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Sample records for evolution driving forces

  1. Delegation to automaticity: the driving force for cognitive evolution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James eShine

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability to delegate control over repetitive tasks from higher to lower neural centres may be a fundamental innovation in human cognition. Plausibly, the massive neurocomputational challenges associated with the mastery of balance during the evolution of bipedality in proto-humans provided a strong selective advantage to individuals with brains capable of efficiently transferring tasks in this way. Thus, the shift from quadrupedal to bipedal locomotion may have driven the rapid evolution of distinctive features of human neuronal functioning. We review recent studies of functional neuroanatomy that bear upon this hypothesis, and identify ways to test our ideas.

  2. Expansion of host range as a driving force in the evolution of Toxoplasma

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    John C Boothroyd

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is unusual in being able to infect almost any cell from almost any warm-blooded animal it encounters. This extraordinary host-range contrasts with its far more particular cousins such as the various species of the malaria parasite Plasmodium where each species of parasite has a single genus or even species of host that it can infect. Genetic and genomic studies have revealed a key role for a number of gene families in how Toxoplasma invades a host cell, modulates gene expression of that cell and successfully evades the resulting immune response. In this review, I will explore the hypothesis that a combination of sexual recombination and expansion of host range may be the major driving forces in the evolution of some of these gene families and the specific genes they encompass. These ideas stem from results and thoughts published by several labs in the last few years but especially recent papers on the role of different forms of rhoptry proteins in the relative virulence of F1 Toxoplasma progeny in a particular host species (mice.

  3. GP4-specific neutralizing antibodies might be a driving force in PRRSV evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costers, Sarah; Vanhee, Merijn; Van Breedam, Wander; Van Doorsselaere, Jan; Geldhof, Marc; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2010-12-01

    The structural envelope glycoprotein GP4 of European porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) strains contains a highly variable neutralizing epitope that is susceptible to neutralizing antibody-mediated selective pressure in vitro. In this study, it was analyzed what happens with this neutralizing epitope during infection in vivo in the presence of neutralizing antibodies. A neutralizing antibody-mediated selective pressure was created in 30 pigs by vaccination prior to inoculation with infectious Lelystad virus (LV). Nine viable neutralizing antibody-escape variants were isolated from 9 of these pigs and their neutralizing antibody-escape mutant-identity was confirmed by the acquired resistance to neutralization by autologous neutralizing sera. Six out of 9 neutralizing antibody-escape variants contained aa substitutions in the GP4 neutralizing epitope and had become resistant to neutralization by a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against this epitope. In addition, in all 6 corresponding pigs, antibodies against this epitope were detected early in infection. In contrast to these 6 virus variants, the 3 other antibody-escape variants did not contain aa substitutions in the GP4 neutralizing epitope and were still sensitive to neutralization by the GP4-specific mAb. These antibody-escape variants were isolated from pigs that did not contain antibodies against this epitope early in infection. All these findings together strongly indicate that aa substitutions in the GP4 neutralizing epitope can abrogate antibody recognition, and that neutralizing antibodies might be responsible for the selection of neutralizing antibody-resistant variants with aa substitutions in the neutralizing epitope on GP4. In conclusion, this study indicates that neutralizing antibodies in pigs might be a driving force in the rapid evolution of the neutralizing epitope on GP4 of European PRRSV strains. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Selective pressure against horizontally acquired prokaryotic genes as a driving force of plastid evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente, Briardo; de Souza, Flavio S. J.; Soto, Gabriela; Meyer, Cristian; Alonso, Guillermo D.; Flawiá, Mirtha M.; Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando; Ayub, Nicolás D.; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The plastid organelle comprises a high proportion of nucleus-encoded proteins that were acquired from different prokaryotic donors via independent horizontal gene transfers following its primary endosymbiotic origin. What forces drove the targeting of these alien proteins to the plastid remains an unresolved evolutionary question. To better understand this process we screened for suitable candidate proteins to recapitulate their prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition. Here we identify the ancient horizontal transfer of a bacterial polyphenol oxidase (PPO) gene to the nuclear genome of an early land plant ancestor and infer the possible mechanism behind the plastidial localization of the encoded enzyme. Arabidopsis plants expressing PPO versions either lacking or harbouring a plastid-targeting signal allowed examining fitness consequences associated with its subcellular localization. Markedly, a deleterious effect on plant growth was highly correlated with PPO activity only when producing the non-targeted enzyme, suggesting that selection favoured the fixation of plastid-targeted protein versions. Our results reveal a possible evolutionary mechanism of how selection against heterologous genes encoding cytosolic proteins contributed in incrementing plastid proteome complexity from non-endosymbiotic gene sources, a process that may also impact mitochondrial evolution.

  5. Mining spatial information to investigate the evolution of karst rocky desertification and its human driving forces in Changshun, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Erqi; Zhang, Hongqi; Li, Mengxian

    2013-08-01

    The processes of karst rocky desertification (KRD) have been found to cause the most severe environmental degradation in southwestern China. Understanding the driving forces that cause KRD is essential for managing and restoring the areas that it impacts. Studies of the human driving forces of KRD are limited to the county level, a specific administrative unit in China; census data are acquired at this scale, which can lead to scale biases. Changshun County is studied here as a representative area and anthropogenic influences in the county are accounted for by using Euclidean distances for the proximity to roads and settlements. We propose a standard coefficient of human influence (SOI) that standardizes the Euclidean distances for different KRD transformations to compare the effects of human activities in different areas. In Changshun County, the individual influences of roads and settlements share similar characteristics. The SOIs of improved KRD transformation types are almost negative, but the SOIs of deteriorated types are nearly positive except for one form of KRD turning to the extremely severe KRD. The results indicated that the distribution and evolution of the KRD areas from 2000 to 2010 in Changshun were affected positively by human activities (e.g., KRD restoration projects) and also negatively (e.g., by intense and irrational land use). Our results demonstrate that the spatial techniques and SOI used in this study can effectively incorporate information concerning human influences and internal KRD transformations. This provides a suitable approach for studying the relationships between human activities and KRD processes at fine scales. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Environmental disruption of Host-Microbe co-adaptation as a potential driving force in evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoav eSoen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The microbiome is known to have a profound effect on the development, physiology and health of its host. Whether and how it also contributes to evolutionary diversification of the host is, however, unclear. Here we hypothesize that disruption of the microbiome by new stressful environments interferes with host-microbe co-adaption, contributes to host destabilization, and can drive irreversible changes in the host prior to its genetic adaptation. This hypothesis is based on 3 presumptions: (1 The microbiome consists of heritable partners which contribute to the stability (canalization of host development and physiology in frequently encountered environments, (2 Upon encountering a stressful new environment, the microbiome adapts much faster than the host, and (3 This differential response disrupts cooperation, contributes to host destabilization and promotes reciprocal changes in the host and its microbiome. This dynamic imbalance relaxes as the host and its microbiome establish a new equilibrium state in which they are adapted to one another and to the altered environment. Over long time in this new environment, the changes in the microbiome contribute to the canalization of the altered state. This scenario supports stability of the adapted patterns, while promoting variability which may be beneficial in new stressful conditions, thus allowing the organism to balance stability and flexibility based on contextual demand. Additionally, interaction between heritable microbial (and/or epigenetic changes can promote new outcomes which persist over a wide range of timescales. A sufficiently persistent stress can further induce irreversible changes in the microbiome which may permanently alter the organism prior to genetic changes in the host. Epigenetic and microbial changes therefore provide a potential infrastructure for causal links between immediate responses to new environments and longer-term establishment of evolutionary adaptations.

  7. Positive selection is the main driving force for evolution of citrus canker-causing Xanthomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunzeng; Jalan, Neha; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Goss, Erica; Jones, Jeffrey B; Setubal, João C; Deng, Xiaoling; Wang, Nian

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the evolutionary history and potential of bacterial pathogens is critical to prevent the emergence of new infectious bacterial diseases. Xanthomonas axonopodis subsp. citri (Xac) (synonym X. citri subsp. citri), which causes citrus canker, is one of the hardest-fought plant bacterial pathogens in US history. Here, we sequenced 21 Xac strains (14 XacA, 3 XacA* and 4 XacAw) with different host ranges from North America and Asia and conducted comparative genomic and evolutionary analyses. Our analyses suggest that acquisition of beneficial genes and loss of detrimental genes most likely allowed XacA to infect a broader range of hosts as compared with XacAw and XacA*. Recombination was found to have occurred frequently on the relative ancient branches, but rarely on the young branches of the clonal genealogy. The ratio of recombination/mutation ρ/θ was 0.0790±0.0005, implying that the Xac population was clonal in structure. Positive selection has affected 14% (395 out of 2822) of core genes of the citrus canker-causing Xanthomonas. The genes affected are enriched in ‘carbohydrate transport and metabolism' and ‘DNA replication, recombination and repair' genes (Pcitrus canker-causing Xanthomonas. Our results suggest that both metabolism and virulence genes provide advantages to endow XacA with higher virulence and a wider host range. Our analysis advances our understanding of the genomic basis of specialization by positive selection in bacterial evolution. PMID:25689023

  8. Positive selection is the main driving force for evolution of citrus canker-causing Xanthomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunzeng; Jalan, Neha; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Goss, Erica; Jones, Jeffrey B; Setubal, João C; Deng, Xiaoling; Wang, Nian

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the evolutionary history and potential of bacterial pathogens is critical to prevent the emergence of new infectious bacterial diseases. Xanthomonas axonopodis subsp. citri (Xac) (synonym X. citri subsp. citri), which causes citrus canker, is one of the hardest-fought plant bacterial pathogens in US history. Here, we sequenced 21 Xac strains (14 XacA, 3 XacA* and 4 XacA(w)) with different host ranges from North America and Asia and conducted comparative genomic and evolutionary analyses. Our analyses suggest that acquisition of beneficial genes and loss of detrimental genes most likely allowed XacA to infect a broader range of hosts as compared with XacA(w) and XacA*. Recombination was found to have occurred frequently on the relative ancient branches, but rarely on the young branches of the clonal genealogy. The ratio of recombination/mutation ρ/θ was 0.0790±0.0005, implying that the Xac population was clonal in structure. Positive selection has affected 14% (395 out of 2822) of core genes of the citrus canker-causing Xanthomonas. The genes affected are enriched in 'carbohydrate transport and metabolism' and 'DNA replication, recombination and repair' genes (Pcitrus canker-causing Xanthomonas. Our results suggest that both metabolism and virulence genes provide advantages to endow XacA with higher virulence and a wider host range. Our analysis advances our understanding of the genomic basis of specialization by positive selection in bacterial evolution.

  9. Interspecies Chemical Signals Released into the Environment May Create Xenohormetic, Hormetic and Cytostatic Selective Forces that Drive the Ecosystemic Evolution of Longevity Regulation Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein, Michelle T; Beach, Adam; Richard, Vincent R; Koupaki, Olivia; Gomez-Perez, Alejandra; Goldberg, Alexander A; Kyryakov, Pavlo; Bourque, Simon D; Glebov, Anastasia; Titorenko, Vladimir I

    2012-01-01

    Various organisms (i.e., bacteria, fungi, plants and animals) within an ecosystem can synthesize and release into the environment certain longevity-extending small molecules. Here we hypothesize that these interspecies chemical signals can create xenohormetic, hormetic and cytostatic selective forces driving the ecosystemic evolution of longevity regulation mechanisms. In our hypothesis, following their release into the environment by one species of the organisms composing an ecosystem, such small molecules can activate anti-aging processes and/or inhibit pro-aging processes in other species within the ecosystem. The organisms that possess the most effective (as compared to their counterparts of the same species) mechanisms for sensing the chemical signals produced and released by other species and for responding to such signals by undergoing certain hormetic and/or cytostatic life-extending changes to their metabolism and physiology are expected to live longer then their counterparts within the ecosystem. Thus, the ability of a species of the organisms composing an ecosystem to undergo life-extending metabolic or physiological changes in response to hormetic or cytostatic chemical compounds released to the ecosystem by other species: 1) increases its chances of survival; 2) creates selective forces aimed at maintaining such ability; and 3) enables the evolution of longevity regulation mechanisms.

  10. Technology as a driving force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torvund, T. [Norsk Hydro A/S (Norway)

    1994-12-31

    The competitiveness of the Norwegian Continental shelf has been put firmly on the agenda in Norway since the report from a working group set up by the Ministry of Industry and Energy was released in February this year. If there is to be secured a long future for oil and gas activities, a reduction in the time and costs used in the projects of the order of 40-50%, without jeopardizing the high safety and environmental standards achieved in Norway. The paper addresses how technology can be a driving force in achieving these aims. But technology alone cannot do the job. Progress and changes in several other areas are also necessary, and the new scenario also calls for improved relations between all actors in the North Sea, authorities, oil companies, contractors and labour unions. 15 figs.

  11. Driving forces behind the evolution of the Aleutian mink disease parvovirus in the context of intensive farming.

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    Canuti, Marta; O'Leary, Kimberly E; Hunter, Bruce D; Spearman, Grant; Ojkic, Davor; Whitney, Hugh G; Lang, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) causes plasmacytosis, an immune complex-associated syndrome that affects wild and farmed mink. The virus can also infect other small mammals (e.g., ferrets, skunks, ermines, and raccoons), but the disease in these hosts has been studied less. In 2007, a mink plasmacytosis outbreak began on the Island of Newfoundland, and the virus has been endemic in farms since then. In this study, we evaluated the molecular epidemiology of AMDV in farmed and wild animals of Newfoundland since before the beginning of the outbreak and investigated the epidemic in a global context by studying AMDV worldwide, thereby examining its diffusion and phylogeography. Furthermore, AMDV evolution was examined in the context of intensive farming, where host population dynamics strongly influence viral evolution. Partial NS1 sequences and several complete genomes were obtained from Newfoundland viruses and analyzed along with numerous sequences from other locations worldwide that were either obtained as part of this study or from public databases. We observed very high viral diversity within Newfoundland and within single farms, where high rates of co-infection, recombinant viruses and polymorphisms were observed within single infected individuals. Worldwide, we documented a partial geographic distribution of strains, where viruses from different countries co-exist within clades but form country-specific subclades. Finally, we observed the occurrence of recombination and the predominance of negative selection pressure on AMDV proteins. A surprisingly low number of immunoepitopic sites were under diversifying pressure, possibly because AMDV gains no benefit by escaping the immune response as viral entry into target cells is mediated through interactions with antibodies, which therefore contribute to cell infection. In conclusion, the high prevalence of AMDV in farms facilitates the establishment of co-infections that can favor the occurrence of recombination

  12. Driving Force Based Design of Cyclic Distillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Fjordbak; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Driving force based design is adopted from conventional continuous distillation to cyclic distillation. This leads to a definition of the operating line representation for the cyclic distillation process. A possible realization of the driving force design is presented, which implies operation...... with mixed phase feeds. A range of binary test cases, benzene toluene, methanol water, and ethanol water, are evaluated. The advantage of the design approach in cyclic distillation is shown to be analogous to the advantages obtained in conventional continuous distillation, including a minimal utility...

  13. Driving forces in the Greenlandic urbanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Kåre

    2014-01-01

    Generally urbanization is recognised as a natural development where the population is mowing into the larger towns driven by e.g. better job opportunities, larger product and service supply and better education and health services, and it is often argued that this is also the driving forces...

  14. Feminization of agriculture: Trends and driving forces

    OpenAIRE

    Lastarria-Cornhiel, Susana

    2006-01-01

    "This paper will describe how women have increased their labor in two types of agricultural production - smallholder production and agro-export agriculture - and the economic and socio-cultural forces that are driving this trend. Finally, this paper examines whether women's participation in income-producing activities, whether as wage workers or as family workers in cash cropping, contributes to empowerment and improves their status within the household." (Excerpt from Executive Summary)

  15. Microorganism and Fungi Drive Evolution of Plant Synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frantisek eBaluska

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the course of plant evolution, there is an obvious trend toward an increased complexity of plant bodies, as well as an increased sophistication of plant behavior and communication. Phenotypic plasticity of plants is based on the polar auxin transport machinery that is directly linked with plant sensory systems impinging on plant behavior and adaptive responses. Similar to the emergence and evolution of eukaryotic cells, evolution of land plants was also shaped and driven by infective and symbiotic microorganisms. These microorganisms are the driving force behind the evolution of plant synapses and other neuronal aspects of higher plants; this is especially pronounced in the root apices. Plant synapses allow synaptic cell-cell communication and coordination in plants, as well as sensory-motor integration in root apices searching for water and mineral nutrition. These neuronal aspects of higher plants are closely linked with their unique ability to adapt to environmental changes.

  16. Microorganism and filamentous fungi drive evolution of plant synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In the course of plant evolution, there is an obvious trend toward an increased complexity of plant bodies, as well as an increased sophistication of plant behavior and communication. Phenotypic plasticity of plants is based on the polar auxin transport machinery that is directly linked with plant sensory systems impinging on plant behavior and adaptive responses. Similar to the emergence and evolution of eukaryotic cells, evolution of land plants was also shaped and driven by infective and symbiotic microorganisms. These microorganisms are the driving force behind the evolution of plant synapses and other neuronal aspects of higher plants; this is especially pronounced in the root apices. Plant synapses allow synaptic cell-cell communication and coordination in plants, as well as sensory-motor integration in root apices searching for water and mineral nutrition. These neuronal aspects of higher plants are closely linked with their unique ability to adapt to environmental changes.

  17. Selection for Mitochondrial Quality Drives Evolution of the Germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzvilavicius, Arunas L; Hadjivasiliou, Zena; Pomiankowski, Andrew; Lane, Nick

    2016-12-01

    The origin of the germline-soma distinction is a fundamental unsolved question. Plants and basal metazoans do not have a germline but generate gametes from pluripotent stem cells in somatic tissues (somatic gametogenesis). In contrast, most bilaterians sequester a dedicated germline early in development. We develop an evolutionary model which shows that selection for mitochondrial quality drives germline evolution. In organisms with low mitochondrial replication error rates, segregation of mutations over multiple cell divisions generates variation, allowing selection to optimize gamete quality through somatic gametogenesis. Higher mutation rates promote early germline sequestration. We also consider how oogamy (a large female gamete packed with mitochondria) alters selection on the germline. Oogamy is beneficial as it reduces mitochondrial segregation in early development, improving adult fitness by restricting variation between tissues. But it also limits variation between early-sequestered oocytes, undermining gamete quality. Oocyte variation is restored through proliferation of germline cells, producing more germ cells than strictly needed, explaining the random culling (atresia) of precursor cells in bilaterians. Unlike other models of germline evolution, selection for mitochondrial quality can explain the stability of somatic gametogenesis in plants and basal metazoans, the evolution of oogamy in all plants and animals with tissue differentiation, and the mutational forces driving early germline sequestration in active bilaterians. The origins of predation in motile bilaterians in the Cambrian explosion is likely to have increased rates of tissue turnover and mitochondrial replication errors, in turn driving germline evolution and the emergence of complex developmental processes.

  18. Shell Evolutions and Nuclear Forces

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    Sorlin, O.

    2014-03-01

    During the last 30 years, and more specifically during the last 10 years, many experiments have been carried out worldwide using different techniques to study the shell evolution of nuclei far from stability. What seemed not conceivable some decades ago became rather common: all known magic numbers that are present in the valley of stability disappear far from stability and are replaced by new ones at the drip line. By gathering selected experimental results, beautifully consistent pictures emerge, that very likely take root in the properties of the nuclear forces.The present manuscript describes some of these discoveries and proposes an intuitive understanding of these shell evolutions derived from observations. Extrapolations to yet unstudied regions, as where the explosive r-process nucleosynthesis occurs, are proposed. Some remaining challenges and puzzling questions are also addressed.

  19. Virus Satellites Drive Viral Evolution and Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frígols, Belén; Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Mir-Sanchis, Ignacio; Donderis, Jorge; Elena, Santiago F; Buckling, Angus; Novick, Richard P; Marina, Alberto; Penadés, José R

    2015-10-01

    Virus satellites are widespread subcellular entities, present both in eukaryotic and in prokaryotic cells. Their modus vivendi involves parasitism of the life cycle of their inducing helper viruses, which assures their transmission to a new host. However, the evolutionary and ecological implications of satellites on helper viruses remain unclear. Here, using staphylococcal pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) as a model of virus satellites, we experimentally show that helper viruses rapidly evolve resistance to their virus satellites, preventing SaPI proliferation, and SaPIs in turn can readily evolve to overcome phage resistance. Genomic analyses of both these experimentally evolved strains as well as naturally occurring bacteriophages suggest that the SaPIs drive the coexistence of multiple alleles of the phage-coded SaPI inducing genes, as well as sometimes selecting for the absence of the SaPI depressing genes. We report similar (accidental) evolution of resistance to SaPIs in laboratory phages used for Staphylococcus aureus typing and also obtain the same qualitative results in both experimental evolution and phylogenetic studies of Enterococcus faecalis phages and their satellites viruses. In summary, our results suggest that helper and satellite viruses undergo rapid coevolution, which is likely to play a key role in the evolution and ecology of the viruses as well as their prokaryotic hosts.

  20. Two possible driving forces supporting the evolution of animal communication. Comment on "Towards a Computational Comparative Neuroprimatology: Framing the language-ready brain" by Michael A. Arbib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin-Frier, Clément; Verschure, Paul F. M. J.

    2016-03-01

    In the target paper [1], M.A. Arbib proposes a quite exhaustive review of the (often computational) models developed during the last decades that support his detailed scenario on language evolution (the Mirror System Hypothesis, MSH). The approach considers that language evolved from a mirror system for grasping already present in LCA-m (the last common ancestor of macaques and humans), to a simple imitation system for grasping present in LCA-c (the last common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans), to a complex imitation system for grasping that developed in the hominid line since that ancestor. MSH considers that this complex imitation system is a key evolutionary step for a language-ready brain, providing all the required elements for an open-ended gestural communication system. The transition from the gestural (bracchio-manual and visual) to the vocal (articulatory and auditory) domain is supposed to be a less important evolutionary step.

  1. Inversion for the driving forces of plate tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    Inverse modeling techniques have been applied to the problem of determining the roles of various forces that may drive and resist plate tectonic motions. Separate linear inverse problems have been solved to find the best fitting pole of rotation for finite element grid point velocities and to find the best combination of force models to fit the observed relative plate velocities for the earth's twelve major plates using the generalized inverse operator. Variance-covariance data on plate motion have also been included. Results emphasize the relative importance of ridge push forces in the driving mechanism. Convergent margin forces are smaller by at least a factor of two, and perhaps by as much as a factor of twenty. Slab pull, apparently, is poorly transmitted to the surface plate as a driving force. Drag forces at the base of the plate are smaller than ridge push forces, although the sign of the force remains in question.

  2. Driving Force Filtering and Driving Mechanism Analysis of Urban Agricultural Development in Weifang County, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUI Fei-fei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As an agricultural nation, the agricultural landscape is the basic appearance and existence in China, but the common existence often be neglected and contempted. As a new type of design and ideology, the development of urban agricultural landscape will greatly affect the texture and structure of the urban space. According to the urban agricultural production data and the socio-economic data of Weifang County, a set of evaluation index system that could analyze quantitatively the driving force of urban agricultural production changes and the internal drive mechanism was built. The original driving force indicators of economy, society, resources and environment from the time-series were chosen, and then 15 driving forces from the original driving forces by correlation analysis and principal component analysis were selected. The degree of influence was analyzed and the driving forces model by means of partial least squares(PLS was built. The results demonstrated that the factors greatly influenced the increase of urban agricultural output value in Weifang County were per capita net income of rural residents, agricultural machinery total power, effective irrigation area, centralized treatment rate of urban sewage, with the driving exponents 0.2509, 0.1019, 0.1655, 0.1332, respectively. The negative influence factor was the use amount of agricultural plastic film and the driving exponent was-0.2146. The research provides a reference for the development of urban agriculture, as well as a reference for the related study.

  3. The Driving Forces of Subsidiary Absorptive Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schleimer, Stephanie C.; Pedersen, Torben

    2013-01-01

    capacity in order to compete in its focal market. The dual embeddedness of MNC subsidiaries plays a key role in this investigation, as subsidiaries belong to the MNC network and are simultaneously embedded in their host country environment. We argue that subsidiary absorptive capacity is formed...... as a purposeful response to this dual embeddedness. An analysis of marketing strategy absorptions undertaken by 213 subsidiaries reveals that MNCs can assist their subsidiaries to compete in competitive and dynamic focal markets by forming specific organizational mechanisms that are conducive to the development......The study investigates how a multinational corporation (MNC) can promote the absorptive capacity of its subsidiaries. The focus is on what drives the MNC subsidiary's ability to absorb marketing strategies that are initiated by the MNC parent, as well as how the subsidiary enacts on this absorptive...

  4. Pattern-formation under acoustic driving forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Jose Manuel

    2015-07-01

    Chemical and metallurgical processes enhanced by high intensity acoustic waves, thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, fuel rods in nuclear reactors, heat exchanger tubes, offshore and vibrating structures, solar thermal collectors, acoustic levitators, microfluidic devices, cycling, musical acoustics, blood flow through veins/arteries, hearing in the mammalian ear, carbon nanotube loudspeakers, etc. The evolution of a myriad of processes involving the oscillation of viscous fluids in the presence of solid boundaries is up to a certain extent influenced by acoustic streaming. In addition to the sound field, viscous energy dissipation at the fluid-solid boundary causes a time-independent fluid circulation, which can lead to a significant enhancement of heat, mass and momentum transfer at large oscillation amplitudes. A particularly relevant phenomenon that can be notably affected by acoustic streaming is the promotion of sound waves by temperature gradients or viceversa (thermoacoustics), which is at the basis of potentially efficient and environmental friendly engines and refrigerators that have attracted a renewed interest in the last years. In the present manuscript, historical developments and the underlying basic physics behind acoustic streaming and thermoacoustics are reviewed from an unifying perspective.

  5. Disruptive Innovations as a Driving Force for the Change of Wireless Telecommunication Infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyoseva, Tsvetoslava; Poulkov, Vladimir; Mihaylov, Mihail Rumenov

    2014-01-01

    Innovations are the driving force for fundamental changes and development of future generation telecommunication networks. When considering innovations as drivers for the development of next generation telecommunication networks an important question is whether an innovative emerging technology...... would cause a disruption requiring fundamental change of the infrastructure or will it will only catalyze its evolution. This paper describes the major characteristics of disruptive innovations as a driving force for fundamental changes in existing telecommunications infrastructures. By analyzing...... the current trends in mobile communications, we reason that the emergence of new telecommunication architectures and infrastructures is inevitable. An important consideration in the analysis is the driving role of disruptive technologies for the future of telecommunications. Based on a model for evaluating...

  6. Learning theory: a driving force in understanding orbitofrontal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDannald, Michael A; Jones, Joshua L; Takahashi, Yuji K; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2014-02-01

    Since it was demonstrated the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is critical to reversal learning, there has been considerable interest in specifying its role in flexible, outcome-guided behavior. Behavioral paradigms from the learning theory tradition, such as outcome devaluation, blocking, Pavlovian to instrumental transfer, and overexpectation have been a driving force in this research. The use of these procedures has revealed OFC's unique role in forming and integrating information about specific features of events and outcomes to drive behavior and learning. These studies highlight the power and importance of learning theory principles in guiding neuroscience research. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. What Drives the Kinematic Evolution of Galaxies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chao-Ling

    2017-07-01

    One important result from recent large integral field spectrograph (IFS) surveys is that the intrinsic velocity dispersion of galaxies increases at high redshift. While massive, rotation-dominated disks are already in place at z 2, they are dynamically hotter compared to spiral galaxies in the local Universe. Although several plausible mechanisms have been proposed (e.g., star formation feedback, elevated gas supply, or galaxy interaction), it remains unclear what is the fundamental driver of the velocity dispersion enhancement at high-z. We investigate the origin of this kinematic evolution using a suite of cosmological simulations from the FIRE (Feedback In Realistic Environments) project. Although the velocity dispersion of simulated galaxies is systematically lower compared to the observed values, the simulations successfully reproduce the observed trends between velocity dispersion, SFR, and redshift. In the FIRE simulations, the variation in velocity dispersion is highly dynamic across cosmic time, and it can vary significantly within a timescale of 100 Myr. These variations closely mirror the evolution of star formation and gas inflow histories. By cross-correlating any two parameters of velocity dispersion, gas inflow rates, and SFR, we show that the increase of gas inflowing into the galaxy lead to the subsequent star formation activities, and the enhancement of velocity dispersion follows closely in time with the increasing gas inflow rates and SFR.

  8. Improved Generalized Force Model considering the Comfortable Driving Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Jie Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an improved generalized force model (IGFM that considers the driver’s comfortable driving behavior. Through theoretical analysis, we propose the calculation methods of comfortable driving distance and velocity. Then the stability condition of the model is obtained by the linear stability analysis. The problems of the unrealistic acceleration of the leading car existing in the previous models were solved. Furthermore, the simulation results show that IGFM can predict correct delay time of car motion and kinematic wave speed at jam density, and it can exactly describe the driver’s behavior under an urgent case, where no collision occurs. The dynamic properties of IGFM also indicate that stability has improved compared to the generalized force model.

  9. WP/084 Measuring Industry Agglomeration and Identifying the Driving Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howard, Emma; Tarp, Finn; Newman, Carol

    Understanding industry agglomeration and its driving forces is critical for the formulation of industrial policy in developing countries. Crucial to this process is the definition and measurement of agglomeration. We propose a new measure and examine what it reveals about the importance of transp......Understanding industry agglomeration and its driving forces is critical for the formulation of industrial policy in developing countries. Crucial to this process is the definition and measurement of agglomeration. We propose a new measure and examine what it reveals about the importance...... of transport costs, labour market pooling, and technology transfer for agglomeration processes. We contrast this analysis with insights from existing measures in the literature and find very different underlying stories at work. An exceptionally rich set of data from Vietnam makes us confident that our measure...

  10. Measuring Industry Coagglomeration and Identifying the Driving Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howard, Emma; Newman, Carol; Tarp, Finn

    2015-01-01

    Understanding industry agglomeration and its driving forces is critical for the formulation of industrial policy in developing countries. Crucial to this process is the definition and measurement of agglomeration. We construct a new coagglomeration index based purely on the location of firms. We...... underlying stories at work. We conclude that in conducting analyses of this kind giving consideration to the source of agglomeration economies, employees or entrepreneurs, and finding an appropriate measure for agglomeration, are both crucial to the process of identifying agglomerative forces....

  11. Processes and driving forces in changing cultural landscapes across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bürgi, Matthias; Bieling, Claudia; Von Hackwitz, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Context: Cultural landscapes evolve over time. However, the rate and direction of change might not be in line with societal needs and more information on the forces driving these changes are therefore needed. Objectives: Filling the gap between single case studies and meta-analyses, we present a ...... developments might be comparatively easy to model, political developments cannot be foreseen but might, nevertheless, leave major marks in the landscape.......Context: Cultural landscapes evolve over time. However, the rate and direction of change might not be in line with societal needs and more information on the forces driving these changes are therefore needed. Objectives: Filling the gap between single case studies and meta-analyses, we present...... a comparative study of landscape changes and their driving forces based in six regions across Europe conducted using a consistent method. Methods: A LULC analysis based on historical and contemporary maps from the nineteenth and twentieth century was combined with oral history interviews to learn more about...

  12. Reevaluating plate driving forces from 3-D models of subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegman, D. R.; Freeman, J.; Schellart, W. P.; Moresi, L.; May, D.; Turnbull, R.

    2004-12-01

    Subducting lithospheric slabs mechanically attached to tectonic plates provide the main driving force for surface plate motion. Numerical models historically simulate slab dynamics as a 2-D process and further simplify the problem into either a density driven model (no heat transfer) or a corner-flow problem (thermal convection) [Christensen, 2001; Enns et al., (in revision); van Keken, 2003]. Recent 3-D global models of density driven flow incorporating a history of plate motion (Conrad and Lithgow-Bertelloni, 2002) have succussfully ruled out slab "suction" (basal shear traction induced by downward flow of the slabs) as a major driving force, but exact partitioning of the remaining forces acting on the slab remain unconstrained. A survey of trenches around the world reveals that over half of the slabs presently subducted in the upper mantle have a discontinuous edge (either a slab tip on a young slab, or the side edge of a slab with finite width) around which mantle can flow: prime examples being slabs in the Mediterranean and Carribean. However, even slabs with a wide lateral extent (and where a 2-D approximation may seem appropriate), show signs of having 3-D complexity. For example, on the surface Tonga appears relatively symmetric, but when the history of subduction is considered, the slab has a twisted, 3-D structure due to significant eastward retreat of just the northern part of an originally N-S oriented trench edge. Similarly the widest slabs, South American and Kamchatka, show seismic anisotropy attributed to trench parallel mantle flow (Russo and Silver, 1994; Peyton, et al., 2001, respectively), while the Aleutian trench has oblique subduction varying in magnitude from west to east, and medium width Central American slab likely has a slab window allowing 3-D flow (Johnston and Thorkelson, 1997). Recent laboratory experiments of subduction have demonstrated the full complexity of flow occuring in 3-D geometry (Kincaid and Griffiths, 2003; Schellart

  13. Solvent driving force ensures fast formation of a persistent and well-separated radical pair in plant cryptochrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüdemann, Gesa; Solov'yov, Ilia; Kubar, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    upon the electron transfer. This approach allows us to follow the time evolution of the electron transfer in an unbiased fashion and to reveal the molecular driving force which ensures fast electron transfer in cryptochrome guaranteeing formation of a persistent radical pair suitable...

  14. Impact assessment of land use planning driving forces on environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Longgao, E-mail: chenlonggao@163.com [Institute of Land Resources, Jiangsu Normal University (JSNU), Xuzhou 221116 (China); Yang, Xiaoyan [Institute of Land Resources, Jiangsu Normal University (JSNU), Xuzhou 221116 (China); School of Environment and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Chen, Longqian [School of Environment and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Li, Long [Department of Geography, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels 1050 (Belgium)

    2015-11-15

    Land use change may exert a negative impact on environmental quality. A state–impact–state (SIS) model describing a state transform under certain impacts has been integrated into land use planning (LUP) environmental impact assessment (LUPEA). This logical model is intuitive and easy to understand, but the exploration of impact is essential to establish the indicator system and to identify the scope of land use environmental impact when it is applied to a specific region. In this study, we investigated environmental driving forces from land use planning (LUPF), along with the conception, components, scope, and impact of LUPF. This method was illustrated by a case study in Zoucheng, China. Through the results, we concluded that (1) the LUPF on environment are impacts originated from the implementation of LUP on a regional environment, which are characterized by four aspects: magnitude, direction, action point, and its owner; (2) various scopes of LUPF on individual environmental elements based on different standards jointly define the final scope of LUPEA; (3) our case study in Zoucheng demonstrates the practicability of this proposed approach; (4) this method can be embedded into LUPEA with direction, magnitudes, and scopes of the LUPF on individual elements obtained, and the identified indicator system can be directly employed into LUPEA and (5) the assessment helps to identify key indicators and to set up a corresponding strategy to mitigate the negative impact of LUP on the environment, which are two important objectives of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) in LUP. - Highlights: • Environmental driving forces from land use planning (LUPF) are investigated and categorized. • Our method can obtains the direction, magnitudes and scopes of environmental driving forces. • The LUPEA scope is determined by the combination of various scopes of LUPF on individual elements. • LUPF assessment can be embedded into LUPEA. • The method can help to

  15. Conceptualizing the driving forces for successful rehabilitation back to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landstad, Bodil J; Åhrberg, Yvonne

    2017-04-11

    An earlier study states that the terms of desire, longing, and vanity carry with them ideas, emotions, and values that influence how individuals perceive themselves and their rehabilitation process. Our aim was (1) to use concept analysis to explore the meaning of the terms desire, longing, and vanity and (2) to investigate the potential role of these concepts in successful rehabilitation back to work. To achieve these two objectives, we used a model of concept analysis. The final step in the model is to define empirical references, for example, articles within the scientific literature, to determine the existence of a concept in a given situation. The concept analysis resulted in 15 new searchable terms. All of these were accepted in the thesaurus system for the databases we used. We identified 59 scientific articles that were deemed relevant to the purposes of the study. Of these, only 20 was about emotions as driving forces in a rehabilitation process back to work. The conclusion of the study is that the concepts of desire, longing, and vanity encompassed ideas, emotions, and values that influence how individuals perceived themselves and their situations. How individuals talk about and understand rehabilitation will undoubtedly play a role in how they respond to interventions, and thus, the success of the rehabilitation process back to work. Implications for rehabilitation Emotional energy often drives behavior and can provide significant motivation that potentially can mobilize vocational rehabilitation. The concepts of desire, longing and vanity encompass ideas, emotions, and values that influence individuals' self-perception and their view of their situation. To engage people in discussions on what they long for and desire could be a new way to connect with a person in a rehabilitation situation. It can be less provoking to talk about what a person desires or longs for than to ask them what they want or are motivated for. Feelings of meaningfulness are a

  16. Solvent effects and driving forces in pillararene inclusion complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönbeck, Christian; Li, Hui; Han, Bao-Hang; Laursen, Bo W

    2015-06-04

    Pillararenes, a recently discovered class of aromatic macrocycles, form inclusion complexes with a large number of guest molecules, but not much is known about the driving forces of complexation, including the role of the solvent. We have measured the binding thermodynamics for a small number of model complexes in several solvents and used computational chemistry to rationalize the obtained results and identify the driving forces of complexation. Favorable electrostatic interactions between the host and guest are obtained when the charge distribution in the guest matches the negative electrostatic potential in the cavity of the pillararene. Polar guests, however, also interact strongly with polar solvents, thereby shifting the complexation equilibrium away from the complex. The shape of the solvent molecules is another important factor as some solvents are sterically hindered from entering the pillararene cavity. By changing solvent from acetonitrile to o-xylene the binding constant in one case increased more than 4 orders of magnitude. Even electrostatically similar solvents such as o-xylene and p-xylene have very different impacts on the binding constants due to their different abilities to fit into the cavity. The study illustrates the importance of taking into account the interactions between the solvent and the complexing species in the investigation and design of molecular host:guest systems.

  17. Developing programs for homeless veterans: understanding driving forces in implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, John; McGuire, Jim; Berman, Stephen; Daniels, William

    2004-01-01

    Between 1992 and 2003, services for homeless veterans at the Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System went from inappropriate utilization of hospital medical and psychiatric beds, to a continuum of residential treatment, transitional housing, and employment programs through arrangements with private agencies. The authors use elements of Hasenfeld and Brock's Political Economy Model (1991) to explain this transformation in service delivery that was spearheaded by a VA social work leadership team. It is argued that three driving forces crucial to program implementation were present: technological certainty, economic stability, and concentration of power. Evidence of the implementation's impact includes creation of new homeless program beds, a reduction in use of medical/psychiatric beds, and a large number of formerly homeless veterans with housing and employment at program discharge. Study limitations and implications for future studies are discussed.

  18. The driving forces of landscape change in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plieninger, Tobias; Draux, Hélène; Fagerholm, Nora

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, landscapes worldwide have experienced changes (e.g., urbanization, agricultural intensification, expansion of renewable energy uses) at magnitudes that put their sustainability at risk. The understanding of the drivers of these landscape changes remains challenging, partly...... because landscape research is spread across many domains and disciplines. We here provide a systematic synthesis of 144 studies that identify the proximate and underlying drivers of landscape change across Europe. First, we categorize how driving forces have been addressed and find that most studies......; low Gross Domestic Product; boreal, steppic, and arctic landscapes; as well as forestland systems are underrepresented in the literature. Third, our review shows that land abandonment/extensification is the most prominent (62% of cases) among multiple proximate drivers of landscape change. Fourthly...

  19. Cultural selection drives the evolution of human communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamariz, Monica; Ellison, T Mark; Barr, Dale J; Fay, Nicolas

    2014-08-07

    Human communication systems evolve culturally, but the evolutionary mechanisms that drive this evolution are not well understood. Against a baseline that communication variants spread in a population following neutral evolutionary dynamics (also known as drift models), we tested the role of two cultural selection models: coordination- and content-biased. We constructed a parametrized mixed probabilistic model of the spread of communicative variants in four 8-person laboratory micro-societies engaged in a simple communication game. We found that selectionist models, working in combination, explain the majority of the empirical data. The best-fitting parameter setting includes an egocentric bias and a content bias, suggesting that participants retained their own previously used communicative variants unless they encountered a superior (content-biased) variant, in which case it was adopted. This novel pattern of results suggests that (i) a theory of the cultural evolution of human communication systems must integrate selectionist models and (ii) human communication systems are functionally adaptive complex systems.

  20. Modeling the Evolution of Female Meiotic Drive in Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, David W; Dawe, R Kelly

    2017-11-09

    Autosomal drivers violate Mendel's law of segregation in that they are overrepresented in gametes of heterozygous parents. For drivers to be polymorphic within populations rather than fixing, their transmission advantage must be offset by deleterious effects on other fitness components. In this paper we develop an analytical model for the evolution of autosomal drivers that is motivated by the neocentromere drive system found in maize. In particular we model both the transmission advantage and deleterious fitness effects on seed viability, pollen viability, seed to adult survival mediated by maternal genotype, and seed to adult survival mediated by offspring genotype. We derive general, biologically intuitive, conditions for the four most likely evolutionary outcomes and discuss the expected evolution of autosomal drivers given these conditions. Finally, we determine the expected equilibrium allele frequencies predicted by the model given recent estimates of fitness components for all relevant genotypes and show that the predicted equilibrium is within the range observed in maize land races for levels of drive at the low end of what has been observed. Copyright © 2017, G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics.

  1. The role of biotic forces in driving macroevolution: beyond the Red Queen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voje, Kjetil L; Holen, Øistein H; Liow, Lee Hsiang; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2015-06-07

    A multitude of hypotheses claim that abiotic factors are the main drivers of macroevolutionary change. By contrast, Van Valen's Red Queen hypothesis is often put forward as the sole representative of the view that biotic forcing is the main evolutionary driver. This imbalance of hypotheses does not reflect our current knowledge: theoretical work demonstrates the plausibility of biotically driven long-term evolution, whereas empirical work suggests a central role for biotic forcing in macroevolution. We call for a more pluralistic view of how biotic forces may drive long-term evolution that is compatible with both phenotypic stasis in the fossil record and with non-constant extinction rates. Promising avenues of research include contrasting predictions from relevant theories within ecology and macroevolution, as well as embracing both abiotic and biotic proxies while modelling long-term evolutionary data. By fitting models describing hypotheses of biotically driven macroevolution to data, we could dissect their predictions and transcend beyond pattern description, possibly narrowing the divide between our current understanding of micro- and macroevolution. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Mutations driving CLL and their evolution in progression and relapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Dan A.; Tausch, Eugen; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro N; Stewart, Chip; Reiter, Johannes G.; Bahlo, Jasmin; Kluth, Sandra; Bozic, Ivana; Lawrence, Mike; Böttcher, Sebastian; Carter, Scott L.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Mertens, Daniel; Sougnez, Carrie; Rosenberg, Mara; Hess, Julian M.; Edelmann, Jennifer; Kless, Sabrina; Kneba, Michael; Ritgen, Matthias; Fink, Anna; Fischer, Kirsten; Gabriel, Stacey; Lander, Eric; Nowak, Martin A.; Döhner, Hartmut; Hallek, Michael; Neuberg, Donna; Getz, Gad; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Wu, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Which genetic alterations drive tumorigenesis and how they evolve over the course of disease and therapy are central questions in cancer biology. We identify 44 recurrently mutated genes and 11 recurrent somatic copy number variations through whole-exome sequencing of 538 chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and matched germline DNA samples, 278 of which were collected in a prospective clinical trial. These include previously unrecognized cancer drivers (RPS15, IKZF3) and collectively identify RNA processing and export, MYC activity and MAPK signaling as central pathways involved in CLL. Clonality analysis of this large dataset further enabled reconstruction of temporal relationships between driver events. Direct comparison between matched pre-treatment and relapse samples from 59 patients demonstrated highly frequent clonal evolution. Thus, large sequencing datasets of clinically informative samples enable the discovery of novel cancer genes and the network of relationships between the driver events and their impact on disease relapse and clinical outcome. PMID:26466571

  3. The Impact of Evolutionary Driving Forces on Human Complex Diseases: A Population Genetics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr T. M. Saeb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigating the molecular evolution of human genome has paved the way to understand genetic adaptation of humans to the environmental changes and corresponding complex diseases. In this review, we discussed the historical origin of genetic diversity among human populations, the evolutionary driving forces that can affect genetic diversity among populations, and the effects of human movement into new environments and gene flow on population genetic diversity. Furthermore, we presented the role of natural selection on genetic diversity and complex diseases. Then we reviewed the disadvantageous consequences of historical selection events in modern time and their relation to the development of complex diseases. In addition, we discussed the effect of consanguinity on the incidence of complex diseases in human populations. Finally, we presented the latest information about the role of ancient genes acquired from interbreeding with ancient hominids in the development of complex diseases.

  4. Unraveling the genetic driving forces enabling antibiotic resistance at the single cell level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Julia

    Bacteria are champions at finding ways to quickly respond and adapt to environments like the human gut, known as the epicentre of antibiotic resistance. How do they do it? Combining molecular biology tools to microfluidic and fluorescence microscopy technologies, we monitor the behavior of bacteria at the single cell level in the presence of non-toxic doses of antibiotics. By tracking the chromosome dynamics of Escherichia coli cells upon antibiotic treatment, we examine the changes in the number, localization and content of the chromosome copies within one cell compartment or between adjacent cells. I will discuss how our work pictures the bacterial genomic plasticity as a driving force in evolution and how it provides access to the mechanisms controlling the subtle balance between genetic diversity and stability in the development of antibiotic resistance.

  5. Driving forces of Indian summer monsoon on Milankovitch and sub-Milankovitch time scales: A review

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.

    A scientific consensus exists that tectonic evolution of Himalaya is the main cause of monsoon initiation and evolution in southeast Asia. Several forcing factors such as tectonic, solar insolation, latent heat transport, albedo of the earth surface...

  6. [Spatiotemporal pattern and its driving forces of urban growth in Shenyang City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-Qing; Hu, Yuan-Man; He, Hong-Shi; Bu, Ren-Cang; Xi, Feng-Ming

    2007-10-01

    By using time series Landsat TM satellite images and adopting GIS spatial analysis and landscape pattern analysis methods, this paper studied the spatiotemporal diversity of urban growth and the evolution of urban landscape pattern in Shenyang, and examined their driving forces. The results showed that in 1988-2004, the urban area in Shenyang increased persistently, and the growth intensity enhanced consistently, with the peaks occured in 2000-2004. The spatial differentiation of urban growth in the City was also distinct, with the southwest direction as the leading orientation, and the urban edges and different level economic development zones as the main growth areas. The urban landscape pattern became more and more complex, and the compactness index of urban development decreased. The evolution of urban landscape pattern was related to the characteristics of urban growth, which also showed spatiotemporal diversity. The urban growth and urban landscape pattern evolution in Shenyang were mainly attributed to the development of industrialization and the construction of different level economic development zones, the proper policies of local governments and the urban planning, as well as the development of traffic infrastructure.

  7. The driving forces of land change in the Northern Piedmont of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auch, Roger F.; Napton, Darrell E.; Kambly, Steven; Moreland, Thomas R.; Sayler, Kristi L.

    2012-01-01

    Driving forces facilitate or inhibit land-use/land-cover change. Human driving forces include political, economic, cultural, and social attributes that often change across time and space. Remotely sensed imagery provides regional land-change data for the Northern Piedmont, an ecoregion of the United States that continued to urbanize after 1970 through conversion of agricultural and forest land covers to developed uses. Eight major driving forces facilitated most of the land conversion; other drivers inhibited or slowed change. A synergistic web of drivers may be more important in understanding land change than individual drivers by themselves.

  8. Social Evolution: The Force of the Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlan, Shane J

    2016-08-22

    Biological market forces shape patterns of cooperation typical of small-scale human societies that are organized by division of labor based on age and gender. Labor specialization promotes trade, while supply and demand affect the amount individuals exchange for commodities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Evolution of the Civil Affairs Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    on their roles as a joint force commanders in the event of large-scale disasters, such as Hurricane Sandy, or a large scale earthquake” ( Baltos , 2012...fsID=5286&page=1 Anklam, P. (2007). Net work. Burlington, MA: Butterworth Heinemann. Baltos , C. (2012). Army north helps prepare future dual-status

  10. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics in the Ionic Driving Force for GABAA Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wright

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly apparent that the strength of GABAergic synaptic transmission is dynamic. One parameter that can establish differences in the actions of GABAergic synapses is the ionic driving force for the chloride-permeable GABAA receptor (GABAAR. Here we review some of the sophisticated ways in which this ionic driving force can vary within neuronal circuits. This driving force for GABAARs is subject to tight spatial control, with the distribution of Cl− transporter proteins and channels generating regional variation in the strength of GABAAR signalling across a single neuron. GABAAR dynamics can result from short-term changes in their driving force, which involve the temporary accumulation or depletion of intracellular Cl−. In addition, activity-dependent changes in the expression and function of Cl− regulating proteins can result in long-term shifts in the driving force for GABAARs. The multifaceted regulation of the ionic driving force for GABAARs has wide ranging implications for mature brain function, neural circuit development, and disease.

  11. Tissue Dynamics and the Forces the Drive Cell Sheet Morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Glenn; Hutson, M. Shane; Tokutake, Yoichiro; Chang, Ming-Shien; Venakides, Stephanos; Bloor, James; Kiehart, Daniel

    2003-03-01

    Dorsal closure is an early stage of fly development when sheets of cells move in a coordinated pattern exhibiting symmetries on the hundred-micron length scale and consequently is ideal for biophysical investigation. We image these patterns by genetically labeling the cytoskeleton with green fluorescent protein, where a visible laser scans the tissue to excite florescence as measured in real time with confocal microscopy. To selectively remove classes of tissue and the forces they produce, we developed a UV-laser microbeam, with subcellular spatial resolution, that can be steered in two-dimensions. By modeling the response to a chosen set of laser incisions, we account for these experimental observations and consequently map the force field. We find that the overall mechanism for dorsal closure is redundant and robust and governed by four processes: two types of contractile mechanisms for force production; reaction force due to stretching of cell sheets; and the intersection of three sheets of tissues that produces a lengthening seam and apparently synchronizes the overall mechanism. Moreover, we are investigating mutant flies that fail to close in a normal way and are beginning to identify the connection between mutations and modified force fields. Identifying the forces that result from the genetic blueprint and how they manifest themselves in tissue dynamics has applications to, for example, developmental biology and wound healing.

  12. Drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy: From vacuum to liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Jaafar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We introduce drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy as a dynamic mode with outstanding performance in all environments from vacuum to liquids. As with frequency modulation, the new mode follows a feedback scheme with two nested loops: The first keeps the cantilever oscillation amplitude constant by regulating the driving force, and the second uses the driving force as the feedback variable for topography. Additionally, a phase-locked loop can be used as a parallel feedback allowing separation of the conservative and nonconservative interactions. We describe the basis of this mode and present some examples of its performance in three different environments. Drive-amplutide modulation is a very stable, intuitive and easy to use mode that is free of the feedback instability associated with the noncontact-to-contact transition that occurs in the frequency-modulation mode.

  13. Nano-rheology of hydrogels using direct drive force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalam, Prathima C; Gosvami, Nitya N; Caporizzo, Matthew A; Composto, Russell J; Carpick, Robert W

    2015-11-07

    We present a magnetic force-based direct drive modulation method to measure local nano-rheological properties of soft materials across a broad frequency range (10 Hz to 2 kHz) using colloid-attached atomic force microscope (AFM) probes in liquid. The direct drive method enables artefact-free measurements over several decades of excitation frequency, and avoids the need to evaluate medium-induced hydrodynamic drag effects. The method was applied to measure the local mechanical properties of polyacrylamide hydrogels. The frequency-dependent storage stiffness, loss stiffness, and loss tangent (tan δ) were quantified for hydrogels having high and low crosslinking densities by measuring the amplitude and the phase response of the cantilever while the colloid was in contact with the hydrogel. The frequency bandwidth was further expanded to lower effective frequencies (0.1 Hz to 10 Hz) by obtaining force-displacement (FD) curves. Slow FD measurements showed a recoverable but highly hysteretic response, with the contact mechanical behaviour dependent on the loading direction: approach curves showed Hertzian behaviour while retraction curves fit the JKR contact mechanics model well into the adhesive regime, after which multiple detachment instabilities occurred. Using small amplitude dynamic modulation to explore faster rates, the load dependence of the storage stiffness transitioned from Hertzian to a dynamic punch-type (constant contact area) model, indicating significant influence of material dissipation coupled with adhesion. Using the appropriate contact model across the full frequency range measured, the storage moduli were found to remain nearly constant until an increase began near ∼100 Hz. The softer gels' storage modulus increased from 7.9 ± 0.4 to 14.5 ± 2.1 kPa (∼85%), and the stiffer gels' storage modulus increased from 16.3 ± 1.1 to 31.7 ± 5.0 kPa (∼95%). This increase at high frequencies may be attributed to a contribution from solvent

  14. Boomers and seniors: The driving force behind leisure participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynda J. Sperazza; Priya. Banerjee

    2010-01-01

    The 76 million Americans in the Baby Boomer population are the force behind the changing demographic picture of society today. Boomers' spending habits and lifestyle choices will also have a powerful influence on retirement and leisure in the coming decades. Boomers will redefine retirement and are expected to demand more than current senior programs and...

  15. Microorganism and filamentous fungi drive evolution of plant synapses

    OpenAIRE

    Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In the course of plant evolution, there is an obvious trend toward an increased complexity of plant bodies, as well as an increased sophistication of plant behavior and communication. Phenotypic plasticity of plants is based on the polar auxin transport machinery that is directly linked with plant sensory systems impinging on plant behavior and adaptive responses. Similar to the emergence and evolution of eukaryotic cells, evolution of land plants was also shaped and driven by infective and s...

  16. Position and force control of a vehicle with two or more steerable drive wheels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reister, D.B.; Unseren, M.A.

    1992-10-01

    When a vehicle with two or more steerable drive wheels is traveling in a circle, the motion of the wheels is constrained. The wheel translational velocity divided by the radius to the center of rotation must be the same for all wheels. When the drive wheels are controlled independently using position control, the motion of the wheels may violate the constraints and the wheels may slip. Consequently, substantial errors can occur in the orientation of the vehicle. A vehicle with N drive wheels has (N - 1) constraints and one degree of freedom. We have developed a new approach to the control of a vehicle with N steerable drive wheels. The novel aspect of our approach is the use of force control. To control the vehicle, we have one degree of freedom for the position on the circle and (N - 1) forces that can be used to reduce errors. Recently, Kankaanranta and Koivo developed a control architecture that allows the force and position degrees of freedom to be decoupled. In the work of Kankaanranta and Koivo the force is an exogenous input. We have made the force endogenous by defining the force in terms of the errors in satisfying the rigid body kinematic constraints. We have applied the control architecture to the HERMIES-III robot and have measured a dramatic reduction in error (more than a factor of 20) compared to motions without force control.

  17. The filamentous fungal pellet and forces driving its formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Zhang, Jining

    2016-12-01

    Filamentous fungi play an important role not only in the bio-manufacturing of value-added products, but also in bioenergy and environmental research. The bioprocess manipulation of filamentous fungi is more difficult than that of other microbial species because of their different pellet morphologies and the presence of tangled mycelia under different cultivation conditions. Fungal pellets, which have the advantages of harvest ease, low fermentation broth viscosity and high yield of some proteins, have been used for a long time. Many attempts have been made to establish the relationship between pellet and product yield using quantitative approaches. Fungal pellet formation is attributed to the combination of electrostatic interactions, hydrophobicity and specific interactions from spore wall components. Electrostatic interactions result from van der Waals forces and negative charge repulsion from carboxyl groups in the spore wall structure. Electrostatic interactions are also affected by counter-ions (cations) and the physiologic conditions of spores that modify the carboxyl groups. Fungal aggregates are promoted by the hydrophobicity generated by hydrophobins, which form a hydrophobic coat that covers the spore. The specific interactions of spore wall components contribute to spore aggregation through salt bridging. A model of spore aggregation was proposed based on these forces. Additionally, some challenges were addressed, including the limitations of research techniques, the quantitative determination of forces and the complex information of biological systems, to clarify the mechanism of fungal pellet formation.

  18. Automatic Driving Control by Robotic Driver Considering the Lack of a Driving Force at Changing Gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-09

    the robotic driver is able to drive a manual transmission car (MT), an automatic transmission car (AT), or a continuously variable transmission car (CVT...America than MTs, as shown in Table I. However, more MTs are sold than ATs in Europe due to differences in traffic situation, standards of living, and...not active during changing the gear. There is a possibility that some large error is caused by better control performance for a target vehicle speed

  19. Study on Forced Torsional Vibration of CFRP Drive-Line System with Internal Damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mo; Hu, Yefa; Zhang, Jinguang; Ding, Guoping; Song, Chunsheng

    2017-12-01

    The use of CFRP transmission shaft has positive effect on the weight and flexural vibration reduction of drive-line system. However, the application of CFRP transmission shaft will greatly reduce the torsional stiffness of the drive-line, and may cause strong transient torsional vibration. Which will seriously affect the performance of CFRP drive-line. In this study, the forced torsional vibration of the CFRP drive-line system is carried out using the lumped parameter model. In addition, the effect of rotary inertia, internal damping, coupling due to the composite laminate, and excitation torque are incorporated in the modified transfer matrix model (TMM). Then, the modified TMM is used to predict the torsional frequency and forced torsional vibration of a CFRP drive-line with three-segment drive shafts. The results of modified TMM shown that the rotational speed difference of the CFRP transmission shaft segment is much larger than metal transmission shaft segment under excitation torque. And compared the results from finite element simulation, modified TMM and torsional vibration experiment respectively, and it has shown that the modified TMM can accurately predict forced torsional vibration behaviors of the CFRP drive-line system.

  20. Experimental modeling of the effect of hurricane wind forces on driving behavior and vehicle performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jose M; Codjoe, Julius; Osman, Osama; Ishak, Sherif; Wolshon, Brian

    2015-01-01

    While traffic planning is important for developing a hurricane evacuation plan, vehicle performance on the roads during extreme weather conditions is critical to the success of the planning process. This novel study investigates the effect of gusty hurricane wind forces on the driving behavior and vehicle performance. The study explores how the parameters of a driving simulator could be modified to reproduce wind loadings experienced by three vehicle types (passenger car, ambulance, and bus) during gusty hurricane winds, through manipulation of appropriate software. Thirty participants were then tested on the modified driving simulator under five wind conditions (ranging from normal to hurricane category 4). The driving performance measures used were heading error and lateral displacement. The results showed that higher wind forces resulted in more varied and greater heading error and lateral displacement. The ambulance had the greatest heading errors and lateral displacements, which were attributed to its large lateral surface area and light weight. Two mathematical models were developed to estimate the heading error and lateral displacements for each of the vehicle types for a given change in lateral wind force. Through a questionnaire, participants felt the different characteristics while driving each vehicle type. The findings of this study demonstrate the valuable use of a driving simulator to model the behavior of different vehicle types and to develop mathematical models to estimate and quantify driving behavior and vehicle performance under hurricane wind conditions.

  1. Pulling force and surface tension drive membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuejuan; Tian, Falin; Yue, Tongtao; Zhang, Xianren; Zhong, Chongli

    2017-11-21

    Despite catalyzed by fusion proteins of quite different molecular architectures, intracellular, viral, and cell-to-cell fusions are found to have the essential common features and the nearly same nature of transition states. The similarity inspires us to find a more general catalysis mechanism for membrane fusion that minimally depends on the specific structures of fusion proteins. In this work, we built a minimal model for membrane fusion, and by using dissipative particle dynamics simulations, we propose a mechanism that the pulling force generated by fusion proteins initiates the fusion process and the membrane tension regulates the subsequent fusion stages. The model shows different features compared to previous computer simulation studies: the pulling force catalyzes membrane fusion through lipid head overcrowding in the contacting region, leading to an increase in the head-head repulsion and/or the unfavorable head-tail contacts from opposing membranes, both of which destabilize the contacting leaflets and thus promote membrane fusion or vesicle rupture. Our simulations produce a variety of shapes and intermediates, closely resembling cases seen experimentally. Our work strongly supports the view that the tight pulling mechanism is a conserved feature of fusion protein-mediated fusion and that the membrane tension plays an essential role in fusion.

  2. Pulling force and surface tension drive membrane fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuejuan; Tian, Falin; Yue, Tongtao; Zhang, Xianren; Zhong, Chongli

    2017-11-01

    Despite catalyzed by fusion proteins of quite different molecular architectures, intracellular, viral, and cell-to-cell fusions are found to have the essential common features and the nearly same nature of transition states. The similarity inspires us to find a more general catalysis mechanism for membrane fusion that minimally depends on the specific structures of fusion proteins. In this work, we built a minimal model for membrane fusion, and by using dissipative particle dynamics simulations, we propose a mechanism that the pulling force generated by fusion proteins initiates the fusion process and the membrane tension regulates the subsequent fusion stages. The model shows different features compared to previous computer simulation studies: the pulling force catalyzes membrane fusion through lipid head overcrowding in the contacting region, leading to an increase in the head-head repulsion and/or the unfavorable head-tail contacts from opposing membranes, both of which destabilize the contacting leaflets and thus promote membrane fusion or vesicle rupture. Our simulations produce a variety of shapes and intermediates, closely resembling cases seen experimentally. Our work strongly supports the view that the tight pulling mechanism is a conserved feature of fusion protein-mediated fusion and that the membrane tension plays an essential role in fusion.

  3. The Driving Forces of Cultural Complexity : Neanderthals, Modern Humans, and the Question of Population Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Laurel; Wakano, Joe Yuichiro; Feldman, Marcus W; Aoki, Kenichi

    2017-03-01

    The forces driving cultural accumulation in human populations, both modern and ancient, are hotly debated. Did genetic, demographic, or cognitive features of behaviorally modern humans (as opposed to, say, early modern humans or Neanderthals) allow culture to accumulate to its current, unprecedented levels of complexity? Theoretical explanations for patterns of accumulation often invoke demographic factors such as population size or density, whereas statistical analyses of variation in cultural complexity often point to the importance of environmental factors such as food stability, in determining cultural complexity. Here we use both an analytical model and an agent-based simulation model to show that a full understanding of the emergence of behavioral modernity, and the cultural evolution that has followed, depends on understanding and untangling the complex relationships among culture, genetically determined cognitive ability, and demographic history. For example, we show that a small but growing population could have a different number of cultural traits from a shrinking population with the same absolute number of individuals in some circumstances.

  4. GEOMETRY MODELING OF GEAR AND CHAIN DRIVE WITH EVOLUTE PROFILE AND RESEARCH OF ITS CONTACT STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman PROTASOV

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Evolute gearing is realized in a family of teeth profiles for gears and chain drives with convex-concave contact. The main criterion of loading capacity for gear is contact strength, for chain drive – tooth wear. Both indicators depend on the level of contact stress. Therefore, the aim of this work is to determine the contact stress in the evolute gearing. Calculations of contact stress are based on the Hertz formula and the finite element method. The analysis and comparison of results for different evolute profiles is carried out.

  5. Hypoxia: The Force that Drives Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiangwei; Colgan, Sean P; Shelley, Carl Simon

    2016-03-01

    In the United States the prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) reached epidemic proportions in 2012 with over 600,000 patients being treated. The rates of ESRD among the elderly are disproportionally high. Consequently, as life expectancy increases and the baby-boom generation reaches retirement age, the already heavy burden imposed by ESRD on the US health care system is set to increase dramatically. ESRD represents the terminal stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD). A large body of evidence indicating that CKD is driven by renal tissue hypoxia has led to the development of therapeutic strategies that increase kidney oxygenation and the contention that chronic hypoxia is the final common pathway to end-stage renal failure. Numerous studies have demonstrated that one of the most potent means by which hypoxic conditions within the kidney produce CKD is by inducing a sustained inflammatory attack by infiltrating leukocytes. Indispensable to this attack is the acquisition by leukocytes of an adhesive phenotype. It was thought that this process resulted exclusively from leukocytes responding to cytokines released from ischemic renal endothelium. However, recently it has been demonstrated that leukocytes also become activated independent of the hypoxic response of endothelial cells. It was found that this endothelium-independent mechanism involves leukocytes directly sensing hypoxia and responding by transcriptional induction of the genes that encode the β2-integrin family of adhesion molecules. This induction likely maintains the long-term inflammation by which hypoxia drives the pathogenesis of CKD. Consequently, targeting these transcriptional mechanisms would appear to represent a promising new therapeutic strategy. © 2016 Marshfield Clinic.

  6. Hypoxia: The Force that Drives Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiangwei; Colgan, Sean P; Shelley, Carl Simon

    2016-01-01

    In the United States the prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) reached epidemic proportions in 2012 with over 600,000 patients being treated. The rates of ESRD among the elderly are disproportionally high. Consequently, as life expectancy increases and the baby-boom generation reaches retirement age, the already heavy burden imposed by ESRD on the US health care system is set to increase dramatically. ESRD represents the terminal stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD). A large body of evidence indicating that CKD is driven by renal tissue hypoxia has led to the development of therapeutic strategies that increase kidney oxygenation and the contention that chronic hypoxia is the final common pathway to end-stage renal failure. Numerous studies have demonstrated that one of the most potent means by which hypoxic conditions within the kidney produce CKD is by inducing a sustained inflammatory attack by infiltrating leukocytes. Indispensable to this attack is the acquisition by leukocytes of an adhesive phenotype. It was thought that this process resulted exclusively from leukocytes responding to cytokines released from ischemic renal endothelium. However, recently it has been demonstrated that leukocytes also become activated independent of the hypoxic response of endothelial cells. It was found that this endothelium-independent mechanism involves leukocytes directly sensing hypoxia and responding by transcriptional induction of the genes that encode the β2-integrin family of adhesion molecules. This induction likely maintains the long-term inflammation by which hypoxia drives the pathogenesis of CKD. Consequently, targeting these transcriptional mechanisms would appear to represent a promising new therapeutic strategy. PMID:26847481

  7. Force control compensation method with variable load stiffness and damping of the hydraulic drive unit force control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangdong; Ba, Kaixian; Yu, Bin; Cao, Yuan; Zhu, Qixin; Zhao, Hualong

    2016-05-01

    Each joint of hydraulic drive quadruped robot is driven by the hydraulic drive unit (HDU), and the contacting between the robot foot end and the ground is complex and variable, which increases the difficulty of force control inevitably. In the recent years, although many scholars researched some control methods such as disturbance rejection control, parameter self-adaptive control, impedance control and so on, to improve the force control performance of HDU, the robustness of the force control still needs improving. Therefore, how to simulate the complex and variable load characteristics of the environment structure and how to ensure HDU having excellent force control performance with the complex and variable load characteristics are key issues to be solved in this paper. The force control system mathematic model of HDU is established by the mechanism modeling method, and the theoretical models of a novel force control compensation method and a load characteristics simulation method under different environment structures are derived, considering the dynamic characteristics of the load stiffness and the load damping under different environment structures. Then, simulation effects of the variable load stiffness and load damping under the step and sinusoidal load force are analyzed experimentally on the HDU force control performance test platform, which provides the foundation for the force control compensation experiment research. In addition, the optimized PID control parameters are designed to make the HDU have better force control performance with suitable load stiffness and load damping, under which the force control compensation method is introduced, and the robustness of the force control system with several constant load characteristics and the variable load characteristics respectively are comparatively analyzed by experiment. The research results indicate that if the load characteristics are known, the force control compensation method presented in this

  8. On Optimizing Steering Performance of Multi-axle Vehicle Based on Driving Force Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Zhicheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The steering performance of multi-axle vehicle with independent driving system is affected by the distribution of the wheel driving force. A nonlinear vehicle dynamics model including magic formula tire model for describing 11 DoF four-axle vehicle with dual-front-axle-steering (DFAS system was presented. The influence of different driving force distribution scheme on the steering performance of the vehicle was analyzed. A control strategy for improving the steady response and transient response of the vehicle steering is proposed. The results show: For the steady response, setting different drive force for internal and external wheels according to the actual steering characteristics of the vehicle can effectively improve its steering characteristics; For the transient response, adopting the zero sideslip angle control strategy and using the PID control algorithm to control the driving force of the outside wheel of tear-two-axle, under angle step input, the vehicle sideslip angle can quickly stabilize to 0 and yaw rate also significantly decreases.

  9. Preliminary Experimental Results for Indirect Vector-Control of Induction Motor Drives with Forced Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Vittek

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution presents an extension of indirect vector control of electric drives employing induction motors to 'Forced Dynamic Control'. This method of control offers an accurate realisation of dynamic response profiles, which can be selected by the user. The developed system can be integrated into a drive with a shaft position encoder or a shaft sensoriess drive, in which only the stator currents are measured. The applied stator voltages are determined by a computed inverter switching algorithm. Simulation results and preliminary experimental results for indirect vector control of an idle running induction motor indicate good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  10. Identification of the driving forces of climate change using the longest instrumental temperature record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Geli; Yang, Peicai; Zhou, Xiuji

    2017-04-01

    The identification of causal effects is a fundamental problem in climate change research. Here, a new perspective on climate change causality is presented using the central England temperature (CET) dataset, the longest instrumental temperature record, and a combination of slow feature analysis and wavelet analysis. The driving forces of climate change were investigated and the results showed two independent degrees of freedom —a 3.36-year cycle and a 22.6-year cycle, which seem to be connected to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation cycle and the Hale sunspot cycle, respectively. Moreover, these driving forces were modulated in amplitude by signals with millennial timescales.

  11. COMPETITIVENESS IN SERVICES, DRIVING FORCE OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAMONA PÎRVU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The competitiveness of a nation is ensured by the profitable activity of firms. They strengthen their position in the domestic and international markets through global strategies whose purpose is to increase productivity and maintain it at a high level. For this, the company must take into account both the internal economic environment which ensures operating conditions and the external economic environment’s development. The five competitive forces determine the industry’s profitability because they configure firms’ selling prices, production costs and investments needed to be competitive in the field. The threat of new competitors limits the potential profit since they involve new production units and the opportunities for market expansion. Economic strength of the buyers and bidders attracts profits to them. Rivalry among existing competitors erodes profits by increasing costs of competition (like advertising, selling expenses or those required for research and development. The presence of substitutive goods or services limits competitors’ prices through buyers’ transfer phenomena limiting and eroding market share of industry / firm in the total production output.

  12. On the evolution of ac machines for spindle drive applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratta, A.; Vagati, A.; Villata, F. (Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Polytecnico di Torino, Torino (Italy))

    1992-10-01

    In the field of ac spindle drives, the induction motor is widely adopted. Synchronous solutions (reluctance, interior permanent magnets) are often suggested to overcome some drawbacks of the induction motor. This paper compares the different options by considering the machine torque-density and the inverter power size needed for a given constant-power speed range. It is shown that an axially laminated reluctance motor gives more torque density than the induction motor but nearly requires the same inverter size. By adding a proper quantity of permanent magnets, the inverter size can be greatly reduced. A comprehensive discussion is made on this subject, aiming to point out a design solution that is 'optimal' for the whole drive.

  13. Energy Barriers and Driving Forces Associated with the Dynamic Transformation of Ti-6Al-4V (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-11

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0516 ENERGY BARRIERS AND DRIVING FORCES ASSOCIATED WITH THE DYNAMIC TRANSFORMATION OF TI-6AL-4V (PREPRINT) S.L...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 11 December 2017 Interim 19 March 2014 – 11 November 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ENERGY BARRIERS AND DRIVING FORCES...The energy barriers and driving forces associated with dynamic transformation in Ti-6Al-4V are evaluated. It is shown that the stored energy is less

  14. Gene, cell, and organ multiplication drives inner ear evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Elliott, Karen L

    2017-11-01

    We review the development and evolution of the ear neurosensory cells, the aggregation of neurosensory cells into an otic placode, the evolution of novel neurosensory structures dedicated to hearing and the evolution of novel nuclei in the brain and their input dedicated to processing those novel auditory stimuli. The evolution of the apparently novel auditory system lies in duplication and diversification of cell fate transcription regulation that allows variation at the cellular level [transforming a single neurosensory cell into a sensory cell connected to its targets by a sensory neuron as well as diversifying hair cells], organ level [duplication of organ development followed by diversification and novel stimulus acquisition] and brain nuclear level [multiplication of transcription factors to regulate various neuron and neuron aggregate fate to transform the spinal cord into the unique hindbrain organization]. Tying cell fate changes driven by bHLH and other transcription factors into cell and organ changes is at the moment tentative as not all relevant factors are known and their gene regulatory network is only rudimentary understood. Future research can use the blueprint proposed here to provide both the deeper molecular evolutionary understanding as well as a more detailed appreciation of developmental networks. This understanding can reveal how an auditory system evolved through transformation of existing cell fate determining networks and thus how neurosensory evolution occurred through molecular changes affecting cell fate decision processes. Appreciating the evolutionary cascade of developmental program changes could allow identifying essential steps needed to restore cells and organs in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Passive Joint Forces Are Tuned to Limb Use in Insects and Drive Movements without Motor Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ache, Jan M.; Matheson, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Limb movements are generally driven by active muscular contractions working with and against passive forces arising in muscles and other structures. In relatively heavy limbs, the effects of gravity and inertia predominate, whereas in lighter limbs, passive forces intrinsic to the limb are of greater consequence. The roles of passive forces generated by muscles and tendons are well understood, but there has been little recognition that forces originating within joints themselves may also be important, and less still that these joint forces may be adapted through evolution to complement active muscle forces acting at the same joint. Results We examined the roles of passive joint forces in insect legs with different arrangements of antagonist muscles. We first show that passive forces modify actively generated movements of a joint across its working range, and that they can be sufficiently strong to generate completely passive movements that are faster than active movements observed in natural behaviors. We further demonstrate that some of these forces originate within the joint itself. In legs of different species adapted to different uses (walking, jumping), these passive joint forces complement the balance of strength of the antagonist muscles acting on the joint. We show that passive joint forces are stronger where they assist the weaker of two antagonist muscles. Conclusions In limbs where the dictates of a key behavior produce asymmetry in muscle forces, passive joint forces can be coadapted to provide the balance needed for the effective generation of other behaviors. PMID:23871240

  16. Regional Quality Assurance Activity in Higher Education in Southeast Asia: Its Characteristics and Driving Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemiya, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    This article analyses the characteristics and driving forces of regional quality assurance activity in Southeast Asia, which has been actively promoted in recent years by the ASEAN University Network, an organisation for higher education under the auspices of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). There are now more collaborative…

  17. Effect of pinning and driving force on the metastability effects in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    susceptibility measurements appears to generate a driving force on the vortex matter. In a nascent pinned single ... pinning in order to differentiate the response of different metastable vortex states, one encounters a new phenomenon, viz., ...... using a lock-in amplifier having a wide band filter option. The above-stated noise.

  18. Emission of greenhouse gases 1990-2010. Trends and driving forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-03-01

    Emissions of greenhouse gases in Norway from 1990-2010 - trends and driving forces, a report that presents emission trends in Norway with the analysis of the main drivers and trends, and a review and analysis of the effectiveness of implemented measures.(Author)

  19. The marriage between welfare services and tourism - A driving force for innovation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjalager, Anne Mette

    2006-01-01

    -based sectors are well connected with other sectors, including the voluntary sector. Both internal and external driving forces are continuously challenging the Danish welfare model. The pressures and the opportunities are transmitted to tourism, albeit not uniformly. There are good reasons for commercial...

  20. Vehicle Dynamics Control of In-wheel Electric Motor Drive Vehicles Based on Averaging of Tire Force Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Nobuo; Iwano, Haruo; Kamada, Takayoshi; Nagai, Masao

    For in-wheel electric motor drive vehicles, a new vehicle dynamics control which is based on the tire force usage rate is proposed. The new controller adopts non-linear optimal control could manage the interference between direct yaw-moment control and the tire force usage rate. The new control is considered total longitudinal and transverse tire force. Therefore the controller can prevent tire force saturation near tire force limit during cornering. Simulations and test runs by the custom made four wheel drive in-wheel motor electric vehicle show that higher driving stability performance compared to the performance of the same vehicle without control.

  1. Driving-forces model on individual behavior in scenarios considering moving threat agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuying; Zhuang, Jun; Shen, Shifei; Wang, Jia

    2017-09-01

    The individual behavior model is a contributory factor to improve the accuracy of agent-based simulation in different scenarios. However, few studies have considered moving threat agents, which often occur in terrorist attacks caused by attackers with close-range weapons (e.g., sword, stick). At the same time, many existing behavior models lack validation from cases or experiments. This paper builds a new individual behavior model based on seven behavioral hypotheses. The driving-forces model is an extension of the classical social force model considering scenarios including moving threat agents. An experiment was conducted to validate the key components of the model. Then the model is compared with an advanced Elliptical Specification II social force model, by calculating the fitting errors between the simulated and experimental trajectories, and being applied to simulate a specific circumstance. Our results show that the driving-forces model reduced the fitting error by an average of 33.9% and the standard deviation by an average of 44.5%, which indicates the accuracy and stability of the model in the studied situation. The new driving-forces model could be used to simulate individual behavior when analyzing the risk of specific scenarios using agent-based simulation methods, such as risk analysis of close-range terrorist attacks in public places.

  2. A study on the fundamental mechanism and the evolutionary driving forces behind aerobic fermentation in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagman, Arne; Piškur, Jure

    2015-01-01

    Baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae rapidly converts sugars to ethanol and carbon dioxide at both anaerobic and aerobic conditions. The later phenomenon is called Crabtree effect and has been described in two forms, long-term and short-term effect. We have previously studied under fully controlled aerobic conditions forty yeast species for their central carbon metabolism and the presence of long-term Crabtree effect. We have also studied ten steady-state yeast cultures, pulsed them with glucose, and followed the central carbon metabolism and the appearance of ethanol at dynamic conditions. In this paper we analyzed those wet laboratory data to elucidate possible mechanisms that determine the fate of glucose in different yeast species that cover approximately 250 million years of evolutionary history. We determine overflow metabolism to be the fundamental mechanism behind both long- and short-term Crabtree effect, which originated approximately 125-150 million years ago in the Saccharomyces lineage. The "invention" of overflow metabolism was the first step in the evolution of aerobic fermentation in yeast. It provides a general strategy to increase energy production rates, which we show is positively correlated to growth. The "invention" of overflow has also simultaneously enabled rapid glucose consumption in yeast, which is a trait that could have been selected for, to "starve" competitors in nature. We also show that glucose repression of respiration is confined mainly among S. cerevisiae and closely related species that diverged after the whole genome duplication event, less than 100 million years ago. Thus, glucose repression of respiration was apparently "invented" as a second step to further increase overflow and ethanol production, to inhibit growth of other microbes. The driving force behind the initial evolutionary steps was most likely competition with other microbes to faster consume and convert sugar into biomass, in niches that were semi-anaerobic.

  3. A study on the fundamental mechanism and the evolutionary driving forces behind aerobic fermentation in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Hagman

    Full Text Available Baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae rapidly converts sugars to ethanol and carbon dioxide at both anaerobic and aerobic conditions. The later phenomenon is called Crabtree effect and has been described in two forms, long-term and short-term effect. We have previously studied under fully controlled aerobic conditions forty yeast species for their central carbon metabolism and the presence of long-term Crabtree effect. We have also studied ten steady-state yeast cultures, pulsed them with glucose, and followed the central carbon metabolism and the appearance of ethanol at dynamic conditions. In this paper we analyzed those wet laboratory data to elucidate possible mechanisms that determine the fate of glucose in different yeast species that cover approximately 250 million years of evolutionary history. We determine overflow metabolism to be the fundamental mechanism behind both long- and short-term Crabtree effect, which originated approximately 125-150 million years ago in the Saccharomyces lineage. The "invention" of overflow metabolism was the first step in the evolution of aerobic fermentation in yeast. It provides a general strategy to increase energy production rates, which we show is positively correlated to growth. The "invention" of overflow has also simultaneously enabled rapid glucose consumption in yeast, which is a trait that could have been selected for, to "starve" competitors in nature. We also show that glucose repression of respiration is confined mainly among S. cerevisiae and closely related species that diverged after the whole genome duplication event, less than 100 million years ago. Thus, glucose repression of respiration was apparently "invented" as a second step to further increase overflow and ethanol production, to inhibit growth of other microbes. The driving force behind the initial evolutionary steps was most likely competition with other microbes to faster consume and convert sugar into biomass, in niches that

  4. The driving of turbulence in simulations of molecular cloud formation and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körtgen, Bastian; Federrath, Christoph; Banerjee, Robi

    2017-12-01

    Molecular clouds are to a great extent influenced by turbulent motions in the gas. Numerical and observational studies indicate that the star formation rate and efficiency crucially depend on the mixture of solenoidal and compressive modes in the turbulent acceleration field, which can be quantified by the turbulent driving parameter b. For purely solenoidal (divergence-free) driving previous studies showed that b=1/3 and for entirely compressive (curl-free) driving b=1. In this study, we determine the evolution of the turbulent driving parameter b in magnetohydrodynamical simulations of molecular cloud formation and evolution. The clouds form due to the convergence of two flows of warm neutral gas. We explore different scenarios by varying the magnitude of the initial turbulent perturbations in the flows. We show that the driving mode of the turbulence within the cloud strongly fluctuates with time and exhibits no clear correlation with typical cloud properties, such as the cloud mass and the (Alfven) Mach number. We specifically find that $b$ strongly varies from b=0.3 to b=0.8 on timescales tcloud to cloud. This rapid change of b from solenoidal to compressive driving is primarily associated with global contraction of the cloud and subsequent onset of star formation. We conclude that the effective turbulence driving parameter should be treated as a free parameter that can vary from solenoidal to compressive in both time and space.

  5. Step-wise and punctuated genome evolution drive phenotype changes of tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanenko, Aleksei, E-mail: a.a.stepanenko@gmail.com [Department of Biosynthesis of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Andreieva, Svitlana; Korets, Kateryna; Mykytenko, Dmytro [Department of Biosynthesis of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Huleyuk, Nataliya [Institute of Hereditary Pathology, National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, Lviv 79008 (Ukraine); Vassetzky, Yegor [CNRS UMR8126, Université Paris-Sud 11, Institut de Cancérologie Gustave Roussy, Villejuif 94805 (France); Kavsan, Vadym [Department of Biosynthesis of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine)

    2015-01-15

    genome context. Temozolomide treatment of 293-pcDNA3.1 cells intensified the stochastic punctuated genome changes and CNAs, and significantly reduced viability and CFE. In contrast, temozolomide treatment of HeLa-CHI3L1 cells promoted the step-wise genome changes, CNAs, and increased viability and CFE, which did not correlate with the ectopic CHI3L1 production. Thus, consistent coevolution of karyotypes and phenotypes was observed. CIN as a driving force of genome evolution significantly influences growth characteristics of tumor cells and should be always taken into consideration during the different experimental manipulations.

  6. What drives the kinematic evolution of star-forming galaxies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chao-Ling

    2017-12-01

    One important result from recent large integral field spectrograph (IFS) surveys is that the intrinsic velocity dispersion of galaxies increases with redshift. Massive, rotationdominated discs are already in place at z ∼ 2, but they are dynamically hotter than spiral galaxies in the local Universe. Although several plausible mechanisms for this elevated velocity dispersion (e.g. star formation feedback, elevated gas supply, or more frequent galaxy interactions) have been proposed, the fundamental driver of the velocity dispersion enhancement at high redshift remains unclear. We investigate the origin of this kinematic evolution using a suite of cosmological simulations from the FIRE (Feedback In Realistic Environments) project. These simulations reproduce the observed trends between intrinsic velocity dispersion (σ intr), SFR, and z. In both the observed and simulated galaxies, σ intr is positively correlated with SFR. σ intr increases with redshift out to z ∼ 1 and then flattens beyond that. In the FIRE simulations, σ intr can vary significantly on timescales of ≲ 100 Myr. These variations closely mirror the time evolution of the SFR and gas inflow rate ( Ṁ gas). By cross-correlating pairs of σ intr Ṁ gas, and SFR, we show that the increased gas inflow leads to subsequent enhanced star formation, and enhancements in σ intr tend to temporally coincide with increases in Ṁ gas and SFR.

  7. A Study of the Effect of the Fringe Fields on the Electrostatic Force in Vertical Comb Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Else Gallagher

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The equation that describes the relationship between the applied voltage and the resulting electrostatic force within comb drives is often used to assist in choosing the dimensions for their design. This paper re-examines how some of these dimensions—particularly the cross-sectional dimensions of the comb teeth—affect this relationship in vertical comb drives. The electrostatic forces in several vertical comb drives fabricated for this study were measured and compared to predictions made with four different mathematical models in order to explore the amount of complexity required within a model to accurately predict the electrostatic forces in the comb drives.

  8. Neanderthal ancestry drives evolution of lipid catabolism in contemporary Europeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrameeva, Ekaterina E.; Bozek, Katarzyna; He, Liu; Yan, Zheng; Jiang, Xi; Wei, Yuning; Tang, Kun; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Prufer, Kay; Kelso, Janet; Paabo, Svante; Giavalisco, Patrick; Lachmann, Michael; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Although Neanderthals are extinct, fragments of their genomes persist in contemporary humans. Here we show that while the genome-wide frequency of Neanderthal-like sites is approximately constant across all contemporary out-of-Africa populations, genes involved in lipid catabolism contain more than threefold excess of such sites in contemporary humans of European descent. Evolutionally, these genes show significant association with signatures of recent positive selection in the contemporary European, but not Asian or African populations. Functionally, the excess of Neanderthal-like sites in lipid catabolism genes can be linked with a greater divergence of lipid concentrations and enzyme expression levels within this pathway, seen in contemporary Europeans, but not in the other populations. We conclude that sequence variants that evolved in Neanderthals may have given a selective advantage to anatomically modern humans that settled in the same geographical areas. PMID:24690587

  9. Extrachromosomal oncogene amplification drives tumor evolution and genetic heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Kristen M.; Deshpande, Viraj; Beyter, Doruk; Koga, Tomoyuki; Rusert, Jessica; Lee, Catherine; Li, Bin; Arden, Karen; Ren, Bing; Nathanson, David A.; Kornblum, Harley I.; Taylor, Michael D.; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Cavenee, Webster K.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert; Furnari, Frank B.; Vandenberg, Scott R.; Rao, P. Nagesh; Wahl, Geoffrey M.; Bafna, Vineet; Mischel, Paul S.

    2017-01-01

    Human cells have twenty-three pairs of chromosomes but in cancer, genes can be amplified in chromosomes or in circular extrachromosomal DNA (ECDNA), whose frequency and functional significance are not understood1–4. We performed whole genome sequencing, structural modeling and cytogenetic analyses of 17 different cancer types, including 2572 metaphases, and developed ECdetect to conduct unbiased integrated ECDNA detection and analysis. ECDNA was found in nearly half of human cancers varying by tumor type, but almost never in normal cells. Driver oncogenes were amplified most commonly on ECDNA, elevating transcript level. Mathematical modeling predicted that ECDNA amplification elevates oncogene copy number and increases intratumoral heterogeneity more effectively than chromosomal amplification, which we validated by quantitative analyses of cancer samples. These results suggest that ECDNA contributes to accelerated evolution in cancer. PMID:28178237

  10. Neanderthal ancestry drives evolution of lipid catabolism in contemporary Europeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrameeva, Ekaterina E; Bozek, Katarzyna; He, Liu; Yan, Zheng; Jiang, Xi; Wei, Yuning; Tang, Kun; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Prufer, Kay; Kelso, Janet; Paabo, Svante; Giavalisco, Patrick; Lachmann, Michael; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2014-04-01

    Although Neanderthals are extinct, fragments of their genomes persist in contemporary humans. Here we show that while the genome-wide frequency of Neanderthal-like sites is approximately constant across all contemporary out-of-Africa populations, genes involved in lipid catabolism contain more than threefold excess of such sites in contemporary humans of European descent. Evolutionally, these genes show significant association with signatures of recent positive selection in the contemporary European, but not Asian or African populations. Functionally, the excess of Neanderthal-like sites in lipid catabolism genes can be linked with a greater divergence of lipid concentrations and enzyme expression levels within this pathway, seen in contemporary Europeans, but not in the other populations. We conclude that sequence variants that evolved in Neanderthals may have given a selective advantage to anatomically modern humans that settled in the same geographical areas.

  11. Analyzing the Long Term Cohesive Effect of Sector Specific Driving Forces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonatan Berman

    Full Text Available Financial markets are partially composed of sectors dominated by external driving forces, such as commodity prices, infrastructure and other indices. We characterize the statistical properties of such sectors and present a novel model for the coupling of the stock prices and their dominating driving forces, inspired by mean reverting stochastic processes. Using the model we were able to explain the market sectors' long term behavior and estimate the coupling strength between stocks in financial markets and the sector specific driving forces. Notably, the analysis was successfully applied to the shipping market, in which the Baltic dry index (BDI, an assessment of the price of transporting the major raw materials by sea, influences the shipping financial market. We also present the analysis of other sectors-the gold mining market and the food production market, for which the model was also successfully applied. The model can serve as a general tool for characterizing the coupling between external forces and affected financial variables and therefore for estimating the risk in sectors and their vulnerability to external stress.

  12. The evolution of the placenta drives a shift in sexual selection in livebearing fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollux, B.J.A.; Meredith, R.W.; Springer, M.S.; Garland, T.; Reznick, D.N.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of the placenta from a non-placental ancestor causes a shift of maternal investment from pre- to post-fertilization, creating a venue for parent–offspring conflicts during pregnancy1, 2, 3, 4. Theory predicts that the rise of these conflicts should drive a shift from a reliance on

  13. Extrachromosomal oncogene amplification drives tumour evolution and genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Kristen M; Deshpande, Viraj; Beyter, Doruk; Koga, Tomoyuki; Rusert, Jessica; Lee, Catherine; Li, Bin; Arden, Karen; Ren, Bing; Nathanson, David A; Kornblum, Harley I; Taylor, Michael D; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Cavenee, Webster K; Wechsler-Reya, Robert; Furnari, Frank B; Vandenberg, Scott R; Rao, P Nagesh; Wahl, Geoffrey M; Bafna, Vineet; Mischel, Paul S

    2017-03-02

    Human cells have twenty-three pairs of chromosomes. In cancer, however, genes can be amplified in chromosomes or in circular extrachromosomal DNA (ecDNA), although the frequency and functional importance of ecDNA are not understood. We performed whole-genome sequencing, structural modelling and cytogenetic analyses of 17 different cancer types, including analysis of the structure and function of chromosomes during metaphase of 2,572 dividing cells, and developed a software package called ECdetect to conduct unbiased, integrated ecDNA detection and analysis. Here we show that ecDNA was found in nearly half of human cancers; its frequency varied by tumour type, but it was almost never found in normal cells. Driver oncogenes were amplified most commonly in ecDNA, thereby increasing transcript level. Mathematical modelling predicted that ecDNA amplification would increase oncogene copy number and intratumoural heterogeneity more effectively than chromosomal amplification. We validated these predictions by quantitative analyses of cancer samples. The results presented here suggest that ecDNA contributes to accelerated evolution in cancer.

  14. Solvent driving force ensures fast formation of a persistent and well-separated radical pair in plant cryptochrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüdemann, Gesa; Solov'yov, Ilia A; Kubař, Tomáš; Elstner, Marcus

    2015-01-28

    The photoreceptor protein cryptochrome is thought to host, upon light absorption, a radical pair that is sensitive to very weak magnetic fields, endowing migratory birds with a magnetic compass sense. The molecular mechanism that leads to formation of a stabilized, magnetic field sensitive radical pair has despite various theoretical and experimental efforts not been unambiguously identified yet. We challenge this unambiguity through a unique quantum mechanical molecular dynamics approach where we perform electron transfer dynamics simulations taking into account the motion of the protein upon the electron transfer. This approach allows us to follow the time evolution of the electron transfer in an unbiased fashion and to reveal the molecular driving force that ensures fast electron transfer in cryptochrome guaranteeing formation of a persistent radical pair suitable for magnetoreception. We argue that this unraveled molecular mechanism is a general principle inherent to all proteins of the cryptochrome/photolyase family and that cryptochromes are, therefore, tailored to potentially function as efficient chemical magnetoreceptors.

  15. The effect of drive frequency and set point amplitude on tapping forces in atomic force microscopy: simulation and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleiter, Justin

    2009-06-17

    In tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM), a sharp probe tip attached to an oscillating cantilever is allowed to intermittently strike a surface. By raster scanning the probe while monitoring the oscillation amplitude of the cantilever via a feedback loop, topographical maps of surfaces with nanoscale resolution can be acquired. While numerous studies have employed numerical simulations to elucidate the time-resolved tapping force between the probe tip and surface, until recent technique developments, specific read-outs from such models could not be experimentally verified. In this study, we explore, via numerical simulation, the impact of imaging parameters, i.e. set point ratio and drive frequency as a function of resonance, on time-varying tip-sample force interactions, which are directly compared to reconstructed tapping forces from real AFM experiments. As the AFM model contains a feedback loop allowing for the simulation of the entire scanning process, we further explore the impact that various tip-sample force have on the entire imaging process.

  16. Environmental variations drive polyploid evolution in neotropical Eugenia species (Myrtaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, R M; Machado, R M; Forni-Martins, E R; Verola, C F; Costa, I R

    2016-10-24

    Polyploidy is one of the most important mechanisms of speciation and diversification in plant evolution. Polyploidy results in genetic variation among individuals of the same species and even between populations, and may be responsible for differences in environmental tolerance between populations of the same species. This study determined chromosome numbers of Eugenia L. (Myrtaceae, x = 11) for 26 populations of 14 species by conventional cytogenetic techniques. Nine species (13 populations) were diploid (2n = 2x = 22), but diploid and/or polyploid cytotypes were found in the other five species (13 populations), with 2n = 33, 2n = 44, and 2n = 55. Data on chromosome number/ploidy level for other Eugenia species/populations were collected from the literature and included in this cytogeographic analysis. For each collection point (32 species and 62 populations), environmental variables were recorded using georeferencing techniques through the DIVA-GIS v.7.5 program. Environmental variables such as temperature, altitude, rainfall, solar radiation, soil type, and vegetation were analyzed with the R program, using Mann-Whitney and chi-square tests, principal component analysis, and graphic analyses, such as scatterplots, boxplots, and barplot. Polyploid and diploid populations had different spatial distribution patterns and were found in areas subjected to different environmental conditions. Polyploid individuals were collected from locations with more adverse environmental conditions, usually at higher elevations than the diploid individuals. Polyploidy allows species to occur at locations with varying environmental conditions. As diploidy and polyploidy occur under different environmental conditions, species with cytotypes exhibit wide environmental tolerance.

  17. Can computational efficiency alone drive the evolution of modularity in neural networks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosh, Colin R

    2016-08-30

    Some biologists have abandoned the idea that computational efficiency in processing multipart tasks or input sets alone drives the evolution of modularity in biological networks. A recent study confirmed that small modular (neural) networks are relatively computationally-inefficient but large modular networks are slightly more efficient than non-modular ones. The present study determines whether these efficiency advantages with network size can drive the evolution of modularity in networks whose connective architecture can evolve. The answer is no, but the reason why is interesting. All simulations (run in a wide variety of parameter states) involving gradualistic connective evolution end in non-modular local attractors. Thus while a high performance modular attractor exists, such regions cannot be reached by gradualistic evolution. Non-gradualistic evolutionary simulations in which multi-modularity is obtained through duplication of existing architecture appear viable. Fundamentally, this study indicates that computational efficiency alone does not drive the evolution of modularity, even in large biological networks, but it may still be a viable mechanism when networks evolve by non-gradualistic means.

  18. Step-wise and punctuated genome evolution drive phenotype changes of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanenko, Aleksei; Andreieva, Svitlana; Korets, Kateryna; Mykytenko, Dmytro; Huleyuk, Nataliya; Vassetzky, Yegor; Kavsan, Vadym

    2015-01-01

    The pattern of genome evolution can be divided into two phases: the step-wise continuous phase (step-wise clonal evolution, stable dominant clonal chromosome aberrations (CCAs), and low frequency of non-CCAs, NCCAs) and punctuated phase (marked by elevated NCCAs and transitional CCAs). Depending on the phase, system stresses (the diverse CIN promoting factors) may lead to the very different phenotype responses. To address the contribution of chromosome instability (CIN) to phenotype changes of tumor cells, we characterized CCAs/NCCAs of HeLa and HEK293 cells, and their derivatives after genotoxic stresses (a stable plasmid transfection, ectopic expression of cancer-associated CHI3L1 gene or treatment with temozolomide) by conventional cytogenetics, copy number alterations (CNAs) by array comparative genome hybridization, and phenotype changes by cell viability and soft agar assays. Transfection of either the empty vector pcDNA3.1 or pcDNA3.1_CHI3L1 into 293 cells initiated the punctuated genome changes. In contrast, HeLa_CHI3L1 cells demonstrated the step-wise genome changes. Increased CIN correlated with lower viability of 293_pcDNA3.1 cells but higher colony formation efficiency (CFE). Artificial CHI3L1 production in 293_CHI3L1 cells increased viability and further contributed to CFE. The opposite growth characteristics of 293_CHI3L1 and HeLa_CHI3L1 cells were revealed. The effect and function of a (trans)gene can be opposite and versatile in cells with different genetic network, which is defined by genome context. Temozolomide treatment of 293_pcDNA3.1 cells intensified the stochastic punctuated genome changes and CNAs, and significantly reduced viability and CFE. In contrast, temozolomide treatment of HeLa_CHI3L1 cells promoted the step-wise genome changes, CNAs, and increased viability and CFE, which did not correlate with the ectopic CHI3L1 production. Thus, consistent coevolution of karyotypes and phenotypes was observed. CIN as a driving force of genome

  19. Analysis of driving force and exciting voltage for a bi-material infrared resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xia; Zhang, Dacheng

    2018-01-01

    For a designed sensor with bi-material resonator which is used to detect infrared (IR) radiation by means of tracking the change in resonance frequency of the resonator with temperature attributed to the IR radiation from targets, in accordance with electromagnetic theory, the relationship between the electrical driving force exerted on the resonator and the exciting voltage applied across two electrodes of the capacitor in the sensor is presented. According to vibration theory, the dependence of the driving force on the exciting voltage is analyzed. The result of analysis is used to guide the vibration mode and frequency-amplitude response simulations of the resonator. The simulation value is approximately equal to the measured value, which demonstrates that the analysis result is effective and practicable.

  20. Environmental technology: legislation as a driving force for development; Miljoeteknologi: lovverket som drivkraft for utviklingen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Technology development providing a reduced pressure on the environment is necessary for a sustainable development. In order to promote such a development in technology, it is important to know which driving forces and barriers influence these processes. Factors contributing to the development of seven technologies are studied, and in general these regulations have played a bigger role for the development than 'pure market forces'. For many participants it is important to be one step ahead of the regulations, i.e. expected regulations are equally important as factual ones in driving the technology development. Simultaneously it is important that the authorities cooperate with the business when introducing new regulations. This will increase acceptance for the regulations and facilitate the necessary adjustments. The most important barrier in the development and use of the technologies studied is probably the lack of demand.

  1. International programs in United States schools of nursing: driving forces, obstacles, and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Tamara H; McNelis, Angela M

    2013-01-01

    To understand the development of international programs in United States schools of nursing from the perspective of driving forces, obstacles, and opportunities. Despite increasing philosophical support for international programs, significant obstacles to their development, integration, and sustainability exist in schools of nursing across the United States. A National League for Nursing (NLN) survey collected information on the number and type of international programs being offered, with an emphasis on obstacles to integration. Driving forces for international programs, identified by 487 responding institutions, included valued program outcomes, a global focus, and limited availability of clinical sites. Obstacles, such as cost, safety, and lack of credit toward a major, were identified. Suggestions for addressing and overcoming the obstacles are proposed, including the sharing of resources and utilization of the NLN Faculty Preparation for Global Experiences Toolkit. More research is needed to understand the implications for curricula, logistics, development, costs, and sustainability.

  2. Application of Laser Ranging and VLBI Data to a Study of Plate Tectonic Driving Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    The conditions under which changes in plate driving or resistive forces associated with plate boundary earthquakes are measurable with laser ranging or very long base interferometry were investigated. Aspects of plate forces that can be characterized by such measurements were identified. Analytic solutions for two dimensional stress diffusion in a viscoelastic plate following earthquake faulting on a finite fault, finite element solutions for three dimensional stress diffusion in a viscoelastic Earth following earthquake faulting, and quantitative constraints from modeling of global intraplate stress on the magnitude of deviatoric stress in the lithosphere are among the topics discussed.

  3. Finite Element Analysis of the Vertical Levitation Force in an Electrostatic MEMS Comb Drive Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, J.; Blackburn, J.; Muniz-Piniella, A.; Stewart, M.; Shean, T. A. V.; Weaver, P. M.; Cain, M. G.

    2013-11-01

    A vertical levitation electrostatic comb drive actuator was manufactured for the purpose of measuring piezoelectric coefficients in small-scale materials and devices. Previous modelling work on comb drive levitation has focussed on control of the levitation in standard poly-silicon devices in order to minimize effects on lateral modes of operation required for the accelerometer and gyroscope applications. The actuator developed in this study was manufactured using a 20 μm electroplated Ni process with a 25 μm trench created beneath the released structure through chemical wet etching. A finite element analysis using ZINC was used to model electrostatic potential around a cross section of one static and one movable electrode, from which the net levitation force per unit electrode was calculated. The model was first verified using the electrode geometry from previously studied systems, and then used to study the variation of force as a function of decreasing substrate-electrode distance. With the top electrode surfaces collinear the calculated force density is 0.00651 epsilon0V2Mμm-1, equivalent to a total force for the device of 36.4 μN at an applied voltage of VM=100 V, just 16% larger than the observed value. The measured increase in force with distance was smaller than predicted with the FEA, due to the geometry of the device in which the electrodes at the anchored ends of the supporting spring structure displace by a smaller amount than those at the centre.

  4. Understanding Driving Forces and Implications Associated with the Land Use and Land Cover Changes in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno M. Meneses

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the processes of land use and land cover changes (LUCC and the associated driving forces is important for achieving sustainable development. This paper presents the LUCC in Portugal at the regional level (NUTS II from 1995 to 2010 and discusses the main driving forces and implications associated with these LUCC. The main objectives of this work are: (a to quantify the land use and land cover (LUC types (level I of LUC cartography by NUT II in Portugal for the years 1995, 2007 and 2010; (b to assess the spatio-temporal LUCC; and (c to identify and discuss the main driving forces of LUCC and corresponding implications based on correlations and Principal Components Analysis. The results revealed large regional and temporal LUCC and further highlighted the different and sometimes opposite time trends between neighboring regions. By associating driving forces to LUCC, different influences at the regional level were observed, namely LUCC into agriculture land derived from the construction of dams (Alentejo region, or the conversion of coniferous forest into eucalypt forest (Centre region associated with increased gross value added (GVA and employment in industry and forestry. Temporal differentiation was also observed, particularly in the settlements that expanded between 1995 and 2007 due to the construction of large infrastructures (e.g., highways, industrial complexes, or buildings, which is reflected on employment in industry and construction and respective GVA. However, certain LUCC have implications, particularly in energy consumption, for which different behavior between regions can be highlighted in this analysis, but also on land-use sustainability.

  5. Identification of the driving forces of climate change using the longest instrumental temperature record

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Geli; Yang, Peicai; Zhou, Xiuji

    2017-01-01

    The identification of causal effects is a fundamental problem in climate change research. Here, a new perspective on climate change causality is presented using the central England temperature (CET) dataset, the longest instrumental temperature record, and a combination of slow feature analysis and wavelet analysis. The driving forces of climate change were investigated and the results showed two independent degrees of freedom ?a 3.36-year cycle and a 22.6-year cycle, which seem to be connect...

  6. Spatiotemporal Variation of Driving Forces for Settlement Expansion in Different Types of Counties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanglong Dong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the process of settlement expansion and the spatiotemporal variation of driving forces is the foundation of rational and specific planning for sustainable development. However, little attention has been paid to the spatiotemporal differences of driving forces among different counties, especially when they are representatives of different development types. This study used Guanyun, Kunshan and Changshu as case studies, and binary logistic regression was employed. The results showed that the expansion rates of Kunshan and Changshu were 5.55 and 3.93 times higher than that of Guanyun. The combinations and relative importance of drivers varied with counties and periods. The change in the number of driving forces can be divided into three stages: increasing stage, decreasing stage, and stable stage. In the relatively developed counties, Kunshan and Changshu, the importance of population is decreased, while it remain an important factor in the less developed county, Guanyun. In addition, the effect of GDP stays the same in Kunshan while it becomes the most important factor in Changshu. The distance to the main road and the distance to town are increasingly important in Kunshan and Guanyun, and distance to town has been the only common factor in the last period, indicating the discrepancy is increased. The relative importance of distance to a lake in Kunshan and Changshu increased, reflecting the role of increasing tourism in accelerating settlement expansion.

  7. A single evolutionary innovation drives the deep evolution of symbiotic N2-fixation in angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Gijsbert D A; Cornwell, William K; Sprent, Janet I; Kattge, Jens; Kiers, E Toby

    2014-06-10

    Symbiotic associations occur in every habitat on earth, but we know very little about their evolutionary histories. Current models of trait evolution cannot adequately reconstruct the deep history of symbiotic innovation, because they assume homogenous evolutionary processes across millions of years. Here we use a recently developed, heterogeneous and quantitative phylogenetic framework to study the origin of the symbiosis between angiosperms and nitrogen-fixing (N2) bacterial symbionts housed in nodules. We compile the largest database of global nodulating plant species and reconstruct the symbiosis' evolution. We identify a single, cryptic evolutionary innovation driving symbiotic N2-fixation evolution, followed by multiple gains and losses of the symbiosis, and the subsequent emergence of 'stable fixers' (clades extremely unlikely to lose the symbiosis). Originating over 100 MYA, this innovation suggests deep homology in symbiotic N2-fixation. Identifying cryptic innovations on the tree of life is key to understanding the evolution of complex traits, including symbiotic partnerships.

  8. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Aimee; Maclaren, Oliver J; Fletcher, Alexander G; Muraro, Daniele; Kreuzaler, Peter A; Byrne, Helen M; Maini, Philip K; Watson, Alastair J M; Pin, Carmen

    2017-02-01

    The functional integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier relies on tight coordination of cell proliferation and migration, with failure to regulate these processes resulting in disease. It is not known whether cell proliferation is sufficient to drive epithelial cell migration during homoeostatic turnover of the epithelium. Nor is it known precisely how villus cell migration is affected when proliferation is perturbed. Some reports suggest that proliferation and migration may not be related while other studies support a direct relationship. We used established cell-tracking methods based on thymine analog cell labeling and developed tailored mathematical models to quantify cell proliferation and migration under normal conditions and when proliferation is reduced and when it is temporarily halted. We found that epithelial cell migration velocities along the villi are coupled to cell proliferation rates within the crypts in all conditions. Furthermore, halting and resuming proliferation results in the synchronized response of cell migration on the villi. We conclude that cell proliferation within the crypt is the primary force that drives cell migration along the villus. This methodology can be applied to interrogate intestinal epithelial dynamics and characterize situations in which processes involved in cell turnover become uncoupled, including pharmacological treatments and disease models.-Parker, A., Maclaren, O. J., Fletcher, A. G., Muraro, D., Kreuzaler, P. A., Byrne, H. M., Maini, P. K., Watson, A. J. M., Pin, C. Cell proliferation within small intestinal crypts is the principal driving force for cell migration on villi. © The Author(s).

  9. MRCK-1 drives apical constriction in C. elegans by linking developmental patterning to force generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Daniel J.; Higgins, Christopher D.; Peters, Kimberly A.; Cupp, Timothy D.; Dickinson, Daniel J.; Pani, Ariel M.; Moore, Regan P.; Cox, Amanda H.; Kiehart, Daniel P.; Goldstein, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Summary Apical constriction is a change in cell shape that drives key morphogenetic events including gastrulation and neural tube formation. Apical force-producing actomyosin networks drive apical constriction by contracting while connected to cell-cell junctions. The mechanisms by which developmental patterning regulates these actomyosin networks and associated junctions with spatial precision are not fully understood. Here, we identify a myosin light chain kinase MRCK-1 as a key regulator of C. elegans gastrulation that integrates spatial and developmental patterning information. We show that MRCK-1 is required for activation of contractile actomyosin dynamics and elevated cortical tension in the apical cell cortex of endodermal precursor cells. MRCK-1 is apically localized by active Cdc42 at the external, cell-cell contact-free surfaces of apically constricting cells, downstream of cell fate determination mechanisms. We establish that the junctional components α-catenin, β-catenin, and cadherin become highly enriched at the apical junctions of apically-constricting cells, and that MRCK-1 and myosin activity are required in vivo for this enrichment. Taken together, our results define mechanisms that position a myosin activator to a specific cell surface where it both locally increases cortical tension and locally enriches junctional components to facilitate apical constriction. These results reveal crucial links that can tie spatial information to local force generation to drive morphogenesis. PMID:27451898

  10. Smaller beaks for colder winters: Thermoregulation drives beak size evolution in Australasian songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Nicholas R; Harmáčková, Lenka; Economo, Evan P; Remeš, Vladimír

    2017-08-01

    Birds' beaks play a key role in foraging, and most research on their size and shape has focused on this function. Recent findings suggest that beaks may also be important for thermoregulation, and this may drive morphological evolution as predicted by Allen's rule. However, the role of thermoregulation in the evolution of beak size across species remains largely unexplored. In particular, it remains unclear whether the need for retaining heat in the winter or dissipating heat in the summer plays the greater role in selection for beak size. Comparative studies are needed to evaluate the relative importance of these functions in beak size evolution. We addressed this question in a clade of birds exhibiting wide variation in their climatic niche: the Australasian honeyeaters and allies (Meliphagoidea). Across 158 species, we compared species' climatic conditions extracted from their ranges to beak size measurements in a combined spatial-phylogenetic framework. We found that winter minimum temperature was positively correlated with beak size, while summer maximum temperature was not. This suggests that while diet and foraging behavior may drive evolutionary changes in beak shape, changes in beak size can also be explained by the beak's role in thermoregulation, and winter heat retention in particular. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  11. Reactive oxygen species drive evolution of pro-biofilm variants in pathogens by modulating cyclic-di-GMP levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Song Lin; Ding, Yichen; Liu, Yang; Cai, Zhao; Zhou, Jianuan; Swarup, Sanjay; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; Schuster, Stephan Christoph; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Givskov, Michael; Yang, Liang

    2016-11-01

    The host immune system offers a hostile environment with antimicrobials and reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are detrimental to bacterial pathogens, forcing them to adapt and evolve for survival. However, the contribution of oxidative stress to pathogen evolution remains elusive. Using an experimental evolution strategy, we show that exposure of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa to sub-lethal hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels over 120 generations led to the emergence of pro-biofilm rough small colony variants (RSCVs), which could be abrogated by l-glutathione antioxidants. Comparative genomic analysis of the RSCVs revealed that mutations in the wspF gene, which encodes for a repressor of WspR diguanylate cyclase (DGC), were responsible for increased intracellular cyclic-di-GMP content and production of Psl exopolysaccharide. Psl provides the first line of defence against ROS and macrophages, ensuring the survival fitness of RSCVs over wild-type P. aeruginosa Our study demonstrated that ROS is an essential driving force for the selection of pro-biofilm forming pathogenic variants. Understanding the fundamental mechanism of these genotypic and phenotypic adaptations will improve treatment strategies for combating chronic infections. © 2016 The Authors.

  12. Commentary: Forces That Drive the Vape Shop Industry and Implications for the Health Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Steve; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Garcia, Robert; Barker, Dianne C; Samet, Jonathan M; Leventhal, Adam; Unger, Jennifer B

    2016-09-01

    At least three factors may be driving the evolution of the vape shop industry, a rapidly growing market sector that specializes in the sales of electronic cigarettes: (1) the tobacco industry, (2) the public health sector and its diverse stakeholders, and (3) consumer demand. These influences and the responses of the vape shop sector have resulted in a rapidly changing landscape. This commentary briefly discusses these three factors and the implications for the health professions, as they address the vape shop industry and its consequences for public health. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Multifactorial determination of the electric drive for the force compensating manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyatibratov, G. Ya; Danshina, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    The methodology of multifactorial determination of rational parameters of transmission gear and synchronous electric motor driving by permanent magnets for the system of the vertical freight movement of the force compensating manipulator is offered. An integrated approach to the selection of the power part of this manipulator takes into account: motor speed matching and an executive mechanism of the manipulator, operation of the electric drive with a minimum possible value of the maximum torque at the movement of freight with constant speed and with acceleration at different values of the freight mass. A reasonable radius of mechanism activation is determined from accepted values with application of the compromise approach enabling to consider at the same time the performance of all limiting conditions. The electromechanical module of the manipulator is selected when a value of the activation radius provides the minimum possible required motor torque.

  14. A new model for biological effects of radiation and the driven force of molecular evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takahiro; Manabe, Yuichiro; Nakajima, Hiroo; Tsunoyama, Yuichi; Bando, Masako

    We proposed a new mathematical model to estimate biological effects of radiation, which we call Whack-A-Mole (WAM) model. A special feature of WAM model is that it involves the dose rate of radiation as a key ingredient. We succeeded to reproduce the experimental data of various species concerning the radiation induced mutation frequencies. From the analysis of the mega-mouse experiments, we obtained the mutation rate per base-pair per year for mice which is consistent with the so-called molecular clock in evolution genetics, 10-9 mutation/base-pair/year. Another important quantity is the equivalent dose rate for the whole spontaneous mutation, deff. The value of deff for mice is 1.1*10-3 Gy/hour which is much larger than the dose rate of natural radiation (10- (6 - 7) Gy/hour) by several orders of magnitude. We also analyzed Drosophila data and obtained essentially the same numbers. This clearly indicates that the natural radiation is not the dominant driving force of the molecular evolution, but we should look for other factors, such as miscopy of DNA in duplication process. We believe this is the first quantitative proof of the small contribution of the natural radiation in the molecular evolution.

  15. The Driving-Force Dependence of Electrochemical Rate Parameters: Origins of Anodic-Cathodic Asymmetries for Metal Aquo Redox Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    homogeneous bimolecular reactions involving oxidation of M(II) aquo complexes . 2 𔃿 - 8 The observed marked asymmetry of the anodic and cathodic Tafel plots...homogeneous oxidations of aquo complexes . Analysis of the driving- force dependencies of homogeneous reactivity is complicated by the need to account for...expected as the driving force is increased. When )f < r (as for aquo V. 19 complex oxidations), the observed values of k are expected to be

  16. Decrease of inhibitory driving force in crayfish stretch reception: a mechanism of the convulsant action of penicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deisz, R A; Aickin, C C; Lux, H D

    1979-03-01

    The effect of penicillin on the evoked IPSP was investigated in the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. The IPSP driving force (IPSP reversal potential minus membrane potential) was reduced in a dose-dependent fashion but, when necessary correction was made for the decrease in resting membrane conductance, the synaptic conductance was only slightly reduced. The possibility that a penicillin-induced intracellular acidification was responsible for the decrease in IPSP driving force is considered.

  17. Design and Synthesis of Distillation Systems using a Driving Force Based Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bek-Pedersen, Erik; Gani, Rafiqul

    2004-01-01

    A new integrated framework for synthesis, design and operation of distillation-based separation schemes is presented here. This framework is based on the driving force approach, which provides a measure of the differences in chemical/physical properties between two co-existing phases...... in a separation unit. A set of algorithms has been developed within this framework for design of simple as well as complex distillation columns, for the sequencing of distillation trains, for the determination of appropriate conditions of operation and for retrofit of distillation columns. The main feature of all...

  18. Determination of Optimal Energy Efficient Separation Schemes based on Driving Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bek-Pedersen, Erik; Gani, Rafiqul; Levaux, O.

    2000-01-01

    A new integrated approach for synthesis, design and operation of separation schemes is presented. This integrated approach is based on driving forces that promote the desired separation for different separation techniques. A set of algorithms needed by the integrated approach for sequencing...... and design of distillation columns and for generating hybrid separation schemes are presented. The main feature of these algorithms is that they provide a 'visual' solution that also appears to be near optimal in terms of energy consumption. Several illustrative examples highlighting the application...

  19. Selection pressure from neutralizing antibodies drives sequence evolution during acute infection with hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, Kimberly A; Netski, Dale M; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Cox, Andrea L; Ray, Stuart C

    2009-06-01

    Despite recent characterization of hepatitis C virus-specific neutralizing antibodies, it is not clear to what extent immune pressure from neutralizing antibodies drives viral sequence evolution in vivo. This lack of understanding is particularly evident in acute infection, the phase when elimination or persistence of viral replication is determined and during which the importance of the humoral immune response has been largely discounted. We analyzed envelope glycoprotein sequence evolution and neutralization of sequential autologous hepatitis C virus pseudoparticles in 8 individuals throughout acute infection. Amino acid substitutions occurred throughout the envelope genes, primarily within the hypervariable region 1 of E2. When individualized pseudoparticles expressing sequential envelope sequences were used to measure neutralization by autologous sera, antibodies neutralizing earlier sequence variants were detected at earlier time points than antibodies neutralizing later variants, indicating clearance and evolution of viral variants in response to pressure from neutralizing antibodies. To demonstrate the effects of amino acid substitution on neutralization, site-directed mutagenesis of a pseudoparticle envelope sequence revealed amino acid substitutions in hypervariable region 1 that were responsible for a dramatic decrease in neutralization sensitivity over time. In addition, high-titer neutralizing antibodies peaked at the time of viral clearance in all spontaneous resolvers, whereas chronically evolving subjects displayed low-titer or absent neutralizing antibodies throughout early acute infection. These findings indicate that, during acute hepatitis C virus infection in vivo, virus-specific neutralizing antibodies drive sequence evolution and, in some individuals, play a role in determining the outcome of infection.

  20. Method for computing short-range forces between solid-liquid interfaces driving grain boundary premelting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, J. J.; Olmsted, David; Jindal, Saryu; Asta, Mark; Karma, Alain

    2009-02-01

    We present a molecular dynamics based method for accurately computing short-range structural forces resulting from the overlap of spatially diffuse solid-liquid interfaces at wetted grain boundaries close to the melting point. The method is based on monitoring the fluctuations of the liquid layer width at different temperatures to extract the excess interfacial free energy as a function of this width. The method is illustrated for a high-energy Σ9 twist boundary in pure Ni. The short-range repulsion driving premelting is found to be dominant in comparison to long-range dispersion and entropic forces and consistent with previous experimental findings that nanometer-scale layer widths may be observed only very close to the melting point.

  1. Positive Darwinian selection is a driving force for the diversification of terpenoid biosynthesis in the genus Oryza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Li, Guanglin; Köllner, Tobias G; Jia, Qidong; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Chen, Feng

    2014-09-16

    Terpenoids constitute the largest class of secondary metabolites made by plants and display vast chemical diversity among and within species. Terpene synthases (TPSs) are the pivotal enzymes for terpenoid biosynthesis that create the basic carbon skeletons of this class. Functional divergence of paralogous and orthologous TPS genes is a major mechanism for the diversification of terpenoid biosynthesis. However, little is known about the evolutionary forces that have shaped the evolution of plant TPS genes leading to terpenoid diversity. The orthologs of Oryza Terpene Synthase 1 (OryzaTPS1), a rice terpene synthase gene involved in indirect defense against insects in Oryza sativa, were cloned from six additional Oryza species. In vitro biochemical analysis showed that the enzymes encoded by these OryzaTPS1 genes functioned either as (E)-β-caryophyllene synthases (ECS), or (E)-β-caryophyllene & germacrene A synthases (EGS), or germacrene D & germacrene A synthases (DAS). Because the orthologs of OryzaTPS1 in maize and sorghum function as ECS, the ECS activity was inferred to be ancestral. Molecular evolutionary detected the signature of positive Darwinian selection in five codon substitutions in the evolution from ECS to DAS. Homology-based structure modeling and the biochemical analysis of laboratory-generated protein variants validated the contribution of the five positively selected sites to functional divergence of OryzaTPS1. The changes in the in vitro product spectra of OryzaTPS1 proteins also correlated closely to the changes in in vivo blends of volatile terpenes released from insect-damaged rice plants. In this study, we found that positive Darwinian selection is a driving force for the functional divergence of OryzaTPS1. This finding suggests that the diverged sesquiterpene blend produced by the Oryza species containing DAS may be adaptive, likely in the attraction of the natural enemies of insect herbivores.

  2. Theory of polymer translocation through a flickering nanopore under an alternating driving force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabadani, Jalal; Ikonen, Timo; Ala-Nissila, Tapio

    2015-08-21

    We develop a theory for polymer translocation driven by a time-dependent force through an oscillating nanopore. To this end, we extend the iso-flux tension propagation theory [Sarabadani et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141, 214907 (2014)] for such a setup. We assume that the external driving force in the pore has a component oscillating in time, and the flickering pore is similarly described by an oscillating term in the pore friction. In addition to numerically solving the model, we derive analytical approximations that are in good agreement with the numerical simulations. Our results show that by controlling either the force or pore oscillations, the translocation process can be either sped up or slowed down depending on the frequency of the oscillations and the characteristic time scale of the process. We also show that while in the low and high frequency limits, the translocation time τ follows the established scaling relation with respect to chain length N0, in the intermediate frequency regime small periodic, fluctuations can have drastic effects on the dynamical scaling. The results can be easily generalized for non-periodic oscillations and elucidate the role of time dependent forces and pore oscillations in driven polymer translocation.

  3. Driving forces and barriers for environmental technology development; Drivkrefter og barrierer for utvikling av miljoeteknologi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    Driving forces and barriers behind development and usage of environmental technology is discussed, and also whether there are certain characteristics related to environmental innovations compared to other innovations in general. The development of environmental technology is in principle dominated by the same drivers and barriers as any other technology, but the order and strength of the various factors may be different. This examination as well as other empirical studies shows that regulations play a greater part for environmental technology than 'pure market forces'. To many participants it is important to be one step ahead of the regulations, i.e. the expected regulations are equally important as the factual ones in driving the technology development. Players in the business community express that it is important that the authorities cooperate with them when introducing new regulations. This will increase acceptance for the regulations and facilitate the necessary adjustments. The most important barrier in the development and use of the technologies studied is probably the lack of demand.

  4. Dissolution Condensation Mechanism of Stress Corrosion Cracking in Liquid Metals: Driving Force and Crack Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Evgeny E.

    2011-02-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in aqueous solution is driven by exothermic reactions of metal oxidation. This stimulus, as well as classical mechanisms of SCC, does not apply to SCC in liquid metals (LMs). In the framework of the dissolution-condensation mechanism (DCM), we analyzed the driving force and crack kinetics for this nonelectrochemical mode of SCC that is loosely called "liquid metal embrittlement" (LME). According to DCM, a stress-induced increase in chemical potential at the crack tip acts as the driving force for out-of-the-tip diffusion mass transfer that is fast because diffusion in LMs is very fast and surface energy at the solid-liquid interface is small. In this article, we review two versions of DCM mechanism, discuss the major physics behind them, and develop DCM further. The refined mechanism is applied then to the experimental data on crack velocity V vs stress intensity factor, the activation energy of LME, and alloying effects. It is concluded that DCM provides a good conceptual framework for analysis of a unified kinetic mechanism of LME and may also contribute to SCC in aqueous solutions.

  5. Driving forces behind the construction of an eco-compensation mechanism for wetlands in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changhai

    2016-09-01

    This research revealed important driving forces behind the construction of an eco-compensation mechanism for wetlands (DFEMW) in China. Using China's provincial panel data from 1978 to 2008, a fixed-effects model was used to analyze the impacts of agricultural production systems on wetlands. We identified three DFEMW as follows: the change of wetland resources and protection measures in China; declaration and implementation of the provincial Wetland Protection Ordinance; and wetland degradation by agricultural production systems, which necessitated the establishment of a wetland eco-compensation mechanism. In addition to the DFEMW, a significant positive correlation between wetland area and both rural population and gross agricultural production was identified, in addition to a negative correlation with chemical fertilizer usage, reservoir storage capacity, and irrigation area. The underlying reasons for the serious degradation and inadequate protection of wetlands were market failure and government failure; these were the driving forces behind the need to establish a wetland eco-compensation mechanism. From a governmental perspective, it has been difficult to rectify market failures in resource distribution and thus to prevent wetland degradation. Factors include conflicts of interest, lack of investment, effective special laws, a simple means to protect wetlands, and a multidisciplinary management system. Therefore, the key factor is the coordination of interest relationships between those who utilize wetlands and those who seek to minimize wetland degradation and effectively protect wetlands.

  6. Application of laser ranging and VLBI data to a study of plate tectonic driving forces. [finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    The measurability of changes in plate driving or resistive forces associated with plate boundary earthquakes by laser rangefinding or VLBI is considered with emphasis on those aspects of plate forces that can be characterized by such measurements. Topics covered include: (1) analytic solutions for two dimensional stress diffusion in a plate following earthquake faulting on a finite fault; (2) two dimensional finite-element solutions for the global state of stress at the Earth's surface for possible plate driving forces; and (3) finite-element solutions for three dimensional stress diffusion in a viscoelastic Earth following earthquake faulting.

  7. Competition drives trait evolution and character displacement between Mimulus species along an environmental gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooyers, Nicholas J; James, Brooke; Blackman, Benjamin K

    2017-05-01

    Closely related species may evolve to coexist stably in sympatry through niche differentiation driven by in situ competition, a process termed character displacement. Alternatively, past evolution in allopatry may have already sufficiently reduced niche overlap to permit establishment in sympatry, a process called ecological sorting. The relative importance of each process to niche differentiation is contentious even though they are not mutually exclusive and are both mediated via multivariate trait evolution. We explore how competition has impacted niche differentiation in two monkeyflowers, Mimulus alsinoides and M. guttatus, which often co-occur. Through field observations, common gardens, and competition experiments, we demonstrate that M. alsinoides is restricted to marginal habitats in sympatry and that the impacts of character displacement on niche differentiation are complex. Competition with M. guttatus alters selection gradients and has favored taller M. alsinoides with earlier seasonal flowering at low elevation and floral shape divergence at high elevation. However, no trait exhibits the pattern typically associated with character displacement, higher divergence between species in sympatry than allopatry. Thus, although character displacement was unlikely the process driving initial divergence along niche axes necessary for coexistence, we conclude that competition in sympatry has likely driven trait evolution along additional niche axes. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  8. Centromere strength provides the cell biological basis for meiotic drive and karyotype evolution in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmátal, Lukáš; Gabriel, Sofia I; Mitsainas, George P; Martínez-Vargas, Jessica; Ventura, Jacint; Searle, Jeremy B; Schultz, Richard M; Lampson, Michael A

    2014-10-06

    Mammalian karyotypes (number and structure of chromosomes) can vary dramatically over short evolutionary time frames. There are examples of massive karyotype conversion, from mostly telocentric (centromere terminal) to mostly metacentric (centromere internal), in 10(2)-10(5) years. These changes typically reflect rapid fixation of Robertsonian (Rb) fusions, a common chromosomal rearrangement that joins two telocentric chromosomes at their centromeres to create one metacentric. Fixation of Rb fusions can be explained by meiotic drive: biased chromosome segregation during female meiosis in violation of Mendel's first law. However, there is no mechanistic explanation of why fusions would preferentially segregate to the egg in some populations, leading to fixation and karyotype change, while other populations preferentially eliminate the fusions and maintain a telocentric karyotype. Here we show, using both laboratory models and wild mice, that differences in centromere strength predict the direction of drive. Stronger centromeres, manifested by increased kinetochore protein levels and altered interactions with spindle microtubules, are preferentially retained in the egg. We find that fusions preferentially segregate to the polar body in laboratory mouse strains when the fusion centromeres are weaker than those of telocentrics. Conversely, fusion centromeres are stronger relative to telocentrics in natural house mouse populations that have changed karyotype by accumulating metacentric fusions. Our findings suggest that natural variation in centromere strength explains how the direction of drive can switch between populations. They also provide a cell biological basis of centromere drive and karyotype evolution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Output Force Enhancement of Scratch Drive Actuator in Low-Voltage Region by Using Flexible Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn CHEN

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Here a low-voltage scratch drive actuator (LVSDA is proposed by incorporating flexible joint into the conventional SDA to improve performance in low-voltage region. Experimental results show that, at the same total plate length of 80 mm and width of 65 mm, the proposed LVSDA can be actuated as low as 40 V, much lower than 80 V, the minimum required input voltage of the conventional SDA. From finite element analysis by CosmosWorks, yielding effect is found to be a critical factor. Before yielding, LVSDA can provide better performance than SDA at the same input voltage. However, the yielding stress in flexible joint would limit the achievable maximum output force in high-voltage region. By varying joint length, width, or location, LVSDA is shown to be operated in low-voltage region where the conventional SDA can not be operated, and can still provide comparable performance as SDA in high-voltage region.

  10. Self-organization in arrays of surface-grown nanoparticles: characterization, control, driving forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levchenko, I; Kumar, S; Yajadda, M M A; Han, Z J; Furman, S; Ostrikov, K, E-mail: Igor.Levchenko@csiro.au [Plasma Nanoscience Centre Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, PO Box 218, Lindfield, New South Wales 2070 (Australia)

    2011-05-04

    Some important issues related to the self-organization in the arrays of nanoparticles on solid surfaces exposed to the low-temperature plasma are analysed and discussed. The available tools for the characterization of the size and position uniformity in nanoarrays are examined. The technique capable of revealing the realistic adsorbed atom and adsorbed radical capture zone pattern based on the surface physics is indicated as the most promising characterization tool. The processes responsible for the self-organization are analysed, the main driving forces of the self-organization are discussed, and possible ways to control the self-organization by controlling the plasma parameters are introduced. A view on the possible ways to further improve the methods of nanoarray characterization and self-organization is presented as well.

  11. Synchronized aromaticity as an enthalpic driving force for the aromatic Cope rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babinski, David J; Bao, Xiaoguang; El Arba, Marie; Chen, Bo; Hrovat, David A; Borden, Weston Thatcher; Frantz, Doug E

    2012-10-03

    We report herein experimental and theoretical evidence for an aromatic Cope rearrangement. Along with several successful examples, our data include the first isolation and full characterization of the putative intermediate that is formed immediately after the initial [3,3] sigmatropic rearrangement. Calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory predict reaction energy barriers in the range 22-23 kcal/mol for the [3,3]-rearrangement consistent with the exceptionally mild reaction conditions for these reactions. The experimental and computational results support a significant enthalpic contribution of the concomitant pyrazole ring formation that serves as both a kinetic and thermodynamic driving force for the aromatic Cope rearrangement.

  12. Coherence of biochemical oscillations is bounded by driving force and network topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2017-06-01

    Biochemical oscillations are prevalent in living organisms. Systems with a small number of constituents cannot sustain coherent oscillations for an indefinite time because of fluctuations in the period of oscillation. We show that the number of coherent oscillations that quantifies the precision of the oscillator is universally bounded by the thermodynamic force that drives the system out of equilibrium and by the topology of the underlying biochemical network of states. Our results are valid for arbitrary Markov processes, which are commonly used to model biochemical reactions. We apply our results to a model for a single KaiC protein and to an activator-inhibitor model that consists of several molecules. From a mathematical perspective, based on strong numerical evidence, we conjecture a universal constraint relating the imaginary and real parts of the first nontrivial eigenvalue of a stochastic matrix.

  13. How sexual selection can drive the evolution of costly sperm ornamentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüpold, Stefan; Manier, Mollie K.; Puniamoorthy, Nalini; Schoff, Christopher; Starmer, William T.; Luepold, Shannon H. Buckley; Belote, John M.; Pitnick, Scott

    2016-05-01

    Post-copulatory sexual selection (PSS), fuelled by female promiscuity, is credited with the rapid evolution of sperm quality traits across diverse taxa. Yet, our understanding of the adaptive significance of sperm ornaments and the cryptic female preferences driving their evolution is extremely limited. Here we review the evolutionary allometry of exaggerated sexual traits (for example, antlers, horns, tail feathers, mandibles and dewlaps), show that the giant sperm of some Drosophila species are possibly the most extreme ornaments in all of nature and demonstrate how their existence challenges theories explaining the intensity of sexual selection, mating-system evolution and the fundamental nature of sex differences. We also combine quantitative genetic analyses of interacting sex-specific traits in D. melanogaster with comparative analyses of the condition dependence of male and female reproductive potential across species with varying ornament size to reveal complex dynamics that may underlie sperm-length evolution. Our results suggest that producing few gigantic sperm evolved by (1) Fisherian runaway selection mediated by genetic correlations between sperm length, the female preference for long sperm and female mating frequency, and (2) longer sperm increasing the indirect benefits to females. Our results also suggest that the developmental integration of sperm quality and quantity renders post-copulatory sexual selection on ejaculates unlikely to treat male-male competition and female choice as discrete processes.

  14. Evolution of dispersal and life history interact to drive accelerating spread of an invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, T Alex; Phillips, Benjamin L; Baskett, Marissa L; Hastings, Alan

    2013-08-01

    Populations on the edge of an expanding range are subject to unique evolutionary pressures acting on their life-history and dispersal traits. Empirical evidence and theory suggest that traits there can evolve rapidly enough to interact with ecological dynamics, potentially giving rise to accelerating spread. Nevertheless, which of several evolutionary mechanisms drive this interaction between evolution and spread remains an open question. We propose an integrated theoretical framework for partitioning the contributions of different evolutionary mechanisms to accelerating spread, and we apply this model to invasive cane toads in northern Australia. In doing so, we identify a previously unrecognised evolutionary process that involves an interaction between life-history and dispersal evolution during range shift. In roughly equal parts, life-history evolution, dispersal evolution and their interaction led to a doubling of distance spread by cane toads in our model, highlighting the potential importance of multiple evolutionary processes in the dynamics of range expansion. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  15. Exploring the driving forces behind the structural assembly of biphenylthiolates on Au(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwüster, Elisabeth; Wruss, Elisabeth; Zojer, Egbert; Hofmann, Oliver T.

    2017-07-01

    In this contribution, we use dispersion-corrected density functional theory to study inter- and intramolecular interactions in a prototypical self-assembled monolayer (SAM) consisting of biphenylthiolates bonded to Au(111) via thiolate groups. The goal is to identify the nature of the interactions that drive the monolayer into a specific conformation. Particular focus is laid on sampling realistic structures rather than high symmetry model configurations. This is achieved by studying conceptually different local minimum structures of the SAM that are obtained via exploring the potential energy surface from systematically varied starting geometries. The six obtained packing motifs differ in the relative arrangement of the two molecules in the unit cell (co-planar versus herringbone) and in the intramolecular configuration (twisted versus planar rings). We find that van der Waals interactions within the organic adsorbate and between the adsorbate and substrate are the main reason that these molecular assemblies can form stable structures at all. The van der Waals interactions are, however, very similar for all observed motifs; by analyzing various types of interactions in the course of three notional SAM-formation steps, we find that the main driving force stabilizing the actual global minimum structure originates from electrostatic interactions between the molecules.

  16. Changing and Differentiated Urban Landscape in China: Spatiotemporal Patterns and Driving Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chuanglin; Li, Guangdong; Wang, Shaojian

    2016-03-01

    Urban landscape spatiotemporal change patterns and their driving mechanisms in China are poorly understood at the national level. Here we used remote sensing data, landscape metrics, and a spatial econometric model to characterize the spatiotemporal patterns of urban landscape change and investigate its driving forces in China between 1990 and 2005. The results showed that the urban landscape pattern has experienced drastic changes over the past 15 years. Total urban area has expanded approximately 1.61 times, with a 2.98% annual urban-growth rate. Compared to previous single-city studies, although urban areas are expanding rapidly, the overall fragmentation of the urban landscape is decreasing and is more irregular and complex at the national level. We also found a stair-stepping, urban-landscape changing pattern among eastern, central, and western counties. In addition, administrative level, urban size, and hierarchy have effects on the urban landscape pattern. We also found that a combination of landscape metrics can be used to supplement our understanding of the pattern of urbanization. The changes in these metrics are correlated with geographical indicators, socioeconomic factors, infrastructure variables, administrative level factors, policy factors, and historical factors. Our results indicate that the top priority should be strengthening the management of urban planning. A compact and congregate urban landscape may be a good choice of pattern for urban development in China.

  17. Stabilization of car-caravan combination using independent steer and drive/or brake forces distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ossama Mokhiamar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Once a combined vehicle becomes unstable, it is very difficult for a driver to stabilize it especially under severe driving conditions, such as turning with braking. This is mainly due to the effect of the towed vehicle on the towing vehicle through the hitch jackknifing. This effect makes the handling characteristics of a car-caravan combination different from those of a single vehicle. Therefore, this paper proposes a control design concept for an optimum distribution of longitudinal and lateral forces of the four tires of a towing vehicle. The mean objectives of the control system were to stabilize the motion of an articulated vehicle utilizing the tires entire ability in both longitudinal and lateral directions as well as to make the handling characteristics of an articulated vehicle similar to those of a single one. The sliding control law based on vehicle planar equations of motion is used to derive the control laws. The proposed control system is evaluated under severe driving conditions and compared with the results of integrated control systems. The robustness of the articulated vehicle motion with the proposed control against the coefficient of friction variation is discussed.

  18. Structural basis, chemical driving forces and biological implications of flavones as Cu(II) ionophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Fang; Yan, Wen-Jing; Du, Yu-Ting; Bao, Xia-Zhen; Li, Xiu-Zhuang; Zhou, Bo

    2017-07-01

    A main biochemical property of cancer cells, compared with normal cells, is altered redox status including increased levels of copper to maintain their malignant phenotypes. Thus, increasing copper accumulation, by using ionophores, to disrupt abnormal redox homeostasis of cancer cells may be an important anticancer strategy. Naturally occurring molecules with extraordinarily diverse chemical scaffolds are an important source of inspiration for developing copper ionophores. Dietary flavonoids are well-characterized copper chelators and show cancer chemopreventive potential, but their ionophoric role for redox-active copper and the related biological implications have remained unknown. This study reports, for the first time, the structural basis, chemical driving forces and biological implications of flavones (a widely distributed subgroup of flavonoids) as Cu(II) ionophores, and also provides new insights into cancer chemopreventive mechanism of flavones bearing 3(or 5)-hydroxy-4-keto group. 3-Hydroxyflavone surfaced as a potent Cu(II) ionophore to induce the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis of cancer cells in a redox intervention fashion via sequential proton-loss Cu(II) chelation, GSH-driving releasing of copper and protonation-dependent efflux of the neutral ligand. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantitative attribution of major driving forces on soil organic carbon dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiping; Liu, Shuguang; Tan, Zhengxi

    2015-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) storage plays a major role in the global carbon cycle and is affected by many factors including land use/management changes (e.g., biofuel production-oriented changes). However, the contributions of various factors to SOC changes are not well understood and quantified. This study was designed to investigate the impacts of changing farming practices, initial SOC levels, and biological enhancement of grain production on SOC dynamics and to attribute the relative contributions of major driving forces (CO2 enrichment and farming practices) using a fractional factorial modeling design. The case study at a crop site in Iowa in the United States demonstrated that the traditional corn-soybean (CS) rotation could still accumulate SOC over this century (from 4.2 to 6.8 kg C/m2) under the current condition; whereas the continuous-corn (CC) system might have a higher SOC sequestration potential than CS. In either case, however, residue removal could reduce the sink potential substantially. Long-term simulation results also suggested that the equilibrium SOC level may vary greatly (∼5.7 to ∼11 kg C/m2) depending on cropping systems and management practices, and projected growth enhancement could make the magnitudes higher (∼7.8 to ∼13 kg C/m2). Importantly, the factorial design analysis indicated that residue management had the most significant impact (contributing 49.4%) on SOC changes, followed by CO2 Enrichment (37%), Tillage (6.2%), the combination of CO2Enrichment-Residue removal (5.8%), and Fertilization (1.6%). In brief, this study is valuable for understanding the major forces driving SOC dynamics of agroecosystems and informative for decision-makers when seeking the enhancement of SOC sequestration potential and sustainability of biofuel production, especially in the Corn Belt region of the United States.

  20. A polymer physics perspective on driving forces and mechanisms for protein aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappu, Rohit V; Wang, Xiaoling; Vitalis, Andreas; Crick, Scott L

    2008-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a commonly occurring problem in biology. Cells have evolved stress-response mechanisms to cope with problems posed by protein aggregation. Yet, these quality control mechanisms are overwhelmed by chronic aggregation-related stress and the resultant consequences of aggregation become toxic to cells. As a result, a variety of systemic and neurodegenerative diseases are associated with various aspects of protein aggregation and rational approaches to either inhibit aggregation or manipulate the pathways to aggregation might lead to an alleviation of disease phenotypes. To develop such approaches, one needs a rigorous and quantitative understanding of protein aggregation. Much work has been done in this area. However, several unanswered questions linger, and these pertain primarily to the actual mechanism of aggregation as well as to the types of inter-molecular associations and intramolecular fluctuations realized at low protein concentrations. It has been suggested that the concepts underlying protein aggregation are similar to those used to describe the aggregation of synthetic polymers. Following this suggestion, the relevant concepts of polymer aggregation are introduced. The focus is on explaining the driving forces for polymer aggregation and how these driving forces vary with chain length and solution conditions. It is widely accepted that protein aggregation is a nucleation-dependent process. This view is based mainly on the presence of long times for the accumulation of aggregates and the elimination of these lag times with "seeds". In this sense, protein aggregation is viewed as being analogous to the aggregation of colloidal particles. The theories for polymer aggregation reviewed in this work suggest an alternative mechanism for the origin of long lag times in protein aggregation. The proposed mechanism derives from the recognition that polymers have unique dynamics that distinguish them from other aggregation-prone systems such as

  1. Driving forces for the self-assembly of graphene oxide on organic monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, Johannes; Wang, Zhenxing; Eigler, Siegfried; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Jäger, Christof M.; Clark, Timothy; Hirsch, Andreas; Halik, Marcus

    2014-09-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) flakes were self-assembled from solution on surfaces of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), varying in the chemical structure of their head groups. The coverage density of GO relates to strength of attractive interaction, which is largest for Coulomb interaction provided by positively charged SAM head groups and negatively charged GO. A rough surface enhances the coverage density but with the same trend in driving force dependency. The self-assembly approach was used to fabricate field-effect transistors with reduced GO (rGO) as active layer. The SAMs as attractive layer for self-assembly remain almost unaffected by the reduction from GO to rGO and serve as ultra-thin gate dielectrics in devices, which operate at low voltages of maximum 3 V and exhibit a shift of the Dirac voltage related to the dipole moment of the SAMs.Graphene oxide (GO) flakes were self-assembled from solution on surfaces of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), varying in the chemical structure of their head groups. The coverage density of GO relates to strength of attractive interaction, which is largest for Coulomb interaction provided by positively charged SAM head groups and negatively charged GO. A rough surface enhances the coverage density but with the same trend in driving force dependency. The self-assembly approach was used to fabricate field-effect transistors with reduced GO (rGO) as active layer. The SAMs as attractive layer for self-assembly remain almost unaffected by the reduction from GO to rGO and serve as ultra-thin gate dielectrics in devices, which operate at low voltages of maximum 3 V and exhibit a shift of the Dirac voltage related to the dipole moment of the SAMs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02527j

  2. Public good dynamics drive evolution of iron acquisition strategies in natural bacterioplankton populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Otto X; Ventouras, Laure-Anne; DeLong, Edward F; Polz, Martin F

    2012-12-04

    A common strategy among microbes living in iron-limited environments is the secretion of siderophores, which can bind poorly soluble iron and make it available to cells via active transport mechanisms. Such siderophore-iron complexes can be thought of as public goods that can be exploited by local communities and drive diversification, for example by the evolution of "cheating." However, it is unclear whether bacterial populations in the environment form stable enough communities such that social interactions significantly impact evolutionary dynamics. Here we show that public good games drive the evolution of iron acquisition strategies in wild populations of marine bacteria. We found that within nonclonal but ecologically cohesive genotypic clusters of closely related Vibrionaceae, only an intermediate percentage of genotypes are able to produce siderophores. Nonproducers within these clusters exhibited selective loss of siderophore biosynthetic pathways, whereas siderophore transport mechanisms were retained, suggesting that these nonproducers can act as cheaters that benefit from siderophore producers in their local environment. In support of this hypothesis, these nonproducers in iron-limited media suffer a significant decrease in growth, which can be alleviated by siderophores, presumably owing to the retention of transport mechanisms. Moreover, using ecological data of resource partitioning, we found that cheating coevolves with the ecological specialization toward association with larger particles in the water column, suggesting that these can harbor stable enough communities for dependencies among organisms to evolve.

  3. Definition of interaction force between car wheel and rough road while driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polyakov V.M.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available For the calculation of indicators of operational properties of a car moving on a rough road, in most cases it is necessary to know the support reactions on the wheels of the vehicle and changing depending on mode of motion. In this connection, there arises an interest in determining strength of the central plane of rotation of the car wheel while driving over uneven at different speeds its movement. A mathematical model for definition of force in the central plane of rotation wheel at uniform rectilinear movements of the car on the support surface with single sinusoidal roughness, was developed. Parameters of mass and geometric parameters of the car and asperity, elastic and dissipative properties of the suspension and tires are taken into account. Results of investigation of interaction of car wheel and single sinusoidal roughness at uniform rectilinear movements Renault 15TS with different speeds, was presented. The plots to assess the influence of vehicle speed on rough roads on the strength of interaction force between car wheel and rough road are presented.

  4. The ultimate and proximate mechanisms driving the evolution of long tails in forest deer mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, Evan P; Kozak, Krzysztof M; Pfeifer, Susanne P; Yang, Dou-Shuan; Hoekstra, Hopi E

    2017-02-01

    Understanding both the role of selection in driving phenotypic change and its underlying genetic basis remain major challenges in evolutionary biology. Here, we use modern tools to revisit a classic system of local adaptation in the North American deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, which occupies two main habitat types: prairie and forest. Using historical collections, we find that forest-dwelling mice have longer tails than those from nonforested habitat, even when we account for individual and population relatedness. Using genome-wide SNP data, we show that mice from forested habitats in the eastern and western parts of their range form separate clades, suggesting that increased tail length evolved independently. We find that forest mice in the east and west have both more and longer caudal vertebrae, but not trunk vertebrae, than nearby prairie forms. By intercrossing prairie and forest mice, we show that the number and length of caudal vertebrae are not correlated in this recombinant population, indicating that variation in these traits is controlled by separate genetic loci. Together, these results demonstrate convergent evolution of the long-tailed forest phenotype through two distinct genetic mechanisms, affecting number and length of vertebrae, and suggest that these morphological changes-either independently or together-are adaptive. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  5. Quantifying Urban Land Sprawl and its Driving Forces in Northeast China from 1990 to 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Drastic urbanization has resulted in numerous problems worldwide, and many studies were devoted to individual cities. There is an urgent need to quantify urbanization patterns and illustrate their driving forces in the regional area on a large scale over a longer time period. This study produced a land cover dataset to characterize sequential urban land expansion in Northeast China from 1990 to 2015 using object-based backdating classification and calculating the expansion index. The drivers were investigated using Pearson correlation analysis and the multiple linear stepwise regression model. The results revealed that the total area of urban land increased by 43.15% from 1990 to 2015, mainly in the middle part of the study area, and especially in the coastal area of Liaoning. Liaoning had the fastest growth rate, while Heilongjiang showed a decrease in growth rate rankings. Urban land expanded northward and southward within Harbin City, towards the west and east within Changchun City, and relatively equally in all directions within Shenyang City. Expansion patterns changed from edge expansion (42% to outlying expansion (47%. Urban land of Liaoning and the Eastern Inner Mongolia Autonomous region expanded with similar patterns as the entire area, but that of Heilongjiang grew in an opposite pattern, and Jilin maintained outlying major expansion. The influence of factors on urban land sprawl varied temporally. Tertiary industry product, gross domestic product, secondary industry product, total population and urban population were driving factors of urban land sprawl in Northeast China from 1990 to 2015. This research provides quantitative methods for better understanding urban land dynamics and devising feasible strategies for sustainable urban development.

  6. Thermal denaturation of Bungarus fasciatus acetylcholinesterase: Is aggregation a driving force in protein unfolding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, I; Wachtel, E; Roth, E; Bon, C; Silman, I; Weiner, L

    2002-08-01

    A monomeric form of acetylcholinesterase from the venom of Bungarus fasciatus is converted to a partially unfolded molten globule species by thermal inactivation, and subsequently aggregates rapidly. To separate the kinetics of unfolding from those of aggregation, single molecules of the monomeric enzyme were encapsulated in reverse micelles of Brij 30 in 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, or in large unilamellar vesicles of egg lecithin/cholesterol at various protein/micelle (vesicle) ratios. The first-order rate constant for thermal inactivation at 45 degrees C, of single molecules entrapped within the reverse micelles (0.031 min(-1)), was higher than in aqueous solution (0.007 min(-1)) or in the presence of normal micelles (0.020 min(-1)). This clearly shows that aggregation does not provide the driving force for thermal inactivation of BfAChE. Within the large unilamellar vesicles, at average protein/vesicle ratios of 1:1 and 10:1, the first-order rate constants for thermal inactivation of the encapsulated monomeric acetylcholinesterase, at 53 degrees C, were 0.317 and 0.342 min(-1), respectively. A crosslinking technique, utilizing the photosensitive probe, hypericin, showed that thermal denaturation produces a distribution of species ranging from dimers through to large aggregates. Consequently, at a protein/vesicle ratio of 10:1, aggregation can occur upon thermal denaturation. Thus, these experiments also demonstrate that aggregation does not drive the thermal unfolding of Bungarus fasciatus acetylcholinesterase. Our experimental approach also permitted monitoring of recovery of enzymic activity after thermal denaturation in the absence of a competing aggregation process. Whereas no detectable recovery of enzymic activity could be observed in aqueous solution, up to 23% activity could be obtained for enzyme sequestered in the reverse micelles.

  7. Actual structure, thermodynamic driving force, and mechanism of benzofuranone-typical compounds as antioxidants in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Qing; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Chun-Hua; Li, Xiu-Tao; Jing, Sha

    2011-04-07

    5,7-Ditert-butyl-3-(3,4-dimethylphenyl)benzofuran-2(3H)-one (HP-136) (1H) and its 30 analogues (2H-5H) as benzofuranone-typical antioxidants were synthesized. The structures of the benzofuranones in solid and solution were examined by using experimental and theoretical methods. The results show that the dominant structure is the lactone form rather than the enol form both in solid and solution. The thermodynamic driving forces of the 31 benzofuranone-typical compounds to release protons [ΔG(PD)(XH)], hydrogen atoms [ΔG(HD)(XH)], and electrons [E(ox)(XH)] and the thermodynamic driving forces of the anions (X(-)) of the benzofuranones to release electrons [E(ox)(X(-))] were determined for the first time in DMSO. The ΔG(HD)(XH) scale of these compounds in DMSO ranges from 65.2 to 74.1 (kcal/mol) for 1H-4H and from 73.8 to 75.0 (kcal/mol) for 5H, respectively, which are all smaller than that of the most widely used commercial antioxidant BHT (2,6-ditert-butyl-4-methylphenol, 81.6 kcal/mol), suggesting that the 31 XH could be used as good hydrogen-atom-donating antioxidants. The ΔG(PD)(XH) were observed to range from 11.5 to 16.0 (kcal/mol) for 1H-4H and from 18.6 to 22.4 (kcal/mol) for 5H, indicating that benzofuranones (1H-4H) are good proton donors, and their analogues (5H) should belong to middle-strong proton donors. E(ox)(XH) of the 31 XH to release an electron vary from 1.346 to 1.962 (V versus Fc(+/0)), implying that the 31 XH are weak electron donors, whereas the quite negative E(ox)(X(-)) show that X(-) are good electron donors. The Gibbs free-energy changes of the radical cations (XH(+•)) to release protons [ΔG(PD)(XH(+•))] were evaluated according to the corresponding thermodynamic cycle, and the results reveal that XH(+•) are good proton donors. Further inspection of our experimental results showed the ΔG(HD)(XH), ΔG(PD)(XH), ΔG(PD)(XH(+•)), E(ox)(XH), and E(ox)(X(-)) of the five chemical and electrochemical processes are all linearly

  8. Influence of a uniform driving force on tracer diffusion in a one-dimensional hard-core lattice gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kutner, R.; Beijeren, H. van

    1985-01-01

    The influence of a uniform driving force on tracer diffusion is investigated for a one-dimensional lattice gas where particles jump stochastically to unoccupied neighboring sites. A new, simple calculation is presented for the diffusion coefficient of a tracer particle with respect to its average

  9. Current profile evolution during fast wave current drive on the DIII-D tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petty, C.C.; Forest, C.B.; Baity, F.W.; Chiu, S.C.; deGrassie, J.S.; Groebner, R.J.; Lin-Liu, Y.; Luce, T.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Porkolab, M.; Prater, R.; Rice, B.W. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

    1996-02-01

    The effect of co and counter fast wave current drive (FWCD) on the plasma current profile has been measured for neutral beam heated plasmas with reversed magnetic shear on the DIII-D tokamak. Although the response of the loop voltage profile was consistent with the application of co and counter FWCD, little difference was observed between the current profiles for the opposite directions of FWCD. The evolution of the current profile was successfully modeled using the ONETWO transport code. The simulation showed that the small difference between the current profiles for co and counter FWCD was mainly due to an offsetting change in the ohmic current profile. In addition, the time scale for the loop voltage to reach equilibrium (i.e., flatten) was found to be much longer than the FWCD pulse, which limited the ability of the current profile to fully respond to co or counter FWCD. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. US Department of The Space Force: A Necessary Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Horizons: A History of the Air Force in Space, 1947-2007 (Colorado Springs: Air Force Space Command, 2007), 136. 8 Mark E. Harter , “Ten...resources effectively. 22 In addition, the 17 Harter , Air & Space Power Journal,Summer 2006, 67...for waging war in order to 12 Armor, The Space Review, 15 September 2008, 7. 13 Mark E. Harter

  11. Human APOBEC3G drives HIV-1 evolution and the development of drug resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Tamoy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Eun - Young [FEINBERG SCHOOL OF MEDS; Koning, Fransje [KING' S COLLEGE LONDON; Malim, Michael [KING' S COLLEGE LONDON; Wolinsky, Steven M [FEINBERG SCHOOL OF MEDS

    2008-01-01

    Human APOBEC3G (hA3G) is an innate virus restriction factor that induces deamination of specific cytidine residues in single-stranded human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA. Whereas destructive hA3G editing leads to a profound loss of HIV-1 infectivity, more limited editing could be a source of adaptation and diversification. Here we show that the presence of hA3G in T-cells can drive the development of diversity in HIV-1 populations and that under selection pressure imposed by the nucleotide analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor 3TC ((-)2',3'-dideoxy-3'-thiacytidine), a single point mutation that confers 3TC resistance, methionine 184 to isoleucine (M1841), emerges rapidly and reaches fixation. These results provide strong evidence that mutation by hA3G is an important source of genetic variation on which natural selection acts to shape the structure of the viral population and drive the tempo of HIV-1 evolution.

  12. Visualizing driving forces of spatially extended systems using the recurrence plot framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Maik; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen

    2017-12-01

    The increasing availability of highly resolved spatio-temporal data leads to new opportunities as well as challenges in many scientific disciplines such as climatology, ecology or epidemiology. This allows more detailed insights into the investigated spatially extended systems. However, this development needs advanced techniques of data analysis which go beyond standard linear tools since the more precise consideration often reveals nonlinear phenomena, for example threshold effects. One of these tools is the recurrence plot approach which has been successfully applied to the description of complex systems. Using this technique's power of visualization, we propose the analysis of the local minima of the underlying distance matrix in order to display driving forces of spatially extended systems. The potential of this novel idea is demonstrated by the analysis of the chlorophyll concentration and the sea surface temperature in the Southern California Bight. We are able not only to confirm the influence of El Niño events on the phytoplankton growth in this region but also to confirm two discussed regime shifts in the California current system. This new finding underlines the power of the proposed approach and promises new insights into other complex systems.

  13. Force Sensitive Handles and Capacitive Touch Sensor for Driving a Flexible Haptic-Based Immersive System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Cugini

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present an approach that uses both two force sensitive handles (FSH and a flexible capacitive touch sensor (FCTS to drive a haptic-based immersive system. The immersive system has been developed as part of a multimodal interface for product design. The haptic interface consists of a strip that can be used by product designers to evaluate the quality of a 3D virtual shape by using touch, vision and hearing and, also, to interactively change the shape of the virtual object. Specifically, the user interacts with the FSH to move the virtual object and to appropriately position the haptic interface for retrieving the six degrees of freedom required for both manipulation and modification modalities. The FCTS allows the system to track the movement and position of the user’s fingers on the strip, which is used for rendering visual and sound feedback. Two evaluation experiments are described, which involve both the evaluation and the modification of a 3D shape. Results show that the use of the haptic strip for the evaluation of aesthetic shapes is effective and supports product designers in the appreciation of the aesthetic qualities of the shape.

  14. pi-Stacking in thiophene oligomers as the driving force for electroactive materials and devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherlis, Damian A; Marzari, Nicola

    2005-03-09

    The pi-stacking between aromatic oligomers has been extensively studied for many years, although the notion of exploiting this phenomenon as the driving force for molecular actuation has only recently emerged. In this work we examine with MP2 and Car-Parrinello ab initio calculations the actuation properties of a novel class of thiophene-based materials introduced by Swager et al. (Adv. Mater. 2002, 14, 368; J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125, 1142). The chemical ingredients of the assembly, calix[4]arenes and oligothiophenes, are screened separately to characterize the actuation mechanisms and design optimal architectures. In particular, ab initio methods are used to study pi-stacking in mixed-valence oligothiophene dimers, revealing strong interactions that can be turned on and off as a function of the electrochemical potential. We show how these interactions could be harnessed to achieve molecular actuation and investigate the response of an active unit in real time with first-principles molecular dynamics simulations.

  15. Driving force for indentation cracking in glass: composition, pressure and temperature dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouxel, Tanguy

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of damage at the surface of glass parts caused by sharp contact loading is a major issue for glass makers, suppliers and end-users. Yet, it is still a poorly understood problem from the viewpoints both of glass science and solid mechanics. Different microcracking patterns are observed at indentation sites depending on the glass composition and indentation cracks may form during both the loading and the unloading stages. Besides, we do not know much about the fracture toughness of glass and its composition dependence, so that setting a criterion for crack initiation and predicting the extent of the damage yet remain out of reach. In this study, by comparison of the behaviour of glasses from very different chemical systems and by identifying experimentally the individual contributions of the different rheological processes leading to the formation of the imprint—namely elasticity, densification and shear flow—we obtain a fairly straightforward prediction of the type and extent of the microcracks which will most likely form, depending on the physical properties of the glass. Finally, some guidelines to reduce the driving force for microcracking are proposed in the light of the effects of composition, temperature and pressure, and the areas for further research are briefly discussed. PMID:25713446

  16. Range expansion drives the evolution of alternate reproductive strategies in invasive fire ants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson A. Helms IV

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many species are expanding their ranges in response to climate changes or species introductions. Expansion-related selection likely drives the evolution of dispersal and reproductive traits, especially in invasive species introduced into novel habitats. We used an agent-based model to investigate these relationships in the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, by tracking simulated populations over 25 years. Most colonies of this invasive species produce two types of queens practicing alternate reproductive strategies. Claustral queens found new colonies in vacant habitats, while parasitic queens take over existing colonies whose queens have died. We investigated how relative investment in the two queen types affects population demography, habitat occupancy, and range expansion. We found that parasitic queens extend the ecological lifespan of colonies, thereby increasing a population’s overall habitat occupancy as well as average colony size (number of workers and territory size. At the same time, investment in parasitic queens slowed the rate of range expansion by diverting investment from claustral queens. Divergent selection regimes caused edge and interior populations to evolve different levels of reproductive investment, such that interior populations invested heavily in parasitic queens whereas those at the edge invested almost entirely in claustral queens. Our results highlight factors shaping ant life histories, including the evolution of social parasitism, and have implications for the response of species to range shifts.

  17. Selection for Social Signalling Drives the Evolution of Chameleon Colour Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart-Fox, Devi; Moussalli, Adnan

    2008-01-01

    Rapid colour change is a remarkable natural phenomenon that has evolved in several vertebrate and invertebrate lineages. The two principal explanations for the evolution of this adaptive strategy are (1) natural selection for crypsis (camouflage) against a range of different backgrounds and (2) selection for conspicuous social signals that maximise detectability to conspecifics, yet minimise exposure to predators because they are only briefly displayed. Here we show that evolutionary shifts in capacity for colour change in southern African dwarf chameleons (Bradypodion spp.) are associated with increasingly conspicuous signals used in male contests and courtship. To the chameleon visual system, species showing the most dramatic colour change display social signals that contrast most against the environmental background and amongst adjacent body regions. We found no evidence for the crypsis hypothesis, a finding reinforced by visual models of how both chameleons and their avian predators perceive chameleon colour variation. Instead, our results suggest that selection for conspicuous social signals drives the evolution of colour change in this system, supporting the view that transitory display traits should be under strong selection for signal detectability. PMID:18232740

  18. Selection for social signalling drives the evolution of chameleon colour change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Stuart-Fox

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid colour change is a remarkable natural phenomenon that has evolved in several vertebrate and invertebrate lineages. The two principal explanations for the evolution of this adaptive strategy are (1 natural selection for crypsis (camouflage against a range of different backgrounds and (2 selection for conspicuous social signals that maximise detectability to conspecifics, yet minimise exposure to predators because they are only briefly displayed. Here we show that evolutionary shifts in capacity for colour change in southern African dwarf chameleons (Bradypodion spp. are associated with increasingly conspicuous signals used in male contests and courtship. To the chameleon visual system, species showing the most dramatic colour change display social signals that contrast most against the environmental background and amongst adjacent body regions. We found no evidence for the crypsis hypothesis, a finding reinforced by visual models of how both chameleons and their avian predators perceive chameleon colour variation. Instead, our results suggest that selection for conspicuous social signals drives the evolution of colour change in this system, supporting the view that transitory display traits should be under strong selection for signal detectability.

  19. Cannibalism can drive the evolution of behavioural phase polyphenism in locusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttal, Vishwesha; Romanczuk, Pawel; Simpson, Stephen J; Sword, Gregory A; Couzin, Iain D

    2012-10-01

    During outbreaks, locust swarms can contain millions of insects travelling thousands of kilometers while devastating vegetation and crops. Such large-scale spatial organization is preceded locally by a dramatic density-dependent phenotypic transition in multiple traits. Behaviourally, low-density 'solitarious' individuals avoid contact with one another; above a critical local density, they undergo a rapid behavioural transition to the 'gregarious phase' whereby they exhibit mutual attraction. Although proximate causes of this phase polyphenism have been widely studied, the ultimate driving factors remain unclear. Using an individual-based evolutionary model, we reveal that cannibalism, a striking feature of locust ecology, could lead to the evolution of density-dependent behavioural phase-change in juvenile locusts. We show that this behavioural strategy minimizes risk associated with cannibalistic interactions and may account for the empirically observed persistence of locust groups during outbreaks. Our results provide a parsimonious explanation for the evolution of behavioural plasticity in locusts. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  20. Gene duplication as a major force in evolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Department of Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, 3Department of Environmental Sciences, and 4Centre for Plant. Breeding and Genetics, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University (TNAU), ...... Zhang J. 2003 Evolution by gene duplication: an update. Trends. Ecol. Evol. 18, 192–198. Received 19 May 2012; in revised ...

  1. Gene duplication as a major force in evolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gene duplication is an important mechanism for acquiring new genes and creating genetic novelty in organisms. Many new gene functions have evolved through gene duplication and it has contributed tremendously to the evolution of developmental programmes in various organisms. Gene duplication can result from ...

  2. Growth of whiskers from Sn surfaces: Driving forces and growth mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chason, Eric; Jadhav, Nitin; Pei, Fei; Buchovecky, Eric; Bower, Allan

    2013-05-01

    Sn whiskers are thin filaments that grow spontaneously out of the surface of coatings on Cu and have become a critical reliability problem in Pb-free electronics. In this review, we focus on what creates the driving force for whiskers (or more rounded “hillocks”), and what determines where on the surface they will form. Experimental studies are reviewed that quantify the relationship between the Cu-Sn intermetallic (IMC) formation, stress in the layer and whisker/hillock density. Measurements of the mechanical properties show how stress relaxation in the Sn layer is intimately related to how much stress develops due to the IMC formation. Real-time scanning electron microscope (SEM)/focused ion beam (FIB) studies are described that illustrate the whisker/hillock growth process in detail. Whiskers are found to grow out of a single grain on the surface with little lateral growth while hillock growth is accompanied by extensive grain growth and crystallite rotation. Electron-backscattering detection (EBSD) shows the grain structure around where the whiskers/hillocks form, indicating that whiskers can grow out of pre-existing grains and do not require the nucleation of new grains. This has led to a picture in which stress builds up due to IMC growth and causes whiskers/hillocks to form at “weak grains”, i.e., grains that have a stress relaxation mechanism that becomes active at a lower stress than its neighbors. FEA (finite element analysis) calculations are used to simulate the evolving stress and whisker growth for several different mechanisms that may lead to “weak” grains.

  3. Analysis of the Driving Forces in Vegetation Variation in the Grain for Green Program Region, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Chinese government introduced six ecological restoration programs to improve its natural environment. Although these programs have proven successful in improving local environmental conditions, some studies have questioned their effectiveness when regions suffer from extreme weather conditions. Using the Grain for Green Program (GGP region as a study area, we estimated vegetation activities in the GGP region from 2000 to 2010 to clarify the trends in vegetation growth and their driving forces. The results showed that: (1 vegetation activities improved in the GGP region during 2000-2010, with 58.94% of the area showing an increased trend in the NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index; (2 26.33% of the increased vegetation was caused by human interference, and 11.61% by climate variation, human activity was the dominant cause, and resulted in 54.68% of the degradation compared to 4.74% from climate change; and, (3 the contribution of different land use types to the NDVI interannual variations showed that high contribution regions were focused in the arid and semiarid areas, where the vegetation growth is associated with variations in recipitation and temperature. However, conversions between farmland and grassland or forest had a significant effect on the change in the NDVI trend. Therefore, although climate conditions can affect vegetation growth, human activities are more important in vegetation changes, and appropriate human activities would contribute to its continual improvement. Hence, we recommend establishing an assessment and scientific management mechanism for eco-risks in the design and management of ecosystem restoration programs.

  4. Crop modeling: Studying the effect of water stress on the driving forces governing plant water potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Emmerik, T. H. M.; Mirfenderesgi, G.; Bohrer, G.; Steele-Dunne, S. C.; Van De Giesen, N.

    2015-12-01

    Water stress is one of the most important environmental factors that influence plant water dynamics. To prevent excessive water loss and physiological damage, plants can regulate transpiration by adjusting the stomatal aperture. This enhances survival, but also reduced photosynthesis and productivity. During periods of low water availability, stomatal regulation is a trade-off between optimization of either survival or production. Water stress defence mechanisms lead to significant changes in plant dynamics, e.g. leaf and stem water content. Recent research has shown that water content in a corn canopy can change up to 30% diurnally as a result of water stress, which has a considerable influence on radar backscatter from a corn canopy [1]. This highlighted the potential of water stress detection using radar. To fully explore the potential of water stress monitoring using radar, we need to understand the driving forces governing plant water potential. For this study, the recently developed the Finite-Element Tree-Crown Hydrodynamic model version 2 (FETCH2) model is applied to a corn canopy. FETCH2 is developed to resolve the hydrodynamic processes within a plant using the porous media analogy, allowing investigation of the influence of environmental stress factors on plant dynamics such as transpiration, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and leaf and stem water content. The model is parameterized and evaluated using a detailed dataset obtained during a three-month field experiment in Flevoland, the Netherlands, on a corn canopy. [1] van Emmerik, T., S. Steele-Dunne, J. Judge and N. van de Giesen: "Impact of Diurnal Variation in Vegetation Water Content on Radar Backscatter of Maize During Water Stress", Geosciences and Remote Sensing, IEEE Transactions on, vol. 52, issue 7, doi: 10.1109/TGRS.2014.2386142, 2015.

  5. Changes in Growing Season Vegetation and Their Associated Driving Forces in China during 2001–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianfeng Liu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the monitoring of vegetation dynamics has become crucial because of its important role in terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, a satellite-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI was combined with climate factors to explore the spatiotemporal patterns of vegetation change during the growing season, as well as their driving forces in China from 2001 to 2012. Our results showed that the growing season NDVI increased continuously during 2001–2012, with a linear trend of 1.4%/10 years (p < 0.01. The NDVI in north China mainly exhibited an increasing spatial trend, but this trend was generally decreasing in south China. The vegetation dynamics were mainly at a moderate intensity level in both the increasing and decreasing areas. The significantly increasing trend in the NDVI for arid and semi-arid areas of northwest China was attributed mainly to an increasing trend in the NDVI during the spring, whereas that for the north and northeast of China was due to an increasing trend in the NDVI during the summer and autumn. Different vegetation types exhibited great variation in their trends, where the grass-forb community had the highest linear trend of 2%/10 years (p < 0.05, followed by meadow, and needle-leaf forest with the lowest increasing trend, i.e., a linear trend of 0.3%/10 years. Our results also suggested that the cumulative precipitation during the growing season had a dominant effect on the vegetation dynamics compared with temperature for all six vegetation types. In addition, the response of different vegetation types to climate variability exhibited considerable differences. In terms of anthropological activity, our statistical analyses showed that there was a strong correlation between the cumulative afforestation area and NDVI during the study period, especially in a pilot region for ecological restoration, thereby suggesting the important role of ecological restoration programs in ecological recovery

  6. Oxidized cholesterol as the driving force behind the development of Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eGamba

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, the most common neurodegenerative disorder associated with dementia, is typified by the pathological accumulation of amyloid β peptides and neurofibrillary tangles within the brain. Considerable evidence indicates that many events contribute to AD progression, including oxidative stress, inflammation, and altered cholesterol metabolism.The brain’s high lipid content makes it particularly vulnerable to oxidative species, with the consequent enhancement of lipid peroxidation and cholesterol oxidation, and the subsequent formation of end products, mainly 4-hydroxynonenal and oxysterols, respectively from the two processes. The chronic inflammatory events observed in the AD brain include activation of microglia and astrocytes, together with enhancement of inflammatory molecule and free radical release. Along with glial cells, neurons themselves have been found to contribute to neuroinflammation in the AD brain, by serving as sources of inflammatory mediators. Oxidative stress is intimately associated with neuroinflammation, and a vicious circle has been found to connect oxidative stress and inflammation in AD. Alongside oxidative stress and inflammation, altered cholesterol metabolism and hypercholesterolemia also significantly contribute to neuronal damage and to progression of AD. Increasing evidence is now consolidating the hypothesis that oxidized cholesterol is the driving force behind the development of AD, and that oxysterols are the link connecting the disease to altered cholesterol metabolism in the brain and hypercholesterolemia; this is because of the ability of oxysterols, unlike cholesterol, to cross the blood brain barrier. The key role of oxysterols in AD pathogenesis has been strongly supported by research pointing to their involvement in modulating neuroinflammation, Aβ accumulation, and cell death.This review highlights the key role played by cholesterol and oxysterols in the brain in AD pathogenesis.

  7. Selection on Network Dynamics Drives Differential Rates of Protein Domain Evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian K Mannakee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The long-held principle that functionally important proteins evolve slowly has recently been challenged by studies in mice and yeast showing that the severity of a protein knockout only weakly predicts that protein's rate of evolution. However, the relevance of these studies to evolutionary changes within proteins is unknown, because amino acid substitutions, unlike knockouts, often only slightly perturb protein activity. To quantify the phenotypic effect of small biochemical perturbations, we developed an approach to use computational systems biology models to measure the influence of individual reaction rate constants on network dynamics. We show that this dynamical influence is predictive of protein domain evolutionary rate within networks in vertebrates and yeast, even after controlling for expression level and breadth, network topology, and knockout effect. Thus, our results not only demonstrate the importance of protein domain function in determining evolutionary rate, but also the power of systems biology modeling to uncover unanticipated evolutionary forces.

  8. Can Foraging Ecology Drive the Evolution of Body Size in a Diving Endotherm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Timothée R.; Lescroël, Amélie; Cherel, Yves; Kato, Akiko; Bost, Charles-André

    2013-01-01

    Within a single animal species, different morphs can allow for differential exploitation of foraging niches between populations, while sexual size dimorphism can provide each sex with access to different resources. Despite being potentially important agents of evolution, resource polymorphisms, and the way they operate in wild populations, remain poorly understood. In this study, we examine how trophic factors can select for different body sizes between populations and sexes in a diving endotherm. Dive depth and duration are positively related to body size in diving birds and mammals, a relationship explained by a lower mass-specific metabolic rate and greater oxygen stores in larger individuals. Based on this allometry, we predict that selection for exploiting resources situated at different depths can drive the evolution of body size in species of diving endotherms at the population and sexual level. To test this prediction, we studied the foraging ecology of Blue-eyed Shags, a group of cormorants with male-biased sexual size dimorphism from across the Southern Ocean. We found that mean body mass and relative difference in body mass between sexes varied by up to 77% and 107% between neighbouring colonies, respectively. Birds from colonies with larger individuals dived deeper than birds from colonies with smaller individuals, when accounting for sex. In parallel, males dived further offshore and deeper than females and the sexual difference in dive depth reflected the level of sexual size dimorphism at each colony. We argue that body size in this group of birds is under intense selection for diving to depths of profitable benthic prey patches and that, locally, sexual niche divergence selection can exaggerate the sexual size dimorphism of Blue-eyed Shags initially set up by sexual selection. Our findings suggest that trophic resources can select for important geographic micro-variability in body size between populations and sexes. PMID:23409169

  9. Female Behaviour Drives Expression and Evolution of Gustatory Receptors in Butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Adriana D.; Macias-Muñoz, Aide; Kozak, Krzysztof M.; Walters, James R.; Yuan, Furong; Jamie, Gabriel A.; Martin, Simon H.; Dasmahapatra, Kanchon K.; Ferguson, Laura C.; Mallet, James; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle; Jiggins, Chris D.

    2013-01-01

    Secondary plant compounds are strong deterrents of insect oviposition and feeding, but may also be attractants for specialist herbivores. These insect-plant interactions are mediated by insect gustatory receptors (Grs) and olfactory receptors (Ors). An analysis of the reference genome of the butterfly Heliconius melpomene, which feeds on passion-flower vines (Passiflora spp.), together with whole-genome sequencing within the species and across the Heliconius phylogeny has permitted an unprecedented opportunity to study the patterns of gene duplication and copy-number variation (CNV) among these key sensory genes. We report in silico gene predictions of 73 Gr genes in the H. melpomene reference genome, including putative CO2, sugar, sugar alcohol, fructose, and bitter receptors. The majority of these Grs are the result of gene duplications since Heliconius shared a common ancestor with the monarch butterfly or the silkmoth. Among Grs but not Ors, CNVs are more common within species in those gene lineages that have also duplicated over this evolutionary time-scale, suggesting ongoing rapid gene family evolution. Deep sequencing (∼1 billion reads) of transcriptomes from proboscis and labial palps, antennae, and legs of adult H. melpomene males and females indicates that 67 of the predicted 73 Gr genes and 67 of the 70 predicted Or genes are expressed in these three tissues. Intriguingly, we find that one-third of all Grs show female-biased gene expression (n = 26) and nearly all of these (n = 21) are Heliconius-specific Grs. In fact, a significant excess of Grs that are expressed in female legs but not male legs are the result of recent gene duplication. This difference in Gr gene expression diversity between the sexes is accompanied by a striking sexual dimorphism in the abundance of gustatory sensilla on the forelegs of H. melpomene, suggesting that female oviposition behaviour drives the evolution of new gustatory receptors in butterfly genomes. PMID

  10. Can foraging ecology drive the evolution of body size in a diving endotherm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothée R Cook

    Full Text Available Within a single animal species, different morphs can allow for differential exploitation of foraging niches between populations, while sexual size dimorphism can provide each sex with access to different resources. Despite being potentially important agents of evolution, resource polymorphisms, and the way they operate in wild populations, remain poorly understood. In this study, we examine how trophic factors can select for different body sizes between populations and sexes in a diving endotherm. Dive depth and duration are positively related to body size in diving birds and mammals, a relationship explained by a lower mass-specific metabolic rate and greater oxygen stores in larger individuals. Based on this allometry, we predict that selection for exploiting resources situated at different depths can drive the evolution of body size in species of diving endotherms at the population and sexual level. To test this prediction, we studied the foraging ecology of Blue-eyed Shags, a group of cormorants with male-biased sexual size dimorphism from across the Southern Ocean. We found that mean body mass and relative difference in body mass between sexes varied by up to 77% and 107% between neighbouring colonies, respectively. Birds from colonies with larger individuals dived deeper than birds from colonies with smaller individuals, when accounting for sex. In parallel, males dived further offshore and deeper than females and the sexual difference in dive depth reflected the level of sexual size dimorphism at each colony. We argue that body size in this group of birds is under intense selection for diving to depths of profitable benthic prey patches and that, locally, sexual niche divergence selection can exaggerate the sexual size dimorphism of Blue-eyed Shags initially set up by sexual selection. Our findings suggest that trophic resources can select for important geographic micro-variability in body size between populations and sexes.

  11. Female behaviour drives expression and evolution of gustatory receptors in butterflies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana D Briscoe

    Full Text Available Secondary plant compounds are strong deterrents of insect oviposition and feeding, but may also be attractants for specialist herbivores. These insect-plant interactions are mediated by insect gustatory receptors (Grs and olfactory receptors (Ors. An analysis of the reference genome of the butterfly Heliconius melpomene, which feeds on passion-flower vines (Passiflora spp., together with whole-genome sequencing within the species and across the Heliconius phylogeny has permitted an unprecedented opportunity to study the patterns of gene duplication and copy-number variation (CNV among these key sensory genes. We report in silico gene predictions of 73 Gr genes in the H. melpomene reference genome, including putative CO2, sugar, sugar alcohol, fructose, and bitter receptors. The majority of these Grs are the result of gene duplications since Heliconius shared a common ancestor with the monarch butterfly or the silkmoth. Among Grs but not Ors, CNVs are more common within species in those gene lineages that have also duplicated over this evolutionary time-scale, suggesting ongoing rapid gene family evolution. Deep sequencing (∼1 billion reads of transcriptomes from proboscis and labial palps, antennae, and legs of adult H. melpomene males and females indicates that 67 of the predicted 73 Gr genes and 67 of the 70 predicted Or genes are expressed in these three tissues. Intriguingly, we find that one-third of all Grs show female-biased gene expression (n = 26 and nearly all of these (n = 21 are Heliconius-specific Grs. In fact, a significant excess of Grs that are expressed in female legs but not male legs are the result of recent gene duplication. This difference in Gr gene expression diversity between the sexes is accompanied by a striking sexual dimorphism in the abundance of gustatory sensilla on the forelegs of H. melpomene, suggesting that female oviposition behaviour drives the evolution of new gustatory receptors in butterfly

  12. Sector trends and driving forces of global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: focus in industry and buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

    1999-09-01

    Disaggregation of sectoral energy use and greenhouse gas emissions trends reveals striking differences between sectors and regions of the world. Understanding key driving forces in the energy end-use sectors provides insights for development of projections of future greenhouse gas emissions. This report examines global and regional historical trends in energy use and carbon emissions in the industrial, buildings, transport, and agriculture sectors, with a more detailed focus on industry and buildings. Activity and economic drivers as well as trends in energy and carbon intensity are evaluated. The authors show that macro-economic indicators, such as GDP, are insufficient for comprehending trends and driving forces at the sectoral level. These indicators need to be supplemented with sector-specific information for a more complete understanding of future energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

  13. Combined theoretical formulation of Energetic and Entropic driving forces of polymers towards surfaces and comparison with experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnikanti, Venkat; Archer, Lynden

    2005-03-01

    An analytical comparison of the energetic attraction of a polymer towards a surface with entropic driving forces of a polymer has been elusive in the field of surface enrichment of polymers at surfaces. The prediction of crossover molecular weights for surface enrichment of polymers in blends, wherein the dominant of the above mentioned effects is reversed have been restricted to computer simulations in the past. Here we will provide a simple linear response theory that will compare these effects as competitive driving forces towards a surface. Predictions will be made using this theory for the cross over molecular weights and the analysis is extended for polymers of branched architectures. Comparisons of this theory with experiments involving star-linear blends of polybutadienes as well as with lattice simulations will be presented.

  14. The Driving Forces for the Practice of Strategic Planning in SMEs: Evidence from Harare Metropolitan Province, Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    Maxwell Sandada; Raynold Tinomudaishe Chikwama

    2016-01-01

    Despite Zimbabwe sharing with the rest of the world, the notion that SMEs are the impeccable engines to economic revival, growth and development, many of the nation`s SMEs are plagued with high failure rates. Previous studies carried out in most foreign countries suggested that the high failure rate of SMEs was attributable to lack of strategic planning among a host of other factors. Against this backdrop, the purpose of this study was to examine the driving forces for the practic...

  15. Amidicity change as a significant driving force and thermodynamic selection rule of transamidation reactions. A synergy between experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucsi, Zoltán; Chass, Gregory A; Csizmadia, Imre G

    2008-07-03

    Although essential in medicinal and industrial chemistry, transamidation reactions are still poorly understood mechanistically and in particular in terms of the extreme nature for their proceeding either very smoothly or not occurring at all. As yet, there exists no qualitative rule to predict the outcome of an amide interacting with an amine, with quantitative evaluations far from being established. In this paper we aim to clarify the thermodynamic selection rule and driving force of transamidation reactions based on amidicity value, measuring numerically the amide bond strength, toward providing a relatively simple protocol for practicing organic chemists to predict the outcome of an experiment. The change of amidicity over the course of a reaction made it possible to see that the process is favorable or unfavorable. This recently evaluated driving force of amidicity behaves analogously to the driving force of aromaticity in other organic reactions. This paper presents a successful comparison between empirical synthetic results and relevant computational characterizations, for a variety of transamidation reactions, all toward a synergy between experiments and theory. In this paper, we are re-examining experimentally and theoretically earlier experimental findings in relation to transamidation reactions and interpreting them from the aspect of amidicity change and stabilization enthalpies.

  16. Experiments with humans indicate that decision accuracy drives the evolution of niche width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosh, Colin R; Ruxton, Graeme D; Krause, Jens; Franks, Daniel W

    2011-12-07

    One theory to explain the high incidence of niche specialization in many animals is that it reduces attentional load during resource-seeking behaviour and thus leads to more accurate resource selection. A recent neural network model refined the predictions of this theory, indicating that a cognitive advantage in specialists is likely to occur under realistic ecological conditions, namely when 'mistakes' (i.e. selection of non-host resources) contribute moderately but positively to fitness. Here, we present a formal empirical test of the predictions of this model. Using a human-computer interactive, we demonstrate that the central prediction of the model is supported: specialist humans are more accurate decision-makers than generalists when their mistakes are rewarded, but not when mistakes are punished. The idea that increased decision accuracy drives the evolution of niche width in animals has been supported in almost all empirical systems in which it has been investigated. Theoretical work supports the idea, and now the predictions of a key theoretical model have been demonstrated in a real biological information-processing system. Considering these interlocking pieces of evidence, we argue that specialization through increased decision accuracy may contribute significantly, along with other mechanisms, to promote niche specialization in animals.

  17. Relaxation of herbivore-mediated selection drives the evolution of genetic covariances between plant competitive and defense traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesugi, Akane; Connallon, Tim; Kessler, André; Monro, Keyne

    2017-06-01

    Insect herbivores are important mediators of selection on traits that impact plant defense against herbivory and competitive ability. Although recent experiments demonstrate a central role for herbivory in driving rapid evolution of defense and competition-mediating traits, whether and how herbivory shapes heritable variation in these traits remains poorly understood. Here, we evaluate the structure and evolutionary stability of the G matrix for plant metabolites that are involved in defense and allelopathy in the tall goldenrod, Solidago altissima. We show that G has evolutionarily diverged between experimentally replicated populations that evolved in the presence versus the absence of ambient herbivory, providing direct evidence for the evolution of G by natural selection. Specifically, evolution in an herbivore-free habitat altered the orientation of G, revealing a negative genetic covariation between defense- and competition-related metabolites that is typically masked in herbivore-exposed populations. Our results may be explained by predictions of classical quantitative genetic theory, as well as the theory of acquisition-allocation trade-offs. The study provides compelling evidence that herbivory drives the evolution of plant genetic architecture. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  18. Quantifying the Driving Forces of Informal Urbanization in the Western Part of the Greater Cairo Metropolitan Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taher Osman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the driving forces (DFs of informal urbanization (IU in the greater Cairo metropolitan region (GCMR using the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP. The IU patterns in the GCMR have been extremely influenced by seven DFs: geographical characteristics, availability of life facilities, economic incentives, land demand and supply, population increase, administrative function, and development plans. This research found that these forces vary significantly in how they influence urban growth in the three study sectors, namely, the middle, north, and south areas in the western part of the GCMR. The forces with the highest influence were economic incentives in the middle sector, population increase in the north sector, and the administrative function in the south sector. Due to the lower availability of buildable land in the middle sector, the land demand and supply force had a lesser influence in this sector compared to in the north and south sectors. The development plans force had medium influence in all sectors. The geographical characteristics force had little influence in both the middle and the north sectors, but higher influence than economic incentives, availability of life facilities, and development plans in the south sector. Because of the spatial variances in life facilities organizations in the GCMR, the life facilities availability force had little effect on IU in the south sector.

  19. Magnetic moment of solar plasma and the Kelvin force: -The driving force of plasma up-flow -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Kiyoto

    2017-04-01

    Thermal plasma in the solar atmosphere is magnetized (diamagnetic). The magnetic moment does not disappear by collisions because complete gyration is not a necessary condition to have magnetic moment. Magnetized fluid is subjected to Kelvin force in non-uniform magnetic field. Generally, magnetic field strength decreases upwards in the solar atmosphere, hence the Kelvin force is directed upwards along the field. This force is not included in the fluid treatment of MHD. By adding the Kelvin force to the MHD equation of motion, we can expect temperature dependent plasma flows along the field which are reported by many observations. The temperature dependence of the flow speed is explained by temperature dependence of magnetic moment. From the observed parameters, we can infer physical parameters in the solar atmosphere such as scale length of the magnetic field strength and the friction force acting on the flowing plasma. In case of closed magnetic field lines, loop-top concentration of hot plasma is expected which is frequently observed.

  20. Tracing the evolution of nuclear forces under the similarity renormalization group

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Calvin W.

    2017-01-01

    I examine the evolution of nuclear forces under the similarity renormalization group (SRG) using traces of the many-body configuration-space Hamiltonian. While SRG is often said to “soften” the nuclear interaction, I provide numerical examples which paint a complementary point of view: the primary effect of SRG, using the kinetic energy as the generator of the evolution, is to shift downward the diagonal matrix elements in the model space, while the off-diagonal elements undergo significantly...

  1. Nonlinear evolution of the modulational instability under weak forcing and damping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Touboul

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of modulational instability, or Benjamin-Feir instability is investigated within the framework of the two-dimensional fully nonlinear potential equations, modified to include wind forcing and viscous dissipation. The wind model corresponds to the Miles' theory. The introduction of dissipation in the equations is briefly discussed. Evolution of this instability in the presence of damping was considered by Segur et al. (2005a and Wu et al. (2006. Their results were extended theoretically by Kharif et al. (2010 who considered wind forcing and viscous dissipation within the framework of a forced and damped nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The marginal stability curve derived from the fully nonlinear numerical simulations coincides with the curve obtained by Kharif et al. (2010 from a linear stability analysis. Furthermore, it is found that the presence of wind forcing promotes the occurrence of a permanent frequency-downshifting without invoking damping due to breaking wave phenomenon.

  2. Driving forces of main landscape change processes from past 200 years in Central Europe - differences between old democratic and post-socialist countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skokanová Hana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article compares and points out differences in driving forces of four main landscape change processes that shaped post-socialist countries and old democratic countries of Central Europe during the last two centuries. Studying landscape change processes and corresponding driving forces helps in understanding patterns of present landscape and can help among others in better prediction of future landscape change trends. Here, the presented results are based on review of scientific articles published in peer-reviewed journals between 2000 and 2014. Driving forces affecting these processes were grouped into four categories. Economic forces drove mainly agricultural intensification; agricultural land abandonment and urbanisation and were pronounced especially in the second half of the 20th century and at the beginning of the 21st century. Technological driving forces affected agricultural intensification especially in the 19th century and the second half of the 20th century while cultural driving forces had the biggest impact on urbanisation at the beginning of the 21st century. Political driving forces affected agricultural intensification, urbanisation as well as agricultural land abandonment and were pronounced mainly during the second half of the 20th century in the post-socialist countries. Political forces in the form of subsidies drove agricultural extensification at the beginning of the 21st century. The drivers for the agricultural intensification as well as urbanisation seem to be similar for both old democratic and post-socialist countries. In contrast, agricultural land abandonment in the old democratic countries was driven by technological, cultural and economic driving forces while in the post-socialist countries the political driving forces were mainly responsible. Changes in systems for subsidies and changes in the agricultural commodity markets are also responsible for different frequencies and rates of extensification of

  3. Dynamic protrusive cell behaviour generates force and drives early matrix contraction by fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlmann-Noor, Annegret H.; Martin-Martin, Belen; Eastwood, Mark; Khaw, Peng T.; Bailly, Maryse

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying force generation and matrix contraction, using human corneal, Tenon's and scleral fibroblasts in a standard collagen matrix. We used timelapse light and confocal reflection microscopy to analyse concomitantly cell behaviour and matrix remodeling during contraction and devised a novel index to quantify dynamic cell behaviour in 3D. Based on the previously described culture force monitor, a novel simultaneous imaging and micro-culture force mon...

  4. MRCK-1 Drives Apical Constriction in C. elegans by Linking Developmental Patterning to Force Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Daniel J; Higgins, Christopher D; Peters, Kimberly A; Cupp, Timothy D; Dickinson, Daniel J; Pani, Ariel M; Moore, Regan P; Cox, Amanda H; Kiehart, Daniel P; Goldstein, Bob

    2016-08-22

    Apical constriction is a change in cell shape that drives key morphogenetic events including gastrulation and neural tube formation. Apical force-producing actomyosin networks drive apical constriction by contracting while connected to cell-cell junctions. The mechanisms by which developmental patterning regulates these actomyosin networks and associated junctions with spatial precision are not fully understood. Here we identify a myosin light-chain kinase MRCK-1 as a key regulator of C. elegans gastrulation that integrates spatial and developmental patterning information. We show that MRCK-1 is required for activation of contractile actomyosin dynamics and elevated cortical tension in the apical cell cortex of endoderm precursor cells. MRCK-1 is apically localized by active Cdc42 at the external, cell-cell contact-free surfaces of apically constricting cells, downstream of cell fate determination mechanisms. We establish that the junctional components α-catenin, β-catenin, and cadherin become highly enriched at the apical junctions of apically constricting cells and that MRCK-1 and myosin activity are required in vivo for this enrichment. Taken together, our results define mechanisms that position a myosin activator to a specific cell surface where it both locally increases cortical tension and locally enriches junctional components to facilitate apical constriction. These results reveal crucial links that can tie spatial information to local force generation to drive morphogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Self-Biased-SMA Drive PU Microgripper with Force Sensing in Visual Servo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren-Jung Chang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available An innovative design of a polyurethane microgripper system with force sensor is developed for the measurement of gripping force in vision-based control. A microgripper mechanism integrated with a force sensing arm is fabricated by an excimer laser. The microgripper is actuated by a self-biased-SMA (Shape Memory Alloy actuator. A computer-vision method through the ERES (Extended Regional Edge Statistics algorithm is employed to track the motion of gripper. The position information of the gripping point together with the deflection of the force sensing arm is utilized for sensing force. A fuzzy expert with a PI controller in a visual servo is employed to test the performance of sensing the gripping force in grasping of 38μm diameter metal rod. In the performance test, the microgripper system provides a maximum gripping size of 40μm, a maximum force resolution of 1μN and a maximum gripping force of 58μN.

  6. Quantifying the net slab pull force as a driving mechanism for plate tectonics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.

    2004-01-01

    It has remained unclear how much of the negative buoyancy force of the slab (FB) is used to pull the trailing plate at the surface into the mantle. Here I present three-dimensional laboratory experiments to quantify the net slab pull force (FNSP) with respect to FB during subduction. Results show

  7. Deciphering the driving forces of erosion rates on millennial to million‐year timescales in glacially impacted landscapes: An example from the Western Alps

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glotzbach, C; Beek, P; Carcaillet, J; Delunel, R

    2013-01-01

    .... Here we study the driving forces of millennial to Myr‐scale erosion rates in the French Western Alps, as estimated from in situ produced cosmogenic 10 Be and a newly developed approach integrating detrital and bedrock apatite fission...

  8. Multiple infections with Cardinium and two strains of Wolbachia in the spider mite Tetranychus phaselus Ehara: revealing new forces driving the spread of Wolbachia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhao, Dong-Xiao; Chen, Da-Song; Ge, Cheng; Gotoh, Tetsuo; Hong, Xiao-Yue

    2013-01-01

    .... Here, we established a spider mite Tetranychus phaselus population multiply infected by Cardinium as well as two distinct lineages of Wolbachia, designated wCon and wOri, to study the forces driving...

  9. Multiple Infections with Cardinium and Two Strains of Wolbachia in The Spider Mite Tetranychus phaselus Ehara: Revealing New Forces Driving the Spread of Wolbachia: e54964

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dong-Xiao Zhao; Da-Song Chen; Cheng Ge; Tetsuo Gotoh; Xiao-Yue Hong

    2013-01-01

    .... Here, we established a spider mite Tetranychus phaselus population multiply infected by Cardinium as well as two distinct lineages of Wolbachia, designated wCon and wOri, to study the forces driving...

  10. Assessment of SSiB2 simulated soil temperature and moisture driving by CLDAS forcing in the Tibetan Plateau area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, S.; Shi, C.; Zhang, T.; Jiang, L.; Liang, X.; Xu, B.; Jiang, Z.; Zhu, Z.

    2016-12-01

    The first version of CMA Land Data Assimilation System (CLDAS) has been put into operation in July, 2013 in NMIC/CMA. The key focus of this system is the establishment of 2m air temperature, surface pressure, 2m humidity, 10m wind speed, precipitation, radiation forcing data fusion processing system, driving CLM3.5 land surface model based on these forcing data to simulate and exporting soil moisture operation product which has been provided to lots of provincial meteorological administrations, municipal meteorological administrations and scientific research institutes to apply. In 2015, as a upgrade of CLDAS-V1.0 system, CLDAS-V2.0 focuses on developing ensemble technology of multiple land surface model simulation.This study uses high spatial and temporal resolution of land surface atmosphere forcing data of CLDAS to drive SSiB2 land surface model to simulate land surface soil temperature and moisture, surface sensible heat, surface latent heat fluxes in Tibet Plateau. At the same time, "The Third Tibetan Plateau Scientific Experiment: Observations for Boundary Layer and Troposphere" provides a large amount of observational data in the Tibetan Plateau and it is helpful to validate the model results including soil moisture, soil temperature, and so on. The assessment result shows that the simulation is consistent with the "true value". It is may because of two aspects, first, the forcing data which merging automatic station data using Space Time Multiscale Analysis System (STMAS) is better than previous forcing data, and the second is that critical surface parameters of model has been replaced with more accurate data.

  11. Driving Force Dependence of Electron Transfer from Electronically Excited [Ir(COD)(μ-Me2pz)]2 to Photo-Acid Generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Wesley; Rachford, Aaron A; LaBeaume, Paul J; Coley, Suzanne M; Thackeray, James W; Cameron, James F; Müller, Astrid M; Winkler, Jay R; Gray, Harry B

    2017-10-12

    We report the rates of electron transfer (ET) reactions of electronically excited [Ir(COD)(μ-Me2pz)]2 with onium salt photoacid generators (PAGs). The reduction potentials of the PAGs span a large electrochemical window that allows determination of the driving force dependence of the ET reactions. Rate constants of ET from electronically excited [Ir(COD)(μ-Me2pz)]2 to onium PAGs are determined by the reaction driving force until the diffusion limit in acetonitrile is reached.

  12. Nonlinear force-free magnetic fields. [quasi-steady state evolution of astrophysical fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, B. C.

    1982-01-01

    The nonlinear properties of force-free magnetic fields are reviewed with particular reference to the mechanisms for the sudden release of stored energy in flares during the quasi-steady evolution of solar fields. It is shown that in the solar atmosphere, force-free fields with a nonconstant scalar function in the field equations are more likely to occur than those with a constant scalar function, and the nonlinear properties of these fields may give rise to many interesting physical effects. Consideration is then given to two possible mechanisms of field evolution: a model in which a force-free field in a medium of infinite electrical conductivity evolves in response to slowly changing boundary conditions brought about by photospheric motions in the solar active region, and a model in which a field in a medium of small finite electrical conductivity evolves in response to the slow Ohmic dissipation of the electric current.

  13. Coastal Foredune Evolution, Part 1: Environmental Factors and Forcing Processes Affecting Morphological Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering Technical Note (CHETN) is the first of two CHETNs focused on improving technologies to forecast coastal foredune...morphodynamic evolution of coastal foredunes. Part 2 reviews modeling approaches to forecast these changes and develops a probabilistic modeling framework to

  14. Definition of interaction force between car wheel and rough road while driving

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Polyakov V.M; Razboynikov A.A

    2016-01-01

    .... A mathematical model for definition of force in the central plane of rotation wheel at uniform rectilinear movements of the car on the support surface with single sinusoidal roughness, was developed...

  15. Driving forces of Chinese primary air pollution emissions: an index decomposition analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lyu, Wanning; Li, Yuan; Guan, Dabo; Zhao, Hongyan; Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Emissions of the fine particulate matters (diameter of 2.5 μm or less) caused by both the primary particle emissions and the precursor emission sources such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, have contributed significantly to poor urban air quality in China, and have attracted tremendous public attention over the past few years. This study provides an interdisciplinary study to investigate the key contributors driving air pollution emissions changes in China from 1997 to 2012, by applying...

  16. ASEAN-5 Passenger Car Industry Outlook: The Driving Forces, Opportunities and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Quek, Wu Kheng

    2010-01-01

    Global automotive industry is growing at an unprecedented speed in the past decade, primarily due to the strong and fastest growing demand from the Asian emerging economies. ASEAN-5 is an economic block with huge potential. It is an attractive alternative destination for business compare with other emerging economies. Total population is 420 million people and combined economic size of $1,355 billion in this region. ASEAN-5 countries are one of the major driving markets contributed to the rap...

  17. Revealing the micromechanics driving cellular division: optical manipulation of force-bearing substructure in mitotic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Matthew; Preece, Daryl; Duquette, Michelle; Forer, Arthur; Berns, Michael

    2017-08-01

    During the anaphase stage of mitosis, a motility force transports genetic material in the form of chromosomes to the poles of the cell. Chromosome deformations during anaphase transport have largely been attributed to viscous drag force, however LaFountain et. al. found that a physical tether connects separating chromosome ends in crane-fly spermatocytes such that a backwards tethering force elongates the separating chromosomes. In the presented study laser microsurgery was used to deduce the mechanistic basis of chromosome elongation in rat-kangaroo cells. In half of tested chromosome pairs, laser microsurgery between separating chromosome ends reduced elongation by 7+/-3% suggesting a source of chromosome strain independent of viscous drag. When microsurgery was used to sever chromosomes during transport, kinetochore attached fragments continued poleward travel while half of end fragments traveled towards the opposite pole and the remaining fragments either did not move or segregated to the proper pole. Microsurgery directed between chromosome ends always ceased cross-polar fragment travel suggesting the laser severed a physical tether transferring force to the fragment. Optical trapping of fragments moving towards the opposite pole estimates an upper boundary on the tethering force of 1.5 pN.

  18. [Spatiotemporal pattern of urban growth and its driving forces in urban agglomeration of central Liaoning Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Feng-Ming; He, Hong-Shi; Hu, Yuan-Man; Wu, Xiao-Qing; Chang, Yu; Liu, Miao; Shi, Tie-Mao; Wang, Jin-Nian

    2010-03-01

    Based on the five temporal Landsat TM remote sensing data of 1988, 1992, 1997, 2000, and 2004, and by using GIS spatial analysis and landscape pattern analysis, this paper analyzed the spatiotemporal pattern of urban growth and its driving forces in the urban agglomeration of central Liaoning Province (UACLP). From 1988 to 2004, the urban area in the UACLP had being increased from 812.55 km2 to 1345.86 km2, with an average growth rate of 32.96 km2 per year. The urban growth rate increased rapidly after 1997, and the urban growth intensity was up to the peak in 1997-2000. The urban growth was mainly concentrated in the central dense belt of the UACLP. From 1988 to 1997, the urban growth was relatively slow, its spatial pattern was compact, and edge growth and filling were the main urban growth types. From 1997 to 2004, the urban growth became faster with diffused spatial pattern and complex patch shape, and "frog leap" and diffusion were the main urban growth types. Non-agricultural population growth, economic growth, urban spatial mutual attraction, industrial development, and development zones construction policies were the main driving forces of urban growth in the UACLP.

  19. Land use changes and its driving forces in hilly ecological restoration area based on gis and rs of northern china

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Niu, Xiang; Wang, Bing; Zheng, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    Land use change is one of the important aspects of the regional ecological restoration research. With remote sensing (RS) image in 2003, 2007 and 2012, using geographic information system (GIS) technologies, the land use pattern changes in Yimeng Mountain ecological restoration area in China and its driving force factors were studied. Results showed that: (1) Cultivated land constituted the largest area during 10 years, and followed by forest land and grass land; cultivated land and unused land were reduced by 28.43% and 44.32%, whereas forest land, water area and land for water facilities and others were increased. (2) During 2003–2007, forest land change showed the largest, followed by unused land and grass land; however, during 2008–2012, water area and land for water facilities change showed the largest, followed by grass land and unused land. (3) Land use degree was above the average level, it was in the developing period during 2003–2007 and in the degenerating period during 2008–2012. (4) Ecological Restoration Projects can greatly change the micro topography, increase vegetation coverage, and then induce significant changes in the land use distribution, which were the main driving force factors of the land use pattern change in the ecological restoration area. PMID:26047160

  20. Increasing climate extremes under global warming - What is the driving force?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2017-04-01

    More climate extreme events have occurred in recent years, including the continual development of extreme drought in California, the severe cold winters in the eastern U.S. since 2014, 2015 Washington drought, and excessive wildfire events over Alaska in 2015. These have been casually attributed to global warming. However, a need for further understanding of mechanisms responsible for climate extremes is growing. In this presentation, we'll use sets of climate model simulation that designed to identify the role of the oceanic feedback in increasing climate extremes under global warming. One is with a fully coupled climate model forced by 1% ramping CO2, and the other is with an atmosphere only model forced by the same CO2 forcing. By contrasting these two, an importance of the oceanic feedback in increasing climate extremes under global warming can be diagnosed.

  1. Causality of global warming seen from observations: a scale analysis of driving force of the surface air temperature time series in the Northern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peicai; Wang, Geli; Zhang, Feng; Zhou, Xiuji

    2016-05-01

    By using the slow feature analysis, we reconstructed the driving force for an observed monthly surface air temperature anomaly time series in the northern hemisphere. Wavelet transformation technique was then used to analyze the scale structure of the derived driving force and its causal relationship with global warming. Results showed that the driving force for the analyzed temperature climate system included two independent degrees of freedom which respectively represented the effects of 22-year solar cycle and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation on the climate. More importantly, the driving force is modulated in amplitude by signals with much longer time periods. The modulation controls the energy input to the climate system and its effect on the global warming is decisive. In addition, through analyzing phase transitions from zero to extremes of the modulating signals, we provide a projection for the future trend of the surface air temperature. In specific, in the next 45-65 years, the driving force will continue to rise which will drive the air temperature even warmer. This is a long term natural trend determined by the modulating amplitude signals, but not directly related to human activity.

  2. Tracing the evolution of nuclear forces under the similarity renormalization group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvin W. Johnson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available I examine the evolution of nuclear forces under the similarity renormalization group (SRG using traces of the many-body configuration-space Hamiltonian. While SRG is often said to “soften” the nuclear interaction, I provide numerical examples which paint a complementary point of view: the primary effect of SRG, using the kinetic energy as the generator of the evolution, is to shift downward the diagonal matrix elements in the model space, while the off-diagonal elements undergo significantly smaller changes. By employing traces, I argue that this is a very natural outcome as one diagonalizes a matrix, and helps one to understand the success of SRG.

  3. Alien plant invasions in South Africa: driving forces and the human dimension

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Le Maitre, David C

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available of resources to caring for the sick and the loss of adult labour could all lead to abandonment of land and lower rates of wood-cutting, facilitating invasions. ? Economic trends South Africa?s economic performance is controlled primarily by the performance...-border control programmes may cancel detrimental effects.115 ? Horticulture Changing fashions continue to drive a demand for new species of flowers, trees, bushes and shrubs. The horticultural trade generally promotes alien species at the expense of indigenous...

  4. Novel features of nuclear forces and shell evolution in exotic nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    大塚 孝治; 鈴木 俊夫; 本間 道雄; 宇都野 穣; 角田 直文; 月山 幸志郎; Hjorth-Jensen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Novel simple properties of the monopole component of the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction are presented, leading to the so-called monopole-based universal interaction. Shell structures are shown to change as functions of $N$ and $Z$ consistently with experiments. Some key cases of this shell evolution are discussed, clarifying the effects of central and tensor forces. The validity of the present tensor force is examined in terms of the low-momentum interaction V$_{low k}$ and the Q$_{box...

  5. Soil organic carbon evolution at the regional scale : overcoming uncertainties & quantifying driving forces

    OpenAIRE

    Goidts, Esther

    2009-01-01

    "Soil is a non-renewable resource (…) vital to human activities and ecosystem survival" (EC, 2006). Soil protection requires studies and monitoring based on indicators of its quality. Soil organic matter content (SOM) is one the most relevant of these indicators. However, the inventory of soil organic carbon (SOC), the main component of SOM, is challenging at the regional scale due to its inherent large spatial variability and its slow dynamics. Uncertainties can reach high levels preventing ...

  6. CTE Policy Past, Present, and Future: Driving Forces behind the Evolution of Federal Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperatore, Catherine; Hyslop, Alisha

    2017-01-01

    Federal legislation has driven and been receptive to the vision of a rigorous, relevant career and technical education (CTE) system integrated with academics and aligned across middle school, secondary school, and postsecondary education. This article uses a social policy analysis approach to trace the history of federal CTE policy throughout the…

  7. Distinct impacts of substrate elasticity and ligand affinity on traction force evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christina; Pompe, Tilo

    2016-01-07

    Cell adhesion is regulated by the mechanical characteristics of the cell environment. The influences of different parameters of the adhesive substrates are convoluted in the cell response leading to questions on the underlying mechanisms, like biochemical signaling on the level of adhesion molecules, or viscoelastic properties of substrates and cell. By a time-resolved analysis of traction force generation during early cell adhesion, we wanted to elucidate the contributions of substrate mechanics to the adhesion process, in particular the impact of substrate elasticity and the molecular friction of adhesion ligands on the substrate surface. Both parameters were independently adjusted by (i) an elastic polyacrylamide hydrogel of variable crosslinking degree and (ii) a thin polymer coating of the hydrogel surface controlling the affinity (and the correlated substrate-ligand friction) of the adhesion ligand fibronectin. Our analysis showed two sequential regimes of considerable force generation, whose occurrence was found to be independent of substrate properties. The first regime is characterized by spreading of the cell and a succeeding force increase. After spreading cells enter the second regime with saturated forces. Substrate elasticity and viscosity, namely hydrogel elasticity and ligand affinity, were both found to affect the kinetics and absolute levels of traction force quantities. A faster increase and a higher saturation level of traction forces were observed for a higher substrate stiffness and a higher ligand affinity. The results complement recent modeling approaches on the evolution of forces in cell spreading and contribute to a better understanding of the dynamics of cell adhesion on viscoelastic substrates.

  8. What Is Implementation Science and What Forces Are Driving a Change in Medical Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David C; Berry, Arnold; Djuricich, Alexander M; Kitto, Simon; Kreutzer, Kathy O'Kane; Van Hoof, Thomas J; Carney, Patricia A; Kalishman, Summers; Davis, Dave

    Evidence-based interventions to improve health care and medical education face multiple complex barriers to adoption and success. Implementation science focuses on the period following research dissemination, which is necessary but insufficient to address important gaps in clinician performance and patient outcomes. This article describes the forces on health care institutions, medical schools, physician clinicians, and trainees that have created the imperative to design educational interventions to address the gap between evidence and practice. These forces include accreditation, certification, licensure, and regulatory and research funding initiatives focused on improving the quality of health professions education and clinical practice. Medical educators must expand their focus on "what to change" to include "how to change" in order to prepare health care professionals and institutions to effectively adopt new evidence-based practices to improve patient, and ultimately population, outcomes.

  9. Influence of Asymmetry and Driving Forces on the Propulsion of Bubble-Propelled Catalytic Micromotors

    OpenAIRE

    Masayuki Hayakawa; Hiroaki Onoe; Nagai, Ken H.; Masahiro Takinoue

    2016-01-01

    Bubble-propelled catalytic micromotors have recently been attracting much attention. A bubble-propulsion mechanism has the advantage of producing a stronger force and higher speed than other mechanisms for catalytic micromotors, but the nature of the fluctuated bubble generation process affects the motions of the micromotors, making it difficult to control their motions. Thus, understanding of the influence of fluctuating bubble propulsion on the motions of catalytic micromotors is important ...

  10. Entropic forces drive self-organization and membrane fusion by SNARE proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, Hakhamanesh; Thiyagarajan, Sathish; Stratton, Benjamin S; Karatekin, Erdem; Warner, Jason M; Rothman, James E; O'Shaughnessy, Ben

    2017-05-23

    SNARE proteins are the core of the cell's fusion machinery and mediate virtually all known intracellular membrane fusion reactions on which exocytosis and trafficking depend. Fusion is catalyzed when vesicle-associated v-SNAREs form trans-SNARE complexes ("SNAREpins") with target membrane-associated t-SNAREs, a zippering-like process releasing ∼65 kT per SNAREpin. Fusion requires several SNAREpins, but how they cooperate is unknown and reports of the number required vary widely. To capture the collective behavior on the long timescales of fusion, we developed a highly coarse-grained model that retains key biophysical SNARE properties such as the zippering energy landscape and the surface charge distribution. In simulations the ∼65-kT zippering energy was almost entirely dissipated, with fully assembled SNARE motifs but uncomplexed linker domains. The SNAREpins self-organized into a circular cluster at the fusion site, driven by entropic forces that originate in steric-electrostatic interactions among SNAREpins and membranes. Cooperative entropic forces expanded the cluster and pulled the membranes together at the center point with high force. We find that there is no critical number of SNAREs required for fusion, but instead the fusion rate increases rapidly with the number of SNAREpins due to increasing entropic forces. We hypothesize that this principle finds physiological use to boost fusion rates to meet the demanding timescales of neurotransmission, exploiting the large number of v-SNAREs available in synaptic vesicles. Once in an unfettered cluster, we estimate ≥15 SNAREpins are required for fusion within the ∼1-ms timescale of neurotransmitter release.

  11. Internal combustion engine for producing a direct driving force by generating centrifugal force pulse in rapid succession. Verbrennungsmotor zur Erzeugung einer direkten Antriebskraft durch Erzeugung von schnell aufeinanderfolgenden Zentrifugalkraftimpulsen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, J.

    1991-04-25

    This is an internal combustion engine to produce a direct driving force by generating centrifugal force pulses in rapid succession with short centrifugal force pulse drive. Conventional vehicles require an internal combustion engine as the drive with subsequent transmission elements such as gearboxes, drive shafts, ships' screws, propellers etc. The effectiveness of these drive mechanisms is reduced by the liability of failure of the expensive technology, dependency on the weather and frictional and flow losses. These disadvantages are avoided by this invention by a driving force generated directly in the engine housing (1). In this, a piston (2) is caused to oscillate by combustion pressure in the housing with a semi-circular guide duct, where centrifugal force pulses (Fz) occur in the direction of the central axis. The fresh or exhaust gases are controlled via slots (3) in the guide duct, where the exhaust gas turbo-supercharger (6) produces a permament air flow. The fresh gases are formed by injecting fuel into the compression duct (4) of the turbo-ignition. The engine is started by a starting compressor with a starting carburettor and starting valves (8) controlled by a linkage (9). The engine can be used in land-, water- and air-vehicles and out in space.

  12. Non-equilibrium forces drive the anomalous diffusion of telomeres in the nucleus of mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Lorenz; Weiss, Matthias

    2017-11-01

    Telomeres are vital nucleotide sequences at both ends of each chromosome, and their motion reports on the local dynamics of decondensed chromatin in the nucleus of interphase cells. Here, we show that the previously reported subdiffusive motion of telomeres is driven by non-equilibrium cytoskeletal forces. In particular, breaking down microtubules leads to a significantly reduced generalized diffusion coefficient of telomeres. This translates into a markedly reduced effective temperature in the stochastic forces that govern the telomeres’ random walk. Moreover, telomere motion in cells that lack microtubules is well described by the monomer dynamics of a Rouse polymer that is embeddded in a viscoelastic medium. In contrast, active cytoskeletal forces in untreated cells override the environment’s elastic contributions, resulting in the well-known scaling for conventional Rouse dynamics in viscous media. Our data highlight that even subdiffusive motion in cells in most cases may not be a simple thermal transport process but rather is driven by non-equilibrium events.

  13. Dynamics of aeolian desertification and its driving forces in the Horqin Sandy Land, Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Han-chen; Wang, Tao; Xue, Xian; Liu, Shu-lin; Guo, Jian

    2014-10-01

    Aeolian desertification is one of the most serious environmental and socioeconomic problems in arid, semi-arid, and dry subhumid zones. Understanding desertification processes and causes is important to provide reasonable and effective control measures for preventing desertification. With satellite remote sensing images as data source to assess the temporal and spatial dynamics of desertification from 1975 to 2010 in the Horqin Sandy Land, dynamic changes of aeolian desertification were detected using the human-machine interactive interpretation method. The driving factors of local desertification were analyzed based on natural and socioeconomic data. The results show that aeolian desertified land in the study area covered 30,199 km(2) in 2010, accounting for 24.1% of the study area. The total area of aeolian desertified land obviously expanded from 30,884 km(2) in 1975 to 32,071 km(2) in 1990, and gradually decreased to 30,199 km(2) in 2010; aeolian desertified land represented an increasing trend firstly and then decreased. During the past 35 years, the gravity centers of desertified lands that are classified as extremely severe and severe generally migrated to the northeast, whereas those that are moderate and slight migrated to the northwest. The migration distance of severely desertified land was the largest, which indicated the southern desertified lands were improved during the last few decades. In addition, the climatic variation in the past 35 years has been favorable to desertification in the Horqin Sandy Land. Aeolian desertified land rapidly expanded from 1975 to 1990 under the combined effects of climate changes and unreasonable human activities. After the 1990s, the main driving factors responsible for the decrease in desertification were positive human activities, such as the series of antidesertification and ecological restoration projects.

  14. Spatial Patterns and Driving Forces of Greenhouse Land Change in Shouguang City, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohua Yu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available As an important facet of modern agricultural development, greenhouses satisfy ever-increasing demands for agricultural production and, therefore, constitute a growing proportion of global agriculture. However, just a handful of countries regularly collect statistics on the land cover of greenhouse infrastructure. Even when collected, these data cannot provide the detailed spatial information required for environmental risk assessment. It is, therefore, important to map spatial changes in greenhouse land cover using remote sensing (RS approaches to determine the underlying factors driving these changes. In this paper, we apply a support vector machine (SVM algorithm to identify greenhouse land cover in Shouguang City, China. Enhanced thematic mapper (ETM images were selected as the data source for land use classification in this study as they can be freely acquired and offer the necessary spatial resolution. We then used a binary logistic regression model to quantitatively discern the mechanisms underlying changes in greenhouse land cover. The results of this study show that greenhouse land cover in Shouguang increased by 50.51% between 2000 and 2015, and that 90.39% of this expansion took place between 2010 and 2015. Elevation, slope, precipitation, and the distance to the nearest rural settlements and coastline are all significant factors driving expansion in greenhouse land cover, while distance to the nearest urban areas, rivers, roads, railways, and coastline have contributed to contractions in this land use type. Our research provided a practical approach to allow the detection of changes in greenhouse land cover in the countries with using free or low-cost satellite images.

  15. Rapid and Recent Evolution of LTR Retrotransposons Drives Rice Genome Evolution During the Speciation of AA-Genome Oryza Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qun-Jie; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2017-06-07

    The dynamics of long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons and their contribution to genome evolution during plant speciation have remained largely unanswered. Here, we perform a genome-wide comparison of all eight Oryza AA-genome species, and identify 3911 intact LTR retrotransposons classified into 790 families. The top 44 most abundant LTR retrotransposon families show patterns of rapid and distinct diversification since the species split over the last ∼4.8 MY (million years). Phylogenetic and read depth analyses of 11 representative retrotransposon families further provide a comprehensive evolutionary landscape of these changes. Compared with Ty1-copia, independent bursts of Ty3-gypsy retrotransposon expansions have occurred with the three largest showing signatures of lineage-specific evolution. The estimated insertion times of 2213 complete retrotransposons from the top 23 most abundant families reveal divergent life histories marked by speedy accumulation, decline, and extinction that differed radically between species. We hypothesize that this rapid evolution of LTR retrotransposons not only divergently shaped the architecture of rice genomes but also contributed to the process of speciation and diversification of rice. Copyright © 2017 Zhang and Gao.

  16. Directional Selection from Host Plants Is a Major Force Driving Host Specificity in Magnaporthe Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhenhui; Norvienyeku, Justice; Chen, Meilian; Bao, Jiandong; Lin, Lianyu; Chen, Liqiong; Lin, Yahong; Wu, Xiaoxian; Cai, Zena; Zhang, Qi; Lin, Xiaoye; Hong, Yonghe; Huang, Jun; Xu, Linghong; Zhang, Honghong; Chen, Long; Tang, Wei; Zheng, Huakun; Chen, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yanli; Lian, Bi; Zhang, Liangsheng; Tang, Haibao; Lu, Guodong; Ebbole, Daniel J; Wang, Baohua; Wang, Zonghua

    2016-05-06

    One major threat to global food security that requires immediate attention, is the increasing incidence of host shift and host expansion in growing number of pathogenic fungi and emergence of new pathogens. The threat is more alarming because, yield quality and quantity improvement efforts are encouraging the cultivation of uniform plants with low genetic diversity that are increasingly susceptible to emerging pathogens. However, the influence of host genome differentiation on pathogen genome differentiation and its contribution to emergence and adaptability is still obscure. Here, we compared genome sequence of 6 isolates of Magnaporthe species obtained from three different host plants. We demonstrated the evolutionary relationship between Magnaporthe species and the influence of host differentiation on pathogens. Phylogenetic analysis showed that evolution of pathogen directly corresponds with host divergence, suggesting that host-pathogen interaction has led to co-evolution. Furthermore, we identified an asymmetric selection pressure on Magnaporthe species. Oryza sativa-infecting isolates showed higher directional selection from host and subsequently tends to lower the genetic diversity in its genome. We concluded that, frequent gene loss or gain, new transposon acquisition and sequence divergence are host adaptability mechanisms for Magnaporthe species, and this coevolution processes is greatly driven by directional selection from host plants.

  17. A single evolutionary innovation drives the deep evolution of symbiotic N2-fixation in angiosperms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werner, G.D.A.; Cornwell, W.K.; Sprent, J.I.; Kattge, J.; Kiers, E.T.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotic associations occur in every habitat on earth, but we know very little about their evolutionary histories. Current models of trait evolution cannot adequately reconstruct the deep history of symbiotic innovation, because they assume homogenous evolutionary processes across millions of

  18. Climate patterns in north central China during the last 1800 yr and their possible driving force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Tan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We synthesized high-resolution precisely-dated stalagmite records and historical document records from north central China to reconstruct a decadal resolution precipitation record during the last 1800 years (190–1980 AD. The synthesized precipitation record shows coincident variations and significant positive correlations with the temperature reconstructions on centennial- to multidecadal-scale, suggesting warm-humid/cool-dry was the main climate pattern in north central China over the past 1800 years. Solar activity may be the dominant force that drove the same-phase variations of the temperature and precipitation in north central China.

  19. The Rarity of Survival to Old Age Does Not Drive the Evolution of Senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Wensink, Maarten Jan; Caswell, Hal; Baudisch, Annette

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of senescence is often explained by arguing that, in nature, few individuals survive to be old and hence it is evolutionarily unimportant what happens to organisms when they are old. A corollary to this idea is that extrinsically imposed mortality, because it reduces the chance of surviving to be old, favors the evolution of senescence. We show that these ideas, although widespread, are incorrect. Selection leading to senescence does not depend directly on survival to old age, b...

  20. Mechanical forces drive neuroblast morphogenesis and are required for epidermal closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernike, Denise; Chen, Yun; Mastronardi, Karina; Makil, Neetha; Piekny, Alisa

    2016-04-15

    Tissue morphogenesis requires myosin-dependent events such as cell shape changes and migration to be coordinated between cells within a tissue, and/or with cells from other tissues. However, few studies have investigated the simultaneous morphogenesis of multiple tissues in vivo. We found that during Caenorhabditis elegans ventral enclosure, when epidermal cells collectively migrate to cover the ventral surface of the embryo, the underlying neuroblasts (neuronal precursor cells) also undergo morphogenesis. We found that myosin accumulates as foci along the junction-free edges of the ventral epidermal cells to form a ring, whose closure is myosin-dependent. We also observed the accumulation of myosin foci and the adhesion junction proteins E-cadherin and α-catenin in the underlying neuroblasts. Myosin may help to reorganize a subset of neuroblasts into a rosette-like pattern, and decrease their surface area as the overlying epidermal cells constrict. Since myosin is required in the neuroblasts for ventral enclosure, we propose that mechanical forces in the neuroblasts influence constriction of the overlying epidermal cells. In support of this model, disrupting neuroblast cell division or altering their fate influences myosin localization in the overlying epidermal cells. The coordination of myosin-dependent events and forces between cells in different tissues could be a common theme for coordinating morphogenetic events during metazoan development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prerequisites and driving forces behind an extended working life among older workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovbrandt, Pia; Håkansson, Carita; Albin, Maria; Carlsson, Gunilla; Nilsson, Kerstin

    2017-11-28

    Reforms are changing pension systems in many European countries, in order to both restrict early retirement and force people to extend their working life. From occupational therapy and occupational science perspectives, studies focusing on aspects of working life that motivate the older worker is urgent. The aim was to describe incentives behind an extended working life among people over age 65. Focus group methodology was used, with participants ages 66-71, from varying work fields: construction and technical companies and the municipal elderly care sector. Work was considered important and valuable to the degree of how challenging work was, the possibilities for inclusion in a team of colleagues and the chances for better personal finances. Amongst all, the participants expressed a feeling of a strengthened identity by being challenged and having the opportunity to manage working tasks. The finding showed the actual reasons behind an extended working life among older workers. However, a risk of rising social inequity may appear with increased working life if older people are forced to extend their working life due to a difficult financial situation as a pensioner. A variety of retirement options and initiatives in order to support older workers are justified.

  2. Modelling the driving forces of the municipal solid waste generation in touristic islands. A case study of the Balearic Islands (2000-2030).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estay-Ossandon, Charles; Mena-Nieto, Angel

    2018-02-14

    The improvement of municipal solid waste (MSW) management in touristic islands has not been sufficiently studied, and by using the Spanish Balearics as a case study, a hybrid methodology has been developed which: (i) identifies the three most influential variables (driving forces) of the MSW generation system through an econometric model based on official historical data for a given period (2000-2014), (ii) develops a System Dynamics (SD) model of the evolution of MSW generation in this archipelago based on the same data and time period, and (iii) forecasts the performance of the MSW management system for a future period (2015-2030). Six different scenarios are considered with varying assumptions, objectives and management policies, while applying Scenario Analysis to the SD model developed. The results show that by maintaining the current policies ("business as usual" BAU scenario) it will be impossible to meet the goals set by the Regional and the Spanish National Plans based on the European MSW Directive. However, by implementing the improvements proposed in the simulated alternative scenarios, the model predicts that by 2030, generation of MSW will have increased by 15% compared to 2014, mainly due to the effect of the Tourist Population which is 37.5% higher than the Resident Population. In addition, for the most optimistic scenario, the amount of MSW sent to landfills would decrease by 40%, and selective collection would increase by 30%, compared to 2014. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The endoderm and myocardium join forces to drive early heart tube assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, Anastasiia; Czirok, Andras; Kosa, Edina; Galkin, Oleksandr; Cheuvront, Tracey J; Rongish, Brenda J

    2015-08-01

    Formation of the muscular layer of the heart, the myocardium, involves the medial movement of bilateral progenitor fields; driven primarily by shortening of the endoderm during foregut formation. Using a combination of time-lapse imaging, microsurgical perturbations and computational modeling, we show that the speed of the medial-ward movement of the myocardial progenitors is similar, but not identical to that of the adjacent endoderm. Further, the extracellular matrix microenvironment separating the two germ layers also moves with the myocardium, indicating that collective tissue motion and not cell migration drives tubular heart assembly. Importantly, as myocardial cells approach the midline, they perform distinct anterior-directed movements relative to the endoderm. Based on the analysis of microincision experiments and computational models, we propose two characteristic, autonomous morphogenetic activities within the early myocardium: 1) an active contraction of the medial portion of the heart field and 2) curling- the tendency of the unconstrained myocardial tissue to form a spherical surface with a concave ventral side. In the intact embryo, these deformations are constrained by the endoderm and the adjacent mesoderm, nevertheless the corresponding mechanical stresses contribute to the proper positioning of myocardial primordia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Study on driving forces of wetland change in the Western Liaohe River basin based on random forest model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Menghong; Yang, Changbao; Zhang, Yanhong; Lin, Nan

    2017-05-01

    Based on the platform of RS and GIS, random forest progression model is used for study driving force of wetland change in western Liaohe river basin, five influencing factors which include elevation, slope, temperature, precipitation and population density are chosen to establish random forest progression model about the wetland change and the driving factors. Using the the mean value of the prediction accuracy outside the bag calculated by the model to evaluate the importance of the variables. The result indicates that the coefficient of partial correlation between precipitation and wetland density is the largest among the five influencing factors, followed by temperature, population density, elevation and slope is smallest. The influence of natural factors on the change of wetland density is mainly reflected in precipitation and temperature factors, and the precipitation is obviously higher than that of temperature, under the influence of human factors, the influence of population density factor on wetland density is higher than that of elevation and slope factor. The result shows that in the past 40 years, the human activities in the study area have increased the density of wetland to some extent, but it is not the main factor.

  5. Distance and driving force dependencies of electron injection and recombination dynamics in organic dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiberg, Joanna; Marinado, Tannia; Hagberg, Daniel P; Sun, Licheng; Hagfeldt, Anders; Albinsson, Bo

    2010-11-18

    A series of dyes based on a triphenylamine donor and a rhodanine acetic acid anchor/acceptor for solar cell application has been studied with regards to electron injection and recombination kinetics using femtosecond transient absorption. The series contains three dyes, with estimated electron transfer distances ranging from 17.2 to 11.0 Å, and which have shown significant differences in energy conversion efficiencies. The injection and recombination kinetics were studied in the NIR region where electrons in the conduction band of the TiO(2) are suggested to absorb. For all dyes, the injection rate is larger than (200 fs)(-1) which implicates a quantitative injection efficiency. Surprisingly, the subsequent recombination reaction has a rate that increases with increasing linker length. On the other hand, this behavior is consistent with the concomitant decrease in driving force for this series of dyes. Moreover, the lifetimes show exponential distance dependence when corrected for driving force and reorganization energy, which indicates a superexchange interaction between the electrons in TiO(2) and the radical cations of the dyes. A dependence on probe wavelength of the attenuation factor was found, giving a β value of 0.38 Å(-1) at 940 nm and 0.49 Å(-1) at 1040 nm. The difference is suggested to be due to the difference in electronic coupling between fully separated dye cations and injected electrons versus geminate electron-hole pairs. Addition of tert-butylpyridine, which from previous work is known to give a substantial drop in the IPCE values for the studied dyes, was found to decrease the amount of long-lived electrons in the TiO(2) without affecting the injection rate.

  6. Tendency to occupy a statistically dominant spatial state of the flow as a driving force for turbulent transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekmarev, Sergei F

    2013-03-01

    The transition from laminar to turbulent fluid motion occurring at large Reynolds numbers is generally associated with the instability of the laminar flow. On the other hand, since the turbulent flow characteristically appears in the form of spatially localized structures (e.g., eddies) filling the flow field, a tendency to occupy such a structured state of the flow cannot be ruled out as a driving force for turbulent transition. To examine this possibility, we propose a simple analytical model that treats the flow as a collection of localized spatial structures, each of which consists of elementary cells in which the behavior of the particles (atoms or molecules) is uncorrelated. This allows us to introduce the Reynolds number, associating it with the ratio between the total phase volume for the system and that for the elementary cell. Using the principle of maximum entropy to calculate the most probable size distribution of the localized structures, we show that as the Reynolds number increases, the elementary cells group into the localized structures, which successfully explains turbulent transition and some other general properties of turbulent flows. An important feature of the present model is that a bridge between the spatial-statistical description of the flow and hydrodynamic equations is established. We show that the basic assumptions underlying the model, i.e., that the particles are indistinguishable and elementary volumes of phase space exist in which the state of the particles is uncertain, are involved in the derivation of the Navier-Stokes equation. Taking into account that the model captures essential features of turbulent flows, this suggests that the driving force for the turbulent transition is basically the same as in the present model, i.e., the tendency of the system to occupy a statistically dominant state plays a key role. The instability of the flow at high Reynolds numbers can then be a mechanism to initiate structural rearrangement of

  7. The driving forces for nitrogen and phosphorus flows in the food chain of china, 1980 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Y; Ma, L; Gao, Z L; Wang, F H; Sims, J T; Ma, W Q; Zhang, F S

    2013-07-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) use and losses in China's food chain have accelerated in the past three decades, driven by population growth, rapid urbanization, dietary transition, and changing nutrient management practice. There has been little detailed quantitative analysis of the relative magnitude of these driving forces throughout this period. Therefore, we analyzed changes in N and P flows and key drivers behind changes in the food (production and consumption) chain at the national scale from 1980 to 2010. Food (N and P) consumption increased by about fivefold in urban settings over this period but has decreased in rural settings since the 1990s. For urban settings, the integrated driving forces for increased food consumption were population growth, which accounted for ∼60%, and changing urban diets toward a greater emphasis on the consumption of animal products. Nutrient inputs and losses in crop and animal productions have continuously increased from 1980 to 2010, but the rates of decadal increase were greatly different. Increased total inputs and losses in crop production were primarily driven by increased crop production for food demand (68-96%) in the 1980s but were likely offset in the 2000s by improved nutrient management practices, as evidenced by decreased total inputs to and losses from cropland for harvesting per nutrient in crop. The contributions of animal production to total N and P losses to waters from the food chain increased by 34 and 60% from 1980 to 2010. These increases were caused mainly by decreased ratios of manure returned to cropland. Our study highlights a larger impact of changing nutrient management practice than population growth on elevated nutrient flows in China's food chain. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  8. Long-term evolution of the force-free twisted magnetosphere of a magnetar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgün, T.; Cerdá-Durán, P.; Miralles, J. A.; Pons, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    We study the long-term quasi-steady evolution of the force-free magnetosphere of a magnetar coupled to its internal magnetic field. We find that magnetospheric currents can be maintained on long time-scales of the order of thousands of years. Meanwhile, the energy, helicity and twist stored in the magnetosphere all gradually increase over the course of this evolution, until a critical point is reached, beyond which a force-free magnetosphere cannot be constructed. At this point, some large-scale magnetospheric rearrangement, possibly resulting in an outburst or a flare, must occur, releasing a large fraction of the stored energy, helicity and twist. After that, the quasi-steady evolution should continue in a similar manner from the new initial conditions. The time-scale for reaching this critical point depends on the overall magnetic field strength and on the relative fraction of the toroidal field. The energy stored in the force-free magnetosphere is found to be up to ˜30 per cent larger than the corresponding vacuum energy. This implies that for a 1014 G field at the pole, the energy budget available for fast magnetospheric events is of the order of a few 1044 erg. The spin-down rate is estimated to increase by up to ˜60 per cent, since the dipole content in the magnetosphere is enhanced by the currents present there. A rough estimate of the braking index n reveals that it is systematically n < 3 for the most part of the evolution, consistent with actual measurements for pulsars and early estimates for several magnetars.

  9. Seasonal changes and driving forces of inflow and outflow through the Bohai Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhixin; Qiao, Fangli; Guo, Jingsong; Guo, Binghuo

    2018-02-01

    This work focuses on analyzing seasonal variation of inflow and outflow through the Bohai Strait that greatly affect the marine environment in the Bohai Sea, using observational data including sea bed mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler currents, CTD salinity data on deck, sea level anomalies of coastal tide gauge stations, and climatological monthly sea level anomalies from Archiving, Validation and Interpretation of Satellite Oceanographic data. Our results show three patterns of outflow and inflow through the Bohai Strait. The first is such that outflow and inflow occur respectively in the southern and northern parts of the strait, as in the traditional understanding. Our results suggest that this pattern occurs only in autumn and winter. Beginning in late September, Ekman currents driven by the northwesterly monsoon carry Bohai Sea water that piles up in the southern part of that sea and then exits eastward to the Yellow Sea. In this process, the pressure and current fields are continuously adjusted, until a quasi balance state between wind stress, Coriolis force and pressure gradient force is reached in winter. Inflow with a compensating property through the northern channel is close to the outflow through the southern channel in winter. The second pattern is a single inflow in spring, and the current and pressure fields are in adjustment. In early spring, the northwesterly monsoon ceases, Yellow Sea water enters the Bohai Sea under the pressure gradient force. With southeasterly monsoon establishment and strengthening, northern Yellow Sea water continually flows into the Bohai Sea and causes sea level rise northward. In the third pattern, outflow is much greater than inflow in summer. The currents run eastward in the central Bohai Sea and then enter the northern Yellow Sea through the northern channel and upper layer of the southern channel, while a westward current with a compensating property enters via the lower layer of the southern channel. Larger

  10. The organization and evolution of the Responder satellite in species of the Drosophila melanogaster group: dynamic evolution of a target of meiotic drive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larracuente, Amanda M

    2014-11-25

    Satellite DNA can make up a substantial fraction of eukaryotic genomes and has roles in genome structure and chromosome segregation. The rapid evolution of satellite DNA can contribute to genomic instability and genetic incompatibilities between species. Despite its ubiquity and its contribution to genome evolution, we currently know little about the dynamics of satellite DNA evolution. The Responder (Rsp) satellite DNA family is found in the pericentric heterochromatin of chromosome 2 of Drosophila melanogaster. Rsp is well-known for being the target of Segregation Distorter (SD)- an autosomal meiotic drive system in D. melanogaster. I present an evolutionary genetic analysis of the Rsp family of repeats in D. melanogaster and its closely-related species in the melanogaster group (D. simulans, D. sechellia, D. mauritiana, D. erecta, and D. yakuba) using a combination of available BAC sequences, whole genome shotgun Sanger reads, Illumina short read deep sequencing, and fluorescence in situ hybridization. I show that Rsp repeats have euchromatic locations throughout the D. melanogaster genome, that Rsp arrays show evidence for concerted evolution, and that Rsp repeats exist outside of D. melanogaster, in the melanogaster group. The repeats in these species are considerably diverged at the sequence level compared to D. melanogaster, and have a strikingly different genomic distribution, even between closely-related sister taxa. The genomic organization of the Rsp repeat in the D. melanogaster genome is complex-it exists of large blocks of tandem repeats in the heterochromatin and small blocks of tandem repeats in the euchromatin. My discovery of heterochromatic Rsp-like sequences outside of D. melanogaster suggests that SD evolved after its target satellite and that the evolution of the Rsp satellite family is highly dynamic over a short evolutionary time scale (<240,000 years).

  11. On the driving forces in the type-II enzymes—Restriction molecular motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikin, S. A.

    2007-11-01

    The motion of the type-II enzyme-DNA complex along the DNA chain is described in the framework of the model of chiral kink movement under the action of a transverse electric field of moderate strength and the model of proper kinetic equations. The basic enzyme characteristics are estimated. The energy released during catalytic reactions due to the participation of certain metal-ions is used to produce bending and twisting of the DNA, the angular motion, and the linear movement of the enzyme along the DNA chain. When water molecules and ions are expelled from the protein-DNA interface, a large longitudinal force appears in the motor, which strives to turn the deformed part of the DNA chain around the transverse axis, which can scissor the DNA chain in some “weak” place inside the enzyme groove.

  12. Nature of peptide wrapping onto metal nanoparticle catalysts and driving forces for size control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Bedford, Nicholas M; Woehl, Taylor J; Knecht, Marc R; Naik, Rajesh R; Heinz, Hendrik

    2017-06-22

    Colloidal metal nanocrystals find many applications in catalysis, energy conversion devices, and therapeutics. However, the nature of ligand interactions and implications on shape control have remained uncertain at the atomic scale. Large differences in peptide adsorption strength and facet specificity were found on flat palladium surfaces versus surfaces of nanoparticles of 2 to 3 nm size using accurate atomistic simulations with the Interface force field. Folding of longer peptides across many facets explains the formation of near-spherical particles with local surface disorder, in contrast to the possibility of nanostructures of higher symmetry with shorter ligands. The average particle size in TEM correlates inversely with the surface coverage with a given ligand and with the strength of ligand adsorption. The role of specific amino acids and sequence mutations on the nanoparticle size and facet composition is discussed, as well as the origin of local surface disorder that leads to large differences in catalytic reactivity.

  13. Transitions in Land Use Architecture under Multiple Human Driving Forces in a Semi-Arid Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issa Ouedraogo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to detect the main shifts in land-use architecture and assess the factors behind the changes in typical tropical semi-arid land in Burkina Faso. Three sets of time-series LANDSAT data over a 23-year period were used to detect land use changes and their underpinning drivers in multifunctional but vulnerable ecologies. Group discussions in selected villages were organized for mapping output interpretation and collection of essential drivers of change as perceived by local populations. Results revealed profound changes and transitions during the study period. During the last decade, shrub and wood savannahs exhibited high net changes (39% and −37% respectively with a weak net positive change for cropland (only 2%, while cropland and shrub savannah exhibited high swap (8% and 16%. This suggests that the area of cropland remained almost unchanged but was subject to relocation, wood savannah decreased drastically, and shrub savannah increased exponentially. Cropland exhibited a null net persistence while shrub and wood savannahs exhibited positive and negative net persistence (1.91 and −10.24, respectively, indicating that there is movement toward agricultural intensification and wood savannah tended to disappear to the benefit of shrub savannah. Local people are aware of the changes that have occurred and support the idea that illegal wood cutting and farming are inappropriate farming practices associated with immigration; absence of alternative cash generation sources, overgrazing and increasing demand for wood energy are driving the changes in their ecosystems. Policies that integrate restoration and conservation of natural ecosystems and promote sustainable agroforestry practices in the study zone are highly recommended.

  14. On the Evolution of Pulsatile Flow Subject to a Transverse Impulse Body Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Labbio, Giuseppe; Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Kadem, Lyes

    2014-11-01

    In the event of an unexpected abrupt traffic stop or car accident, automotive passengers will experience an abrupt body deceleration. This may lead to tearing or dissection of the aortic wall known as Blunt Traumatic Aortic Rupture (BTAR). BTAR is the second leading cause of death in automotive accidents and, although quite frequent, the mechanisms leading to BTAR are still not clearly identified, particularly the contribution of the flow field. As such, this work is intended to provide a fundamental framework for the investigation of the flow contribution to BTAR. In this fundamental study, pulsatile flow in a three-dimensional, straight pipe of circular cross-section is subjected to a unidirectional, transverse, impulse body force applied on a strictly bounded volume of fluid. These models were simulated using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT. The evolution of fluid field characteristics was investigated during and after the application of the force. The application of the force significantly modified the flow field. The force induces a transverse pressure gradient causing the development of secondary flow structures that dissipate the energy added by the acceleration. Once the force ceases to act, these structures are carried downstream and gradually dissipate their excess energy.

  15. Thermodynamic Description of Synergy in Solvent Extraction: II Thermodynamic Balance of Driving Forces Implied in Synergistic Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, J; Bley, M; Dufrêche, J-F; Gourdin, S; Pellet-Rostaing, S; Zemb, T; Dourdain, S

    2017-11-21

    In the second part of this study, we analyze the free energy of transfer in the case of synergistic solvent extraction. This free energy of the transfer of an ion in dynamic equilibrium between two coexisting phases is decomposed into four driving forces combining long-range interactions with the classical complexation free energy associated with the nearest neighbors. We demonstrate how the organometallic complexation is counterbalanced by the cost in free energy related to structural change on the colloidal scale in the solvent phase. These molecular forces of synergistic extraction are driven not only by the entropic term associated with the tight packing of electrolytes in the solvent and by the free energy cost of coextracting water toward the hydrophilic core of the reverse aggregates present but also by the entropic costs in the formation of the reverse aggregate and by the interfacial bending energy of the extractant molecules packed around the extracted species. Considering the sum of the terms, we can rationalize the synergy observed, which cannot be explained by classical extraction modeling. We show an industrial synergistic mixture combining an amide and a phosphate complexing site, where the most efficient/selective mixture is observed for a minimal bending energy and maximal complexation energy.

  16. Spatial Analysis and Quantification of the Thermodynamic Driving Forces in Protein-Ligand Binding: Binding Site Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, E. Prabhu; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic driving forces behind small molecule-protein binding are still not well understood, including the variability of those forces associated with different types of ligands in different binding pockets. To better understand these phenomena we calculate spatially resolved thermodynamic contributions of the different molecular degrees of freedom for the binding of propane and methanol to multiple pockets on the proteins Factor Xa and p38 MAP kinase. Binding thermodynamics are computed using a statistical thermodynamics based end-point method applied on a canonical ensemble comprising the protein-ligand complexes and the corresponding free states in an explicit solvent environment. Energetic and entropic contributions of water and ligand degrees of freedom computed from the configurational ensemble provides an unprecedented level of detail into the mechanisms of binding. Direct protein-ligand interaction energies play a significant role in both non-polar and polar binding, which is comparable to water reorganization energy. Loss of interactions with water upon binding strongly compensates these contributions leading to relatively small binding enthalpies. For both solutes, the entropy of water reorganization is found to favor binding in agreement with the classical view of the “hydrophobic effect”. Depending on the specifics of the binding pocket, both energy-entropy compensation and reinforcement mechanisms are observed. Notable is the ability to visualize the spatial distribution of the thermodynamic contributions to binding at atomic resolution showing significant differences in the thermodynamic contributions of water to the binding of propane versus methanol. PMID:25625202

  17. Influence of Asymmetry and Driving Forces on the Propulsion of Bubble-Propelled Catalytic Micromotors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Hayakawa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bubble-propelled catalytic micromotors have recently been attracting much attention. A bubble-propulsion mechanism has the advantage of producing a stronger force and higher speed than other mechanisms for catalytic micromotors, but the nature of the fluctuated bubble generation process affects the motions of the micromotors, making it difficult to control their motions. Thus, understanding of the influence of fluctuating bubble propulsion on the motions of catalytic micromotors is important in exploiting the advantages of bubble-propelled micromotors. Here, we report experimental demonstrations of the bubble-propelled motions of propeller-shaped micromotors and numerical analyses of the influence of fluctuating bubble propulsion on the motions of propeller-shaped micromotors. We found that motions such as trochoid-like motion and circular motion emerged depending on the magnitude or symmetricity of fluctuations in the bubble-propulsion process. We hope that those results will help in the construction and application of sophisticated bubble-propelled micromotors in the future.

  18. Environmental heterogeneity drives within-host diversification and evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Trine; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Gómez Lozano, María

    2014-01-01

    Within-host pathogen evolution and diversification during the course of chronic infections is of importance in relation to therapeutic intervention strategies, yet our understanding of these processes is limited. Here, we investigate intraclonal population diversity in P. aeruginosa during chronic...

  19. Correlated evolution of male and female reproductive traits drive a cascading effect of reinforcement in Drosophila yakuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeault, Aaron A; Venkat, Aarti; Matute, Daniel R

    2016-07-27

    Selection against maladaptive hybridization can drive the evolution of reproductive isolation in a process called reinforcement. While the importance of reinforcement in evolution has been historically debated, many examples now exist. Despite these examples, we typically lack a detailed understanding of the mechanisms limiting the spread of reinforced phenotypes throughout a species' range. Here we address this issue in the fruit fly Drosophila yakuba, a species that hybridizes with its sister species D. santomea and is undergoing reinforcement in a well-defined hybrid zone on the island of São Tomé. Within this region, female D. yakuba show increased postmating-prezygotic (gametic) isolation towards D. santomea when compared with females from allopatric populations. We use a combination of natural collections, fertility assays, and experimental evolution to understand why reinforced gametic isolation in D. yakuba is confined to this hybrid zone. We show that, among other traits, D. yakuba males from sympatric populations sire fewer progeny than allopatric males when mated to allopatric D. yakuba females. Our results provide a novel example of reinforcement acting on a postmating-prezygotic trait in males, resulting in a cascade of reproductive isolation among conspecific populations. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Competing feedbacks drive state transitions during initial catchment evolution: Examples from post-mining landscape and ecosystems evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Christoph; Wolfgang, Schaaf; Werner, Gerwin

    2014-05-01

    Within the context of severely disturbed landscapes with little or no ecological memory, such as post-mining landscapes, we propose a simple framework that explains the catchment evolution as a result of competing feedbacks influenced by the initial conditions and the atmospheric drivers such as rainfall intermittency and intensity. The first stage of the evolution is dominated by abiotic feedbacks triggered by rainfall and subsequent fluid flow causing particle mobilisation on the surface and in the subsurface leading to flow concentration or in some instances to densification of surface and subsurface substrates. Subsequently, abiotic-biotic feedbacks start to compete in the sense that biological activity generally stabilizes substrate by preventing particle mobilisation and hence contribute to converting the substrate to a habitat. We suggest that these competing feedbacks may generate alternative stable states in particular under semi-arid and arid climatic conditions, while in temperate often energy limited environments biological process "outcompete" abiotic processes leading to a stable state, in particular from the water balance point of view for comparable geomorphic situations. To illustrate this framework, we provide examples from post-mining landscapes, in which soil, water and vegetation was monitored. In case of arid regions in Australia, we provide evidence that the initial conditions of a mine waste disposal "locked" the system into a state that was limited by water and nutrient storage capacity while at the same time it was stable from a geomorphic point of view for the observation period. The cause of the system to be locked in, is the very high hydraulic conductivity of the substrate, that has not undergone any changes during the first years. In contrast to this case study, we illustrate how this framework explains the evolution of an artificial catchment (Hühnerwasser Catchment) in Lusatia (150 km southeast of Berlin, Germany). During the

  1. Medical school survival versus social responsibility: finances as a driving force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, E N

    1989-01-01

    Medical educators are an interesting group of people. They thrive on new knowledge. They get excited and enthusiastic, and readily adopt new ways when the evidence is sufficient. Yet, at the same time, they resist with great vehemence change in the way they do their business. Ask how often the curriculum structure is examined. Indeed, the function of most curriculum committees is to ensure that that does not happen. Ask how often the criteria for medical school admission are examined, especially with respect to the knowledge requirements. Ask how often the faculty discusses, or even examines, the expectations of society as they are expressed by alumni, legislators, or members of the public. Ask how often faculties try to determine strategies for dealing with all of these external forces. Are those strategies approached with the same degree of objectivity and data-gathering skills that would be used in examining new therapeutic regimens? Medical educators are talented, creative people. They have a very large appetite for information and great ambition to be as fine academicians as possible. It is those characteristics that have served them well, as students and as responsible academicians. Indeed, the great strength of medical education, in my view, is that medical schools take some very bright people called faculty and some very bright people called students, mix them together for four years, and graduate a group of very smart people who will then spend three years or more mixed up with some very bright and creative people. That is a strength that can-not lost. Will the future allow us to continue that in an equally effective manner?

  2. Stability of an anti-stroke peptide: driving forces and kinetics in chemical degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Wang, Fengzhen; Chen, Li; Zhu, Shuning; Wu, Lin; Jiang, Sunmin; Xu, Qunwei; Zhu, Dongya

    2014-09-10

    NR2B9c (Lys-Leu-Ser-Ser-Ile-Glu-Ser-Asp-Val) is a 9-amino acid peptide that has been illustrated to be a potential anti-stroke drug. For more effective treatment, suitable drug delivery systems should be developed. However, little is known about the stability of NR2B9c which is essential to its formulation. In this study, a reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was applied to study the forced degradation behavior and stability of NR2B9c. HPLC studies were performed with an C8 column using a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile (14.5:85.5, v/v) and aqueous solution (0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and 0.05 M KH2PO4). The flow rate and the wavelength set during HPLC detection were 1.0 mL/min and 205 nm, respectively. The degradation pattern of NR2B9c aqueous solution followed pseudo first-order kinetics. The degradation rate at pH 7.5 was the slowest according to the plotting V-shaped pH-rate profile. The influence of temperature on the rate of reactions was interpreted in terms of Arrhenius equation (r(2)>0.98). Thermodynamic parameters were calculated based on Eyring equation (r(2)>0.98). The concentrations of drug, buffer species, buffer concentrations, oxidation and organic solvents have noticeable effects on the degradation of NR2B9c while ultrasound shows little impact under the experimental conditions. In a word, this study may give a detailed description of stability of NR2B9c. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Morpho morphometrics: Shared ancestry and selection drive the evolution of wing size and shape in Morpho butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazot, Nicolas; Panara, Stephen; Zilbermann, Nicolas; Blandin, Patrick; Le Poul, Yann; Cornette, Raphaël; Elias, Marianne; Debat, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Butterfly wings harbor highly diverse phenotypes and are involved in many functions. Wing size and shape result from interactions between adaptive processes, phylogenetic history, and developmental constraints, which are complex to disentangle. Here, we focus on the genus Morpho (Nymphalidae: Satyrinae, 30 species), which presents a high diversity of sizes, shapes, and color patterns. First, we generate a comprehensive molecular phylogeny of these 30 species. Next, using 911 collection specimens, we quantify the variation of wing size and shape across species, to assess the importance of shared ancestry, microhabitat use, and sexual selection in the evolution of the wings. While accounting for phylogenetic and allometric effects, we detect a significant difference in wing shape but not size among microhabitats. Fore and hindwings covary at the individual and species levels, and the covariation differs among microhabitats. However, the microhabitat structure in covariation disappears when phylogenetic relationships are taken into account. Our results demonstrate that microhabitat has driven wing shape evolution, although it has not strongly affected forewing and hindwing integration. We also found that sexual dimorphism of forewing shape and color pattern are coupled, suggesting a common selective force. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  4. Entropy evolution of a damped harmonic oscillator driven by quasimonochromatic noise and external periodic force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jie; Ning, Lijuan

    2017-08-01

    This paper addresses the entropy evolution of a damped harmonic oscillator driven by quasimonochromatic noise (QMN). Due to QMN is distinct from white noise, so this paper studied the effect of QMN noise on the upper bound of time derivative of entropy for a damped harmonic oscillator. Through the comparison of probability density function (PDF) and the upper bound for the time derivative of entropy, we find that the entropy evolution is also a useful tool to describe the system dynamic behavior. Then we discuss the interplay of the parameters of QMN, damping constant, the frequency of oscillator and external periodic force and their effects on the upper bound for the rate of entropy change. Finally, some beneficial conclusions are obtained.

  5. Supply Chain Management as a Driving Force for Generating Competitive Advantage for Dairy Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Olegovna Poleshkina

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to uncover the reserves to generate competitive advantages for the participants of the market of perishables in the case of the dairy sector due to the formation of effective supply chains, as this category of goods is the most demanding in terms of periods and conditions of transportation and terms of preservation. The research technique is based on the concepts of value chains and supply chain management. In order to optimize the distribution of functions between the participants of the dairy chain a process-based approach has been applied. The research has revealed the main reasons for high aggregate costs and the places of their formation at each stage of the dairy supply chain. The article proposes the mechanisms to address three main problems arising from the process of building relations between the participants of the dairy supply chain in Russia. These problems are associated with a disproportionate margin distribution between the participants of the chain, with non-compliance of the quality of raw milk with the requirements for the production of specific types of dairy products, and with distrust of the supply chain participants, which increases transaction costs and forces to create reserve supplies which reduce the competitiveness of the whole dairy supply chain in general. In order to improve the competitiveness of all participants in the dairy chain, the article presents several mechanisms for solving these problems. The first is margin distribution based on the costs incurred by each participant of the dairy chain. The second is the use of a mathematical model to determine the assortment of goods of a dairy enterprise on the basis of the incoming volume and quality of raw milk according to the seasonal factor and the demand for dairy products. The third is the feasibility of refusal from the formation of reserve supplies by all participants of the dairy chain, which will not only minimize aggregate costs, but also

  6. MHD Forces in Quasi-Static Evolution, Catastrophe, and ``Failed'' Eruption of Solar Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, James

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the first unified theoretical model of flux rope dynamics---a single set of flux-rope equations in ideal MHD---to describe as one dynamical process the quasi-static evolution, catastrophic transition to eruption, cessation (``failure'') of eruption, and the post-eruption quasi-equilibria. The model is defined by the major radial {\\it and} minor radial equations of motion including pressure. The initial equilibrium is a flux rope in a background plasma with pressure $p_c(Z)$ and an overlying magnetic field $B_c(Z)$. The flux rope is initially force-free, but theevolution is not required to be force- free. A single quasi-static control parameter, the rate of increase in poloidal flux, is used for the entire process. As this parameter is slowly increased, the flux rope rises, following a sequence of quasi-static equilibria. As the apex of the flux rope rises past a critical height $Z_{crt}$, it expands on a dynamical (Alfvénic) timescale. The eruption rapidly ceases, as the stored magnetic energy of eruption is exhausted, and a new equilibrium is established at height $Z_1 > Z_{crt}$. The calculated velocity profile resembles the observed velocity profiles in ``failed'' eruptions including a damped oscillation. In the post-eruption equilibria, the outward hoop force is balanced by the tension of the toroidal self magnetic field and pressure gradient force. Thus, the flux rope does not evolve in a force-free manner. The flux rope may also expand without reaching a new equilibrium, provided a sufficient amount of poloidal flux is injected on the timescale of eruption. This scenario results in a full CME eruption. It is shown that the minor radial expansion critically couples the evolution of the toroidal self-field and pressure gradient force. No parameter regime is found in which the commonly used simplifications---near-equilibrium minor radial expansion, force-free expansion, and constant aspect ratio $R/a$ (e.g., the torus instability equation

  7. How does oxygen rise drive evolution? Clues from oxygen-dependent biosynthesis of nuclear receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ying-Ying; Kong, De-Xin; Qin, Tao; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2010-01-08

    It is well known that oxygen rise greatly facilitated biological evolution. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Recently, Raymond and Segrè revealed that molecular oxygen allows 1000 more metabolic reactions than can occur in anoxic conditions. From the novel metabolites produced in aerobic metabolism, we serendipitously found that some of the metabolites are signaling molecules that target nuclear receptors. Since nuclear signaling systems are indispensable to superior organisms, we speculated that aerobic metabolism may facilitate biological evolution through promoting the establishment of nuclear signaling systems. This hypothesis is validated by the observation that most (97.5%) nuclear receptor ligands are produced by aerobic metabolism, which is further explained in terms of the chemical criteria (appropriate volume and rather high hydrophobicity) of nuclear receptor ligands that aerobic metabolites are more ready than anaerobic counterparts to satisfy these criteria. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Did shifting seawater sulfate concentrations drive the evolution of deep-sea methane-seep ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Steffen

    2015-04-07

    The origin and evolution of the faunas inhabiting deep-sea hydrothermal vents and methane seeps have been debated for decades. These faunas rely on a local source of sulfide and other reduced chemicals for nutrition, which spawned the hypothesis that their evolutionary history is independent from that of photosynthesis-based food chains and instead driven by extinction events caused by deep-sea anoxia. Here I use the fossil record of seep molluscs to show that trends in body size, relative abundance and epifaunal/infaunal ratios track current estimates of seawater sulfate concentrations through the last 150 Myr. Furthermore, the two main faunal turnovers during this time interval coincide with major changes in seawater sulfate concentrations. Because sulfide at seeps originates mostly from seawater sulfate, variations in sulfate concentrations should directly affect the base of the food chain of this ecosystem and are thus the likely driver of the observed macroecologic and evolutionary patterns. The results imply that the methane-seep fauna evolved largely independently from developments and mass extinctions affecting the photosynthesis-based biosphere and add to the growing body of evidence that the chemical evolution of the oceans had a major impact on the evolution of marine life. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. The Rarity of Survival to Old Age Does Not Drive the Evolution of Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensink, Maarten J; Caswell, Hal; Baudisch, Annette

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of senescence is often explained by arguing that, in nature, few individuals survive to be old and hence it is evolutionarily unimportant what happens to organisms when they are old. A corollary to this idea is that extrinsically imposed mortality, because it reduces the chance of surviving to be old, favors the evolution of senescence. We show that these ideas, although widespread, are incorrect. Selection leading to senescence does not depend directly on survival to old age, but on the shape of the stable age distribution, and we discuss the implications of this important distinction. We show that the selection gradient on mortality declines with age even in the hypothetical case of zero mortality, when survivorship does not decline. Changing the survivorship function by imposing age independent mortality has no affect on the selection gradients. A similar result exists for optimization models: age independent mortality does not change the optimal result. We propose an alternative, brief explanation for the decline of selection gradients, and hence the evolution of senescence.

  10. Terminal reassortment drives the quantum evolution of type III effectors in bacterial pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Stavrinides

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Many bacterial pathogens employ a type III secretion system to deliver type III secreted effectors (T3SEs into host cells, where they interact directly with host substrates to modulate defense pathways and promote disease. This interaction creates intense selective pressures on these secreted effectors, necessitating rapid evolution to overcome host surveillance systems and defenses. Using computational and evolutionary approaches, we have identified numerous mosaic and truncated T3SEs among animal and plant pathogens. We propose that these secreted virulence genes have evolved through a shuffling process we have called "terminal reassortment." In terminal reassortment, existing T3SE termini are mobilized within the genome, creating random genetic fusions that result in chimeric genes. Up to 32% of T3SE families in species with relatively large and well-characterized T3SE repertoires show evidence of terminal reassortment, as compared to only 7% of non-T3SE families. Terminal reassortment may permit the near instantaneous evolution of new T3SEs and appears responsible for major modifications to effector activity and function. Because this process plays a more significant role in the evolution of T3SEs than non-effectors, it provides insight into the evolutionary origins of T3SEs and may also help explain the rapid emergence of new infectious agents.

  11. Multi Satellites Monitoring of Land Use/Cover Change and Its Driving Forces in Kashgar Region, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimaitiaili, Ayisulitan; Aji, xiaokaiti; Kondoh, Akihiko

    2016-04-01

    Multi Satellites Monitoring of Land Use/Cover Change and Its Driving Forces in Kashgar Region, China Ayisulitan Maimaitiaili1, Xiaokaiti Aji2 Akihiko Kondoh2 1Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, Japan 2Center for Environmental Remote Sensing, Chiba University The spatio-temporal changes of Land Use/Cover (LUCC) and its driving forces in Kashgar region, Xinjiang Province, China, are investigated by using satellite remote sensing and a geographical information system (GIS). Main goal of this paper is to quantify the drivers of LUCC. First, considering lack of the Land Cover (LC) map in whole study area, we produced LC map by using Landsat images. Land use information from Landsat data was collected using maximum likelihood classification method. Land use change was studied based on the change detection method of land use types. Second, because the snow provides a key water resources for stream flow, agricultural production and drinking water for sustaining large population in Kashgar region, snow cover are estimated by Spot Vegetation data. Normalized Difference Snow Index (NDSI) algorithm are applied to make snow cover map, which is used to screen the LUCC and climate change. The best agreement is found with threshold value of NDSI≥0.2 to generate multi-temporal snow cover and snowmelt maps. Third, driving forces are systematically identified by LC maps and statistical data such as climate and socio-economic data, regarding to i) the climate changes and ii) socioeconomic development that the spatial correlation among LUCC, snow cover change, climate and socioeconomic changes are quantified by using liner regression model and negative / positive trend analysis. Our results showed that water bodies, bare land and grass land have decreasing notably. By contrast, crop land and urban area have continually increasing significantly, which are dominated in study area. The area of snow/ice have fluctuated and has strong seasonal trends, total annual snow cover

  12. Study on Law of Groundwater Evolution under Natural and Artificial Forcing with Case study of Haihe River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jinjun; Gan, Hong; Wang, Lin; Bi, Xue; Du, Sisi

    2010-05-01

    The evolution of groundwater is one of the key problems of water cycle study. It is a result of joint effect of natural condition and human activities, but until now the driving forces of groundwater system evolution were not fully understood due to the complexity of groundwater system structures and the uncertainty of affecting factors. Geology, precipitation and human activity are the main factors affecting the groundwater system evolution and interact each other, but the influence of such three factors on groundwater system are not clarified clearly on a macroscopic scale. The precipitation changes the volume of water recharge and the groundwater pumping effect the discharge of groundwater. Another important factor influencing balance of groundwater storage is the underlaying that affects the renewablility of groundwater. The underlaying is decided mainly by geological attributes but also influenced by human activited. The macroscopic environment of groundwater evolves under the natural and anthropic factors. This paper study the general law of groundwater evolution among the factors based on the case study in Haihe River Basin, a typical area with dramatic groundwater change under natural precipitation attenuation and gradually increase of water suuply. Haihe River Basin is located in north-China, covers an area of 320,041 km2 with over 40% plain areas. The plain area of Haihe Basin is densely populated with many large and medium-sized cities, including metropolis of Beijing and Tianjin, and concentrated irrigated areas, playing important roles in China's economy and food production. It is the unique basin where groundwater occupies majority of total water supply in China. Long-term groundwater over-exploitation causes a series of ecological and environmental problems that threats the sustainable development. In this paper, the historical process of groundwater balance in Haihe Basin is divided into three phases by decrease of rainfall and increase of water

  13. Land use/cover changes in European mountain areas: identifying links between global driving forces and local consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, Žiga; Schröter, Dagmar; Glade, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Minor land use/cover changes in mountain areas can aggravate the consequences of hydro-meteorological hazards such as landslides, avalanches, rockfall and flash floods. What is more, they change the provisioning of ecosystem services; also as their recovery after anthropogenic induced changes in mountains are slower or not occurring at all due to harsh climate and soil conditions. Examples of these changes are urbanization in high risk areas or deforestation on slopes. To understand the driving forces behind land use/cover changes in European mountain areas, the focus is on the two case study areas: The Val Canale valley in the Italian Alps and the Buzau valley in the Romanian Carpathians. Land use/cover changes were analyzed in the recent decades applying various remote sensing techniques, such as satellite imagery classification and visual interpretation, as well as integration of various databases (e.g. forestry, spatial planning and cadaster plans). Instead of identifying the statistical significance of particular variables (e.g. population change), the links between different driving forces of global change (e.g. political and policy changes, infrastructural plans) and local socio-economic variables were investigated further through interviewing local and regional stakeholders. The results show how both areas differ in the consequences of global changes in terms of land use/cover change. The Italian area witnessed a trajectory from a commercially active and competitive area, to an area with a large portion of abandoned commercial, customs, industrial and mining zones. These processes were accompanied by the expansion of settlements comprised mostly of secondary housing on areas with high risk, resulting in catastrophic consequences in recent flash floods and debris flows events. The Romanian site also witnessed a breakdown of local commercial and industrial activities. Together with land ownership reforms, this has resulted in the emergence of subsistence

  14. Multi Satellites Monitoring of Land Use/Cover Change and Its Driving Forces in Kashgar Region, Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimaitiaili, A.

    2016-12-01

    The spatio-temporal changes of Land Use/Cover (LUCC) and its driving forces in Kashgar region, central Asia, are investigated by using satellite remote sensing and a GIS thechnics. Main goal of this paper is to quantify the drivers of LUCC. First, considering lack of the Land Cover (LC) map in study area, we produced LC map by using Landsat images. Land use information from Landsat data was collected using maximum likelihood classification method. Second, because the snow provides a key water resources for the study area, snow cover are estimated by Spot Vegetation data. Normalized Difference Snow Index algorithm are applied to make snow cover map, which is used to screen the LUCC and climate change. Third, driving forces are systematically identified by LC maps and statistical data, regarding to the climate changes and socioeconomic development that the spatial correlation among LUCC, snow cover change, climate and socioeconomic changes are quantified by using liner regression model. Our results showed that water bodies, bare land and grass land have decreasing notably. By contrast, crop land and urban area have continually increasing. The area of snow/ice have fluctuated, total annual snow cover has two peaks in 2005 and 2009. With increasing population, crop land reclamation from 6031.4 km2 in 1972 to 16549km2 in 2014 at the study area. Water resources consumption increased with support to large population and irrigate whole crop land area, caused the water shortages that the surface water bodies decreased from 2531.43km2 in the 1972s to 1067.05km2 in the 2014. The results also suggested high linearity between the LUCC and socioeconomic changes that specific land cover change be cause of the fact that socioeconomic development. In the recent 42 years, average annual temperature have been increasing, although, precipitation have increased but partly weaken effect of the rising temperature, in addition snow cover more sensitive to precipitation than temperature

  15. Evolution of phase structure and giant strain at low driving fields in Bi-based lead-free incipient piezoelectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maqbool, Adnan; Hussain, Ali; Malik, Rizwan Ahmed; Rahman, Jamil Ur [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Changwon National University, Gyeongnam 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Zaman, Arif [Department of Physics, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan, KPK (Pakistan); Song, Tae Kwon [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Changwon National University, Gyeongnam 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won-Jeong [Department of Physics, Changwon National University, Gyeongnam 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myong-Ho, E-mail: mhkim@changwon.ac.kr [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Changwon National University, Gyeongnam 641-773 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nb-doped BNBT–SZ ceramics were prepared by conventional solid state method. • A giant normalized strain of 825 pm/V at 4 kV/mm was achieved. • A large strain of 0.20% triggered at a relatively low field of 3 kV/mm. • Highest strain obtained in BNT-based ceramics at such a low driving field. • Ferroelectric to ergodic-relaxor phase transition occurred with Nb-doping. - Abstract: Lead-free 0.99[(Bi{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5}){sub 0.935}Ba{sub 0.065}Ti{sub (1–x)}Nb{sub x}O{sub 3}]–0.01SrZrO{sub 3} (BNBTNb100x–SZ, with Nb100x = 0–1) ceramics were prepared by the conventional mixed oxide route. X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering was utilized for the structural evolution of Nb-modified BNBT–SZ ceramics at average and short-scale localized structure. Temperature dependent dielectric properties showed ferroelectric–ergodic relaxor (FE–ER) transition in Nb-modified BNBT–SZ ceramics by producing a significant disruption of the long-range FE order. A giant normalized strain of 825 pm/V at 4 kV/mm was achieved at Nb1.0. Interestingly, at a relatively low applied field of 3 kV/mm, the Nb0.75 sample displayed a large electric field-induced strain (EFIS) response of 0.20%, which is highest value obtained in non-textured lead-free BNT-based ceramics at such low driving field. The structural distortion induced by doping and electric poling is correlated with the dielectric, ferroelectric and EFIS response, and the evolution of giant strain was ascribed to reversible field induced phase transition from ER–FE phase.

  16. Eco-Evolutionary Trophic Dynamics: Loss of Top Predators Drives Trophic Evolution and Ecology of Prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palkovacs, Eric P.; Wasserman, Ben A.; Kinnison, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    Ecosystems are being altered on a global scale by the extirpation of top predators. The ecological effects of predator removal have been investigated widely; however, predator removal can also change natural selection acting on prey, resulting in contemporary evolution. Here we tested the role of predator removal on the contemporary evolution of trophic traits in prey. We utilized a historical introduction experiment where Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata) were relocated from a site with predatory fishes to a site lacking predators. To assess the trophic consequences of predator release, we linked individual morphology (cranial, jaw, and body) to foraging performance. Our results show that predator release caused an increase in guppy density and a “sharpening” of guppy trophic traits, which enhanced food consumption rates. Predator release appears to have shifted natural selection away from predator escape ability and towards resource acquisition ability. Related diet and mesocosm studies suggest that this shift enhances the impact of guppies on lower trophic levels in a fashion nuanced by the omnivorous feeding ecology of the species. We conclude that extirpation of top predators may commonly select for enhanced feeding performance in prey, with important cascading consequences for communities and ecosystems. PMID:21526156

  17. Coastal saltmarsh managed realignment drives rapid breach inlet and external creek evolution, Freiston Shore (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friess, Daniel A.; Möller, Iris; Spencer, Thomas; Smith, Geoffrey M.; Thomson, Andrew G.; Hill, Ross A.

    2014-03-01

    The creation of saltmarsh through the managed realignment of sea defences, implemented in NW Europe as a sustainable coastal defence option, represents a substantial hydrodynamic perturbation to the local coastal system. The impact of a significantly increased tidal prism on hydromorphological features was investigated at Freiston Shore, Lincolnshire UK. Local tidal conditions and inadequate drainage at this realignment trial contributed to significant channel erosion due to the establishment of water surface slopes and pooling between the newly realigned site and the adjacent intertidal zone. Very high spatial resolution aerial photography and blimp photography were used to monitor inlet evolution from breaching in August 2002 to March 2008, showing a highly non-linear response with breach channels increasing in width by up to 960% within 2.5 months. Airborne laser scanning/LiDAR and terrestrial laser scanning quantified breach channel volume increases, showing a similar pattern. Breach channel evolution did not follow established tidal prism-channel width/cross-sectional area relationships that are often used to guide realignment design. Pre- and post-breach rates of external creek morphology change between 1999 and 2006 were also quantified, with intertidal creeks attached to the breach channels increasing significantly after realignment in both width and depth. This study highlights the physical processes affected by managed realignment, and the importance of understanding the causes of complex water surface slopes at multiple scales.

  18. Herbivore exclusion drives the evolution of plant competitiveness via increased allelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesugi, Akane; Kessler, André

    2013-05-01

    The 'Evolution of Increased Competitive Ability (EICA)' hypothesis predicts the evolution of plant invasiveness in introduced ranges when plants escape from their natural enemies. So far, the EICA hypothesis has been tested by comparing plant vigor from native and invasive populations, but these studies are confounded by among-population differences in additional environmental factors and/or founder effects. We tested the major prediction of EICA by comparing the competitive ability (CA) of Solidago altissima plants originating from artificial selection plots in which we manipulated directly the exposure to above-ground herbivores. In a common garden experiment, we found an increase in inter-specific, but not intra-specific, CA in clones from herbivore exclusion plots relative to control plots. The evolutionary increase in inter-specific CA coincided with the increased production of polyacetylenes, whose major constituent was allelopathic against a heterospecific competitor, Poa pratensis, but not against conspecifics. Our results provide direct evidence that release from herbivory alone can lead to an evolutionary increase in inter-specific CA, which is likely to be mediated by the increased production of allelopathic compounds in S. altissima. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. Eco-evolutionary trophic dynamics: loss of top predators drives trophic evolution and ecology of prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palkovacs, Eric P; Wasserman, Ben A; Kinnison, Michael T

    2011-04-19

    Ecosystems are being altered on a global scale by the extirpation of top predators. The ecological effects of predator removal have been investigated widely; however, predator removal can also change natural selection acting on prey, resulting in contemporary evolution. Here we tested the role of predator removal on the contemporary evolution of trophic traits in prey. We utilized a historical introduction experiment where Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata) were relocated from a site with predatory fishes to a site lacking predators. To assess the trophic consequences of predator release, we linked individual morphology (cranial, jaw, and body) to foraging performance. Our results show that predator release caused an increase in guppy density and a "sharpening" of guppy trophic traits, which enhanced food consumption rates. Predator release appears to have shifted natural selection away from predator escape ability and towards resource acquisition ability. Related diet and mesocosm studies suggest that this shift enhances the impact of guppies on lower trophic levels in a fashion nuanced by the omnivorous feeding ecology of the species. We conclude that extirpation of top predators may commonly select for enhanced feeding performance in prey, with important cascading consequences for communities and ecosystems.

  20. Colonisation of toxic environments drives predictable life-history evolution in livebearing fishes (Poeciliidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, Rüdiger; Plath, Martin; Schlupp, Ingo; Tobler, Michael; Brian Langerhans, R

    2014-01-01

    New World livebearing fishes (family Poeciliidae) have repeatedly colonised toxic, hydrogen sulphide-rich waters across their natural distribution. Physiological considerations and life-history theory predict that these adverse conditions should favour the evolution of larger offspring. Here, we examined nine poeciliid species that independently colonised toxic environments, and show that these fishes have indeed repeatedly evolved much larger offspring size at birth in sulphidic waters, thus uncovering a widespread pattern of predictable evolution. However, a second pattern, only indirectly predicted by theory, proved additionally common: a reduction in the number of offspring carried per clutch (i.e. lower fecundity). Our analyses reveal that this secondary pattern represents a mere consequence of a classic life-history trade-off combined with strong selection on offspring size alone. With such strong natural selection in extreme environments, extremophile organisms may commonly exhibit multivariate phenotypic shifts even though not all diverging traits necessarily represent adaptations to the extreme conditions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  1. Eco-evolutionary trophic dynamics: loss of top predators drives trophic evolution and ecology of prey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric P Palkovacs

    Full Text Available Ecosystems are being altered on a global scale by the extirpation of top predators. The ecological effects of predator removal have been investigated widely; however, predator removal can also change natural selection acting on prey, resulting in contemporary evolution. Here we tested the role of predator removal on the contemporary evolution of trophic traits in prey. We utilized a historical introduction experiment where Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata were relocated from a site with predatory fishes to a site lacking predators. To assess the trophic consequences of predator release, we linked individual morphology (cranial, jaw, and body to foraging performance. Our results show that predator release caused an increase in guppy density and a "sharpening" of guppy trophic traits, which enhanced food consumption rates. Predator release appears to have shifted natural selection away from predator escape ability and towards resource acquisition ability. Related diet and mesocosm studies suggest that this shift enhances the impact of guppies on lower trophic levels in a fashion nuanced by the omnivorous feeding ecology of the species. We conclude that extirpation of top predators may commonly select for enhanced feeding performance in prey, with important cascading consequences for communities and ecosystems.

  2. Invasion of Nostocales (cyanobacteria to subtropical and temperate freshwater lakes – Physiological, regional and global driving forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaf eSukenik

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Similarly to the increased number of studies on invasive plants and animals in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, many reports were recently published on the invasion of Nostocales (cyanobacteria to freshwater environments worldwide. Invasion and proliferation of Nostocales in new habitats have the potential to significantly alter the structure of native community and to modify ecosystem functioning. But most importantly, they influence the water quality due to a variety of toxic compounds that some species produce. Therefore a special attention was given to the invasion and persistence of toxic cyanobacteria in many aquatic ecosystems. Here we summarize the currently published records on the invasion of two Nostocales genera, Cylindrospermopsis and Aphanizomenon, to lakes and water reservoirs in subtropical and temperate zones. These invading species possess traits thought to be common to many invasive organisms: high growth rate, high resource utilization efficiency and overall superior competitive abilities over native species when local conditions vary. Assuming that dispersion routes of cyanobacteria have not been changed much in recent decades, their recent establishment and proliferation in new habitats indicate changes in the environment under which they can exploit their physiological advantage over the native phytoplankton population. In many cases global warming was identified as the major driving force for the invasion of Nostocales. Due to this uncontrollable trend, invasive Nostocales species are expected to maintain their presence in new habitats and further expand to new environments. In other cases regional changes in nutrient loads and in biotic conditions were attributed to the invasion events

  3. Is personality a driving force for socioeconomic differences in young adults' health care use? A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Maren; Arts, Koos; Traag, Tanja; Otten, Ferdy; Bosma, Hans

    2017-09-01

    To relate personality characteristics at the age of 12 to socioeconomic differences in health care use in young adulthood. And thereby examining the extent to which socioeconomic differences in the use of health care in young adulthood are based on differences in personality characteristics, independent of the (parental) socioeconomic background. Personality of more than 13,000 Dutch 12-year old participants was related to their health and socioeconomic position after a follow-up of 13 years (when the participants had become young adults). In young adulthood, low socioeconomic status was related to high health care use (e.g. low education -hospital admission: OR = 2.21; low income -GP costs: OR = 1.25). Odds ratios (for the socioeconomic health differences) did not decrease when controlled for personality. In this Dutch sample of younger people, personality appeared not to be a driving force for socioeconomic differences in health care use. Findings thus do not support the personality-related, indirect selection perspective on the explanation of socioeconomic differences in health.

  4. Spatiotemporal Pattern and Driving Forces of Arable Land-Use Intensity in China: Toward Sustainable Land Management Using Emergy Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hualin Xie

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The level of arable land-use intensity has important impacts on food security and rural sustainable development. Using the emergy method, we investigate the spatial disparities and driving forces of arable land-use intensity in China from 1999 to 2008 at the national, regional and provincial levels. The empirical results show that chemical fertilizer was the largest component of agricultural inputs and that agricultural diesel oil recorded the highest growth rate. The degree of heterogeneities in arable land-use intensity in China showed a decreasing trend, which resulted mainly from the differences among the eastern, northeastern, central and western regions. The regional disparities in labor, pesticides and plastic sheeting decreased from 1999 to 2008. The per capita annual net incomes of household operations and the agricultural policies had a significant positive correlation with total inputs, fertilizer inputs, pesticide inputs and agricultural plastic sheeting. In addition, the nonagricultural population had a greater impact on agricultural plastic sheeting. Finally, we suggest that there is an urgent need to focus on the effects of chemical fertilizer and pesticide inputs on the ecological environment. Agricultural support policies should be introduced for the poor agricultural production provinces.

  5. The effect of driving force on intramolecular electron transfer in proteins. Studies on single-site mutated azurins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Skov, L K; van de Kamp, M

    1992-01-01

    these substitutions are not in the microenvironment separating the electron donor and acceptor, they were expected to affect the LRET rate because of their effect on the redox potential of the copper site and thus on the driving force of the reaction, as well as on the reorganization energies of the copper site....... The rate of intramolecular electron transfer from RSSR- to Cu(II) in the wild-type P. aeruginosa azurin (delta G degrees = -68.9 kJ/mol) has previously been determined to be 44 +/- 7 s-1 at 298 K, pH 7.0. The [M44K]azurin mutant (delta G degrees = -75.3 kJ/mol) was now found to react considerably faster (k...... = 134 +/- 12 s-1 at 298 K, pH 7.0) while the [H35Q]azurin mutant (delta G degrees = -65.4 kJ/mol) exhibits, within experimental error, the same specific rate (k = 52 +/- 11 s-1, 298 K, pH 7.0) as that of the wild-type azurin. From the temperature dependence of these LRET rates the following activation...

  6. The Driving Forces for the Practice of Strategic Planning in SMEs: Evidence from Harare Metropolitan Province, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell Sandada

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite Zimbabwe sharing with the rest of the world, the notion that SMEs are the impeccable engines to economic revival, growth and development, many of the nation`s SMEs are plagued with high failure rates. Previous studies carried out in most foreign countries suggested that the high failure rate of SMEs was attributable to lack of strategic planning among a host of other factors. Against this backdrop, the purpose of this study was to examine the driving forces for the practice of strategic planning in SMEs. A quantitative cross sectional study was conducted among active SMEs who are registered with the Ministry of Small and Medium Enterprises and Cooperative Development in Zimbabwe. The study revealed that globalisation, business ownership motivations, environmental dynamism and innovation & technological advancement have a positive and statistically significant influence on the adoption or practice of strategic planning among SMEs. The study has important implications for the practice and implementation of strategic planning among SMEs especially in the context of a developing country such as Zimbabwe.

  7. The hydrophobic effect revisited--studies with supramolecular complexes imply high-energy water as a noncovalent driving force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Frank; Nau, Werner M; Schneider, Hans-Jörg

    2014-10-13

    Traditional descriptions of the hydrophobic effect on the basis of entropic arguments or the calculation of solvent-occupied surfaces must be questioned in view of new results obtained with supramolecular complexes. In these studies, it was possible to separate hydrophobic from dispersive interactions, which are strongest in aqueous systems. Even very hydrophobic alkanes associate significantly only in cavities containing water molecules with an insufficient number of possible hydrogen bonds. The replacement of high-energy water in cavities by guest molecules is the essential enthalpic driving force for complexation, as borne out by data for complexes of cyclodextrins, cyclophanes, and cucurbiturils, for which complexation enthalpies of up to -100 kJ mol(-1) were reached for encapsulated alkyl residues. Water-box simulations were used to characterize the different contributions from high-energy water and enabled the calculation of the association free enthalpies for selected cucurbituril complexes to within a 10% deviation from experimental values. Cavities in artificial receptors are more apt to show the enthalpic effect of high-energy water than those in proteins or nucleic acids, because they bear fewer or no functional groups in the inner cavity to stabilize interior water molecules. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. From inflation to recent cosmic acceleration: the fermionic Elko field driving the evolution of the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, S. H.; Guimarães, T. M.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we construct the complete evolution of the universe driven by the mass dimension one dark spinor called Elko, starting with inflation, passing by the matter dominated era and finishing with the recent accelerated expansion. The dynamic of the fermionic Elko field with a symmetry breaking type potential can reproduce all phases of the universe in a natural and elegant way. The dynamical equations in general case and slow roll conditions in the limit Hll mpl are also presented for the Elko system. Numerical analysis for the number of e-foldings during inflation, energy density after inflation and for present time and also the actual size of the universe are in good agreement with the standard model of cosmology. An interpretation of the inflationary phase as a result of Pauli exclusion principle is also possible if the Elko field is treated as an average value of its quantum analogue.

  9. Adaptive tolerance to a pathogenic fungus drives major histocompatibility complex evolution in natural amphibian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Anna E; Zamudio, Kelly R

    2016-03-30

    Amphibians have been affected globally by the disease chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), and we are just now beginning to understand how immunogenetic variability contributes to disease susceptibility. Lineages of an expressed major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II locus involved in acquired immunity are associated with chytridiomycosis susceptibility in controlled laboratory challenge assays. Here, we extend these findings to natural populations that vary both in exposure and response to Bd We find that MHC alleles and supertypes associated with Bd survival in the field show a molecular signal of positive selection, while those associated with susceptibility do not, supporting the hypothesis that heritable Bd tolerance is rapidly evolving. We compare MHC supertypes to neutral loci to demonstrate where selection versus demography is shaping MHC variability. One population with Bd tolerance in nature shows a significant signal of directional selection for the same allele (allele Q) that was significantly associated with survival in an earlier laboratory study. Our findings indicate that selective pressure for Bd survival drives rapid immunogenetic adaptation in some natural populations, despite differences in environment and demography. Our field-based analysis of immunogenetic variation confirms that natural amphibian populations have the evolutionary potential to adapt to chytridiomycosis. © 2016 The Authors.

  10. Interactions between topographically and thermally forced stationary waves: implications for ice-sheet evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Liakka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines mutual interactions between stationary waves and ice sheets using a dry atmospheric primitive-equation model coupled to a three-dimensional thermomechanical ice-sheet model. The emphasis is on how non-linear interactions between thermal and topographical forcing of the stationary waves influence the ice-sheet evolution by changing the ablation. Simulations are conducted in which a small ice cap, on an idealised Northern Hemisphere continent, evolves to an equilibrium continental-scale ice sheet. In the absence of stationary waves, the equilibrium ice sheet arrives at symmetric shape with a zonal equatorward margin. In isolation, the topographically induced stationary waves have essentially no impact on the equilibrium features of the ice sheet. The reason is that the temperature anomalies are located far from the equatorward ice margin. When forcing due to thermal cooling is added to the topographical forcing, thermally induced perturbation winds amplify the topographically induced stationary-wave response, which that serves to increase both the equatorward extent and the volume of the ice sheet. Roughly, a 10% increase in the ice volume is reported here. Hence, the present study suggests that the topographically induced stationary-wave response can be substantially enhanced by the high albedo of ice sheets.

  11. Positive Selection Drives Rapid Evolution of the meq Oncogene of Marek's Disease Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abinash Padhi

    Full Text Available Marek's disease (MD, caused by Marek's disease virus (MDV, a poultry-borne alphaherpesvirus, is a devastating disease of poultry causing an estimated annual loss of one billion dollars to poultry producers, worldwide. Despite decades of control through vaccination, MDV field strains continue to emerge having increased virulence. The evolutionary mechanism driving the emergence of this continuum of strains to increased MDV virulence, however, remains largely enigmatic. Increase in MDV virulence has been associated with specific amino acid changes within the C-terminus domain of Mareks's EcoRI-Q (meq-encoded oncoprotein. In this study, we sought to determine whether the meq gene has evolved adaptively and whether past vaccination efforts have had any significant effect on the reduction or increase of MDV diversity over time. Our analysis suggests that meq is estimated to be evolving at a much faster rate than most dsDNA viruses, and is comparable with the evolutionary rate of RNA viruses. Interestingly, most of the polymorphisms in meq gene appear to have evolved under positive selection and the time of divergence at the meq locus coincides with the period during which the poultry industry had undergone transitions in management practices including the introduction and widespread use of live attenuated vaccines. Our study has revealed that the decades-long use of vaccines did not reduce MDV diversity, but rather had a stimulating effect on the emergence of field strains with increased genetic diversity until the early 2000s. During the years 2004-2005, there was an abrupt decline in the genetic diversity of field isolates followed by a recovery from this bottleneck in the year 2010. Collectively, these data suggest that vaccination seems to not have had any effect on MDV eradication, but rather had a stimulating effect on MDV emergence through adaptation.

  12. Land use change and its driving forces toward mutual conversion in Zhangjiakou City, a farming-pastoral ecotone in Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Xu, Yueqing; Sun, Piling; Huang, An; Zheng, Weiran

    2017-09-14

    Land use/cover change (LUCC), a local environmental issue of global importance, and its driving forces have been crucial issues in geography and environmental research. Previous studies primarily focused on major driving factors in various land use types, with few explorations of differences between driving forces of mutual land use type conversions, especially in fragile eco-environments. In this study, Zhangjiakou City, in a farming-pastoral ecotone in Northern China, was taken as an example to analyze land use change between 1989 and 2015, and explore the driving forces of mutual land use type conversions using canonical correlation analysis. Satellite images and government statistics, including social-economic and natural data, were used as sources. Arable land, forestland, and grassland formed the main land use structure. From 1989 to 2015 forestland, orchard land, and construction land significantly increased, while arable land, grassland, unused land, and water areas decreased. Conversions from grassland to forestland; from arable land to orchard land, forestland and construction land; and from unused land to grassland and forestland were the primary land use changes. Among these, the conversion from grassland to forestland had the highest ranking. Average annual precipitation and per capita net income of rural residents positively affected the conversion of arable land to forestland and unused land to grassland. GDP, total population, and urbanization rate contributed most significantly to converting arable land to construction land; total retail sales of social consumer goods, average annual temperature, and GDP had important positive influences in converting arable land to orchard land.

  13. Adaptation through genetic time travel? Fluctuating selection can drive the evolution of bacterial transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelstädter, Jan; Moradigaravand, Danesh

    2014-01-22

    Natural transformation is a process whereby bacteria actively take up DNA from the surrounding environment and incorporate it into their genome. Natural transformation is widespread in bacteria, but its evolutionary significance is still debated. Here, we hypothesize that transformation may confer a fitness advantage in changing environments through a process we term 'genetic time travel': by taking up old genes that were retained in the environment, the bacteria may revert to a past genotypic state that proves advantageous in the present or a future environment. We scrutinize our hypothesis by means of a mathematical model involving two bacterial types (transforming and non-transforming), a single locus under natural selection and a free DNA pool. The two bacterial types were competed in environments with changing selection regimes. We demonstrate that for a wide range of parameter values for the DNA turnover rate, the transformation rate and the frequency of environmental change, the transforming type outcompetes the non-transforming type. We discuss the empirical plausibility of our hypothesis, as well as its relationship to other hypotheses for the evolution of transformation in bacteria and sex more generally, speculating that 'genetic time travel' may also be relevant in eukaryotes that undergo horizontal gene transfer.

  14. Post-translocational adaptation drives evolution through genetic selection and transcriptional shift in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosato, Valentina; Sims, Jason; West, Nicole; Colombin, Martina; Bruschi, Carlo V

    2017-05-01

    Adaptation by natural selection might improve the fitness of an organism and its probability to survive in unfavorable environmental conditions. Decoding the genetic basis of adaptive evolution is one of the great challenges to deal with. To this purpose, Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been largely investigated because of its short division time, excellent aneuploidy tolerance and the availability of the complete sequence of its genome with a thorough genome database. In the past, we developed a system, named bridge-induced translocation, to trigger specific, non-reciprocal translocations, exploiting the endogenous recombination system of budding yeast. This technique allows users to generate a heterogeneous population of cells with different aneuploidies and increased phenotypic variation. In this work, we demonstrate that ad hoc chromosomal translocations might induce adaptation, fostering selection of thermo-tolerant yeast strains with improved phenotypic fitness. This "yeast eugenomics" correlates with a shift to enhanced expression of genes involved in stress response, heat shock as well as carbohydrate metabolism. We propose that the bridge-induced translocation is a suitable approach to generate adapted, physiologically boosted strains for biotechnological applications.

  15. Both selective and neutral processes drive GC content evolution in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzoli, Uberto; Menozzi, Giorgia; Fumagalli, Matteo; Cereda, Matteo; Comi, Giacomo P; Cagliani, Rachele; Bresolin, Nereo; Sironi, Manuela

    2008-03-27

    Mammalian genomes consist of regions differing in GC content, referred to as isochores or GC-content domains. The scientific debate is still open as to whether such compositional heterogeneity is a selected or neutral trait. Here we analyze SNP allele frequencies, retrotransposon insertion polymorphisms (RIPs), as well as fixed substitutions accumulated in the human lineage since its divergence from chimpanzee to indicate that biased gene conversion (BGC) has been playing a role in within-genome GC content variation. Yet, a distinct contribution to GC content evolution is accounted for by a selective process. Accordingly, we searched for independent evidences that GC content distribution does not conform to neutral expectations. Indeed, after correcting for possible biases, we show that intron GC content and size display isochore-specific correlations. We consider that the more parsimonious explanation for our results is that GC content is subjected to the action of both weak selection and BGC in the human genome with features such as nucleosome positioning or chromatin conformation possibly representing the final target of selective processes. This view might reconcile previous contrasting findings and add some theoretical background to recent evidences suggesting that GC content domains display different behaviors with respect to highly regulated biological processes such as developmentally-stage related gene expression and programmed replication timing during neural stem cell differentiation.

  16. Both selective and neutral processes drive GC content evolution in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cagliani Rachele

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian genomes consist of regions differing in GC content, referred to as isochores or GC-content domains. The scientific debate is still open as to whether such compositional heterogeneity is a selected or neutral trait. Results Here we analyze SNP allele frequencies, retrotransposon insertion polymorphisms (RIPs, as well as fixed substitutions accumulated in the human lineage since its divergence from chimpanzee to indicate that biased gene conversion (BGC has been playing a role in within-genome GC content variation. Yet, a distinct contribution to GC content evolution is accounted for by a selective process. Accordingly, we searched for independent evidences that GC content distribution does not conform to neutral expectations. Indeed, after correcting for possible biases, we show that intron GC content and size display isochore-specific correlations. Conclusion We consider that the more parsimonious explanation for our results is that GC content is subjected to the action of both weak selection and BGC in the human genome with features such as nucleosome positioning or chromatin conformation possibly representing the final target of selective processes. This view might reconcile previous contrasting findings and add some theoretical background to recent evidences suggesting that GC content domains display different behaviors with respect to highly regulated biological processes such as developmentally-stage related gene expression and programmed replication timing during neural stem cell differentiation.

  17. What drives the evolution of Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies in Clusters vs. the Field?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Gregory

    2017-08-01

    Present-day galaxy clusters consist chiefly of low-mass dwarf elliptical galaxies, but the progenitors of this dominant population remain unclear. A prime candidate is the class of objects known as Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies, common in intermediate-reshift clusters but virtually extinct today. Recent cosmological simulations suggest that the present-day dwarfs galaxies begin as irregular field galaxies, undergo an environmentally-driven starburst phase as they enter the cluster, and stop forming stars earlier than their counterparts in the field. This model predicts that cluster dwarfs should have lower stellar mass per unit dynamical mass than their counterparts in the field. We propose a two-pronged archival research program to test this key prediction using the combination of precision photometry from space and high-quality spectroscopy. First, we will combine optical HST/ACS imaging of five z=0.55 clusters (including two HST Frontier Fields) with Spitzer IR imaging and publicly-released Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy to measure stellar-to-dynamical-mass ratios for a large sample of cluster LCBGs. Second, we will exploit a new catalog of LCBGs in the COSMOS field to gather corresponding data for a significant sample of field LCBGs. By comparing mass ratios from these datasets, we will test theoretical predictions and determine the primary physical driver of cluster dwarf-galaxy evolution.

  18. Directional selection can drive the evolution of modularity in complex traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Diogo; Marroig, Gabriel

    2015-01-13

    Modularity is a central concept in modern biology, providing a powerful framework for the study of living organisms on many organizational levels. Two central and related questions can be posed in regard to modularity: How does modularity appear in the first place, and what forces are responsible for keeping and/or changing modular patterns? We approached these questions using a quantitative genetics simulation framework, building on previous results obtained with bivariate systems and extending them to multivariate systems. We developed an individual-based model capable of simulating many traits controlled by many loci with variable pleiotropic relations between them, expressed in populations subject to mutation, recombination, drift, and selection. We used this model to study the problem of the emergence of modularity, and hereby show that drift and stabilizing selection are inefficient at creating modular variational structures. We also demonstrate that directional selection can have marked effects on the modular structure between traits, actively promoting a restructuring of genetic variation in the selected population and potentially facilitating the response to selection. Furthermore, we give examples of complex covariation created by simple regimes of combined directional and stabilizing selection and show that stabilizing selection is important in the maintenance of established covariation patterns. Our results are in full agreement with previous results for two-trait systems and further extend them to include scenarios of greater complexity. Finally, we discuss the evolutionary consequences of modular patterns being molded by directional selection.

  19. The Plio-Pleistocene climatic evolution as a consequence of orbital forcing on the carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillard, Didier

    2017-09-01

    Since the discovery of ice ages in the 19th century, a central question of climate science has been to understand the respective role of the astronomical forcing and of greenhouse gases, in particular changes in the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide. Glacial-interglacial cycles have been shown to be paced by the astronomy with a dominant periodicity of 100 ka over the last million years, and a periodicity of 41 ka between roughly 1 and 3 million years before present (Myr BP). But the role and dynamics of the carbon cycle over the last 4 million years remain poorly understood. In particular, the transition into the Pleistocene about 2.8 Myr BP or the transition towards larger glaciations about 0.8 Myr BP (sometimes referred to as the mid-Pleistocene transition, or MPT) are not easily explained as direct consequences of the astronomical forcing. Some recent atmospheric CO2 reconstructions suggest slightly higher pCO2 levels before 1 Myr BP and a slow decrease over the last few million years (Bartoli et al., 2011; Seki et al., 2010). But the dynamics and the climatic role of the carbon cycle during the Plio-Pleistocene period remain unclear. Interestingly, the δ13C marine records provide some critical information on the evolution of sources and sinks of carbon. In particular, a clear 400 kyr oscillation has been found at many different time periods and appears to be a robust feature of the carbon cycle throughout at least the last 100 Myr (e.g. Paillard and Donnadieu, 2014). This oscillation is also visible over the last 4 Myr but its relationship with the eccentricity appears less obvious, with the occurrence of longer cycles at the end of the record, and a periodicity which therefore appears shifted towards 500 kyr (see Wang et al., 2004). In the following we present a simple dynamical model that provides an explanation for these carbon cycle variations, and how they relate to the climatic evolution over the last 4 Myr. It also gives an explanation for

  20. Reciprocal Vegetation-Flow Feedbacks Driving Early-Stage Landscape Evolution in a Restored Wet Meadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, L.; Merritts, D. J.; Walter, R. C.; Watts, D.

    2013-12-01

    Just as taxonomic classification has improved understanding in biology, ecogeomorphologists would benefit from a functional classification of biota based on the biophysical feedbacks that they engage in. Early stages of landscape development following disturbance provide a unique opportunity to delineate and understand these feedback processes, as the diversity in functional morphotypes (a.k.a. 'ecomorphs,' to expand on a concept from terrestrial ecology) is high and the potential for self-organization of landscape pattern strong. We used the opportunity of a stream restoration that reset its floodplain to 'initial conditions' to perform a suite of biophysical measurements designed to delineate the classes of feedback that influence landscape evolution in distinct ways. The Big Spring Run restoration (Lancaster, PA), completed in November 2011, involved removal of 15,000 t of legacy sediment from the valley bottom to expose a Holocene hydric layer and reestablish wet meadow hydrology and biota. By performing repeat biogeomorphic surveys within a study grid, we tested the hypothesis that distinct ecomorphs determine the persistence and location of channel and microtopographic features. The qualitatively distinct patch types surveyed included carpet-forming mat vegetation, tussock-forming vegetation, sparsely vegetated mudflats, benthic algal mats, mixed herbaceous communities, grasses, and clonal emergent vegetation. Within each sampling location, changes in vegetation community architecture, grain size distribution, critical shear stress for sediment entrainment, and topography were monitored over time, and flow resistance was measured. An overbank flow event that completely filled the floodplain provided an additional opportunity to measure vegetation-flow-sediment interactions. Once emergent vegetation was bent over by flow, vegetation had a negligible influence on flow velocity--in contrast to most other wetlands--but continued to shelter the bed from sediment

  1. Force of infection and evolution of lesions of canine tegumentary leishmaniasis in Northwestern Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Diego Marco

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available A clinical-serological follow-up was carried out in a canine population in endemic foci of Leishmania braziliensis spread in northwestern Argentina. Each dog was studied in at least two visits, 309±15 days (X±SE apart. Some initially healthy dogs (n=52 developed seroconversion or lesions. The clinical evolution of the disease in dogs resembles in many aspects the human disease. Similarities include the long duration of most ulcers with occasional healing or appearance of new ones and the late appearance of erosive snout lesions in some animals. Yearly incidence rates of 22.7% for seroconversion and of 13.5% for disease were calculated as indicators of the force of infection by this parasite upon the canine population.

  2. Comparison of the driving forces of spring phenology among savanna landscapes by including combined spatial and temporal heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Likai; Southworth, Jane; Meng, Jijun

    2015-10-01

    Understanding spatial and temporal dynamics of land surface phenology (LSP) and its driving forces are critical for providing information relevant to short- and long-term decision making, particularly as it relates to climate response planning. With the third generation Global Inventory Monitoring and Modeling System (GIMMS3g) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data and environmental data from multiple sources, we investigated the spatio-temporal changes in the start of the growing season (SOS) in southern African savannas from 1982 through 2010 and determined its linkage to environmental factors using spatial panel data models. Overall, the SOS occurs earlier in the north compared to the south. This relates in part to the differences in ecosystems, with northern areas representing high rainfall and dense tree cover (mainly tree savannas), whereas the south has lower rainfall and sparse tree cover (mainly bush and grass savannas). From 1982 to 2010, an advanced trend was observed predominantly in the tree savanna areas of the north, whereas a delayed trend was chiefly found in the floodplain of the north and bush/grass savannas of the south. Different environmental drivers were detected within tree- and grass-dominated savannas, with a critical division being represented by the 800 mm isohyet. Our results supported the importance of water as a driver in this water-limited system, specifically preseason soil moisture, in determining the SOS in these water-limited, grass-dominated savannas. In addition, the research pointed to other, often overlooked, effects of preseason maximum and minimum temperatures on the SOS across the entire region. Higher preseason maximum temperatures led to an advance of the SOS, whereas the opposite effects of preseason minimum temperature were observed. With the rapid increase in global change research, this work will prove helpful for managing savanna landscapes and key to predicting how projected climate changes will affect

  3. Long-term dynamics in land resource use and the driving forces in the Beressa watershed, highlands of Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsalu, Aklilu; Stroosnijder, Leo; de Graaff, Jan

    2007-06-01

    Land degradation in the Ethiopian highlands is considered to be one of the major problems threatening agricultural development and food security in the country. However, knowledge about the forces driving the long-term dynamics in land resources use is limited. This research integrates biophysical information with socio-economic processes and policy changes to examine the dynamics of land resource use and farmers' livelihoods in the Beressa watershed for over 40 years during the second half of the 20th century. It was found that there have been substantial dynamics in land resource use in the area. The natural vegetation cover has been extensively cleared, although most of the cleared areas have since been replaced with plantations. Grazing land has expanded remarkably at the expense of cropland and bare land. However, the expansion of cropland was minimal over the 43-year period despite a quadrupling of the population density. Yields have not increased to compensate for the reduction in per capita cropland, and the soil quality appears to be not that good. Though the farmers perceived it otherwise, the long-term rainfall pattern has improved. In response to soil degradation, water shortage, socio-economic and policy changes, farmers have tended to gradually change from annual cropping to tree planting and livestock production to cope with the problems of soil degradation, water scarcity and smaller farms. Income diversification through the sale of wood and cattle dung is becoming a major livelihood strategy. Apparently, however, little attention has been paid to investments in soil and water conservation (SWC) and local soil fertility amendments. In particular, increased erosion and related high nutrient losses in sediments, as well as the removal of potentially available soil nutrients through the sale of manure threatens to damage agricultural sustainability in the area.

  4. Evolution of the rotation of a viscoelastic planet on a circular orbit in a central force field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vil' ke, V.G.; Kopylov, S.A.; Markov, Y.G.

    1984-11-01

    Approximate equations describing the evolution of the rotational motion of a viscoelastic planet in a central Newtonian force field are obtained by an averaging method. The equations are written in Andoyer canonical variables. The evolution of the planet's rotation is investigated on the basis of the averaged equations. When energy dissipation is present the motion of a deformable planet can serve as a model of tidal phenomena in the motion of planets of the solar system.

  5. Landscape genomics: natural selection drives the evolution of mitogenome in penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Barbara; González-Acuña, Daniel; Loyola, David E; Johnson, Warren E; Parker, Patricia G; Massaro, Melanie; Dantas, Gisele P M; Miranda, Marcelo D; Vianna, Juliana A

    2018-01-16

    Mitochondria play a key role in the balance of energy and heat production, and therefore the mitochondrial genome is under natural selection by environmental temperature and food availability, since starvation can generate more efficient coupling of energy production. However, selection over mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes has usually been evaluated at the population level. We sequenced by NGS 12 mitogenomes and with four published genomes, assessed genetic variation in ten penguin species distributed from the equator to Antarctica. Signatures of selection of 13 mitochondrial protein-coding genes were evaluated by comparing among species within and among genera (Spheniscus, Pygoscelis, Eudyptula, Eudyptes and Aptenodytes). The genetic data were correlated with environmental data obtained through remote sensing (sea surface temperature [SST], chlorophyll levels [Chl] and a combination of SST and Chl [COM]) through the distribution of these species. We identified the complete mtDNA genomes of several penguin species, including ND6 and 8 tRNAs on the light strand and 12 protein coding genes, 14 tRNAs and two rRNAs positioned on the heavy strand. The highest diversity was found in NADH dehydrogenase genes and the lowest in COX genes. The lowest evolutionary divergence among species was between Humboldt (Spheniscus humboldti) and Galapagos (S. mendiculus) penguins (0.004), while the highest was observed between little penguin (Eudyptula minor) and Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) (0.097). We identified a signature of purifying selection (Ka/Ks selection is constraining mitogenome evolution to maintain Oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) proteins and functionality. Pairwise species maximum-likelihood analyses of selection at codon sites suggest positive selection has occurred on ATP8 (Fixed-Effects Likelihood, FEL) and ND4 (Single Likelihood Ancestral Counting, SLAC) in all penguins. In contrast, COX1 had a signature of strong negative selection. ND4 Ka/Ks ratios

  6. Force

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Forces are at work all around us. Discover what a force is, and different kinds of forces that work on contact and at a distance. We use simple language and vocabulary to make this invisible world easy for students to ""see"" and understand. Examine how forces ""add up"" to create the total force on an object, and reinforce concepts and extend learning with sample problems.

  7. The dynamical evolution and the force model for asteroid (196256) 2003 EH1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galushina, T. Yu.; Sambarov, G. E.

    2017-08-01

    This paper is devoted to the dynamics of asteroid (196256) 2003 EH1 which belongs to the Amor group. It is known that asteroid 2003 EH1 is associated with one of the main annual meteor showers - the Quadrantids. In this work we analyze the influence of various perturbing factors on the asteroid motion. The perturbations' estimation was done by five different methods based on the nominal orbit evolution and the size of the initial confidence region. The most significant influences on the dynamical evolution of 2003 EH1 are gravitational forces from the Sun, major planets and the Moon, and the relativistic effects (RE) of the Sun. The Earth, the Sun and Jupiter oblateness; gravitational perturbations from Pallas, Ceres, Vesta and Pluto; and the RE of planets, the Moon, and Pluto are of less importance. The researches of chaoticity and evolution of asteroid 2003 EH1 were examined by integrating its motion equations along with 500 clones. The time interval (1000-4000 years) has been determined by integration precision estimation. We estimated the mean exponential growth factor of nearby orbits (MEGNO) and found that MEGNO < 2 only in the interval from 1700 year to 2300 year. After 2300 year the MEGNO parameter increases that indicates motion instability. It shows that the orbit may be considered as regular on the time interval of ±300 years from now, and as chaotic outside this interval. We suppose that the reasons are the frequent close approaches of the asteroid with Jupiter and the overlap of apsidal-nodal resonances.

  8. DropBot: An open-source digital microfluidic control system with precise control of electrostatic driving force and instantaneous drop velocity measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fobel, Ryan [Institute for Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, 164 College St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G9 (Canada); Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, 160 College St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E1 (Canada); Fobel, Christian [School of Computer Science, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Wheeler, Aaron R. [Institute for Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, 164 College St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G9 (Canada); Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, 160 College St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E1 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2013-05-13

    We introduce DropBot: an open-source instrument for digital microfluidics (http://microfluidics.utoronto.ca/dropbot). DropBot features two key functionalities for digital microfluidics: (1) real-time monitoring of instantaneous drop velocity (which we propose is a proxy for resistive forces), and (2) application of constant electrostatic driving forces through compensation for amplifier-loading and device capacitance. We anticipate that this system will enhance insight into failure modes and lead to new strategies for improved device reliability, and will be useful for the growing number of users who are adopting digital microfluidics for automated, miniaturized laboratory operation.

  9. Driving Forces of Dynamic Changes in Soil Erosion in the Dahei Mountain Ecological Restoration Area of Northern China Based on GIS and RS

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiao; Niu, Xiang; Wang, Bing; Gao, Peng; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic change in soil erosion is an important focus of regional ecological restoration research. Here, the dynamic changes of soil erosion and its driving forces in the Dahei Mountain ecological restoration area of northern China were analyzed by LANDSAT TM remote sensing captured via geographic information system (GIS) technologies during three typical periods in 2004, 2008 and 2013. The results showed the following: (1) a decrease in intensive erosion and moderate erosion areas, as well as...

  10. Analysis of Vehicle Steering and Driving Bifurcation Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianbin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The typical method of vehicle steering bifurcation analysis is based on the nonlinear autonomous vehicle model deriving from the classic two degrees of freedom (2DOF linear vehicle model. This method usually neglects the driving effect on steering bifurcation characteristics. However, in the steering and driving combined conditions, the tyre under different driving conditions can provide different lateral force. The steering bifurcation mechanism without the driving effect is not able to fully reveal the vehicle steering and driving bifurcation characteristics. Aiming at the aforementioned problem, this paper analyzed the vehicle steering and driving bifurcation characteristics with the consideration of driving effect. Based on the 5DOF vehicle system dynamics model with the consideration of driving effect, the 7DOF autonomous system model was established. The vehicle steering and driving bifurcation dynamic characteristics were analyzed with different driving mode and driving torque. Taking the front-wheel-drive system as an example, the dynamic evolution process of steering and driving bifurcation was analyzed by phase space, system state variables, power spectral density, and Lyapunov index. The numerical recognition results of chaos were also provided. The research results show that the driving mode and driving torque have the obvious effect on steering and driving bifurcation characteristics.

  11. Effect of the electromagnetic force on the power-train vibration of the in-wheel motor driving system with rubber bushings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Tan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available For an in-wheel motor driving system with rubber bushings, the driving motor is integrated into the wheel. A magnet gap deformation of the motor will be inevitably caused by the road excitation, which will produce an unbalanced electromagnetic force and influence the power-train vibration. Furthermore, the rim is flexibly connected to the motor rotor by rubber bushings, and a strong coupling and nonlinear vibration of the power-train in all directions can be demonstrated under the electromagnetic excitations. Thus, a 14-degree-of-freedom coupling vibration model of the power-train is first developed for the in-wheel motor driving system with rubber bushings, including the bushing and bearing models. Then, the mathematical model is deduced using a Lagrangian approach. Finally, based on the model, a coupling vibration analysis is conducted under different electromagnetic force excitations. The results indicate that there are coupling vibration components in the torsional direction, except the one-time rotating frequency; however, in the bending direction, the vibration response includes a one-time rotating frequency component and an excitation frequency component of the electromagnetic force. Furthermore, the results indicate that the bushing plays an important role in reducing the power-train vibration, which has a positive effect on the improving vehicle dynamics.

  12. Local deforestation patterns and their driving forces of tropical dry forest in two municipalities in Southern Oaxaca, Mexico (1985-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Galicia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The tropical dry forest is an ecosystem that is undergoing rapid changes. Although global driving forces behind these changes have been addressed at a local scale, spatio-temporal dynamics are still largely unknown. The main objective of this study was to identify the causes governing the dynamics of changes in land use and land cover in the tropical dry forest in two municipalities in Southern México. Satellite imagery and air photographs were used in a GIS context to produce maps of land use and land cover for 1985, 1995 and 2006. A number of statistical methods (Markov chains, general lineal models and regression tree analysis were applied to identify the proximate and the underlying causes of deforestation, agriculture being the most important one. When agriculture is mainly for self consumption, topographic factors determine its location. Increasing job opportunities in the tourism sector has resulted in the abandonment of agricultural land; consequently, the forest has recovered. Different studies have examined the dynamics of local deforestation and its driving forces in México; however, this study considered both spatial and temporal elements in order to identify the most important underlying driving forces of deforestation and its dynamics at local scale, and also compared two neighboring municipalities.

  13. [Spatio-temporal change of sand-fixing function and its driving forces in desertification control ecological function area of Hunshandake, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lu; Tian, Mei-rong; Gao, Ji-xi; Qian, Jin-ping

    2016-01-01

    Soil erosion is an important ecological and environmental problem in Hunshandake Desert, and the sand-fixing function determines the degree of ecological security in the entire region. In order to clarify the situation of windbreak and sand fixation in Hunshandake area, and to guide the prevention and treatment of desertification on regional scale, based on the meteorological and remote sensing data, this paper quantitatively analyzed the temporal and spatial pattern of windbreak and sand fixation ability between 2000-2010 by the revised wind erosion equation (RWEQ) model, meanwhile, the driving forces for each county ( or banner) in the functional zone were analyzed with the method of principal component analysis. The results showed that there was a fluctuation of the sand fixing capacity in Hunshandake over time, generally rendering a decline trend. The coniferous forest and grassland had strong windbreak and sand fixation capacity in unit area among the various land categories. In terms of spatial distribution, the windbreak and sand fixation function in western and southeastern region was weak and needed to be strengthened with ecological restoration efforts. Through the study of the social driving forces of each administrative region in the function zone, there were 3 main social driving forces of soil erosion in the administrative functions: the intensity of input-output, the level of economic development and the level of agriculture-husbandry development.

  14. Impeller radial force evolution in a large double-suction centrifugal pump during startup at the shut-off condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Zhichao [College of Water Resources and Civil Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Fujun, E-mail: wangfj@cau.edu.cn [College of Water Resources and Civil Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Engineering Research Center of Safety and Energy Saving Technology for Water Supply Network System, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Yao, Zhifeng [College of Water Resources and Civil Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Engineering Research Center of Safety and Energy Saving Technology for Water Supply Network System, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Tao, Ran [College of Water Resources and Civil Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Xiao, Ruofu [College of Water Resources and Civil Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Engineering Research Center of Safety and Energy Saving Technology for Water Supply Network System, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Huaicheng [Shanghai Liancheng (Group) Co., Ltd., Shanghai 201812 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Conclude the characteristics of transient radial force in the startup process for a large double-suction centrifugal pump. • The overall direction of the radial force during startup process is also confirmed. • A formula used to calculate the transient radial force during startup process is proposed. • A relationship between radial force variation and axial vortex development in blade channel during the startup process is established. The mechanism of the radial force evolution is revealed. - Abstract: Double-suction centrifugal pumps play an important role in the main feedwater systems of nuclear power plant. The impeller radial force in a centrifugal pump varies dramatically during startup at the shut-off condition. In this study, the startup process of a large double-suction centrifugal pump is investigated using CFD. During testing, the impeller speed is accelerated from zero to its rated speed in 1.0 s (marked as t{sub 0}) and is then maintained at the rated speed. The results show that the radial force increase lags behind the impeller speed increase. At 0–0.4t{sub 0}, the radial force is small (approaching zero). At 0.4–1.4t{sub 0}, the radial force increases rapidly. After 1.4t{sub 0}, the average radial force stabilizes and reaches its maximum value of 55,619 N. The observed maximum radial force value during startup is approximately nine times as high as the radial force under rated condition. During startup, the overall radial force direction is proximate to the radial line located 25° from the volute tongue along circumferential direction. A transient radial force formula is proposed to evaluate the changes in radial force during startup. The streamline distribution in impeller passages and the impeller outlet pressure profile varying over time are produced. The relationship between radial force evolution and the varying axial-to-spiral vortex structure is analyzed. The radial force change mechanism is revealed. This research

  15. The Plio-Pleistocene climatic evolution as a consequence of orbital forcing on the carbon cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Paillard

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of ice ages in the 19th century, a central question of climate science has been to understand the respective role of the astronomical forcing and of greenhouse gases, in particular changes in the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide. Glacial–interglacial cycles have been shown to be paced by the astronomy with a dominant periodicity of 100 ka over the last million years, and a periodicity of 41 ka between roughly 1 and 3 million years before present (Myr BP. But the role and dynamics of the carbon cycle over the last 4 million years remain poorly understood. In particular, the transition into the Pleistocene about 2.8 Myr BP or the transition towards larger glaciations about 0.8 Myr BP (sometimes referred to as the mid-Pleistocene transition, or MPT are not easily explained as direct consequences of the astronomical forcing. Some recent atmospheric CO2 reconstructions suggest slightly higher pCO2 levels before 1 Myr BP and a slow decrease over the last few million years (Bartoli et al., 2011; Seki et al., 2010. But the dynamics and the climatic role of the carbon cycle during the Plio-Pleistocene period remain unclear. Interestingly, the δ13C marine records provide some critical information on the evolution of sources and sinks of carbon. In particular, a clear 400 kyr oscillation has been found at many different time periods and appears to be a robust feature of the carbon cycle throughout at least the last 100 Myr (e.g. Paillard and Donnadieu, 2014. This oscillation is also visible over the last 4 Myr but its relationship with the eccentricity appears less obvious, with the occurrence of longer cycles at the end of the record, and a periodicity which therefore appears shifted towards 500 kyr (see Wang et al., 2004. In the following we present a simple dynamical model that provides an explanation for these carbon cycle variations, and how they relate to the climatic evolution over the

  16. Is ultra-violet radiation the main force shaping molecular evolution of varicella-zoster virus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escobar-Gutiérrez Alejandro

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Varicella (chickenpox exhibits a characteristic epidemiological pattern which is associated with climate. In general, primary infections in tropical regions are comparatively less frequent among children than in temperate regions. This peculiarity regarding varicella-zoster virus (VZV infection among certain age groups in tropical regions results in increased susceptibility during adulthood in these regions. Moreover, this disease shows a cyclic behavior in which the number of cases increases significantly during winter and spring. This observation further supports the participation of environmental factors in global epidemiology of chickenpox. However, the underlying mechanisms responsible for this distinctive disease behavior are not understood completely. In a recent publication, Philip S. Rice has put forward an interesting hypothesis suggesting that ultra-violet (UV radiation is the major environmental factor driving the molecular evolution of VZV. Discussion While we welcomed the attempt to explain the mechanisms controlling VZV transmission and distribution, we argue that Rice's hypothesis takes lightly the circulation of the so called "temperate VZV genotypes" in tropical regions and, to certain degree, overlooks the predominance of such lineages in certain non-temperate areas. Here, we further discuss and present new information about the overwhelming dominance of temperate VZV genotypes in Mexico regardless of geographical location and climate. Summary UV radiation does not satisfactorily explain the distribution of VZV genotypes in different tropical and temperate regions of Mexico. Additionally, the cyclic behavior of varicella does not shown significant differences between regions with different climates in the country. More studies should be conducted to identify the factors directly involved in viral spreading. A better understanding of the modes of transmissions exploited by VZV and their effect on viral

  17. The effect of electric field geometry on the performance of electromembrane extraction systems: Footprints of a third driving force along with migration and diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moazami, Hamid Reza [School of Physics and Accelerators, NSTRI, P. O. Box, 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseiny Davarani, Saied Saeed, E-mail: ss-hosseiny@sbu.ac.ir [Faculty of Chemistry, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., 1983963113, Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadi, Jamil; Nojavan, Saeed [Faculty of Chemistry, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., 1983963113, Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abrari, Masoud [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., 1983963113, Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-03

    The distribution of electric field vectors was first calculated for electromembrane extraction (EME) systems in classical and cylindrical electrode geometries. The results showed that supported liquid membrane (SLM) has a general field amplifying effect due to its lower dielectric constant in comparison with aqueous donor/acceptor solutions. The calculated norms of the electric field vector showed that a DC voltage of 50 V can create huge electric field strengths up to 64 kV m{sup −1} and 111 kV m{sup −1} in classical and cylindrical geometries respectively. In both cases, the electric field strength reached its peak value on the inner wall of the SLM. In the case of classical geometry, the field strength was a function of the polar position of the SLM whereas the field strength in cylindrical geometry was angularly uniform. In order to investigate the effect of the electrode geometry on the performance of real EME systems, the analysis was carried out in three different geometries including classical, helical and cylindrical arrangements using naproxen and sodium diclofenac as the model analytes. Despite higher field strength and extended cross sectional area, the helical and cylindrical geometries gave lower recoveries with respect to the classical EME. The observed decline of the signal was proved to be against the relations governing migration and diffusion processes, which means that a third driving force is involved in EME. The third driving force is the interaction between the radially inhomogeneous electric field and the analyte in its neutral form. - Highlights: • Electric field vectors have been calculated in EME systems. • A new driving force has been proposed in EME systems. • EME can be theoretically applied to nonionic polarizable analytes.

  18. The Aligning Forces for Quality initiative: background and evolution from 2005 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Dennis P; Beich, Jeff; Leitzell, Brigitt; Shaw, Bethany W; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Christianson, Jon B; Farley, Diane C; Greene, Jessica; Jean-Jacques, Muriel; McHugh, Megan; Wolf, Laura J

    2016-08-01

    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's (RWJF's) Aligning Forces for Quality (AF4Q) program was the largest privately funded, community-based quality improvement initiative to date, providing funds and technical assistance (TA) to 16 multi-stakeholder alliances located throughout the United States. This article describes the AF4Q initiative's underlying theory of change, its evolution over time, and the key activities undertaken by alliances. Descriptive overview of a multi-site, community-based quality improvement initiative. We summarized information from program documents, program meetings, observation of alliance activities, and interviews with RWJF staff, TA providers, and AF4Q alliance stakeholders. The AF4Q program was a dynamic initiative, expanding and evolving over time. The underlying theory of change was based on the notion that an aligned, multi-stakeholder approach is superior to independent siloed efforts by stakeholders. Participating alliances developed or strengthened programming to varying degrees in 5 main programmatic areas: (1) measurement and public reporting of healthcare quality, patient experience, cost, and efficiency for ambulatory physician practices and hospitals; (2) efforts to engage consumers in health, healthcare, and alliance governance (consumer engagement); (3) adoption and spread of effective strategies to improve care delivery; (4) advancing healthcare equity; and (5) integration of alliance activities with payment reform initiatives. The AF4Q initiative was an ambitious program affecting multiple leverage points in the healthcare system. AF4Q alliances were provided a similar set of expectations, and given financial support and access to substantial TA. There was considerable variation in how alliances addressed the AF4Q programmatic areas, given differences in their composition, market structure, and history.

  19. Using geoinformatics and cultural anthropology to identify links between land change, driving forces and actors in the Okavango catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röder, Achim; Stellmes, Marion; Pröpper, Michael; Schneibel, Anne

    2015-04-01

    intensive uses, although the same processes are likely to occur in parts of the Okavango region in the future. Literature: Banwart, S. (2011). "Save our soils." Nature 474: 151-152. Bürgi, M., A. M. Hersperger, et al. (2004). "Driving forces of landscape change - current and new directions." Landscape Ecology 19: 857-868. Butchart, S. H. M., M. Walpole, et al. (2010). "Global Biodiversity: Indicators of Recent Declines." Science 328(5982): 1164-1168. Ellis, E. C. and N. Ramankutty (2008). "Putting people in the map: anthropogenic biomes of the world." Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 6(8): 439-447. Foley, J. A., R. Defries, et al. (2005). "Global consequences of land use." Science 309(5734): 570-574. Geist, H. J. and E. F. Lambin (2002). "Proximate causes and underlying driving forces of tropical deforestation." BioScience 52(2): 143-150. Haub, C. (2012) World Population Data Sheet. World Population Hein, L., K. van Koppen, et al. (2006). "Spatial scales, stakeholders and the valuation of ecosystem services." Ecological Economics 57: 209-228. Hersperger, A. M., M.-P. Gennaio, et al. (2010). "Linking land change with driving forces and actors: four conceptual models." Ecology and Society 15(4): 1-17. Huang, C., L. S. Davis, et al. (2002). "An assessment of support vector machines for land cover classification." International Journal of Remote Sensing 23(4): 725-749. IPCC (2013). Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. T. F. Stocker, G. Qin, G.-K. Plattneret al. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. Jönsson, P. and L. Eklundh (2004). "TIMESAT - a program for analysing time-series of satellite sensor data." Computers and Geosciences 30(833-845). Kowalski, B., N. Azebaze, et al. (2013). "Mashare - The People." Biodiversity & Ecology 5: 121-128. Lal, R. (2013). "Climate-strategic agriculture and the water-soil-waste nexus." Journal of Plant

  20. Eating disorders and the cultural forces behind the drive for thinness: are African American women really protected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, L

    1998-01-01

    Responding to mainstream ideals of female beauty, many women and girls view thinness as a requirement for feeling acceptable to themselves and to others. The drive to be thin can lead to problematic eating patterns, such as self-starvation, binge-eating, and purging, symptoms of the eating disorders, anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Most current literature on eating disorders and the drive for thinness focuses only on White middle-class women and girls. African American females have been largely excluded from studies, due to the assumption that the Black community's acceptance of women with fuller shapes protects its women from eating problems. However, recent studies are beginning to show that race, class, and exposure to a dominant culture which denigrates Black features and physiques impact body image among Black women and may play a role in the development of eating problems.

  1. Evolution of Skin Temperature after the Application of Compressive Forces on Tendon, Muscle and Myofascial Trigger Point.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Figueiredo Magalhães

    Full Text Available Some assessment and diagnosis methods require palpation or the application of certain forces on the skin, which affects the structures beneath, we highlight the importance of defining possible influences on skin temperature as a result of this physical contact. Thus, the aim of the present study is to determine the ideal time for performing thermographic examination after palpation based on the assessment of skin temperature evolution. Randomized and crossover study carried out with 15 computer-user volunteers of both genders, between 18 and 45 years of age, who were submitted to compressive forces of 0, 1, 2 and 3 kg/cm2 for 30 seconds with a washout period of 48 hours using a portable digital dynamometer. Compressive forces were applied on the following spots on the dominant upper limb: myofascial trigger point in the levator scapulae, biceps brachii muscle and palmaris longus tendon. Volunteers were examined by means of infrared thermography before and after the application of compressive forces (15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes. In most comparisons made over time, a significant decrease was observed 30, 45 and 60 minutes after the application of compressive forces (p 0.05. In conclusion, infrared thermography can be used after assessment or diagnosis methods focused on the application of forces on tendons and muscles, provided the procedure is performed 15 minutes after contact with the skin. Regarding to the myofascial trigger point, the thermographic examination can be performed within 60 minutes after the contact with the skin.

  2. Evolution of Skin Temperature after the Application of Compressive Forces on Tendon, Muscle and Myofascial Trigger Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Marina Figueiredo; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; de Oliveira Guirro, Elaine Caldeira; Girasol, Carlos Eduardo; de Oliveira, Alessandra Kelly; Dias, Fabiana Rodrigues Cancio; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Some assessment and diagnosis methods require palpation or the application of certain forces on the skin, which affects the structures beneath, we highlight the importance of defining possible influences on skin temperature as a result of this physical contact. Thus, the aim of the present study is to determine the ideal time for performing thermographic examination after palpation based on the assessment of skin temperature evolution. Randomized and crossover study carried out with 15 computer-user volunteers of both genders, between 18 and 45 years of age, who were submitted to compressive forces of 0, 1, 2 and 3 kg/cm2 for 30 seconds with a washout period of 48 hours using a portable digital dynamometer. Compressive forces were applied on the following spots on the dominant upper limb: myofascial trigger point in the levator scapulae, biceps brachii muscle and palmaris longus tendon. Volunteers were examined by means of infrared thermography before and after the application of compressive forces (15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes). In most comparisons made over time, a significant decrease was observed 30, 45 and 60 minutes after the application of compressive forces (p 0.05). In conclusion, infrared thermography can be used after assessment or diagnosis methods focused on the application of forces on tendons and muscles, provided the procedure is performed 15 minutes after contact with the skin. Regarding to the myofascial trigger point, the thermographic examination can be performed within 60 minutes after the contact with the skin. PMID:26070073

  3. Evolution of Skin Temperature after the Application of Compressive Forces on Tendon, Muscle and Myofascial Trigger Point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Marina Figueiredo; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; de Oliveira Guirro, Elaine Caldeira; Girasol, Carlos Eduardo; de Oliveira, Alessandra Kelly; Dias, Fabiana Rodrigues Cancio; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Some assessment and diagnosis methods require palpation or the application of certain forces on the skin, which affects the structures beneath, we highlight the importance of defining possible influences on skin temperature as a result of this physical contact. Thus, the aim of the present study is to determine the ideal time for performing thermographic examination after palpation based on the assessment of skin temperature evolution. Randomized and crossover study carried out with 15 computer-user volunteers of both genders, between 18 and 45 years of age, who were submitted to compressive forces of 0, 1, 2 and 3 kg/cm2 for 30 seconds with a washout period of 48 hours using a portable digital dynamometer. Compressive forces were applied on the following spots on the dominant upper limb: myofascial trigger point in the levator scapulae, biceps brachii muscle and palmaris longus tendon. Volunteers were examined by means of infrared thermography before and after the application of compressive forces (15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes). In most comparisons made over time, a significant decrease was observed 30, 45 and 60 minutes after the application of compressive forces (p 0.05). In conclusion, infrared thermography can be used after assessment or diagnosis methods focused on the application of forces on tendons and muscles, provided the procedure is performed 15 minutes after contact with the skin. Regarding to the myofascial trigger point, the thermographic examination can be performed within 60 minutes after the contact with the skin.

  4. On the Driving Forces of Magnetically Induced Martensitic Transformation in Directionally Solidified Polycrystalline Ni-Mn-In Meta-Magnetic Shape Memory Alloy with Structural Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qiaodan; Zhou, Zhenni; Yang, Liang; Huang, Yujin; Li, Jun; Li, Jianguo

    2017-11-01

    The magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) in the ferromagnetic shape memory alloys (FSMAs) provides the driving forces to obtain large magnetic field induced strain (MFIS) by rearranging the martensitic variants. However, to date, no significant MAE was observed in the new class of Ni-Mn-Z ( Z = In, Sn, Sb) metamagnetic shape memory alloys (MSMAs). Here, we report a significant magnetic anisotropy in Ni48Mn35In17 Heusler alloy with a [110]A fiber texture prepared by the directional solidification. In this case, when the applied magnetic field is along the [110]A direction, a larger magnetization change is obtained compared with that of the randomly oriented samples, which increases the driving forces for the magnetically induced martensitic transformation (MIMT). In contrast, along the [110]A direction, the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) is enhanced by 60 pct, the MFIS is improved by 20 pct, and the critical field for the MFIS is reduced by 0.5 T. Such a peculiar magnetic behavior could be well explained by a proposed model on the viewpoint of the transformation of ferromagnetic austenite phase. Furthermore, considering the thermodynamics aspects, we demonstrate that two main magnetic energies of the Zeeman energy and the MAE in the MSMAs assist each other to promote the MIMT, instead of opposing each other in the FSMAs. This discovery of the strong magnetic anisotropy in highly textured polycrystals provides a feasible route to enhance the MIMT, and new insights to design and prepare the Ni-Mn-based Heusler alloys for practical applications.

  5. [Spatiotemporal patterns and driving forces of land use change in industrial relocation area: a case study of old industrial area in Tiexi of Shenyang, Northeast China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-Ling; Bing, Long-Fei; Xi, Feng-Ming; Wu, Rui; Geng, Yong

    2013-07-01

    Based on the QuickBird remote sensing images and with the support of GIS, this paper analyzed the spatiotemporal characteristics of land use change and its driving forces in old industrial area of Tiexi, Shenyang City of Liaoning Province in 2000-2010. During the study period, the industrial and mining warehouse land pattern had the greatest change, evolving from the historical pattern of residential land in the south and of industrial land in the north into residential land as the dominant land use pattern. In the last decade, the residential land area increased by 9%, mainly transferred from the industrial and mining warehouse land located in the north of Jianshe Road, while the industrial and mining warehouse land area decreased by 20%. The land areas for the commercial service and for the administrative and public services were increased by 1.3% and 3.1%, respectively. The land area for construction had a greater change, with an overall change rate being 76.9%. The land use change rate in 2000-2005 was greater than that in 2005-2010. National development strategies and policies, regional development planning, administrative reform, and industrial upgrading were the main driving forces of the land use change in old industrial area of Tiexi.

  6. Driving forces and barriers to improved energy performance of buildings: an analysis of energy performance of Swedish buildings, 2000-2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuglseth, Bente Beckstroem

    2008-06-15

    The building sector is responsible for a substantial part of energy use and green house gas emissions in Europe. This report explores driving forces and barriers to improved energy performance of buildings, using the Swedish building sector as a case. The development of energy performance of buildings in Sweden from 2000 until 2006 is explored by applying a threefold understanding of energy performance of buildings: substitution from fossil fuels to renewable energy, conversion from electrical heating to thermal energy and reduction in energy demand. Three explanatory approaches are used to analyse driving forces and barriers to improved energy performance: the techno-economic approach stresses the physical aspects of infrastructure and technologies, the institutional approach emphasizes the role of institutional factors, while the regulative approach focuses on formal rules and laws. The study concludes that all factors have promoted substitution of fossil fuels with renewable energy, while they have prevented conversion from electrical heating to thermal energy and reduction in energy demand. (author). 95 refs

  7. Driving Forces of Dynamic Changes in Soil Erosion in the Dahei Mountain Ecological Restoration Area of Northern China Based on GIS and RS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Niu, Xiang; Wang, Bing; Gao, Peng; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic change in soil erosion is an important focus of regional ecological restoration research. Here, the dynamic changes of soil erosion and its driving forces in the Dahei Mountain ecological restoration area of northern China were analyzed by LANDSAT TM remote sensing captured via geographic information system (GIS) technologies during three typical periods in 2004, 2008 and 2013. The results showed the following: (1) a decrease in intensive erosion and moderate erosion areas, as well as an increase in light erosion areas, was observed during two periods: one from 2004 to 2008 and the other from 2008 to 2013. (2) Between 2004 and 2008, the variation in the range of slight erosion was the largest (24.28%), followed by light erosion and intensive erosion; between 2008 and 2013, the variation in the range of intensive erosion area was the largest (9.89%), followed by slight erosion and moderate erosion. (3) Socioeconomic impact, accompanied by natural environmental factors, was the main driving force underlying the change in soil erosion within the ecological restoration area. In particular, the socioeconomic factors of per capita forest area and land reclamation rate, as well as the natural environmental factor of terrain slope, significantly influenced soil erosion changes within the ecological restoration area.

  8. Long-term evolution of fish communities in European mountainous rivers: past log driving effects, river management and species introduction (Salzach River, Danube).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidvogl, Gertrud; Pont, Didier; Dolak, Horst; Hohensinner, Severin

    Using historical sources from the turn of the 19th to the 20th century, we investigated the long-term evolution of the fish community in a mountainous river network and the influence of different human uses and management measures. Within the alpine Salzach catchment, historical presence was reconstructed for 26 fish species, abundance classes for 19 species. Due to channelization, flood protection and dam erections, the spatial distribution of fish species was reduced during the 20th century. Many rheophilic and eurytopic fish species historically inhabited river reaches along a wide longitudinal profile and were present in more upstream river reaches than nowadays. The decrease of species diversity in the headwater sections is a consequence of lost lateral connectivity. Strongest effects are reported for sensitive species requiring different habitat types during their life cycles (especially pike, nase, Danube salmon). One of the most important shifts from the historical fish community to the present one reflects the deliberate introduction of fish species for fisheries. Rainbow trout and brook trout, absent from the historical fish assemblage, today represent up to 29 % of the total number of fish occurrences. In contrast, log driving, one of the most common historical pressures in European mountainous rivers, did not show significant negative effects on the past fish ecological situation. This result strongly differs from the impacts of log driving and deforestation demonstrated for recent times, and could be related to the change in log driving practices during the 20th century and to the high societal value of fish before the industrialization period along with other historical pressures affecting fish in rivers without log driving. In general, our results can be valid for a large number of European mountainous rivers. They highlight the usefulness of such detailed historical studies for our understanding of the long-term evolution of fish communities and

  9. Quadrupole moment of the 6{sup -} isomeric state in {sup 66}Cu: Interplay between different nuclear deformation driving forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozeva, R.L., E-mail: Radomira.Lozeva@iphc.cnrs.f [CSNSM, Universite Paris-Sud 11, CNRS, IN2P3, F-91405 Orsay-Campus (France); IPHC, CNRS, IN2P3, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Balabanski, D.L. [INRNE, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Georgiev, G. [CSNSM, Universite Paris-Sud 11, CNRS, IN2P3, F-91405 Orsay-Campus (France); Daugas, J.-M.; Peru, S. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon Cedex (France); Audi, G.; Cabaret, S. [CSNSM, Universite Paris-Sud 11, CNRS, IN2P3, F-91405 Orsay-Campus (France); Faul, T. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon Cedex (France); Ferraton, M. [IPN, CNRS, IN2P3, F-91406 Orsay-Campus (France); Fiori, E.; Gaulard, C. [CSNSM, Universite Paris-Sud 11, CNRS, IN2P3, F-91405 Orsay-Campus (France); Ibrahim, F. [IPN, CNRS, IN2P3, F-91406 Orsay-Campus (France); Morel, P. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon Cedex (France); Risegari, L. [CSNSM, Universite Paris-Sud 11, CNRS, IN2P3, F-91405 Orsay-Campus (France); Verney, D. [IPN, CNRS, IN2P3, F-91406 Orsay-Campus (France); Yordanov, D.T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-01-03

    We have measured the spectroscopic quadrupole moment of the 6{sup -} isomeric state in {sup 66}Cu to be |Q{sub s}|=18.6(12) efm{sup 2}. This state results from a weak coupling of the {pi}p{sub 3/2} and the {nu}g{sub 9/2} orbitals, which lead to sizable deformation at oblate and prolate shapes, correspondingly, in the {sup 68}Ni region. The interplay between these two different deformation-driving orbitals is observed at N=37 for the 6{sup -} state resulting in a most probable oblate shape.

  10. Varieties of flood risk governance in Europe: How do countries respond to driving forces and what explains institutional change?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiering, M.A.; Kaufmann, M.; Mees, H.; Schellenberger, T.; Ganzevoort, W.; Hegger, D.L.T.; Larrue, C.; Matczak, P.

    2017-01-01

    Floods are challenging the resilience of societies all over the world. In many countries there are discussions on diversifying the strategies for flood risk management, which implies some sort of policy change. To understand the possibilities of such change, a thorough understanding of the forces of

  11. Improving the Drive System of Permanent Magnet Linear Synchronous Motor Based on Direct Thrust Force Control Applying Space Vector Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Manoochehri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Applying the direct thrust force control (DFC method in permanent magnet linear synchronous motor (PMLSM leads to some important problems. The most important disadvantages of applying this method are electromagnetic force and linkage flux big ripple and variable switching frequency. In this paper space vector modulation (SVM technique is applied for removing the disadvantages of classic DFC method. SVM technique makes the switching frequency constant and provides continues Voltage space compared with discrete space in classic method. Simulation results confirmed the theory. They show that combining the DFC method with SVM technique removes lots of the disadvantages of classic DFC method like big ripples and variable switching and remains the benefits of this method.

  12. Varieties of flood risk governance in Europe : how do countries respond to driving forces and what explains institutional change?

    OpenAIRE

    Wiering, Mark; Kaufmann, M.; Mees, H.; Schellenberger, T.; Ganzevoort, W.; Hegger, D. L. T.; Larrue, C.; Matczak, P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Floods are challenging the resilience of societies all over the world. In many countries there are discussions on diversifying the strategies for flood risk management, which implies some sort of policy change. To understand the possibilities of such change, a thorough understanding of the forces of stability and change of underlying governance arrangements is required. It follows from the path dependency literature that countries which rely strongly on flood infrastructures, as par...

  13. Evolution of Nuclear Many-Body Forces with the Similarity Renormalization Group

    OpenAIRE

    Jurgenson, E. D.; Navratil, P.; Furnstahl, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    The first practical method to evolve many-body nuclear forces to softened form using the Similarity Renormalization Group (SRG) in a harmonic oscillator basis is demonstrated. When applied to He4 calculations, the two- and three-body oscillator matrix elements yield rapid convergence of the ground-state energy with a small net contribution of the induced four-body force.

  14. Horizontal gene transfer in evolution: facts and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Boto, Luis

    2009-01-01

    The contribution of horizontal gene transfer to evolution has been controversial since it was suggested to be a force driving evolution in the microbial world. In this paper, I review the current standpoint on horizontal gene transfer in evolutionary thinking and discuss how important horizontal gene transfer is in evolution in the broad sense, and particularly in prokaryotic evolution. I review recent literature, asking, first, which processes are involved in the evolutionary success of tran...

  15. The role of ecological constraint in driving the evolution of avian song frequency across a latitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Jason T; Wheatcroft, David J; Price, Trevor D

    2012-09-01

    Just as features of the physical and biotic environment constrain evolution of ecological and morphological traits, they may also affect evolution of communication systems. Here we analyze constraints on rates of vocal evolution, using a large dataset of New World avian sister taxa. We show that species breeding in tropical forests sing at generally lower frequencies and across narrower bandwidths than species breeding in open habitats, or at high latitudes. We attribute these restrictions on birdsong frequency to the presence of high-frequency insect noise and greater degradation of high-frequency sounds in tropical forests. We fit Ornstein-Uhlenbeck models to show that recent evolution of song frequency has been more greatly constrained in tropical forests than elsewhere, that is, songs have shown less tendency to diverge over time in tropical forests, consistent with inferred acoustic restrictions. In addition, we find that song frequency has evolved more rapidly overall at high latitudes in both forest and open habitats. Besides a larger available sound window, other factors contributing to more rapid divergence at high latitudes may include an overall increased intensity of sexual selection, occupation of more divergent habitats, and the presence of fewer competing species. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  16. Fine-scale variation in vector host use and force of infection drive localized patterns of West Nile virus transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Gabriel L; Chaves, Luis F; Anderson, Tavis K; Kitron, Uriel D; Brawn, Jeffrey D; Ruiz, Marilyn O; Loss, Scott R; Walker, Edward D; Goldberg, Tony L

    2011-01-01

    The influence of host diversity on multi-host pathogen transmission and persistence can be confounded by the large number of species and biological interactions that can characterize many transmission systems. For vector-borne pathogens, the composition of host communities has been hypothesized to affect transmission; however, the specific characteristics of host communities that affect transmission remain largely unknown. We tested the hypothesis that vector host use and force of infection (i.e., the summed number of infectious mosquitoes resulting from feeding upon each vertebrate host within a community of hosts), and not simply host diversity or richness, determine local infection rates of West Nile virus (WNV) in mosquito vectors. In suburban Chicago, Illinois, USA, we estimated community force of infection for West Nile virus using data on Culex pipiens mosquito host selection and WNV vertebrate reservoir competence for each host species in multiple residential and semi-natural study sites. We found host community force of infection interacted with avian diversity to influence WNV infection in Culex mosquitoes across the study area. Two avian species, the American robin (Turdus migratorius) and the house sparrow (Passer domesticus), produced 95.8% of the infectious Cx. pipiens mosquitoes and showed a significant positive association with WNV infection in Culex spp. mosquitoes. Therefore, indices of community structure, such as species diversity or richness, may not be reliable indicators of transmission risk at fine spatial scales in vector-borne disease systems. Rather, robust assessment of local transmission risk should incorporate heterogeneity in vector host feeding and variation in vertebrate reservoir competence at the spatial scale of vector-host interaction.

  17. Fine-scale variation in vector host use and force of infection drive localized patterns of West Nile virus transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel L Hamer

    Full Text Available The influence of host diversity on multi-host pathogen transmission and persistence can be confounded by the large number of species and biological interactions that can characterize many transmission systems. For vector-borne pathogens, the composition of host communities has been hypothesized to affect transmission; however, the specific characteristics of host communities that affect transmission remain largely unknown. We tested the hypothesis that vector host use and force of infection (i.e., the summed number of infectious mosquitoes resulting from feeding upon each vertebrate host within a community of hosts, and not simply host diversity or richness, determine local infection rates of West Nile virus (WNV in mosquito vectors. In suburban Chicago, Illinois, USA, we estimated community force of infection for West Nile virus using data on Culex pipiens mosquito host selection and WNV vertebrate reservoir competence for each host species in multiple residential and semi-natural study sites. We found host community force of infection interacted with avian diversity to influence WNV infection in Culex mosquitoes across the study area. Two avian species, the American robin (Turdus migratorius and the house sparrow (Passer domesticus, produced 95.8% of the infectious Cx. pipiens mosquitoes and showed a significant positive association with WNV infection in Culex spp. mosquitoes. Therefore, indices of community structure, such as species diversity or richness, may not be reliable indicators of transmission risk at fine spatial scales in vector-borne disease systems. Rather, robust assessment of local transmission risk should incorporate heterogeneity in vector host feeding and variation in vertebrate reservoir competence at the spatial scale of vector-host interaction.

  18. Tectonics, orbital forcing, global climate change, and human evolution in Africa: introduction to the African paleoclimate special volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslin, Mark A; Christensen, Beth

    2007-11-01

    The late Cenozoic climate of Africa is a critical component for understanding human evolution. African climate is controlled by major tectonic changes, global climate transitions, and local variations in orbital forcing. We introduce the special African Paleoclimate Issue of the Journal of Human Evolution by providing a background for and synthesis of the latest work relating to the environmental context for human evolution. Records presented in this special issue suggest that the regional tectonics, appearance of C(4) plants in East Africa, and late Cenozoic global cooling combined to produce a long-term drying trend in East Africa. Of particular importance is the uplift associated with the East African Rift Valley formation, which altered wind flow patterns from a more zonal to more meridinal direction. Results in this volume suggest a marked difference in the climate history of southern and eastern Africa, though both are clearly influenced by the major global climate thresholds crossed in the last 3 million years. Papers in this volume present lake, speleothem, and marine paleoclimate records showing that the East African long-term drying trend is punctuated by episodes of short, alternating periods of extreme wetness and aridity. These periods of extreme climate variability are characterized by the precession-forced appearance and disappearance of large, deep lakes in the East African Rift Valley and paralleled by low and high wind-driven dust loads reaching the adjacent ocean basins. Dating of these records show that over the last 3 million years such periods only occur at the times of major global climatic transitions, such as the intensification of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation (2.7-2.5 Ma), intensification of the Walker Circulation (1.9-1.7 Ma), and the Mid-Pleistocene Revolution (1-0.7 Ma). Authors in this volume suggest this onset occurs as high latitude forcing in both Hemispheres compresses the Intertropical Convergence Zone so that East Africa

  19. The Temporal and Spatial Evolution of Momentum, Kinetic Energy and Force in Tsunami Waves during Breaking and Inundation

    CERN Document Server

    Marivela, Roberto; Synolakis, Costas

    2016-01-01

    A plethora of studies in the past decade describe tsunami hazards and study their evolution from the source to the target coastline, but mainly focus on coastal inundation and maximum runup. Nonetheless, anecdotal reports from eyewitnesses, photographs and videos suggest counterintuitive flow dynamics, for example rapid initial acceleration when the wave first strikes the initial shoreline. Further, the details of the flow field at or within tens of meters of the shoreline are exquisitely important in determining damage to structures and evacuation times. Based on a set of three-dimensional numerical simulations using solitary waves as a model, we show the spatial-temporal distribution of the flow momentum, kinetic energy and force during the breaking process. We infer that the flow reaches its highest destructive capacity not when flow momentum or kinetic energy reach their maxima, but when flow force reaches its. This occurs in the initial shoreline environment, which needs to be considered in nearshore str...

  20. Combat Pair: The Evolution of Air Force-Navy Integration in Strike Warfare

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lambeth, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    ... any significant interoperability features. The most influential factor accounting for this gradual trend toward integration was the nation's ten-year experience with Operations Northern and Southern Watch, in which both Air Force land-based...

  1. Bimodal atomic force microscopy driving the higher eigenmode in frequency-modulation mode: Implementation, advantages, disadvantages and comparison to the open-loop case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebeling, Daniel; Solares, Santiago D

    2013-01-01

    We present an overview of the bimodal amplitude-frequency-modulation (AM-FM) imaging mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM), whereby the fundamental eigenmode is driven by using the amplitude-modulation technique (AM-AFM) while a higher eigenmode is driven by using either the constant-excitation or the constant-amplitude variant of the frequency-modulation (FM-AFM) technique. We also offer a comparison to the original bimodal AFM method, in which the higher eigenmode is driven with constant frequency and constant excitation amplitude. General as well as particular characteristics of the different driving schemes are highlighted from theoretical and experimental points of view, revealing the advantages and disadvantages of each. This study provides information and guidelines that can be useful in selecting the most appropriate operation mode to characterize different samples in the most efficient and reliable way.

  2. Bimodal atomic force microscopy driving the higher eigenmode in frequency-modulation mode: Implementation, advantages, disadvantages and comparison to the open-loop case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ebeling

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present an overview of the bimodal amplitude–frequency-modulation (AM-FM imaging mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM, whereby the fundamental eigenmode is driven by using the amplitude-modulation technique (AM-AFM while a higher eigenmode is driven by using either the constant-excitation or the constant-amplitude variant of the frequency-modulation (FM-AFM technique. We also offer a comparison to the original bimodal AFM method, in which the higher eigenmode is driven with constant frequency and constant excitation amplitude. General as well as particular characteristics of the different driving schemes are highlighted from theoretical and experimental points of view, revealing the advantages and disadvantages of each. This study provides information and guidelines that can be useful in selecting the most appropriate operation mode to characterize different samples in the most efficient and reliable way.

  3. Dehydrogenation Kinetics and Modeling Studies of MgH2 Enhanced by Transition Metal Oxide Catalysts Using Constant Pressure Thermodynamic Driving Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saidi Temitope Sabitu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of transition metal oxide catalysts (ZrO2, CeO2, Fe3O4 and Nb2O5 on the hydrogen desorption kinetics of MgH2 was investigated using constant pressure thermodynamic driving forces in which the ratio of the equilibrium plateau pressure (pm to the opposing plateau (pop was the same in all the reactions studied. The results showed Nb2O5 to be vastly superior to other catalysts for improving the thermodynamics and kinetics of MgH2. The modeling studies showed reaction at the phase boundary to be likely process controlling the reaction rates of all the systems studied.

  4. Analysis of Urban-Rural Land-Use Change during 1995-2006 and Its Policy Dimensional Driving Forces in Chongqing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guihua Dong

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the urban-rural land-use change of Chongqing and its policydimensional driving forces from 1995 to 2006, using high-resolution Landsat TM(Thematic Mapper data of 1995, 2000 and 2006, and socio-economic data from bothresearch institutes and government departments. The outcomes indicated that urban-ruralland-use change in Chongqing can be characterized by two major trends: First, thenon-agricultural land increased substantially from 1995 to 2006, thus causing agriculturalland especially farmland to decrease continuously. Second, the aggregation index of urbansettlements and rural settlements shows that local urban-rural development experienced aprocess of changing from aggregation (1995-2000 to decentralization (2000-2006.Chongqing is a special area getting immersed in many important policies, which includethe establishment of the municipality directly under the Central Government, the buildingof Three Gorges Dam Project, the Western China Development Program and theGrain-for-Green Programme, and bring about tremendous influences on its land-usechange. By analyzing Chongqing’s land-use change and its policy driving forces, someimplications for its new policy of ‘Urban-rural Integrated Reform’ are obtained. That ismore attentions need to be paid to curbing excessive and idle rural housing andconsolidating rural construction land, and to laying out a scientific land-use plan for its rural areas taking such rural land-use issues as farmland occupation and rural housing landmanagement into accounts, so as to coordinate and balance the urban-rural development.

  5. Measuring forces and spatiotemporal evolution of thin water films between an air bubble and solid surfaces of different hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chen; Cui, Xin; Xie, Lei; Liu, Qingxia; Chan, Derek Y C; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-01-27

    A combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) was used to measure simultaneously the interaction force and the spatiotemporal evolution of the thin water film between a bubble in water and mica surfaces with varying degrees of hydrophobicity. Stable films, supported by the repulsive van der Waals-Casimir-Lifshitz force were always observed between air bubble and hydrophilic mica surfaces (water contact angle, θ(w) bubble attachment occurred on hydrophobized mica surfaces. A theoretical model, based on the Reynolds lubrication theory and the augmented Young-Laplace equation including the effects of disjoining pressure, provided excellent agreement with experiment results, indicating the essential physics involved in the interaction between air bubble and solid surfaces can be elucidated. A hydrophobic interaction free energy per unit area of the form: WH(h) = -γ(1 - cos θ(w))exp(-h/D(H)) can be used to quantify the attraction between bubble and hydrophobized solid substrate at separation, h, with γ being the surface tension of water. For surfaces with water contact angle in the range 45° bubble and hydrophobic surfaces, and provided a feasible method for synchronous measurements of the interaction forces with sub-nN resolution and the drainage dynamics of thin films down to nm thickness.

  6. Polycation-π interactions are a driving force for molecular recognition by an intrinsically disordered oncoprotein family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhui Song

    Full Text Available Molecular recognition by intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs commonly involves specific localized contacts and target-induced disorder to order transitions. However, some IDPs remain disordered in the bound state, a phenomenon coined "fuzziness", often characterized by IDP polyvalency, sequence-insensitivity and a dynamic ensemble of disordered bound-state conformations. Besides the above general features, specific biophysical models for fuzzy interactions are mostly lacking. The transcriptional activation domain of the Ewing's Sarcoma oncoprotein family (EAD is an IDP that exhibits many features of fuzziness, with multiple EAD aromatic side chains driving molecular recognition. Considering the prevalent role of cation-π interactions at various protein-protein interfaces, we hypothesized that EAD-target binding involves polycation- π contacts between a disordered EAD and basic residues on the target. Herein we evaluated the polycation-π hypothesis via functional and theoretical interrogation of EAD variants. The experimental effects of a range of EAD sequence variations, including aromatic number, aromatic density and charge perturbations, all support the cation-π model. Moreover, the activity trends observed are well captured by a coarse-grained EAD chain model and a corresponding analytical model based on interaction between EAD aromatics and surface cations of a generic globular target. EAD-target binding, in the context of pathological Ewing's Sarcoma oncoproteins, is thus seen to be driven by a balance between EAD conformational entropy and favorable EAD-target cation-π contacts. Such a highly versatile mode of molecular recognition offers a general conceptual framework for promiscuous target recognition by polyvalent IDPs.

  7. Fine-tuning translation kinetics selection as the driving force of codon usage bias in the hepatitis A virus capsid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Aragonès

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis A virus (HAV, the prototype of genus Hepatovirus, has several unique biological characteristics that distinguish it from other members of the Picornaviridae family. Among these, the need for an intact eIF4G factor for the initiation of translation results in an inability to shut down host protein synthesis by a mechanism similar to that of other picornaviruses. Consequently, HAV must inefficiently compete for the cellular translational machinery and this may explain its poor growth in cell culture. In this context of virus/cell competition, HAV has strategically adopted a naturally highly deoptimized codon usage with respect to that of its cellular host. With the aim to optimize its codon usage the virus was adapted to propagate in cells with impaired protein synthesis, in order to make tRNA pools more available for the virus. A significant loss of fitness was the immediate response to the adaptation process that was, however, later on recovered and more associated to a re-deoptimization rather than to an optimization of the codon usage specifically in the capsid coding region. These results exclude translation selection and instead suggest fine-tuning translation kinetics selection as the underlying mechanism of the codon usage bias in this specific genome region. Additionally, the results provide clear evidence of the Red Queen dynamics of evolution since the virus has very much evolved to re-adapt its codon usage to the environmental cellular changing conditions in order to recover the original fitness.

  8. Novel scheme for simulating the force-free equations: Boundary conditions and the evolution of solutions towards stationarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, F. L.; Reula, O. A.

    2017-09-01

    Force-free electrodynamics (FFE) describes a particular regime of magnetically dominated relativistic plasmas, which arises on several astrophysical scenarios of interest such as pulsars or active galactic nuclei. In this article, we present a full 3D numerical implementation of the FFE evolution around a Kerr black hole. The novelty of our approach is three-folded: (i) We use the "multiblock" technique [1 L. Lehner, O. Reula, and M.Tiglio, Multi-block simulations in general relativity: High-order discretizations, numerical stability and applications, Classical Quantum Gravity 22, 5283 (2005)., 10.1088/0264-9381/22/24/006] to represent a domain with S2×R+ topology within a stable finite-differences scheme. (ii) We employ as evolution equations those arising from a covariant hyperbolization of the FFE system [2 F. Carrasco and O. Reula, Covariant hyperbolization of force-free electrodynamics, Phys. Rev. D 93, 085013 (2016)., 10.1103/PhysRevD.93.085013]. (iii) We implement stable and constraint-preserving boundary conditions to represent an outer region given by a uniform magnetic field aligned or misaligned respect to the symmetry axis. The construction of appropriate and consistent boundary conditions, both preserving the constraints and physically immersing the system in a uniform magnetic field, has allowed us to obtain long-term stationary solutions representing jets of astrophysical relevance. These numerical solutions are shown to be consistent with previous studies.

  9. From Kites through Cold War: The Evolution of United States Air Force Manned Airborne ISR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-06

    D.C.: Air Force History and Museums Program, 1998), 1. 86 Gill Robb Wilson, “The Memories of a Pioneer,” Flying 61, no. 2 (August 1957): 41-51. 87...the Mexican Punitive Expedition of 1916,” (Washington, D.C.: Air Force History and Museums Program, 2003), 5; Hennessy, The United States Army Air ...Marne, 1914: The Opening of World War I and the Battle That Changed the World (New York, NY: Random House, 2009), 230. 29 Mead, Eye in the Air , 56

  10. Dewey's Logic and Social Autopoiesis: Creative Forces for/of Social (R)evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleener, M. Jayne

    This paper discusses how John Dewey's logic in his theory of inquiry can inform and perhaps guide efforts to re-form education and to allow the creative forces of emergence to affect and create adaptive social systems as learning organizations. The paper contends that Dewey's naturalistic theory of experience predated yet anticipated the…

  11. Low voltage electric potential as a driving force to hinder biofouling in self-supporting carbon nanotube membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamaraiselvan, Chidambaram; Ronen, Avner; Lerman, Sofia; Balaish, Moran; Ein-Eli, Yair; Dosoretz, Carlos G

    2017-11-03

    This study aimed at evaluating the contribution of low voltage electric field, both alternating (AC) and direct (DC) currents, on the prevention of bacterial attachment and cell inactivation to highly electrically conductive self-supporting carbon nanotubes (CNT) membranes at conditions which encourage biofilm formation. A mutant strain of Pseudomonas putida S12 was used a model bacterium and either capacitive or resistive electrical circuits and two flow regimes, flow-through and cross-flow filtration, were studied. Major emphasis was placed on AC due to its ability of repulsing and inactivating bacteria. AC voltage at 1.5 V, 1 kHz frequency and wave pulse above offset (+0.45) with 100Ω external resistance on the ground side prevented almost completely attachment of bacteria (>98.5%) with concomitant high inactivation (95.3 ± 2.5%) in flow-through regime. AC resulted more effective than DC, both in terms of biofouling reduction compared to cathodic DC and in terms of cell inactivation compared to anodic DC. Although similar trends were observed, a net reduced extent of prevention of bacterial attachment and inactivation was observed in filtration as compared to flow-through regime, which is mainly attributed to the permeate drag force, also supported by theoretical calculations in DC in capacitive mode. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis suggests a pure resistor behavior in resistance mode compared to involvement of redox reactions in capacitance mode, as source for bacteria detachment and inactivation. Although further optimization is required, electrically polarized CNT membranes offer a viable antibiofouling strategy to hinder biofouling and simplify membrane care during filtration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Duplications and Positive Selection Drive the Evolution of Parasitism-Associated Gene Families in the Nematode Strongyloides papillosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Praveen; Jaleta, Tegegn G; Streit, Adrian; Rödelsperger, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Gene duplication is a major mechanism playing a role in the evolution of phenotypic complexity and in the generation of novel traits. By comparing parasitic and nonparasitic nematodes, a recent study found that the evolution of parasitism in Strongyloididae is associated with a large expansion in the Astacin and CAP gene families.To gain novel insights into the developmental processes in the sheep parasite Strongyloides papillosus, we sequenced transcriptomes of different developmental stages and sexes. Overall, we found that the majority of genes are developmentally regulated and have one-to-one orthologs in the diverged S. ratti genome. Together with the finding of similar expression profiles between S. papillosus and S. ratti, these results indicate a strong evolutionary constraint acting against change at sequence and expression levels. However, the comparison between parasitic and free-living females demonstrates a quite divergent pattern that is mostly due to the previously mentioned expansion in the Astacin and CAP gene families. More detailed phylogenetic analysis of both gene families shows that most members date back to single expansion events early in the Strongyloides lineage and have undergone subfunctionalization resulting in clusters that are highly expressed either in infective larvae or in parasitic females. Finally, we found increased evidence for positive selection in both gene families relative to the genome-wide expectation.In summary, our study reveals first insights into the developmental transcriptomes of S. papillosus and provides a detailed analysis of sequence and expression evolution in parasitism-associated gene families. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  13. United theory of biological evolution: Disaster-forced evolution through Supernova, radioactive ash fall-outs, genome instability, and mass extinctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshikazu Ebisuzaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the disaster-forced biological evolution model as a general framework that includes Darwinian “phylogenic gradualism”, Eldredge-Gould's “punctuated equilibrium”, mass extinctions, and allopatric, parapatric, and sympatric speciation. It describes how reproductive isolation of organisms is established through global disasters due to supernova encounters and local disasters due to radioactive volcanic ash fall-outs by continental alkaline volcanism. Our new evolution model uniquely highlights three major factors of disaster-forced speciation: enhanced mutation rate by higher natural radiation level, smaller population size, and shrunken habitat size (i.e., isolation among the individual populations. We developed a mathematical model describing speciation of a half-isolated group from a parental group, taking into account the population size (Ne, immigration rate (m, and mutation rate (μ. The model gives a quantitative estimate of the speciation, which is consistent with the observations of speciation speed. For example, the speciation takes at least 105 generations, if mutation rate is less than 10−3 per generation per individual. This result is consistent with the previous studies, in which μ is assumed to be 10−3–10−5. On the other hand, the speciation is much faster (less than 105 generations for the case that μ is as large as 0.1 in parapatric conditions (m < μ. Even a sympatric (m ~ 1 speciation can occur within 103 generations, if mutation rate is very high (μ ~ 1 mutation per individual per generation, and if Ne < 20–30. Such a high mutation rate is possible during global disasters due to supernova encounters and local disasters due to radioactive ash fall-outs. They raise natural radiation level by a factor of 100–1000. Such rapid speciation events can also contribute to macro-evolution during mass extinction events, such as observed during the Cambrian explosion of biodiversity. A

  14. Forced evolution in silico by artificial transposons and their genetic operators: The ant navigation problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamdborg, Leonid; Holloway, David M.; Merelo, Juan J.; Levchenko, Vladimir F.; Spirov, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Modern evolutionary computation utilizes heuristic optimizations based upon concepts borrowed from the Darwinian theory of natural selection. Their demonstrated efficacy has reawakened an interest in other aspects of contemporary biology as an inspiration for new algorithms. However, amongst the many excellent candidates for study, contemporary models of biological macroevolution attract special attention. We believe that a vital direction in this field must be algorithms that model the activity of “genomic parasites”, such as transposons, in biological evolution. Many evolutionary biologists posit that it is the co-evolution of populations with their genomic parasites that permits the high efficiency of evolutionary searches found in the living world. This publication is our first step in the direction of developing a minimal assortment of algorithms that simulate the role of genomic parasites. Specifically, we started in the domain of genetic algorithms (GA) and selected the Artificial Ant Problem as a test case. This navigation problem is widely known as a classical benchmark test and possesses a large body of literature. We add new objects to the standard toolkit of GA - artificial transposons and a collection of operators that operate on them. We define these artificial transposons as a fragment of an ant's code with properties that cause it to stand apart from the rest. The minimal set of operators for transposons is a transposon mutation operator, and a transposon reproduction operator that causes a transposon to multiply within the population of hosts. An analysis of the population dynamics of transposons within the course of ant evolution showed that transposons are involved in the processes of propagation and selection of blocks of ant navigation programs. During this time, the speed of evolutionary search increases significantly. We concluded that artificial transposons, analogous to real transposons, are truly capable of acting as intelligent

  15. Unlocking the biogeochemical black box: What drives microbial response to climate forcing in semi-arid soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravec, B. G.; McLain, J. E.; Lohse, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    Microbial mediated cycling of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) and their loss from soils are closely linked to soil moisture and temperature. Yet, it is unclear how microbial communities will respond to climatic forcing (namely increased inter-annual precipitation variability and severe drought) and to what extent parent material controls these responses. We used Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) and C utilization assays to determine the relative abundance and diversity of microbial populations during pre-, mid- and post-monsoon time intervals at four sites along a steep elevation gradient (temperature and precipitation range of >10°C and >50 cm, respectively) in the Santa Catalina Mountains, AZ. Contrasting parent materials (schist and granite) were paired at elevations. RT-PCR results showed large increases of bacterial and fungal biomarkers at high elevations with the onset of precipitation (pre- to mid- monsoon conditions) (as much as 824%). In contrast, bacteria biomarkers did not change at low elevation granite site as a result of the onset of precipitation whereas fungal biomarkers increased by 177% at this site. Both bacteria and fungal biomarkers increased substantially at low elevation schist sites with the onset of precipitation. Finally, C utilization assays indicated that high elevation sites had a relatively high diversity of C utilization compared to low elevation soils. We hypothesize that increased bacterial and fungal abundance in low elevation schist-derived soils relative to granite soils after the onset of monsoon rains may be a function of soil texture, with higher clay content in schist soils leading to higher soil moisture availability. Alternatively, differences in microbial responses may be due to higher C availability in schist soils compared to granite soils. Higher C utilization diversity as well as similar bacteria and fungal biomarker responses found at high elevation sites (both granite and schist soils) in response to

  16. The temporal nature of forces acting on metal drops in gas metal arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, L.A.; Eagar, T.W.; Lang, J.H. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    At moderate and high welding currents, the most important forces in gas metal arc welding acting on the molten electrode are magnetic forces arising from the interaction between the welding current and its own magnetic field. These forces drive the dynamic evolution of the drop and also depend on the instantaneous shape of the drop. IN this paper, experimentally observed manifestations of magnetic forces are shown, and a technique for approximating the temporal evolution of these forces from experimentally measured drops shapes is reported. The technique provides quantitative data illustrating the large increase in the magnetic forces as a drop detaches from the electrode.

  17. The temporal nature of forces acting on metal drops in gas metal arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, L.A.; Eagar, T.W.; Lang, J.H. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    At moderate and high welding currents, the most important forces in gas metal arc welding acting on the molten electrode are magnetic forces arising from the interaction between the welding current and its own magnetic field. These forces drive the dynamic evolution of the drop and also depend on the instantaneous shape of the drop. In this paper, experimentally observed manifestations of magnetic forces are shown, and a technique for approximating the temporal evolution of these forces from experimentally measured drop shapes is reported. The technique provides quantitative data illustrating the large increase in the magnetic forces as a drop detaches from the electrode.

  18. Reactive oxygen species drive evolution of pro-biofilm variants in pathogens by modulating cyclic-di-GMP levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chua, Song Lin; Ding, Yichen; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    an experimental evolution strategy, we show that exposure of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa to sub-lethal hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels over 120 generations led to the emergence of pro-biofilm rough small colony variants (RSCVs), which could be abrogated by l-glutathione antioxidants....... Comparative genomic analysis of the RSCVs revealed that mutations in the wspF gene, which encodes for a repressor of WspR diguanylate cyclase (DGC), were responsible for increased intracellular cyclic-di-GMP content and production of Psl exopolysaccharide. Psl provides the first line of defence against ROS...

  19. Distinct phases of eustatic and tectonic forcing for late Quaternary landscape evolution in southwest Crete, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouslopoulou, Vasiliki; Begg, John; Fülling, Alexander; Moraetis, Daniel; Partsinevelos, Panagiotis; Oncken, Onno

    2017-09-01

    The extent to which climate, eustasy and tectonics interact to shape the late Quaternary landscape is poorly known. Alluvial fans often provide useful indexes that allow the decoding of information recorded on complex coastal landscapes, such as those of the eastern Mediterranean. In this paper we analyse and date (using infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) dating) a double alluvial fan system on southwest Crete, an island straddling the forearc of the Hellenic subduction margin, in order to constrain the timing and magnitude of its vertical deformation and discuss the factors contributing to its landscape evolution. The studied alluvial system is exceptional because each of its two juxtaposed fans records individual phases of alluvial and marine incision, thus providing unprecedented resolution in the formation and evolution of its landscape. Specifically, our analysis shows that the fan sequence at Domata developed during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 due to five distinct stages of marine transgressions and regressions and associated river incision, in response to sea-level fluctuations and tectonic uplift at averaged rates of ˜ 2.2 mm yr-1. Interestingly, comparison of our results with published tectonic uplift rates from western Crete shows that uplift during 20-50 kyr BP was minimal (or even negative). Thus, most of the uplift recorded at Domata must have occurred in the last 20 kyr. This implies that eustasy and tectonism impacted the landscape at Domata over mainly distinct time intervals (e.g. sequentially and not synchronously), with eustasy forming and tectonism preserving the coastal landforms.

  20. The evolution of vertical climbing in primates: evidence from reaction forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Jandy B; Granatosky, Michael C; Rana, Pooja; Schmitt, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Vertical climbing is an essential behavior for arboreal animals, yet limb mechanics during climbing are poorly understood and rarely compared with those observed during horizontal walking. Primates commonly engage in both arboreal walking and vertical climbing, and this makes them an ideal taxa in which to compare these locomotor forms. Additionally, primates exhibit unusual limb mechanics compared with most other quadrupeds, with weight distribution biased towards the hindlimbs, a pattern that is argued to have evolved in response to the challenges of arboreal walking. Here we test an alternative hypothesis that functional differentiation between the limbs evolved initially as a response to climbing. Eight primate species were recorded locomoting on instrumented vertical and horizontal simulated arboreal runways. Forces along the axis of, and normal to, the support were recorded. During walking, all primates displayed forelimbs that were net braking, and hindlimbs that were net propulsive. In contrast, both limbs served a propulsive role during climbing. In all species, except the lorisids, the hindlimbs produced greater propulsive forces than the forelimbs during climbing. During climbing, the hindlimbs tends to support compressive loads, while the forelimb forces tend to be primarily tensile. This functional disparity appears to be body-size dependent. The tensile loading of the forelimbs versus the compressive loading of the hindlimbs observed during climbing may have important evolutionary implications for primates, and it may be the case that hindlimb-biased weight support exhibited during quadrupedal walking in primates may be derived from their basal condition of climbing thin branches. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Differential thermodynamic driving force of first- and second-generation antihistamines to determine their binding affinity for human H1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishinuma, Shigeru; Sugawara, Kenta; Uesawa, Yoshihiro; Fukui, Hiroyuki; Shoji, Masaru

    2014-09-15

    Differential binding sites for first- and second-generation antihistamines were indicated on the basis of the crystal structure of human histamine H1 receptors. In this study, we evaluated differences between the thermodynamic driving forces of first- and second-generation antihistamines for human H1 receptors and their structural determinants. The binding enthalpy and entropy of 20 antihistamines were estimated with the van't Hoff equation using their dissociation constants obtained from their displacement curves against the binding of [(3)H]mepyramine to membrane preparations of Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing human H1 receptors at various temperatures from 4°C to 37°C. Structural determinants of antihistamines for their thermodynamic binding properties were assessed by quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses. We found that entropy-dependent binding was more evident in second- than first-generation antihistamines, resulting in enthalpy-entropy compensation between the binding forces of first- and second-generation antihistamines. QSAR analyses indicated that enthalpy-entropy compensation was determined by the sum of degrees, maximal electrostatic potentials, water-accessible surface area and hydrogen binding acceptor count of antihistamines to regulate their affinity for receptors. In conclusion, it was revealed that entropy-dependent hydrophobic interaction was more important in the binding of second-generation antihistamines, even though the hydrophilicity of second-generation antihistamines is generally increased. Furthermore, their structural determinants responsible for enthalpy-entropy compensation were explored by QSAR analyses. These findings may contribute to understanding the fundamental mechanisms of how the affinity of ligands for their receptors is regulated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The morphological development of newly inundated intertidal areas: the mechanisms driving the early evolution of an estuarine environment designed and constructed by humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Jonathan; Burgess, Heidi; Cundy, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Intertidal saltmarsh and mudflat habitats are of global importance due to the ecosystem, economic and cultural services they provide. These services include wildlife habitat provision and species diversity, immobilisation of pollutants and protection from coastal flooding. Saltmarsh and mudflat environments are, however, being lost and degraded due to erosion caused by rising sea levels and increased storminess. These losses are exacerbated by anthropogenic influences including land reclamation, increased coastal development and the construction of coastal flood defences which prevent the landwards migration of saltmarsh and mudflat environments, resulting in coastal squeeze. To compensate for saltmarsh and mudflat losses areas of the coastal hinterland are being inundated by breaching defences and constructing new defences inland, thus extending or constructing new estuarine environments; a processes known as de-embankment or managed realignment. Morphological engineering and landscaping within managed realignment sites prior to site inundation varies depending on the aims of the scheme. However, there is a shortage of data on the morphological evolution within these sites post site inundation impeding the ability of coastal engineers to effectively design and construct future sites. To date there has been a focus on the colonisation of marine macro fauna and flora within newly inundated managed realignment sites, which can be relatively rapid and easily quantified. Little is known of the morphological evolution in response to altered sedimentary processes, its driving mechanisms and therefore the success and ecological sustainability of these sites. This study evaluates the post-inundation morphological development of the largest open coast managed realignment site in Europe, at Medmerry on the south coast of the United Kingdom. Inundated in September 2013, the Medmerry Managed Realignment Site consists of a mosaic of former agricultural land and areas of lower

  3. Speciation and extinction drive the appearance of directional range size evolution in phylogenies and the fossil record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigot, Alex L; Owens, Ian P F; Orme, C David L

    2012-01-01

    While the geographic range of a species is a fundamental unit of macroecology and a leading predictor of extinction risk, the evolutionary dynamics of species' ranges remain poorly understood. Based on statistical associations between range size and species age, many studies have claimed support for general models of range evolution in which the area occupied by a species varies predictably over the course of its life. Such claims have been made using both paleontological data and molecular estimates of the age of extant species. However, using a stochastic model, we show that the appearance of trends in range size with species' age can arise even when range sizes have evolved at random through time. This occurs because the samples of species used in existing studies are likely to be biased with respect to range size: for example, only those species that happened to have large or expanding ranges are likely to survive to the present, while extinct species will tend to be those whose ranges, by chance, declined through time. We compared the relationship between the age and range size of species arising under our stochastic model to those observed across 1,269 species of extant birds and mammals and 140 species of extinct Cenozoic marine mollusks. We find that the stochastic model is able to generate the full spectrum of empirical age-area relationships, implying that such trends cannot be simply interpreted as evidence for models of directional range size evolution. Our results therefore challenge the theory that species undergo predictable phases of geographic expansion and contraction through time.

  4. Speciation and Extinction Drive the Appearance of Directional Range Size Evolution in Phylogenies and the Fossil Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigot, Alex L.; Owens, Ian P. F.; Orme, C. David L.

    2012-01-01

    While the geographic range of a species is a fundamental unit of macroecology and a leading predictor of extinction risk, the evolutionary dynamics of species' ranges remain poorly understood. Based on statistical associations between range size and species age, many studies have claimed support for general models of range evolution in which the area occupied by a species varies predictably over the course of its life. Such claims have been made using both paleontological data and molecular estimates of the age of extant species. However, using a stochastic model, we show that the appearance of trends in range size with species' age can arise even when range sizes have evolved at random through time. This occurs because the samples of species used in existing studies are likely to be biased with respect to range size: for example, only those species that happened to have large or expanding ranges are likely to survive to the present, while extinct species will tend to be those whose ranges, by chance, declined through time. We compared the relationship between the age and range size of species arising under our stochastic model to those observed across 1,269 species of extant birds and mammals and 140 species of extinct Cenozoic marine mollusks. We find that the stochastic model is able to generate the full spectrum of empirical age–area relationships, implying that such trends cannot be simply interpreted as evidence for models of directional range size evolution. Our results therefore challenge the theory that species undergo predictable phases of geographic expansion and contraction through time. PMID:22371689

  5. Speciation and extinction drive the appearance of directional range size evolution in phylogenies and the fossil record.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex L Pigot

    Full Text Available While the geographic range of a species is a fundamental unit of macroecology and a leading predictor of extinction risk, the evolutionary dynamics of species' ranges remain poorly understood. Based on statistical associations between range size and species age, many studies have claimed support for general models of range evolution in which the area occupied by a species varies predictably over the course of its life. Such claims have been made using both paleontological data and molecular estimates of the age of extant species. However, using a stochastic model, we show that the appearance of trends in range size with species' age can arise even when range sizes have evolved at random through time. This occurs because the samples of species used in existing studies are likely to be biased with respect to range size: for example, only those species that happened to have large or expanding ranges are likely to survive to the present, while extinct species will tend to be those whose ranges, by chance, declined through time. We compared the relationship between the age and range size of species arising under our stochastic model to those observed across 1,269 species of extant birds and mammals and 140 species of extinct Cenozoic marine mollusks. We find that the stochastic model is able to generate the full spectrum of empirical age-area relationships, implying that such trends cannot be simply interpreted as evidence for models of directional range size evolution. Our results therefore challenge the theory that species undergo predictable phases of geographic expansion and contraction through time.

  6. Female mate choice can drive the evolution of high frequency echolocation in bats: a case study with Rhinolophus mehelyi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien J Puechmaille

    Full Text Available Animals employ an array of signals (i.e. visual, acoustic, olfactory for communication. Natural selection favours signals, receptors, and signalling behaviour that optimise the received signal relative to background noise. When the signal is used for more than one function, antagonisms amongst the different signalling functions may constrain the optimisation of the signal for any one function. Sexual selection through mate choice can strongly modify the effects of natural selection on signalling systems ultimately causing maladaptive signals to evolve. Echolocating bats represent a fascinating group in which to study the evolution of signalling systems as unlike bird songs or frog calls, echolocation has a dual role in foraging and communication. The function of bat echolocation is to generate echoes that the calling bat uses for orientation and food detection with call characteristics being directly related to the exploitation of particular ecological niches. Therefore, it is commonly assumed that echolocation has been shaped by ecology via natural selection. Here we demonstrate for the first time using a novel combined behavioural, ecological and genetic approach that in a bat species, Rhinolophus mehelyi: (1 echolocation peak frequency is an honest signal of body size; (2 females preferentially select males with high frequency calls during the mating season; (3 high frequency males sire more off-spring, providing evidence that echolocation calls may play a role in female mate choice. Our data refute the sole role of ecology in the evolution of echolocation and highlight the antagonistic interplay between natural and sexual selection in shaping acoustic signals.

  7. Distinct phases of eustatic and tectonic forcing for late Quaternary landscape evolution in southwest Crete, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Mouslopoulou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The extent to which climate, eustasy and tectonics interact to shape the late Quaternary landscape is poorly known. Alluvial fans often provide useful indexes that allow the decoding of information recorded on complex coastal landscapes, such as those of the eastern Mediterranean. In this paper we analyse and date (using infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL dating a double alluvial fan system on southwest Crete, an island straddling the forearc of the Hellenic subduction margin, in order to constrain the timing and magnitude of its vertical deformation and discuss the factors contributing to its landscape evolution. The studied alluvial system is exceptional because each of its two juxtaposed fans records individual phases of alluvial and marine incision, thus providing unprecedented resolution in the formation and evolution of its landscape. Specifically, our analysis shows that the fan sequence at Domata developed during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS 3 due to five distinct stages of marine transgressions and regressions and associated river incision, in response to sea-level fluctuations and tectonic uplift at averaged rates of  ∼ 2.2 mm yr−1. Interestingly, comparison of our results with published tectonic uplift rates from western Crete shows that uplift during 20–50 kyr BP was minimal (or even negative. Thus, most of the uplift recorded at Domata must have occurred in the last 20 kyr. This implies that eustasy and tectonism impacted the landscape at Domata over mainly distinct time intervals (e.g. sequentially and not synchronously, with eustasy forming and tectonism preserving the coastal landforms.

  8. Proton Gradients as a Key Physical Factor in the Evolution of the Forced Transport Mechanism Across the Lipid Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strbak, Oliver; Kanuchova, Zuzana; Krafcik, Andrej

    2016-11-01

    A critical phase in the transition from prebiotic chemistry to biological evolution was apparently an asymmetric ion flow across the lipid membrane. Due to imbalance in the ion flow, the early lipid vesicles could selectively take the necessary molecules from the environment, and release the side-products from the vesicle. Natural proton gradients played a definitively crucial role in this process, since they remain the basis of energy transfer in the present-day cells. On the basis of this supposition, and the premise of the early vesicle membrane's impermeability to protons, we have shown that the emergence of the proton gradient in the lipid vesicle could be a key physical factor in the evolution of the forced transport mechanism (pore formation and active transport) across the lipid bilayer. This driven flow of protons across the membrane is the result of the electrochemical proton gradient and osmotic pressures on the integrity of the lipid vesicle. At a critical number of new lipid molecules incorporated into the vesicle, the energies associated with the creation of the proton gradient exceed the bending stiffness of the lipid membrane, and overlap the free energy of the lipid bilayer pore formation.

  9. Proton Gradients as a Key Physical Factor in the Evolution of the Forced Transport Mechanism Across the Lipid Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strbak, Oliver; Kanuchova, Zuzana; Krafcik, Andrej

    2016-11-01

    A critical phase in the transition from prebiotic chemistry to biological evolution was apparently an asymmetric ion flow across the lipid membrane. Due to imbalance in the ion flow, the early lipid vesicles could selectively take the necessary molecules from the environment, and release the side-products from the vesicle. Natural proton gradients played a definitively crucial role in this process, since they remain the basis of energy transfer in the present-day cells. On the basis of this supposition, and the premise of the early vesicle membrane's impermeability to protons, we have shown that the emergence of the proton gradient in the lipid vesicle could be a key physical factor in the evolution of the forced transport mechanism (pore formation and active transport) across the lipid bilayer. This driven flow of protons across the membrane is the result of the electrochemical proton gradient and osmotic pressures on the integrity of the lipid vesicle. At a critical number of new lipid molecules incorporated into the vesicle, the energies associated with the creation of the proton gradient exceed the bending stiffness of the lipid membrane, and overlap the free energy of the lipid bilayer pore formation.

  10. Full description of copper uptake by algal biomass combining an equilibrium NICA model with a kinetic intraparticle diffusion driving force approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Roberto; Lodeiro, Pablo; García-Casal, Lino J; Vilariño, Teresa; Rey-Castro, Carlos; David, Calin; Rodríguez, Pilar

    2011-02-01

    In this work kinetic and equilibrium studies related to copper binding to the protonated macroalga Sargassum muticum are reported. An intraparticle-diffusion linear driving force (LDF) model has been chosen for the quantitative description of the kinetics at several initial metal concentrations. Copper intraparticle homogeneous diffusion coefficient (D(h)) obtained is in the range 0.2-0.9×10(-10) m(2) s(-1). NICA isotherm is demonstrated to constitute a substantial improvement with respect to a simpler Langmuir competitive equation. The binding parameters were chosen to provide the best simultaneous description of the equilibrium experiments. Values of log K(Cu) (4.3), n(Cu) (1) and p (0.31) in NICA isotherm, and log K(Cu) (3.5-5) in Langmuir competitive model, have been obtained. These parameters have been also used to predict the competition between copper and cadmium for binding sites. Two acids, HNO(3) and HCl, have been tested to evaluate their effectiveness to release copper from the metal-laden biomass. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A thermo-mechanical correlation with driving forces for hcp martensite and twin formations in the Fe–Mn–C system exhibiting multicomposition sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinichiro Nakano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermodynamic properties of the Fe–Mn–C system were investigated by using an analytical model constructed by a CALPHAD approach. The stacking fault energy (SFE of the fcc structure with respect to the hcp phase was always constant at T0, independent of the composition and temperature when other related parameters were assumed to be constant. Experimental limits for the thermal hcp formation and the mechanical (deformation-induced hcp formation were separated by the SFE at T0. The driving force for the fcc to hcp transition, defined as a dimensionless value –dGm/(RT, was determined in the presence of Fe-rich and Mn-rich composition sets in each phase. Carbon tended to partition to the Mn-rich phase rather than to the Fe-rich phase for the compositions studied. The results obtained revealed a thermo-mechanical correlation with empirical yield strength, maximum true stress and maximum true strain. The proportionality between thermodynamics and mechanical properties is discussed.

  12. Nature of macroeconomic equilibrium and driving force of economic cycles in the light of difference between money and exergy forms in cost estimations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandura, A.V. [National Politechnical Univ., Kiev (Ukraine); Brodianskii, V.M. [Moscow Power Engineering Inst. Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1996-11-01

    The main problem of exergy application directly in economic analysis is to find valid correlation between money-based cost and exergy based one (including exergy expenses of labour) and to define exergy cost as an economic category among the existing traditional economic ones. The present report is aimed to search the way for this macroeconomic problems` solution. It is demonstrated that exergy-based cost can be recalculated in a monetary form using a coefficient, defined as a ratio between money supply and the total exergy of all natural resources involved in production process, i.e. as a ratio between monetary and exergy bases. The difference between `natural` and current prices (P) can be used directly both for general quantitative characteristics of an economic cycles driving force and for control of market relationship imperfection. It is shown that for the period of time with the positive P, that is, current price is lower than a `natural` one, the recoveries in business cycles are observed. For the period of time with the negative P, that is, current price is higher than a natural one, economic recessions are observed. The moment of time when P = 0 corresponds to the turning point of a business cycle. In such a way the possibility to predict the turning points of business cycles is demonstrated. 14 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  13. Daylighting as the Driving Force of the Design Process: from the Results of a Survey to the Implementation into an Advanced Daylighting Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio R.M. Lo Verso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study for the transformation of an industrial area in Turin, Italy. The area hosts two buildings (one of which appointed as listed to be transformed into dwellings. A synergic approach was adopted which combined expertise from architecture, social-economics, psychology and building physics sciences. Building physics sciences lead the research team. A user-centered design was pursued, using a bottom-up approach. A specifically developed questionnaire was submitted on-line to potential users. The survey showed that ‘amount of daylight’, ‘size of rooms’, ‘tranquility of the area’ and ‘presence of a private garden’ were perceived by users to be the most positive aspects of both their present and future, ideal home. These results were then implemented into the project. The exploitation of daylight became the driving force of the transformation project. Especially for the listed building, skylights and light wells were designed to bring daylight into the cores of the buildings, which host common spaces such as libraries or study rooms. The amount of daylight was assessed through the legislative index of the average daylight factor and through a climate-based modeling approach, calculating dynamic metrics such as the spatial daylight autonomy and the Useful Daylight Illuminance. The paper critically compares and discusses these two approaches. Finally, the energy demand for lighting was also calculated to analyze how the increased exploitation of daylight may imply a reduced need for electricity for lighting.

  14. From sequence and forces to structure, function, and evolution of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman-Kay, Julie D; Mittag, Tanja

    2013-09-03

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), which lack persistent structure, are a challenge to structural biology due to the inapplicability of standard methods for characterization of folded proteins as well as their deviation from the dominant structure/function paradigm. Their widespread presence and involvement in biological function, however, has spurred the growing acceptance of the importance of IDPs and the development of new tools for studying their structure, dynamics, and function. The interplay of folded and disordered domains or regions for function and the existence of a continuum of protein states with respect to conformational energetics, motional timescales, and compactness are shaping a unified understanding of structure-dynamics-disorder/function relationships. In the 20(th) anniversary of Structure, we provide a historical perspective on the investigation of IDPs and summarize the sequence features and physical forces that underlie their unique structural, functional, and evolutionary properties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Was skin cancer a selective force for black pigmentation in early hominin evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Mel

    2014-01-01

    Melanin provides a crucial filter for solar UV radiation and its genetically determined variation influences both skin pigmentation and risk of cancer. Genetic evidence suggests that the acquisition of a highly stable melanocortin 1 receptor allele promoting black pigmentation arose around the time of savannah colonization by hominins at some 1–2 Ma. The adaptive significance of dark skin is generally believed to be protection from UV damage but the pathologies that might have had a deleterious impact on survival and/or reproductive fitness, though much debated, are uncertain. Here, I suggest that data on age-associated cancer incidence and lethality in albinos living at low latitudes in both Africa and Central America support the contention that skin cancer could have provided a potent selective force for the emergence of black skin in early hominins. PMID:24573849

  16. Patterns of maximum body size evolution in Cenozoic land mammals: eco-evolutionary processes and abiotic forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarinen, Juha J.; Boyer, Alison G.; Brown, James H.; Costa, Daniel P.; Ernest, S. K. Morgan; Evans, Alistair R.; Fortelius, Mikael; Gittleman, John L.; Hamilton, Marcus J.; Harding, Larisa E.; Lintulaakso, Kari; Lyons, S. Kathleen; Okie, Jordan G.; Sibly, Richard M.; Stephens, Patrick R.; Theodor, Jessica; Uhen, Mark D.; Smith, Felisa A.

    2014-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that macroevolutionary patterns of mammal evolution during the Cenozoic follow similar trajectories on different continents. This would suggest that such patterns are strongly determined by global abiotic factors, such as climate, or by basic eco-evolutionary processes such as filling of niches by specialization. The similarity of pattern would be expected to extend to the history of individual clades. Here, we investigate the temporal distribution of maximum size observed within individual orders globally and on separate continents. While the maximum size of individual orders of large land mammals show differences and comprise several families, the times at which orders reach their maximum size over time show strong congruence, peaking in the Middle Eocene, the Oligocene and the Plio-Pleistocene. The Eocene peak occurs when global temperature and land mammal diversity are high and is best explained as a result of niche expansion rather than abiotic forcing. Since the Eocene, there is a significant correlation between maximum size frequency and global temperature proxy. The Oligocene peak is not statistically significant and may in part be due to sampling issues. The peak in the Plio-Pleistocene occurs when global temperature and land mammal diversity are low, it is statistically the most robust one and it is best explained by global cooling. We conclude that the macroevolutionary patterns observed are a result of the interplay between eco-evolutionary processes and abiotic forcing. PMID:24741007

  17. Evolution of Lake Turkana level at the end of the African Humid Period: modalities and forcings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutz, A.; Schuster, M.

    2015-12-01

    The African Humid Period (AHP), ca. 11,000 to 5,000 years ago, is a major phase that had significant impacts on the environments, ecosystems, and human occupation of Africa over several millennia. One of the most marked aspects stemming from an increase in rainfall during this climate period was the creation of numerous regional lakes and the recording of highstands for these waterbodies. The termination of the AHP is known to have been time-transgressive depending on the location, being either abrupt or gradual, thereby highlighting the complex interaction among multiple forcings and responses. Lake Turkana is one of the great lakes of the East African Rift where chronology of the AHP termination has already been investigated. In this study, the delta complex of the Turkwel River is analyzed using trajectory analysis in order to provide modalities of lake level decline during that time. Trajectories reveal six slightly descending (slope gradient: >0° to 0.4°) plateaus separated by four abrupt steps having higher slope gradients (1° to 3.8°). These abrupt steps reveal repeated short-lived strong increases in the rate of lake level decline that are superimposed on the relatively steady lake level decrease characterizing this period. This marks a stepwise forced regression at the end of the AHP in the Lake Turkana. We correlate the short-lived increases in the rate of lake level decline with short-lived abrupt decreases of solar irradiance. Through the termination of the AHP, the abrupt decreases in solar irradiance modulated the continuous precessional-based reduction of solar insulation that drastically impacted monsoon activity (i.e. rainfall) and led to variations in lake levels as a response. This suggests that short-term solar variability is able to modulate longer-term orbitally-driven climate trends having significant impacts in terms of hydrology and the regional continental environments.

  18. Driving forces of researchers mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, Floriana; Carletti, Timoteo

    2014-05-01

    Starting from the dataset of the publication corpus of the APS during the period 1955-2009, we reconstruct the individual researchers trajectories, namely the list of the consecutive affiliations for each scholar. Crossing this information with different geographic datasets we embed these trajectories in a spatial framework. Using methods from network theory and complex systems analysis we characterise these patterns in terms of topological network properties and we analyse the dependence of an academic path across different dimensions: the distance between two subsequent positions, the relative importance of the institutions (in terms of number of publications) and some socio-cultural traits. We show that distance is not always a good predictor for the next affiliation while other factors like ``the previous steps'' of the career of the researchers (in particular the first position) or the linguistic and historical similarity between two countries can have an important impact. Finally we show that the dataset exhibit a memory effect, hence the fate of a career strongly depends from the first two affiliations.

  19. A Driving Force in NASCAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    Minority participation and interest in sports is legendary--depending on what sport you are talking about. Blacks have long been a major factor in the popularity of basketball and football. Tiger Woods' success has contributed to an explosion of interest in golf within the Black community. Arthur Ashe brought tennis into the Black consciousness,…

  20. Carbonaceous aerosols and pollutants over Delhi urban environment: Temporal evolution, source apportionment and radiative forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisht, D.S. [Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, New Delhi (India); Dumka, U.C., E-mail: dumka@aries.res.in [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences, Nainital (India); Kaskaoutis, D.G. [School of Natural Sciences, Shiv Nadar University, Tehsil Dadri (India); Pipal, A.S. [Department of Chemistry, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune (India); Srivastava, A.K. [Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, New Delhi (India); Soni, V.K.; Attri, S.D.; Sateesh, M. [India Meteorology Department, Lodhi Road, New Delhi (India); Tiwari, S. [Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, New Delhi (India)

    2015-07-15

    Particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}) samples were collected over Delhi, India during January to December 2012 and analysed for carbonaceous aerosols and inorganic ions (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} and NO{sub 3}{sup −}) in order to examine variations in atmospheric chemistry, combustion sources and influence of long-range transport. The PM{sub 2.5} samples are measured (offline) via medium volume air samplers and analysed gravimetrically for carbonaceous (organic carbon, OC; elemental carbon, EC) aerosols and inorganic ions (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} and NO{sub 3}{sup −}). Furthermore, continuous (online) measurements of PM{sub 2.5} (via Beta-attenuation analyser), black carbon (BC) mass concentration (via Magee scientific Aethalometer) and carbon monoxide (via CO-analyser) are carried out. PM{sub 2.5} (online) range from 18.2 to 500.6 μg m{sup −3} (annual mean of 124.6 ± 87.9 μg m{sup −3}) exhibiting higher night-time (129.4 μg m{sup −3}) than daytime (103.8 μg m{sup −3}) concentrations. The online concentrations are 38% and 28% lower than the offline during night and day, respectively. In general, larger night-time concentrations are found for the BC, OC, NO{sub 3}{sup −}and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}, which are seasonally dependent with larger differences during late post-monsoon and winter. The high correlation (R{sup 2} = 0.74) between OC and EC along with the OC/EC of 7.09 (day time) and 4.55 (night-time), suggest significant influence of biomass-burning emissions (burning of wood and agricultural waste) as well as secondary organic aerosol formation during daytime. Concentrated weighted trajectory (CWT) analysis reveals that the potential sources for the carbonaceous aerosols and pollutants are local emissions within the urban environment and transported smoke from agricultural burning in northwest India during post-monsoon. BC radiative forcing estimates result in very high atmospheric heating rates (~ 1.8–2.0 K day{sup −1}) due to agricultural burning effects

  1. Forced current sheet structure, formation and evolution: application to magnetic reconnection in the magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Domrin

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available By means of a simulation model, the earlier predicted nonlinear kinetic structure, a Forced Kinetic Current Sheet (FKCS, with extremely anisotropic ion distributions, is shown to appear as a result of a fast nonlinear process of transition from a previously existing equilibrium. This occurs under triggering action of a weak MHD disturbance that is applied at the boundary of the simulation box. In the FKCS, current is carried by initially cold ions which are brought into the CS by convection from both sides, and accelerated inside the CS. The process then appears to be spontaneously self-sustained, as a MHD disturbance of a rarefaction wave type propagates over the background plasma outside the CS. Comparable to the Alfvénic discontinuity in MHD, transformation of electromagnetic energy into the energy of plasma flows occurs at the FKCS. But unlike the MHD case, ``free" energy is produced here: dissipation should occur later, through particle interaction with turbulent waves generated by unstable ion distribution being formed by the FKCS action. In this way, an effect of magnetic field ``annihilation" appears, required for fast magnetic reconnection. Application of the theory to observations at the magnetopause and in the magnetotail is considered.

  2. Revealing the Driving Forces of Mid-Cities Urban Growth Patterns Using Spatial Modeling: a Case Study of Los Ángeles, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio I. Aguayo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available City growth and changes in land-use patterns cause various important social and environmental impacts. To understand the spatial and temporal dynamics of these processes, the factors that drive urban development must be identified and analyzed, especially those factors that can be used to predict future changes and their potential environmental effects. Our objectives were to quantify the relationship between urban growth and its driving forces and to predict the spatial growth pattern based on historical land-use changes for the city of Los Ángeles in central Chile. This involved the analysis of images from 1978, 1992, and 1998 and characterization of the spatial pattern of land-use change; the construction of digital coverage in GIS; the selection of predictive variables through univariate analysis; the construction of logistic regression models using growth vs. nongrowth for 1978-1992 as the dependent variable; and the prediction of the probability of land-use change by applying the regression model to the 1992-1998 period. To investigate the influence of spatial scale, we constructed several sets of models that contained (1 only distance variables, e.g., distance to highways; (2 only scale-dependent density variables, e.g., density of urban area within a 600-m radius; (3 both distance and density variables; and (4 both distance and density variables at several spatial scales. The environmental variables were included in all models. The combination of distance and density variables at several scales is required to appropriately capture the multiscale urban growth process. The best models correctly predict ~90% of the observed land-use changes for 1992-1998. The distance to access roads, densities of the urban road system and urbanized area at various scales, and soil type were the strongest predictors of the growth pattern. Other variables were less important or not significant in explaining the urban growth process. Our approach, which

  3. Assessing driving forces of land use and land cover change by a mixed-method approach in north-eastern Ghana, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleemann, Janina; Baysal, Gülendam; Bulley, Henry N N; Fürst, Christine

    2017-07-01

    Land use and land cover change (LULCC) is the result of complex human-environmental interactions. The high interdependencies in social-ecological systems make it difficult to identify the main drivers. However, knowledge of key drivers of LULCC, including indirect (underlying) drivers which cannot be easily determined by spatial or economic analyses, is essential for land use planning and especially important in developing countries. We used a mixed-method approach in order to detect drivers of LULCC in the Upper East Region of northern Ghana by different qualitative and quantitative methods which were compared in a confidence level analysis. Viewpoints from experts help to answer why the land use is changing, since many triggering effects, especially non-spatial and indirect drivers of LULCC, are not measurable by other methodological approaches. Geo-statistical or economic analyses add to validate the relevance of the expert-based results. First, we conducted in-depth interviews and developed a list of 34 direct and indirect drivers of LULCC. Subsequently, a group of experts was asked in a questionnaire to select the most important drivers by using a Likert scale. This information was complemented by remote sensing analysis. Finally, the driver analysis was compared to information from literature. Based on these analyses there is a very high confidence that population growth, especially in rural areas, is a major driver of LULCC. Further, current farming practice, bush fires, livestock, the road network and climate variability were the main direct drivers while the financial capital of farmers and customary norms regarding land tenure were listed as important indirect drivers with high confidence. Many of these driving forces, such as labour shortage and migration, are furthermore interdependent. Governmental laws, credits, the service by extension officers, conservational agriculture and foreign agricultural medium-scale investments are currently not driving

  4. Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Ulmschneider

    When we are looking for intelligent life outside the Earth, there is a fundamental question: Assuming that life has formed on an extraterrestrial planet, will it also develop toward intelligence? As this is hotly debated, we will now describe the development of life on Earth in more detail in order to show that there are good reasons why evolution should culminate in intelligent beings.

  5. Drives for electric vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dustmann, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    Internal combustion and electricity as engine driving forces are compared with regard to their specific weight, engine characteristics, efficiency in converting the primary energy and trends of development. Electric drives show a number of advantages especially in cities where frequent stop-and-go traffic is the rule: low emissions, low noise and good utilization of the primary energy are the main advantages here. Technically one needs to have suitable batteries and driving systems. With the Na-S-heavy duty battery coming on to the market a wave of innovations on the area of high-efficiency electric drives is expected in the following years. (orig.).

  6. Magnetic forces acting on molten drops in gas metal arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L. A.; Eagar, T. W.; Lang, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    In gas metal arc welding, magnetic forces arising from the interaction of the welding current with its own magnetic field play an important role in the detachment of drops from the molten welding electrode. These forces drive the dynamic evolution of the drop and also depend on the instantaneous shape of the drop. In this paper, experimentally observed manifestations of magnetic forces are shown and a technique for approximating the temporal evolution of the axial magnetic force from experimentally measured drop shapes is reported. The technique provides quantitative data illustrating the large increase in the magnetic forces when a drop detaches from the electrode.

  7. Carbonaceous aerosols and pollutants over Delhi urban environment: Temporal evolution, source apportionment and radiative forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, D S; Dumka, U C; Kaskaoutis, D G; Pipal, A S; Srivastava, A K; Soni, V K; Attri, S D; Sateesh, M; Tiwari, S

    2015-07-15

    Particulate matter (PM2.5) samples were collected over Delhi, India during January to December 2012 and analysed for carbonaceous aerosols and inorganic ions (SO4(2-) and NO3(-)) in order to examine variations in atmospheric chemistry, combustion sources and influence of long-range transport. The PM2.5 samples are measured (offline) via medium volume air samplers and analysed gravimetrically for carbonaceous (organic carbon, OC; elemental carbon, EC) aerosols and inorganic ions (SO4(2-) and NO3(-)). Furthermore, continuous (online) measurements of PM2.5 (via Beta-attenuation analyser), black carbon (BC) mass concentration (via Magee scientific Aethalometer) and carbon monoxide (via CO-analyser) are carried out. PM2.5 (online) range from 18.2 to 500.6μgm(-3) (annual mean of 124.6±87.9μgm(-3)) exhibiting higher night-time (129.4μgm(-3)) than daytime (103.8μgm(-3)) concentrations. The online concentrations are 38% and 28% lower than the offline during night and day, respectively. In general, larger night-time concentrations are found for the BC, OC, NO3(-)and SO4(2-), which are seasonally dependent with larger differences during late post-monsoon and winter. The high correlation (R(2)=0.74) between OC and EC along with the OC/EC of 7.09 (day time) and 4.55 (night-time), suggest significant influence of biomass-burning emissions (burning of wood and agricultural waste) as well as secondary organic aerosol formation during daytime. Concentrated weighted trajectory (CWT) analysis reveals that the potential sources for the carbonaceous aerosols and pollutants are local emissions within the urban environment and transported smoke from agricultural burning in northwest India during post-monsoon. BC radiative forcing estimates result in very high atmospheric heating rates (~1.8-2.0Kday(-1)) due to agricultural burning effects during the 2012 post-monsoon season. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Drive Stands

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electrical Systems Laboratory (ESL)houses numerous electrically driven drive stands. A drive stand consists of an electric motor driving a gearbox and a mounting...

  9. Plateau Uplift, Erosion, and Geodynamic Forcing in Southern Africa from Integration of Landscape Evolution Modeling with Geologic and Thermochronologic Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, J. R.; Braun, J.; Flowers, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    The southern African plateau is a dominant feature of African topography but there is considerable debate about when and how it formed. Cretaceous kimberlite activity and the presence of a large low shear seismic velocity province (LLSVP) in the deep mantle below southern Africa have lead many to propose uplift related to mantle processes. Better constraints on the timing of uplift have the potential to constrain the nature of the LLSVP and the source of support for southern Africa's anomalous elevations. However, surface uplift is difficult to detect directly in the geologic record and the relationships between mantle sourced uplift and erosion are not necessarily direct. Here, we use a landscape evolution model combined with data constraining the spatiotemporal erosion patterns across southern Africa to explore how topographic development and erosion are related. We integrate a highly efficient landscape evolution model (FastScape, Braun and Willett, 2013) and a thermal module with a large apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) thermochronologic dataset, sedimentary flux volumes for the major offshore basins, and geologic observations to address these questions. We used inversion methods based on the Neighborhood Algorithm to investigate how data is best simulated by the model while varying model parameters related to plateau uplift and the physical characteristics of the eroding material. Results from the inversions show that the data are sufficient to constrain many model parameters. Additionally, we show that the combination of different types of data, and in particular the spatiotemporal erosion information from the AHe thermochronologic results, is valuable for constraining many of these parameters. We show that the geometry and physical characteristics of the overlying sedimentary basin, as well as the characteristics of the geodynamic forcing, have significant control on plateau erosion patterns. It is therefore important to consider both geodynamics and surface controls

  10. Bimodal atomic force microscopy driving the higher eigenmode in frequency-modulation mode: Implementation, advantages, disadvantages and comparison to the open-loop case

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ebeling, Daniel; Solares, Santiago D

    2013-01-01

    .... General as well as particular characteristics of the different driving schemes are highlighted from theoretical and experimental points of view, revealing the advantages and disadvantages of each...

  11. Plant virus emergence and evolution: origins, new encounter scenarios, factors driving emergence, effects of changing world conditions, and prospects for control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Roger A C

    2009-05-01

    This review focuses on virus-plant pathosystems at the interface between managed and natural vegetation, and describes how rapid expansion in human activity and climate change are likely to impact on plants, vectors and viruses causing increasing instability. It starts by considering virus invasion of cultivated plants from their wild ancestors in the centres of plant domestication in different parts of the world and subsequent long distance movement away from these centres to other continents. It then describes the diverse virus-plant pathosystem scenarios possible at the interface between managed and natural vegetation and gives examples that illustrate situations where indigenous viruses emerge to damage introduced cultivated plants and newly introduced viruses become potential threats to biodiversity. These examples demonstrate how human activities increasingly facilitate damaging new encounters between plants and viruses worldwide. The likely effects of climate change on virus emergence are emphasised, and the major factors driving virus emergence, evolution and greater epidemic severity at the interface are analysed and explained. Finally, the kinds of challenges posed by rapidly changing world conditions to achieving effective control of epidemics of emerging plant viruses, and the approaches needed to address them, are described.

  12. Toroidal drive with half stator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhong Xu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The toroidal drive can transmit large torque. However, it is a hard work to produce small toroidal stator which limits the miniaturization of the toroidal drive. Here, a novel toroidal drive with half stator is proposed for which the small stator can be produced easily. For the novel toroidal drive, three-dimensional design and the motion simulation are done; the forces and the contact stress in drive system are investigated; and the output torque is compared with one of the normal toroidal drives. Results show that the output torque of the toroidal drive with half stator is almost the same as the output torque of the normal toroidal drive, and the half stator toroidal drive is a good design for realizing the miniaturization of the toroidal drive.

  13. Making sense of ocean biota: How evolution and biodiversity of land ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I argue that organism interactions, in particular co-evolution between predators and prey (the arms race), play a central role in driving evolution in the pelagic realm. Understanding the evolutionary forces shaping ocean biota is a prerequisite for harnessing plankton for human purposes and also for protecting the oceanic ...

  14. Impaired Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impaired driving is dangerous. It's the cause of more than half of all car crashes. It means operating ... texting Having a medical condition which affects your driving For your safety and the safety of others, do not drive while impaired. Have someone else drive you or take public ...

  15. Estímulos ao Desenvolvimento Tecnológico: Influência do Mercado Driving Forces for Technology Development: Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José de A. Cid

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Hoje em dia não se discute mais a importância da Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento para a sobrevivência e longevidade de uma Empresa. Todo tipo de indústria sente o impacto do aumento da competição e da velocidade dos avanços tecnológicos. Entretanto, os recursos estão escassos, tanto para as despesas necessárias às atividades de negócio quanto para a pesquisa, o que deixa os gerentes com a difícil tarefa de decidir onde os recursos serão aplicados. Anos atrás, quando os recursos eram (aparentemente ilimitados a força que impulsionava a pesquisa era o desafio da descoberta do novo. A complexidade do processo, os intricados métodos de análise, a quebra de barreiras do conhecimento, alimentavam as mentes dos cientistas. Depois da pesquisa, os profissionais de marketing deveriam encontrar mercados para os novos produtos. Atualmente a pesquisa de mercado, as ferramentas de análise de negócio e outros aspectos outrora desconhecidos dos cientistas dominam as mesas dos gerentes. Este artigo descreve três diferentes abordagens na distribuição de recursos para pesquisa e resume alguns dos princípios que ajudam as empresas a funcionar melhor.Nowadays the importance of Research and Development to a Company survival and longevity is well known. Virtually every industry feels the impact of increased competition and the fast pace of technology change. However, resources are getting scarce, both for doing business and research as well, leaving managers with the tough job of selecting which project will get funding. Years ago, when money was (seemingly unlimited the driving force to research was the challenge of inventing something new. The process complexity, the intricate analysis methods, the breaking of new frontiers were the food for the scientists inquiring minds. Then marketing professionals had to work to find or create market. Now market research, business analysis tools and other aspects once unknown to scientists rule. This article

  16. Study on HCl Driving Force for the Reaction of NaCl-Maleic Acid Mixing Single Droplet Using Micro-FTIR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiang; Zhang, Yunhong

    2016-04-01

    Chemical aging is the one of the most important physicochemical process in atmospheric aerosols. Mixing of sea salt and water-soluble organic components has profound effects on the volatile characteristic and evolving chemical composition of the anthropogenic origin aerosols, which are poorly understood. In this study, the chemical reaction behavior of the mixture of NaCl and maleic acid (H2MA) micron-level single droplet was investigated using a gas-flow system combined with microscopic Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR) spectrometer over the range of relative humidity (63˜95% RH) for the first time. The results showed that the mixture of NaCl and H2MA single droplet could react to form monosodium maleate salt (NaHMA) at the constant RH from the characterization of the FTIR. The reaction is a result of an acid displacement reaction R1, which is driven by high volatility of the HCl product. NaCl(aq)+H2MA(aq)=NaHMA(aq)+HCl(aq,g) (R1) According to the change tendency of the absorbance values of 1579 cm-1 COO- stretching band of the NaHMA dependent upon reaction times at different RHs, the growth range of the trend which could lead to the faster reaction rate was obvious at lower RH. The water content of the droplet was also more likely to reduce rapidly with the loss of the RH from the absorbance changes of 3400 cm-1H2O stretching band dependent upon reaction times. These may be due to irreversible evaporation of HCl gas which is the main driving force for this type of reaction and the NaHMA is a less hygroscopic component compared to H2MA. And the HCl gas is more likely to evaporate faster from the single droplet and promote the reaction rate and the consumption of water content at lower RH. These results could help in understanding the chemical conversion processes of water-soluble dicarboxylic acids to dicarboxylate salts, as well as the consumption of Cl in sea salt aerosols by organic acids in the atmosphere.

  17. The Dynamics of Drinking and Driving in the U.S.: The Role of Social Forces and the Role of Law

    OpenAIRE

    Darren Grant

    2010-01-01

    Among U.S. drivers involved in fatal accidents, blood alcohol concentration conditional on drinking is static. Thus the dynamics of drunk driving can be described using the fraction of accident-involved drivers who have been drinking (HBD). Changes in this variable imply significant reductions in vehicle fatalities between 1975 and 2004, and correlate mildly with the underlying “general risk factor” that accounts for the remaining reduction in fatalities. But seven important drunk driving law...

  18. Driving Fast Flows with Volumetric Current Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milhone, Jason; Endrizzi, D.; Flanagan, K.; Nornberg, M. D.; Peterson, E. E.; Forest, C. B.

    2017-10-01

    Volumetric current drive has been shown to be an efficient method for driving fast flows with high Rm for studying the onset of flow-driven plasma instabilities. High performance plasmas are produced with 20 kW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and thermally emissive lanthanum hexaboride cathodes. Plasma flow is achieved by injecting current through the plasma across an externally applied weak magnetic field setting up a J × B body force on the plasma volume. Two scenarios for volumetric current drive have been demonstrated. The first injects current across a weak uniform axial magnetic field driving a Keplerian-like flow for magneto-rotational instability (MRI) studies. The second injects current across a weak quadrupole magnetic field for driving a von Karman-like flow for dynamo studies. First results measuring velocity and ion temperature profiles measured by a Fabry-Perot interferometer are shown. Detailed mach probe flow measurements show stronger flow shear in volumetric current drive compared to previous edge-driven plasma flow experiments. Worked funded by NSF and DOE.

  19. Toroidal drive with half stator

    OpenAIRE

    Lizhong Xu; Linping Fu

    2015-01-01

    The toroidal drive can transmit large torque. However, it is a hard work to produce small toroidal stator which limits the miniaturization of the toroidal drive. Here, a novel toroidal drive with half stator is proposed for which the small stator can be produced easily. For the novel toroidal drive, three-dimensional design and the motion simulation are done; the forces and the contact stress in drive system are investigated; and the output torque is compared with one of the normal toroidal d...

  20. Sleepy driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Nelson B; Chau, Jason K M

    2010-05-01

    Sleepiness and drowsiness are neurophysiologic states that may cause attenuation of vigilance and slowing of reaction times, and thus increase the risks of driving. This article reviews selected peer-reviewed publications from the past and present body of knowledge regarding sleepiness and drowsiness while driving and related accidents, injuries, and possible death. Comparative studies of driving drunk and driving sleepy are reviewed because both exhibit similarly dangerous driving behaviors. It is hoped that some of the information from this article could provide new interest in the necessity of education for sleepy drivers.

  1. Electric drives

    CERN Document Server

    Boldea, Ion

    2005-01-01

    ENERGY CONVERSION IN ELECTRIC DRIVESElectric Drives: A DefinitionApplication Range of Electric DrivesEnergy Savings Pay Off RapidlyGlobal Energy Savings Through PEC DrivesMotor/Mechanical Load MatchMotion/Time Profile MatchLoad Dynamics and StabilityMultiquadrant OperationPerformance IndexesProblemsELECTRIC MOTORS FOR DRIVESElectric Drives: A Typical ConfigurationElectric Motors for DrivesDC Brush MotorsConventional AC MotorsPower Electronic Converter Dependent MotorsEnergy Conversion in Electric Motors/GeneratorsPOWER ELECTRONIC CONVERTERS (PECs) FOR DRIVESPower Electronic Switches (PESs)The

  2. Driving forces behind the increasing cardiovascular treatment intensity.A dynamic epidemiologic model of trends in Danish cardiovascular drug utilization.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Helle Wallach; Andersen, Morten

    -state (untreated, treated, dead) semi-Markov model to analyse the dynamics of drug use. Transitions were from untreated to treated (incidence), the reverse (discontinuation), and from either untreated or treated to dead. Stratified by sex and age categories, prevalence trends of "growth driving" drug categories...

  3. Driving forces behind the increasing cardiovascular treatment intensity.A dynamic epidemiologic model of trends in Danish cardiovascular drug utilization.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Helle Wallach; Andersen, Morten

    -state (untreated, treated, dead) semi-Markov model to analyse the dynamics of drug use. Transitions were from untreated to treated (incidence), the reverse (discontinuation), and from either untreated or treated to dead. Stratified by sex and age categories, prevalence trends of "growth driving" drug categories...

  4. The current status of the psychoanalytic theory of instinctual drives. I: Drive concept, classification, and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, A

    1983-07-01

    The evolution of Freud's theory of instinctual drives, with the accompanying models of a mental apparatus, is remarkable for its tenacious adherence to addressing the fundamental problems of human psychology, here phrased as the problems of body-mind-environment relationships. The concept of instinctual drives continues to be one of the most pervasive concepts of psychoanalysis, weathering considerable attack over the last several decades, although losing some clarity in the process. I have cited and discussed as basic issues of the concept of instinctual drives: the relationship of observational data and theoretical constructs in psychology; whether our construct of drives is or should be or can be purely psychological; the problem of conceptualizing the ontogenetic origin of mind; the issues of the "force-meaning conjunction" and the problem of psychic energy in psychoanalytic constructs; and the relation of our concept of instinctual drives to the concept of instincts in general. It seems that progress with these fundamental issues might be made by utilizing models that are more homologous with present knowledge in related fields than is Freud's reflex arc model of the nervous system, in order to build a better drive construct within the framework of psychoanalysis. The classification of instinctual drives remains a problem. Clinically, aggression seems to be a factor in conflict, very much like sexuality. Despite widespread acceptance of the idea of aggression as simply parallel to sexuality in all respects, there are major discrepancies. Perhaps aggression cannot be viewed as a drive after all; perhaps our drive construct needs to be modified to accommodate aggression. Certainly, controversy in this area has interfered with the production of good clinical studies which could begin to increase our understanding of aggression and its place in the human personality. The psychoanalytic theory of drive development has probably undergone less change in the last

  5. Characterizing Spatiotemporal Pattern of Land Use Change and Its Driving Force Based on GIS and Landscape Analysis Techniques in Tianjin during 2000–2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafei Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The spatial and temporal characteristics and driving factors analysis of regional land use are the core scientific problems in the research of ecological environment and human sustainable development. It is also an important basis for the government to formulate land management policy. Based on the land use maps of 2000, 2005, 2010 and 2015, this article analyzed the spatiotemporal pattern of land use change in Tianjin, and determined the relative importance of each driving factor of land use change. The main features of land use change were the continuous expansion of built-up land (1386.89 km2/74.73% gains and the decrease of arable land area (1181.60 km2/16.84% losses. The area and intensity of land use change were not completely consistent, such as Wuqing and Jixian. The hotspots of land use change mainly were located in the main urban region in Tianjin, around the suburban settlements and Binhai New Area. The landscape pattern in the research region has also changed significantly. The Largest patch index (LPI and largest shape index (LSI of arable land showed an increasing trend, and the degree of landscape fragmentation of arable land was deepened. The trend of landscape index of built-up land was similar to that of arable land, but the change intensity was more severe. In addition, the article also used the stepwise regression analysis in the multiple regression to analyze the relative importance of various driving factors, indicating that the driving factors of the built-up land and arable land change were obviously different in different periods. Government policies also have a significant impact on land use change, such as establishing the Tianjin Binhai New Area (TBNA.

  6. Pile Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Machine-oriented structural engineering firm TERA, Inc. is engaged in a project to evaluate the reliability of offshore pile driving prediction methods to eventually predict the best pile driving technique for each new offshore oil platform. Phase I Pile driving records of 48 offshore platforms including such information as blow counts, soil composition and pertinent construction details were digitized. In Phase II, pile driving records were statistically compared with current methods of prediction. Result was development of modular software, the CRIPS80 Software Design Analyzer System, that companies can use to evaluate other prediction procedures or other data bases.

  7. Driving things

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevile, Maurice Richard

    2015-01-01

    I explore how participants organise involvement with objects brought into the car, relative to the demands of driving and social activity. Objects in cars commonly include phones or other technologies, food, body care products, texts, clothing, bags and carry items, toys, and even animals...... 2004, Haddington et al. 2012). I focus here especially on how the practical and interactional work of locating, seeing, placing, handling, hearing, and relinquishing, is ordered and accomplished relative to the emerging and contingent demands of both driving and social participation...... of in-car distractions, and how they impact driving activities (Nevile & Haddington 2010). Data are video recordings of ordinary journeys, capturing drivers and passengers in real-world real-time driving situations (27 hours, 90 journeys). For driving and road safety, research and experience has...

  8. Yaw-rate Control for Electric Vehicle with Active Front/Rear Steering and Driving/Braking Force Distribution of Rear Wheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Naoki; Fujimoto, Hiroshi

    Direct yaw-moment control (DYC) is an effective method for achieving stable vehicle motion. In the DYC of vehicles having in-wheel motors (IWMs) and active front and rear steering systems, some of the control inputs are generally redundant. This means that input variables can not be decided uniquely to control each longitudinal, lateral, and yawing motion. The equalization of workload for each wheel on the basis of longitudinal and lateral force distribution enhances the cornering performance of vehicles. Therefore, we have proposed a method for obtaining longitudinal- and latitudinal-force distributions on the basis of the least squares solution of the equations for longitudinal, lateral, and yawing motion. Further, we have proposed a lateral-force control method with tire lateral force sensors and active front/rear steering and a DYC method for reducing the tracking error in this controller. In this paper, we show that the equalization of the workload for each wheel and quick yaw-rate response are achieved by adopting these proposed methods. Simulations and experiments are carried out to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  9. A new force emerges from the dark side: evidence is growing that an intrinsic property of the universe is helping to drive its expansion

    CERN Multimedia

    Cookson, C

    2003-01-01

    "Astronomical surveys over the past five years have forced cosmologists to conclude that ordinary matter - in the form of familiar stars, planets and interstellar dust or more exotic objects, such as quasars and neutron stars - makes up only 4 per cent of the universe" (1 page).

  10. [Driving force analysis of land use change in the developed area based on Probit regression model: A case study of Nanjing City, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kang; Li, Yue-e; Wu, Qun; Shen, Jian-fen

    2015-07-01

    Based on the remote sensing image in 1996, 2002 and 2010, with the help of RS and GIS technology, and using the Probit regression model, this paper analyzed the characteristics of land use change in Nanjing City from 1996 to 2010, and the driving factors of land use change. The results showed that the cultivated land and woodland decreased, constructive land, garden plot and grassland continued to increase, and the comprehensive land use change rate was rising since 1996. The results of regression model for cultivated land and woodland change indicated that the change of cultivated land in the years 1996-2002 was mainly affected by the factors of "distance to the nearest rural settlement" and "farmers' population density". However, in the years 2002-2010 it was mainly affected by the factors of "change of per area GDP", "distance to the rural settlement" and "distance to the nearest road". The change of woodland in the years 1996-2002 was mainly affected by the factors of "the elevation" and "distance to the rural settlement". However, in the years 2002-2010 it was mainly affected by the factors of "change of per area GDP", "population density" and "distance to the nearest road". By comparison, the early driving factors of land use change were mainly natural factors, but in recent years, they were mainly social, economic and demographic factors.

  11. Error signals driving locomotor adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    anaesthesia (n = 5) instead of repetitive nerve stimulation. Foot anaesthesia reduced ankle adaptation to external force perturbations during walking. Our results suggest that cutaneous input plays a role in force perception, and may contribute to the 'error' signal involved in driving walking adaptation when...

  12. Driving forces of biomedical science education and research in state-of-the arts academic medical centres: the United States as example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, T A

    2011-06-01

    Basic science departments in academic medical centres are influenced by changes that are commonly directed at medical education and financial gain. Some of such changes may have been detrimental to or may have enhanced basic science education. They may have determined basic science research focus or basic science research methods. However, there is lack of research on the educational process in the basic sciences including training of PhD's while there is ample research on medical education pertaining to training of medical doctors. The author here identifies, from university websites and available literature, some forces that have driven teaching and research focus and methods in state-of-the-arts academic medical centres in recent times with a view of seeing through their possible influences on basic science education and research, using the United States of America as an example. The "forces" are: Changes in medical schools; Medical educational philosophies: problem based learning, evidence based medicine, cyberlearning and self-directed learning; Shifting impressions of the value of basic sciences in medical schools; Research trends in Basic Sciences: role of antivivisectionists, alternative experimentations, explosion of molecular and cell biology; Technological advancements; Commercialization of research; and Funding agencies. The author encourages African leaders in academia to pay attention to such forces as the leadership seeks to raise African Universities as centres of knowledge that have a major role in acquiring, preserving, imparting, and utilizing knowledge.

  13. Holocene evolution of summer winds and marine productivity in the tropical Indian Ocean in response to insolation forcing: data-model comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. C. Bassinot

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The relative abundance of Globigerinoides bulloides was used to infer Holocene paleo-productivity changes on the Oman margin and at the southern tip of India. Today, the primary productivity at both sites reaches its maximum during the summer season, when monsoon winds result in local Eckman pumping, which brings more nutrients to the surface. On a millennium time-scale, however, the % G. bulloides records indicate an opposite evolution of paleo-productivity at these sites through the Holocene. The Oman Margin productivity was maximal at ~9 ka (boreal summer insolation maximum and has decreased since then, suggesting a direct response to insolation forcing. On the contrary, the productivity at the southern tip of India was minimum at ~9 ka, and strengthened towards the present.

    Paleo-reconstructions of wind patterns, marine productivity and foraminifera assemblages were obtained using the IPSL-CM4 climate model coupled to the PISCES marine biogeochemical model and the FORAMCLIM ecophysiological model. These reconstructions are fully coherent with the marine core data. They confirm that the evolution of particulate export production and foraminifera assemblages at our two sites were directly linked with the strength of the upwelling. Model simulations at 9 ka and 6 ka BP show that the relative evolution between the two sites since the early Holocene can be explained by the weakening but also the southward shift of monsoon winds over the Arabian Sea during boreal summer.

  14. Distracted Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about 5 seconds, long enough to cover a football field while driving at 55 mph. 4 How ... 8 On September 17, 2010, the Federal Railroad Administration banned cell phone and electronic device use of ...

  15. Natural selection and neutral evolution jointly drive population divergence between alpine and lowland ecotypes of the allopolyploid plant Anemone multifida (Ranunculaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Jamie R; Vamosi, Jana C; Rogers, Sean M

    2013-01-01

    Population differentiation can be driven in large part by natural selection, but selectively neutral evolution can play a prominent role in shaping patters of population divergence. The decomposition of the evolutionary history of populations into the relative effects of natural selection and selectively neutral evolution enables an understanding of the causes of population divergence and adaptation. In this study, we examined heterogeneous genomic divergence between alpine and lowland ecotypes of the allopolyploid plant, Anemone multifida. Using peak height and dominant AFLP data, we quantified population differentiation at non-outlier (neutral) and outlier loci to determine the potential contribution of natural selection and selectively neutral evolution to population divergence. We found 13 candidate loci, corresponding to 2.7% of loci, with signatures of divergent natural selection between alpine and lowland populations and between alpine populations (Fst  = 0.074-0.445 at outlier loci), but neutral population differentiation was also evident between alpine populations (FST  = 0.041-0.095 at neutral loci). By examining population structure at both neutral and outlier loci, we determined that the combined effects of selection and neutral evolution are associated with the divergence of alpine populations, which may be linked to extreme abiotic conditions and isolation between alpine sites. The presence of outlier levels of genetic variation in structured populations underscores the importance of separately analyzing neutral and outlier loci to infer the relative role of divergent natural selection and neutral evolution in population divergence.

  16. Natural selection and neutral evolution jointly drive population divergence between alpine and lowland ecotypes of the allopolyploid plant Anemone multifida (Ranunculaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie R McEwen

    Full Text Available Population differentiation can be driven in large part by natural selection, but selectively neutral evolution can play a prominent role in shaping patters of population divergence. The decomposition of the evolutionary history of populations into the relative effects of natural selection and selectively neutral evolution enables an understanding of the causes of population divergence and adaptation. In this study, we examined heterogeneous genomic divergence between alpine and lowland ecotypes of the allopolyploid plant, Anemone multifida. Using peak height and dominant AFLP data, we quantified population differentiation at non-outlier (neutral and outlier loci to determine the potential contribution of natural selection and selectively neutral evolution to population divergence. We found 13 candidate loci, corresponding to 2.7% of loci, with signatures of divergent natural selection between alpine and lowland populations and between alpine populations (Fst  = 0.074-0.445 at outlier loci, but neutral population differentiation was also evident between alpine populations (FST  = 0.041-0.095 at neutral loci. By examining population structure at both neutral and outlier loci, we determined that the combined effects of selection and neutral evolution are associated with the divergence of alpine populations, which may be linked to extreme abiotic conditions and isolation between alpine sites. The presence of outlier levels of genetic variation in structured populations underscores the importance of separately analyzing neutral and outlier loci to infer the relative role of divergent natural selection and neutral evolution in population divergence.

  17. The evolution of the translational-rotational motion of a viscoelastic planet in a central force field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilke, V. G.; Markov, Y. G.

    1988-08-01

    The averaging method has been applied to obtain approximate equations describing the evolution of translation-rotational motion of a viscoelastic planet in the plane case. The equations are written down in the form using known Delaunay-Andoyer canonical variables. The described motion of a deformed planet in presence of energy dissipation can serve to simulate the tidal phenomena in the motion of a planet of the solar system.

  18. Evolution of a Western Arctic Ice Ocean Boundary Layer and Mixed Layer Across a Developing Thermodynamically Forced Marginal Ice Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    in the Canada Basin seasonal ice zone. The subsections below outline the new contributions to the field of Arctic ice-ocean science discovered during...doi:10.1002/2013GL058956. Paulson, C.A. and W. S. Pegau, 2001: The summertime thermohaline evolution of an Arctic lead: Heat budget of the surface...Menge, 2010: Influences of the ocean surface mixed layer and thermohaline stratification on Arctic Sea ice in the central Canada Basin. J. Geophys. Res

  19. Force of habit: shrubs, trees and contingent evolution of wood anatomical diversity using Croton (Euphorbiaceae) as a model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arévalo, Rafael; van Ee, Benjamin W; Riina, Ricarda; Berry, Paul E; Wiedenhoeft, Alex C

    2017-03-01

    Wood is a major innovation of land plants, and is usually a central component of the body plan for two major plant habits: shrubs and trees. Wood anatomical syndromes vary between shrubs and trees, but no prior work has explicitly evaluated the contingent evolution of wood anatomical diversity in the context of these plant habits. Phylogenetic comparative methods were used to test for contingent evolution of habit, habitat and wood anatomy in the mega-diverse genus Croton (Euphorbiaceae), across the largest and most complete molecular phylogeny of the genus to date. Plant habit and habitat are highly correlated, but most wood anatomical features correlate more strongly with habit. The ancestral Croton was reconstructed as a tree, the wood of which is inferred to have absent or indistinct growth rings, confluent-like axial parenchyma, procumbent ray cells and disjunctive ray parenchyma cell walls. The taxa sampled showed multiple independent origins of the shrub habit in Croton , and this habit shift is contingent on several wood anatomical features (e.g. similar vessel-ray pits, thick fibre walls, perforated ray cells). The only wood anatomical trait correlated with habitat and not habit was the presence of helical thickenings in the vessel elements of mesic Croton . Plant functional traits, individually or in suites, are responses to multiple and often confounding contexts in evolution. By establishing an explicit contingent evolutionary framework, the interplay between habit, habitat and wood anatomical diversity was dissected in the genus Croton . Both habit and habitat influence the evolution of wood anatomical characters, and conversely, the wood anatomy of lineages can affect shifts in plant habit and habitat. This study hypothesizes novel putatively functional trait associations in woody plant structure that could be further tested in a variety of other taxa.

  20. Bimodal atomic force microscopy driving the higher eigenmode in frequency-modulation mode: Implementation, advantages, disadvantages and comparison to the open-loop case

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Ebeling; Solares, Santiago D

    2013-01-01

    Summary We present an overview of the bimodal amplitude?frequency-modulation (AM-FM) imaging mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM), whereby the fundamental eigenmode is driven by using the amplitude-modulation technique (AM-AFM) while a higher eigenmode is driven by using either the constant-excitation or the constant-amplitude variant of the frequency-modulation (FM-AFM) technique. We also offer a comparison to the original bimodal AFM method, in which the higher eigenmode is driven with con...

  1. The evidences of progressive pressurization of volcanic conduit as driving forces of unrest phenomena analyzed via modelling of multiplatform geodetic measurements: Fernandina (GALAPAGOS) and Maunaloa (HAWAII) case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Susi; Castaldo, Raffaele; Casu, Francesco; D'Auria, Luca; De Luca, Claudio; De Novellis, Vincenzo; Solaro, Giuseppe; Tizzani, Pietro

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the source of the ground deformation pattern affecting the Mauna Loa (Hawaii) and Fernandina (Galapagos) volcanoes by jointly exploiting different dataset collected by both GPS and multiplatform and multiorbit SAR sensors. We exploited the advanced Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) techniques to analyze unrest episode in two different geodynamics context. Our main goal is the understanding of the relationship among the spatio-temporal evolution of the ground deformation field and the temporal volumetric variation of the detected geodetic source during the uplift phenomena. We highlight the huge opportunity in understanding volcano unrest phenomena offered by the joint use of remote sensing data and inversion procedures: this prospect is particularly relevant for the analysis of uplift events, when other geophysical measurements are not available. For Mauna Loa (Hawaii) and Fernandina (Galapagos) volcanoes, the performed statistic analysis support the source pipe-like as the more suitable geometry to explain the unrest phenomena in which magmatic masses intrude in volcanic conduits. In particular, the deformation time series achieved at MounaLoa volcano are achieved by 23 GPS permanent stations of the Hawaii surveillance network, processed by Nevada Geodetic Laboratory, 7 SAR dataset acquired from ascending and descending orbits, with different look angles and along different tracks, by the C-Band Envisat satellite along the 2003 - 2010 time period for a total of 189 SAR imagery. Moreover, we exploited 2 dataset collected from ascending and descending passes by the X-Band Cosmo Sky-Med constellation during the 2012 - 2015 time span . These SAR datasets have been processed through the advanced DInSAR technique referred to as P-SBAS (De Luca et al., 2016), which allows us to retrieve the Line of Sight (LOS) projection of the surface deformation and analyze its temporal evolution by generating displacement time series. Starting this data

  2. Vegetation dynamics and its driving forces from climate change and human activities in the Three-River Source Region, China from 1982 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Chaobin; Wang, Zhaoqi; Chen, Yizhao; Gang, Chengcheng; An, Ru; Li, Jianlong

    2016-09-01

    The Three-River Source Region (TRSR), a region with key importance to the ecological security of China, has undergone climate changes and a shift in human activities driven by a series of ecological restoration projects in recent decades. To reveal the spatiotemporal dynamics of vegetation dynamics and calculate the contributions of driving factors in the TRSR across different periods from 1982 to 2012, net primary productivity (NPP) estimated using the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford approach model was used to assess the status of vegetation. The actual effects of different climatic variation trends on interannual variation in NPP were analyzed. Furthermore, the relationships of NPP with different climate factors and human activities were analyzed quantitatively. Results showed the following: from 1982 to 2012, the average NPP in the study area was 187.37gcm(-2)yr(-1). The average NPP exhibited a fluctuation but presented a generally increasing trend over the 31-year study period, with an increase rate of 1.31gcm(-2)yr(-2). During the entire study period, the average contributions of temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation to NPP interannual variation over the entire region were 0.58, 0.73, and 0.09gcm(-2)yr(-2), respectively. Radiation was the climate factor with the greatest influence on NPP interannual variation. The factor that restricted NPP increase changed from temperature and radiation to precipitation. The average contributions of climate change and human activities to NPP interannual variation were 1.40gcm(-2)yr(-2) and -0.08gcm(-2)yr(-2), respectively. From 1982 to 2000, the general climate conditions were favorable to vegetation recovery, whereas human activities had a weaker negative impact on vegetation growth. From 2001 to 2012, climate conditions began to have a negative impact on vegetation growth, whereas human activities made a favorable impact on vegetation recovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Distribution of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sludge organic matter pools as a driving force of their fate during anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aemig, Quentin; Chéron, Claire; Delgenès, Nadine; Jimenez, Julie; Houot, Sabine; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Patureau, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    The fate of organic matter during anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge was studied in batch systems thanks to a sequential chemical fractionation of the particulate phase coupled to fluorescence spectroscopy. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) distribution within the organic pools was characterized from their analysis in the residual fraction after each extraction. Both methods were combined to understand the link between PAHs presence in organic pools and their spectral characterization after extraction. Two batch systems (sludge and inoculum mixture) were set up to study the impact of PAHs spiking on their fate and distribution. The sequential fractionation allowed us to extract and characterize about 50% of total Chemical Oxygen Demand. Moreover, fluorescence spectroscopy helped us to understand the organic pools evolution: the most easily extracted pools composed of protein-like molecules were highly degraded meaning that chemical accessibility mimics the bioaccessibility to degrading microorganisms. PAHs were present in all pools of organic matter but native PAHs were mainly present in low accessible (hardly extractable) fractions and during anaerobic digestion, they accumulated in the non-accessible (non extractable) fraction. Spiked PAHs were more dissipated during anaerobic digestion since spiking made them present in more accessible fractions. During the anaerobic digestion, contrary to native PAHs, spiked ones relocated toward less accessible organic fractions confirming the ageing phenomenon. PCA analysis showed that, in spiked mixture, PAHs presence in organic pools is linked to both PAHs physical-chemical properties and quality/quantity of the associated organic pools. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Temporal genomic evolution of bird sex chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zongji; Zhang, Jilin; Yang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    driving forces of Z chromosome evolution, we analyze here 45 newly available bird genomes and four species' transcriptomes, over their course of recombination loss between the sex chromosomes. RESULTS: We show Z chromosomes in general have a significantly higher substitution rate in introns and synonymous...... protein-coding sites than autosomes, driven by the male-to-female mutation bias ('male-driven evolution' effect). Our genome-wide estimate reveals that the degree of such a bias ranges from 1.6 to 3.8 among different species. G + C content of third codon positions exhibits the same trend of gradual...... ('fast-Z' evolution). And species with a lower level of intronic heterozygosities tend to evolve even faster on the Z chromosome. Further analysis of fast-evolving genes' enriched functional categories and sex-biased expression patterns support that, fast-Z evolution in birds is mainly driven by genetic...

  5. Vegetation dynamics and its driving forces from climate change and human activities in the Three-River Source Region, China from 1982 to 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Chaobin; Wang, Zhaoqi; Chen, Yizhao; Gang, Chengcheng [School of Life Science, Nanjing University, Xianlin Road 163, Qixia District, Nanjing, 210046 (China); An, Ru [School of Earth Science and Engineering, Hohai University, Xikang Road 129, Nanjing, 210098 (China); Li, Jianlong, E-mail: lijianlongnju@163.com [School of Life Science, Nanjing University, Xianlin Road 163, Qixia District, Nanjing, 210046 (China)

    2016-09-01

    The Three-River Source Region (TRSR), a region with key importance to the ecological security of China, has undergone climate changes and a shift in human activities driven by a series of ecological restoration projects in recent decades. To reveal the spatiotemporal dynamics of vegetation dynamics and calculate the contributions of driving factors in the TRSR across different periods from 1982 to 2012, net primary productivity (NPP) estimated using the Carnegie–Ames–Stanford approach model was used to assess the status of vegetation. The actual effects of different climatic variation trends on interannual variation in NPP were analyzed. Furthermore, the relationships of NPP with different climate factors and human activities were analyzed quantitatively. Results showed the following: from 1982 to 2012, the average NPP in the study area was 187.37 g cm{sup −2} yr{sup −1}. The average NPP exhibited a fluctuation but presented a generally increasing trend over the 31-year study period, with an increase rate of 1.31 g cm{sup −2} yr{sup −2}. During the entire study period, the average contributions of temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation to NPP interannual variation over the entire region were 0.58, 0.73, and 0.09 g cm{sup −2} yr{sup −2}, respectively. Radiation was the climate factor with the greatest influence on NPP interannual variation. The factor that restricted NPP increase changed from temperature and radiation to precipitation. The average contributions of climate change and human activities to NPP interannual variation were 1.40 g cm{sup −2} yr{sup −2} and − 0.08 g cm{sup −2} yr{sup −2}, respectively. From 1982 to 2000, the general climate conditions were favorable to vegetation recovery, whereas human activities had a weaker negative impact on vegetation growth. From 2001 to 2012, climate conditions began to have a negative impact on vegetation growth, whereas human activities made a favorable impact on vegetation

  6. Hairless mutation: a driving force of humanization from a human–ape common ancestor by enforcing upright walking while holding a baby with both hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutou, Shizuyo

    2012-01-01

    Three major characteristics distinguish humans from other primates: bipedality, practical nakedness, and the family as a social unit. A hairless mutation introduced into the chimpanzee/human last common ancestor (CLCA) 6 million years ago (Mya) diverged hairless human and hairy chimpanzee lineages. All primates except humans can carry their babies without using their hands. A hairless mother would be forced to stand and walk upright. Her activities would be markedly limited. The male partner would have to collect food and carry it to her by hand to keep her and their baby from starving; irresponsible and selfish males could not have left their offspring. The mother would have sexually accepted her partner at any time as a reward for food. Sexual relations irrespective of estrus cycles might have strengthened the pair bond. Molecular and paleontological dating indicates that CLCA existed 6 Mya, and early hominin fossils show that they were bipeds, indicating that humanization from CLCA occurred rapidly. A single mutation in animals with scalp hair is known to induce hairless phenotype (ectodermal dysplasia). Bipedalism and hairlessness are disadvantageous traits; only those who could survive trials and tribulations in cooperation with family members must have been able to evolve as humans. PMID:22404045

  7. Self force via m-mode regularization and 2+1D evolution: Foundations and a scalar-field implementation on Schwarzschild

    CERN Document Server

    Dolan, Sam R

    2010-01-01

    To model the radiative evolution of extreme mass-ratio binary inspirals (a key target of the LISA mission), the community needs efficient methods for computation of the gravitational self-force (SF) on the Kerr spacetime. Here we further develop a practical `$m$-mode regularization' scheme for SF calculations, and give details of a first implementation. The key steps in the method are (i) removal of a singular part of the perturbation field with a suitable `puncture' to leave a sufficiently regular residual within a finite worldtube surrounding the particle's worldline, (ii) decomposition in azimuthal ($m$-)modes, (iii) numerical evolution of the $m$-modes in 2+1D with a finite difference scheme, and (iv) reconstruction of the SF from the mode sum. The method relies on a judicious choice of puncture, based on the Detweiler--Whiting decomposition. We give a working definition for the `order' of the puncture, and show how it determines the convergence rate of the $m$-mode sum. The dissipative piece of the SF di...

  8. Did vicariance and adaptation drive cryptic speciation and evolution of brooding in Ophioderma longicauda (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea), a common Atlanto-Mediterranean ophiuroid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissin, E; Stöhr, S; Chenuil, A

    2011-11-01

    Over the last decade, cryptic speciation has been discovered in an increasing number of taxa. Species complexes are useful models for the understanding of speciation processes. Motivated by the discovery of brooding specimens in the common Atlanto-Mediterranean broadcast spawning brittle star, Ophioderma longicauda, a recent study revealed the occurrence of divergent mitochondrial lineages. We analysed 218 specimens from 23 locations spread over the geographic range of the species with partial Cytochrome c Oxidase subunit I (COI) sequences. A subset of this sample was also surveyed with the internal transcribed spacer of the ribosomal DNA cluster (nuclear ITS-1). Our study revealed six highly divergent mitochondrial lineages, and the ITS-1 data confirmed that they most likely represent a species complex. Geographic ranges, abundances and genetic structures are contrasted among the putative cryptic species. Lineages in which brooding specimens have been found form a monophyletic group and are restricted to the Eastern Mediterranean basin, an oligotrophic zone. A phylogeny-trait association analysis revealed a phylogenetic signal for low 'chlorophyll a' values (our proxy for oligotrophy). An ecological shift related to the hyper oligotrophy of the Eastern Mediterranean region is therefore likely to have played a role in the evolution of brooding. This study revealed that a complex mixture of vicariance, population expansion, adaptive divergence and possibly high local diversification rates resulting from brooding has shaped the evolution of this species complex. The dating analysis showed that these events probably occurred in the Pleistocene epoch. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Evolution of Biological Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    It is a general rule of nature that larger organisms are more complex, at least as measured by the number of distinct types of cells present. This reflects the fitness advantage conferred by a division of labor among specialized cells over homogeneous totipotency. Yet, increasing size has both costs and benefits, and the search for understanding the driving forces behind the evolution of multicellularity is becoming a very active area of research. This article presents an overview of recent experimental and theoretical work aimed at understanding this biological problem from the perspective of physics. For a class of model organisms, the Volvocine green algae, an emerging hypothesis connects the transition from organisms with totipotent cells to those with terminal germ-soma differentiation to the competition between diffusion and fluid advection created by beating flagella. A number of challenging problems in fluid dynamics, nonlinear dynamics, and control theory emerge when one probes the workings of the simplest multicellular organisms.

  10. Evolution of the seasonal temperature cycle in a transient Holocene simulation: orbital forcing and sea-ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Fischer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the Earth's orbit lead to changes in the seasonal and meridional distribution of insolation. We quantify the influence of orbitally induced changes on the seasonal temperature cycle in a transient simulation of the last 6000 years – from the mid-Holocene to today – using a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (ECHAM5/MPI-OM including a land surface model (JSBACH.

    The seasonal temperature cycle responds directly to the insolation changes almost everywhere. In the Northern Hemisphere, its amplitude decreases according to an increase in winter insolation and a decrease in summer insolation. In the Southern Hemisphere, the opposite is true.

    Over the Arctic Ocean, decreasing summer insolation leads to an increase in sea-ice cover. The insulating effect of sea ice between the ocean and the atmosphere leads to decreasing heat flux and favors more "continental" conditions over the Arctic Ocean in winter, resulting in strongly decreasing temperatures. Consequently, there are two competing effects: the direct response to insolation changes and a sea-ice insulation effect. The sea-ice insulation effect is stronger, and thus an increase in the amplitude of the seasonal temperature cycle over the Arctic Ocean occurs. This increase is strongest over the Barents Shelf and influences the temperature response over northern Europe.

    We compare our modeled seasonal temperatures over Europe to paleo reconstructions. We find better agreements in winter temperatures than in summer temperatures and better agreements in northern Europe than in southern Europe, since the model does not reproduce the southern European Holocene summer cooling inferred from the paleo reconstructions. The temperature reconstructions for northern Europe support the notion of the influence of the sea-ice insulation effect on the evolution of the seasonal temperature cycle.

  11. Mechanistically Distinct Pathways of Divergent Regulatory DNA Creation Contribute to Evolution of Human-Specific Genomic Regulatory Networks Driving Phenotypic Divergence of Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinsky, Gennadi V

    2016-09-19

    Thousands of candidate human-specific regulatory sequences (HSRS) have been identified, supporting the hypothesis that unique to human phenotypes result from human-specific alterations of genomic regulatory networks. Collectively, a compendium of multiple diverse families of HSRS that are functionally and structurally divergent from Great Apes could be defined as the backbone of human-specific genomic regulatory networks. Here, the conservation patterns analysis of 18,364 candidate HSRS was carried out requiring that 100% of bases must remap during the alignments of human, chimpanzee, and bonobo sequences. A total of 5,535 candidate HSRS were identified that are: (i) highly conserved in Great Apes; (ii) evolved by the exaptation of highly conserved ancestral DNA; (iii) defined by either the acceleration of mutation rates on the human lineage or the functional divergence from non-human primates. The exaptation of highly conserved ancestral DNA pathway seems mechanistically distinct from the evolution of regulatory DNA segments driven by the species-specific expansion of transposable elements. Genome-wide proximity placement analysis of HSRS revealed that a small fraction of topologically associating domains (TADs) contain more than half of HSRS from four distinct families. TADs that are enriched for HSRS and termed rapidly evolving in humans TADs (revTADs) comprise 0.8-10.3% of 3,127 TADs in the hESC genome. RevTADs manifest distinct correlation patterns between placements of human accelerated regions, human-specific transcription factor-binding sites, and recombination rates. There is a significant enrichment within revTAD boundaries of hESC-enhancers, primate-specific CTCF-binding sites, human-specific RNAPII-binding sites, hCONDELs, and H3K4me3 peaks with human-specific enrichment at TSS in prefrontal cortex neurons (P Homo sapiens is driven by the evolution of human-specific genomic regulatory networks via at least two mechanistically distinct pathways of

  12. [Study on the types and water pollution driving forces of the typical and medium-small-sized cities in the southern China based on the analysis of water environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Shi-Xing; Wang, La-Chun; Huo, Yu; Chen, Chang-Chun; Teng, Juan

    2009-07-15

    According to the major pollution sources of urban water environment, 10 indexes such as industrial sewage quantity were closen to establish evaluation indexes system about the types and influencing factors of the typical and medium-small-sized cities in the southern China. Case studies of 16 typical and medium-small-sized cities were taken in Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Hubei and Anhui provinces. Combined with SPSS 11.0 cluster analysis results, city types were divided in reference to the values of water resources comprehensive pollution indexes and economical development indexes. The driving forces about city water environment pollution were studied by principal component analysis method. The result indicates that the 16 cities belong to two categories and four sub-categories, which are rich economy as well as light pollution of water environment and poor economy as well as heavy pollution of water environment. The influencing factors of water environment pollution are in sequence of industrial water pollution, agricultural no-point source pollution and urban domestic water pollution. The main factors of water environment pollution influenced I category cities, II as well as IV category cities and III category cities are industrial water pollution, urban domestic pollution and agricultural no-point source pollution respectively.

  13. Positive selection drives rapid evolution of certain amino acid residues in an evolutionarily highly conserved interferon-inducible antiviral protein of fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhi, Abinash

    2013-01-01

    Viperin, an evolutionarily highly conserved interferon-inducible multifunctional protein, has previously been reported to exhibit antiviral activity against a wide range of DNA and RNA viruses. Utilizing the complete nucleotide coding sequence data of fish viperin antiviral genes, and employing the maximum likelihood-based codon substitution models, the present study reports the pervasive role of positive selection in the evolution of viperin antiviral protein in fishes. The overall rate of nonsynonymous (dN) to synonymous (dS) substitutions (dN/dS) for the three functional domains of viperin (N-terminal, central domain and C-terminal) were 1.1, 0.12, and 0.24, respectively. Codon-by-codon substitution analyses have revealed that while most of the positively selected sites were located at the N-terminal amphipathic α-helix domain, few amino acid residues at the C-terminal domain were under positive selection. However, none of the sites in the central domain were under positive selection. These results indicate that, although viperin is evolutionarily highly conserved, the three functional domains experienced differential selection pressures. Taken together with the results of previous studies, the present study suggests that the persistent antagonistic nature of surrounding infectious viral pathogens might be the likely cause for such adaptive evolutionary changes of certain amino acids in fish viperin antiviral protein.

  14. Death Drive in Tourism Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buda, Dorina

    2014-01-01

    The psychoanalytical concept of the death drive refers to a constant metapsychological force at the junction between life and death: it is not understood in a biological sense of physical demise of the body, nor in opposition to life. Geographies of tourist performances in places in the proximity of

  15. The community as a driving force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A Workshop on Effective Strategies for Sustainable Community-based Family Planning (FP) and Maternal and Child Health (MCH) was held on October 14-23, 1993, as part of an Asian regional project focusing on women. Bangladesh, China, Laos, Nepal, the Philippines, and Viet Nam were represented at the workshop. The program introduced participants to effective community participation strategies in FP and MCH in Indonesia and allowed for the exchange of information. The UN Population Fund expressed support and encouragement for the exchange and recognition of Indonesia's government support for efforts at regional exchanges. Indonesia established integrated service posts or "Posyandu" in villages during the 1980s for women volunteers as health advocates. FP/MCH was later integrated in these health posts. The service posts aim to reduce infant mortality and maternal mortality through growth monitoring of children aged under five years, provision of FP, nutrition services for pregnant mothers, immunization, and monitoring of high-risk pregnancies. Trained volunteers and community people are aides to either government personnel or nongovernmental (NGO) workers. The Indonesian government FP program evolved from a program "for" the people, to "with" the people, and finally "by" the people. Fees for contraception, which are still below retail prices, are being introduced as a means of achieving sustainability. The government trains doctors and midwives in FP. NGOs such as Yayasan Kusuma Buana (YKB) in Jakarta provide a mix of quality services. YKB is active in promoting awareness of FP. Community outreach is achieved through mothers' classes, urban Posyandu services, and training of traditional birth attendants. The Indonesian Planned Parenthood Association maintains self-reliance programs in FP/MCH. Day-care centers and youth counseling centers are used in promoting FP/MCH. YKB methods were demonstrated for workshop participants (posters used in local shops and awareness activities for school health programs). Workshop participants were exposed to many activities in FP/MCH. Participants learned the importance of government commitment and the importance of people's acceptance that FP is necessary for improving the quality of life.

  16. Chemical driving force for rafting in superalloys

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nabarro, FRN

    1997-08-15

    Full Text Available the interface when the interface moves. Suppose a tensile stress (T is applied along a cube axis to a superalloy with a positive misfit, i.e the lattice parameter of the 1/ particles exceeds that of the y matrix. There is a large increase in the energy... volume LpO We shall take this to represent */, and, following Saito et al., neglect he dependence on applied stress of the free energy of U lJc)+scJ I I I p -_- I I I ----_ I I ’ i I I I ’ I I I I + \\ 4 Ni CoC Cl Al Ub Figure 2...

  17. The driving force role of ruthenacyclobutanes

    KAUST Repository

    Vummaleti, Sai V. C.

    2015-02-07

    DFT calculations have been used to determine the thermodynamic and kinetic preference for ruthenacyclobutanes resulting from the experimentally proposed interconversion pathways (olefin and alkylidene rotations) through the investigation of cross-metathesis reaction mechanism for neutral Grubbs catalyst, RuCl2(=CHEt)NHC (A), with ethylene and 1-butene as the substrates. Our results show that although the proposed interconversions are feasible due to the predicted low energy barriers (2-6 kcal/mol), the formation of ruthenacyclobutane is kinetically favored over the competitive reactions involving alkylidene rotations. In comparison with catalyst A, the reaction energy profile for cationic Piers catalyst [RuCl2(=CHPCy3)NHC+] (B) is more endothermic in nature with both ethylene and 1-butene substrates.

  18. Thermodynamic driving force for rafting in superalloys

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nabarro, FRN

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available anblastique et en principe rtversible. Quand la d&formation plastique surpasse m6. des plaques perpendiculaires $ l’axe de I’effort se forment quand le produit a6 est negatif. Zusammenfassung-Der Energie-Impuls Tensor von Eshelby wird fiir die Darstellung...

  19. Somatic clonal evolution: A selection-centric perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jacob; Marusyk, Andriy

    2017-04-01

    It is generally accepted that the initiation and progression of cancers is the result of somatic clonal evolution. Despite many peculiarities, evolution within populations of somatic cells should obey the same Darwinian principles as evolution within natural populations, i.e. variability of heritable phenotypes provides the substrate for context-specific selection forces leading to increased population frequencies of phenotypes, which are better adapted to their environment. Yet, within cancer biology, the more prevalent way to view evolution is as being entirely driven by the accumulation of "driver" mutations. Context-specific selection forces are either ignored, or viewed as constraints from which tumor cells liberate themselves during the course of malignant progression. In this review, we will argue that explicitly focusing on selection forces acting on the populations of neoplastic cells as the driving force of somatic clonal evolution might provide for a more accurate conceptual framework compared to the mutation-centric driver gene paradigm. Whereas little can be done to counteract the "bad luck" of stochastic occurrences of cancer-related mutations, changes in selective pressures and the phenotypic adaptations they induce can, in principle, be exploited to limit the incidence of cancers and to increase the efficiency of existing and future therapies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Evolutionary principles - heterogeneity in cancer?, edited by Dr. Robert A. Gatenby. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular evolution of human species D adenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Christopher M; Seto, Donald; Jones, Morris S; Dyer, David W; Chodosh, James

    2011-08-01

    Adenoviruses are medium-sized double stranded DNA viruses that infect vertebrates. Human adenoviruses cause an array of diseases. Currently there are 56 human adenovirus types recognized and characterized within seven species (A-G). Of those types, a majority belongs to species D. In this review, the genomic conservation and diversity are examined among human adenoviruses within species D, particularly in contrast to other human adenovirus species. Specifically, homologous recombination is presented as a driving force for the molecular evolution of human adenoviruses and the emergence of new adenovirus pathogens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Adaptive evolution in ecological communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin M Turcotte

    Full Text Available Understanding how natural selection drives evolution is a key challenge in evolutionary biology. Most studies of adaptation focus on how a single environmental factor, such as increased temperature, affects evolution within a single species. The biological relevance of these experiments is limited because nature is infinitely more complex. Most species are embedded within communities containing many species that interact with one another and the physical environment. To understand the evolutionary significance of such ecological complexity, experiments must test the evolutionary impact of interactions among multiple species during adaptation. Here we highlight an experiment that manipulates species composition and tracks evolutionary responses within each species, while testing for the mechanisms by which species interact and adapt to their environment. We also discuss limitations of previous studies of adaptive evolution and emphasize how an experimental evolution approach can circumvent such shortcomings. Understanding how community composition acts as a selective force will improve our ability to predict how species adapt to natural and human-induced environmental change.

  2. Adaptive evolution in ecological communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Martin M; Corrin, Michael S C; Johnson, Marc T J

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how natural selection drives evolution is a key challenge in evolutionary biology. Most studies of adaptation focus on how a single environmental factor, such as increased temperature, affects evolution within a single species. The biological relevance of these experiments is limited because nature is infinitely more complex. Most species are embedded within communities containing many species that interact with one another and the physical environment. To understand the evolutionary significance of such ecological complexity, experiments must test the evolutionary impact of interactions among multiple species during adaptation. Here we highlight an experiment that manipulates species composition and tracks evolutionary responses within each species, while testing for the mechanisms by which species interact and adapt to their environment. We also discuss limitations of previous studies of adaptive evolution and emphasize how an experimental evolution approach can circumvent such shortcomings. Understanding how community composition acts as a selective force will improve our ability to predict how species adapt to natural and human-induced environmental change.

  3. Finite Element Analysis Of Influence Of Flank Wear Evolution On Forces In Orthogonal Cutting Of 42CrMo4 Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madajewski Marek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents analysis of flank wear influence on forces in orthogonal turning of 42CrMo4 steel and evaluates capacity of finite element model to provide such force values. Data about magnitude of feed and cutting force were obtained from measurements with force tensiometer in experimental test as well as from finite element analysis of chip formation process in ABAQUS/Explicit software. For studies an insert with complex rake face was selected and flank wear was simulated by grinding operation on its flank face. The aim of grinding inset surface was to obtain even flat wear along cutting edge, which after the measurement could be modeled with CAD program and applied in FE analysis for selected range of wear width. By comparing both sets of force values as function of flank wear in given cutting conditions FEA model was validated and it was established that it can be applied to analyze other physical aspects of machining. Force analysis found that progression of wear causes increase in cutting force magnitude and steep boost to feed force magnitude. Analysis of Fc/Ff force ratio revealed that flank wear has significant impact on resultant force in orthogonal cutting and magnitude of this force components in cutting and feed direction. Surge in force values can result in transfer of substantial loads to machine-tool interface.

  4. How mantle slabs drive plate tectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Clinton P; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2002-10-04

    The gravitational pull of subducted slabs is thought to drive the motions of Earth's tectonic plates, but the coupling between slabs and plates is not well established. If a slab is mechanically attached to a subducting plate, it can exert a direct pull on the plate. Alternatively, a detached slab may drive a plate by exciting flow in the mantle that exerts a shear traction on the base of the plate. From the geologic history of subduction, we estimated the relative importance of "pull" versus "suction" for the present-day plates. Observed plate motions are best predicted if slabs in the upper mantle are attached to plates and generate slab pull forces that account for about half of the total driving force on plates. Slabs in the lower mantle are supported by viscous mantle forces and drive plates through slab suction.

  5. Controlling mutation: intervening in evolution as a therapeutic strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirz, Ryan T; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2007-01-01

    Mutation is the driving force behind many processes linked to human disease, including cancer, aging, and the evolution of drug resistance. Mutations have traditionally been considered the inevitable consequence of replicating large genomes with polymerases of finite fidelity. Observations over the past several decades, however, have led to a new perspective on the process of mutagenesis. It has become clear that, under some circumstances, mutagenesis is a regulated process that requires the induction of pro-mutagenic enzymes and that, at least in bacteria, this induction may facilitate evolution. Herein, we review what is known about induced mutagenesis in bacteria as well as evidence that it contributes to the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Finally, we discuss the possibility that components of induced mutation pathways might be targeted for inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

  6. QUICK RELEASABLE DRIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, J.J.

    1958-07-01

    A quick releasable mechanical drive system suitable for use in a nuclear reactor is described. A small reversible motor positions a control rod by means of a worm and gear speed reducer, a magnetic torque clutch, and a bell crank. As the control rod is raised to the operating position, a heavy coil spring is compressed. In the event of an emergency indicated by either a''scram'' signal or a power failure, the current to the magnetic clutch is cut off, thereby freeing the coil spring and the bell crank positioner from the motor and speed reduction gearing. The coil spring will immediately act upon the bell crank to cause the insertion of the control rod. This arrangement will allow the slow, accurate positioning of the control rod during reactor operation, while providing an independent force to rapidly insert the rod in the event of an emergency.

  7. Specialization Can Drive the Evolution of Modularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Soto, Carlos; Wagner, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Organismal development and many cell biological processes are organized in a modular fashion, where regulatory molecules form groups with many interactions within a group and few interactions between groups. Thus, the activity of elements within a module depends little on elements outside of it. Modularity facilitates the production of heritable variation and of evolutionary innovations. There is no consensus on how modularity might evolve, especially for modules in development. We show that modularity can increase in gene regulatory networks as a byproduct of specialization in gene activity. Such specialization occurs after gene regulatory networks are selected to produce new gene activity patterns that appear in a specific body structure or under a specific environmental condition. Modules that arise after specialization in gene activity comprise genes that show concerted changes in gene activities. This and other observations suggest that modularity evolves because it decreases interference between different groups of genes. Our work can explain the appearance and maintenance of modularity through a mechanism that is not contingent on environmental change. We also show how modularity can facilitate co-option, the utilization of existing gene activity to build new gene activity patterns, a frequent feature of evolutionary innovations. PMID:20360969

  8. Specialization can drive the evolution of modularity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Espinosa-Soto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Organismal development and many cell biological processes are organized in a modular fashion, where regulatory molecules form groups with many interactions within a group and few interactions between groups. Thus, the activity of elements within a module depends little on elements outside of it. Modularity facilitates the production of heritable variation and of evolutionary innovations. There is no consensus on how modularity might evolve, especially for modules in development. We show that modularity can increase in gene regulatory networks as a byproduct of specialization in gene activity. Such specialization occurs after gene regulatory networks are selected to produce new gene activity patterns that appear in a specific body structure or under a specific environmental condition. Modules that arise after specialization in gene activity comprise genes that show concerted changes in gene activities. This and other observations suggest that modularity evolves because it decreases interference between different groups of genes. Our work can explain the appearance and maintenance of modularity through a mechanism that is not contingent on environmental change. We also show how modularity can facilitate co-option, the utilization of existing gene activity to build new gene activity patterns, a frequent feature of evolutionary innovations.

  9. α-Melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) drive melanosome transfer by promoting filopodia delivery and shedding spheroid granules: Evidences from atomic force microscopy observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hui-Jun; Ma, Hui-Yong; Yang, Yang; Li, Peng-Cheng; Zi, Shao-Xia; Jia, Chi-Yu; Chen, Rong

    2014-12-01

    Skin pigmentation is accomplished by production of melanin in melanosome and by transfer of these organelles from melanocytes (MCs) to surrounding keratinocytes (KCs). However, the detailed mechanism is still unknown. We aimed to investigate the morphological structure changes on human epidermal MCs and KCs, which were either mono-cultured or co-cultured, with or without the treatment of both α-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and to provide more direct proofs for process of melanosome transfer. Human epidermal MCs and KCs were isolated and co-cultured with 1:10 ratio in a defined Keratinocyte-serum free medium (K-SFM). After exposure with 100 nM α-MSH or 20 μM PGE2 for 3 days, cells were fixed with 0.5% glutaraldehyde and AFM images of scanning observation were captured by contacting and tapping model under normal atmospheric pressure and temperature. It showed that human epidermal MCs in culture had secondary or tertiary branches. Except for globular granules structure on the surface of dendrites, some filopodia were protruded on the tips and lateral sides of the dendrites. The administration of α-MSH and PGE2 made not only the dendrites thinner and longer, but also the globular granules more intensive and denser. Many spheroid granules were shed from branches of dendrite and most of them adhered with dense filopodia. Compared with untreated group, the number of filopodia per cell, diameter of filopodia, and shedding spheroid granules per field all increased following α-MSH and PGE2 exposure (Pspheroid granules per field all increased after the administration of α-MSH and PGE2 (Pspheroid granules, filopodia delivery and KC phagocytosis are major mode of melanosome transfer between MCs and KCs. PGE2, as well as α-MSH, drives melanosome transfer by promoting filopodia delivery and numbers of shedding spheroid granules in MCs, but no direct morphological effects on KCs. These findings open a

  10. Stability and skill in driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treffner, Paul; Barrett, Rod; Petersen, Andrew

    2002-12-01

    Two experiments addressed the relation between postural stability, perceptual sensitivity, and stability of driving performance. A vehicle was fitted with differential GPS for measuring position and speed, position sensors for measuring brake and accelerator depression, force transducers for measuring door, console and footrest bracing forces, and an accelerometer for measuring the 3D accelerations of the vehicle. In Experiment 1, we investigated whether the initiation of deceleration and the control of braking might be due to sensitivity to the perceptual variable tau, which specifies time-to-contact (TTC), and in particular, whether its first derivative, tau-dot, is used to maintain a constant deceleration profile. Using both untrained experienced drivers (EDs) and trained driving instructors from the Holden Performance Driving Centre (HPDC), results confirmed that, regardless of skill level, tau-dot was maintained at a value close to 0.5 and, as predicted by Lee [Perception 5 (1976) 437], braking was initiated when TTC approximately 5 s. In Experiment 2, we wished to quantify the purported differences in driving behaviour between EDs and HPDC instructors during a variety of everyday manoeuvres. Results indicated that instructors utilised a different cornering trajectory, a different emergency braking strategy, and were able to perform a high-speed swerve and recovery task more effectively than the EDs. In general, the instructors applied greater bracing forces using the door and console compared with EDs. The instructors also applied greater footrest forces during emergency braking than did the EDs. The greater use of bracing by instructor drivers to resist g-forces represents a strategy of active stabilisation that enhances both postural stability, as well as overall stability and consistency of driving performance. Results are discussed with regard to the dynamics of perceptual-motor coordination, and how increased stability might improve sensitivity to

  11. Nonlinear forecasting of intertidal shoreface evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, D. J.; Cortale, N.; Baker, K.; McNamara, D. E.

    2015-10-01

    Natural systems dominated by sediment transport are notoriously difficult to forecast. This is particularly true along the ocean coastline, a region that draws considerable human attention as economic investment and infrastructure are threatened by both persistent, long-term and acute, event driven processes (i.e., sea level rise and storm damage, respectively). Forecasting the coastline's evolution over intermediate time (daily) and space (tens of meters) scales is hindered by the complexity of sediment transport and hydrodynamics, and limited access to the detailed local forcing that drives fast scale processes. Modern remote sensing systems provide an efficient, economical means to collect data within these regions. A solar-powered digital camera installation is used to capture the coast's evolution, and machine learning algorithms are implemented to extract the shoreline and estimate the daily mean intertidal coastal profile. Methods in nonlinear time series forecasting and genetic programming applied to these data corroborate that coastal morphology at these scales is predominately driven by nonlinear internal dynamics, which partially mask external forcing signatures. Results indicate that these forecasting techniques achieve nontrivial predictive skill for spatiotemporal forecast of the upper coastline profile (as much as 43% of variance in data explained for one day predictions). This analysis provides evidence that societally relevant coastline forecasts can be achieved without knowing the forcing environment or the underlying dynamical equations that govern coastline evolution.

  12. Efficient Driving of Piezoelectric Transducers Using a Biaxial Driving Technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Pichardo

    Full Text Available Efficient driving of piezoelectric materials is desirable when operating transducers for biomedical applications such as high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU or ultrasound imaging. More efficient operation reduces the electric power required to produce the desired bioeffect or contrast. Our preliminary work [Cole et al. Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. 2014;26(13:135901.] suggested that driving transducers by applying orthogonal electric fields can significantly reduce the coercivity that opposes ferroelectric switching. We present here the experimental validation of this biaxial driving technique using piezoelectric ceramics typically used in HIFU. A set of narrow-band transducers was fabricated with two sets of electrodes placed in an orthogonal configuration (following the propagation and the lateral mode. The geometry of the ceramic was chosen to have a resonance frequency similar for the propagation and the lateral mode. The average (± s.d. resonance frequency of the samples was 465.1 (± 1.5 kHz. Experiments were conducted in which each pair of electrodes was driven independently and measurements of effective acoustic power were obtained using the radiation force method. The efficiency (acoustic/electric power of the biaxial driving method was compared to the results obtained when driving the ceramic using electrodes placed only in the pole direction. Our results indicate that the biaxial method increases efficiency from 50% to 125% relative to the using a single electric field.

  13. Contributions of stochastic events to biological evolution and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson KM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic genetic and epigenetic events have been fundamental in contributing to the development of manifold life-forms, past and present. The development of malignant cell clones and the role of stochasticity as a driving force in cancer cell evolution complements, in a perverse way evidence for the role of chance in normal cellular development and evolution. Stochastic events at multiple levels of cellular control and implementation represent a primary driving force and an ultimate filter through which evolutionary innovation occurs. Stochasticity provides the opportunity for a random assortment of disparate genetic and epigenetic events, in some instances resulting in altered metabolic and developmental capabilities of sufficient stability and uniqueness to contribute to deterministic sequelae that promote the viability and procreation of cells under stress. Cellular evolution has so far resulted in a “survival of a (sic fittest”, often dependent mechanistically on and determined by stochastic events. The implications of this are mirrored in the evolution of malignant change, to some extent as a variant of “reverse engineering” of dedifferentiation. Efforts to reduce the incidence of malignant change will have to take in to account its random nature and further the understanding of this feature.

  14. Effective resonant interactions via a driving field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimov, A B [Departamento de FIsica, Universidad de Guadalajara, Revolucion 1500, Guadalajara 44420 (Mexico); Sainz, I [Departamento de FIsica, Universidad de Guadalajara, Revolucion 1500, Guadalajara 44420 (Mexico); Saavedra, C [Center for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Departamento de FIsica, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile)

    2004-11-01

    Effective resonant quantum atom-field interactions are studied. These resonant interactions are induced by the presence of an external classical driving field. An adequate choice for frequencies of the driving field produces nonlinear effective Hamiltonians both for atom-field and for spin-spin interactions. It is shown that the exact numerical evolution for each resonance condition is well described by the corresponding effective Hamiltonian.

  15. Extended driving impairs nocturnal driving performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagaspe, Patricia; Taillard, Jacques; Akerstedt, Torbjorn; Bayon, Virginie; Espié, Stéphane; Chaumet, Guillaume; Bioulac, Bernard; Philip, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Though fatigue and sleepiness at the wheel are well-known risk factors for traffic accidents, many drivers combine extended driving and sleep deprivation. Fatigue-related accidents occur mainly at night but there is no experimental data available to determine if the duration of prior driving affects driving performance at night. Participants drove in 3 nocturnal driving sessions (3-5 am, 1-5 am and 9 pm-5 am) on open highway. Fourteen young healthy men (mean age [+/-SD] = 23.4 [+/-1.7] years) participated Inappropriate line crossings (ILC) in the last hour of driving of each session, sleep variables, self-perceived fatigue and sleepiness were measured. Compared to the short (3-5 am) driving session, the incidence rate ratio of inappropriate line crossings increased by 2.6 (95% CI, 1.1 to 6.0; P<.05) for the intermediate (1-5 am) driving session and by 4.0 (CI, 1.7 to 9.4; P<.001) for the long (9 pm-5 am) driving session. Compared to the reference session (9-10 pm), the incidence rate ratio of inappropriate line crossings were 6.0 (95% CI, 2.3 to 15.5; P<.001), 15.4 (CI, 4.6 to 51.5; P<.001) and 24.3 (CI, 7.4 to 79.5; P<.001), respectively, for the three different durations of driving. Self-rated fatigue and sleepiness scores were both positively correlated to driving impairment in the intermediate and long duration sessions (P<.05) and increased significantly during the nocturnal driving sessions compared to the reference session (P<.01). At night, extended driving impairs driving performances and therefore should be limited.

  16. Extended driving impairs nocturnal driving performances.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Sagaspe

    Full Text Available Though fatigue and sleepiness at the wheel are well-known risk factors for traffic accidents, many drivers combine extended driving and sleep deprivation. Fatigue-related accidents occur mainly at night but there is no experimental data available to determine if the duration of prior driving affects driving performance at night. Participants drove in 3 nocturnal driving sessions (3-5 am, 1-5 am and 9 pm-5 am on open highway. Fourteen young healthy men (mean age [+/-SD] = 23.4 [+/-1.7] years participated Inappropriate line crossings (ILC in the last hour of driving of each session, sleep variables, self-perceived fatigue and sleepiness were measured. Compared to the short (3-5 am driving session, the incidence rate ratio of inappropriate line crossings increased by 2.6 (95% CI, 1.1 to 6.0; P<.05 for the intermediate (1-5 am driving session and by 4.0 (CI, 1.7 to 9.4; P<.001 for the long (9 pm-5 am driving session. Compared to the reference session (9-10 pm, the incidence rate ratio of inappropriate line crossings were 6.0 (95% CI, 2.3 to 15.5; P<.001, 15.4 (CI, 4.6 to 51.5; P<.001 and 24.3 (CI, 7.4 to 79.5; P<.001, respectively, for the three different durations of driving. Self-rated fatigue and sleepiness scores were both positively correlated to driving impairment in the intermediate and long duration sessions (P<.05 and increased significantly during the nocturnal driving sessions compared to the reference session (P<.01. At night, extended driving impairs driving performances and therefore should be limited.

  17. Teen Driving Risk and Prevention: Naturalistic Driving Research Contributions and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce G. Simons-Morton

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Naturalistic driving (ND methods may be particularly useful for research on young driver crash risk. Novices are not safe drivers initially, but tend to improve rapidly, although the pace of learning is highly variable. However, knowledge is lacking about how best to reduce the learning curve and the variability in the development of safe driving judgment. A great deal has been learned from recent naturalistic driving (ND studies that have included young drivers, providing objective information on the nature of crash risk and the factors that contribute to safety critical events. This research indicates that most learners obtain at least the amount of practice driving recommended and develop important driving skills. Unfortunately, most learners are not exposed during training to more complex driving situations and the instruction provided by supervising parents is mostly reactive and may not fully prepare teens for independent driving. While supervised practice driving is quite safe, crash rates are high during the first six months or so of independent driving then decline rapidly, but remain high for years relative to experienced drivers. Contributing factors to crash risk include exposure, inexperience, elevated gravitational-force event rates, greater willingness to engage in secondary tasks while driving, and social influence from peer passengers. The findings indicate the need and possible objectives for improving practice driving instruction and developing innovative prevention approaches for the first year of independent driving.

  18. HARMONIC DRIVE SELECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr FOLĘGA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The variety of types and sizes currently in production harmonic drive is a problem in their rational choice. Properly selected harmonic drive must meet certain requirements during operation, and achieve the anticipated service life. The paper discusses the problems associated with the selection of the harmonic drive. It also presents the algorithm correct choice of harmonic drive. The main objective of this study was to develop a computer program that allows the correct choice of harmonic drive by developed algorithm.

  19. Naturalistic driving : observing everyday driving behaviour.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Naturalistic Driving is a relatively new research method for the observation of everyday driving behaviour of road users. For this purpose, systems are installed in subjects’ own vehicles that unobtrusively register vehicle manoeuvres, driver behaviour (such as eye, head and hand manoeuvres) and

  20. Brain evolution and human neuropsychology: the inferential brain hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koscik, Timothy R; Tranel, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    Collaboration between human neuropsychology and comparative neuroscience has generated invaluable contributions to our understanding of human brain evolution and function. Further cross-talk between these disciplines has the potential to continue to revolutionize these fields. Modern neuroimaging methods could be applied in a comparative context, yielding exciting new data with the potential of providing insight into brain evolution. Conversely, incorporating an evolutionary base into the theoretical perspectives from which we approach human neuropsychology could lead to novel hypotheses and testable predictions. In the spirit of these objectives, we present here a new theoretical proposal, the Inferential Brain Hypothesis, whereby the human brain is thought to be characterized by a shift from perceptual processing to inferential computation, particularly within the social realm. This shift is believed to be a driving force for the evolution of the large human cortex. (JINS, 2012, 18, 394-401).

  1. Brain Evolution and Human Neuropsychology: The Inferential Brain Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koscik, Timothy R.; Tranel, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Collaboration between human neuropsychology and comparative neuroscience has generated invaluable contributions to our understanding of human brain evolution and function. Further cross-talk between these disciplines has the potential to continue to revolutionize these fields. Modern neuroimaging methods could be applied in a comparative context, yielding exciting new data with the potential of providing insight into brain evolution. Conversely, incorporating an evolutionary base into the theoretical perspectives from which we approach human neuropsychology could lead to novel hypotheses and testable predictions. In the spirit of these objectives, we present here a new theoretical proposal, the Inferential Brain Hypothesis, whereby the human brain is thought to be characterized by a shift from perceptual processing to inferential computation, particularly within the social realm. This shift is believed to be a driving force for the evolution of the large human cortex. PMID:22459075

  2. Evolution of ozone, particulates, and aerosol direct radiative forcing in the vicinity of Houston using a fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Barnard, James C.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Grell, Georg A.; Peckham, Steven E.

    2006-11-01

    A new fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model is used to simulate the urban- to regional-scale variations in trace gases, particulates, and aerosol direct radiative forcing in the vicinity of Houston over a 5 day summer period. Model performance is evaluated using a wide range of meteorological, chemistry, and particulate measurements obtained during the 2000 Texas Air Quality Study. The predicted trace gas and particulate distributions were qualitatively similar to the surface and aircraft measurements with considerable spatial variations resulting from urban, power plant, and industrial sources of primary pollutants. Sulfate, organic carbon, and other inorganics were the largest constituents of the predicted particulates. The predicted shortwave radiation was 30 to 40 W m-2 closer to the observations when the aerosol optical properties were incorporated into the shortwave radiation scheme; however, the predicted hourly aerosol radiative forcing was still underestimated by 10 to 50 W m-2. The predicted aerosol radiative forcing was larger over Houston and the industrial ship channel than over the rural areas, consistent with surface measurements. The differences between the observed and simulated aerosol radiative forcing resulted from transport errors, relative humidity errors in the upper convective boundary layer that affect aerosol water content, secondary organic aerosols that were not yet included in the model, and uncertainties in the primary particulate emission rates. The current model was run in a predictive mode and demonstrates the challenges of accurately simulating all of the meteorological, chemical, and aerosol parameters over urban to regional scales that can affect aerosol radiative forcing.

  3. Electric Vehicle - Economical driving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, VCE, Steen V.; Schøn, Henriette

    1999-01-01

    Instruct the reader in getting most satisfaction out of an EV, especially concerning driving and loading.......Instruct the reader in getting most satisfaction out of an EV, especially concerning driving and loading....

  4. Radiative Forcing of Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Boucher, Olivier; Haigh, J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Haywood, J.; Myhre, G.; Nakajima, Takahito; Shi, Guangyu; Solomon, S.; Betts, Robert E.; Charlson, R.; Chuang, C. C.; Daniel, J. S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Feichter, J.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Forster, P. M.; Ghan, Steven J.; Jones, A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Koch, D.; Land, C.; Lean, J.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Minschwaner, K.; Penner, Joyce E.; Roberts, D. L.; Rodhe, H.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Rotstayn, Leon D.; Schneider, T. L.; Schumann, U.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Schwartzkopf, M. D.; Shine, K. P.; Smith, Steven J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Stordal, F.; Tegen, I.; van Dorland, R.; Zhang, Y.; Srinivasan, J.; Joos, Fortunat

    2001-10-01

    Chapter 6 of the IPCC Third Assessment Report Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Sections include: Executive Summary 6.1 Radiative Forcing 6.2 Forcing-Response Relationship 6.3 Well-Mixed Greenhouse Gases 6.4 Stratospheric Ozone 6.5 Radiative Forcing By Tropospheric Ozone 6.6 Indirect Forcings due to Chemistry 6.7 The Direct Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.8 The Indirect Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.9 Stratospheric Aerosols 6.10 Land-use Change (Surface Albedo Effect) 6.11 Solar Forcing of Climate 6.12 Global Warming Potentials hydrocarbons 6.13 Global Mean Radiative Forcings 6.14 The Geographical Distribution of the Radiative Forcings 6.15 Time Evolution of Radiative Forcings Appendix 6.1 Elements of Radiative Forcing Concept References.

  5. Gear bearing drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Brian (Inventor); Mavroidis, Constantinos (Inventor); Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gear bearing drive provides a compact mechanism that operates as an actuator providing torque and as a joint providing support. The drive includes a gear arrangement integrating an external rotor DC motor within a sun gear. Locking surfaces maintain the components of the drive in alignment and provide support for axial loads and moments. The gear bearing drive has a variety of applications, including as a joint in robotic arms and prosthetic limbs.

  6. An Investigation of Air Force Communities of Practice: A Descriptive Study of Evolution Through Assessment of People, Process, and Technology Capabilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    May, Jason

    2003-01-01

    ... (Gongla and Rizzuto, 2001). A primary goal of AFMC/DRW, AFMC Electronic Learning (eLearning) Knowledge Management Integrated Project Team, and the office of the Air Force Chief Information Officer is to increase CoP participation and effectiveness...

  7. Sex drives intracellular conflict in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, E; MacLean, R C; Koufopanou, V; Burt, A

    2014-08-01

    Theory predicts that sex can drive the evolution of conflict within the cell. During asexual reproduction, genetic material within the cell is inherited as a single unit, selecting for cooperation both within the genome as well as between the extra-genomic elements within the cell (e.g. plasmids and endosymbionts). Under sexual reproduction, this unity is broken down as parental genomes are distributed between meiotic progeny. Genetic elements able to transmit to more than 50% of meiotic progeny have a transmission advantage over the rest of the genome and are able to spread, even where they reduce the fitness of the individual as a whole. Sexual reproduction is therefore expected to drive the evolution of selfish genetic elements (SGEs). Here, we directly test this hypothesis by studying the evolution of two independent SGEs, the 2-μm plasmid and selfish mitochondria, in populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Following 22 rounds of sexual reproduction, 2-μm copy number increased by approximately 13.2 (±5.6) copies per cell, whereas in asexual populations copy number decreased by approximately 5.1 (±1.5) copies per cell. Given that the burden imposed by this parasite increases with copy number, these results support the idea that sex drives the evolution of increased SGE virulence. Moreover, we found that mitochondria that are respiratory-deficient rapidly invaded sexual but not asexual populations, demonstrating that frequent outcrossed sex can drive the de novo evolution of genetic parasites. Our study highlights the genomic perils of sex and suggests that SGEs may play a key role in driving major evolutionary transitions, such as uniparental inheritance. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  8. Prediction and analysis of variable reluctance stepmotor drive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulle, D. W. J.

    1982-01-01

    A relationship between the electric terminal parameters and output/input power is derived for conventional doubly-salient synchronous machines and extended to include the variable reluctance motor. The advantages and limitations of the drive-schemes are shown in Blondel diagrams and torque speed curves. A general method for obtaining a quantitative assessment of drive-schemes is developed by the introduction of so-called performance figures, related to the output power and efficiency. From this method applied to four drive schemes, it is concluded that severe performance degradation is the result of using a forging resistance in a drive-scheme. A forced decay unipolar chopper drive is presented.

  9. Simple Driving Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Mads

    2002-01-01

    Driving was introduced as a program transformation technique by Valentin Turchin in some papers around 1980. It was intended for the programming language REFAL and used in metasystem transitions based on super compilation. In this paper we present one version of driving for a more conventional lisp......-like language. Our aim is to extract a simple notion of driving and show that even in this tamed form it has much of the power of more general notions of driving. Our driving technique may be used to simplify functional programs which use function composition and will often be able to remove intermediate data...

  10. High performance AC drives

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmad, Mukhtar

    2010-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive view of high performance ac drives. It may be considered as both a text book for graduate students and as an up-to-date monograph. It may also be used by R & D professionals involved in the improvement of performance of drives in the industries. The book will also be beneficial to the researchers pursuing work on multiphase drives as well as sensorless and direct torque control of electric drives since up-to date references in these topics are provided. It will also provide few examples of modeling, analysis and control of electric drives using MATLAB/SIMULIN

  11. Analysis of microstructural evolution driven by production bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woo, C.H.; Semenov, A.A.; Singh, B.N.

    1993-01-01

    The concept of production bias was first considered in the preceding workshop in this series at Silkeborg in 1989. Since then, much work has been done to investigate the validity of the concept, and its usefulness in complementing the current theory of microstructure evolution based solely...... on the sink bias (e.g., dislocation bias) as a driving force. Comparison of the theory with experimental results clearly supports the concept. The present paper reviews and summarizes these investigations, and arrives at the following conclusions: a) the concept of production bias is consistent...

  12. Classical-driving-assisted entanglement dynamics control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ying-Jie, E-mail: yingjiezhang@qfnu.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Laser Polarization and Information Technology, Department of Physics, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Han, Wei [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Laser Polarization and Information Technology, Department of Physics, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Xia, Yun-Jie, E-mail: yjxia@qfnu.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Laser Polarization and Information Technology, Department of Physics, Qufu Normal University, Qufu 273165 (China); Fan, Heng, E-mail: hfan@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing, 100190 (China)

    2017-04-15

    We propose a scheme of controlling entanglement dynamics of a quantum system by applying the external classical driving field for two atoms separately located in a single-mode photon cavity. It is shown that, with a judicious choice of the classical-driving strength and the atom–photon detuning, the effective atom–photon interaction Hamiltonian can be switched from Jaynes–Cummings model to anti-Jaynes–Cummings model. By tuning the controllable atom–photon interaction induced by the classical field, we illustrate that the evolution trajectory of the Bell-like entanglement states can be manipulated from entanglement-sudden-death to no-entanglement-sudden-death, from no-entanglement-invariant to entanglement-invariant. Furthermore, the robustness of the initial Bell-like entanglement can be improved by the classical driving field in the leaky cavities. This classical-driving-assisted architecture can be easily extensible to multi-atom quantum system for scalability.

  13. Synergy and Target Promiscuity Drive Structural Divergence in Bacterial Alkylquinolone Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yihan; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R

    2017-12-21

    Microbial natural products are genetically encoded by dedicated biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). A given BGC usually produces a family of related compounds that share a core but contain variable substituents. Though common, the reasons underlying this divergent biosynthesis are in general unknown. Herein, we have addressed this issue using the hydroxyalkylquinoline (HAQ) family of natural products synthesized by Burkholderia thailandensis. Investigations into the detailed functions of two analogs show that they act synergistically in inhibiting bacterial growth. One analog is a nanomolar inhibitor of pyrimidine biosynthesis and at the same time disrupts the proton motive force. A second analog inhibits the cytochrome bc 1 complex as well as pyrimidine biogenesis. These results provide a functional rationale for the divergent nature of HAQs. They imply that synergy and target promiscuity are driving forces for the evolution of tailoring enzymes that diversify the products of the HAQ biosynthetic pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The potential and flux landscape theory of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Xu, Li; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2012-08-14

    We established the potential and flux landscape theory for evolution. We found explicitly the conventional Wright's gradient adaptive landscape based on the mean fitness is inadequate to describe the general evolutionary dynamics. We show the intrinsic potential as being Lyapunov function(monotonically decreasing in time) does exist and can define the adaptive landscape for general evolution dynamics for studying global stability. The driving force determining the dynamics can be decomposed into gradient of potential landscape and curl probability flux. Non-zero flux causes detailed balance breaking and measures how far the evolution from equilibrium state. The gradient of intrinsic potential and curl flux are perpendicular to each other in zero fluctuation limit resembling electric and magnetic forces on electrons. We quantified intrinsic energy, entropy and free energy of evolution and constructed non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The intrinsic non-equilibrium free energy is a Lyapunov function. Both intrinsic potential and free energy can be used to quantify the global stability and robustness of evolution. We investigated an example of three allele evolutionary dynamics with frequency dependent selection (detailed balance broken). We uncovered the underlying single, triple, and limit cycle attractor landscapes. We found quantitative criterions for stability through landscape topography. We also quantified evolution pathways and found paths do not follow potential gradient and are irreversible due to non-zero flux. We generalized the original Fisher's fundamental theorem to the general (i.e., frequency dependent selection) regime of evolution by linking the adaptive rate with not only genetic variance related to the potential but also the flux. We show there is an optimum potential where curl flux resulting from biotic interactions of individuals within a species or between species can sustain an endless evolution even if the physical environment is unchanged. We

  15. Extended inclusive fitness theory: synergy and assortment drives the evolutionary dynamics in biology and economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    W.D. Hamilton's Inclusive Fitness Theory explains the conditions that favor the emergence and maintenance of social cooperation. Today we know that these include direct and indirect benefits an agent obtains by its actions, and through interactions with kin and with genetically unrelated individuals. That is, in addition to kin-selection, assortation or homophily, and social synergies drive the evolution of cooperation. An Extended Inclusive Fitness Theory (EIFT) synthesizes the natural selection forces acting on biological evolution and on human economic interactions by assuming that natural selection driven by inclusive fitness produces agents with utility functions that exploit assortation and synergistic opportunities. This formulation allows to estimate sustainable cost/benefit threshold ratios of cooperation among organisms and/or economic agents, using existent analytical tools, illuminating our understanding of the dynamic nature of society, the evolution of cooperation among kin and non-kin, inter-specific cooperation, co-evolution, symbioses, division of labor and social synergies. EIFT helps to promote an interdisciplinary cross fertilization of the understanding of synergy by, for example, allowing to describe the role for division of labor in the emergence of social synergies, providing an integrated framework for the study of both, biological evolution of social behavior and economic market dynamics. Another example is a bio-economic understanding of the motivations of terrorists, which identifies different forms of terrorism.

  16. The death drive in tourism studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buda, Dorina Maria

    2015-01-01

    The psychoanalytical concept of the death drive postulated by Freud and Lacan refers to a constant force at the junction between life and death, which is not understood in a biological sense of physical demise of the body, nor in opposition to life. Tourist experiences in conflict zones can be more

  17. Sexual and natural selection both influence male genital evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Clarissa M; Lewis, Zenobia; Hodgson, Dave J; Wedell, Nina; Sharma, Manmohan D; Hunt, John; Hosken, David J

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and divergent evolution of male genital morphology is a conspicuous and general pattern across internally fertilizing animals. Rapid genital evolution is thought to be the result of sexual selection, and the role of natural selection in genital evolution remains controversial. However, natural and sexual selection are believed to act antagonistically on male genital form. We conducted an experimental evolution study to investigate the combined effects of natural and sexual selection on the genital-arch lobes of male Drosophila simulans. Replicate populations were forced to evolve under lifetime monogamy (relaxed sexual selection) or lifetime polyandry (elevated sexual selection) and two temperature regimes, 25°C (relaxed natural selection) or 27°C (elevated natural selection) in a fully factorial design. We found that natural and sexual selection plus their interaction caused genital evolution. Natural selection caused some aspects of genital form to evolve away from their sexually selected shape, whereas natural and sexual selection operated in the same direction for other shape components. Additionally, sexual and natural selection tended to favour larger genitals. Thus we find that the underlying selection driving genital evolution is complex, does not only involve sexual selection, and that natural selection and sexual selection do not always act antagonistically.

  18. Superluminal warp drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F. [Colina de los Chopos, Centro de Fisica ' Miguel A. Catalan' , Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: p.gonzalezdiaz@imaff.cfmac.csic.es

    2007-09-20

    In this Letter we consider a warp drive spacetime resulting from that suggested by Alcubierre when the spaceship can only travel faster than light. Restricting to the two dimensions that retains most of the physics, we derive the thermodynamic properties of the warp drive and show that the temperature of the spaceship rises up as its apparent velocity increases. We also find that the warp drive spacetime can be exhibited in a manifestly cosmological form.

  19. Universal Drive Train Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This vehicle drive train research facility is capable of evaluating helicopter and ground vehicle power transmission technologies in a system level environment. The...

  20. Medications and impaired driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetland, Amanda; Carr, David B

    2014-04-01

    To describe the association of specific medication classes with driving outcomes and provide clinical recommendations. The MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched for articles published from January 1973 to June 2013 on classes of medications associated with driving impairment. The search included outcome terms such as automobile driving, motor vehicle crash, driving simulator, and road tests. Only English-language articles that contained findings from observational or interventional designs with ≥ 10 participants were included in this review. Cross-sectional studies, case series, and case reports were excluded. Driving is an important task and activity for the majority of adults. Some commonly prescribed medications have been associated with driving impairment measured by road performance, driving simulation, and/or motor vehicle crashes. This review of 30 studies identified findings with barbiturates, benzodiazepines, hypnotics, antidepressants, opioid and nonsteroidal analgesics, anticonvulsants, antipsychotics, antiparkinsonian agents, skeletal muscle relaxants, antihistamines, anticholinergic medications, and hypoglycemic agents. Additional studies of medication impact on sedation, sleep latency, and psychomotor function, as well as the role of alcohol, are also discussed. Psychotropic agents and those with central nervous system side effects were associated with measures of impaired driving performance. It is difficult to determine if such associations are actually a result of medication use or the medical diagnosis itself. Regardless, clinicians should be aware of the increased risk of impaired driving with specific classes of medications, educate their patients, and/or consider safer alternatives.

  1. Evolution of nano-rheological properties of Nafion{sup ®} thin films during pH modification by strong base treatment: A static and dynamic force spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslami, Babak; López-Guerra, Enrique A.; Raftari, Maryam; Solares, Santiago D., E-mail: ssolares@gwu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2016-04-28

    Addition of a strong base to Nafion{sup ®} proton exchange membranes is a common practice in industry to increase their overall performance in fuel cells. Here, we investigate the evolution of the nano-rheological properties of Nafion thin films as a function of the casting pH, via characterization with static and dynamic, contact and intermittent-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. The addition of KOH causes non-monotonic changes in the viscoelastic properties of the films, which behave as highly dissipative, softer materials near neutral pH values, and as harder, more elastic materials at extreme pH values. We quantify this behavior through calculation of the temporal evolution of the compliance and the glassy compliance under static AFM measurements. We complement these observations with dynamic AFM metrics, including dissipated power and virial (for intermittent-contact-mode measurements), and contact resonance frequency and quality factor (for dynamic contact-mode measurements). We explain the non-monotonic material property behavior in terms of the degree of ionic crosslinking and moisture content of the films, which vary with the addition of KOH. This work focuses on the special case study of the addition of strong bases, but the observed mechanical property changes are broadly related to water plasticizing effects and ionic crosslinking, which are also important in other types of films.

  2. Feeling the right force: How to contextualize the cell mechanical behavior in physiologic turnover and pathologic evolution of the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Maurizio; Santoro, Rosaria

    2017-03-01

    Although traditionally linked to the physiology of tissues in 'motion', the ability of the cells to transduce external forces into coordinated gene expression programs is emerging as an integral component of the fundamental structural organization of multicellular organisms with consequences for cell differentiation even from the beginning of embryonic development. The ability of the cells to 'feel' the surrounding mechanical environment, even in the absence of tissue motion, is then translated into 'positional' or 'social' sensing that instructs, before the organ renewal, the correct patterning of the embryos. In the present review, we will highlight how these basic concepts, emerging from the employment of novel cell engineering tools, can be linked to pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system, and may contribute to understanding the molecular bases of some of the major cardiovascular diseases like heart failure, heart valve stenosis and failure of the venous aorto-coronary bypass. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Electric Vehicle - Economical driving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, VCE, Steen V.; Schøn, Henriette

    1999-01-01

    How do you reduce the energy-wast when driving and loading EV's - or rather: How do I get more km/l out of an EV......How do you reduce the energy-wast when driving and loading EV's - or rather: How do I get more km/l out of an EV...

  4. Piezoelectric drive circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treu, Jr., Charles A.

    1999-08-31

    A piezoelectric motor drive circuit is provided which utilizes the piezoelectric elements as oscillators and a Meacham half-bridge approach to develop feedback from the motor ground circuit to produce a signal to drive amplifiers to power the motor. The circuit automatically compensates for shifts in harmonic frequency of the piezoelectric elements due to pressure and temperature changes.

  5. Wrong-way driving.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2006-01-01

    Wrong-way driving is a phenomenon that mainly happens on motorways. Although the number of wrong-way crashes is relatively limited, their consequences are much more severe than the consequences of other motorway injury crashes. The groups most often causing wrong-way driving accidents are young,

  6. Self-driving carsickness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diels, C.; Bos, J.E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the predicted increase in the occurrence and severity of motion sickness in self-driving cars. Self-driving cars have the potential to lead to significant benefits. From the driver's perspective, the direct benefits of this technology are considered increased comfort and

  7. Switched reluctance motor drives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Davis RM, Ray WF, Blake RJ 1981 Inverter drive for switched reluctance: circuits and component ratings. Inst. Elec. Eng. Proc. B128: 126-136. Ehsani M. 1991 Position Sensor elimination technique for the switched reluctance motor drive. US Patent No. 5,072,166. Ehsani M, Ramani K R 1993 Direct control strategies based ...

  8. Fundamentals of electrical drives

    CERN Document Server

    Veltman, André; De Doncker, Rik W

    2007-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive introduction to various aspects of electrical drive systems. This volume provides a presentation of dynamic generic models that cover all major electrical machine types and modulation/control components of a drive as well as dynamic and steady state analysis of transformers and electrical machines.

  9. Self-driving carsickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diels, C.; Bos, J.E.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the predicted increase in the occurrence and severity of motion sickness in self-driving cars. Self-driving cars have the potential to lead to significant benefits. From the driver's perspective, the direct benefits of this technology are considered increased comfort and

  10. Electric vehicles: Driving range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempton, Willett

    2016-09-01

    For uptake of electric vehicles to increase, consumers' driving-range needs must be fulfilled. Analysis of the driving patterns of personal vehicles in the US now shows that today's electric vehicles can meet all travel needs on almost 90% of days from a single overnight charge.

  11. Driving the Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haff, P. K.

    2012-12-01

    Technological modification of the earth's surface (e.g., agriculture, urbanization) is an old story in human history, but what about the future? The future of landscape in an accelerating technological world, beyond a relatively short time horizon, lies hidden behind an impenetrable veil of complexity. Sufficiently complex dynamics generates not only the trajectory of a variable of interest (e.g., vegetation cover) but also the environment in which that variable evolves (e.g., background climate). There is no way to anticipate what variables will define that environment—the dynamics creates its own variables. We are always open to surprise by a change of conditions we thought or assumed were fixed or by the appearance of new phenomena of whose possible existence we had been unaware or thought unlikely. This is especially true under the influence of technology, where novelty is the rule. Lack of direct long-term predictability of landscape change does not, however, mean we cannot say anything about its future. The presence of persistence (finite time scales) in a system means that prediction by a calibrated numerical model should be good for a limited period of time barring bad luck or faulty implementation. Short-term prediction, despite its limitations, provides an option for dealing with the longer-term future. If a computer-controlled car tries to drive itself from New York to Los Angeles, no conceivable (or possible) stand-alone software can be constructed to predict a priori the space-time trajectory of the vehicle. Yet the drive is normally completed easily by most drivers. The trip is successfully completed because each in a series of very short (linear) steps can be "corrected" on the fly by the driver, who takes her cues from the environment to keep the car on the road and headed toward its destination. This metaphor differs in a fundamental way from the usual notion of predicting geomorphic change, because it involves a goal—to reach a desired

  12. How evolution generates complexity without design: language as an instructional metaphor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillings, Michael R

    2012-03-01

    One of the major stumbling blocks to understanding evolution is the difficulty in reconciling the emergence of complexity with the apparently undirected forces that drive evolutionary processes. This difficulty was originally framed as the "Watch and Watchmaker" argument and more recently revived by proponents of "intelligent design." Undergraduates in particular often attribute purpose and forethought as the driving force behind biological phenomena, and have difficulty understanding evolutionary processes. To demonstrate that complexity can arise solely through mutations that fix in populations via natural selection or drift, we can use analogies where processes can be observed across short time frames and where the key data are accessible to those without specialized biological knowledge. The evolution of language provides such an example. Processes of natural selection, mutation, genetic drift, acquisition of new functions, punctuated equilibria, and lateral gene transfer can be illustrated using examples of changing spellings, neologism, and acquisition of words from other languages. The examples presented in this article are readily accessible, and demonstrate to students that languages have dynamically increased in complexity, simply driven by the usage patterns of their speakers. © 2011 The Author. Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  13. Transmission of clonal hepatitis C virus genomes reveals the dominant but transitory role of CD8¿ T cells in early viral evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callendret, Benoît; Bukh, Jens; Eccleston, Heather B

    2011-01-01

    occurred slowly over several years of chronic infection. Together these observations indicate that during acute hepatitis C, virus evolution was driven primarily by positive selection pressure exerted by CD8(+) T cells. This influence of immune pressure on viral evolution appears to subside as chronic......The RNA genome of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) diversifies rapidly during the acute phase of infection, but the selective forces that drive this process remain poorly defined. Here we examined whether Darwinian selection pressure imposed by CD8(+) T cells is a dominant force driving early amino acid...... virus at frequent intervals revealed that most acute-phase nonsynonymous mutations were clustered in class I epitopes and appeared much earlier than those in the remainder of the HCV genome. Moreover, the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous mutations, a measure of positive selection pressure...

  14. Dual role of an ac driving force and the underlying two distinct order–disorder transitions in the vortex phase diagram of Ca{sub 3}Ir{sub 4}Sn{sub 13}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Santosh, E-mail: santoshkumar@phy.iitb.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Singh, Ravi P.; Thamizhavel, A. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Tomy, C.V., E-mail: tomy@phy.iitb.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Grover, A.K. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • This work pertains to new findings related to a broad SMP anomaly. • Broad SMP prima facie encompasses two phase transformations in vortex matter. • We demarcated two phase boundaries pertaining to order–disorder transitions which have quasi first-order nature. - Abstract: We present distinct demarcation of the Bragg glass (BG) to multi-domain vortex glass (VG) transition line and the eventual amorphization of the VG phase in a weakly pinned single crystal of the superconducting compound Ca{sub 3}Ir{sub 4}Sn{sub 13} on the basis of comprehension of the different yields about the second magnetization peak (SMP) anomaly in the dc magnetization and the corresponding anomalous feature in the ac susceptibility measurements. The shaking by a small ac magnetic field, inevitably present in the ac susceptibility measurements, is seen to result in contrasting responses in two different portions of the field-temperature (H, T) phase space of the multi-domain VG. In one of the portions, embracing the BG to VG transition across the onset of the SMP anomaly, the ac drive is surprisingly seen to assist the transformation of the well ordered BG phase to a lesser ordered VG phase. The BG phase exists as a superheated state over a small portion of the VG space and this attests to the first order nature of the BG to VG transition.

  15. Gene duplication and the evolution of moonlighting proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana eEspinosa-Cantú

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gene duplication is a recurring phenomenon in genome evolution and a major driving force in the gain of biological functions. Here, we examine the role of gene duplication in the origin and maintenance of moonlighting proteins, with special focus on functional redundancy and innovation, molecular tradeoffs, and genetic robustness. An overview of specific examples--mainly from yeast--suggests a widespread conservation of moonlighting behavior in duplicate genes after long evolutionary times. Dosage amplification and incomplete subfunctionalization appear to be prevalent in the maintenance of multifunctionality. We discuss the role of gene-expression divergence and paralog responsiveness in moonlighting proteins with overlapping biochemical properties. Future studies analyzing multifunctional genes in a more systematic and comprehensive manner will not only enable a better understanding of how this emerging class of protein behavior originates and is maintained, but also provide new insights on the mechanisms of evolution by gene duplication.

  16. Gene duplication and the evolution of moonlighting proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Cantú, Adriana; Ascencio, Diana; Barona-Gómez, Francisco; DeLuna, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplication is a recurring phenomenon in genome evolution and a major driving force in the gain of biological functions. Here, we examine the role of gene duplication in the origin and maintenance of moonlighting proteins, with special focus on functional redundancy and innovation, molecular tradeoffs, and genetic robustness. An overview of specific examples-mainly from yeast-suggests a widespread conservation of moonlighting behavior in duplicate genes after long evolutionary times. Dosage amplification and incomplete subfunctionalization appear to be prevalent in the maintenance of multifunctionality. We discuss the role of gene-expression divergence and paralog responsiveness in moonlighting proteins with overlapping biochemical properties. Future studies analyzing multifunctional genes in a more systematic and comprehensive manner will not only enable a better understanding of how this emerging class of protein behavior originates and is maintained, but also provide new insights on the mechanisms of evolution by gene duplication.

  17. Transitionless driving on adiabatic search algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sangchul; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-01

    We study quantum dynamics of the adiabatic search algorithm with the equivalent two-level system. Its adiabatic and non-adiabatic evolution is studied and visualized as trajectories of Bloch vectors on a Bloch sphere. We find the change in the non-adiabatic transition probability from exponential decay for the short running time to inverse-square decay in asymptotic running time. The scaling of the critical running time is expressed in terms of the Lambert W function. We derive the transitionless driving Hamiltonian for the adiabatic search algorithm, which makes a quantum state follow the adiabatic path. We demonstrate that a uniform transitionless driving Hamiltonian, approximate to the exact time-dependent driving Hamiltonian, can alter the non-adiabatic transition probability from the inverse square decay to the inverse fourth power decay with the running time. This may open up a new but simple way of speeding up adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  18. The growth of a mountain belt forced by base-level fall: Tectonics and surface processes during the evolution of the Alborz Mountains, N Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballato, P.

    2015-12-01

    The idea that climatically modulated erosion may impact orogenic processes has challenged geoscientists for decades, However, to date, field-based work has produced controversial results. The central-western Alborz Mts. of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone are characterized by asymmetric precipitation superimposed on spatiotemporal changes in exhumation rates, deformation patterns, and prolonged, km-scale base-level changes. Our analysis suggests that despite the existence of a strong climatic gradient at least since 17.5 Ma, the early orogenic evolution was characterized by decoupled orographic precipitation and tectonics. In particular, faster exhumation and sedimentation along the more arid southern orogenic flank point to a north-directed accretionary flux and underthrusting of Central Iran. Conversely, from ~ 6 to 3 Ma, erosion rates along the northern orogenic flank became higher than those in the south, where they dropped to minimum values. This change occurred during a ~3-Myr-long, km-scale, base-level lowering event in the Caspian Sea. We speculate that mass redistribution processes along the northern flank of the Alborz Mts. and presumably across all mountain belts adjacent to the South Caspian Basin the Eurasian plate increased the sediment load in the basin leading to the underthusting of the Caspian Basin beneath the Alborz Mts. This underthrusting in turn triggered a new phase of northward orogenic expansion, transformed the wetter northern flank into a new pro-wedge, and led to the establishment of apparent steady-state conditions along the northern orogenic flank. Conversely, the southern mountain front became the retro-wedge and experienced limited tectonic activity. These observations overall raise the possibility that mass-distribution processes during a pronounced erosion phase driven by base-level changes may have contributed to the inferred regional plate-tectonic reorganization of the northern Arabia-Eurasia collision during the last ~ 5 Ma.

  19. Satellite, Observational, Meteorological and Thermal Records From Two Sites in the Antarctic Megadunes - Stability of Atmospheric Forcing, Thermal Cracking, and the Seasonal Evolution of the Thermal Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahnestock, M. A.; Shuman, C. A.; Albert, M.; Scambos, T.

    2004-12-01

    An NSF-OPP funded research site in the megadunes occupied during the 2002-2003 and 2003-2004 field seasons provided an opportunity to monitor wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure, air temperature, and the evolution of the thermal profile in the firn. In the first season this was done on the lee face of a megadune; in the second season it was done there and at an additional site on the windward face. Wind speed and temperature fluctuations were well correlated at the two sites with little lag. The thermal profiles provide a picture of the cold wave penetration at both sites. Firn in these areas was significantly recrystallized (see abstract by Courville et al., this session), had a surface character that included both large sastrugi (windward slopes) and very smooth surfaces (lee slopes), and showed numerous thermal contraction cracks that were likely sites of vertical air movement. In the first season the smooth lee slope was covered by a thin glaze; the spatial extent of this glaze and the surface roughness variations are detectable in satellite imagery from this period. Large area MODIS-based image maps show the dominance of katabatic-wind-generated features in the dune field. Satellite-based microwave emission time series show the source of emission to be extremely shallow and/or characteristic of rapid cooling to near isothermal conditions; these patterns have been used to map the extent of recrystallized firn. This will be revisited in light of the new time series of firn thermal profiles.

  20. Is a larger refuge always better? Dispersal and dose in pesticide resistance evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Yamanaka, Takehiko; Sudo, Masaaki; Andow, David A

    2017-06-01

    The evolution of resistance against pesticides is an important problem of modern agriculture. The high-dose/refuge strategy, which divides the landscape into treated and nontreated (refuge) patches, has proven effective at delaying resistance evolution. However, theoretical understanding is still incomplete, especially for combinations of limited dispersal and partially recessive resistance. We reformulate a two-patch model based on the Comins model and derive a simple quadratic approximation to analyze the effects of limited dispersal, refuge size, and dominance for high efficacy treatments on the rate of evolution. When a small but substantial number of heterozygotes can survive in the treated patch, a larger refuge always reduces the rate of resistance evolution. However, when dominance is small enough, the evolutionary dynamics in the refuge population, which is indirectly driven by migrants from the treated patch, mainly describes the resistance evolution in the landscape. In this case, for small refuges, increasing the refuge size will increase the rate of resistance evolution. Our analysis distils major driving forces from the model, and can provide a framework for understanding directional selection in source-sink environments. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  1. Trophic specialization influences the rate of environmental niche evolution in damselfishes (Pomacentridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litsios, Glenn; Pellissier, Loïc; Forest, Félix; Lexer, Christian; Pearman, Peter B.; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.; Salamin, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    The rate of environmental niche evolution describes the capability of species to explore the available environmental space and is known to vary among species owing to lineage-specific factors. Trophic specialization is a main force driving species evolution and is responsible for classical examples of adaptive radiations in fishes. We investigate the effect of trophic specialization on the rate of environmental niche evolution in the damselfish, Pomacentridae, which is an important family of tropical reef fishes. First, phylogenetic niche conservatism is not detected in the family using a standard test of phylogenetic signal, and we demonstrate that the environmental niches of damselfishes that differ in trophic specialization are not equivalent while they still overlap at their mean values. Second, we estimate the relative rates of niche evolution on the phylogenetic tree and show the heterogeneity among rates of environmental niche evolution of the three trophic groups. We suggest that behavioural characteristics related to trophic specialization can constrain the evolution of the environmental niche and lead to conserved niches in specialist lineages. Our results show the extent of influence of several traits on the evolution of the environmental niche and shed new light on the evolution of damselfishes, which is a key lineage in current efforts to conserve biodiversity in coral reefs. PMID:22719034

  2. Turbulent current drive mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, Christopher J.; Tang, Xian-Zhu; Guo, Zehua

    2017-08-01

    Mechanisms through which plasma microturbulence can drive a mean electron plasma current are derived. The efficiency through which these turbulent contributions can drive deviations from neoclassical predictions of the electron current profile is computed by employing a linearized Coulomb collision operator. It is found that a non-diffusive contribution to the electron momentum flux as well as an anomalous electron-ion momentum exchange term provide the most efficient means through which turbulence can modify the mean electron current for the cases considered. Such turbulent contributions appear as an effective EMF within Ohm's law and hence provide an ideal means for driving deviations from neoclassical predictions.

  3. Metabolic evolution of a deep-branching hyperthermophilic chemoautotrophic bacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogier Braakman

    Full Text Available Aquifex aeolicus is a deep-branching hyperthermophilic chemoautotrophic bacterium restricted to hydrothermal vents and hot springs. These characteristics make it an excellent model system for studying the early evolution of metabolism. Here we present the whole-genome metabolic network of this organism and examine in detail the driving forces that have shaped it. We make extensive use of phylometabolic analysis, a method we recently introduced that generates trees of metabolic phenotypes by integrating phylogenetic and metabolic constraints. We reconstruct the evolution of a range of metabolic sub-systems, including the reductive citric acid (rTCA cycle, as well as the biosynthesis and functional roles of several amino acids and cofactors. We show that A. aeolicus uses the reconstructed ancestral pathways within many of these sub-systems, and highlight how the evolutionary interconnections between sub-systems facilitated several key innovations. Our analyses further highlight three general classes of driving forces in metabolic evolution. One is the duplication and divergence of genes for enzymes as these progress from lower to higher substrate specificity, improving the kinetics of certain sub-systems. A second is the kinetic optimization of established pathways through fusion of enzymes, or their organization into larger complexes. The third is the minimization of the ATP unit cost to synthesize biomass, improving thermodynamic efficiency. Quantifying the distribution of these classes of innovations across metabolic sub-systems and across the tree of life will allow us to assess how a tradeoff between maximizing growth rate and growth efficiency has shaped the long-term metabolic evolution of the biosphere.

  4. Time-Resolved Tracking of Mutations Reveals Diverse Allele Dynamics during Escherichia coli Antimicrobial Adaptive Evolution to Single Drugs and Drug Pairs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hickman, Rachel A.; Munck, Christian; Sommer, Morten Otto Alexander

    2017-01-01

    at several time-points during adaptive evolution experiments involving five different antibiotic conditions. We monitor the mutational spectra in lineages evolved to be resistant to single antibiotics [amikacin (AMK), chloramphenicol (CHL), and ciprofloxacin (CIP)], as well as antibiotic combinations (AMK...... and fixation allele dynamics. To further understand the selective forces driving specific allele dynamics, a subset of mutations were introduced into the ancestral wild type enabling differentiation between clonal interference and negative epistasis....

  5. Ecological constraint and the evolution of sexual dichromatism in darters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossu, Christen M; Near, Thomas J

    2015-05-01

    It is not known how environmental pressures and sexual selection interact to influence the evolution of extravagant male traits. Sexual and natural selection are often viewed as antagonistic forces shaping the evolution of visual signals, where conspicuousness is favored by sexual selection and crypsis is favored by natural selection. Although typically investigated independently, the interaction between natural and sexual selection remains poorly understood. Here, we investigate whether sexual dichromatism evolves stochastically, independent from, or in concert with habitat use in darters, a species-rich lineage of North American freshwater fish. We find the evolution of sexual dichromatism is coupled to habitat use in darter species. Comparative analyses reveal that mid-water darter lineages exhibit a narrow distribution of dichromatism trait space surrounding a low optimum, suggesting a constraint imposed on the evolution of dichromatism, potentially through predator-mediated selection. Alternatively, the transition to benthic habitats coincides with greater variability in the levels of dichromatism that surround a higher optimum, likely due to relaxation of the predator-mediated selection and heterogeneous microhabitat dependent selection regimes. These results suggest a complex interaction of sexual selection with potentially two mechanisms of natural selection, predation and sensory drive, that influence the evolution of diverse male nuptial coloration in darters. © 2015 The Author(s).

  6. The edge of neutral evolution in social dilemmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremer, Jonas; Frey, Erwin [Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics and Center for NanoScience, Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Theresienstrasse 37, D-80333 Muenchen (Germany); Reichenbach, Tobias [Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Laboratory of Sensory Neuroscience, Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States)], E-mail: jonas.cremer@physik.uni-muenchen.de

    2009-09-15

    The functioning of animal as well as human societies fundamentally relies on cooperation. Yet, defection is often favorable for the selfish individual, and social dilemmas arise. Selection by individuals' fitness, usually the basic driving force of evolution, quickly eliminates cooperators. However, evolution is also governed by fluctuations that can be of greater importance than fitness differences, and can render evolution effectively neutral. Here, we investigate the effects of selection versus fluctuations in social dilemmas. By studying the mean extinction times of cooperators and defectors, a variable sensitive to fluctuations, we are able to identify and quantify an emerging 'edge of neutral evolution' that delineates regimes of neutral and Darwinian evolution. Our results reveal that cooperation is significantly maintained in the neutral regimes. In contrast, the classical predictions of evolutionary game theory, where defectors beat cooperators, are recovered in the Darwinian regimes. Our studies demonstrate that fluctuations can provide a surprisingly simple way to partly resolve social dilemmas. Our methods are generally applicable to estimate the role of random drift in evolutionary dynamics.

  7. Drugs and driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walsh, J. Michael; De Gier, Johan J.; Christopherson, Asbjørg S.; Verstraete, Alain G.

    The authors present a global overview on the issue of drugs and driving covering four major areas: (1) Epidemiology and Prevalence-which reviews epidemiological research, summarizes available information, discusses the methodological shortcomings of extant studies, and makes recommendations for

  8. Safe driving for teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a problem for all drivers. Do not use cell phones for talking, texting, or email when you are ... Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Driving among high school students - United States, 2013. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly ...

  9. Science of driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The Science of Driving project focused on developing a collaborative relationship to develop curriculum units for middle school and high school students to engage them in exciting real-world scenarios. This effort involved faculty, staff, and student...

  10. Factors Driving Business Intelligence Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimvydas Skyrius

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The field of business intelligence (BI, despite rapid technology advances, continues to feature inadequate levels of adoption. The attention of researchers is shifting towards hu-man factors of BI adoption. The wide set of human factors influencing BI adoption con-tains elements of what we call BI culture – an overarching concept covering key managerial issues that come up in BI implementation. Research sources provide different sets of features pertaining to BI culture or related concepts – decision-making culture, analytical culture and others. The goal of this paper is to perform the review of research and practical sources to examine driving forces of BI – data-driven approaches, BI agility, maturity and acceptance – to point out culture-related issues that support BI adoption and to suggest an emerging set of factors influencing BI culture.

  11. Ecological divergence and sexual selection drive sexual size dimorphism in New World pitvipers (Serpentes: Viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, C R; Guiher, T J; Pyron, R A

    2014-04-01

    Hypotheses for the origin and maintenance of sexual size dimorphism (SSD) fall into three primary categories: (i) sexual selection on male size, (ii) fecundity selection on female size and (iii) ecological selection for gender-specific niche divergence. We investigate the impact of these forces on SSD evolution in New World pitvipers (Crotalinae). We constructed a phylogeny from up to eight genes (seven mitochondrial, one nuclear) for 104 species of NW crotalines. We gathered morphological and ecological data for 82 species for comparative analyses. There is a strong signal of sexual selection on male size driving SSD, but less evidence for fecundity selection on female size across lineages. No support was found for allometric scaling of SSD (Rensch's rule), nor for directional selection for increasing male size (the Fairbairn-Preziosi hypothesis) in NW crotalines. Interestingly, arboreal lineages experience higher rates of SSD evolution and a pronounced shift to female-biased dimorphism. This suggests that fecundity selection on arboreal females exaggerates ecologically mediated dimorphism, whereas sexual selection drives male size in terrestrial lineages. We find that increasing SSD in both directions (male- and female-biased) decreases speciation rates. In NW crotalines, it appears that increasing magnitudes of ecologically mediated SSD reduce rates of speciation, as divergence accumulates within species among sexes, reducing adaptive divergence between populations leading to speciation. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  12. Driving risk and Accidents

    OpenAIRE

    Sagaspe, P; Philip, P.

    2007-01-01

    For many years fatigue has been associated with an increased risk of accidents, but the causes were unclear. Work or driving that is extensive or conducted during the night-time hours is associated with accidents but few reports have differentiated fatigue, which is usually seen as owing to driving time, from sleepiness, which is owing to reduced sleep extended time awake or being awake at the circadian trough, or drugs. Epidemiological studies from the1990s showed that sleep-related accident...

  13. Microlinear piezo drive experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Azin, A. V.; Bogdanov, Evgeny Petrovich; Rikkonen, S. V.; PONOMAREV S.V.; Khramtsov, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The article embraces the experimental description of the micro linear piezo drive intended for the peripheral cord tensioner in the reflecting surface shape regulator system for large-sized transformable spacecraft antenna reflectors. The research target is the experimental investigation of the micro linear piezo drive to determine the stable oscillatory system operating modes which would include improved energy conversion parameters. The following points are briefly presented: test stand con...

  14. Wrong-way driving.

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Wrong-way driving is a phenomenon that mainly happens on motorways. Although the number of wrong-way crashes is relatively limited, their consequences are much more severe than the consequences of other motorway injury crashes. The groups most often causing wrong-way driving accidents are young, inexperienced drivers and elderly drivers. Alcohol often plays a large role with the young; processing (visual) information is especially a problem with the elderly. Improved road signs and infrastruc...

  15. Instant Google Drive starter

    CERN Document Server

    Procopio, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This book is a Starter which teaches you how to use Google Drive practically. This book is perfect for people of all skill levels who want to enjoy the benefits of using Google Drive to safely store their files online and in the cloud. It's also great for anyone looking to learn more about cloud computing in general. Readers are expected to have an Internet connection and basic knowledge of using the internet.

  16. Driving Schools Buying Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Mbewe, Kelvin

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to understand driving schools’ buying behavior when buying auto-mobiles from car dealers and to understand the motives of the people responsible for making such decisions and how driving schools prefer to acquire automobiles from car dealers. These were the main research problems that required quantitative research to conclude. The theoretical chapter of the thesis discusses the principles that influence an organization’s buying behavior, the buying center, m...

  17. Belt drive construction improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Yu. Khomenko

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of the traction capacity increase of the belt drive TRK is examined. This was done for the purpose of air conditioning system of passenger car with double-generator system energy supplying. Belts XPC (made by the German firm «Continental ContiTech» testing were conducted. The results confirmed the possibility of their usage in order to improve belt drive TRK characteristics.

  18. VEHICLE DRIVING CYCLE OPTIMISATION ON THE HIGHWAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinoviy STOTSKO

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the problem of reducing vehicle energy consumption. The authors consider the optimisation of highway driving cycle a way to use the kinetic energy of a car more effectively at various road conditions. The model of a vehicle driving control at the highway which consists of elementary cycles, such as accelerating, free rolling and deceleration under forces of external resistance, was designed. Braking, as an energy dissipation regime, was not included. The influence of the various longitudinal profiles of the road was taken into consideration and included in the model. Ways to use the results of monitoring road and traffic conditions are presented. The method of non-linear programming is used to design the optimal vehicle control function and phase trajectory. The results are presented by improved typical driving cycles that present energy saving as a subject of choice at a specified schedule.

  19. Epilepsy and driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moetamedi M

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a disease with high prevalence, which interferes driving and may lead to car accident; This case-control study has been done on 100 epileptic patients and 100 persons as control group, who had history of driving. We gathered our patients with face to face interview and registering their information in special forms which were prepared for this study. There were three times more accidents among epileptic cases comparing with control group and this difference was more considerable in men and in patients under 35 years old. The cause of accident were not seizure attack in more than 60% of the patients and these ordinary accidents were also more in case group. Epileptic patients with history of car accidents during driving had poor drug compliance comparing with the epileptics without history of an accident so drug compliance may be valuable in predicting accident in these patients. We have also found poor drug compliance in whom seizure attacks caused accident for them. 58% of the epileptics had not consulted their physician about driving. 43.3% of seizures during driving were of generalized type and none of the patients had inform police about their disease during getting driving license.

  20. Driving systems of scraper conveyors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kryukov, I.V.

    1980-02-01

    About 50 types of face scraper conveyors are used in coal mines of the USSR. Various types of driving systems of scraper conveyors are described, among others: the UV-DP thyristor controlled direct current drive, AD-EhMS asynchronous drive with electro-magnetic coupling, and the AD- EhMP asynchronous drive with electro-magnetic powder clutch. These three types of scraper conveyor drive are regarded as superior to other types of drive. From among the three, the UV-DP thyristor controlled drive is the most modern but more difficult to produce and use in mines than AD-EhMP drives. (In Russian)