unitarity is violated. In any case, any violation that may remain will be suppressed by inverse powers of the reduced Planck mass.

  14. Drugs induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seferian, Andrei; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Savale, Laurent; Günther, Sven; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disorder characterized by progressive obliteration of the pulmonary microvasculature, resulting in elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and premature death. According to the current classification, PAH can be associated with exposure to certain drugs or toxins, particularly appetite suppressant drugs, such as aminorex, fenfluramine derivatives and benfluorex. These drugs have been confirmed to be risk factors for PAH and were withdrawn from the market. The supposed mechanism is an increase in serotonin levels, which was demonstrated to act as a growth factor for the pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. Amphetamines, phentermine and mazindol were less frequently used but are also considered as possible risk factors for PAH. Dasatinib, a dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, used in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia was associated with cases of severe PAH, in part reversible after its withdrawal. Recently several studies raised the potential endothelial dysfunction that could be induced by interferon, and few cases of PAH have been reported with interferon therapy. Other possible risk factors for PAH include: nasal decongestants, like phenylpropanolamine, dietary supplement - L-Tryptophan, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, pergolide and other drugs that could act on 5HT2B receptors. Interestingly, PAH remains a rare complication of these drugs, suggesting possible individual susceptibility and further studies are needed to identify patients at risk of drugs induced PAH. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Induced gravity II: grand unification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einhorn, Martin B.; Jones, D. R. Timothy

    2016-05-01

    As an illustration of a renormalizable, asymptotically-free model of induced gravity, we consider an SO(10) gauge theory interacting with a real scalar multiplet in the adjoint representation. We show that dimensional transmutation can occur, spontaneously breaking SO(10) to SU(5)⊗U(1), while inducing the Planck mass and a positive cosmological constant, all proportional to the same scale v. All mass ratios are functions of the values of coupling constants at that scale. Below this scale (at which the Big Bang may occur), the model takes the usual form of Einstein-Hilbert gravity in de Sitter space plus calculable corrections. We show that there exist regions of parameter space in which the breaking results in a local minimum of the effective action giving a positive dilaton (mass)2 from two-loop corrections associated with the conformal anomaly. Furthermore, unlike the singlet case we considered previously, some minima lie within the basin of attraction of the ultraviolet fixed point. Moreover, the asymptotic behavior of the coupling constants also lie within the range of convergence of the Euclidean path integral, so there is hope that there will be candidates for sensible vacua. Although open questions remain concerning unitarity of all such renormalizable models of gravity, it is not obvious that, in curved backgrounds such as those considered here, unitarity is violated. In any case, any violation that may remain will be suppressed by inverse powers of the reduced Planck mass.

  16. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.

    1996-08-20

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue. 25 figs.

  17. Geomagnetically induced currents in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viljanen Ari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Statistics of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC in the European high-voltage power grids based on 1-min geomagnetic recordings in 1996–2008 and on 1-D models of the ground conductivity have been derived in the EURISGIC project (European Risk from Geomagnetically Induced Currents. The simplified yet realistic power grid model indicates that large GIC can occur anywhere in Europe. However, geomagnetic variations are clearly larger in North Europe, so it is the likely region of significant GIC events. Additionally, there are areas in the North with especially low ground conductivities, which further tend to increase GIC. The largest modelled GIC values at single substations in 1996–2008 are about 400 A in the Nordic Countries, about 100 A in the British Isles, about 80 A in the Baltic Countries, and less than 50 A in Central and South Europe. The largest GIC event in the period studied is the Halloween storm on 29–30 October 2003, and the next largest ones occurred on 15 July 2000 and 9 November 2004.

  18. Condensation induced water hammer safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gintner, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    Condensation induced water hammer events in piping systems can cause catastrophic steam system failures which can result in equipment damage, personal injury, and even death. As an industry, we have learned to become accustomed to the ''banging'' that we often hear in our steam piping systems, and complacent in our actions to prevent it. It is unfortunate that lives are lost needlessly, as this type of water hammer event is preventable if one only applies some basic principles when operating and maintaining their steam systems. At the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site where I work, there was one such accident that occurred in 1993 which took the life of a former co-worker and friend of mine. Hanford was established as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. it is a 560 square mile complex located along the banks of the Columbia River in Southeastern Washington State. For almost 45 years, hanford's mission was to produce weapons grade plutonium for our nations defense programs. Today, Hanford no longer produces plutonium, but is focused on site clean-up and economic diversification. Hanford still uses steam for heating and processing activities, utilizing over 20 miles of piping distribution systems similar to those found in industry. Although these aging systems are still sound, they cannot stand up to the extreme pressure pulses developed by a condensation induced water hammer

  19. Coalescence-induced nanodroplet jumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyeongyun; Xu, Chenyu; Sotelo, Jesus; Chun, Jae Min; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Enright, Ryan; Miljkovic, Nenad

    2016-10-01

    Water vapor condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces has received much attention in recent years due to the ability of such surfaces to shed microscale water droplets via coalescence-induced droplet jumping, resulting in heat transfer, anti-icing, and self-cleaning performance enhancement. Here we report the coalescence-induced removal of water nanodroplets (R ≈500 nm ) from superhydrophobic carbon nanotube (CNT) surfaces. The two-droplet coalescence time is measured for varying droplet Ohnesorge numbers, confirming that coalescence prior to jumping is governed by capillary-inertial dynamics. By varying the conformal hydrophobic coating thickness on the CNT surface, the minimum jumping droplet radius is shown to increase with increasing solid fraction and decreasing apparent advancing contact angle, allowing us to explore both hydrodynamic limitations stemming from viscous dissipation and surface adhesion limitations. We find that, even for the smallest nanostructure length scale (≤100 nm) and lowest surface adhesions, nonideal surface interactions and the evolved droplet morphology play defining roles in limiting the minimum size for jumping on real surfaces. The outcomes of this work demonstrate the ability to passively shed nanometric water droplets, which has the potential to further increase the efficiency of systems that can harness jumping droplets for a wide range of energy and water applications.

  20. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  1. Inducible competitors and adaptive diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beren W. ROBINSON, David W. PFENNIG

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the causes of diversification is central to evolutionary biology. The ecological theory of adaptive diversification holds that the evolution of phenotypic differences between populations and species––and the formation of new species––stems from divergent natural selection, often arising from competitive interactions. Although increasing evidence suggests that phenotypic plasticity can facilitate this process, it is not generally appreciated that competitively mediated selection often also provides ideal conditions for phenotypic plasticity to evolve in the first place. Here, we discuss how competition plays at least two key roles in adaptive diversification depending on its pattern. First, heterogenous competition initially generates heterogeneity in resource use that favors adaptive plasticity in the form of “inducible competitors”. Second, once such competitively induced plasticity evolves, its capacity to rapidly generate phenotypic variation and expose phenotypes to alternate selective regimes allows populations to respond readily to selection favoring diversification, as may occur when competition generates steady diversifying selection that permanently drives the evolutionary divergence of populations that use different resources. Thus, competition plays two important roles in adaptive diversification––one well-known and the other only now emerging––mediated through its effect on the evolution of phenotypic plasticity [Current Zoology 59 (4: 537–552, 2013].

  2. Neutrino-induced nuclear excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belusevic, R. [National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK), Oho 1-1, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken, 305 (Japan)

    1995-04-01

    We present an improved, compared to that of Belusevic and Rein, theoretical value of the cross section for the neutrino-induced nuclear excitation of iron. This result is based on a measurement of the photoabsorption cross section on the same nucleus, which can be related to the transverse part of the neutrino cross section via the conserved vector current hypothesis. The longitudinal part is related to the pion absorption cross section through the partial conservation of the axial-vector current, and thus reflects the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. A general formula for the excitation cross section is derived, which is valid for both low and high incident neutrino energies. When caused by a weak neutral current, this process may play an important role in core-collapse supernovae. It can also be detected using low-temperature techniques with the purpose of cosmological and weak-interaction studies. A new estimate of the cross sections for neutrino-induced nonscaling processes described by Belusevic and Rein is discussed in the context of two experiments using iron targets, but at very different beam energies.

  3. Shear induced phase transitions induced in edible fats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzanti, Gianfranco; Welch, Sarah E.; Marangoni, Alejandro G.; Sirota, Eric B.; Idziak, Stefan H. J.

    2003-03-01

    The food industry crystallizes fats under different conditions of temperature and shear to obtain products with desired crystalline phases. Milk fat, palm oil, cocoa butter and chocolate were crystallized from the melt in a temperature controlled Couette cell. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies were conducted to examine the role of shear on the phase transitions seen in edible fats. The shear forces on the crystals induced acceleration of the alpha to beta-prime phase transition with increasing shear rate in milk fat and palm oil. The increase was slow at low shear rates and became very strong above 360 s-1. In cocoa butter the acceleration between beta-prime-III and beta-V phase transition increased until a maximum of at 360 s-1, and then decreased, showing competition between enhanced heat transfer and viscous heat generation.

  4. Local lesions and induced resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loebenstein, G

    2009-01-01

    The local lesion phenomenon is one of the most notable resistance mechanisms where virus after multiplying in several hundred cells around the point of entry, does not continue to spread and remains in a local infection. Several types of local lesions are known, inter alia, necrotic, chlorotic, and starch lesions. Cells inside the lesion generally contain much less virus than cells in a systemic infection. Cytopathic changes accompany the local lesion development. Proteases that may have properties similar to caspases, which promote programmed cell death (PCD) in animals, seem to participate in PCD during the hypersensitive response. Salicylic acid seems to be associated with the HR and may play a role in localizing the virus. The functions and properties of the N gene of Nicotiana, which was the first plant virus resistance gene to be isolated by transposon tagging, are discussed and compared with other plant genes for disease resistance. The Inhibitor of Virus Replication (IVR) associated with the local lesion response is mainly a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein. TPR motifs are also present in inducible interferons found in animal cells. Transformation of N. tabacum cv. Samsun nn, in which Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) spreads systemically, with the NC330 gene sequence, encoding an IVR-like protein, resulted in a number of transgenic plant lines, expressing variable resistance to TMV and the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Transformation of tomato plants with the IVR gene became also partially resistant to B. cinerea (Loebenstein et al., in press). IVR-like compounds were found in the interspecific hybrid of N. glutinosa x N. debneyi that is highly resistant to TMV, and in the "green island" tissue of tobacco, cv. Xanthi-nc, infected with Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). Infection in one part of the plant often induces resistance in other non-invaded tissues. Local (LAR) or systemic (SAR) acquired resistance can be activated by viruses, bacterial, and fungal

  5. Amoxicillin-induced aseptic meningoencephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radi Shahien

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Radi Shahien1, Vetaly Vieksler1, Abdalla Bowirrat11Department of Neurology and Neurophysiology, Ziv Medical Center, Safed, IsraelAbstract: Meningitis is usually produced by an infectious agent, but there are multiple noninfectious causes. Drug-induced aseptic meningitis (DIAM is an important entity and has been reported as an uncommon adverse reaction with numerous agents. Thus, DIAM constitutes a diagnostic and patient management challenge. We present a patient with three episodes of aseptic meningitis due to amoxicillin, and then review the literature on this rare idiosyncratic event which may occur after local or systemic drug administration. A 77-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with fever, headache, and neck stiffness. Seven days before admission he had a dental and gingival inflammation. He was treated with two oral doses of 500 mg daily of amoxicillin for one week. The seventh day he awoke with the complaints that prompted hospital admittance. Amoxicillin was stopped 1 day before his admission. From his history we knew of two similar episodes: The first episode was after a dental procedure 3 months before this incident. He had received a 1-week course of postprocedure amoxicillin of 500 mg daily and had similar headache, fever, and chills during the entire course of treatment. He wasn’t admitted to the hospital, because he stopped taking amoxicillin and he felt spontaneous pain relief after taking symptomatic pain treatment. The second episodes was 6 months after his first admission, he had been admitted to our hospital with the same symptoms. Amoxicillin was stopped and changed with intravenous (IV ceftriaxone (CTRX for 10 days due to suspected partial untreated meningitis. The patient improved rapidly within 2 days and was discharged from the hospital. On the basis of these three confirmed episodes of meningitis after recurrent exposure to amoxicillin, with repetitive negative testing for viral, bacterial, and mycobacterial

  6. Exercise-induced bronchospasm in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Chris

    2008-04-01

    This review will encompass definition, history, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of exercise -induced bronchospasm in the pediatric individual with and without known asthma. Exercise induced asthma is the conventional term for transient airway narrowing in a known asthma in association with strenuous exercise usually lasting 5-10 minutes with a decline in pulmonary function by at least 10%. Exercise induced asthma will be referred to as exercise induced bronchospasm in an asthmatic. Exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB ) is the same phenomenon in an individual without known asthma. EIB can be seen in healthy individuals including children as well as defense recruits and competitive or elite athletes. The diagnosis with objective exercise challenge methods in conjunction with history is delineated. Management is characterized with pharmacotherapy and non pharmacotherapeutic measures for underlying asthma as well as exercise induced bronchospasm and inhalant allergy. Children can successfully participate in all sports if asthma is properly managed.

  7. Innovation Inducement Prizes: Connecting Research to Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Besharov, Douglas J.; Williams, Heidi L.

    2012-01-01

    Innovation inducement prizes have been used for centuries. In the United States, a recent federal policy change—the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010—clarified and simplified a path by which all federal agencies can offer innovation inducement prizes, thus intensifying interest in how government agencies can most effectively design and apply such prizes. This paper aims to review and synthesize the academic literature on innovation inducement prizes, to clarify what has been learne...

  8. Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0531 TITLE: Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: William H. McBride CONTRACTING...FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Radiation-Induced Vaccination to...determine abscopal responses that are hypothesized to be due to RT- induced vaccination . RT was started 10 days after the first and 3rd dose of

  9. Induced Cavities for Photonic Quantum Gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahad, Ohr; Firstenberg, Ofer

    2017-09-01

    Effective cavities can be optically induced in atomic media and employed to strengthen optical nonlinearities. Here we study the integration of induced cavities with a photonic quantum gate based on Rydberg blockade. Accounting for loss in the atomic medium, we calculate the corresponding finesse and gate infidelity. Our analysis shows that the conventional limits imposed by the blockade optical depth are mitigated by the induced cavity in long media, thus establishing the total optical depth of the medium as a complementary resource.

  10. Gravity induced wave function collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarri, G.; Toroš, M.; Donadi, S.; Bassi, A.

    2017-11-01

    Starting from an idea of S. L. Adler [in Quantum Nonlocality and Reality: 50 Years of Bell's Theorem, edited by M. Bell and S. Gao (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England 2016)], we develop a novel model of gravity induced spontaneous wave function collapse. The collapse is driven by complex stochastic fluctuations of the spacetime metric. After deriving the fundamental equations, we prove the collapse and amplification mechanism, the two most important features of a consistent collapse model. Under reasonable simplifying assumptions, we constrain the strength ξ of the complex metric fluctuations with available experimental data. We show that ξ ≥10-26 in order for the model to guarantee classicality of macro-objects, and at the same time ξ ≤10-20 in order not to contradict experimental evidence. As a comparison, in the recent discovery of gravitational waves in the frequency range 35 to 250 Hz, the (real) metric fluctuations reach a peak of ξ ˜10-21.

  11. Typhoon-Induced Ground Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouyen, M.; Canitano, A.; Chao, B. F.; Hsu, Y.-J.; Steer, P.; Longuevergne, L.; Boy, J.-P.

    2017-11-01

    Geodetic instruments now offer compelling sensitivity, allowing to investigate how solid Earth and surface processes interact. By combining surface air pressure data, nontidal sea level variations model, and rainfall data, we systematically analyze the volumetric deformation of the shallow crust at seven borehole strainmeters in Taiwan induced by 31 tropical cyclones (typhoons) that made landfall to the island from 2004 to 2013. The typhoon's signature consists in a ground dilatation due to air pressure drop, generally followed by a larger ground compression. We show that this compression phase can be mostly explained by the mass loading of rainwater that falls on the ground and concentrates in the valleys towards the strainmeter sensitivity zone. Further, our analysis shows that borehole strainmeters can help quantifying the amount of rainwater accumulating and flowing over a watershed during heavy rainfalls, which is a useful constraint for building hydrological models.

  12. Drug-induced hepatic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Henrik; Andreasen, P B

    1992-01-01

    .5%) reports and unclassifiable in four (0.4%) reports. Hepatic injuries accounted for 5.9% of all adverse drug reactions reported, and 14.7% of the lethal adverse drug reactions. A total of 47.2% were classified as acute cytotoxic, 16.2% as acute cholestatic and 26.9% as abnormal hepatic function. In 52 (4.......7%) cases the hepatic injury was lethal; only 14 (1.3%) cases were chronic. Halothane accounted for 25% of the cases. The incidence of halothane-induced hepatic injury is decreasing, and only one lethal case has been reported since 1981. Next to halothane, sulfasalazine was the drug most often suspected...

  13. Exercise-induced cardiac remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Rory B; Baggish, Aaron L

    2012-01-01

    Early investigations in the late 1890s and early 1900s documented cardiac enlargement in athletes with above-normal exercise capacity and no evidence of cardiovascular disease. Such findings have been reported for more than a century and continue to intrigue scientists and clinicians. It is well recognized that repetitive participation in vigorous physical exercise results in significant changes in myocardial structure and function. This process, termed exercise-induced cardiac remodeling (EICR), is characterized by structural cardiac changes including left ventricular hypertrophy with sport-specific geometry (eccentric vs concentric). Associated alterations in both systolic and diastolic functions are emerging as recognized components of EICR. The increasing popularity of recreational exercise and competitive athletics has led to a growing number of individuals exhibiting these findings in routine clinical practice. This review will provide an overview of EICR in athletes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Valproic Acid-induced Agranulocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Chuan Hsu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Valproic acid is considered to be the most well-tolerated antiepileptic drug. However, few cases of neutropenia or leukopenia caused by valproic acid have been reported. We present a patient who took valproic acid to treat a complication of brain surgery and in whom severe agranulocytosis occurred after 2.5 months. Valproic acid was stopped immediately, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was administered for 2 days. The patient's white blood cell count returned to normal within 2 weeks. The result of bone marrow aspiration was compatible with drug-induced agranulocytosis. This case illustrates that patients who take valproic acid may need regular checking of complete blood cell count.

  15. Human-induced Arctic moistening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Seung-Ki; Zhang, Xuebin; Zwiers, Francis

    2008-04-25

    The Arctic and northern subpolar regions are critical for climate change. Ice-albedo feedback amplifies warming in the Arctic, and fluctuations of regional fresh water inflow to the Arctic Ocean modulate the deep ocean circulation and thus exert a strong global influence. By comparing observations to simulations from 22 coupled climate models, we find influence from anthropogenic greenhouse gases and sulfate aerosols in the space-time pattern of precipitation change over high-latitude land areas north of 55 degrees N during the second half of the 20th century. The human-induced Arctic moistening is consistent with observed increases in Arctic river discharge and freshening of Arctic water masses. This result provides new evidence that human activity has contributed to Arctic hydrological change.

  16. Mechanically induced degradation of diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Bouwelen, F V

    1996-01-01

    bombardment a mechanically induced graphitisation, as opposed to a thermally activated transformation, may occur locally on collision with the CVD diamond. Two types of diamond-graphite interfaces were observed: (111) planes of diamond parallel to the a-b planes of graphite and (111) planes of diamond, smoothly within the plane, connected to a-b planes of graphite. The thesis concludes with a summary of the results, conclusions and recommendations for further work. This thesis deals with the wear of diamond occurring during frictional sliding contact between diamonds. In the introduction, a literature survey on friction, wear and polishing behaviour of diamond, with some emphasis on the anisotropy, is presented and earlier work is discussed. A review of the existing theories is given, a new hypothesis is proposed and key-experiments for verification are identified. Electron microscopical techniques such as High Resolution Electron Microscopy (HREM) imaging and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy are described a...

  17. [Iodine excess induced thyroid dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egloff, Michael; Philippe, Jacques

    2016-04-20

    The principle sources of iodine overload, amiodarone and radiologic contrast media, are frequently used in modern medicine. The thyroid gland exerts a protective effect against iodine excess by suppressing iodine internalization into the thyrocyte and iodine organification, the Wolff-Chaikoff effect. Insufficiency of this effect or lack of escape from it leads to hypo- or hyperthyroidism respectively. Amiodarone induced thyrotoxicosis is a complex condition marked by two different pathophysiological mechanisms with different treatments. Thyroid metabolism changes after exposure to radiologic contrast media are frequent, but they rarely need to be treated. High risk individuals need to be identifed in order to delay the exam or to monitor thyroid function or apply prophylactic measures in selected cases.

  18. Radiation-induced heterophase polymerizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carenza, M.; Palma, G.

    1985-01-01

    Investigations were carried out on the morphology of particles produced in the early stages of radiation-induced heterophase polymerization of acrylonitrile in quiescent conditions over a wide temperature range both in bulk and with addition of a solvent or a comonomer. The data were compared with the corresponding data obtained in the polymerization of vinyl chloride, producing an amorphous polymer, taking into account also the kinetic behaviours of the two polymerization systems. The particle morphologies in the two systems were quite similar at low polymerization temperatures but there were considerable differences when higher temperatures were involved. This change was interpreted on the basis of differences in compatability between the liquid phase and the polymer particle phase for the two systems. In order to account for the two different kinetic behaviours, a two-phase polymerization model was formulated and also a polymerization model in which the surface of the polymer particles was the locus of polymerization. (author)

  19. Ciprofloxacin-Induced Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audra Fuller

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure (ARF is a common diagnosis in hospitalized patients, particularly in intensive care units (ICU. Determining the cause and contributing factors associated with ARF is crucial during treatment. The etiology is complex, and several factors often contribute to its development. Medications can cause acute tubular necrosis, acute interstitial nephritis, and crystal-induced or post-obstructive nephropathy. There have been several case reports of ARF secondary to fluoroquinolones. Here we report the development of acute renal failure within a few days of initiating oral ciprofloxacin therapy and briefly describe the different types of renal failure secondary to fluoroquinolone administration. Clinical studies demonstrate that using fluoroquinolones with other potentially nephrotoxic medications requires monitoring of renal function to limit the renal toxicity with these medications. Also, the risk-benefit profile of patients requiring fluoroquinolones should be considered.

  20. Tremelimumab-Induced Graves Hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Earn H; Mitchell, Anna L; Plummer, Ruth; Pearce, Simon; Perros, Petros

    2017-07-01

    Tremelimumab and ipilimumab are monoclonal antibodies directed against the extracellular domain of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and have been used as immunotherapies against immune checkpoints that suppress T-cell activation. Anti-CTLA-4 antibody-based therapies have been shown to be effective in treating various cancers including metastatic melanoma. However, a few immune-related adverse events including hypophysitis and thyroid disorder have been reported, mostly developed within the first year of receiving treatment. We report a case of tremelimumab-induced Graves hyperthyroidism in a 55-year-old man who was diagnosed with metastatic melanoma after 8 years of tremelimumab therapy. He had no personal or family history of thyroid or autoimmune diseases. His biochemical profile was in keeping with Graves disease, with raised serum free thyroid hormones, suppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration, and raised thyrotropin receptor antibody level. He was treated with carbimazole as part of the block and replace therapy, without complications. Tremelimumab therapy was temporarily discontinued and recommenced when he was rendered biochemically euthyroid. There has been no further relapse of Graves hyperthyroidism since the discontinuation of block and replace therapy. The mechanistic profile of anti-CTLA-4-induced thyroid dysfunction and the long-term endocrine safety of this therapeutic approach remain unclear. It is important to monitor thyroid functions in patients receiving anti-CTLA-4 therapies, as their effects on endocrine systems could be more latent or prolonged than the data from current clinical trials suggest. Antithyroid drug therapy was safe and effective alongside anti-CTLA-4 therapy without compromising antitumour treatment efficacy.

  1. Radiation-induced instability of human genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabchenko, N.N.; Demina, Eh.A.

    2014-01-01

    A brief review is dedicated to the phenomenon of radiation-induced genomic instability where the increased level of genomic changes in the offspring of irradiated cells is characteristic. Particular attention is paid to the problems of genomic instability induced by the low-dose radiation, role of the bystander effect in formation of radiation-induced instability, and its relationship with individual radiosensitivity. We believe that in accordance with the paradigm of modern radiobiology the increased human individual radiosensitivity can be formed due to the genome instability onset and is a significant risk factor for radiation-induced cancer

  2. The transition time induced narrow linewidth of the electromagnetically induced transparency in caesium vapour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Luming; Peng Xiang; Liu Cheng; Guo Hong; Chen Xuzong

    2004-01-01

    We observed a narrow linewidth (∼60 kHz) in a Doppler-broadened system showing electromagnetically induced transparency in caesium atomic vapour. The transition time induced reduction of the linewidth is illustrated both theoretically and experimentally

  3. The ecology and evolution of inducible defenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvell, C D

    1990-09-01

    Inducible defenses are responses activated through a previous encounter with a consumer or competitor that confer some degree of resistance to subsequent attacks. While the importance of inducible resistance has long been known in host-parasite interactions, it is only recently that its importance has emerged in other natural systems. Although the structural defenses produced by invertebrates to their competitors and predators are by no means the same as an immune response triggered by parasites, these responses all share the properties of (1) specificity, (2) amplification and (3) memory. This review discusses the following ecological consequences and evolutionary causes of inducible defenses: (1) Inducible defenses render historical factors important in biological interactions and can affect the probability of individual survival and growth, as well as affect population dynamics of consumers in some circumstances. (2) Although the benefits of inducible defenses are often balanced by fitness costs, including reduced growth, reproductive output and survivorship, the role of costs and benefits in the evolution of inducible defenses is by no means clear. A more integrated approach would involve a multivariate analysis of the role of natural selection on the inducible characters of interest, their norms of reaction and correlated fitness characters. (3) The disproportionate representation of inducible, morphological defenses among clonal organisms may be due to both a higher rate of origination and enhanced selection to maintain these defenses in clonal taxa. (4) Inducible defenses should be most common when reliable cues are available, attacks by biological agents are unpredictable, and the fitness gains of defenses are balanced by the costs. An integrated approach to studying inducible defenses would thus combine mechanistic estimates of costs, population-level estimates of defense effectiveness, and genetic estimates of correlations between fitness and inducible

  4. Towards inducing superconductivity into graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efetov, Dmitri K.

    Graphenes transport properties have been extensively studied in the 10 years since its discovery in 2004, with ground-breaking experimental observations such as Klein tunneling, fractional quantum Hall effect and Hofstadters butterfly. Though, so far, it turned out to be rather poor on complex correlated electronic ground states and phase transitions, despite various theoretical predictions. The purpose of this thesis is to help understanding the underlying theoretical and experimental reasons for the lack of strong electronic interactions in graphene, and, employing graphenes high tunability and versatility, to identify and alter experimental parameters that could help to induce stronger correlations. In particular graphene holds one last, not yet experimentally discovered prediction, namely exhibiting intrinsic superconductivity. With its vanishingly small Fermi surface at the Dirac point, graphene is a semi-metal with very weak electronic interactions. Though, if it is doped into the metallic regime, where the size of the Fermi surface becomes comparable to the size of the Brillouin zone, the density of states becomes sizeable and electronic interactions are predicted to be dramatically enhanced, resulting in competing correlated ground states such as superconductivity, magnetism and charge density wave formation. Following these predictions, this thesis first describes the creation of metallic graphene at high carrier doping via electrostatic doping techniques based on electrolytic gates. Due to graphenes surface only properties, we are able to induce carrier densities above n>1014 cm-2 (epsilonF>1eV) into the chemically inert graphene. While at these record high carrier densities we yet do not observe superconductivity, we do observe fundamentally altered transport properties as compared to semi-metallic graphene. Here, detailed measurements of the low temperature resistivity reveal that the electron-phonon interactions are governed by a reduced, density

  5. Fisheries-induced disruptive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Pietro; Hui, Cang; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2015-01-21

    Commercial harvesting is recognized to induce adaptive responses of life-history traits in fish populations, in particular by shifting the age and size at maturation through directional selection. In addition to such evolution of a target stock, the corresponding fishery itself may adapt, in terms of fishing policy, technological progress, fleet dynamics, and adaptive harvest. The aim of this study is to assess how the interplay between natural and artificial selection, in the simplest setting in which a fishery and a target stock coevolve, can lead to disruptive selection, which in turn may cause trait diversification. To this end, we build an eco-evolutionary model for a size-structured population, in which both the stock׳s maturation schedule and the fishery׳s harvest rate are adaptive, while fishing may be subject to a selective policy based on fish size and/or maturity stage. Using numerical bifurcation analysis, we study how the potential for disruptive selection changes with fishing policy, fishing mortality, harvest specialization, life-history tradeoffs associated with early maturation, and other demographic and environmental parameters. We report the following findings. First, fisheries-induced disruptive selection is readily caused by commonly used fishing policies, and occurs even for policies that are not specific for fish size or maturity, provided that the harvest is sufficiently adaptive and large individuals are targeted intensively. Second, disruptive selection is more likely in stocks in which the selective pressure for early maturation is naturally strong, provided life-history tradeoffs are sufficiently consequential. Third, when a fish stock is overexploited, fisheries targeting only large individuals might slightly increase sustainable yield by causing trait diversification (even though the resultant yield always remains lower than the maximum sustainable yield that could be obtained under low fishing mortality, without causing disruptive

  6. Hydralazine-induced cholestatic hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ahad; Hammad, Raza; Cucco, Robert; Niranjan, Selva

    2009-01-01

    Hydralazine has been widely used for treating hypertension, particularly in patients with renal failure. We report a case on a patient in whom we believe the drug was implicated in an otherwise unexplained disturbance of liver function. A 63-year-old African-American female with medical history of hypertension and end-stage renal disease (on hemodialysis) was admitted to the hospital with epigastric pain and jaundice. The symptoms started about 1 week ago. Initial laboratory tests showed abnormal liver enzymes with elevated conjugated bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase suggestive of cholestatic jaundice. Amylase and lipase were normal. Abdominal ultrasound showed normal caliber common bile duct without evidence of obstruction. Abdominal CT scan does not show any evidence of intra- or extrahepatic biliary ductal dilatation, and no mass lesions were seen in the pancreas. Further blood chemistry showed worsening of liver enzymes and increased bilirubin over the next 2-3 days. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography failed to show any evidence of intra- or extrahepatic biliary ductal dilatation. No other laboratory evidence of cholestatic jaundice was found. Before proceeding for invasive diagnostic procedure, that is, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, the patient's drug history was reviewed. She was on hydralazine 75 mg 3 times per day, started 5 months ago. At that time, her liver function tests were normal. As we could not find any other cause of cholestatic jaundice, we attributed this as a side effect of hydralazine. A trial was given by stopping the hydralazine. It was seen that there was significant improvement in the liver function enzymes over the next week. Complete clinical and biochemical recovery occurred over the next 4 weeks. Liver injury after long-term therapy with hydralazine and after short-term therapy with hydralazine (2-10 days) has been described. Hydralazine-induced hepatotoxicity may manifest as hypersensitivity-type injury

  7. Pulsed high voltage discharge induce hematologic changes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... (2004) Shows that high intensity ultrasonic-induced cavitation, which is responsible for platelet rupture that leads to platelet aggregation in samples of platelet rich plasma (PRP) alone. Ultrasonic induced bulk fluid flow is necessary to mix platelet- activating factors and to allow platelet-platelet interac- tions.

  8. Characterization of Entamoeba histolytica-induced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    However, it requires intact cells, as purified lectin failed to induce dephosphorylation in Jurkat cells. The nonpathogenic, but morphologically identical amoeba, Entamoeba moshkovskii also did not induce dephosphorylation in target cells. Treatment of Jurkat cells with phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitors has shown that ...

  9. Induced topological pressure for topological dynamical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Zhitao; Chen, Ercai

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, inspired by the article [J. Jaerisch et al., Stochastics Dyn. 14, 1350016, pp. 1-30 (2014)], we introduce the induced topological pressure for a topological dynamical system. In particular, we prove a variational principle for the induced topological pressure

  10. Acute, persistent quinine-induced blindness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-05-04

    May 4, 1991 ... Acute, persistent quinine-induced blindness. A case report. P. RHEEDER, W. L. SIELlNG. Summary auinine-induced blindness arising during empirical treatment for malaria in a young man is reported. The condition was noteworthy because it was total and permanent, which is at varia.nce with other ...

  11. Collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bevaart, Lisette; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J.; Tak, Paul P.

    2010-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is an animal model for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and can be induced in DBA/1 and C57BL/6 mice using different protocols. The CIA model can be used to unravel mechanisms involved in the development of arthritis and is frequently used to study the effect of new

  12. Studies of positron induced luminescence from polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Lewis, T.A.; Tolk, N.H.

    1994-01-01

    Light emission from polymers (anthracene dissolved in polystryrene) induced by low-energy positrons and electrons has been studied. Results indicate a clear difference between optical emissions under positron and electron bombardment. The positron-induced luminescence spectrum is believed to be generated by both collisional and annihilation processes

  13. Low speed inducers for cryogenic upper stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Briefing charts are presented, which were used in an oral presentation of the results and recommendations for the design and analysis of low speed hydrogen and oxygen inducers and their drive systems applicable to the space tug. A discussion of the design of the 15K and RL-10 inducers is included.

  14. Azithromycin-induced Hiccups | Ayankunle | Highland Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hiccups are not only known symptoms of some diseases but have been found to be induced by some drugs. In this report, we present a very rare case of azithromycin induced hiccups seen in a young male adult. Methods: The case records of a 34 year old male who was admitted and successfully managed for ...

  15. Inducible defences and the paradox of enrichment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M.; Kooi, B.W.; Mooij, W.M.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    2004-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of inducible defences on community stability and persistence, we analyzed models of bitrophic and tritrophic food chains that incorporate consumer-induced polymorphisms. These models predict that intraspecific heterogeneity in defence levels resolves the paradox of

  16. Inducible defences and the paradox of enrichment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M.; Kooi, B.W.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Mooij, W.M.

    2004-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of inducible defences on community stability and persistence, we analyzed models of bitrophic and tritrophic food chains that incorporate consumer-induced polymorphisms. These models predict that intra-specific heterogeneity in defence levels resolves the paradox of

  17. Laser-Induced Energy Transfer in Solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsink, J.B.W.; Rullmann, Johan; Wiersma, Douwe

    1981-01-01

    Laser-induced energy transfer was observed and studied in the system pentacene doped into naphthalene. The transfer spectrum shows a remarkable correspondence with the host density of states function. The rate for laser-induced energy transfer is given and it is concluded that most likely,

  18. Clustering of noise-induced oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sosnovtseva, Olga; Fomin, A I; Postnov, D E

    2001-01-01

    The subject of our study is clustering in a population of excitable systems driven by Gaussian white noise and with randomly distributed coupling strength. The cluster state is frequency-locked state in which all functional units run at the same noise-induced frequency. Cooperative dynamics...... of this regime is described in terms of effective synchronization and noise-induced coherence....

  19. Distribution of induced activity in tungsten targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donahue, R.J.; Nelson, W.R.

    1988-09-01

    Estimates are made of the induced activity created during high-energy electron showers in tungsten, using the EGS4 code. Photon track lengths, neutron yields and spatial profiles of the induced activity are presented. 8 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  20. Radiation-induced leukemias in ankylosing spondylitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toolis, F.; Potter, B.; Allan, N.C.; Langlands, A.O.

    1981-01-01

    Three cases of leukemia occurred in patients with ankylosing spondylitis treated by radiotherapy. In each case, the leukemic process exhibited bizarre features suggesting that radiation is likely to induce atypical forms of leukemia possessing unusual attributes not shared by spontaneously developing leukemia. The likely distinctive aspects of radiation-induced leukemia are discussed

  1. Molecular characterization of induced mutagenesis through gamma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic variability in Jatropha curcas was induced by different doses (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45 and 50 kR) of gamma-rays. Gamma radiation induced earliness in flowering and the plants set flowers earlier than that of control, which took longer duration of 327 days for flowering. The improved reproductive and yield ...

  2. Induced abortion among Jimma comprehensive high school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    knew the health hazards of abortion, and 69% were not aware of contraceptive methods. Almost 35% had no information on legal issues of induced abortion, 20.72% wished induced abortion be legalized while 67.4% opposed. Based on the study findings, intensification of sex education, and provision of family planning ...

  3. Induced mutation to monocotyledony in periwinkle, Catharanthus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 79; Issue 3. Induced mutation to monocotyledony in ... A recessive EMS-induced mutation inherited in Mendelian fashion caused monocotyledonous embryo formation and seed germination on high salt medium in Catharanthus roseus. Availability during embryo development of ...

  4. Proton induced X-ray emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Rashiduzzman

    1976-09-01

    The developments in proton induced X-ray emission analysis are reviewed. Techniques for analyzing thick and thin samples of different origin are described. Discussions on the application of proton induced X-ray emission analysis in different fields, comparison of the sensitivity of this method with other analytical techniques, its limitations and possible improvements are presented

  5. Induced propagation of African clariid catfish, Heterobranchus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ovaprim worth N3467.00 was used for induced breeding of H. bidorsalis with combined body weight of 13.38 kg while pituitary hormone was extracted from N 6350.00 worth of H. bidorsalis and used for induced breeding of gravid H. bidorsalis with combined body weight of 12.72 kg. Because of its relatively cheap cost, ...

  6. Uridine prevents fenofibrate-induced fatty liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuc T Le

    Full Text Available Uridine, a pyrimidine nucleoside, can modulate liver lipid metabolism although its specific acting targets have not been identified. Using mice with fenofibrate-induced fatty liver as a model system, the effects of uridine on liver lipid metabolism are examined. At a daily dosage of 400 mg/kg, fenofibrate treatment causes reduction of liver NAD(+/NADH ratio, induces hyper-acetylation of peroxisomal bifunctional enzyme (ECHD and acyl-CoA oxidase 1 (ACOX1, and induces excessive accumulation of long chain fatty acids (LCFA and very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA. Uridine co-administration at a daily dosage of 400 mg/kg raises NAD(+/NADH ratio, inhibits fenofibrate-induced hyper-acetylation of ECHD, ACOX1, and reduces accumulation of LCFA and VLCFA. Our data indicates a therapeutic potential for uridine co-administration to prevent fenofibrate-induced fatty liver.

  7. Drug-Induced Oxidative Stress and Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian G. Deavall

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are a byproduct of normal metabolism and have roles in cell signaling and homeostasis. Species include oxygen radicals and reactive nonradicals. Mechanisms exist that regulate cellular levels of ROS, as their reactive nature may otherwise cause damage to key cellular components including DNA, protein, and lipid. When the cellular antioxidant capacity is exceeded, oxidative stress can result. Pleiotropic deleterious effects of oxidative stress are observed in numerous disease states and are also implicated in a variety of drug-induced toxicities. In this paper, we examine the nature of ROS-induced damage on key cellular targets of oxidative stress. We also review evidence implicating ROS in clinically relevant, drug-related side effects including doxorubicin-induced cardiac damage, azidothymidine-induced myopathy, and cisplatin-induced ototoxicity.

  8. Inflammation-Induced Cell Proliferation Potentiates DNA Damage-Induced Mutations In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraly, Orsolya; Gong, Guanyu; Olipitz, Werner; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations are a critical driver of cancer initiation. While extensive studies have focused on exposure-induced mutations, few studies have explored the importance of tissue physiology as a modulator of mutation susceptibility in vivo. Of particular interest is inflammation, a known cancer risk factor relevant to chronic inflammatory diseases and pathogen-induced inflammation. Here, we used the fluorescent yellow direct repeat (FYDR) mice that harbor a reporter to detect misalignments during homologous recombination (HR), an important class of mutations. FYDR mice were exposed to cerulein, a potent inducer of pancreatic inflammation. We show that inflammation induces DSBs (γH2AX foci) and that several days later there is an increase in cell proliferation. While isolated bouts of inflammation did not induce HR, overlap between inflammation-induced DNA damage and inflammation-induced cell proliferation induced HR significantly. To study exogenously-induced DNA damage, animals were exposed to methylnitrosourea, a model alkylating agent that creates DNA lesions relevant to both environmental exposures and cancer chemotherapy. We found that exposure to alkylation damage induces HR, and importantly, that inflammation-induced cell proliferation and alkylation induce HR in a synergistic fashion. Taken together, these results show that, during an acute bout of inflammation, there is a kinetic barrier separating DNA damage from cell proliferation that protects against mutations, and that inflammation-induced cell proliferation greatly potentiates exposure-induced mutations. These studies demonstrate a fundamental mechanism by which inflammation can act synergistically with DNA damage to induce mutations that drive cancer and cancer recurrence. PMID:25647331

  9. Transgenic technologies to induce sterility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wimmer Ernst A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The last few years have witnessed a considerable expansion in the number of tools available to perform molecular and genetic studies on the genome of Anopheles mosquitoes, the vectors of human malaria. As a consequence, knowledge of aspects of the biology of mosquitoes, such as immunity, reproduction and behaviour, that are relevant to their ability to transmit disease is rapidly increasing, and could be translated into concrete benefits for malaria control strategies. Amongst the most important scientific advances, the development of transgenic technologies for Anopheles mosquitoes provides a crucial opportunity to improve current vector control measures or design novel ones. In particular, the use of genetic modification of the mosquito genome could provide for a more effective deployment of the sterile insect technique (SIT against vector populations in the field. Currently, SIT relies on the release of radiation sterilized males, which compete with wild males for mating with wild females. The induction of sterility in males through the genetic manipulation of the mosquito genome, already achieved in a number of other insect species, could eliminate the need for radiation and increase the efficiency of SIT-based strategies. This paper provides an overview of the mechanisms already in use for inducing sterility by transgenesis in Drosophila and other insects, and speculates on possible ways to apply similar approaches to Anopheles mosquitoes.

  10. Coronary spasm induced by dipyridamole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wartski, M.; Caussin, C.; Lancelin, B.

    2001-01-01

    A 59 years old man was admitted at hospital for recurrent instable angina 1 month after coronary artery bypass surgery. Coronary artery disease started with a transmural antero-septo-apical myocardial infarction without thrombolysis and a percutaneous angioplasty with endo-prothesis on proximal left anterior descendant artery (LAD) is performed Because of recurrent rest angina and subacute stent thrombosis, a coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) is performed with anastomosis of the left internal thoracic artery on LAD. The patient is admitted for recurrent rest angina one month after CABG. On ECG performed during chest pain, a ST-T segment elevation occurred on inferior leads. Coronary angiography showed no significant stenosis on endo-prothesis and no bypass graft dysfunction. Dipyridamole scintigraphy was realized. 2 minutes after the beginning of Dipyridamole infusion, a ST-T elevation occurred on inferior leads and two marked antero-septal and inferior defects were noticed on myocardial scintigraphy. Images at rest showed a clear improvement in the anterior wall and the inferior wall became normally perfused Patient was treated with anti-spastic drugs and a new coronarography with methyl-ergotamine test was performed inducing chest pain, ST-T elevation on inferior leads and tri-truncular coronary spasm. Patient's treatment was then modified with introduction of Nifedipine. The patient did not experienced new recurrent chest pain and remained totally asymptomatic few months later. (authors)

  11. Flow induced vibrations of piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibert, R.J.; Axisa, F.

    1977-01-01

    In order to design the supports of piping systems, estimations of the vibrations induced by the fluid conveyed through the pipes are generally needed. For that purpose it is necessary to calculate the model parameters of liquid containing pipes. In most computer codes, fluid effects are accounted for just by adding the fuid mass to the structure. This may lead to serious errors.- Inertial effects from the fluid are not correctly evaluated especially in the case of bended or of non-uniform section pipes. Fluid boundary conditions are simply ignored. - In many practical problems fluid compressibility cannot be negelcted, even in the low frequencies domain which corresponds to efficient excitation by turbulent sources of the flow. This paper presents a method to take into account these efects, by solving a coupled mechanical acoustical problem: the computer code TEDEL of the C.E.A./D.E.M.T. System, based on the finite-elements method, has been extended to calculate simultaneously the pressure fluctuations in the fluid and the vibrations of the pipe. (Auth.)

  12. Motility-Induced Phase Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Michael E.; Tailleur, Julien

    2015-03-01

    Self-propelled particles include both self-phoretic synthetic colloids and various microorganisms. By continually consuming energy, they bypass the laws of equilibrium thermodynamics. These laws enforce the Boltzmann distribution in thermal equilibrium: The steady state is then independent of kinetic parameters. In contrast, self-propelled particles tend to accumulate where they move more slowly. They may also slow down at high density for either biochemical or steric reasons. This creates positive feedback, which can lead to motility-induced phase separation (MIPS) between dense and dilute fluid phases. At leading order in gradients, a mapping relates variable-speed, self-propelled particles to passive particles with attractions. This deep link to equilibrium phase separation is confirmed by simulations but generally breaks down at higher order in gradients: New effects, with no equilibrium counterpart, then emerge. We give a selective overview of the fast-developing field of MIPS, focusing on theory and simulation but including a brief speculative survey of its experimental implications.

  13. ACE inhibitor-induced angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baram, Michael; Kommuri, Anand; Sellers, Subhashini A; Cohn, John R

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) are commonly prescribed for blood pressure control and renal protection. ACEI angioedema is a common problem in patients who are taking ACEI, although, in most cases, the disorder is self-limited, and spontaneous episodes of apparently unprovoked angioedema stop with the discontinuation of the medication. In a subset of patients, hospitalization and even intubation are required for airway protection. The diagnosis is made clinically. There are no laboratory studies that establish the diagnosis. However, such investigations help exclude alternative diagnoses as the cause for the patient's presentation. Conventional treatment with regimens used to control allergic angioedema is ineffective in this condition. The mechanism of ACEI-induced angioedema is thought to be related to its effect on the kallikrein-kinin system. Kallikrein is a protease that converts high-molecular-weight kininogens into kinins, primarily bradykinin. Medications recently developed, primarily icatibant and ecallantide, to control hereditary angioedema, a disorder also associated with kallikrein-kinin activation, have been used to treat ACEI angioedema with some success. The efficacy of these agents and their optimal use remains to be established by randomized and placebo controlled trials. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiation-induced parotid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, M.J.; Chaudhuri, P.K.; Wood, D.C.; Das Gupta, T.K.

    1981-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of 72 cases of primary malignant tumors of the parotid gland treated at the University of Illinois Hospital, Chicago, from 1950 through 1978 revealed that six of these had developed from two to 24 years after irradiation of the head or neck for various benign and malignant neoplastic conditions. At the time of irradiation, ages ranged from 7 to 73 years; the sex distribution was equal. From our findings and those in 26 cases reported by various other authors, the following criteria are proposed for the designation of a parotid tumor as being radiation induced: (1) well-documented radiation exposure; (2) part of irradiation must incorporate the gland in which the cancer subseqently arises; (3) exposure to a minimum of 300 rads; and (4) minimum latent period of two years. In view of the widespread use in the past of heat and neck irradiation of benign neoplastic disease, the surgeon should be aware of this possible link with parotid gland tumor

  15. Bleomycin-Induced Lung Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Reinert

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleomycin is a chemotherapeutic agent commonly used to treat curable diseases such as germinative tumors and Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The major limitation of bleomycin therapy is pulmonary toxicity, which can be life threatening in up to 10% of patients receiving the drug. The mechanism of bleomycin-induced pneumonitis (BIP involves oxidative damage, relative deficiency of the deactivating enzyme bleomycin hydrolase, genetic susceptibility, and the elaboration of inflammatory cytokines. Ultimately, BIP can progress to lung fibrosis. The diagnosis of BIP is established by the combination of systemic symptoms, radiological and histological findings, and respiratory function tests abnormalities, while other disorders should be excluded. Although the diagnosis and pathophysiology of this disease have been better characterized over the past few years, there is no effective therapy for the disease. In general, the clinical picture is extremely complex. A greater understanding of the BIP pathogenesis may lead to the development of new agents capable of preventing or even treating the injury already present. Physicians who prescribe bleomycin must be aware of the potential pulmonary toxicity, especially in the presence of risk factors. This review will focus on BIP, mainly regarding recent advances and perspectives in diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Noise-induced hearing loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catlin, F.I.

    1986-03-01

    Hearing loss affects 30 million people in the United States; of these, 21 million are over the age of 65 years. This disorder may have several causes: heredity, noise, aging, and disease. Hearing loss from noise has been recognized for centuries but was generally ignored until some time after the Industrial Revolution. Hearing loss from occupational exposure to hazardous noise was identified as a compensable disability by the United States courts in 1948 to 1959. Development of noisy jet engines and supersonic aircraft created additional claims for personal and property damage in the 1950s and 1960s. These conditions led to legislation for noise control in the form of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and the Noise Control Act of 1972. Protection of the noise-exposed employee was also an objective of the Hearing Conservation Act of 1971. Subsequent studies have confirmed the benefits of periodic hearing tests for workers exposed to hazardous noise and of otologic evaluation as part of the hearing conservation process. Research studies in laboratory animals, using scanning electron microscopical techniques, have demonstrated that damage to the inner ear and organ of hearing can occur even though subjective (conditioned) response to sound stimuli remains unaffected. Some investigators have employed an epidemiologic approach to identify risk factors and to develop profiles to susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss. The need for joint involvement of workers and employers in the reduction and control of occupational noise hazards is evident. 19 references.

  17. Nebivolol Induced Hyperkalemia: Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altabas, Karmela; Altabas, Velimir; Gulin, Tonko

    2016-12-01

    In this article, we document a conclusive case of nebivolol-induced hyperkalemia for the first time in the known medical literature. Hyperkalemia is associated with serious conditions such as cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Nebivolol was not known to cause hyperkalemia, and this event is not listed in its summary of product characteristics (SmPC). For older beta blockers, hyperkalemia is recognized as a rare adverse event linked to cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) polymorphism and poor drug degradation. Our patient, a 47-year-old woman taking nebivolol for hypertension developed persistent hyperkalemia, with serum potassium levels up to 6.4 mmol/L. After extensive diagnostic evaluation and exclusion of other known conditions leading to hyperkalemia, its cause remained occult. Since hyperkalemia coincided with increased doses of nebivolol, dose reduction and discontinuation were attempted, resulting in normalized serum potassium. Poor drug metabolism could not explain this adverse effect, since pharmacogenetic testing showed no relevant aberrations. In conclusion, hyperkalemia is a harmful adverse event with possible lethal outcome, and it may be caused by nebivolol. Therefore, medical professionals have to be aware of this side effect and hyperkalemia should be listed as an adverse event in nebivolol SmPC.

  18. Hypermagnesemia-induced paralytic ileus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golzarian, J; Scott, H W; Richards, W O

    1994-05-01

    Hypermagnesemia is a well-known cause of hypotension and cardiac dysfunction but not well recognized is the induction of paralytic ileus. This report details the second and third adult patients reported with hypermagnesemia-induced paralytic ileus. The first patient was a 65-year-old white woman with normal renal function, who had consumed large amounts of magnesium citrate and milk of magnesia. As magnesium blood level fell from 5.1 mg/dl on admission to 2.4 mg/dl on day 3, the vomiting, obstipation, and abdominal distension resolved. The second patient was a 67-year-old woman with mild renal insufficiency, who consumed a large amount of Epsom salts containing magnesium sulfate to treat her constipation. Magnesium levels of 8.1 mg/dl on admission fell to below 3.1 mg/dl on the third hospital day and the paralytic ileus resolved. Mechanical obstruction was ruled out by colonoscopy, gastrographin enema, and barium small bowel series in both patients. Although the clinical findings of muscle weakness, flaccid paralysis, respiratory muscle paralysis or cardiac arrest due to hypermagnesemia are well described in the literature, intestinal smooth muscle dysfunction leading to paralytic ileus has only been reported in one other adult patient. The laboratory and clinical course of these two patients strongly suggest a causal relationship between hypermagnesemia and paralytic ileus.

  19. Radiation-induced gene responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Oryhon, J.

    1996-12-31

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5` region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression.

  20. Anatomopathological Changes Induced by Mycotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Tirziu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Fungi or mycetes represents the biggest group of microorganisms from the entire biologic system (nearly 250.000 species, very widespread in nature. They are inferior vegetal organisms, heterotrophic, lacking chlorophyll or other trophic pigments, which grow up on live organic substrates or on decaying substrates. The intensive researches from the last two decades had proved that only 30 – 40% from the total number of fungi species is capable to synthesize some toxic metabolites, and, among this species, only 60 species had proved to be dangerous for human or animals. Researches about mycotoxins action upon factors that interfere with the natural or acquired immunity are relatively recent and most of them refer to aflatoxins. The immune-suppression phenomena rely on morphological and histological modifications of lymphoid organs, changes of blood parameters, changes of functional capacity of humoral and some cellular factors. The presence of mycotoxins in feed causes major economic losses, either by their direct action (defined by disease state or indirectly, by affecting the specific and nonspecific resistance of the organism. In the present study we studied the effect of aflatoxins upon the main organs involved in immune response, pathological changes induced by mycotoxins. To determine the influence of mycotoxins on food conversion, weighings were made at the beginning and the end of the experimental period.

  1. Laser induced fusion - theoretical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawande, S.V.; Gunye, M.R.

    1979-01-01

    The theoretical aspects of thermonuclear fusion induced by laser are discussed. After outlining the basic features and the energetics of laser fusion in the chapter 1, various non-linear mechanisms responsible for an enhanced absorption of laser energy into the plasma and the stimulated scattering processes which hinder the absorption are discussed in the second chapter on laser plasma interactions. The third chapter on gas dynamics and the shock phenomena presents the mathematical formulation of the compression to high densities of the core of the pellet for its implosion. A hydrodynamic model developed to stimulate the evolution of laser heated symmetric plasma is outlined in the chapter four on numerichigly relativistic noninteracting particles, regular bouncing states may occur at high densities, or at high temperatures. The latter case is considered in details for the collapse phase of a hot universe; lepton pair creation may completely decelerate the collapse of a hot hadronic plasma, provided the observational parameters, the Hubble constant Hsub(deg), the matter parameter Ωsub(deg) and the deceleration parameter qsub(deg) satisfy certain constraint conditions

  2. Radiation-induced gene responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Shearin-Jones, P.; Oryhon, J.

    1996-01-01

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5' region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression

  3. Methylphenidate Actively Induces Emergence from General Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solt, Ken; Cotten, Joseph F.; Cimenser, Aylin; Wong, Kin F.K.; Chemali, Jessica J.; Brown, Emery N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although accumulating evidence suggests that arousal pathways in the brain play important roles in emergence from general anesthesia, the roles of monoaminergic arousal circuits are unclear. In this study we tested the hypothesis that methylphenidate (an inhibitor of dopamine and norepinephrine transporters) induces emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. Methods Using adult rats we tested the effect of methylphenidate IV on time to emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. We then performed experiments to test separately for methylphenidate-induced changes in arousal and changes in minute ventilation. A dose-response study was performed to test for methylphenidate–induced restoration of righting during continuous isoflurane anesthesia. Surface electroencephalogram recordings were performed to observe neurophysiological changes. Plethysmography recordings and arterial blood gas analysis were performed to assess methylphenidate-induced changes in respiratory function. Droperidol IV was administered to test for inhibition of methylphenidate's actions. Results Methylphenidate decreased median time to emergence from 280 to 91 s. The median difference in time to emergence without compared to with methylphenidate was 200 [155, 331] s (median, [95% confidence interval]). During continuous inhalation of isoflurane, methylphenidate induced return of righting in a dose-dependent manner, induced a shift in electroencephalogram power from delta to theta, and induced an increase in minute ventilation. Administration of droperidol (0.5 mg/kg IV) prior to methylphenidate (5 mg/kg IV) largely inhibited methylphenidate-induced emergence behavior, electroencephalogram changes, and changes in minute ventilation. Conclusions Methylphenidate actively induces emergence from isoflurane anesthesia by increasing arousal and respiratory drive, possibly through activation of dopaminergic and adrenergic arousal circuits. Our findings suggest that methylphenidate may be clinically

  4. Metoclopramide-induced cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha M. Rumore

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of cardiac arrest in a patient receiving intravenous (IV metoclopramide and review the pertinent literature. A 62-year-old morbidly obese female admitted for a gastric sleeve procedure, developed cardiac arrest within one minute of receiving metoclopramide 10 mg via slow intravenous (IV injection. Bradycardia at 4 beats/min immediately appeared, progressing rapidly to asystole. Chest compressions restored vital function. Electrocardiogram (ECG revealed ST depression indicative of myocardial injury. Following intubation, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. Various cardiac dysrrhythmias including supraventricular tachycardia (SVT associated with hypertension and atrial fibrillation occurred. Following IV esmolol and metoprolol, the patient reverted to normal sinus rhythm. Repeat ECGs revealed ST depression resolution without pre-admission changes. Metoclopramide is a non-specific dopamine receptor antagonist. Seven cases of cardiac arrest and one of sinus arrest with metoclopramide were found in the literature. The metoclopramide prescribing information does not list precautions or adverse drug reactions (ADRs related to cardiac arrest. The reaction is not dose related but may relate to the IV administration route. Coronary artery disease was the sole risk factor identified. According to Naranjo, the association was possible. Other reports of cardiac arrest, severe bradycardia, and SVT were reviewed. In one case, five separate IV doses of 10 mg metoclopramide were immediately followed by asystole repeatedly. The mechanism(s underlying metoclopramide’s cardiac arrest-inducing effects is unknown. Structural similarities to procainamide may play a role. In view of eight previous cases of cardiac arrest from metoclopramide having been reported, further elucidation of this ADR and patient monitoring is needed. Our report should alert clinicians to monitor patients and remain diligent in surveillance and

  5. Radiation-Induced Liver Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Schuffenegger, Pablo; Ng, Sylvia; Dawson, Laura A

    2017-10-01

    The advent of highly conformal radiation therapy (RT) has defined a new role for RT in the treatment of both primary and metastatic liver cancer. Despite major advances in how RT is delivered, radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) remains a concern. Classic RILD, characterized by anicteric ascites and hepatomegaly, is unlikely to occur if treating to doses of ≤30Gy in 2Gy per fraction in patients with baseline Child-Pugh A liver function. On the other hand, nonclassic RILD is a spectrum of liver toxicity, including a general decline in liver function and elevation of liver enzymes. It is less well defined and less predictable, especially in patients with underlying liver disease. Scoring and quantifying RILD remains a challenge. The Child-Pugh score has been the most consistently used parameter. Other scoring systems such as the albumin-bilirubin score provide further discrimination in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, although their value in patients treated with RT remains to be established. Many serum and imaging biomarkers of liver function are currently being investigated, and they will provide further useful information in the future for local and global liver function assessment, for planning optimization, and for treatment adaptation. To date, no pharmacological therapies have provided consistent results in mitigating RILD once it has manifested clinically. Numerous promising treatment strategies including TGFβ inhibition, Hedgehog inhibition, CXCR4 inhibition, hepatocyte transplantation, and bone marrow-derived stromal cell therapy, have potential to be helpful in the treatment of RILD in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mitochondrial rejuvenation after induced pluripotency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven T Suhr

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available As stem cells of the early embryo mature and differentiate into all tissues, the mitochondrial complement undergoes dramatic functional improvement. Mitochondrial activity is low to minimize generation of DNA-damaging reactive oxygen species during pre-implantation development and increases following implantation and differentiation to meet higher metabolic demands. It has recently been reported that when the stem cell type known as induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs are re-differentiated for several weeks in vitro, the mitochondrial complement progressively re-acquires properties approximating input fibroblasts, suggesting that despite the observation that IPSC conversion "resets" some parameters of cellular aging such as telomere length, it may have little impact on other age-affected cellular systems such as mitochondria in IPSC-derived cells.We have examined the properties of mitochondria in two fibroblast lines, corresponding IPSCs, and fibroblasts re-derived from IPSCs using biochemical methods and electron microscopy, and found a dramatic improvement in the quality and function of the mitochondrial complement of the re-derived fibroblasts compared to input fibroblasts. This observation likely stems from two aspects of our experimental design: 1 that the input cell lines used were of advanced cellular age and contained an inefficient mitochondrial complement, and 2 the re-derived fibroblasts were produced using an extensive differentiation regimen that may more closely mimic the degree of growth and maturation found in a developing mammal.These results - coupled with earlier data from our laboratory - suggest that IPSC conversion not only resets the "biological clock", but can also rejuvenate the energetic capacity of derived cells.

  7. Noise-induced hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariola Sliwinska-Kowalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL still remains a problem in developed countries, despite reduced occupational noise exposure, strict standards for hearing protection and extensive public health awareness campaigns. Therefore NIHL continues to be the focus of noise research activities. This paper summarizes progress achieved recently in our knowledge of NIHL. It includes papers published between the years 2008-2011 (in English, which were identified by a literature search of accessible medical and other relevant databases. A substantial part of this research has been concerned with the risk of NIHL in the entertainment sector, particularly in professional, orchestral musicians. There are also constant concerns regarding noise exposure and hearing risk in "hard to control" occupations, such as farming and construction work. Although occupational noise has decreased since the early 1980s, the number of young people subject to social noise exposure has tripled. If the exposure limits from the Noise at Work Regulations are applied, discotheque music, rock concerts, as well as music from personal music players are associated with the risk of hearing loss in teenagers and young adults. Several recent research studies have increased the understanding of the pathomechanisms of acoustic trauma, the genetics of NIHL, as well as possible dietary and pharmacologic otoprotection in acoustic trauma. The results of these studies are very promising and offer grounds to expect that targeted therapies might help prevent the loss of sensory hair cells and protect the hearing of noise-exposed individuals. These studies emphasize the need to launch an improved noise exposure policy for hearing protection along with developing more efficient norms of NIHL risk assessment.

  8. Research progress of exercise-induced fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-yi DAI

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Exercise-induced fatigue is a comprehensive response to a variety of physiological and biochemical changes in the body, and can affect people's quality of life to different extents. If no timely recovery after occurrence of fatigue, accumulated gradually, it can lead to "burnout", a "overtraining syndrome", "chronic fatigue syndrome", etc., which will cause endocrine disturbance, immune suppression, even physical illness. Exercise-induced fatigue becomes an important factor endangering human health. In recent years, many experts and scholars at home and abroad are committed to the research of exercise-induced fatigue, and have put forward a variety of hypothesis to explain the cause of exercise-induced fatigue. They expect to find out the methods for preventing and eliminating exercise-induced fatigue. This article discusses mainly the pathogenesis, model building, elimination/ relief, etc. of exercise-induced fatigue to point out the research achievements of exercise-induced fatigue and its existing problems. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.11.14

  9. Inducibility of d-ary trees

    OpenAIRE

    Czabarka, Éva; Dossou-Olory, Audace A. V.; Székely, László A.; Wagner, Stephan

    2018-01-01

    Imitating a recently introduced invariant of trees, we initiate the study of the inducibility of $d$-ary trees (rooted trees whose vertex outdegrees are bounded from above by $d\\geq 2$) with a given number of leaves. We determine the exact inducibility for stars and binary caterpillars. For $T$ in the family of strictly $d$-ary trees (every vertex has $0$ or $d$ children), we prove that the difference between the maximum density of a $d$-ary tree $D$ in $T$ and the inducibility of $D$ is of o...

  10. Bronchial or Laryngeal Obstruction Induced by Exercise?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoub Bey

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A child suspected of exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction and asthma is examined by laryngoscopy and respiratory resistance (Rrs after exercise challenge. Immediately at exercise cessation, the visualized adduction of the larynx in inspiration is reflected in a paroxystic increase in Rrs. While normal breathing has apparently resumed later on during recovery from exercise, the pattern of Rrs in inspiration is observed to reoccur following a deep breath or swallowing. The procedure may thus help diagnosing the site of exercise-induced obstruction when laryngoscopy is not available and identify re-inducers of laryngeal dysfunction.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of induced-mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Takeshi

    1985-01-01

    The outcome of recent studies on mechanisms of induced-mutations is outlined with particular emphasis on the dependence of recA gene function in Escherichia coli. Genes involved in spontaneous mutation and x-ray- and chemical-induced mutation and genes involved in adaptive response are presented. As for SOS mutagenesis, SOS-induced regulation mechanisms and mutagenic routes are described. Furthermore, specificity of mutagens themselves are discussed in relation to mechanisms of base substitution, frameshift, and deletion mutagenesis. (Namekawa, K.)

  12. Laser-induced damage in optical materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ristau, Detlev

    2014-01-01

    Dedicated to users and developers of high-powered systems, Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials focuses on the research field of laser-induced damage and explores the significant and steady growth of applications for high-power lasers in the academic, industrial, and military arenas. Written by renowned experts in the field, this book concentrates on the major topics of laser-induced damage in optical materials and most specifically addresses research in laser damage that occurs in the bulk and on the surface or the coating of optical components. It considers key issues in the field of hi

  13. Reorientation in combined stress induced martensite?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sittner, P.; Tokuda, M.

    1995-01-01

    The thermoelastic martensitic transformation induced by independent external forces has been investigated in combined tension-torsion experiments with Cu-Al-Zn-Mn SMA hollow bar polycrystals. When the nonproportional change of the applied stress (reloading) occurs at low volume fraction of stress induced martensite phase, the shape of the experimental transformation path suggests, that the forward or reverse stress induced martensitic transformations take place, depending whether the mechanical energy is being supplied or released. At higher volume fraction of martensite, the deformation behavior upon reloading becomes more complex, suggesting a possible role of martensite to martensite transformations or reorientation processes. (orig.)

  14. Temporary ischaemia induced by degradable starch microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lote, K.

    1981-01-01

    Possible thrombogenic effects of degradable starch microspheres were investigated. Controlled temporary small intestinal ischaemia was induced by injection into the superior mesenteric artery in cats. Arterial flow consistently recovered after ischaemia. No consumption of blood platelets, fibrinogen, or Factor VIII was observed. Aggregation of human platelets was not influenced by microsphere exposure, and platelet retention in starch microsphere columns was minimal. No thrombosis was detected in feline small intestinal vessels in vivo nor did starch surfaces induce adhesion or aggregation of human platelets in vitro. Thus, no evidence of thrombotic hazards was found by inducing temporary intestinal ischaemia by starch microspheres. (Auth.)

  15. Epidural Naloxone to Prevent Buprenorphine Induced PONV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Jadon

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidural infusion of local analgesic and opioid are commonly used for postoperative pain relief. This combina-tion gives excellent anlgesia but nausea and vomiting remains a major concern. Low dose epidural naloxone prevents PONV induced by spinal opioids like morphine, fentanyl and sufentanil. However, it is not known that epidural naloxone administration prevents PONV induced by epidural buprenorphine. We have reported three cases of major abdominal operation in which lowdose epidural infusion of naloxone releived the symptom of buprenorphine induced severe PONV and improved the quality of analgesia.

  16. DYFI data for Induced Earthquake Studies

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — The significant rise in seismicity rates in Oklahoma and Kansas (OK–KS) in the last decade has led to an increased interest in studying induced earthquakes. Although...

  17. Treatment of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    d'Aldin, Gervais

    1999-01-01

    .... Guinea pigs are subjected to an acoustic trauma. The recovery of the noise-induced hearing loss is followed up to 14 days post exposure by electrocochleography and morphologic examination of the cochlea is performed...

  18. Agitation, Mixing, and Transfers Induced by Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, Frédéric

    2018-01-01

    Bubbly flows involve bubbles randomly distributed within a liquid. At large Reynolds number, they experience an agitation that can combine shear-induced turbulence (SIT), large-scale buoyancy-driven flows, and bubble-induced agitation (BIA). The properties of BIA strongly differ from those of SIT. They have been determined from studies of homogeneous swarms of rising bubbles. Regarding the bubbles, agitation is mainly caused by the wake-induced path instability. Regarding the liquid, two contributions must be distinguished. The first one corresponds to the anisotropic flow disturbances generated near the bubbles, principally in the vertical direction. The second one is the almost isotropic turbulence induced by the flow instability through a population of bubbles, which turns out to be the main cause of horizontal fluctuations. Both contributions generate a k‑3 spectral subrange and exponential probability density functions. The subsequent issue will be to understand how BIA interacts with SIT.

  19. [Induced abortion--a historical outline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenc, F

    1974-11-11

    An historical review of the use of induced abortion is presented, beginning with early eras. The Chinese were the 1st to record the practice of induced abortion, with this operation being administered to royal concubines recorded at 500-515 B.C. Induced abortion was not used in ancient Greece, either for criminal or ethical reason. However, the ancient Greeks did utilize compulsory abortion for serious economic indications, as a means of controlling natural growth. Greek medical, gyneoclogigcal instruments for adminsitering abortions were described by Hippocrates. The Greek moral attitudes on abortion were largely adopted by the Romans, which were later altered by the appearance of Christianity and new ethical ideas. These ideas dominated European attitudes, along with the Church of Rome, limiting induced abortion to cases where the life of the mother was threatened. This attitude has existed until the present century, when these moral ideas are being challanged seriously for the 1st time in modern history.

  20. Thermally induced defects in industrial diamond

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the authors make use of laser heating of HTHP industrial diamond, as well as the optically measured temperature profile of the diamond surface, to study temperature induced changes to the diamond structure, both chemically...

  1. Histopathological changes induced by copepoda parasites ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Histopathological changes induced by copepoda parasites infections on the gills of economically important fish mugilidae ( Liza falcipinnis and Mugil cephalus ) from Ganvie area of Lac Nokoue, Republic of Benin.

  2. Electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xihua; Sheng Jiteng; Xiao Min

    2011-01-01

    We conduct theoretical studies on electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions in an inhomogeneously broadened ladder-type three-level system with the density-matrix approach. The effects of the collision-induced coherence decay rates as well as the probe laser field intensity on the probe field absorption are examined. It is shown that with the increase of the collisional decay rates in a moderate range, a narrow dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency superimposed on the Doppler-broadened absorption background can be turned into a narrow peak under the conditions that the probe field intensity is not very weak as compared to the pump field, which results from the enhancement of constructive interference and suppression of destructive interference between one-photon and multiphoton transition pathways. The physical origin of the collision-assisted electromagnetically induced absorption is analyzed with a power-series solution of the density-matrix equations.

  3. Reaper-Induced Cytochrome C Release

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olson, Michael

    2003-01-01

    ...-interacting protein called Scythe that promoted cytochrome c release form the mitochondria. The goal of the proposed research has been to determine the mechanism whereby Reaper and Scythe cooperate to induce mitochondrial cytochrome c release and eventual cell death.

  4. A case of dapsone induced methaemoglobinaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, D

    2008-09-01

    We present a case of dapsone induced methaemoglobinaemia that occurred in a patient who presented to the Emergency Department of a University Hospital. It is an uncommon condition that requires specific and urgent treatment in severe cases.

  5. Radiation-induced carcinoma of the penis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, A.D.; Pryor, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    Two patients with carcinoma of the penis were treated with interstitial radiation. They were cured of their disease for 17 and 21 years respectively and then developed radiation-induced tumours. (author)

  6. Drug-induced low blood sugar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drug-induced low blood sugar is low blood glucose that results from taking medicine. ... Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is common in people with diabetes who are taking insulin or other medicines to control their diabetes. ...

  7. Self-Reports of Induced Abortion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, V; Muhammad, H; Urassa, E

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study estimated the proportion of incomplete abortions that are induced in hospital-based settings in Tanzania. METHODS: A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted in 2 phases at 3 hospitals in Tanzania. Phase 1 included 302 patients with a diagnosis of incomplete abortion......, and phase 2 included 823 such patients. RESULTS: In phase 1, in which cases were classified by clinical criteria and information from the patient, 3.9% to 16.1% of the cases were classified as induced abortion. In phase 2, in which the structured interview was changed to an empathetic dialogue...... and previously used clinical criteria were omitted, 30.9% to 60.0% of the cases were classified as induced abortion. CONCLUSIONS: An empathetic dialogue improves the quality of data collected among women with induced abortion....

  8. Tsunami Induced Scour Around Monopile Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Eltard-Larsen, Bjarke; Baykal, Cüneyt

    While the run-up, inundation, and destructive potential of tsunami events has received considerable attention in the literature, the associated interaction with the sea bed i.e. boundary layer dynamics, induced sediment transport, and resultant sea bed morphology, has received relatively little...... specific attention. The present paper aims to further the understanding of tsunami-induced scour, by numerically investigating tsunami-induced flow and scour processes around a monopile structure, representative of those commonly utilized as offshore wind turbine foundations. The simulations are based...... a monopile at model (laboratory) spatial and temporal scales. Therefore, prior to conducting such numerical simulations involving tsunami-induced scour, it is necessary to first establish a methodology for maintaining similarity of model and full field scales. To achieve hydrodynamic similarity we...

  9. Ionizing radiation induced malignancies in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutrillaux, B.

    1997-01-01

    Using data on gene and chromosome alterations in human cancers, it is proposed that most radiation induced cancers are a consequence of recessive mutations of tumor suppressor genes. This explains the long delay between radiation exposure and the cancer onset. As a consequence, radiation induced cancers belong to groups of tumors where no specific translocations (forming or activating oncogenes) but multiple unbalanced chromosome rearrangements (deletions unmasking recessive mutations) exist. This explains why osteosarcomas, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, chondrosarcomas are frequently induced, but not liposarcoma, Ewing sarcomas and rhabdomyosarcomas, among others. A single exception confirms this rule: papillary thyroid cancer, frequently induced in exposed children, in which structural rearrangements frequently form a RET/PTC3 fusion gene. This fusion gene is the results of the inversion of a short segment of chromosome 10, and it is assumed that such rearrangement (small para-centric inversion) can easily occur after exposure to radiations, at contrast with translocations between to genes belonging to different chromosomes. (author)

  10. Temperature dependence of pulse-induced mechanoluminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    induced ML. It has been found that in the substances showing lumi- nescence at room temperature, the luminescence is quen- ched at some higher temperature. On the other hand, many substances which are not luminescent at room tem-.

  11. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammatory events ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is used to activate BV-2 microglia. Nitric oxide (NO) levels were measured using Griess assay. Inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expressional levels were measured by Western blot analysis.

  12. Developmental Aspects of Reaction to Positive Inducements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindskold, Svenn; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Probes children's behavioral sensitivity to variation in reward probability and magnitude (bribes) and suggests that preadolescent children do respond to promises of positive inducements for cooperation in a mixed-motive situation. (WY)

  13. Radiation Induced Bystander Effect in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Chai, Yunfei; Hei K. Tom

    2009-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect is defined as the induction of biological effects in cells that are not directly traversed by radiation, but merely in the presence of cells that are. Although radiation induced bystander effects have been well defined in a variety of in vitro models using a range of endpoints including clonogenic survival, mutations, neoplastic transformation, apoptosis, micronucleus, chromosomal aberrations and DNA double strand breaks, the mechanism(s) as well as the pres...

  14. Induced mutations - a tool in plant research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    These proceedings include 34 papers and 18 brief descriptions of poster presentations in the following areas as they are affected by induced mutations: advancement of genetics, plant evolution, plant physiology, plant parasites, plant symbioses, in vitro culture, gene ecology and plant breeding. Only a relatively small number of papers are of direct nuclear interest essentially in view of the mutations being induced by ionizing radiations. The papers of nuclear interest have been entered as separate and individual items of input

  15. Therapy-Induced Senescence in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ewald, Jonathan A.; Desotelle, Joshua A.; Wilding, George; Jarrard, David F.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a response to nonlethal stress that results in persistent cytostasis with a distinct morphological and biochemical phenotype. The senescence phenotype, detected in tumors through the expression of mRNA and protein markers, can be generated in cancer cells lacking functional p53 and retinoblastoma protein. Current research suggests that therapy-induced senescence (TIS) represents a novel functional target that may improve cancer therapy. TIS can be induced in immortal an...

  16. Fluorometholone-induced cataract after photorefractive keratectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgihan, K; Gürelik, G; Akata, F; Hasanreisoglu, B

    1997-01-01

    The use of topical corticosteroids following photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) is widespread. The major complications of potent corticosteroids are glaucoma and cataract formation; in order to decrease these complications, 0.1% fluorometholone administration is usually preferred after PRK. We report here a case of lens opacification which was induced by 0.1% fluorometholone administration after PRK in a period of 4 months. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of 0.1% fluorometholone-induced cataract after PRK.

  17. Paliperidone Induced Hypoglycemia by Increasing Insulin Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsubasa Omi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 41-year-old woman with schizophrenia who developed persistent hypoglycemia following paliperidone administration. After discontinuing paliperidone, the hypoglycemia resolved, but symptoms of diabetes emerged. Therefore, it appears that the hypoglycemia induced by paliperidone may mask symptoms of diabetes. Paliperidone may induce hypoglycemia by increasing insulin secretion. This report could help elucidate the relationship between atypical antipsychotics and glucose metabolism.

  18. Paliperidone Induced Hypoglycemia by Increasing Insulin Secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Omi, Tsubasa; Riku, Keisen; Fukumoto, Motoyuki; Kanai, Koji; Omura, Yumi; Takada, Hiromune; Matunaga, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old woman with schizophrenia who developed persistent hypoglycemia following paliperidone administration. After discontinuing paliperidone, the hypoglycemia resolved, but symptoms of diabetes emerged. Therefore, it appears that the hypoglycemia induced by paliperidone may mask symptoms of diabetes. Paliperidone may induce hypoglycemia by increasing insulin secretion. This report could help elucidate the relationship between atypical antipsychotics and glucose m...

  19. Radiation Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0531 TITLE: Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: William H. McBride CONTRACTING...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Radiation-Induced Vaccination to Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0531 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...therapy to generate an in situ tumor vaccine and abscopal effects at distant tumor sites (13), giving some rationale for this attempt to examine this

  20. Electromagnetically induced transparency in 6Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, J; Duffy, G J; Rowlands, W J; Akulshin, A M

    2006-01-01

    We report electromagnetically induced transparency for the D1 and D2 lines in 6 Li in both a vapour cell and an atomic beam. Electromagnetically induced transparency is created using copropagating mutually coherent laser beams with a frequency difference equal to the hyperfine ground state splitting of 228.2 MHz. The effects of various optical polarization configurations and applied magnetic fields are investigated. In addition, we apply an optical Ramsey spectroscopy technique which further reduces the observed resonance width

  1. Geomagnetic Induced Current Effects on Power Transformers

    OpenAIRE

    Røen, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Solar storms are inevitable and have a number of negative effects on technological systems, the power grid being no exception. High geoelectric field values due to severe geomagnetic storms cause geomagnetic induced currents to flow in conducting structures of the power system. The geomagnetic induced currents will enter and leave the power grid through the neutral grounding of power transformers. This may cause half-cycle saturation of the transformer core, which in turn leads to high levels...

  2. Gauge structures induced on curved manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, K.; Chepilko, N.M.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the present talk are i) to summarize the features of the induced gauge structure appearing in CPA to one-particle motion on M n embedded in R p with p ≥n+2, ii) to show concretely the relation of the induced gauge field in CPA with that generated on S p-1 [is implied by R p ], and iii) ti give some remarks on some extension as well as possible applications

  3. Contrast induced hyperthyroidism due to iodine excess

    OpenAIRE

    Mushtaq, Usman; Price, Timothy; Laddipeerla, Narsing; Townsend, Amanda; Broadbridge, Vy

    2009-01-01

    Iodine induced hyperthyroidism is a thyrotoxic condition caused by exposure to excessive iodine. Historically this type of hyperthyroidism has been described in areas of iodine deficiency. With advances in medicine, iodine induced hyperthyroidism has been observed following the use of drugs containing iodine—for example, amiodarone, and contrast agents used in radiological imaging. In elderly patients it is frequently difficult to diagnose and control contrast related hyperthyroidism, as most...

  4. How does relativity affect magnetically induced currents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, R J F; Repisky, M; Komorovsky, S

    2015-09-21

    Magnetically induced probability currents in molecules are studied in relativistic theory. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) enhances the curvature and gives rise to a previously unobserved current cusp in AuH or small bulge-like distortions in HgH2 at the proton positions. The origin of this curvature is magnetically induced spin-density arising from SOC in the relativistic description.

  5. Acute lens-induced glaucomas: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Shoeb Ahmad

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lens-induced factors are important and common mechanisms causing acute elevation of intraocular pressure. While in most cases, the diagnosis and management are straight-forward, in others it is difficult and can lead to improper procedures, complications and poor visual outcomes. This review was done with the aim of studying the various types of lens-induced glaucomas, classifying them in an easy way to understand manner, their clinical features, current management and future possibilities.

  6. [Drug-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homberg, J C

    1999-04-03

    AUTOANTIBODY PRODUCTION: The production of autoantibodies can only occur if immune tolerance is circumvented. Thus drug-induced autoimmune hemolytic anemia requires that the drug have an effect on both autoantigens and on the immune system. AN EXAMPLE, METHYLDOPA: Methyldopa is a hypotensive agent which induces major production of anti-Rh IgG anti-erythrocyte autoantibodies, anti-nuclear antibodies and anti-actin antibodies. These autoantibodies generally appear 6 months after treatment onset and are observed in 20% of treated patients. Hemolysis is however exceptional and is only clinically or biologically perceptible in 1 to 2% of the patients who become immunized. Induced lupus has been reported as have been several dozen cases of drug-induced hepatitis with anti-actin autoantibodies. DRUGS INDUCING HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA: Besides methyldopa, other drugs known to induce hemolytic anemia include levodopa used for Parkinson's disease, mefenamic acid, a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, interferon-alpha, used in chronic viral hepatitis, cyclosporin used for the prevention of graft rejection and the treatment of certain autoimmune diseases, and fludarabin, used in chronic lymphoid leukemia. If there is no clinical or biological expression, the drug can be continued, excepting fludarabin where regular controls are needed. If hemolytic anemia is patent, the drug must be discontinued, transfusion and corticosteroid therapy should be envisaged.

  7. Calpain Activator Dibucaine Induces Platelet Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcium-dependent calpains are a family of cysteine proteases that have been demonstrated to play key roles in both platelet glycoprotein Ibα shedding and platelet activation and altered calpain activity is associated with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Calpain activators induce apoptosis in several types of nucleated cells. However, it is not clear whether calpain activators induce platelet apoptosis. Here we show that the calpain activator dibucaine induced several platelet apoptotic events including depolarization of the mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, up-regulation of Bax and Bak, down-regulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, caspase-3 activation and phosphatidylserine exposure. Platelet apoptosis elicited by dibucaine was not affected by the broad spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. Furthermore, dibucaine did not induce platelet activation as detected by P-selectin expression and PAC-1 binding. However, platelet aggregation induced by ristocetin or α-thrombin, platelet adhesion and spreading on von Willebrand factor were significantly inhibited in platelets treated with dibucaine. Taken together, these data indicate that dibucaine induces platelet apoptosis and platelet dysfunction.

  8. Induced abortion and subsequent pregnancy duration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Wei Jin; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Olsen, Jørn

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether induced abortion influences subsequent pregnancy duration. METHODS: Women who had their first pregnancies during 1980, 1981, and 1982 were identified in three Danish national registries. A total of 15,727 women whose pregnancies were terminated by first-trimester ind......OBJECTIVE: To examine whether induced abortion influences subsequent pregnancy duration. METHODS: Women who had their first pregnancies during 1980, 1981, and 1982 were identified in three Danish national registries. A total of 15,727 women whose pregnancies were terminated by first......-trimester induced abortions were compared with 46,026 whose pregnancies were not terminated by induced abortions. All subsequent pregnancies until 1994 were identified by register linkage. RESULTS: Preterm and post-term singleton live births were more frequent in women with one, two, or more previous induced...... abortions. After adjusting for potential confounders and stratifying by gravidity, the odds ratios of preterm singleton live births in women with one, two, or more previous induced abortions were 1.89 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.70, 2.11), 2.66 (95% CI 2.09, 3.37), and 2.03 (95% CI 1.29, 3...

  9. Management of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, J D; Olszynski, W P; Hanley, D A; Hodsman, A B; Kendler, D L; Siminoski, K G; Brown, J; Cowden, E A; Goltzman, D; Ioannidis, G; Josse, R G; Ste-Marie, L G; Tenenhouse, A M; Davison, K S; Blocka, K L; Pollock, A P; Sibley, J

    2000-02-01

    To educate scientists and health care providers about the effects of corticosteroids on bone, and advise clinicians of the appropriate treatments for patients receiving corticosteroids. This review summarizes the pathophysiology of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis, describes the assessment methods used to evaluate this condition, examines the results of clinical trials of drugs, and explores a practical approach to the management of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis based on data collected from published articles. Despite our lack of understanding about the biological mechanisms leading to corticosteroid-induced bone loss, effective therapy has been developed. Bisphosphonate therapy is beneficial in both the prevention and treatment of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis. The data for the bisphosphonates are more compelling than for any other agent. For patients who have been treated but continue to lose bone, hormone replacement therapy, calcitonin, fluoride, or anabolic hormones should be considered. Calcium should be used only as an adjunctive therapy in the treatment or prevention of corticosteroid-induced bone loss and should be administered in combination with other agents. Bisphosphonates have shown significant treatment benefit and are the agents of choice for both the treatment and prevention of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis.

  10. [Induced abortion: a world perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshaw, S K

    1987-01-01

    This article presents current estimates of the number, rate, and proportion of abortions for all countries which make such data available. 76% of the world's population lives in countries where induced abortion is legal at least for health reasons. Abortion is legal in almost all developed countries. Most developing countries have some laws against abortion, but it is permitted at least for health reasons in the countries of 67% of the developing world's population. The other 33%--over 1 billion persons--reside mainly in subSaharan Africa, Latin America, and the most orthodox Muslim countries. By the beginning of the 20th century, abortion had been made illegal in most of the world, with rules in Africa, Asia, and Latin America similar to those in Europe and North America. Abortion legislation began to change first in a few industrialized countries prior to World War II and in Japan in 1948. Socialist European countries made abortion legal in the first trimester in the 1950s, and most of the industrialized world followed suit in the 1960s and 1970s. The worldwide trend toward relaxed abortion restrictions continues today, with governments giving varying reasons for the changes. Nearly 33 million legal abortions are estimated to be performed annually in the world, with 14 million of them in China and 11 million in the USSR. The estimated total rises to 40-60 million when illegal abortions added. On a worldwide basis some 37-55 abortions are estimated to occur for each 1000 women aged 15-44 years. There are probably 24-32 abortions per 100 pregnancies. The USSR has the highest abortion rate among developed countries, 181/1000 women aged 15-44, followed by Rumania with 91/1000, many of them illegal. The large number of abortions in some countries is due to scarcity of modern contraception. Among developing countries, China apparently has the highest rate, 62/1000 women aged 15-44. Cuba's rate is 59/1000. It is very difficult to calculate abortion rates in countries

  11. Induced Seismicity Potential of Energy Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitzman, Murray

    2013-03-01

    Earthquakes attributable to human activities-``induced seismic events''-have received heightened public attention in the United States over the past several years. Upon request from the U.S. Congress and the Department of Energy, the National Research Council was asked to assemble a committee of experts to examine the scale, scope, and consequences of seismicity induced during fluid injection and withdrawal associated with geothermal energy development, oil and gas development, and carbon capture and storage (CCS). The committee's report, publicly released in June 2012, indicates that induced seismicity associated with fluid injection or withdrawal is caused in most cases by change in pore fluid pressure and/or change in stress in the subsurface in the presence of faults with specific properties and orientations and a critical state of stress in the rocks. The factor that appears to have the most direct consequence in regard to induced seismicity is the net fluid balance (total balance of fluid introduced into or removed from the subsurface). Energy technology projects that are designed to maintain a balance between the amount of fluid being injected and withdrawn, such as most oil and gas development projects, appear to produce fewer seismic events than projects that do not maintain fluid balance. Major findings from the study include: (1) as presently implemented, the process of hydraulic fracturing for shale gas recovery does not pose a high risk for inducing felt seismic events; (2) injection for disposal of waste water derived from energy technologies does pose some risk for induced seismicity, but very few events have been documented over the past several decades relative to the large number of disposal wells in operation; and (3) CCS, due to the large net volumes of injected fluids suggested for future large-scale carbon storage projects, may have potential for inducing larger seismic events.

  12. Magnetic-flutter-induced pedestal plasma transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.; Hegna, C.C.; Cole, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma toroidal rotation can limit reconnection of externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields δB on rational magnetic flux surfaces. Hence it causes the induced radial perturbations δB ρ to be small there, thereby inhibiting magnetic island formation and stochasticity at the top of pedestals in high (H-mode) confinement tokamak plasmas. However, the δB ρ s induced by RMPs increase away from rational surfaces and are shown to induce significant sinusoidal radial motion (flutter) of magnetic field lines with a radial extent that varies linearly with δB ρ and inversely with distance from the rational surface because of the magnetic shear. This produces a radial electron thermal diffusivity that is (1/2)(δB ρ /B 0 ) 2 times a kinetically derived, electron-collision-induced, magnetic-shear-reduced, effective parallel electron thermal diffusivity in the absence of magnetic stochasticity. These low collisionality flutter-induced transport processes and thin magnetic island effects are shown to be highly peaked in the vicinity of rational surfaces at the top of low collisionality pedestals. However, the smaller but finite level of magnetic-flutter-induced electron heat transport midway between rational surfaces is the primary factor that determines the electron temperature difference between rational surfaces at the pedestal top. The magnetic-flutter-induced non-ambipolar electron density transport can be large enough to push the plasma toward an electron density transport root. Requiring ambipolar density transport is shown to determine the radial electric field, the plasma toroidal rotation (via radial force balance), a reduced electron thermal diffusivity and increased ambipolar density transport in the pedestal. At high collisionality the various flutter effects are less strongly peaked at rational surfaces and generally less significant. They are thus less likely to exhibit flutter-induced resonant behaviour and transition toward an

  13. HNE as an inducer of COX-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Koji

    2017-10-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an inducible isoform responsible for high levels of prostaglandin (PG) production during inflammation and immune responses, mediate a variety of biological actions involved in vascular pathophysiology. COX-2 is induced by various stimuli, including proinflammatory cytokines, to result in PG synthesis associated with inflammation and carcinogenesis. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is one of a group of small molecules that can induce COX-2 expression. The mechanistic studies have revealed that the HNE-induced COX-2 expression results from the stabilization of COX-2 mRNA mediated by the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and uniquely requires a serum component, which is eventually identified to be modified low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), such as the oxidized form of LDLs. It has also been shown that HNE-induced COX-2 expression is mechanistically linked to the expression of transcription factor p53 and that the overexpression of COX-2 is associated with down-regulation of a proteasome subunit, leading to the enhanced accumulation of p53 and ubiquitinated proteins and to the enhanced sensitivity toward HNE. Thus, the overall mechanism and pathophysiological role of the COX-2 induction by HNE have become increasingly evident. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Neutron induced bystander effect among zebrafish embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C. Y. P.; Kong, E. Y.; Kobayashi, A.; Suya, N.; Uchihori, Y.; Cheng, S. H.; Konishi, T.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper reported the first-ever observation of neutron induced bystander effect (NIBE) using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos as the in vivo model. The neutron exposure in the present work was provided by the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. Two different strategies were employed to induce NIBE, namely, through directly partnering and through medium transfer. Both results agreed with a neutron-dose window (20-50 mGy) which could induce NIBE. The lower dose limit corresponded to the threshold amount of neutron-induced damages to trigger significant bystander signals, while the upper limit corresponded to the onset of gamma-ray hormesis which could mitigate the neutron-induced damages and thereby suppress the bystander signals. Failures to observe NIBE in previous studies were due to using neutron doses outside the dose-window. Strategies to enhance the chance of observing NIBE included (1) use of a mono-energetic high-energy (e.g., between 100 keV and 2 MeV) neutron source, and (2) use of a neutron source with a small gamma-ray contamination. It appeared that the NASBEE facility used in the present study fulfilled both conditions, and was thus ideal for triggering NIBE.

  15. Inducible clindamycin resistance in Staphylococcus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afridi, Faisal Iqbal; Zeb, Mubarak; Hussain, Arif; Farooqi, Badar Jahan; Murtuza, Ghulam

    2014-07-01

    To determine the frequency of inducible clindamycin resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus species by phenotypic D-test. Observational study. Ziauddin University Hospital, Karachi, from July to December 2011. Consecutive clinical isolates of Staphylococcus species were collected and identified by conventional microbiological techniques. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing and inducible clindamycin resistance was carried out by performing D-test using CLSI criteria. Methicillin resistance was detected by using Cefoxitin disk as a surrogate marker. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS version-17. A total of 667 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus species were obtained during the study period. In these isolates, 177 (26.5%) were Staphylococcus aureus, and 490 (73.5%) were coagulase negative Staphylococci. The total frequency of inducible clindamycin resistance among isolates of Staphylococcus species was 120/667 (18%). Frequency of inducible clindamycin resistance among coagulase negative Staphylococci group and Staphylococcus aureus group were 18.57% and 16.38% respectively. Median age of patients in D-test positive group was 19.5 (1 - 54) years. The frequency of inducible clindamycin resistance among Staphylococcus species may differ in different hospital setup. Clinical microbiology laboratories should implement testing simple and effective D-test on all Staphylococcus species. D-test positive isolates should be reported clindamycin resistant to decrease treatment failure.

  16. Prediction of machining induced residual stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramod, Monangi; Reddy, Yarkareddy Gopi; Prakash Marimuthu, K.

    2017-07-01

    Whenever a component is machined, residual stresses are induced in it. These residual stresses induced in the component reduce its fatigue life, corrosion resistance and wear resistance. Thus it is important to predict and control the machining-induced residual stress. A lot of research is being carried out in this area in the past decade. This paper aims at prediction of residual stresses during machining of Ti-6Al-4V. A model was developed and under various combinations of cutting conditions such as, speed, feed and depth of cut, the behavior of residual stresses were simulated using Finite Element Model. The present work deals with the development of thermo-mechanical model to predict the machining induced residual stresses in Titanium alloy. The simulation results are compared with the published results. The results are in good agreement with the published results. Future work involves optimization or the cutting parameters that effect the machining induced residual stresses. The results obtained were validated with previous work.

  17. Inducible Clindamycin Resistance in Staphylococcus Species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afridi, F. I.; Zeb, M.; Farooqi, B. J.; Murtaza, G.; Hussain, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of inducible clindamycin resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus species by phenotypic D-test. Study Design: Observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Ziauddin University Hospital, Karachi, from July to December 2011. Methodology: Consecutive clinical isolates of Staphylococcus species were collected and identified by conventional microbiological techniques. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing and inducible clindamycin resistance was carried out by performing D-test using CLSI criteria. Methicillin resistance was detected by using Cefoxitin disk as a surrogate marker. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS version-17. Results: A total of 667 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus species were obtained during the study period. In these isolates, 177 (26.5%) were Staphylococcus aureus, and 490 (73.5%) were coagulase negative Staphylococci. The total frequency of inducible clindamycin resistance among isolates of Staphylococcus species was 120/667 (18%). Frequency of inducible clindamycin resistance among coagulase negative Staphylococci group and Staphylococcus aureus group were 18.57% and 16.38% respectively. Median age of patients in D-test positive group was 19.5 (1 - 54) years. Conclusion: The frequency of inducible clindamycin resistance among Staphylococcus species may differ in different hospital setup. Clinical microbiology laboratories should implement testing simple and effective D-test on all Staphylococcus species. D-test positive isolates should be reported clindamycin resistant to decrease treatment failure. (author)

  18. Induced-Fission Imaging of Nuclear Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents initial results from development of the induced-fission imaging technique, which can be used for the purpose of measuring or verifying the distribution of fissionable material in an unopened container. The technique is based on stimulating fissions in nuclear material with 14 MeV neutrons from an associated-particle deuterium-tritium (D-T) generator and counting the subsequent induced fast fission neutrons with an array of fast organic scintillation detectors. For each source neutron incident on the container, the neutron creation time and initial trajectory are known from detection of the associated alpha particle of the d + t → α + n reaction. Many induced fissions will lie along (or near) the interrogating neutron path, allowing an image of the spatial distribution of prompt induced fissions, and thereby fissionable material, to be constructed. A variety of induced-fission imaging measurements have been performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with a portable, low-dose D-T generator, including single-view radiographic measurements and three-dimensional tomographic measurements. Results from these measurements will be presented along with the neutron transmission images that have been performed simultaneously. This new capability may have applications to a number of areas in which there may be a need to confirm the presence or configuration of nuclear materials, such as nuclear material control and accountability, quality assurance, treaty confirmation, or homeland security applications.

  19. Genetic alterations during radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews radiation-induced genetic alterations and its carcinogenesis, focusing on the previous in vitro assay outcome. A colony formation assay using Syrian hamster fetal cells and focus formation assay using mouse C3H10T1/2 cells are currently available to find malignant transformation of cells. Such in vitro assays has proposed the hypothesis that radiation-induced carcinogenesis arises from at least two-stage processes; i.e., that an early step induced by irradiation plays an important role in promoting the potential to cause the subsequent mutation. A type of genetic instability induced by radiation results in a persistently elevated frequency of spontaneous mutations, so-called the phenomenon of delayed reproductive death. One possible mechanism by which genetic instability arises has been shown to be due to the development of abnormality in the gene group involved in the maintenance mechanism of genome stability. Another possibility has also been shown to stem from the loss of telomere (the extremities of a chromosome). The importance of search for radiation-induced genetic instability is emphasized in view of the elucidation of carcinogenesis. (N.K.)

  20. Infrared laser-induced chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Mikio

    1978-01-01

    The experimental means which clearly distinguishes between infrared ray-induced reactions and thermal reactions has been furnished for the first time when an intense monochromatic light source has been obtained by the development of infrared laser. Consequently, infrared laser-induced chemical reactions have started to develop as one field of chemical reaction researches. Researches of laser-induced chemical reactions have become new means for the researches of chemical reactions since they were highlighted as a new promising technique for isotope separation. Specifically, since the success has been reported in 235 U separation using laser in 1974, comparison of this method with conventional separation techniques from the economic point of view has been conducted, and it was estimated by some people that the laser isotope separation is cheaper. This report briefly describes on the excitation of oscillation and reaction rate, and introduces the chemical reactions induced by CW laser and TEA CO 2 laser. Dependence of reaction yield on laser power, measurement of the absorbed quantity of infrared ray and excitation mechanism are explained. Next, isomerizing reactions are reported, and finally, isotope separation is explained. It was found that infrared laser-induced chemical reactions have the selectivity for isotopes. Since it is evident that there are many examples different from thermal and photo-chemical reactions, future collection of the data is expected. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  1. Radiation-induced linking reactions in polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoepfl, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    Three types of measurements are reported relating to chemical reactions in polyethylene induced by ionizing radiation: 1) viscometric and low-angle laser light scattering measurements to determine the effect of a radical scavenger on the yield of links; 2) calorimetric measurements to determine the effect of radiation-induced linking on the melting behavior of polyethylene; and 3) high-resolution solution carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry measurements to determine the nature of the links and the method of their formation. The NMR results present the first direct detection of radiation-induced long-chain branching (Y links) in polyethylene, and place an apparent upper limit on the yield of H-shaped crosslinks that are formed when polyethylene is irradiated to low absorbed doses. The effect of radiation-induced linking on the melting behavior of polyethylene was examined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It was found that radiation-induced links do not change the heat of fusion of polythylene crystals, but decrease the melt entropy and increase the fold surface free energy per unit area of the crystals. The carbon 13 NMR results demonstrate that long-chain branches (Y links) are formed much more frequently than H-shaped crosslinks at low absorbed doses. The Y links are produced by reactions of alkyl free radicals with terminal vinyl groups in polyethylene

  2. Electromagnetically Induced Transparency of Magnetized Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvets, G.; Wurtele, J.S.

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that electromagnetic radiation with a frequency equal to the cyclotron frequency of plasma electrons is strongly absorbed by magnetized plasma. It is shown here that this absorption does not occur in the presence of a second, properly de tuned, electromagnetic pump pulse. The plasma can thus be made transparent at the cyclotron frequency. The pump is de tuned from the probe by the plasma frequency. Transparency occurs because the currents induced at the cyclotron frequency by sideband of the pump can cancel the currents induced by the probe. This effect is very similar to electromagnetically-induced transparency of atomic vapors. The essential difference is that the plasma considered here is completely classical, and no quantum mechanical effects are invoked to produce the electromagnetically-induced transparency. The plasma system is significantly more complex than the three level quantum system in particular, a non-local interaction, the plasma oscillation, corresponds to one of the levels. Potential applications of the electromagnetically-induced transparency in plasma will be discussed

  3. Fermion-induced quantum critical points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi-Xiang; Jiang, Yi-Fan; Jian, Shao-Kai; Yao, Hong

    2017-08-22

    A unified theory of quantum critical points beyond the conventional Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson paradigm remains unknown. According to Landau cubic criterion, phase transitions should be first-order when cubic terms of order parameters are allowed by symmetry in the Landau-Ginzburg free energy. Here, from renormalization group analysis, we show that second-order quantum phase transitions can occur at such putatively first-order transitions in interacting two-dimensional Dirac semimetals. As such type of Landau-forbidden quantum critical points are induced by gapless fermions, we call them fermion-induced quantum critical points. We further introduce a microscopic model of SU(N) fermions on the honeycomb lattice featuring a transition between Dirac semimetals and Kekule valence bond solids. Remarkably, our large-scale sign-problem-free Majorana quantum Monte Carlo simulations show convincing evidences of a fermion-induced quantum critical points for N = 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, consistent with the renormalization group analysis. We finally discuss possible experimental realizations of the fermion-induced quantum critical points in graphene and graphene-like materials.Quantum phase transitions are governed by Landau-Ginzburg theory and the exceptions are rare. Here, Li et al. propose a type of Landau-forbidden quantum critical points induced by gapless fermions in two-dimensional Dirac semimetals.

  4. Aloin induces apoptosis in Jurkat cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buenz, Eric J

    2008-03-01

    Aloe is widely used as a dietary supplement. However, there are continuing concerns over the toxicity and the purity of aloe-based products. The primary class of compounds responsible for aloe-induced toxicity are anthraquinones. One of these, aloe-emodin, has been extensively investigated for apoptosis inducing effects. Conversely, the precursor to aloe-emodin, aloin, has been subjected to only minimal investigation of any cytotoxic effects. Jurkat T cells, an established model for the study of compound toxicity, were used to evaluate the effect of aloin on cell viability. Cells were analyzed using flow cytometry and microscopy for cell size and granularity, cell membrane integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell cycle profile. Treatment with aloin resulted in a reduction in cell size, compromised membrane integrity, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, treatment with aloin resulted in alteration of the cell cycle, specifically a block at G2/M phase. Importantly, the loss of cell membrane integrity was preceded by a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting a mitochondrial-dependent pathway for aloin-induced apoptosis. These observations provide insight into the potential mechanisms of aloin-induced toxicity and thus, perhaps, aloe preparation-induced toxicity. Furthermore, because of the concern over the safety of aloe-based supplements, this work suggests that aloe supplements not containing aloin may be safer than aloe supplements containing aloin, and that aloin should be considered in addition to concentrations of aloe-emodin.

  5. Mechanisms of cadmium induced genomic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipič, Metka

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium is an ubiquitous environmental contaminant that represents hazard to humans and wildlife. It is found in the air, soil and water and, due to its extremely long half-life, accumulates in plants and animals. The main source of cadmium exposure for non-smoking human population is food. Cadmium is primarily toxic to the kidney, but has been also classified as carcinogenic to humans by several regulatory agencies. Current evidence suggests that exposure to cadmium induces genomic instability through complex and multifactorial mechanisms. Cadmium dose not induce direct DNA damage, however it induces increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which in turn induce DNA damage and can also interfere with cell signalling. More important seems to be cadmium interaction with DNA repair mechanisms, cell cycle checkpoints and apoptosis as well as with epigenetic mechanisms of gene expression control. Cadmium mediated inhibition of DNA repair mechanisms and apoptosis leads to accumulation of cells with unrepaired DNA damage, which in turn increases the mutation rate and thus genomic instability. This increases the probability of developing not only cancer but also other diseases associated with genomic instability. In the in vitro experiments cadmium induced effects leading to genomic instability have been observed at low concentrations that were comparable to those observed in target organs and tissues of humans that were non-occupationally exposed to cadmium. Therefore, further studies aiming to clarify the relevance of these observations for human health risks due to cadmium exposure are needed.

  6. Insulin-Inducible SMILE Inhibits Hepatic Gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Min; Seo, Woo-Young; Han, Hye-Sook; Oh, Kyoung-Jin; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Don-Kyu; Choi, Seri; Choi, Byeong Hun; Harris, Robert A; Lee, Chul-Ho; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    The role of a glucagon/cAMP-dependent protein kinase-inducible coactivator PGC-1α signaling pathway is well characterized in hepatic gluconeogenesis. However, an opposing protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt-inducible corepressor signaling pathway is unknown. A previous report has demonstrated that small heterodimer partner-interacting leucine zipper protein (SMILE) regulates the nuclear receptors and transcriptional factors that control hepatic gluconeogenesis. Here, we show that hepatic SMILE expression was induced by feeding in normal mice but not in db/db and high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Interestingly, SMILE expression was induced by insulin in mouse primary hepatocyte and liver. Hepatic SMILE expression was not altered by refeeding in liver-specific insulin receptor knockout (LIRKO) or PKB β-deficient (PKBβ(-/-)) mice. At the molecular level, SMILE inhibited hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-mediated transcriptional activity via direct competition with PGC-1α. Moreover, ablation of SMILE augmented gluconeogenesis and increased blood glucose levels in mice. Conversely, overexpression of SMILE reduced hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression and ameliorated hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in db/db and HFD-fed mice. Therefore, SMILE is an insulin-inducible corepressor that suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis. Small molecules that enhance SMILE expression would have potential for treating hyperglycemia in diabetes. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  7. Characterization of ion beam induced nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghatak, J.; Satpati, B.; Umananda, M.; Kabiraj, D.; Som, T.; Dev, B.N.; Akimoto, K.; Ito, K.; Emoto, T.; Satyam, P.V.

    2006-01-01

    Tailoring of nanostructures with energetic ion beams has become an active area of research leading to the fundamental understanding of ion-solid interactions at nanoscale regime and with possible applications in the near future. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and asymmetric X-ray Bragg-rocking curve experimental methods have been used to characterize ion-induced effects in nanostructures. The possibility of surface and sub-surface/interface alloying at nano-scale regime, ion-beam induced embedding, crater formation, sputtering yield variations for systems with isolated nanoislands, semi-continuous and continuous films of noble metals (Au, Ag) deposited on single crystalline silicon will be reviewed. MeV-ion induced changes in specified Au-nanoislands on silicon substrate are tracked as a function of ion fluence using ex situ TEM. Strain induced in the bulk silicon substrate surface due to 1.5 MeV Au 2+ and C 2+ ion beam irradiation is determined by using HRTEM and asymmetric Bragg X-ray rocking curve methods. Preliminary results on 1.5 MeV Au 2+ ion-induced effects in nanoislands of Co deposited on silicon substrate will be discussed

  8. Characterization of ion beam induced nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghatak, J. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Satpati, B. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Umananda, M. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Kabiraj, D. [Nuclear Science Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Som, T. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Dev, B.N. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Akimoto, K. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ito, K. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Emoto, T. [Toyota National College of Technology, 2-1, Toyota, Aichi 471-8525 (Japan); Satyam, P.V. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India)]. E-mail: satyam@iopb.res.in

    2006-03-15

    Tailoring of nanostructures with energetic ion beams has become an active area of research leading to the fundamental understanding of ion-solid interactions at nanoscale regime and with possible applications in the near future. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and asymmetric X-ray Bragg-rocking curve experimental methods have been used to characterize ion-induced effects in nanostructures. The possibility of surface and sub-surface/interface alloying at nano-scale regime, ion-beam induced embedding, crater formation, sputtering yield variations for systems with isolated nanoislands, semi-continuous and continuous films of noble metals (Au, Ag) deposited on single crystalline silicon will be reviewed. MeV-ion induced changes in specified Au-nanoislands on silicon substrate are tracked as a function of ion fluence using ex situ TEM. Strain induced in the bulk silicon substrate surface due to 1.5 MeV Au{sup 2+} and C{sup 2+} ion beam irradiation is determined by using HRTEM and asymmetric Bragg X-ray rocking curve methods. Preliminary results on 1.5 MeV Au{sup 2+} ion-induced effects in nanoislands of Co deposited on silicon substrate will be discussed.

  9. Pump, sodium, inducer, intermediate size (ISIP) (impeller/inducer/diffuser retrofit)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paradise, D.R.

    1978-01-01

    This specification defines the requirements for the Intermediate-Size Inducer Pump (ISIP), which is to be made by replacing the impeller of the FFTF Prototype Pump with a new inducer, impeller, diffuser, seal, and necessary adapter hardware. Subsequent testing requirements of the complete pump assembly are included

  10. A chloride-inducible gene expression cassette and its use in induced lysis of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Jan Willem; Venema, Gerard; Kok, Jan

    1997-01-01

    A chloride-inducible promoter previously isolated from the chromosome of Lactococcus lactis (J. W. Sanders, G. Venema, J. Kok, and K. Leenhouts, Mol. Gen. Genet., in press) was exploited for the inducible expression of homologous and heterologous gens. An expression cassette consisting of the

  11. Apoptosis-inducing factor (Aif1) mediates anacardic acid-induced apoptosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzaffar, Suhail; Chattoo, Bharat B

    2017-03-01

    Anacardic acid is a medicinal phytochemical that inhibits proliferation of fungal as well as several types of cancer cells. It induces apoptotic cell death in various cell types, but very little is known about the mechanism involved in the process. Here, we used budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model to study the involvement of some key elements of apoptosis in the anacardic acid-induced cell death. Plasma membrane constriction, chromatin condensation, DNA degradation, and externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) indicated that anacardic acid induces apoptotic cell death in S. cerevisiae. However, the exogenous addition of broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK or deletion of the yeast caspase Yca1 showed that the anacardic acid-induced cell death is caspase independent. Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF1) deletion mutant was resistant to the anacardic acid-induced cell death, suggesting a key role of Aif1. Overexpression of Aif1 made cells highly susceptible to anacardic acid, further confirming that Aif1 mediates anacardic acid-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, instead of the increase in the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) normally observed during apoptosis, anacardic acid caused a decrease in the intracellular ROS levels. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed downregulation of the BIR1 survivin mRNA expression during the anacardic acid-induced apoptosis.

  12. Profile of circulating levels of IL-1Ra, CXCL10/IP-10, CCL4/MIP-1β and CCL2/MCP-1 in dengue fever and parvovirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzia Maria de-Oliveira-Pinto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV and parvovirus B19 (B19V infections are acute exanthematic febrile illnesses that are not easily differentiated on clinical grounds and affect the paediatric population. Patients with these acute exanthematic diseases were studied. Fever was more frequent in DENV than in B19V-infected patients. Arthritis/arthralgias with DENV infection were shown to be significantly more frequent in adults than in children. The circulating levels of interleukin (IL-1 receptor antagonist (Ra, CXCL10/inducible protein-10 (IP-10, CCL4/macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta and CCL2/monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1 were determined by multiplex immunoassay in serum samples obtained from B19V (37 and DENV-infected (36 patients and from healthy individuals (7. Forward stepwise logistic regression analysis revealed that circulating CXCL10/IP-10 tends to be associated with DENV infection and that IL-1Ra was significantly associated with DENV infection. Similar analysis showed that circulating CCL2/MCP-1 tends to be associated with B19V infection. In dengue fever, increased circulating IL-1Ra may exert antipyretic actions in an effort to counteract the already increased concentrations of IL-1β, while CXCL10/IP-10 was confirmed as a strong pro-inflammatory marker. Recruitment of monocytes/macrophages and upregulation of the humoral immune response by CCL2/MCP-1 by B19V may be involved in the persistence of the infection. Children with B19V or DENV infections had levels of these cytokines similar to those of adult patients.

  13. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Schreck, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Panozzo, J. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States); Libertin, C.R. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Doses which caused over 99% cell killing induced HIV-LTR transcription maximally, demonstrating that cells that will go on to die by 14 days are the cells expressing HIV-LTR-CAT.

  14. Seismic induced earth pressures in buried vaults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.A.; Costantino, C.J.

    1994-01-01

    The magnitude and distribution of earth pressures acting on buried structures and induced by a seismic event are considered in this paper. A soil-structure-interaction analysis is performed for typical Department of Energy high level waste storage tanks using a lumped parameter model. The resulting soil pressure distributions are determined and compared with the static soil pressure to assess the design significance of the seismic induced soil pressures. It is found that seismic pressures do not control design unless the peak ground acceleration exceeds about 0.3 G. The effect of soil non linearities (resulting from local soil failure) are also found to have little effect on the predictions of the seismic response of the buried structure. The seismic induced pressures are found to be very similar to those predicted using the elastic model in ASCE 4-86

  15. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpytis, Mindaugas; Karosas, Vytautas; Tamosauskas, Rokas; Dementaviciene, Jurate; Strupas, Kestutis; Sileikis, Audrius; Sipylaite, Jurate

    2012-11-10

    Hypertriglyceridemia is a well known phenomenon of pregnancy occurring due to physiologic changes in sex hormone levels. Occasionally, it could lead to development of acute pancreatitis. Gestational hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis occurs in pregnant women usually with preexisting abnormalities of the lipid metabolism and is associated with additional diagnostic and therapeutic challenges related to hypertriglyceridemia and pregnancy. We present a case of the hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnant woman with no previous history of lipid abnormality and pregnancy as the only known triggering factor for hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis is a rare complication of pregnancy; however, it should be suspected in all pregnant patients admitted for nonobsteric abdominal pain.

  16. Diclofenac inhibits 27-hydroxycholesterol-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo-Young; Son, Yonghae; Eo, Seong-Kug; Park, Young Chul; Kim, Koanhoi

    2016-09-23

    27-Hydroxycholesterol (27OHChol) is a cholesterol oxidation product that induces inflammation. In the current study we investigated the effects of diclofenac on inflammatory responses caused by 27OHChol using human monocyte/macrophage (THP-1) cells. Transcription and secretion of CCL2, CCL3, and CCL4 chemokines enhanced by 27OHChol were significantly attenuated by diclofenac in a concentration dependent manner. Migrations of monocytic cells and CCR5-positive Jurkat T cells were reduced proportionally to the concentrations of diclofenac. Superproduction of CCL2 and monocytic cell migration induced by 27OHChol plus LPS were significantly attenuated by diclofenac. Diclofenac also attenuated transcription of MMP-9 and release of its active gene product. These results indicate that diclofenac inhibits 27OHChol-induced inflammatory responses, thereby suppressing inflammation in a milieu rich in cholesterol oxidation products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nonacetaminophen Drug-Induced Acute Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Arul M; Lewis, James H

    2018-05-01

    Acute liver failure of all causes is diagnosed in between 2000 and 2500 patients annually in the United States. Drug-induced acute liver failure is the leading cause of acute liver failure, accounting for more than 50% of cases. Nonacetaminophen drug injury represents 11% of all cases in the latest registry from the US Acute Liver Failure Study Group. Although rare, acute liver failure is clinically dramatic when it occurs, and requires a multidisciplinary approach to management. In contrast with acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure, non-acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure has a more ominous prognosis with a lower liver transplant-free survival. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Sports-induced infections--an overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenoff, P; Handrick, W; Haustein, U F

    2002-01-01

    Sportive activities are playing an increasing role for the spare time in our society. Subsequently, practicing of various kinds of sport can lead to direct and indirect exposures to and transmission of microorganisms between athletes and also passive observers. As a result, different microbial pathogens can be transmitted and might lead predominantly to cutaneous or mucosal infections. These include both bacteria--Staphylococcus aureus, streptococci and gram-negative bacteria, like Pseudomonas, viruses--herpes simplex virus, human papilloma virus--and, last but not least, also dermatophytes--e.g. Trichophyton tonsurans as particular pathogenic agent of tinea gladiatorum. Beside single cases of infections outbreaks through various virus-, bacteria- and dermatophytes-induced infections might happen and have indeed been reported. Surprisingly, there is only limited knowledge among physicians concerning sport-induced infections. Therefore, sport-induced infections are reviewed giving details about their route of transmission. Awareness of these infections might facilitate implementation of early treatment and preventive measures.

  19. Ethnocultural identity and induced abortion in Kazakstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agadjanian, V; Qian, Z

    1997-12-01

    This study analyzes ethnic differences in induced abortion among ever-married women in Kazakstan, drawing on data from the 1995 Kazakstan Demographic and Health Survey. Instead of conventional ethnic markers, such as "Kazak" or "Russian," it focuses on more complex ethnocultural identities that combine ascribed ethnicity with language use. Because of the history of russification in Kazakstan, three ethnocultural groups are defined and compared--Kazak women who chose to be interviewed in Kazak, Kazak women who chose to be interviewed in Russian, and women of European background interviewed in Russian. Whereas women of European origin were the most likely to undergo induced abortion, the Russian-interviewed Kazaks had higher abortion ratios and were more likely to terminate their pregnancies than were the Kazak-interviewed Kazaks, net of other characteristics. The implications of the results for induced abortion trends and family planning policy in Kazakstan are discussed in addition to other findings.

  20. UV-Induced Photocatalytic Cashmere Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyun Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cashmere with UV-induced photocatalytic properties is developed for the first time by applying nanocrystalline anatase TiO2 colloid that is free of inorganic acids and organic solvents via a facile low-temperature one-step sol-gel process. The coated cashmere exhibits remarkable UV-induced photodegradation of methyl orange. Furthermore, the photocatalytic nano-coating on cashmere exhibits significant stability after repetitive washing cycles without the need for chemical or physical pretreatment, where the photocatalytic activities remain almost unchanged after three washing cycles while maintaining a water contact angle above 150°. The one-step functionalization process also minimizes the impact on the peculiar intrinsic properties of cashmere. These findings indicate that cashmere combining reproducible UV-induced photocatalytic activity with stable superhydrophobicity has potential in practical applications.

  1. Hyper-inducible expression system for streptomycetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herai, Sachio; Hashimoto, Yoshiteru; Higashibata, Hiroki; Maseda, Hideaki; Ikeda, Haruo; Ōmura, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2004-01-01

    Streptomycetes produce useful enzymes and a wide variety of secondary metabolites with potent biological activities (e.g., antibiotics, immunosuppressors, pesticides, etc.). Despite their importance in the pharmaceutical and agrochemical fields, there have been no reports for practical expression systems in streptomycetes. Here, we developed a “PnitA-NitR” system for regulatory gene expression in streptomycetes based on the expression mechanism of Rhodococcus rhodochrous J1 nitrilase, which is highly induced by an inexpensive and safe inducer, ε-caprolactam. Heterologous protein expression experiments demonstrated that the system allowed suppressed basal expression and hyper-inducible expression, yielding target protein levels of as high as ≈40% of all soluble protein. Furthermore, the system functioned in important streptomycete strains. Thus, the PnitA-NitR system should be a powerful tool for improving the productivity of various useful products in streptomycetes. PMID:15377796

  2. Exertional and CrossFit-Induced Rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michelle; Sundaram, Sneha; Schafhalter-Zoppoth, Ingeborg

    2017-07-14

    Few publications of exercise-induced rhabomyolysis currently exist in the medical literature besides case reports. However, this condition can be severe, resulting in hospitalization and IV fluid administration to prevent serious sequelae. This report describes a case of exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis caused by a CrossFit workout. A 31-year-old female presented with 2 days of bilateral upper extremity pain and soreness, which began 2 days after she completed a CrossFit workout. Workup revealed an elevated creatine phosphokinase (CPK) of 18 441 U/L, consistent with exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis, and elevated liver function tests and elevated D-dimer, although her renal function was normal. She was hospitalized for 2 days and treated with IV fluids. This case report demonstrates that CrossFit exercises can lead to rhabdomyolysis, highlighting a condition that may be underdiagnosed and underreported.

  3. Nonsurgical Management of Nifedipine Induced Gingival Overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Sam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced gingival overgrowth is frequently associated with three particular drugs: phenytoin, cyclosporin, and nifedipine. As gingival enlargement develops, it affects the normal oral hygiene practice and may interfere with masticatory functions. The awareness in the medical community about this possible side effect of nifedipine is less when compared to the effects of phenytoin and cyclosporin. The frequency of gingival enlargement associated with chronic nifedipine therapy remains controversial. Within the group of patients that develop this unwanted effect, there appears to be variability in the extent and severity of the gingival changes. Although gingival inflammation is considered a primary requisite in their development, few cases with minimal or no plaque induced gingival inflammation have also been reported. A case report of gingival overgrowth induced by nifedipine in a patient with good oral hygiene and its nonsurgical management with drug substitution is discussed in this case report.

  4. Chemically induced proximity in biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Benjamin Z; Chory, Emma J; Crabtree, Gerald R

    2018-03-09

    Proximity, or the physical closeness of molecules, is a pervasive regulatory mechanism in biology. For example, most posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation, methylation, and acetylation promote proximity of molecules to play deterministic roles in cellular processes. To understand the role of proximity in biologic mechanisms, chemical inducers of proximity (CIPs) were developed to synthetically model biologically regulated recruitment. Chemically induced proximity allows for precise temporal control of transcription, signaling cascades, chromatin regulation, protein folding, localization, and degradation, as well as a host of other biologic processes. A systematic analysis of CIPs in basic research, coupled with recent technological advances utilizing CRISPR, distinguishes roles of causality from coincidence and allows for mathematical modeling in synthetic biology. Recently, induced proximity has provided new avenues of gene therapy and emerging advances in cancer treatment. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  5. Sugar-induced molten-globule model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Searles, P R; Morar, A S; Saunders, A J; Erie, D A; Pielak, G J

    1998-12-01

    Proteins denature at low pH because of intramolecular electrostatic repulsions. The addition of salt partially overcomes this repulsion for some proteins, yielding a collapsed conformation called the A-state. A-states have characteristics expected for the molten globule, a notional kinetic protein folding intermediate. Here we show that the addition of neutral sugars to solutions of acid-denatured equine ferricytochrome c induces formation of the A-state in the absence of added salt. We characterized the structure and stability of the sugar-induced A-state with circular dichroism spectropolarimetry (CD) and NMR-monitored hydrogen-deuterium exchange experiments. We also examined the stability of the sugar-induced A-state as a function of sugar size and concentration. The results are interpreted using several models and we conclude that the stabilizing effect is consistent with increased steric repulsion between the protein and the sugar solutions.

  6. Griseofulvin-induced aggregation of microtubule protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roobol, A; Gull, K; Pogson, C I

    1977-01-01

    Griseofulvin (7-chloro-2',4,6-trimethoxy-6'-methylspiro[benzofuran-2(3H),1'-[2]cyclohexene]-3,4'-dione) induces aggregation of microtubule protein at 0 degrees C. This aggregate contains approx. 90% of the microtubule-associated proteins originally present in the microtubule protein. The supernatant obtained after removal of the griseofulvin-induced aggregate does not form microtubules on warming at 37 degrees C. Addition of the griseofulvin-aggregated protein to this supernatant and warming to 37 degrees C gives rise to a limited amount of microtubule assembly. The possible involvement of griseofulvin-induced aggregation of microtubule protein at 0 degrees C in the inhibition by griseofulvin of microtubule assembly in vitro is discussed. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PMID:588267

  7. Mechanically Induced Multicolor Change of Luminescent Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiyong; Wang, Zhijian; Teng, Mingjun; Xu, Zejun; Jia, Xinru

    2015-06-22

    Mechanofluorochromic or piezochromic fluorescence chemistry involves the switching and tuning of the luminescent properties of solid-state materials induced by exogenous forces, such as grinding, shearing, compression, tension, and so forth. Up until now, most reported mechanochromic systems, including liquid crystals, organic molecules, organometallic compounds, polymers, and dye-doped polymers, have displayed reversible two-color changes, which arise from either supramolecular or chemical structure transformations. However, fluorescent materials that undergo mechanically induced multicolor changes remain rare; this Minireview is focused on such materials. Topics are categorized according to the different applied forces that are required to induce the multicolor change, including mechanical control of either the supramolecular structures or the chemical structures, and mechanical control of both the supramolecular structures and chemical structures. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Sepsis-Induced Osteoblast Ablation Causes Immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terashima, Asuka; Okamoto, Kazuo; Nakashima, Tomoki; Akira, Shizuo; Ikuta, Koichi; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2016-06-21

    Sepsis is a host inflammatory response to severe infection associated with high mortality that is caused by lymphopenia-associated immunodeficiency. However, it is unknown how lymphopenia persists after the accelerated lymphocyte apoptosis subsides. Here we show that sepsis rapidly ablated osteoblasts, which reduced the number of common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs). Osteoblast ablation or inducible deletion of interleukin-7 (IL-7) in osteoblasts recapitulated the lymphopenic phenotype together with a lower CLP number without affecting hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Pharmacological activation of osteoblasts improved sepsis-induced lymphopenia. This study demonstrates a reciprocal interaction between the immune and bone systems, in which acute inflammation induces a defect in bone cells resulting in lymphopenia-associated immunodeficiency, indicating that bone cells comprise a therapeutic target in certain life-threatening immune reactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Bile acids in radiation-induced diarrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlow, F.L.; Dekovich, A.A.; Priest, R.J.; Beher, W.T.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation-induced bowel disease manifested by debilitating diarrhea is an unfortunate consequence of therapeutic irradiation for pelvic malignancies. Although the mechanism for this diarrhea is not well understood, many believe it is the result of damage to small bowel mucosa and subsequent bile acid malabsorption. Excess amounts of bile acids, especially the dihydroxy components, are known to induce water and electrolyte secretion and increase bowel motility. We have directly measured individual and total bile acids in the stool samples of 11 patients with radiation-induced diarrhea and have found bile acids elevated two to six times normal in eight of them. Our patients with diarrhea and increased bile acids in their stools had prompt improvement when given cholestyramine. They had fewer stools and returned to a more normal life-style

  10. Does erythropoietin augment noise induced hearing loss?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Lund, Søren Peter

    2007-01-01

    of EPO upon damage to the central nervous system and the retina. This paper reports three separate trials, conducted to investigate the hypothesis that noise-induced hearing loss is prevented or reduced by erythropoietin. The trials employed three different modes of drug application, different......Noise-induced hearing loss may result from excessive release of glutamate, nitrogen oxide and reactive oxygen species. The effects of these factors on the inner ear may potentially be prevented or reduced by erythropoietin (EPO), as indicated by previously demonstrated neuro-protective effects...... and auditory brainstem responses (at 16kHz) were recorded before and after noise exposure in all trials. The noise exposure induced a hearing loss in all animals. In trial 1, no recovery and no improvement of hearing occurred in any treatment group. In trial 2 and 3, a partial hearing recovery was seen...

  11. Deuterium NMR, induced and intrinsic cholesteric lyomesophases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcantara, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Induced and intrinsic cholesteric lyotropic mesophases were studied. Induced cholesteric lyomesophases based on potassium laurate (KL) system, with small amounts of cholesterol added, were studied by deuterium NMR and by polarizing microscopy. Order profiles obtained from deuterium NMR of KL perdenderated chains in both induced cholesteric and normal mesophases were compared. The intrinsic cholesteric lyotropic mesophases were based on the amphiphile potassium N-lauroyl serinate (KLNS) in the resolved levo form. The study of the type I intrinsic cholesteric mesophase was made by optical microscopy under polarized light and the type II intrinsic cholesteric lyomesophase was characterized by deuterium NMR. The new texture was explained by the use of the theory of disclinations developed for thermotropic liquid crystals, specially for cholesteric type. (M.J.C.) [pt

  12. Copper Induces Vasorelaxation and Antagonizes Noradrenaline -Induced Vasoconstriction in Rat Mesenteric Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chun Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Copper is an essential trace element for normal cellular function and contributes to critical physiological or pathological processes. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of copper on vascular tone of rat mesenteric artery and compare the effects of copper on noradrenaline (NA and high K+ induced vasoconstriction. Methods: The rat mesenteric arteries were isolated and the vessel tone was measured by using multi wire myograph system in vitro. Blood pressure of carotid artery in rabbits was measured by using physiological data acquisition and analysis system in vivo. Results: Copper dose-dependently blunted NA-induced vasoconstriction of rat mesenteric artery. Copper-induced vasorelaxation was inhibited when the vessels were pretreated with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME. Copper did not blunt high K+-induced vasoconstriction. Copper preincubation inhibited NA-evoked vasoconstriction and the inhibition was not affected by the presence of L-NAME. Copper preincubation showed no effect on high K+-evoked vasoconstriction. Copper chelator diethyldithiocarbamate trihydrate (DTC antagonized the vasoactivity induced by copper in rat mesenteric artery. In vivo experiments showed that copper injection (iv significantly decreased blood pressure of rabbits and NA or DTC injection (iv did not rescue the copper-induced hypotension and animal death. Conclusion: Copper blunted NA but not high K+-induced vasoconstriction of rat mesenteric artery. The acute effect of copper on NA-induced vasoconstriction was depended on nitric oxide (NO, but the effect of copper pretreatment on NA-induced vasoconstriction was independed on NO, suggesting that copper affected NA-induced vasoconstriction by two distinct mechanisms.

  13. Sex ratios at birth after induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquia, Marcelo L; Moineddin, Rahim; Jha, Prabhat; O'Campo, Patricia J; McKenzie, Kwame; Glazier, Richard H; Henry, David A; Ray, Joel G

    2016-06-14

    Skewed male:female ratios at birth have been observed among certain immigrant groups. Data on abortion practices that might help to explain these findings are lacking. We examined 1 220 933 births to women with up to 3 consecutive singleton live births between 1993 and 2012 in Ontario. Records of live births, and induced and spontaneous abortions were linked to Canadian immigration records. We determined associations of male:female infant ratios with maternal birthplace, sex of the previous living sibling(s) and prior spontaneous or induced abortions. Male:female infant ratios did not appreciably depart from the normal range among Canadian-born women and most women born outside of Canada, irrespective of the sex of previous children or the characteristics of prior abortions. However, among infants of women who immigrated from India and had previously given birth to 2 girls, the overall male:female ratio was 1.96 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.75-2.21) for the third live birth. The male:female infant ratio after 2 girls was 1.77 (95% CI 1.26-2.47) times higher if the current birth was preceded by 1 induced abortion, 2.38 (95% CI 1.44-3.94) times higher if preceded by 2 or more induced abortions and 3.88 (95% CI 2.02-7.50) times higher if the induced abortion was performed at 15 weeks or more gestation relative to no preceding abortion. Spontaneous abortions were not associated with male-biased sex ratios in subsequent births. High male:female ratios observed among infants born to women who immigrated from India are associated with induced abortions, especially in the second trimester of pregnancy. © 2016 Canadian Medical Association or its licensors.

  14. Prevalence of induced ischemia by mental distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbirato, Gustavo Borges; Félix, Renata; de Azevedo, Jader Cunha; Corrêa, Patrícia Lavatori; de Nóbrega, Antônio Claudio Lucas; Coimbra, Alexandro; Volschan, André; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Dohmann, Hans Fernando Rocha; Mesquita, Cláudio Tinoco

    2010-03-01

    The myocardial radionuclide imaging with mental distress seems to induce ischemia through a particular physiopathology when compared to radionuclide imaging with physical or pharmacological distress. To assess the prevalence of induced myocardial ischemia by mental distress in patients with thoracic pain and radionuclide imaging with normal conventional distress, with 99mTc-Sestamibi. Twenty-two patients were admitted with thoracic pain at emergency or were referred to the nuclear medicine service of our institution, where myocardial radionuclide imaging of distress or rest without ischemic alterations was carried out. The patients were, then, invited to go through an additional phase with mental distress induced by color conflict (Strop Color Test) with the objective of detecting myocardial ischemia. Two cardiologists and nuclear physicians performed the blind analysis of perfusional data and consequent quantification through Summed Difference Score (SDS), punctuating the segments that were altered after mental distress and comparing it to the rest period image. The presence of myocardial ischemia was considered if SDS > or = 3. The prevalence of mental distress-induced myocardial ischemia was 40% (9 positive patients). Among the 22 studied patients, there were no statistical differences with regard to the number of risk factors, mental distress-induced hemodynamic alterations, usage of medications, presented symptoms, presence or absence of coronary disease and variations of ejection fraction and final systolic volume of Gated SPECT. In a selected sample of patients with thoracic pain and normal myocardial radionuclide imaging, the research of myocardial ischemia induced by mental distress through radionuclide imaging may be positive in up to 40% of cases.

  15. Incidence of induced abortion in Malawi, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polis, Chelsea B; Mhango, Chisale; Philbin, Jesse; Chimwaza, Wanangwa; Chipeta, Effie; Msusa, Ausbert

    2017-01-01

    In Malawi, abortion is legal only if performed to save a woman's life; other attempts to procure an abortion are punishable by 7-14 years imprisonment. Most induced abortions in Malawi are performed under unsafe conditions, contributing to Malawi's high maternal mortality ratio. Malawians are currently debating whether to provide additional exceptions under which an abortion may be legally obtained. An estimated 67,300 induced abortions occurred in Malawi in 2009 (equivalent to 23 abortions per 1,000 women aged 15-44), but changes since 2009, including dramatic increases in contraceptive prevalence, may have impacted abortion rates. We conducted a nationally representative survey of health facilities to estimate the number of cases of post-abortion care, as well as a survey of knowledgeable informants to estimate the probability of needing and obtaining post-abortion care following induced abortion. These data were combined with national population and fertility data to determine current estimates of induced abortion and unintended pregnancy in Malawi using the Abortion Incidence Complications Methodology. We estimate that approximately 141,044 (95% CI: 121,161-160,928) induced abortions occurred in Malawi in 2015, translating to a national rate of 38 abortions per 1,000 women aged 15-49 (95% CI: 32 to 43); which varied by geographical zone (range: 28-61). We estimate that 53% of pregnancies in Malawi are unintended, and that 30% of unintended pregnancies end in abortion. Given the challenges of estimating induced abortion, and the assumptions required for calculation, results should be viewed as approximate estimates, rather than exact measures. The estimated abortion rate in 2015 is higher than in 2009 (potentially due to methodological differences), but similar to recent estimates from nearby countries including Tanzania (36), Uganda (39), and regional estimates in Eastern and Southern Africa (34-35). Over half of pregnancies in Malawi are unintended. Our

  16. Mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth G Vichaya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available While chemotherapeutic agents have yielded relative success in the treatment of cancer, patients are often plagued with unwanted and even debilitating side-effects from the treatment which can lead to dose reduction or even cessation of treatment. Common side effects (symptoms of chemotherapy include (i cognitive deficiencies such as problems with attention, memory and executive functioning; (ii fatigue and motivational deficit; and (iii neuropathy. These symptoms often develop during treatment but can remain even after cessation of chemotherapy, severely impacting long-term quality of life. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms responsible for the development of these behavioral toxicities, however, neuroinflammation is widely considered to be one of the major mechanisms responsible for chemotherapy-induced symptoms. Here, we critically assess what is known in regards to the role of neuroinflammation in chemotherapy-induced symptoms. We also argue that, based on the available evidence neuroinflammation is unlikely the only mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities. We evaluate two other putative candidate mechanisms. To this end we discuss the mediating role of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs activated in response to chemotherapy-induced cellular damage. We also review the literature with respect to possible alternative mechanisms such as a chemotherapy-induced change in the bioenergetic status of the tissue involving changes in mitochondrial function in relation to chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie the emergence of fatigue, neuropathy, and cognitive difficulties is vital to better treatment and long-term survival of cancer patients.

  17. Role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Harris, A.H. (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-05-01

    The role of neurotensin in radiation-induced hypothermia was examined. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of neurotensin produced dose-dependent hypothermia. Histamine appears to mediate neurotensin-induced hypothermia because the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate and antihistamines blocked the hypothermic effects of neurotensin. An ICV pretreatment with neurotensin antibody attenuated neurotensin-induced hypothermia, but did not attenuate radiation-induced hypothermia, suggesting that radiation-induced hypothermia was not mediated by neurotensin.

  18. Influence of Geometric Parameters of Inducer Bush Design on Cavitation Erosion Characteristics of Centrifugal Inducer Stage of Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkach, P. Y.

    2017-08-01

    The article represents the research results of a centrifugal inducer stage with inducer bush. We determined the optimal inducer bush design that would improve the cavitation erosion characteristics without deteriorating the energy levels and preserving overall dimensions of the centrifugal inducer stage at the same time.

  19. Ghrelin- and GH-induced insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Esben Thyssen; Krag, Morten B; Poulsen, Morten M

    2013-01-01

    Supraphysiological levels of ghrelin and GH induce insulin resistance. Serum levels of retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) correlate inversely with insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes. We aimed to determine whether ghrelin and GH affect RBP4 levels in human subjects.......Supraphysiological levels of ghrelin and GH induce insulin resistance. Serum levels of retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) correlate inversely with insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes. We aimed to determine whether ghrelin and GH affect RBP4 levels in human subjects....

  20. Noise-induced hearing impairment and handicap

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    A permanent, noise-induced hearing loss has doubly harmful effect on speech communications. First, the elevation in the threshold of hearing means that many speech sounds are too weak to be heard, and second, very intense speech sounds may appear to be distorted. The whole question of the impact of noise-induced hearing loss upon the impairments and handicaps experienced by people with such hearing losses was somewhat controversial partly because of the economic aspects of related practical noise control and workmen's compensation.

  1. Skull Vibration Induced Nystagmus in Otorhinolaryngology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sánchez Blanco

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The Vibration Induced Nystagmus (VIN is a useful, easy, non-invasive examination that involves an asymmetry of the vestibular function. Applying a 100Hz vibration over the mastoid process induces a horizontal nystagmus beating towards the normal side in patients with unilateral vestibular loss. In this paper we show the physiological foundations, practical conditions and the interpretation of the results. Methods: Narrative review. Discussion and conclusions: VIN starts with stimulation onset and it stops at stimulation offset. It has the same direction when you stimulate both mastoids. It shows a little or no habituation and it is permanent even in well compensated patients.

  2. Flow induced crystallisation of penetrable particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scacchi, Alberto; Brader, Joseph M.

    2018-03-01

    For a system of Brownian particles interacting via a soft exponential potential we investigate the interaction between equilibrium crystallisation and spatially varying shear flow. For thermodynamic state points within the liquid part of the phase diagram, but close to the crystallisation phase boundary, we observe that imposing a Poiseuille flow can induce nonequilibrium crystalline ordering in regions of low shear gradient. The physical mechanism responsible for this phenomenon is shear-induced particle migration, which causes particles to drift preferentially towards the center of the flow channel, thus increasing the local density in the channel center. The method employed is classical dynamical density functional theory.

  3. Penicillamin-induced neuropathy in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P B; Hogenhaven, H

    1990-01-01

    A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse eff...... effect should be born in mind, and discontinuation of the drug considered.......A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse...

  4. Electromagnetically Induced Transparency In Rydberg Atomic Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Li; Cong, Lu; Chen, Ai-Xi

    2018-03-01

    Due to possessing big principal quantum number, Rydberg atom has some unique properties, for example: its radiative lifetime is long, dipole moment is large, and interaction between atoms is strong and so on. These properties make one pay attention to Rydberg atoms. In this paper we investigate the effects of Rydberg dipole-dipole interactions on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) schemes and group velocity in three-level systems of ladder type, which provides theoretical foundation for exploring the linear and nonlinear characteristics of light in a Rydberg electromagnetically-induced-transparency medium.

  5. The Angiotensin-Converting-Enzyme-Induced Angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, Murat

    2017-02-01

    The bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist icatibant is effective in angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced angioedema. The drug is not approved officially for this indication and has to be administered in an emergency situation off-label. Corticosteroids or antihistamines do not seem to work in this condition. The effectiveness of C1-esterase-inhibitor in angiotensin-converting enzyme-induced angioedema must be verified in a double-blind study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An experiment of spectral induced polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sambuelli

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available A Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP survey was carried out in a mining test site in Sardinia (Italy. Measurements were developed along a profile by using an axial dipole-dipole array with 10 AB positions and 6 MN positions for cach AB. The amplitude and phase spectra of the apparent resistivity were acquired in the 0.25-4096 Hz frequeney range. The results obtained through the processing and inversion step seem to confirm that, with respect to the classical TD/FD Induced Polarization, SIP allows better discrimination of some important characteristics of mineral deposits such as mineral content and grain size.

  7. A Case of Meropenem Induced Cholestasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Büşra Canbaz, Özgür Kara, Güneş Arık

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Meropenem is a broad-spectrum carbapenem antibiotic used for complicated hospital infections. Mild aminotransferase elevations have been reported in meropenem recipients, but cholestasis is rare. A 70 year old man was admitted for infected diabetic foot ulcer. ALP and GGT levels started increasing one week after the initiation of meropenem, with normal ALT, AST and bilirubin levels. Meropenem induced intrahepatic cholestasis was suspected and meropenem was discontinued, followed by normalization of liver enzymes. Drug induced liver injury should be suspected in patients with unexplained liver enzyme elevations. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2016;6(4: 190-191

  8. Prophylaxis of Contrast-Induced Nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contrast-induced nephrotoxicity (CIN is a form of acute kidney injury that follows intravascular contrast media exposure. CIN may be preventable because its risk factors are well established and the timing of renal insult is commonly known in advance. However, contrast-induced nephrotoxicity is still the third leading cause of iatrogenic renal failure. This important complication accounts up to 10% of acute renal failure cases in hospitalized patients and it is associated with increased short- and long-term morbidity and mortality. Prolonged hospitalization follows and overall increases healthcare resource utilization. This paper will discuss the various prophylactic procedures tested in clinical trials.

  9. Neuraxial opioid-induced pruritus: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Szarvas, Szilvia

    2012-02-03

    When intrathecal and epidural opioids are administered, pruritus occurs as an unwanted and troublesome side effect. The reported incidence varies between 30% and 100%. The exact mechanisms of neuraxial opioid-induced pruritus remain unclear. Postulated mechanisms include the presence of an "itch center" in the central nervous system, medullary dorsal horn activation, and antagonism of inhibitory transmitters. The treatment of intrathecal opioid-induced pruritus remains a challenge. Many pharmacological therapies, including antihistamines, 5-HT(3)-receptor antagonists, opiate-antagonists, propofol, nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs, and droperidol, have been studied. In this review, we will summarize pathophysiological and pharmacological advances that will improve understanding and ultimately the management of this troublesome problem.

  10. Stress induced reorientation of vanadium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beardsley, M.B.

    1977-10-01

    The critical stress for the reorientation of vanadium hydride was determined for the temperature range 180 0 to 280 0 K using flat tensile samples containing 50 to 500 ppM hydrogen by weight. The critical stress was observed to vary from a half to a third of the macroscopic yield stress of pure vanadium over the temperature range. The vanadium hydride could not be stress induced to precipitate above its stress-free precipitation temperature by uniaxial tensile stresses or triaxial tensile stresses induced by a notch

  11. Radiation-induced damage of membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonei, Shuji

    1977-01-01

    An outline of membranous structure was stated, and radiation-induced damage of membranes were surveyed. By irradiation, permeability of membranes, especially passive transportation mechanism, was damaged, and glycoprotein in the surface layers of cells and the surface layer structures were changed. The intramembranous damage was induced by decrease of electrophoresis of nuclear mambranes and a quantitative change of cytochrome P450 of microsomal membranes of the liver, and peroxidation of membranous lipid and SH substitute damage of membranous protein were mentioned as the mechanism of membranous damage. Recovery of membranous damage depends on radiation dose and temperature, and membranous damage participates largely in proliferation death. (tsunoda, M.)

  12. Movement disorders induced by peripheral trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nóbrega José Cláudio Marinho da

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Movement disorders induced by central nervous system trauma are well recognized. However, over the last few years, attention has been drawn to the role of peripherally induced movement disorders. We describe three patients presenting respectively dystonia, tremor and choreoathetosis associated with tremor and dystonia of the body parts previously exposed to traumatic injuries. Pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these phenomena are not entirely known, but functional changes in afferent neuronal input to the spinal cord and secondary affection of higher brain stem and subcortical centers are probably involved.

  13. The Marquis de Sade and induced abortion.

    OpenAIRE

    Farr, A D

    1980-01-01

    In 1795 the Marquis de Sade published his La Philosophic dans le boudoir, in which he proposed the use of induced abortion for social reasons and as a means of population control. It is from this time that medical and social acceptance of abortion can be dated, although previously the subject had not been discussed in public in modern times. It is suggested that it was largely due to de Sade's writing that induced abortion received the impetus which resulted in its subsequent spread in wester...

  14. Shock-induced electrical activity in polymeric solids. A mechanically induced bond scission model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    When polymeric solids are subjected to high-pressure shock loading, two anomalous electrical phenomena, shock-induced conduction and shock-induced polarization, are observed. The present paper proposes a model of mechanically induced bond scission within the shock front to account for the effects. An experimental study of shock-induced polarization in poly(pyromellitimide) (Vespel SP-1) is reported for shock compressions from 17 to 23% (pressures from 2.5 to 5.4 GPa). Poly(pyromellitimide) is found to be a strong generator of such polarization and the polarization is found to reflect an irreversible or highly hysteretic process. The present measurements are combined with prior measurements to establish a correlation between monomer structure and strength of shock-induced polarization; feeble signals are observed in the simpler monomer repeat units of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) and polyethylene while the strongest signals are observed in more complex monomers of poly(methyl methacrylate) and poly(pyromellitimide). It is also noted that there is an apparent correlation between shock-induced conduction and shock-induced polarization. Such shock-induced electrical activity is also found to be well correlated with the propensity for mechanical bond scission observed in experiments carried out in conventional mechanochemical studies. The bond scission model can account for characteristics observed for electrical activity in shock-loaded polymers and their correlation to monomer structure. Localization of elastic energy within the monomer repeat unit or along the main chain leads to the different propensities for bond scission and resulting shock-induced electrical activity

  15. Induced resistance: an enhancement of basal resistance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M. de; Robben, C.; Pelt, J.A. van; Loon, L.C. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Upon primary pathogen attack, plants activate resistance mechanisms at the site of infection. Besides this so-called basal resistance, plants have also the ability to enhance their defensive capacity against future pathogen attack. There are at least two types of biologically induced resistance.

  16. Hypocentre estimation of induced earthquakes in Groningen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spetzler, J.; Dost, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Induced earthquakes due to gas production have taken place in the province of Groningen in the northeast of The Netherlands since 1986. In the first years of seismicity, a sparse seismological network with large station distances from the seismogenic area in Groningen was used. The location of

  17. Desaturation After Remifentanil-Propofol Induced Apnea

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    succinylcholine-induced apnea was responsible for the desaturation. Our hypothesis was that avoiding succinylcholine by using propofol and remifentanil to facilitate tracheal intubation would prevent prolonged apnea and subsequent desaturation. We attempted to identify a dose of remifentanil which, in combination with ...

  18. Topical cholesterol in clofazimine induced ichthyosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey S

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Topical application of 10% cholesterol in petrolatum significantly (P< 0.05 controlled the development of ichthyosis in 62 patients taking 100 mg clofazimine daily for a period of 3 months. However, topical cholesterol application did not affect the lowering of serum cholesterol induced by oral clofazimine. Probable mechanism of action is being discussed.

  19. Clustering of noise-induced oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sosnovtseva, Olga; Fomin, A I; Postnov, D E

    2001-01-01

    The subject of our study is clustering in a population of excitable systems driven by Gaussian white noise and with randomly distributed coupling strength. The cluster state is frequency-locked state in which all functional units run at the same noise-induced frequency. Cooperative dynamics...

  20. Galaxies interactions and induced star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kennicutt Jr, Robert C; Barnes, JE

    1998-01-01

    The papers that make up this volume present a comprehensive review of the field of galaxy interaction. Galaxies are dynamic forces that evolve, interact, merge, blaze and reshape. This book offers a historical perspective and studies such topics as induced star formation.

  1. Hole pairing induced by antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Z.B.; Yu Lu; Dong, J.M.; Tosatti, E.

    1987-08-01

    The effective interaction induced by antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations is considered in the random phase approximation in the context of the recently discovered high T c oxide superconductors. This effective attraction favours a triplet pairing of holes. The implications of such pairing mechanism are discussed in connection with the current experimental observations. (author). 30 refs, 2 figs

  2. Neuroprotective effect of paeonol against isoflurane- induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate whether paeonol affords neuroprotection against isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity. Methods: Separate ... significant improvement in the general behaviour and working memory of the rats. Conclusion: Paeonol significantly .... any visual impairments and/or swimming difficulties. The pool was covered ...

  3. Oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zedan, Ahmed; Hansen, Torben Frøstrup; Fex Svenningsen, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent effective against advanced colorectal cancer. Unlike with other platinum-based agents, the main side effect of oxaliplatin is polyneuropathy. Oxaliplatin-induced polyneuropathy (OIPN) has a unique profile, which can be divided into acute and chronic...

  4. Thermally induced damage studies with shaped light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available thermal stress. We illustrate the technique on an industrial diamond sample where a gradient and uniform temperature profile on the surface of the diamond was successfully created and measured. We use the technique to study the thermally induced...

  5. Optic flow induced self-tilt perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Roll optic flow induces illusory self-tilt in humans. As far as the mechanism underlying this visual-vestibular interaction is understood, larger angles of self-tilt are predicted than observed. It is hypothesized that the discrepancy can be explained by idiotropic (i.e., referring to a personal

  6. Review of fungus-induced asthmatic reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauffman, H. F.; TOMEE, J. F.; van der Werf, T. S.; de Monchy, J. G.; Koëter, G. K.

    Fungus-induced obstructive airway disease in atopic individuals can be differentiated into two categories: first, uncomplicated asthmatic reactions due to high but transient exposure to fungal spores (fungal asthma), resulting in a T-H2-type response with immunoglobulin E-mediated reactions and

  7. Heparin and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-06-15

    Jun 15, 2007 ... therapy, namely heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). Pharmacology. Unfractionated heparin (UFH) ... UFH, because inpatient therapy with careful monitoring of aPTT is not required. Thus LMWH have allowed ... in 1909,7 and is derived from the medicinal leech. Lepirudin is recombinant hirudin, and ...

  8. Haematogical changes induced by subchronic glyphosate exposure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the haematological changes induced by subchronic glyphosate exposure in Wistar rats and the ameliorative effect of zinc. Sixty adult male and female Wistar rats were used for the study. Twelve of them were used for the LD50 which was evaluated to be 3750 mg kg-1 with clinical ...

  9. Temperature dependence of pulse-induced mechanoluminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Mechanoluminescence; dislocations; pulse-induced excitation; alkali halides; radiative recombination. ... B P Chandra2. Department of Post Graduate Studies and Research in Physics and Electronics, Rani Durgawati University, Jabalpur 482 001, India; Pt. Ravi Shanker Shukla University, Raipur 492 010, India ...

  10. Does lipophilicity per se induce adjuvant effects?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jitka Stilund; Larsen, Søren Thor; Poulsen, Lars K.

    2007-01-01

    compound induces immunomodulatory effects was investigated in a murine inhalation model with the highly lipophilic methyl palmitate (MP) as model substance. First, studies of acute effects following a 1-h exposure of up to 348 mg/m3 MP showed no effects on cell composition in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL...

  11. Advances in Glucocorticoid-induced Osteoporosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Uyl, D.; Bultink, I.E.M.; Lems, W.F.

    2011-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) is one of the most important side effects of glucocorticoid use, as it leads to an increased risk of fractures. Recently, many published studies have focused on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of bone metabolism, the pathophysiology of GIOP, and the

  12. Diffuse Transcranial Electrical Stimulation (DTES)-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Status epilepticus (SE) was induced in male and female Wistar rats by passing low direct current across the brain via steel electrodes clipped to their ear lobes, and the effects of some anti-convulsants on these animals were studied in a motility counter chamber. Sodium valproate was found to significantly attenuate diffuse ...

  13. Friction-induced nanofabrication on monocrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Bingjun; Qian Linmao; Yu Jiaxin; Zhou Zhongrong; Dong Hanshan; Chen Yunfei

    2009-01-01

    Fabrication of nanostructures has become a major concern as the scaling of device dimensions continues. In this paper, a friction-induced nanofabrication method is proposed to fabricate protrusive nanostructures on silicon. Without applying any voltage, the nanofabrication is completed by sliding an AFM diamond tip on a sample surface under a given normal load. Nanostructured patterns, such as linear nanostructures, nanodots or nanowords, can be fabricated on the target surface. The height of these nanostructures increases rapidly at first and then levels off with the increasing normal load or number of scratching cycles. TEM analyses suggest that the friction-induced hillock is composed of silicon oxide, amorphous silicon and deformed silicon structures. Compared to the tribochemical reaction, the amorphization and crystal defects induced by the mechanical interaction may have played a dominating role in the formation of the hillocks. Similar to other proximal probe methods, the proposed method enables fabrication at specified locations and facilitates measuring the dimensions of nanostructures with high precision. It is highlighted that the fabrication can also be realized on electrical insulators or oxide surfaces, such as quartz and glass. Therefore, the friction-induced method points out a new route in fabricating nanostructures on demand.

  14. Aspirin-induced asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botey, J; Navarro, C; Marín, A; Eseverri, J L

    1988-01-01

    Since Cooke first described bronchospasm induced by acetyl salicylic acid in asthmatic patients in 1919, numerous studies have been done with the objective of understanding the pathology, treatment and incidence of aspirin-induced asthma. The incidence is difficult to establish but according to two recent studies, the percentage in the infantile asthmatic population was estimated at 13% and 28%. This prevalence is greater than that suspected at first and reveals the necessity of reviewing this problem. In this study we present 4 pediatric patients, 2 atopics and 2 non-atopics affected with aspirin-induced asthma. A detailed clinical history, oral provocation test to acetyl salicylic acid, other non-steroid anti-inflammatory analgesics and additives was performed. The oral provocation test with acetyl salicylic acid was positive in all 4 cases. The oral provocation with non-steroid anti-inflammatory analgesics and other additives was negative in 2 patients. In the remaining 2 patients, one demonstrated sensitivity only to tartrazine and the other to tartrazine, red coccine, mefenamic acid and benorylate. In conclusion, aspirin-induced asthma is not infrequent in infancy. Therefore, it is important to bear it always in mind and to diagnose it through oral provocation besides looking for possible cross reactions.

  15. The interstitial pneumonitis induced by cytostatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubrava, M.; Markova, I.; Mistina, L.

    1998-01-01

    The author presents a cause of 9-year old boy with ALL-F2B in the stage of the prevention treatment where in the its course the induced interstitial pneumonitis by cytostatics was developed. The bacterial, virus, mycological and parasitic causes of the interstitial pneumonitis on the basis of the bronchoscopy, BAL, CT, scintigraphy, laboratory and by cultivation were excluded. (authors)

  16. Parity violation in neutron induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudkov, V.P.

    1991-06-01

    The theory of parity violation in neutron induced reactions is discussed. Special attention is paid to the energy dependence and enhancement factors for the various types of nuclear reactions and the information which might be obtained from P-violating effects in nuclei. (author)

  17. Extreme ultraviolet induced oxidation of Ru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Feng; Sturm, Jacobus Marinus; Lee, Christopher James; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    13.5 nm EUV photons generate a significant amount of secondary electrons at the surface of the multilayer mirrors (MLM) in the lithography tool, inducing photochemical reactions between residual gas molecules and the mirror surfaces [1]. An understanding of the catalytic role of the mirror surface

  18. Finger cold-induced vasodilation : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H. A M

    Cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) in the finger tips generally occurs 5-10 min after the start of local cold exposure of the extremities. This phenomenon is believed to reduce the risk of local cold injuries. However, CIVD is almost absent during hypothermia, when survival of the organism takes

  19. Compensation of oscillation coupling induced by solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelinskij, A.Yu.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Shcherbakov, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Methods for construction of various schemes of oscillation coupling compensation, induced by solenoids in charged particle storage rings, are described. Peculiarities of magnetic structure, enabling to localize oscillation coupling in wide energy range are discussed. Results of calculation of compensation schemes for design of NR-2000 storage ring spin rotation are presented

  20. Determinants of reflux-induced chronic cough

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herregods, Thomas V. K.; Pauwels, Ans; Jafari, Jafar; Sifrim, Daniel; Bredenoord, Albert J.; Tack, Jan; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Gastro-oesophageal reflux is considered to be an important contributing factor in chronic unexplained cough. It remains unclear why some reflux episodes in the same patient causes cough while others do not. To understand more about the mechanism by which reflux induces cough, we aimed to

  1. Fluoride treatment in corticosteroid induced osteoporosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rejou, F; Dumas, R; Belon, C; Meunier, P J; Edouard, C

    1986-01-01

    Severe osteoporosis with multiple vertebral fractures occurred in two girls receiving prolonged high dose corticosteroids for relapsing dermatomyositis. Sodium fluoride, supplemented with calcium and vitamin D, helped control secondary osteoporosis in one case and should be considered as part of the curative treatment of corticoid induced osteoporosis.

  2. PREVENTION OF PHOSPHATE - INDUCED MITOCHONDRIAL SWELLING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Arnold J.; Kuwabara, Toichiro

    1962-01-01

    The prevention of phosphate-induced mitochondrial swelling in the whole retina of the rabbit was studied with the electron microscope. It was found that a mixture of ATP, Mg++, and bovine serum albumin protected the mitochondria in vitro. This finding confirmed the results obtained spectrophotometrically with isolated rat liver mitochondria by Lehninger. PMID:13927020

  3. OCT4: A penetrant pluripotency inducer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuecong Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Native OCT4 protein has the intrinsic ability of crossing cellular membranes to enter cells. This finding could revive efforts to induce pluripotency with proteins replacing nucleic acid-based approaches, and raises the intriguing question as to whether OCT4 can act non-cell-autonomously.

  4. OCT4: A penetrant pluripotency inducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuecong; Jauch, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Native OCT4 protein has the intrinsic ability of crossing cellular membranes to enter cells. This finding could revive efforts to induce pluripotency with proteins replacing nucleic acid-based approaches, and raises the intriguing question as to whether OCT4 can act non-cell-autonomously.

  5. OCT4: A penetrant pluripotency inducer

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xuecong; Jauch, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Native OCT4 protein has the intrinsic ability of crossing cellular membranes to enter cells. This finding could revive efforts to induce pluripotency with proteins replacing nucleic acid-based approaches, and raises the intriguing question as to whether OCT4 can act non-cell-autonomously.

  6. Derivation, characterization and retinal differentiation of induced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-01-11

    Jan 11, 2013 ... 1Sudhakar and Sreekanth Ravi Stem Cell Biology Laboratory, Prof Brien Holden Eye. Research ... cells, alternative stem cell sources like the embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer a great promise for ...... exhibit ion transport, membrane potential, polarized vascular.

  7. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Kayama

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD, cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF. HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS. ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease.

  8. HEPARIN-INDUCED THROMBOCYTOPAENIA/THROMBOSIS: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-02

    Dec 2, 2009 ... HEPARIN-INDUCED THROMBOCYTOPAENIA/THROMBOSIS: A CLINICO-. PATHOLOGIC REVIEW. P. A. DAVE. ABSTRACT. Background:Heparin is widely used for the prophylaxis of venous thrombo-embolism and pulmonary embolism. Thrombocytopaenia and the sequale of thrombosis are uncommon ...

  9. Constitutive and ligand-induced TCR degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Siersma, Volkert

    2004-01-01

    divergent models for TCR down-regulation and degradation have been suggested. The aims of this study were to determine the rate constants for constitutive and ligand-induced TCR degradation and to determine whether the TCR subunits segregate or are processed as an intact unit during TCR down...

  10. Inducible Clindamycin Resistance among Staphylococci Isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clindamycin has been used successfully to treat pneumonia and soft-tissue infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. However, inducible clindamycin resistance has been described as a cause of treatment failure of such infections. A total of 159 staphylococcal isolates from different clinical ...

  11. Induced mutants for cereal grain protein improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Out of 17 papers and one summary presented, six dealing with the genetic improvement of seed protein using ionizing radiations fall within the INIS subject scope. Other topics discussed were non-radiation induced mutants used for cereal grain protein improvement

  12. Drug-induced hyperthermia in Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaasbeek, D; Naarding, Paul; Stor, T; Kremer, H P H

    Until now, only three patients with Huntington's disease (HD) and a neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) have been reported in the literature. We describe four cases with advanced stage Huntington's disease who within a period of one year developed drug-induced hyperthermia, either the neuroleptic

  13. Experimentally induced Porcine Coccidiosis | Onawunmi | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 4, No 2 (1977) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Experimentally induced Porcine Coccidiosis. OA Onawunmi. Abstract. No abstract.

  14. Tomato pomace powder ameliorated cisplatin-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) pomace powder (TPP) may be a preventive agent by virtue of its known antioxidant property. The possible protective role of TPP against cisplatin-induced alteration of the microanatomy of rat brain was investigated. Thirty rats were divided equally into five groups: control, propylene glycol ...

  15. Specificity in liquid metal induced embrittlement

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fernandes, PJL

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most intriguing features of liquid metal induced embrittlement (LMIE) is the observation that some liquid metal-solid metal couples are susceptible to embrittlement, while others appear to be immune. This is referred to as the specificity...

  16. Cholinergic Modulation of Restraint Stress Induced Neurobehavioral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The involvement of the cholinergic system in restraint stress induced neurobehavioral alterations was investigated in rodents using the hole board, elevated plus maze, the open field and the light and dark box tests. Restraint stress (3h) reduced significantly (p<0.05) the number of entries and time spent in the open arm, ...

  17. Antimalarial drug induced decrease in creatinine clearance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landewé, R. B.; Vergouwen, M. S.; Goeei The, S. G.; van Rijthoven, A. W.; Breedveld, F. C.; Dijkmans, B. A.

    1995-01-01

    To confirm the antimalarial drug induced increase of creatinine to determine the factors contributing to this effect. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (n = 118) who have used or still use antimalarials (chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine). Serum creatinines prior to antimalarials and serum

  18. Curvature-Induced Instabilities of Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzulla, Matteo; Stoop, Norbert; Steranka, Mark P.; Bade, Abdikhalaq J.; Holmes, Douglas P.

    2018-01-01

    Induced by proteins within the cell membrane or by differential growth, heating, or swelling, spontaneous curvatures can drastically affect the morphology of thin bodies and induce mechanical instabilities. Yet, the interaction of spontaneous curvature and geometric frustration in curved shells remains poorly understood. Via a combination of precision experiments on elastomeric spherical shells, simulations, and theory, we show how a spontaneous curvature induces a rotational symmetry-breaking buckling as well as a snapping instability reminiscent of the Venus fly trap closure mechanism. The instabilities, and their dependence on geometry, are rationalized by reducing the spontaneous curvature to an effective mechanical load. This formulation reveals a combined pressurelike term in the bulk and a torquelike term in the boundary, allowing scaling predictions for the instabilities that are in excellent agreement with experiments and simulations. Moreover, the effective pressure analogy suggests a curvature-induced subcritical buckling in closed shells. We determine the critical buckling curvature via a linear stability analysis that accounts for the combination of residual membrane and bending stresses. The prominent role of geometry in our findings suggests the applicability of the results over a wide range of scales.

  19. Mechanisms of transient radiation-induced creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyatiletov, Yu.S.

    1981-01-01

    Radiation-induced creep at the transient stage is investigated for metals. The situation, when several possible creep mechanisms operate simultaneously is studied. Among them revealed are those which give the main contribution and determine thereby the creep behaviour. The time dependence of creep rate and its relation to the smelling rate is obtained. The results satisfactorily agree with the available experimental data [ru

  20. [Exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis - a new trend?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardal, Hilde; Gøransson, Lasse G

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not there has been an increase in the number of admissions for exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis at Stavanger University Hospital (SUS) in recent years. The study is a retrospective review of patients discharged over the period January 2010 to March 2015 with a diagnosis of exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis and with maximum creatine kinase (CK) levels more than ten times the upper reference limit. A total of 33 patients, 21 women and 12 men, with a median age of 28 years (18 - 68), were included in the study. Of the 33 patients, three quarters (25) were admitted in 2014 - 15, compared with eight over the period 2010 - 13. One patient developed kidney failure that required dialysis. The treatment depended more on the attending physician and department than on the patient's clinical condition and CK-level, but this did not seem to affect the rate of complications. The incidence of exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis at SUS increased from autumn 2014, and this coincided with increased media attention and a new exercise trend. We recommend standardising the treatment of exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis, as current treatment recommendations are based on rhabdomyolysis triggered by causes other than exercise.

  1. Lorsban-induced changes in haematological parameters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [9] showed that cypermethrin induced pronounced hazardous effects in several physio- metabolic functions including body weight, feed intake, testosterone levels and reproductive performance of male rabbits. Chlorpyriphos-ethyl is a broad-spectrum organophosphorus pesticide used as an insecticide to control household ...

  2. Finger cold-induced vasodilation : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) in the finger tips generally occurs 5-10 min after the start of local cold exposure of the extremities. This phenomenon is believed to reduce the risk of local cold injuries. However, CIVD is almost absent during hypothermia, when survival of the organism takes

  3. Photoexcitation-induced processes in amorphous semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Jai

    2005-01-01

    Theories for the mechanism of photo-induced processes of photodarkening (PD), volume expansion (VE) in amorphous chalcogenides are presented. Rates of spontaneous emission of photons by radiative recombination of excitons in amorphous semiconductors are also calculated and applied to study the excitonic photoluminescence in a-Si:H. Results are compared with previous theories

  4. Chloroquine induced pruritus - questionnaire based epidemiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chloroquine (CQ) is a very useful drug with a broad spectrum of uses (as anti malarial, anti amoebiasis and for connective tissue diseases). A major side effect preventing or limiting its utilization in blacks is chloroquine induced pruritus (CP). A descriptive cross sectional questionnaire based epidemiological study of ...

  5. Computational modeling of induced emotion using GEMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aljanaki, Anna; Wiering, Frans; Veltkamp, Remco

    2014-01-01

    Most researchers in the automatic music emotion recognition field focus on the two-dimensional valence and arousal model. This model though does not account for the whole diversity of emotions expressible through music. Moreover, in many cases it might be important to model induced (felt) emotion,

  6. Enhancement of acetaminophen overdosage-induced hepatotoxicity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    paracetamol) overdosage-induced hepatotoxicity in three groups of albino Wistar rats. Administration of the minimum toxic dose of paracetamol (150mg/kg body weight) to animals (group II) produced significantly (P≤0.05) higher levels of alanine ...

  7. Radiation induced micrencephaly in guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, L.K.; Johnston, D.A.; Felleman, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    A brain weight deficit of about 70 mg was induced at doses of approximately 75-mGy and a deficit of 60 mg was induced at 100 mGy. This confirms the effects projected and observed by Wanner and Edwards. Although the data do not demonstrate a clear dose-response relationship between the 75-mGy and 100-mGy groups, the data are statistically consistent with a dose-response effect because of the overlapping confidence intervals. The lack of a statistically significant observation is most likely related to the small difference in doses and the limited numbers of animals examined. There are several factors that can influence the brain weight of guinea pig pups, such as caging and housing conditions, the sex of the animal, and litter size. These should be taken into account for accurate analysis. Dam weight did not appear to have a significant effect. The confirmation of a micrencephalic effect induced x rays at doses of 75-mGy during this late embryonic stage of development is consistent with the findings of small head size induced in those exposed prior to the eight week of conception at Hiroshima. This implies a mechanism for micrencephaly different from those previously suggested and lends credence to a causal relation between radiation and small head size in humans at low doses as reported by Miller and Mulvihill. 16 refs., 13 tabs

  8. The sound-induced phosphene illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognini, Nadia; Convento, Silvia; Fusaro, Martina; Vallar, Giuseppe

    2013-12-01

    Crossmodal illusions clearly show how perception, rather than being a modular and self-contained function, can be dramatically altered by interactions between senses. Here, we provide evidence for a novel crossmodal "physiological" illusion, showing that sounds can boost visual cortical responses in such a way to give rise to a striking illusory visual percept. In healthy participants, a single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (sTMS) delivered to the occipital cortex evoked a visual percept, i.e., a phosphene. When sTMS is accompanied by two auditory beeps, the second beep induces in neurologically unimpaired participants the perception of an illusory second phosphene, namely the sound-induced phosphene illusion. This perceptual "fission" of a single phosphene, due to multiple beeps, is not matched by a "fusion" of double phosphenes due to a single beep, and it is characterized by an early auditory modulation of the TMS-induced visual responses (~80 ms). Multiple beeps also induce an illusory feeling of multiple TMS pulses on the participants' scalp, consistent with an audio-tactile fission illusion. In conclusion, an auditory stimulation may bring about a phenomenological change in the conscious visual experience produced by the transcranial stimulation of the occipital cortex, which reveals crossmodal binding mechanisms within early stages of visual processing.

  9. Penicillamin-induced neuropathy in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P B; Hogenhaven, H

    1990-01-01

    A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse...

  10. Antidepressant induced sexual dysfunction Part 1: epidemiology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    Part 2 will focus on the assessment and management of AISD. Antidepressant induced sexual dysfunction Part 1: epidemiology and clinical presentation .... Poor self esteem. SOCIAL. Cultural issues. Religious issues. Environmental issues. Interpersonal conflicts. Partner specific. Sexual activity specific. Pregnancy and ...

  11. Glutathione role in gallium induced toxicity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Asim

    2012-01-26

    Jan 26, 2012 ... It is very important and interesting to study the reaction of gallium nitrate and glutathione as biomarker of glutathione ... Key words: Gallium nitrate, reduced glutathione (GSH), whole blood, plasma, cytosolic fraction (CF), oxidized ..... DMSA effect on gallium arsenide induced pathological liver injury in rats.

  12. Levofloxacin-induced acute anxiety and insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kandasamy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolones can cause adverse neuropsychiatric side effects, which are more common in older age. We present three cases of levofloxacin-induced acute anxiety and insomnia in young adults. In all the cases, discontinuation of levofloxacin immediately lead to remission.

  13. Antidepressant induced sexual dysfunction, part 1: epidemiology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... their compliance with medication and ultimately the prognosis of their illness. This review will be presented in two parts. The first part focuses on the prevalence of antidepressant induced sexual dysfunction and its clinical presentation both generally and in the case of individual classes of antidepressants. The second part ...

  14. Ephedrine-induced thermogenesis in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, A; Bülow, J; Christensen, N J

    1984-01-01

    The warmest interscapular skin areas were located by thermography in six healthy subjects during ephedrine-induced thermogenesis. In these interscapular areas, and in lumbar control areas, the skin temperature, subcutaneous temperature and adipose tissue blood flow were measured before and during...

  15. Motherhood and induced abortion among teenagers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mogens

    The study investigates the social background of teenagers before being teenage mothers or having an induced abortion. A discrete-time proportional hazard modelling was used to analyse the longitudinal observations of population-based registers covering all children born in Denmark in 1966...

  16. Catecholamine-Induced Myocardial Damage Associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four out of 7 patients dying of phaeochromocytomas and 7 out of 11 dying of tetanus had microscopic widespread myofibre damage (myofibrillar degeneration and 'myocytolysis). It is suggested that the myocardial lesions in both groups are induced by catecholamine excess. In those with phaeochromocytomas the ...

  17. Norepinephrine kinetics during insulin-induced hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Christensen, N J; Larsen, S

    1985-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) kinetics (plasma appearance rate, clearance, and forearm extraction) were measured during insulin-induced hypoglycemia in six healthy subjects. NE clearance did not change during hypoglycemia, indicating that the increase in plasma NE during hypoglycemia is due to an increased...

  18. Constraint-induced movement therapy after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakkel, G.; Veerbeek, J.M.; van Wegen, E.E.H.; Wolf, S.L.

    2015-01-01

    Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) was developed to overcome upper limb impairments after stroke and is the most investigated intervention for the rehabilitation of patients. Original CIMT includes constraining of the non-paretic arm and task-oriented training. Modified versions also apply

  19. Extracellular ATP induces albuminuria in pregnant rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, M.M.; van der Schaaf, G.; Borghuis, T.; Jongman, R.M.; van Pampus, Maria; de Vos, P.; van Goor, Harry; Bakker, W.W.

    BACKGROUND: As circulating plasma ATP concentrations are increased in pre-eclampsia, we tested whether increased plasma ATP is able to induce albuminuria during pregnancy. METHODS: Pregnant (day 14) and non-pregnant rats were infused with ATP (3000 microg/kg bw) via a permanent jugular vein cannula.

  20. in Alloxan-induced Diabetic Rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    extract of its leaves [7,8]. Despite the fact that ethanolic extract of Carica papaya leaf is used in the treatment of diabetes in Nigeria [6], there is dearth of information on its efficacy. Therefore, this study was aimed at evaluating the anti- diabetic effect of ethanolic extract of Carica papaya leaves in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.