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Sample records for evolution amplified processing

  1. Continuous evolution of lithographic films through process steps: an example with 193 chemically amplified resists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrough, Samir; Tiron, Raluca; Perret, Damien; Thackeray, James W.; Sourd, Claire; Paniez, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Chemically Amplified resists are complex systems. If the main mechanisms implied have already been described, the challenge to even better control and model these formulations remains important as performance requirements become more and more stringent and critical dimensions get smaller and smaller. This paper tries to assess and deconvolute some of the main potential mechanisms involved during the process of a 193 nm chemically amplified resist, before correlating them with the final lithographic results obtained. A formulation was selected in order to offer a large range of film physical properties, thus allowing the resist film to switch from non-annealing to annealing conditions. The use of thermal analysis as the main characterization technique allowed correlation between the variations in physico-chemical properties and process conditions. This investigation also included a study of the behavior of some additives during bake steps. In so doing, it became possible to correlate the variations of the resist properties under different bake conditions to the changes in its final lithographic performance, i.e. contrast, sensitivity and line edge roughness.

  2. Fast processes in semiconductor optical amplifiers: theory and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    We review the physical processes responsible for ultrafast gain and index dynamics in semiconductor optical amplifiers and discuss their impact on optical switching applications......We review the physical processes responsible for ultrafast gain and index dynamics in semiconductor optical amplifiers and discuss their impact on optical switching applications...

  3. Ultrafast optical signal processing using semiconductor quantum dot amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    The linear and nonlinear properties of quantum dot amplifiers are discussed on the basis of an extensive theoretical model. These devices show great potential for linear amplification as well as ultrafast signal processing.......The linear and nonlinear properties of quantum dot amplifiers are discussed on the basis of an extensive theoretical model. These devices show great potential for linear amplification as well as ultrafast signal processing....

  4. Simple geometric interpretation of signal evolution in phase-sensitive fibre optic parametric amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redyuk, A A; Bednyakova, A E; Medvedev, S B; Fedoruk, M P; Turitsyn, S K

    2017-01-09

    Visualisation of complex nonlinear equation solutions is a useful analysis tool for various scientific and engineering applications. We have re-examined the geometrical interpretation of the classical nonlinear four-wave mixing equations for the specific scheme of a phase sensitive one-pump fiber optical parametric amplification, which has recently attracted revived interest in the optical communications due to potential low noise properties of such amplifiers. Analysis of the phase portraits of the corresponding dynamical systems provide valuable additional insight into field dynamics and properties of the amplifiers. Simple geometric approach has been proposed to describe evolution of the waves, involved in phase-sensitive fiber optical parametric amplification (PS-FOPA) process, using a Hamiltonian structure of the governing equations. We have demonstrated how the proposed approach can be applied to the optimization problems arising in the design of the specific PS-FOPA scheme. The method considered here is rather general and can be used in various applications.

  5. Semiconductor quantum dot amplifiers for optical signal processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Uskov, A. V.; Bischoff, Svend

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of quantum dot semiconductor amplifiers are investigated theoretically with respect to the potential for ultrafast signal processing. The high-speed signal processing capacity of these devices is found to be limited by the wetting layer dynamics in case of electrical pumping, while...... optical pumping partly removes this limitation. Also, the possibility of using spectral hole burning for signal processing is discussed....

  6. Managing Software Process Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book focuses on the design, development, management, governance and application of evolving software processes that are aligned with changing business objectives, such as expansion to new domains or shifting to global production. In the context of an evolving business world, it examines...... the complete software process lifecycle, from the initial definition of a product to its systematic improvement. In doing so, it addresses difficult problems, such as how to implement processes in highly regulated domains or where to find a suitable notation system for documenting processes, and provides...... essential insights and tips to help readers manage process evolutions. And last but not least, it provides a wealth of examples and cases on how to deal with software evolution in practice. Reflecting these topics, the book is divided into three parts. Part 1 focuses on software business transformation...

  7. Process Information and Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastain, Erick; Smith, Cameron

    2016-12-01

    Universal Semantic Communication (USC) is a theory that models communication among agents without the assumption of a fixed protocol. We demonstrate a connection, via a concept we refer to as process information, between a special case of USC and evolutionary processes. In this context, one agent attempts to interpret a potentially arbitrary signal produced within its environment. Sources of this effective signal can be modeled as a single alternative agent. Given a set of common underlying concepts that may be symbolized differently by different sources in the environment, any given entity must be able to correlate intrinsic information with input it receives from the environment in order to accurately interpret the ambient signal and ultimately coordinate its own actions. This scenario encapsulates a class of USC problems that provides insight into the semantic aspect of a model of evolution proposed by Rivoire and Leibler. Through this connection, we show that evolution corresponds to a means of solving a special class of USC problems, can be viewed as a special case of the Multiplicative Weights Updates algorithm, and that infinite population selection with no mutation and no recombination conforms to the Rivoire-Leibler model. Finally, using process information we show that evolving populations implicitly internalize semantic information about their respective environments.

  8. Longitudinal Coherence Preservation and Chirp Evolution in a High Gain Laser Seeded Free Electron Laser Amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, J.B.; /BNL, NSLS; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC; Wang, X.J.; Watanabe, T.; /BNL, NSLS

    2006-06-07

    In this letter we examine the start-up of a high gain free electron laser in which a frequency-chirped coherent seed laser pulse interacts with a relativistic electron beam. A Green function formalism is used to evaluate the initial value problem. We have fully characterized the startup and evolution through the exponential growth regime. We obtain explicit expressions for the pulse duration, bandwidth and chirp of the amplified light and show that the FEL light remains fully longitudinally coherent.

  9. Face-to-face: Perceived personal relevance amplifies face processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublatzky, Florian; Pittig, Andre; Schupp, Harald T; Alpers, Georg W

    2017-05-01

    The human face conveys emotional and social information, but it is not well understood how these two aspects influence face perception. In order to model a group situation, two faces displaying happy, neutral or angry expressions were presented. Importantly, faces were either facing the observer, or they were presented in profile view directed towards, or looking away from each other. In Experiment 1 (n = 64), face pairs were rated regarding perceived relevance, wish-to-interact, and displayed interactivity, as well as valence and arousal. All variables revealed main effects of facial expression (emotional > neutral), face orientation (facing observer > towards > away) and interactions showed that evaluation of emotional faces strongly varies with their orientation. Experiment 2 (n = 33) examined the temporal dynamics of perceptual-attentional processing of these face constellations with event-related potentials. Processing of emotional and neutral faces differed significantly in N170 amplitudes, early posterior negativity (EPN), and sustained positive potentials. Importantly, selective emotional face processing varied as a function of face orientation, indicating early emotion-specific (N170, EPN) and late threat-specific effects (LPP, sustained positivity). Taken together, perceived personal relevance to the observer-conveyed by facial expression and face direction-amplifies emotional face processing within triadic group situations. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Processing of optical combs with fiber optic parametric amplifiers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slavík, Radan; Kakande, J.; Richardson, D.J.; Petropoulos, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 9 (2012), s. 10059-10070 ISSN 1094-4087 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Fiber-optic parametric amplifier * Phase sensitive * Spectral coverage Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.546, year: 2012

  11. Ultrafast dynamics in semiconductor optical amplifiers and all-optical processing: Bulk versus quantum dot devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Berg, Tommy Winther; Magnúsdóttir, Ingibjörg

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the dynamical properties of semiconductor optical amplifiers and the importance for all-optical signal processing. In particular, the dynamics of quantum dot amplifiers is considered and it is suggested that these may be operated at very high bit-rates without significant patterning...

  12. Process Optimization for Monolithic Integration of Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor and MOSFET Amplifier with SOI Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinoth Kumar, V.; Dasgupta, A.; Bhat, K. N.; KNatarajan

    2006-04-01

    In this paper we present the design and process optimization for fabricating piezoresitive pressure sensor and MOSFET Differential Amplifier simultaneously on the same chip. Silicon On Insulator approach has been used for realizing the membrane as well as the electronics on the same chip. The amplifier circuit has been configured in the common source connection and it has been designed with PSPICE simulation to achieve a voltage gain of about 5. In the initial set of experiments the Pressure sensor and the amplifier were fabricated on separate chips to optimize the process steps and tested in the hybrid mode. In the next set of experiments, SOI wafer having the SOI layer thickness of about 11 microns was used for realizing the membrane by anisotropic etching from the backside. The piezo-resistive pressure sensor was realized on this membrane by connecting the polysilicon resistors in the form of a Wheatstone bridge. The MOSFET source follower amplifier was also fabricated on the same SOI wafer by tailoring the process steps to suit the requirement of simultaneous fabrication of piezoresistors and the amplifier for achieving MOSFET Integrated Pressure Sensor. Reproducible results have been achieved on the SOI wafers, with the process steps developed in the laboratory. Sensitivity of 270 mV /Bar/10V, with the on chip amplifier gain of 4.5, has been achieved with this process.

  13. Evolution of Monolithic Technology for Wireless Communications: GaN MMIC Power Amplifiers For Microwave Radios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Camarchia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the progress of monolithic technology for microwaveapplication, focusing on gallium nitride technology advances in the realization of integratedpower amplifiers. Three design examples, developed for microwave backhaul radios, areshown. The first design is a 7 GHz Doherty developed with a research foundry, while thesecond and the third are a 7 GHz Doherty and a 7–15 GHz dual-band combined poweramplifiers, both based on a commercial foundry process. The employed architectures, themain design steps and the pros and cons of using gallium nitride technology are highlighted.The measured performance demonstrates the potentialities of the employed technology, andthe progress in the accuracy, reliability and performance of the process.

  14. An audio FIR-DAC in a BCD process for high power Class-D amplifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, T.S.; van Tuijl, Adrianus Johannes Maria; Schinkel, Daniel; Annema, Anne J.; Berkhout, M.; Berkhout, M.; Nauta, Bram

    A 322 coefficient semi-digital FIR-DAC using a 1-bit PWM input signal was designed and implemented in a high voltage, audio power bipolar CMOS DMOS (BCD) process. This facilitates digital input signals for an analog class-D amplifier in BCD. The FIR-DAC performance depends on the ISI-resistant

  15. On the Controlled Evolution of Process Choreographies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinderle, S.B.; Wombacher, Andreas; Reichert, M.U.

    2005-01-01

    Process¿aware information systems have to be frequently adapted due to business process changes. One important challenge not adequately addressed so far concerns the evolution of process choreographies, i.e., the change of interactions between partner processes in a cross-organizational setting. If

  16. Semiconductor optical amplifier-based all-optical gates for high-speed optical processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkjær, Kristian

    2000-01-01

    Semiconductor optical amplifiers are useful building blocks for all-optical gates as wavelength converters and OTDM demultiplexers. The paper reviews the progress from simple gates using cross-gain modulation and four-wave mixing to the integrated interferometric gates using cross-phase modulatio....... These gates are very efficient for high-speed signal processing and open up interesting new areas, such as all-optical regeneration and high-speed all-optical logic functions......Semiconductor optical amplifiers are useful building blocks for all-optical gates as wavelength converters and OTDM demultiplexers. The paper reviews the progress from simple gates using cross-gain modulation and four-wave mixing to the integrated interferometric gates using cross-phase modulation...

  17. Implementation of Lean System on Erbium Doped Fibre Amplifier Manufacturing Process to Reduce Production Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneechote, T.; Luangpaiboon, P.

    2010-10-01

    A manufacturing process of erbium doped fibre amplifiers is complicated. It needs to meet the customers' requirements under a present economic status that products need to be shipped to customers as soon as possible after purchasing orders. This research aims to study and improve processes and production lines of erbium doped fibre amplifiers using lean manufacturing systems via an application of computer simulation. Three scenarios of lean tooled box systems are selected via the expert system. Firstly, the production schedule based on shipment date is combined with a first in first out control system. The second scenario focuses on a designed flow process plant layout. Finally, the previous flow process plant layout combines with production schedule based on shipment date including the first in first out control systems. The computer simulation with the limited data via an expected value is used to observe the performance of all scenarios. The most preferable resulted lean tooled box systems from a computer simulation are selected to implement in the real process of a production of erbium doped fibre amplifiers. A comparison is carried out to determine the actual performance measures via an analysis of variance of the response or the production time per unit achieved in each scenario. The goodness of an adequacy of the linear statistical model via experimental errors or residuals is also performed to check the normality, constant variance and independence of the residuals. The results show that a hybrid scenario of lean manufacturing system with the first in first out control and flow process plant lay out statistically leads to better performance in terms of the mean and variance of production times.

  18. Evolution of Process Choreographies in DYCHOR

    OpenAIRE

    Rinderle, S.B.; Wombacher, Andreas; Reichert, M.U.

    2006-01-01

    Process-aware information systems have to be frequently adapted due to business process changes. One important challenge not adequately addressed so far concerns the evolution of process choreographies, i.e., the change of interactions between partner processes in a cross-organizational setting. If respective modifications are applied in an uncontrolled manner, inconsistencies or errors might occur in the sequel. In particular, modifications of private processes performed by a single party ma...

  19. On the Controlled Evolution of Process Choreographies

    OpenAIRE

    Rinderle, S.B.; Wombacher, Andreas; Reichert, M.U.

    2005-01-01

    Process¿aware information systems have to be frequently adapted due to business process changes. One important challenge not adequately addressed so far concerns the evolution of process choreographies, i.e., the change of interactions between partner processes in a cross-organizational setting. If respective modifications are applied in an uncontrolled manner, inconsistencies or errors might occur in the sequel. In particular, modifications of private processes performed by a single party ma...

  20. Stellar Evolution and Social Evolution: A Study in Parallel Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Robert L.

    From the beginning of anthropology, social evolution has been one of its major interests. However, in recent years the study of this process has languished. Accordingly, those anthropologists who still consider social evolution to be of central importance to their discipline, and who continue to pursue it, find their endeavor bolstered when parallel instances of evolutionary reconstructions can be demonstrated in other fields. Stellar evolution has long been a prime interest to astronomers, and their progress in deciphering its course has been truly remarkable. In examining astronomers' reconstructions of stellar evolution, I have been struck by a number of similarities between ways stars and societies have evolved. The parallels actually begin with the method used by both disciplines, namely, the comparative method. In astronomy, the method involves plotting stars on a Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram, and interpreting, diachonically, the pattern made by essentially synchronic data used for plotting. The comparative method is particularly appropriate when one is studying a process that cannot be observed over its full range in the life of any single individual, be it a star or a society. Parallels also occur in that stars and societies have each followed distinctive stages in their evolution. These stages are, in both cases, sometimes unlinear and sometimes multilinear. Moreover, the distinction drawn by anthropologists between a pristine and a secondary state (which depends on whether state so represented is the first such occurrence in an area, or was a later development derivative from earlier states) finds its astronomical parallel in the relationship existing between Population II and Population I stars. These and other similarities between stellar and social evolution will be cited and discussed.

  1. Branching processes and neutral evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Taïb, Ziad

    1992-01-01

    The Galton-Watson branching process has its roots in the problem of extinction of family names which was given a precise formulation by F. Galton as problem 4001 in the Educational Times (17, 1873). In 1875, an attempt to solve this problem was made by H. W. Watson but as it turned out, his conclusion was incorrect. Half a century later, R. A. Fisher made use of the Galton-Watson process to determine the extinction probability of the progeny of a mutant gene. However, it was J. B. S. Haldane who finally gave the first sketch of the correct conclusion. J. B. S. Haldane also predicted that mathematical genetics might some day develop into a "respectable branch of applied mathematics" (quoted in M. Kimura & T. Ohta, Theoretical Aspects of Population Genetics. Princeton, 1971). Since the time of Fisher and Haldane, the two fields of branching processes and mathematical genetics have attained a high degree of sophistication but in different directions. This monograph is a first attempt to apply the current sta...

  2. Reconfigurable Optical Signal Processing Based on a Distributed Feedback Semiconductor Optical Amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Deng, Ye; Tang, Jian; Sun, Shuqian; Yao, Jianping; Azaña, José; Zhu, Ninghua

    2016-01-27

    All-optical signal processing has been considered a solution to overcome the bandwidth and speed limitations imposed by conventional electronic-based systems. Over the last few years, an impressive range of all-optical signal processors have been proposed, but few of them come with reconfigurability, a feature highly needed for practical signal processing applications. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an analog optical signal processor based on a phase-shifted distributed feedback semiconductor optical amplifier (DFB-SOA) and an optical filter. The proposed analog optical signal processor can be reconfigured to perform signal processing functions including ordinary differential equation solving and temporal intensity differentiation. The reconfigurability is achieved by controlling the injection currents. Our demonstration provitdes a simple and effective solution for all-optical signal processing and computing.

  3. Improved PCR method for the creation of saturation mutagenesis libraries in directed evolution: application to difficult-to-amplify templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis, Joaquin; Fernández, Layla; Carballeira, J Daniel; Drone, Jullien; Gumulya, Yosephine; Höbenreich, Horst; Kahakeaw, Daniel; Kille, Sabrina; Lohmer, Renate; Peyralans, Jérôme J-P; Podtetenieff, John; Prasad, Shreenath; Soni, Pankaj; Taglieber, Andreas; Wu, Sheng; Zilly, Felipe E; Reetz, Manfred T

    2008-11-01

    Saturation mutagenesis constitutes a powerful method in the directed evolution of enzymes. Traditional protocols of whole plasmid amplification such as Stratagene's QuikChange sometimes fail when the templates are difficult to amplify. In order to overcome such restrictions, we have devised a simple two-primer, two-stage polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method which constitutes an improvement over existing protocols. In the first stage of the PCR, both the mutagenic primer and the antiprimer that are not complementary anneal to the template. In the second stage, the amplified sequence is used as a megaprimer. Sites composed of one or more residues can be randomized in a single PCR reaction, irrespective of their location in the gene sequence.The method has been applied to several enzymes successfully, including P450-BM3 from Bacillus megaterium, the lipases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida antarctica and the epoxide hydrolase from Aspergillus niger. Here, we show that megaprimer size as well as the direction and design of the antiprimer are determining factors in the amplification of the plasmid. Comparison of the results with the performances of previous protocols reveals the efficiency of the improved method.

  4. Application of monolithic CMOS switched-capacitor filters and amplifiers for signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, D.; Bradshaw, J. L.

    1980-10-01

    A custom monolithic CMOS array was designed and integrated for use in meeting the analog conditioning requirements for microsignal processors. These processors are used in 'smart' sensors for the purposes of detection and classification. Constrained by very low power dissipation requirements, this array provides a variety of bandpass and low-pass filter functions and programmable CMOS operational amplifiers for AGC amplification for signals in the audio region. Specifically, the custom chip contains 12 poles based on switched-capacitor techniques partitioned into a six-pole low-pass filter ladder configuration, and three two-pole bandpass and low-pass state variable filter configurations. The amplifiers were used in conjunction with an associated microprocessor for software-controlled AGC. A mask change can provide for different capacitor ratios, and hence, frequency responses. Also, the switch clock rates can be used to vary the filter characteristics. Operating from a single +5 V supply, this standard process chip dissipates about 2 mW, and meets all predicted performance characteristics.

  5. Perceived communicative context and emotional content amplify visual word processing in the fusiform gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Sebastian; Wegrzyn, Martin; Steppacher, Inga; Kissler, Johanna

    2015-04-15

    The personal significance of a language statement depends on its communicative context. However, this is rarely taken into account in neuroscience studies. Here, we investigate how the implied source of single word statements alters their cortical processing. Participants' brain event-related potentials were recorded in response to identical word streams consisting of positive, negative, and neutral trait adjectives stated to either represent personal trait feedback from a human or to be randomly generated by a computer. Results showed a strong impact of perceived sender. Regardless of content, the notion of receiving feedback from a human enhanced all components, starting with the P2 and encompassing early posterior negativity (EPN), P3, and the late positive potential (LPP). Moreover, negative feedback by the "human sender" elicited a larger EPN, whereas positive feedback generally induced a larger LPP. Source estimations revealed differences between "senders" in visual areas, particularly the bilateral fusiform gyri. Likewise, emotional content enhanced activity in these areas. These results specify how even implied sender identity changes the processing of single words in seemingly realistic communicative settings, amplifying their processing in the visual brain. This suggests that the concept of motivated attention extends from stimulus significance to simultaneous appraisal of contextual relevance. Finally, consistent with distinct stages of emotional processing, at least in contexts perceived as social, humans are initially alerted to negative content, but later process what is perceived as positive feedback more intensely. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/356010-10$15.00/0.

  6. Fiber Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    The chapter provides a discussion of optical fiber amplifiers and through three sections provides a detailed treatment of three types of optical fiber amplifiers, erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA), Raman amplifiers, and parametric amplifiers. Each section comprises the fundamentals including...... the basic physics and relevant in-depth theoretical modeling, amplifiers characteristics and performance data as a function of specific operation parameters. Typical applications in fiber optic communication systems and the improvement achievable through the use of fiber amplifiers are illustrated....

  7. A UML-based metamodel for software evolution process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zuo; Zhou, Wei-Hong; Fu, Zhi-Tao; Xiong, Shun-Qing

    2014-04-01

    A software evolution process is a set of interrelated software processes under which the corresponding software is evolving. An object-oriented software evolution process meta-model (OO-EPMM), abstract syntax and formal OCL constraint of meta-model are presented in this paper. OO-EPMM can not only represent software development process, but also represent software evolution.

  8. The evolution of holistic processing of faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren eBurke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we examine the holistic processing of faces from an evolutionary perspective, clarifying what such an approach entails, and evaluating the extent to which the evidence currently available permits any strong conclusions. While it seems clear that the holistic processing of faces depends on mechanisms evolved to perform that task, our review of the comparative literature reveals that there is currently insufficient evidence (or sometimes insufficiently compelling evidence to decide when in our evolutionary past such processing may have arisen. It is also difficult to assess what kinds of selection pressures may have led to evolution of such a mechanism, or even what kinds of information holistic processing may have originally evolved to extract, given that many sources of socially relevant face-based information other than identity depend on integrating information across different regions of the face – judgements of expression, behavioural intent, attractiveness, sex, age, etc. We suggest some directions for future research that would help to answer these important questions.

  9. Integrated Al2O3:Er3+ amplifiers: The impact of fast spectroscopic quenching processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agazzi, L.; Bradley, J.; Ay, F.; Worhoff, Kerstin; Pollnau, Markus

    We report a number of recently demonstrated integrated Al2O3:Er3+ devices and present spectroscopic investigations revealing the presence of a fast quenching mechanism – undetected in typical luminescence decay measurements – which limits the Al2O3:Er3+ amplifier performance.

  10. Angiography technique with a large-sized image amplifier and process control via microprocessor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holsten, D.R.; Jalloul, M.K.; Joetten, G.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of new technological developments it was possible to design and introduce into practice a new generation of large-sized image amplifiers, which were first of all used in X-ray examination equipment and are now also being used in special devices for angiography and digital substraction angiography.

  11. Ultrafast signal processing in quantum dot amplifiers through effective spectral holeburning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper; Uskov, A. V.

    2002-01-01

    Significant progress has been obtained on quantum dot (QD) lasers, but the possible advantages of QD amplifiers are not yet clear. We show here that a relatively slow coupling between the optically active QD carrier states and the surrounding carrier reservoir can lead to efficient gain modulatio...

  12. Amplified Brain Processing of Dentoalveolar Pressure Stimulus in Persistent Dentoalveolar Pain Disorder Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moana-Filho, Estephan J.; Bereiter, David A.; Nixdorf, Donald R.

    2016-01-01

    activations were still present for PDAP patients compared to controls, although to a lesser extent. Conclusion The present results suggest that dentoalveolar pressure is processed differently in the brain of PDAP patients, and the increased activation in several brain areas is consistent with amplified pain processing. PMID:26485382

  13. Cultural evolution as a nonstationary stochastic process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicholson, Arwen; Sibani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We present an individual based model of cultural evolution, where interacting agents are coded by binary strings standing for strategies for action, blueprints for products or attitudes and beliefs. The model is patterned on an established model of biological evolution, the Tangled Nature Model...

  14. Design and analysis of an integrated pulse modulated s-band power amplifier in gallium nitride process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlock, Steve [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The design of power amplifiers in any semi-conductor process is not a trivia exercise and it is often encountered that the simulated solution is qualitatively different than the results obtained. Phenomena such as oscillation occurring either in-band or out of band and sometimes at subharmonic intervals, continuous spectrum noticed in some frequency bands, often referred to as chaos, and jumps and hysteresis effects can all be encountered and render a design useless. All of these problems might have been identified through a more rigorous approach to stability analysis. Designing for stability is probably the one area of amplifier design that receives the least amount of attention but incurs the most catastrophic of effects if it is not performed properly. Other parameters such as gain, power output, frequency response and even matching may suitable mitigation paths. But the lack of stability in an amplifier has no mitigating path. In addition to of loss of the design completely there are the increased production cycle costs, costs involved with investigating and resolving the problem and the costs involved with schedule slips or delays resulting from it. The Linville or Rollett stability criteria that many microwave engineers follow and rely exclusively on is not sufficient by itself to ensure a stable and robust design. It will be shown that the universal belief that unconditional stability is obtained through an analysis of the scattering matrix S to determine if 1 and |{Delta}{sub S}| < 1 is only part of the procedure and other tools must be used to validate the criteria. The research shown contributes to the state of the art by developing a more thorough stability design technique for designing amplifiers of any class, whether that be current mode or switch mode, than is currently undertaken with the goal of obtaining first pass design success.

  15. Cultural evolution as a nonstationary stochastic process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicholson, Arwen; Sibani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    in the system, show how different cultures are formed and merge, and how their survival probability lacks, in the model, a finite average life-time. Finally, we use historical data on the number of car manufacturers after the introduction of the automobile to the market, to argue that our model can......We present an individual based model of cultural evolution, where interacting agents are coded by binary strings standing for strategies for action, blueprints for products or attitudes and beliefs. The model is patterned on an established model of biological evolution, the Tangled Nature Model...... (TNM), where a “tangle” of interactions between agents determines their reproductive success. In addition, our agents also have the ability to copy part of each other's strategy, a feature inspired by the Axelrod model of cultural diversity. Unlike the latter, but similarly to the TNM, the model...

  16. Operational amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Dostal, Jiri

    1993-01-01

    This book provides the reader with the practical knowledge necessary to select and use operational amplifier devices. It presents an extensive treatment of applications and a practically oriented, unified theory of operational circuits.Provides the reader with practical knowledge necessary to select and use operational amplifier devices. Presents an extensive treatment of applications and a practically oriented, unified theory of operational circuits

  17. Spectral and temporal breathing self-similar evolution in a fiber amplifier for low-noise transform-limited pulse generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sijia; Chen, Wei; Qin, Peng; Song, Youjian; Hu, Minglie; Liu, Bowen

    2016-11-15

    We demonstrate a simple scheme for high-power low-noise high-contrast ultrashort pulse generation. It is enabled by the spectral and temporal breathing self-similar pulse evolution with an optimized negative pre-chirp. Experiments and simulations indicate the enhanced tolerances of this scheme to the gain-shaping distortions and pump fluctuations. It can lead to ∼16% increase in the compressed pulse quality with more than a two times wider spectrum and ∼31% reduction in the root-mean-square (rms) relative intensity noise (RIN). Transform-limited pulses as short as 36 fs are generated with the rms RIN of 0.029% (1 kHz-5 MHz) from a 2 m Yb-fiber amplifier.

  18. Electrospun Amplified Fiber Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Morello, Giovanni; Camposeo, Andrea; Moffa, Maria; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-01-01

    A lot of research is focused on all-optical signal processing, aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for an efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods, involving high-temperature processes performed in highly pure environment, slow down the fabrication and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, ...

  19. PROCESSES AND FACTORS OF POROSITY EVOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Jigau

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available It is widely recognized that agriculture, and mostly the intensive type of agriculture, has an important impact on soil. In this case, even the simplest tillage operation leads to the greatest dysfunction ever met in the trophic chain and to the negative anthropogenic impact on soil. The result is defined by a number of new features (arable horizon, sub-arable horizon, layered and reversed profiles and intensification of some processes like dehumification, compaction, de-structuring etc. Specified processes are distributed and have a common characteristic regarding the accumulation of residual effects from one year to another, from one stage to another, leading to the establishment in agricultural soils of a specific dynamic of pedogenetic processes, different from the natural one.The integrated index of the mentioned processes is the soil pore space and its dynamics in an anthropogenic regime.

  20. Amplifying the process of inclusion through a genuine marriage between pedagogy and technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard; Voldborg, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    This study addresses the challenge of inclusion in mainstream schools of learners with developmental and attention deficits and examines the potential of a digital structuring tool, MobilizeMe, to scaffold this process, including the impact and implications associated with the implementation. The...

  1. Evolution process of the Late Silurian–Late Devonian tectonic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 124; Issue 1. Evolution process of the ... The East Kunlun Orogenic Belt has undergone a composite orogenic process consisting of multiple orogenic cycles and involving many types of magmatic rocks spread over the whole district. However, due to bad natural ...

  2. Evaluating choices in multi-process landscape evolution models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temme, A.J.A.M.; Claessens, L.; Veldkamp, A.; Schoorl, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The interest in landscape evolution models (LEMs) that simulate multiple landscape processes is growing. However, modelling multiple processes constitutes a new starting point for which some aspects of the set up of LEMs must be re-evaluated. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the

  3. Photomask defect tracing, analysis, and reduction with chemically amplified resist process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-ming; Lai, Rick; Huang, W. H.; Wang, B. C.; Chen, C. Y.; Kung, C. H.; Yoo, Chue-San; Chen, Jieh-Jang; Lee, Sheng-Cha

    2003-08-01

    The features of optical proximity correction are becoming very aggressive as production technology migrates into 90nm/130 nm regime. The complicated optical proximity correction (OPC) patterns often result in un-repairable defects, a major yield loss mechanisms in a mask production line. Defect control is increasingly important. A methodology for identifying defect sources and reduction is demonstrated in this paper. The mechanisms and causes of defect formation could be determined with corresponding process step on the strength of sequence inspections. The cause of half-etched opaque defect on negative CAR process was found from PR fragment contamination of e-beam exposure step. After clean-up of e-beam chamber, yield was increased over 20%. Big pinhole defect and contact of AttPSM positive process was found on ADI step. The possible cause was poor CAR adhesion. These two type defects were decreased by modification of developing recipe, special on rinse step. Design experiment with Taguchi method was used to optimize the interactive recipe of plasma descum and rinse step on developing step of implanted layer. Average defect density was decreased from 0.99 to 0.27, and percentage of zero defect rate has been increased from 29.5 to 63.3%.

  4. Integrating Process Learning and Process Evolution - A Semantics Based Approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinderle, S.B.; Weber, B.; Reichert, M.U.; Wild, W.; van der Aalst, W.M.P.; Benatallah, B.; Casati, F.; Curbera, F.

    Companies are developing a growing interest in aligning their information systems in a process-oriented way. However, current process-aware information systems (PAIS) fail to meet process flexibility requirements, which reduces the applicability of such systems. To overcome this limitation PAIS

  5. Implementing chemically amplified resist to 10kV raster e-beam process in photomask manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sook-Kyeong; Kim, Byung-Gook; Moon, Seong-Yong; Choi, Sung-Woon; Han, Woo-Sung

    2005-06-01

    CAR(Chemically amplified resist) is widely used in 50keV VSB (Variable Shaped Beam) e-beam process in photomask manufacturing due to its advantage of high sensitivity which gives to reduced writing time compared to non-CAR. The 10kV raster e-beam system, however, is spread out already worldwide and plays a important role till now in middle grade mask-making. Conventionally the non-CAR like ZEP7000 has been applied to the 10kV raster e-beam system and it gives good performance for raster scan e-beam system. In mass production, sometimes, maintaining two kinds of resist simultaneously of CAR and non-CAR are inefficient strategy to the mask house which has limited resources. This situation makes the authors to apply CAR to the 10kV raster e-beam process. Generally, the grid of 10kV raster e-beam(MEBES) is large and limited compared to the current VSB grid. Historically, many layout data is designed already based on the large limited grid and this gives to limited sizing value. Moreover, it is difficult to control exposure dose in raster e-beam system and control bias with develop time in CAR process. These situations make more difficult CAR application to raster e-beam system under the simple mask data preparation strategy. In this paper, some critical problems will be discussed in isofocal process making for raster scan e-beam system. Advantage and disadvantage will be also discussed through the comparison of basic parameters such as dose margin, develop margin, and the fogging effect between the CAR and non-CAR process in 10kV raster e-beam process.

  6. Quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier: role of second excited state on ultrahigh bit-rate signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadyar, Seyed Mohsen; Razaghi, Mohammad; Hassanzadeh, Abdollah

    2017-04-20

    In this paper, a theoretical model for a quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier (QDSOA) is proposed. The dynamics of carriers in ground, excited, and continuum states and wetting layer are considered in this model. The effects of the second excited state (ES2) inclusion are investigated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, in the proposed QDSOA model. Moreover, the inhomogeneous broadening effect due to size distribution of dots, and the homogeneous broadening effect of a single dot in the gain spectrum by grouping of dots based on their optical resonant frequency, are included in the model. Furthermore, grouping of photon modes is considered in the model. It is shown that improvement of QDSOA performance is possible by considering ES2 in rate equations. Gain saturation in different injection currents is obtained for various square-shaped pulse train bit-rates. It is shown that carriers' relaxation time plays an important role in signal amplification and processing of QDSOA. The results illustrate that QDSOA can be used for high bit-rate signal processing devices (up to 450 Gbps) with negligible wave distortion and fast gain recovery.

  7. Amplified Policymaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Katherine; Woempner, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    This brief examines the policy implications of two drivers of change presented in the "2020 Forecast: Creating the Future of Learning"-- Pattern Recognition and Amplified Organization. These drivers point toward a series of cultural shifts and illuminate how we are developing new ways of organizing, constructing, and managing knowledge.…

  8. Electrospun amplified fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Giovanni; Camposeo, Andrea; Moffa, Maria; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-03-11

    All-optical signal processing is the focus of much research aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods involving high-temperature processes performed in a highly pure environment slow the fabrication process and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, high-throughput, room temperature production. Here, we report on near-infrared polymer fiber amplifiers working over a band of ∼20 nm. The fibers are cheap, spun with a process entirely carried out at room temperature, and shown to have amplified spontaneous emission with good gain coefficients and low levels of optical losses (a few cm(-1)). The amplification process is favored by high fiber quality and low self-absorption. The found performance metrics appear to be suitable for short-distance operations, and the large variety of commercially available doping dyes might allow for effective multiwavelength operations by electrospun amplified fiber optics.

  9. Real Time Monitoring of NH3 Concentration Using Diffusion Scrubber Sampling Technique and Result of Application to the Processing of Chemically Amplified Resists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungchul; Bae, Eunyoung; Park, Chungeun; Han, Woosung; Koh, Youngbum; Lee, Moonyoung; Lee, Jonggil

    1995-12-01

    The application of chemically amplified resist is known to cause a problem in the accurate measurement of the concentration of basic gas species ( NH3, N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP)) in a clean room environment because it is sensitive to its environment. Among various methods of measurement, diffusion scrubber sampling method was selected and tested. The environmental sensitivity of a commercial chemically amplified resist, APEX-E, was also tested. For the concentration measurement, the method proved to be suitable for automation and good for measuring NH3 concentration as low as the sub ppb level (limit of detection ˜0.08 ppb). Some measurement results concerning various aspects of application are presented. Test results of the environmental stability of chemically amplified resists showed that NH3 concentration should be controlled to at least under 7.5 ppb for maintaining the process stability.

  10. Modeling of semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Bischoff, Svend; Berg, Tommy Winther

    We discuss the modelling of semiconductor optical amplifiers with emphasis on their high-speed properties. Applications in linear amplification as well as ultrafast optical signal processing are reviewed. Finally, the possible role of quantum-dot based optical amplifiers is discussed.......We discuss the modelling of semiconductor optical amplifiers with emphasis on their high-speed properties. Applications in linear amplification as well as ultrafast optical signal processing are reviewed. Finally, the possible role of quantum-dot based optical amplifiers is discussed....

  11. A stochastic version of the Price equation reveals the interplay of deterministic and stochastic processes in evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rice Sean H

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution involves both deterministic and random processes, both of which are known to contribute to directional evolutionary change. A number of studies have shown that when fitness is treated as a random variable, meaning that each individual has a distribution of possible fitness values, then both the mean and variance of individual fitness distributions contribute to directional evolution. Unfortunately the most general mathematical description of evolution that we have, the Price equation, is derived under the assumption that both fitness and offspring phenotype are fixed values that are known exactly. The Price equation is thus poorly equipped to study an important class of evolutionary processes. Results I present a general equation for directional evolutionary change that incorporates both deterministic and stochastic processes and applies to any evolving system. This is essentially a stochastic version of the Price equation, but it is derived independently and contains terms with no analog in Price's formulation. This equation shows that the effects of selection are actually amplified by random variation in fitness. It also generalizes the known tendency of populations to be pulled towards phenotypes with minimum variance in fitness, and shows that this is matched by a tendency to be pulled towards phenotypes with maximum positive asymmetry in fitness. This equation also contains a term, having no analog in the Price equation, that captures cases in which the fitness of parents has a direct effect on the phenotype of their offspring. Conclusion Directional evolution is influenced by the entire distribution of individual fitness, not just the mean and variance. Though all moments of individuals' fitness distributions contribute to evolutionary change, the ways that they do so follow some general rules. These rules are invisible to the Price equation because it describes evolution retrospectively. An equally general

  12. [History evolution of salt production and processing with brine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yan, Cai-Yun; Le, Zhi-Yong; Dong, Jing-Jing; Bai, Zong-Li

    2017-10-01

    Salt is an important excipient for Chinese medicine salt. The standardization of its quality is conducive to ensuring the quality of Chinese medicine pieces. In this paper, the processing with brine and the processing auxiliary salt were studied from three aspects: the history evolution of salt, the history evolution of processing with brine, and the modern research of processing with brine. It has been found that salt plays an important role in the history of China. It has a long history and a wide variety. The salt used in the processing of traditional Chinese medicine mainly includes three categories: common salt, halitum and white salt. The quality of salt is closely related to its origin and processing, mainly based on the color and the place of origin. In ancient times, the varieties of salt used in the production of different Chinese herbal medicines were different, which might be related to the nature of drugs. The primary purpose of processing with brine is to increase the efficacy of drugs. At present, there are many reports on optimizing the preparation technology of processing with brine, but the evaluation indexes are quite different, and its scientific nature is to be discussed. The processing method with brine and its processing auxiliary materials are lacking of relevant evaluation standards and quality standards, which is not conducive to the healthy development of Chinese herbal pieces. In this paper, the relevant literature was studied in order to provide reference for the establishment of standards for salt processing excipient in traditional Chinese medicine. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  13. Bioattractors: dynamical systems theory and the evolution of regulatory processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Johannes; Monk, Nick

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we illustrate how dynamical systems theory can provide a unifying conceptual framework for evolution of biological regulatory systems. Our argument is that the genotype-phenotype map can be characterized by the phase portrait of the underlying regulatory process. The features of this portrait--such as attractors with associated basins and their bifurcations--define the regulatory and evolutionary potential of a system. We show how the geometric analysis of phase space connects Waddington's epigenetic landscape to recent computational approaches for the study of robustness and evolvability in network evolution. We discuss how the geometry of phase space determines the probability of possible phenotypic transitions. Finally, we demonstrate how the active, self-organizing role of the environment in phenotypic evolution can be understood in terms of dynamical systems concepts. This approach yields mechanistic explanations that go beyond insights based on the simulation of evolving regulatory networks alone. Its predictions can now be tested by studying specific, experimentally tractable regulatory systems using the tools of modern systems biology. A systematic exploration of such systems will enable us to understand better the nature and origin of the phenotypic variability, which provides the substrate for evolution by natural selection. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  14. A High Efficiency RF Power Amplifier Using Linearity-Enhanced Method in 40nm Standard CMOS Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-stage RF CMOS power amplifier with high linearity for WLAN is presented in this paper.The proposed PA consists of a programmable gain amplifier and a high power stage which is composed of a main amplifier with class AB bias and an auxiliary amplifier with class C bias. To improve the linearity ,an integrated diode linearition circuit provides a compensation mechanism for the input capacitance variation of the active devices,improving the linearity from the gain compressing. Moreover ,based on the un-even bias scheme,the power stage can improve linearity and reduce current consumption in the low power region. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique,two types of PAs have been designed.The improved PA at 3.3V supply voltage,has a 37dB of power gain, 1.1 dBm increase of P,8.3% increase of PAE@Pand dB increase of ACPR for 802.11g WLAN,respectively,as compared with the traditional PA.

  15. Evolution and the Growth Process: Natural Selection of Entrepreneurial Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galor, Oded; Michalopoulos, Stelios

    2012-03-01

    This research suggests that a Darwinian evolution of entrepreneurial spirit played a significant role in the process of economic development and the dynamics of inequality within and across societies. The study argues that entrepreneurial spirit evolved non-monotonically in the course of human history. In early stages of development, risk-tolerant, growth promoting traits generated an evolutionary advantage and their increased representation accelerated the pace of technological progress and the process of economic development. In mature stages of development, however, risk-averse traits gained an evolutionary advantage, diminishing the growth potential of advanced economies and contributing to convergence in economic growth across countries.

  16. Evolution and the Growth Process: Natural Selection of Entrepreneurial Traits*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galor, Oded; Michalopoulos, Stelios

    2013-01-01

    This research suggests that a Darwinian evolution of entrepreneurial spirit played a significant role in the process of economic development and the dynamics of inequality within and across societies. The study argues that entrepreneurial spirit evolved non-monotonically in the course of human history. In early stages of development, risk-tolerant, growth promoting traits generated an evolutionary advantage and their increased representation accelerated the pace of technological progress and the process of economic development. In mature stages of development, however, risk-averse traits gained an evolutionary advantage, diminishing the growth potential of advanced economies and contributing to convergence in economic growth across countries. PMID:25089059

  17. Segment formation in Annelids: patterns, processes and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balavoine, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    The debate on the origin of segmentation is a central question in the study of body plan evolution in metazoans. Annelids are the most conspicuously metameric animals as most of the trunk is formed of identical anatomical units. In this paper, I summarize the various patterns of evolution of the metameric body plan in annelids, showing the remarkable evolvability of this trait, similar to what is also found in arthropods. I then review the different modes of segment formation in the annelid tree, taking into account the various processes taking place in the life histories of these animals, including embryogenesis, post-embryonic development, regeneration and asexual reproduction. As an example of the variations that occur at the cellular and genetic level in annelid segment formation, I discuss the processes of teloblastic growth or posterior addition in key groups in the annelid tree. I propose a comprehensive definition for the teloblasts, stem cells that are responsible for sequential segment addition. There are a diversity of different mechanisms used in annelids to produce segments depending on the species, the developmental time and also the life history processes of the worm. A major goal for the future will be to reconstitute an ancestral process (or several ancestral processes) in the ancestor of the whole clade. This in turn will provide key insights in the current debate on ancestral bilaterian segmentation.

  18. Evolution and mass extinctions as lognormal stochastic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccone, Claudio

    2014-10-01

    In a series of recent papers and in a book, this author put forward a mathematical model capable of embracing the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence (SETI), Darwinian Evolution and Human History into a single, unified statistical picture, concisely called Evo-SETI. The relevant mathematical tools are: (1) Geometric Brownian motion (GBM), the stochastic process representing evolution as the stochastic increase of the number of species living on Earth over the last 3.5 billion years. This GBM is well known in the mathematics of finances (Black-Sholes models). Its main features are that its probability density function (pdf) is a lognormal pdf, and its mean value is either an increasing or, more rarely, decreasing exponential function of the time. (2) The probability distributions known as b-lognormals, i.e. lognormals starting at a certain positive instant b>0 rather than at the origin. These b-lognormals were then forced by us to have their peak value located on the exponential mean-value curve of the GBM (Peak-Locus theorem). In the framework of Darwinian Evolution, the resulting mathematical construction was shown to be what evolutionary biologists call Cladistics. (3) The (Shannon) entropy of such b-lognormals is then seen to represent the `degree of progress' reached by each living organism or by each big set of living organisms, like historic human civilizations. Having understood this fact, human history may then be cast into the language of b-lognormals that are more and more organized in time (i.e. having smaller and smaller entropy, or smaller and smaller `chaos'), and have their peaks on the increasing GBM exponential. This exponential is thus the `trend of progress' in human history. (4) All these results also match with SETI in that the statistical Drake equation (generalization of the ordinary Drake equation to encompass statistics) leads just to the lognormal distribution as the probability distribution for the number of extra

  19. Time evolution of absorption process in nonlinear metallic photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Mahi R.; Hatef, Ali [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    The time evolution of the absorption coefficient in metallic photonic crystals has been studied numerically. These crystals are made from metallic spheres which are arranged periodically in air. The refractive index of the metallic spheres depends on the plasma frequency. Probe and pump fields are applied to monitor the absorption process. Ensembles of three-level particles are embedded in the crystal. Nanoparticles are interacting with the metallic crystals via the electron-photon interaction. It is found that when the resonance states lie away from the band edges system goes to transparent state. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Urgency of evolution-process congruent thinking in physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychoudhuri, Chandrasekhar

    2015-09-01

    It is now generally recognized that physics has not been contributing anything conceptually fundamentally new beyond the century old Relativity and 90 years old Quantum Mechanics [1-4]. We have also started recognizing that there is an increasing rate of species extinction all over the world, especially since the last century [5]; and we are beginning to understand that the related problems are being steadily accelerated by human behavior to conquer nature, rather than understanding nature as is and living within its system logics [6,7]. We are beginning to appreciate that our long-term sustainability as a species literally depends upon proactively learning to nurture the entire bio-diversity [8-10]. Thus, humans must consciously become evolution process congruent thinkers. The evolutionary biologists have been crying out loud for us to listen [5,6, 8-10]. Social scientists, political scientists, economic scientists [13] have started chiming in to become consilient thinkers [6] for re-constructing sustainable societies. But, the path to consilient thinking requires us to recognize and accept a common vision based thinking process, which functionally serves as a uniting platform. I am articulating that platform as the "evolution process congruent thinking" (EPCT). Do physicists have any obligation to co-opt this EPCT? Is there any immediate and/or long-term gain for them? This paper argues affirmatively that co-opting EPCT is the best way to re-anchor physics back to reality ontology and develop newer and deeper understanding of natural phenomena based on understanding of the diverse interaction processes going on in nature. Physics is mature enough to acknowledge that all of our theories are "work in progress". This is a good time to start iteratively re-evaluating and re-structuring all the foundational postulates behind all the working theories. This will also consistently energize all the follow-on generation of physicists to keep on fully utilizing their

  1. Levels and Atypical Evolutions of the Romanian Demographic Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Ionela Aceleanu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the XXth century, especially in the second half thereof, the approach views of the relation between the population and economy (both of them regarded in dynamics have multiplied themselves, the points of view as regards this subject becoming not only much more diverse but also opposite. All these views are characterised by the population transformation in endogenous factor (in internal, intrinsic side of the economic development (of the economic growth, factor that, at its turn, is determined by the economic processes. The double position of the population in the demo-economical relations system - as main production factor and as virtual recipient of produced goods - is a strong argument in the favour of the demographic factor as endogenous factor of growth and economic development. The correlations between the two variables are diverse and very difficultly to be quantified. It is known that the effect of the demographic impact upon the economic factor is felt after many years from the date of the demo-economic phenomenon occurring. So, within the last decades, the research intended to identify certain essential, durable relations between the population evolution and the economic growth became more intensive. On this line there are presented atypical evolutions and levels of demographic processes in Romania.

  2. THE UK ELECTRICITY MARKET EVOLUTION DURING THE LIBERALIZATION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Vasilica Rotaru

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers an insight on the liberalization process that took place in the United Kingdom starting with 1990 until now. The electricity market in the United Kingdom made incredible progress in the road to reaching a full level of liberalization where customers are free to choose between suppliers and services. An analysis of the most important indicators for the electricity market evolution such as electricity price, the market share of the largest generator, the energy efficiency indicator shows that the liberalization process brought many advantages starting with 2001. Also, UK has to face new challenges in order to keep the development of the industry on the right path, challenges that are presented in the final part of the paper.

  3. Superluminal waves in amplifying media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oraevsky, Anatolii N [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    In amplifying media steady-state waves can travel faster than the speed of light in vacuum without violating the principles of special relativity. The possibility of generating superluminal waves in induced elementary particle production processes is discussed. (methodological notes)

  4. Optimization of Process Design Problems Using Differential Evolution Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Gujarathia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A modified differential evolution algorithm (MDE has been used for solving different process related design problems (namely calculation of the NRTL and Two-Suffix Margules activity coefficient models parameters in 20 ternary extraction systems including different ionic liquids and reactor network design problem. The obtained results, in terms of root mean square deviations (rmsd for these models are satisfactory, with the overall values of 0.0023 and 0.0170 for 169 tie-lines for NRTL and Two-Suffix Margules models, respectively. The results showed that the MDE algorithm results in better solutions compared to the previous work based on genetic algorithm (GA for correlating liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE data in these systems. MDE also outperformed DE algorithm when tested on reactor network design problem with respect to convergence and speed.

  5. Evolution in Mind: Evolutionary Dynamics, Cognitive Processes, and Bayesian Inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchow, Jordan W; Bourgin, David D; Griffiths, Thomas L

    2017-07-01

    Evolutionary theory describes the dynamics of population change in settings affected by reproduction, selection, mutation, and drift. In the context of human cognition, evolutionary theory is most often invoked to explain the origins of capacities such as language, metacognition, and spatial reasoning, framing them as functional adaptations to an ancestral environment. However, evolutionary theory is useful for understanding the mind in a second way: as a mathematical framework for describing evolving populations of thoughts, ideas, and memories within a single mind. In fact, deep correspondences exist between the mathematics of evolution and of learning, with perhaps the deepest being an equivalence between certain evolutionary dynamics and Bayesian inference. This equivalence permits reinterpretation of evolutionary processes as algorithms for Bayesian inference and has relevance for understanding diverse cognitive capacities, including memory and creativity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Subgrid Modeling Geomorphological and Ecological Processes in Salt Marsh Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, F.; Kirby, J. T., Jr.; Wu, G.; Abdolali, A.; Deb, M.

    2016-12-01

    Numerical modeling a long-term evolution of salt marshes is challenging because it requires an extensive use of computational resources. Due to the presence of narrow tidal creeks, variations of salt marsh topography can be significant over spatial length scales on the order of a meter. With growing availability of high-resolution bathymetry measurements, like LiDAR-derived DEM data, it is increasingly desirable to run a high-resolution model in a large domain and for a long period of time to get trends of sedimentation patterns, morphological change and marsh evolution. However, high spatial-resolution poses a big challenge in both computational time and memory storage, when simulating a salt marsh with dimensions of up to O(100 km^2) with a small time step. In this study, we have developed a so-called Pre-storage, Sub-grid Model (PSM, Wu et al., 2015) for simulating flooding and draining processes in salt marshes. The simulation of Brokenbridge salt marsh, Delaware, shows that, with the combination of the sub-grid model and the pre-storage method, over 2 orders of magnitude computational speed-up can be achieved with minimal loss of model accuracy. We recently extended PSM to include a sediment transport component and models for biomass growth and sedimentation in the sub-grid model framework. The sediment transport model is formulated based on a newly derived sub-grid sediment concentration equation following Defina's (2000) area-averaging procedure. Suspended sediment transport is modeled by the advection-diffusion equation in the coarse grid level, but the local erosion and sedimentation rates are integrated over the sub-grid level. The morphological model is based on the existing morphological model in NearCoM (Shi et al., 2013), extended to include organic production from the biomass model. The vegetation biomass is predicted by a simple logistic equation model proposed by Marani et al. (2010). The biomass component is loosely coupled with hydrodynamic and

  7. Evolution of quantum-like modeling in decision making processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikova, Polina

    2012-12-01

    The application of the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics to model behavioral patterns in social science and economics is a novel and constantly emerging field. The aim of the so called 'quantum like' models is to model the decision making processes in a macroscopic setting, capturing the particular 'context' in which the decisions are taken. Several subsequent empirical findings proved that when making a decision people tend to violate the axioms of expected utility theory and Savage's Sure Thing principle, thus violating the law of total probability. A quantum probability formula was devised to describe more accurately the decision making processes. A next step in the development of QL-modeling in decision making was the application of Schrödinger equation to describe the evolution of people's mental states. A shortcoming of Schrödinger equation is its inability to capture dynamics of an open system; the brain of the decision maker can be regarded as such, actively interacting with the external environment. Recently the master equation, by which quantum physics describes the process of decoherence as the result of interaction of the mental state with the environmental 'bath', was introduced for modeling the human decision making. The external environment and memory can be referred to as a complex 'context' influencing the final decision outcomes. The master equation can be considered as a pioneering and promising apparatus for modeling the dynamics of decision making in different contexts.

  8. The Physical Processes of CME/ICME Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, Ward; Kilpua, Emilia K. J.; Liu, Ying D.; Lugaz, Noé; Riley, Pete; Török, Tibor; Vršnak, Bojan

    2017-11-01

    As observed in Thomson-scattered white light, coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are manifest as large-scale expulsions of plasma magnetically driven from the corona in the most energetic eruptions from the Sun. It remains a tantalizing mystery as to how these erupting magnetic fields evolve to form the complex structures we observe in the solar wind at Earth. Here, we strive to provide a fresh perspective on the post-eruption and interplanetary evolution of CMEs, focusing on the physical processes that define the many complex interactions of the ejected plasma with its surroundings as it departs the corona and propagates through the heliosphere. We summarize the ways CMEs and their interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) are rotated, reconfigured, deformed, deflected, decelerated and disguised during their journey through the solar wind. This study then leads to consideration of how structures originating in coronal eruptions can be connected to their far removed interplanetary counterparts. Given that ICMEs are the drivers of most geomagnetic storms (and the sole driver of extreme storms), this work provides a guide to the processes that must be considered in making space weather forecasts from remote observations of the corona.

  9. The Physical Processes of CME/ICME Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, Ward; Kilpua, Emilia K. J.; Liu, Ying D.; Lugaz, Noé; Riley, Pete; Török, Tibor; Vršnak, Bojan

    2017-08-01

    As observed in Thomson-scattered white light, coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are manifest as large-scale expulsions of plasma magnetically driven from the corona in the most energetic eruptions from the Sun. It remains a tantalizing mystery as to how these erupting magnetic fields evolve to form the complex structures we observe in the solar wind at Earth. Here, we strive to provide a fresh perspective on the post-eruption and interplanetary evolution of CMEs, focusing on the physical processes that define the many complex interactions of the ejected plasma with its surroundings as it departs the corona and propagates through the heliosphere. We summarize the ways CMEs and their interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) are rotated, reconfigured, deformed, deflected, decelerated and disguised during their journey through the solar wind. This study then leads to consideration of how structures originating in coronal eruptions can be connected to their far removed interplanetary counterparts. Given that ICMEs are the drivers of most geomagnetic storms (and the sole driver of extreme storms), this work provides a guide to the processes that must be considered in making space weather forecasts from remote observations of the corona.

  10. Incorporating Terrestrial Processes in Models of PETM Carbon Cycle Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, G. J.

    2016-12-01

    Evidence for the massive, rapid release of carbon to the ocean/atmosphere/biosphere system at the onset of the PETM is unequivocal, but the sequence of feedbacks that governed the evolution and recovery of the carbon cycle over the subsequent 150,000 years of the event remain unclear. Sedimentological evidence suggests that much of the excess carbon was eventually sequestered as carbonate in marine sediments, but there is also significant and growing evidence for changes in continental carbon cycle processes, most of which have not been incorporated in models of the event. I describe several aspects of the observed or implied continental response to the PETM, including changes in ecosystem organic carbon storage, soil carbonate growth, and export of organic carbon to the marine margins. These processes, along with continental silicate weathering, have been incorporated in a terrestrial module for a simple box model of the PETM carbon cycle, which is being used to evaluate their potential impact on global carbon cycle response and recovery. Although changes in terrestrial organic carbon storage can help explain patterns of global carbon isotope change throughout the event, constraints from ocean pH records suggest that other mechanisms must have contributed to pacing the duration and recovery of the PETM. Model results suggest that enhanced soil carbonate formation and the provenance of organic carbon buried in continental margin sediments are two poorly constrained variables that could alter the interpretation and implications of the continental records. Given the strong potential for, and high uncertainty in, future changes in terrestrial carbon cycle processes, resolving the nature and long-term impacts of such changes during the PETM represents a major opportunity to leverage the geologic record of this hyperthermal to increase understanding of human-induced global change.

  11. Self-biased transconductance amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendola, Gilles; Blanchard, Yves; Exertier, Anne; Spirkovitch, Serge; Lu, Guo N.; Alquie, George

    1999-09-01

    A CMOS, self-biased transconductance amplifier has been designed to be associated and integrated with a silicon capacitive microphone. To meet requirements especially on gain sensitivity, power consumption, and minimization of parasite capacitance effect, we have proposed a cascode structure with the cascode transistor source used as signa input. Switched-capacitor techniques have been applied for realizing self-bias for the amplifier and ensuring its high- gain operation. The proposed amplifier has been designed and fabricated in a 0.8 micrometers CMOS process. It has a surface area of 210 micrometers by 170 micrometers . Experimental results obtained from measuring the fabricated chip show a high-gain sensitivity and a low power dissipation for the amplifier. Results of simulations and measurements have been discussed.

  12. Outskirts of spiral galaxies: result of a secular evolution process?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakos, J.; Trujillo, I.; Azzollini, R.; Beckman, J. E.; Pohlen, M.

    We present our recent results on the properties of the outskirts of disk galaxies. In particular, we focus on spiral galaxies with stellar disk truncations in their radial surface brightness profiles. Using SDSS, UDF and GOODS data we show how the position of the break (i.e., a direct estimator of the size of the stellar disk) evolves with time since z˜1. Our findings agree with an evolution on the radial position of the break by a factor of 1.3±0.1 in the last 8 Gyr for galaxies with similar stellar masses. We also present radial color gradients and how they evolve with time. At all redshift we find a radial inside-out bluing reaching a minimum at the position of the break radius, this minimum is followed by a reddening outwards. Our results constrain several galaxy disk formation models and favour a scenario where stars are formed inside the break radius and are relocated in the outskirts of galaxies through secular processes.

  13. Wideband amplifier design

    CERN Document Server

    Hollister, Allen L

    2007-01-01

    In this book, the theory needed to understand wideband amplifier design using the simplest models possible will be developed. This theory will be used to develop algebraic equations that describe particular circuits used in high frequency design so that the reader develops a ""gut level"" understanding of the process and circuit. SPICE and Genesys simulations will be performed to show the accuracy of the algebraic models. By looking at differences between the algebraic equations and the simulations, new algebraic models will be developed that include parameters originally left out of the model

  14. Wideband Low Noise Amplifiers Exploiting Thermal Noise Cancellation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruccoleri, F.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    2005-01-01

    Low Noise Amplifiers (LNAs) are commonly used to amplify signals that are too weak for direct processing for example in radio or cable receivers. Traditionally, low noise amplifiers are implemented via tuned amplifiers, exploiting inductors and capacitors in resonating LC-circuits. This can render

  15. The transmission process: A combinatorial stochastic process for the evolution of transmission trees over networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainudiin, Raazesh; Welch, David

    2016-12-07

    We derive a combinatorial stochastic process for the evolution of the transmission tree over the infected vertices of a host contact network in a susceptible-infected (SI) model of an epidemic. Models of transmission trees are crucial to understanding the evolution of pathogen populations. We provide an explicit description of the transmission process on the product state space of (rooted planar ranked labelled) binary transmission trees and labelled host contact networks with SI-tags as a discrete-state continuous-time Markov chain. We give the exact probability of any transmission tree when the host contact network is a complete, star or path network - three illustrative examples. We then develop a biparametric Beta-splitting model that directly generates transmission trees with exact probabilities as a function of the model parameters, but without explicitly modelling the underlying contact network, and show that for specific values of the parameters we can recover the exact probabilities for our three example networks through the Markov chain construction that explicitly models the underlying contact network. We use the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) to consistently infer the two parameters driving the transmission process based on observations of the transmission trees and use the exact MLE to characterize equivalence classes over the space of contact networks with a single initial infection. An exploratory simulation study of the MLEs from transmission trees sampled from three other deterministic and four random families of classical contact networks is conducted to shed light on the relation between the MLEs of these families with some implications for statistical inference along with pointers to further extensions of our models. The insights developed here are also applicable to the simplest models of "meme" evolution in online social media networks through transmission events that can be distilled from observable actions such as "likes", "mentions

  16. The role of impacting processes in the chemical evolution of the atmosphere of primordial Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhin, Lev M.; Gerasimov, M. V.

    1991-01-01

    The role of impacting processes in the chemical evolution of the atmosphere of primordial Earth is discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) Earth's initial atmosphere; (2) continuous degassing; (3) impact processes and the Earth's protoatmosphere; and (4) the evolution of an impact-generated atmosphere.

  17. Amplification variable factor amplifier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akitsugu, Oshita; Nauta, Bram

    2007-01-01

    PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To provide an amplification factor variable amplifier capable of achieving temperature compensation of an amplification factor over a wide variable amplification factor range. ; SOLUTION: A Gilbert type amplification factor variable amplifier 11 amplifies an input signal and

  18. Amplification variable factor amplifier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akitsugu, O.; Nauta, Bram

    2006-01-01

    PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To provide an amplification factor variable amplifier capable of achieving temperature compensation of an amplification factor over a wide variable amplification factor range. ; SOLUTION: A Gilbert type amplification factor variable amplifier 11 amplifies an input signal and

  19. Jointly Amplified Basal and Pulsatile Growth Hormone (GH) Secretion and Increased Process Irregularity in Women with Anorexia Nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, R K; Veldhuis, J D; Flyvbjerg, A

    1999-01-01

    positively correlated to GH secretion rates. Leptin levels were significantly inversely correlated to the pulsatile, but not the basal, GH secretion rate. The present data demonstrate augmented basal as well as pulsatile GH secretion with disruption of the orderliness of the GH release process in AN....... Accordingly, GH secretion in AN probably reflects altered neuroendocrine feedback regulation, e.g. associated with increased hypothalamic GHRH discharge superimposed on reduced hypothalamic somatostatinergic tone....

  20. Low noise tuned amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, L. L. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A bandpass amplifier employing a field effect transistor amplifier first stage is described with a resistive load either a.c. or directly coupled to the non-inverting input of an operational amplifier second stage which is loaded in a Wien Bridge configuration. The bandpass amplifier may be operated with a signal injected into the gate terminal of the field effect transistor and the signal output taken from the output terminal of the operational amplifier. The operational amplifier stage appears as an inductive reactance, capacitive reactance and negative resistance at the non-inverting input of the operational amplifier, all of which appear in parallel with the resistive load of the field effect transistor.

  1. Stochastic evolution of the Universe: A possible dynamical process ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we propose a stochastic evolution of the early Universe which can lead to a fractal correlation in galactic distribution in the Universe. The stochastic equation of state, due to fluctuating creation rates of various components in a many-component fluid, leads to a fluctuating expansion rate for the Universe in the ...

  2. Amplified terminal protection assay of small molecule/protein interactions via a highly characteristic solid-state Ag/AgCl process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiong; Jiang, Bingying; Xu, Jin; Xie, Jiaqing; Xiang, Yun; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin

    2013-05-15

    In this work, we describe a new sensitive strategy for electrochemical detection of protein via small molecule/protein interactions. This assay is based on a terminal protection mechanism that small molecule-linked single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is protected against hydrolysis by exonuclease I when the target protein is captured by the corresponding small molecule recognition element. Positively charged gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are attached to the termini-protected and negatively charged ssDNA through electrostatic interactions. Subsequent AuNP-catalyzed silver enhancement followed by a highly characteristic and sensitive solid-state Ag/AgCl process is introduced to the sensing platform to amplify the signal output. By combining the amplification ability resulting from the silver deposition on the surface-captured AuNPs with the inherent high sensitivity of the electrochemical solid-state Ag/AgCl process, our method expands its range to the detection of macromolecules that bind to specific small molecules and enables low picomolar detection of protein. As a model of biotin/streptavidin interaction, a detection limit of 10 pM for streptavidin is readily achieved with desirable sensitivity and specificity, which indicates that the terminal protection assay coupled with the electrochemical solid-state Ag/AgCl process can offer a promising platform for the determination of various of types of proteins or small molecule-protein interactions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Coastal Foredune Evolution, Part 1: Environmental Factors and Forcing Processes Affecting Morphological Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering Technical Note (CHETN) is the first of two CHETNs focused on improving technologies to forecast coastal foredune...morphodynamic evolution of coastal foredunes. Part 2 reviews modeling approaches to forecast these changes and develops a probabilistic modeling framework to

  4. Echo movement and evolution from real-time processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    Preliminary experimental data on the effectiveness of conventional radars in measuring the movement and evolution of meteorological echoes when the radar is connected to a programmable real-time processor are examined. In the processor programming is accomplished by conceiving abstract machines which constitute the actual programs used in the methods employed. An analysis of these methods, such as the center of gravity method, the contour-displacement method, the method of slope, the cross-section method, the contour crosscorrelation method, the method of echo evolution at each point, and three-dimensional measurements, shows that the motions deduced from them may differ notably (since each method determines different quantities) but the plurality of measurement may give additional information on the characteristics of the precipitation.

  5. Cultural Evolution as a Non-Stationary Stochastic Process

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholson, Arwen E

    2016-01-01

    We present an individual based model of cultural evolution, where interacting agents are coded by binary strings standing for strategies for action, blueprints for products or attitudes and beliefs. The model is patterned on an established model of biological evolution, the Tangled Nature Model (TNM), where a `tangle' of interactions between agents determines their reproductive success. In addition, our agents also have the ability to copy part of each other's strategy, a feature inspired by the Axelrod model of cultural diversity. Unlike the latter, but similarly to the TNM, the model dynamics goes through a series of metastable stages of increasing length, each characterized by mutually enforcing cultural patterns. These patterns are abruptly replaced by other patterns characteristic of the next metastable period. We analyze the time dependence of the population and diversity in the system, show how different cultures are formed and merge, and how their survival probability lacks, in the model, a finite ave...

  6. Creation, Its Processes, and Significance (Samkhya Evolution and Involution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratibha Gramann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Science, religions, and cultural traditions develop theories and creative descriptions about the origin of the universe and meaning of life. These theories have both similarities and differences regarding the cause and effect of creation, and life as human beings know it. Religions and cultural traditions primarily adhere to a personal God as creator and ruler. Science has gone in the opposite direction of denying the existence of a God. A definitive cause of creation has not been scientifically found. Science may find a comparable, suitable match in the ancient thought of Samkhya, written in the 500-800 BC time. Samkhya is probably the first complete philosophical description of the origin and evolution of creation. The three basic energetics of Samkhya are comparable to the basic energies of physics. This paper addresses the hypothesis that the evolution and origin of creation stem from the 3 energies gunas of materiality prakriti described in ancient Samkhya.

  7. Differential automatic zero-adjusting amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broersen, B; Van Krevelen, F; van Heusden, J T; van Heukelom, J S

    1979-07-01

    A method is described for building a low-voltage-drift differential dc amplifier featuring automatic zero adjustment, a high input impedance, and a bandwidth of 10 kHz. This is achieved by an asymmetric two-step process between the input signal and ground. Bandwidth can be extended by the use of a second amplifier during the ground-sampling time. The amplifier can be made with standard electronic components. A major advantage of this method is that an existing amplifier can easily be converted into a low-voltage-drift amplifier by adding the essential elements of the described automatic zero-adjusting amplifier to its input stage. To illustrate the method a practical example is constructed featuring a drift of 0.2 microV/ degrees C.

  8. Linearisation of RF Power Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Asbeck

    2001-01-01

    of circuitry such as the linearisation circuit. The amplifier has the highest output power compared to other published class B power in the same process. The design phase including the on-chip inductor and the lateral flux capacitors is described. The other test chips designed are envelope detectors. Three......This thesis deals with linearisation techniques of RF power amplifiers (PA), PA design techniques and integration of the necessary building blocks in a CMOS technology. The opening chapters introduces the theory of transmitter architectures, RF-signal representation and the principles of digital...... modulation. Furthermore different types of power amplifiers, models and measures of non-linearities are presented. A chapter is also devoted to different types of linearisation systems. The work carried out and described in this thesis can be divided into a more theoretical and system oriented treatment...

  9. Evolution Inclusions and Variation Inequalities for Earth Data Processing I

    CERN Document Server

    Zgurovsky, Mikhail Z; Kasyanov, Pavlo O

    2011-01-01

    Here, the authors present modern mathematical methods to solve problems of differential-operator inclusions and evolution variation inequalities which may occur in fields such as geophysics, aerohydrodynamics, or fluid dynamics. For the first time, they describe the detailed generalization of various approaches to the analysis of fundamentally nonlinear models and provide a toolbox of mathematical equations. These new mathematical methods can be applied to a broad spectrum of problems. Examples of these are phase changes, diffusion of electromagnetic, acoustic, vibro-, hydro- and seismoacousti

  10. Double conjugate laser amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, S.; Daunt, G.H.

    1991-01-29

    This paper describes a double conjugate laser amplifier system for producing a stable output laser beam in line with a laser oscillator input beam. It comprises: a laser oscillator which produces a low energy oscillator laser beam therefrom directly along a laser beam axis of the system; an amplification means comprised of double conjugate laser amplifiers further comprised of a first and a second singly phase conjugate amplifiers laterally opposite each other about the laser beam axis; polarizers with one of the polarizers positioned between each of the first and second singly phase conjugate amplifiers on the laser beam axis; Pockels cells with on of the Pockels cells positioned on the laser beam axis immediately prior to one of the polarizers; and a means for selectively switching the amplifier means comprised of applying a half-wave voltage at each of the Pockels cells to provide a polarization rotation of the input beam through 90{degrees} for routing of the oscillator laser beam directly through or reflected off the polarizes as an input beam to the amplification means wherein the amplification means amplifies the input beam twice in each of the first and second singly phase conjugate amplifiers and reflects the amplified laser beam off the polarizers as an amplified laser output beam in exactly the same direction as the input laser beam.

  11. How Evolution May Work Through Curiosity-Driven Developmental Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudeyer, Pierre-Yves; Smith, Linda B

    2016-04-01

    Infants' own activities create and actively select their learning experiences. Here we review recent models of embodied information seeking and curiosity-driven learning and show that these mechanisms have deep implications for development and evolution. We discuss how these mechanisms yield self-organized epigenesis with emergent ordered behavioral and cognitive developmental stages. We describe a robotic experiment that explored the hypothesis that progress in learning, in and for itself, generates intrinsic rewards: The robot learners probabilistically selected experiences according to their potential for reducing uncertainty. In these experiments, curiosity-driven learning led the robot learner to successively discover object affordances and vocal interaction with its peers. We explain how a learning curriculum adapted to the current constraints of the learning system automatically formed, constraining learning and shaping the developmental trajectory. The observed trajectories in the robot experiment share many properties with those in infant development, including a mixture of regularities and diversities in the developmental patterns. Finally, we argue that such emergent developmental structures can guide and constrain evolution, in particular with regard to the origins of language. Copyright © 2016 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  12. Understanding the design research process: The evolution of a professional development program in Indian slums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney, Susan; Raval, Harini; Pieters, Jules

    2011-01-01

    McKenney, S., Raval, H., & Pieters, J. (2011, 8-12 April). Understanding the design research process: The evolution of a professional development program in Indian slums. Presentation at AERA annual meeting, New Orleans.

  13. Understanding the design research process: The evolution of a professional development program in Indian slums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney, Susan; Raval, Harini; Pieters, Jules

    2012-01-01

    McKenney, S., Raval, H., & Pieters, J. (2011, 8-12 April). Understanding the design research process: The evolution of a professional development program in Indian slums. Paper presentation at AERA annual meeting, New Orleans.

  14. Hybrid models for the simulation of microstructural evolution influenced by coupled, multiple physical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikare, Veena [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hernandez-Rivera, Efrain [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Madison, Jonathan D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Holm, Elizabeth Ann [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Patterson, Burton R. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Homer, Eric R. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2013-09-01

    Most materials microstructural evolution processes progress with multiple processes occurring simultaneously. In this work, we have concentrated on the processes that are active in nuclear materials, in particular, nuclear fuels. These processes are coarsening, nucleation, differential diffusion, phase transformation, radiation-induced defect formation and swelling, often with temperature gradients present. All these couple and contribute to evolution that is unique to nuclear fuels and materials. Hybrid model that combines elements from the Potts Monte Carlo, phase-field models and others have been developed to address these multiple physical processes. These models are described and applied to several processes in this report. An important feature of the models developed are that they are coded as applications within SPPARKS, a Sandiadeveloped framework for simulation at the mesoscale of microstructural evolution processes by kinetic Monte Carlo methods. This makes these codes readily accessible and adaptable for future applications.

  15. Demographic processes affect HIV-1 evolution in primary infection before the onset of selective processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbeck, Joshua T; Rolland, Morgane; Liu, Yi; McLaughlin, Sherry; McNevin, John; Zhao, Hong; Wong, Kim; Stoddard, Julia N; Raugi, Dana; Sorensen, Stephanie; Genowati, Indira; Birditt, Brian; McKay, Angela; Diem, Kurt; Maust, Brandon S; Deng, Wenjie; Collier, Ann C; Stekler, Joanne D; McElrath, M Juliana; Mullins, James I

    2011-08-01

    HIV-1 transmission and viral evolution in the first year of infection were studied in 11 individuals representing four transmitter-recipient pairs and three independent seroconverters. Nine of these individuals were enrolled during acute infection; all were men who have sex with men (MSM) infected with HIV-1 subtype B. A total of 475 nearly full-length HIV-1 genome sequences were generated, representing on average 10 genomes per specimen at 2 to 12 visits over the first year of infection. Single founding variants with nearly homogeneous viral populations were detected in eight of the nine individuals who were enrolled during acute HIV-1 infection. Restriction to a single founder variant was not due to a lack of diversity in the transmitter as homogeneous populations were found in recipients from transmitters with chronic infection. Mutational patterns indicative of rapid viral population growth dominated during the first 5 weeks of infection and included a slight contraction of viral genetic diversity over the first 20 to 40 days. Subsequently, selection dominated, most markedly in env and nef. Mutants were detected in the first week and became consensus as early as day 21 after the onset of symptoms of primary HIV infection. We found multiple indications of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) escape mutations while reversions appeared limited. Putative escape mutations were often rapidly replaced with mutually exclusive mutations nearby, indicating the existence of a maturational escape process, possibly in adaptation to viral fitness constraints or to immune responses against new variants. We showed that establishment of HIV-1 infection is likely due to a biological mechanism that restricts transmission rather than to early adaptive evolution during acute infection. Furthermore, the diversity of HIV strains coupled with complex and individual-specific patterns of CTL escape did not reveal shared sequence characteristics of acute infection that could be harnessed for

  16. Power amplifier circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takeya, Hideaki; Nauta, Bram

    2015-01-01

    PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To provide a power amplifier circuit which has high power efficiency while suppressing a fluctuation of output power relatively to a fluctuation of a power supply voltage in a high-efficiency switching amplifier which operates in a radio frequency band.SOLUTION: A duty ratio

  17. Oscillators and operational amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    2005-01-01

    A generalized approach to the design of oscillators using operational amplifiers as active elements is presented. A piecewise-linear model of the amplifier is used so that it make sense to investigate the eigenvalues of the Jacobian of the differential equations. The characteristic equation...

  18. The Evolution of Process Safety: Current Status and Future Direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannan, M Sam; Reyes-Valdes, Olga; Jain, Prerna; Tamim, Nafiz; Ahammad, Monir

    2016-06-07

    The advent of the industrial revolution in the nineteenth century increased the volume and variety of manufactured goods and enriched the quality of life for society as a whole. However, industrialization was also accompanied by new manufacturing and complex processes that brought about the use of hazardous chemicals and difficult-to-control operating conditions. Moreover, human-process-equipment interaction plus on-the-job learning resulted in further undesirable outcomes and associated consequences. These problems gave rise to many catastrophic process safety incidents that resulted in thousands of fatalities and injuries, losses of property, and environmental damages. These events led eventually to the necessity for a gradual development of a new multidisciplinary field, referred to as process safety. From its inception in the early 1970s to the current state of the art, process safety has come to represent a wide array of issues, including safety culture, process safety management systems, process safety engineering, loss prevention, risk assessment, risk management, and inherently safer technology. Governments and academic/research organizations have kept pace with regulatory programs and research initiatives, respectively. Understanding how major incidents impact regulations and contribute to industrial and academic technology development provides a firm foundation to address new challenges, and to continue applying science and engineering to develop and implement programs to keep hazardous materials within containment. Here the most significant incidents in terms of their impact on regulations and the overall development of the field of process safety are described.

  19. High Pressure Processing Technology and Equipment Evolution: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael M. Elamin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available High pressure processing (HPP is an interesting non-thermal technology that involves the sterilization of food by the mean of ultra-high pressures, which lead to extending the shelf life of processed food, as well as maintaining nutritional value and quality of food products. The consumers’ increasing demand for this new products graped the interest of several already-existing high pressure equipment manufacturers around the globe. The successful of this technology encouraged them to enter the field of food processing and adjust their existing technologies to adapt to the new process. This review spots the major discoveries in HPP equipment history, describes the current applications of HHP in processing and provides comprehensive information about HPP equipment technology used in commercial and research applications. In addition, this paper presents the major manufacturers in HPP equipment industry around the world.

  20. Effect of thermomechanical processing on evolution of various ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    , it is governed by aging tem- perature as well as the Nb content. Keywords. Heat treatment; Ti–Nb alloys; thermomechanical processing; microstructure; X-ray diffraction. 1. Introduction. Titanium and its alloys, owing to their attractive proper-.

  1. Stochastic evolution of the Universe: A possible dynamical process ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Sivakumar

    2017-12-11

    type equations [25,29] or stochastic differential equations (SDE). We argue that, such dynamical processes may lead to a fractal distribu- tion (or a scale invariant inhomogeneous distribution) of galaxies, because dynamical ...

  2. Dynamic evolution process of turbulent channel flow after opposition control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Mingwei; Tian, De; Yongqian, Liu

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic evolution of turbulent channel flow after application of opposition control (OC), together with the mechanism of drag reduction, is studied through direct numerical simulation (DNS). In the simulation, the pressure gradient is kept constant, and the flow rate increases due to drag reduction. In the transport of mean kinetic energy (MKE), one part of the energy from the external pressure is dissipated by the mean shear, and the other part is transported to the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) through a TKE production term (TKP). It is found that the increase of MKE is mainly induced by the reduction of TKP that is directly affected by OC. Further analysis shows that the suppression of the redistribution term of TKE in the wall normal direction plays a key role in drag reduction, which represses the wall normal velocity fluctuation and then reduces TKP through the attenuation of its main production term. When OC is suddenly applied, an acute imbalance of energy in space is induced by the wall blowing and suction. Both the skin-friction and TKP terms exhibit a transient growth in the initial phase of OC, which can be attributed to the local effect of and in the viscous sublayer. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11402088 and Grant No. 51376062) , State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources (Grant No. LAPS15005), and ‘the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities’ (Grant No.2014MS33).

  3. Auto-Zero Differential Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilligan, Gerard T. (Inventor); Aslam, Shahid (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An autozero amplifier may include a window comparator network to monitor an output offset of a differential amplifier. The autozero amplifier may also include an integrator to receive a signal from a latched window comparator network, and send an adjustment signal back to the differential amplifier to reduce an offset of the differential amplifier.

  4. Laser Cooled High-Power Fiber Amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Nemova, Galina

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model for laser cooled continuous-wave fiber amplifier is presented. The amplification process takes place in the Tm3+-doped core of the fluoride ZBLAN (ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF) glass fiber. The cooling process takes place in the Yb3+:ZBLAN fiber cladding. It is shown that for each value of the pump power and the amplified signal there is a distribution of the concentration of the Tm3+ along the length of the fiber amplifier, which provides its athermal operation. The influence ...

  5. Noiseless attenuation using an optical parametric amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, R. A.; Nodurft, I. C.; Pittman, T. B.; Franson, J. D.

    2017-10-01

    The process of heralded noiseless amplification, and the inverse process of heralded noiseless attenuation, have potential applications in the context of quantum communications. Although several different physical implementations of heralded noiseless amplifiers have now been demonstrated, the research on heralded noiseless attenuators has been largely confined to a beam-splitter based approach. Here we show that an optical parametric amplifier (OPA), combined with appropriate heralding, can also serve as a heralded noiseless attenuator. The counterintuitive use of an optical amplifier as an attenuator is only possible due to the probabilistic nature of the device.

  6. An Implantable CMOS Amplifier for Nerve Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jannik Hammel; Lehmann, Torsten

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a low noise high gain CMOS amplifier for minute nerve signals is presented. By using a mixture of weak- and strong inversion transistors, optimal noise suppression in the amplifier is achieved. A continuous-time offset-compensation technique is utilized in order to minimize impact...... on the amplifier input nodes. The method for signal recovery from noisy nerve signals is presented. A prototype amplifier is realized in a standard digital 0.5 μm CMOS single poly, n-well process. The prototype amplifier features a gain of 80 dB over a 3.6 kHz bandwidth, a CMRR of more than 87 dB and a PSRR...

  7. Structural evolution in the aging process of supercooled colloidal liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Takeshi; Tanaka, Hajime

    2014-06-01

    When a liquid is rapidly quenched to a temperature below the glass-transition point, it is driven out of equilibrium; it then slowly relaxes to a (quasi)equilibrium state. This slow relaxation process is called aging. By definition, any glasses are inevitably in the process of aging and actually slowly evolving with time. Thus the study of aging phenomena is of fundamental importance for understanding not only the nonequilibrium nature of the glass transition, but also the stability of glassy materials. Here we consider aging after a rather shallow quench, for which a system is still able to reach (metastable) equilibrium. By using polydisperse colloidal liquids as a model, we show the validity of dynamical scaling that there is only one relevant length scale not only for a quasiequilibrium supercooled state but also for a nonequilibrium process of aging, which is reminiscent of dynamical critical phenomena. Our finding indicates that the aging toward (metastable) equilibrium may be regarded as the growth process of critical-like fluctuations of static order associated with low-free-energy configurations, further suggesting that this ordering is the origin of cooperative slow dynamics in the systems studied. The generality of this statement for other glass-forming systems remains for a future study.

  8. Information Integration; The process of integration, evolution and versioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Keijzer, Ander; van Keulen, Maurice

    2005-01-01

    At present, many information sources are available wherever you are. Most of the time, the information needed is spread across several of those information sources. Gathering this information is a tedious and time consuming job. Automating this process would assist the user in its task. Integration

  9. Evolution of attention mechanisms for early visual processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Thomas; Knoll, Alois

    2011-03-01

    Early visual processing as a method to speed up computations on visual input data has long been discussed in the computer vision community. The general target of a such approaches is to filter nonrelevant information from the costly higher-level visual processing algorithms. By insertion of this additional filter layer the overall approach can be speeded up without actually changing the visual processing methodology. Being inspired by the layered architecture of the human visual processing apparatus, several approaches for early visual processing have been recently proposed. Most promising in this field is the extraction of a saliency map to determine regions of current attention in the visual field. Such saliency can be computed in a bottom-up manner, i.e. the theory claims that static regions of attention emerge from a certain color footprint, and dynamic regions of attention emerge from connected blobs of textures moving in a uniform way in the visual field. Top-down saliency effects are either unconscious through inherent mechanisms like inhibition-of-return, i.e. within a period of time the attention level paid to a certain region automatically decreases if the properties of that region do not change, or volitional through cognitive feedback, e.g. if an object moves consistently in the visual field. These bottom-up and top-down saliency effects have been implemented and evaluated in a previous computer vision system for the project JAST. In this paper an extension applying evolutionary processes is proposed. The prior vision system utilized multiple threads to analyze the regions of attention delivered from the early processing mechanism. Here, in addition, multiple saliency units are used to produce these regions of attention. All of these saliency units have different parameter-sets. The idea is to let the population of saliency units create regions of attention, then evaluate the results with cognitive feedback and finally apply the genetic mechanism

  10. Deformational mass transport and invasive processes in soil evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimhall, George H.; Chadwick, Oliver A.; Lewis, Chris J.; Compston, William; Williams, Ian S.; Danti, Kathy J.; Dietrich, William E.; Power, Mary E.; Hendricks, David; Bratt, James

    1992-01-01

    Channels left in soil by decayed roots and burrowing animals allow organic and inorganic precipitates and detritus to move through soil from above, to depths at which the minuteness of pores restricts further passage. Consecutive translocation-and-root-growth phases stir the soil, constituting an invasive, dilatational process which generates cumulative strains. Below the depths thus affected, mineral dissolution by descending organic acids leads to internal collapse; this softened/condensed precursor horizon is then transformed into soil via biological activity that mixes and expands the evolving residuum through root and micropore-network invasion.

  11. Noise in Optical Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Palle

    1997-01-01

    Noise in optical amplifiers is discussed on the basis of photons and electromagntic fields. Formulas for quantum noise from spontaneous emission, signal-spontaneous beat noise and spontaneous-spontaneous beat noise are derived.......Noise in optical amplifiers is discussed on the basis of photons and electromagntic fields. Formulas for quantum noise from spontaneous emission, signal-spontaneous beat noise and spontaneous-spontaneous beat noise are derived....

  12. Diabatic processes and the evolution of two contrasting extratropical cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methven, John; Martinez-Alvarado, Oscar; Gray, Suzanne

    2017-04-01

    Extratropical cyclones are typically weaker and less frequent in summer as a result of differences in the background state flow and diabatic processes with respect to other seasons. Two extratropical cyclones were observed in summer 2012 with a research aircraft during the DIAMET (DIAbatic influences on Mesoscale structure in ExTratropical storms) field campaign. The first cyclone deepened only down to 995 hPa; the second cyclone deepened down to 978 hPa and formed a potential vorticity (PV) tower, a frequent signature of intense cyclones. The cyclones were analyzed through numerical simulations incorporating tracers for the effects of diabatic processes on potential temperature and PV. It was found that the observed maximum vapor flux in the stronger cyclone was twice as strong as in the weaker cyclone; the water vapor mass flow along the warm conveyor belt of the stronger cyclone was over half that typical in winter even though the flow was weaker. Did the greater water transport and latent heat release associated with condensation result in the greater circulation in the PV tower case? A cyclone-centred integral framework is introduced relating the tracers with cross-isentropic mass transport and circulation around the cyclone. It is shown that the circulation increases much more slowly than the amplitude of the diabatically-generated PV tower at its centre. This effect is explained using the PV impermeability theorem and the influence of diabatic heating on circulation around a cyclone is shown to scale with Rossby number. The implication is that the stronger a cyclone becomes (larger Rossby number), the stronger the influence of latent heating on circulation.

  13. Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Ulmschneider

    When we are looking for intelligent life outside the Earth, there is a fundamental question: Assuming that life has formed on an extraterrestrial planet, will it also develop toward intelligence? As this is hotly debated, we will now describe the development of life on Earth in more detail in order to show that there are good reasons why evolution should culminate in intelligent beings.

  14. Modeling the evolution space of breakage fusion bridge cycles with a stochastic folding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, C D; Cooke, S L; Marshall, J; Stratton, M R; Campbell, P J

    2016-01-01

    Breakage-fusion-bridge cycles in cancer arise when a broken segment of DNA is duplicated and an end from each copy joined together. This structure then 'unfolds' into a new piece of palindromic DNA. This is one mechanism responsible for the localised amplicons observed in cancer genome data. Here we study the evolution space of breakage-fusion-bridge structures in detail. We firstly consider discrete representations of this space with 2-d trees to demonstrate that there are [Formula: see text] qualitatively distinct evolutions involving [Formula: see text] breakage-fusion-bridge cycles. Secondly we consider the stochastic nature of the process to show these evolutions are not equally likely, and also describe how amplicons become localized. Finally we highlight these methods by inferring the evolution of breakage-fusion-bridge cycles with data from primary tissue cancer samples.

  15. Space Shuttle Ascent Flight Design Process: Evolution and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picka, Bret A.; Glenn, Christopher B.

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Ascent Flight Design team is responsible for defining a launch to orbit trajectory profile that satisfies all programmatic mission objectives and defines the ground and onboard reconfiguration requirements for this high-speed and demanding flight phase. This design, verification and reconfiguration process ensures that all applicable mission scenarios are enveloped within integrated vehicle and spacecraft certification constraints and criteria, and includes the design of the nominal ascent profile and trajectory profiles for both uphill and ground-to-ground aborts. The team also develops a wide array of associated training, avionics flight software verification, onboard crew and operations facility products. These key ground and onboard products provide the ultimate users and operators the necessary insight and situational awareness for trajectory dynamics, performance and event sequences, abort mode boundaries and moding, flight performance and impact predictions for launch vehicle stages for use in range safety, and flight software performance. These products also provide the necessary insight to or reconfiguration of communications and tracking systems, launch collision avoidance requirements, and day of launch crew targeting and onboard guidance, navigation and flight control updates that incorporate the final vehicle configuration and environment conditions for the mission. Over the course of the Space Shuttle Program, ascent trajectory design and mission planning has evolved in order to improve program flexibility and reduce cost, while maintaining outstanding data quality. Along the way, the team has implemented innovative solutions and technologies in order to overcome significant challenges. A number of these solutions may have applicability to future human spaceflight programs.

  16. Turn-based evolution in a simplified model of artistic creative process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlstedt, Palle

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary computation has often been presented as a possible model for creativity in computers. In this paper, evolution is discussed in the light of a theoretical model of human artistic process, recently presented by the author. Some crucial differences between human artistic creativity...... and natural evolution are observed and discussed, also in the light of other creative processes occurring in nature. As a tractable way to overcome these limitations, a new kind of evolutionary implementation of creativity is proposed, based on a simplified version of the previously presented model...

  17. Effects of Melt Processing on Evolution of Structure in PEEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Georgi; Dai, Patrick Shuanghua; Oyebode, Elizabeth; Cebe, Peggy; Capel, Malcolm

    1999-01-01

    We report on the effects of melt processing temperature on structure formation in Poly(ether-ether-ketone), PEEK. Real time Small Angle X-ray Scattering, SAXS, and thermal analysis are used to follow the melting behavior after various stages of processing. Assignment of peaks to structural entities within the material, the relative perfection of the crystals, and the possibility of their reorganization, are all influenced by the melt processing history. With the advent of high intensity synchrotron sources of X-radiation, polymer scientists gain a research tool which, when used along with thermal analysis, provides additional structural information about the crystals during growth and subsequent melting. PEEK is an engineering thermoplastic polymer with a very high glass transition temperature (145 C) and crystal melting point (337 C). PEEK has been the subject of recent studies by X-ray scattering in which melt and cold crystallization were followed in real-time. X-ray scattering and thermal studies have been used to address the formation of dual endothermic response which has been variously ascribed to lamellar insertion, dual crystal populations, or melting followed by re-crystallization. Another important issue is whether all of the amorphous phase is located in interlamellar regions, or alternatively whether some is located in "pockets" away from the crystalline lamellar stacks. The interpretation of scattering from lamellar stacks varies depending upon whether such amorphous pockets are formed. Some groups believe all of the amorphous phase is interlamellar. This leads to selection of a smaller thickness for the crystals. Other groups suggest that most amorphous phase is not interlamellar, and this leads to the suggestion that the crystal thickness is larger than the amorphous layer within the stacks. To investigate these ideas, we used SAXS and Differential Scanning Calorimetry to compare results of single and dual stage melt crystallization of PEEK using a

  18. An Implantable CMOS Amplifier for Nerve Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jannik Hammel; Lehmann, Torsten

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a low noise high gain CMOS amplifier for minute nerve signals is presented. The amplifier is constructed in a fully differential topology to maximize noise rejection. By using a mixture of weak- and strong inversion transistors, optimal noise suppression in the amplifier is achieved....... A continuous-time current-steering offset-compensation technique is utilized in order to minimize the noise contribution and to minimize dynamic impact on the amplifier input nodes. The method for signal recovery from noisy nerve signals is presented. A prototype amplifier is realized in a standard digital 0.......5 mum CMOS single poly, n-well process. The prototype amplifier features a gain of 80 dB over a 10 kHz bandwidth, a CMRR of more than 87 dB and a PSRR greater than 84 dB. The equivalent input referred noise in the bandwidth of interest is 4.8 nV/rootHz. The amplifier power consumption is 275 muW, drawn...

  19. The Ecology and Evolution of Cancer: The Ultra-Microevolutionary Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chung-I; Wang, Hurng-Yi; Ling, Shaoping; Lu, Xuemei

    2016-11-23

    Although tumorigenesis has been accepted as an evolutionary process ( 20 , 102 ), many forces may operate differently in cancers than in organisms, as they evolve at vastly different time scales. Among such forces, natural selection, here defined as differential cellular proliferation among distinct somatic cell genotypes, is particularly interesting because its action might be thwarted in multicellular organisms ( 20 , 29 ). In this review, selection is analyzed in two stages of cancer evolution: Stage I is the evolution between tumors and normal tissues, and Stage II is the evolution within tumors. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data show a low degree of convergent evolution in Stage I, where genetic changes are not extensively shared among cases. An equally important, albeit much less highlighted, discovery using TCGA data is that there is almost no net selection in cancer evolution. Both positive and negative selection are evident but they neatly cancel each other out, rendering total selection ineffective in the absence of recombination. The efficacy of selection is even lower in Stage II, where neutral (non-Darwinian) evolution is increasingly supported by high-density sampling studies ( 81 , 123 ). Because natural selection is not a strong deterministic force, cancers usually evolve divergently even in similar tissue environments.

  20. Generalized Bell states map physical systems’ quantum evolution into a grammar for quantum information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Francisco

    2017-12-01

    Quantum information processing should be generated through control of quantum evolution for physical systems being used as resources, such as superconducting circuits, spinspin couplings in ions and artificial anyons in electronic gases. They have a quantum dynamics which should be translated into more natural languages for quantum information processing. On this terrain, this language should let to establish manipulation operations on the associated quantum information states as classical information processing does. This work shows how a kind of processing operations can be settled and implemented for quantum states design and quantum processing for systems fulfilling a SU(2) reduction in their dynamics.

  1. A computational study into the evolution of dual-route dynamics for affective processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Dulk, P.; Heerebout, B.T.; Phaf, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    The evolutionary justification by J. E. LeDoux (1996) for his dual-route model of fear processing was analyzed computationally by applying genetic algorithms to artificial neural networks. The evolution was simulated of a neural network controlling an agent that gathered food in an artificial world

  2. Numerical modeling of hydration process and temperature evolution in early age concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caggiano, A.; Pepe, M.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Martinelli, E.; Etse, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Heat production induced by the hydration reaction and the resulting temperature evolution in the early phases of setting and hardening processes are critical phenomena, often leading to premature cracking of concrete members. However, the interest for simulating such phenomena is also related to the

  3. Students' Conceptual Ecologies and the Process of Conceptual Change in Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demastes, Sherry S.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Using conceptual change as theoretical lens, describes the structure of (n=4) learners' conceptual ecology within biological evolution and illustrates how this ecology influences the process of conceptual change. Prior conceptions relate to evolutionary theory, scientific and religious orientations, view of biological world, and acceptance of…

  4. Evolution of hardness in ultrafine-grained metals processed by high-pressure torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megumi Kawasaki

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The processing of metals through the application of high-pressure torsion (HPT provides the potential for achieving exceptional grain refinement in bulk metals. Numerous reports are now available demonstrating the application of HPT to a range of pure metals and simple alloys. In practice, excellent grain refinement is achieved using this processing technique with the average grain size often reduced to the true nano-scale range. Contrary to the significant grain refinement achieved in metals during HPT, the models of the hardness evolution are very different depending upon the material properties. For a better understanding of the material characteristics after conventional HPT processing, this report demonstrates the hardness evolutions in simple metals including high-purity Al, commercial purity aluminum Al-1050, ZK60A magnesium alloy and Zn-22% Al eutectoid alloy after processing by HPT. Separate models of hardness evolution are described with increasing equivalent strain by HPT. Moreover, a new approach for the use of HPT is demonstrated by synthesizing an Al–Mg metal system by processing two separate commercial metals of Al-1050 and ZK60A through conventional HPT processing at room temperature.

  5. National cultural values and the evolution of process and outcome discrepancies in international strategic alliances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Nti, Kofi O

    2004-01-01

    on differences in three value orientations among cultures. activity orientation, mastery over nature, and assumptions about human nature are the value orientations that affect alliance functioning. The author/s argue that alliances are prone to interpretational, attributional, and behavioral conflicts......The article assesses the role played by national cultural values in shaping the evolution of international strategic alliances. The authors build on a systems dynamic model of alliance evolution in which the developmental path of an alliance depends on how the partners manage process and outcome...... discrepancies that may emerge during the course of an alliance. They argue that national culture affects alliance evolution by influencing partners sensitivity to discrepancy detection , shaping the nature of attributions they make, and by affecting the partners reactions to discrepancies. They focus...

  6. Astrophysical site(s of r-process elements in galactic chemodynamical evolution model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirai Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Astrophysical site(s of rapid neutron-capture process (r-process is (are not identified yet. Although core-collapse supernovae have been regarded as one of the possible candidates of the astrophysical site of r-process, nucleosynthesis studies suggest that serious difficulties in core-collapse supernovae to produce heavy elements with mass number of ≳110. Recent studies show that neutron star mergers (NSMs can synthesize these elements due to their neutron rich environment. Some chemical evolution studies of the Milky Way halo, however, hardly reproduce the observed star-to-star scatters of the abundance ratios of r-process elements (e.g., Eu in extremely metal-poor stars. This is because of their low rate (∼ 10−4 yr−1 for a Milky Way size galaxy and long merger time (≳ 100 Myr. This problem might be solved if the stars in the Galactic halo are consisted of the stars formed in dwarf galaxies where the star formation efficiencies were very low. In this study, we carry out numerical simulations of galactic chemo-dynamical evolution using an N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. We construct detailed chemo-dynamical evolution model for the Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs assuming that the NSMs are the major source of r-process elements. Our models successfully reproduce the observed dispersion in [Eu/Fe] as a function of [Fe/H] if we set merger time of NSMs, ≲ 300 Myr with the Galactic NSM rate of ∼ 10−4 yr−1. In addition, our results are consistent with the observed metallicity distribution of dSphs. In the early phase (≲1 Gyr of galaxy evolution is constant due to low star formation efficiency of dSphs. This study supports the idea that NSMs are the major site of r-process nucleosynthesis.

  7. The fundamental units, processes and patterns of evolution, and the Tree of Life conundrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Yuri I

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The elucidation of the dominant role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT in the evolution of prokaryotes led to a severe crisis of the Tree of Life (TOL concept and intense debates on this subject. Concept Prompted by the crisis of the TOL, we attempt to define the primary units and the fundamental patterns and processes of evolution. We posit that replication of the genetic material is the singular fundamental biological process and that replication with an error rate below a certain threshold both enables and necessitates evolution by drift and selection. Starting from this proposition, we outline a general concept of evolution that consists of three major precepts. 1. The primary agency of evolution consists of Fundamental Units of Evolution (FUEs, that is, units of genetic material that possess a substantial degree of evolutionary independence. The FUEs include both bona fide selfish elements such as viruses, viroids, transposons, and plasmids, which encode some of the information required for their own replication, and regular genes that possess quasi-independence owing to their distinct selective value that provides for their transfer between ensembles of FUEs (genomes and preferential replication along with the rest of the recipient genome. 2. The history of replication of a genetic element without recombination is isomorphously represented by a directed tree graph (an arborescence, in the graph theory language. Recombination within a FUE is common between very closely related sequences where homologous recombination is feasible but becomes negligible for longer evolutionary distances. In contrast, shuffling of FUEs occurs at all evolutionary distances. Thus, a tree is a natural representation of the evolution of an individual FUE on the macro scale, but not of an ensemble of FUEs such as a genome. 3. The history of life is properly represented by the "forest" of evolutionary trees for individual FUEs (Forest of Life, or

  8. Benchmarking the state comparison amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleczkowska, Klaudia; Puthoor, Ittoop Vergheese; Bain, Lauren; Andersson, Erika

    2017-10-01

    The state comparison amplifier is a recently proposed probabilistic quantum amplifier, intended especially for amplifying coherent states. Its realization is simple and uses only linear optics and photodetectors, and the preparation of a "guess" state, typically a coherent state. Fidelity and success probability can be high compared with other probabilistic amplifiers. State comparison amplification does, however, extract information about the amplified state, which means that it is especially important to benchmark it against a simple measure-and-resend procedure. We compare state comparison quantum amplifiers to measure-and-resend strategies, and identify parameter regimes and scenarios where these can and where they cannot provide an advantage.

  9. Envelope tracking CMOS power amplifier with high-speed CMOS envelope amplifier for mobile handsets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Eiji; Sakai, Yasufumi; Oishi, Kazuaki; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Mori, Toshihiko; Yamaura, Shinji; Suto, Kazuo; Tanaka, Tetsu

    2014-01-01

    A high-efficiency CMOS power amplifier (PA) based on envelope tracking (ET) has been reported for a wideband code division multiple access (W-CDMA) and long term evolution (LTE) application. By adopting a high-speed CMOS envelope amplifier with current direction sensing, a 5% improvement in total power-added efficiency (PAE) and a 11 dB decrease in adjacent channel leakage ratio (ACLR) are achieved with a W-CDMA signal. Moreover, the proposed PA achieves a PAE of 25.4% for a 10 MHz LTE signal at an output power (Pout) of 25.6 dBm and a gain of 24 dB.

  10. Comparison of the evolutional process of children with autism spectrum disorders in different language therapeutic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamanaha, Ana Carina; Perissinoto, Jacy

    2011-03-01

    To analyze and compare the extension and the speed of the evolutional process of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in direct and indirect interventions as opposed to only indirect intervention. The design of this study is a clinical trial. The sample was composed of 11 children diagnosed with Autism (n=6) and Asperger syndrome (n=5) by a multidisciplinary team, that attended specialized speech-language pathology therapy at the institution were the study was carried out. These children were randomly divided into two groups: Therapy Group (TG) - composed by six subjects receiving both direct and indirect intervention; and Orientation Group (OG) - constituted by five subjects receiving exclusively indirect intervention. It was used the Autism Behavior Checklist (ABC) to interview the mothers, and the Sample of Vocal Behavior (SVB), in three occasions: at the beginning of the intervention process (time 0), six months later (time 1) and 12 months later (time 2). It was observed greater speed and extension in the evolutional process of the TG Group, both in the analysis of the Autism Behavior Checklist (total and partial scores) and the Sample of Vocal Behavior, especially in the item Full Language. The performance of children with Asperger syndrome was considered more positive when compared to that of children with autism. There was greater evolution in younger children and with normal, mild, and moderate adaptive functioning. The tendency towards better performance of the children attending direct and indirect intervention showed that this association is fundamental in the therapeutic process of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

  11. Biomechanical evidence for convergent evolution of the invasive growth process among fungi and oomycete water molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Money, Nicholas P; Davis, Christopher M; Ravishankar, J P

    2004-09-01

    Diverse microorganisms traditionally called fungi are recognized as members of two kingdoms: mushroom-forming species and their relatives in the Fungi, and oomycete water molds in the Stramenopila. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that these kingdoms diverged early in the evolution of eukaryotes. The phylogenetic detachment of the fungi and oomycetes is reflected in radical differences in their biochemistry, cell structure, and development. In terms of their biological activities, however, they show great similarity, because both groups form colonies of filamentous hyphae that invade and decompose solid food sources. Here we present biomechanical evidence of the convergent evolution of the invasive growth process in these microorganisms. Using miniature strain gauges to measure the forces exerted by single hyphae, we show that the hyphae of species in both kingdoms exert up to 2 atmospheres of hydrostatic pressure as they extend at their tips. No other eukaryotes have adopted this process for meeting their nutritional needs.

  12. Demonstration of SQUID Parametric Amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AMPLIFIERS, *PREAMPLIFIERS, *RECEIVERS, *SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, CEPHALOPODA , ELECTROMAGNETISM, HETERODYNING, INTERFERENCE, LEVEL(QUANTITY), LIMITATIONS, MILLIMETER WAVES, NOISE, QUANTUM THEORY, RADIOFREQUENCY, SURVIVABILITY, TEMPERATURE.

  13. Understanding the process of social network evolution: Online-offline integrated analysis of social tie formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Doyeon; Kim, Wonjoon

    2017-01-01

    It is important to consider the interweaving nature of online and offline social networks when we examine social network evolution. However, it is difficult to find any research that examines the process of social tie formation from an integrated perspective. In our study, we quantitatively measure offline interactions and examine the corresponding evolution of online social network in order to understand the significance of interrelationship between online and offline social factors in generating social ties. We analyze the radio signal strength indicator sensor data from a series of social events to understand offline interactions among the participants and measure the structural attributes of their existing online Facebook social networks. By monitoring the changes in their online social networks before and after offline interactions in a series of social events, we verify that the ability to develop an offline interaction into an online friendship is tied to the number of social connections that participants previously had, while the presence of shared mutual friends between a pair of participants disrupts potential new connections within the pre-designed offline social events. Thus, while our integrative approach enables us to confirm the theory of preferential attachment in the process of network formation, the common neighbor theory is not supported. Our dual-dimensional network analysis allows us to observe the actual process of social network evolution rather than to make predictions based on the assumption of self-organizing networks.

  14. Understanding the process of social network evolution: Online-offline integrated analysis of social tie formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doyeon Kwak

    Full Text Available It is important to consider the interweaving nature of online and offline social networks when we examine social network evolution. However, it is difficult to find any research that examines the process of social tie formation from an integrated perspective. In our study, we quantitatively measure offline interactions and examine the corresponding evolution of online social network in order to understand the significance of interrelationship between online and offline social factors in generating social ties. We analyze the radio signal strength indicator sensor data from a series of social events to understand offline interactions among the participants and measure the structural attributes of their existing online Facebook social networks. By monitoring the changes in their online social networks before and after offline interactions in a series of social events, we verify that the ability to develop an offline interaction into an online friendship is tied to the number of social connections that participants previously had, while the presence of shared mutual friends between a pair of participants disrupts potential new connections within the pre-designed offline social events. Thus, while our integrative approach enables us to confirm the theory of preferential attachment in the process of network formation, the common neighbor theory is not supported. Our dual-dimensional network analysis allows us to observe the actual process of social network evolution rather than to make predictions based on the assumption of self-organizing networks.

  15. Electronic amplifiers for automatic compensators

    CERN Document Server

    Polonnikov, D Ye

    1965-01-01

    Electronic Amplifiers for Automatic Compensators presents the design and operation of electronic amplifiers for use in automatic control and measuring systems. This book is composed of eight chapters that consider the problems of constructing input and output circuits of amplifiers, suppression of interference and ensuring high sensitivity.This work begins with a survey of the operating principles of electronic amplifiers in automatic compensator systems. The succeeding chapters deal with circuit selection and the calculation and determination of the principal characteristics of amplifiers, as

  16. Simplified design of IC amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Lenk, John

    1996-01-01

    Simplified Design of IC Amplifiers has something for everyone involved in electronics. No matter what skill level, this book shows how to design and experiment with IC amplifiers. For experimenters, students, and serious hobbyists, this book provides sufficient information to design and build IC amplifier circuits from 'scratch'. For working engineers who design amplifier circuits or select IC amplifiers, the book provides a variety of circuit configurations to make designing easier.Provides basics for all phases of practical design.Covers the most popular forms for amplif

  17. Effects of Different Forging Processes on Microstructure Evolution for 316LN Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Dashan; Zhu, Lingling; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Peipei; Cui, Zhenshan

    2017-10-01

    Forging experiments were designed and carried out on a 3150 kN hydraulic press to investigate the effects of different processes on the microstructure evolution for 316LN steel. The forging processes included single-pass (upsetting) and multipass (stretching) deformations, and the experimental results indicated that the average grain size varied with forging processes. Moreover, the size had distinct differences at different positions in the workpiece. Meanwhile, numerical simulations were implemented to study the influence of temperature, strain, and strain rate on microstructure evolution. The results of experiments and simulations comprehensively demonstrated that dynamic, static, and meta-dynamic recrystallization could coexist in the hot forging process and that the recrystallization process could easily occur under the conditions of higher temperature, larger strain, and higher strain rate. Moreover, the temperature had more significant influence on both recrystallization and grain growth. A higher temperature could not only promote the recrystallization but also speed up the grain growth. Therefore, a lower temperature is beneficial to obtain refinement grains on the premise that the recrystallization can occur completely.

  18. Neutrinos from Beta Processes in a Presupernova: Probing the Isotopic Evolution of a Massive Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Kelly M.; Lunardini, Cecilia; Farmer, Robert J.; Timmes, F. X.

    2017-12-01

    We present a new calculation of the neutrino flux received at Earth from a massive star in the ∼24 hr of evolution prior to its explosion as a supernova (presupernova). Using the stellar evolution code MESA, the neutrino emissivity in each flavor is calculated at many radial zones and time steps. In addition to thermal processes, neutrino production via beta processes is modeled in detail, using a network of 204 isotopes. We find that the total produced {ν }e flux has a high-energy spectrum tail, at E≳ 3{--}4 {MeV}, which is mostly due to decay and electron capture on isotopes with A=50{--}60. In a tentative window of observability of E≳ 0.5 {MeV} and t< 2 hr pre-collapse, the contribution of beta processes to the {ν }e flux is at the level of ∼90%. For a star at D = 1 kpc distance, a 17 kt liquid scintillator detector would typically observe several tens of events from a presupernova, of which up to ∼30% is due to beta processes. These processes dominate the signal at a liquid argon detector, thus greatly enhancing its sensitivity to a presupernova.

  19. How to Develop a Multi-Grounded Theory: the evolution of a business process theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Lind

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available In the information systems field there is a great need for different theories. Theory development can be performed in different ways – deductively and/or inductively. Different approaches with their pros and cons for theory development exists. A combined approach, which builds on inductive as well as deductive thinking, has been put forward – a Multi-Grounded Theory approach. In this paper the evolution of a business process theory is regarded as the development of a multi-grounded theory. This evolution is based on empirical studies, theory-informed conceptual development and the creation of conceptual cohesion. The theoretical development has involved a dialectic approach aiming at a theoretical synthesis based on antagonistic theories. The result of this research process was a multi-grounded business process theory. Multi-grounded means that the theory is empirically, internally and theoretically founded. This business process theory can be used as an aid for business modellers to direct attention towards relevant aspects when business process determination is performed.

  20. Color and turbidity evolution in the aging process of port wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Luis M. C.

    2004-08-01

    Port Wine ageing process is very important to produce the most appreciated and expensive wines from the class. The process takes decades to accomplish and involves particular techniques which are taken inside refrigerated cellars. Different wines pass through such process to produce 10 year, 20 year, 30 year and 40 year Ports. There are no documented data about color or turbidity evolution during the ageing process. We decided to verify the states of color and spectral turbidity of different aged Gold white port wine. The acquired results show a spectral evolution on transmition and scattered radiation along with color modification which are a close and direct consequence of adopted corrective measures. In measuring the four samples, we have used our spectronephelometer with optical fiber tips to illuminate sample and to acquire transmitted or scattered radiation. Transmition results were calibrated with a standard spectrophotometer at our laboratory, and scattered spectra were measured considering a system calibration with ISO12103 standard dust. We are aware that the four samples were harvested in different years, but the wine type is the same and the ageing process does not differ from one sample to another.

  1. SR 97. Processes in the repository evolution. Background report to SR 97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedin, A. [ed.

    1999-11-01

    This report describes, in a comprehensive and coherent fashion, all identified internal processes of importance for the post-closure evolution and safety of a KBS-3 repository for spent nuclear fuel. The report has been written to be used in the SR 97 project, which has limited the time available for its preparation. Differences in the level of detail in descriptions of different processes do not always reflect differences in the significance of the processes. Discussions of different types of uncertainties could in many cases be broadened and deepened, and the stylistic quality could sometimes be improved. Like other background material for the safety assessments, the process report is also expected to require revision as site-specific conditions are progressively clarified. Today's version of the process report is therefore the firstversion of a report that will be revised prior to every safety report. The intention is to perform the first revision of the report after scrutiny of SR 97. The report describes the internal processes which over time lead to changes in a KBS-3 repository for spent nuclear fuel. The context of the material in the report is described in SR 97 Main Report and briefly entails the following: The repository has been divided into four subsystems: fuel/cavity, cast iron insert/copper canister, buffer/backfill and geosphere. A number of processes of importance for the post-closure evolution of the repository have been identified within each subsystem. This has been done with the aid of material in the so-called interaction matrices previously developed by SKB. The processes have been divided into the categories thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical. Furthermore, there are processes related to radiation and radionuclide transport. The identified processes are documented in this report. Each subsystem has its own chapter, and each chapter is divided into radiation related, thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical processes as well

  2. Demonstration of Geomorphic Processes and Landform Evolution Through MATLAB GUI Apps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, P. N.

    2016-12-01

    Although some rapid events can alter the landscape almost instantaneously (e.g. landslides, cliff failures), many geomorphic processes operate on time scales that are slower than human observation intervals (e.g. hillslope diffusion, isostatic uplift). Because these "slower" processes are more challenging for undergraduate students to conceptualize, it is illustrative to present topographic change through computer simulations that honor the physics of the geomorphic processes, but have the ability to speed up geologic time thereby providing a clear visualization of landscape evolution. As part of a project to produce a series of visualizations to illustrate coupled geomorphic processes and the landforms they produce, I present two MATLAB Apps that provide Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs) that allow students to manipulate rates and magnitudes of processes and observe the computed geomorphic results. In a GUI app that simulates hillslope diffusion in response to an evolving topographic gradient, the student user sets the rate of bedrock river downcutting, the rate of regional uplift, and the diffusivity parameter, then the model produces an animation that shows how the interfluves evolve through gradient-driven hillslope material transport. In a GUI app that simulates regional isostatic uplift in response to bedrock river incision, the student user sets the incision rate and the densities of crust and mantle, respectively, then the model produces an animation that shows how the mountain peaks uplift higher than the original ridgeline and how the Moho rises while the mean topographic surface elevation lowers. By providing students with a range of values for the input parameters, students can explore the computed landscape evolution results by simple inspection of the graphical output. In addition, students are introduced to the code that produced the GUI, in an effort to demystify the production of apps and encourage the use of MATLAB to complete assignments that

  3. Stochastic processes are key determinants of short-term evolution in influenza a virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha I Nelson

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the evolutionary dynamics of influenza A virus is central to its surveillance and control. While immune-driven antigenic drift is a key determinant of viral evolution across epidemic seasons, the evolutionary processes shaping influenza virus diversity within seasons are less clear. Here we show with a phylogenetic analysis of 413 complete genomes of human H3N2 influenza A viruses collected between 1997 and 2005 from New York State, United States, that genetic diversity is both abundant and largely generated through the seasonal importation of multiple divergent clades of the same subtype. These clades cocirculated within New York State, allowing frequent reassortment and generating genome-wide diversity. However, relatively low levels of positive selection and genetic diversity were observed at amino acid sites considered important in antigenic drift. These results indicate that adaptive evolution occurs only sporadically in influenza A virus; rather, the stochastic processes of viral migration and clade reassortment play a vital role in shaping short-term evolutionary dynamics. Thus, predicting future patterns of influenza virus evolution for vaccine strain selection is inherently complex and requires intensive surveillance, whole-genome sequencing, and phenotypic analysis.

  4. Historical evolution of process safety and major-accident hazards prevention in Spain. Contribution of the pioneer Joaquim Casal

    OpenAIRE

    Planas Cuchi, Eulàlia; Arnaldos Viger, Josep; Darbra Roman, Rosa Maria; Muñoz, Miguel; Pastor Ferrer, Elsa; Vílchez Sánchez, Juan Antonio

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims at presenting the evolution of process safety in Spain from various points of view. In first place, a study of the accidents occurred in this country in the process industry and in the transportation of chemical substances is presented. After this, the starting point of the process safety research in Spain and its evolution during the years are explained. The importance of this topic has also been reflected in the chemical engineering studies in some Spanish universities. Ther...

  5. Cow-eye microstructure evolution of laser pulse processed for ductile iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Fahai; Gan, Cuihua; Yu, Gang

    2003-04-01

    Pulsed laser beam with lattice distribution was used to modify surface processing for ductile iron. The microstructures around the graphite were observed using OM, and Nanoindentation and micro-hardness of that measured from surface to inner of sample. The result shows that the graphite ball has an important effect on cow-eye microstructure evolution either in light molten area or in phase change hardened are. It is not true that assuming the material is uniform during laser rapid heating and fast cooling for the graphite ball as a dependant composition phase. The microstructures of cow-eye is made up of fine remnant austenite in light molten area, and consisted of martensite and bainite in laser modified are. The cow-eye microstructure has a transformation from martensite and bainite to pearlite with the distance increasing from surfce. At last, the microstructure evolution of cow-eye has been discussed.

  6. Building valve amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Morgan

    2013-01-01

    Building Valve Amplifiers is a unique hands-on guide for anyone working with tube audio equipment--as an electronics hobbyist, audiophile or audio engineer. This 2nd Edition builds on the success of the first with technology and technique revisions throughout and, significantly, a major new self-build project, worked through step-by-step, which puts into practice the principles and techniques introduced throughout the book. Particular attention has been paid to answering questions commonly asked by newcomers to the world of the valve, whether audio enthusiasts tackling their first build or

  7. Hardness evolution of AZ80 magnesium alloy processed by HPT at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad A. Alsubaie

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Discs of an extruded AZ80 magnesium alloy were processed by high-pressure torsion (HPT using 6.0 GPa up to 10 turns at different temperatures (296 K and 473 K. The disc surfaces and cross-sectional planes were examined before and after processing using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Vickers microhardness (Hv. The microhardness results at the surface show differences in the strength of the material as a function of distance from the disc centres up to saturation, as well as a function of distance from the bottom to the surface in the cross-sectional plane. This study analyses the effect of processing temperature on the evolution of microhardness in the AZ80 magnesium alloy processed by high-pressure torsion. Keywords: Hardness, High-pressure torsion, Magnesium alloy, Severe plastic deformation

  8. Temperature and thermal stress evolutions in sapphire crystal during the cooling process by heat exchanger method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wencheng; Zhao, Wenhan; Wu, Ming; Ding, Guoqiang; Liu, Lijun

    2017-09-01

    Transient numerical calculations were carried out to predict the evolutions of temperature and thermal stress in sapphire single crystal during the cooling process by heat exchanger method (HEM). Internal radiation in the semitransparent sapphire crystal was taken into account using the finite volume method (FVM) in the global heat transfer model. The numerical results seem to indicate that the narrow bottom region of the sapphire crystal is subjected to high thermal stress during the cooling process, which could be responsible for the seed cracking of the as-grown crystal, while the thermal stress is relatively small in the central main body of the crystal, and is less than 10 MPa during the whole cooling process. The fast decrease of the thermal stress in the bottom region of the crystal during the initial stage of cooling process is dominated by the reduction of the cooling helium gas in the heat exchanger shaft, and is not significantly affected by the heating power reduction rate.

  9. The neurophysiology of language processing shapes the evolution of grammar: evidence from case marking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Balthasar; Witzlack-Makarevich, Alena; Choudhary, Kamal K; Schlesewsky, Matthias; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina

    2015-01-01

    Do principles of language processing in the brain affect the way grammar evolves over time or is language change just a matter of socio-historical contingency? While the balance of evidence has been ambiguous and controversial, we identify here a neurophysiological constraint on the processing of language that has a systematic effect on the evolution of how noun phrases are marked by case (i.e. by such contrasts as between the English base form she and the object form her). In neurophysiological experiments across diverse languages we found that during processing, participants initially interpret the first base-form noun phrase they hear (e.g. she…) as an agent (which would fit a continuation like … greeted him), even when the sentence later requires the interpretation of a patient role (as in … was greeted). We show that this processing principle is also operative in Hindi, a language where initial base-form noun phrases most commonly denote patients because many agents receive a special case marker ("ergative") and are often left out in discourse. This finding suggests that the principle is species-wide and independent of the structural affordances of specific languages. As such, the principle favors the development and maintenance of case-marking systems that equate base-form cases with agents rather than with patients. We confirm this evolutionary bias by statistical analyses of phylogenetic signals in over 600 languages worldwide, controlling for confounding effects from language contact. Our findings suggest that at least one core property of grammar systematically adapts in its evolution to the neurophysiological conditions of the brain, independently of socio-historical factors. This opens up new avenues for understanding how specific properties of grammar have developed in tight interaction with the biological evolution of our species.

  10. The neurophysiology of language processing shapes the evolution of grammar: evidence from case marking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balthasar Bickel

    Full Text Available Do principles of language processing in the brain affect the way grammar evolves over time or is language change just a matter of socio-historical contingency? While the balance of evidence has been ambiguous and controversial, we identify here a neurophysiological constraint on the processing of language that has a systematic effect on the evolution of how noun phrases are marked by case (i.e. by such contrasts as between the English base form she and the object form her. In neurophysiological experiments across diverse languages we found that during processing, participants initially interpret the first base-form noun phrase they hear (e.g. she… as an agent (which would fit a continuation like … greeted him, even when the sentence later requires the interpretation of a patient role (as in … was greeted. We show that this processing principle is also operative in Hindi, a language where initial base-form noun phrases most commonly denote patients because many agents receive a special case marker ("ergative" and are often left out in discourse. This finding suggests that the principle is species-wide and independent of the structural affordances of specific languages. As such, the principle favors the development and maintenance of case-marking systems that equate base-form cases with agents rather than with patients. We confirm this evolutionary bias by statistical analyses of phylogenetic signals in over 600 languages worldwide, controlling for confounding effects from language contact. Our findings suggest that at least one core property of grammar systematically adapts in its evolution to the neurophysiological conditions of the brain, independently of socio-historical factors. This opens up new avenues for understanding how specific properties of grammar have developed in tight interaction with the biological evolution of our species.

  11. Mechanical and Metallurgical Evolution of Stainless Steel 321 in a Multi-step Forming Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M.; Bridier, F.; Gholipour, J.; Jahazi, M.; Wanjara, P.; Bocher, P.; Savoie, J.

    2016-04-01

    This paper examines the metallurgical evolution of AISI Stainless Steel 321 (SS 321) during multi-step forming, a process that involves cycles of deformation with intermediate heat treatment steps. The multi-step forming process was simulated by implementing interrupted uniaxial tensile testing experiments. Evolution of the mechanical properties as well as the microstructural features, such as twins and textures of the austenite and martensite phases, was studied as a function of the multi-step forming process. The characteristics of the Strain-Induced Martensite (SIM) were also documented for each deformation step and intermediate stress relief heat treatment. The results indicated that the intermediate heat treatments considerably increased the formability of SS 321. Texture analysis showed that the effect of the intermediate heat treatment on the austenite was minor and led to partial recrystallization, while deformation was observed to reinforce the crystallographic texture of austenite. For the SIM, an Olson-Cohen equation type was identified to analytically predict its formation during the multi-step forming process. The generated SIM was textured and weakened with increasing deformation.

  12. Operational amplifier circuits analysis and design

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, J C C

    1995-01-01

    This book, a revised and updated version of the author's Basic Operational Amplifiers (Butterworths 1986), enables the non-specialist to make effective use of readily available integrated circuit operational amplifiers for a range of applications, including instrumentation, signal generation and processing.It is assumed the reader has a background in the basic techniques of circuit analysis, particularly the use of j notation for reactive circuits, with a corresponding level of mathematical ability. The underlying theory is explained with sufficient but not excessive, detail. A range of compu

  13. Micro-structural evolution of rubber/clay nanocomposites with vulcanization process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Brominated isobutyl-isoprene rubber/clay nanocomposite (BIIRCN and ethylene-propylene-diene-monomer rubber/clay nanocomposite (EPDMCN were prepared by melt blending. The micro-structural evolution of these two kinds of rubber/clay nanocomposites (RCNs with vulcanization process was investigated using wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD and transmission electron microscope (TEM. The WAXD results revealed that the intercalated structure of organically modified clay (OMC changed throughout the whole curing process. The intercalated structure kept on changing beyond the vulcanization stage of T90. The interlayer space of intercalated silicate in uncured BIIRCN is larger than that in uncured EPDMCN. However, the intercalated structure for EPDMCN changed by a larger extent than that for BIIRCN during the vulcanization process, and the interlayer space of the intercalated structure is larger in the cured EPDMCN than that in the cured BIIRCN. It was found that the intercalant (i.e., octadecylamine, ODA for OMC could shorten the scorch time of the curing reaction, and increase the curing rate, which was attributed to the further intercalation during vulcanization. TEM results indicated that the spatial distribution of OMC is much better in BIIR (a polar rubber matrix than that in EPDM (a non-polar rubber matrix. The changes in spatial dispersion structure during vulcanization for EPDMCN and BIIRCN show different trends. In conclusion, the polarity of the rubber is the determining factor influencing the evolution of both the intercalated structure and the spatial dispersion of clay during vulcanization.

  14. General purpose graphics-processing-unit implementation of cosmological domain wall network evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, J. R. C. C. C.; Martins, C. J. A. P.

    2017-10-01

    Topological defects unavoidably form at symmetry breaking phase transitions in the early universe. To probe the parameter space of theoretical models and set tighter experimental constraints (exploiting the recent advances in astrophysical observations), one requires more and more demanding simulations, and therefore more hardware resources and computation time. Improving the speed and efficiency of existing codes is essential. Here we present a general purpose graphics-processing-unit implementation of the canonical Press-Ryden-Spergel algorithm for the evolution of cosmological domain wall networks. This is ported to the Open Computing Language standard, and as a consequence significant speedups are achieved both in two-dimensional (2D) and 3D simulations.

  15. General purpose graphics-processing-unit implementation of cosmological domain wall network evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, J R C C C; Martins, C J A P

    2017-10-01

    Topological defects unavoidably form at symmetry breaking phase transitions in the early universe. To probe the parameter space of theoretical models and set tighter experimental constraints (exploiting the recent advances in astrophysical observations), one requires more and more demanding simulations, and therefore more hardware resources and computation time. Improving the speed and efficiency of existing codes is essential. Here we present a general purpose graphics-processing-unit implementation of the canonical Press-Ryden-Spergel algorithm for the evolution of cosmological domain wall networks. This is ported to the Open Computing Language standard, and as a consequence significant speedups are achieved both in two-dimensional (2D) and 3D simulations.

  16. The microstrip SQUID amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therrien, Roy

    A Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDS) can operate at frequencies up to several GHz and can be cooled to less than 100 mK. Such characteristics make the SQUID---a flux-to-voltage transducer---an excellent candidate for use as a low-noise rf amplifier. Coupling of input signals of frequencies larger than 200 MHz, however, has been limited by the parasitic capacitance between the input coil and SQUID body. We present experimental observations of a do SQUID-based rf amplifier which circumvents this problem by incorporating the input coil as a microstrip resonator. The microstrip input configuration uses the capacitance and inductance of the input coil to form a resonant cavity capable of operating up to several GHz. The input signal is applied between the SQUID body and one end of the input coil, while the other end of the coil is left open. We present data from microstrip SQUID amplifiers with gains of up to 22 dB at 900 MHz. In order to understand the gain and input impedance of the microstrip SQUID in greater detail, we made and studied a 1:190 scale analog patterned on a double-sided printed circuit board consisting of copper deposited on a kapton sheet. The measured input impedance of the analog SQUID is successfully modeled by describing the microstrip input as a low-loss transmission line. When operated with the slit in the copper washer ground plane shorted, the input coil behaves exactly like a linear resonator with the resonant frequency given by f = 1/2ℓ(L 0C0)1/2, where L0 and C0 are the inductance and capacitance per unit length and ℓ is the coil length. With the slit in the washer left open, the inductance of the input coil is significantly altered in a manner partially consistent with the Ketchen-Jaycox model in which the reflected inductance of the input coil is Li = n2L, where L is the inductance of the washer loop and n is the number of turns in the coil. We present input impedance measurements on microstrip SQUIDs cooled to 4

  17. Palaeofluid evolution process in Well Block Tubei 1 in the Kuqa Depression, Tarim Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Wu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Under the joint action of gypsum-salt rocks and faults, fluid evolution process is complicated in the northern Tuzimazha, Kuqa Depression, Tarim Basin. In the past, however, the oil and gas distribution rules in this area were less studied, so the related understanding was insufficient. In this paper, the reservoirs in Well Block Tubei 1 were analyzed by means of fluid inclusion and quantitative grain fluorescence (QGF techniques. Based on tectonic evolution history, burial history, thermal history and hydrocarbon generation history, the paleofluid evolution process in this area was reproduced. It is shown that the well block experienced hydrocarbon charge in two periods. The first period is the early–middle stage (16–9 Ma of Miocene Kangcun Fm (N1–2k, when it was charged with oil, with the corresponding characteristics of yellow and white–yellow fluid inclusion fluorescence and the QGF Index higher than 4, indicating that there were paleo-oil reservoirs at the early stage of the reservoirs. And at the late stage, the fluids that were accumulated at the early stage escaped because the gypsum-salt rocks were cut by faults, and bitumen remained in the reservoirs. It is also the evidence for the escaping of the early charged oil that the total scanning fluorescence (TSF of the hydrocarbon adsorbed to the surface of the current reservoirs is generally unimodal. The second period is the late stage (about 3 Ma of Pliocene Kuqa Fm (N2k, when the natural gas and light oil charging occurred. Correspondingly, there are two inclusions, i.e. black gaseous hydrocarbon inclusion and blue fluorescence inclusion located along the edge of the quartz grains. At this stage, the gypsum-salt caprocks deepened and their sealing capacity was recovered due to a strong plastic flow. Moreover, the trap was uplifted violently under the effect of Himalaya orogeny, and a large amount of natural gas and a little light oil were accumulated.

  18. Coupled tectonic/surface processes modeling of the Neogene Mesopotamian basin evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillon, Charlotte; Garcia-Castellanos, Daniel; Vergés, Jaume

    2014-05-01

    Understanding how wide and long-lived drainage systems respond to changes in plate configuration is key to decipher between climate and tectonic forcing on the sedimentary record. The Mesopotamian large foreland basin results from flexure of the Arabian plate controlled by tectonic load of the Zagros Mountains to the East. In contrast, the current drainage pattern seems to be ruled by the uplift of the Anatolian region to the North, forcing the two main river systems (Tigris and Euphrates) to drain the basin longitudinally. In addition to that, the Mesopotamian area developed where the Neogene closure of the gateway between Mediterranean sea and Indian ocean occurred consequently to the convergence of the Arabian and Eurasian plates, but modes and timing of basin development remain poorly constrained. Moreover, the connection between the Mesopotamian basin and the Indian Ocean via the Persian Gulf still remains to be understood. The purpose of this study is to understand and investigate the processes involved in the Mesopotamian basin evolution, with an emphasis on the evolution of drainage conditions, from the closure of the basin as a result of the propagation of the collision, to the opening of the drainage through the Hormuz Strait and contribution of the uplift of the Oman Mountains. To that purpose, we perform integrated modeling of surface processes (erosion/transport/sedimentation), lithospheric flexure and kinematic fault deformation. The numerical model is particularly designed to study the 3D foreland basin evolution and to dentify large-scale relationships between tectonic movements and sediment transport. This model allows us to investigate the basin history at the scale of the Arabian plate and over a long period of time, i.e. since the collision (35-20 Ma ) to present day.

  19. Language at Three Timescales: The Role of Real-Time Processes in Language Development and Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, Bob

    2016-04-01

    Evolutionary developmental systems (evo-devo) theory stresses that selection pressures operate on entire developmental systems rather than just genes. This study extends this approach to language evolution, arguing that selection pressure may operate on two quasi-independent timescales. First, children clearly must acquire language successfully (as acknowledged in traditional evo-devo accounts) and evolution must equip them with the tools to do so. Second, while this is developing, they must also communicate with others in the moment using partially developed knowledge. These pressures may require different solutions, and their combination may underlie the evolution of complex mechanisms for language development and processing. I present two case studies to illustrate how the demands of both real-time communication and language acquisition may be subtly different (and interact). The first case study examines infant-directed speech (IDS). A recent view is that IDS underwent cultural to statistical learning mechanisms that infants use to acquire the speech categories of their language. However, recent data suggest is it may not have evolved to enhance development, but rather to serve a more real-time communicative function. The second case study examines the argument for seemingly specialized mechanisms for learning word meanings (e.g., fast-mapping). Both behavioral and computational work suggest that learning may be much slower and served by general-purpose mechanisms like associative learning. Fast-mapping, then, may be a real-time process meant to serve immediate communication, not learning, by augmenting incomplete vocabulary knowledge with constraints from the current context. Together, these studies suggest that evolutionary accounts consider selection pressure arising from both real-time communicative demands and from the need for accurate language development. Copyright © 2016 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  20. Chemical compositions, sources and evolution processes of the submicron aerosols in Nanjing, China during wintertime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; He, Y.; Ge, X.; Wang, J.; Yu, H.; Chen, M.

    2016-12-01

    Elevated atmospheric particulate matter pollution is one of the most significant environmental issues in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD), China. Thus it is important to unravel the characteristics, sources and evolution processes of the ambient aerosols in order to improve the air quality. In this study, we report the real-time monitoring results on submicron aerosol particles (PM1) in suburban Nanjing during wintertime of 2015, using an Aerodyne soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS). This instrument allows the fast measurement of refractory black carbon simultaneously with other aerosol components. Results show that organics was on average the most abundant species of PM1 (25.9%), but other inorganic species, such as nitrate (23.7%) and sulfate (23.3%) also comprised large mass fractions. As the sampling site is heavily influenced by various sources including industrial, traffic and other anthropogenic emissions, etc., six organic aerosol (OA) factors were identified from Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the SP-AMS OA mass spectra. These factors include three primary OA factors - a hydrocarbon-like OA, an industry-related OA (IOA) and a cooking OA (COA), and three secondary OA factors, i.e., a local OOA (LSOA), a semi-volatile OOA (SV-OOA) and a low-volatility OOA (LV-OOA). Overall, the primary organic aerosol (POA) (HOA, IOA and COA) dominated the total OA mass. Behaviors and evolution processes of these OA factors will be discussed in combining with the other supporting data.

  1. Dynamic recrystallization and texture evolution of Mg–Y–Zn alloy during hot extrusion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, L.B. [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resources Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Li, X. [Institut für Metallkunde und Metallphysik, RWTH-Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Guangzhou Research Institute of Non-ferrous Metals, Guangzhou 510651 (China); Zhang, D.P.; Cheng, L.R.; Meng, J. [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resources Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Zhang, H.J., E-mail: hongjie@ciac.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resources Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2014-06-01

    The microstructure and texture evolution of Mg{sub 98.5}Y{sub 1}Zn{sub 0.5} and Mg{sub 92.5}Y{sub 5}Zn{sub 2.5} (atomic percent) alloys during hot extrusion were systematically investigated. The coarse LPSO phases with higher volume fraction (∼ 57%) suppressed the twinning generation in the initial stage of extrusion, and accelerated the dynamic recrystallization through the particle deformation zones. Therefore, the volume fraction of DRXed grains in as-extruded Mg{sub 92.5}Y{sub 5}Zn{sub 2.5} alloy was much higher than that of Mg{sub 98.5}Y{sub 1}Zn{sub 0.5} alloy. The intensive recrystallization process resulted in the conventional basal texture weakening, although the texture evolution was mainly dominated by flow behavior. The dynamic recrystallization behavior in Mg{sub 92.5}Y{sub 5}Zn{sub 2.5} alloy restricted the formation of deformation texture, and thus the more random texture was observed during the whole extrusion process. - Highlights: • The densely coarse LPSO phases suppressed the twinning deformation. • Coarse LPSO phases induced the particle stimulated nucleation effect. • Dynamic recrystallization resulted in the basal texture weakening effect.

  2. [Monitoring and analysis on evolution process of rainfall runoff water quality in urban area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wen; Li, Huai-En; Li, Jia-Ke

    2013-02-01

    In order to find the water quality evolution law and pollution characteristics of the rainfall runoff from undisturbed to the neighborhood exit, 6 times evolution process of rainfall runoff water quality were monitored and analyzed from July to October in 2011, and contrasted the clarification efficiency of the grassland to the roof runoff rudimentarily at the same time. The research showed: 1. the results of the comparison from "undisturbed, rainfall-roof, rainfall runoff-road, rainfall-runoff the neighborhood exit runoff " showed that the water quality of the undisturbed rain was better than that from the roof and the neighborhood exist, but the road rainfall runoff water quality was the worst; 2. the average concentrations of the parameters such as COD, ammonia nitrogen and total nitrogen all exceeded the Fifth Class of the Surface Water Quality Standard except for the soluble total phosphorus from undisturbed rainfall to the neighborhood exit; 3. the runoff water quality of the short early fine days was better than that of long early fine days, and the last runoff water quality was better than that of the initial runoff in the same rainfall process; 4. the concentration reduction of the grassland was notable, and the reduction rate of the grassland which is 1.0 meter wide of the roof runoff pollutants such as COD and nitrogen reached 30%.

  3. Late Pleistocene - Holocene surface processes and landscape evolution in the central Swiss Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxleitner, Max; Musso, Alessandra; Waroszewski, Jarosław; Malkiewicz, Małgorzata; Maisch, Max; Dahms, Dennis; Brandová, Dagmar; Christl, Marcus; de Castro Portes, Raquel; Egli, Markus

    2017-10-01

    The European Alps are a geomorphologically active region and experience a number of gravity-driven hillslope processes. Soil and landscape formation in the Alps has consequently undergone several minor and major traceable changes of developmental trajectories during the Holocene. Soil development is hypothesised to be often non-linear with time and characterised by stages of progressive and regressive evolution caused by upbuilding (formation, profile deepening) and erosion (profile shallowing). Several cold and warm climate phases are identified during the Holocene but it is largely unknown which effects these might have had on slope processes. By using datable moraines (10Be) and mires (14C), we have constructed a temporal framework for these processes. Using the geochemical imprint of mires in the Alpine setting of the Göschener-valley of the Central Swiss Alps, we reconstructed general (mostly erosional) landscape processes for the last ca. 10 ka. As this is the type locality for the Göschener cold phase, we assumed that this phase (Göschener cold phase I and II 1.5 and 2.5 ka BP) should have left easily recognizable traits. After deglaciation (11-12 ka BP), soil evolution was progressive. Beginning around 8 ka BP, we detect a distinct increase in erosion here, together with a vegetation change (towards tundra vegetation) and the highest measured rates of carbon sequestration. Other phases of high geomorphic activity were recognised ca. 5-6 ka BP, 4 ka BP and, to a lesser extent, 1-3 ka ago. The cold phase at 5-6 ka BP corresponds to a less distinct change in vegetation and lessened erosion. Human impact is increasingly obvious since about 2.4 ka BP which overlaps with the Göschener cold phase. Nonetheless, erosion processes were not extraordinarily high during this period and a climate effect cannot be distinguished. We detect evidence of increasing human disturbance (regressive soil evolution) for about the last 1 ka. We also detect an increase in dust

  4. Cellular and molecular processes leading to embryo formation in sponges: evidences for high conservation of processes throughout animal evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ereskovsky, Alexander V; Renard, Emmanuelle; Borchiellini, Carole

    2013-03-01

    The emergence of multicellularity is regarded as one of the major evolutionary events of life. This transition unicellularity/pluricellularity was acquired independently several times (King 2004). The acquisition of multicellularity implies the emergence of cellular cohesion and means of communication, as well as molecular mechanisms enabling the control of morphogenesis and body plan patterning. Some of these molecular tools seem to have predated the acquisition of multicellularity while others are regarded as the acquisition of specific lineages. Morphogenesis consists in the spatial migration of cells or cell layers during embryonic development, metamorphosis, asexual reproduction, growth, and regeneration, resulting in the formation and patterning of a body. In this paper, our aim is to review what is currently known concerning basal metazoans--sponges' morphogenesis from the tissular, cellular, and molecular points of view--and what remains to elucidate. Our review attempts to show that morphogenetic processes found in sponges are as diverse and complex as those found in other animals. In true epithelial sponges (Homoscleromorpha), as well as in others, we find similar cell/layer movements, cellular shape changes involved in major morphogenetic processes such as embryogenesis or larval metamorphosis. Thus, sponges can provide information enabling us to better understand early animal evolution at the molecular level but also at the cell/cell layer level. Indeed, comparison of molecular tools will only be of value if accompanied by functional data and expression studies during morphogenetic processes.

  5. Evolution of secondary phases in alloy ATI 718Plus® during processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casanova Ana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ATI 718Plus® is a polycrystalline Ni-base superalloy for aero-engine disc applications, which relies on the precipitation of η-phase (Ni6Nb[Al,Ti], D024 at grain boundaries for resistance to intergranular failure and grain size control. The nucleation and evolution of the η particles have been examined throughout the manufacturing process. During hot working below the η solvus, existing precipitates lose their orientation relationship with the matrix and become aligned with the forging flow. During heat treatment, a dual morphology develops by the uniform growth of those incoherent precipitates into coarse plates, together with the new nucleation of thin lamellae from selected grain boundaries. The balance between the two morphologies in the final component can be achieved by controlling precipitation and dissolution processes during forging.

  6. Correlated process of phase separation and microstructure evolution of ternary Co-Cu-Pb alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, N.; Wang, W. L.; Luo, S. B.; Hu, L.; Wei, B.

    2013-11-01

    The phase separation and rapid solidification of liquid ternary Co45Cu42Pb13 immiscible alloy have been investigated under both bulk undercooling and containerless processing conditions. The undercooled bulk alloy is solidified as a vertical two-layer structure, whereas the containerlessly solidified alloy droplet is characterized by core-shell structures. The dendritic growth velocity of primary α(Co) phase shows a power-law relation to undercooling and achieves a maximum of 1.52 m/s at the undercooling of 112 K. The Pb content is always enriched in Cu-rich zone and depleted in Co-rich zone. Numerical analyses indicate that the Stokes motion, solutal Marangoni convection, thermal Marangoni convection, and interfacial energy play the main roles in the correlated process of macrosegregation evolution and microstructure formation.

  7. Evolution of seismic velocities in heavy oil sand reservoirs during thermal recovery process

    CERN Document Server

    Nauroy, Jean-François; Guy, N; Baroni, Axelle; Delage, Pierre; Mainguy, Marc; 10.2516/ogst/2012027

    2013-01-01

    In thermally enhanced recovery processes like cyclic steam stimulation (CSS) or steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD), continuous steam injection entails changes in pore fluid, pore pressure and temperature in the rock reservoir, that are most often unconsolidated or weakly consolidated sandstones. This in turn increases or decreases the effective stresses and changes the elastic properties of the rocks. Thermally enhanced recovery processes give rise to complex couplings. Numerical simulations have been carried out on a case study so as to provide an estimation of the evolution of pressure, temperature, pore fluid saturation, stress and strain in any zone located around the injector and producer wells. The approach of Ciz and Shapiro (2007) - an extension of the poroelastic theory of Biot-Gassmann applied to rock filled elastic material - has been used to model the velocity dispersion in the oil sand mass under different conditions of temperature and stress. A good agreement has been found between these pre...

  8. Neural networks and differential evolution algorithm applied for modelling the depollution process of some gaseous streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curteanu, Silvia; Suditu, Gabriel Dan; Buburuzan, Adela Marina; Dragoi, Elena Niculina

    2014-11-01

    The depollution of some gaseous streams containing n-hexane is studied by adsorption in a fixed bed column, under dynamic conditions, using granular activated carbon and two types of non-functionalized hypercross-linked polymeric resins. In order to model the process, a new neuro-evolutionary approach is proposed. It is a combination of a modified differential evolution (DE) with neural networks (NNs) and two local search algorithms, the global and local optimizers, working together to determine the optimal NN model. The main elements that characterize the applied variant of DE consist in using an opposition-based learning initialization, a simple self-adaptive procedure for the control parameters, and a modified mutation principle based on the fitness function as a criterion for reorganization. The results obtained prove that the proposed algorithm is able to determine a good model of the considered process, its performance being better than those of an available phenomenological model.

  9. Stability-based sorting: The forgotten process behind (not only) biological evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toman, Jan; Flegr, Jaroslav

    2017-12-21

    Natural selection is considered to be the main process that drives biological evolution. It requires selected entities to originate dependent upon one another by the means of reproduction or copying, and for the progeny to inherit the qualities of their ancestors. However, natural selection is a manifestation of a more general persistence principle, whose temporal consequences we propose to name "stability-based sorting" (SBS). Sorting based on static stability, i.e., SBS in its strict sense and usual conception, favours characters that increase the persistence of their holders and act on all material and immaterial entities. Sorted entities could originate independently from each other, are not required to propagate and need not exhibit heredity. Natural selection is a specific form of SBS-sorting based on dynamic stability. It requires some form of heredity and is based on competition for the largest difference between the speed of generating its own copies and their expiration. SBS in its strict sense and selection thus have markedly different evolutionary consequences that are stressed in this paper. In contrast to selection, which is opportunistic, SBS is able to accumulate even momentarily detrimental characters that are advantageous for the long-term persistence of sorted entities. However, it lacks the amplification effect based on the preferential propagation of holders of advantageous characters. Thus, it works slower than selection and normally is unable to create complex adaptations. From a long-term perspective, SBS is a decisive force in evolution-especially macroevolution. SBS offers a new explanation for numerous evolutionary phenomena, including broad distribution and persistence of sexuality, altruistic behaviour, horizontal gene transfer, patterns of evolutionary stasis, planetary homeostasis, increasing ecosystem resistance to disturbances, and the universal decline of disparity in the evolution of metazoan lineages. SBS acts on all levels in

  10. Basic processes and factors determining the evolution of collapse sinkholes: a sensitivity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Douchko; Kaufmann, Georg

    2017-04-01

    Collapse sinkholes appear as closed depressions at the surface. The origin of these karst features is related to the continuous dissolution of the soluble rock caused by a focussed sub-surface flow. Water flowing along a preferential pathway through fissures and fractures within the phreatic part of a karst aquifer is able to dissolve the rock (limestone, gypsum, anhydrite). With time, the dissolved void volume increases and part of the ceiling above the stream can become unstable, collapses, and accumulates as debris in the flow path. The debris partially blocks the flow and thus activates new pathways. Because of the low compaction of the debris (high hydraulic conductivity), the flow and the dissolution rates within this crushed zone remain high. This allows a relatively fast dissolutional and erosional removal of the crushed material and the development of new empty voids. The void volume expands upwards towards the surface until a collapse sinkhole is formed. The collapse sinkholes exhibit a large variety of shapes (cylindrical, cone-, bowl-shaped), depths (from few to few hundred meters) and diameters (meters up to hundreds of meters). Two major processes are responsible for this diversity: a) the karst evolution of the aquifer - responsible for the dissolutional and erosional removal of material; b) the mechanical evolution of the host rock and the existence of structural features, faults for example, which determine the stability and the magnitude of the subsequent collapses. In this work we demonstrate the influence of the host rock type, the hydrological and geological boundary conditions, the chemical composition of the flowing water, and the geometry and the scale of the crushed zone, on the location and the evolution of the growing sinkhole. We demonstrate the ability of the karst evolution models to explain, at least qualitatively, the growth and the morphology of the collapse sinkholes and to roughly predict their shape and location. Implementing

  11. Evolution of olfactory receptor genes in primates dominated by birth-and-death process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dong; He, Guimei; Zhang, Shuyi; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2009-08-04

    Olfactory receptor (OR) is a large family of G protein-coupled receptors that can detect odorant in order to generate the sense of smell. They constitute one of the largest multiple gene families in animals including primates. To better understand the variation in odor perception and evolution of OR genes among primates, we computationally identified OR gene repertoires in orangutans, marmosets, and mouse lemurs and investigated the birth-and-death process of OR genes in the primate lineage. The results showed that 1) all the primate species studied have no more than 400 intact OR genes, fewer than rodents and canine; 2) Despite the similar number of OR genes in the genome, the makeup of the OR gene repertoires between different primate species is quite different as they had undergone dramatic birth-and-death evolution with extensive gene losses in the lineages leading to current species; 3) Apes and Old World monkey (OWM) have similar fraction of pseudogenes, whereas New World monkey (NWM) have fewer pseudogenes. To measure the selective pressure that had affected the OR gene repertoires in primates, we compared the ratio of nonsynonymous with synonymous substitution rates by using 70 one-to-one orthologous quintets among five primate species. We found that OR genes showed relaxed selective constraints in apes (humans, chimpanzees, and orangutans) than in OWMs (macaques) and NWMs (marmosets). We concluded that OR gene repertoires in primates have evolved in such a way to adapt to their respective living environments. Differential selective constraints might play important role in the primate OR gene evolution in each primate species.

  12. Millimeter-wave power amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    du Preez, Jaco

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a detailed review of millimeter-wave power amplifiers, discussing design issues and performance limitations commonly encountered in light of the latest research. Power amplifiers, which are able to provide high levels of output power and linearity while being easily integrated with surrounding circuitry, are a crucial component in wireless microwave systems. The book is divided into three parts, the first of which introduces readers to mm-wave wireless systems and power amplifiers. In turn, the second focuses on design principles and EDA concepts, while the third discusses future trends in power amplifier research. The book provides essential information on mm-wave power amplifier theory, as well as the implementation options and technologies involved in their effective design, equipping researchers, circuit designers and practicing engineers to design, model, analyze, test and implement high-performance, spectrally clean and energy-efficient mm-wave systems.

  13. Linear Distributed GaN MMIC Power Amplifier with Improved Power-added Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    QPSK LTE waveform, the ACPR1improved by ~10 dBc at average output power of 23 dBm, without digital pre-distortion. Keywords: GaN, linear amplifiers...wideband amplifier, OIP3, LTE Introduction RF communications with spectral efficiency utilizes complex modulation schemes that require amplifier...QPSK) long-term evolution ( LTE ) waveforms also improved by ~10 dBc at an average linear power of 23 dBm. Figure 1. (a) A schematic drawing of

  14. Structural and Chemical Evolution of Methylammonium Lead Halide Perovskites during Thermal Processing from Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenon, David P.; Christians, Jeffrey A.; Wheeler, Lance M.; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.; Sanehira, Erin M.; Dou, Benjia; Olsen, Michele L.; Zhu, Kai; Berry, Joseph J.; Luther, Joseph M.

    2016-06-01

    Following the prominent success of CH3NH3PbI3 in photovoltaics and other optoelectronic applications, focus has been placed on better understanding perovskite crystallization from precursor and intermediate phases in order to facilitate improved crystallinity often desirable for advancing optoelectronic properties. Understanding of stability and degradation is also of critical importance as these materials seek commercial applications. In this study, we investigate the evolution of perovskites formed from targeted precursor chemistries by correlating in situ temperature-dependent X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and mass spectral analysis of the evolved species. This suite of analyses reveals important precursor composition-induced variations in the processes underpinning perovskite formation and degradation. The addition of Cl- leads to widely different precursor evolution and perovskite formation kinetics, and results in significant changes to the degradation mechanism, including suppression of crystalline PbI2 formation and modification of the thermal stability of the perovskite phase. This work highlights the role of perovskite precursor chemistry in both its formation and degradation.

  15. Measuring microscopic evolution processes of complex networks based on empirical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Liping

    2015-04-01

    Aiming at understanding the microscopic mechanism of complex systems in real world, we perform the measurement that characterizes the evolution properties on two empirical data sets. In the Autonomous Systems Internet data, the network size keeps growing although the system suffers a high rate of node deletion (r = 0.4) and link deletion (q = 0.81). However, the average degree keeps almost unchanged during the whole time range. At each time step the external links attached to a new node are about c = 1.1 and the internal links added between existing nodes are approximately m = 8. For the Scientific Collaboration data, it is a cumulated result of all the authors from 1893 up to the considered year. There is no deletion of nodes and links, r = q = 0. The external and internal links at each time step are c = 1.04 and m = 0, correspondingly. The exponents of degree distribution p(k) ∼ k-γ of these two empirical datasets γdata are in good agreement with that obtained theoretically γtheory. The results indicate that these evolution quantities may provide an insight into capturing the microscopic dynamical processes that govern the network topology.

  16. Spatial and temporal diversity in genomic instability processes defines lung cancer evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Elza C; McGranahan, Nicholas; Mitter, Richard; Salm, Max; Wedge, David C; Yates, Lucy; Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Shafi, Seema; Murugaesu, Nirupa; Rowan, Andrew J; Grönroos, Eva; Muhammad, Madiha A; Horswell, Stuart; Gerlinger, Marco; Varela, Ignacio; Jones, David; Marshall, John; Voet, Thierry; Van Loo, Peter; Rassl, Doris M; Rintoul, Robert C; Janes, Sam M; Lee, Siow-Ming; Forster, Martin; Ahmad, Tanya; Lawrence, David; Falzon, Mary; Capitanio, Arrigo; Harkins, Timothy T; Lee, Clarence C; Tom, Warren; Teefe, Enock; Chen, Shann-Ching; Begum, Sharmin; Rabinowitz, Adam; Phillimore, Benjamin; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Stamp, Gordon; Szallasi, Zoltan; Matthews, Nik; Stewart, Aengus; Campbell, Peter; Swanton, Charles

    2014-10-10

    Spatial and temporal dissection of the genomic changes occurring during the evolution of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may help elucidate the basis for its dismal prognosis. We sequenced 25 spatially distinct regions from seven operable NSCLCs and found evidence of branched evolution, with driver mutations arising before and after subclonal diversification. There was pronounced intratumor heterogeneity in copy number alterations, translocations, and mutations associated with APOBEC cytidine deaminase activity. Despite maintained carcinogen exposure, tumors from smokers showed a relative decrease in smoking-related mutations over time, accompanied by an increase in APOBEC-associated mutations. In tumors from former smokers, genome-doubling occurred within a smoking-signature context before subclonal diversification, which suggested that a long period of tumor latency had preceded clinical detection. The regionally separated driver mutations, coupled with the relentless and heterogeneous nature of the genome instability processes, are likely to confound treatment success in NSCLC. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. Evolution of oxidised peptides during the processing of 9months Spanish dry-cured ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Marta; Mora, Leticia; Toldrá, Fidel

    2018-01-15

    Sensory and nutritional properties of dry-cured ham can be negatively affected due to oxidative modifications of muscle proteins during its processing. In this study, a peptidomic approach has been used in order to study the evolution of oxidised peptides generated throughout the dry-curing process (0, 2, 3.5, 5, 6.5 and 9months), focusing on those derived from major myofibrillar proteins. A total of 67 peptides showing methionine, proline, and tryptophan oxidations were identified in common in all samples by nano liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for their relative quantification using a label-free methodology, showing the hydrolysis of some of the peptides during the process. So, the peptidomics strategy used in this work has resulted to be very useful as a complementary tool to the methods currently used to study protein oxidation, allowing a better understanding of the oxidation at peptide level and the influence of ham processing conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Focused particle beam nano-machining: the next evolution step towards simulation aided process prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Harald

    2015-02-06

    During the last decade, focused ion beam processing has been developed from traditionally used Ga(+) liquid ion sources towards higher resolution gas field ion sources (He(+) and Ne(+)). Process simulations not only improve the fundamental understanding of the relevant ion-matter interactions, but also enable a certain predictive power to accelerate advances. The historic 'gold' standard in ion-solid simulations is the SRIM/TRIM Monte Carlo package released by Ziegler, Ziegler and Biersack 2010 Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 268 1818-23. While SRIM/TRIM is very useful for a myriad of applications, it is not applicable for the understanding of the nanoscale evolution associated with ion beam nano-machining as the substrate does not evolve with the sputtering process. As a solution for this problem, a new, adapted simulation code is briefly overviewed and finally addresses these contributions. By that, experimentally observed Ne(+) beam sputter profiles can be explained from a fundamental point of view. Due to their very good agreement, these simulations contain the potential for computer aided optimization towards predictable sputter processes for different nanotechnology applications. With these benefits in mind, the discussed simulation approach represents an enormous step towards a computer based master tool for adaptable ion beam applications in the context of industrial applications.

  19. Mechanism of Texture and Precipitates Evolution in CGO Silicon Steel During High-Temperature Annealing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-chao; Dang, Ning; Jiang, Hai-tao; Xia, Zhen-hai

    2017-11-01

    Grain-oriented silicon steel is an important soft magnetic material for electrical applications. A conventional grain-oriented silicon steel with final thicknesses of 0.27, 0.23 and 0.20 mm was prepared separately by a two-stage cold rolling process. Texture evolution, precipitates distribution and Goss textures formed during secondary recrystallization were analyzed by electron backscattered diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The results show that plate thickness influences the distribution density of secondary phase particles and the content of favorable texture components such as {111} , {111} and {112} texture. Decreasing plate thickness increases the areal density of secondary phase particles, the temperature of secondary recrystallization, which also increases the content of favorable texture component, and the strength of Goss texture in secondary recrystallization. Goss grains have higher particle density than the grains with other orientations, which facilitates their abnormal growth by swallowing surrounding grains with lower particle density.

  20. Texture evolution in Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steel tubes during pilgering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakhitova, E.; Sornin, D.; Barcelo, F.; François, M.

    2017-10-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels are foreseen as fuel cladding material in the coming generation of Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR). Cladding tubes are manufactured by hot extrusion and subsequent cold forming steps. In this study, a 9 wt% Cr ODS steel exhibiting α-γ phase transformation at high temperature is cold formed under industrial conditions with a large section reduction in two pilgering steps. The influence of pilgering process parameters and intermediate heat treatment on the microstructure evolution is studied experimentally using Electron Backscattering Diffraction (EBSD) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) methods. Pilgered samples show elongated grains and a high texture formation with a preferential orientation along the rolling direction. During the heat treatment, grain morphology is recovered from elongated grains to almost equiaxed ones, while the well-known α-fiber texture presents an unexpected increase in intensity. The remarkable temperature stability of this fiber is attributed to a crystallographic structure memory effect during phase transformations.

  1. The Future Evolution of the Fast TracKer Processing Unit

    CERN Document Server

    Gentsos, Christos; The ATLAS collaboration; Magalotti, Daniel; Bertolucci, Federico; Citraro, Saverio; Kordas, Kostantinos; Nikolaidis, Spyridon

    2015-01-01

    Real time tracking is a key ingredient for online event selection at hadron colliders. The Silicon Vertex Tracker at the CDF experiment and the Fast Tracker (FTK) at ATLAS are two successful examples of the importance of dedicated hardware to reconstruct full events at hadron machines. We present the future evolution of this technology, for applications in the High Luminosity runs at the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). Data processing speed is achieved with custom VLSI pattern recognition and linearized track fitting executed inside modern FPGAs, exploiting deep pipelining, extensive parallelism, and efficient use of available resources. In the current system, one large FPGA executed track fitting in full resolution inside low resolution candidate tracks found by a set of custom ASIC devices, called Associative Memories (AM chips). The FTK dual structure, based on the cooperation of VLSI AM and programmable FPGAs, is maintained, but we plan to increase the FPGA parallelism by associating one FPGA to each AM c...

  2. The Future Evolution of the Fast TracKer Processing Unit

    CERN Document Server

    Gentsos, Christos; The ATLAS collaboration; Magalotti, Daniel; Bertolucci, Federico; Citraro, Saverio; Kordas, Kostantinos; Nikolaidis, Spyridon

    2016-01-01

    Real time tracking is a key ingredient for online event selection at hadron colliders. The Silicon Vertex Tracker at the CDF experiment and the Fast Tracker (FTK) at ATLAS are two successful examples of the importance of dedicated hardware to reconstruct full events at hadron machines. We present the future evolution of this technology, for applications in the High Luminosity runs at the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). Data processing speed is achieved with custom VLSI pattern recognition and linearized track fitting executed inside modern FPGAs, exploiting deep pipelining, extensive parallelism, and efficient use of available resources. In the current system, one large FPGA executed track fitting in full resolution inside low resolution candidate tracks found by a set of custom ASIC devices, called Associative Memories (AM chips). The FTK dual structure, based on the cooperation of VLSI AM and programmable FPGAs, is maintained, but we plan to increase the FPGA parallelism by associating one FPGA to each AM c...

  3. Mechanism of Texture and Precipitates Evolution in CGO Silicon Steel During High-Temperature Annealing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-chao; Dang, Ning; Jiang, Hai-tao; Xia, Zhen-hai

    2017-10-01

    Grain-oriented silicon steel is an important soft magnetic material for electrical applications. A conventional grain-oriented silicon steel with final thicknesses of 0.27, 0.23 and 0.20 mm was prepared separately by a two-stage cold rolling process. Texture evolution, precipitates distribution and Goss textures formed during secondary recrystallization were analyzed by electron backscattered diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The results show that plate thickness influences the distribution density of secondary phase particles and the content of favorable texture components such as {111} , {111} and {112} texture. Decreasing plate thickness increases the areal density of secondary phase particles, the temperature of secondary recrystallization, which also increases the content of favorable texture component, and the strength of Goss texture in secondary recrystallization. Goss grains have higher particle density than the grains with other orientations, which facilitates their abnormal growth by swallowing surrounding grains with lower particle density.

  4. A wideband RF amplifier for satellite tuners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xueqing, Hu; Zheng, Gong; Yin, Shi; Foster, Dai Fa

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents the design and measured performance of a wideband amplifier for a direct conversion satellite tuner. It is composed of a wideband low noise amplifier (LNA) and a two-stage RF variable gain amplifier (VGA) with linear gain in dB and temperature compensation schemes. To meet the system linearity requirement, an improved distortion compensation technique and a bypass mode are applied on the LNA to deal with the large input signal. Wideband matching is achieved by resistive feedback and an off-chip LC-ladder matching network. A large gain control range (over 80 dB) is achieved by the VGA with process voltage and temperature compensation and dB linearization. In total, the amplifier consumes up to 26 mA current from a 3.3 V power supply. It is fabricated in a 0.35-μm SiGe BiCMOS technology and occupies a silicon area of 0.25 mm2.

  5. A process-based decomposition of decadal-scale surface temperature evolutions over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junwen; Deng, Yi; Lin, Wenshi; Yang, Song

    2017-08-01

    This study partitions the observed decadal evolution of surface temperature and surface temperature differences between two decades (early 2000s and early 1980s) over the East Asian continent into components associated with individual radiative and non-radiative (dynamical) processes in the context of the coupled atmosphere-surface climate feedback-response analysis method (CFRAM). Rapid warming in this region occurred in late 1980s and early 2000s with a transient pause of warming between the two periods. The rising CO2 concentration provides a sustained, region-wide warming contribution and surface albedo effect, largely related to snow cover change, is important for warming/cooling over high-latitude and high-elevation regions. Sensible hear flux and surface dynamics dominates the evolution of surface temperature, with latent heat flux and atmospheric dynamics working against them mostly through large-scale and convective/turbulent heat transport. Cloud via its shortwave effect provides positive contributions to warming over southern Siberia and South China. The longwave effect associated with water vapor change contributes significant warming over northern India, Tibetan Plateau, and central Siberia. Impacts of solar irradiance and ozone changes are relatively small. The strongest year-to-year temperature fluctuation occurred at a rapid warming (1987-1988) and a rapid cooling (1995-1996) period. The pattern of the rapid warming receives major positive contributions from sensible heat flux with changes in atmospheric dynamics, water vapor, clouds, and albedo providing secondary positive contributions, while surface dynamics and latent heat flux providing negative contributions. The signs of the contributions from individual processes to the rapid cooling are almost opposite to those to the rapid warming.

  6. Both selective and neutral processes drive GC content evolution in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzoli, Uberto; Menozzi, Giorgia; Fumagalli, Matteo; Cereda, Matteo; Comi, Giacomo P; Cagliani, Rachele; Bresolin, Nereo; Sironi, Manuela

    2008-03-27

    Mammalian genomes consist of regions differing in GC content, referred to as isochores or GC-content domains. The scientific debate is still open as to whether such compositional heterogeneity is a selected or neutral trait. Here we analyze SNP allele frequencies, retrotransposon insertion polymorphisms (RIPs), as well as fixed substitutions accumulated in the human lineage since its divergence from chimpanzee to indicate that biased gene conversion (BGC) has been playing a role in within-genome GC content variation. Yet, a distinct contribution to GC content evolution is accounted for by a selective process. Accordingly, we searched for independent evidences that GC content distribution does not conform to neutral expectations. Indeed, after correcting for possible biases, we show that intron GC content and size display isochore-specific correlations. We consider that the more parsimonious explanation for our results is that GC content is subjected to the action of both weak selection and BGC in the human genome with features such as nucleosome positioning or chromatin conformation possibly representing the final target of selective processes. This view might reconcile previous contrasting findings and add some theoretical background to recent evidences suggesting that GC content domains display different behaviors with respect to highly regulated biological processes such as developmentally-stage related gene expression and programmed replication timing during neural stem cell differentiation.

  7. Both selective and neutral processes drive GC content evolution in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cagliani Rachele

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian genomes consist of regions differing in GC content, referred to as isochores or GC-content domains. The scientific debate is still open as to whether such compositional heterogeneity is a selected or neutral trait. Results Here we analyze SNP allele frequencies, retrotransposon insertion polymorphisms (RIPs, as well as fixed substitutions accumulated in the human lineage since its divergence from chimpanzee to indicate that biased gene conversion (BGC has been playing a role in within-genome GC content variation. Yet, a distinct contribution to GC content evolution is accounted for by a selective process. Accordingly, we searched for independent evidences that GC content distribution does not conform to neutral expectations. Indeed, after correcting for possible biases, we show that intron GC content and size display isochore-specific correlations. Conclusion We consider that the more parsimonious explanation for our results is that GC content is subjected to the action of both weak selection and BGC in the human genome with features such as nucleosome positioning or chromatin conformation possibly representing the final target of selective processes. This view might reconcile previous contrasting findings and add some theoretical background to recent evidences suggesting that GC content domains display different behaviors with respect to highly regulated biological processes such as developmentally-stage related gene expression and programmed replication timing during neural stem cell differentiation.

  8. Small signal microwave amplifier design

    CERN Document Server

    Grosch, Theodore

    2000-01-01

    This book explains techniques and examples for designing stable amplifiers for high-frequency applications in which the signal is small and the amplifier circuit is linear. An in-depth discussion of linear network theory provides the foundation needed to develop actual designs. Examples throughout the book will show you how to apply the knowledge gained in each chapter leading to the complex design of low noise amplifiers. Many exercises at the end of each chapter will help students to practice their skills. The solutions to these design problems are available in an accompanying solutions book

  9. Reductive evolution of the mitochondrial processing peptidases of the unicellular parasites trichomonas vaginalis and giardia intestinalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrej Smíd

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial processing peptidases are heterodimeric enzymes (alpha/betaMPP that play an essential role in mitochondrial biogenesis by recognizing and cleaving the targeting presequences of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. The two subunits are paralogues that probably evolved by duplication of a gene for a monomeric metallopeptidase from the endosymbiotic ancestor of mitochondria. Here, we characterize the MPP-like proteins from two important human parasites that contain highly reduced versions of mitochondria, the mitosomes of Giardia intestinalis and the hydrogenosomes of Trichomonas vaginalis. Our biochemical characterization of recombinant proteins showed that, contrary to a recent report, the Trichomonas processing peptidase functions efficiently as an alpha/beta heterodimer. By contrast, and so far uniquely among eukaryotes, the Giardia processing peptidase functions as a monomer comprising a single betaMPP-like catalytic subunit. The structure and surface charge distribution of the Giardia processing peptidase predicted from a 3-D protein model appear to have co-evolved with the properties of Giardia mitosomal targeting sequences, which, unlike classic mitochondrial targeting signals, are typically short and impoverished in positively charged residues. The majority of hydrogenosomal presequences resemble those of mitosomes, but longer, positively charged mitochondrial-type presequences were also identified, consistent with the retention of the Trichomonas alphaMPP-like subunit. Our computational and experimental/functional analyses reveal that the divergent processing peptidases of Giardia mitosomes and Trichomonas hydrogenosomes evolved from the same ancestral heterodimeric alpha/betaMPP metallopeptidase as did the classic mitochondrial enzyme. The unique monomeric structure of the Giardia enzyme, and the co-evolving properties of the Giardia enzyme and substrate, provide a compelling example of the power of reductive evolution

  10. Ultra-low Voltage CMOS Cascode Amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Torsten; Cassia, Marco

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we design a folded cascode operational transconductance amplifier in a standard CMOS process, which has a measured 69 dB DC gain, a 2 MHz bandwidth and compatible input- and output voltage levels at a 1 V power supply. This is done by a novel Current Driven Bulk (CDB) technique......, which reduces the MOST threshold voltage by forcing a constant current though the transistor bulk terminal. We also look at limitations and improvements of this CDB technique....

  11. Nano-copper-bearing stainless steel promotes fracture healing by accelerating the callus evolution process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangdong; Wang, Yugang; Han, Xiuguo; Jiang, Wenbo; Dai, Kerong; Yang, Ke; Hao, Yongqiang

    2017-01-01

    Treatment for fractures requires internal fixation devices, which are mainly produced from stainless steel or titanium alloy without biological functions. Therefore, we developed a novel nano-copper-bearing stainless steel with nano-sized copper-precipitation (317L-Cu SS). Based on previous studies, this work explores the effect of 317L-Cu SS on fracture healing; that is, proliferation, osteogenic differentiation, osteogenesis-related gene expression, and lysyl oxidase activity of human bone mesenchymal stem cells were detected in vitro. Sprague–Dawley rats were used to build an animal fracture model, and fracture healing and callus evolution were investigated by radiology (X-ray and micro-CT), histology (H&E, Masson, and safranin O/fast green staining), and histomorphometry. Further, the Cu2+ content and Runx2 level in the callus were determined, and local mechanical test of the fracture was performed to assess the healing quality. Our results revealed that 317L-Cu SS did not affect the proliferation of human bone mesenchymal stem cells, but promoted osteogenic differentiation and the expression of osteogenesis-related genes. In addition, 317L-Cu SS upregulated the lysyl oxidase activity. The X-ray and micro-CT results showed that the callus evolution efficiency and fracture healing speed were superior for 317L-Cu SS. Histological staining displayed large amounts of fibrous tissues at 3 weeks, and cartilage and new bone at 6 weeks. Further, histomorphometric analysis indicated that the callus possessed higher osteogenic efficiency at 6 weeks, and a high Cu2+ content and increased Runx2 expression were observed in the callus for 317L-Cu SS. Besides, the mechanical strength of the fracture site was much better than that of the control group. Overall, we conclude that 317L-Cu SS possesses the ability to increase Cu2+ content and promote osteogenesis in the callus, which could accelerate the callus evolution process and bone formation to provide faster and better

  12. Influence of karst evolution on solute transport evaluated by process-based numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubinger, Bernhard; Birk, Steffen

    2010-05-01

    Karst waters are of major interest in water resources management. Because of their inherent properties karst systems show great vulnerability with regard to contaminants. Karst systems include highly permeable solution conduit networks formed by chemical aggressive water embedded in a fissured matrix. Small initial voids are widened and thus act as preferential passages, where flow is rapid and often turbulent. Water discharging at karst spring originates from different pathways with different residence times. Contaminant transport through conduit pathways is very rapid, whereas flow through the fissured porous matrix is much slower. Thus, on the one hand, pollutants may be rapidly transported and reach high concentrations at the karst spring shortly after their release; on the other hand, the existence of slow flow components may cause the pollution to last for long times. In this work, solute transport properties of karst aquifers are investigated using generic conduit networks of hydraulically connected proto-conduits with initially log-normally distributed apertures in the millimetre range and below. Conduit evolution is modelled by coupling flow, transport, and dissolution processes, whereby single conduits are widened up to the metre range. Thus, different stages of karst evolution can be distinguished. The resulting flow systems provide the basis for modelling advective-dispersive transport of non-reactive solutes through the network of more or less widened (proto-)conduits. The general transport characteristics in karst systems as well as the influence of heterogeneities and structures on solute transport are illustrated for cases of direct injection into the conduit systems at different evolutionary stages. The resulting breakthrough curves typically show several distinct, chronologically shifted peaks with long tailings, which appears to be similar to data from field tracer experiments.

  13. PID Controller with Operational Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Paul Chioncel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a PID controller made with LM741 operational amplifier that implement the PID controllers laws and allow for a widerange of applications of in the field of automatic control of technicalprocesses and systems.

  14. Linearization of broadband microwave amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorić Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The linearization of broadband power amplifier for application in the frequency range 0.9-1.3 GHz is considered in this paper. The amplifier is designed for LDMOSFET characterized by the maximum output power 4W designing the broadband lumped element matching circuits and matching circuits in topologies that combines LC elements and transmission lines. The linearization of the amplifier is carried out by the second harmonics of the fundamental signals injected at the input and output of the amplifier transistor. The effects of linearization are considered for the case of two sinusoidal signals separated in frequency by different intervals up to 80 MHz ranging input power levels to saturation. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-32052

  15. Operational amplifiers theory and design

    CERN Document Server

    Huijsing, Johan

    2017-01-01

    This proven textbook guides readers to a thorough understanding of the theory and design of operational amplifiers (OpAmps). The core of the book presents systematically the design of operational amplifiers, classifying them into a periodic system of nine main overall configurations, ranging from one gain stage up to four or more stages. This division enables circuit designers to recognize quickly, understand, and choose optimal configurations. Characterization of operational amplifiers is given by macro models and error matrices, together with measurement techniques for their parameters. Definitions are given for four types of operational amplifiers depending on the grounding of their input and output ports. Many famous designs are evaluated in depth, using a carefully structured approach enhanced by numerous figures. In order to reinforce the concepts introduced and facilitate self-evaluation of design skills, the author includes problems with detailed solutions, as well as simulation exercises. Provides te...

  16. New Packaging for Amplifier Slabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Thorsness, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Suratwala, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Steele, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rogowski, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-03-18

    The following memo provides a discussion and detailed procedure for a new finished amplifier slab shipping and storage container. The new package is designed to maintain an environment of <5% RH to minimize weathering.

  17. Performance comparison of differential evolution techniques on optimization of feeding profile for an industrial scale baker's yeast fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüzgeç, Uğur

    2010-01-01

    Differential evolution (DE) is one of the novel evolutionary optimization methods used for solving the problems that consist of nondifferentiable, nonlinear and multi-objective functions. In this presented work, the classical DE technique and its various versions, such as opposition based on differential evolution (ODE), adaptive differential evolution (ADE), adaptive opposition based on differential evolution (AODE) which is an advanced version of ODE, are presented to determine the optimal feeding flow profile of an industrial scale fed-batch baker's yeast fermentation process. The main objective in any fed-batch fermentation process optimization is both to maximize the amount of the biomass at the end of the process and to minimize the ethanol formation during the process. Four different cases regarding the initial condition of the fermentation process were considered so as to evaluate the performances of proposed algorithms. Besides, two strategies of mutation and crossover operators, which are the most popular in DE's applications, were utilized for performance comparison tests. The influence of initial seed value, initial condition of the process, and both of the mutation and crossover strategies have been investigated for all the different classic, opposition-based, self-adaptive and adaptive opposition-based mechanisms. To demonstrate the performance comparison of the of DE's techniques, the experimental data collected from the fermentor with volume of 100 m(3) are presented with the optimization results obtained by using all the interested DE techniques for the same initial conditions. 2009 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Chemo-Mechano Coupling Processes Inducing Evolution of Rock Permeability under Hydrothermal and Stressed Conditions (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, H.; Takahashi, M.; Kishida, K.; Nakashima, S.

    2013-12-01

    Coupled thermo-hydro-mechano-chemo (THMC) processes prevailing within fractured rocks are of significant importance in case of a long-term geo-sequestration of anthropogenic wastes of high level radioactive materials and carbon dioxide, and an effective recovery of energy from petroleum and geothermal reservoirs typically located in deep underground. The THMC processes should change the mechanical, hydraulic, and transport properties of the host rocks. Under even moderate pressure and temperature conditions, geochemical processes such as mineral dissolution should be active and may induce the change of those properties. Therefore, the effects should be examined in detail. In this work, a suite of long-term permeability experiments using granite, sandstone, and mudstone with or without a single fracture has been conducted under moderate confining pressures ranging 3 - 15 MPa and temperatures of 20 and 90 °C, and monitors the evolution in rock permeability and effluent chemistry throughout the experimental periods. Under net reduction or augmentation of pore/fracture volumes, the net permeability should alternatively increase or decrease with time, depending on the prevailing mechanical and geochemical processes. In granite samples, At 20 °C the observed fracture permeabilities monotonically reduce and reach quasi-steady state in two weeks, but after the temperature is increased to 90 °C those resume decreasing throughout the rest of experiments - the ultimate reductions are roughly two orders of magnitude within 40 days. In mudstone samples, similar results to those in granite samples are obtained (i.e., monotonic reduction and subsequent quasi-steady state). In contrast, in sandstone samples, a monotonic augmentation in permeability has been observed throughout the experiments. A chemo-mechanical model that accounts for temperature-dependent mineral dissolutions at contacting areas and free walls of pore spaces is applied to replicating the experimental

  19. COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN (CED STUDIO IN TWO ARCHITECTURE SCHOOLS IN KARACHI: EVOLUTION, PROCESS AND IMPACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noman Ahmed

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Since 1979, a studio module was introduced in the final year studies of Bachelor of Architecture programme at the Dawood College of Engineering and Technology, Karachi which was the only architecture school in the city at that time. A key objective of this studio module was to sensitize the ‘architects in making’ about context of the built environment, the process through which it was shaped and the forces that contributed in its shaping. The students were assigned to study a micro urban area for indepth investigation and analysis. At the conclusion, analytical presentations followed that also included basic proposals for addressing problems that were identified in the studio exercise. Begun in Dawood College, the studio was adopted by many schools of architecture in the country including the NED University, Karachi. This studio had multiple impacts. Understanding the realities behind creation of urban built environment, realization of multiple roles for professional contribution to ongoing metamorphosis and appreciation of diverse fields of studies within the domain of architectural education and practice were some of the vital aspects. The objectives of this paper are to document the evolution and process of CED studio work. The paper also aims to study the affects of CED work on the perception, understandings and professional orientation of architects who graduated from the schools where CED studio was conducted.

  20. Evolution of Submicrometer Organic Aerosols during a Complete Residential Coal Combustion Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Jiang, Jingkun; Duan, Lei; Hao, Jiming

    2016-07-19

    In the absence of particulate matter (PM) control devices, residential coal combustion contributes significantly to ambient PM pollution. Characterizing PM emissions from residential coal combustion with high time resolution is beneficial for developing control policies and evaluating the environmental impact of PM. This study reports the evolution of submicrometer organic aerosols (OA) during a complete residential coal combustion process, that is, from fire start to fire extinction. Three commonly used coal types (bituminous, anthracite, and semicoke coals) were evaluated in a typical residential stove in China. For all three types of coal, the OA emission exhibited distinct characteristics in the four stages, that is, ignition, fierce combustion, relatively stable combustion, and ember combustion. OA emissions during the ignition stage accounted for 58.2-85.4% of the total OA emission of a complete combustion process. The OA concentration decreased rapidly during the fierce combustion stage and remained low during the relatively stable combustion stage. During these two stages, a significant ion peak of m/z 73 from organic acids were observed. The degree of oxidation of the OA increased from the first stage to the last stage. Implications for ambient OA source-apportionment and residential PM emission characterization and control are discussed.

  1. Reconfigurable Josephson Circulator/Directional Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Sliwa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Circulators and directional amplifiers are crucial nonreciprocal signal routing and processing components involved in microwave read-out chains for a variety of applications. They are particularly important in the field of superconducting quantum information, where the devices also need to have minimal photon losses to preserve the quantum coherence of signals. Conventional commercial implementations of each device suffer from losses and are built from very different physical principles, which has led to separate strategies for the construction of their quantum-limited versions. However, as recently theoretically, by establishing simultaneous pairwise conversion and/or gain processes between three modes of a Josephson-junction-based superconducting microwave circuit, it is possible to endow the circuit with the functions of either a phase-preserving directional amplifier or a circulator. Here, we experimentally demonstrate these two modes of operation of the same circuit. Furthermore, in the directional amplifier mode, we show that the noise performance is comparable to standard nondirectional superconducting amplifiers, while in the circulator mode, we show that the sense of circulation is fully reversible. Our device is far simpler in both modes of operation than previous proposals and implementations, requiring only three microwave pumps. It offers the advantage of flexibility, as it can dynamically switch between modes of operation as its pump conditions are changed. Moreover, by demonstrating that a single three-wave process yields nonreciprocal devices with reconfigurable functions, our work breaks the ground for the development of future, more complex directional circuits, and has excellent prospects for on-chip integration.

  2. Shape evolution of nanostructures by thermal and ion beam processing. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roentzsch, L.

    2007-07-01

    Single-crystalline nanostructures often exhibit gradients of surface (and/or interface) curvature that emerge from fabrication and growth processes or from thermal fluctuations. Thus, the system-inherent capillary force can initiate morphological transformations during further processing steps or during operation at elevated temperature. Therefore and because of the ongoing miniaturization of functional structures which causes a general rise in surface-to-volume ratios, solid-state capillary phenomena will become increasingly important: On the one hand diffusion-mediated capillary processes can be of practical use in view of non-conventional nanostructure fabrication methods based on self-organization mechanisms, on the other hand they can destroy the integrity of nanostructures which can go along with the failure of functionality. Additionally, capillarity-induced shape transformations are effected and can thereby be controlled by applied fields and forces (guided or driven evolution). With these prospects and challenges at hand, formation and shape transformation of single-crystalline nanostructures due to the system-inherent capillary force in combination with external fields or forces are investigated in the frame of this dissertation by means of atomistic computer simulations. For the exploration (search, description, and prediction) of reaction pathways of nanostructure shape transformations, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations are the method of choice. Since the employed KMC code is founded on a cellular automaton principle, the spatio-temporal development of lattice-based N-particle systems (N up to several million) can be followed for time spans of several orders of magnitude, while considering local phenomena due to atomic-scale effects like diffusion, nucleation, dissociation, or ballistic displacements. In this work, the main emphasis is put on nanostructures which have a cylindrical geometry, for example, nanowires (NWs), nanorods, nanotubes etc

  3. Fundamentals of fiber lasers and fiber amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Ter-Mikirtychev, Valerii (Vartan)

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the fundamental aspects of fiber lasers and fiber amplifiers, and includes a wide range of material from laser physics fundamentals to state-of-the-art topics in this rapidly growing field of quantum electronics. Emphasis is placed on the nonlinear processes taking place in fiber lasers and amplifiers, their similarities, differences to, and their advantages over other solid-state lasers. The reader will learn basic principles of solid-state physics and optical spectroscopy of laser active centers in fibers, main operational laser regimes, and practical recommendations and suggestions on fiber laser research, laser applications, and laser product development. The book will be useful for students, researchers, and professionals who work with lasers, in the optical communications, chemical and biological industries, etc.

  4. High-speed CuBr brightness amplifier beam profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evtushenko, G. S.; Torgaev, S. N.; Trigub, M. V.; Shiyanov, D. V.; Evtushenko, T. G.; Kulagin, A. E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the experimental study of the beam profile of the CuBr brightness amplifier operating at a wide range of pulse repetition frequencies. The use of a medium-size gas discharge tube (2 cm) ensures the operation of the brightness amplifier both at typical PRFs (520 kHz) and at higher PRFs (up to 100 kHz), either with or without HBr additive. The effect of the active additive on the beam profile is demonstrated. The testing results on kinetic modeling of radial processes in the laser (brightness amplifier) plasma are also discussed.

  5. Long term landscape evolution within central Apennines (Italy): Marsica and Peligna region morphotectonics and surface processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccadei, E.; Piacentini, T.; Berti, C.

    2010-12-01

    The relief features of the Apennines have been developed in a complex geomorphological and geological setting from Neogene to Quaternary. Growth of topography has been driven by active tectonics (thrust-related crustal shortening and high-angle normal faulting related to crustal extension), regional rock uplift, and surface processes, starting from Late Miocene(?) - Early Pliocene. At present a high-relief landscape is dominated by morphostructures including high-standing, resistant Mesozoic and early Tertiary carbonates ridges (i.e. thrust ridges, faulted homocline ridges) and intervening, erodible Tertiary siliciclastics valleys (i.e. fault line valleys) and Quaternary continental deposits filled basins (i.e. tectonic valleys, tectonic basins). This study tries to identify paleo-uplands that may be linked to paleo-base levels and aims at the reconstruction of ancient landscapes since the incipient phases of morphogenesis. It analyzes the role of tectonics and morphogenic processes in the long term temporal scale landscape evolution (i.e. Mio?-Pliocene to Quaternary). It is focused on the marsicano-peligna region, located along the main drainage divide between Adriatic side and Tyrrhenian side of Central Apennines, one of the highest average elevation area of the whole chain. The work incorporates GIS-based geomorphologic field mapping of morphostructures and Quaternary continental deposits, and plano-altimetric analysis and morphometry (DEM-, map-based) of the drainage network (i.e. patterns, hypsometry, knick points, Ks). Field mapping give clues on the definition of paleo-landscapes related to different paleo-morpho-climatic environments (i.e. karst, glacial, slope, fluvial). Geomorphological evidence of tectonics and their cross-cutting relationships with morphostructures, continental deposits and faults, provide clues on the deciphering of the reciprocal relationship of antecedence of the paleo-landscapes and on the timing of morphotectonics. Morphotectonic

  6. Evolution Inclusions and Variation Inequalities for Earth Data Processing II Differential-operator Inclusions and Evolution Variation Inequalities for Earth Data Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Zgurovsky, Mikhail Z; Kasyanov, Pavlo O

    2011-01-01

    Here, the authors present modern mathematical methods to solve problems of differential-operator inclusions and evolution variation inequalities which may occur in fields such as geophysics, aerohydrodynamics, or fluid dynamics. For the first time, they describe the detailed generalization of various approaches to the analysis of fundamentally nonlinear models and provide a toolbox of mathematical equations. These new mathematical methods can be applied to a broad spectrum of problems. Examples of these are phase changes, diffusion of electromagnetic, acoustic, vibro-, hydro- and seismoacousti

  7. The Evolution of English Language Teaching during Societal Transition in Finland--A Mutual Relationship or a Distinctive Process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaatinen, Riitta; Saarivirta, Toni

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the evolution of English language teaching in Finland and looks into the connections of the societal and educational changes in the country as explanatory factors in the process. The results of the study show that the language teaching methodology and the status of foreign languages in Finland are clearly connected to the…

  8. Language as a multimodal phenomenon: implications for language learning, processing and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigliocco, Gabriella; Perniss, Pamela; Vinson, David

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the cognitive and neural underpinnings of language has traditionally been firmly based on spoken Indo-European languages and on language studied as speech or text. However, in face-to-face communication, language is multimodal: speech signals are invariably accompanied by visual information on the face and in manual gestures, and sign languages deploy multiple channels (hands, face and body) in utterance construction. Moreover, the narrow focus on spoken Indo-European languages has entrenched the assumption that language is comprised wholly by an arbitrary system of symbols and rules. However, iconicity (i.e. resemblance between aspects of communicative form and meaning) is also present: speakers use iconic gestures when they speak; many non-Indo-European spoken languages exhibit a substantial amount of iconicity in word forms and, finally, iconicity is the norm, rather than the exception in sign languages. This introduction provides the motivation for taking a multimodal approach to the study of language learning, processing and evolution, and discusses the broad implications of shifting our current dominant approaches and assumptions to encompass multimodal expression in both signed and spoken languages. PMID:25092660

  9. Total Synthesis of Δ(12) -Prostaglandin J3 : Evolution of Synthetic Strategies to a Streamlined Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, K C; Pulukuri, Kiran Kumar; Yu, Ruocheng; Rigol, Stephan; Heretsch, Philipp; Grove, Charles I; Hale, Christopher R H; ElMarrouni, Abdelatif

    2016-06-13

    The total synthesis of Δ(12) -prostaglandin J3 (Δ(12) -PGJ3 , 1), a reported leukemia stem cell ablator, through a number of strategies and tactics is described. The signature cross-conjugated dienone structural motif of 1 was forged by an aldol reaction/dehydration sequence from key building blocks enone 13 and aldehyde 14, whose lone stereocenters were generated by an asymmetric Tsuji-Trost reaction and an asymmetric Mukaiyama aldol reaction, respectively. During this program, a substituent-governed regioselectivity pattern for the Rh-catalyzed C-H functionalization of cyclopentenes and related olefins was discovered. The evolution of the synthesis of 1 from the original strategy to the final streamlined process proceeded through improvements in the construction of both fragments 13 and 14, exploration of the chemistry of the hitherto underutilized chiral lactone synthon 57, and a diastereoselective alkylation of a cyclopentenone intermediate. The described chemistry sets the stage for large-scale production of Δ(12) -PGJ3 and designed analogues for further biological and pharmacological studies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Processing of meteoritic organic materials as a possible analog of early molecular evolution in planetary environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzarello, Sandra; Davidowski, Stephen K; Holland, Gregory P; Williams, Lynda B

    2013-09-24

    The composition of the Sutter's Mill meteorite insoluble organic material was studied both in toto by solid-state NMR spectroscopy of the powders and by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses of compounds released upon their hydrothermal treatment. Results were compared with those obtained for other meteorites of diverse classifications (Murray, GRA 95229, Murchison, Orgueil, and Tagish Lake) and found to be so far unique in regard to the molecular species released. These include, in addition to O-containing aromatic compounds, complex polyether- and ester-containing alkyl molecules of prebiotic appeal and never detected in meteorites before. The Sutter's Mill fragments we analyzed had likely been altered by heat, and the hydrothermal conditions of the experiments realistically mimic early Earth settings, such as near volcanic activity or impact craters. On this basis, the data suggest a far larger availability of meteoritic organic materials for planetary environments than previously assumed and that molecular evolution on the early Earth could have benefited from accretion of carbonaceous meteorites both directly with soluble compounds and, for a more protracted time, through alteration, processing, and release from their insoluble organic materials.

  11. Microstructure evolution of the oxide dispersion strengthened CLAM steel during mechanical alloying process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Liangliang [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Liu, Shaojun, E-mail: shaojun.liu@fds.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Mao, Xiaodong [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A nano-sized oxides dispersed ODS-CLAM steel was obtained by MA and HIP. • A minimum saturated grain size of down to 30 nm was achieved by varying the milling time from 0 to 100 h. • Solution of W in the MA powder could be significantly improved by increasing MA rotation speed. - Abstracts: Oxide dispersion strengthened Ferritic/Martensitic steel is considered as one of the most potential structural material for future fusion reactor, owing to its high mechanical properties and good irradiation resistance. The oxide dispersion strengthened China Low Activation Martensitic (ODS-CLAM) steel was fabricated by mechanical alloying (MA) and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The microstructural evolutions during the process of ball milling and subsequent consolidation were investigated by SEM, XRD and TEM. The results showed that increasing the milling time during the first 36 h milling could effectively decrease the grain size to a value of around 30 nm, over which grain sized remained nearly constant. Increasing the rotation speed promoted the solution of tungsten (W) element obviously and decreased the grain size to a certain degree. Observation on the consolidated and further heat-treated ODS-CLAM steel samples indicated that a martensite microstructure with a high density of nano-particles was achieved.

  12. Modeling of microstructure evolution of magnesium alloy during the high pressure die casting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mengwu; Xiong, Shoumei

    2012-07-01

    Two important microstructure characteristics of high pressure die cast magnesium alloy are the externally solidified crystals (ESCs) and the fully divorced eutectic which form at the filling stage of the shot sleeve and at the last stage of solidification in the die cavity, respectively. Both of them have a significant influence on the mechanical properties and performance of magnesium alloy die castings. In the present paper, a numerical model based on the cellular automaton (CA) method was developed to simulate the microstructure evolution of magnesium alloy during cold-chamber high pressure die casting (HPDC) process. Modeling of dendritic growth of magnesium alloy with six-fold symmetry was achieved by defining a special neighbourhood configuration and calculating of the growth kinetics from complete solution of the transport equations. Special attention was paid to establish a nucleation model considering both of the nucleation of externally solidified crystals in the shot sleeve and the massive nucleation in the die cavity. Meanwhile, simulation of the formation of fully divorced eutectic was also taken into account in the present CA model. Validation was performed and the capability of the present model was addressed by comparing the simulated results with those obtained by experiments.

  13. Parental selection: a third selection process in the evolution of human hairlessness and skin color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Judith Rich

    2006-01-01

    It is proposed that human hairlessness, and the pale skin seen in modern Europeans and Asians, are not the results of Darwinian selection; these attributes provide no survival benefits. They are instead the results of sexual selection combined with a third, previously unrecognized, process: parental selection. The use of infanticide as a method of birth control in premodern societies gave parents - in particular, mothers - the power to exert an influence on the course of human evolution by deciding whether to keep or abandon a newborn infant. If such a decision was made before the infant was born, it could be overturned in the positive direction if the infant was particularly beautiful - that is, if the infant conformed to the standards of beauty prescribed by the mother's culture. It could be overturned in the negative direction if the infant failed to meet those standards. Thus, human hairlessness and pale skin could have resulted in part from cultural preferences expressed as decisions made by women immediately after childbirth.

  14. The Structural Evolution and Segregation in a Dual Alloy Ingot Processed by Electroslag Remelting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The structural evolution and segregation in a dual alloy made by electroslag remelting (ESR was investigated by various analytical techniques. The results show that the macrostructure of the ingot consists of two crystallization structures: one is a quite narrow, fine, equiaxed grain region at the edge and the other is a columnar grain region, which plays a leading role. The typical columnar structure shows no discontinuity between the CrMoV, NiCrMoV, and transition zones. The average secondary arm-spacing is coarsened from 35.3 to 49.2 μm and 61.5 μm from the bottom to the top of the ingot. The distinctive features of the structure are attributed to the different cooling conditions during the ESR process. The Ni, Cr, and C contents markedly increase in the transition zone (TZ and show a slight increase from the bottom to the top and from the surface to the center of the ESR ingot due to the partition ratios, gravity segregation, the thermal buoyancy flow, the solutal buoyancy flow, and the inward Lorentz force. Less dendrite segregation exists in the CrMoV zone and the transition zone due to a stronger cooling rate (11.1 and 4.5 °C/s and lower Cr and C contents. The precipitation of carbides was observed in the ingot due to a lower solid solubility of the carbon element in the α phase.

  15. Language as a multimodal phenomenon: implications for language learning, processing and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigliocco, Gabriella; Perniss, Pamela; Vinson, David

    2014-09-19

    Our understanding of the cognitive and neural underpinnings of language has traditionally been firmly based on spoken Indo-European languages and on language studied as speech or text. However, in face-to-face communication, language is multimodal: speech signals are invariably accompanied by visual information on the face and in manual gestures, and sign languages deploy multiple channels (hands, face and body) in utterance construction. Moreover, the narrow focus on spoken Indo-European languages has entrenched the assumption that language is comprised wholly by an arbitrary system of symbols and rules. However, iconicity (i.e. resemblance between aspects of communicative form and meaning) is also present: speakers use iconic gestures when they speak; many non-Indo-European spoken languages exhibit a substantial amount of iconicity in word forms and, finally, iconicity is the norm, rather than the exception in sign languages. This introduction provides the motivation for taking a multimodal approach to the study of language learning, processing and evolution, and discusses the broad implications of shifting our current dominant approaches and assumptions to encompass multimodal expression in both signed and spoken languages. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Evolution of gel structure during thermal processing of Na-geopolymer gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxson, Peter; Lukey, Grant C; van Deventer, Jannie S J

    2006-10-10

    The present work examines how the gel structure and phase composition of Na-geopolymers derived from metakaolin with varied Si/Al ratio evolve with exposure to temperatures up to 1000 degrees C. Gels were thermally treated and characterized using quantitative XRD, DTA, and FTIR to elucidate the changes in gel structure, phase composition, and porosity at each stage of heating. It is found that the phase stability, defined by the amount and onset temperature of crystallization, is improved at higher Si/Al ratios. Two different mechanisms of densification have been isolated by FTIR, related to viscous flow and collapse of the highly distributed pore network in the gel. Gels with low Si/Al ratio only experience viscous flow that correlates with low thermal shrinkage. Gels at a higher Si/Al ratio, which have a homogeneous microstructure composed of a highly distributed porosity, undergo both densification processes corresponding to a large extent of thermal shrinkage during densification. This work elucidates the intimate relationship between gel microstructure, chemistry, and thermal evolution of Na-geopolymer gels.

  17. Quantum Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers - Physics and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes the physics and applications of quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers based on numerical simulations. These devices possess a number of unique properties compared with other types of semiconductor amplifiers, which should allow enhanced performance of semiconductor...... and QW devices and to experiments on quantum dot amplifiers. These comparisons outline the qualitative differences between the different types of amplifiers. In all cases focus is put on the physical processes responsible the differences....... devices in communication systems in the future. The basic properties of quantum dot devices are investigated, especially regarding the potential of realizing amplification and signal processing without introducing pattern dependence. Also the gain recovery of a single short pulse is modeled...

  18. Transport and Mixing Processes Affecting the Evolution of Aerosols in the Sacramento Valley during CARES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, J. D.; Shaw, W. J.; Berg, L. K.; Pekour, M. S.; Gustafson, W. I.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Zaveri, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    During June 2010, the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) was conducted to obtain measurements on the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols and their optical and hygroscopic properties in the Sacramento urban plume as it is routinely transported to the northeast over the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Carbonaceous aerosols (black carbon and organic matter) have been shown to play a major role in direct and indirect radiative forcing of climate; however, there are still significant knowledge gaps regarding secondary organic aerosol formation, black carbon mixing state, and optical and hygroscopic properties of fresh and aged aerosols. During summer, the Sacramento urban plume transport is controlled by extremely consistent, terrain-driven upslope winds that draw polluted air to the northeast over the oak and pine trees in the Blodgett Forest area by late afternoon. The Sacramento-Blodgett Forest corridor therefore serves as a mesoscale (~100 km) daytime flow reactor in which the urban aerosols undergo significant aging due to coagulation, condensation, and photochemical processes. Downslope winds are expected to transport biogenic aerosols towards urban areas at night. We will present initial findings regarding the characteristics of the diurnally varying flows and boundary layer structure in the region, based on radar wind profiler, sodar, radiosonde, and aircraft measurements. The effect of the thermally-driven flows on the transport and mixing of aerosols will be described using measurements that include the vertical structure of aerosols obtained from NASA’s High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) deployed on an aircraft. HSRL data will also be used to find evidence of mountain venting process that loft aerosols from the Sacramento Valley into the free atmosphere over the foothills. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was used operationally during CARES, and an assessment of the predicted thermally-driven flows will be made as well as

  19. Physical simulation of hot deformation and microstructural evolution of AISI 1016 steel using processing maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajput, S.K. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247667 (India); Dikovits, M. [IWS—Institute for Materials Science and Welding, Graz University of Technology Kopernikusgasse 24, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Chaudhari, G.P., E-mail: chaudfmt@iitr.ernet.in [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247667 (India); Poletti, C. [IWS—Institute for Materials Science and Welding, Graz University of Technology Kopernikusgasse 24, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Warchomicka, F. [IWS—Institute for Materials Science and Welding, Graz University of Technology Kopernikusgasse 24, A-8010 Graz (Austria); IMST—Institute of Materials Science and Technology, Vienna University of Technology, Karlsplatz 13/E308, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Pancholi, V.; Nath, S.K. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2013-12-10

    The hot deformation behavior of AISI 1016 steel is studied by performing hot compression tests in the Gleeble{sup ®} 3800 physical simulator in the temperature range 750–1050 °C after austenitization at 1050 °C for 5 min. The strain rates used vary from 0.01 to 80 s{sup −1} and the total true strain achieved is 0.7. The microstructural evolution is described based on light optical and scanning electron microscopy of the deformed and water quenched samples. An EBSD measurement on selected sample in the two-phase field is used to determine the microstructural changes in the ferritic phase. Then, processing windows are created using dynamic materials model, modified dynamic materials model, and strain rate sensitivity maps, which are correlated with the microstructural development. In order to determine the flow instability ranges produced by flow localization, different instability parameters are employed and compared. The processing map obtained using the power dissipation efficiency, η, correlates well with microstructural changes observed due to the dependency of this parameter on strain rate sensitivity m. Although instability zones predicted by the instability parameter κ{sub j} are similar to these predicted by flow localization parameter α, the latter approach is physically explained by the thermal softening due to adiabatic flow at high strain rates. Using sinh type constitutive equation, the average apparent activation energy for hot deformation of AISI 1016 steel is 290 kJ/mol and the stress exponent n is 3.8, indicating plastic deformation by dislocation gliding and climbing.

  20. EMI-resilient amplifier circuits

    CERN Document Server

    van der Horst, Marcel J; Linnenbank, André C

    2014-01-01

    This book enables circuit designers to reduce the errors introduced by the fundamental limitations and electromagnetic interference (EMI) in negative-feedback amplifiers.  The authors describe a systematic design approach for application specific negative-feedback amplifiers, with specified signal-to-error ratio (SER).  This approach enables designers to calculate noise, bandwidth, EMI, and the required bias parameters of the transistors used in  application specific amplifiers in order to meet the SER requirements.   ·         Describes design methods that incorporate electromagnetic interference (EMI) in the design of application specific negative-feedback amplifiers; ·         Provides designers with a structured methodology to avoid the use of trial and error in meeting signal-to-error ratio (SER) requirements; ·         Equips designers to increase EMI immunity of the amplifier itself, thus avoiding filtering at the input, reducing the number of components and avoiding detr...

  1. Low-Noise Band-Pass Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, L.

    1982-01-01

    Circuit uses standard components to overcome common limitation of JFET amplifiers. Low-noise band-pass amplifier employs JFET and operational amplifier. High gain and band-pass characteristics are achieved with suitable choice of resistances and capacitances. Circuit should find use as low-noise amplifier, for example as first stage instrumentation systems.

  2. Quantum Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers - Physics and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes the physics and applications of quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers based on numerical simulations. These devices possess a number of unique properties compared with other types of semiconductor amplifiers, which should allow enhanced performance of semiconductor devices in communication systems in the future. The basic properties of quantum dot devices are investigated, especially regarding the potential of realizing amplification and signal processing without ...

  3. Capacitively-coupled chopper amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Qinwen; Huijsing, Johan H

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the concept and design of the capacitively-coupled chopper technique, which can be used in precision analog amplifiers. Readers will learn to design power-efficient amplifiers employing this technique, which can be powered by regular low supply voltage such as 2V and possibly having a +\\-100V input common-mode voltage input. The authors provide both basic design concepts and detailed design examples, which cover the area of both operational and instrumentation amplifiers for multiple applications, particularly in power management and biomedical circuit designs. Discusses basic working principles and details of implementation for proven designs; Includes a diverse set of applications, along with measurement results to demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique; Explains advantages and drawbacks of the technique, given particular circumstances.

  4. Role of tectonomagmatic processes for surface environmental changes and evolution of biosphere on terrestrial planets: Evidence for evolution of the life on the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkov, Evgenii; Bogina, Maria

    It is known that ecological systems on the Earth in the Middle Paleoproterozoic was experienced fundamental change, which finally led to the appearance of multicellular organisms. Though life has been already existed in the Paleoarchean (Harris et al., 2009 and references herein), the multicellular organisms appeared only in the middle Paleoproterozoic about 1.6 Ga ago. It was preceded by fundamental change of tectononagmatic processes at period from 2.35 to 2.0 Ga, when early Precambrian high-Mg magmas, derived from depleted mantle, were gradually changed by geochemical-enriched Fe-Ti picrites and basalts, similar to Phanerozoic within-plate magmas. A drastic change of the tectonic pattern occurred at ca. 2 Ga when plate-tectonics changed plume-tectonics of the early Precambrian. Since that time tectonomagmatic processes irretrievably changed over the whole Earth and gradually change of ancient continental crust for secondary oceanic (basaltic) crust has occurred. New type of magmatic melts, appeared in the Middle Paleoproterozoic, was characterized by elevated and high contents of Fe, Ti, Cu, P, Mn, alkalis, LREE, and other incompatible elements (Zr, Ba, Sr, U, Th, F, etc.). A large-scale influx of alkalis in the World Ocean presumably neutralized its water, making it more suitable for the life, while input of Fe-group metals, P, and other trace elements, which are required for metabolism and fermentation, rapidly expanded the possibility for the development of bio-sphere. This caused a rapid evolution of organic life, especially photosynthesizing cyanobacteria and, subsequently, the emergence of oxidizing atmosphere, marked by formation of cupriferous red beds at all Precambrian shields and generation of first hydrocarbon deposits (Melezhik et al., 2005). A drop in atmospheric CO2 presumably suppressed the greenhouse effect, while significant intensification of relief ruggedness caused by wide development of plate tectonics after 2 Ga resulted in the change of

  5. The Earthscope USArray Array Network Facility (ANF): Evolution of Data Acquisition, Processing, and Storage Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, G. A.; Battistuz, B.; Foley, S.; Vernon, F. L.; Eakins, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Since April 2004 the Earthscope USArray Transportable Array (TA) network has grown to over 400 broadband seismic stations that stream multi-channel data in near real-time to the Array Network Facility in San Diego. In total, over 1.7 terabytes per year of 24-bit, 40 samples-per-second seismic and state of health data is recorded from the stations. The ANF provides analysts access to real-time and archived data, as well as state-of-health data, metadata, and interactive tools for station engineers and the public via a website. Additional processing and recovery of missing data from on-site recorders (balers) at the stations is performed before the final data is transmitted to the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC). Assembly of the final data set requires additional storage and processing capabilities to combine the real-time data with baler data. The infrastructure supporting these diverse computational and storage needs currently consists of twelve virtualized Sun Solaris Zones executing on nine physical server systems. The servers are protected against failure by redundant power, storage, and networking connections. Storage needs are provided by a hybrid iSCSI and Fiber Channel Storage Area Network (SAN) with access to over 40 terabytes of RAID 5 and 6 storage. Processing tasks are assigned to systems based on parallelization and floating-point calculation needs. On-site buffering at the data-loggers provide protection in case of short-term network or hardware problems, while backup acquisition systems at the San Diego Supercomputer Center and the DMC protect against catastrophic failure of the primary site. Configuration management and monitoring of these systems is accomplished with open-source (Cfengine, Nagios, Solaris Community Software) and commercial tools (Intermapper). In the evolution from a single server to multiple virtualized server instances, Sun Cluster software was evaluated and found to be unstable in our environment. Shared filesystem

  6. Evolution processes of the corrosion behavior and structural characteristics of plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings on AZ31 magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Wang, Ruiqiang; Huang, Zhiquan; Wu, Yekang; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Guorui; Li, Dalong; Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong; Yu, Shengxue; Shen, Dejiu; Nash, Philip

    2018-03-01

    Evolution processes of the corrosion behavior and structural characteristics of the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coated AZ31 magnesium alloy were investigated by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), potentio-dynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. Detached coating samples were fabricated by an electrochemical method and more details of the internal micro-structure of coatings were clearly observed on the fractured cross-section morphologies of the samples compared to general polished cross-section morphologies. Evolution mechanisms of the coating corrosion behavior in relation to the evolution of micro-structural characteristics were discussed in detail.

  7. Investigation of the sources and evolution processes of severe haze pollution in Beijing in January 2013

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sun, Yele; Jiang, Qi; Wang, Zifa; Fu, Pingqing; Li, Jie; Yang, Ting; Yin, Yan

    2014-01-01

    China experienced severe haze pollution in January 2013. Here we have a detailed characterization of the sources and evolution mechanisms of this haze pollution with a focus on four haze episodes that occurred during 10...

  8. Evolution of Oxide Inclusions in Si-Mn Killed Steels During Hot-Rolling Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen; Guo, Changbo; Zhang, Lifeng; Ling, Haitao; Li, Chao

    2017-10-01

    The evolution of oxide inclusions in Si-Mn killed steels refined by slags of different basicity during a four-pass industrial hot-rolling process was investigated using an automated microscopy system. High-basicity refining slag induced the formation of CaO- and Al2O3-containing inclusions, while refining slag with 0.8 basicity induced dominant inclusions of SiO2 and MnO-SiO2. CaO-SiO2-Al2O3 inclusions mainly formed endogenously during solidification and cooling of Ca-containing steels, where Ca originated from slag-steel reactions. However, the larger-sized higher-CaO inclusions originated from slag entrainment. Different inclusions presented different hot-rolling behaviors. The inclusion composition changed by deformation and new phase formation. The dominant oxide types were unchanged under refinement by low-basicity slag; however, they changed under refinement with high-basicity slag. The deformation index of inclusions decreased with increasing accumulated reduction (AR) of the steel. The difference in deformation index between different inclusion types was the largest in the first rolling stage and decreased in subsequent stages. SiO2-CaO and SiO2-MnO-CaO inclusions had larger deformation indices during hot rolling but smaller indices in the last two stages. High-basicity slag increased inclusion complexity; from the perspective of cold-drawing performance, low-basicity refining slag is better for the industrial production of tire-cord steels.

  9. Guidelines for designing BJT amplifiers with low 1/f AM and PM noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferre-Pikal, E S; Walls, F L; Nelson, C W

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we discuss guidelines for designing linear bipolar junction transistor amplifiers with low 1/f amplitude modulation (AM) and phase modulation (PM) noise. These guidelines are derived from a new theory that relates AM and PM noise to transconductance fluctuations, junction capacitance fluctuations, and circuit architecture. We analyze the noise equations of each process for a common emitter (CE) amplifier and use the results to suggest amplifier designs that minimize the 1/f noise while providing other required attributes such as high gain. Although we use a CE amplifier as an example, the procedure applies to other configurations as well. Experimental noise results for several amplifier configurations are presented.

  10. Smartphone Operated Signal Transduction by Ion Nanogating (STING) Amplifier for Nanopore Sensors: Design and Analytical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Rıfat Emrah; Kahnemouyi, Sina; Fan, Hsinwen; Mak, Wai Han; Lohith, Akshar; Seger, Adam; Teodorescu, Mircea; Pourmand, Nader

    2016-03-25

    In this report, we demonstrated a handheld wireless voltage-clamp amplifier for current measurement of nanopore sensors. This amplifier interfaces a sensing probe and connects wirelessly with a computer or smartphone for the required stimulus input, data processing and storage. To test the proposed Signal Transduction by Ion Nanogating (STING) wireless amplifier, in the current study the system was tested with a nano-pH sensor to measure pH of standard buffer solutions and the performance was compared against the commercial voltage-clamp amplifier. To our best knowledge, STING amplifier is the first miniaturized wireless voltage-clamp platform operated with a customized smart-phone application (app).

  11. Modeling of Yb3+-sensitized Er3+-doped silica waveguide amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lester, Christian; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Rasmussen, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    A model for Yb3+-sensitized Er3+-doped silica waveguide amplifiers is described and numerically investigated in the small-signal regime. The amplified spontaneous emission in the ytterbium-band and the quenching process between excited erbium ions are included in the model. For pump wavelengths...... between 860 and 995 nm, the amplified spontaneous emission in the ytterbium-band is found to reduce both the gain and the optimum length of the amplifier significantly. The achievable gain of the Yb3+-sensitized amplifier is found to be higher than in an Er3+-doped silica waveguide without Yb 3+ (18 d...

  12. A transformation theory of stochastic evolution in Red Moon methodology to time evolution of chemical reaction process in the full atomistic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuichi; Nagaoka, Masataka

    2017-05-28

    Atomistic information of a whole chemical reaction system, e.g., instantaneous microscopic molecular structures and orientations, offers important and deeper insight into clearly understanding unknown chemical phenomena. In accordance with the progress of a number of simultaneous chemical reactions, the Red Moon method (a hybrid Monte Carlo/molecular dynamics reaction method) is capable of simulating atomistically the chemical reaction process from an initial state to the final one of complex chemical reaction systems. In the present study, we have proposed a transformation theory to interpret the chemical reaction process of the Red Moon methodology as the time evolution process in harmony with the chemical kinetics. For the demonstration of the theory, we have chosen the gas reaction system in which the reversible second-order reaction H2 + I2 ⇌ 2HI occurs. First, the chemical reaction process was simulated from the initial configurational arrangement containing a number of H2 and I2 molecules, each at 300 K, 500 K, and 700 K. To reproduce the chemical equilibrium for the system, the collision frequencies for the reactions were taken into consideration in the theoretical treatment. As a result, the calculated equilibrium concentrations [H2]eq and equilibrium constants Keq at all the temperatures were in good agreement with their corresponding experimental values. Further, we applied the theoretical treatment for the time transformation to the system and have shown that the calculated half-life τ's of [H2] reproduce very well the analytical ones at all the temperatures. It is, therefore, concluded that the application of the present theoretical treatment with the Red Moon method makes it possible to analyze reasonably the time evolution of complex chemical reaction systems to chemical equilibrium at the atomistic level.

  13. Agent amplified communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kautz, H.; Selman, B.; Milewski, A. [AT& T Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

    1996-12-31

    We propose an agent-based framework for assisting and simplifying person-to-person communication for information gathering tasks. As an example, we focus on locating experts for any specified topic. In our approach, the informal person-to-person networks that exist within an organization are used to {open_quotes}referral chain{close_quotes} requests for expertise. User-agents help automate this process. The agents generate referrals by analyzing records of e-mail communication patterns. Simulation results show that the higher responsiveness of an agent-based system can be effectively traded for the higher accuracy of a completely manual approach. Furthermore, preliminary experience with a group of users on a prototype system has shown that useful automatic referrals can be found in practice. Our experience with actual users has also shown that privacy concerns are central to the successful deployment of personal agents: an advanced agent-based system will therefore need to reason about issues involving trust and authority.

  14. Cryogenic MMIC Low Noise Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreb, S.; Gaier, T.; Fernandez, J.; Erickson, N.; Wielgus, J.

    2000-01-01

    Monolithic (MMIC) and discrete transistor (MIC) low noise amplifiers are compared on the basis of performance, cost, and reliability. The need for cryogenic LNA's for future large microwave arrays for radio astronomy is briefly discussed and data is presented on a prototype LNA for the 1 to 10 GZH range along with a very wideband LNA for the 1 to 60 GHz range.

  15. MMIC DHBT Common-Base Amplifier for 172 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paidi, Vamsi; Griffith, Zack; Wei, Yun; Dahlstrom, Mttias; Urteaga, Miguel; Rodwell, Mark; Samoska, Lorene; Fung, King Man; Schlecht, Erich

    2006-01-01

    Figure 1 shows a single-stage monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifier in which the gain element is a double-heterojunction bipolar transistor (DHBT) connected in common-base configuration. This amplifier, which has been demonstrated to function well at a frequency of 172 GHz, is part of a continuing effort to develop compact, efficient amplifiers for scientific instrumentation, wide-band communication systems, and radar systems that will operate at frequencies up to and beyond 180 GHz. The transistor is fabricated from a layered structure formed by molecular beam epitaxy in the InP/InGaAs material system. A highly doped InGaAs base layer and a collector layer are fabricated from the layered structure in a triple mesa process. The transistor includes two separate emitter fingers, each having dimensions of 0.8 by 12 m. The common-base configuration was chosen for its high maximum stable gain in the frequency band of interest. The input-matching network is designed for high bandwidth. The output of the transistor is matched to a load line for maximum saturated output power under large-signal conditions, rather than being matched for maximum gain under small-signal conditions. In a test at a frequency of 172 GHz, the amplifier was found to generate an output power of 7.5 mW, with approximately 5 dB of large-signal gain (see Figure 2). Moreover, the amplifier exhibited a peak small-signal gain of 7 dB at a frequency of 176 GHz. This performance of this MMIC single-stage amplifier containing only a single transistor represents a significant advance in the state of the art, in that it rivals the 170-GHz performance of a prior MMIC three-stage, four-transistor amplifier. [The prior amplifier was reported in "MMIC HEMT Power Amplifier for 140 to 170 GHz" (NPO-30127), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 11 (November 2003), page 49.] This amplifier is the first heterojunction- bipolar-transistor (HBT) amplifier built for medium power operation in this

  16. The radiation-wavefront instability in pulsed CO2 amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, S. V.; Iur'ev, M. S.

    1987-07-01

    The space-time evolution of a small-scale perturbation against a background of a smooth input beam which is incident on a pulsed CO2 amplifier is studied theoretically. Ranges of transverse frequency, longitudinal coordinate, and time values are found in which the perturbation growth is exponential in nature. It is shown that the wavefront instability is stabilized by the amplification of the main beam and sound damping.

  17. EMG amplifier with wireless data transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Grzegorz; Wildner, Krzysztof

    2017-08-01

    Wireless medical diagnostics is a trend in modern technology used in medicine. This paper presents a concept of realization, architecture of hardware and software implementation of an elecromyography signal (EMG) amplifier with wireless data transmission. This amplifier consists of three components: analogue processing of bioelectric signal module, micro-controller circuit and an application enabling data acquisition via a personal computer. The analogue bioelectric signal processing circuit receives electromyography signals from the skin surface, followed by initial analogue processing and preparation of the signals for further digital processing. The second module is a micro-controller circuit designed to wirelessly transmit the electromyography signals from the analogue signal converter to a personal computer. Its purpose is to eliminate the need for wired connections between the patient and the data logging device. The third block is a computer application designed to display the transmitted electromyography signals, as well as data capture and analysis. Its purpose is to provide a graphical representation of the collected data. The entire device has been thoroughly tested to ensure proper functioning. In use, the device displayed the captured electromyography signal from the arm of the patient. Amplitude- frequency characteristics were set in order to investigate the bandwidth and the overall gain of the device.

  18. Molecular evolution modeled as a fractal renewal point process in agreement with the dispersion of substitutions in mammalian genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, D R; West, B J

    1998-11-01

    A fractal renewal point process (FRPP) is used to model molecular evolution in agreement with the relationship between the variance and the mean numbers of nonsynonymous and synonymous substitutions in mammals. Like other episodic models such as the doubly stochastic Poisson process, this model accounts for the large variances observed in amino acid substitution rates, but unlike certain other episodic models, it also accounts for the increase in the index of dispersion with the mean number of substitutions in Ohta's (1995) data. We find that this correlation is significant for nonsynonymous substitutions at the 1% level and for synonymous substitutions at the 10% level, even after removing lineage effects and when using Bulmer's (1989) unbiased estimator of the index of dispersion. This model is simpler than most other overdispersed models of evolution in the sense that it is fully specified by a single interevent probability distribution. Interpretations in terms of chaotic dynamics and in terms of chance and selection are discussed.

  19. An analytical process of the spatio-temporal evolution of urban systems based on allometric and fractal ideas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yanguang [Department of Geography, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)], E-mail: chenyg@pku.edu.cn; Jiang Shiguo [Department of Geography, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2009-01-15

    This paper presents a computer-based analytical framework for the spatio-temporal evolution of urban systems using the ideas from the allometric growth associated with fractals. Both cities as systems and systems of cities follow the law of allometric growth, and the scaling factors of the allometric relations can compose the matrix equations as eigenfunctions. The fractal dimension arrays are just the eigenvectors of the scaling factor matrices while the numbers of variables are the greatest eigenvalues. The solutions of matrix equations can be employed to analyse city systems and evaluate relative levels of urban development. The method is applied to Hangzhou urban system of China. The results reveal clearly an urbanization process characterized as population concentration and an industrialization process characterized as industrial diffusion. The computation results are consistent with the reality, which indicate that the method is available for analyzing the spatio-temporal evolution of complex systems such as cities.

  20. Clonal status of actionable driver events and the timing of mutational processes in cancer evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Favero, Francesco; de Bruin, Elza C.

    2015-01-01

    during cancer evolution, and to identify drivers of subclonal expansions. Although mutations in known driver genes typically occurred early in cancer evolution, we also identified later subclonal “actionable” mutations, including BRAF (V600E), IDH1 (R132H), PIK3CA (E545K), EGFR (L858R), and KRAS (G12D......), which may compromise the efficacy of targeted therapy approaches. More than 20% of IDH1 mutations in glioblastomas, and 15% of mutations in genes in the PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase)–AKT–mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling axis across all tumor types were subclonal. Mutations...

  1. Stochastic evolution of the Universe: A possible dynamical process leading to fractal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, C.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a stochastic evolution of the early Universe which can lead to a fractal correlation in galactic distribution in the Universe. The stochastic equation of state, due to fluctuating creation rates of various components in a many-component fluid, leads to a fluctuating expansion rate for the Universe in the early epochs. It provides persistent fluctuations in the number count vs. apparent magnitude relation, as expected from the observation of a fractal distribution of the galaxies. We also present a stochastic evolution of density perturbations in the early Universe.

  2. Forest Ecosystem Processes at the Watershed Scale: Ecosystem services, feedback and evolution in developing mountainous catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, Larry

    2010-05-01

    Mountain watersheds provide significant ecosystem services both locally and for surrounding regions, including the provision of freshwater, hydropower, carbon sequestration, habitat, forest products and recreational/aesthetic opportunities. The hydrologic connectivity along hillslopes in sloping terrain provides an upslope subsidy of water and nutrients to downslope ecosystem patches, producing characteristic ecosystem patterns of vegetation density and type, and soil biogeochemical cycling. Recent work suggests that optimal patterns of forest cover evolve along these flowpaths which maximize net primary productivity and carbon sequestration at the hillslope to catchment scale. These watersheds are under significant pressure from potential climate change, changes in forest management, increasing population and development, and increasing demand for water export. As water balance and flowpaths are altered by shifting weather patterns and new development, the spatial distribution and coupling of water, carbon and nutrient cycling will spur the evolution of different ecosystem patterns. These issues have both theoretical and practical implications for the coupling of water, carbon and nutrient cycling at the landscape level, and the potential to manage watersheds for bundled ecosystem services. If the spatial structure of the ecosystem spontaneously adjusts to maximize landscape level use of limiting resources, there may be trade-offs in the level of services provided. The well known carbon-for-water tradeoff reflects the growth of forests to maximize carbon uptake, but also transpiration which limits freshwater availability in many biomes. We provide examples of the response of bundled ecosystem services to climate and land use change in the Southern Appalachian Mountains of the United States. These mountains have very high net primary productivity, biodiversity and water yields, and provide significant freshwater resources to surrounding regions. There has been a

  3. Silicon on insulator MESFETs for RF amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Seth J.; Balijepalli, Asha; Ervin, Joseph; Lepkowski, William; Thornton, Trevor J.

    2010-03-01

    CMOS compatible, high voltage SOI MESFETs have been fabricated using a standard 3.3 V CMOS process without any changes to the process flow. A 0.6 μm gate length device operates with a cut-off frequency of 7.3 GHz and a maximum oscillation frequency of 21 GHz. There is no degradation in device performance up to its breakdown voltage, which greatly exceeds that of CMOS devices on the same process. Other figures-of-merit of relevance to RF front-end design are presented, including the maximum stable gain and noise figure. An accurate representation of the device in SPICE has been developed using the commercially available TOM3 model. Using the SOI MESFET model, a source degenerated low noise RF amplifier targeting operation near 1 GHz has been designed. The amplifier was fabricated on a PCB board and operates at 940 MHz with a minimum NF of 3.8 dB and RF gain of 9.9 dB while only consuming 5mW of DC power.

  4. Can knowledge of developmental processes illuminate the evolution of parental care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, George F; Tyler, Amber N

    2007-01-01

    There are two levels of investigation for elucidating the evolution of parental behavior. The macro level focuses on how parental behavior can evolve as an aspect of reproduction. The micro level focuses on how species variations in parental behavior evolve. Recently, modern evolutionary biology has turned to developmental biology as a source for information about how trait variability (the substrate upon which natural selection and other evolutionary mechanisms can operate) can emerge during development (called "evo-devo"). Application of this evo-devo approach to the phenomenon of parental behavior requires identification of those mechanisms that produce variations in developmental pathways leading to parental behavior. It is these variations that provide the phenotypes for the potential evolution of different parental behavior systems. Variations in rodent maternal behavior affect the development of the HPA and HPG axes in their offspring. These mechanisms are examined to reveal how such developmental variations could underlie the evolution of biparental behavior. Knowledge of the developmental mechanisms responsible for species variations in mammalian parental behavior systems may provide insight into those mechanisms that may have been involved in the evolution of parental behavior itself. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Structural Evolution of Colloidal Crystal Films in the Process of Melting Revealed by Bragg Peak Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sulyanova, Elena A.; Shabalin, Anatoly; Zozulya, Alexey V.; Meijer, Janne-Mieke|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325780277; Dzhigaev, Dmitry; Gorobtsov, Oleg; Kurta, Ruslan P.; Lazarev, Sergey; Lorenz, Ulf; Singer, Andrej; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Zaluzhnyy, Ivan; Besedin, Ilya; Sprung, Michael; Petukhov, A. V.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829196; Vartanyants, Ivan A.

    2015-01-01

    In situ X-ray diffraction studies of structural evolution of colloidal crystal films formed by polystyrene spherical particles upon incremental heating are reported. The Bragg peak parameters, such as peak position, integrated intensity, and radial and azimuthal widths were analyzed as a function of

  6. From fast to slow processes in the evolution of urban and regional settlement structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Weidlich

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex systems consist of many intertwined organizational levels starting from micro-structures and ending with macrostructures. Their evolution takes place on different time scales: Micropatterns exhibit a fast dynamics whereas macropatterns develop slowly. Urban and regional science can make use of this fact by constructing a hierarchy of models on different spatio-temporal scales.

  7. Single conversion stage amplifier - SICAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljusev, P.

    2005-12-15

    This Ph.D. thesis presents a thorough analysis of the so called SICAM - SIngle Converter stage AMplifier approach to building direct energy conversion audio power amplifiers. The mainstream approach for building isolated audio power amplifiers today consists of isolated DC power supply and Class D amplifier, which essentially represents a two stage solution, where each of the components can be viewed as separate and independent part. The proposed SICAM solution strives for direct energy conversion from the mains to the audio output, by dedicating the operation of the components one to another and integrating their functions, so that the final audio power amplifier represents a single-stage topology with higher efficiency, lower volume, less board space, lower component count and subsequently lower cost. The SICAM approach is both applicable to non-isolated and isolated audio power amplifiers, but the problems encountered in these two cases are different. Non-isolated SICAM solutions are intended for both AC mains-connected and battery-powered devices. In non-isolated mains-connected SICAMs the main idea is to simplify the power supply or even provide integrated power factor correction (PFC) functions, while still maintaining low component stress and good audio performance by generally decreasing the input voltage level to the Class D audio power amplifier. On the other hand, non-isolated battery-powered SICAMs have to cope with the ever changing battery voltage and provide output voltage levels which are both lower and higher than the battery voltage, while still being simple and single-stage energy conversion solutions. In isolated SICAMs the isolation transformer adjusts the voltage level on the secondary side to the desired level, so the main challenges here are decreasing the size of the magnetic core and reducing the number and size of bulky reactive components as much as possible. The main focus of this thesis is directed towards the isolated SICAMs and

  8. Integrated waveguide amplifiers for optical backplanes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, J.; Lamprecht, T.; Worhoff, Kerstin; Driessen, A.; Horst, F.; Horst, F.; Offrein, B.J.; Offrein, B.J.; Ay, F.; Pollnau, Markus

    Amplifier performance of Nd3+-doped polymer and Al2O3 channel waveguides at 880 nm is investigated. Tapered amplifiers are embedded between optical backplane waveguides, and a maximum 0.21 dB net gain is demonstrated.

  9. Identification of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Identification of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fragments linked to soybean mosaic virus resistance gene in Glycine soja and conversion to a sequence characterized amplified regions (SCAR) marker for rapid selection.

  10. Higher order mode optical fiber Raman amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Usuga Castaneda, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    We review higher order mode Raman amplifiers and discuss recent theoretical as well as experimental results including system demonstrations.......We review higher order mode Raman amplifiers and discuss recent theoretical as well as experimental results including system demonstrations....

  11. Analog circuit design designing high performance amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Feucht, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    The third volume Designing High Performance Amplifiers applies the concepts from the first two volumes. It is an advanced treatment of amplifier design/analysis emphasizing both wideband and precision amplification.

  12. Cascode-based voltage-amplifier stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pospisilik Martin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-amplifier stages are the basic components of commonly used high gain amplifiers the bias and other parameters of whose are set by the external negative feedback. The typical device that uses the voltage-amplifier stage is the operational amplifier. Similar constructions can also be created on the basis of discrete transistors. From the circuit designer’s point of view, the voltage-amplifier stage defines the crucial parameters of the whole unit - the amplification factor, dominant pole of its transfer function and the slew rate. In this paper the proposal on construction of the voltage-amplifier stage based on discrete transistors is described. When connected between the input differential amplifier and the output stage, it allows creating of cheap amplifier for HiFi applications with considerable performance.

  13. High power gas laser amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leland, Wallace T.; Stratton, Thomas F.

    1981-01-01

    A high power output CO.sub.2 gas laser amplifier having a number of sections, each comprising a plurality of annular pumping chambers spaced around the circumference of a vacuum chamber containing a cold cathode, gridded electron gun. The electron beam from the electron gun ionizes the gas lasing medium in the sections. An input laser beam is split into a plurality of annular beams, each passing through the sections comprising one pumping chamber.

  14. SPS RF System Amplifier plant

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The picture shows a 2 MW, 200 MHz amplifier plant with feeder lines. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X.

  15. High power regenerative laser amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John L.; Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, Clifford B.; Zapata, Luis E.

    1994-01-01

    A regenerative amplifier design capable of operating at high energy per pulse, for instance, from 20-100 Joules, at moderate repetition rates, for instance from 5-20 Hertz is provided. The laser amplifier comprises a gain medium and source of pump energy coupled with the gain medium; a Pockels cell, which rotates an incident beam in response to application of a control signal; an optical relay system defining a first relay plane near the gain medium and a second relay plane near the rotator; and a plurality of reflectors configured to define an optical path through the gain medium, optical relay and Pockels cell, such that each transit of the optical path includes at least one pass through the gain medium and only one pass through the Pockels cell. An input coupler, and an output coupler are provided, implemented by a single polarizer. A control circuit coupled to the Pockels cell generates the control signal in timed relationship with the input pulse so that the input pulse is captured by the input coupler and proceeds through at least one transit of the optical path, and then the control signal is applied to cause rotation of the pulse to a polarization reflected by the polarizer, after which the captured pulse passes through the gain medium at least once more and is reflected out of the optical path by the polarizer before passing through the rotator again to provide an amplified pulse.

  16. Challenges in higher order mode Raman amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Nielsen, Kristian; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk

    2015-01-01

    A higher order Raman amplifier model that take random mode coupling into account ispresented. Mode dependent gain and signal power fluctuations at the output of the higher order modeRaman amplifier are discussed......A higher order Raman amplifier model that take random mode coupling into account ispresented. Mode dependent gain and signal power fluctuations at the output of the higher order modeRaman amplifier are discussed...

  17. Discretization analysis of bifurcation based nonlinear amplifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Feldkord

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, for modeling biological amplification processes, nonlinear amplifiers based on the supercritical Andronov–Hopf bifurcation have been widely analyzed analytically. For technical realizations, digital systems have become the most relevant systems in signal processing applications. The underlying continuous-time systems are transferred to the discrete-time domain using numerical integration methods. Within this contribution, effects on the qualitative behavior of the Andronov–Hopf bifurcation based systems concerning numerical integration methods are analyzed. It is shown exemplarily that explicit Runge–Kutta methods transform the truncated normalform equation of the Andronov–Hopf bifurcation into the normalform equation of the Neimark–Sacker bifurcation. Dependent on the order of the integration method, higher order terms are added during this transformation.A rescaled normalform equation of the Neimark–Sacker bifurcation is introduced that allows a parametric design of a discrete-time system which corresponds to the rescaled Andronov–Hopf system. This system approximates the characteristics of the rescaled Hopf-type amplifier for a large range of parameters. The natural frequency and the peak amplitude are preserved for every set of parameters. The Neimark–Sacker bifurcation based systems avoid large computational effort that would be caused by applying higher order integration methods to the continuous-time normalform equations.

  18. Discretization analysis of bifurcation based nonlinear amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldkord, Sven; Reit, Marco; Mathis, Wolfgang

    2017-09-01

    Recently, for modeling biological amplification processes, nonlinear amplifiers based on the supercritical Andronov-Hopf bifurcation have been widely analyzed analytically. For technical realizations, digital systems have become the most relevant systems in signal processing applications. The underlying continuous-time systems are transferred to the discrete-time domain using numerical integration methods. Within this contribution, effects on the qualitative behavior of the Andronov-Hopf bifurcation based systems concerning numerical integration methods are analyzed. It is shown exemplarily that explicit Runge-Kutta methods transform the truncated normalform equation of the Andronov-Hopf bifurcation into the normalform equation of the Neimark-Sacker bifurcation. Dependent on the order of the integration method, higher order terms are added during this transformation.A rescaled normalform equation of the Neimark-Sacker bifurcation is introduced that allows a parametric design of a discrete-time system which corresponds to the rescaled Andronov-Hopf system. This system approximates the characteristics of the rescaled Hopf-type amplifier for a large range of parameters. The natural frequency and the peak amplitude are preserved for every set of parameters. The Neimark-Sacker bifurcation based systems avoid large computational effort that would be caused by applying higher order integration methods to the continuous-time normalform equations.

  19. From molecular engineering to process engineering: development of high-throughput screening methods in enzyme directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lidan; Yang, Chengcheng; Yu, Hongwei

    2018-01-01

    With increasing concerns in sustainable development, biocatalysis has been recognized as a competitive alternative to traditional chemical routes in the past decades. As nature's biocatalysts, enzymes are able to catalyze a broad range of chemical transformations, not only with mild reaction conditions but also with high activity and selectivity. However, the insufficient activity or enantioselectivity of natural enzymes toward non-natural substrates limits their industrial application, while directed evolution provides a potent solution to this problem, thanks to its independence on detailed knowledge about the relationship between sequence, structure, and mechanism/function of the enzymes. A proper high-throughput screening (HTS) method is the key to successful and efficient directed evolution. In recent years, huge varieties of HTS methods have been developed for rapid evaluation of mutant libraries, ranging from in vitro screening to in vivo selection, from indicator addition to multi-enzyme system construction, and from plate screening to computation- or machine-assisted screening. Recently, there is a tendency to integrate directed evolution with metabolic engineering in biosynthesis, using metabolites as HTS indicators, which implies that directed evolution has transformed from molecular engineering to process engineering. This paper aims to provide an overview of HTS methods categorized based on the reaction principles or types by summarizing related studies published in recent years including the work from our group, to discuss assay design strategies and typical examples of HTS methods, and to share our understanding on HTS method development for directed evolution of enzymes involved in specific catalytic reactions or metabolic pathways.

  20. Spontaneous emission from saturated parametric amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Steffensen, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Noise performance of parametric amplifiers is typically calculated assuming un-depleted operation. However, in many applications especially when applied as regenerative amplifiers in systems based on phase shift keyed modulation schemes, this assumption is not valid. Here we show the impact...... on accumulated spontaneous emission for a parametric amplifier operated in saturation....

  1. European Research on THz Vacuum Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, F.; Cojocarua, C.-S.; de Rossi, A.

    2010-01-01

    The OPTHER (OPtically Driven TeraHertz AmplifiERs) project represents a considerable advancement in the field of high frequency amplification. The design and realization of a THz amplifier within this project is a consolidation of efforts at the international level from the main players of the Eu...

  2. low pump power photonic crystal fibre amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Kristian G.; Broeng, Jes; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2003-01-01

    Designs of low pump power optical amplifiers, based on photonic crystal fibres are presented. The potential of these fibre amplifiers is investigated, and it is demonstrated that such amplifiers may deliver gains of more than 15 dB at 1550 nm with less than 1 mW of optical pump power....

  3. Cooled Low-Noise HEMT Microwave Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, J. Javier; Ortiz, Gerardo G.; Duh, Kuanghann George

    1992-01-01

    Prototype cooled low-noise microwave amplifiers based on high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMT's) considered as replacements for cooled ruby masers used as low-noise receiver-front-end amplifiers in communications, radio science, radar systems, radio astronomy, and telemetry. HEMT amplifier operates at 12 K, requires less cooling power and operates at lower cost with simpler, more-reliable cooling system.

  4. An examination of microstructural evolution in a Cu–Ni–Si alloy processed by HPT and ECAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khereddine, Abdel Yazid; Larbi, Fayçal Hadj [Faculté de Physique, USTHB, BP 32, El-Alia, Dar El Beida, Algiers (Algeria); CDTA, Haouch Oukil BP 17 Baba-Hassan, Algiers (Algeria); Kawasaki, Megumi, E-mail: megumi@hanyang.ac.kr [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133–791 (Korea, Republic of); Baudin, Thierry [Université de Paris-Sud, ICMMO, UMR CNRS 8182, Laboratoire de physico-chimie de l’état solide, Bâtiment 410, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Bradai, Djamel [Faculté de Physique, USTHB, BP 32, El-Alia, Dar El Beida, Algiers (Algeria); Langdon, Terence G. [Departments of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1453 (United States); Materials Research Group, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the evolution of hardness and microstructure in a commercial Cu–2.5Ni–0.6Si alloy (in wt%) after processing using High-Pressure Torsion (HPT) at room temperature with an imposed pressure of 6.0 GPa and Equal-Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP) at 423 K using a channel angle of 135°. Hardness measurements, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used for microstructural evaluation and the results show a general consistency between these various techniques. The changes in the crystallite size and the dislocation structure as a function of the number of HPT revolutions and ECAP passes are discussed and compared with the results of the TEM observations. The detailed microstructural observations show a gradual evolution with increasing numbers of revolutions and passes with a saturation after 3 turns of HPT but with no saturation attained in ECAP even after 12 passes because of the lower imposed strain.

  5. The evolution of microstructures, corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of AZ80 joints using ultrasonic vibration assisted welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Jiansheng

    2017-12-01

    The evolution of microstructures, corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of AZ80 joints using an ultrasonic vibration assisted welding process is investigated. The results show that, with ultrasonic vibration treatment, a reliable AZ80 joint without defects is obtained. The coarsening α-Mg grains are refined to about 83.5  ±  3.3 µm and the continuous β-Mg17Al12 phases are broken to granular morphology, owing to the acoustic streaming effect and the cavitation effect evoked by ultrasonic vibration. Both immersion and electrochemical test results indicate that the corrosion resistance of the AZ80 joint welded with ultrasonic vibration is improved, attributed to microstructure evolution. With ultrasonic power of 900 W, the maximum tensile strength of an AZ80 specimen is 261  ±  7.5 MPa and fracture occurs near the heat affected zone of the joint.

  6. Chemical evolution with rotating massive star yields I. The solar neighborhood and the s-process elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prantzos, N.; Abia, C.; Limongi, M.; Chieffi, A.; Cristallo, S.

    2018-02-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the abundance evolution of the elements from H to U in the Milky Way halo and local disk. We use a consistent chemical evolution model, metallicity dependent isotopic yields from low and intermediate mass stars and yields from massive stars which include, for the first time, the combined effect of metallicity, mass loss and rotation for a large grid of stellar masses and for all stages of stellar evolution. The yields of massive stars are weighted by a metallicity dependent function of the rotational velocities, constrained by observations as to obtain a primary-like 14N behavior at low metallicity and to avoid overproduction of s-elements at intermediate metallicities. We show that the solar system isotopic composition can be reproduced to better than a factor of two for isotopes up to the Fe-peak, and at the 10% level for most pure s-isotopes, both light ones (resulting from the weak s-process in rotating massive stars) and the heavy ones (resulting from the main s-process in low and intermediate mass stars). We conclude that the light element primary process (LEPP), invoked to explain the apparent abundance deficiency of the s-elements with Astars - as a result of the contribution of rotating massive stars at sub-solar metallicities. We find that those stars produce primary F and dominate its solar abundance and we confirm their role in the observed primary behavior of N. In contrast, we show that their action is insufficient to explain the small observed values of ^{12}C/^{13}C in halo red giants, which is rather due to internal processes in those stars.

  7. Stochastic Evolution Dynamic of the Rock-Scissors-Paper Game Based on a Quasi Birth and Death Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qian; Fang, Debin; Zhang, Xiaoling; Jin, Chen; Ren, Qiyu

    2016-06-27

    Stochasticity plays an important role in the evolutionary dynamic of cyclic dominance within a finite population. To investigate the stochastic evolution process of the behaviour of bounded rational individuals, we model the Rock-Scissors-Paper (RSP) game as a finite, state dependent Quasi Birth and Death (QBD) process. We assume that bounded rational players can adjust their strategies by imitating the successful strategy according to the payoffs of the last round of the game, and then analyse the limiting distribution of the QBD process for the game stochastic evolutionary dynamic. The numerical experiments results are exhibited as pseudo colour ternary heat maps. Comparisons of these diagrams shows that the convergence property of long run equilibrium of the RSP game in populations depends on population size and the parameter of the payoff matrix and noise factor. The long run equilibrium is asymptotically stable, neutrally stable and unstable respectively according to the normalised parameters in the payoff matrix. Moreover, the results show that the distribution probability becomes more concentrated with a larger population size. This indicates that increasing the population size also increases the convergence speed of the stochastic evolution process while simultaneously reducing the influence of the noise factor.

  8. Mode instability thresholds for Tm-doped fiber amplifiers pumped at 790 nm

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Arlee V.; Smith, Jesse J.

    2015-01-01

    We use a detailed numerical model of stimulated thermal Rayleigh scattering to compute mode instability thresholds in Tm$^{3+}$-doped fiber amplifiers. The fiber amplifies 2040 nm light using a 790 nm pump. The cross-relaxation process is strong, permitting power efficiencies of 60%. The predicted instability thresholds are compared with those in similar Yb$^{3+}$-doped fiber amplifiers with 976 nm pump and 1060 nm signal, and are found to be higher, even though the heat load is much higher i...

  9. GaN MMIC Power Amplifiers for S-band and X-band

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suijker, E.M.; Sudow, M.; Fagerlind, M.; Hek, A.P. de; Vliet, F.E. van; Rorsman, N.

    2008-01-01

    The development of two GaN MMIC power amplifiers is reported. The amplifiers are processed in the AlGaN/GaN technology of Chalmers University of Technology using 0.25 μm HEMTs. The S-band amplifier operates at frequencies from 3 to 4 GHz and has a maximum output power of 5.6 W with an associated

  10. The evolution of concepts of vestibular peripheral information processing: toward the dynamic, adaptive, parallel processing macular model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Muriel D.

    2003-01-01

    In a letter to Robert Hooke, written on 5 February, 1675, Isaac Newton wrote "If I have seen further than certain other men it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants." In his context, Newton was referring to the work of Galileo and Kepler, who preceded him. However, every field has its own giants, those men and women who went before us and, often with few tools at their disposal, uncovered the facts that enabled later researchers to advance knowledge in a particular area. This review traces the history of the evolution of views from early giants in the field of vestibular research to modern concepts of vestibular organ organization and function. Emphasis will be placed on the mammalian maculae as peripheral processors of linear accelerations acting on the head. This review shows that early, correct findings were sometimes unfortunately disregarded, impeding later investigations into the structure and function of the vestibular organs. The central themes are that the macular organs are highly complex, dynamic, adaptive, distributed parallel processors of information, and that historical references can help us to understand our own place in advancing knowledge about their complicated structure and functions.

  11. High temperature charge amplifier for geothermal applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblom, Scott C.; Maldonado, Frank J.; Henfling, Joseph A.

    2015-12-08

    An amplifier circuit in a multi-chip module includes a charge to voltage converter circuit, a voltage amplifier a low pass filter and a voltage to current converter. The charge to voltage converter receives a signal representing an electrical charge and generates a voltage signal proportional to the input signal. The voltage amplifier receives the voltage signal from the charge to voltage converter, then amplifies the voltage signal by the gain factor to output an amplified voltage signal. The lowpass filter passes low frequency components of the amplified voltage signal and attenuates frequency components greater than a cutoff frequency. The voltage to current converter receives the output signal of the lowpass filter and converts the output signal to a current output signal; wherein an amplifier circuit output is selectable between the output signal of the lowpass filter and the current output signal.

  12. Periglacial processes incorporated into a long-term landscape evolution model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jane Lund; Egholm, D.L.; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou

    allows us to study the conditions under which a regolith cover is likely to accelerate frost cracking. We find that thin layers of regolith may accelerate erosion in cold regions where the presence of surface water drives bedrock cracking during the summer period. The detailed sensitivity analysis also...... allows us to couple the frost-cracking model to a long- term landscape evolution model where surface elevation, sediment thickness, and air temperature evolve through time. This enables us to explore the spatial distribution of frost cracking in realistic landscapes, and to study the slow feedbacks...

  13. Audio power amplifier design handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Self, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    This book is essential for audio power amplifier designers and engineers for one simple reason...it enables you as a professional to develop reliable, high-performance circuits. The Author Douglas Self covers the major issues of distortion and linearity, power supplies, overload, DC-protection and reactive loading. He also tackles unusual forms of compensation and distortion produced by capacitors and fuses. This completely updated fifth edition includes four NEW chapters including one on The XD Principle, invented by the author, and used by Cambridge Audio. Cro

  14. Visual information: amplifying and foraging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Claire; Munro, Malcolm

    2001-05-01

    Visualization is an important weapon in the management and control of the vast flood of data now generated. In order to be effective and useful it is important that such visualizations are designed to accommodate the variabilities of the tasks to which they will be put, and for the data they will be expected to be able to display. Such a view necessarily means that not all visualizations are always applicable. To this end, work has been done on visualizing software and systems with the aim of creating intelligence amplifying tools that aid, rather than try to replace the user and his intuition and domain knowledge.

  15. Testing Convergent Evolution in Auditory Processing Genes between Echolocating Mammals and the Aye-Aye, a Percussive-Foraging Primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankoff, Richard J; Jerjos, Michael; Hohman, Baily; Lauterbur, M Elise; Kistler, Logan; Perry, George H

    2017-07-01

    Several taxonomically distinct mammalian groups-certain microbats and cetaceans (e.g., dolphins)-share both morphological adaptations related to echolocation behavior and strong signatures of convergent evolution at the amino acid level across seven genes related to auditory processing. Aye-ayes (Daubentonia madagascariensis) are nocturnal lemurs with a specialized auditory processing system. Aye-ayes tap rapidly along the surfaces of trees, listening to reverberations to identify the mines of wood-boring insect larvae; this behavior has been hypothesized to functionally mimic echolocation. Here we investigated whether there are signals of convergence in auditory processing genes between aye-ayes and known mammalian echolocators. We developed a computational pipeline (Basic Exon Assembly Tool) that produces consensus sequences for regions of interest from shotgun genomic sequencing data for nonmodel organisms without requiring de novo genome assembly. We reconstructed complete coding region sequences for the seven convergent echolocating bat-dolphin genes for aye-ayes and another lemur. We compared sequences from these two lemurs in a phylogenetic framework with those of bat and dolphin echolocators and appropriate nonecholocating outgroups. Our analysis reaffirms the existence of amino acid convergence at these loci among echolocating bats and dolphins; some methods also detected signals of convergence between echolocating bats and both mice and elephants. However, we observed no significant signal of amino acid convergence between aye-ayes and echolocating bats and dolphins, suggesting that aye-aye tap-foraging auditory adaptations represent distinct evolutionary innovations. These results are also consistent with a developing consensus that convergent behavioral ecology does not reliably predict convergent molecular evolution. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  16. Microstructure and Texture Evolution during Single- and Multiple-Pass Friction Stir Processing of Heat-Treatable Aluminum Alloy 2024

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadammal, Naresh; Kailas, Satish V.; Szpunar, Jerzy; Suwas, Satyam

    2017-09-01

    Microstructure and crystallographic texture evolution during single- and multiple-pass friction stir processing (FSP) of an age-hardenable aluminum alloy 2024 (Al-Cu-Mg) was investigated. Multiple-pass experiments were carried out using two different processing strategies, multi-pass FSP, and multi-track FSP. Effect of a post-FSP heat treatment above and below the solutionizing temperature of the alloy was also studied. FSP experiments were carried out using an optimal set of parameters. Characterization tools used in the study include scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD), electron probe micro-analyser (EPMA), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Microstructural features indicate the occurrence of particle stimulated nucleation (PSN) assisted dynamic recrystallization (DRX) as the dominant microstructural evolution mechanism in the nugget zone. Geometrical coalescence occurred, leading to the formation of some larger grains in the nugget zone. Heterogenous micro-texture distribution was observed in the nugget zone with the bulk textures consisting of FCC shear texture components dominated by A 1*/ A 2* and C. Microstructure and texture in the nugget zone remained stable after both routes of multiple-pass processing, demonstrating the possibility of FSP to produce bulk volume of fine-grained materials. Post-FSP heat treatment indicated the stability of microstructure and texture up to 723 K (450 °C) owing to relatively lower strain energies retained after FSP.

  17. EBSD Study on Grain Boundary and Microtexture Evolutions During Friction Stir Processing of A413 Cast Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamanian, Morteza; Mostaan, Hossein; Safari, Mehdi; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2016-07-01

    The as-cast Al alloys contain heterogeneous distributions of non-deforming particles due to non-equilibrium solidification effects. Therefore, these alloys have poor tribological and mechanical behaviors. It is well known that using friction stir processing (FSP), very fine microstructure is created in the as-cast Al alloys, while their wear resistance can be improved. In this research work, FSP is used to locally refine a surface layer of the coarse as-cast microstructure of cast A413 Al alloy. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of FSP on microstructure and microtexture evolutions in A413 cast Al alloy. The grain boundary character distribution, grain structure, and microtexture evolutions in as-cast and friction stir processed A413 Al alloy are analyzed by electron back scatter diffraction technique. It is found that with the FSP, the fraction of low ∑boundary such as ∑3, 7, and 9 are increased. The obtained results show that there are no deformation texture components in the structure of friction stir processed samples. However, some of the main recrystallization texture components such as BR and cubeND are formed during FSP which indicate the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization phenomenon due to the severe plastic deformation induced by the rotation of tool.

  18. The evolution of discharge current and channel radius in cloud-to-ground lightning return stroke process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingting; Yuan, Ping; Wang, Xuejuan; Cen, Jianyong; Chang, Xuan; Zhao, Yanyan

    2017-09-01

    The spectra of two negative cloud-to-ground lightning discharge processes with multi-return strokes are obtained by a slit-less high-speed spectrograph, which the temporal resolution is 110 μs. Combined with the synchronous electrical observation data and theoretical calculation, the physical characteristics during return strokes process are analysed. A positive correlation between discharge current and intensity of ionic lines in the spectra is verified, and based on this feature, the current evolution characteristics during four return strokes are investigated. The results show that the time from peak current to the half-peak value estimated by multi point-fitting is about 101 μs-139 μs. The Joule heat in per unit length of four return strokes channel is in the order of 105J/m-106 J/m. The radius of arc discharge channel is positively related to the discharge current, and the more intense the current is, the greater the radius of channel is. Furthermore, the evolution for radius of arc core channel in the process of return stroke is consistent with the change trend of discharge current after the peak value. Compared with the decay of the current, the temperature decreases more slowly.

  19. Crustal formation and evolution processes in the Natal Valley and Mozambique Ridge, off South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanyu, Tomoko; Nogi, Yoshifumi; Fujii, Masakazu

    2017-09-01

    The evolution of seafloor spreading of Africa, South America, and Antarctica is key to understanding the initial break-up of Gondwana. Vector geomagnetic surveys were conducted in the Natal Valley and Mozambique Ridge, off South Africa. We summarize the nature of the crust using the results of dense vector geomagnetic anomaly data, as well as satellite gravity data. Based on both inversion and forward analytical results, we identified areas of stretched continental crust, with basaltic magma intrusion in parts, as the northern Natal Valley, north part of the Mozambique Ridge, and north part of the southern Natal Valley. Oceanic crust was identified in the south part of the southern Natal Valley and south part of the Mozambique Ridge. Magnetic isochrons M0-M10 were identified in the south part of the southern Natal Valley. Clear magnetic lineations were observed in the south part of the Mozambique Ridge, where some areas were distorted by hotspot volcanism. The location of the continental ocean boundary in the Natal Valley, along with a four-stage model of tectonic evolution of the study area since about 183 Ma, are newly proposed.

  20. Phase evolution and thermal stability of 2 Mg–Cu alloys processed by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez, C., E-mail: carola.martinezu@usach.cl [Departamento de Ingeniería Metalúrgica, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Av. Lib. Bernardo O’Higgins 3363, Casilla de correo 10233, Santiago (Chile); Ordoñez, S., E-mail: stella.ordonez@usach.cl [Departamento de Ingeniería Metalúrgica, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Av. Lib. Bernardo O’Higgins 3363, Casilla de correo 10233, Santiago (Chile); Guzmán, D. [Departamento de Ingeniería en Metalurgia, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Atacama y CRIDESAT, Av. Copayapu 485, Casilla de Correo 240, Copiapó (Chile); Serafini, D. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Av. Lib. Bernardo O’Higgins 3363, Casilla de correo 307, Santiago (Chile); Iturriza, I. [CEIT, Manuel de Lardizábal 15, 20018 San Sebastián, España (Spain); Bustos, O. [Departamento de Ingeniería Metalúrgica, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Av. Lib. Bernardo O’Higgins 3363, Casilla de correo 10233, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-12-25

    Highlights: •Study of phase evolution of elemental powders Mg and Cu by mechanical alloying. •The presence of an amorphous precursor which crystallizes to Mg{sub 2}Cu can be observed. •Establishing the sequence of phase transformations leading to the formation of Mg{sub 2}Cu. •The feasibility to obtain Mg{sub 2}Cu by means two possible routes has been established. -- Abstract: Phase evolution during mechanical alloying (MA) of elemental Mg and Cu powders and their subsequent heat treatment is studied. Elemental Mg and Cu powders in a 2:1 atomic ratio were mechanically alloyed in a SPEX 8000D mill using a 10:1 ball-to-powder ratio. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that the formation of the intermetallic Mg{sub 2}Cu takes place between 3 and 4 h of milling, although traces of elemental Cu are still present after 10 h of milling. The thermal behavior of different powder mixtures was evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The combination of DSC, heat treatment and XRD has shown a sequence of phase transformations that results in the intermetallic Mg{sub 2}Cu from an amorphous precursor. This amorphous phase is converted into Mg{sub 2}Cu by heating at low temperature (407 K). Short MA times and the formation of the amorphous precursor, together with its subsequent transformation into Mg{sub 2}Cu at low temperatures; represent an advantageous alternative route for its preparation.

  1. High power RF solid state power amplifier system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, III, William Herbert (Inventor); Chavers, Donald Gregory (Inventor); Richeson, James J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A high power, high frequency, solid state power amplifier system includes a plurality of input multiple port splitters for receiving a high-frequency input and for dividing the input into a plurality of outputs and a plurality of solid state amplifier units. Each amplifier unit includes a plurality of amplifiers, and each amplifier is individually connected to one of the outputs of multiport splitters and produces a corresponding amplified output. A plurality of multiport combiners combine the amplified outputs of the amplifiers of each of the amplifier units to a combined output. Automatic level control protection circuitry protects the amplifiers and maintains a substantial constant amplifier power output.

  2. Ways to suppress click and pop for class D amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haishi, Wang; Bo, Zhang; Jiang, Sun

    2012-08-01

    Undesirable audio click and pop may be generated in a speaker or headphone. Compared to linear (class A/B/AB) amplifiers, class D amplifiers that comprise of an input stage and a modulation stage are more prone to producing click and pop. This article analyzes sources that generate click and pop in class D amplifiers, and corresponding ways to suppress them. For a class D amplifier with a single-ended input, click and pop is likely to be due to two factors. One is from a voltage difference (VDIF) between the voltage of an input capacitance (VCIN) and a reference voltage (VREF) of the input stage, and the other one is from the non-linear switching during the setting up of the bias and feedback voltages/currents (BFVC) of the modulation stage. In this article, a fast charging loop is introduced into the input stage to charge VCIN to roughly near VREF. Then a correction loop further charges or discharges VCIN, substantially equalizing it with VREF. Dummy switches are introduced into the modulation stage to provide switching signals for setting up BFVC, and the power switches are disabled until the BFVC are set up successfully. A two channel single-ended class D amplifier with the above features is fabricated with 0.5 μm Bi-CMOS process. Road test and fast Fourier transform analysis indicate that there is no noticeable click and pop.

  3. A fully integrated 16 channel digitally trimmed pulse shaping amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hearn, W.E.; Wright, M.E.

    1993-11-01

    A fully integrated CMOS pulse shaping amplifier has been developed at LBL. All frequency dependent networks are included on the chip. Provision is made for tuning to compensate for process variations. The overall architecture and details of the circuitry are discussed. Test results are presented.

  4. Computational processes of evolution and the gene expression messy genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kargupta, H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Computational Science Methods Div.

    1996-05-01

    This paper makes an effort to project the theoretical lessons of the SEARCH (Search Envisioned As Relation and Class Hierarchizing) framework introduced elsewhere (Kargupta, 1995b) in the context of natural evolution and introduce the gene expression messy genetic algorithm (GEMGA) -- a new generation of messy GAs that directly search for relations among the members of the search space. The GEMGA is an O({vert_bar}{Lambda}{vert_bar}{sup k}({ell} + k)) sample complexity algorithm for the class of order-k delineable problems (Kargupta, 1995a) (problems that can be solved by considering no higher than order-k relations) in sequence representation of length {ell} and alphabet set {Lambda}. Unlike the traditional evolutionary search algorithms, the GEMGA emphasizes the computational role of gene expression and uses a transcription operator to detect appropriate relations. Theoretical conclusions are also substantiated by experimental results for large multimodal problems with bounded inappropriateness of representation.

  5. Self-assembly and photoluminescence evolution of hydrophilic and hydrophobic quantum dots in sol–gel processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ping, E-mail: mse_yangp@ujn.edu.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Matras-Postolek, Katarzyna [Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Cracow University of Technology, Krakow 31-155 (Poland); Song, Xueling; Zheng, Yan; Liu, Yumeng; Ding, Kun; Nie, Shijie [School of Material Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Highly luminescent quantum dots (QDs) with tunable photoluminescence (PL) wavelength were assembled into various morphologies including chain, hollow spheres, fibers, and ring structures through sol–gel processes. The PL properties during assembly as investigated. - Highlights: • Highly luminescent quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized from several ligands. • The evolution of PL in self-assembly via sol–gel processes was investigated. • CdTe QDs were assembled into a chain by controlling hydrolysis and condensation reactions. • Hollow spheres, fibers, and ring structures were created via CdSe/ZnS QDs in sol–gel processes. - Abstract: Highly luminescent quantum dots (QDs) with tunable photoluminescence (PL) wavelength were synthesized from several ligands to investigate the PL evolution in QD self-assembly via sol–gel processes. After ligand exchange, CdTe QDs were assembled into a chain by controlling the hydrolysis and condensation reaction of 3-mercaptopropyl-trimethoxysilane. The chain was then coated with a SiO{sub 2} shell from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS). Hollow spheres, fibers, and ring structures were created from CdSe/ZnS QDs via various sol–gel processes. CdTe QDs revealed red-shifted and narrowed PL spectrum after assembly compared with their initial one. In contrast, the red-shift of PL spectra of CdSe/ZnS QDs is small. By optimizing experimental conditions, SiO{sub 2} spheres with multiple CdSe/ZnS QDs were fabricated using TEOS and MPS. The QDs in these SiO{sub 2} spheres retained their initial PL properties. This result is useful for application because of their high stability and high PL efficiency of 33%.

  6. Wideband LTE power amplifier with integrated novel analog pre-distorter linearizer for mobile wireless communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthirajoo, Eswaran; Ramiah, Harikrishnan; Kanesan, Jeevan; Reza, Ahmed Wasif

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, a new circuit to extend the linear operation bandwidth of a LTE (Long Term Evolution) power amplifier, while delivering a high efficiency is implemented in less than 1 mm2 chip area. The 950 µm × 900 µm monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifier (PA) is fabricated in a 2 µm InGaP/GaAs process. An on-chip analog pre-distorter (APD) is designed to improve the linearity of the PA, up to 20 MHz channel bandwidth. Intended for 1.95 GHz Band 1 LTE application, the PA satisfies adjacent channel leakage ratio (ACLR) and error vector magnitude (EVM) specifications for a wide LTE channel bandwidth of 20 MHz at a linear output power of 28 dBm with corresponding power added efficiency (PAE) of 52.3%. With a respective input and output return loss of 30 dB and 14 dB, the PA's power gain is measured to be 32.5 dB while exhibiting an unconditional stability characteristic from DC up to 5 GHz. The proposed APD technique serves to be a good solution to improve linearity of a PA without sacrificing other critical performance metrics.

  7. Interface evolution and shear strength of Al/Ti bi-metals processed by a spark plasma sintering (SPS) apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miriyev, Aslan, E-mail: aslan.miriyev@columbia.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University in the City of New York, 500 W. 120th St., Mudd 220, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Levy, Asaf; Kalabukhov, Sergey; Frage, Nachum [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O.B. 653, Beer Sheva 8410501 (Israel)

    2016-09-05

    Microstructural evolution of the Al/Ti bi-metal interface during heat treatment in a spark plasma sintering (SPS) apparatus was investigated under various conditions for the first time. A mechanism of interfacial layer growth was suggested based on the results of SEM, TEM and X-ray diffraction analysis. A continuous TiAl{sub 3} intermetallic layer was formed at the Al/Ti interface even after a processing time as short as about a minute. The TiAl{sub 3} layer grew mainly into the Ti part, while only a few individual grains grew into the Al part. Evolution of the interlayer was determined by Al diffusion through the (TiAl{sub 3}/TiAl{sub 3}) grain boundary. The activation energy of the process was 140 kJ/mol. The shear strength of the interface in the Al/Ti bi-metal was determined after various heat treatments. The shear strength of the bi-metal was limited by the properties of aluminum, with no effect of interlayer thickness or current mode and pulse pattern of the SPS treatment being detected. - Highlights: • Spark plasma sintering apparatus was used for heat treatment of Al/Ti bi-metals. • Microstructural evolution of Al/Ti interface during SPS treatment was investigated. • A continuous TiAl{sub 3} intermetallic layer was formed at the Al/Ti interface. • The bi-metal shear strength was limited by the properties of pure aluminum. • No effect of TiAl{sub 3} thickness or SPS current mode and pulse pattern was detected.

  8. Challenges of VDD scaling for analog circuits: an amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bargagli-Stoffi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available With the shrinking of the device dimensions, the power supply voltage value is continuously decreasing. Since the threshold voltage value does not decrease as much as the power supply and the drain source saturation voltage becomes an important fraction of the power supply, many amplifier architectures are no more suitable for modern processes. A transconductance amplifier based on current mirrors is analyzed highlighting the main challenges of a low-voltage analog design. Among the many proposed amplifier architectures, a topology based on current mirrors has been chosen as the most promising to operate with low voltages. Simulations with 90nm CMOS prove the feasibility of circuit operation with satisfactory performance at an operating power supply voltage as low as 0.6V.

  9. Chemical evolution of 244Pu in the solar vicinity and its implications for the properties of r-process production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Takuji; Yokoyama, Tetsuya; Bekki, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Meteoritic abundances of r-process elements are analyzed to deduce the history of chemical enrichment by the r-process, from the beginning of disk formation to the present time in the solar vicinity. Our analysis combines the abundance information from short-lived radioactive nuclei such as 244Pu with the abundance information from stable r-process nuclei such as Eu. These two types of nuclei can be associated with one r-process event and an accumulation of events until the formation of the solar system, respectively. With the help of the observed local star formation (SF) history, we deduce the chemical evolution of 244Pu and obtain three main results: (I) the last r-process event occurred 130-140 Myr before the formation of the solar system; (II) the present-day low 244Pu abundance as measured in deep-sea reservoirs results from the low recent SF rate compared to ˜4.5-5 Gyr ago; and (III) there were ˜15 r-process events in the solar vicinity from the formation of the Galaxy to the time of solar system’s formation and ˜30 r-process events to the present time. Then, adopting the hypothesis that a neutron star (NS) merger is the r-process production site, we find that the ejected r-process elements are extensively spread out and mixed with interstellar matter, with a mass of ˜ 3.5× {10}6 M⊙, which is about 100 times larger than that for supernova ejecta. In addition, the event frequency of r-process production is estimated to be 1 per ~1400 core-collapse supernovae, which is identical to the frequency of NS mergers estimated from the analysis of stellar abundances.

  10. Evolution of microstructure and mechanical properties of SUS430/C11000/SUS430 composites during the laser-forming process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazari, Hamed Delfan; Seyedkashi, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Gollo, Mohammad Hoseinpour; Moon, Young Hoon

    2017-09-01

    Multilayered sheet metals have been widely used to achieve a wide range of favorable mechanical, physical, thermal and electrical properties. Laser beam irradiation over these materials creates extreme temperature changes that can lead to changes in the microstructural properties. Microstructure plays a very crucial role in determining the mechanical property of the irradiated region, thus determining the optimum laser processing conditions. In this study, metallographic studies, as well as tensile, fatigue and hardness tests, are undertaken on SUS430/C11000/SUS430 laminated composites that have been exposed to laser irradiation with different number of passes. This composite can be used in the microelectronics industry since it has the anti-corrosion and strength capability of stainless steel, and the electrical superiority of copper. Ytterbium fiber laser is used in such a way that the governing mechanism of the process is the temperature gradient mechanism. Evolution of the microstructure is revealed by metallography, and the fracture levels of tension and fatigue test specimens are further evaluated by SEM. This study illustrates the significant effects of successive laser irradiation on the evolution of microstructure and mechanical properties, which lead to some suggestions for improving the properties of laser-formed SUS430/C11000/SUS430 composites.

  11. Quantitative genetics approaches to study evolutionary processes in ecotoxicology; a perspective from research on the evolution of resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerks, Paul L; Xie, Lingtian; Levinton, Jeffrey S

    2011-05-01

    Quantitative genetic approaches are often used to study evolutionary processes in ecotoxicology. This paper focuses on the evolution of resistance to environmental contaminants-an important evolutionary process in ecotoxicology. Three approaches are commonly employed to study the evolution of resistance: (1) Assessing whether a contaminant-exposed population has an increased resistance relative to a control population, using either spatial or temporal comparisons. (2) Estimating a population's heritability of resistance. (3) Investigating responses in a laboratory selection experiment. All three approaches provide valuable information on the potential for contaminants to affect a population's evolutionary trajectory via natural selection. However, all three approaches have inherent limitations, including difficulty in separating the various genetic and environmental variance components, responses being dependent on specific population and testing conditions, and inability to fully capture natural conditions in the laboratory. In order to maximize insights into the long-term consequences of adaptation, it is important to not just look at resistance itself, but also at the fitness consequences and at correlated responses in characteristics other than resistance. The rapid development of molecular genetics has yielded alternatives to the "black box" approach of quantitative genetics, but the presence of different limitations and strengths in the two fields means that they should be viewed as complementary rather than exchangeable. Quantitative genetics is benefiting from the incorporation of molecular tools and remains an important field for studying evolutionary toxicology. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

  12. Additive genetic variance in polyandry enables its evolution, but polyandry is unlikely to evolve through sexy or good sperm processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, L M; Simmons, L W; Garcia-Gonzalez, F

    2016-05-01

    Polyandry is widespread despite its costs. The sexually selected sperm hypotheses ('sexy' and 'good' sperm) posit that sperm competition plays a role in the evolution of polyandry. Two poorly studied assumptions of these hypotheses are the presence of additive genetic variance in polyandry and sperm competitiveness. Using a quantitative genetic breeding design in a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster, we first established the potential for polyandry to respond to selection. We then investigated whether polyandry can evolve through sexually selected sperm processes. We measured lifetime polyandry and offensive sperm competitiveness (P2 ) while controlling for sampling variance due to male × male × female interactions. We also measured additive genetic variance in egg-to-adult viability and controlled for its effect on P2 estimates. Female lifetime polyandry showed significant and substantial additive genetic variance and evolvability. In contrast, we found little genetic variance or evolvability in P2 or egg-to-adult viability. Additive genetic variance in polyandry highlights its potential to respond to selection. However, the low levels of genetic variance in sperm competitiveness suggest that the evolution of polyandry may not be driven by sexy sperm or good sperm processes. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  13. The Evolution of a Children's Domestic Violence Counseling Group: Stages and Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, E. Heather

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study is to illuminate the lived experiences of 4 young children between 6 and 7 years old who witnessed domestic violence while revealing the complex relationship between group process and stage development in their 18-week counseling group. Data revealed that processes occurring between and among group…

  14. Visualization of the Evolution of Layout Metrics for Business Process Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haisjackl, Cornelia; Burattin, Andrea; Soffer, Pnina

    2017-01-01

    Considerable progress regarding impact factors of process model understandability has been achieved. For example, it has been shown that layout features of process models have an effect on model understandability. Even so, it appears that our knowledge about the modeler’s behavior regarding the l...

  15. STUDY ON SYNTHESIS AND EVOLUTION OF NANOCRYSTALLINE Mg4Ta2O9 BY AQUEOUS SOL-GEL PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H. T.; Yang, C. H.; Wu, W. B.; Yue, Y. L.

    2012-06-01

    Nanosized and highly reactive Mg4Ta2O9 were successfully synthesized by aqueous sol-gel method compared with conventional solid-state method. Ta-Mg-citric acid solution was first formed and then evaporated resulting in a dry gel for calcination in the temperature ranging from 600°C to 800°C for crystallization in oxygen atmosphere. The crystallization process from the gel to crystalline Mg4Ta2O9 was identified by thermal analysis and phase evolution of powders was studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique during calcinations. Particle size and morphology were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM). The results revealed that sol-gel process showed great advantages over conventional solid-state method and Mg4Ta2O9 nanopowders with the size of 20-30 nm were obtained at 800°C.

  16. Switched-capacitor amplifier and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Mori, S.

    1985-01-01

    A switched-capacitor (SC) amplifier in which the bias and load circuits are made of SC circuits is proposed. It is shown that by changing the control clock in the SC circuit, which is suitable for integration, the characteristics of the amplifier can be varied. An SC amplifier of the signal-recursion type is described. Since the SC amplifier is configured with only one active device and one set of peripheral components, it has a small size and a high gain. An example is given for an SC bandpass filter using the SC amplifier. It is concluded that the SC amplifier is useful for integration and low-power consumption of the SC network.

  17. A Bayesian approach to constrain the time evolution of tropospheric parameters in GNSS data processing : implications for meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahmani, S.; Rebischung, P.; Bock, O.

    2016-12-01

    The atmospheric water vapor induces a delay in the propagation time of GNSS signals when they cross the troposphere. Zenithal Wet Delays (ZWD) are thus estimated during GNSS data processing and used to retrieve Integrated Water Vapor (IWV) with a usual precision of around 1-2 kg.m-2. These GNSS-derived IWV are now routinely assimilated into numerical weather prediction models and are also used to validate satellite measurements and evaluate climate models. However, their accuracy remains to be precisely evaluated especially during intense weather events. Developing and evaluating advanced tropospheric products for monitoring severe weather events and climate is one of the main objectives of the COST Action ES1206 supported by the EU.In this study, we focus on a particular limitation of GNSS-derived IWV: in GNSS data processing, the temporal evolution of ZWD is usually modelled as a random walk (ZWD(t+dt) = ZWD(t) + ɛ(t)), where the variance of the white noise ɛ(t) is usually chosen arbitrarily, regardless of the location of the station and the local weather conditions. This approach is clearly not optimal, for instance in case of severe weather events, where an inappropriate variance choice for ɛ(t) can induce biases over 5 kg.m-2 on GNSS-derived IWV. We therefore use a Bayesian approach to determine optimal random walk variances for both ZWD and tropospheric gradients in PPP processing of GNSS data. We first present the methodology and validate it with simulated data. Then, we apply our method on real GNSS data and compare the obtained ZWD with those from a usual PPP processing. Finally, we plan to use data from microwave radiometers to get an external characterization of the temporal evolution of ZWD and to verify that the random walk variances obtained with our method adequately describe the variability of atmospheric water vapor.

  18. Search for the algorithm of genes distribution during the process of microbial evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.

    2015-09-01

    Previous two and three dimensional graph analysis of eco-physiological data of Archaea demonstrated specific geometry for distribution of major Prokaryotic groups in a hyperboloid function. The function of a two-sheet hyperboloid covered all known biological groups, and therefore, could be applied for the entire evolution of life on Earth. The vector of evolution was indicated from the point of hyper temperature, extreme acidity and low salinity to the point of low temperature and increased alkalinity and salinity. According to this vector, the following groups were chosen for the gene screening analysis. In the vector "High-Temperature → Low-Temperature" within extreme acidic pH (0-3), it is: 1) the hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeota - order Sulfolobales, 2) moderately thermophilic Euryarchaeota - Class Thermoplasmata, and 3) mesophilic acidophiles- genus Thiobacillus and others. In the vector "Low pH → High pH" the following groups were selected in three temperature ranges: a) Hyperthermophilic Archaea and Eubacteria, b) moderately thermophilic - representatives of the genera Anaerobacter and Anoxybacillus, and c) mesophilic haloalkaliphiles (Eubacteria and Archaea). The genes associated with acidophily (H+ pump), chemolitho-autotrophy (proteins of biochemichal cycles), polymerases, and histones were proposed for the first vector, and for the second vector the genes associated with halo-alkaliphily (Na+ pumps), enzymes of organotrophic metabolisms (sugar- and proteolytics), and others were indicated for the screening. Here, an introduction to the phylogenetic constant (ρη) is presented and discussed. This universal characteristic is calculated for two principally different life forms -Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes; Existence of the second type of living forms is impossible without the first one. The number of chromosomes in Prokaryotic organisms is limited to one (with very rare exceptions, to two), while in Eukaryotic organisms this number is larger. Currently

  19. Enhanced Gain in Photonic Crystal Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Sara; Semenova, Elizaveta; Hansen, Per Lunnemann

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate enhanced gain in the slow-light regime of quantum well photonic crystal amplifiers. A strong gain enhancement is observed with the increase of the group refractive index, due to light slow-down. The slow light enhancement is shown in a amplified spontaneous emission ....... These results are promising for short and efficient semiconductor optical amplifiers. This effect will also benefit other devices, such as mode locked lasers....

  20. Short Rayleigh Range Free Electron Laser Amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, L H; Murphy, J B; Rose, J; Shaftan, T V; Wang, X J; Watanabe, T

    2005-01-01

    An important requirement for a high average power laser system is a manageable power density on the first optical element. One possibility to achieve this is a single pass amplifier which generates a short Rayleigh range (SRL) light beam. We present design parameters and calculated performances for several SRL configurations. These include a simulation of the optically guided (pinched) MW class FEL [1], the scalloped beam FEL amplifier [2] and high gain TOK amplifiers we propose to explore at our SDL facility.

  1. Silicon Germanium Cryogenic Low Noise Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardin, J. C.; Montazeri, S.; Chang, Su-Wei

    2017-05-01

    Silicon germanium heterojunction bipolar transistors have emerged in the last decade as an excellent option for use in cryogenic low noise amplifiers. This paper begins with a review of the critical developments that have led to today’s cryogenic low noise amplifiers. Next, recent work focused on minimizing the power consumption of SiGe cryogenic amplifiers is presented. Finally, open issues related to the cryogenic noise properties of SiGe HBTs are discussed.

  2. Evolution of a sensory novelty: tympanic ears and the associated neural processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Carr, Catherine E

    2008-01-01

    frequencies (2-4kHz). In ancestral atympanate tetrapods, we hypothesize that low-frequency sound may have been processed by non-tympanic mechanisms like those in extant amphibians. The subsequent emergence of tympanic hearing would have led to changes in the central auditory processing of both high......-frequency sound and directional hearing. These changes should reflect the independent origin of the tympanic ears in the major tetrapod groups. The processing of low-frequency sound, however, may have been more conserved, since the acoustical coupling of the ancestral tympanate ear probably produced little...

  3. Transverse pumped laser amplifier architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayramian, Andrew James; Manes, Kenneth; Deri, Robert; Erlandson, Al; Caird, John; Spaeth, Mary

    2013-07-09

    An optical gain architecture includes a pump source and a pump aperture. The architecture also includes a gain region including a gain element operable to amplify light at a laser wavelength. The gain region is characterized by a first side intersecting an optical path, a second side opposing the first side, a third side adjacent the first and second sides, and a fourth side opposing the third side. The architecture further includes a dichroic section disposed between the pump aperture and the first side of the gain region. The dichroic section is characterized by low reflectance at a pump wavelength and high reflectance at the laser wavelength. The architecture additionally includes a first cladding section proximate to the third side of the gain region and a second cladding section proximate to the fourth side of the gain region.

  4. Characterization of Josephson parametric amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorzalek, Stefan; Fedorov, Kirill; Zhong, Ling; Bitzenbichler, Martin; Haeberlein, Max; Schwarz, Manuel J.; Eder, Peter; Goetz, Jan; Wulschner, Friedrich; Xie, Edwar; Baust, Alexander; Marx, Achim; Menzel, Edwin P.; Deppe, Frank; Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Muenchen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Propagating quantum microwaves are a promising building block for quantum communication. In particular, such itinerant quantum microwaves can be generated in the form of squeezed photon states using Josephson parametric amplifiers (JPA). A thorough experimental characterization of JPAs is therefore an essential prerequisite for further experiments towards quantum communication. For implementing JPAs we employ an established λ/4 bi-coplanar microwave resonator design where a dc-SQUID is biased by an external flux to tune the resonant frequency. An inductively coupled antenna acts as a pump for the JPA. We characterize several JPAs and evaluate the data within standard Josephson junction theory and the input-output formalism. In particular, we investigate hysteretic and bifurcation behavior of the JPAs in addition to usual non-degenerate JPA gain measurements.

  5. Monitoring structural evolution of organosilicate species during sol-gel processes by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Chen, Lei

    2016-02-28

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has been employed to study species distribution in controlled acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and condensation of (3-chloropropyl)trimethoxysilane (CPTMS), which is frequently used in the synthesis of hybrid silica-based materials. The conditions of analysis for reaction products, i.e. organosilicate oligomers, were optimized by using various capillary temperatures and solute concentrations. The structures of organosilicate oligomers were shown to vary with reaction duration and the molar ratio of water to siloxane (r), with multiple types of oligomers attributed to linear, cyclic and hydroxylated species. The evolution of oligomeric structures was elucidated from the ESI-MS spectra. The number and intensity of cyclic oligomers increase with an increase in the r-value or reaction length, at the expense of linear species, indicating the trend to formation of cross-linked polysiloxane structures. Overall, this work demonstrates that ESI-MS is an indispensable tool for the comprehensive characterization of the correlation between properties and structure of hybrid silica-based materials. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Momentum Budget Evolution of Typhoon Nari (2001 During the Landfall Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Jen Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the evolution of tangential and radial flows of Typhoon Nari (2001 during its landfall in Taiwan, absolute angular momentum (AAM and radial wind budgets of Nari are conducted by analyzing the MM5 simulation results with high spatial and temporal resolutions (2-km horizontal grid spacing and 2-min output interval. The AAM is nearly conserved outside the eyewall and above the boundary layer while Nari is over the ocean; after landfall, the enhanced surface friction and turbulent mixing produces mostly negative local tendencies of AAM above terrain. For the landfall storm, both the radar observation and model simulation indicate that the radial inflows at lower levels become thicker and stronger over land, and the sloping radial outflow jet is maximized at the midlevel above rugged topography. The midlevel radial outflows result from supergradient accelerations of 20 - 35 m s-1 h-1 and supergradient winds of 5 - 9 m s-1. The enhanced imbalance accelerations imply that the gradient wind balance is no longer appropriate to describe tangential winds over terrain. Near the eyewall, the supergradient winds can be as strong as 9 m s-1 above terrain and subgradient winds up to -21 m s-1 are found at the surface on the lee side. The stronger force imbalances of the landfall Nari produce larger local changes of AAM and radial momentum, leading to more quickly-evolved vortex flows and secondary circulations over Taiwan¡¦s steep terrain.

  7. Design of an 1800nm Raman amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    in transmission loss, but also the reduction in the Raman gain coefficient as the amplifier wavelength is increased. Both polarization components of the Raman gain is characterized, initially for linearly co-polarized signal and pump, subsequently linearly polarized orthogonal signal and pump. The noise......We present the experimental results for a Raman amplifier that operates at 1810 nm and is pumped by a Raman fiber laser at 1680 nm. Both the pump laser and the Raman amplifier is polarization maintaining. A challenge when scaling Raman amplifiers to longer wavelengths is the increase...

  8. Technological evolution of main critical processes used in COMPERJ; Evolucao tecnologica dos principais processos criticos utilizados no COMPERJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Roberta A. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica; Construtora Norberto Odebrecht, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Seidl, Peter; Guimaraes, Maria Jose O.C. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    2008-07-01

    Considered key to the country, the Petrochemical Complex in Rio de Janeiro (COMPERJ) will provide significant benefits to the Brazilian industry, such as production, a large-scale petrochemical raw materials, due to bigger and better processing of heavy oil national, especially the field of Marlim. The deployment of this complex aggregate value to the national economy, due to replace the export of heavy oil, lower market value, the export of products of higher added value to be produced in the complex. The integration refining-petrochemistry that occur in COMPERJ facilitate critical processes, such as atmospheric distillation, vacuum distillation, Petrochemical FCC and polymerization processes. This venture will take in the same plant, a Basic Petrochemical Unit (UPB) and a number of Petrochemical Associates units (UPA's), where in the first generation, the UPB will produce ethylene and propylene and in the second generation, the UPA's will convert the basic petrochemical in resins such as polypropylene, polyethylene, styrene, among others. The technology of PETROBRAS in relation to processes cited previously, has made many progress in recent years and the result of this development can be seen by increasing of patent number in the technical area. The analysis of technological evolution of these processes is of extreme importance for the identification of innovation trends of Brazil in relation to other countries to confirm the great potential of the Research Center of PETROBRAS with regard to these processes. Thus, this work aims to make an analysis of the technological developments of the main critical processes that will occur in COMPERJ and their integration refining-petrochemistry, identifying the various innovations regarding these processes. (author)

  9. Viral inhibition of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP: a striking example of functional convergent evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke C Verweij

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses are large DNA viruses that are highly abundant within their host populations. Even in the presence of a healthy immune system, these viruses manage to cause lifelong infections. This persistence is partially mediated by the virus entering latency, a phase of infection characterized by limited viral protein expression. Moreover, herpesviruses have devoted a significant part of their coding capacity to immune evasion strategies. It is believed that the close coexistence of herpesviruses and their hosts has resulted in the evolution of viral proteins that specifically attack multiple arms of the host immune system. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs play an important role in antiviral immunity. CTLs recognize their target through viral peptides presented in the context of MHC molecules at the cell surface. Every herpesvirus studied to date encodes multiple immune evasion molecules that effectively interfere with specific steps of the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP plays a key role in the loading of viral peptides onto MHC class I molecules. This is reflected by the numerous ways herpesviruses have developed to block TAP function. In this review, we describe the characteristics and mechanisms of action of all known virus-encoded TAP inhibitors. Orthologs of these proteins encoded by related viruses are identified, and the conservation of TAP inhibition is discussed. A phylogenetic analysis of members of the family Herpesviridae is included to study the origin of these molecules. In addition, we discuss the characteristics of the first TAP inhibitor identified outside the herpesvirus family, namely, in cowpox virus. The strategies of TAP inhibition employed by viruses are very distinct and are likely to have been acquired independently during evolution. These findings and the recent discovery of a non-herpesvirus TAP inhibitor represent a striking example of functional

  10. Process-based morphodynamic modeling of the Yangtze Estuary at a decadal timescale: Controls on estuarine evolution and future trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Hua Long; Ding, Ping Xing; Wang, Zheng Bing; Ge, Jian Zhong

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the decadal morphodynamic evolution of estuaries and deltas and their controls is of vital importance regarding management for estuarine function and sustainable development. This work addresses this issue by applying a process-based model system (Delft3D) to hindcast and then forecast the morphodynamic evolution of the Yangtze Estuary at a decadal timescale. Forced by the river and tides, the model considers sand-mud mixture and the variations of river water discharge and sediment discharge. The morphodynamic model is validated against three periods, i.e., an accretion period (1958-1978), an erosion period (1986-1997) and a recent accretion period with human activities (2002 - 2010). Model results show good performance with respect to spatial erosion and deposition patterns, sediment volume changes, and hypsometry curves. The model reveals quite different behaviors for mud transport between the dry and wet seasons, which is subject to the prescription of river boundary conditions and bed composition. We define six scenarios to project evolution to the year 2030 under decreased river inputs and increased relative sea level. The simulations reveal that overwhelming amount of erosion will likely occur in the inner and mouth bar area of the estuary. Particularly, the mouth zone will shift from net deposition before 2010 to net erosion by 2030, mainly because of decreasing sediment supply. Changes in water discharge have minor effects on the projected trend. Net erosion will be considerable when the sediment supply is extremely low (100 Mt yr- 1) due to the abundance of erodible modern sediment in the Yangtze Estuary. Erosion within the mouth bar area may be unexpected, including the deepening of the tidal inlet at East Chongming mudflat and the formation of a flood channel on the seaward side of Jiuduansha Shoal. Overall, the model results provide valuable information for sustainable delta management under changing conditions for both the Yangtze system

  11. Renewal stochastic processes with correlated events: phase transitions along time evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, Jorge; Robledo, Alberto

    2011-03-01

    We consider renewal stochastic processes generated by nonindependent events from the perspective that their basic distribution and associated generating functions obey the statistical-mechanical structure of systems with interacting degrees of freedom. Based on this fact we look briefly into the less-known case of processes that display phase transitions along time. When the density distribution ψ{n}(t) for the occurrence of the nth event at time t is considered to be a partition function, of a "microcanonical" type for n "degrees of freedom" at fixed "energy" t, one obtains a set of four partition functions of which that for the generating function variable z and Laplace transform variable ε, conjugate to n and t, respectively, plays a central role. These partition functions relate to each other in the customary way and in accordance to the precepts of large deviations theory, while the entropy, or Massieu potential, derived from ψ{n}(t) satisfies an Euler relation. We illustrate this scheme first for an ordinary renewal process of events generated by a simple exponential waiting-time distribution ψ(t). Then we examine a process modeled after the so-called Hamiltonian mean-field model that is representative of agents that perform a repeated task with an associated outcome, such as an opinion poll. When a sequence of (many) events takes place in a sufficiently short time the process exhibits clustering of the outcome, but for larger times the process resembles that of independent events. The two regimes are separated by a sharp transition, technically of the second order. Finally we point out the existence of a similar scheme for random-walk processes.

  12. Renewal stochastic processes with correlated events: Phase transitions along time evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, Jorge; Robledo, Alberto

    2011-03-01

    We consider renewal stochastic processes generated by nonindependent events from the perspective that their basic distribution and associated generating functions obey the statistical-mechanical structure of systems with interacting degrees of freedom. Based on this fact we look briefly into the less-known case of processes that display phase transitions along time. When the density distribution ψn(t) for the occurrence of the nth event at time t is considered to be a partition function, of a “microcanonical” type for n “degrees of freedom” at fixed “energy” t, one obtains a set of four partition functions of which that for the generating function variable z and Laplace transform variable ɛ, conjugate to n and t, respectively, plays a central role. These partition functions relate to each other in the customary way and in accordance to the precepts of large deviations theory, while the entropy, or Massieu potential, derived from ψn(t) satisfies an Euler relation. We illustrate this scheme first for an ordinary renewal process of events generated by a simple exponential waiting-time distribution ψ(t). Then we examine a process modeled after the so-called Hamiltonian mean-field model that is representative of agents that perform a repeated task with an associated outcome, such as an opinion poll. When a sequence of (many) events takes place in a sufficiently short time the process exhibits clustering of the outcome, but for larger times the process resembles that of independent events. The two regimes are separated by a sharp transition, technically of the second order. Finally we point out the existence of a similar scheme for random-walk processes.

  13. Ping-pong auto-zero amplifier with glitch reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Mark R [Maple Grove, MN

    2008-01-22

    A ping-pong amplifier with reduced glitching is described. The ping-pong amplifier includes a nulling amplifier coupled to a switching network. The switching network is used to auto-zero a ping amplifier within a ping-pong amplifier. The nulling amplifier drives the output of a ping amplifier to a proper output voltage level during auto-zeroing of the ping amplifier. By being at a proper output voltage level, glitches associated with transitioning between a ping amplifier and a pong amplifier are reduced or eliminated.

  14. Tectonomagmatic evolution of the terrestrial planets: importance for understanding of processes of their formation and subsequent development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkov, E.; Bogatikov, O.

    2009-04-01

    Our knowledge about formation and evolution of the terrestrial planets (the Earth, Venus, Mars, Mercury and, possibly, the Moon) based on different physical and geochemical speculations and models. The main disadvantage of such hypotheses is their abstract character and ignoring any data on tectonomagmatic evolution of those planets. At the same time, just this type of data provide an important information, which is necessary for elaborating of a present-day theory of their formation and evolution. The Earth has been much better studied compared to the other planets, therefore we will discuss the main questions of planetary tectonomagmatic evolution using the Earth as example plus involve other data on the Moon and the terrestrial planets. Two dominating hypotheses about composition of the primordial Earth's crust exist now: (1) traditional implies that the primordial crust had basic composition, whereas the sialic crust resulted from a geosyncline process or, in modern terms, from processes at convergent plate margins, and (2) primordial crust was sialic; the plate tectonic mechanisms started in the Middle Paleoproterozoic and resulted in oceanic spreading and formation of the secondary oceanic crust. Both models require a global melting of a primary chondritic material to form the primordial crust. The final result depends on the degree of melt differentiation during solidification of a magmatic ocean. Such a solidification, due to differences between adiabatic and melting-points gradients had to proceed in bottom-top direction (Jeffries, 1929) and resulted in accumulation of low-temperature derivates in the primordial crust. Geological data, namely granite-dominated Archean crust, and results of studying of detrital zircon from Australia supports the primordial-sialic crust hypothesis. The Moon which is four times smaller than Earth has a basic primordial crust. Such a difference can be explained by different depths of their magmatic oceans. The Early

  15. Evolution of chloroplast transcript processing in Plasmodium and its chromerid algal relatives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G Dorrell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well understood that apicomplexan parasites, such as the malaria pathogen Plasmodium, are descended from free-living algae, and maintain a vestigial chloroplast that has secondarily lost all genes of photosynthetic function. Recently, two fully photosynthetic relatives of parasitic apicomplexans have been identified, the 'chromerid' algae Chromera velia and Vitrella brassicaformis, which retain photosynthesis genes within their chloroplasts. Elucidating the processes governing gene expression in chromerid chloroplasts might provide valuable insights into the origins of parasitism in the apicomplexans. We have characterised chloroplast transcript processing pathways in C. velia, V. brassicaformis and P. falciparum with a focus on the addition of an unusual, 3' poly(U tail. We demonstrate that poly(U tails in chromerids are preferentially added to transcripts that encode proteins that are directly involved in photosynthetic electron transfer, over transcripts for proteins that are not involved in photosynthesis. To our knowledge, this represents the first chloroplast transcript processing pathway to be associated with a particular functional category of genes. In contrast, Plasmodium chloroplast transcripts are not polyuridylylated. We additionally present evidence that poly(U tail addition in chromerids is involved in the alternative processing of polycistronic precursors covering multiple photosynthesis genes, and appears to be associated with high levels of transcript abundance. We propose that changes to the chloroplast transcript processing machinery were an important step in the loss of photosynthesis in ancestors of parasitic apicomplexans.

  16. Self-organizing maps in geothermal exploration-A new approach for understanding geochemical processes and fluid evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehme, Maren; Bauer, Klaus; Nukman, Mochamad; Regenspurg, Simona

    2017-04-01

    Understanding geochemical processes is an important part of geothermal exploration to get information about the source and evolution of geothermal fluids. However, in most cases knowledge of fluid properties is based on few parameters determined in samples from the shallow subsurface. This study presents a new approach that allows to conclude from the combination of a variety of these data on processes occurring at depth in a geothermal reservoir. The neural network clustering technique called ;self-organizing maps; (SOMs) successfully distinguished two different geothermal settings based on a hydrochemical database and disclosed the source, evolution and flow pathways of geothermal fluids. Scatter plots, as shown in this study, are appropriate presentations of element concentrations and the chemical interaction of water and rock at depth. One geological setting presented here is marked by fault dominated fluid pathways and minor influence of volcanic affected fluids with high concentrations of HCO3, Ca and Sr. The second is a magmatically dominated setting showing strong alteration features in volcanic rocks and accommodates acidic fluids with high SO4 and Si concentrations. Former studies, i.e., Giggenbach (1988), suggested Cl, HCO3 and SO4 to be generally the most important elements for understanding hydrochemical processes in geothermal reservoirs. Their relation has been widely used to classify different water types in geothermal fields. However, this study showed that non-standard elements are at least of same importance to reveal different fluid types in geothermal systems. Therefore, this study is an extended water classification approach using SOM for element correlations. SOM have been proven to be a successful method for analyzing even relatively small hydrochemical datasets in geothermal applications.

  17. Microstructural evolution and strengthening behavior in in-situ magnesium matrix composites fabricated by solidification processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelliah, Nagaraj M., E-mail: cmnraj.7@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Rupnagar 140001, Punjab (India); Singh, Harpreet, E-mail: harpreetsingh@iitrpr.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Rupnagar 140001, Punjab (India); Surappa, M.K., E-mail: mirle@materials.iisc.ac.in [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560012, Karnataka (India)

    2017-06-15

    In-situ magnesium matrix composites with three different matrix materials (including Mg, AZ91 and AE44 Mg-alloys) were fabricated by injecting cross-linked polymer directly into the molten Mg/Mg-alloys, and having it convert to the 2.5 vol% SiCNO ceramic phase using liquid stir-casting method. In-situ chemical reaction took place within the molten slurry tending to produce 42 and 18 vol% Mg{sub 2}Si crystals in Mg and AE44 matrix composites, respectively but not in AZ91 matrix composite. Microstructural evolution of Mg{sub 2}Si crystals was discussed on the basis of availability of heterogeneous nucleation sites and amount of Al-atoms in the molten slurry. The observed micro-hardness and yield strengths are enhanced by factor of four to three as compared to their unreinforced counterparts, and Taylor strengthening was found to be the predominant strengthening mechanism in magnesium and AE44 matrix composites. Summation model predicted the yield strengths of the fabricated composites more preciously when compared to Zhang and Chen, and modified Clyne models. - Highlights: • In-situ magnesium composites were fabricated using liquid stir-casting method. • In-situ pyrolysis of cross-linked polymer has been utilized to obtain ceramic phases. • Mg{sub 2}Si crystals were formed in magnesium and AE44 matrix composites but not in AZ91 matrix composites. • The variation in size and morphology of Mg{sub 2}Si crystals with matrix materials are discussed. • Strengthening mechanisms in in-situ composites are analyzed and discussed.

  18. Future evolution of the Fast TracKer (FTK) processing unit

    CERN Document Server

    Gentsos, C; The ATLAS collaboration; Giannetti, P; Magalotti, D; Nikolaidis, S

    2014-01-01

    The Fast Tracker (FTK) processor [1] for the ATLAS experiment has a computing core made of 128 Processing Units that reconstruct tracks in the silicon detector in a ~100 μsec deep pipeline. The track parameter resolution provided by FTK enables the HLT trigger to identify efficiently and reconstruct significant samples of fermionic Higgs decays. Data processing speed is achieved with custom VLSI pattern recognition, linearized track fitting executed inside modern FPGAs, pipelining, and parallel processing. One large FPGA executes full resolution track fitting inside low resolution candidate tracks found by a set of 16 custom Asic devices, called Associative Memories (AM chips) [2]. The FTK dual structure, based on the cooperation of VLSI dedicated AM and programmable FPGAs, is maintained to achieve further technology performance, miniaturization and integration of the current state of the art prototypes. This allows to fully exploit new applications within and outside the High Energy Physics field. We plan t...

  19. Natural processes and system evolution during mine closure: numerical simulation and visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, M.; Poppei, J.; Schlickenrieder, L. [Colenco Power Engineering LTD, Baden (Switzerland); Forster, B. [Gsf-Forschungszentrum Fur Umwelt Und Gesundheit - Schachtanlage Asse, Remlingen (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    We have developed a numerical tool which is particularly suitable for the simulation of water and gas flow, mechanical and chemical phenomena as well as processes related to the transport of contaminants and radionuclides in underground structures over long periods of time. KAFKA was applied for investigations concerning the flooding and closure of the Asse research mine, a former salt mine. Given the complexity of the mine structure and the multitude of interconnected processes considered, the specifically designed visualization tool Assemblage is indispensable for the interpretation of intermittent and final simulation results. (authors)

  20. 1-MHz high power femtosecond Yb-doped fiber chirped-pulse amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhong-Qi; Yang, Pei-Long; Teng, Hao; Zhu, Jiang-Feng; Wei, Zhi-Yi

    2018-01-01

    A practical femtosecond polarization-maintaining Yb-doped fiber amplifier enabling 153 fs transform-limited pulse duration with 32 μJ pulse energy at 1 MHz repetition rate corresponding to a peak power of 0.21 GW is demonstrated. The laser system based on chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) technique is seeded by a dispersion managed, nonlinear polarization evolution (NPE) mode-locked oscillator with spectrum bandwidth of 31 nm at 1040 nm and amplified by three fiber pre-amplifying stages and a rod type fiber main amplifying stage. The laser works with beam quality of M2 of 1.3 and power stability of 0.63% (root mean square, RMS) over 24 hours will be stable sources for industrial micromachining, medical therapy and scientific research.

  1. Coupling of local texture and microstructure evolution during restoration processes in aluminum deformed to large strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels; Yu, Tianbo; Mishin, Oleg

    2013-01-01

    The coupling between local texture and microstructure is analyzed during restoration processes in aluminum cold-rolled to high and ultrahigh strains. The deformed microstructure is composed of lamellae with orientations of rolling texture components that occupy different volume fractions and vary...

  2. Early Evolution of the Toxicity Identification Evaluation Process: Contributions from the USEPA Effluent Testing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of its whole effluent testing program, the USEPA developed an effects-directed analysis (EDA) approach to identifying the cause of toxicity in toxic effluents or ambient waters, an EDA process termed a “Toxicity Identification Evaluation” (TIE), which is the focus of this...

  3. Selected Problems of the Microstructure Evolution During Microalloyed Steel Wire Rod Production Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwiecień M.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we have discussed the selected problems of microstructure development during the whole manufacturing process, i.e. continuous casting, thermomechanical processing, and cold metal forming of the microalloyed steels wires. In the investigated steels, the microstructure development was controlled by the history of deformation and by the effects of microalloying elements, mostly Nb, Ti, and B. It has been concluded that obtained in the ultrafine grained microalloyed steel wires mechanical properties were first of all resulting from specific structural composition and grain refinement. Additionally, it has been proven that austenite grain refinement, that increases nucleation rate during the austenite-to-ferrite phase transformation, as a result of the thermomechanical processing, are very beneficial from point of view of the final mechanical properties. This problem starts to be very important when the microalloyed steel products are subjected to severe plastic deformation, as it has been shown discussed in the present work for combined processes of wire drawing and wire flattening.

  4. Kinetics and microstructure evolution of Ti{sub 2}SC during in situ synthesis process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Wen Bin, E-mail: siwuya1984@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 122 Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China); Song, Jing Hong [Center for Materials Research and Analysis, Wuhan University of Technology, 122 Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China); Mei, Bing Chu [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 122 Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2013-07-25

    Highlights: •We first fabricate bulk Ti{sub 2}SC by using in situ/hot press method. •The reaction path of Ti{sub 2}SC formation is investigated. •The densification process of bulk sample is observed. -- Abstract: Using in situ reaction method, we have studied the sinter process of the layered ternary Ti{sub 2}SC with Ti, TiS{sub 2} and C powders as initial materials. By XRD and thermodynamic calculations we know that Ti{sub 2}SC is the final result of the reaction between TiS and TiC. TiS is an important intermediate which is more possible the result of TiS{sub 2} and Ti rather than the decomposition of TiS{sub 2}. DSC curves are used to investigate the reaction kinetics of the whole sintering process. By Kissinger and Ozawa method the activation energy are separately calculated to be 125.4 kJ/mol and 134.9 kJ/mol. We also have observed the grain growth and densification process of bulk sample by SEM.

  5. Microstructural evolution of all-wet-processed CIGS films using Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hee Soo; Choi, Eunmi; Kim, Areum; Pyo, Sung Gyu [School of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heukseok-Dong, Seoul, 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sung Pil [Fuel Cell Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    We report a wet process deposition in order to identify a cost-effective processing scheme for CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (CIGS) layers on molybdenum/soda lime glass substrates from a Cu-In-Ga precursor solution. We employed a spin coater at various settings to evaluate the uniformity of the resulting CIGS solar cell layer. After the CIGS precursor film was deposited, we applied a selenization process. In the selenization process, we used a controlled temperature RTA system and compared it to a noncontrolled temperature system. We investigated the morphological properties for different selenization temperature treatments. We used Raman mapping to detect binary compounds and found the binary compound effect on the film. Raman mapping results show that the density of the binary compound in the CIGS layer increased with selenization temperature, and at 600 C, the density of the binary compounds was highest. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Making Time for Instructional Leadership. Volume 1: The Evolution of the SAM Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldring, Ellen; Grissom, Jason A.; Neumerski, Christine M.; Murphy, Joseph; Blissett, Richard; Porter, Andy

    2015-01-01

    This three-volume report describes the "SAM (School Administration Manager) process," an approach that about 700 schools around the nation are using to direct more of principals' time and effort to improve teaching and learning in classrooms. Research has shown that a principal's instructional leadership is second only to teaching among…

  7. Morphodynamic river processes and techniques for assessment of channel evolution in Alpine gravel bed rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formann, E.; Habersack, H. M.; Schober, St.

    2007-10-01

    Over the past 10 years many restoration projects have been undertaken in Austria, and river engineering measures such as spur dykes and longitudinal bank protection, which imposed fixed lateral boundaries on rivers, have been removed. The EU-Life Project "Auenverbund Obere Drau" has resulted in extensive restoration on the River Drau, aimed to improve the ecological integrity of the river ecosystem, to arrest riverbed degradation, and to ensure flood protection. An essential part of the restoration design involved the consideration of self-forming river processes, which led to new demands being imposed on river management. This paper illustrates how model complexity is adapted to the solution and evaluation of different aspects of river restoration problems in a specific case. Point-scale monitoring data were up-scaled to the whole investigation area by means of digital elevation models, and a scaling approach to the choice of model complexity was applied. Simple regime analysis methods and 1-D models are applicable to the evaluation of long-term and reach-scale restoration aims, and to the prediction of kilometre-scale processes (e.g. mean river bed aggradation or degradation, flood protection). 2-D models gave good results for the evaluation of hydraulic changes (e.g. transverse flow velocities, shear stresses, discharges at diffluences) for different morphological units at the local scale (100 m-10 m), and imposed an intermediate demand on calibration data and topographic survey. The study shows that complex 3-D numerical models combined with high resolution digital elevation models are necessary for detailed analysis of processes (1 m-0.01 m), but not for the evaluation of the restoration aims on the River Drau. In conclusion, model choice (complexity) will depend on both lower limits (determined by the complexity of processes to be analysed) and upper limits (field data quality and process understanding for numerical models).

  8. Late Quaternary landscape evolution in the Great Karoo, South Africa: Processes and drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldknow, Chris; Hooke, Janet; Lang, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The Great Karoo spans the north-central part of South Africa at a major climatic boundary. The characteristics, sequences, spatial patterns and drivers of river response to Late Quaternary climate changes in this region remain unclear due to the fragmentary alluvial/colluvial stratigraphic record and the lack of dated palaeoclimatic archives. Dendritic gully networks incised into deep deposits (up to 6 m) of colluvium and alluvium in the upper Sundays River catchment expose a legacy of "cut and fill" features. In 1st order tributaries, these are predominantly discontinuous palaeochannels and flood-outs with localised palaeosols, whereas in 2nd & 3rd order tributaries there are: 1) incised palaeo-geomorphic surfaces, 2) semi-continuous inset terrace sequences, 3) buried palaeo-gully topography. Using a combination of field mapping, logging of sediment outcrops, soil micromorphological and grain size analysis, mineral magnetic measurements and radiometric dating (OSL & 14C), we derive a stratigraphic evolution model which demonstrates a) the number of phases of incision, aggradation and pedogenesis, b) the spatial and temporal extent of each phase and c) the drivers of alluviation and associated feedbacks. Our reconstruction of regional valley alluviation indicates four distinct terrace units of contrasting depositional age. The base of the succession reflects slow aggradation under periglacial conditions associated with the Last Glacial Maximum. Subsequent channel entrenchment, causing terrace abandonment (T1) occurred in the deglacial period when vegetation and rainfall were in anti-phase. Re-instatement of connectivity with deep upland colluvial stores resulted in the injection of a pulse of sediment to valley floors, triggering compartmentalised backfilling (aggradation of T2) which propagated upstream as far as the second order drainage lines. This backfilling restructured the local hydrology, which, in concert with enhanced summer-rainfall, contributed to a

  9. Design Study of a Compact Megawatt Class FEL Amplifier Based on the VISA Undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, T; Murphy, J B; Pinayev, I P; Rose, J; Shaftan, T V; Skaritka, J; Tanabé, T; Tsang, Thomas; Wang, X J; Yu, L H

    2005-01-01

    The design of a Short Rayleigh Length (SRL) FEL amplifier based on the strong focusing VISA undulator [1] is presented in this study. The SRL FEL amplifier will be operating in the IR (0.8 - 1 μm), and consists of a two-meter VISA undulator with a peak seed laser power of about 1 kW. The FEL power and transverse mode evolution along the undulator were investigated using the three-dimensional numerical code GENESIS1.3. The evolution of the FEL output from the undulator exit to the first downstream optics is also studied. The possibility of using the proposed amplifier for a two-stage cascaded HGHG FEL [2] at the BNL SDL is also explored. The design parameters and the numerical results will be presented.

  10. Evolution of International Space Station Program Safety Review Process and Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratterman, Christian D.; Green, Collin; Guibert, Matthew R.; McCracken, Kristle I.; Sang, Anthony C.; Sharpe, Matthew D.; Tollinger, Irene V.

    2013-09-01

    As the International Space Station (ISS) transitions to the operations and research lifecycle phase, an expected increase in the number of payloads necessitates an easier, more consistent method for management of the hazard reporting process. To that end, the ISS Program decided to upgrade their Safety and Hazard data systems with three goals: make safety and hazard data more accessible; better support the interconnection of different types of safety data (e.g., problems, hazards, hardware); and, increase the efficiency (and compliance) of safety-related processes.These goals are accomplished by moving data into a web-based, structured data system utilizing the Mission Assurance System (MAS), which is based on the open- source Bugzilla software bug tracker. This paper provides an overview of the MAS system and the approach taken by the ISS Program and the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) Human Computer Interaction (HCI) team to determine requirements and implementation strategy for the new system.

  11. Feature profile evolution in plasma processing using on-wafer monitoring system

    CERN Document Server

    Samukawa, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    This book provides for the first time a good understanding of the etching profile technologies that do not disturb the plasma. Three types of sensors are introduced: on-wafer UV sensors, on-wafer charge-up sensors and on-wafer sheath-shape sensors in the plasma processing and prediction system of real etching profiles based on monitoring data. Readers are made familiar with these sensors, which can measure real plasma process surface conditions such as defect generations due to UV-irradiation, ion flight direction due to charge-up voltage in high-aspect ratio structures and ion sheath conditions at the plasma/surface interface. The plasma etching profile realistically predicted by a computer simulation based on output data from these sensors is described.

  12. Degrading organic micropollutants: The next challenge in the evolution of biological wastewater treatment processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh eSinghal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Global water scarcity is driving the need for identifying new water source. Wastewater could be a potential water resource if appropriate treatment technologies could be developed. One of the barriers to obtaining high quality water from wastewater arises from the presence of organic micropollutants, which are biologically active at trace levels. Removal of these compounds from wastewater by current physico-chemical technologies is prohibitively expensive. While biological treatment processes are comparatively cheap, current systems are not capable of degrading the wide range of organic micropollutants present in wastewater. As current wastewater treatment processes were developed for treating conventional pollutants present at mg/L levels, degrading the ng/L levels of micropollutants will require a different approach to system design and operation. In this paper we discuss strategies that could be employed to develop biological wastewater treatment systems capable of degrading organic micropollutants.

  13. Quaternary climate - Terrestrial Biosphere Interaction: amplifying or stabilizing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claussen, Martin

    2016-04-01

    According to the Gaia hypothesis, interaction between climate and biological processes tend to homeostatically maintain, on a global scale, conditions favourable for life. Does the idea of homeostatic interaction between terrestrial biosphere and climate hold for the Quaternary glacial - interglacial changes? Interpretation of palaeoclimate and palaeobotanic evidence by using climate and Earth system models yields an interesting picture. The synergy between the sea-ice albedo - climate feedback and the taiga-tundra - climate feedback is suggested to amplify the orbitally forced climatic precession. This effect seems to be strong at regional scale, but small at global scale. Various simulations indicate that biogeophysical processes amplify the difference of some 4 to 6 K in global mean temperature between glacial and interglacial climate by some 10 percent. The combined effect of biogeophysical and biogeochemical processes, i.e. processes with involve carbon stored in biomass and soil, is less clear. Theoretical studies suggest that in pre-industrial, interglacial climate, a reduction in boreal and extratropical forests tend to cool the climate and a reduction in tropical forest, to warm the climate. Recent estimates in changes in organic carbon stored under ice sheets and in permafrost point at the possibility that the sum of all terrestrial biogeochemical processes might almost "carbon neutral" to the climate system. If corroborated, this observation would favour the assumption of a dominance of biogeophysical processes amplifying orbitally forced Quaternary climate variations.

  14. Chemical roots of biological evolution: the origins of life as a process of development of autonomous functional systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Mirazo, Kepa; Briones, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, an extension of the Darwinian framework is being considered for the study of prebiotic chemical evolution, shifting the attention from homogeneous populations of naked molecular species to populations of heterogeneous, compartmentalized and functionally integrated assemblies of molecules. Several implications of this shift of perspective are analysed in this critical review, both in terms of the individual units, which require an adequate characterization as self-maintaining systems with an internal organization, and also in relation to their collective and long-term evolutionary dynamics, based on competition, collaboration and selection processes among those complex individuals. On these lines, a concrete proposal for the set of molecular control mechanisms that must be coupled to bring about autonomous functional systems, at the interface between chemistry and biology, is provided. PMID:28446711

  15. Analytical investigation on the minimum traffic delay at a two-phase intersection considering the dynamical evolution process of queues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Ze; Jiang, Rui; Hu, Mao-Bin; Jia, Bin

    2016-04-01

    This paper has studied the minimum traffic delay at a two-phase intersection, taking into account the dynamical evolution process of queues. The feature of delay function has been studied, which indicates that the minimum traffic delay must be achieved when at least one of the two constraint inequalities take the equal sign. We have derived the minimum delay as well as the corresponding traffic signal period, which shows that two situations are classified. Under certain circumstance, extra green time is needed for one phase while otherwise extra green time should be assigned to neither phase. Our work indicates that although the clearing policies were shown in many experiments to be optimal at isolated intersections, it is sometimes not the case.

  16. Euglena in time: Evolution, control of central metabolic processes and multi-domain proteins in carbohydrate and natural product biochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis C. O’Neill

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Euglena gracilis is a eukaryotic microalgae that has been the subject of scientific study for hundreds of years. It has a complex evolutionary history, with traces of at least four endosymbiotic genomes and extensive horizontal gene transfer. Given the importance of Euglena in terms of evolutionary cell biology and its unique taxonomic position, we initiated a de novo transcriptome sequencing project in order to understand this intriguing organism. By analysing the proteins encoded in this transcriptome, we can identify an extremely complex metabolic capacity, rivalling that of multicellular organisms. Many genes have been acquired from what are now very distantly related species. Herein we consider the biology of Euglena in different time frames, from evolution through control of cell biology to metabolic processes associated with carbohydrate and natural products biochemistry.

  17. Chemical roots of biological evolution: the origins of life as a process of development of autonomous functional systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Mirazo, Kepa; Briones, Carlos; de la Escosura, Andrés

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, an extension of the Darwinian framework is being considered for the study of prebiotic chemical evolution, shifting the attention from homogeneous populations of naked molecular species to populations of heterogeneous, compartmentalized and functionally integrated assemblies of molecules. Several implications of this shift of perspective are analysed in this critical review, both in terms of the individual units, which require an adequate characterization as self-maintaining systems with an internal organization, and also in relation to their collective and long-term evolutionary dynamics, based on competition, collaboration and selection processes among those complex individuals. On these lines, a concrete proposal for the set of molecular control mechanisms that must be coupled to bring about autonomous functional systems, at the interface between chemistry and biology, is provided. © 2017 The Authors.

  18. Fate of Deepwater Horizon oil in Alabama's beach system: understanding physical evolution processes based on observational data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayworth, Joel S; Prabakhar Clement, T; John, Gerald F; Yin, Fang

    2015-01-15

    The impact of MC252 oil on northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) beaches from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) catastrophe was extensive along Alabama's beaches. While considerable amount of cleanup has occurred along these beaches, as of August 2014, DWH oil spill residues continue to be found as surface residual balls (SRBs), and also occasionally as submerged oil mats (SOMs). Four years of field observations informing the fate and transport of DWH SRBs in Alabama's beach system are presented here, along with a conceptual framework for describing their physical evolution processes. The observation data show that SRBs containing MC252 residues currently remain in Alabama's beach system, although their relationship to SOMs is not fully known. Based on our field observations we conclude that small DWH SRBs are likely to persist for several years along the Alabama shoreline. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Grain size and microhardness evolution during annealing of a magnesium alloy processed by high-pressure torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Raquel C. Malheiros

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High-pressure torsion (HPT was used to impose severe plastic deformation on a magnesium alloy AZ31. The material was processed for 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7 turns at room temperature under a pressure of 6.0 GPa. Samples were annealed for 1800 s at temperatures of 373 K, 423 K, 473 K, 573 K and 673 K. Microhardness tests and metallography were used to determine the evolution of strength and grain size as a function of the annealing temperature. The results show that recrystallization takes place at temperatures higher than 423 K. The annealing behavior is independent of the number of turns in HPT.

  20. Analytical investigation on the minimum traffic delay at a two-phase intersection considering the dynamical evolution process of queues

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hong-Ze; Hu, Mao-Bin; Jia, Bin

    2016-01-01

    This paper has studied the minimum traffic delay at a two-phase intersection, taking into account the dynamical evolution process of queues. The feature of delay function has been studied, which indicates that the minimum traffic delay must be achieved when equality holds in at least one of the two constraints. We have derived the minimum delay as well as the corresponding traffic signal period, which shows that two situations are classified. Under certain circumstance, extra green time is needed for one phase while otherwise no extra green time should be assigned in both phases. Our work indicates that although the clearing policies were shown in many experiments to be optimal at isolated intersections, it is sometimes not the case.

  1. Septa and processes: convergent evolution of the orbit in haplorhine primates and strigiform birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegaz, Rachel A; Kirk, E Christopher

    2009-12-01

    According to the "nocturnal visual predation hypothesis" (NVPH), the convergent eyes and orbits of primates result from selection for improved stereoscopic depth perception to facilitate manual capture of prey at night. Within primates, haplorhines share additional derived orbital morphologies, including a postorbital septum and greater orbital convergence than any other mammalian clade. While the homology and function of the haplorhine septum remain controversial, experimental data suggest that septa evolved to inhibit mechanical disturbance of the orbital contents by the anterior temporalis muscle during mastication. According to this "insulation hypothesis," haplorhines are particularly susceptible to disruption of the orbital contents because they have large and highly convergent eyes and orbits. However, comparative tests of the insulation hypothesis have been hindered by the morphological uniqueness of the haplorhine septum among mammals. Among birds, owls (Strigiformes) exhibit an expanded postorbital process that may be functionally analogous to the haplorhine septum. Here we present a comparative analysis of orbital morphology in 103 avian species that tests two hypotheses: (1) large, convergent orbits are associated with nocturnal visual predation, and (2) the strigiform postorbital process and haplorhine postorbital septum similarly function to insulate the eyes from contractions of mandibular adductors. Strigiforms, as nocturnal visual predators, possess relatively large orbits and exhibit the highest degree of orbital convergence in our sample. Notably, orbital convergence does not scale with orbit size in birds as in mammals. Owls are also unique among the birds examined in possessing extensive, plate-like postorbital processes that largely isolate the orbits from the temporal fossae. Furthermore, dissections of four owl species demonstrate that the expanded strigiform postorbital process deflects the path of mandibular adductors around the eye

  2. Self-pulsation in Raman fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Erland Vestergaard; Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic behavior caused by Brillouin scattering in Raman fiber amplifiers is studied. Modes of self-pulsation steady state oscillations are found. Their dependence on amplification scheme is demonstrated.......Dynamic behavior caused by Brillouin scattering in Raman fiber amplifiers is studied. Modes of self-pulsation steady state oscillations are found. Their dependence on amplification scheme is demonstrated....

  3. CMOS Current-mode Operational Amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaulberg, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    A fully differential-input differential-output current-mode operational amplifier (COA) is described. The amplifier utilizes three second generation current-conveyors (CCII) as the basic building blocks. It can be configured to provide either a constant gain-bandwidth product in a fully balanced...

  4. A CMOS current-mode operational amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaulberg, Thomas

    1993-01-01

    A fully differential-input, differential-output, current-mode operational amplifier (COA) is described. The amplifier utilizes three second-generation current conveyors (CCIIs) as the basic building blocks. It can be configured to provide either a constant gain-bandwidth product in a fully balanced...

  5. Evolution of resveratrol and piceid contents during the industrial winemaking process of sherry wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán, Ana; Palacios, Victor; Caro, Ildefonso; Pérez, Luis

    2010-04-14

    In the Jerez region, the sherry winemaking process involves a stage of aging carried out in a dynamic system known as "soleras" and "criaderas". In the case of fino sherry, this aging takes place in the presence of a yeast film growing on the surface of the wine, which gives it a very specific character. In this work, the influence of the sherry elaboration process on resveratrol and piceid levels has been studied. With this purpose, the contents of resveratrol isomers and piceid during the main stages of the sherry wine production system, from maturation until bottling, were monitored during two vintages. The results showed that resveratrol contents of both the skin and juice, for Palomino fino grape, are very similar to those described for other white grape varieties. Sherry wine fermentation, clarification, cold stabilization, and filtration processes considerably affect resveratrol and piceid contents. However, biological aging has the most important influence, diminishing their contents by 80%. These results were confirmed in several tests performed in the laboratory, in which various factors that could affect the resveratrol contents during aging were taken into account (oxidative phenomena and a combination with acetaldehyde and "flor" biofilm growth).

  6. Evolution of International Space Station Program Safety Review Processes and Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratterman, Christian D.; Green, Collin; Guibert, Matt R.; McCracken, Kristle I.; Sang, Anthony C.; Sharpe, Matthew D.; Tollinger, Irene V.

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station Program at NASA is constantly seeking to improve the processes and systems that support safe space operations. To that end, the ISS Program decided to upgrade their Safety and Hazard data systems with 3 goals: make safety and hazard data more accessible; better support the interconnection of different types of safety data; and increase the efficiency (and compliance) of safety-related processes. These goals are accomplished by moving data into a web-based structured data system that includes strong process support and supports integration with other information systems. Along with the data systems, ISS is evolving its submission requirements and safety process requirements to support the improved model. In contrast to existing operations (where paper processes and electronic file repositories are used for safety data management) the web-based solution provides the program with dramatically faster access to records, the ability to search for and reference specific data within records, reduced workload for hazard updates and approval, and process support including digital signatures and controlled record workflow. In addition, integration with other key data systems provides assistance with assessments of flight readiness, more efficient review and approval of operational controls and better tracking of international safety certifications. This approach will also provide new opportunities to streamline the sharing of data with ISS international partners while maintaining compliance with applicable laws and respecting restrictions on proprietary data. One goal of this paper is to outline the approach taken by the ISS Progrm to determine requirements for the new system and to devise a practical and efficient implementation strategy. From conception through implementation, ISS and NASA partners utilized a user-centered software development approach focused on user research and iterative design methods. The user-centered approach used on

  7. Design and performance of the beamlet amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlandson, A.C.; Rotter, M.D.; Frank, M.D.; McCracken, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    In future laser systems, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF), multi-segment amplifiers (MSAs) will be used to amplify the laser beam to the required levels. As a prototype of such a laser architecture, the authors have designed, built, and tested flash-lamp-pumped, Nd:Glass, Brewster-angle slab MSAs for the Beamlet project. In this article, they review the fundamentals of Nd:Glass amplifiers, describe the MSA geometry, discuss parameters that are important in amplifier design, and present our results on the characterization of the Beamlet MSAs. In particular, gain and beam steering measurements show that the Beamlet amplifiers meet all optical performance specifications and perform close to model predictions.

  8. Detection of Non-Amplified Genomic DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Corradini, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    This book offers a state-of-the-art overview on non amplified DNA detection methods and provides chemists, biochemists, biotechnologists and material scientists with an introduction to these methods. In fact all these fields have dedicated resources to the problem of nucleic acid detection, each contributing with their own specific methods and concepts. This book will explain the basic principles of the different non amplified DNA detection methods available, highlighting their respective advantages and limitations. The importance of non-amplified DNA sequencing technologies will be also discussed. Non-amplified DNA detection can be achieved by adopting different techniques. Such techniques have allowed the commercialization of innovative platforms for DNA detection that are expected to break into the DNA diagnostics market. The enhanced sensitivity required for the detection of non amplified genomic DNA has prompted new strategies that can achieve ultrasensitivity by combining specific materials with specifi...

  9. Calculations of superconducting parametric amplifiers performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, T.; Takeda, M.; Saito, S.; Shimakage, H.

    2017-07-01

    A superconducting parametric amplifier is an electromagnetic wave amplifier with high-quality characteristics such as a wide bandwidth, an extremely low noise, and a high dynamic range. In this paper, we report on the estimations of a YBCO superconducting parametric amplifier characteristic. The YBCO thin films were deposited on an MgO substrate by a pulsed laser deposition method. Based on the measured YBCO thin film parameters, theoretical calculations were implemented for evaluations of kinetic inductance nonlinearities and parametric gains. The nonlinearity of the YBCO thin film was estimated to be stronger than a single crystal NbTiN thin film. It is indicated that the YBCO parametric amplifier has a potential to be realized the amplifier with the high parametric gain. It is also expected that it could be operated in the range of the high frequency band, at the high temperature, and low applied current.

  10. Design of an 1800 nm Raman Amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    in the pump power requirement and deteriorated noise properties. Here we demonstrate a Raman amplifier designed for signal wavelengths around 1800 nm. The amplification fiber is an OFS PM Raman fiber, and is pumped by a Raman fiber laser emitting at 1680 nm [4]. The amplifier was pumped co...... suggested as potential transmission fibers for extended wavelength operation, as low losses at long wavelengths have been predicted [3]. Fig. 1 illustrates the predicted low loss limit for a hollow core fiber and for comparison the measured loss of a OFS True Wave fiber. Besides low loss transmission fibers......, also extended band amplifiers are required. As a solution to the latter challenge, Raman amplifiers are suggested as promising candidates. The main hurdle when designing a long wavelength Raman amplifier is the increased intrinsic fiber attenuation which as a consequence leads to an increase...

  11. Quantum dots: lasers and amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bimberg, Dieter; Ledentsov, Nikolai [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, PN5-2, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 (Germany)

    2003-06-25

    Continuous wave room-temperature output power of {approx} 3 W for edge emitters and of 1.2 mW for vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers is realized for GaAs-based devices using InAs quantum dots (QDs) operating at 1.3 {mu}m. Characteristic temperatures up to 170 K below 330 K are realized. Simultaneously, differential efficiency exceeds 80% for these devices. Lasers emitting up to 12 W at 1140-1160 nm are useful as pump sources for Tm{sup 3+}-doped fibres for frequency up-conversion to 470 nm. Both types of lasers show transparency current densities of 6 A cm{sup -2} per dot layer, {eta}{sub int} = 98% and {alpha}{sub i} around 1.5 cm{sup -1}. Long operation lifetimes (above 3000 h at 50 deg C heatsink temperature at 1.5 W CW) and improved radiation hardness as compared to quantum well (QW) devices are manifested. Cut-off frequencies of about 10 GHz at 1100 nm and 6 GHz at 1300 nm and low {alpha} factors resulting in reduced filamentation and improved M{sup 2} values in single-mode operation are realized. Quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers (QD SOAs) demonstrate gain recovery times of 120-140 fs, 4-7 times faster than bulk/QW SOAs. The breakthrough became possible due to the development of self-organized growth in QD technology. (topical review)

  12. Free electron maser amplifier experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Whyte, C G; Cross, A W; He, W; Ronald, K; Young, A; Phelps, A D R

    2000-01-01

    We present results from the X-band reversed guide magnetic field Raman Free Electron Maser (FEM) amplifier experiment at Strathclyde University. The FEM has been designed for zero slippage to achieve maximum instantaneous bandwidth. The tuneablity is further extended by the adjustment of beam voltage and undulator field strength. A 1 kW TWT has been used as the input source for broadband measurements and two 25 kW magnetrons for saturated output power measurements at discrete frequencies. Results show an instantaneous -3 dB bandwidth of 30% for a fixed cathode voltage and magnetic field. The device can be tuned over a range of 65% of the centre frequency by adjusting the cathode voltage. A saturated power of over 1 MW has been measured for 50 A input current. Broadband unsaturated gains of over 35 dB have been measured. An experiment using a 50 A beam from a thermionic cathode electron gun designed at Strathclyde is currently in progress. This will theoretically allow CW operation of the FEM using a DC undula...

  13. Process compensated resonance testing modeling for damage evolution and uncertainty quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Eric; Heffernan, Julieanne; Mayes, Alexander; Gatewood, Garrett; Jauriqui, Leanne; Goodlet, Brent; Pollock, Tresa; Torbet, Chris; Aldrin, John C.; Mazdiyasni, Siamack

    2017-02-01

    Process Compensated Resonance Testing (PCRT) is a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method based on the fundamentals of Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS). PCRT is used for material characterization, defect detection, process control and life monitoring of critical gas turbine engine and aircraft components. Forward modeling and model inversion for PCRT have the potential to greatly increase the method's material characterization capability while reducing its dependence on compiling a large population of physical resonance measurements. This paper presents progress on forward modeling studies for damage mechanisms and defects in common to structural materials for gas turbine engines. Finite element method (FEM) models of single crystal (SX) Ni-based superalloy Mar-M247 dog bones and Ti-6Al-4V cylindrical bars were created, and FEM modal analyses calculated the resonance frequencies for the samples in their baseline condition. Then the frequency effects of superalloy creep (high-temperature plastic deformation) and macroscopic texture (preferred crystallographic orientation of grains detrimental to fatigue properties) were evaluated. A PCRT sorting module for creep damage in Mar-M247 was trained with a virtual database made entirely of modeled design points. The sorting module demonstrated successful discrimination of design points with as little as 1% creep strain in the gauge section from a population of acceptable design points with a range of material and geometric variation. The resonance frequency effects of macro-scale texture in Ti-6Al-4V were quantified with forward models of cylinder samples. FEM-based model inversion was demonstrated for Mar-M247 bulk material properties and variations in crystallographic orientation. PCRT uncertainty quantification (UQ) was performed using Monte Carlo studies for Mar-M247 that quantified the overall uncertainty in resonance frequencies resulting from coupled variation in geometry, material properties, crystallographic

  14. Desalinization, legislative evolution of the concession processes. Colombia as case of study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Lastra-Mier

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Colombia is a country that has an abundant offer of hydric resources. However, this offer is conditioned to the climatic characteristics of the territory and diverse ocean-atmospheric phenomenon (El Niño / La Niña. This disparity of conditions comports excess periods or scarcity periods of water. In this case, alternatives are necessaries for supply the needs of the coast zones populations. The desalinisation of marine waters is an alternative for supply a possible hydric deficit, but is necessary to define and explain the concepts and scopes of this process, from his juridical nature, competencies of the governing entity that regulate them and his concessions.

  15. An enhanced reliability-oriented workforce planning model for process industry using combined fuzzy goal programming and differential evolution approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ighravwe, D. E.; Oke, S. A.; Adebiyi, K. A.

    2017-08-01

    This paper draws on the "human reliability" concept as a structure for gaining insight into the maintenance workforce assessment in a process industry. Human reliability hinges on developing the reliability of humans to a threshold that guides the maintenance workforce to execute accurate decisions within the limits of resources and time allocations. This concept offers a worthwhile point of deviation to encompass three elegant adjustments to literature model in terms of maintenance time, workforce performance and return-on-workforce investments. These fully explain the results of our influence. The presented structure breaks new grounds in maintenance workforce theory and practice from a number of perspectives. First, we have successfully implemented fuzzy goal programming (FGP) and differential evolution (DE) techniques for the solution of optimisation problem in maintenance of a process plant for the first time. The results obtained in this work showed better quality of solution from the DE algorithm compared with those of genetic algorithm and particle swarm optimisation algorithm, thus expressing superiority of the proposed procedure over them. Second, the analytical discourse, which was framed on stochastic theory, focusing on specific application to a process plant in Nigeria is a novelty. The work provides more insights into maintenance workforce planning during overhaul rework and overtime maintenance activities in manufacturing systems and demonstrated capacity in generating substantially helpful information for practice.

  16. Microstructure and texture evolution in a Cu–Ni–Si alloy processed by equal-channel angular pressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadj Larbi, Fayçal; Azzeddine, Hiba [Faculté de Physique, USTHB, BP 32 El-Alia, Dar El Beida, Alger (Algeria); Baudin, Thierry [Université de Paris Sud, ICMMO, UMR CNRS 8182, Laboratoire de physico-chimie de l’état solide, Bâtiment 410, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Mathon, Marie-Hélène [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, CEA-CNRS, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Brisset, François; Helbert, Anne-Laure [Université de Paris Sud, ICMMO, UMR CNRS 8182, Laboratoire de physico-chimie de l’état solide, Bâtiment 410, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Kawasaki, Megumi, E-mail: megumi@hanyang.ac.kr [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Departments of Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1453 (United States); Bradai, Djamel [Faculté de Physique, USTHB, BP 32 El-Alia, Dar El Beida, Alger (Algeria); Langdon, Terence G. [Departments of Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1453 (United States); Materials Research Group, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-25

    Highlights: • A Cu–Ni–Si alloy is processed by ECAP up to 12 passes at 423 K through route A. • The texture after ECAP is characterized by typical shear components of fcc metals. • ECAP leads to randomization of the texture with increasing numbers of passes. • ECAP through route A rotates the texture positions from the ideal component. - Abstract: Experiments were conducted to evaluate the evolution of microstructure and texture in a commercial Cu–2.5Ni–0.6Si (wt.%) alloy processed by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) at 423 K for up to 12 passes. An electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis shows that ECAP processing leads to microstructural refinement with an average grain size of ∼0.9 μm. The refined grains are inclined to the direction of extrusion and the deformation structure evolves from elongated grains to a duplex microstructure of equiaxed and elongated grains. Detailed measurements demonstrate that the grain boundary misorientations gradually increase with increasing numbers of ECAP passes. The texture was investigated using both EBSD and neutron diffraction. The results show the texture after ECAP is characterized by typical shear components of face-centered cubic metals which deviate from their ideal positions.

  17. Influence of the oxygen partial pressure on the phase evolution during Bi-2212 wire melt processing

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C.; Rikel, M.O.; Kadar, J.; Doerrer, C.; Di Michiel, M.; Ballarino, A.; Bottura, L.; Jiang, J.; Kametani, F.; Hellstrom, E.E.; Larbalestier, D.C.

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the influence of the oxygen partial pressure pO2 up to 5.5 bar on the phase changes that occur during melt processing of a state-of-the-art Bi-2212 multifilamentary wire. Phase changes have been monitored in situ by high energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD). We found that the stability of Bi-2212 phase is reduced with increasing pO2. For pO2>1 bar a significant amount of Bi-2212 phase decomposes upon heating in the range 400 to 650 °C. The extent of decomposition strongly increases with increasing pO2, and at pO2=5.5 bar Bi-2212 decomposes completely in the solid state. Textured Bi-2212 can be formed during solidification when pO2 is reduced to 0.45 bar when the precursor is molten. Since the formation of current limiting second phases is very sensitive to pO2 when it exceeds 1 bar, we recommend to reduce the oxygen partial pressure below the commonly used pO2=1 bar, in order to increase the pO2 margins and to make the overpressure process more robust.

  18. Evolution of an audit and monitoring tool into an infection prevention and control process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, A; Topping, A; Humphreys, P

    2016-09-01

    In 2010, an infection prevention and control team in an acute hospital trust integrated an audit and monitoring tool (AMT) into the management regime for patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). To examine the mechanisms through which the implementation of an AMT influenced the care and management of patients with CDI. A constructivist grounded theory approach was used, employing semi-structured interviews with ward staff (N=8), infection prevention and control practitioners (IPCPs) (N=7) and matrons (N=8), and subsequently a theoretical sample of senior managers (N=4). All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using a constant comparison approach until explanatory categories emerged. The AMT evolved into a daily review process (DRP) that became an essential aspect of the management of all patients with CDI. Participants recognized that the DRP had positively influenced the care received by patients with CDI. Two main explanatory themes emerged to offer a framework for understanding the influence of the DRP on care management: education and learning, and the development and maintenance of relationships. The use of auditing and monitoring tools as part of a daily review process may enable ward staff, matrons, and IPCPs to improve patient outcomes and achieve the required levels of environmental hygiene if they act as a focal point for interaction, education, and collaboration. The findings offer insights into the behavioural changes and improved patient outcomes that ensue from the implementation of a DRP. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Evolution of the NASA Commercial Crew Program Mission Assurance Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Amy C.

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) established the Commercial Crew Program (CCP) in order to provide human access to the International Space Station and low Earth orbit via the commercial (non-governmental) sector. A particular challenge to NASA has been how to determine that the Commercial Provider's transportation system complies with programmatic safety requirements. The process used in this determination is the Safety Technical Review Board which reviews and approves provider submitted hazard reports. One significant product of the review is a set of hazard control verifications. In past NASA programs, 100% of these safety critical verifications were typically confirmed by NASA. The traditional Safety and Mission Assurance (S&MA) model does not support the nature of the CCP. To that end, NASA S&MA is implementing a Risk Based Assurance process to determine which hazard control verifications require NASA authentication. Additionally, a Shared Assurance Model is also being developed to efficiently use the available resources to execute the verifications.

  20. Remarks and examples on transient processes and attractors in biological evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Lherminier

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a model for the competition of two biological entities into the same species (polyphasie, clonal/sex, cancerous cells, the first one with a birth ratio higher than the second when the resources are abundant, whereas the situation is reversed for scarce resources. The first one rapidly exhausts the resources, improving growth of the second, leading to a auto-sustained cyclic process (ESS = Evolutionary Stable Strategy. We use known models of population dynamics for three agents: two phases asexual and sexual (for instance of the same species and one of resources. The main feature of the model (for certain values of the parameters is the very long and entangled transient process, which involves a long period where one of the forms is practically absent, before emerging again to join a stable cycle which implies preservation of both forms. This model should throw some light on the biological problem of the maintenance of sexuality in competition with asexual clones, as well as on the alternated fast growth versus latency in cancer tumors.

  1. The Donkerhuk batholith (Namibia): Evolution of and processes in a giant magma reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, John; Jung, Stefan; Kisters, Alex; Buick, Ian

    2016-04-01

    The Donkerhuk batholith represents a gigantic accumulation of felsic magma and thus provides insight into the processes and outcomes in at least some huge felsic magma bodies. The largely S-type batholith, which intrudes amphibolite-facies metaturbidites of the Kuiseb Formation, was emplaced at about 530 Ma, in the Southern Zone of the Damara Belt, following the collision of the Kalahari Craton with the Congo Craton (to the north) in the earliest Phanerozoic. It is a vast, elongate body, > 200 km long and 15 to 40 km wide, trending NE-SW, parallel to the Okahandja Lineament and the general structural grain of the Belt. Our current tectonic model for the Donkerhuk magmatism involves intense and prolonged crustal heating due to the opening of a slab window. Over large areas, the granitic rocks carry variably developed magmatic foliations and, in places, solid-state fabrics, underlining its syn- to late-tectonic emplacement, during northwest shortening and pure-shear-dominated transpression. The magmas were not derived through melting of the Kuiseb schists, but rather from older metasedimentary crust just a few km below emplacement level. They were added to the 'magma chamber' as thousands of separate pulses, preserved as sheets that retain their individuality, at least near the margins and roof zones. In the core of the batholith there was evidently some greater degree of thermal insulation and individual sheets are less easily identified. Thus, the 'magma reservoir' was never a large molten mass, but grew over perhaps 14 Myr, in small increments. This set of processes meant that only very local differentiation look place, that there was little or no mixing between magma batches, even in the core of the batholith where the individuality of the pulses became blurred due to a prolonged crystallisation history. As a result, the Donkerhuk rocks preserve a remarkably high degree of source-inherited elemental and isotopic heterogeneity. We suggest that great caution be

  2. Trinity Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Shannon M

    2010-06-01

    Trinity Evolution Cryopreserved Cell Viable Bone Matrix is a minimally manipulated, human cellular, and tissue-based allograft containing adult mesenchymal stem cells, osteoprogenitor cells, and a demineralized cortical component. The cancellous bone used to produce Trinity Evolution is derived from freshly recovered donor tissue by Food and Drug Administration-registered facilities and processed under aseptic conditions. Preclinical in vivo and in vitro testing as well as strict donor screening has demonstrated the safety of Trinity Evolution as well as its osteoinductive and osteogenic potential contained within a natural osteoconductive matrix.

  3. Major geochemical processes in the evolution of carbonate-Aquifer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanshaw, B.B.; Back, W.

    1979-01-01

    As a result of recent advances by carbonate petrologists and geochemists, hydrologists are provided with new insights into the origin and explanation of many aquifer characteristics and hydrologic phenomena. Some major advances include the recognition that: (1) most carbonate sediments are of biological origin; (2) they have a strong bimodal size-distribution; and (3) they originate in warm shallow seas. Although near-surface ocean water is oversaturated with respect to calcite, aragonite, dolomite and magnesite, the magnesium-hydration barrier effectively prevents either the organic or inorganic formation of dolomite and magnesite. Therefore, calcareous plants and animals produce only calcite and aragonite in hard parts of their bodies. Most carbonate aquifers that are composed of sand-size material have a high initial porosity; the sand grains that formed these aquifers originated primarily as small shells, broken shell fragments of larger invertebrates, or as chemically precipitated oolites. Carbonate rocks that originated as fine-grained muds were initially composed primarily of aragonite needles precipitated by algae and have extremely low permeability that requires fracturing and dissolution to develop into aquifers. Upon first emergence, most sand beds and reefs are good aquifers; on the other hand, the clay-sized carbonate material initially has high porosity but low permeability, a poor aquifer property. Without early fracture development in response to influences of tectonic activity these calcilutites would not begin to develop into aquifers. As a result of selective dissolution, inversion of the metastable aragonite to calcite, and recrystallization, the porosity is collected into larger void spaces, which may not change the overall porosity, but greatly increases permeability. Another major process which redistributes porosity and permeability in carbonates is dolomitization, which occurs in a variety of environments. These environments include back

  4. The hydrogeochemical evolution of a barrier island freshwater reservoir: Conceptual understanding and identification of key processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Stephan; Holt, Tobias; Greskowiak, Janek; Freund, Holger; Böttcher, Michael E.; Massmann, Gudrun

    2017-04-01

    Coastal aquifers play an important role in satisfying the water demands for many people in the world. However, exposition to storm surges, climate change and extensive abstraction pose a threat to current and future use of these valuable water resources in many cases. To mitigate water quality constraints and ensure safe water supply applications, an in-depth understanding of relevant process that determine the water quality is required. We investigated two freshwater reservoirs below the barrier island Spiekeroog, Germany. The main freshwater reservoir is located at the western part of the island, ˜350 years old and has a vertical extension of ˜45m. The other investigated freshwater reservoir is located at the east of Spiekeroog, only a few decades old and has a vertical extension reactions. The expected freshening time of the main aquifer was estimated by means of the retardation formula for sharp fronts and corresponds to ˜880 years. A 1D PHREEQC simulation showed, however, that the effects of ongoing freshening on the present water quality (after ˜350 years) are negligible. Calculated decalcification rates amount to ˜4.4 mm/year which corresponds to ˜1.5 m downward movement of the decalcification front within the last 350 years. pH values ranging between 7.5-8.5 confirm that groundwater at Spiekeroog is in equilibrium with calcite and underline that calcite dissolution is an important process. With respect to the redox system, the data indicates oxygen and nitrate reduction within the first meters of the saturated zone but Mn-Oxide and Fe-Oxide reduction rates seem to be low in the aquifer based on measured dissolved Mn(2+) and Fe(2+) concentrations. The absence of dissolved Fe(2+) could be explained by the formation of iron sulfide minerals which is in agreement with observed sulfate reduction at greater depth indicated by elevated H2S concentrations and PHREEQC speciation calculations.

  5. Measuring Optimal Length of the Amplifying Fiber in Different Working Conditions of the Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek Poboril

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to highlight possible unwanted behaviour of an EDFA optical amplifier during temperature changes. After a brief introduction dealing with amplifiers and doped fibers in general we focus on the assembly of our own EDFA amplifier with standard construction and the IsoGain I-6 amplifying fiber, and on the parameters of its individual components. Since an erbium doped fiber has usually no direct thermal stabilization, temperature changes can affect performance of the entire amplifier. The next part of the article therefore describes the impacts of such changes on behaviour of our amplifier. At the very end we performed a measurement of the amplifier deployed in the actual WDM-PON the description of which can be found in the last chapter.

  6. Microstructure and Texture Evolutions of Biomedical Ti-13Nb-13Zr Alloy Processed by Hydrostatic Extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaltin, K.; Panigrahi, A.; Chrominski, W.; Bulutsuz, A. G.; Kulczyk, M.; Zehetbauer, M. J.; Lewandowska, M.

    2017-11-01

    A biomedical β-type Ti-13Nb-13Zr (TNZ) (wt pct) ternary alloy was subjected to severe plastic deformation by means of hydrostatic extrusion (HE) at room temperature without intermediate annealing. Its effect on microstructure, mechanical properties, phase transformations, and texture was investigated by light and electron microscopy, mechanical tests (Vickers microhardness and tensile tests), and XRD analysis. Microstructural investigations by light microscope and transmission electron microscope showed that, after HE, significant grain refinement took place, also reaching high dislocation densities. Increases in strength up to 50 pct occurred, although the elongation to fracture left after HE was almost 9 pct. Furthermore, Young's modulus of HE-processed samples showed slightly lower values than the initial state due to texture. Such mechanical properties combined with lower Young's modulus are favorable for medical applications. Phase transformation analyses demonstrated that both initial and extruded samples consist of α' and β phases but that the phase fraction of α' was slightly higher after two stages of HE.

  7. An analysis of crack evolution of a 12Cr13 stainless steel during forging process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-min Guo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of an abnormal crack of a forging plate is presented in this work. The crack was found after forging process. Macro-analysis, SEM, composition inspection, metallographic analysis, inclusion analysis, EPMA and EDS were implemented. SEM shows that cleavage fracture is the main feature of the fracture surface, according to which it can be decided that the fracture is brittle fracture. XRF and carbon and sulphur analyzer indicate regular composition condition of the plate. EPMA and EDS suggest phosphorus segregation spread a lot around the crack. The results indicate that: brittleness caused by phosphorus segregation around crack zone is the main reason that cracks generate in the 12Cr13 steel during forging. As all we know, phosphorus has deleterious effect on toughness of steel because of its enrichment on grain boundaries, which can weaken the bond strength of grain boundary. Its existence should be avoided and microstructure of the steel should be homogeneous when good plasticity and toughness are wanted.

  8. Applications of the Galton-Watson process to human DNA evolution and demography

    CERN Document Server

    Neves, A G M

    2005-01-01

    We show that the problem of existence of a mitochondrial Eve can be understood as an application of the Galton--Watson process and presents interesting analogies with critical phenomena in Statistical Mechanics. In the approximation of small survival probability, and assuming limited progeny, we are able to find for a genealogic tree the maximum and minimum survival probabilities over all probability distributions for the number of children per woman constrained to a given mean. As a consequence, we can relate existence of a mitochondrial Eve to quantitative demographic data of early mankind. In particular, we show that a mitochondrial Eve may exist even in an exponentially growing population, provided that the mean number of children per woman $\\overline N$ is constrained to a small range depending on the probability $p$ that a child is a female. Assuming that the value $p \\approx 0.488$ valid nowadays has remained fixed for thousands of generations, the range where a mitochondrial Eve occurs with sizeable p...

  9. IN VITRO EXAMINATION OF DEGENERATIVE EVOLUTION OF ADRENERGIC NERVE ENDINGS IN PULMONARY INFLAMATORY PROCESSES IN NEWBORNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islami, Hilmi; Shabani, Ragip; Haliti, Naim; Bexheti, Sadi; Koliqi, Rozafa; Raka, Denis; Sukalo, Aziz; Izairi, Rusmi; Dauti, Hilmi; Qehaja, Nazim

    2008-01-01

    Morphological aspect of tracheal preparations and pulmonary tissue was studied in vitro. The material was obtained from autopsy of newborns that died from different causes. Examinations were made in different gestational periods (immature 23-29 weeks; premature 30-37 weeks; mature >38 weeks). Material for examination was obtained up to 6 hours after death. Pulmonary and tracheal tissue was incubated for fixation in buffered formalin (10%). Special histochemical and histoenzymatic methods were used for coloring of pulmonary and tracheal tissue and the activity of ATP-ase and dopaoxidase was monitored. Cut out models were made in series of 7μ, 10 μ and 20 μ. In peripheral axons of tracheobronchial pathways, degenerative alterations of adrenergic nerve endings in lung inflammatory processes were documented. These morphologic neuronal changes were described: Walerians degeneration, neuro-axonal degeneration and segment demyelinisation. These changes are well seen with argentafine coloring (Sevier-Munger modification for nerve endings) and with dopaoxidase reaction. In mature newborns that died from respiratory distress syndrome, we found different forms of metabolic and toxic degenerative damage in peripheral axons, such as: segment demyelinisation, neurotubular fragmentation, Schwan cell proliferation, fragmentation and bulging out of axonal neurotubules and neurofilaments. In tracheo-bronchial tissue, chromafine granules are homogenously distributed on Lamina propria layer and through glandular structures. This gives as a contradiction, according to some authors, that adrenergic nerve fibers for muscle tissue are absent and that adrenaline and noradrenalin diffuse in muscle tissue from interstice. PMID:18816252

  10. [Evolution of Root Nodule Bacteria: Reconstruction of the Speciation Processes Resulting from Genomic Rearrangements in a Symbiotic System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provorov, N A; Andronov, E E

    2016-01-01

    The processes of speciation and macroevolution of root nodule bacteria (rhizobia), based on deep rearrangements of their genomes and occurring in the N₂-fixing symbiotic system, are reconstructed. At the first stage of rhizobial evolution, transformation of free-living diazotrophs (related to Rhodopseudomonas) to symbiotic N₂-fixers (Bradyrhizobium) occurred due to the acquisition of the fix gene system, which is responsible for providing nitrogenase with electrons and reducing equivalents, as well as for oxygen-dependent regulation of nitrogenase synthesis in planta, and then of the nod genes responsible for the synthesis of the lipo- chito-oligosaccharide Nod factors, which induce root nodule development. The subsequent rearrangements of bacterial genomes included: (1) increased volume of hereditary information supported by species, genera (pan-genome), and individual strains; (2) transition from the unitary genome to a multicomponent one; and (3) enhanced levels of bacterial genetic plasticity and horizontal gene transfer, resulting in formation of new genera, of which Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium, and Sinorhizobium are the largest, and of over 100 species. Rhizobial evolution caused by development and diversification of the Nod factor synthesizing systems may result in both increased host specificity range (transition of Bradyrhizobium from autotrophic to symbiotrophic carbon metabolism in interaction with a broad spectrum of legumes) and to its contraction (transition of Rhizobium and Sinorhizobium to "altruistic" interaction with legumes of the galegoid clade). Reconstruction of the evolutionary pathway from symbiotic N₂-fixers to their free-living ancestors makes it possible to initiate the studies based on up-to-date genome screening technologies and aimed at the issues of genetic integration of organisms into supracpecies complexes, ratios of the macro- and microevolutionary mechanisms, and developmetn of cooperative adaptations based on altruistic

  11. Morphogenesis and evolution of shelf mud depocenters controlled by natural and anthropogenic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyan; Hanebuth, Till; Oberle, Ferdinand; Cui, Yongsheng; Santos, Ana

    2016-04-01

    Shelf mud depocenters (MDCs) represent the proximal sink for continent-derived material during modern sea level conditions. They serve as habitat for benthic life and store large quantities of carbon nutrients, and contaminants. Most of them initiated to form during mid- to late Holocene. Despite of their important role in the global source-to-sink transport and ecosystem functioning, their growth dynamics and the particular natural as well as anthropogenic drivers that shape their morphology remain largely speculative. In this study we try to address the challenges for a comprehensive understanding of the development of MDCs along the NW Iberian continental margin based on the outcome of an interdisciplinary project GALIOMAR, which ultilizes dense-spaced subbottom seismic profiles, sediment cores, hydrographic monitoring in combination with 3D process-based numerical modeling. The NW Iberian mud depocenter chain (Spain/Portugal) extends coast-parallel over 60 nm at 90-140 m water depth with an average thickness of 1 m (7 m in its core) holding 4,000 million tons of sediment. It started to form at 5.3 cal ka BP around remote accumulation nuclei rather than being attached to the main river suppliers. To link the long-term formation with the modern system, bottom sediment transport during a storm event as representative for winter hydrodynamic conditions was monitored and modelled. Storm-generated downwelling front and associated coastal jets are found to be the primary control for the morphogensis of the MDCs. Near-bottom concentrated suspensions initiated by the storm greatly shape the morphology of MDCs. Due to dam construction along the rivers and intense bottom trawling activities since the 20th century, a great portion of the surface layer of the MDCs has been eroded,endangering the development of the MDCs and their associated ecosystem that is worthy of greater concern.

  12. A Low-Noise Semiconductor Optical Amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratowsky, R.P.; Dijaili, S.; Kallman, J.S.; Feit, M.D.; Walker, J.

    1999-03-23

    Optical amplifiers are essential devices for optical networks, optical systems, and computer communications. These amplifiers compensate for the inevitable optical loss in long-distance propagation (>50 km) or splitting (>10x). Fiber amplifiers such as the erbium-doped fiber amplifier have revolutionized the fiber-optics industry and are enjoying widespread use. Semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) are an alternative technology that complements the fiber amplifiers in cost and performance. One obstacle to the widespread use of SOAs is the severity of the inevitable noise output resulting from amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). Spectral filtering is often used to reduce ASE noise, but this constrains the source spectrally, and improvement is typically limited to about 10 dB. The extra components also add cost and complexity to the final assembly. The goal of this project was to analyze, design, and take significant steps toward the realization of an innovative, low-noise SOA based on the concept of ''distributed spatial filtering'' (DSF). In DSF, we alternate active SOA segments with passive free-space diffraction regions. Since spontaneous emission radiates equally in all directions, the free-space region lengthens the amplifier for a given length of gain region, narrowing the solid angle into which the spontaneous emission is amplified [1,2]. Our innovation is to use spatial filtering in a differential manner across many segments, thereby enhancing the effect when wave-optical effects are included [3]. The structure quickly and effectively strips the ASE into the higher-order modes, quenching the ASE gain relative to the signal.

  13. Microstructural Evolution of a Nanostructured Complex Copper Alloy Processed by Accumulative Roll-Bonding of Oxygen Free Copper and DLP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Hee; Lee, Seong Ro; Ahn, In-Sook; Lim, Cha-Yong

    2016-02-01

    The accumulative roll-bonding (ARB) process using different copper alloys of oxygen free copper (OFC) and dioxide low-phosphorous copper (DLPC) was performed up to six cycles at ambient temperature without lubrication. A complex copper alloy sheet'in which OFC and DLPC alloys are stacked alternately each other was successfully fabricated by the ARB process. The microstructural evolution and texture development of the complex copper alloy with proceeding of the ARB were investigated by electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) measurement. The specimen after 1 cycle showed significantly inhomogeneous microstructure in thickness direction, however, the inhomogeneity decreased gradually with increasing the number of ARB cycles. In addition, the grains became finer with the proceeding of the ARB. Resultantly, after 6 cycles, the specimen exhibited an ultrafine grained structure in which the grains above 65% were surrounded by the high angle grain boundaries above 15 degrees. On the other hand, there was no difference in texture development between OFC and DLPC in almost all specimens. In addition, the texture development did not depend on positions in thickness direction; the rolling texture such as {112} and {011} components developed strongly at all regions.

  14. Patterns of maximum body size evolution in Cenozoic land mammals: eco-evolutionary processes and abiotic forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarinen, Juha J.; Boyer, Alison G.; Brown, James H.; Costa, Daniel P.; Ernest, S. K. Morgan; Evans, Alistair R.; Fortelius, Mikael; Gittleman, John L.; Hamilton, Marcus J.; Harding, Larisa E.; Lintulaakso, Kari; Lyons, S. Kathleen; Okie, Jordan G.; Sibly, Richard M.; Stephens, Patrick R.; Theodor, Jessica; Uhen, Mark D.; Smith, Felisa A.

    2014-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that macroevolutionary patterns of mammal evolution during the Cenozoic follow similar trajectories on different continents. This would suggest that such patterns are strongly determined by global abiotic factors, such as climate, or by basic eco-evolutionary processes such as filling of niches by specialization. The similarity of pattern would be expected to extend to the history of individual clades. Here, we investigate the temporal distribution of maximum size observed within individual orders globally and on separate continents. While the maximum size of individual orders of large land mammals show differences and comprise several families, the times at which orders reach their maximum size over time show strong congruence, peaking in the Middle Eocene, the Oligocene and the Plio-Pleistocene. The Eocene peak occurs when global temperature and land mammal diversity are high and is best explained as a result of niche expansion rather than abiotic forcing. Since the Eocene, there is a significant correlation between maximum size frequency and global temperature proxy. The Oligocene peak is not statistically significant and may in part be due to sampling issues. The peak in the Plio-Pleistocene occurs when global temperature and land mammal diversity are low, it is statistically the most robust one and it is best explained by global cooling. We conclude that the macroevolutionary patterns observed are a result of the interplay between eco-evolutionary processes and abiotic forcing. PMID:24741007

  15. Processing temperature driven morphological evolution of ZnO nanostructures prepared by electro-exploding wire technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lalit; Medwal, Rohit; Sen, P.; Annapoorni, S.

    2014-03-01

    This article presents an effective approach for the synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles with desired morphology via an environmentally benevolent electro-exploding wire (EEW) technique. In this process, ZnO nanoparticles evolve through the plasma generated from the parent Zn metal. Compared to other typical chemical methods, electro-exploding wire technique is a simple and economical technique that normally operates in water or organic liquids under ambient conditions. The effect of different processing temperatures in the range (5-80 °C), on the morphology of ZnO nanoparticles is clearly demonstrated. At 5 °C, nanoparticles with spherical morphology are observed. However, elliptical morphology is observed at room temperature and multipod nanorods at 50 °C and 80 °C. The evolution of ZnO phase is investigated with the help of time dependent UV-vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) studies. The mechanism of formation and different morphologies of ZnO nanoparticles formed are also proposed.

  16. The MESSENGER mission to Mercury: new insights into geological processes and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, James W., III; Solomon, Sean C.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Blewett, David T.; Chapman, Clark R.; Domingue, Deborah L.; Evans, Larry G.; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Hawkins, S. Edward, III; Helbert, Jörn; Holsclaw, Gregory M.; Izenberg, Noam R.; McClintock, William E.; McCoy, Timothy J.; Merline, William J.; Murchie, Scott L.; Nittler, Larrz R.; Phillips, Roger J.; Prockter, Louise M.; Robinson, Mark S.; Sprague, Ann L.; Strom, Robert G.; Vilas, Faith; Watters, Thomas R.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2008-09-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission, a part of NASA's Discovery Program, was designed to answer six questions [1]: (1) What planetary formational processes led to Mercury's high ratio of metal to silicate? (2) What is the geological history of Mercury? (3) What are the nature and origin of Mercury's magnetic field? (4) What are the structure and state of Mercury's core? (5) What are the radar-reflective materials at Mercury's poles? (6) What are the important volatile species and their sources and sinks near Mercury? MESSENGER is currently midway through a complex interplanetary cruise phase that involves three flybys of Mercury. The first of these, on 14 January 2008, provided important new information relating to several of the questions above [2-13]. Here we summarize observations made during the flyby that are most relevant to new insights about geological processes that have operated on Mercury and implications for the planet's history [3, 8-13]. The instruments that provided the most direct information on the geological history of Mercury during this first encounter were the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) [14], the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) [15], and the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) [16]. Among the many specific questions remaining following the Mariner 10 mission to Mercury (1974- 1975) were (1) the level of mineralogical and compositional diversity of the crust, which appeared relatively bland in Mariner 10 data, (2) the nature of the rest of the huge Caloris impact basin seen only partially in Mariner 10 images, (3) the origin of the extensive plains observed on the surface (ponded impact ejecta or extrusive lava flows?), (4) the diversity and global distribution of tectonic features that have deformed the crust and their implications for strain as a function of time, and (5) the bombardment chronology and geological history of Mercury [1, 17-19]. The viewing

  17. Patterning effects in quantum dot amplifiers characterized through pump probe spectroscopy using two pump pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Poel, Mike van der; Laemmlin, M.

    2004-01-01

    Patterning effects at ultrahigh bitrates in quantum dot amplifiers are investigated by a novel experimental technique. Slow carrier dynamics in the excited states and wetting layer are found to limit the potential for ultrahigh-speed signal processing....

  18. Broad-band semiconductor optical amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Ying [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)]. E-mail: yingding@red.semi.ac.cn; Kan Qiang [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang Junling [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Pan Jiaoqing [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhou Fan [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Chen Weixi [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang Wei [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2007-01-15

    Broad-band semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) with different thicknesses and thin bulk tensile-strained active layers were fabricated and studied. Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) spectra and gain spectra of SOAs were measured and analyzed at different CW biases. A maximal 3 dB ASE bandwidth of 136 nm ranging from 1480 to 1616 nm, and a 3 dB optical amplifier gain bandwidth of about 90 nm ranging from 1510 to 1600 nm, were obtained for the very thin bulk active SOA. Other SOAs characteristics such as saturation output power and polarization sensitivity were measured and compared.

  19. A parallel input composite transimpedance amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D. J.; Kim, C.

    2018-01-01

    A new approach to high performance current to voltage preamplifier design is presented. The design using multiple operational amplifiers (op-amps) has a parasitic capacitance compensation network and a composite amplifier topology for fast, precision, and low noise performance. The input stage consisting of a parallel linked JFET op-amps and a high-speed bipolar junction transistor (BJT) gain stage driving the output in the composite amplifier topology, cooperating with the capacitance compensation feedback network, ensures wide bandwidth stability in the presence of input capacitance above 40 nF. The design is ideal for any two-probe measurement, including high impedance transport and scanning tunneling microscopy measurements.

  20. Fundamentals of RF and microwave transistor amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Bahl, Inder J

    2009-01-01

    A Comprehensive and Up-to-Date Treatment of RF and Microwave Transistor Amplifiers This book provides state-of-the-art coverage of RF and microwave transistor amplifiers, including low-noise, narrowband, broadband, linear, high-power, high-efficiency, and high-voltage. Topics covered include modeling, analysis, design, packaging, and thermal and fabrication considerations. Through a unique integration of theory and practice, readers will learn to solve amplifier-related design problems ranging from matching networks to biasing and stability. More than 240 problems are included to help read

  1. Phase noise in RF and microwave amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudot, Rodolphe; Rubiola, Enrico

    2012-12-01

    Understanding amplifier phase noise is a critical issue in many fields of engineering and physics, such as oscillators, frequency synthesis, telecommunication, radar, and spectroscopy; in the emerging domain of microwave photonics; and in exotic fields, such as radio astronomy, particle accelerators, etc. Focusing on the two main types of base noise in amplifiers, white and flicker, the power spectral density of the random phase φ(t) is Sφ(f) = b(0) + b(-1)/f. White phase noise results from adding white noise to the RF spectrum in the carrier region. For a given RF noise level, b(0) is proportional to the reciprocal of the carrier power P(0). By contrast, flicker results from a near-dc 1/f noise-present in all electronic devices-which modulates the carrier through some parametric effect in the semiconductor. Thus, b(-1) is a parameter of the amplifier, constant in a wide range of P(0). The consequences are the following: Connecting m equal amplifiers in parallel, b(-1) is 1/m times that of one device. Cascading m equal amplifiers, b(-1) is m times that of one amplifier. Recirculating the signal in an amplifier so that the gain increases by a power of m (a factor of m in decibels) as a result of positive feedback (regeneration), we find that b(-1) is m(2) times that of the amplifier alone. The feedforward amplifier exhibits extremely low b(-1) because the carrier is ideally nulled at the input of its internal error amplifier. Starting with an extensive review of the literature, this article introduces a system-oriented model which describes the phase flickering. Several amplifier architectures (cascaded, parallel, etc.) are analyzed systematically, deriving the phase noise from the general model. There follow numerous measurements of amplifiers using different technologies, including some old samples, and in a wide frequency range (HF to microwaves), which validate the theory. In turn, theory and results provide design guidelines and give suggestions for CAD and

  2. Ultrashort pulse amplification in cryogenically cooled amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, Sterling J.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret Mary

    2004-10-12

    A laser amplifier system amplifies pulses in a single "stage" from .about.10.sup.-9 joules to more than 10.sup.-3 joules, with average power of 1-10 watts, and beam quality M.sup.2 characteristics of the medium. This is done with the medium inside a sealed, evacuated or purged cell to avoid moisture or other materials condensing on the surface. A "seed" pulse from a separate laser is passed through the laser medium, one or more times, in any of a variety of configurations including single-pass, multiple-pass, and regenerative amplifier configurations.

  3. Small signal microwave amplifier design solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Grosch, Theodore

    2000-01-01

    This book explains techniques and examples for designing stable amplifiers for high-frequency applications in which the signal is small and the amplifier circuit is linear. An in-depth discussion of linear network theory provides the foundation needed to develop actual designs. Examples throughout the book will show you how to apply the knowledge gained in each chapter leading to the complex design of low noise amplifiers. Many exercises at the end of each chapter will help students to practice their skills. The solutions to these design problems are available in an accompanying solutions book

  4. Noise Suppression Phenomenon in Fiber Raman Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felinskyi Georgii

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of small bit error rate is actual in fiber Raman amplifiers. Our experimental data on the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE with backward pumping as a base of optical noise evaluation are presented in this paper. Raman gain spectrum for useful Stokes low-powered signal is calculated and compared with obtained spectrum of non-coherent ASE noise. It is shown that output optical signal has better gain than the amplified spontaneous emission that leads to appreciable growth of output optical signal-to-noise ratio.

  5. Seasonal evolution of physical processes and biological responses in the northern Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Asfahani, Khaled

    2017-12-01

    A sequence of autonomous underwater glider deployments were used to characterize the spatial-temporal variability of the region over an eight month period from late September to May. Strongly stratified system was found in early fall with significant gradients in both temperature (T) and salinity (S), during winter T < 23°C and minimum S of 40.3 psu was observed and resulting in weakened stratification that enables deep convective mixing and upwelling of deep water by cyclonic circulations in the region leading to significant biomass increase. Throughout the entire observational period the slope of the 28 and 28.5 kg/m3 isopycnals remained sloping downward from offshore toward the coast reflected a persistent northward geostrophic flow. The depth of the 180 μmol/kg isopleth of oxygen, indicative of the top of the nutricline, paralleled the depth of the 28 kg/m3, but remained slightly deeper than the isopycnal. The deep winter mixing did not penetrate the nutricline where the mixed layer was deeper near the coast. However, because of the cyclonic signature the 28 kg/m3 rose to the surface offshore, injecting nutrients into the surface layer and promoting increased biomass in the central Red Sea. With the presence of cyclonic eddies, there was evidence of subduction associated with the cross-eddy circulation. This subducted flow was toward the coast within the domain of the glider observations. During this period, increases in the particulate backscatter were associated with increased chlorophyll indicating that the suspended particles were primarily phytoplankton particles. Within the mean northward flow there is a cross-basin flow wherein water is upwelled near the center of the Red Sea, there is a eastward component to the northward flow, and subsequent downwelling near the coasts. Within the surface flow subductive processes lead not only to a horizontal flow, but also a downward component toward the coast. Overall transport is very 3-dimensional in the

  6. Evolution of a Reconfigurable Processing Platform for a Next Generation Space Software Defined Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacpura, Thomas J.; Downey, Joseph A.; Anderson, Keffery R.; Baldwin, Keith

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)Harris Ka-Band Software Defined Radio (SDR) is the first, fully reprogrammable space-qualified SDR operating in the Ka-Band frequency range. Providing exceptionally higher data communication rates than previously possible, this SDR offers in-orbit reconfiguration, multi-waveform operation, and fast deployment due to its highly modular hardware and software architecture. Currently in operation on the International Space Station (ISS), this new paradigm of reconfigurable technology is enabling experimenters to investigate navigation and networking in the space environment.The modular SDR and the NASA developed Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standard are the basis for Harris reusable, digital signal processing space platform trademarked as AppSTAR. As a result, two new space radio products are a synthetic aperture radar payload and an Automatic Detection Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) receiver. In addition, Harris is currently developing many new products similar to the Ka-Band software defined radio for other applications. For NASAs next generation flight Ka-Band radio development, leveraging these advancements could lead to a more robust and more capable software defined radio.The space environment has special considerations different from terrestrial applications that must be considered for any system operated in space. Each space mission has unique requirements that can make these systems unique. These unique requirements can make products that are expensive and limited in reuse. Space systems put a premium on size, weight and power. A key trade is the amount of reconfigurability in a space system. The more reconfigurable the hardware platform, the easier it is to adapt to the platform to the next mission, and this reduces the amount of non-recurring engineering costs. However, the more reconfigurable platforms often use more spacecraft resources. Software has similar considerations

  7. The cascaded amplifier and saturable absorber (CASA) all-optical switch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilliger, E.; Berger, J.; Weber, H. G.

    2001-01-01

    The cascaded amplifier and saturable absorber is presented as a new all-optical switching scheme for optical signal processing applications. First demultiplexing experiments demonstrate the principle of operation of this scheme.......The cascaded amplifier and saturable absorber is presented as a new all-optical switching scheme for optical signal processing applications. First demultiplexing experiments demonstrate the principle of operation of this scheme....

  8. Numerical model of frequency converter based on four-wave mixing in semiconductor amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cassioli, D.; Scotti, S.; Mecozzi, A.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a numerical model of the dynamics of a semiconductor optical amplifier that includes the description of the nonlinear optical processes within the waveguide and the longitudinal inhomogeneity caused by the saturating field.......We describe a numerical model of the dynamics of a semiconductor optical amplifier that includes the description of the nonlinear optical processes within the waveguide and the longitudinal inhomogeneity caused by the saturating field....

  9. Gain recovery dynamics and limitations in quantum dot amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Bischoff, Svend; Magnúsdóttir, Ingibjörg

    2001-01-01

    gain recovery in a quantum dot amplifier, and it is thus not yet clear what the limiting processes for the device response are. We present the results of a comprehensive theoretical model, which agrees well with the experimental results, and indicates the importance of slow recovery of higher energy...... levels. The model used is of the rate-equation type with three energy levels: ground state (GS) and excited state (ES) dot levels and a wetting layer...

  10. [Effect of processes in the earth's crust on evolution of photosynthesis (as indicated by data on carbon isotopic composition)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivlev, A A

    2010-01-01

    A probable mechanism of effect of processes occurring in the Earth's crust on evolution of photosynthesis is considered. According to the hypothesis, this effect is realized through entrance to the Earth's atmosphere of carbon dioxide that stimulates photosynthesis. Supply of CO2 is irregular and is due to irregular movements of the Earth's crust plates. This is accompanied by destruction of carbonates and conversion of carbon of the organic matter to CO2 due to processes of reduction of sulfates. The CO2 content in atmosphere rises for relatively short orogenic periods, due to intensive crust plate movement, while for the subsequent long periods, called the geosynclinal ones, of the relatively slow plate movement, the CO2 content falls due to the higher rate of its consumption for photosynthesis. Owing to the carbon isotopic fractionation accompanying photosynthesis, regular isotopic differences appear between the atmospheric CO2 and the "living" matter (Relay's effect); these differences are then transformed to isotope differences of the carbonate and organic carbon. At the appearance in atmosphere of free oxygen--product of photosynthesis--in organisms there appears photorespiration that also is accompanied by fractionation of carbon isotopes, but with effect of opposite sign. This leads to enrichment of the photosynthesizing biomass with 13C isotope at the orogenic periods. As a result, the initially pronounced isotope differences of the carbonate and organic carbon decrease by the end of the geosyclinal periods. According to the proposed model, concentrations of CO2 and O2 are exchanged in the antiphase. They lead to alternation of periods of warning up and cooling off on the Earth. The former coincide with the orogenic periods, the latter appear at the end of geosyclinal periods when oxygen is accumulated in atmosphere, while organic substance in sediments. Accumulation of organic substance leads to formation of petroleum-maternal masses. To substantiate the

  11. Computing the origin and evolution of the ribosome from its structure — Uncovering processes of macromolecular accretion benefiting synthetic biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Caetano-Anollés, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Accretion occurs pervasively in nature at widely different timeframes. The process also manifests in the evolution of macromolecules. Here we review recent computational and structural biology studies of evolutionary accretion that make use of the ideographic (historical, retrodictive) and nomothetic (universal, predictive) scientific frameworks. Computational studies uncover explicit timelines of accretion of structural parts in molecular repertoires and molecules. Phylogenetic trees of protein structural domains and proteomes and their molecular functions were built from a genomic census of millions of encoded proteins and associated terminal Gene Ontology terms. Trees reveal a ‘metabolic-first’ origin of proteins, the late development of translation, and a patchwork distribution of proteins in biological networks mediated by molecular recruitment. Similarly, the natural history of ancient RNA molecules inferred from trees of molecular substructures built from a census of molecular features shows patchwork-like accretion patterns. Ideographic analyses of ribosomal history uncover the early appearance of structures supporting mRNA decoding and tRNA translocation, the coevolution of ribosomal proteins and RNA, and a first evolutionary transition that brings ribosomal subunits together into a processive protein biosynthetic complex. Nomothetic structural biology studies of tertiary interactions and ancient insertions in rRNA complement these findings, once concentric layering assumptions are removed. Patterns of coaxial helical stacking reveal a frustrated dynamics of outward and inward ribosomal growth possibly mediated by structural grafting. The early rise of the ribosomal ‘turnstile’ suggests an evolutionary transition in natural biological computation. Results make explicit the need to understand processes of molecular growth and information transfer of macromolecules. PMID:27096056

  12. Study of the geodynamic evolution of the Chinese Tianshan metamorphic belt to unravel deep processes occurring at the plate interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayet, L.; John, T.; Agard, P.; Becker, H.; Gao, J.

    2016-12-01

    Field-based studies of fossil plate interfaces can be used to provide constraints on the mechanical behaviour of subduction channel processes at depth. The Chinese Tianshan metamorphic belt (TMB) represents a suitable test area to study such processes since it contains fresh high-pressure rocks and well exposed structures in its central part. Lithologies composed of intercalated metasediments and volcanoclastics are likely derived from the trench during subduction with incorporation of first metapelitic-rich components and then increasing amounts of psammitic- and mafic-rich components and few carbonates. During burial, this material as well as pieces of the upper oceanic crust (pillow basalts) were scrapped off the slab and stacked to the upper plate and/or to the subduction channel at depth. During exhumation most of the deformation was accommodated by shearing and schistosity developed at blueschist-facies conditions (glaucophane lineations). A systematic sampling survey was carried out in the area through two N-S transects in order to reconstruct the P-T-t history of the central part of the TMB. Peak pressures and temperatures were estimated independently using Raman spectroscopy (quartz inclusions in garnet (P) and carbonaceous material (T)) and electron microprobe analysis (Zr-in rutile) on metasediments and metabasites. These yield coherent peak conditions of 530±30°C and 2.3±3 GPa. We combined these results with new geochronological Rb-Sr data to constrain the age of underplating and exhumation. We finally propose a tentative model for the geodynamic evolution of the TMB, based on field observations and P-T-t conditions. The TMB is interpreted to represent an erosive margin with accretion and stacking of tectonic slices at depths of 70 km, implying strong coupling/decoupling processes around this depth. During later exhumation this stack of detached material was brought back to the surface as a single unit undergoing shearing with minor internal

  13. Advanced Concepts in Josephson Junction Reflection Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lähteenmäki, Pasi; Vesterinen, Visa; Hassel, Juha; Paraoanu, G. S.; Seppä, Heikki; Hakonen, Pertti

    2014-06-01

    Low-noise amplification at microwave frequencies has become increasingly important for the research related to superconducting qubits and nanoelectromechanical systems. The fundamental limit of added noise by a phase-preserving amplifier is the standard quantum limit, often expressed as noise temperature . Towards the goal of the quantum limit, we have developed an amplifier based on intrinsic negative resistance of a selectively damped Josephson junction. Here we present measurement results on previously proposed wide-band microwave amplification and discuss the challenges for improvements on the existing designs. We have also studied flux-pumped metamaterial-based parametric amplifiers, whose operating frequency can be widely tuned by external DC-flux, and demonstrate operation at pumping, in contrast to the typical metamaterial amplifiers pumped via signal lines at.

  14. BROADBAND TRAVELLING WAVE SEMICONDUCTOR OPTICAL AMPLIFIER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    Broadband travelling wave semiconductor optical amplifier (100, 200, 300, 400, 800) for amplification of light, wherein the amplifier (100, 200, 300, 400, 800) comprises a waveguide region (101, 201, 301, 401, 801) for providing confinement of the light in transverse directions and adapted...... for propagation of the light in at least a first mode along a longitudinal axis (102, 202, 302) of the amplifier (100, 200, 300, 400, 800) in a propagation direction (103, 203, 303), and wherein the waveguide region (101, 201, 301, 401, 801) comprises a gain region (104, 204, 304, 404, 804) for amplifying......, 301, 401, 801) increases along the longitudinal axis (102, 202, 302), and wherein the ratio between the width (106, 206, 306) of the waveguide region (101, 201, 301, 401, 801) and the width (107, 207, 307) of the gain region (104, 204, 304, 404, 804) increases along the longitudinal axis (102, 202...

  15. High Energy Single Frequency Resonant Amplifier Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR phase I project proposes a single frequency high energy resonant amplifier for remote sensing. Current state-of-art technologies can not provide all...

  16. Ku band low noise parametric amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    A low noise, K sub u-band, parametric amplifier (paramp) was developed. The unit is a spacecraft-qualifiable, prototype, parametric amplifier for eventual application in the shuttle orbiter. The amplifier was required to have a noise temperature of less than 150 K. A noise temperature of less than 120 K at a gain level of 17 db was achieved. A 3-db bandwidth in excess of 350 MHz was attained, while deviation from phase linearity of about + or - 1 degree over 50 MHz was achieved. The paramp operates within specification over an ambient temperature range of -5 C to +50 C. The performance requirements and the operation of the K sub u-band parametric amplifier system are described. The final test results are also given.

  17. EQUIPMENT WITH HYDROSTATIC AMPLIFIER MODELED 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFTIMIE Dorin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The equipment with hydrostatic amplifier is a new constructive solution modeled 3D using NX 7.5 software. Hydraulic equipment allows the amplification of a constant torque of a DC electric motor of low power at a variable speed. The hydrostatic speed amplifier of constant torque with electric control device is a hydraulic device which provides by design a bridge between the conventional hydraulic and the servo-hydraulic.

  18. Phase Noise in RF and Microwave Amplifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Boudot, Rodolphe; Rubiola, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the amplifier phase noise is a critical issue in numerous fields of engineering and physics, like oscillators, frequency synthesis, telecommunications, radars, spectroscopy, in the emerging domain of microwave photonics, and in more exotic domains like radio astronomy, particle accelerators, etc. This article analyzes the two main types of phase noise in amplifiers, white and flicker. White phase noise results from adding white noise to the RF spectrum around the carrier. For a ...

  19. Efficient Power Amplifier for Motor Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Pulse-width-modulated amplifier supplies high current as efficiently as low current needed for starting and running motor. Key to efficiency of motor-control amplifier is V-channel metal-oxide/semiconductor transistor Q1. Device has low saturation resistance. However, has large gate input capacitance and small margin between its turn-on voltage and maximum allowable gate-to-source voltage. Circuits for output stages overcome limitations of VMOS device.

  20. Fishing amplifies forage fish population collapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essington, Timothy E; Moriarty, Pamela E; Froehlich, Halley E; Hodgson, Emma E; Koehn, Laura E; Oken, Kiva L; Siple, Margaret C; Stawitz, Christine C

    2015-05-26

    Forage fish support the largest fisheries in the world but also play key roles in marine food webs by transferring energy from plankton to upper trophic-level predators, such as large fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. Fishing can, thereby, have far reaching consequences on marine food webs unless safeguards are in place to avoid depleting forage fish to dangerously low levels, where dependent predators are most vulnerable. However, disentangling the contributions of fishing vs. natural processes on population dynamics has been difficult because of the sensitivity of these stocks to environmental conditions. Here, we overcome this difficulty by collating population time series for forage fish populations that account for nearly two-thirds of global catch of forage fish to identify the fingerprint of fisheries on their population dynamics. Forage fish population collapses shared a set of common and unique characteristics: high fishing pressure for several years before collapse, a sharp drop in natural population productivity, and a lagged response to reduce fishing pressure. Lagged response to natural productivity declines can sharply amplify the magnitude of naturally occurring population fluctuations. Finally, we show that the magnitude and frequency of collapses are greater than expected from natural productivity characteristics and therefore, likely attributed to fishing. The durations of collapses, however, were not different from those expected based on natural productivity shifts. A risk-based management scheme that reduces fishing when populations become scarce would protect forage fish and their predators from collapse with little effect on long-term average catches.

  1. Gold Nanoparticle Labels Amplify Ellipsometric Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasubbarao, Srivatsa

    2008-01-01

    The ellipsometric method reported in the immediately preceding article was developed in conjunction with a method of using gold nanoparticles as labels on biomolecules that one seeks to detect. The purpose of the labeling is to exploit the optical properties of the gold nanoparticles in order to amplify the measurable ellipsometric effects and thereby to enable ultrasensitive detection of the labeled biomolecules without need to develop more-complex ellipsometric instrumentation. The colorimetric, polarization, light-scattering, and other optical properties of nanoparticles depend on their sizes and shapes. In the present method, these size-and-shape-dependent properties are used to magnify the polarization of scattered light and the diattenuation and retardance of signals derived from ellipsometry. The size-and-shape-dependent optical properties of the nanoparticles make it possible to interrogate the nanoparticles by use of light of various wavelengths, as appropriate, to optimally detect particles of a specific type at high sensitivity. Hence, by incorporating gold nanoparticles bound to biomolecules as primary or secondary labels, the performance of ellipsometry as a means of detecting the biomolecules can be improved. The use of gold nanoparticles as labels in ellipsometry has been found to afford sensitivity that equals or exceeds the sensitivity achieved by use of fluorescence-based methods. Potential applications for ellipsometric detection of gold nanoparticle-labeled biomolecules include monitoring molecules of interest in biological samples, in-vitro diagnostics, process monitoring, general environmental monitoring, and detection of biohazards.

  2. A Process-Based Assessment of Decadal-Scale Surface Temperature Evolutions in the NCAR CCSM4's 25-Year Hindcast Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi; Chen, Junwen

    2017-04-01

    This study represents an initial effort in the context of the coupled atmosphere-surface climate feedback-response analysis method (CFRAM) to partition the temporal evolution of the global surface temperature from 1981 to 2005 into components associated with individual radiative and non-radiative (dynamical) processes in the NCAR CCSM4's decadal hindcasts. When compared with the observation (ERA-Interim), the CCSM4 is able to predict an overall warming trend as well as the transient cooling occurring during the period 1989-1994. However, while the model captures fairly well the positive contributions of the CO2 and surface albedo change to the temperature evolution, it has an overly strong water vapor effect that dictates the temperature evolution in the hindcast. This is in contrast with the observation where changes in surface dynamics (mainly ocean circulation and heat content change) dominates the actual temperature evolution. Atmospheric dynamics in both the observation and model works against the surface temperature tendency through turbulent and convective heat transport, leading to an overall negative contribution to the evolution of the surface temperature. Impacts of solar forcing and ozone change on the surface temperature change are relatively weak during this period. The magnitude of cloud effect is considerably smaller compared to that in the observation and the spatial distribution of the cloud effect is also significantly different between the two especially over the equatorial Pacific. The value and limitations of this process-based temperature decomposition are discussed.

  3. Studying the co-evolution of production and test code in open source and industrial developer test processes through repository mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaidman, A.; Van Rompaey, B.; Van Deursen, A.; Demeyer, S.

    2010-01-01

    Many software production processes advocate rigorous development testing alongside functional code writing, which implies that both test code and production code should co-evolve. To gain insight in the nature of this co-evolution, this paper proposes three views (realized by a tool called TeMo)

  4. Synergetic effect at the interfaces of solution processed MoS2-WS2 composite for hydrogen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Ku; Song, Wooseok; Ji, Seulgi; Lim, Yi Rang; Lee, Young Bum; Myung, Sung; Lim, Jongsun; An, Ki-Seok; Lee, Sun Sook

    2017-12-01

    Recently, the importance of developing an effective catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction is emphasized because hydrogen fueled energy conversion processes are gaining attention as the next generation energy production method. We propose a transition metal dichalcogenide composite catalyst based on molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and tungsten disulfide (WS2) on reduced graphene oxide coated nickel (rGO-Ni) foams. The composite exhibited enhanced catalytic activity with observed on-set potential of ∼275 mV at -10 mA/cm2 and Tafel slope of 54.1 mV/dec when the composition of the composite was 50%MoS2-50%WS2. The composite catalyst demonstrated high-stability up to 300 cycles. In order to understand the enhanced catalytic activity, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy compositional analysis was utilized. We propose that the enhancement of catalytic activities exhibited by the composited samples were achieved due to introduction of new type of interface between MoS2 and WS2 grains, regional transition of 2H phase MoS2 and WS2 to 1T phase, and formation of excess sulfur which depended directly on the composition.

  5. Unified risk analysis of fatigue failure in ductile alloy components during all three stages of fatigue crack evolution process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, Ravindra

    2003-10-01

    Statistical fatigue life of a ductile alloy specimen is traditionally divided into three stages, namely, crack nucleation, small crack growth, and large crack growth. Crack nucleation and small crack growth show a wide variation and hence a big spread on cycles versus crack length graph. Relatively, large crack growth shows a lesser variation. Therefore, different models are fitted to the different stages of the fatigue evolution process, thus treating different stages as different phenomena. With these independent models, it is impossible to predict one phenomenon based on the information available about the other phenomenon. Experimentally, it is easier to carry out crack length measurements of large cracks compared to nucleating cracks and small cracks. Thus, it is easier to collect statistical data for large crack growth compared to the painstaking effort it would take to collect statistical data for crack nucleation and small crack growth. This article presents a fracture mechanics-based stochastic model of fatigue crack growth in ductile alloys that are commonly encountered in mechanical structures and machine components. The model has been validated by Ray (1998) for crack propagation by various statistical fatigue data. Based on the model, this article proposes a technique to predict statistical information of fatigue crack nucleation and small crack growth properties that uses the statistical properties of large crack growth under constant amplitude stress excitation. The statistical properties of large crack growth under constant amplitude stress excitation can be obtained via experiments.

  6. Evolution and structure of Tomato spotted wilt virus populations: evidence of extensive reassortment and insights into emergence processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tentchev, Diana; Verdin, Eric; Marchal, Cécile; Jacquet, Monique; Aguilar, Juan M; Moury, Benoît

    2011-04-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV; genus Tospovirus, family Bunyaviridae) genetic diversity was evaluated by sequencing parts of the three RNA genome segments of 224 isolates, mostly from pepper and tomato crops in southern Europe. Eighty-three per cent of the isolates showed consistent clustering into three clades, corresponding to their geographical origin, Spain, France or the USA, for the three RNA segments. In contrast, the remaining 17% of isolates did not belong to the same clade for the three RNA segments and were shown to be reassortants. Among them, eight different reassortment patterns were observed. Further phylogenetic analyses provided insights into the dynamic processes of the worldwide resurgence of TSWV that, since the 1980s, has followed the worldwide dispersal of the western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) tospovirus vector. For two clades composed essentially of Old World (OW) isolates, tree topology suggested a local re-emergence of indigenous TSWV populations following F. occidentalis introductions, while it could not be excluded that the ancestors of two other OW clades were introduced from North America contemporarily with F. occidentalis. Finally, estimation of the selection intensity that has affected the evolution of the NSs and nucleocapsid proteins encoded by RNA S of TSWV suggests that the former could be involved in the breakdown of resistance conferred by the Tsw gene in pepper.

  7. Volcanological evolution of the Rivi-Capo Volcanic Complex at Salina, Aeolian Islands: magma storage processes and ascent dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotra, Eugenio; Viccaro, Marco; De Rosa, Rosanna; Sapienza, Marco

    2014-08-01

    Lava flows and pyroclastic deposits from strombolian fallout related to the activity of the Rivi and Capo volcanoes, which are representative of early subaerial volcanoes on Salina (Aeolian Islands), have been investigated through a geological-petrological approach. Our geological field survey shows that Rivi and Capo volcanoes are part of a single N50°E aligned volcanic complex, here named Rivi-Capo Volcanic Complex (RCVC). Stratigraphically specific rock sampling has allowed reconstruction of the magma feeding processes through time. Whole rock major element compositions, together with core-to-rim profiles of plagioclase and clinopyroxene crystals, show a general evolution toward more basic compositions through the three formations constituting the Capo volcano and within the Rivi center. MELTS simulations and mass balance modeling suggest that the RCVC rocks are the result of fractional crystallization of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and olivine (ca. 45 % of solid removed) from a primary magma. In addition to fractional crystallization, continuous recharge and mixing with more basic magma coming from deeper parts of the magmatic plumbing system contributed to the final volcanic rock compositions. Our textural and microanalytical data on plagioclase and clinopyroxene crystals allow the definition of a multilevel magmatic storage system with reservoirs at ~20 and ~3 km below sea level. When processes of magma differentiation, ascent, and storage are considered together with the stratigraphic position of each sample, a history of continuous modification of the RCVC plumbing system can be constructed. Volcanism may have been characterized by fissure-type eruptions during the early stages (Lower Capo, Lower Rivi, and Middle Capo Formations), gradually changing later to central-type volcanism (Upper Capo and Upper Rivi Formations).

  8. Insight as a social identity process in the evolution of psychosocial functioning in the early phase of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaas, H S; Clémence, A; Marion-Veyron, R; Antonietti, J-P; Alameda, L; Golay, P; Conus, P

    2017-03-01

    Awareness of illness (insight) has been found to have contradictory effects for different functional outcomes after the early course of psychosis. Whereas it is related to psychotic symptom reduction and medication adherence, it is also associated with increased depressive symptoms. In this line, the specific effects of insight on the evolution of functioning over time have not been identified, and social indicators, such as socio-occupational functioning have barely been considered. Drawing from social identity theory we investigated the impact of insight on the development of psychosocial outcomes and the interactions of these variables over time. The participants, 240 patients in early phase of psychosis from the Treatment and Early Intervention in Psychosis Program (TIPP) of the University Hospital of Lausanne, Switzerland, were assessed at eight time points over 3 years. Cross-lagged panel analyses and multilevel analyses were conducted on socio-occupational and general functioning [Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS) and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF)] with insight, time and depressive symptoms as independent variables. Results from multilevel analyses point to an overall positive impact of insight on psychosocial functioning, which increases over time. Yet the cross-lagged panel analysis did not reveal a systematic positive and causal effect of insight on SOFAS and GAF scores. Depressive symptoms seem only to be relevant in the beginning of the treatment process. Our results point to a complex process in which the positive impact of insight on psychosocial functioning increases over time, even when considering depressive symptoms. Future studies and treatment approaches should consider the procedural aspect of insight.

  9. Formation and evolution of a drainage network during the Pleistocene through a process of homoclinal shifting initiated by headward erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelltort, F. Xavier; Carles Balasch, J.; Cirés, Jordi; Colombo, Ferran

    2017-04-01

    A homoclinal shifting process in NE of the Ebro basin, NE Iberian Peninsula, reorganized an old flow network into a new one. This process was initiated by the reactivation of a major normal fault (Amer Fault). An anaclinal stream, flowing to the hanging wall block, incised in the fault-line scarp, accessing by headward erosion the less resistant Paleogene units. The result was the formation of a sequence of strike valleys. The first valleys are situated in a more elevated topographical position than the valleys formed later. The last and the most important valley is La Plana de Vic, which is being emptied by differential erosion in front of the resistant base layer. The study of the lateral migration of a drainage basin since its initial stages has allowed the recognition of the layout of a drainage network and its model of evolution. The new drainage network includes three different subsystems. The main subsystem consists of stream courses flowing along the strike valley. While the other two subsystems flow into the main or can flow directly to the basin sink. These are the anaclinal subsystem, which drains the scarp face of the asymmetric valley, and the cataclinal subsystem, which drains the cuesta. The process of homoclinal shifting makes the strike streams migrate laterally and dip in the less resistant unit. This migration implies the reorganization of the other two tributary subsystems. The sequence of reorganizations may be preserved on the resistant bedrock of the cuesta. This allows the reconstruction of the route of the headward erosion of the initial anaclinal stream course through remnants of ancient strike streams flowing into former basin sinks, and its cataclinal tributaries draining the cuesta. In the case study of La Plana de Vic the migration route of the basin sink can be reconstructed from its initial position, Early Pleistocene, until present day. Besides, reorganization of the cataclinal network can also be recognized. During the lateral

  10. Design of an operational transconductance amplifier applying multiobjective optimization techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Pereira-Arroyo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem at hand consists in the sizing of an Operational Transconductance Amplifier (OTA. The Pareto front is introduced as a useful analysis concept in order to explore the design space of such analog circuit. A genetic algorithm (GA is employed to automatically detect this front in a process that efficiently finds optimal parameteriza­tions and their corresponding values in an aggregate fitness space. Since the problem is treated as a multi-objective optimization task, different measures of the amplifier like the transconductance, the slew rate, the linear range and the input capacitance are used as fitness functions. Finally, simulation results are pre­sented, using a standard 0,5μm CMOS technology.

  11. A one-way quantum amplifier for long-distance quantum communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elemy, Hany

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a model for single photon amplification based on cluster-state quantum computation is proposed. A rescaling of the probability amplitudes of a deteriorated qubit in favor of the one-photon component will define the amplifier's gain. Unlike the heralded quantum amplifiers, the probabilistic success of the whole process will not depend on the successful detection of a heralding signal. Instead, the whole procedure will rely upon a single-qubit measurement, which is simpler compared to any two-qubit interaction gate in the heralded quantum amplifiers. The proposed model can be used as a qubit protector against propagation losses in long-distance quantum communication networks.

  12. Performance Optimization of a Low Noise Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, S. F. Wan Muhamad; Soin, N.

    2009-06-01

    This work presents potential performance optimization techniques that can be applied to an RF CMOS low noise amplifier (LNA). LNA noise optimization methods namely the Conjugate Noise Match (CNM), the Simultaneous Noise and Input Matching (SNIM), the Power Constrained Noise Optimization (PCNO) and the Power Constrained Simultaneous Noise and Input Matching (PCSNIM) are introduced and discussed. Through detailed analysis and review, it has been realized that the PCSNIM technique implies to be the best method in optimizing the noise performance of the LNA. The gain enhancement technique is another technique that is introduced in this work where positive feedback is employed to reduce the total conductance of the circuit and subsequently boosting the gain performance of the design. This work will also show how the amount of the gain enhancement technique is governed by stability considerations. Substrate biasing is additionally recommended to further boost the performance of the LNA so that the device employed can work more efficiently at low power voltage. To implement the forward body-biased NMOS scheme, a deep N-well process is needed, which can provide separate body region for the transistor. To demonstrate the above suggested optimization techniques, a fully-integrated narrow-band source degenerated cascode RF LNA that dissipates 19.89 mW from a 0.9 V power supply is designed and simulated using Cadence Virtuoso and Cadence's Analog Design Environment respectively, based on a 0.18 μm RF-CMOS process. The layout of the LNA is additionally presented at the end section of this paper.

  13. The evolution of periodic seismicity, waveform similarity, and conduit processes during unrest episodes at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Andrew; Hernandez, Stephen; Gaunt, Elizabeth; Mothes, Patricia; Hidalgo, Silvana; Ruiz, Mario

    2016-04-01

    November with juvenile magma was quickly followed by a resumption of periodic low-frequency seismicity. The changes in the seismicity of Tungurahua in 2015 suggest a significant change in the magma-conduit system. Elevated periodicity may indicate the presence of a slowly upward moving plug at a depth of 1-2km below the summit crater, likely associated with the unusually long repose period since the last major vulcanian episode in October 2014. Evolution in the periodicity and type of seismic signals within and between unrest episodes will be controlled by a combination of the gas flux and permeability, and a balance between thermo-mechanical plug degradation and time-dependent healing processes. These factors are also likely to determine the nature of future eruptive activity.

  14. Identification of druggable cancer driver genes amplified across TCGA datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Chen

    Full Text Available The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA projects have advanced our understanding of the driver mutations, genetic backgrounds, and key pathways activated across cancer types. Analysis of TCGA datasets have mostly focused on somatic mutations and translocations, with less emphasis placed on gene amplifications. Here we describe a bioinformatics screening strategy to identify putative cancer driver genes amplified across TCGA datasets. We carried out GISTIC2 analysis of TCGA datasets spanning 16 cancer subtypes and identified 486 genes that were amplified in two or more datasets. The list was narrowed to 75 cancer-associated genes with potential "druggable" properties. The majority of the genes were localized to 14 amplicons spread across the genome. To identify potential cancer driver genes, we analyzed gene copy number and mRNA expression data from individual patient samples and identified 42 putative cancer driver genes linked to diverse oncogenic processes. Oncogenic activity was further validated by siRNA/shRNA knockdown and by referencing the Project Achilles datasets. The amplified genes represented a number of gene families, including epigenetic regulators, cell cycle-associated genes, DNA damage response/repair genes, metabolic regulators, and genes linked to the Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, JAK/STAT, NF-KB and MAPK signaling pathways. Among the 42 putative driver genes were known driver genes, such as EGFR, ERBB2 and PIK3CA. Wild-type KRAS was amplified in several cancer types, and KRAS-amplified cancer cell lines were most sensitive to KRAS shRNA, suggesting that KRAS amplification was an independent oncogenic event. A number of MAP kinase adapters were co-amplified with their receptor tyrosine kinases, such as the FGFR adapter FRS2 and the EGFR family adapters GRB2 and GRB7. The ubiquitin-like ligase DCUN1D1 and the histone methyltransferase NSD3 were also identified as novel putative cancer driver genes. We discuss the patient tailoring implications

  15. Identification of druggable cancer driver genes amplified across TCGA datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; McGee, Jeremy; Chen, Xianming; Doman, Thompson N; Gong, Xueqian; Zhang, Youyan; Hamm, Nicole; Ma, Xiwen; Higgs, Richard E; Bhagwat, Shripad V; Buchanan, Sean; Peng, Sheng-Bin; Staschke, Kirk A; Yadav, Vipin; Yue, Yong; Kouros-Mehr, Hosein

    2014-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) projects have advanced our understanding of the driver mutations, genetic backgrounds, and key pathways activated across cancer types. Analysis of TCGA datasets have mostly focused on somatic mutations and translocations, with less emphasis placed on gene amplifications. Here we describe a bioinformatics screening strategy to identify putative cancer driver genes amplified across TCGA datasets. We carried out GISTIC2 analysis of TCGA datasets spanning 16 cancer subtypes and identified 486 genes that were amplified in two or more datasets. The list was narrowed to 75 cancer-associated genes with potential "druggable" properties. The majority of the genes were localized to 14 amplicons spread across the genome. To identify potential cancer driver genes, we analyzed gene copy number and mRNA expression data from individual patient samples and identified 42 putative cancer driver genes linked to diverse oncogenic processes. Oncogenic activity was further validated by siRNA/shRNA knockdown and by referencing the Project Achilles datasets. The amplified genes represented a number of gene families, including epigenetic regulators, cell cycle-associated genes, DNA damage response/repair genes, metabolic regulators, and genes linked to the Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, JAK/STAT, NF-KB and MAPK signaling pathways. Among the 42 putative driver genes were known driver genes, such as EGFR, ERBB2 and PIK3CA. Wild-type KRAS was amplified in several cancer types, and KRAS-amplified cancer cell lines were most sensitive to KRAS shRNA, suggesting that KRAS amplification was an independent oncogenic event. A number of MAP kinase adapters were co-amplified with their receptor tyrosine kinases, such as the FGFR adapter FRS2 and the EGFR family adapters GRB2 and GRB7. The ubiquitin-like ligase DCUN1D1 and the histone methyltransferase NSD3 were also identified as novel putative cancer driver genes. We discuss the patient tailoring implications for existing cancer

  16. New laser amplifier improves laser Doppler interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-02-01

    The design of a laser light amplifier developed to improve the ability of a laser Doppler interferometry system to measure the high velocities of explosion-driven objects or targets is described. The amplifier increases the laser light intensity and S/N ratio. A green coumarin dye is utilized as if the lasing medium for an argon-ion laser and a blue dye as the frequency shifter to improve coupling between the light-pump power source and lasing medium. The arrangement of amplifier components and the frequency characteristics of the flash lamps and dyes are examined. The design requirements for eliminating chirping and achieving acoustic isolation are discussed. The control of the thermal gradients which produce lens effect is analyzed. The selection of a proper dye concentration for uniform excitation across the active volume of the amplifier is studied; an excitation absorption length of three diameters of active cross section is utilized. In order to increase the amount of pumping light reaching the laser dye and to reduce the number of unwanted wavelengths a optical frequency shifter is employed. The amplifier produces enough light to observe two or more spots on the target, record data for up to 12 microsec, and have an accuracy of 0.5 pct.

  17. Transpermeance Amplifier Applied to Magnetic Bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jossana Ferreira

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The most conventional approach of controlling magnetic forces in active magnetic bearings (AMBs is through current feedback amplifiers: transconductance. This enables the operation of the AMB to be understood in terms of a relatively simple current-based model as has been widely reported on in the literature. The alternative notion of using transpermeance amplifiers, which approximate the feedback of gap flux rather than current, has been in commercial use in some form for at least thirty years, however is only recently seeing more widespread acceptance as a commercial standard. This study explores how such alternative amplifiers should be modeled and then examines the differences in behavior between AMBs equipped with transconductance and transpermeance amplifiers. The focus of this study is on two aspects. The first is the influence of rotor displacement on AMB force, commonly modeled as a constant negative equivalent mechanical stiffness, and it is shown that either scheme actually leads to a finite bandwidth effect, but that this bandwidth is much lower when transpermeance is employed. The second aspect is the influence of eddy currents. Using a very simple model of eddy currents (a secondary short-circuited coil, it is demonstrated that transpermeance amplifiers can recover significant actuator bandwidth compared with transconductance, but at the cost of needing increased peak current headroom.

  18. The OPTHER Project: Progress toward the THz Amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paoloni, C; Brunetti, F; Di Carlo, A

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the status of the OPTHER (OPtically driven TeraHertz AmplifiERs) project and progress toward the THz amplifier realization. This project represents a considerable advancement in the field of high frequency amplification. The design and realization of a THz amplifier within th...

  19. Evolution of controllable urchin-like SrCO{sub 3} with enhanced electrochemical performance via an alternative processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhiwei, E-mail: wangzw0818@163.com; He, Geping, E-mail: hgping2013@126.com; Yin, Hongfeng; Bai, Wenyu; Ding, Donghai

    2017-07-31

    Graphical abstract: Strontium carbonate (SrCO{sub 3}) owning an urchin-like morphology with a hierarchical nanostructure was synthesized. Specific capacitance of SrCO{sub 3} was enhanced greatly by controllable urchin-like morphology through a mechanism of oxygen diffusion. - Highlights: • Urchin-like SrCO{sub 3} hierarchical nanostructure was prepared by hydrothermal route. • Morphology evolution of urchin-like SrCO{sub 3} with different preparation conditions. • Mechanism of nuclear aggregates—nanorods embellishment—urchin-like. • Specific capacitance of SrCO{sub 3} was enhanced greatly by controllable urchin-like morphology. - Abstract: Strontium carbonate (SrCO{sub 3}) owning an urchin-like morphology with a hierarchical nanostructure was synthesized by the reactants of strontium nitrate and urea via a facilitative, green initiative hydrothermal route. Samples characterization results of the structure showed that the surface of urchin-like SrCO{sub 3} was evenly distributed with nanorods with a diameter of about 50 nm and lengths of 1–2 μm. It was also found that the hydrothermal reaction time and reactants of trace concentrations changes will have an impact on the size and morphology. For these reasons we presented the crystal growth mechanism of “nuclear aggregates–nanorods embellishment–urchin-like” during the process of fabricating urchin-like SrCO{sub 3} crystal. Specific capacitance was enhanced more than 6 times, which dug out the optimal urchin-like SrCO{sub 3} influenced by a growth of surface nanorods.

  20. ZigBee Radio with External Power Amplifier and Low-Noise Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan HUYNH

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the performance study of a ZigBee module with both an external power amplifier and a low-noise amplifier, measured in outdoor and indoor environments, respectively. Our previous study has already shown that the indoor campus environment such as walls and floors would reduce the radio link range drastically and the packet error rate increased. In this study, both an external power amplifier and a low-noise amplifier have been added to a ZigBee module to increase both the transmitter power and receiver sensitivity. It is shown that with an external power amplifier and a low-noise amplifier the outdoor radio range can reach up to 1600 m with a negligible packet error rate compared to 144 m without any external amplifier for point-to-point radio connection. Thus, by increasing both the transmitter power and receiver sensitivity the radio range can be increased significantly. The power consumption issue with the added amplifiers is studied as well, indicating that the module can still be battery driven with a battery lifetime of about 9 years at a normal sampling rate to the sensor.

  1. A 3-14 GHz pseudo-differential distributed low noise amplifier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hek, P. de; Caekenberghe, K. van; Dijk, R. van

    2010-01-01

    A 3-14 GHz pseudo-differential distributed low noise amplifier, henceforth referred to as the distributed amplifier (DA), is reported. The DA is realized in the WIN PL15-10 process, which is a 0.15 μm Al0.3Ga 0.7As/In0.5Ga0.5As low-noise depletion-mode

  2. C-band 10-Watt HBT high-power amplifier with 50% PAE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hek, A.P. de; Boer, A. de; Svensson, T.

    2001-01-01

    The design and measurement of a C-band HBT high-power amplifier (HPA) is discussed. The amplifier is realised in the HB20P power HBT process of UMS. The HPA combines a high average output power of 9 Watt with both a high gain of 21.6 dB and a high power added effciency (PAE) of 50% over about 20%

  3. Design Of A Doherty Power Amplifier For GSM Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Wasmi Osman

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and analysis of Doherty power amplifier. The Doherty amplifier is used in  a base station for mobile system because of its high efficiency. The class AB power amplifier used in the configuration of the main and auxiliary amplifier. The result obtained shows that the Doherty power amplifier can be used on a wide band spectrum, the amplifier works at 900MHz and has very good power added efficiency (PAE and gain. The amplifier can also work at 1800MHz at input power greater than 20dBm. 

  4. Distributed feedback laser amplifiers combining the functions of amplifiers and channel filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Z.; Durhuus, T.; Mikkelsen, Benny

    1994-01-01

    A dynamic model for distributed feedback amplifiers, including the mode coupled equations and the carrier rate equation, is established. The presented mode coupled equations have taken into account the interaction between fast changing optical signal and the waveguide with corrugations. By showin...... the possibility of amplifying 100 ps pulses without pulse broadening, we anticipate that a distributed feedback amplifier can be used as a combined amplifier and channel filter in high bit rate transmission systems.......A dynamic model for distributed feedback amplifiers, including the mode coupled equations and the carrier rate equation, is established. The presented mode coupled equations have taken into account the interaction between fast changing optical signal and the waveguide with corrugations. By showing...

  5. Wideband pulse amplifiers for the NECTAr chip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanuy, A., E-mail: asanuy@ecm.ub.es [Dept. AM i Dept. ECM, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona. Marti i Franques 1, E08028, Barcelona (Spain); Delagnes, E. [IRFU/DSM/CEA, CE-Saclay, Bat. 141 SEN Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gascon, D. [Dept. AM i Dept. ECM, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona. Marti i Franques 1, E08028, Barcelona (Spain); Sieiro, X. [Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona. Marti i Franques 1, E08028, Barcelona (Spain); Bolmont, J.; Corona, P. [LPNHE, Universite Paris VI and Universite Paris VII and IN2P3/CNRS, Barre 12-22, 1er etage, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris (France); Feinstein, F. [LUPM, Universite Montpellier II and IN2P3/CNRS, CC072, bat. 13, place Eugene Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier (France); Glicenstein, J-F. [IRFU/DSM/CEA, CE-Saclay, Bat. 141 SEN Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Naumann, C.L.; Nayman, P. [LPNHE, Universite Paris VI and Universite Paris VII and IN2P3/CNRS, Barre 12-22, 1er etage, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris (France); Ribo, M. [Dept. AM i Dept. ECM, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona. Marti i Franques 1, E08028, Barcelona (Spain); and others

    2012-12-11

    The NECTAr collaboration's FE option for the camera of the CTA is a 16 bits and 1-3 GS/s sampling chip based on analog memories including most of the readout functions. This works describes the input amplifiers of the NECTAr ASIC. A fully differential wideband amplifier, with voltage gain up to 20 V/V and a BW of 400 MHz. As it is impossible to design a fully differential OpAmp with an 8 GHz GBW product in a 0.35 CMOS technology, an alternative implementation based on HF linearized transconductors is explored. The output buffer is a class AB miller operational amplifier, with special non-linear current boost.

  6. Spatial-temporal evolution of topography of the central Andes and implications for deep tectonic processes (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzione, C. N.; Auerbach, D. J.; Bershaw, J. T.; Kar, N.; Smith, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Resolving the spatial and temporal evolution of changes in the elevation of mountain belts provides constraints on the geodynamic mechanisms that caused surface uplift of these regions. Several recent studies in the Central Andean plateau (between 13°S and 28°S) have used multiple climate proxies to demonstrate punctuated (several myr) changes in the composition of meteoric water and surface temperature inferred to reflect significant (≥1000 m) surface uplift. These studies suggest that different regions experienced surface uplift at different times. In comparison with crustal thickening histories derived from reconstructions of crustal shortening, it is also clear that crustal thickening and surface uplift are temporally decoupled, with significant crustal thickening preceding punctuated surface uplift events by several tens of millions of years. Here we compile results from paleoclimate studies of the Central Andean plateau to infer regional patterns of surface uplift. Limited paleoclimate data and geologic evidence indicate that the Eastern Cordillera experienced an earlier pulse of surface uplift than the Altiplano zone, associated with an eastward sweep of magmatism that marks the current limits of the plateau. Within the Altiplano zone, the southern Altiplano appears to have risen beginning in middle Miocene time and continuing through late Miocene time. During this time, the north-central Altiplano remained low and experienced increasing rates of sedimentation. In late Miocene time, sedimentation rates slowed dramatically at the same time that climate proxy data suggest rapid surface uplift of the north-central Altiplano. The northernmost Altiplano of Peru experienced a pulse of surface uplift in middle Miocene to early Pliocene time, with the exact timing unconstrained as of yet. Crustal shortening reconstructions from the southern through the north-central plateau (between 17°S and 24°S) yield upper estimates that range between 300×20 km, sufficient

  7. Localization of the cochlear amplifier in living sensitive ears.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianying Ren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To detect soft sounds, the mammalian cochlea increases its sensitivity by amplifying incoming sounds up to one thousand times. Although the cochlear amplifier is thought to be a local cellular process at an area basal to the response peak on the spiral basilar membrane, its location has not been demonstrated experimentally. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a sensitive laser interferometer to measure sub-nanometer vibrations at two locations along the basilar membrane in sensitive gerbil cochleae, here we show that the cochlea can boost soft sound-induced vibrations as much as 50 dB/mm at an area proximal to the response peak on the basilar membrane. The observed amplification works maximally at low sound levels and at frequencies immediately below the peak-response frequency of the measured apical location. The amplification decreases more than 65 dB/mm as sound levels increases. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the cochlea amplifier resides at a small longitudinal region basal to the response peak in the sensitive cochlea. These data provides critical information for advancing our knowledge on cochlear mechanisms responsible for the remarkable hearing sensitivity, frequency selectivity and dynamic range.

  8. Two-Stage, 90-GHz, Low-Noise Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Gaier, Todd C.; Xenos, Stephanie; Soria, Mary M.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Cleary, Kieran A.; Ferreira, Linda; Lai, Richard; Mei, Xiaobing

    2010-01-01

    A device has been developed for coherent detection of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). A two-stage amplifier has been designed that covers 75-110 GHz. The device uses the emerging 35-nm InP HEMT technology recently developed at Northrop Grumman Corporation primarily for use at higher frequencies. The amplifier has more than 18 dB gain and less than 35 K noise figure across the band. These devices have noise less than 30 K at 100 GHz. The development started with design activities at JPL, as well as characterization of multichip modules using existing InP. Following processing, a test campaign was carried out using single-chip modules at 100 GHz. Successful development of the chips will lead to development of multichip modules, with simultaneous Q and U Stokes parameter detection. This MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) amplifier takes advantage of performance improvements intended for higher frequencies, but in this innovation are applied at 90 GHz. The large amount of available gain ultimately leads to lower possible noise performance at 90 GHz.

  9. Research and implementation of the key technology of digital lock-in amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; You, Jia; Feng, Cheng; Li, Xisheng

    2017-08-01

    Lock-in amplifier technology is a very effective means of weak signal detection, with a center frequency stability, narrow pass band, high quality factor, which has been widely applied in physics, chemistry, biomedicine, remote sensing, materials science, etc. With the development of digital signal processing technology, digital phase-locked amplifier gradually replace analog lock-in amplifier, phase sensitive detector improved analog lock-in amplifier using analog method, by the way of the digital signal processing to achieve phase sensitive detector. FPGA has strong flexibility, can be programmed, and debugged, can be fully developed and verified. In this paper, we complete the construction of the digital lock-in amplifier based on the FPGA platform, using DSP Builder as design tool, using the ALTER's IP core to achieve rapid implementation. It is mainly divided into three modules: numerically controlled oscillator, Fast Fourier Transformation, digital phase sensitive detector. According to the process of MATLAB/Simulink/DSP Builder/Quartus II, it calls fft_v13_0 core, nco_v13_0 core provided by DSP Builder toolbox to build the model. The experimental results show that the designed digital phase-locked amplifier can effectively remove the noise interference and improve the detection accuracy.

  10. Origin and early evolution of photosynthetic eukaryotes in freshwater environments: reinterpreting proterozoic paleobiology and biogeochemical processes in light of trait evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Carrine E

    2013-12-01

    Phylogenetic analyses were performed on concatenated data sets of 31 genes and 11,789 unambiguously alignable characters from 37 cyanobacterial and 35 chloroplast genomes. The plastid lineage emerged somewhat early in the cyanobacterial tree, at a time when Cyanobacteria were likely unicellular and restricted to freshwater ecosystems. Using relaxed molecular clocks and 22 age constraints spanning cyanobacterial and eukaryote nodes, the common ancestor to the photosynthetic eukaryotes was predicted to have also inhabited freshwater environments around the time that oxygen appeared in the atmosphere (2.0-2.3 Ga). Early diversifications within each of the three major plastid clades were also inferred to have occurred in freshwater environments, through the late Paleoproterozoic and into the middle Mesoproterozoic. The colonization of marine environments by photosynthetic eukaryotes may not have occurred until after the middle Mesoproterozoic (1.2-1.5 Ga). The evolutionary hypotheses proposed here predict that early photosynthetic eukaryotes may have never experienced the widespread anoxia or euxinia suggested to have characterized marine environments in the Paleoproterozoic to early Mesoproterozoic. It also proposes that earliest acritarchs (1.5-1.7 Ga) may have been produced by freshwater taxa. This study highlights how the early evolution of habitat preference in photosynthetic eukaryotes, along with Cyanobacteria, could have contributed to changing biogeochemical conditions on the early Earth. © 2013 Phycological Society of America.

  11. Plasma Wave Seed for Raman Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Kenan; Barth, Ido; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2016-10-01

    It is proposed to replace traditionally used laser seed in backward Raman amplifiers with initial plasma wave seed. We show, analytically and numerically, that similarly to laser seeds plasma seeds result in Raman amplified pulse in both the linear and nonlinear regimes. The plasma seed is prepared in advance with a certain wavevector and envelope at one edge of the plasma. This methodology is attractive because it avoids issues in preparing and synchronizing frequency shifted laser seed. This work was supported by NNSA Grant No. DE-NA0002948, AFOSR Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0391.

  12. Predistortion of a Bidirectional Cuk Audio Amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Thomas Hagen; Nielsen, Dennis; Knott, Arnold

    2014-01-01

    using predistortion. This paper suggests linearizing a nonlinear bidirectional Cuk audio amplifier using an analog predistortion approach. A prototype power stage was built and results show that a voltage gain of up to 9 dB and reduction in THD from 6% down to 3% was obtainable using this approach.......Some non-linear amplifier topologies are capable of providing a larger voltage gain than one from a DC source, which could make them suitable for various applications. However, the non-linearities introduce a significant amount of harmonic distortion (THD). Some of this distortion could be reduced...

  13. Improving the Quality of Heisenberg Back-Action of Qubit Measurements made with Parametric Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, Katrina

    The quantum back-action of the measurement apparatus arising from the Heisenberg uncertainty principle is both a fascinating phenomenon and a powerful way to apply operations on quantum systems. Unfortunately, there are other effects which may overwhelm the Heisenberg back-action. This thesis focuses on two effects arising in the dispersive measurement of superconducting qubits made with two ultra-low-noise parametric amplifiers, the Josephson bifurcation amplifier (JBA) and the Josephson parametric converter (JPC). The first effect is qubit dephasing due to excess photons in the cavity coming from rogue radiation emitted by the first amplifier stage toward the system under study. This problem arises primarily in measurements made with the JBA, where a strong resonant pump tone is traditionally used to provide the energy for amplification. Replacing the single strong pump tone with two detuned pump tones minimized this dephasing to the point where the Heisenberg back-action of measurements made with the JBA could be observed. The second effect is reduced measurement efficiency arising from losses between the qubit and the parametric amplifier. Most commonly used parametric amplifiers operate in reflection, requiring additional lossy, magnetic elements known as circulators both to separate input from output, and to protect the qubits from dephasing due to the amplified reflected signal. This work presents two alternative directional elements, the Josephson circulator, which is both theoretically loss-less and does not rely upon the strong magnetic fields needed for traditional circulators, and the Josephson directional amplifier which does not send any amplified signal back toward the qubit. Both of these elements achieve directionality by interfering multiple parametric processes inside a single JPC, allowing for in-situ switching between the two modes of operation. This brings valuable experimental flexibility, and also makes these devices strong candidates for

  14. How Processing Atmosphere Influences the Evolution of GeO[subscript 2]-Embedded Germanium Nanocrystals Obtained from the Thermolysis of Phenyl Trichlorogermane-Derived Polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Eric J.; Hessel, Colin M.; Cavell, Ronald G.; Veinot, Jonathan G.C. (Alberta)

    2010-06-22

    We report the influence of processing atmosphere on the evolution of oxide-embedded germanium nanocrystals (Ge-NCs) formed by the thermal processing of (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}GeO{sub 1.5}){sub n} sol-gel polymers. In an inert processing atmosphere (100% Ar), the generation of elemental Ge from thermally induced disproportionation of the germanium rich oxide (GRO) leads to GeO{sub 2}-embedded Ge-NCs whose size is independent of peak processing temperature and time. Processing in a slightly reducing atmosphere (5% H{sub 2}/95% Ar) activates a second Ge-NC formation and growth pathway, involving the reduction of Ge oxide species. Here, we report that the processing atmosphere governs the distribution of Ge species. By modifying the contributions from redistribution and reduction reactions within the GRO, diffusion of Ge atoms throughout the oxide matrix and formation and growth of Ge-NCs are impacted.

  15. Total Suspended Matter (TSM) and Maximum Signal Depth (Z90_max) for Monitoring the Evolution of Sediment Resuspension Process in Shallow Coastal Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipponi, Federico; Zucca, Francesco; Taramelli, Andrea; Valentini, Emiliana

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring sediment fluxes patterns in coastal area, like dispersion, sedimentation and resuspension processes, is a relevant topic for scientists, decision makers and natural resources management. Time series analysis of Earth Observation (EO) data may contribute to the understanding and the monitoring of processes in sedimentary depositional marine environment, especially for shallow coastal areas. This research study show the ability of optical medium resolution imagery to interpret the evolution of sediment resuspension from seafloor in coastal areas during intense wind forcings. Intense bora wind events in northern Adriatic Sea basin during winter season provoke considerable wave-generated resuspension of sediments, which cause variation in water column turbidity. Total Suspended Matter (TSM) product has been selected as proxy for qualitative and quantitative analysis of resuspended sediments. In addition, maximum signal depth (Z90_max), has been used to evaluate the evolution of sediment concentration in the water column.

  16. High‐Efficiency CMOS Power Amplifier Using Uneven Bias for Wireless LAN Application

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ryu, Namsik; Jung, Jae‐Ho; Jeong, Yongchae

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a high‐efficiency power amplifier (PA) with uneven bias. The proposed amplifier consists of a driver amplifier, power stages of the main amplifier with class AB bias, and an auxiliary amplifier with class C bias...

  17. Mode instability thresholds for Tm-doped fiber amplifiers pumped at 790 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Arlee V; Smith, Jesse J

    2016-01-25

    We use a detailed numerical model of stimulated thermal Rayleigh scattering to compute mode instability thresholds in Tm(3+)-doped fiber amplifiers. The fiber amplifies 2040 nm light using a 790 nm pump. The cross-relaxation process is strong, permitting power efficiencies of 60%. The predicted instability thresholds are compared with those in similar Yb(3+)-doped fiber amplifiers with 976 nm pump and 1060 nm signal, and are found to be higher, even though the heat load is much higher in Tm-doped amplifiers. The higher threshold in the Tm-doped fiber is attributed to its longer signal wavelength, and to stronger gain saturation, due in part to cross-relaxation heating.

  18. An integrated, low noise patch-clamp amplifier for biological nanopore applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Dunbar, William B

    2010-01-01

    We present an integrated, low noise patch-clamp amplifier for biological nanopore applications. Our amplifier consists of an integrator-differentiator architecture coupled with a novel opamp design in the CMOS 0.35 µm process. The post-layout full-chip simulation shows the input referred noise of the amplifier is 0.49 pA RMS over a 5 kHz bandwidth using a verified electrical model for the biological nanopore system. In our biological nanopore experiments studying protein-DNA interactions, we encounter capacitive transients with a nominal settling time of 5 ms. Our amplifier design reduces the settling time to 0.2 ms, without requiring any compensation circuitry.

  19. Study of drilling muds on the anti-erosion property of a fluidic amplifier in directional drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-fu He

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to some drawbacks of conventional drilling methods and drilling tools, the application of hydraulic hammers with a fluidic amplifier have been extensively popularized since its emergence in recent years. However, the performance life of a fluidic amplifier is still unsatisfactory in oil and gas wells drilling, especially the heavy wear or erosion of the fluidic amplifier leads to the reduction of service life time of hydraulic hammers, which is derived from the incision of drilling muds with high speed and pressure. In order to investigate the influence of drilling muds, such as particle size, solid content and jet velocity, on the antierosion property of a fluidic amplifier, several groups of drilling muds with different performance parameters have been utilized to numerical simulation on basis of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD. Simulation results have shown that the jet nozzle of fluidic amplifiers is primarily abraded, afterwards are the lateral plates and the wedge of the fluidic amplifier, which shows extraordinary agreement with the actual cases of fluidic amplifier in drilling process. It can be concluded that particle size, solid content and jet velocity have a great influence on the anti-erosion property of a fluidic amplifier, and the erosion rate linearly varies with the particle size of drilling muds, nevertheless exponentially varies with solid content and jet velocity of drilling muds. As to improve the service life time of a fluidic amplifier, the mud purification system or low solid clay-free mud system is suggested in the operation of directional well drilling

  20. Space-Time Evolution of Seismicity in North-Western Geysers Geothermal Field and its Connection to Stimulation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leptokaropoulos, Konstantinos; Staszek, Monika; Lasocki, Stanislaw; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Martinez-Garzon, Patricia

    2017-04-01

    The rising needs for energy along with the recent requirements for more efficient usage and exploitation of the deep underground have resulted to a growing scientific and public concern on related environmental impacts. Hydraulic fracturing that has been carried out during the last decades is occasionally connected with triggered and induced seismicity worldwide. Data from geothermal fields can be used as a proxy for shale gas exploitation associated seismicity since they are both tightly connected to hydraulic fracturing. For that reason we utilize 'The Geysers' data from the compiled SHEER (Shale Gas Exploration and Exploitation Induced Risks) database. The Geysers (California, USA) is the largest producing geothermal field in the world and has been sufficiently monitored and studied since the last decades. Seismic and technological data gathered during the past 40 years indicate a connection of seismic activity with the fluctuations of the injected fluid volume. In this study we verify and quantify this correlation by analyzing the data associated with 2 injection wells (Prati-9 and Prati-29) which covers a time period of approximately 7 years (from November 2007 to August 2014). The correlation between spatio-temporal seismicity evolution and variation of the injection data is performed by elaboration of original and smoothed time-series through specified statistical tools (cross correlation, binomial test to investigate significant rate changes, b-value variation). Our analysis indicate a short time delay of seismicity occurrence at distances larger than 200m from the injection well, whereas no evidence of significant correlation between injection rates and b-values was discovered. The obtained results are expected to contribute to a better comprehension of the role of hydraulic fracturing and the physical processes controlling seismogenesis in fluid injection sites. Acknowledgements: This work was supported within SHEER: "Shale Gas Exploration and

  1. Power amplifiers for the S-, C-, X- and Ku-bands an EDA perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Božanić, Mladen

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a detailed review of power amplifiers, including classes and topologies rarely covered in books, and supplies sufficient information to allow the reader to design an entire amplifier system, and not just the power amplification stage. A central aim is to furnish readers with ideas on how to simplify the design process for a preferred power amplifier stage by introducing software-based routines in a programming language of their choice. The book is in two parts, the first focusing on power amplifier theory and the second on EDA concepts. Readers will gain enough knowledge of RF and microwave transmission theory, principles of active and passive device design and manufacturing, and power amplifier design concepts to allow them to quickly create their own programs, which will help to accelerate the transceiver design process. All circuit designers facing the challenge of designing an RF or microwave power amplifier for frequencies from 2 to 18 GHz will find this book to be a valuable asset.

  2. Frequency Compensation of an Audio Power Amplifier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, Ronan A.R.; van Heeswijk, R.

    2006-01-01

    A car audio power amplifier is presented that uses a frequency compensation scheme which avoids large compensation capacitors around the MOS power transistors, while retaining the bandwidth and stable load range of nested miller compensation. THD is 0.005%@(1kHz, 10W), SNR is 108dB, and the

  3. Molecular markers. Amplified fragment length polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pržulj Novo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism molecular markers (AFLPs has been developed combining procedures of RFLPs and RAPDs molekular markers, i.e. the first step is restriction digestion of the genomic DNA that is followed by selective amplification of the restricted fragments. The advantage of the AFLP technique is that it allows rapid generation of a large number of reproducible markers. The reproducibility of AFLPs markers is assured by the use of restriction site-specific adapters and adapter-specific primers for PCR reaction. Only fragments containing the restriction site sequence plus the additional nucleotides will be amplified and the more selected nucleotides added on the primer sequence the fewer the number of fragments amplified by PCR. The amplified products are normally separated on a sequencing gel and visualized after exposure to X-ray film or by using fluorescent labeled primers. AFLP shave proven to be extremely proficient in revealing diversity at below the species level. A disadvantage of AFLP technique is that AFLPs are essentially a dominant marker system and not able to identify heterozygotes.

  4. Using optimized random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Citrus nobilis Lour. Gonggan is an excellent fruit variety which is widely planted in South China. The origin of Gonggan is not clear. It is conjectured that its origin is from a cross between tangerine and orange; however, there is no direct evidence to confirm this. Here, we applied the optimized random amplified polymorphic ...

  5. Design of a lock-amplifier circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Huang, W. J.; Song, X.; Zhang, W. Y.; Sa, L. B.

    2017-01-01

    The lock-in amplifier is recovered by phase sensitive detection technique for the weak signal submerged in the noise background. This design is based on the TI ultra low power LM358, INA129, OPA227, OP07 and other chips as the core design and production of the lock-in amplifier. Signal generator by 10m ohms /1K ohm resistance points pressure network 10 mu V 1mV adjustable sine wave signal s (T). The concomitant interference signal together through the AC amplifier and band-pass filter signal x (T), on the other hand reference signal R (T) driven by square wave phase shift etc. steps to get the signal R (T), two signals and by phase sensitive detector are a DC full wave, again through its low pass filter and a DC amplifier to be measured signal more accurate detection, the final circuit through the AD conversion and the use of single-chip will display the output.

  6. Stereoscopy Amplifies Emotions Elicited by Facial Expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussi Hakala

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mediated facial expressions do not elicit emotions as strongly as real-life facial expressions, possibly due to the low fidelity of pictorial presentations in typical mediation technologies. In the present study, we investigated the extent to which stereoscopy amplifies emotions elicited by images of neutral, angry, and happy facial expressions. The emotional self-reports of positive and negative valence (which were evaluated separately and arousal of 40 participants were recorded. The magnitude of perceived depth in the stereoscopic images was manipulated by varying the camera base at 15, 40, 65, 90, and 115 mm. The analyses controlled for participants’ gender, gender match, emotional empathy, and trait alexithymia. The results indicated that stereoscopy significantly amplified the negative valence and arousal elicited by angry expressions at the most natural (65 mm camera base, whereas stereoscopy amplified the positive valence elicited by happy expressions in both the narrowed and most natural (15–65 mm base conditions. Overall, the results indicate that stereoscopy amplifies the emotions elicited by mediated emotional facial expressions when the depth geometry is close to natural. The findings highlight the sensitivity of the visual system to depth and its effect on emotions.

  7. Modeling Power Amplifiers using Memory Polynomials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kokkeler, Andre B.J.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present measured in- and output data of a power amplifier (PA). We compare this data with an AM-AM and AM-PM model. We conclude that a more sophisticated PA model is needed to cope with severe memory effects. We suggest to use memory polynomials and introduce two approaches to

  8. Fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rosa rugosa is an excellent ornamental plant with important ecological, economical and medicinal values in China. Polymorphism amplifications of the genomic DNA of 5 wild R. rugosa accessions and 25 cultivars that originated from China with fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism molecular markers were ...

  9. Relationship between morphological and amplified fragment length ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... morphological and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) marker based genetic diversity, to estimate mid parent heterosis and to correlate the estimated parental genetic diversity with heterosis chilli. Five CMS B - lines and 30 testers were used for morphological and AFLP marker genetic divergence analysis.

  10. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) marker associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-06-29

    Jun 29, 2011 ... between the studied provenances were less than 39%. Key words: Acacia Senegal, provenance variation, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) marker, salt tolerance, seed germination, seedling growth. INTRODUCTION. Salinity is the major factor limiting plants growth, widely spread and has more ...

  11. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) marker associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-06-29

    Jun 29, 2011 ... bands detected were polymorphic for the provenances of A. senegal and the dissimilarity indices between the studied provenances were less than 39%. Key words: Acacia Senegal, provenance variation, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) marker, salt tolerance, seed germination, seedling growth ...

  12. Optimization of Pr3+:ZBLAN fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, B.; Miniscalco, J. W.; Quimby, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental parameters have been measured and used in a quantitative model of Pr3+-doped fluorozirconate fiber amplifiers. The optimum cutoff wavelength was determined to be 800 nm and the gain for 400 mW of pump was found to increase from 12 to 34 dB if the NA was increased from 0.15 to 0...

  13. Reflected-wave maser. [low noise amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss, R. C. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A number of traveling-wave, slow-wave maser structures, containing active maser material but absent the typical ferrite isolators, are immersed in a nonuniform magnetic field. The microwave signal to be amplified is inserted at a circulator which directs the signal to a slow-wave structure. The signal travels through the slow-wave structure, being amplified according to the distance traveled. The end of the slow-wave structure farthest from the circulator is arranged to be a point of maximum reflection of the signal traveling through the slow-wave structure. As a consequence, the signal to be amplified traverses the slow-wave structure again, in the opposite direction (towards the circulator) experiencing amplification equivalent to that achieved by a conventional traveling-wave maser having twice the length. The circulator directs the amplified signal to following like stages of amplification. Isolators are used in between stages to prevent signals from traveling in the wrong direction, between the stages. Reduced signal loss is experienced at each stage. The high gain produced by each slow-wave structure is reduced to a moderate value by use of a nonuniform magnetic field which also broadens the line width of the maser material. The resulting bandwidth can be exceptionally wide. Cascaded stages provide high gain, exceptionally wide bandwith and very low noise temperature.

  14. LASER PHYSICS: Instability of the radiation wavefront in pulsed CO2 amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, S. V.; Yur'ev, M. S.

    1987-07-01

    A theoretical investigation is reported of the evolution in space and time of a small-scale perturbation against the background of a smooth beam entering a pulsed CO2 amplifier. The ranges of the transverse frequency, longitudinal coordinate, and time in which the perturbation growth is exponential are determined. It is shown that the wavefront instability can be suppressed by amplification of the main beam and by the attenuation of sound.

  15. Experimental Characterization of the Seeded FEL Amplifier at the BNL SDL

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, T; Murphy, J B; Rose, J; Shaftan, T V; Tsang, Thomas; Wang, X J; Yu, L H

    2005-01-01

    A laser seeded near IR FEL amplifier experiment was initiated at the BNL SDL [1] to explore various schemes of FEL efficiency improvement and generation of short Rayleigh length (SRL) FEL output. The FEL achieved first SASE lasing at 0.8 μm on May 6, 2005. The experimental characterization of the laser seeded FEL output power, spectrum and transverse mode structure evolution will be presented.

  16. Multi-pass amplifier architecture for high power laser systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manes, Kenneth R; Spaeth, Mary L; Erlandson, Alvin C

    2014-04-01

    A main amplifier system includes a first reflector operable to receive input light through a first aperture and direct the input light along an optical path. The input light is characterized by a first polarization. The main amplifier system also includes a first polarizer operable to reflect light characterized by the first polarization state. The main amplifier system further includes a first and second set of amplifier modules. Each of the first and second set of amplifier modules includes an entrance window, a quarter wave plate, a plurality of amplifier slablets arrayed substantially parallel to each other, and an exit window. The main amplifier system additionally includes a set of mirrors operable to reflect light exiting the first set of amplifier modules to enter the second set of amplifier modules and a second polarizer operable to reflect light characterized by a second polarization state.

  17. The oxygen evolution on La0.5Ba0.5CoO3 : Passivation processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobussen, A.G.C.; Willems, H.; Broers, G.H.J.

    1982-01-01

    Earlier publications on the oxygen evolution of La0.5Ba0.5CoO3 have left a number of observations involving passivation effects of the electrode unexplained. Therefore, the electrode surface used was studied by means of X-ray powder diffraction and electron microscopy (with diffraction and elemental

  18. The Process of Scientific Inquiry as It Relates to the Creation/Evolution Controversy: I. A Serious Social Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jon S.; Toth, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    We describe how the increased level of religiosity in the United States is correlated with the resistance to the teaching of evolution and argue that this is a social, rather than scientific, issue. Our goal is to foster teachers' understanding of the philosophy of biology and encourage them to proactively deal with creationism at all levels,…

  19. Geochemical evolution of the acid crater lake of Poas volcano (Costa Rica): Insights into volcanic-hydrothermal processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez Cruz, María

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the evolution of Laguna Caliente, an acid crater lake at the summit of Po:is, a persistently active volcano in central Costa Rica. The appearance, volume, temperature and chemical composition of the lake have continuously changed over the entire known period of its

  20. Short-pulse propagation in fiber optical parametric amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristofori, Valentina

    Fiber optical parametric amplifiers (FOPAs) are attractive because they can provide large gain over a broad range of central wavelengths, depending only on the availability of a suitable pump laser. In addition, FOPAs are suitable for the realization of all-optical signal processing functionalities...... is implemented to obtain an all-fiber system. The advantages of all fiber-systems are related to their reliability, long-term stability and compactness. Fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplification is promising for the amplification of such signals thanks to the inherent compatibility of FOPAs with fiber...

  1. Linear CMOS RF power amplifiers a complete design workflow

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz, Hector Solar

    2013-01-01

    The work establishes the design flow for the optimization of linear CMOS power amplifiers from the first steps of the design to the final IC implementation and tests. The authors also focuses on design guidelines of the inductor's geometrical characteristics for power applications and covers their measurement and characterization. Additionally, a model is proposed which would facilitate designs in terms of transistor sizing, required inductor quality factors or minimum supply voltage. The model considers limitations that CMOS processes can impose on implementation. The book also provides diffe

  2. The warm, rich sound of valve guitar amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeports, David

    2017-03-01

    Practical solid state diodes and transistors have made glass valve technology nearly obsolete. Nevertheless, valves survive largely because electric guitar players much prefer the sound of valve amplifiers to the sound of transistor amplifiers. This paper discusses the introductory-level physics behind that preference. Overdriving an amplifier adds harmonics to an input sound. While a moderately overdriven valve amplifier produces strong even harmonics that enhance a sound, an overdriven transistor amplifier creates strong odd harmonics that can cause dissonance. The functioning of a triode valve explains its creation of even and odd harmonics. Music production software enables the examination of both the wave shape and the harmonic content of amplified sounds.

  3. Low phase noise oscillator using two parallel connected amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L.

    1987-01-01

    A high frequency oscillator is provided by connecting two amplifier circuits in parallel where each amplifier circuit provides the other amplifier circuit with the conditions necessary for oscillation. The inherent noise present in both amplifier circuits causes the quiescent current, and in turn, the generated frequency, to change. The changes in quiescent current cause the transconductance and the load impedance of each amplifier circuit to vary, and this in turn results in opposing changes in the input susceptance of each amplifier circuit. Because the changes in input susceptance oppose each other, the changes in quiescent current also oppose each other. The net result is that frequency stability is enhanced.

  4. Gene networks, occlusal clocks, and functional patches: new understanding of pattern and process in the evolution of the dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polly, P David

    2015-05-01

    Our understanding of the evolution of the dentition has been transformed by advances in the developmental biology, genetics, and functional morphology of teeth, as well as the methods available for studying tooth form and function. The hierarchical complexity of dental developmental genetics combined with dynamic effects of cells and tissues during development allow for substantial, rapid, and potentially non-linear evolutionary changes. Studies of selection on tooth function in the wild and evolutionary functional comparisons both suggest that tooth function and adaptation to diets are the most important factors guiding the evolution of teeth, yet selection against random changes that produce malocclusions (selectional drift) may be an equally important factor in groups with tribosphenic dentitions. These advances are critically reviewed here.

  5. The Landscape Evolution Observatory: A large-scale controllable infrastructure to study coupled Earth-surface processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangle, Luke A.; DeLong, Stephen B.; Abramson, Nate; Adams, John; Barron-Gafford, Greg A.; Breshears, David D.; Brooks, Paul D.; Chorover, Jon; Dietrich, William E.; Dontsova, Katerina; Durcik, Matej; Espeleta, Javier; Ferre, T. P. A.; Ferriere, Regis; Henderson, Whitney; Hunt, Edward A.; Huxman, Travis E.; Millar, David; Murphy, Brendan; Niu, Guo-Yue; Pavao-Zuckerman, Mitch; Pelletier, Jon D.; Rasmussen, Craig; Ruiz, Joaquin; Saleska, Scott; Schaap, Marcel; Sibayan, Michael; Troch, Peter A.; Tuller, Markus; van Haren, Joost; Zeng, Xubin

    2015-09-01

    Zero-order drainage basins, and their constituent hillslopes, are the fundamental geomorphic unit comprising much of Earth's uplands. The convergent topography of these landscapes generates spatially variable substrate and moisture content, facilitating biological diversity and influencing how the landscape filters precipitation and sequesters atmospheric carbon dioxide. In light of these significant ecosystem services, refining our understanding of how these functions are affected by landscape evolution, weather variability, and long-term climate change is imperative. In this paper we introduce the Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO): a large-scale controllable infrastructure consisting of three replicated artificial landscapes (each 330 m2 surface area) within the climate-controlled Biosphere 2 facility in Arizona, USA. At LEO, experimental manipulation of rainfall, air temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed are possible at unprecedented scale. The Landscape Evolution Observatory was designed as a community resource to advance understanding of how topography, physical and chemical properties of soil, and biological communities coevolve, and how this coevolution affects water, carbon, and energy cycles at multiple spatial scales. With well-defined boundary conditions and an extensive network of sensors and samplers, LEO enables an iterative scientific approach that includes numerical model development and virtual experimentation, physical experimentation, data analysis, and model refinement. We plan to engage the broader scientific community through public dissemination of data from LEO, collaborative experimental design, and community-based model development.

  6. The Landscape Evolution Observatory: a large-scale controllable infrastructure to study coupled Earth-surface processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangle, Luke A.; DeLong, Stephen B.; Abramson, Nate; Adams, John; Barron-Gafford, Greg A.; Breshears, David D.; Brooks, Paul D.; Chorover, Jon; Dietrich, William E.; Dontsova, Katerina; Durcik, Matej; Espeleta, Javier; Ferre, T. P. A.; Ferriere, Regis; Henderson, Whitney; Hunt, Edward A.; Huxman, Travis E.; Millar, David; Murphy, Brendan; Niu, Guo-Yue; Pavao-Zuckerman, Mitch; Pelletier, Jon D.; Rasmussen, Craig; Ruiz, Joaquin; Saleska, Scott; Schaap, Marcel; Sibayan, Michael; Troch, Peter A.; Tuller, Markus; van Haren, Joost; Zeng, Xubin

    2015-01-01

    Zero-order drainage basins, and their constituent hillslopes, are the fundamental geomorphic unit comprising much of Earth's uplands. The convergent topography of these landscapes generates spatially variable substrate and moisture content, facilitating biological diversity and influencing how the landscape filters precipitation and sequesters atmospheric carbon dioxide. In light of these significant ecosystem services, refining our understanding of how these functions are affected by landscape evolution, weather variability, and long-term climate change is imperative. In this paper we introduce the Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO): a large-scale controllable infrastructure consisting of three replicated artificial landscapes (each 330 m2 surface area) within the climate-controlled Biosphere 2 facility in Arizona, USA. At LEO, experimental manipulation of rainfall, air temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed are possible at unprecedented scale. The Landscape Evolution Observatory was designed as a community resource to advance understanding of how topography, physical and chemical properties of soil, and biological communities coevolve, and how this coevolution affects water, carbon, and energy cycles at multiple spatial scales. With well-defined boundary conditions and an extensive network of sensors and samplers, LEO enables an iterative scientific approach that includes numerical model development and virtual experimentation, physical experimentation, data analysis, and model refinement. We plan to engage the broader scientific community through public dissemination of data from LEO, collaborative experimental design, and community-based model development.

  7. Assessment of the microstructure evolution of an austempered ductile iron during austempering process through strain hardening analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnini, Riccardo; Fabrizi, Alberto; Bonollo, Franco; Zanardi, Franco; Angella, Giuliano

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine a procedure based on tensile testing to assess the critical range of austempering times for having the best ausferrite produced through austempering. The austempered ductile iron (ADI) 1050 was quenched at different times during austempering and the quenched samples were tested in tension. The dislocation-density-related constitutive equation proposed by Estrin for materials having high density of geometrical obstacles to dislocation motion, was used to model the flow curves of the tensile tested samples. On the basis of strain hardening theory, the equation parameters were related to the microstructure of the quenched samples and were used to assess the ADI microstructure evolution during austempering. The microstructure evolution was also analysed through conventional optical microscopy, electron back-scattered diffraction technique and transmission electron microscopy. The microstructure observations resulted to be consistent with the assessment based on tensile testing, so the dislocation-density-related constitutive equation was found to be a powerful tool to characterise the evolution of the solid state transformations of austempering.

  8. High gain, multiatmosphere CO2 laser amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, G. C.; Houtman, H.; Meyer, J.

    1987-02-01

    A novel TE discharge, 15-mm aperture, multiatmosphere, CO2 laser amplifier is described, with measured electrical characteristics and gain measurements on the 9.294-micron, 9R (16) line. The electrical circuit used in this amplifier is a realistic alternative to the Marx bank or conventional LC inversion circuit and, similarly, it would be useful for excitation of other gas lasers as well. This automatically preionized, double-sided, fourfold LC inversion circuit uses only one spark gap, and it is shown to provide small-signal gains of 5.7 percent/cm, at 120 J/l atm and 10 atm. The generalization to an n-stage device, which would be suitable for higher pressures, and larger apertures, is discussed.

  9. Amplified music exposure carries risks to hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Valéria Gomes; de Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Costa Pires; Tauil, Pedro Luíz; de Castro Silva, Isabella Monteiro; Sampaio, André Luiz Lopes

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the association between changes in the outer hair cells and exposure to amplified music in a group of high-school students. In this retrospective, case-control study, 86 subjects underwent audiometry, immittance audiometry, and distortion-product otoacoustic emission tests. The subjects were questioned about their listening habits and divided into 2 groups: exposed and unexposed. Most of the subjects had reduced function in their outer hair cells, mainly beginning at 8 kHz. Among 60 subjects-30 cases and 30 controls-75% were considered exposed and 25% unexposed. The exposed subjects were 9.33 times more likely to have altered outer hair cells than the unexposed subjects were. Exposure to amplified music is associated with reduced function in the hair cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Noise Gain Features of Fiber Raman Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgii S. Felinskyi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation dynamics of the optical noise in a silica single mode fiber (SMF as function of the pump power variation in the counter pumped fiber Raman amplifier (FRA is experimentally studied. The ratio between the power of amplified spontaneous emission and the power of incoherent optical noise is quantitatively determined by detailed analysis of experimental data in the pump powers range of 100–300 mW within the full band of Stokes frequencies, including FRA working wavelengths over the C + L transparency windows. It is found out the maximum of Raman gain coefficient for optical noise does not exceed ~60% of corresponding peak at the gain profile maximum of coherent signal. It is shown that the real FRA noise figure may be considerably less than 3 dB over a wide wavelength range (100 nm at a pump power of several hundreds of mW.

  11. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perin J.P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YAG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz. The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100 K–170 K with a heat flux of 1 MW*m−2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser.

  12. SINGLE CONVERSION ISOLATED IMPEDANCE TRANSFORMATION AMPLIFIER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The invention relates to a switch mode power amplifier. A first and a second change-over switch are inserted between a DC voltage supply and a primary side of an isolation transformer. Two secondary windings are connected to a power output terminal. A first and a second secondary side power switch...... are adapted to connect the two secondary windings to the power connector of the power output terminal. The pulse width modulation means is adapted to generate control signals for the driver means of the first and the second change-over switch so as to cause every second pulse to be inverted. The pulse width...... modulation means is also adapted to generate a third and a fourth control signal for said driver means of the power switches of said first and said second secondary. The invention also relates to a method of controlling a switch mode power amplifier...

  13. Conversion of the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conversion of the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) marker UBC#116 linked to Fusarium crown and root rot resistance gene (Frl) into a co-dominant sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker for marker-assisted selection of tomato.

  14. A SIMULATION OF 450MHz AMPLIFIER WITH DISTRIBUTED ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    USING BIPOLAR JUNCTION TRANSISTOR FROM NI- CIRCUIT DESIGN ... amplifier and multistage distributed amplifier is carried out. In this ... namely, bandwidth, signal power and noise are the .... and Engineers', Prentice-Hall International.

  15. Amplifying the Hawking Signal in BECs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Balbinot

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider simple models of Bose-Einstein condensates to study analog pair-creation effects, namely, the Hawking effect from acoustic black holes and the dynamical Casimir effect in rapidly time-dependent backgrounds. We also focus on a proposal by Cornell to amplify the Hawking signal in density-density correlators by reducing the atoms’ interactions shortly before measurements are made.

  16. Fast Electrocardiogram Amplifier Recovery after Defibrillation Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Dotsinsky

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available A procedure for fast ECG amplifier recovery after defibrillation shocks was developed and simulated in the MATLAB environment. Exponentially decaying post-shock voltages have been recorded. Signals from the AHA database are taken and mixed with the recorded exponential disturbances. The algorithm applies moving averaging (comb filter on the compound input signal, thereby obtaining the samples of the disturbance. They are currently subtracted from the input signal. The results obtained show that its recovery is practically instantaneous.

  17. Predistortion for Nonlinear Power Amplifiers with Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Nizamuddin, Muhammad Ali

    2002-01-01

    The fusion of voice and data applications, along with the demand for high data-rate applications such as video-on-demand, is making radio frequency (RF) spectrum an increasingly expensive commodity for current and future communications. Although bandwidth-efficient digital modulation alleviates part of the problem by requiring a minimal use of spectral resources, they put an extra design burden on RF engineers. RF transmitters and power amplifiers account for more t...

  18. Self-amplifying mRNA vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Luis A; Kommareddy, Sushma; Maione, Domenico; Uematsu, Yasushi; Giovani, Cinzia; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Otten, Gillis R; Yu, Dong; Mandl, Christian W; Mason, Peter W; Dormitzer, Philip R; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Geall, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief introduction to nucleic acid-based vaccines and recent research in developing self-amplifying mRNA vaccines. These vaccines promise the flexibility of plasmid DNA vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity and safety. The key to realizing the full potential of these vaccines is efficient delivery of nucleic acid to the cytoplasm of a cell, where it can amplify and express the encoded antigenic protein. The hydrophilicity and strong net negative charge of RNA impedes cellular uptake. To overcome this limitation, electrostatic complexation with cationic lipids or polymers and physical delivery using electroporation or ballistic particles to improve cellular uptake has been evaluated. This chapter highlights the rapid progress made in using nonviral delivery systems for RNA-based vaccines. Initial preclinical testing of self-amplifying mRNA vaccines has shown nonviral delivery to be capable of producing potent and robust innate and adaptive immune responses in small animals and nonhuman primates. Historically, the prospect of developing mRNA vaccines was uncertain due to concerns of mRNA instability and the feasibility of large-scale manufacturing. Today, these issues are no longer perceived as barriers in the widespread implementation of the technology. Currently, nonamplifying mRNA vaccines are under investigation in human clinical trials and can be produced at a sufficient quantity and quality to meet regulatory requirements. If the encouraging preclinical data with self-amplifying mRNA vaccines are matched by equivalently positive immunogenicity, potency, and tolerability in human trials, this platform could establish nucleic acid vaccines as a versatile new tool for human immunization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Charge sensitive amplifies. The state of arts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Kunishiro [Clear Pulse Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-07-01

    In the radiation detectors, signals are essentially brought with charges produced by radiation, then it is naturally the best way to use a charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) system to extract those signals. The CSA is thought to be the best amplifier suitable to almost all the radiation detectors, if neglecting economical points of view. The CSA has been only applied to special fields like radiation detection because the concept of `charges` is not so universal against the concepts of `voltage` and `current`. The CSA, however, is low in noise and a high speed amplifier and may be applicable not only to radiation measurement but also piezoelectric devices and also bolometers. In this article, noise in the CSA, basic circuit on the CSA, concepts of `equivalent noise charge` (ENC), a method for the ENC, and importance of the `open-loop gain` in the CSA to achieve better performance of it and how to realize in a practical CSA were described. And, characteristics on a counting rate of the CSA, various circuit used in the CSA, and CSAs which are commercially available at present and special purpose CSAs were also introduced. (G.K.)

  20. A 205GHz Amplifier in 90nm CMOS Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    A 205GHz Amplifier in 90nm CMOS Technology Shahab Ardalan, Senior Member, IEEE Electrical Department, Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering...greater CMOS technologies . Keywords: Amplifier, neutralization, parasitic, Psat, P1dB.   Introduction Millimeter-wave and sub-mm-wave (THz band...amplifier has been implemented and fabricated in 90nm CMOS technology . The proposed amplifier attained a gain of 10.5 dB whilst consuming a dc power

  1. Noise and saturation properties of semiconductor quantum dot optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of quantum dot optical amplifiers. Due to the presence of a reservoir of wetting layer states, the saturation and noise properties differ markedly from bulk or QW amplifiers and may be significantly improved.......We present a detailed theoretical analysis of quantum dot optical amplifiers. Due to the presence of a reservoir of wetting layer states, the saturation and noise properties differ markedly from bulk or QW amplifiers and may be significantly improved....

  2. Pump to signal noise transfer in parametric fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Hansen, Toke; Rottwitt, Karsten; Peucheret, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Fiber optic parametric amplifiers have been suggested due to their potential low spontaneous emission. However, by nature the parametric amplifier only work in a forward pumped configuration, which result in transfer of relative intensity noise in the pump to the signal.......Fiber optic parametric amplifiers have been suggested due to their potential low spontaneous emission. However, by nature the parametric amplifier only work in a forward pumped configuration, which result in transfer of relative intensity noise in the pump to the signal....

  3. A Comparison of the CHILD and Landlab Computational Landscape Evolution Models and Examples of Best Practices in Numerical Modeling of Surface Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, N. M.; Hobley, D. E. J.; Tucker, G. E.; Istanbulluoglu, E.; Adams, J. M.; Nudurupati, S. S.; Hutton, E. W. H.

    2014-12-01

    Computational models are important tools that can be used to quantitatively understand the evolution of real landscapes. Commonalities exist among most landscape evolution models, although they are also idiosyncratic, in that they are coded in different languages, require different input values, and are designed to tackle a unique set of questions. These differences can make applying a landscape evolution model challenging, especially for novice programmers. In this study, we compare and contrast two landscape evolution models that are designed to tackle similar questions, but the actual model designs are quite different. The first model, CHILD, is over a decade-old and is relatively well-tested, well-developed and well-used. It is coded in C++, operates on an irregular grid and was designed more with function rather than user-experience in mind. In contrast, the second model, Landlab, is relatively new and was designed to be accessible to a wide range of scientists, including those who have not previously used or developed a numerical model. Landlab is coded in Python, a relatively easy language for the non-proficient programmer, and has the ability to model landscapes described on both regular and irregular grids. We present landscape simulations from both modeling platforms. Our goal is to illustrate best practices for implementing a new process module in a landscape evolution model, and therefore the simulations are applicable regardless of the modeling platform. We contrast differences and highlight similarities between the use of the two models, including setting-up the model and input file for different evolutionary scenarios, computational time, and model output. Whenever possible, we compare model output with analytical solutions and illustrate the effects, or lack thereof, of a uniform vs. non-uniform grid. Our simulations focus on implementing a single process, including detachment-limited or transport-limited fluvial bedrock incision and linear or non

  4. Exploration of Single-Chip Phase-Sensitive Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-05

    PERCENT_SUPPORTEDNAME FTE Equivalent: Total Number: ...... ...... Inventions (DD882) Scientific Progress First single -chip photonic integrated phase -sensitive amplifier...Sep-2015 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Exploration of Single -Chip Phase -Sensitive Amplifiers The views, opinions...published in non peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: Exploration of Single -Chip Phase -Sensitive Amplifiers Report Title A monolithically integrated

  5. The Use of Cryogenic HEMT Amplifiers in Wide Band Radiometers

    OpenAIRE

    Jarosik, Norman

    2000-01-01

    Advances in device fabrication, modelling and design techniques have made wide band, low noise cryogenic amplifiers available at frequencies up to 106 GHz. Microwave radiometry applications as used in radio astronomy capitalize on the low noise and large bandwidths of these amplifiers. Radiometers must be carefully designed so as to preclude sensitivity degradations caused by small, low frequency gain fluctuations inherent in these amplifiers.

  6. The Nature of Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alles, David L.

    2005-01-01

    The nature of evolution, the historical change in the universe, and the change that is caused by the workings of the dynamic processes at the smallest and largest scales are studied. It is viewed that the cumulative change in the historical systems is caused by evolution, which is a type of causal relationship and evolutionary processes could be…

  7. A low-voltage sense amplifier with two-stage operational amplifier clamping for flash memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiarong

    2017-04-01

    A low-voltage sense amplifier with reference current generator utilizing two-stage operational amplifier clamp structure for flash memory is presented in this paper, capable of operating with minimum supply voltage at 1 V. A new reference current generation circuit composed of a reference cell and a two-stage operational amplifier clamping the drain pole of the reference cell is used to generate the reference current, which avoids the threshold limitation caused by current mirror transistor in the traditional sense amplifier. A novel reference voltage generation circuit using dummy bit-line structure without pull-down current is also adopted, which not only improves the sense window enhancing read precision but also saves power consumption. The sense amplifier was implemented in a flash realized in 90 nm flash technology. Experimental results show the access time is 14.7 ns with power supply of 1.2 V and slow corner at 125 °C. Project supported by the National Natural Science Fundation of China (No. 61376028).

  8. Atomic-scale structure evolution in a quasi-equilibrated electrochemical process of electrode materials for rechargeable batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lin; Xiao, Dongdong; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Li, Hong; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2015-04-01

    Lithium-ion batteries have proven to be extremely attractive candidates for applications in portable electronics, electric vehicles, and smart grid in terms of energy density, power density, and service life. Further performance optimization to satisfy ever-increasing demands on energy storage of such applications is highly desired. In most of cases, the kinetics and stability of electrode materials are strongly correlated to the transport and storage behaviors of lithium ions in the lattice of the host. Therefore, information about structural evolution of electrode materials at an atomic scale is always helpful to explain the electrochemical performances of batteries at a macroscale. The annular-bright-field (ABF) imaging in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) allows simultaneous imaging of light and heavy elements, providing an unprecedented opportunity to probe the nearly equilibrated local structure of electrode materials after electrochemical cycling at atomic resolution. Recent progress toward unraveling the atomic-scale structure of selected electrode materials with different charge and/or discharge state to extend the current understanding of electrochemical reaction mechanism with the ABF and high angle annular dark field STEM imaging is presented here. Future research on the relationship between atomic-level structure evolution and microscopic reaction mechanisms of electrode materials for rechargeable batteries is envisaged. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Simulation of planar FEL-amplifier with tape relativistic electron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Ginzburg, N S; Peskov, N Yu; Arzhannikov, A V; Sinitskij, S L

    2001-01-01

    The simulation of the planar microwave (4 mm) amplifier on the basis of the powerful laser on free electrons (FEL- amplifier) is carried out. The tape relativistic electron beam with the energy up to 1 MeV and operating current up to 2 kA is formed by the Y-3 accelerators. The complete nonaveraging system of the self-consistent equations describing the process of interaction of the particles, moving in the plane ondulator field is obtained. Thereafter the averaging of the above-mentioned equations was carried out and the linear and nonlinear stages of the amplification process were studied. The additional simulation of the FEL-amplifier is carried out on the basis of the two-dimensional version of the KARAT PIC-code. It is shown that the applied approaches give sufficiently close results

  10. Simulation investigation of impact factors in photodarkening-induced beam degradation in fiber amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chen; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Hanwei; Su, Rongtao; Ma, Pengfei; Zhou, Pu; Xu, Xiaojun; Lu, Qisheng

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we have numerically investigated the photodarkening induced long-term beam degradations in ytterbium doped fiber amplifiers under different fiber types, doping concentrations, pumping schemes and pumping powers. The influence of different factors on this degradation procedure was theoretically revealed. First, the coupling strength characteristics of active fibers are mainly determined by the fiber core dimension and pumping wavelength. Second, amplifiers with a stronger coupling strength will experience the degradation procedure faster than those with a weaker coupling strength. Third, the interaction length of the fiber amplifier could also affect the beam degradation process. Lastly, the more intense pumping power will enhance the degradation process. Our simulation results can provide instructive suggestions when designing ytterbium-doped fiber based fiber amplification systems.

  11. Exponential gain and saturation of a self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, S V; Gluskin, E; Arnold, N D; Benson, C; Berg, W; Biedron, S G; Borland, M; Chae, Y C; Dejus, R J; Den Hartog, P K; Deriy, B; Erdmann, M; Eidelman, Y I; Hahne, M W; Huang, Z; Kim, K J; Lewellen, J W; Li, Y; Lumpkin, A H; Makarov, O; Moog, E R; Nassiri, A; Sajaev, V; Soliday, R; Tieman, B J; Trakhtenberg, E M; Travish, G; Vasserman, I B; Vinokurov, N A; Wang, X J; Wiemerslage, G; Yang, B X

    2001-06-15

    Self-amplified spontaneous emission in a free-electron laser has been proposed for the generation of very high brightness coherent x-rays. This process involves passing a high-energy, high-charge, short-pulse, low-energy-spread, and low-emittance electron beam through the periodic magnetic field of a long series of high-quality undulator magnets. The radiation produced grows exponentially in intensity until it reaches a saturation point. We report on the demonstration of self-amplified spontaneous emission gain, exponential growth, and saturation at visible (530 nanometers) and ultraviolet (385 nanometers) wavelengths. Good agreement between theory and simulation indicates that scaling to much shorter wavelengths may be possible. These results confirm the physics behind the self-amplified spontaneous emission process and forward the development of an operational x-ray free-electron laser.

  12. Dynamic landscapes in human evolution and dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devès, Maud; King, Geoffrey; Bailey, Geoffrey; Inglis, Robyn; Williams, Matthew; Winder, Isabelle

    2013-04-01

    Archaeological studies of human settlement in its wider landscape setting usually focus on climate change as the principal environmental driver of change in the physical features of the landscape, even on the long time scales of early human evolution. We emphasize that landscapes evolve dynamically due to an interplay of processes occurring over different timescales. Tectonic deformation, volcanism, sea level changes, by acting on the topography, the lithology and on the patterns of erosion-deposition in a given area, can moderate or amplify the influence of climate at the regional and local scale. These processes impose or alleviate physical barriers to movement, and modify the distribution and accessibility of plant and animal resources in ways critical to human ecological and evolutionary success (King and Bailey, JHE 2006; Bailey and King, Antiquity 2011, Winder et al. Antiquity in press). The DISPERSE project, an ERC-funded collaboration between the University of York and the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, aims to develop systematic methods for reconstructing landscapes associated with active tectonics, volcanism and sea level change at a variety of scales in order to study their potential impact on patterns of human evolution and dispersal. Examples are shown to illustrate the ways in which changes of significance to human settlement can occur at a range of geographical scales and on time scales that range from lifetimes to tens of millennia, creating and sustaining attractive conditions for human settlement and exercising powerful selective pressures on human development.

  13. An RF Power Amplifier in a Digital CMOS Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Asbeck; Fallesen, Carsten

    2002-01-01

    is presented. It separates the determination of the optimal load resistance and the determination of the large signal drain-source capacitance. Based on this method, proper values for on-chip interstage matching and off-chip output matching can be derived. A envelope linearisation circuit for the PA...... is proposed. Simulations and measurements of a fabricated linearisation circuit are presented and used to calculate the achievable linearity in terms of the spectral leakage and the error vector magnitude of a EDGE (3 pi /8-8PSK) modulated signal....

  14. Analysis of multipass laser amplifier systems for storage laser media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, J.F.

    1980-03-25

    The performance characteristics of single pass and multipass storage laser amplifiers are presented and compared. The effects of the multipass amplifier parameters on the extraction characteristics are examined. For a wide range of conditions the multipass amplifier is found to provide high energy gain and high efficiency simultaneously. This is a significant advantage over the single pass laser amplifier. Finally, three specific storage laser amplifier systems, flashlamp pumped V:MgF/sub 2/, XeF laser pumped Tm:Glass, and photolytically pumped Selenium, are examined. The performance characteristics for each of the three systems are calculated and compared.

  15. 160-190 GHz Monolithic Low Noise Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Y. L.; Wang, H.; Huang, T. W.; Lai, R.; Chen, Y. C.; Sholley, M.; Block, T.; Streit, D. C.; Liu, P. H.; Allen, B. R.; hide

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the results of two 160-190 GHz monolithic low noise amplifiers (LNAs) fabricated with 0.07-microns pseudomorphic (PM) InAlAs/InGaAs/InP HEMT technology using a reactive ion etch (RIE) via hole process. A peak small signal gain of 9 dB was measured at 188 GHz for the first LNA with a 3-dB bandwidth from 164 to 192 GHz while the second LNA has achieved over 6-dB gain from 142 to 180 GHz. The same design (second LNA) was also fabricated with 0.08-micron gate and a wet etch process, showing a small signal gain of 6 dB with noise figure 6 dB. All the measurement results were obtained via on-wafer probing. The LNA noise measurement at 170 GHz is also the first attempt at this frequency.

  16. Class D audio amplifiers for high voltage capacitive transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis

    Audio reproduction systems contains two key components, the amplifier and the loudspeaker. In the last 20 – 30 years the technology of audio amplifiers have performed a fundamental shift of paradigm. Class D audio amplifiers have replaced the linear amplifiers, suffering from the well-known issues...... of high volume, weight, and cost. High efficient class D amplifiers are now widely available offering power densities, that their linear counterparts can not match. Unlike the technology of audio amplifiers, the loudspeaker is still based on the traditional electrodynamic transducer invented by C.W. Rice......-of-the-art for class D audio amplifiers driving the electrodynamic transducer is presented. Chapter 3 gives an introduction to the DEAP transducer as a load in loudspeaker systems. The main purpose being to established the frequency response of the DEAP input impedance, but also investigate the large signal...

  17. Electrodeposition and characterization of Fe–Mo alloys as cathodes for hydrogen evolution in the process of chlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. N. GRGUR

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Fe–Mo alloys were electrodeposited from a pyrophosphate bath using a single diode rectified AC current. Their composition and morphology were investigated by SEM, optical microscopy and EDS, in order to determine the influence of the deposition conditions on the morphology and composition of these alloys. It was shown that the electrodeposition parameters, such as: chemical bath composition and current density, influenced both the composition of the Fe–Mo alloys and the current efficiency for their deposition, while the micro and macro-morphology did not change significantly with changing conditions of alloy electrodeposition. It was found that the electrodeposited Fe–Mo alloys possessed a 0.15 V to 0.30 V lower overvoltage than mild steel for hydrogen evolution in an electrolyte commonly used in commercial chlorate production, depending on the alloy composition, i.e., the conditions of alloy electrodeposition.

  18. Effect of Thermomechanical Processing on Microstructure, Texture Evolution, and Mechanical Properties of Al-Mg-Si-Cu Alloys with Different Zn Contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X. F.; Guo, M. X.; Chen, Y.; Zhu, J.; Zhang, J. S.; Zhuang, L. Z.

    2017-07-01

    The effect of thermomechanical processing on microstructure, texture evolution, and mechanical properties of Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloys with different Zn contents was studied by mechanical properties, microstructure, and texture characterization in the present study. The results show that thermomechanical processing has a significant influence on the evolution of microstructure and texture and on the final mechanical properties, independently of Zn contents. Compared with the T4P-treated (first preaged at 353 K (80 °C) for 12 hours and then naturally aged for 14 days) sheets with high final cold rolling reduction, the T4P-treated sheets with low final cold rolling reduction possess almost identical strength and elongation and higher average r values. Compared with the intermediate annealed sheets with high final cold rolling reduction, the intermediate annealed sheets with low final cold rolling reduction contain a higher number of particles with a smaller size. After solution treatment, in contrast to the sheets with high final cold rolling reduction, the sheets with low final cold rolling reduction possess finer grain structure and tend to form a weaker recrystallization texture. The recrystallization texture may be affected by particle distribution, grain size, and final cold rolling texture. Finally, the visco-plastic self-consistent (VPSC) model was used to predict r values.

  19. Samovar: a thermomechanical code for modeling of geodynamic processes in the lithosphere-application to basin evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elesin, Y; Gerya, T; Artemieva, Irina

    2010-01-01

    of extended crust, and rift zones). The code models deformation of the lithosphere with viscoelastoplastic rheology, including erosion/sedimentation processes and formation of shear zones in areas of high stresses. It also models steady-state and transient conductive and advective thermal processes including...

  20. Interaction of tectonic and depositional processes that control the evolution of the Iberian Gulf of Cadiz margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, A.; Nelson, C.H.

    1999-01-01

    This study provides an integrated view of the growth patterns and factors that controlled the evolution of the Gulf of Cadiz continental margin based on studies of the tectonic, sedimentologic and oceanographic history of the area. Seven sedimentary regimes are identified, but there are more extensive descriptions of the late Cenozoic regimes because of the larger data base. The regimes of the Mesozoic passive margin include carbonate platforms, which become mixed calcareous-terrigenous deposits during the Late Cretaceous-early Tertiary. The Oligocene and Early Miocene terrigenous regimes developed, in contrast, over the active and transcurrent margins near the African-Iberian plate boundary. The top of the Gulf of Cadiz olistostrome, emplaced in the Late Miocene, is used as a key horizon to define the 'post-orogenic' depositional regimes. The Late Miocene progradational margin regime is characterized by a large terrigenous sediment supply to the margin and coincides with the closing of the Miocene Atlantic-Mediterranean gateways. The terrigenous drift depositional regime of the Early Pliocene resulted from the occurrence of high eustatic sea level and the characteristics of the Mediterranean outflow currents that developed after the opening of the Strait of Gibraltar. The Late Pliocene and Quaternary regimes are dominated by sequences of deposits related to cycles of high and low sea levels. Deposition of shelf-margin deltas and slope wedges correlate with regressive and low sea level regimes caused by eustasy and subsidence. During the highstand regimes of the Holocene, inner shelf prograding deltas and deep-water sediment drifts were developed under the influence of the Atlantic inflow and Mediterranean outflow currents, respectively. A modern human cultural regime began 2000 years ago with the Roman occupation of Iberia; human cultural effects on sedimentary regimes may have equalled natural factors such as climate change. Interplay of tectonic and